WorldWideScience

Sample records for system chemical decontamination

  1. Full system chemical decontamination concept for Kori Unit 1 decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Doo Ho; Kwon, Hyuk Chul; Kim, Deok Ki [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Kori Unit 1, the first PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) plant in Korea, began its commercial operation in 1978 and will permanently shut down on June 18, 2017. After moving the spent fuels to SFP (Spent Fuel Pool) system, Kori Unit 1 will perform a full system chemical decontamination to reduce radiation levels inside the various plant systems. This paper will describe the operation concept of the full system chemical decontamination for Kori Unit 1 based on experiences overseas.

  2. Chemical surface decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexa, J.

    1978-12-01

    A brief analysis of the decontamination process and some general rules of the chemical decontamination of surfaces are reported. About 30 decontamination procedures developed by UJV are presented in an annex. (author)

  3. Chemical decontamination method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Hitoshi.

    1996-01-01

    Metal wastes contaminated by radioactive materials are contained in a rotational decontamination vessel, and the metal wastes are rotated therein while being in contact with a slight amount of a decontamination liquid comprising a mineral acid. As the mineral acid, a mixed acid of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid and fluoric acid is preferably used. Alternatively, chemical decontamination can also be conducted by charging an acid resistant stirring medium in the rotational decontamination vessel. The surface of the metal wastes is uniformly covered by the slight amount of decontamination liquid to dissolve the surface layer. In addition, heat of dissolution generated in this case is accumulated in the inside of the rotational decontamination vessel, the temperature is elevated with no particular heating, thereby enabling to obtain an excellent decontamination effect substantially at the same level as in the case of heating the liquid to 70degC in a conventional immersion decontamination method. Further, although contact areas between the metal wastes and the immersion vessel are difficult to be decontaminated in the immersion decontamination method, all of areas can be dissolved uniformly in the present invention. (T.M.)

  4. Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1: Primary cooling system chemical decontamination: Draft environmental statement (Docket No. 50-10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    The staff has considered the environmental impact and economic costs of the proposed primary cooling system chemical decontamination at Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. The staff has focused this statement on the occupational radiation exposure associated with the proposed Unit 1 decontamination program, on alternatives to chemical decontamination, and on the environmental impact of the disposal of the solid radioactive waste generated by this decontamination. The staff has concluded that the proposed decontamination will not significantly affect the quality of the human environment. Furthermore, any impacts from the decontamination program are outweighed by its benefits. 2 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Testing and evaluation of eight decontamination chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, R.

    1994-09-01

    This report covers experimental work comparing eight different decontamination chemicals. Seven of these chemicals have some novelty, or are not currently in use at the ICPP. The eighth is a common ICPP decontamination reagent used as a baseline for effective comparison. Decontamination factors, waste generation values, and corrosion rates are tabulated for these chemicals. Recommendations are given for effective methods of non-sodium or low-sodium decontamination chemicals. The two most effective chemical for decontamination found in these test were a dilute hydrofluoric and nitric acid (HF/HNO{sub 3}) mixture and a fluoroboric acid solution. The fluoroboric acid solution (1 molar) was by far the most effective decontamination reagent, but suffered the problem of generating significant final calcine volume. The HF/HNO{sub 3} solution performed a very good decontamination of the SIMCON coupons while generating only small amounts of calcine volume. Concentration variables were also tested, and optimized for these two solutions. Several oxidation/reduction decon chemical systems were also tested. These systems were similar to the TURCO 4502 and TURCO 4521 solutions used for general decontamination at the ICPP. A low sodium alternative, nitric acid/potassium permanganate, to the ``high sodium`` TURCO 4502 was tested extensively, optimized and recommended for general ICPP use. A reductive chemical solution, oxalic acid/nitric acid was also shown to have significant advantages.

  6. Recent developments in chemical decontamination technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.J. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Chemical decontamination of parts of reactor coolant systems is a mature technology, used routinely in many BWR plants, but less frequently in PWRs. This paper reviews recent developments in the technology - corrosion minimization, waste processing and full system decontamination, including the fuel. Earlier work was described in an extensive review published in 1990.

  7. Full reactor coolant system chemical decontamination qualification programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Corrosion and wear products are found throughout the reactor coolant system (RCS), or primary loop, of a PWR power plant. These products circulate with the primary coolant through the reactor where they may become activated. An oxide layer including these activated products forms on the surfaces of the RCS (including the fuel elements). The amount of radioactivity deposited on the different surface varies and depends primarily on the corrosion rate of the materials concerned, the amount of cobalt in the coolant and the chemistry of the coolant. The oxide layer, commonly called crud, on the surfaces of nuclear plant systems leads to personnel radiation exposure. The level of the radiation fields from the crud increases with time from initial plant startup and typically levels off after 4 to 6 cycles of plant operation. Thereafter, significant personnel radiation exposure may be incurred whenever major maintenance is performed. Personnel exposure is highest during refueling outages when routine maintenance on major plant components, such as steam generators and reactor coolant pumps, is performed. Administrative controls are established at nuclear plants to minimize the exposure incurred by an individual and the plant workers as a whole.

  8. National demonstration of full reactor coolant system (RCS) chemical decontamination at Indian Point 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trovato, S.A.; Parry, J.O. [Consolidated Edison Co., New York, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Key to the safe and efficient operation of the nation`s civilian nuclear power plants is the performance of maintenance activities within regulations and guidelines for personnel radiation exposure. However, maintenance activities, often performed in areas of relatively high radiation fields, will increase as the nation`s plant age. With the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) lowering the allowable radiation exposure to plant workers in 1994 and considering further reductions and regulations in the future, it is imperative that new techniques be developed and applied to reduce personnel exposure. Full primary system chemical decontamination technology offers the potential to be single most effective method of maintaining workers exposure {open_quotes}as low as reasonably achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) while greatly reducing plant operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. A three-phase program underway since 1987, has as its goal to demonstrate that full RCS decontamination is a visible technology to reduce general plant radiation levels without threatening the long term reliability and operability of a plant. This paper discusses research leading to and plans for a National Demonstration of Full RCS Chemical Decontamination at Indian Point 2 nuclear generating station in 1995.

  9. Chemical Gel for Surface Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Moon, J. K.; Won, H. J.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, C. K.

    2010-01-01

    Many chemical decontamination processes operate by immersing components in aggressive chemical solutions. In these applications chemical decontamination technique produce large amounts of radioactive liquid waste. Therefore it is necessary to develop processes using chemical gels instead of chemical solutions, to avoid the well-known disadvantages of chemical decontamination techniques while retaining their high efficiency. Chemical gels decontamination process consists of applying the gel by spraying it onto the surface of large area components (floors, walls, etc) to be decontaminated. The gel adheres to any vertical or complex surface due to their thixotropic properties and operates by dissolving the radioactive deposit, along with a thin layer of the gel support, so that the radioactivity trapped at the surface can be removed. Important aspects of the gels are that small quantities can be used and they show thixitropic properties : liquid during spraying, and solid when stationary, allowing for strong adherence to surfaces. This work investigates the decontamination behaviors of organic-based chemical gel for SS 304 metallic surfaces contaminated with radioactive materials

  10. Assessment of chemical processes for the post-accident decontamination of reactor-coolant systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, L.F.; Card, C.J.; Divine, J.R.

    1983-02-01

    Previously used chemical decontamination processes and potentially useful new decontamination processes were examined for the usefulness following a reactor accident. Both generic fuel damage accidents and the accident at TMI-2 were considered. A total of fourteen processes were evaluated. Process evaluation included data in the following categories: technical description of the process, recorded past usage, effectiveness, process limitation, safety consideration, and waste management. These data were evaluated, and cost considerations were presented along with a description of the applicability of the process to TMI-2 and development and demonstration needs. Specific recommendations regarding a primary-system decontamination development program to support TMI-2 recovery were also presented

  11. Comparison of dilute chemical decontaminations of RAPS-2 full primary heat transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, H.R.

    2000-01-01

    First ever attempt to decontaminate a full primary system of an Indian PHWR was carried out at Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit -2 (RAPS-2) in August 1992. The decontamination factors obtained were moderate. The second attempt to decontaminate the same system was made in February 1996 with a different formulation. The decontamination factors obtained were lesser than the earlier attempt. The details of the two campaigns and their relative merits and demerits are discussed. Some more studies are required to be done before further implementation of the picolonic acid/ascorbic acid formulation. The 1992 attempt was with picolinic acid and ascorbic acid whereas the 1996 attempt was with EDTA + citric acid + ascorbic Acid (EAC ) formulation. A number of lessons were learnt from the first campaign and the improvements were applied during the subsequent decontamination campaigns at Madras Atomic Power station. The total iron removed and various radio nuclides removed are also detailed in the paper. Picolonic acid and ascorbic acid is a better formulation for decontamination of full PHT systems of Indian PHWRs. Use of EAC formulation generates a lot of crud which settles in narrow clearances. Picolonic Acid/Ascorbic Acid formulation does not generate any crud. Decontamination using a single cycle of the picolonic acid/ascorbic acid formulation is more effective than the decontamination using three cycles of EAC formulation. (author)

  12. NPOx Decontamination System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, K.; Demmer, R.; Argyle, M.; Ancho, M.; Hai-Pao, J.

    2002-02-25

    The nitric acid/potassium permanganate/oxalic acid (NPOx) Phase II system is being prepared for remote operation at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Several tests have been conducted to prepare the system for remote operation. This system performs very well with high decontamination efficiencies and very low quantities of waste generated during decontamination.

  13. Full system decontamination. AREVAs experience in decontamination prior to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topf, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Minimizing collective radiation exposure and producing free-release material are two of the highest priorities in the decommissioning of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Full System Decontamination (FSD) is the most effective measure to reduce source term and remove oxide layer contamination within the plant systems. FSD is typically a decontamination of the primary coolant circuit and the auxiliary systems. In recent years AREVA NP has performed several FSDs in PWRs and BWRs prior to decommissioning by applying the proprietary CORD copyright family and AMDA copyright technology. Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination or CORD represents the chemical decontamination process while AMDA stands for Automated Mobile Decontamination Appliance, AREVA NPs decontamination equipment. Described herein are the excellent results achieved for the FSDs applied at the German PWRs Stade in 2004 and Obrigheim in 2007 and for the FSDs performed at the Swedish BWRs, Barsebaeck Unit 1 in 2007 and Barsebaeck Unit 2 in 2008. All four FSDs were performed using the AREVA NP CORD family decontamination technology in combination with the AREVA NP decontamination equipment, AMDA. (orig.)

  14. Chemical Decontaminant Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-20

    18 the decontaminant during application is required. It is recommended that a standard hard bristle toothbrush be used when testing coupons and...and Evah~ation Contmand!US Joint Science and Technology Office (JSTO) Armv Evaluation Command CATEC/AEC) Ci!J~-~jA) ~~1 ~ichae l rober 0 𔄃’" 11...34~’W.US.anny.miVsuitelfiles/22142943 and on the Natiooallnstitute of Standards and Technology (N!Sl) website at bttp://gsi.niSt.gov/globaVindcx.cfmiLI-4/L2

  15. Chemical decontamination and melt densification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, R.L.; Griggs, B.; Kemper, R.S.; Nelson, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary studies on the chemical decontamination and densification of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel undissolved residues remaining after dissolution of the UO 2 --PuO 2 spent fuel material from sheared fuel bundles are reported. The studies were made on cold or very small samples to demonstrate the feasibility of the processes developed before proceeding to hot cell demonstrations with kg level of the sources. A promising aqueous decontamination method for Zr alloy cladding was developed in which oxidized surfaces are conditioned with HF prior to leaching with ammonium oxalate, ammonium citrate, ammonium fluoride, and hydrogen peroxide. Feasibility of molten salt decontamination of oxidized Zircaloy was demonstrated. A low melting alloy of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel was obtained in induction heated graphite crucibles. Segregated Zircaloy cladding sections were directly melted by the inductoslag process to yield a metal ingot suitable for storage. Both Zircaloy and Zircaloy--stainless steel--Inconel alloys proved to be highly satisfactory getters and sinks for recovered tritium

  16. Chemical cleaning, decontamination and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadiyar, H.S.; Das Chintamani; Gaonkar, K.B.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical cleaning of process equipments and pipings in chemical/petrochemical industries is necessitated for improving operation, for preventing premature failures and for avoiding contamination. In developing a chemical formulation for cleaning equipments, the important aspects to be considered include (i) effective removal of corrosion products and scales, (ii) minimum corrosion of the base metal, (iii) easy to handle chemicals and (iv) economic viability. As on date, a wide variety of chemical formulations are available, many of them are either proprietory or patented. For evolving an effective formulation, knowledge of the oxides of various metals and alloys on the one hand and acid concentration, complexing agents and inhibitors to be incorporated on the other, is quite essential. Organic acids like citric acid, acetic acid and formic acid are more popular ones, often used with EDTA for effective removal of corrosion products from ferrous components. The report enumerates some of the concepts in developing effective formulations for chemical cleaning of carbon steel components and further, makes an attempt to suggest simple formulations to be developed for chemical decontamination. (author). 6 refs., 3 fi gs., 4 tabs

  17. Cost effectiveness of dilute chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.; Weyman, G.D.

    The basic principles of dilute chemical decontamination are described, as well as the method of application. Methods of computing savings in radiation dose and costs are presented, with results from actual experience and illustrative examples. It is concluded that dilute chemical decontamination is beneficial in many cases. It reduces radiation exposure of workers, saves money, and simplifies maintenance work

  18. Testing and comparison of seventeen decontamination chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of seventeen decontamination chemicals. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, overall corrosion potential for plant equipment, interim waste generation and final waste generation

  19. Testing and comparison of seventeen decontamination chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of seventeen decontamination chemicals. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, overall corrosion potential for plant equipment, interim waste generation and final waste generation.

  20. Mechanical and chemical decontamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienhoefer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Decontamination does not mean more than a special technique of cleaning surfaces by methods well known in the industry. The main difference consists in the facts that more than just the visible dirt is to be removed and that radioactive contamination cannot be seen. Especially, intensive mechanical and chemical carry-off methods are applied to attack the surfaces. In order to minimize damages caused to the surfaces, the decontamination method is to adapt to the material and the required degree of decontamination. The various methods, their advantages and disadvantages are described, and the best known chemical solutions are shown. (orig./RW)

  1. Processing method of chemical decontamination liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enda, Masami; Yaita, Yumi; Fujihata, Kenji; Sakai, Hitoshi

    1998-01-01

    A method of processing spent chemical decontamination liquid wastes containing an aminocarboxylic acid type chelating agent comprises a combination of a step of decomposing the chelating agent in the decontamination liquid wastes to gaseous carbon dioxide, water and an ammonium ion, a step of separating the ammonium ion and a step of neutralizing and solidifying the decontamination liquid wastes from which the ammonium ion is separated and removed. The decomposition is conducted by using an oxidizing means such as anodic oxidation, irradiation of UV rays, ozone or sodium peroxide. The ammonium ion is separated from the decontamination liquid wastes by an electrolytic (electric) dialysis method. Decomposition of EDTA and separation/removal of the ammonium ion as a decomposed product can be conducted simultaneously by the electrolytic dialysis. (N.H.)

  2. Aggressive chemical decontamination tests on small valves from the Garigliano BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregani, F.

    1990-01-01

    In order to check the effectiveness of direct chemical decontamination on small and complex components, usually considered for storage without decontamination because of the small amount, some tests were performed on the DECO experimental loop. Four small stainless steel valves from the primary system of the Garigliano BWR were decontaminated using mainly aggressive chemicals such as HC1, HF, HNO 3 and their mixtures. On two valves, before the treatment with aggressive chemicals, a step with soft chemical (oxalic and citric acid mixture) was performed in order to see whether a softening action enhances the following aggressive decontamination. Moreover, in order to increase as much as possible the decontamination effectiveness, a decontamination process using ultrasounds jointly with aggressive chemicals was investigated. After an intensive laboratory testing programme, two smaller stainless steel valves from the primary system of the Garigliano BWR were decontaminated using ultrasounds in aggressive chemical solutions

  3. Chemical Warfare Agent Degradation and Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmage, Sylvia Smith [ORNL; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Munro, Nancy B [ORNL; King, J. [U.S. Army Environmental Center

    2007-02-01

    The decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWA) from structures, environmental media, and even personnel has become an area of particular interest in recent years due to increased homeland security concerns. In addition to terrorist attacks, scenarios such as accidental releases of CWA from U.S. stockpile sites or from historic, buried munitions are also subjects for response planning. To facilitate rapid identification of practical and effective decontamination approaches, this paper reviews pathways of CWA degradation by natural means as well as those resulting from deliberately applied solutions and technologies; these pathways and technologies are compared and contrasted. We then review various technologies, both traditional and recent, with some emphasis on decontamination materials used for surfaces that are difficult to clean. Discussion is limited to the major threat CWA, namely sulfur mustard (HD, bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), VX (O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate), and the G-series nerve agents. The principal G-agents are GA (tabun, ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate), GB (sarin, isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate), and GD (soman, pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate). The chemical decontamination pathways of each agent are outlined, with some discussion of intermediate and final degradation product toxicity. In all cases, and regardless of the CWA degradation pathway chosen for decontamination, it will be necessary to collect and analyze pertinent environmental samples during the treatment phase to confirm attainment of clearance levels.

  4. Enhanced toxic cloud knockdown spray system for decontamination applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betty, Rita G [Rio Rancho, NM; Tucker, Mark D [Albuquerque, NM; Brockmann, John E [Albuquerque, NM; Lucero, Daniel A [Albuquerque, NM; Levin, Bruce L [Tijeras, NM; Leonard, Jonathan [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-09-06

    Methods and systems for knockdown and neutralization of toxic clouds of aerosolized chemical or biological warfare (CBW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals using a non-toxic, non-corrosive aqueous decontamination formulation.

  5. Chemical decontamination of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.I.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. There is also a variety of alternatives for treatment and conditioning of the wastes prior disposal. The importance of treatment of radioactive waste for protection of human and environment has long been recognized and considerable experience has gained in this field. Generally, the methods used for treatment of radioactive wastes can be classified into three type's biological, physical and chemical treatment this physical treatment it gives good result than biological treatment. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. In chemical treatment there are different procedures, solvent extraction, ion exchange, electro dialysis but solvent extraction is best one because high purity can be optioned on the other hand the disadvantage that it is expensive. Beside the solvent extraction technique one can be used is ion exchange which gives reasonable result, but requires pretreatment that to avoid in closing of column by colloidal and large species. Electro dialysis technique gives quite result but less than solvent extraction and ion exchange technique the advantage is a cheep.(Author)

  6. Chemical decontamination for repair and decommissionning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demtroeder, P.; Neupert, D.

    1981-12-01

    The decontamination processes volatilization of metal-oxides and metal-alloys by reaction with aggressive gases and decontamination with strippable decontamination pastes have been tested experimentally. Tests have been made with inactive and radioactive samples, in order to assess the suitability of both decontamination processes. As the material is considerably damaged by decontamination through a gaseous-phase reaction, this process can only be used for special cases. The decontamination pastes developed by Nukem can be applied in all areas of nuclear technology in order to decontaminate radioactive components. Decontamination factors of 10 3 could be obtained after only one application of the pastes, which consist essentially of a decontamination compound, a thickening compound, a film former and other secondary chemicals. (orig./HP) [de

  7. NTA-based formulation for the chemical decontamination of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rufus, A.L.; Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2004-01-01

    EDTA (ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid)-based chemical formulations are often employed for the decontamination of nuclear reactor coolant systems. However, its use in the dilute chemical decontamination (DCD) process operated in regenerative mode indicated several drawbacks. Hence, the search for a better decontaminant was imperative. Some of the potential amino carboxylic acids were explored for their suitability as a decontamination formulation constituent. NTA (nitrilo tri-acetic acid) was found to be a better substitute for EDTA with respect to properties that are relevant to DCD such as interaction of decontaminants and their metal complexes with ion exchange resins, oxide dissolution, corrosion compatibility of structural materials, and radiation stability. The studies revealed that better decontamination factors would be obtained if NTA-based formulations were used for the decontamination process. (author)

  8. Dilute chemical decontamination resins and the mixed waste issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denault, R.P.; Hallman, J.T.

    1988-01-01

    The decontamination of reactor primary systems, sub-systems and components is an important method used to reduce the occupational radiation exposure of nuclear plant personnel. The waste produced by the application of this technology is mainly solid in the form of ion exchange resins. As a result of a recent agreement between the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), all radioactive waste must meet EPA burial criteria. The chemicals used in a decontamination and certain metals dissolved during the process, primarily chromium, could render the waste hazardous as well as radioactive or more commonly called a mixed waste. This paper defines mixed waste as described in the EPA directive 9432.00-2, and examine the criteria by which waste is categorized as hazardous. The decontamination waste resin generated by two processes, the CAN-DEREM and the LOMI process, is described in detail. Waste data obtained from decontaminations performed by LN Technologies Corporation including chemical, metal and radionuclide loadings on resins from both PWR and BWR applications are presented

  9. Random Vibration Analysis of the XM2l Decontaminant Pumper Module of the Modular Decontamination System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colclough, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The XM21 Decontaminant Pumper module of the Modular Decontamination System was analyzed using finite element analysis techniques to show why the first design iteration passed transportation vibration...

  10. The first chemical decontamination system for decommissioning in italy 'Phadec Technology' in Caorso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, F.; Lupu, M.; Mazzoni, C.; Orlandi, S.; Ricci, C. [Nuclear System Engineering Department, Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, 16161 Genova (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    The PHADEC Process (Phosphoric Acid Decontamination Process) is designed for surface decontamination of steel scrap using phosphoric acid. It has been successfully installed at Caorso NPP (Piacenza, Italy) at the end of 2008. The decontamination of steel scrap is done by removing the radioactivity localized in a few micron thickness from the surface with an electro-polishing (Stainless Steel) or acid pickling (Carbon Steel) treatment in basins filled with 40%-Phosphoric Acid that is regenerated and recycled for reuse. (authors)

  11. Studies on residue-free decontaminants for chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, George W

    2015-03-17

    Residue-free decontaminants based on hydrogen peroxide, which decomposes to water and oxygen in the environment, are examined as decontaminants for chemical warfare agents (CWA). For the apparent special case of CWA on concrete, H2O2 alone, without any additives, effectively decontaminates S-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX), pinacolyl methylphosphorofluoridate (GD), and bis(2-choroethyl) sulfide (HD) in a process thought to involve H2O2 activation by surface-bound carbonates/bicarbonates (known H2O2 activators for CWA decontamination). A plethora of products are formed during the H2O2 decontamination of HD on concrete, and these are characterized by comparison to synthesized authentic compounds. As a potential residue-free decontaminant for surfaces other than concrete (or those lacking adsorbed carbonate/bicarbonate) H2O2 activation for CWA decontamination is feasible using residue-free NH3 and CO2 as demonstrated by reaction studies for VX, GD, and HD in homogeneous solution. Although H2O2/NH3/CO2 ("HPAC") decontaminants are active for CWA decontamination in solution, they require testing on actual surfaces of interest to assess their true efficacy for surface decontamination.

  12. System decontamination as a tool to control radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, R.; Bertholdt, H.O. [Siemens Power Generation Group, Erlangen (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    Since chemical decontamination of the Reactor Coolant Systems (RCS) and subsystems has the highest potential to reduce radiation fields in a short term this technology has gained an increasing importance. The available decontamination process at Siemens, i.e., the CORD processes, will be described. It is characterized by using permanganic acid for preoxidation and diluted organic acid for the decontamination step. It is a regenerative process resulting in very low waste volumes. This technology has been used frequently in Europe and Japan in both RCS and subsystems. An overview will be given i.e. on the 1993 applications. This overview will include plant, scope, date of performance, system volume specal features of the process removed activities, decon factor time, waste volumes, and personnel dose during decontamination. This overview will be followed by an outlook on future developments in this area.

  13. Electrochemical decontamination system for actinide processing gloveboxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedman, D.E.; Lugo, J.L.; Ford, D.K.; Nelson, T.O.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1998-03-01

    An electrolytic decontamination technology has been developed and successfully demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the decontamination of actinide processing gloveboxes. The technique decontaminates the interior surfaces of stainless steel gloveboxes utilizing a process similar to electropolishing. The decontamination device is compact and transportable allowing it to be placed entirely within the glovebox line. In this way, decontamination does not require the operator to wear any additional personal protective equipment and there is no need for additional air handling or containment systems. Decontamination prior to glovebox decommissioning reduces the potential for worker exposure and environmental releases during the decommissioning, transport, and size reduction procedures which follow. The goal of this effort is to reduce contamination levels of alpha emitting nuclides for a resultant reduction in waste level category from High Level Transuranic (TRU) to low Specific Activity (LSA, less than or equal 100 nCi/g). This reduction in category results in a 95% reduction in disposal and disposition costs for the decontaminated gloveboxes. The resulting contamination levels following decontamination by this method are generally five orders of magnitude below the LSA specification. Additionally, the sodium sulfate based electrolyte utilized in the process is fully recyclable which results in the minimum of secondary waste. The process bas been implemented on seven gloveboxes within LANL's Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55. Of these gloveboxes, two have been discarded as low level waste items and the remaining five have been reused

  14. Comprehensive investigation of the corrosion and surface chemical effects of the decontamination technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo-Nagy, Andrea; Varga, Kalman; Deak-Horvath, Emese; Nemeth, Zoltan; Horvath, David; Schunk, Janos; Patek, Gabor

    2012-09-01

    Decontamination technologies are mainly developed to reduce the collective dose of the maintenance personnel at NPPs. The highest efficiency (i.e., the highest DF values) available without detrimental modification of the treated surface of structural material is the most important goal in the course of the application of a decontamination technology. A so-called 'soft' chemical decontamination technology has been developed - supported by the Paks Nuclear Power Plant - at the Institute of Radiochemistry and Radioecology of the University of Pannonia. The novel base technology can be effectively applied for the decontamination of the heat exchanger tubes of steam generators. In addition, by optimizing the main technological parameters (temperature, concentration of the liquid chemicals, flow rates, contact time, etc.) it can be utilized for specific applications such as decontamination of some dismountable devices and separable equipment or the total decontamination prior to plant dismantling (decommissioning) in the future. The aim of this work is to compare the efficiency, corrosion and surface chemical effects of some improved versions of the novel base-technology elaborated for decontamination of austenitic stainless steel surfaces. The experiments have been performed at laboratory conditions in decontamination model systems. The applied methods: γ-spectrometry, ICP-OES, voltammetry and SEM-EDX. The experimental results revealed that the efficiency of the base-technology mainly depends on the surface features of the stainless steel samples such as the chemical composition and thickness of the oxide layer, the nature (quantity, morphology and chemical composition) of the crystalline deposits. It has been documented that the improved version of the base-technology are suitable for the decontamination of both steel surfaces covered by chemically resistant large Cr-content crystals and that having compact oxide-layers (up to a thickness of 10

  15. Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) is a trace contaminant control device based on non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma technology. Compared to...

  16. Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) is a trace contaminant control device based on non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma technology that operates...

  17. Systems analysis of decontamination options for civilian vehicles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this project, which was supported by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) Chemical and Biological Division (CBD), was to investigate options for the decontamination of the exteriors and interiors of vehicles in the civilian setting in order to restore those vehicles to normal use following the release of a highly toxic chemical. The decontamination of vehicles is especially challenging because they often contain sensitive electronic equipment, multiple materials some of which strongly adsorb chemical agents, and in the case of aircraft, have very rigid material compatibility requirements (i.e., they cannot be exposed to reagents that may cause even minor corrosion). A systems analysis approach was taken examine existing and future civilian vehicle decontamination capabilities.

  18. New decontamination techniques: chemical gels, electropolishing and abrasives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunel, G.; Gauchon, J.P.; Kervegant, Y.; Josso, F.

    1991-01-01

    The decommissioning of nuclear installations requires decontamination techniques that are efficient, simple to apply and producing a small amount of wastes, which are easy to process. With a view to this, three decontamination methods, which appear to be particularly suited to decommissioning, have been studied. These three methods are: - spraying of gels carrying chemical decontaminating agents, - electropolishing with a swab device, - abrasives blasting. After parametric tests on non-radioactive and active samples, the industrial application of these methods in the dismantling of installations was studied. These industrial applications concern: - decontamination of pieces coming from the German BWR ISAR by immersion and gel spraying, - decontamination, mainly by gel spraying, and dismantling of the BRENNILIS bituminisation plant, - decontamination of part of the cooling circuit of the graphite gas reactor G2 by gel spraying, - decontamination of a component of the FBR SuperPhenix, using dry abrasives blasting. During the first three applications, generated secondary wastes volume and form were determined. 33 tabs., 16 figs., 12 refs

  19. Chemical decontamination of Santa Maria de Garona NPP recirculation loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coello, R.

    2002-01-01

    Santa Maria de Garona is a boiling water reactor (BWR-3) with a Primary Containment type Mark 1. Its electrical power is 466 Mw and began its commercial operation in 1971. The plant currently operates in 24 month cycles. The reactor water recirculation system (RWRS) is composed of two independent loops. Each of them has a one stage vertical centrifugal recirculation pump, with a nominal flow of 2020 l/s, and ten jet pumps. It is worthy of mention that in 1986 it was started to inject hydrogen into the feedwater (concentration = 0,3 mg/l) in order to implement the chemical condition known as hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) in the primary circuit. The objective was to create an electrochemical potential below -230 mV in the RWRS which is assumed to be low enough to mitigate the intergranular stress corrosion cracking phenomena (IGSCC) in the sensitized austenitic stainless steels. Later, in 1994, the hydrogen concentration in the feedwater was increased to 0,9 mg/l in order to obtain the protection's ECP in the bottom of the reactor vessel. This feedwater hydrogen concentration has been maintained since then. The nature of the oxides that are formed in the RWRS is strongly affected by the electrochemical conditions (ECP) which have been maintained in this system. It is frequent to find oxides like Fe 2 O 3 (hematite), Fe 3 O 4 (magnetite), NiFe 2 O 4 (trevorite), Cr 2 FeO 4 (chromite), Fe 3-x-y Cr x Ni y O 4 (spinels), etc. However, it is normal to find a combination of all of them in various proportions, depending on the ECP established. Radioactive isotopes of the transition metals ( 60 Co, 54 Mn, 51 Cr, 59 Fe, etc.) also participate in these oxides and contribute greatly to increase the dose rate in the circuit. The chemical decontamination processes are designed for the effective dissolution of the metallic oxides present and therefore the type of process to be applied will depend largely on the ECP that has been maintained in the circuit to be decontaminated. For

  20. Evaluation on Safety of Stainless Steels in Chemical Decontamination Process with Immersion Type of Reactor Coolant Pump for Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Jong; Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Ki Joon

    2011-01-01

    Due to commercialization of nuclear power, most countries have taken interest in decontamination process of nuclear power plant and tried to develop a optimum process. Because open literature of the decontamination process are rare, it is hard to obtain skills on decontamination of foreign country and it is necessarily to develop proper chemical decontamination process system in Korea. In this study, applicable possibility in chemical decontamination for reactor coolant pump (RCP) was investigated for the various stainless steels. The stainless steel (STS) 304 showed the best electrochemical properties for corrosion resistance and the lowest weight loss ratio in chemical decontamination process with immersion type than other materials. However, the pitting corrosion was generated in both STS 415 and STS 431 with the increasing numbers of cycle. The intergranular corrosion in STS 431 was sporadically observed. The sizes of their pitting corrosion also increased with increasing cycle numbers

  1. Decontamination by water jet, chemical and electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauchon, J.P.; Mordenti, P.; Bezia, C.; Fuentes, P.; Kervegant, Y.; Munoz, C.; Pierlas, C.

    1986-01-01

    The decontamination tests have been carried out on samples coming from representative specimens from primary circuit of the PWR and on samples coming from the emergency feed water piping of the German BWR (Isar). The oxide found in PWR primary loops can only be removed by a two steps process. The initial embrittling step is particularly effective in hot alkaline permanganate medium. Oxidation by ozone treatment is less effective. The second step involves chemical erosion of the metal in nitrofluoric acid in conjonction with ultrasonic agitation. Among the reagents used, only oxalic acid is suitable for electrolytic decontamination. Among the reagents possible for decontamination of the Isar specimens (ferritic steel lined with hematite) halogenous acid in mixture without or with oxygenated water, sulfuric acid, the formic acid/formaldehyde mixture are chosen. Metal erosion with high pressure jet as well as the decontamination efficiency on parts lined with hematite have made possible to determine the best conditions. 33 figs, 29 refs

  2. Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montford, B.

    1975-01-01

    Development of special techniques has permitted the use of mild decontamination processes for the CANDU type reactor primary coolant circuit, overcoming many of the problems associated with conventional decontamination processes, which use strong, acidic reagents. (Author)

  3. Decontaminating reagents for radioactive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddon, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    A decontaminating reagent composition has been developed comprising EDTA, citric acid, oxalic acid, and formic acid. Formic acid inhibits the decomposition of both EDTA and citric acid, and yields oxalic acid as a result of its own radiolysis. The invention includes the improvement of initially incorporating formic acid in the mixture and maintaining the presence of formic acid by at least one further addition

  4. Development and assessment of two decontamination processes: closed electropolishing system for decontamination of underwater surfaces -vibratory decontamination with abrasives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavides, E.; Fajardo, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two decontamination processes have been developed to decontaminate the stainless steel components of nuclear power plants. The first process uses an underwater closed electropolishing system for the decontamination of large stainless steel surfaces in flooded systems without loss of electrolyte. Large underwater contaminated areas can be treated with an electropolishing head covering an area of 2 m 2 in one step. The decontamination factors achieved with this technique range between 100 and 1000. The second process consists in the decontamination of nuclear components using vibratory equipment with self-cleaning abrasives generating a minimum quantity of waste. This technique may reach contamination factors similar to those obtained with other abrasive methods (brush abrasion, abrasive blasting, etc...). The obtained decontamination factors range between 5 and 50. Only a small quantity of waste is generated, which is treated and reduced in volume by filtration and evaporation

  5. Kit systems for granulated decontamination formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2010-07-06

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a sorbent additive, and water. A highly adsorbent sorbent additive (e.g., amorphous silica, sorbitol, mannitol, etc.) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field. The formulation can be pre-mixed and pre-packaged as a multi-part kit system, where one or more of the parts are packaged in a powdered, granulated form for ease of handling and mixing in the field.

  6. Evaluation of a dilute chemical decontaminant for pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Mathur, P.K.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a dilute chemical decontamination formulation based on ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, oxalic acid, and citric acid is evaluated for its efficacy in removing oxide layers in a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). An ion exchange system that is specifically suited for fission product-dominated contamination in a PHWR is suggested for the reagent regeneration stage of the decontamination process. An attempt has been made to understand the redeposition behavior of various isotopes during the decontamination process. The polarographic method of identifying the species formed in the dissolution process is explained. Electrochemical measurements are employed to follow the course of oxide removal during the dissolution process. Scanning electron micrographs of metal coupons before and after the dissolution process exemplify the involvement of base metal in the formation of a ferrous oxalate layer. Material compatibility tests between the decontaminant and carbon steel, Monel-400, and Zircaloy-2 are reported

  7. A decontamination study of simulated chemical and biological agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Han S.; Lee, Han Y.; Hong, Yong C.; Shin, Dong H.; Park, Yun H.; Hong, Yi F.; Lee, Chong K.

    2007-07-01

    A comprehensive decontamination scheme of the chemical and biological agents, including airborne agents and surface contaminating agents, is presented. When a chemical and biological attack occurs, it is critical to decontaminate facilities or equipments to an acceptable level in a very short time. The plasma flame presented here may provide a rapid and effective elimination of toxic substances in the interior air in isolated spaces. As an example, a reaction chamber, with the dimensions of a 22cm diameter and 30cm length, purifies air with an airflow rate of 5000l/min contaminated with toluene, the simulated chemical agent, and soot from a diesel engine, the simulated aerosol for biological agents. Although the airborne agents in an isolated space are eliminated to an acceptable level by the plasma flame, the decontamination of the chemical and biological agents cannot be completed without cleaning surfaces of the facilities. A simulated sterilization study of micro-organisms was carried out using the electrolyzed ozone water. The electrolyzed ozone water very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) within 3min. The electrolyzed ozone water also kills the vegetative micro-organisms, fungi, and virus. The electrolyzed ozone water, after the decontamination process, disintegrates into ordinary water and oxygen without any trace of harmful materials to the environment.

  8. Decontamination system study for the Tank Waste Retrieval System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reutzel, T.; Manhardt, J.

    1994-05-01

    This report summarizes the findings of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's decontamination study in support of the Tank Waste Retrieval System (TWRS) development program. Problems associated with waste stored in existing single shell tanks are discussed as well as the justification for the TWRS program. The TWRS requires a decontamination system. The subsystems of the TWRS are discussed, and a list of assumptions pertinent to the TWRS decontamination system were developed. This information was used to develop the functional and operational requirements of the TWRS decontamination system. The requirements were combined with a comprehensive review of currently available decontamination techniques to produced a set of evaluation criteria. The cleaning technologies and techniques were evaluated, and the CO 2 blasting decontamination technique was chosen as the best technology for the TWRS

  9. Next Generation Non-particulate Dry Nonwoven Pad for Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramkumar, S S; Love, A; Sata, U R; Koester, C J; Smith, W J; Keating, G A; Hobbs, L; Cox, S B; Lagna, W M; Kendall, R J

    2008-05-01

    New, non-particulate decontamination materials promise to reduce both military and civilian casualties by enabling individuals to decontaminate themselves and their equipment within minutes of exposure to chemical warfare agents or other toxic materials. One of the most promising new materials has been developed using a needlepunching nonwoven process to construct a novel and non-particulate composite fabric of multiple layers, including an inner layer of activated carbon fabric, which is well-suited for the decontamination of both personnel and equipment. This paper describes the development of a composite nonwoven pad and compares efficacy test results for this pad with results from testing other decontamination systems. The efficacy of the dry nonwoven fabric pad was demonstrated specifically for decontamination of the chemical warfare blister agent bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (H or sulfur mustard). GC/MS results indicate that the composite fabric was capable of significantly reducing the vapor hazard from mustard liquid absorbed into the nonwoven dry fabric pad. The mustard adsorption efficiency of the nonwoven pad was significantly higher than particulate activated carbon (p=0.041) and was similar to the currently fielded US military M291 kit (p=0.952). The nonwoven pad has several advantages over other materials, especially its non-particulate, yet flexible, construction. This composite fabric was also shown to be chemically compatible with potential toxic and hazardous liquids, which span a range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic chemicals, including a concentrated acid, an organic solvent and a mild oxidant, bleach.

  10. Change in permeation parameters and the decontamination efficacy of three chemical protective gloves after repeated exposures to solvents and thermal decontaminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pengfei; El-Ayouby, Nadia; Wassell, James T

    2005-02-01

    Chemical protective clothing (CPC) and gloves, which provide adequate protection, are usually too expensive to be considered disposable. Repeated use of CPC without effective decontamination may result in secondary exposure and injury. However, decontamination may change the physical and/or chemical properties of the barrier material, causing variations in breakthrough time (BT) and steady-state permeation rate (SSPR). Glove materials including neoprene, Guardian butyl rubber, and nitrile synthetic rubber were selected for this study. Toluene and acetone were chosen as the challenge chemicals. Permeation was measured in a closed loop system using a 2.5 cm permeation cell and a MIRAN infrared analyzer (Foxboro, MA). Following the permeation test, the samples were thermally decontaminated. After each exposure/decontamination cycle, BT and SSPR were measured. A total of 260 permeation tests were conducted. Permeation test results were collected on each material/chemical combination for up to 10 exposure/decontamination cycles. On average, changes in BT and SSPR in comparison with respect to new swatches were 11.5% and 13.7% after seven exposure/decontamination cycles. The percentages increased to 26.6% and 15.9% after 10 exposure/decontamination cycles, respectively. For at least seven cycles, the BT mean for four out of five material/chemical combinations tested (neoprene/acetone, neoprene/toluene, nitrile/acetone, and nitrile/toluene) was not significantly different from the original value of the BT for each corresponding swatch. Similarly, the SSPR mean for each of the five material/chemical combinations after at least five cycles was not significantly different from those for new swatches. The BT mean for the butyl/toluene combination, however, was significantly different from the new swatches even after the first exposure/decontamination. The SSPR mean was significantly different after five cycles compared to the new swatches. Except for the butyl

  11. Method of heat decomposition for chemical decontaminating resin waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Akira.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To make resin wastes into non-deleterious state, discharge them into a resin waste storage tank of existent radioactive waste processing facility and store and dispose them. Constitution: In the processing of chemical decontaminating resin wastes, iron exchange resins adsorbing chemical decontaminating agents comprising a solution of citric acid, oxalic acid, formic acid and EDTA alone or as a mixture of them are heated to dry, thermally decomposed and then separated from the ion exchange resins. That is, the main ingredients of the chemical decontaminating agents are heat-decomposed when heated and dried at about 250 deg C in air and converted into non-toxic gases such as CO, CO 2 , NO, NO 2 or H 2 O. Further, since combustion or carbonization of the basic materials for the resin is not caused at such a level of temperature, the resin wastes removed with organic acid and chelating agents are transferred to an existent resin waste storage tank and stored therein. In this way, facility cost and radiation exposure can remarkably be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Development of waste minimization and decontamination technologies at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, R.L.; Archibald, K.E.; Demmer, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    Emphasis on the minimization of decontamination secondary waste has increased because of restrictions on the use of hazardous chemicals and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) waste handling issues. The Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co. (LITCO) Decontamination Development Subunit has worked to evaluate and introduce new performed testing, evaluations, development and on-site demonstrations for a number of novel decontamination techniques that have not yet previously been used at the ICPP. This report will include information on decontamination techniques that have recently been evaluated by the Decontamination Development Subunit

  13. Development of waste minimization and decontamination technologies at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, R.L.; Archibald, K.E.; Demmer, R.L. [and others

    1995-11-01

    Emphasis on the minimization of decontamination secondary waste has increased because of restrictions on the use of hazardous chemicals and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) waste handling issues. The Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co. (LITCO) Decontamination Development Subunit has worked to evaluate and introduce new performed testing, evaluations, development and on-site demonstrations for a number of novel decontamination techniques that have not yet previously been used at the ICPP. This report will include information on decontamination techniques that have recently been evaluated by the Decontamination Development Subunit.

  14. Microwave-Based Water Decontamination System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Byerly, Diane (Inventor); Sognier, Marguerite (Inventor); Dusl, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system for decontaminating a medium. The system can include a medium having one or more contaminants disposed therein. The contaminants can be or include bacteria, fungi, parasites, viruses, and combinations thereof. A microwave energy radiation device can be positioned proximate the medium. The microwave energy radiation device can be adapted to generate a signal having a frequency from about 10 GHz to about 100 GHz. The signal can be adapted to kill one or more of the contaminants disposed within the medium while increasing a temperature of the medium by less than about 10 C.

  15. Decontamination of radioactive waste water by chemical precipitation and centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehlmann, K.H.

    1987-01-01

    At the end of 1984, BWB Engineering GmbH, Lorrach/West Germany, was assigned the task of planning and supplying a complete plant for the treatment of radioactive contaminated waste water by chemical precipitation, subsequent centrifugation and solidification. The plant has to be incorporated in a nuclear power plant, operating with two pressurized water reactors (PWR), design Westinghouse. The report deals with the previous decontamination methods and the development of new techniques to improve the results, as well as fulfilling the various safety requirements in the realization of this complex project. The plant is scheduled to be commissioned in May 1987. The operating results will be published at a later date

  16. Decontamination of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-seven papers were presented at this conference in five sessions. Topics covered include regulation, control and consequences of decontamination; decontamination of components and facilities; chemical and non-chemical methods of decontamination; and TMI decontamination experience

  17. Processes of elimination of activated corrosion products. Chemical decontamination - fuel cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viala, C.; Brun, C.; Neuhaus, R.; Richier, S.; Bachet, M.

    2007-01-01

    The abatement of the individual and collective dose of a PWR imposes to control the source term through different processes implemented during the plant exploitation. When the limits of these different optimization processes are reached, the abatement of dose rates requires the implementation of curative processes. The objective is thus to eliminate the contaminated oxides and deposits present on surfaces free of radiation flux, and eventually on surfaces under radiation flux and on the fuel itself. The chemical decontamination of equipments and systems is the main and universal remedy implemented at different levels. On the other hand, the ultrasonic cleaning of fuel assemblies is a promising process. This paper aims at illustrating these different techniques using concrete examples of application in France and abroad (decontamination during steam generator replacement, decontamination of primary pump scroll in hot workshop, decontamination of loop sections, ultrasonic cleaning of fuel). The description of these different operations stresses on their efficiency in terms of dosimetric gain, duration of implementation, generation of wastes, and recontamination following their implementation. (J.S.)

  18. Evaluation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination for alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevremovic, M.; Milosevic, B.; Lazarevic, N.

    2009-01-01

    The article presents experimental results obtained by the investigation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination of metal surface with alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating system, which are used for painting of military equipment. Samples for testing are painted aluminum plates contaminated with liquid solutions of radioactive isotopes 60 Co, 133 Ba, 152 Eu and 241 Am. The degree of removal of the radioactivity on the samples was observed as an indicator of the efficiency of decontamination. Comparison of the results is done in relation to the retention time of the contamination on the surface coating, which is an important factor for the effectiveness of decontamination. Samples with alkyd coating system showed better efficiency of decontamination than the samples with the epoxy-urethane coating system, although the coatings based on epoxy and urethane resin superior in relation to the alkyd in terms of protection, decorative characteristics and chemical resistance. (author) [sr

  19. INTEGRATED VERTICAL AND OVERHEAD DECONTAMINATION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities performed during FY98 and describes the planned activities for FY99. Accomplishments for FY98 include identifying and selecting decontamination, the screening of potential characterization technologies, development of minimum performance factors for the decontamination technology, and development and identification of Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Regulations (ARARs).

  20. INTEGRATED VERTICAL AND OVERHEAD DECONTAMINATION SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities performed during FY98 and describes the planned activities for FY99. Accomplishments for FY98 include identifying and selecting decontamination, the screening of potential characterization technologies, development of minimum performance factors for the decontamination technology, and development and identification of Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Regulations (ARARs)

  1. Transport and Reactivity of Decontaminants to Provide Hazard Mitigation of Chemical Warfare Agents from Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    directions for future decontamination formulation approaches. 15. SUBJECT TERMS GD HD Decontamination Hazard mitigation VX Chemical warfare agent...agent from materials. The objective of this study was to provide a screening tool to identify decontamination chemistries and formulations that will...mitigation. The materials included a water-dispersible polyurethane (WDP) paint (MIL-DTL-53039) and an alkyd paint (MIL-PRF-24635). Two polymers were also

  2. Report on decontamination of the heavy water system - Annex 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    After dying, the air was introduced into the heavy water system including both heat exchangers. The whole system excluding the pump 'Avala' was filled with 7% acid solution. After 3 days, this solution was removed and the system was filled with 1% solution which remained in the system for 6 hours. The analysis of decontamination effects showed that the whole procedure should be repeated. Parts of the taken apart pump were decontaminated. Washing of the heavy water system was done by cold, then by warm water and finally by distilled water. The pH value was permanently controlled. The achieved decontamination results are shown in a separate report [sr

  3. Decontamination and Management of Human Remains Following Incidents of Hazardous Chemical Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Public Health Command; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Bock, Robert Eldon [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To provide specific procedural guidance and resources for identification, assessment, control, and mitigation of compounds that may contaminate human remains resulting from chemical attack or release. Design: A detailed technical, policy, and regulatory review is summarized. Setting: Guidance is suitable for civilian or military settings where human remains potentially contaminated with hazardous chemicals may be present. Settings would include sites of transportation accidents, natural disasters, terrorist or military operations, mortuary affairs or medical examiner processing and decontamination points, and similar. Patients, Participants: While recommended procedures have not been validated with actual human remains, guidance has been developed from data characterizing controlled experiments with fabrics, materiel, and laboratory animals. Main Outcome Measure(s): Presentation of logic and specific procedures for remains management, protection and decontamination of mortuary affairs personnel, as well as decision criteria for determining when remains are sufficiently decontaminated so as to pose no chemical health hazard. Results: Established procedures and existing equipment/materiel available for decontamination and verification provide appropriate and reasonable means to mitigate chemical hazards from remains. Extensive characterization of issues related to remains decontamination indicates that supra-lethal concentrations of liquid chemical warfare agent VX may prove difficult to decontaminate and verify in a timely fashion. Specialized personnel can and should be called upon to assist with monitoring necessary to clear decontaminated remains for transport and processing. Conclusions: Once appropriate decontamination and verification have been accomplished, normal procedures for remains processing and transport to the decedent s family and the continental United States can be followed.

  4. Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear decontamination: Recent trends and future perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN decontamination is the removal of CBRN material from equipment or humans. The objective of the decontamination is to reduce radiation burden, salvage equipment, and materials, remove loose CBRN contaminants, and fix the remaining in place in preparation for protective storage or permanent disposal work activities. Decontamination may be carried out using chemical, electrochemical, and mechanical means. Like materials, humans may also be contaminated with CBRN contamination. Changes in cellular function can occur at lower radiation doses and exposure to chemicals. At high dose, cell death may take place. Therefore, decontamination of humans at the time of emergency while generating bare minimum waste is an enormous task requiring dedication of large number of personnel and large amount of time. General principles of CBRN decontamination are discussed in this review with emphasis on radiodecontamination.

  5. Decontamination and Decommissioning Equipment Tracking System (DDETS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.

    1994-07-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE)(EM-50), the Scientific Computing Unit developed a prototype system to track information and data relevant to equipment and tooling removed during decontamination and decommissioning activities. The DDETS proof-of-concept tracking system utilizes a one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) bar coding technology to retain and track information such as identification number, manufacturer, requisition information, and various contaminant information, etc. The information is encoded in a bar code, printed on a label and can be attached to corresponding equipment. The DDETS was developed using a proven relational database management system which allows the addition, modification, printing, and deletion of data. In addition, communication interfaces with bar code printers and bar code readers were developed. Additional features of the system include: (a) Four different reports available for the user (REAPS, transaction, and two inventory), (b) Remote automated inventory tracking capabilities, (c) Remote automated inventory tracking capability (2D bar codes allow equipment to be scanned/tracked without being linked to the DDETS database), (d) Edit, update, delete, and query capabilities, (e) On-line bar code label printing utility (data from 2D bar codes can be scanned directly into the data base simplifying data entry), and (f) Automated data backup utility. Compatibility with the Reportable Excess Automated Property System (REAPS) to upload data from DDETS is planned

  6. Development of Personal Decontamination System Final Report CRADA No. TC-02078-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); O' Dell, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and O’Dell Engineering, Ltd. (O’Dell) to develop an improved low-cost personal decontamination system for Toxic Industrial Chemicals (TICs) and chemical agents. The significant change to the project was that COTS (Commercial Off-the Shelf Components) were identified that performed as well, or better than, the proprietary materials created and tested as part of this CRADA. These COTS components were combined to create a new LPDS (low-cost personal decontamination system) that met all specifications.

  7. Decision Analysis System for Selection of Appropriate Decontamination Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Boudreaux, J.F.; Chinta, S.; Zanakis, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    The principal objective for designing Decision Analysis System for Decontamination (DASD) is to support DOE-EM's endeavor to employ the most efficient and effective technologies for treating radiologically contaminated surfaces while minimizing personnel and environmental risks. DASD will provide a tool for environmental decision makers to improve the quality, consistency, and efficacy of their technology selection decisions. The system will facilitate methodical comparisons between innovative and baseline decontamination technologies and aid in identifying the most suitable technologies for performing surface decontamination at DOE environmental restoration sites

  8. Decision Analysis System for Selection of Appropriate Decontamination Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Boudreaux, J.F.; Chinta, S.; Zanakis, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    The principal objective for designing Decision Analysis System for Decontamination (DASD) is to support DOE-EM's endeavor to employ the most efficient and effective technologies for treating radiologically contaminated surfaces while minimizing personnel and environmental risks. DASD will provide a tool for environmental decision makers to improve the quality, consistency, and efficacy of their technology selection decisions. The system will facilitate methodical comparisons between innovative and baseline decontamination technologies and aid in identifying the most suitable technologies for performing surface decontamination at DOE environmental restoration sites.

  9. Decontamination of radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despotovic, R.; Music, S.; Subotic, B.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Removal of radioactive isotopes under controlled conditions is determined by a number of physical and chemical properties considered radiocontaminating and by the characteristics of the contaminated object. Determination of quantitative and qualitative factors for equilibrium in a contamination-decontamination system provides the basis for rational and successful decontamination. The decontamination of various ''solid/liquid'' systems is interesting from the scientific and technological point of view. These systems are of great importance in radiation protection (decontamination of various surfaces, liquids, drinking water, fixation or collection of radiocontaminants). Different types of decontamination systems are discussed. The dependence of rate and efficiency of the preparation conditions and on the ageing of the scavenger is described. The influence of coagulating electrolyte on radioactive isotope fixation efficiency was also determined. The fixation of fission radionuclide on oxide scavengers has been studied. The connection between fundamental investigations and practical decontamination of the ''solid/liquid'' systems is discussed. (author)

  10. Chemical decontamination for decommissioning purposes. (Vigorous decontamination tests of steel samples in a special test loop)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregani, F.; Pascali, R.; Rizzi, R.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the research activities described was to develop vigorous decontamination techniques for decommissioning purposes, taking into account the cost of treatment of the radwaste, to achieve possibly unrestricted release of the treated components, and to obtain know-how for in situ hard decontamination. The decontamination procedures for strong decontamination have been optimized in static and dynamic tests (DECO-loop). The best values have been found for: (i) hydrochloric acid: 4 to 5% vol. at low temperature, 0.7 to 1% vol. at high temperature (80 0 C); (ii) hydrofluoric plus nitric acid: 1.5% vol. HF + 5% vol. HNO 3 at low temperature; 0.3 to 0.5% vol. HF + 2.5 to 5% vol. HNO 3 at high temperature. High flow rates are not necessary, but a good re-circulation of the solution is needed. The final contamination levels, after total oxide removal, are in accordance with limits indicated for unrestricted release of materials in some countries. The arising of the secondary waste is estimated. Decontamination of a 10 m 2 surface would typically produce 0.5 to 3.0 kg of dry waste, corresponding to 1.6 to 10 kg of concrete conditioned waste

  11. Evaluation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination for alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevremović, Milutin; Milošević, Bratislav; Lazarević, Nataša

    2010-01-01

    This article presents experimental results obtained by the investigation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination of a metal surface with alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating systems, which are used for the painting of military equipment. During the evaluation of the efficiency of decontamination, the impact of contaminants on the coating was not examined but the amount of contaminants residual after decontamination was, and was determined by activity measurements of the surface. The samples for testing were painted aluminum plates contaminated by liquid solutions of radioactive isotopes 60Co, 133Ba, 152Eu and 241Am (A=12297.91 Bq/ml). Decontamination of contaminated samples was performed with 0.5% detergent solution on the basis of synthetic surfactants. The activity measurements of samples were conducted using gamma spectroscopy system with a high-resolution high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector of relative efficiency of 50% at 60Co (1.33 MeV). The degree of removal of the radioactivity on the samples was observed as an indicator of the efficiency of decontamination. A comparison of the results is presented in relation to the retention time of the contamination on the surface coating, which is an important factor for the efficiency of decontamination. The samples with an alkyd coating system showed better efficiency of decontamination than the samples with the epoxy-urethane coating system, although the coatings based on epoxy and urethane resin were superior in relation to the alkyd in terms of protection, decorative characteristics and chemical resistance. The difference in the efficiency of decontamination for the examined coatings increases almost linearly in relation to the retention time of the contaminants in the coating.

  12. Comparison of Selected Methods for Individual Decontamination of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Capoun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the individual decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWA and other hazardous substances. The individual decontamination applies to contaminated body surfaces, protective clothing and objects immediately after contamination, performed individually or by mutual assistance using prescribed or improvised devices. The article evaluates the importance of individual decontamination, security level for Fire and Rescue Service Units of the Czech Republic (FRS CR and demonstrates some of the devices. The decontamination efficiency of selected methods (sorbent, glove and sponge, two-chamber foam device and wiping with alcohol was evaluated for protective clothing and painted steel plate contaminated with O-ethyl-S-(diisopropylaminoethyl-methylthiophosphonate (VX, sulfur mustard, o-cresol and acrylonitrile. The methods were assessed from an economic point of view and with regard to specific user parameters, such as the decontamination of surfaces or materials with poor accessibility and vertical surfaces, the need for a water rinse as well as toxic waste and its disposal.

  13. A chemical decontamination process for PWR primary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, D.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and loop decontamination tests were performed to select a decontamination process and to try to optimize it. Results were good on Inconel 82 and 308L stainless steel but lower on Inconel 600. Simultaneous use of ultrasonic waves gave good results on Inconel 600 in laboratory experiments, but this was not confirmed in loop experiments on contaminated materials, taken from French nuclear power plants. (author)

  14. Decontamination Systems Information and Reseach Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Echol E

    1998-04-01

    The following paragraphs comprise the research efforts during the first quarter of 1998 (January 1 - March 31). These tasks have been granted a continuation from the 1997 work and will all end in June 1998. This report represents the last technical quarterly report deliverable for the WVU Cooperative Agreement - Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Final reports for all of the 1997 projects will be submitted afterwards as one document. During this period, groundwater extraction operations were completed on Task 1.6 - Pilot Scale Demonstration of TCE Flushing Through PVDs at the DOE/RMI Extrusion Plant. The data have been evaluated and graphs are presented. The plot of TCE Concentration versus Time shows that the up-gradient groundwater monitoring well produced consistent levels of TCE contamination. A similar trend was observed for the down-gradient wells via grab samples tested. Groundwater samples from the PVD test pad Zone of Influence showed consistent reductions in TCE concentrations with respect to time. In addition, a natural pulse frequency is evident which will have a significant impact on the efficiency of the contaminant removal under natural groundwater advection/diffusion processes. The relationships between the PVD Extraction Flow Rate versus Cumulative Time shows a clear trend in flow rate. Consistent values between 20 to 30 g.p.m. at the beginning of the extraction duration, to less than 10 g.p.m. by the end of the extraction cycle are observed. As evidenced by the aquifer's diminishing recharge levels, the PVD extraction is affecting the response of the aquifer's natural attenuation capability. Progress was also marked on the Injection and Circulation of Potable Water Through PVDs task. Data reduction from this sequence of testing is ongoing. Work planned for next quarter includes completing the Injection / Extraction of potable water task and beginning the Surfactant Injection and removal task.

  15. Decontamination of chemical agents from drinking water infrastructure: a literature review and summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Jeff; Minamyer, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This report summarizes the current state of knowledge on the persistence of chemical contamination on drinking water infrastructure (such as pipes) along with information on decontamination should persistence occur. Decontamination options for drinking water infrastructure have been explored for some chemical contaminants, but important data gaps remain. In general, data on chemical persistence on drinking water infrastructure is available for inorganics such as arsenic and mercury, as well as select organics such as petroleum products, pesticides and rodenticides. Data specific to chemical warfare agents and pharmaceuticals was not found and data on toxins is scant. Future research suggestions focus on expanding the available chemical persistence data to other common drinking water infrastructure materials. Decontaminating agents that successfully removed persistent contamination from one infrastructure material should be used in further studies. Methods for sampling or extracting chemical agents from water infrastructure surfaces are needed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Efficacy of liquid and foam decontamination technologies for chemical warfare agents on indoor surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Adam H; Bailey, Christopher G; Hanna, M Leslie; Hok, Saphon; Vu, Alex K; Reutter, Dennis J; Raber, Ellen

    2011-11-30

    Bench-scale testing was used to evaluate the efficacy of four decontamination formulations on typical indoor surfaces following exposure to the liquid chemical warfare agents sarin (GB), soman (GD), sulfur mustard (HD), and VX. Residual surface contamination on coupons was periodically measured for up to 24h after applying one of four selected decontamination technologies [0.5% bleach solution with trisodium phosphate, Allen Vanguard Surface Decontamination Foam (SDF™), U.S. military Decon Green™, and Modec Inc. and EnviroFoam Technologies Sandia Decontamination Foam (DF-200)]. All decontamination technologies tested, except for the bleach solution, performed well on nonporous and nonpermeable glass and stainless-steel surfaces. However, chemical agent residual contamination typically remained on porous and permeable surfaces, especially for the more persistent agents, HD and VX. Solvent-based Decon Green™ performed better than aqueous-based bleach or foams on polymeric surfaces, possibly because the solvent is able to penetrate the polymer matrix. Bleach and foams out-performed Decon Green for penetrating the highly polar concrete surface. Results suggest that the different characteristics needed for an ideal and universal decontamination technology may be incompatible in a single formulation and a strategy for decontaminating a complex facility will require a range of technologies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gross decontamination experiment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

  18. Gross decontamination experiment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment

  19. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Amlôt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS. The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit.

  20. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Joseph R.; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing) of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit. PMID:23202768

  1. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Chemical Process Cell (CPC): Topical report for the period January 1985-March 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigs, R.A.

    1987-07-01

    To support interim storage of vitrified High-Level Waste (HLW) at the West Valley Demonstration Project, the shielded, remotely operated Chemical Process Cell (CPC) was decommissioned and decontaminated. All equipment was removed, packaged and stored for future size reduction and decontamination. Floor debris was sampled, characterized, and vacuumed into remotely handled containers. The cell walls, ceiling, and floor were decontaminated. Three 20 Mg (22.5 ton) concrete neutron absorber cores were cut with a high-pressure water/abrasive jet cutting system and packaged for disposal. All operations were performed remotely using two overhead bridge cranes which included two 1.8 Mg (2 ton) hoists, one 14.5 Mg (16 ton) hoist, and an electromechanical manipulator or an industrial robot mounted on a mobile platform. Initial general area dose rates in the cell ranged from 1 to 50 R/h. Target levels of less than 10 mR/h general area readings were established before decontamination and decommissioning was initiated; general area dose rates between 200 mR/h and 1200 mR/h were obtained at the completion of the decontamination work. 4 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs

  2. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations

  3. Decontamination of the chemical crane room and decontamination and decommissioning of the extraction chemical room at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, E.C.; Golden, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the decontamination of the Chemical Crane Room (CCR) of the West Valley Plant and the Extraction Chemical Room (XCR) from radioactively contaminated conditions to essentially shirt sleeve environments. In both cases, subsequent use re-contaminated the rooms. Prior to decontamination, general exposure rates in the CCR were 50 to 100 mR/hr with hot spots as high as 2000 mR/hr. Smearable levels on the floor were in the range of 10 5 to 10 6 dpm per 100/cm 2 . Respiratory protection was mandatory for entry. In the Extraction Chemical Room (XCR) prior to decontamination and decommissioning (D/D), radiological surveys indicated a maximum radiation field of 5 mR/hr, due to sources internal to the room, and 20,000 dpm beta/100 cm 2 surface contamination. A radiation source external to the XCR caused a hot spot with a 9 mR/hr exposure rate inside the XCR. The CCR, located at the north end of the Chemical Process Cell (CPC) is for the storage and servicing of two bridge cranes used in the CPC. Decontamination and exposure reduction in the CCR has been completed using vacuum cleaning, damp wipe down, and surface grinding followed by shielding and painting. The decontamination and decommissioning of the Extraction Chemical Room (XCR), located on the fifth floor elevation (160') of the reprocessing plant at the WVDP, has been completed. D/D operations included removal of piping, tanks, supports, and equipment to provide a clean work area of about 3000 square feet and 17 feet high

  4. The restoration project : decontamination of facilities from chemical, biological and radiological contamination after terrorist action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.; Volchek, K.; Thouin, G.; Harrison, S.; Kuang, W. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science Div; Velicogna, D.; Hornof, M.; Punt, M. [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Payette, P.; Duncan, L.; Best, M.; Krishnan; Wagener, S.; Bernard, K.; Majcher, M. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Cousins, T.; Jones, T. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Bioterrorism poses a real threat to the public health and national security, and the restoration of affected facilities after a chemical, biological or radiological attack is a major concern. This paper reviewed aspects of a project conducted to collect information, test and validate procedures for site restoration after a terrorist attack. The project began with a review of existing technology and then examined new technologies. Restoration included pickup, neutralization, decontamination, removal and final destruction and deposition of contaminants as well as cleaning and neutralization of material and contaminated waste from decontamination. The project was also intended to test existing concepts and develop new ideas. Laboratory scale experiments consisted of testing, using standard laboratory techniques. Radiation decontamination consisted of removal and concentration of the radioisotopes from removal fluid. General restoration guidelines were provided, as well as details of factors considered important in specific applications, including growth conditions and phases of microorganisms in biological decontamination, or the presence of inhibitors or scavengers in chemical decontamination. Various agents were proposed that were considered to have broad spectrum capability. Test surrogates for anthrax were discussed. The feasibility of enhanced oxidation processes was examined in relation to the destruction of organophosphorus, organochlorine and carbamate pesticides. The goal was to identify a process for the treatment of surfaces contaminated with pesticides. Tests included removal from carpet, porous ceiling tile, steel plates, and floor tiles. General radiation contamination procedures and techniques were reviewed, as well as radiological decontamination waste treatment. It was concluded that there is no single decontamination technique applicable for all contaminants, and decontamination methods depend on economic, social and health factors. The amount of

  5. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This reports reports the progress/efforts performed on six technical projects: 1. systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; 2. site remediation technologies (SRT):drain- enhanced soil flushing for organic contaminants removal; 3. SRT: in situ bio-remediation of organic contaminants; 4. excavation systems for hazardous waste sites: dust control methods for in-situ nuclear waste handling; 5. chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; and 6. development of organic sensors: monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors

  6. Research and development for decontamination system of spent resin in Hanbit Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Gi Hong [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    When reactor coolant leaks occur due to cracks of a steam generator tube, radioactive materials contained in the primary cooling water in nuclear power plant are forced out toward the secondary systems. At this time the secondary water purification resin in the ion exchange resin tower of the steam generator blowdown system is contaminated by the radioactivity of the leaked radioactive materials, so we pack this in special containers and store temporarily because we could not dispose it by ourselves. If steam generator tube leakage occurs, it produces contaminated spent resins annually about 5,000-7,000 liters. This may increase the amount of nuclear waste productions, a disposal working cost and a unit price of generating electricity in the plant. For this reasons, it is required to develop a decontamination process technique for reducing the radioactive level of these resins enough to handle by the self-disposal method. In this research, First, Investigated the structure and properties of the ion exchange resin used in a steam generator blowdown system. Second, Checked for a occurrence status of contaminated spent resin and a disposal technology. Third, identified the chemical characteristics of the waste radionuclides of the spent resin, and examined ionic bonding and separation mechanism of radioactive nuclear species and a spent resin. Finally, we carried out the decontamination experiment using chemicals, ultrasound, microbubbles, supercritical carbon dioxide to process these spent resin. In the case of the spent resin decontamination method using chemicals, the higher the concentration of the drug decontamination efficiency was higher. In the ultrasound method, foreign matter of the spent resin was removed and was found that the level of radioactivity is below of the MDA. In the microbubbles method, we found that the concentration of the radioactivity decreased after the experiment, so it can be used to the decontamination process of the spent resin. In

  7. SAFETY STUDIES TO MEASURE EXOTHERMIC REACTIONS OF SPENT PLUTONIUM DECONTAMINATION CHEMICALS USING WET AND DRY DECONTAMINATION METHODS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; JACKSON, G.W.; MINETTE, M.; EWALT, J.; COOPER, T.; SCOTT, P.; JONES, S.; SCHEELEY, R.

    2005-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the Hanford site in Eastern Washington is currently being decommissioned by Fluor Hanford. Chemicals being considered for dccontamination of gloveboxes in PFP include cerium (IV) nitrate in a nitric acid solution, and proprietary commercial solutions that include acids and sequestering agents. Aggressive chemicals are commonly used to remove transuranic contaminants from process equipment to allow disposal of the equipment as low level waste. Fluor's decontamination procedure involves application of chemical solutions as a spray on the contaminated surfaces, followed by a wipe-down with rags. Alternatively, a process of applying oxidizing Ce IV ions contained in a gel matrix and vacuuming a dry gel material is being evaluated. These processes effectively transfer the transuranic materials to rags or a gel matrix which is then packaged as TRU waste and disposed

  8. Development of chemical decontamination for low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Seigo; Omata, Kazuo; Obinata, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Yoshihiko; Kanamori, Osamu.

    1995-01-01

    During routine intermittent inspection and maintenance at nuclear power plants, a considerable quantity of low level radioactive waste is generated requiring release from the nuclear site or treating additionally. To decontaminate this waste for safe release from the nuclear power plant, the first step could be washing the waste in Methylene chloride, CH 2 Cl 2 , to remove most of the paint coating. However, CH 2 Cl 2 washing does not completely remove the paint coating from the waste, which in the next step is shot blasted with plastic bead media to loose and remove the remaining paint coating. Following in succession, in the third step, the waste is washed in a chelate solution, after which most waste is decontaminated and suitable to be released for recycling. The residual chelate solution may be decomposed into nontoxic carbon dioxide and water by an electrolysis process and then safely discharged into the environment. (author)

  9. Physico-Chemical Dynamics of Nanoparticle Formation during Laser Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, M.D.

    2005-06-01

    Laser-ablation based decontamination is a new and effective approach for simultaneous removal and characterization of contaminants from surfaces (e.g., building interior and exterior walls, ground floors, etc.). The scientific objectives of this research are to: (1) characterize particulate matter generated during the laser-ablation based decontamination, (2) develop a technique for simultaneous cleaning and spectroscopic verification, and (3) develop an empirical model for predicting particle generation for the size range from 10 nm to tens of micrometers. This research project provides fundamental data obtained through a systematic study on the particle generation mechanism, and also provides a working model for prediction of particle generation such that an effective operational strategy can be devised to facilitate worker protection.

  10. Reactivity of Dual-Use Decontaminants with Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Markers, Inc.; Huntington Beach, CA) 9.5 M Windex (S.C. Johnson; Racine, WI) 10.8 —: not measured. 4 Table 2. Listing of Formulations...control, reference technology, or alternate treatment condition). For example, the calculation can indicate if and by how much a hazard mitigation...i.e., if CI > LDR), the evaluated decontaminant did not change the agent concentration during the reaction residence period. Treatment of the

  11. How Clean is Safe? Improving the Effectiveness of Decontamination of Structures and People Following Chemical and Biological Incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt (Sorensen), B.M.

    2003-04-03

    This report describes a U.S. Department of Energy, (DOE) Chemical and Biological National Security Program project that sought to establish what is known about decontamination of structures, objects, and people following an exposure to chemical or biological materials. Specifically we sought to identify the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the factors determining when people were (or were not) decontaminated, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  12. Self-care Decontamination within a Chemical Exposure Mass-casualty Incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Raymond G; Pearce, Laurie D R

    2015-06-01

    Growing awareness and concern for the increasing frequency of incidents involving hazardous materials (HazMat) across a broad spectrum of contaminants from chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) sources indicates a clear need to refine the capability to respond successfully to mass-casualty contamination incidents. Best results for decontamination from a chemical agent will be achieved if done within minutes following exposure, and delays in decontamination will increase the length of time a casualty is in contact with the contaminate. The findings presented in this report indicate that casualties involved in a HazMat/CBRN mass-casualty incident (MCI) in a typical community would not receive sufficient on-scene care because of operational delays that are integral to a standard HazMat/CBRN first response. This delay in response will mean that casualty care will shift away from the incident scene into already over-tasked health care facilities as casualties seek aid on their own. The self-care decontamination protocols recommended here present a viable option to ensure decontamination is completed in the field, at the incident scene, and that casualties are cared for more quickly and less traumatically than they would be otherwise. Introducing self-care decontamination procedures as a standard first response within the response community will improve the level of care significantly and provide essential, self-care decontamination to casualties. The process involves three distinct stages which should not be delayed; these are summarized by the acronym MADE: Move/Assist, Disrobe/Decontaminate, Evaluate/Evacuate.

  13. Methods for Decontamination of a Bipropellant Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Mark B.; Greene, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Most propulsion systems are designed to be filled and flown, draining can be done but decontamination may be difficult. Transport of these systems may be difficult as well because flight weight vessels are not designed around DOT or UN shipping requirements. Repairs, failure analysis work or post firing inspections may be difficult or impossible to perform due to the hazards of residual propellants being present.

  14. A study of the decontamination procedures used for chemical analysis of polar deep ice cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Miyake

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the decontamination procedures used on polar deep ice cores before chemical analyses such as measurements of the concentrations of iron species and dust (microparticles. We optimized cutting and melting protocols for decontamination using chemically ultraclean polyethylene bags and simulated ice samples made from ultrapure water. For dust and ion species including acetate, which represented a high level of contamination, we were able to decrease contamination to below several μg l^ for ion concentrations and below 10000 particles ml^ for the dust concentration. These concentration levels of ion species and dust are assumed to be present in the Dome Fuji ice core during interglacial periods. Decontamination of the ice core was achieved by cutting away approximately 3 mm of the outside of a sample and by melting away approximately 30% of a sample's weight. Furthermore, we also report the preparation protocols for chemical analyses of the 2nd Dome Fuji ice core, including measurements of ion and dust concentrations, pH, electric conductivity (EC, and stable isotope ratios of water (δD and δO, based on the results of the investigation of the decontamination procedures.

  15. CBRN Decontamination: Multiservice Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    conflict in the former Yugoslavia, Muslim forces deliberately positioned canisters of chlorine from the Tuzla industrial chemical plant to deter Serb...Listeriosis ( Listeria monocytogenes) Less than 24 hours Diffused light: 24 but not 48 hours In sun; soil surface: 12 days (2-3 cm...biological material Laboratories and storage facilities Radiological Nuclear fuel and medical sources Nuclear power plants , medical facilities, industrial

  16. THE CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGIES OF SOIL’S DECONTAMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana – Gabriela POPA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemical soil degradation technologies are based on the pollutant conversion and immobilisation, or the mobilization, extraction and washing of pollutants. They use chemical agents that oxidize or reduce pollutants to less toxic or non-toxic forms and immobilize them in the underground environment in order to diminish their migration and the extent of pollution. Classification of chemical methods of depollution is based on the dominant reaction criterion: oxidation, reduction, neutralization, precipitation, chemical extraction, hydrolysis, dehalogenation, precipitation.

  17. Testing of a portable ultrahigh pressure water decontamination system (UHPWDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovell, A.; Dahlby, J.

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the tests done with a portable ultrahigh pressure water decontamination system (UHPWDS) on highly radioactively contaminated surfaces. A small unit was purchased, modified, and used for in-situ decontamination to change the waste level of the contaminated box from transuranic (TRU) waste to low- level waste (LLW). Low-level waste is less costly by as much as a factor of five or more if compared with TRU waste when handling, storage, and disposal are considered. The portable unit we tested is commercially available and requires minimal utilities for operation. We describe the UHPWDS unit itself, a procedure for its use, the results of the testing we did, and conclusions including positive and negative aspects of the UHPWDS

  18. Decontamination of Chemical Agent Simulant by Nanometal Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    NanoActive CeO2 94.9 ± 0.7 1.1 ± 0.0 1.9 ± 0.3 107.9 ± 1.8 NanoActive CuO 90.5 ± 1.0 2.0 ± 0.1 6.0 ± 0.9 118.8 ± 0.5 NanoActive TiO2 75.1 ± 1.9 0.0...reactants, as the diffusion of CEES is a major limiting factor in decontamination. The solvent/metal oxide slurry procedure was attempted with...5.6 2 NanoActive CeO2 50 9.5 70 6.0 3 NanoActive CuO 65 6 85 5.7 4 NanoActive TiO2 500 5 32 3.7 4 Al2O3 (Aldrich) 155 — — — — TiO2 (Alfa Aesar) 45

  19. Locus-specific microemulsion catalysts for sulfur mustard (HD) chemical warfare agent decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallis, Ian A; Griffiths, Peter C; Cosgrove, Terence; Dreiss, Cecile A; Govan, Norman; Heenan, Richard K; Holden, Ian; Jenkins, Robert L; Mitchell, Stephen J; Notman, Stuart; Platts, Jamie A; Riches, James; Tatchell, Thomas

    2009-07-22

    The rates of catalytic oxidative decontamination of the chemical warfare agent (CWA) sulfur mustard (HD, bis(2-chlororethyl) sulfide) and a range (chloroethyl) sulfide simulants of variable lipophilicity have been examined using a hydrogen peroxide-based microemulsion system. SANS (small-angle neutron scattering), SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering), PGSE-NMR (pulsed-gradient spin-echo NMR), fluorescence quenching, and electrospray mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) were implemented to examine the distribution of HD, its simulants, and their oxidation/hydrolysis products in a model oil-in-water microemulsion. These measurements not only present a means of interpreting decontamination rates but also a rationale for the design of oxidation catalysts for these toxic materials. Here we show that by localizing manganese-Schiff base catalysts at the oil droplet-water interface or within the droplet core, a range of (chloroethyl) sulfides, including HD, spanning some 7 orders of octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)), may be oxidized with equal efficacy using dilute (5 wt. % of aqueous phase) hydrogen peroxide as a noncorrosive, environmentally benign oxidant (e.g., t(1/2) (HD) approximately 18 s, (2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide, C(6)H(5)SCH(2)CH(2)Cl) approximately 15 s, (thiodiglycol, S(CH(2)CH(2)OH)(2)) approximately 19 s {20 degrees C}). Our observations demonstrate that by programming catalyst lipophilicity to colocalize catalyst and substrate, the inherent compartmentalization of the microemulsion can be exploited to achieve enhanced rates of reaction or to exert control over product selectivity. A combination of SANS, ESI-MS and fluorescence quenching measurements indicate that the enhanced catalytic activity is due to the locus of the catalyst and not a result of partial hydrolysis of the substrate.

  20. THE CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGIES OF SOIL’S DECONTAMINATION

    OpenAIRE

    Roxana – Gabriela POPA

    2017-01-01

    The chemical soil degradation technologies are based on the pollutant conversion and immobilisation, or the mobilization, extraction and washing of pollutants. They use chemical agents that oxidize or reduce pollutants to less toxic or non-toxic forms and immobilize them in the underground environment in order to diminish their migration and the extent of pollution. Classification of chemical methods of depollution is based on the dominant reaction criterion: oxidation, reduction,...

  1. Chemical Decontamination of Campylobacter jejuni on Chicken Skin and Meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, Charlotte Tandrup; Brøndsted, Lone; Rosenquist, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of 11 chemical compounds to reduce Campylobacter jejuni on chicken skin and meat samples dipped in chemical solutions. Treatment of skin samples for 1 min using tartaric acid (2%) and caprylic acid sodium salt (5%) caused reductions of C. jejuni NCTC11168...

  2. Enzymatic decontamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Prusińska-Kurstak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Abstract[/b]. This paper is devoted to the methods of decontamination of weapons of mass destruction (biological and chemical, based on the use of protein catalysts of chemical reactions — enzymes. This paper presents the possibility of using enzymes to neutralize the harmful and destructive to the environment and human chemicals used in weapons of mass destruction. The mechanism of the enzymatic reaction is showed. These are the possibilities of using lysozyme as destructor dangerous bacteria (E. coli, anthrax Bacillus anthracis and their spores. The advantages and disadvantages of chemical and enzymatic methods of decontamination have been compared. It was found that under certain conditions the enzymes can be an alternative to chemical methods of decontamination of weapons of mass destruction.[b]Keywords[/b]: decontamination, weapons of mass destruction, enzymes

  3. Chemical Decontamination of Campylobacter jejuni on Chicken Skin and Meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, Charlotte Tandrup; Brøndsted, Lone; Rosenquist, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    effective, indicating that some cells may recover after a 1-min treatment with these chemicals. An increase in treatment time to 15 min resulted in higher effectiveness of trisodium phosphate and formic acid. Interestingly, when reduction of the C. jejuni population was compared on chicken skin and meat......This study evaluated the effectiveness of 11 chemical compounds to reduce Campylobacter jejuni on chicken skin and meat samples dipped in chemical solutions. Treatment of skin samples for 1 min using tartaric acid (2%) and caprylic acid sodium salt (5%) caused reductions of C. jejuni NCTC11168......, sterile water and lactic acid caused considerably larger reductions on skin than on meat, whereas the opposite was seen for caprylic acid sodium salt. In conclusion, this study has identified chemicals with substantial reduction effects on C. jejuni. The analysis has further emphasized that treatment time...

  4. Chemical Warfare Agent Decontaminant Solution Using Quaternary Ammonium Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-11

    warfare agents, which include a variety of organophosphorus and organosulfur compounds, are known in the art. 15 However, these known methods use...chemical warfare agents, and works particularly well for neutralization of organosulfur agents such as mustard gas (HD), and organophosphorus agents such...detoxifying/neutralizing a variety of chemical warfare agents, including organosulfur agents such as mustard gas (HD), and organophosphorus agents such as

  5. Characterization of nuclear decontamination solutions at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from 1982-1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zohner, S.K.

    1996-03-01

    This report represents possibly the single largest collection of operational decontamination data from a nuclear reprocessing facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and perhaps anywhere in the world. The uniqueness of this data is due to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant`s (ICPP`s) ability to process different types of highly enriched nuclear fuel. The report covers an 8-year period, during which six campaigns were conducted to dissolve nuclear fuel clad in stainless steel, aluminum, graphite, and zirconium. Each fuel type had a separate head-end process with unique dissolution chemistry, but shared the same extraction process equipment. This report presents data about decontamination activities of the ICPP`s First Cycle extraction vessels, columns, piping, and aluminum dissolution vessels. Operating data from 1982 through 1990 has been collected, analyzed, and characterized. Chemicals used in the decontamination processes are documented along with quantities used. The chemical solutions are analyzed to compare effectiveness. Radioisotopic analysis is recorded, showing and quantifying what nuclides were removed by the various solutions. The original data is also provided to make it possible for researchers to address questions and test other hypotheses not discussed in this report.

  6. Application of the chemical properties of ruthenium to decontamination processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, A.; Berger, D.

    1965-01-01

    The chemical properties of ruthenium in the form of an aqueous solution of the nitrate and of organic tributylphosphate solution are reviewed. From this data, some known examples are given: they demonstrate the processes of separation or of elimination of ruthenium from radioactive waste. (authors) [fr

  7. DECONTAMINATION SYSTEMS AND INFORMATION RESEARCH PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echol E. Cook, Ph.D., PE.

    1998-11-01

    Tek Centrifugal Membrane System was a unique separation process introduced through the Agreement that is now being used at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Based on the cost to the USDOE for both technologies and considering their usefulness in cleaning up contaminated sites, no other technologies developed through USDOE provide or have the propensity to provide as great a return on investment and impact on environmental remediation. These technologies alone make the $10.3 million USDOE investment in the WVU Cooperative Agreement a tremendous investment.

  8. Development of the 2007 Chemical Decontaminant Source Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    be calculated using the contact sampler results (note definition as total measured agent, evaporative loss between touches is not included). The...Chemical Agent Simulant Specific DEM diethyl malonate MeS methyl salicylate PEG200 Polyethylene glycol 200 TEP triethyl phosphate Group 6...section contains the definitions for key terminology in this document. Some of the definitions are focused on the specific use or context of the test

  9. Decontamination of Toxic Chemicals in Vehicle Interiors using Hot Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    were analyzed subsequently for MS by UV spectroscopy . Similarly, DMMP was sampled into diethyl phthalate in sequential sampler bubblers. Bubbler...residual contamination of two chemical simulants, methyl salicylate (MS) and dimethyl methylphos- phonate (DMMP), remaining in vehicle interiors after...0.119 aVehicle type. bMethyl salicylate in milligrams. CPW.E dALYD. P3 was constrained was regressed on simulant dosage, depicted in Figure 4. Within

  10. Full system decontamination (FSD) for sustainable dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiepani, Christoph; Sempere-Belda, Luis; Topf, Christian; Basu, Ashim

    2012-09-01

    Nuclear power plants experience an increase in dose rates during operation due to the build-up of the activity inventory. The activity build-up is influenced by the construction materials, past and present water chemistries, and the individual operating history of the plant. Depending on these factors the dose levels in an operating plant may reach a point in which concrete actions to reduce the overall radiation exposure become necessary. In the past dose reduction plans were performed, based on - Modification in coolant water chemistry - Substitution of Cobalt containing materials - Outage optimization program - Installation of permanent shielding - Decontamination The dose rate reduction took several years and today a stagnation of further dose rate reduction can be seen. Therefore AREVA has developed the Concept for Sustainable Dose Reduction in Operating BWRs and PWRs. This is a program of joint corrective measures to minimize dose levels rapidly and keep them low for continued operation. It can be applied in plants from all constructors and designs. The concept is based fully on the application of proven technologies, including: - Full System Decontamination with AREVA's decontamination process HP/CORD UV to minimize the activity inventory - The formation of new, very stable protective oxides on the system surfaces including injection of depleted zinc - Introduction of advanced water chemistry for maintaining the low dose levels achieved during ongoing operation The implementation of this program is particularly interesting for plants with a long operation history, especially when considering life extension. The latest application was performed successfully at the German PWR Grafenrheinfeld in 2010. In this paper the concept for sustainable dose reduction will be outlined and the site application detailed and the achieved results at PWR Grafenrheinfeld will be described. The recontamination after one cycle will be outlined in a second paper. (authors)

  11. Surface Decontamination of Chemical Agent Surrogates Using an Atmospheric Pressure Air Flow Plasma Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanguo; Li, Ying; Cao, Peng; Zhao, Hongjie

    2013-07-01

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator using air flow as the feedstock gas was applied to decontaminate the chemical agent surrogates on the surface of aluminum, stainless steel or iron plate painted with alkyd or PVC. The experimental results of material decontamination show that the residual chemical agent on the material is lower than the permissible value of the National Military Standard of China. In order to test the corrosion effect of the plasma jet on different material surfaces in the decontamination process, corrosion tests for the materials of polymethyl methacrylate, neoprene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE), phenolic resin, iron plate painted with alkyd, stainless steel, aluminum, etc. were carried out, and relevant parameters were examined, including etiolation index, chromatism, loss of gloss, corrosion form, etc. The results show that the plasma jet is slightly corrosive for part of the materials, but their performances are not affected. A portable calculator, computer display, mainboard, circuit board of radiogram, and a hygrometer could work normally after being treated by the plasma jet.

  12. Surface Decontamination of Chemical Agent Surrogates Using an Atmospheric Pressure Air Flow Plasma Jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhanguo; Li Ying; Cao Peng; Zhao Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator using air flow as the feedstock gas was applied to decontaminate the chemical agent surrogates on the surface of aluminum, stainless steel or iron plate painted with alkyd or PVC. The experimental results of material decontamination show that the residual chemical agent on the material is lower than the permissible value of the National Military Standard of China. In order to test the corrosion effect of the plasma jet on different material surfaces in the decontamination process, corrosion tests for the materials of polymethyl methacrylate, neoprene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE), phenolic resin, iron plate painted with alkyd, stainless steel, aluminum, etc. were carried out, and relevant parameters were examined, including etiolation index, chromatism, loss of gloss, corrosion form, etc. The results show that the plasma jet is slightly corrosive for part of the materials, but their performances are not affected. A portable calculator, computer display, mainboard, circuit board of radiogram, and a hygrometer could work normally after being treated by the plasma jet

  13. Effect of gamma irradiation on microbial decontamination, and chemical and sensory characteristic of lycium fruit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, H.-W.; Chung, H.-P.; Chou, F.-I.; Lin, I-H.; Hsieh, P.-C.

    2006-01-01

    Lycium fruit, popular traditional Chinese medicine and food supplement generally is ingested uncooked, was exposed to several doses of gamma irradiation (0-14 kGy) to evaluate decontamination efficiency, changes in chemical composition, and changes in sensory characteristic. In this study, lycium fruit specimens contained microbial counts of 3.1x10 3 -1.7x10 5 CFU/g and 14 kGy was sufficient for microbial decontamination. Before irradiation, the main microbe isolated from lycium fruit was identified as a strain of yeast, Cryptococcus laurentii. After 10 kGy of irradiation, a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium, Bacillus cereus, was the only survivor. The first 90% reduction (LD 9 ) of C. laurentii and B. cereus was approximately 0.6 and 6.5 kGy, respectively, the D 1 doses of C. laurentii and B. cereus was approximately 0.6 and 1.7 kGy, respectively. After 14 kGy irradiation, except the vitamin C content, other chemical composition (e.g., crude protein, β-carotene, riboflavin, fructose, etc.) and the sensory characteristic of lycium fruit specimens did not have significant changes. In conclusion, 14 kGy is the optimal decontamination dose for lycium fruit for retention of its sensory quality and extension of shelf life

  14. Effect of gamma irradiation on microbial decontamination, and chemical and sensory characteristic of lycium fruit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, H.-W. [Department of Food Science and Technology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 14456 (United States); Chung, H.-P. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chou, F.-I. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: fichou@mx.nthu.edu.tw; Lin, I-H. [Committee on Chinese Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Health, Executive Yuan, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, P.-C. [Committee on Chinese Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Health, Executive Yuan, Taiwan (China)

    2006-05-15

    Lycium fruit, popular traditional Chinese medicine and food supplement generally is ingested uncooked, was exposed to several doses of gamma irradiation (0-14 kGy) to evaluate decontamination efficiency, changes in chemical composition, and changes in sensory characteristic. In this study, lycium fruit specimens contained microbial counts of 3.1x10{sup 3}-1.7x10{sup 5} CFU/g and 14 kGy was sufficient for microbial decontamination. Before irradiation, the main microbe isolated from lycium fruit was identified as a strain of yeast, Cryptococcus laurentii. After 10 kGy of irradiation, a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium, Bacillus cereus, was the only survivor. The first 90% reduction (LD{sub 9}) of C. laurentii and B. cereus was approximately 0.6 and 6.5 kGy, respectively, the D{sub 1} doses of C. laurentii and B. cereus was approximately 0.6 and 1.7 kGy, respectively. After 14 kGy irradiation, except the vitamin C content, other chemical composition (e.g., crude protein, {beta}-carotene, riboflavin, fructose, etc.) and the sensory characteristic of lycium fruit specimens did not have significant changes. In conclusion, 14 kGy is the optimal decontamination dose for lycium fruit for retention of its sensory quality and extension of shelf life.

  15. Manipulator-deployed laser decontamination system. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littwin, Rene; Hurtado, Antonio; Lippmann, Wolfgang

    2011-09-01

    Project aim is the development of a manipulator-deployed system using laser technology to ablate radioactive concrete surfaces. Manipulator technology competences of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and competences of TU Dresden (TUD) using laser technology for the ablation of surfaces were successfully combined. The report presents the results that were accomplished at TU Dresden. In the first part, the state of development in decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Germany and Europe is presented and technologies commonly used are being identified and compared. So requirements have been derived from this data base to be fulfilled by the laser decontamination technology and the carrier system. Using the results of the research project LASABA II (FKZ: 02S8356, completed in 2008) for optimized laser ablation of concrete surfaces, the technology has been further developed in order to use it as a fully remote controlled device in combination with a manipulator as carrier system. Therefore, the laser ablation unit was equipped with a sensor system developed within this project. Together with the manipulator the latter serves as a basis for the system to be used under industrial conditions. The performance of the laser decontamination system was increased by adapting it to an enhanced diode laser with 10 kW laser power recently put into operation at TU Dresden. The performance of the single components was analysed and verified in several experiments. This includes tests with obstacles of different shapes and sizes occurring in real nuclear power plants like metal bolts, screws and edges. The experiments show that small metal parts are ablated by the laser decontamination system, while bigger parts, which would otherwise damage the system, are detected by the sensors. Thereby, the system is able to avoid these big metal parts. In cooperation with E.ON Kernkraft, concrete samples from the nuclear power plant in Wuergassen were used to show that the developed

  16. Properties and solidification of decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.S.; Piciulo, P.L.; Bowerman, B.S.; Adams, J.W.; Milian, L.

    1983-01-01

    LWRs will require one or more chemical decontaminations to achieve their designed lifetimes. Primary system decontamination is designed to lower radiation fields in areas where plant maintenance personnel must work. Chemical decontamination methods are either hard (concentrated chemicals, approximately 5 to 25 weight percent) or soft (dilute chemicals less than 1 percent by weight). These methods may have different chemical reagents, some tailor-made to the crud composition and many methods are and will be proprietary. One factor common to most commercially available processes is the presence of organic acids and chelates. These types of organic reagents are known to enhance the migration of radionuclides after disposal in a shallow land burial site. The NRC sponsors two programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory that are concerned with the management of decontamination wastes which will be generated by the full system decontamination of LWRs. These two programs focus on potential methods for degrading or converting decontamination wastes to more acceptable forms prior to disposal and the impact of disposing of solidified decontamination wastes. The results of the solidification of simulated decontamination resin wastes will be presented. Recent results on combustion of simulated decontamintion wastes will be described and procedures for evaluating the release of decontamination reagents from solidified wastes will be summarized

  17. Application of a modified electrochemical system for surface decontamination of radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Lim, Y.K.; Yang, H.Y.; Shin, S.W.; Song, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional and modified electrolytic decontamination experiments were performed in a solution of sodium sulfate for the decontamination of carbon steel as the simulated metal wastes which are generated in large amounts from nuclear power plants. The effect of reaction time, current density and concentration of electrolytes in the modified electrolytic decontamination system were examined to remove the surface contamination of the simulated radioactive metal wastes. As for the results of this research, the modified electrochemical decontamination process can decontaminate more effectively than the conventional decontamination process by applying different anode material which causes higher induced electro-motive forces. When 0.5 M sodium sulfate, 0.4 A/cm 2 current density and 30 minutes reaction time were applied in the modified process, a 16 μm thickness change that is expected to remove most surface contamination in radioactive metal wastes was achieved on carbon steel which is the main material of radioactive metal waste in nuclear power plants. The decontamination efficiency of metal waste showed similar results with the small and large lab-scale modified electrochemical system. The application of this modified electrolytic decontamination system is expected to play a considerable role for decontamination of radioactive metal waste in nuclear power plants in the near future. (author)

  18. Decontamination in preparation for dismantlement - AREVA's chemical decontamination technologies, projects performed and results obtained in the period 2011-2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topf, C.; Sempere Belda, L.

    2017-01-01

    As a consequence of the nuclear phase-out decreed by the German government, several nuclear power plants in the country have already ceased operation. The remaining ones will cease operation by 2022. This has turned Germany into one of the most active regions worldwide in the field of nuclear decommissioning, with new and emerging technologies being deployed on the field, and already preexisting technologies being put to the test, optimized and developed into full maturity. The chemistry services division of AREVA GmbH has already performed 5 Full System Decontaminations (FSD) in preparation for decommissioning in this period - three in PWRs and two in BWRs - along with other international projects of relevance for decommissioning operations. During a FSD, the complete primary circuit of a nuclear power plant including auxiliary systems is subject to a chemical treatment; designed to remove radioactive matter accumulated onto system surfaces during operation. Through the effective removal of this radioactive accumulations contact dose rates on the different components of the primary circuit can be consistently reduced by factors larger than 50. This results in much lower ambient dose rates and, hence, in very significant dose savings for subsequent decommissioning activities. Additionally, dismantlement operations of large components are considerably simplified and can be performed under conditions that wouldn't have been possible before. The project specific objectives and challenges, the technologies employed, and the results obtained are presented and commented here. (authors)

  19. Ares I Reaction Control System Propellant Feedline Decontamination Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasch, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the work presented here is to quantify the effects of purge gas temperature, pressure, and mass flow rate on Hydrazine (Hz) decontamination rates of the Ares I Roll Control System and Reaction Control System. A survey of experts in this field revealed the absence of any decontamination rate prediction models. Three basic decontamination methods were identified for analysis and modeling. These include low pressure eduction, high flow rate purge, and pulse purge. For each method, an approach to predict the Hz mass transfer rate, as a function of system pressure, temperature, and purge gas mass flow rate, is developed based on the applicable physics. The models show that low pressure eduction is two orders of magnitude more effective than the high velocity purge, which in turn is two orders of magnitude more effective than the pure diffusion component of pulse purging of deadheads. Eduction subjects the system to low pressure conditions that promote the extraction of Hz vapors. At 120 F, Hz is saturated at approximately 1 psia. At lower pressures and 120 F, Hz will boil, which is an extremely efficient means to remove liquid Hz. The Hz boiling rate is predicted by equating the rate at which energy is added to the saturated liquid Hz through heaters at the tube outer wall with the energy removed from the liquid through evaporation. Boil-off fluxes were predicted by iterating through the range of local pressures with limits set by the minimum allowed pressure of 0.2 psia and maximum allowed wall temperature of 120 F established by the heaters, which gives a saturation pressure of approximately 1.0 psia. Figure 1 shows the resulting boil-off fluxes as a function of local eduction pressure. As depicted in figure 1, the flux is a strong inverse function of eduction pressure, and that minimizing the eduction pressure maximizes the boil-off flux. Also, higher outer wall temperatures lead to higher boil-off fluxes and allow for boil-off over a greater range

  20. The radiologic decontamination of metal surfaces with new emulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stjepanovic, N.; Mladenovic, V.; Lukovic, Z.; Ivkovic, S.

    1999-01-01

    The efficiencies of the emulsion FN-10 and FN-6 and detergent DV-60 in the radiological decontamination were investigated. The metal surfaces, clean and dirty, were contaminated with Cs-137, and decontaminated with water and appropriate solution. The most efficiency of DV-60 in both cases, was obtained. (author)

  1. Experience in decontamination of the equipment of NPP's with the WWER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaban-Irmenin, Yu.V.

    1981-01-01

    Different methods of decontamination at NPPs are briefly characterized. Decontamination of the removable part of the main circulation pump (MCP) of the WWER-440 reactor is considered as an example of removable equipment decontamination. A design of the decontamination bath of the removable MCP elements and the applied chemical agents are described. A decontamination flowsheet of the Novovoronezh NPP steam generator (SG) is considered as an example of the autonomic decontamination system. The SG decontamination modes, principal flowsheets of a hydromonitor, steam-ejection sprayer and steam-emulsion device are described [ru

  2. Development of small size wall decontamination robot systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tsuneaki; Takahashi, Tsuyosi

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of wall decontamination robot systems for nuclear power plants. In nuclear power plants, it is required to reduce maintenance costs, including annual inspection, repairs and so on. Most of such maintenance activities are actually performed after decontamination processes are completed. In particular, the decontamination process of reactor wells is very important for reducing the radiation exposure of human workers. In the past, decontamination of reactor wells used to be done by extra large machine and tools, which caused long working hours and tiresome works. It was one of the reasons maintenance costs couldn't have been easily reduced. There are narrow spaces in the reactor wells that have to be decontaminated by human workers. In order to minimize the radiation exposure to humans, wall decontamination robot systems have been developed. The decontamination robots have rolled brushes and suction mechanisms and are capable of removing contaminants attached to the wall surface of the reactor wells. By making the robots smaller, it is possible to work in narrower spaces. In this paper, the effectiveness of decontamination by the developed robots is shown through experiments in the actual nuclear power plants. (author)

  3. Full system decontamination for dose reduction at the preventive maintenance work of the reactor core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.; Inami, I.; Suzuki, N.; Fujimori, A.; Wille, H.

    2000-01-01

    At the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station unit 3 and unit 2 of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), the replacement of the core shroud and internals have been conducted respectively in the FY 1997 outage and in the FY 1998 outage. The replacement of the welded core internals in operating BWR plants is the first time in the world as complete countermeasure to improve SCC resistance. At present both units are operating smoothly. The developed technology concept is to restore those internals in air inside the reactor pressure vessel. To reduce the radiation dose rate inside the RPV, not only a shielding method was applied to cut the radiation from the irradiated structures but also a chemical decontamination method was applied to dissolve the radioactive crud deposit on the surface by using chemical agents. The CORD UV process was applied for this Full System Decontamination including operating the reactor recirculation pumps. The critical pass time required was approximately 7 days for each unit. In both units the radioactivity of 10 TBq (280 Ci) and the Fe, Ni, Cr crud of 60-70 kg as metal in total was dissolved and removed by 5 m 3 (175 ft 3 ) ion exchange resins as only waste generated. The obtained decontamination factor (DF) at the RPV bottom reached 40-100. As result, the dose rate decreased to approximately 0.1 mSv/h under water. Before and after the installation of the in-vessel shielding, a mechanical cleaning was extensively applied inside the RPV to remove the residual crud as well as the cutting particles. As result, the RPV bottom dose rate decreased further to 0.03 mSv/h under water and 0.2 mSv/h in air. A better working environment for human access than expected was established inside the RPV, resulting the 70, 140 man*Sv saving respectively at unit 3 (1F-3) and unit 2 (1F-2). (author)

  4. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL DYNAMICS OF NANOPARTICLE FORMATION DURING LASER DECONTAMINATION AND CHARACTERIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn

    2003-01-01

    Acceleration of decommission and deactivation (D and D) activities of US Department of Energy (DOE) requires improved understandings of nanoparticle production and transformation during laser decontamination. Many material researchers have explored particle formation during laser energy-material interaction, but there are little data relevant to D and D work while laser energy is used to remove materials from contaminated surfaces. Fine particles are harmful to D and D workers and the environment. The focus of this research is to investigate the effects of the laser parameters and the chemistry of target samples on the dynamics and properties of produced particles. Data will facilitate better design of decontamination and deactivation strategies. There are three goals associated with achieving the required understanding of nanoparticle dynamics. (1) To develop baseline property data of laser-produced nanoparticles from samples of different bulk chemical composition and surface morphology. The data would include properties of particles such as the size from a few nanometers to a few micrometers, shape, distribution, and chemical composition. (2) To develop advanced particle instrumentation (for sizing and chemistry measurement) enabling higher resolution and shorter interval measurement, and (3) To develop computer simulation model to analyze and predict the dynamics of particles produced

  5. NRC regulations and positions concerning decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, C.

    1982-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission encourages the use of decontamination to reduce man-rem exposure. The Commission feels that there are several processes developed to the point where soft decontamination can be applied to an entire plant in the near future. A utility can do a decontamination under its own licence without coming in for regulatory review if the process does not involve a change in technical specifications for the plant or does not involve unreviewed safety questions. Prior verbal notification is required for some steam generator secondary side cleaning or for decontamination of individual components that have not been removed from the reactor using chemicals not normally added to the reactor coolant. Prior written notification is required for steam generator secondary side crevice cleaning or sludge removal at a dented unit, or for chemical decontamination of reactor coolant systems or safety-related systems using chemicals not normally added to the coolant

  6. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 entitled ``Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs.`` Stipulated within the Agreement is the requirement that WVU submit to METC a series of Technical Progress Reports on a quarterly basis. This report comprises the first Quarterly Technical Progress Report for Year 2 of the Agreement. This report reflects the progress and/or efforts performed on the sixteen (16) technical projects encompassed by the Year 2 Agreement for the period of January 1 through March 31, 1994. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated organic solvents; Microbial enrichment for enhancing in-situ biodegradation of hazardous organic wastes; Treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using biofilters; Drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; Chemical destruction of chlorinated organic compounds; Remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming; Soil decontamination with a packed flotation column; Use of granular activated carbon columns for the simultaneous removal of organics, heavy metals, and radionuclides; Monolayer and multilayer self-assembled polyion films for gas-phase chemical sensors; Compact mercuric iodide detector technology development; Evaluation of IR and mass spectrometric techniques for on-site monitoring of volatile organic compounds; A systematic database of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; Dust control methods for insitu nuclear and hazardous waste handling; Winfield Lock and Dam remediation; and Socio-economic assessment of alternative environmental restoration technologies.

  7. Development of haemostatic decontaminants for treatment of wounds contaminated with chemical warfare agents. 3: Evaluation of in vitro topical decontamination efficacy using damaged skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydon, Helen L; Hall, Charlotte A; Dalton, Christopher H; Chipman, J Kevin; Graham, John S; Chilcott, Robert P

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that haemostatic products with an absorptive mechanism of action retain their clotting efficiency in the presence of toxic materials and are effective in decontaminating chemical warfare (CW) agents when applied to normal, intact skin. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess three candidate haemostatic products for effectiveness in the decontamination of superficially damaged porcine skin exposed to the radiolabelled CW agents, soman (GD), VX and sulphur mustard (HD). Controlled physical damage (removal of the upper 100 μm skin layer) resulted in a significant enhancement of the dermal absorption of all three CW agents. Of the haemostatic products assessed, WoundStat™ was consistently the most effective, being equivalent in performance to a standard military decontaminant (fuller's earth). These data suggest that judicious application of haemostatic products to wounds contaminated with CW agents may be a viable option for the clinical management of casualties presenting with contaminated, haemorrhaging injuries. Further studies using a relevant animal model are required to confirm the potential clinical efficacy of WoundStat™ for treating wounds contaminated with CW agents. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agents using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, H.W.; Henins, I.; Park, J.; Selwyn, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) [A. Schuetze et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 26, 1685 (1998)] is a nonthermal, high pressure, uniform glow plasma discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g., He/O 2 /H 2 O), which flows between an outer, grounded, cylindrical electrode and an inner, coaxial electrode powered at 13.56 MHz rf. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, dissociated or ionized by electron impact. Once the gas exits the discharge volume, ions and electrons are rapidly lost by recombination, but the fast-flowing effluent still contains neutral metastable species (e.g., O 2 * , He * ) and radicals (e.g., O, OH). This reactive effluent has been shown to be an effective neutralizer of surrogates for anthrax spores and mustard blister agent. Unlike conventional wet decontamination methods, the plasma effluent does not cause corrosion and it does not destroy wiring, electronics, or most plastics, making it highly suitable for decontamination of sensitive equipment and interior spaces. Furthermore, the reactive species in the effluent rapidly degrade into harmless products leaving no lingering residue or harmful by-products. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  9. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators.

  10. Development of standards for chemical and biological decontamination of buildings and structures affected by terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumley, T.C.; Volchek, K.; Fingas, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Division, Environmental Technology Centre, Science and Technology Branch; Hay, A.W.M. [Leeds Univ., Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are no suitable standards for determining levels of safety when reoccupying a building that has been recommissioned following a biological or chemical attack. For that reason, this study focused on developing clean-up standards for decontaminating buildings and construction materials after acts of terrorism. Several parameters must be assessed when determining the course of action to decontaminate toxic agents and to rehabilitate facilities. First, the hazardous substance must be positively identified along with the degree of contamination and information on likely receptors. Potential exposure route is also a key consideration in the risk assessment process. A key objective of the study was to develop specific guidelines for ascertaining and defining clean. In particular, standards for chemical and biological agents that pose a real or potential risk for use as agents of terrorism will be developed. The selected agents for standards development were ammonia, fentanyl, malathion, mustard gas, potassium cyanide, ricin, sarin, hepatitis A virus, and bacillus anthracis. The standards will be developed by establishing the relationship between the amount of exposure and expected health effects; assessing real and potential risks by identifying individuals at risk and consideration of all exposure routes; and, characterizing the risk to determine the potential for toxicity or infectivity. For non-carcinogens, this was done through the analysis of other known guidelines. Cancer-slope factors will be considered for carcinogens. The standards will be assessed in the laboratory using animal models. The guidelines and standards are intended for first-responders and are scheduled for development by the end of 2006. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Decontamination and inspection plan for phase 2 closure of the 300 Area waste acid treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hays, C.B.

    1998-01-01

    This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 2 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 2, the second phase of three proposed phases of closure for WATS, provides for closure of all WATS portions of the 334-A Building and some, but not all, WATS portions of the 333 and 303-F Buildings. Closure of the entire unit will not occur until all three closure phases have been completed. The DIP also describes the designation and management-process for waste and debris generated during Phase 2 closure activities. Information regarding the decontamination and verification methods for Phase 1 closure can be found in Decontamination and Inspection Plan, for Phase 1 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System, 21 WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001. Information regarding Phase 3 closure will be provided in later documents

  12. A dry ice jet system for decontamination of painted metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ye; Zhang Dong; Wang Ping; Li Taowen; Sun Yu; Zhao Dan; Tan Zhaoyi

    2012-01-01

    In this work, decontamination of painting on metal surface by dry ice jet was carried out. The influence of jet parameters on decontamination efficiency was examined. The results showed that the painting weight loss decreased with increasing speed of jet movement. The optimized parameters were target distance of 25 mm, jet angle of 63 degree, and the pressure of 0.6 -0.7 MPa, with a filtration efficiency of over 99% and 5.8-9.0 μm particle sizes of the aerosol. For the painted samples polluted by 137 Cs and 235 U, the decontamination effect is excellent. For the polluted plumbum kettles,this method is effective. Therefore, the dry ice jet is an excellent technology for painting on metal surface. (authors)

  13. Radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    This Code of Practice covers: (a) the decontamination of plant items, buildings and associated equipment; (b) decontamination of protective clothing; (c) simple personal decontamination; and (d) the basic mechanisms of contamination and their influence on decontaminability. (author)

  14. Decontamination System Development of Radioative Activated Carbon using Micro-bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jong seon; Kim, Wi soo [NESS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Byoung sub. [Enesys Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This study was aimed to develop a decontamination system by applying such technical characteristics that minimizes a generation of secondary wastes while decontaminating radiation wastes. The radioactive activated carbon is removed from the end-of-life air cleaning filter in replacement or decommission of nuclear power plant or nuclear facility. By removing radioactive activated carbon, the filter would be classified as a low radioactive contaminant. And thus the amount of radioactive wastes and the treatment cost would be decreased. We are in development of the activated carbon cleaning technique by utilizing micro-bubbles, which improve efficiency and minimize damage of activated carbon. The purpose of using micro-bubbles is to decontamination carbon micropore, which is difficult to access, by principle of cavitation phenomenon generated in collapse of micro-bubbles. In this study, we introduced the micro-bubble decontamination system developed to decontaminate activated carbon. For further researches, we will determine carbon weight change and the decontamination rate under the experimental conditions such as temperature and pH.

  15. Aqueous media treatment and decontamination of hazardous chemical and biological substances by contact plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivovarov, A.; Kravchenko, A.; Kublanovsky, V.

    2009-01-01

    Usage of non-equilibrium contact plasma for processes of decontamination and neutralization in conditions of manifestation of chemical, biological and radiation terrorism takes on special significance due to portability of equipment and its mobility in places where toxic liquid media hazardous for people's health are located. Processes of decontamination of aqueous media, seminated with pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, treatment of water containing toxic heavy metals, cyanides, surface-active substances, and heavy radioactive elements, are investigated. Examples of activation processes in infected water and toxic aqueous solutions present convincing evidence of the way, how new quality technological approach for achievement of high enough degree of the said media treatment is used in each specific case. Among new properties of water activated as a result of action of non-equilibrium contact plasma, it is necessary to mention presence of cluster structure, confirmed by well-known spectral and physical-chemical methods, presence of peroxide compounds, active particles and radicals. Anti-microbial activity which is displayed under action of plasma in aqueous media (chemically pure water, drinking water, aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, potassium iodide, as well as other inorganic compounds) towards wide range of pathogenic and conventionally pathogenic microorganisms allows use them as reliable, accessible and low-cost preparations for increasing the degree of safety of food products. Combination of such processes with known methods of filtration and ultra-filtration gives an efficient and available complex capable of withstanding any threats, which may arise for population and living organisms. Present-day level of machine-building, electrical engineering, and electronics allows predict creation of industrial plasma installations, adapted to conditions of various terrorist threats, with minimized power consumption and optimized technological parameters

  16. Electrolytic technique for the chemical decontamination process with sulfuric acid-cerium (IV) for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Tsong-Yang; Hsieh, Jung-Chun.

    1992-01-01

    An electrolyzer with an ion-exchange membrane as the separator has been used to study the electrolytic redox reaction of Ce 4+ / Ce 3+ in sulfuric acid solution, which is a reagent for predismantling system decontamination. Influencing factors such as current density, cerium concentration, acidity, electrolyte flow rate, membrane type and electrode material were studied experimentally. The results indicate that the redox can be achieved with high conversion even as the cerium concentration is below 0.005 M. However, the current efficiency strongly depends on the cerium concentration. In addition, the acid content and the electrolyte flow rate show little influence on the redox reaction. Both cation and anion membrane are feasible for this process. Therefore, the operation conditions are widely applicable. Moreover, two different electrode materials, platinized titanium meshes and graphite, were used. The results show that the platinized titanium meshes is preferable to the graphite for higher current efficiency. (author)

  17. Analysis of the application of decontamination technologies to radioactive metal waste minimization using expert systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayrakal, S.

    1993-01-01

    Radioactive metal waste makes up a significant portion of the waste currently being sent for disposal. Recovery of this metal as a valuable resource is possible through the use of decontamination technologies. Through the development and use of expert systems a comparison can be made of laser decontamination, a technology currently under development at Ames Laboratory, with currently available decontamination technologies for applicability to the types of metal waste being generated and the effectiveness of these versus simply disposing of the waste. These technologies can be technically and economically evaluated by the use of expert systems techniques to provide a waste management decision making tool that generates, given an identified metal waste, waste management recommendations. The user enters waste characteristic information as input and the system then recommends decontamination technologies, determines residual contamination levels and possible waste management strategies, carries out a cost analysis and then ranks, according to cost, the possibilities for management of the waste. The expert system was developed using information from literature and personnel experienced in the use of decontamination technologies and requires validation by human experts and assignment of confidence factors to the knowledge represented within

  18. Analysis of the application of decontamination technologies to radioactive metal waste minimization using expert systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayrakal, Suna [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-09-30

    Radioactive metal waste makes up a significant portion of the waste currently being sent for disposal. Recovery of this metal as a valuable resource is possible through the use of decontamination technologies. Through the development and use of expert systems a comparison can be made of laser decontamination, a technology currently under development at Ames Laboratory, with currently available decontamination technologies for applicability to the types of metal waste being generated and the effectiveness of these versus simply disposing of the waste. These technologies can be technically and economically evaluated by the use of expert systems techniques to provide a waste management decision making tool that generates, given an identified metal waste, waste management recommendations. The user enters waste characteristic information as input and the system then recommends decontamination technologies, determines residual contamination levels and possible waste management strategies, carries out a cost analysis and then ranks, according to cost, the possibilities for management of the waste. The expert system was developed using information from literature and personnel experienced in the use of decontamination technologies and requires validation by human experts and assignment of confidence factors to the knowledge represented within.

  19. Development of acidic processes for decontaminating LMFBR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, E.F.; Colburn, R.P.; Lutton, J.M.; Maffei, H.P.

    1978-01-01

    The objective of the DOE decontamination program is to develop a well characterized chemical decontamination process for application to LMFBR primary system components that subsequently permits contact maintenance and allows requalification of the components for reuse in reactors. The paper describes the subtasks of deposit characterization, development of requalification and process acceptance criteria, development of process evaluation techniques and studies which led to a new acidic process for decontaminating 304 stainless steel hot leg components

  20. Foam process for application of decontamination agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.M.; Miller, J.R.; Frazier, R.S.; Walter, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents the results and observations of a study performed by the authors to parametrically evaluate the performance characteristics of a foam process for application of decontamination agents. The initial tests were established to assess foam quality. Subsequent tests determined the ability of the foam as a carrier of chemical systems, and established system operating parameters. The technique was then applied in an actual decontamination task to verify effectiveness of these established parameters and to determine decontamination reduction factors. 4 figures, 5 tables

  1. Fate of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX) on soil following accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravett, M R; Hopkins, F B; Self, A J; Webb, A J; Timperley, C M; Riches, J R

    2014-08-01

    In the event of alleged use of organophosphorus nerve agents, all kinds of environmental samples can be received for analysis. These might include decontaminated and charred matter collected from the site of a suspected chemical attack. In other scenarios, such matter might be sampled to confirm the site of a chemical weapon test or clandestine laboratory decontaminated and burned to prevent discovery. To provide an analytical capability for these contingencies, we present a preliminary investigation of the effect of accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination on soil contaminated with the nerve agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX). The objectives were (a) to determine if VX or its degradation products were detectable in soil after an accelerant-based fire promoted by aviation fuel, including following decontamination with Decontamination Solution 2 (DS2) or aqueous sodium hypochlorite, (b) to develop analytical methods to support forensic analysis of accelerant-soaked, decontaminated and charred soil and (c) to inform the design of future experiments of this type to improve analytical fidelity. Our results show for the first time that modern analytical techniques can be used to identify residual VX and its degradation products in contaminated soil after an accelerant-based fire and after chemical decontamination and then fire. Comparison of the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) profiles of VX and its impurities/degradation products from contaminated burnt soil, and burnt soil spiked with VX, indicated that the fire resulted in the production of diethyl methylphosphonate and O,S-diethyl methylphosphonothiolate (by an unknown mechanism). Other products identified were indicative of chemical decontamination, and some of these provided evidence of the decontaminant used, for example, ethyl 2-methoxyethyl methylphosphonate and bis(2-methoxyethyl) methylphosphonate following decontamination with DS2. Sample preparation

  2. Electromagnetic mixed waste processing system for asbestos decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasevich, R.S.; Vaux, W.G.; Nocito, T.

    1995-01-01

    DOE sites contain a broad spectrum of asbestos materials (cloth, pipe lagging, sprayed insulation and other substances) which are contaminated with a combination of hazardous and radioactive wastes due to its use during the development of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex. These wastes consist of cutting oils, lubricants, solvents, PCB's, heavy metals and radioactive contaminants. The radioactive contaminants are the activation, decay and fission products of DOE operations. The asbestos must be converted by removing and separating the hazardous and radioactive materials to prevent the formation of mixed wastes and to allow for both sanitary disposal and effective decontamination. Currently, no technology exists that can meet these sanitary and other objectives

  3. Reducing the Risks. In the aftermath of a terrorist attack, wastewater utilities may have to contend with decontamination water containing chemical, biological, or radiological substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Linda P.; Hornback, Chris; Strom, Daniel J.

    2006-08-01

    In the aftermath of a chemical, biological, or radiological (CBR) attack, decontamination of people and infrastructure will be needed. Decontamination inevitably produces wastewater, and wastewater treatment plants (WTPs) need to know how to handle decontamination wastewater. This article describes CBR substances; planning, coordinating, and communicating responses across agencies; planning within a utility; coordination with local emergency managers and first responders; mitigating effects of decontamination wastewater; and mitigating effects on utility personnel. Planning for Decontamination Wastewater: A Guide for Utilities, the document on which this article is based, was developed under a cooperative agreement from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA) and its contractor, CH2MHILL, Inc.

  4. Effective Responder Communication Improves Efficiency and Psychological Outcomes in a Mass Decontamination Field Experiment: Implications for Public Behaviour in the Event of a Chemical Incident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Amlôt, Richard; Rubin, G. James; Williams, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The risk of incidents involving mass decontamination in response to a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear release has increased in recent years, due to technological advances, and the willingness of terrorists to use unconventional weapons. Planning for such incidents has focused on the technical issues involved, rather than on psychosocial concerns. This paper presents a novel experimental study, examining the effect of three different responder communication strategies on public experiences and behaviour during a mass decontamination field experiment. Specifically, the research examined the impact of social identity processes on the relationship between effective responder communication, and relevant outcome variables (e.g. public compliance, public anxiety, and co-operative public behaviour). All participants (n = 111) were asked to visualise that they had been involved in an incident involving mass decontamination, before undergoing the decontamination process, and receiving one of three different communication strategies: 1) ‘Theory-based communication’: Health-focused explanations about decontamination, and sufficient practical information; 2) ‘Standard practice communication’: No health-focused explanations about decontamination, sufficient practical information; 3) ‘Brief communication’: No health-focused explanations about decontamination, insufficient practical information. Four types of data were collected: timings of the decontamination process; observational data; and quantitative and qualitative self-report data. The communication strategy which resulted in the most efficient progression of participants through the decontamination process, as well as the fewest observations of non-compliance and confusion, was that which included both health-focused explanations about decontamination and sufficient practical information. Further, this strategy resulted in increased perceptions of responder legitimacy and increased

  5. Advanced liquid radwaste decontamination by using a centrifuge system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscheschlok, K.; Szukala, M.

    1999-01-01

    Waste water streams basically include undissolved suspended solids which contain almost the main part of the activated products. The centrifuge system, called LRS (Liquid Radwaste Treatment System), is able to remove these solids from the liquid content and fills the dewatered product into disposal containers. For this purpose a chemical pre-treatment step is often used for selective precipitation of special radionuclides and flocculents to agglomerate smaller sized particles (colloids) to make them separatable with the LRS. The plant arrangement, the process optimization and the collected operational experiences are described. 2 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs

  6. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, C.S.; Patterson, R.W.; Upton, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  7. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites Remedial Action Program. Report of the decontamination of Jones Chemical Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynuveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has implemented a program to decontaminate radioactively contaminated sites that were formerly utilized by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and/or the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) for activities that included handling of radioactive material. This program is referred to as the ''Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program'' (FUSRAP). Among these sites are Jones Chemical Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, Kent Chemical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall of The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. Since 1977, the University of Chicago decontaminated Kent Chemical Laboratory as part of a facilities renovation program. All areas of Eckhart Hall, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Jones Chemical Laboratory that had been identified as contaminated in excess of current guidelines in the 1976-1977 surveys were decontaminated to levels where no contamination could be detected relative to natural backgrounds. All areas that required defacing to achieve this goal were restored to their original condition. The radiological evaluation of the sewer system, based primarily on the radiochemical analyses of sludge and water samples, indicated that the entire sewer system is potentially contaminated. While this evaluation was defined as part of this project, the decontamination of the sewer system was not included in the purview of this effort. The documentation included in this report substantiates the judgment that all contaminated areas identified in the earlier reports in the three structures included in the decontamination effort (Eckhart Hall, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Jones Chemical Laboratory) were cleaned to levels commensurate with release for unrestricted use.

  8. Concrete decontamination scoping tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archibald, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report details the research efforts and scoping tests performed at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant using scabbling, chemical, and electro-osmotic decontamination techniques on radiologically contaminated concrete

  9. Methodology for the evaluation of decontaminant drugs at in vitro systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez de Giorgi, Cristina; Dubner, Diana; Gomez Parada, Ines

    1987-01-01

    An experimental system was developed in order to facilitate hte study of the action of decontaminant drugs in hepatic tissue. Three stages are distinguished: 1) The isolation and the hepatocytes culture in the presence of a chelant agent. 2) The obtainment of the soluble cytoplasmic fraction and its chromatographyc analysis. 3) The comparison of the behaviour of the chelant agent in in vivo and in vitro of the mentioned fraction. 144 CeCl was employed as a radionuclide and DTPA CaNa 3 as a decontaminant agent. The preliminary results of the mechanism of action of the decontaminant obtained by chromatography shows a different distribution of the radionuclide between compounds of high and low molecular weight, in the hepatocytes incubated in the presence of the chelant concerning the controls. (M.E.L.) [es

  10. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report is a summary of the work conducted for the period of October--December 1993 by the West Virginia University for the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Research under the program focuses on pertinent technology for hazardous waste clean-up. This report reflects the progress performed on sixteen technical projects encompassed by this program: Systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; Site remediation technologies: (a) Drain-enhanced soil flushing and (b) In situ bio-remediation of organic contaminants; Excavation systems for hazardous waste sites: Dust control methods for in-situ nuclear waste handling; Chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; Development of organic sensors: Monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield lock and dam remediation; Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; Remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming; Microbial enrichment for enhancing biodegradation of hazardous organic wastes in soil; Soil decontamination with a packed flotation column; Treatment of volatile organic compounds using biofilters; Use of granular activated carbon columns for the simultaneous removal of organic, heavy metals, and radionuclides; Compact mercuric iodide detector technology development; Evaluation of IR and mass spectrometric techniques for on-site monitoring of volatile organic compounds; and Improved socio-economic assessment of alternative environmental restoration techniques.

  11. Chemical cleaning and decontamination of equipments in Rajasthan Atomic Power Station-2, Kota, NPCIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, P.K.; Saini, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    Heat exchanger of End Shield Cooling System of RAPS-2 made up of 70:30 cupronickel was cleaned with a cleaning solution containing 5% sulphamic acid for periods of around 10 hours at a temperature of 60 deg C. The cleaning was attempted to remove the deposit inside the tube of heat exchanger to make a path of the probe to go inside the tube for eddy current testing for measurement of wall thinning. During the campaign 20 kg of CaCO 3 and 5 kg of SiO 2 were removed. Pre-cooler of heat transport system of RAPS-2 made up of monel was cleaned with a cleaning solution containing 5% citric acid, 1% ascorbic acid and 1% NTA at 50-60 deg C temperature for about 20 hours. The cleaning was attempted to remove the deposit inside the tube of pre cooler to make a path of the probe to go inside the tube for eddy current testing for measurement of wall thinning. For the pre-cooler a decontamination factor of 2 to 3 was obtained. The paper describes about the analysis of the deposit, the cleaning process, and schematic diagram of the process. (author)

  12. Environmental decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C. (eds.)

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination. (DLS)

  13. Environmental decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C.

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination

  14. Lessons Learned from Decontamination Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, JH

    2000-11-16

    This interim report describes a DOE project currently underway to establish what is known about decontamination of buildings and people and the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  15. Mass Casualty Decontamination in the United States: An Online Survey of Current Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Sarah; Symons, Charles; Carter, Holly; Jones, Emma; Amlôt, Richard; Larner, Joanne; Matar, Hazem; Chilcott, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Mass casualty decontamination is a public health intervention that would be employed by emergency responders following a chemical, biological, or radiological incident. The decontamination of large numbers of casualties is currently most often performed with water to remove contaminants from the skin surface. An online survey was conducted to explore US fire departments' decontamination practices and their preparedness for responding to incidents involving mass casualty decontamination. Survey respondents were asked to provide details of various aspects of their decontamination procedures, including expected response times to reach casualties, disrobing procedures, approaches to decontamination, characteristics of the decontamination showering process, provision for special populations, and any actions taken following decontamination. The aim of the survey was to identify any differences in the way in which decontamination guidance is implemented across US states. Results revealed that, in line with current guidance, many US fire departments routinely use the "ladder-pipe system" for conducting rapid, gross decontamination of casualties. The survey revealed significant variability in ladder-pipe construction, such as the position and number of fire hoses used. There was also variability in decontamination characteristics, such as water temperature and water pressure, detergent use, and shower duration. The results presented here provide important insights into the ways in which implementation of decontamination guidance can vary between US states. These inconsistencies are thought to reflect established perceived best practices and local adaptation of response plans to address practical and logistical constraints. These outcomes highlight the need for evidence-based national guidelines for conducting mass casualty decontamination.

  16. Reduced weight decontamination formulation for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2014-06-03

    A reduced weight DF-200 decontamination formulation that is stable under high temperature storage conditions. The formulation can be pre-packed as an all-dry (i.e., no water) or nearly-dry (i.e., minimal water) three-part kit, with make-up water (the fourth part) being added later in the field at the point of use.

  17. Decontamination and inspection plan for Phase 3 closure of the 300 area waste acid treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 3 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 3 is the third phase of three WATS closure phases. Phase 3 attains clean closure conditions for WATS portions of the 334 and 311 Tank Farms (TF) and the 333 and 303-F Buildings. This DIP also describes designation and management of waste and debris generated during Phase 3 closure activities. Information regarding Phase 1 and Phase 2 for decontamination and verification activities closure can be found in WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001 and HNF-1784, respectively. This DIP is provided as a supplement to the closure plan (DOE/RL-90-11). This DIP provides the documentation for Ecology concurrence with Phase 3 closure methods and activities. This DIP is intended to provide greater detail than is contained in the closure plan to satisfy Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 requirement that closure documents describe the methods for removing, transporting, storing, and disposing of all dangerous waste at the unit. The decontamination and verification activities described in this DIP are based on the closure plan and on agreements reached between Ecology and the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) during Phase 3 closure activity workshops and/or project manager meetings (PMMs)

  18. Decontamination impacts on solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Davis, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The increased occupational exposure resulting from the accumulation of activated corrosion products in the primary system of LWRs has led to the development of chemical methods to remove the contamination. In the past, the problem of enhanced migration of radionuclides away from trenches used to dispose of low-level radioactive waste, has been linked to the presence, at the disposal unit, of chelating or complexing agents such as those used in decontamination processes. These agents have further been found to reduce the normal sorptive capacity of soils for radionuclides. The degree to which these agents inhibit the normal sorptive processes is dependent on the type of complexing agent, the radionuclide of concern, the soil properties and whether the nuclide is present as a complex or is already sorbed to the soil. Since the quantity of reagent employed in a full system decontamination is large (200 to 25,000 kg), the potential for enhanced migration of radionuclides from a site used to dispose of the decontamination wastes should be addressed and guidelines established for the safe disposal of these wastes

  19. Chemical surety material decontamination and decommissioning of Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemical Surety Material Laboratory area TA-3, building SM-29, room 4009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, T.E.; Smith, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    From 1982 through 1987, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performed surety laboratory operations for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (MRDC). Room 4009 in building SM-29, TA-3, was used as the laboratory for work with the following chemical surety material (CSM) agents: sarin (GB), soman (GD), lewisite (L), and distilled mustard (HD) radio-labelled with H 3 or C 14 . The work was confined to three CSM-certified fume hoods, located in room 4009 (see diagram in Appendix C). The laboratory ceased all active operations during the late 1986 and early 1987 period. From 1987 until 1993 the laboratory was secured and the ventilation system continued to operate. During late 1992, the decision was made to utilize this laboratory space for other operations, thus a decision was made to dismantle and reconfigure this room. LANL sub-contracted Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) to draw upon the CSM experience of the technical staff from the Hazardous Materials Research Facility (HMRF) to assist in developing a decontamination and decommissioning plan. BMI was subcontracted to devise a CSM safety training course, and a sampling and air monitoring plan for CSM material to ensure personnel safety during all disassembly operations. LANL subcontracted Johnson Controls personnel to perform all disassembly operations. Beginning in early 1993 BMI personnel from the HMRF visited the laboratory to develop both the safety plan and the sample and air monitoring plan. Execution of that plan began in September 1993 and was completed in January 1994

  20. Noble gas removal system for post-accident decontamination of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, M.J.; Kanak, B.E.; Little, D.K.; Merriman, J.R.; Riepe, R.C.

    1980-05-01

    Oak Ridge has developed a noble gas removal system, as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, that could be used to help decontaminate the containment vessel of a power reactor following core release of fission gas in the event that containment venting is judged to be unacceptable. The system is based on a fluorocarbon selective absorption process, which has been well demonstrated on an engineering scale with over 10 years of pilot plant operation

  1. Effectiveness of different chemical agents in rapid decontamination of gutta-percha cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Celso Luíz

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of seven disinfectant compounds used in dentistry for a rapid decontamination of 32 gutta-percha cones adhered with Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli strains or Bacillus subtilis spores was compared. Cones were treated with 2% glutaraldehyde, 1% sodium hypochlorite, 70% ethyl alcohol, 1% and 0.3% iodine alcohol, 2% chlorhexidine, 6% hydrogen peroxide, and 10% polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine, for 1, 5, 10, and 15 minutes. After treatment, each cone was transferred to thioglycollate broth and incubated at 37ºC for 7 days. The products were bactericidal after 1 to 5 minutes and, with exception of ethyl alcohol and iodine-alcohol, sporicidal after 1 to 15 minutes of exposure. Results suggest that chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite, polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine, hydrogen peroxide, and glutaraldehyde were the most effective products in the decontamination of gutta-percha cones.

  2. Decontamination of chemical warfare sulfur mustard agent simulant by ZnO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Meysam; Yekta, Sina; Ghaedi, Hamed

    2016-07-01

    In this study, zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have been surveyed to decontaminate the chloroethyl phenyl sulfide as a sulfur mustard agent simulant. Prior to the reaction, ZnO NPs were successfully prepared through sol-gel method in the absence and presence of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). PVA was utilized as a capping agent to control the agglomeration of the nanoparticles. The formation, morphology, elemental component, and crystalline size of nanoscale ZnO were certified and characterized by SEM/EDX, XRD, and FT-IR techniques. The decontamination (adsorption and destruction) was tracked by the GC-FID analysis, in which the effects of polarity of the media, such as isopropanol, acetone and n-hexane, reaction time intervals from 1 up to 18 h, and different temperatures, including 25, 35, 45, and 55 °C, on the catalytic/decontaminative capability of the surface of ZnO NPs/PVA were investigated and discussed, respectively. Results demonstrated that maximum decontamination (100 %) occurred in n-hexane solvent at 55 °C after 1 h. On the other hand, the obtained results for the acetone and isopropanol solvents were lower than expected. GC-MS chromatograms confirmed the formation of hydroxyl ethyl phenyl sulfide and phenyl vinyl sulfide as the destruction reaction products. Furthermore, these chromatograms proved the role of hydrolysis and elimination mechanisms on the catalyst considering its surface Bronsted and Lewis acid sites. A non-polar solvent aids material transfer to the reactive surface acid sites without blocking these sites.

  3. Full Scale Development and Initial Production of the Personnel/Casualty Decontamination System Skin Decontamination Kit (PCDS SDK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    because its physical properties are similar to dD and because it is easily analyzed at very low cor.centrations by UV spectroscopy . The foil was covered...analyzed by UV for methyl salicylate . No attempt was made to insure that the laminates had reached equilibrium. The results were used as a means of...sorptive capacity and all registered greater than 95% removal’ of thickened methyl salicylate during simulated decontaminations. At the conclusion of

  4. System DECON - an innovative solution for the decontamination of surfaces in buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, T.; Schlag, J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the most important tasks in decommissioning nuclear facilities is, in disposal-oriented dismantling, the removal of contaminated surfaces. These coatings are traditionally removed manually by chiseling, abrasive blasting or sanding. With these processes it is often the case that the dust particles are then released into the air and settle on surrounding surfaces (secondary contamination); the material lands on the floor. The time limits set by the Nuclear Energy Withdrawal Act increase the demand by the industry for a suitable system for decontamination work. Since the end of 2000 the tool-head DECON 300 is being used in connection with a powerful DECON vacuum system from HOCHTIEF for decontamination work. The initial experiences were gained in the pilot nuclear plant Kahl (VAK) and in the former fuel rods factory NUKEM-Alt, Hanau, and the performance specifications determined. The system was used for both the removal of concrete as well as for the removal of the decontamination coating, bricks and plaster. With the DECON system the entire range of contaminated surfaces on floors, masonries and ceilings can be handled ''in situ''. The efficiency of this mechanical removal process is proven by the total of the removal performance, the quality of the surface, the lack of dust and handling, while simultaneously meeting the requirements of the StrSchV (German Radiation Protection Ordinance). (orig.)

  5. Influence of Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of several decontamination techniques on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. There are different kinds of decontamination methods like mechanical and chemical processes. The techniques specified, and their potential to change measured characteristics like the isotope vector of the contamination is demonstrated. It is common for all these processes, that the contamination is removed from the surface. Slightly adhered nuclides can be removed more effectively than strongly sticking nuclides. Usually a mixture of these nuclides forms the contamination. Problematically any kind of decontamination will influence the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector. On the one hand it is helpful to know the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector for the radiological characterization of the nuclear facility and on the other hand this information will be changed in the decontamination process. This is important especially for free release procedures, radiation protection and waste management. Some questions on the need of decontamination have been discussed. (authors)

  6. Development of Novel Decontamination Techniques for Chemical Agents (GB, VX, HD) Contaminated Facilities. Phase 1. Identification and Evaluation of Novel Decontamination Concepts. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    Phosphoric, citric or other acids may be used as coupling agent/solvents in the cleaning tank. Decontamination solutions may also be used. Ultrasonics may be... Carboxymethyl cellulose 0.2%; and Bactericide 0.1%. Davis, 1950 reported that 100 C steam (no additives) was effective in decontaminating samples exposed to...versatile and promising surfactant being: H20 67.5%; Veegum T, 11.2%; Tergitol 15-5-9, 1%; BuOC 2H4OH, 15%; Carboxymethyl cellulose 0.2%; and Bactericide 0.1

  7. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, January 1996--March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement in August 1992 titled open-quotes Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programsclose quotes (DOE Instrument No.: DE-FC21-92MC29467). Requirements stipulated by the Agreement require WVU to submit quarterly Technical Progress reports. This report contains the efforts of the research projects comprising the Agreement for the 1st calendar quarter of 1996. For the period January 1 through December 31, 1996 twelve projects have been selected for funding, and the Kanawha Valley will continue under a no-cost extension. Three new projects have also been added to the program. This document describes these projects involving decontamination, decommissioning and remedial action issues and technologies

  8. Environmentally Friendly Phthalocyanine Catalysts for Water Decontamination - Non Photocatalytic Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klusoň, Petr; Drobek, M.; Zsigmond, A.; Baranyi, J.; Bata, P.; Zárubová, Š.; Kalaji, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 91, 3-4 (2009), s. 605-609 ISSN 0926-3373 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD203/03/H140; GA AV ČR KAN400720701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : phthalocyanine s * phenol * chlorophenols Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 5.252, year: 2009

  9. Pilot scale study of a chemical treatment process for decontamination of aqueous radioactive waste of pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, F.; Hussain, M.; Ahmad, S.S.; Aslam, M.; Haq, E.U.

    2007-12-01

    Chemical treatment process for the low level liquid radioactive waste generated at PINSTECH was previously optimized on lab-scale making use of coprecipitation of hydrous oxides of iron in basic medium. Ferrous sulfate was used as coagulant. Batch wise application of this procedure on pilot scale has been tested on a 1200 L batch volume of typical PINSTECH liquid waste. Different parameters and unit operations have been evaluated. The required data for the construction of a small size treatment plant envisioned can be used for demonstration/teaching purpose as well as for the decontamination of the waste effluents of the Institute. The lab-scale process parameters were verified valid on pilot scale. It was observed that reagent doses can further be economized with out any deterioration of the Decontamination Factors (DF) achieved or of any other aspect of the process. This simple, cost- effective, DF-efficient and time-smart batch wise process could be coupled with an assortment of other treatment operations thus affording universal application. Observations recorded during this study are presented. (author)

  10. Long lasting decontamination foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  11. Modification and testing of the Sandia Laboratories Livermore tritium decontamination systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gildea, P.D.; Birnbaum, H.G.; Wall, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    Sandia Laboratories, Livermore, has put into operation a new facility, the Tritium Research Laboratory. The laboratory incorporates containment and cleanup facilities such that any tritium accidentally released is captured rather than vented to the atmosphere. This containment is achieved with hermetically sealed glove boxes that are connected on demand by manifolds to two central decontamination systems called the Gas Purification System (GPS) and the Vacuum Effluent Recovery System (VERS). The primary function of the GPS is to remove tritium and tritiated water vapor from the glove box atmosphere. The primary function of the VERS is to decontaminate the gas exhausted from the glove box pressure control systems and vacuum pumps in the building before venting the gas to the stack. Both of these systems are designed to remove tritium to the few parts per billion range. Acceptance tests at the manufacturer's plant and preoperational testing at Livermore demonstrated that the systems met their design specifications. After preoperational testing the Gas Purification System was modified to enhance the safety of maintanance operations. Both the Gas Purification System and the Vacuum Effluent Recovery System were performance tested with tritium. Results show that concentration reduction factors (ratio of inlet to exhaust concentrations) much in excess of 1000 per pass have been achieved for both systems at inlet concentrations of 1 ppM or less

  12. Chemical surety material decontamination and decommissioning of Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemical Surety Material Laboratory area TA-3, building SM-29, room 4009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, T.E.; Smith, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    From 1982 through 1987, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performed surety laboratory operations for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (MRDC). Room 4009 in building SM-29, TA-3, was used as the laboratory for work with the following chemical surety material (CSM) agents: sarin (GB), soman (GD), lewisite (L), and distilled mustard (HD) radio-labelled with H{sup 3} or C{sup 14}. The work was confined to three CSM-certified fume hoods, located in room 4009 (see diagram in Appendix C). The laboratory ceased all active operations during the late 1986 and early 1987 period. From 1987 until 1993 the laboratory was secured and the ventilation system continued to operate. During late 1992, the decision was made to utilize this laboratory space for other operations, thus a decision was made to dismantle and reconfigure this room. LANL sub-contracted Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) to draw upon the CSM experience of the technical staff from the Hazardous Materials Research Facility (HMRF) to assist in developing a decontamination and decommissioning plan. BMI was subcontracted to devise a CSM safety training course, and a sampling and air monitoring plan for CSM material to ensure personnel safety during all disassembly operations. LANL subcontracted Johnson Controls personnel to perform all disassembly operations. Beginning in early 1993 BMI personnel from the HMRF visited the laboratory to develop both the safety plan and the sample and air monitoring plan. Execution of that plan began in September 1993 and was completed in January 1994.

  13. NPP decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedov, V.M.; Senin, E.V.; Nesterenko, A.P.; Zakharova, E.V.

    1988-01-01

    Decontamination methods for NPP with LWGR and WWER reactors are considered. Circuits iof NPP with LWGR are decontaminated with solutions on the basis of oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide with addition of nitrate-ions, whereas WWER with complexones followed treatment with strong oxidizers. As a result of decontamination γ-background of the equipment decreases 5-100 fold. The instruments and room surfaces are decontaminated using vapour-ejecting sprayers, hydromonitors and special baths with solutions on the basis of mineral acids and complexones with various additions, which can be used for stainless and carbon steels, coatings of epoxide enamels and plastifiers. Methods of dry decontamination using easily peeled off coatings on the basis of polyvinyl alcohol and other materials lately are widely used for NPP room decontamination. Small metallic parts of surface are decontaminated by electrochemical method. Different mixtures of mineral and organic acids, as well as caustic potash and boric acid, are used as electrolytes

  14. PILOT DECONTAMINATION THROUGH PILOT SEQUENCE HOPPING IN MASSIVE MIMO SYSTEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The invention relates to a system for determining channel coefficients of channels in a wireless cellular network. The wireless cellular network comprises a plurality of cells wherein each cell comprises a base station configured to communicate with users within the cell and wherein a communicati...

  15. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon building so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered

  16. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-05-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon buildings so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered. (U.S.)

  17. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, April--June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US Department of Energy Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 titled `Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs`. Requirements stipulated by the Agreement require WVU to submit Technical Progress reports on a quarterly basis. This report contains the efforts of the fourteen research projects comprising the Agreement for the period April 1 to June 30, 1995. During this period three new projects have been funded by the Agreement. These projects are: (1) WERC National Design Contest, (2) Graduate Interns to the Interagency Environmental Technology Office under the National Science and Technology Council, and (3) WV High Tech Consortium.

  18. Reduced weight decontamination formulation utilizing a solid peracid compound for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-09-20

    A reduced weight decontamination formulation that utilizes a solid peracid compound (sodium borate peracetate) and a cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride) that can be packaged with all water removed. This reduces the packaged weight of the decontamination formulation by .about.80% (as compared to the "all-liquid" DF-200 formulation) and significantly lowers the logistics burden on the warfighter. Water (freshwater or saltwater) is added to the new decontamination formulation at the time of use from a local source.

  19. A survey of decontamination processes applicable to DOE nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this survey was to select an appropriate technology for in situ decontamination of equipment interiors as part of the decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy nuclear facilities. This selection depends on knowledge of existing chemical decontamination methods. This report provides an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. According to available information, aqueous systems are probably the most universally used method for decontaminating and cleaning metal surfaces. We have subdivided the technologies, on the basis of the types of chemical solvents, into acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and miscellaneous systems. Two miscellaneous chemical decontamination methods (electrochemical processes and foam and gel systems) are also described. A concise technical description of various processes is given, and the report also outlines technical considerations in the choice of technologies, including decontamination effectiveness, waste handing, fields of application, and the advantages and limitations in application. On the basis of this survey, six processes were identified for further evaluation. 144 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. A survey of decontamination processes applicable to DOE nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this survey was to select an appropriate technology for in situ decontamination of equipment interiors as part of the decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy nuclear facilities. This selection depends on knowledge of existing chemical decontamination methods. This report provides an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. According to available information, aqueous systems are probably the most universally used method for decontaminating and cleaning metal surfaces. We have subdivided the technologies, on the basis of the types of chemical solvents, into acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and miscellaneous systems. Two miscellaneous chemical decontamination methods (electrochemical processes and foam and gel systems) are also described. A concise technical description of various processes is given, and the report also outlines technical considerations in the choice of technologies, including decontamination effectiveness, waste handing, fields of application, and the advantages and limitations in application. On the basis of this survey, six processes were identified for further evaluation. 144 refs., 2 tabs

  1. Large Scale Tests of Vaporous Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP(Register Trademark)) for Chemical and Biological Weapons Decontamination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wagner, George; Procell, Larry; Sorrick, David; Maclver, Brian; Turetsky, Abe; Pfarr, Jerry; Dutt, Diane; Brickhouse, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Vaporous Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) has been used for more than a decade to sterilize clean rooms and pharmaceutical processing equipment and, more recently, to decontaminate anthraxcontaminated buildings...

  2. [Injuries from pepper spray used for self defense: analysis of 15 cases managed in an emergency chemical decontamination area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigó, Montserrat; Fernández, Fuensanta; Velasco, Verónica; Nogué, Santiago

    2016-10-01

    We analyzed epidemiologic and clinical characteristics, treatment received, and clinical course in cases of pepper spray injury treated in the chemical decontamination area of an emergency department over a 5-year period. A total of 15 patients with a mean (SD) age of 25 (8.3) years were included. Thirteen were men and 53% were foreign-born. All uses of pepper spray occurred during muggings that to place mainly in the early hours of the morning (66.7% between 4:30 and 6:30 AM). Two or more attackers were injured in 60% of the events. Seventy-three percent of the attacks took place on the street and the median delay in reaching the emergency department was 30 minutes. The face and eyes were usually injured, and symptoms included itching, irritation, burning, and pain. On arrival, the patients were treated immediately (mean delay, 3 minutes) with hypertonic saline, an amphoteric surfactant, and a chelating agent in 80% of the cases, in which improvement was substantial as mean pain scale scores changed from 7.2 on admission to 3 on discharge (P=.009). Patients spent an average of 40 minutes in the treatment area. Eleven patients required further care from an ophthalmologist and topical medication for symptoms. Outcomes were good and there were no complications in any of the cases. We conclude that pepper sprays are being used as an aid to self defense in muggings in our community. Decontamination measures have priority as they alleviate symptoms and prevent long-lasting effects.

  3. Challenges in decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengal, P.R.; Davis, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    The recovery of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 facilities has transformed decontamination from traditional ''mop-and-bucket'' cleaning into an advanced technology. The decontamination of the reactor building and auxiliary and fuel handling building required the development of new methodologies, adaptation of equipment from other fields, and the development of new equipment to meet the projects goals. Experience at TMI-2 has resulted in the development of techniques for; radiological characterization with wide angle detectors and autoradiograhic techniques for the determination of sources and depth of contamination penetration, coatings and base surface removal with ultra-high-pressure water dissolution chemicals and mechanical scabblers (paint-chipping devices), and surface decontamination with high-pressure steam vacuum extraction. This paper presents an overview of the development of decontamination technology and its impact on the TMI-2 program. The benefits of expanding the TMI-2 experience to general use in the nuclear industry are discussed

  4. Surface decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S. da; Teixeira, M.V.

    1986-06-01

    The general methods of surface decontamination used in laboratory and others nuclear installations areas, as well as the procedures for handling radioactive materials and surfaces of work are presented. Some methods for decontamination of body external parts are mentioned. The medical supervision and assistance are required for internal or external contamination involving or not lesion in persons. From this medical radiation protection decontamination procedures are determined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Electrochemical ion exchange of LOMI decontamination solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, D.; Elder, G.R.

    1991-05-01

    The objective of the LOMI Electrochemical Ion Exchange (ELOMIX) process is to reduce the volume of waste arising from LOMI decontamination operations. This is achieved by using the conventional ion exchange resin as an intermediate, rather than a final waste form. Radioactive and metal ion constitutents removed during the decontamination are converted by the process to a metallic form. In its simplest form the ELOMIX cell consists of three compartments, (anode, cathode and resin) separated by cation permeable membranes. In the resin compartment, radioactive and chemical components are removed from the flowing solution by the resin. These components are then migrated under the influence of an electric field into the cathode compartment where metallic elements are deposited. After successful laboratory testing a pilot scale ELOMIX unit was constructed and shipped to Commonwealth Edison's Dresden Unit 2 LOMI decontamination in October 1990. The pilot-scale cell was tied in to the decontamination equipment. The cell operated successfully during three LOMI steps, processing a total of 165 resin bed volumes of solution, far exceeding the normal capacity of the ion exchange resin. Removal efficiencies for iron and radioactivity were good throughout the test. The ELOMIX unit was successfully operated in the time, operational and safety constraints of a reactor decontamination. The main benefits of the process are reduced waste volume, and greater chemical and radiation stability of the waste, which is particularly relevant to full system decontamination. Although the testing to date has focused on the LOMI process, the ELOMIX technique could in principle be applied to be other decontamination processes. 13 figs., 1 tab

  6. Assessment of skin exposure to N,N-dimethylformamide and methyl ethylketone through chemical protective gloves and decontamination of gloves for reuse purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Keh-Ping; Wang, Ping; Chen, Chen-Peng; Tang, Ping-Yu

    2011-02-15

    N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and methyl ethylketone (MEK) are the hazardous chemicals commonly used in the synthetic leather industries. Although chemical protective gloves provide adequate skin exposure protection to workers in these industries, there is currently no clear guideline or understanding with regard to the use duration of these gloves. In this study, the permeation of DMF/MEK mixture through neoprene gloves and the desorption of chemicals from contaminated gloves were conducted using the ASTM F739 cell. The acceptable use duration time of the gloves against DMF/MEK permeation was estimated by assuming a critical body burden of chemical exposure as a result of dermal absorption. In a re-exposure cycle of 5 days, decontamination of the gloves by aeration at 25°C was found to be inadequate in a reduction of breakthrough time as compared to a new unexposed glove. However, decontamination of the gloves by heating at 70 or 100°C showed that the protective coefficient of the exposed gloves had similar levels of resistance to DMF/MEK as that of new gloves. Implications of this study include an understanding of the use duration of neoprene gloves and proper decontamination of chemical protective gloves for reuse. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Decontamination of Drinking Water Infrastructure ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Brief This study examines the effectiveness of decontaminating corroded iron and cement-mortar coupons that have been contaminated with spores of Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii (B. globigii), which is often used as a surrogate for pathogenic B. anthracis (anthrax) in disinfection studies. Bacillus spores are persistent on common drinking water material surfaces like corroded iron, requiring physical or chemical methods to decontaminate the infrastructure. In the United States, free chlorine and monochloramine are the primary chemical disinfectants used by the drinking water industry to inactivate microorganisms. Flushing is also a common, easily implemented practice in drinking water distribution systems, although large volumes of contaminated water needing treatment could be generated. Identifying readily available alternative disinfectant formulations for infrastructure decontamination could give water utilities options for responding to specific types of contamination events. In addition to presenting data on flushing alone, which demonstrated the persistence of spores on water infrastructure in the absence of high levels of disinfectants, data on acidified nitrite, chlorine dioxide, free chlorine, monochloramine, ozone, peracetic acid, and followed by flushing are provided.

  8. Chemical cloud tracking systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Larry B.; Gruber, Thomas C., Jr.; Marshall, Martin; Rowland, Brad

    2002-02-01

    This paper describes the Chemical Cloud Tracking System (CCTS) which has been installed at Dugway Proving Ground. The CCTS allows mapping of chemical clouds in real time from a safe standoff distance. The instruments used are passive standoff chemical agent detectors (FTIRs). Each instrument individually can only measure the total of all the chemical in its line-of-site; the distance to the cloud is unknown. By merging data from multiple vantage points (either one instrument moving past the cloud or two or more instruments spaced so as to view the cloud from different directions) a map of the cloud locations can be generated using tomography. To improve the sensitivity and accuracy of the cloud map, chemical point sensors can be added to the sensor array being used. The equipment required for the CCTS is commercially available. Also, the data fusion techniques (tomography) have been demonstrated previously in the medical field. The Chemical Cloud Tracking System can monitor the movement of many chemical clouds of either military or industrial origin. Since the technique is standoff, the personnel are not exposed to toxic hazards while they follow the cloud. Also, the equipment works on-the-move which allows rapid response to emergency situations (plant explosions, tanker car accidents, chemical terrorism, etc.).

  9. Catalytic oxidation efficiencies for tritium and tritiated methane in a mature, industrial-scale decontamination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mintz, J.M.; Gildea, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    Almost all tritium decontamination systems proposed for fusion facilities employ catalytic oxidation to water, followed by drying, to remove tritium and tritiated hydrocarbons from gas streams. One such large-scale system, the gas purification system (GPS), has been operating in the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, since October 1977. A series of experiments have recently been conducted there to assesss the current operating characteristics of the GPS catalyst. The experiments used tritium and tritiated methane and covered a range of temperatures, flow rates, and concentration levels. When contrasted with 1977 data, the results indicate that no measurable degradation of catalyst function had occurred. However, some reduction in active metal surface area, as indicated by B.E.T. surface area measurements (approx. 100 → 90m 2 /g) and AES scans (approx. 1.4 → 0.9 at. % Pt), had occurred. Kinetic rate coefficients were also derived and a rough temperature dependence obtained

  10. Catalytic oxidation efficiencies for tritium and tritiated methane in a mature, industrial-scale decontamination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mintz, J.M.; Gildea, P.D.

    1980-10-01

    Almost all tritium decontamination systems proposed for fusion facilities employ catalytic oxidation to water, followed by drying, to remove tritium and tritiated hydrocarbons from gas streams. One such large-scale system, the gas purification system (GPS), has been operating in the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, since October 1977. A series of experiments have recently been conducted there to assess the current operating characteristics of the GPS catalyst. The experiments used tritium and tritiated methane and covered a range of temperatures, flow rates, and concentration levels. When contrasted with 1977 data, the results indicate that no measurable degradation of catalyst function had occurred. However, some reduction in active metal surface area, as indicated by B.E.T. surface area measurements (approx. 100 → 90 m 2 /g) and AES scans (approx. 1.4 → 0.9 at% Pt), had occurred. Kinetic rate coefficients were also derived and a rough temperature dependence obtained

  11. Guidelines for Cold Weather Mass Decontamination During a Terrorist Chemical Agent Incident, Revision 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... Under this initiative, the Department of Defense (DoD) was charged with enhancing the capability of federal, state, and local emergency responders in incidents involving nuclear, biological, and chemical terrorism. The U.S...

  12. Decontamination of radionuclides on construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuleev, P.V.; Andrews, W.S.; Creber, K.A.M.; Velicogna, D.

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of materials can become contaminated by radionuclides, either from a terrorist attack or an industrial or nuclear accident. The final disposition of these materials depends, in large part, on the effectiveness of decontamination measures. This study reports on investigations into the decontamination of a selection of building materials. The aim has been to find an effective, easy-to-use and inexpensive decontamination system for radionuclides of cesium and cobalt, considering both the chemical and physical nature of these potential contaminants. The basic method investigated was surface washing, due to its ease and simplicity. In the present study, a basic decontamination formulation was modified by adding isotope-specific sequestering agents, to enhance the removal of cesium(I) and cobalt(II) from such construction materials as concrete, marble, aluminum and painted steel. Spiking solutions contained 134 Cs or 60 Co, which were prepared by neutron activation in the SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear reactor facility at the Royal Military College of Canada. Gamma spectroscopy was used to determine the decontamination efficiency. The results showed that the addition of sequestering agents generally improved the radiological decontamination. Although the washing of both cesium and cobalt from non-porous materials, such as aluminum and painted steel, achieved a 90-95 % removal, the decontamination of concrete and marble was more challenging, due to the porous nature of the materials. Nevertheless, the removal efficiency from 6-year-old concrete increased from 10 % to approximately 50 % for cobalt(II), and from 18 to 55 % for cesium(I), with the use of isotope binding agents, as opposed to a simple water wash. (author)

  13. Chemical laser systems analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doughty, J.R.

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents a means by which the chemical laser device weight can be minimized with respect to its performance and the device power minimized with respect to the target range. Chemical laser performance parameters such as the specific power and nozzle power flux are then used in conjunction with weight and propagation models to determine system effectiveness. A measure of merit is given by which systems can be contrasted. An illustrative example is included in which DF and Iodine laser systems are compared for an airborne scenario. 14 references.

  14. Whole system chemical geothermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang Zhonghe

    1999-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic geothermometers are equations or models based on temperature dependent chemical reactions or isotope equilibrium fractionation reactions from which equilibrium temperatures of these reactions can be calculated. The major drawback of all the conventional geothermometry methods lies in their incapability on making a judgement on the equilibrium status of the studied systems. This review will focus on two of recent approaches in this field. Zhangzhou Geothermal Field in SE China will be used as an example to demonstrate the applications

  15. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, October 1995--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the U.S. Department of Energy Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 titled {open_quotes}Decontamination Systems Information and Research programs{close_quotes} (DOE Instrument No. DE-FC21-92MC29467) This report contains the efforts of the research projects comprising the Agreement for the 4th calendar quarter of 1995, and is the final quarterly report deliverable required for the period ending 31 December 1995. The projects reported for the WVU Cooperative Agreement are categorized into the following three areas: 1.0 In Situ Remediation Process Development, 2.0 Advanced Product Applications Testing, and 3.0 Information Systems, Public Policy, Community Outreach, and Economics. Summaries of the significant accomplishments for the projects reported during the period 1 October 95 through 31 December 95 are presented in the following discussions.

  16. Safety aspects in decontamination operations: Lessons learned during the decommissioning of a small PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Ponnet, M.; Emond, O.

    2002-01-01

    Decontamination operations are generally executed during the decommissioning of nuclear installations for different objectives: decontamination of loops or large pieces to reduce the dose rate inside a contaminated plant or decontamination to minimize the amount of radioactive waste. These decontamination operations raise safety issues such as radiological exposure, classical safety, environmental releases, production and management of secondary waste, management of primary resources, etc. This paper presents the return of experience from decontamination operations performed during the dismantling of the BR3 PWR reactor. The safety issues are discussed for 3 types of decontamination operations: full system decontamination of the primary loop with a chemical process to reduce the dose rate by a factor of 10; thorough decontamination with an aggressive chemical process of dismantled pieces to reach the unconditional clearance values; and thorough decontamination processes with physical processes of metals and of concrete to reach the unconditional clearance values. For the protection of the workers, we must consider the ALARA aspects and the classical safety issues. During the progress of our dismantling operations, the dose rate issue was becoming less important but the classical safety issues were becoming preponderant due to the use of very aggressive techniques. For the protection of the environment, we must take all the precautions to avoid any leakages from the plant and we must use processes which minimize the use of toxic products and which minimize the production of secondary wastes. We therefore promote the use of regenerative processes. (author)

  17. Decontamination of TRU glove boxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.H.

    1978-03-01

    Two glove boxes that had been used for work with transuranic nuclides (TRU) for about 12 years were decontaminated in a test program to collect data for developing a decontamination facility for large equipment highly contaminated with alpha emitters. A simple chemical technique consisting of a cycle of water flushes and alkaline permanganate and oxalic acid washes was used for both boxes. The test showed that glove boxes and similar equipment that are grossly contaminated with transuranic nuclides can be decontaminated to the current DIE nonretrievable disposal guide of <10 nCi TRU/g with a moderate amount of decontamination solution and manpower. Decontamination of the first box from an estimated 1.3 Ci to about 5 mCi (6 nCi/g) required 1.3 gallons of decontamination solution and 0.03 man-hour of work for each square foot of surface area. The second box was decontaminated from an estimated 3.4 Ci to about 2.8 mCi (4.2 nCi/g) using 0.9 gallon of decontamination solution and 0.02 man-hour for each square foot of surface area. Further reductions in contamination were achieved by repetitive decontamination cycles, but the effectiveness of the technique decreased sharply after the initial cycle

  18. Evaluation of Silver-Exchanged Zeolites Under Development by University of Maine for Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brickhouse, Mark D; Lalain, Teri A; D'Onofrio, Terrence G; Procell, Lawrence R; Zander, Zachary B

    2007-01-01

    This effort is for the evaluation of a non-toxic photo-catalytic decontamination technology based on silver-exchanged zeolites being developed by the University of Maine research team under the direction of Dr. Howard H...

  19. Evaluation of Silver-Exchanged Zeolites Under Development by University of Maine for Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brickhouse, Mark D; Lalain, Teri A; D'Onofrio, Terrence G; Procell, Lawrence R; Zander, Zachary B

    2007-01-01

    .... The hypothesis under investigation is that rapid decontamination can be achieved by the interaction of agent with silver metal clusters within zeolites coupled with subsequent photo-catalytic excitation...

  20. Decontamination and decommissioning of TAN radioactive liquid-waste-evaporator system (PM-2A). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes the decontamination and decommissioning of the Test Area North (TAN) liquid waste evaporator (PM-2A). The PM-2A facility included the aboveground evaporator system, two underground holding tanks and feedlines, an electrical distribution subsystem, and one above ground concrete tank. Much surface soil of the PM-2A area was also radioactively contaminated. Stabilization of the liquid and sludge in the holding tanks, a major task, was achieved by pumping most of the liquid into 55-gal drums and mixing it with cement. The drums were buried in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The remaining liquid and sludge were dried in place by layers of diatomaceous earth. The most contaminated surface soil was removed, and the area backfilled with clean topsoil and graded, reducing the surface radiation field to background. A 6-ft-high chain link fence now surrounds the area. Most of the area was seeded to crested wheatgrass. 46 figures, 9 tables

  1. Interactive planning system for developing decommissioning and decontamination plans at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litchfield, J. W.; King, J. C.

    1977-09-01

    The 570-square mile Hanford Project contains facilities with varying degrees of radioactive contamination as a result of plutonium production operations. With the evolution of production requirements and technology, many of these have been retired and will be decommissioned and decontaminated (D and D). Planning for D and D at Hanford requires identification and characterization of contaminated facilities, prioritization of facilities for decommissioning, selection of D and D modes, estimating costs and other characteristics of D and D activities, definition of future scenarios at Hanford, and preparation and assessment of plans to achieve defined scenarios. A multiattributed decision model using four criteria was used to prioritize facilities for decommissioning. A computer-based interactive planning system was developed to facilitate preparation and assessment of D and D plans.

  2. From the Decomposition of Chemical Warfare Agents to the Decontamination of Cytostatics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Šťastný, Martin; Janoš, P.; Mazanec, K.; Perez-Diaz, J. L.; Štenglová Netíková, I. R.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 6 (2018), s. 2114-2122 ISSN 0888-5885 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 312804 - COUNTERFOG Grant - others:NATO(US) SPS984599 Program:Science for Peace and Security Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Chemical warfare agents * Degradation * Metal oxide sorbents Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 2.843, year: 2016

  3. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehrle, G.

    1975-01-01

    A general survey of skin decontamination is given. The success of every decontamination treatments depends mainly on the speed, but also on the care, with which the action is taken. The best way to remove the skin contaminants is thorough washing under lukewarm running water with mild soap and a soft brush. This washing is to be repeated several times for a period of several minutes. If results are not satisfactory, light duty detergents and wetting agents available commercially may also be used. Some solutions which have proved useful are mentioned. The decontamination solutions are best used in the order given. When one has no satisfactory decontamination effect, the next one is to be used. If necessary, these agents must be used several times in the stated order as long as this does not involve too much strain for the skin. All the decontamination measures mentioned refer, of course, to intact healthy skin. After decontamination has been completed, the skin should be treated with a protective cream

  5. Steam Generator Group Project. Task 6. Channel head decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.P.; Clark, R.L.; Reece, W.D.

    1984-08-01

    The Steam Generator Group Project utilizes a retired-from-service pressurized-water-reactor steam generator as a test bed and source of specimens for research. An important preparatory step to primary side research activities was reduction of the radiation field in the steam generator channel head. This task report describes the channel head decontamination activities. Though not a programmatic research objective it was judged beneficial to explore the use of dilute reagent chemical decontamination techniques. These techniques presented potential for reduced personnel exposure and reduced secondary radwaste generation, over currently used abrasive blasting techniques. Two techniques with extensive laboratory research and vendors prepared to offer commercial application were tested, one on either side of the channel head. As indicated in the report, both techniques accomplished similar decontamination objectives. Neither technique damaged the generator channel head or tubing materials, as applied. This report provides details of the decontamination operations. Application system and operating conditions are described.

  6. Presolidification treatment of decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habayeb, M.A.

    1982-02-01

    Unsatisfactory leaching performance of several solidified decontamination solutions indicated a need for presolidification treatments to reduce the water sensitivity of the active chemicals. Chemical treatments examined in this work include pH adjustment, precipitation and oxidation-reduction reactions. The reactions involved in these treatments are discussed. The most suitable presolidification treatment for each decontamination solution has been identified. Further research is needed to test the effectivenss of these treatments

  7. Radioactive decontamination of equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    After a recall of some definitions relating to decontamination techniques and of the regulation into effect, the principles to be respected to arrange rationally work zones are quoted while insisting more particularly on the types of coatings which facilitate maintenance operations and the dismantling of these installations. Then, the processes and equipments to use in decontamination units for routine or particular operations are described; the list of recommended chemical products to decontaminate the equipment is given. The influence of these treatments on the state and the duration of life of equipments is studied, and some perfectible methods are quoted. In the appendix, are given: the limits of surface contamination accepted in the centers; a standard project which defines the criteria of admissible residual contamination in wastes considered as cold wastes; some remarks on the interest that certain special ventilation and air curtain devices for the protection of operators working on apparatus generating contaminated dusts [fr

  8. Nuclear decontamination of personnel and material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehleisen, R. [Alfred Kaercher Gmbh and Co., Winnenden (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    Nuclear decontamination of personnel and material has to be carried out immediately after any contaminating incident. A safe decontamination will only be successful when a suitable decontamination system and effective decontamination agent are used. The aim hereby is, that personnel will not suffer from any acute somatic or late somatic effect and that material can be re-used again without any protective devices. Test results have shown, that personnel decontamination is more effective today due to new technologies. Also material decontamination, nowadays carried out with hot foam and high pressure units improves the deradiation result.

  9. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO 3 -HF and H 2 C 2 O 4 to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated

  10. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1981-06-01

    The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO 3 -HF and H 2 C 2 O 4 to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated

  11. Decontamination by fractional distillation of a radioactive mixture of perchlorethylene, bitumen, and sludges from chemical co-precipitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefillatre, G.; Hullo, R.

    1969-01-01

    It is not possible to incinerate the contaminated organic waste containing chlorine, produced at the Marcoule Centre. The only valid method for these solvents of average activity is fractional distillation. This report presents a pilot fractional distillation plant designed for decontaminating the residual solvents produced by the Centre's Waste Processing Station. These contaminated solvents come from the decontamination of a screw extrusion apparatus with perchlorethylene; this equipment is used for coating the radioactive sludges with bitumen. The pilot plant operates discontinuously and is used to decontaminate the perchlorethylene, to separate the perchlorethylene from the water, and to process the distillation residue. The electrically heated boiler is fitted with a removable base in the form of a disposable container. The installations decontamination factor is 3.4 x 10 6 when solvents with a specific activity of 0.23 Ci/m 3 are used. The average flow-rate for a distillation run is 10 l/hr at atmospheric pressure, and 21 l/hr at a residual pressure of 40 torr. The decontamination factor for the installation is better at atmospheric pressure than in a vacuum. (authors) [fr

  12. Design and characterisation of a novel in vitro skin diffusion cell system for assessing mass casualty decontamination systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, H; Larner, J; Kansagra, S; Atkinson, K L; Skamarauskas, J T; Amlot, R; Chilcott, R P

    2014-06-01

    The efficient removal of contaminants from the outer surfaces of the body can provide an effective means of reducing adverse health effects associated with incidents involving the accidental or deliberate release of hazardous materials. Showering with water is frequently used by first responders as a rapid method of mass casualty decontamination (MCD). However, there is a paucity of data on the generic effectiveness and safety of aqueous decontamination systems. To address these issues, we have developed a new in vitro skin diffusion cell system to model the conditions of a common MCD procedure ("ladder pipe system"). The new diffusion cell design incorporates a showering nozzle, an air sampling port for measurement of vapour loss and/aerosolisation, adjustable (horizontal to vertical) skin orientation and a circulating manifold system (to maintain a specified flow rate, temperature and pressure of shower water). The dermal absorption characteristics of several simulants (Invisible Red S, curcumin and methyl salicylate) measured with the new in vitro model were in good agreement with previous in vitro and in vivo studies. Moreover, these initial studies have indicated that whilst flow rate and water temperature are important factors for MCD, the presence of clothing during showering may (under certain circumstances) cause transfer and spreading of contaminants to the skin surface. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microbial decontamination by low dose gamma irradiation and its impact on the physico-chemical quality of peppermint (Mentha piperita)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machhour, Hasna [Valorization of the Agro-Ressources and Food Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Cadi Ayyad University, B.P. 2390, Marrakesh 40000 (Morocco); Laboratory of Biotechnology, Protection and Valorization of the Vegetable Resources, Cadi Ayyad University, B.P 2390, Marrakesh 40000 (Morocco); El Hadrami, Ismail [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Protection and Valorization of the Vegetable Resources, Cadi Ayyad University, B.P 2390, Marrakesh 40000 (Morocco); Imziln, Boujamaa [Laboratory of Biology and Biotechnology of Microorganisms, Environmental Microbiology and Toxicology Team ((mu)BioToxE, Department of Biology), Cadi Ayyad University, P.O. Box no. 2390, Marrakech 40000 (Morocco); Mouhib, Mohamed [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Centre Regional de la Recherche Agronomique de Tanger, Unite de Recherche sur les Techniques Nucleaires, l' Environnement et la Qualite (URTNEQ), 78 Boulevard Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, Tanger 90000 (Morocco); Mahrouz, Mostafa, E-mail: mahrouz10@yahoo.f [Valorization of the Agro-Ressources and Food Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Cadi Ayyad University, B.P. 2390, Marrakesh 40000 (Morocco)

    2011-04-15

    Peppermint was inoculated with Escherichia coli and its decontamination was carried out by gamma irradiation at low irradiation doses (0.5, 1.0 and 2.66 kGy). The efficiency of this decontamination method was evaluated and its impact on the quality parameters of peppermint, such as the color and ash content, as well as the effect on fingerprint components such as phenols and essential oils, was studied. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) were used to characterize essential oils and phenolic compounds, respectively. The results indicated a complete decontamination of peppermint after the low dose gamma irradiation without a significant loss in quality attributes.

  14. Report on decontamination of the evaporator and cleaning of the condenser of the distillation system - Annex 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, D.

    1964-01-01

    The distillation system condenser had to be cleaned since the flow of the technical water for cooling the distillation system was decreased. The condensed is situated in the sam room with the evaporator. Due to accumulation of cobalt from the heavy water the radiation on the evaporator was 9 - 10 R/h. Under such conditions it was not possible to clean the condenser without previous decontamination of the evaporator. Both tasks were fulfilled

  15. RSDL decontamination of human skin contaminated with the nerve agent VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thors, L; Lindberg, S; Johansson, S; Koch, B; Koch, M; Hägglund, L; Bucht, A

    2017-03-05

    Dermal exposure to low volatile organophosphorus compounds (OPC) may lead to penetration through the skin and uptake in the blood circulation. Skin decontamination of toxic OPCs, such as pesticides and chemical warfare nerve agents, might therefore be crucial for mitigating the systemic toxicity following dermal exposure. Reactive skin decontamination lotion (RSDL) has been shown to reduce toxic effects in animals dermally exposed to the nerve agent VX. In the present study, an in vitro flow-through diffusion cell was utilized to evaluate the efficacy of RSDL for decontamination of VX exposed to human epidermis. In particular, the impact of timing in the initiation of decontamination and agent dilution in water was studied. The impact of the lipophilic properties of VX in the RSDL decontamination was additionally addressed by comparing chemical degradation in RSDL and decontamination efficacy between the VX and the hydrophilic OPC triethyl phosphonoacetate (TEPA). The epidermal membrane was exposed to 20, 75 or 90% OPC diluted in deionized water and the decontamination was initiated 5, 10, 30, 60 or 120min post-exposure. Early decontamination of VX with RSDL, initiated 5-10min after skin exposure, was very effective. Delayed decontamination initiated 30-60min post-exposure was less effective but still the amount of penetrated agent was significantly reduced, while further delayed start of decontamination to 120min resulted in very low efficacy. Comparing RSDL decontamination of VX with that of TEPA showed that the decontamination efficacy at high agent concentrations was higher for VX. The degradation mechanism of VX and TEPA during decontamination was dissected by 31 P NMR spectroscopy of the OPCs following reactions with RSDL and its three nucleophile components. The degradation rate was clearly associated with the high pH of the specific solution investigated; i.e. increased pH resulted in a more rapid degradation. In addition, the solubility of the OPC in RSDL

  16. Release mitigation spray safety systems for chemical demilitarization applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Jonathan; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Brockmann, John E.; Servantes, Brandon; Sanchez, Andres L.; Tucker, Mark David; Allen, Ashley N.; Wilson, Mollye C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.

    2010-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has conducted proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating effective knockdown and neutralization of aerosolized CBW simulants using charged DF-200 decontaminant sprays. DF-200 is an aqueous decontaminant, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and procured and fielded by the US Military. Of significance is the potential application of this fundamental technology to numerous applications including mitigation and neutralization of releases arising during chemical demilitarization operations. A release mitigation spray safety system will remove airborne contaminants from an accidental release during operations, to protect personnel and limit contamination. Sandia National Laboratories recently (November, 2008) secured funding from the US Army's Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materials Agency (PMNSCMA) to investigate use of mitigation spray systems for chemical demilitarization applications. For non-stockpile processes, mitigation spray systems co-located with the current Explosive Destruction System (EDS) will provide security both as an operational protective measure and in the event of an accidental release. Additionally, 'tented' mitigation spray systems for native or foreign remediation and recovery operations will contain accidental releases arising from removal of underground, unstable CBW munitions. A mitigation spray system for highly controlled stockpile operations will provide defense from accidental spills or leaks during routine procedures.

  17. Site decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicker, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Among the several DOE sites that have been radiologically decontaminated under the auspices of the Nevada Operations Office are three whose physical characteristics are unique. These are the Tatum Dome Test Site (TDTS) near Hattiesburg, Mississippi; a location of mountainous terrain (Pahute Mesa) on the Nevada Test Site; and the GNOME site near Carlsbad, New Mexico. In each case the contamination, the terrain, and the climate conditions were different. This presentation includes a brief description of each site, the methods used to perform radiological surveys, the logistics required to support the decontamination (including health physics and sample analysis), and the specific techniques used to reduce or remove the contamination

  18. Chemical and microbial decontamination of pool water using activated potassium peroxymonosulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anipsitakis, George P; Tufano, Thomas P; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2008-06-01

    Potassium peroxymonosulfate activation leads to the formation of highly reactive species, mainly the sulfate radicals. Activated potassium peroxymonosulfate (from now on peroxymonosulfate) was tested against specific pollutants such as ammonium ion, creatinine, chlorinated creatinine products, arginine and Escherichia coli (E. coli), all constituents or derivatives of human discharges. The objective was to assess whether activated peroxymonosulfate can be a viable treatment reagent in recreational water applications. It was found that organic molecules such as creatinine, chlorinated creatinine products and arginine could be effectively treated with activated peroxymonosulfate. Ammonium ion was oxidized only by chlorine species and only in de-ionized water. Chlorine species were formed from the reaction of sulfate radicals with chloride ions. In pool water, the reaction of sulfate radicals with chloride ions and the subsequent ammonium ion oxidation were scavenged by the presence of bicarbonate ions. The Co/Peroxymonosulfate system was also shown to be an effective disinfection reagent, since 99.99% (4-log) kill of E. coli was achieved in 60 min of treatment. At the concentrations tested here, however, it is still not efficacious enough to qualify as an EPA-registered sanitizer for swimming pools (requires 6-log kill of E. coli, ATCC 11229, and Enterococcus faecium, ATCC 6569, in 30s).

  19. Decontamination of Subway Railcar and Related Materials ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report In the event of a biological incident in a transportation hub such as a subway system, effective remediation of railcars, subway tunnels and stations will require the use of various decontamination approaches. One potential decontamination tool that could be used in such an event is the fogging of sporicidal liquids. The study described in this report builds on previous fogging decontamination research, but with a focus on decontaminating subway railcars and related materials.

  20. Concept for Sustainable Dose Reduction in Operating BWRs and PWRs with FSD (Full System decontamination)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sempere Belda, L.; Stiepani, C.; Topf, C.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power plants experience an increase in dose rates during operation due to the build-up of the activity inventory. The activity build-up is influenced by the construction materials, past and present water chemistries, and the individual operating history of the plant. Depending on these factors the dose levels in an operating plant may reach a point in which concrete actions to reduce the overall radiation exposure become necessary. AREVA has developed the Concept for Sustainable Dose Reduction in Operating BWRs and PWRs. This is a program of joint corrective measures to minimize dose levels and keep them low for continued operation. It can be applied in plants from all constructors and designs. The concept is put into practice through the coordinated application of proven technologies, including: . Full System Decontamination to minimize the activity inventory . The formation of new, very stable protective oxides on the system surfaces including injection of depleted zinc . Introduction of advanced water chemistry for maintaining the low dose levels achieved during ongoing operation The implementation of this program is particularly interesting for plants with a long operation history, especially when considering life extension. A description of the activities involved is provided, including an approximate timeline for the implementation from the initial planning stages until completion.

  1. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Progress reports are given on the following projects: (A) Subsurface contaminants, containment and remediation: 1.1 Characteristic evaluation of grout barriers in grout testing chamber; 1.2 Development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for desiccation barriers; 1.3 Development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for in-situ formed barriers -- technical support; 1.4 Laboratory studies and field testing at the DOE/RMI Extrusion Plant (Ashtabula, Ohio); 1.5 Use of drained enhanced soil flushing for contaminants removal; (B) Mixed waste characterization, treatment and disposal: Analysis of the Vortec cyclone melting system for remediation of PCB contaminated soils using computational fluid dynamics; (C) Decontamination and decommissioning: 3.1 Production and evaluation of biosorbents and cleaning solutions for use in D and D; 3.2 Use of Spintek centrifugal membrane technology and sorbents/cleaning solutions in the D and D of DOE facilities; (D) Cross-cutting innovative technologies: 4.1 Use of centrifugal membrane technology with novel membranes to treat hazardous/radioactive wastes; 4.2 Environmental pollution control devices based on novel forms of carbon; 4.3 Design of rotating membrane filtration system for remediation technologies; and (E) Outreach: Small business technical based support.

  2. [Decontamination of organophosphorus compounds: Towards new alternatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, L; Jacquet, P; Elias, M; Daudé, D; Chabrière, E

    2017-05-01

    Organophosphorus coumpounds (OP) are toxic chemicals mainly used for agricultural purpose such as insecticides and were also developed and used as warfare nerve agents. OP are inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, a key enzyme involved in the regulation of the central nervous system. Chemical, physical and biological approaches have been considered to decontaminate OP. This review summarizes the current and emerging strategies that are investigated to tackle this issue with a special emphasis on enzymatic remediation methods. During the last decade, many studies have been dedicated to the development of biocatalysts for OP removal. Among these, recent reports have pointed out the promising enzyme SsoPox isolated from the archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus. Considering both its intrinsic stability and activity, this hyperthermostable enzyme is highly appealing for the decontamination of OP. Copyright © 2017 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of the chemical properties of ruthenium to decontamination processes; L'application des proprietes chimiques du ruthenium a des procedes de decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, A.; Berger, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The chemical properties of ruthenium in the form of an aqueous solution of the nitrate and of organic tributylphosphate solution are reviewed. From this data, some known examples are given: they demonstrate the processes of separation or of elimination of ruthenium from radioactive waste. (authors) [French] Les proprietes chimiques du ruthenium en solutions aqueuses nitriques et en solutions organiques de tributylphosphate, sont passees en revue. A partir de ces donnees, quelques exemples connus sont cites: ils exposent des procedes de separation ou d'elimination du ruthenium de dechets radioactifs. (auteurs)

  4. Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility's process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-21). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases

  5. Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility's process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-2 1). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases

  6. Nova target chamber decontamination study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    An engineering study was performed to determine the most effective method for decontamination of the Nova target chamber. Manual and remote decontamination methods currently being used were surveyed. In addition, a concept that may not require in-situ decontamination was investigated. Based on the presently available information concerning material and system compatibility and particle penetration, it is recommended that a system of removable aluminum shields be considered. It is also recommended that a series of tests be performed to more precisely determine the vacuum compatibility and penetrability of other materials discussed in this report

  7. The development of remote repairing system, decontamination and in-cell remote inspection equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Yuzo; Toyoda, Osamu; Haginoya, Isao; Yamamoto, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Yasumasa

    1993-01-01

    PNC has been developing remote repair and inspection technologies for in-cell components in reprocessing Plants. In this report, several remote technologies such as remote dismantling and removal, decontamination, remote pipe maintenance and remote in-cell inspection equipment are described. (author)

  8. Decontamination in the Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antsipov, G.V.; Matveenko, S.A.; Mirkhaidarov, A.Kh.

    2002-01-01

    To continue the decontamination work in the Republic of Belarus, which was carried out by the military troops, the state specialized enterprises were formed in Gomel and Mogilev in 1991. The organization and regulations were developed inside the country: instructions, rules, radiological and hygienic criteria and norms. The enterprises concentrated on decontamination of the most socially significant facilities: kindergartens, schools, medical institutions and industrial enterprises. During 9 years Gomel State Specialized Enterprise 'Polessje' decontaminated 130 kindergartens, schools and hospitals. The total decontaminated area was 450 000 m 2 . The ventilation systems and equipment at 27 industrial enterprises in Gomel were decontaminated. The practical decontamination methods for areas, buildings, roofs, industrial equipment, ventilation systems were developed and tested. The special rules for handling wastes contaminated with Cs were elaborated. The paper analyzes and sums up the acquired experience which is important for implementation of rehabilitation programs and improvement of decontamination methods. (author)

  9. Comparison of thorough decontamination techniques on dismantled pieces of a PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Rahier, A.; Mandoki, R.; Ponnet, M.

    1998-01-01

    The decontamination experience gained during the BR3 dismantling project is developed. This started with the full system decontamination of the primary loop and was followed by R and D on thorough decontamination projects. First, a wet abrasive installation has been installed and is now in operation for the thorough cleaning of metallic pieces of simple geometry. Afterwards, the chemical cerium process has been developed. The results of the regeneration with ozone and with electrochemistry are presented in detail. The ozone regeneration process has been selected for the industrial installation of which the construction is foreseen in 1998. (author)

  10. Criteria for the evaluation of a dilute decontamination demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzPatrick, V.F.; Divine, J.R.; Hoenes, G.R.; Munson, L.F.; Card, C.J.

    1981-12-01

    This document provides the prerequisite technical information required to evaluate and/or develop a project to demonstrate the dilute chemical decontamination of the primary coolant system of light water reactors. The document focuses on five key areas: the basis for establishing programmatic prerequisites and the key decision points that are required for proposal evaluation and/or RFP (Request for Proposal) issuance; a technical review of the state-of-the-art to identify the potential impacts of a reactor's primary-system decontamination on typical BWR and PWR plants; a discussion of the licensing, recertification, fuel warranty, and institutional considerations and processes; a preliminary identification and development of the selection criteria for the reactor and the decontamination process; and a preliminary identification of further research and development that might be required

  11. Physicochemical characteristics of PFC surfactants for dry decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Jin; Lee, Chi Woo [Korea University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Even the trace amount of the used nuclear fuels of high radioactivity are hazardous to the earth and humans. Perfluorocarbons and perfluorocarbon surfactants are emerging to be efficient chemicals in the dry decontamination process of the used fuels of high radioactivity. The theme was undertaken to increase the knowledge on perfluorocarbon surfactants to develop the perfluorocarbon system in the dry decontamination process in Korea. Several cationic and anionic pfc surfactants were synthesized. Effects of pfc surfactants on electrochemical etching of silicon were investigated to form porous silicons. Forces were measured between silicon surfaces and AFM tip in the absence and presence of pfc surfactants. 7 refs., 10 figs. (Author)

  12. Decontamination Data - Blister Agents

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Decontamination efficacy data for blister agents on various building materials using various decontamination solutions. This dataset is associated with the following...

  13. Decontamination of lead by fusion (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutot, P.; Giachetto, L.; Capitaine, A.

    1962-01-01

    Various attempts to decontaminate using mechanical and chemical methods having given questionable results, a fusion method has been developed. The apparatus consists of a propane-heated oven fitted with a steel crucible of 1 400 kg capacity, with two ventilation systems, and with a vacuum gauge for preventing the diffusion of toxic gases. There are three operational controls : 1. On the samples taken before during and after the operation, 2. On the plugs taken from the ingots, 3. On the ingot itself. The continuous sanitary control is done by a radioactive aerosol recorder and by periodic sampling. This decontamination process will be improved, especially as far as the productivity and the safety precautions are concerned. (authors) [fr

  14. Development of a suppression method for deposition of radioactive cobalt after chemical decontamination: Confirmation of the Suppression Mechanism with Preoxidized Ferrite Film for Deposition of Radioactive Cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tsuyoshi; Hosokawa, Hideyuki; Nagase, Makoto; Aizawa, Motohiro; Fuse, Motomasa

    2012-09-01

    Recently, chemical decontamination at the beginning of a periodical inspection is applied to many Japanese boiling water reactor (BWR) plants in order to reduce radiation exposure. In the chemical decontamination, the oxides that have incorporated 60 Co are dissolved using reductive and oxidative chemical reagents. Some of the piping stainless steel (SS) base metal is exposed to the reactor water after this decontamination. The oxide film growth rate of the piping during plant operation just after the decontamination is higher than that just before it. Therefore, there is a possibility that the deposition amount of 60 Co on the piping just after decontamination is higher than that just before the chemical decontamination. The Hi-F Coat (Hitachi ferrite coating) process has been developed to lower recontamination after the chemical decontamination. In this process, a fine Fe 3 O 4 coating film is formed on the piping SS base metal in aqueous solution at 363 K using three chemical reagents: ferrous ion, oxidant, and pH adjuster. The growth rate of the corrosion oxide film that incorporated 60 Co on the piping during plant operation is suppressed by the fine ferrite film that blocks both diffusion of oxidant in the reactor water to the SS base metal and metal ions in the oxide film to the reactor water. As a result, the amount of 60 Co deposition is suppressed by the Hi-F coating film. In a previous report, we found that the Hi-F Coat process lowered the amount of 60 Co to 1/3 that for non-coated specimens. To improve the suppression of 60 Co deposition further, we combined the Hi-F Coat process with a pre-oxidation step which we named the pre-oxidized Hi-F Coat process. In laboratory experiments, using the pre-oxidized Hi-F Coat process we found the deposited amount of 60 Co was 1/10 that for non-coated specimens. By combining the Hi-F Coat process with the pre-oxidation step, the suppression effect of 60 Co deposition was three times higher than that of the Hi

  15. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system

  16. Health physics and industrial hygiene aspects of decontamination as a precursor to decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Card, C.J.; Hoenes, G.R.; Munson, L.F.; Halseth, G.A.

    1982-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting a comprehensive study of the impacts, benefits and effects of decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The program deals primarily with chemical cleaning of light-water reactor (LWR) systems that will not be returned to operation. A major section of this study defines the health physics and industrial hygiene and safety concerns during decontamination operations. The primary health physics concerns include providing adequate protection for workers from radiation sources which are transported by the decontamination processes, estimating and limiting radioactive effluents to the environment and maintaining operations in accordance with the ALARA philosophy. Locating and identifying the areas of contamination and measuring the radiation exposure rates throughout the reactor primary system are fundamental to implementing these health physics goals. The principal industrial hygiene and safety concerns stem from the fact that a nuclear power plant is being converted for a time to a chemical plant which will contain large volumes of chemical solutions

  17. Study of the characterization and formulation of the decontamination gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Youn Bong; Bang, In Bae; Bae, Bong Moon; Oh, Gyu Hwan

    2011-04-01

    To develop a chemical gel decontamination technology for a removal of non-fixed contaminants during the maintenance and decommissioning works of high radiation hot cells which have been used for a recycling or treatment of spent fuels we have prepare gels with CAB-O-SIL M-5 or Aerosil 380 as viscosifier and some non-ionic surfactants such as diethylene glycol hexyl ether, triethylene glycol dodecyl ether, polyethylene glycol 600, and triethylene glycol butyl ether. Surfactants are playing important roles in manipulating the properties of decontamination the gels. We have found the CAB-O-SIL with triethylene glycol butyl ether and Aerosil with triethylene glycol dodecyl ether systems promising for the decontamination work

  18. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following projects: systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies--drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors--monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield Lock and Dam remediation; Winfield cleanup survey; assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation--non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; assessment of environmental remediation storage technology; assessment of environmental remediation excavation technology; assessment of environmental remediation monitoring technology; and remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming.

  19. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following projects: systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; site remediation technologies--drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; excavation systems for hazardous waste sites; chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; development of organic sensors--monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield Lock and Dam remediation; Winfield cleanup survey; assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation--non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; assessment of environmental remediation storage technology; assessment of environmental remediation excavation technology; assessment of environmental remediation monitoring technology; and remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming

  20. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This reports reports the progress/efforts performed on six technical projects: 1. systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; 2. site remediation technologies (SRT):drain- enhanced soil flushing for organic contaminants removal; 3. SRT: in situ bio-remediation of organic contaminants; 4. excavation systems for hazardous waste sites: dust control methods for in-situ nuclear waste handling; 5. chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; and 6. development of organic sensors: monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors.

  1. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

    2003-01-01

    As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials

  2. Decontamination and renovation of the Master/Slave Manipulator Repair Shop and the Chemical Crane Room at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Final topical report, June 1982-June 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, E.C.; Golden, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the decontamination and renovation of the Master/Slave Manipulator Repair Shop (MSMRS) and the Chemical Crane Room (CCR) at the WVDP from radioactively contaminated conditions to essentially shirt sleeve environments. In both cases, subsequent use recontaminated the rooms. Before decontamination, general exposure rates as high as 20 mrad/hr and surface contamination as high as 10 5 dpm/100 cm 2 were measured in the MSMRS, while general exposure rates in the CCR were 50 to 100 mrad/hr with hot spots as high as 2000 mrad/hr. Smearable levels on the floor in each room were in the range of 10 5 to 10 6 dpm per 100/cm 2 . Respiratory protection was mandatory for entry into the CCR. The MSMRS, located at the north end of the Process Building on ground elevation, is needed for the refurbishment of plant manipulators and other equipment. The MSMRS has been decontaminated and renovated as follows: all tools, equipment and furnishings were removed, the walls were stripped and repainted, and the contaminated concrete floor was removed and disposal of as low-level waste. A new concrete floor was poured and a stainless steel liner covering the entire floor and extending 45.7 cm up the walls was added to provide the WVDP with a shop facility that can be easily decontaminated. Decontamination of the MSMRS has been completed and the facility is available for service. The CCR, located at the north end of the Chemical Process Cell (CPC) is for the storage and servicing of two bridge cranes used in the CPC. Decontamination and exposure reduction in the CCR has been completed using vacuum cleaning, damp wipe down, and surface grinding followed by shielding and painting

  3. Task 21 - Development of Systems Engineering Applications for Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, T.A.

    1998-11-01

    The objectives of this task are to: Develop a model (paper) to estimate the cost and waste generation of cleanup within the Environmental Management (EM) complex; Identify technologies applicable to decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations within the EM complex; Develop a database of facility information as linked to project baseline summaries (PBSs). The above objectives are carried out through the following four subtasks: Subtask 1--D and D Model Development, Subtask 2--Technology List; Subtask 3--Facility Database, and Subtask 4--Incorporation into a User Model.

  4. Task 21 - Development of Systems Engineering Applications for Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this task are to: Develop a model (paper) to estimate the cost and waste generation of cleanup within the Environmental Management (EM) complex; Identify technologies applicable to decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations within the EM complex; Develop a database of facility information as linked to project baseline summaries (PBSs). The above objectives are carried out through the following four subtasks: Subtask 1--D and D Model Development, Subtask 2--Technology List; Subtask 3--Facility Database, and Subtask 4--Incorporation into a User Model

  5. Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination Efficacy Testing Large-Scale Chamber mVHP (registered trademerk) Decontamination System Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    was limited by arm length. Several extension pole- clutching tools were evaluated. These tools were well suited for short lengths. The placement of...flnaptin.) Rt>c«vfwJ by (won A print) - for notes O through <S> see back of form APPENDIX D 178 Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society...SCOPE: The Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society (ACES) Journal hereinafter known as the ACES Journal is devoted to the exchange of

  6. Mobile decontamination units-room for improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribordy, Pascale; Rocksén, David; Dellgar, Uno; Persson, Sven-Åke; Arnoldsson, Kristina; Ekåsen, Hans; Häggbom, Sune; Nerf, Ola; Ljungqvist, Asa; Gryth, Dan; Claesson, Ola

    2012-10-01

    Mobile decontamination units are intended to be used at the accident site to decontaminate persons contaminated by toxic substances. A test program was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of mobile decontamination units. The tests included functionality, methodology, inside environment, effects of wind direction, and decontamination efficacy. Three different types of units were tested during summer and winter conditions. Up to 15 test-persons per trial were contaminated with the imitation substances Purasolve ethyl lactate (PEL) and methyl salicylate (MES). Decontamination was carried out according to standardized procedures. During the decontamination trials, the concentrations of the substances inside the units were measured. After decontamination, substances evaporating from test-persons and blankets as well as remaining amounts in the units were measured. The air concentrations of PEL and MES inside the units during decontamination in some cases exceeded short-term exposure limits for most toxic industrial chemicals. This was a problem, especially during harmful wind conditions, i.e., wind blowing in the same direction as persons moving through the decontamination units. Although decontamination removed a greater part of the substances from the skin, the concentrations evaporating from some test-persons occasionally were high and potentially harmful if the substances had been toxic. The study also showed that blankets placed in the units absorbed chemicals and that the units still were contaminated five hours after the end of operations. After decontamination, the imitation substances still were present and evaporating from the contaminated persons, blankets, and units. These results indicate a need for improvements in technical solutions, procedures, and training.

  7. Decontaminating products for routine decontamination in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    Routine decontamination work that has to be carried out in practical operation includes the cleaning of all kinds of surfaces such as floors, walls and apparatus, the decontamination of professional clothes and of the personnel. In order to ensure a trouble-free functioning of plants for the treatment of waste water and concentrate in nuclear power plants, radioactive liquid wastes appearing in the controlled area should be compatible with the treatment methods in practice. Radioactive concentrates and resides obtained from the treatment methods are mixed with matrix materials like cement or bitumen or treated by roller frame drying and thus are conditioned for intermediate or final storage. Several requirements should be made on decontaminating agents used in the controlled area. Some of these physical-chemical criteria will be described in detail. (R.P.)

  8. Decontamination of Some Cosmetic Products and Raw Materials by Irradiation and its Effect on Their Organoleptic, Chemical and Physical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltablawy, S.Y.

    2012-01-01

    This study was achieved to use gamma irradiation for decontamination of some available cosmetic products and raw materials in Egypt in order to reduce their microbial counts to the acceptable limits. The total bacterial counts of the tested samples ranged between 7 CFU/g or ml and the total fungal and yeast count ranged between 10 - 4x10 3 CFU/g or ml. Irradiation dose of 7.5 kGy was effective in eliminating the radioresistant Bacillus cereus from the tested samples. Irradiation dose of 5, 7.5, 10 and 12 kGy had no changes in the organoleptic properties of the tested samples. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study was carried out on the most heavily contaminated samples before and after irradiation at 7.5 kGy and no by-products was detected. Also, the transmission electron microscopy of irradiated raw materials indicated that there were no significant changes in their mean particle size.

  9. Precipitation process for supernate decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.M.; Kilpatrick, L.L.

    1982-11-01

    A precipitation and adsorption process has been developed to remove cesium, strontium, and plutonium from water-soluble, high-level radioactive waste. An existing waste tank serves as the reaction vessel and the process begins with the addition of a solution of sodium tetraphenylborate and a slurry of sodium titanate to the contained waste salt solution. Sodium tetraphenylborate precipitates the cesium and sodium titanate adsorbs the strontium and plutonium. The precipitate/adsorbate is then separated from the decontaminated salt solution by crossflow filtration. This new process offers significant capital savings over an earlier ion exchange process for salt decontamination. Chemical and small-scale engineering studies with actual waste are reported. The effect of many variables on the decontamination factors and filter performance are defined

  10. Decontamination trade study for the Light Duty Utility Arm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieck, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    Various methods were evaluated for decontaminating the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). Physical capabilities of each method were compared with the constraints and requirements for the LDUA Decontamination System. Costs were compared and a referred alternative was chosen

  11. Glacial ice cores: A model system for developing extraterrestrial decontamination protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, Brent C.; Mikucki, Jill A.; Foreman, Christine M.; Denson, Jackie; Priscu, John C.

    2005-04-01

    Evidence gathered from spacecraft orbiting Mars has shown that water ice exists at both poles and may form a large subsurface reservoir at lower latitudes. The recent exploration of the martian surface by unmanned landers and surface rovers, and the planned missions to eventually return samples to Earth have raised concerns regarding both forward and back contamination. Methods to search for life in these icy environments and adequate protocols to prevent contamination can be tested with earthly analogues. Studies of ice cores on Earth have established past climate changes and geological events, both globally and regionally, but only recently have these results been correlated with the biological materials (i.e., plant fragments, seeds, pollen grains, fungal spores, and microorganisms) that are entrapped and preserved within the ice. The inclusion of biology into ice coring research brings with it a whole new approach towards decontamination. Our investigations on ice from the Vostok core (Antarctica) have shown that the outer portion of the cores have up to 3 and 2 orders of magnitude higher bacterial density and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) than the inner portion of the cores, respectively, as a result of drilling and handling. The extreme gradients that exist between the outer and inner portion of these samples make contamination a very relevant aspect of geomicrobiological investigations with ice cores, particularly when the actual numbers of ambient bacterial cells are low. To address this issue and the inherent concern it raises for the integrity of future investigations with ice core materials from terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments, we employed a procedure to monitor the decontamination process in which ice core surfaces are painted with a solution containing a tracer microorganism, plasmid DNA, and fluorescent dye before sampling. Using this approach, a simple and direct method is proposed to verify the authenticity of geomicrobiological

  12. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Chong Hun; Choi, Wang Kyu; Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Gye Nam

    2004-02-01

    Technology development of surface decontamination in the uranium conversion facility before decommissioning, technology development of component decontamination in the uranium conversion facility after decommissioning, uranium sludge treatment technology development, radioactive waste soil decontamination technology development at the aim of the temporary storage soil of KAERI, Optimum fixation methodology derivation on the soil and uranium waste, and safety assessment methodology development of self disposal of the soil and uranium waste after decontamination have been performed in this study. The unique decontamination technology applicable to the component of the nuclear facility at room temperature was developed. Low concentration chemical decontamination technology which is very powerful so as to decrease the radioactivity of specimen surface under the self disposal level was developed. The component decontamination technology applicable to the nuclear facility after decommissioning by neutral salt electro-polishing was also developed. The volume of the sludge waste could be decreased over 80% by the sludge waste separation method by water. The electrosorption method on selective removal of U(VI) to 1 ppm of unrestricted release level using the uranium-containing lagoon sludge waste was tested and identified. Soil decontamination process and equipment which can reduce the soil volume over 90% were developed. A pilot size of soil decontamination equipment which will be used to development of real scale soil decontamination equipment was designed, fabricated and demonstrated. Optimized fixation methodology on soil and uranium sludge was derived from tests and evaluation of the results. Safety scenario and safety evaluation model were development on soil and uranium sludge aiming at self disposal after decontamination

  13. Atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Selwyn, Gary S.

    2001-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber is described. The apparatus is useful for decontaminating sensitive equipment and materials, such as electronics, optics and national treasures, which have been contaminated with chemical and/or biological warfare agents, such as anthrax, mustard blistering agent, VX nerve gas, and the like. There is currently no acceptable procedure for decontaminating such equipment. The apparatus may also be used for sterilization in the medical and food industries. Items to be decontaminated or sterilized are supported inside the chamber. Reactive gases containing atomic and metastable oxygen species are generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge in a He/O.sub.2 mixture and directed into the region of these items resulting in chemical reaction between the reactive species and organic substances. This reaction typically kills and/or neutralizes the contamination without damaging most equipment and materials. The plasma gases are recirculated through a closed-loop system to minimize the loss of helium and the possibility of escape of aerosolized harmful substances.

  14. Study on the Decontamination of Radionuclides in Spent Phosphogypsum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Won, H. J.; Moon, J. K.

    2010-01-15

    The objective of the study is to confirm the possibility of further R and D thru pre-study on the decontamination technology for the safe, high decontamination factor, low waste arising and cost effective removal of radionuclide in spent phosphogypsum. The following contents were studied. 1) Decontamination of Radionuclide in Phosphogypsum - Effect of decontamination chemical formulation on Ra removal - Effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration on Ra removal - Effect of Sr concentration on Ra removal 2) Removal of Radionuclide in Liquid Waste from Decontamination of Phosphogypsum - Ra removal by chromate treatment - Ra removal by zeolite and ACF treatment

  15. Sterilization and Decontamination of Surfaces Contaminated With Biological and Chemical Warfare Agents Using Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Discharges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garate, Eusebio

    1999-01-01

    ... based on the application of an atmospheric pressure plasma. We used both a DC corona and dielectric barrier discharge for the sterilization tests which were conducted on a variety of substrates including metals and chemically resistant fabrics...

  16. Chemical systems, chemical contiguity and the emergence of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kee, Terrence P.; Monnard, Pierre Alain

    2017-01-01

    to complex chemical systems over specific isolated functional apparatuses. We will summarize the recent advances in system chemistry and show that chemical systems in the geochemical context imply a form of chemical contiguity in the syntheses of the various molecules that precede modern biomolecules....

  17. Decontamination techniques for BWR power generation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Susumu

    1990-01-01

    The present report describes various techniques used for decontamination in BWR power generation plants. Objectives and requirements for decontamination in BWR power plants are first discussed focusing on reduction in dose, prevention of spread of contamination, cleaning of work environments, exposure of equipment parts for inspection, re-use of decontaminated resources, and standards for decontamination. Then, the report outlines major physical, chemical and electrochemical decontamination techniques generally used in BWR power generation plants. The physical techniques include suction of deposits in tanks, jet cleaning, particle blast cleaning, ultrasonic cleaning, coating with special paints, and flushing cleaning. The chemical decontamination techniques include the use of organic acids etc. for dissolution of oxidized surface layers and treatment of secondary wastes such as liquids released from primary decontamination processes. Other techniques are used for removal of penetrated contaminants, and soft and hard cladding in and on equipment and piping that are in direct contact with radioactive materials used in nuclear power generation plants. (N.K.)

  18. Criteria and evaluation of three decontamination techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripp, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Past decontamination and solvent recovery activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), which is part of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), have resulted in the accumulation of 1.5 million gallons of radioactively contaminated sodium-bearing liquid waste. Future decontamination activities at the ICPP could result in the production of 5 million gallons or more of sodium-bearing waste using the current decontamination techniques of chemical/water flushes and steam jet cleaning. This waste requires a large amount of cold chemical additive to process because the low melting temperatures of sodium and potassium salts cause agglomeration in the bed of the calciner vessel. Criteria have been established for evaluating methods and technologies available for decontaminating equipment and facilities. The criteria were weighted according to their relative importance using a Kepner-Tregoe Problem Solving process. These criteria were used to rank three decontamination techniques new to the ICPP: laser ablation, liquid abrasive blasting and CO{sub 2} pellet blasting, against the standard decontamination techniques of sodium-based chemical cleaning and water/steam jets used.

  19. Criteria and evaluation of three decontamination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripp, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Past decontamination and solvent recovery activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), which is part of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), have resulted in the accumulation of 1.5 million gallons of radioactively contaminated sodium-bearing liquid waste. Future decontamination activities at the ICPP could result in the production of 5 million gallons or more of sodium-bearing waste using the current decontamination techniques of chemical/water flushes and steam jet cleaning. This waste requires a large amount of cold chemical additive to process because the low melting temperatures of sodium and potassium salts cause agglomeration in the bed of the calciner vessel. Criteria have been established for evaluating methods and technologies available for decontaminating equipment and facilities. The criteria were weighted according to their relative importance using a Kepner-Tregoe Problem Solving process. These criteria were used to rank three decontamination techniques new to the ICPP: laser ablation, liquid abrasive blasting and CO 2 pellet blasting, against the standard decontamination techniques of sodium-based chemical cleaning and water/steam jets used

  20. Unit for air decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariano H, E.

    1991-02-01

    To fulfill the applicable requirements of safety to the ventilation systems in nuclear facilities, it is necessary to make a cleaning of the air that hurtles to the atmosphere. For that which was designed and it manufactured an unit for decontamination of the air for the Pilot plant of production of Nuclear Fuel that this built one with national parts, uses Hepa national filters and the design can adapt for different dimensions of filters, also can be added a lodging for a prefilter or to adopt two Hepa filters. (Author)

  1. A new laser decontamination device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke J.

    2012-01-01

    A new laser decontamination device has been developed to evaporate instantly with almost no temperature rise and to clean up the radioisotope (RI) contaminated stainless steel components, devices and major structural objects of nuclear power station, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, accelerator facilities and the related ones. The laser decontamination device delivers the tightly focused laser light of GW/cm 2 just on the surface to clean up RI contained rust mold on and inside the stress corrosion cracks and corrosion pitting in the stainless steel-made components, devices and objects. The decontamination device is newly designed to measure three-dimensional surface map very quickly, and successfully to peel the three-dimensional irregular surface according to the measured map using the three dimensional fast scanner, displacement meter and laser system. In the cold tests, the device performed to peel off the surface of cans and multi-stepped plates very precisely, very uniformly and very quickly. (author)

  2. Tritium decontamination of machine components and walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hircq, B.; Wong, K.Y.; Jalbert, R.A.; Shmayda, W.T.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium decontamination techniques for machine components and their application at tritium handling facilities are reviewed. These include commonly used methods such as vacuuming, purging, thermal desorption and isotopic exchange as well as less common methods such as chemical/electrochemical etching, plasma discharge cleaning, and destructive methods. Problems associated with tritium contamination of walls and use of protective coatings are reviewed. Tritium decontamination considerations at fusion facilities are discussed

  3. Environmental and occupational hazards associated with decontamination solutions (a)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levanthal, L.

    1985-01-01

    Some of the reagents employed in the decontamination of reactor coolant systems are potentially hazardous. Potential exposure to decontamination agents by operating personnel, or members of the general population, could occur during use, processing, transportation to, or disposal at a low-level waste site. Federal and state agencies have promulgated regulations relevant to the disposal of decontamination solution waste to prevent acute or chronic exposures. In particular, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Transportation (DOT), Department of Labor - Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), State of South Carolina, State of Nevada, and the State of Washington have such regulations. These regulations may impact on the choice of decontamination solutions, operations procedures, processing methods, or disposal methods. Laws and regulations relate to both chemically hazardous, or toxic materials and to radioactive hazards. Laws which regulate the exposure of workers and the general public to effluents and emissions during processing, disposal and transport have been abstracted. As a result of these regulations, utilities are required to obtain permits to perform monitoring and sampling of personnel and the on-site and off-site environment, provide proper protective clothing and ventilation, make certain the solutions are properly contained during use, storage and processing, and destroy and/or properly immobilize the residues for disposal. Waste treatment processes such as neutralization, ion exchange, evaporation, incineration, etc., must not produce, nor result in hazardous emissions, effluents, residues, or hazards to workers. The laws also stipulate record keeping and documentation

  4. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomasney, H.L.; Yachmenev, V.

    1994-01-01

    Concrete structures which have been contaminated with uranium and other radioisotopes may be decontaminated using in-situ electrokinetic remediation. By placing an electrode cell on the concrete surface and using the concrete's rebar, a ground rod, or another surface cell as the counter electrode, the radioisotopes may be migrated from the concrete into this cell. The process is highly dependent upon the chemical parameters of the species involved; namely, the concrete, the contaminants, and the solubilizers used to mobilize the contaminants. In a preliminary study conducted at the K-25 Site of the Oak Ridge National Labs, an estimated removal of >40 percent of uranium has been observed for a short duration run. This removal occurred using traditional uranium solubilizers in contact with the contaminated surface

  5. Effectiveness of Vaporous Hydrogen Peroxide for the Decontamination of Representative Military Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dutt, D. L; Turetsky, A. L; Brickhouse, M; Pfarr, J. W; McVey, I. F; Meilander, S. L; Janick, A. J; Schulte, S. L; Dallmier, A. W

    2004-01-01

    .... While many chemical decontamination methods, including aqueous hydrogen peroxide, have been used or are under development for direct application, few vaporous methods are being evaluated for decontamination efficacy (McDonnell, G. et al., 2002...

  6. Skin contamination - prevention and decontaminating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed examination is made of the structure of human skin. Measures were drawn up to prevent skin contamination in nuclear installations as well as contaminated skin was decontaminated from the personnel. By systematically applying these measures a significant level of success was achieved in preventing contamination in nuclear installations. Cases where more far-reaching chemical methods had to be used were kept to a minimum. (R.P.)

  7. Decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Status report Task 2: process evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Woodruff, E.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Zima, G.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program to reduce occupational exposure and waste volumes, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Eleven processes or solvents were examined for their behavior in decontaminating BWR carbon steel samples. The solvents included NS-1, a proprietary solvent of Dow Chemical Corporation, designed for BWR use, and AP-Citrox, a well-known, two-step process designed for PWR stainless steel; it was used to provide a reference for later comparison to other systems and processes. The decontamination factors observed in the tests performed in a small laboratory scale recirculating loop ranged from about 1 (no effect) to 222 (about 99.6% of the initial activity removed. Coordinated corrosion measurements were made using twelve chemical solvents and eight metal alloys found in a range of reactor types

  8. Decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Status report Task 2: process evaluation. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divine, J.R.; Woodruff, E.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Zima, G.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program to reduce occupational exposure and waste volumes, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Eleven processes or solvents were examined for their behavior in decontaminating BWR carbon steel samples. The solvents included NS-1, a proprietary solvent of Dow Chemical Corporation, designed for BWR use, and AP-Citrox, a well-known, two-step process designed for PWR stainless steel; it was used to provide a reference for later comparison to other systems and processes. The decontamination factors observed in the tests performed in a small laboratory scale recirculating loop ranged from about 1 (no effect) to 222 (about 99.6% of the initial activity removed. Coordinated corrosion measurements were made using twelve chemical solvents and eight metal alloys found in a range of reactor types.

  9. Validation of a Protocol to Compare the Effectiveness of Experimental Decontaminants with Component 2 of the M258A1 Kit or Fuller’s Earth Standard Decontaminants Against Percutaneous Application of Undiluted Vesicant Chemical Surety Materiel to the Laboratory Albino Rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-24

    is individually packaged in aluminum foil to maintain activity of the ingredients and to prolong the storage life of the kit. Component I consists of...1.0 (w/w) mixture of Ketamine and Rompun (8.75 mg/kg and 5.0 mg/kg, respectively) by intramuscular injection. The unconscious animals were then...corresponding time interval for the standard decontamination system. The ease of estimation of lesion length was enhanced by the intramuscular injection of I ml

  10. Chemically Assisted Photocatalytic Oxidation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino, Jean; Wu, Chang-Yu; Mazyck, David; Teixeira, Arthur A.

    2009-01-01

    The chemically assisted photocatalytic oxidation system (CAPOS) has been proposed for destroying microorganisms and organic chemicals that may be suspended in the air or present on surfaces of an air-handling system that ventilates an indoor environment. The CAPOS would comprise an upstream and a downstream stage that would implement a tandem combination of two partly redundant treatments. In the upstream stage, the air stream and, optionally, surfaces of the air-handling system would be treated with ozone, which would be generated from oxygen in the air by means of an electrical discharge or ultraviolet light. In the second stage, the air laden with ozone and oxidation products from the first stage would be made to flow in contact with a silica-titania photocatalyst exposed to ultraviolet light in the presence of water vapor. Hydroxyl radicals generated by the photocatalytic action would react with both carbon containing chemicals and microorganisms to eventually produce water and carbon dioxide, and ozone from the first stage would be photocatalytically degraded to O2. The net products of the two-stage treatment would be H2O, CO2, and O2.

  11. Ion Exchange Equilibrium and Kinetic Properties of Polyacrylate Films and Applications to Chemical Analysis and Environmental Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Stephen P.

    1997-01-01

    One of the goals of the original proposal was to study how cross-linking affects the properties of an ion exchange material(IEM) developed at Lewis Research Center. However, prior to the start of this work, other workers at LERC investigated the effect of cross-linking on the properties of this material. Other than variation in the ion exchange capacity, the chemical characteristics were shown to be independent of the cross-linking agent, and the degree of cross-linking. New physical forms of the film were developed (film, supported film, various sizes of beads, and powder). All showed similar properties with respect to ion exchange equilibria but the kinetics of ion exchange depended on the surface area per unit mass; the powder form of the IEM exchanging much more rapidly than the other forms. The research performed under this grant was directed towards the application of the IEM to the analysis of metal ions at environmental concentrations.

  12. Decontamination and dismantlement of Plant 7 at Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertin, M.; Borgman, T.; Zebick, B.

    1994-01-01

    Decontamination and dismantlement (D ampersand D) tasks have been successfully completed on Plant 7 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The seven story facility was radiologically, chemically, and biologically contaminated. The work involved the D ampersand D work beginning with safe shutdown and gross decontamination, and ended with removal of the structural steel. A series of lessons learned were gained which include use of explosives, bidding tactics, safe shutdown, building decontamination and lockdown, use of seam climbers, etc

  13. Decontamination of paint-coated concrete in nuclear plants using laser technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthofer, Anton; Lippmann, Wolfgang; Hurtado, Antonio [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Chair of Hydrogen and Nuclear Technology

    2013-07-01

    A review of the state of the art shows the technical novelty of the combined project. The development of an all-in-one process for treatment hazard chemical contamination on concrete structures with online monitoring method reduces the laborious mechanic decontamination and post-treatment. For safe experimental investigations, a three-barrier-system was constructed and can be used for tests with - first - epoxy paint in order to analyze and optimize the process. Simulation models help to formulate a mathematic scheme of the decontamination process by laser technology. The goal is a decontamination system with an online analyzing system of the flue gas for a mobile and extensive component in nuclear and conventional decommission. (orig.)

  14. Decontamination of Bacillus spores adhered to iron and cement-mortar drinking water infrastructure in a model system using disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Jeffrey G; Meiners, Greg; Heckman, Lee; Rice, Eugene W; Hall, John

    2017-02-01

    Decontamination of Bacillus spores adhered to common drinking water infrastructure surfaces was evaluated using a variety of disinfectants. Corroded iron and cement-mortar lined iron represented the infrastructure surfaces, and were conditioned in a 23 m long, 15 cm diameter (75 ft long, 6 in diameter) pilot-scale drinking water distribution pipe system. Decontamination was evaluated using increased water velocity (flushing) alone at 0.5 m s -1 (1.7 ft s -1 ), as well as free chlorine (5 and 25 mg L -1 ), monochloramine (25 mg L -1 ), chlorine dioxide (5 and 25 mg L -1 ), ozone (2.0 mg L -1 ), peracetic acid 25 mg L -1 ) and acidified nitrite (0.1 mol L -1 at pH 2 and 3), all followed by flushing at 0.3 m s -1 (1 ft s -1 ). Flushing alone reduced the adhered spores by 0.5 and 2.0 log 10 from iron and cement-mortar, respectively. Log 10 reduction on corroded iron pipe wall coupons ranged from 1.0 to 2.9 at respective chlorine dioxide concentrations of 5 and 25 mg L -1 , although spores were undetectable on the iron surface during disinfection at 25 mg L -1 . Acidified nitrite (pH 2, 0.1 mol L -1 ) yielded no detectable spores on the iron surface during the flushing phase after disinfection. Chlorine dioxide was the best performing disinfectant with >3.0 log 10 removal from cement-mortar at 5 and 25 mg L -1 . The data show that free chlorine, monochloramine, ozone and chlorine dioxide followed by flushing can reduce adhered spores by > 3.0 log 10 on cement-mortar. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Decontamination of radioactively contaminated surfaces - Method for testing and assessing the ease of decontamination (International Standard Publication ISO 8690:1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanik, J.

    2001-01-01

    The specifications laid down in this International Standard apply to the testing of surfaces which may become contaminated by radioactive materials. Decontaminability data obtained using this test method are not applicable to technical systems where layers of contaminating materials are formed as a result of long-term application of higher temperatures and pressures (for example primary circuits of nuclear reactors). The purpose of the test is to assess the ease of decontamination of surfaces under laboratory conditions. In practical applications, it may be important to consider other qualities, such as chemical, mechanical and radiation resistance and long-term stability in the selection of the materials to be used. It should be recognized that further decontamination tests under simulated service conditions may be needed

  16. Decontamination techniques for dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, J.R.; Lorin; Courtois, C.; Gauchon, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Decontamination is one step of dismantling operations which can be necessary to optimize dismantling wastes management. Choice of a decontamination process follows experiments from laboratory scale to pilote scale, and takes into account needed decontamination efficiency, secondary wastes balance, difficulties and cost of industrial operations. Some examples of process development and industrial applications are indicated for gas cooled reactor G2 and fast breeder reactor Rapsodie

  17. Effect of Different Saliva Decontamination Procedures on Bond Strength to Dentin in Single Bottle Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghavam

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Following the increasing use of composites in restoring anterior and posterior teeth, problems due to its technique sensitivity have become a major concern.One of these problems is the possibility of contamination of dentin with saliva, blood and/or gingival fluid in different stages of bonding procedure, even with application of different methods of isolation. However, by introduction of Single-bottle dentin adhesives,the contamination possibility reduced to two stages. Scientific documents show that saliva contamination reduces bond strength of composites to dentin. Application of simple and efficient methods for reducing or eliminating saliva contamination enables clinicians to carry out dental treatment without any concern about deterioration of clinical longevity of restoration.Purpose: This study was designed to compare the effect of different decontamination methods on the shear bond strength of composite to dentin using a “Single-bottle” adhesive.Materials and Methods: Seventy-two extracted sound human molars and premolars were selected. Enamel of buccal surface was ground flat to expose dentin. The teeth were divided into 9 groups of 8 each. In control group (1 the adhesive “Excite” was used according tothe manufacturer, without any contamination. Conditioned and saliva contaminated dentin was (2 rinsed and blot dried, (3 rinsed, dried and re-etched. In groups 4, 5, 6 uncured adhesive was saliva contaminated and then: (4 only blot dried (5 rinsed, blot dried with adhesive reapplication and (6 resurfaced with bur, rinsed, dried and followed by repeating the whole process. In groups 7, 8, 9 cured adhesive was contaminated with saliva and then:(7 rinsed and dried (8 rinsed, blot dried with adhesive reapplication (9 same as group (6.Then “Tetric Ceram” composite cylinders were bonded to dentin surfaces. Samples were thermo cycled in 5°C and 55°C water, 30 seconds in each bath with a dowel time of 10

  18. Susceptibility of Microsporum canis arthrospores to a mixture of chemically defined essential oils: a perspective for environmental decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardoni, Simona; Tortorano, Annamaria; Mugnaini, Linda; Profili, Greta; Pistelli, Luisa; Giovanelli, Silvia; Pisseri, Francesca; Papini, Roberto; Mancianti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The zoophilic dermatophyte Microsporum canis has cats as natural reservoir, but it is able to infect a wide range of hosts, including humans, where different clinical features of the so-called ringworm dermatophytosis have been described. Human infections are increasingly been reported in Mediterranean countries. A reliable control program against M. canis infection in cats should include an antifungal treatment of both the infected animals and their living environment. In this article, a herbal mixture composed of chemically defined essential oils (EOs) of Litsea cubeba (1%), Illicium verum, Foeniculum vulgare, and Pelargonium graveolens (0.5% each) was formulated and its antifungal activity assessed against M. canis arthrospores which represent the infective environmental stage of M. canis. Single compounds present in higher amounts in the mixture were also separately tested in vitro. Litsea cubeba and P. graveolens EOs were most effective (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.5%), followed by EOs of I. verum (MIC 2%) and F. vulgare (MIC 2.5%). Minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFC) values were 0.75% (L. cubeba), 1.5% (P. graveolens), 2.5% (I. verum) and 3% (F. vulgare). MIC and MFC values of the mixture were 0.25% and 0.5%, respectively. The daily spray of the mixture (200 μL) directly onto infected hairs inhibited fungal growth from the fourth day onwards. The compounds present in higher amounts exhibited variable antimycotic activity, with MIC values ranging from >10% (limonene) to 0.1% (geranial and neral). Thus, the mixture showed a good antifungal activity against arthrospores present in infected hairs. These results are promising for a further application of the mixture as an alternative tool or as an adjuvant in the environmental control of feline microsporosis.

  19. Potential problems associated with ion-exchange resins used in the decontamination of light-water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.; Adams, J.W.; Kempf, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    During a typical decontamination event, ion-exchange resin beds are used to remove corrosion products (radioactive and nonradioactive) and excess decontamination reagents from waste streams. The spent resins may be solidified in a binder, such as cement, or sealed in a high-integrity container (HIC) in order to meet waste stability requirements specified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Lack of stability of low-level waste in a shallow land burial trench may lead to trench subsidence, enhanced water infiltration and waste leaching, which would result in accelerated transport of radionuclides and the complexing agents used for decontamination. The current program is directed at investigating safety problems associated with the handling, solidification and containerization of decontamination resin wastes. The three tasks currently underway include freeze-thaw cycling of cementitious and vinyl ester-styrene forms to determine if mechanical integrity is compromised, a study of the corrosion of container materials by spent decontamination waste resins, and investigations of resin degradation mechanisms

  20. Integrated five station nondestructive assay system for the support of decontamination and decommissioning of a former plutonium mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, J.T.; Bieri, J.M.; Hastings, R.D.; Horton, W.S.; Kuckertz, T.H.; Kunz, W.E.; Plettenberg, K.; Smith, L.D.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of a safe, efficient and economic decontamination and decommissioning of plutonium facilities can be greatly enhanced through the intelligent use of an integrated system of nondestructive assay equipment. We have designed and fabricated such a system utilizing five separate NDA stations integrated through a single data acquisition and management personal computer-based controller. The initial station utilizes a passive neutron measurement to determine item Pu inventory to the 0.1 gm level prior to insertion into the decontamination cell. A large active neutron station integrated into the cell is used to measure decontamination effectiveness at the 10 nci/gm level. Cell Pu buildup at critical points is monitored with passive neutron detectors. An active neutron station having better than 1 mg Pu assay sensitivity is used to quantify final compacted waste pucks outside the cell. Bulk Pu in various forms and isotopic enrichments is quantified in a combined passive neutron coincidence and high resolution gamma ray spectrometer station outside the cell. Item control and Pu inventory are managed with bar code labeling and a station integrating algorithm. Overall economy is achieved by multiple station use of the same expensive hardware such as the neutron generator

  1. Innovative permeable cover system to reduce risks at a chemical munitions burial site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powels, C.C.; Bon, I.; Okusu, N.M.

    1997-01-01

    An innovative permeable sand cover with various integrated systems has been designed to contain and treat the Old O-Field chemical munitions landfill at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The 18,200 m 2 (4.5 acre) landfill was used from the mid 1930s to the mid 1950s for the disposal of chemical, incendiary, and explosive munitions from domestic and foreign origins, together with contaminated wastes associated with the development and production of chemical warfare agents (CWA). The site is suspected to be contaminated with white phosphorous (WP) (which when dry, spontaneously burns when exposed to air), shock sensitive picric acid fuses and has the potential to contain large quantities of CWA-filled munitions. Historically, one to three explosions or fires occurred per ten-year period at the landfill. Such events have the potential to cause a CWA release to the environment, which could potentially affect densely populated areas. Recovery and decontamination projects conducted at the site in the late 1940s and early 1950s used large amounts of decontamination chemicals (containing solvents) and fuels which further contaminated the area. The groundwater downgradient of the landfill is contaminated with volatile organic compounds, metals, explosives and CWA degradation compounds and is currently being contained by a groundwater extraction and treatment system. This report describes a remedial action program for the site

  2. Development of strippable gel for surface decontamination applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, D.; Sandhya, U.; Khot, S.A.; Srinivas, C.

    2015-07-01

    Strippable gels are an attractive option for decontamination of surfaces particularly when materials are to be reused after decontamination. The process in general results in good decontamination performance with minimal secondary waste generation. This paper reports on development of strippable gel formulation using polyvinyl alcohol as the gel former. Peeling behavior of the gel film improved when glycerol was used as plasticizer. Incorporation of decontaminating agents is essential for the gel to be effective, so a number of decontaminating agents were screened based on their miscibility with the gel, smooth peeling, and good decontamination performance. Based on this study, a strippable gel, ‘INDIGEL’ was formulated as a potential candidate for surface decontamination applications. Extensive trials on evaluation of decontamination performance of Indigel were done on simulated surfaces like stainless steel tray, stainless steel fume hood, PVC floor, granite and ceramic table tops. Results show that Indigel is highly effective for decontamination of surfaces contaminated with all types of radionuclides. Simplicity of its use coupled with good decontamination ability will find application in nuclear and other chemical industries. (author)

  3. Borated coolant decontamination and water-chemical regime of the primary coolant circuit of WWER-1 type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matskevich, G.V.; Klement'eva, E.M.; Plotnikov, I.M.

    1974-01-01

    Treatment of the boron concentrate from the evaporation plant by coagulation and mechanical filtration and H-cation exchange, Bo 3 3- anion exchange makes it possible to return the boron concentrate to the primary loop. The duration of the filter cycle, during the course of which the boron concentrate is very effectively treated with respect to all the 'standard' characteristics, is determined by the start of breakthrough of potassium and ammonium cations from the H-cation exchange filter. After regenerating the cation filter with acid the effectiveness of treatment by the anion exchange filter is restored. The investigation leads to the recommendation of a technology for regenerating boric acid not only from the boron-containing drain waters from the primary loop under conditions of liquid boron control but also, if necessary, from the non-design leakage flows to the special drain system of the station. The optimal water conditions for the primary loop of the WWER-1 reactor when effecting control by a boron-containing coolant are those in which the water is treated with caustic potash and a volatile alkali, ammonia or hydrazine hydrate. When working with a coolant which has a high concentration of boric acid (up to 7-8g/l), corrosion-free conditions for the materials of the high- and low-temperature parts of the primary loop can be achieved only by an additional dose of hydrogen-containing alkali

  4. Active Chemical Sampling System for Underwater Chemical Source Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuichi Takemura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of active water sampling to enhance chemical reception for small underwater robots. The search for a chemical source in a stagnant water environment is not an easy task because the chemical solution released from the source stays in the close vicinity of the source. No signal is obtained even if a robot with chemical sensors is placed a few centimeters from the chemical source. In the system under study, four electrochemical sensors are aligned in front of a suction pipe that draws water samples from the surroundings. Owing to the smooth laminar flow converging to the suction port, the streak of the chemical solution drawn to the sensors is shaped into a thin filamentous form. To prevent the chemical solution from passing between the sensors without touching their surfaces, slits are placed in front of the sensors to guide the incoming chemical solution from different directions to the corresponding sensors. A chemical source can be located by moving the system in the direction of the sensor showing the largest response. It is also shown that the chemical reception at the sensors can be significantly enhanced when the system is wobbled to introduce disturbances.

  5. Radioactive contamination of some rubber or plastic surfaces by fission products. Decontamination tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestre, E.; Sautiez, N.

    1957-10-01

    With the objective of notably addressing the contamination and decontamination of gloves and floor covering, this report first presents some characteristics of contaminating radioactive materials (nature, physical and chemical condition), of contaminated surfaces (surface condition, surface nature), and of decontamination processes (physical, chemical or mechanical action). It describes the operational modality implemented to test decontamination processes on various glove or flooring materials: sample preparation, counting, decontamination, reproducibility of decontamination tests, results in terms of activity reduction. It more precisely describes the tested samples: short gloves, gloves from glove boxes, floor and wall coverings. Results are presented and discussed in terms of sample susceptibility to contamination, and of decontamination, but also for re-contamination tests after a Nab-based decontamination (susceptibility to contamination, decontamination gain)

  6. An appraisal of existing decontamination technology used in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenech, J.S.; Frost, F.; Curran, A.R.; Grave, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    This report is a review of decontamination technology applied by industry to radioactively contaminated components in the U.S.A. In addition some newer techniques under development or recently emerging are discussed. Mechanical, chemical, manual and other techniques such as electropolishing and ultrasonics are reviewed. Whilst the emphasis is mainly on non-destructive techniques for components some discussion of segmentation is included as this is inevitable during concrete decontamination; and also when decontamination of components occurs as part of a decommissioning programme the use of segmentation techniques may facilitate the process. A bibliography has been included to facilitate further reading. It is important to consider the relevance of the US data in this report to the United Kingdom both to the learning curve of development and the different nuclear reactor systems in the respective countries. The authors have therefore listed some conclusions and recommendations which have become apparent to them whilst undertaking the study. (U.K.)

  7. Automatic remote sampling and delivery system incorporating decontamination and disposal of sample bottles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savarkar, V.K.; Mishra, A.K.; Bajpai, D.D.; Nair, M.K.T.

    1990-01-01

    The present generation of reprocessing plants have sampling and delivery systems that have to be operated manually with its associated problems. The complete automation and remotisation of sampling system has hence been considered to reduce manual intervention and personnel exposure. As a part of this scheme an attempt to automate and remotise various steps in sampling system has been made. This paper discusses in detail the development work carried out in this area as well as the tests conducted to incorporate the same in the existing plants. (author). 3 figs

  8. Full Scale Drinking Water System Decontamination at the Water Security Test Bed

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EPA’s Water Security Test Bed (WSTB) facility is a full-scale representation of a drinking water distribution system. In collaboration with the Idaho National...

  9. Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Oh, W. Z.; Won, H. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K

    2007-11-15

    Through the project of 'Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution', the followings were studied. 1. Investigation of decontamination characteristics of chemical decontamination process 2. Analysis of COD, ferrous ion concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration 3. Decomposition tests of hardly decomposable organic compounds 4. Improvement of organic acid decomposition process by ultrasonic wave and UV light 5. Optimization of decomposition process using a surrogate decontamination waste solution.

  10. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, July--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The projects reported for the WVU Cooperative Agreement are categorized into the following three areas: (1) in situ remediation process development; (2) advanced product applications testing; and (3) information systems, public policy, community outreach, and economics. Summaries of the significant accomplishments for the projects reported during the period 1 July 1995 through 30 September 1995 are presented.

  11. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, January--March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The projects reported during this period are categorized into the following three areas: 1.0 Site Remediation Technologies, 2.0 Advanced Product Applications Testing, and 3.0 Information Systems, Public Policy, Community Outreach, and Economics. Summaries of the significant accomplishments for the projects reported during this period, are presented.

  12. An advanced semiautonomous robotic system for hazardous response work for decontamination and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, C.; Tulenko, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The articulated transporter/manipulator system (ATMS) under development by the University of Florida (UF) with Odetics Corporation as lead subcontractor will be able to manipulate through obstructed areas. Since 1987, the Advanced Technology Division of the US Department of Energy has sponsored a university team composed of the UF, University of Michigan, University of Tennessee, and the University of Texas under the leadership of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to pursue innovative robotics research leading to the development of advanced robotic systems. The UF has the task of developing the ATMS innovative transport system. As part of this task, UF has been focusing on developing horizontal and external navigation algorithms that carry out ongoing ATMS autonomous path planning. The flexibility of the ATMS is also being demonstrated as a surveillance/maintenance robot for the PRISM reactor. The ATMS has demonstrated that it can carry out autonomous planning responding both to obstacles and set operating levels. The ATMS also has demonstrated that it has sufficient flexibility to serve in a surveillance/maintenance mode. Work is progressing on developing the hardware to deliver the mechanical capabilities demonstrated by simulated robotic system

  13. Surface decontamination using dry ice snow cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.D.; Park, K.H.; Lee, B.S.; Kim, Y.E.

    1999-01-01

    The water washing and steam blast cleaning method are currently used in nuclear power plants in decontamination. These methods produce lots of secondary wastes and tend to damage the work surface. A dry ice snow cleaning device with an adjustable nozzle was developed for the decontamination purpose. Glass with finger prints and scratched acrylic plastics surface with adsorbed oil-dust mixture were tested to see the cleaning ability of the developed device. Traces of finger prints and oil-dust mixture could not be detected after cleaning. The radioactivity of pump housing in a primary system of Wolsung Nuclear Power Plant was also tested. The maximum of 82% of radioactivity was reduced after dry ice snow cleaning. This device is expected to be used in decontamination of expensive electronic and optical instruments and detectors that cannot be decontaminated by water

  14. A new General Purpose Decontamination System for Chemical and Biological Warfare and Terrorism Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khetan, Sushil; Banerjee, xdDeboshri; Chanda, Arani; Collins, Terry

    2003-01-01

    ...,Optimization of Reaction Conditions,Use of Cationic Surfactant, Time Dependence of Spore Kill,Enhanced Spore Mortality, Oxidative Detoxification of Organophosphorus Triesters and Dialkyl sulfides,TAML...

  15. Effect of decontamination on nuclear power plant primary circuit materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezina, M.; Kupca, L.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of repeated decontamination on the properties of structural materials of the WWER-440 primary coolant circuit was examined. Three kinds of specimens of 08Kh18Ni10T steel were used for radioactivity-free laboratory experiments; they included material obtained from assembly additions to the V-2 nuclear power plant primary piping, and a sheet of the CSN 17247 steel. Various chemical, electrochemical and semi-dry electrochemical decontamination procedures were tested. Chemical decontamination was based on the conventional AP(20/5)-CITROX(20/20) procedure and its variants; NP-CITROX type procedures with various compositions were also employed. Solutions based on oxalic acid were tested for the electrochemical and semi-dry electrochemical decontamination. The results of measurements of mass losses of the surfaces, of changes in the corrosion resistance and in the mechanical properties of the materials due to repeated decontamination are summarized. (Z.S.). 12 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs

  16. Development of a Portable Sensitive Equipment Decontamination System. Volume 2: Activated Carbon Fiber Wipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Spent Activated carbon fiber fabric: Rationale—the JSSED and JPID ORD require that the process or system must not permit any residual health hazards...approved 2001): Standard Test Method for Stiffness of Nonwoven Fabrics Using the Cantilever Test • ASTM D 6829-02: Standard Test Method for...experimental flow sheet and Figure 9 is a photograph of the experimental setup. Stainless Steel Screen 5um Teflon• Membrane Filter Packing A •* Outlet

  17. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, April--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This report contains separate reports on the following subtasks: analysis of the Vortec cyclone melting system for remediation of PCB contaminated soils using CFD; drain enhanced soil flushing using prefabricated vertical drains; performance and characteristics evaluation of acrylates as grout barriers; development of standard test protocol barrier design models for desiccation barriers, and for in-situ formed barriers; in-situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvents at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; development of a decision support system and a prototype database for management of the EM50 technology development program; GIS-based infrastructure for site characterization and remediation; treatment of mixed wastes via fluidized bed steam reforming; use of centrifugal membrane technology to treat hazardous/radioactive waste; environmental pollution control devices based on novel forms of carbon; development of instrumental methods for analysis of nuclear wastes and environmental materials; production and testing of biosorbents and cleaning solutions for D and D; use of SpinTek centrifugal membrane and sorbents/cleaning solutions for D and D; West Virginia High Tech Consortium Foundation--Environmental support program; small business interaction opportunities; and approach for assessing potential voluntary environmental protection.

  18. Decontamination Processes for Restorative Operations and as a Precursor to Decommissioning: A Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, J. L.; Divine, J. R.

    1981-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted an comprehensive literature review of actual reactor decontamination processes that are currently available. In general, any decontamination process should be based on the following criteria: effectiveness, efficiency, safety, and waste production. The information that was collected and analyzed has been divided into three major categories of decontamination: chemical, mechanical, and electrochemical. Chemical methods can be further classified as either low-concentration, singlestep processes or high-concentration, single- or multistep processes. Numerous chemical decontamination methods are detailed. Mechanical decontamination methods are usually restricted to the removal of a contaminated surface layer, whlch limits their versatility; several mechanical decontamination methods are described. Electrochemical decontamination. is both fast and easily controlled, and numerous processes that have been used in industry for many years are discussed. Information obtained from this work is tabulated in Appendix A for easy access, and a bibliography and a glossary have been provided.

  19. Decontamination techniques for buildings, structures and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M.P.; Clark, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides information on pollution protection. It describes decontamination process for such pertinent pollutants as asbestos, acids, explosives, cyanides, low level radiation, pesticides, P.C.B.'s and hazardous organic chemicals. The discussions include advantages, disadvantages, cost, effectiveness of the procedures and waste disposal

  20. Nuclear reactor decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, John.

    1982-01-01

    A new method for decontaminating and removing corrosion products from nuclear reactors was developed which involves first oxidizing insoluble metal oxides on the contaminated surfaces with ozone to make them more soluble in water or acid solutions. The method is effective on chromium (III) oxide and can be used to decontaminate iron-, chromium-, and nickel-containing alloys such as are used in PWRs. The solubilized metal oxides are then dissolved in ozone-saturated water. Mild acidic decontamination reagents in low concentrations in water are used to remove the remaining surface oxides. Insoluble material is filtered from the aqueous solution, and both dissolved metals and the decontamination reagent are removed with cation and anion-exchange resins

  1. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  2. Advance in radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basteris M, J. A.; Farrera V, R.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine if the application of the Na hypochlorite has some utility in the radioactive decontamination, in comparison with the water, detergent and alcohol. Several methods were compared for decontaminate the iodine 131 and technetium 99, the work table and the skin it was carried out an initial count with the Geiger Muller. Later on, in a single occasion, the areas were washed with abundant water, alcohol, clothes detergent and sodium hypochlorite (used commercially as domestic bleacher) without diluting. Observing that the percentage in the decrease of the counted radioactivity by the Geiger Muller, decreased in the following way: It was demonstrated that the Na hypochlorite presents the highest index of radioactive decontamination with 100% of effectiveness. The Na hypochlorite is an excellent substance that can be used with effectiveness and efficiency like decontamination element in the accident cases of radioactive contamination in the clinical laboratories of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  3. Decontamination of two filter boxes after a fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerre, P.; Mestre, E.; Lafitte, T.

    1961-01-01

    As a primary filter of the venting system caught fire in a hot cell of the Laboratory of Examination of Irradiated Fuels, this filter (as well as the secondary filter) has been removed, wrapped in polyvinyl sheets, and transported into the decontamination station. The authors report the details of the handling and decontamination operations: modifications to the station arrangement, measures of radiation protection, decontamination and measurements, observations made when disassembling the filter and filter-boxes [fr

  4. Decontamination of Bacillus subtilis Spores in a Sealed Package Using a Non-thermal Plasma System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, Kevin M.; Jensen, J. L.; Valdramidis, V. P.; Byrne, E.; Connolly, J.; Mosnier, J. P.; Cullen, P. J.

    The safety of packaged food and medical devices is a major concern to consumers and government officials. Recent inventions (PK-1 and PK-2) based on the principles of non-thermal, atmospheric plasma has shown significant reduction in bacterial contamination inside a sealed package. The objective of this study was to evaluate the PK-1 and PK-2 systems in the reduction of Bacillus subtilis spores using packages containing air or modified atmosphere (MA) gas (65% O2/30% CO2/5% N2). The experimental design consisted of the following parameters: (1) two voltage conditions: 13.5 kV with 1.0 cm electrode gap (PK-1) and 80 kV with 4.5 cm electrode gap (PK-2), (2) two treatment conditions: inside and outside the field of ionization, (3) PK-1 and PK-2 optimized treatment times: 300 and 120 s, respectively, and (4) two package gas types: air and modified atmosphere (MA) gas (65% O2/30% CO2/5% N2). Measurements included: (1) bacterial reductions of Bacillus subtilis var. niger (B. atrophaeus), (2) ozone, nitrous oxides (NOx), and carbon monoxide concentrations, and (3) relative humidity. Bacillus subtilis (1.7 × 106/strip) were loaded into sterile uncovered petri dishes and treated with ionization generated in packages using air or MA gas blend. Samples were treated for 300 s (PK-1) or 120 s (PK-2) and stored at room ­temperature for 24 h. Results documented relative humidity (RH) ranged from 20% to 30%. After 300 s of PK-1 treatment (13.5 kV/44 W/1.0 cm gap), ozone concentrations were 6,000 ppm (air) and 7,500 ppm (MA). After 120 s of PK-2 treatment (80 kV/150 W/4.5 cm), ozone concentrations were 7,500 ppm (air) and 12,000 ppm (MA). Ozone and NOx concentrations were non-detect (ND) after 24 h. PK-1 carbon monoxide levels were package ionization process.

  5. DECONTAMINATION/DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR ORGANICS IN TRANSURANIC WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris Jones; Javier Del Campo; Patrick Nevins; Stuart Legg

    2002-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has approximately 5000 55-gallon drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste in interim storage. These may not be shipped to WIPP in TRUPACT-II containers due to the high rate of hydrogen production resulting from the radiolysis of the organic content of the drums. In order to circumvent this problem, the {sup 238}Pu needs to be separated from the organics--either by mineralization of the latter or by decontamination by a chemical separation. We have conducted ''cold'' optimization trials and surrogate tests in which a combination of a mediated electrochemical oxidation process (SILVER II{trademark}) and ultrasonic mixing have been used to decontaminate the surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes were impregnated with copper oxalate for plutonium dioxide. Our process combines both mineralization of reactive components (such cellulose, rubber, and oil) and surface decontamination of less reactive materials such as polyethylene, polystyrene and polyvinylchloride. By using this combination of SILVER II and ultrasonic mixing, we have achieved 100% current efficiency for the destruction of the reactive components. We have demonstrated that: The degree of decontamination achieved would be adequate to meet both WIPP waste acceptance criteria and TRUPACT II packaging and shipping requirements; The system can maintain near absolute containment of the surrogate radionuclides; Only minimal pre-treatment (coarse shredding) and minimal waste sorting are required; The system requires minimal off gas control processes and monitoring instrumentation; The laboratory trials have developed information that can be used for scale-up purposes; The process does not produce dioxins and furans; Disposal routes for secondary process arisings have already been demonstrated in other programs. Based on the results from Phase 1, the recommendation is to proceed to Phase 2 and use the equipment at Savannah

  6. Stability of Decontamination Foam Containing Silica Nanoparticles and Viscosifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, In Ho; Jung, Chong Hun; Yoon, Suk Bon; Kim, Chorong; Jung, Jun Young; Park, Sang Yoon; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Wang Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This formulation can significantly decrease the amounts of chemical reagents and secondary waste. The advantage of decontamination foam is its potentially wide application for metallic walls, overhead surfaces, and the elements of complex components and facilities. In addition, foam is a good material for in situ decontamination because it generates low final waste volumes owing to its volume expansion. The application of foam allows for remote decontamination processing using only an injection nozzle and the equipment to generate the decontamination foam, which reduces operator exposure to high radioactivity. The decontamination efficiency can be enhanced by improving the contact time between chemical reagents and a contaminated surface through the addition of surfactants and viscosifiers into the decontamination foam. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of silica nanoparticles and a viscosifier on the foam stability and the dissolution behaviors of corroded specimens using a non-ionic surfactant. This study showed the effect of viscosifiers and nanoparticles on the foam stability when developing new formulations of decontamination foam. The addition of xanthan gum and the mixture of xanthan gum and silica nanoparticles (M-5) significantly increased the foam stability, compared to the surfactant solution alone. This result indicates that both the viscosifier and nanoparticles have a synergistic effect on the foam stability. As the contact time increased, the dissolution rate increased to become similar to the dissolution that contained decontamination liquid.

  7. Decommissioning and Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaut, V.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's decommissioning and decontamination programme are (1) to develop, test and optimise the technologies and procedures for decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear installations in order to minimise the waste arising and the distributed dose; (2) to optimise the environmental impact; (3) to reduce the cost of the end-of-life of the installation; (4) to make these new techniques available to the industry; (5) to share skills and competences. The programme and achievements in 1999 are summarised

  8. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted

  9. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  10. Emergency destruction system for recovered chemical munitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepodd, T.J.; Stofleth, J.H.; Haroldsen, B.L.

    1998-04-01

    At the request of the US Army Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel, Sandia National Laboratories is developing a transportable system for destroying recovered, explosively configured, chemical warfare munitions. The system uses shaped charges to access the agent and burster followed by chemical neutralization to destroy them. The entire process takes place inside a sealed pressure vessel. In this paper, they review the design, operation, and testing of a prototype system capable of containing up to one pound of explosive.

  11. Research and development activities of the Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgungstechnik on the decontamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dippel, T.; Hentschel, D.; Kunze, S.

    1983-06-01

    After developing a procedure for the ''Testing of Surface Coating Materials for the Decontamination'' about 900 different surface coating materials had been tested and evaluated for the domestic and foreign industry. The results prove the following basic facts: Surface coatings, low in porosity, forming a smooth surface and containing limited amounts of filler are in the majority very effectively decontaminated if they are prepared of chemically stable, water repellent materials; Decontamination results are drastically poorer if the degree of filling of the materials is high especially if hygroscopic fillers and/or hygroscopic colouring matters are used. Currently available cleansers and washing powders used for decontamination did not fulfill the three basic demands for a decontamination agent: high efficiency, small foam generation and sufficient thermal stability. Therefore for the decontamination of walls, floors, etc. a water delutable, liquid cleanser was developed. In the same context a washing powder was optimized for the decontamination of contaminated clothing. The experiments on the decontamination of stainless steels ended up with the formulation of a pickling paste. Furthermore all investigations were aimed at a minimization of the waste generation by the decontamination process. This resulted in decontamination techniques, in which the decontaminating agents were applied in thin layers. A comparison of the currently practiced dipping technique with the coating technique showed that the latter one gave the better decontamination results and that the amount of decontamination waste was reduced. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Mycotoxin Decontamination of Food: Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma versus "Classic" Decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojnik, Nataša; Cvelbar, Uroš; Tavčar-Kalcher, Gabrijela; Walsh, James L; Križaj, Igor

    2017-04-28

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by several filamentous fungi, which frequently contaminate our food, and can result in human diseases affecting vital systems such as the nervous and immune systems. They can also trigger various forms of cancer. Intensive food production is contributing to incorrect handling, transport and storage of the food, resulting in increased levels of mycotoxin contamination. Mycotoxins are structurally very diverse molecules necessitating versatile food decontamination approaches, which are grouped into physical, chemical and biological techniques. In this review, a new and promising approach involving the use of cold atmospheric pressure plasma is considered, which may overcome multiple weaknesses associated with the classical methods. In addition to its mycotoxin destruction efficiency, cold atmospheric pressure plasma is cost effective, ecologically neutral and has a negligible effect on the quality of food products following treatment in comparison to classical methods.

  13. Mycotoxin Decontamination of Food: Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma versus “Classic” Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojnik, Nataša; Cvelbar, Uroš; Tavčar-Kalcher, Gabrijela; Walsh, James L.; Križaj, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by several filamentous fungi, which frequently contaminate our food, and can result in human diseases affecting vital systems such as the nervous and immune systems. They can also trigger various forms of cancer. Intensive food production is contributing to incorrect handling, transport and storage of the food, resulting in increased levels of mycotoxin contamination. Mycotoxins are structurally very diverse molecules necessitating versatile food decontamination approaches, which are grouped into physical, chemical and biological techniques. In this review, a new and promising approach involving the use of cold atmospheric pressure plasma is considered, which may overcome multiple weaknesses associated with the classical methods. In addition to its mycotoxin destruction efficiency, cold atmospheric pressure plasma is cost effective, ecologically neutral and has a negligible effect on the quality of food products following treatment in comparison to classical methods. PMID:28452957

  14. PYROCHEMICAL DECONTAMINATION METHOD FOR REACTOR FUEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyers, A.G.

    1959-06-30

    A pyro-chemical method is presented for decontaminating neutron irradiated uranium and separating plutonium therefrom by contact in the molten state with a metal chloride salt. Uranium trichloride and uranium tetrachloride either alone or in admixture with alkaline metal and alkaline eanth metal fluorides under specified temperature and specified phase ratio conditions extract substantially all of the uranium from the irradiated uranium fuel together with certain fission products. The phases are then separated leaving purified uranium metal. The uranium and plutonium in the salt phase can be reduced to forin a highly decontaminated uraniumplutonium alloy. The present method possesses advantages for economically decontaminating irradiated nuclear fuel elements since irradiated fuel may be proccessed immediately after withdrawal from the reactor and the uranium need not be dissolved and later reduced to the metallic form. Accordingly, the uranium may be economically refabricated and reinserted into the reactor.

  15. Decontamination tests on tritium-contaminated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutot, P.; Schipfer, P.

    1967-01-01

    These tests are designed to try out various processes liable to be applied to the decontamination of a material contaminated with tritium. The samples are thin stainless- steel slabs contaminated in the laboratory with elements extracted from industrial installations. The measurement of the initial and residual activities is carried out using an open-window BERTHOLD counter. The best results are obtained by passing a current of pre-heated (300 deg. C) air containing water vapour. This process makes it possible to reach a decontamination factor of 99.5 per cent in 4 hours. In a vacuum, the operation has to be prolonged to 100 hours in order to obtain a decontamination factor of 99.2 per cent. Wet-chemical or electrolytic treatments are efficient but their use is limited by the inherent corrosion risks. A study of the reappearance of the contamination has made it possible to observe that this phenomenon occurs whatever the process used. (authors) [fr

  16. Residual methamphetamine in decontaminated clandestine drug laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Glen; Daniell, William; Treser, Charles

    2009-03-01

    This pilot cross-sectional study examined three previously decontaminated residential clandestine drug laboratories (CDLs) in Washington State to determine the distribution and magnitude of residual methamphetamine concentrations relative to the state decontamination standard. A total of 159 discrete random methamphetamine wipe samples were collected from the three CDLs, focusing on the master bedroom, bathroom, living room, and kitchen at each site. Additional samples were collected from specific non-random locations likely to be contacted by future residents (e.g., door knobs and light switches). Samples were analyzed for methamphetamine by EPA method 8270 for semivolatile organic chemicals. Overall, 59% of random samples and 75% of contact point samples contained methamphetamine in excess of the state decontamination standard (0.1 micro g/100 cm(2)). At each site, methamphetamine concentrations were generally higher and more variable in rooms where methamphetamine was prepared and used. Even compared with the less stringent standard adopted in Colorado (0.5 micro g/100cm(2)), a substantial number of samples at each site still demonstrated excessive residual methamphetamine (random samples, 25%; contact samples, 44%). Independent oversight of CDL decontamination in residential structures is warranted to protect public health. Further research on the efficacy of CDL decontamination procedures and subsequent verification of methods is needed.

  17. Los Alamos DP West Plutonium Facility decontamination project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garde, R.; Cox, E.J.; Valentine, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The DP West Plutonium Facility operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decontaminated between April 1978 and April 1981. The facility was constructed in 1944 to 1945 to produce plutonium metal and fabricate parts for nuclear weapons. It was continually used as a plutonium processing and research facility until mid-1978. Decontamination operations included dismantling and removing gloveboxes and conveyor tunnels; removing process systems, utilities, and exhaust ducts; and decontaminating all remaining surfaces. This report describes glovebox and conveyor tunnel separations, decontamination techniques, health and safety considerations, waste management procedures, and costs of the operation

  18. Use of irradiation for chemical and microbial decontamination of water, wastewater and sludge. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The co-ordinated research project (CRP) was established in order to focus the attention of appropriate technical experts in integrating the effects of ionizing radiation on refractory organic pollutants and pathogenic microorganisms and parasites in the treatment of water, waste water and sewage sludge. This publication describes the findings of the CRP in three subject areas: ground water remediation, decontamination of industrial and municipal waste water and sewage sludge hygienization. This publication contains 11 individual papers from participants; each of the papers was indexed separately

  19. Decontamination of Belarus research reactor installation by strippable coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronik, N.I.; Shatilo, N.N.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop new strippable coatings using water-based solutions of polyvinyl alcohol and active additives for decontamination of research reactor equipment. The employment of strippable coatings makes it possible to minimize the quantity of liquid radioactive waste. The selection of strippable decontaminating coatings was carried out on the basis of general requirements to decontaminating solutions: successfully dissolve corrosion deposits; ensure the desorption of radionuclides from the surfaces and the absence of resorption; introduce minimal corrosion effect of construction materials; to be relatively cheap and available in reagents. The decontaminating ability and adhesion properties of these coatings depending on metal and deposit sorts were investigated. Research on the chemical stability of solid wastes was carried out. The data obtained were the base for recommendations on waste management procedure for used films and pastes. A full-scale case-study analysis was performed for comparing strippable coatings with decontaminating solutions. (author)

  20. Decontamination of the reactor pressure vessel and further internals and auxiliary systems in the German boiling water reactor Isar-1; Dekontamination des RDB inkl. der Einbauten wie Dampftrockner und Wasserabscheider sowie der angeschlossenen Hilfssysteme im deutschen Siedewasserreaktor ISAR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Michael; Sempere Belda, Luis; Basu, Ashim; Topf, Christian [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany). Abt. Chemistry Services; Erbacher, Thomas; Hiermer, Thomas; Schnurr, Bernhard; Appeldorn, Thomas van [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Kernkraftwerk ISAR, Essenbach (Germany). Abt. Maschinentechnik; Volkmann, Christian [ESG Engineering Services GmbH, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The German nuclear power plant ISAR 1 (KKI 1), a 878 MWe boiling water reactor of KWU design, was shut down on March 17{sup th}, 2011. With the objective to minimize the plants activity inventory accompanied by the reduction of contact dose rates of systems and components the project 'decontamination of the RPV incl. steam dryer and water separator and the connected auxiliary systems' was implemented in the first quarter of 2015. One major focus within the project was the specific in-situ decontamination of the steam dryer.

  1. Solving decontaminable flooring problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Pennsylvania Power and Light wanted to cover deteriorating concrete in unit 2 of its Susquehanna BWR with a smooth, durable, decontaminable coating. Traditionally, floors in the plant had been coated with epoxy paint, but many of these floors suffered delamination, and failed in three to five years. Painting with epoxy would also interrupt operations for as much as three days while the floor dried, yet critical instruments in some areas had to be monitored at least once per shift. In addition, conventional floor surface preparation produced dust and vibration around sensitive equipment. The solution was a dustless scabbling system for surface preparation, followed by the installation of a high-strength acrylic industrial floor known as Silakal. The work was carried out by Pentek. Silikal bonds to the underlying concrete, so that delamination of the floor will not occur even under severe traffic conditions. Another advantage of this type of flooring is that it cures in one hour, so floor resurfacing has only minimal impact on plant operations. (author)

  2. Retrofit design of remotely removable decontamination spray nozzles for the new waste calcining facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    High level radioactive liquid waste is converted to a solid form at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The conversion is done by a fluidized bed combustion process in the calciner vessel. The interior decontamination system for the calciner vessel uses a common header bolted to four decontamination nozzles around the upper head. The retrofit was required to eliminate hands-on maintenance and difficulty in nozzle removal because of nozzle plugging. The retrofit design for this project demonstrates the solution of problems associated with thermal phenomena, structural supports, seismic requirements, remote handling and installations into extremely restricted spaces

  3. Hazardous chemical tracking system (HAZ-TRAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramlette, J D; Ewart, S M; Jones, C E

    1990-07-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) developed and implemented a computerized hazardous chemical tracking system, referred to as Haz-Trac, for use at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Haz-Trac is designed to provide a means to improve the accuracy and reliability of chemical information, which enhances the overall quality and safety of ICPP operations. The system tracks all chemicals and chemical components from the time they enter the ICPP until the chemical changes form, is used, or becomes a waste. The system runs on a Hewlett-Packard (HP) 3000 Series 70 computer. The system is written in COBOL and uses VIEW/3000, TurboIMAGE/DBMS 3000, OMNIDEX, and SPEEDWARE. The HP 3000 may be accessed throughout the ICPP, and from remote locations, using data communication lines. Haz-Trac went into production in October, 1989. Currently, over 1910 chemicals and chemical components are tracked on the system. More than 2500 personnel hours were saved during the first six months of operation. Cost savings have been realized by reducing the time needed to collect and compile reporting information, identifying and disposing of unneeded chemicals, and eliminating duplicate inventories. Haz-Trac maintains information required by the Superfund Amendment Reauthorization Act (SARA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

  4. Decommissioning and Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaut, V

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's decommissioning and decontamination programme are (1) to develop, test and optimise the technologies and procedures for decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear installations in order to minimise the waste arising and the distributed dose; (2) to optimise the environmental impact; (3) to reduce the cost of the end-of-life of the installation; (4) to make these new techniques available to the industry; (5) to share skills and competences. The programme and achievements in 1999 are summarised.

  5. Experiences with decontaminating tritium-handling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maienschein, J.L.; Garcia, F.; Garza, R.G.; Kanna, R.L.; Mayhugh, S.R.; Taylor, D.T.

    1992-01-01

    Tritium-handling apparatus has been decontaminated as part of the downsizing of the LLNL Tritium Facility. Two stainless-steel glove boxes that had been used to process lithium deuteride-tritide (LiDT) slat were decontaminated using the Portable Cleanup System so that they could be flushed with room air through the facility ventilation system. In this paper the details on the decontamination operation are provided. A series of metal (palladium and vanadium) hydride storage beds have been drained of tritium and flushed with deuterium, in order to remove as much tritium as possible. The bed draining and flushing procedure is described, and a calculational method is presented which allows estimation of the tritium remaining in a bed after it has been drained and flushed. Data on specific bed draining and flushing are given

  6. Dry Ice Blast Decontamination to in-service equipment in Japanese PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    MHI had developed several mechanical decontamination methods. Mechanical decontamination is beneficial when it is applied to equipment whose surface is narrow. Especially in terms of secondary waste reduction, MHI started the study of application of Dry Ice Blast Decontamination to actual PWR plant. This paper provides an introduction to Dry Ice Blast Decontamination principle, its system and actual application result to PWR plant. (J.P.N.)

  7. 48 CFR 1523.303-71 - Decontamination of Government-furnished property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Decontamination of... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Hazardous Material and Material Safety Data 1523.303-71 Decontamination of..., Decontamination of Government-Furnished Property, when it is anticipated that a Contractor will use Government...

  8. Final report on the decontamination of the Curium Source Fabrication Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaich, R.W.

    1983-12-01

    The Curium Source Fabrication Facility (CSFF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was decontaminated to acceptable contamination levels for maintenance activities, using standard decontamination techniques. Solid and liquid waste volumes were controlled to minimize discharges to the ORNL waste systems. This program required two years of decontamination effort at a total cost of approximately $700K. 5 references, 7 figures, 2 tables

  9. Psychosocial considerations for mass decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemyre, L.; Johnson, C.; Corneil, W.

    2010-01-01

    Mass exposure to explosions, infectious agents, food-borne illnesses, chemicals or radiological materials may require mass decontamination that have critical psychosocial implications for the public and for both traditional and non-traditional responders in terms of impact and of response. Five main issues are common to mass decontamination events: (i) perception, (ii) somatisation, (iii) media role and communication, (iv) information sharing, (v) behavioural guidance and (vi) organisational issues. Empirical evidence is drawn from a number of cases, including Chernobyl; Goiania, Brazil; the sarin gas attack in Tokyo; the anthrax attacks in the USA; Three Mile Island; and by features of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome pandemic. In this paper, a common platform for mass casualty management is explored and suggestions for mass interventions are proposed across the complete event timeline, from pre-event threat and warning stages through to the impact and reconstruction phases. Implication for responders, health care and emergency infrastructure, public behaviour, screening processes, risk communication and media management are described. (authors)

  10. Comparison and Evaluation of Various Tritium Decontamination Techniques and Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Langish, S.W.; Skinner, C.H.; Ciebiera, L.P.

    2005-01-01

    In support of fusion energy development, various techniques and processes have been developed over the past two decades for the removal and decontamination of tritium from a variety of items, surfaces, and components. The motivational force for tritium decontamination by chemical, physical, mechanical, or a combination of these methods, is driven by two underlying forces. The first of these motivational forces is safety. Safety is paramount to the established culture associated with fusion energy. The second of these motivational forces is cost. In all aspects, less tritium contamination equals lower operational and disposal costs. This paper will discuss and evaluate the various processes employed for tritium removal and decontamination

  11. Comparison and Evaluation of Various Tritium Decontamination Techniques and Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Langish, S.W.; Skinner, C.H.; Ciebiera, L.P.

    2004-01-01

    In support of fusion energy development, various techniques and processes have been developed over the past two decades for the removal and decontamination of tritium from a variety of items, surfaces, and components. Tritium decontamination, by chemical, physical, mechanical, or a combination of these methods, is driven by two underlying motivational forces. The first of these motivational forces is safety. Safety is paramount to the established culture associated with fusion energy. The second of these motivational forces is cost. In all aspects, less tritium contamination equals lower operational and disposal costs. This paper will discuss and evaluate the various processes employed for tritium removal and decontamination

  12. Plasma-chemical processes and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro B, J.

    1987-01-01

    The direct applications of plasma technology on chemistry and metallurgy are presented. The physical fundaments of chemically active non-equilibrium plasma, the reaction kinetics, and the physical chemical transformations occuring in the electrical discharges, which are applied in the industry, are analysed. Some plasma chemical systems and processes related to the energy of hydrogen, with the chemical technology and with the metallurgy are described. Emphasis is given to the optimization of the energy effectiveness of these processes to obtain reducers and artificial energetic carriers. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. Linear systems on balancing chemical reaction problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafi, R. A.; Abdillah, B.

    2018-01-01

    The concept of linear systems appears in a variety of applications. This paper presents a small sample of the wide variety of real-world problems regarding our study of linear systems. We show that the problem in balancing chemical reaction can be described by homogeneous linear systems. The solution of the systems is obtained by performing elementary row operations. The obtained solution represents the finding coefficients of chemical reaction. In addition, we present a computational calculation to show that mathematical software such as Matlab can be used to simplify completion of the systems, instead of manually using row operations.

  14. Decontamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    1977-01-01

    Main sources and characteristics of wastes are discussed and basic data are given on the amount and nature of all wastes produced during the treatment of liquid and gaseous wastes in nuclear power plants with boiling (BWR), pressurized (PWR), and advanced gas-cooled (MGR) reactors of a 1,000 MW(e) installed power. A short comparison of methods used for liquid radioactive waste treatment is given. Methods are shortly described for solidification of concentrates, sludges, resin slurries, and for immobilization of radioactive substances in other solid wastes. An approach to the problem of waste storage in a densely populated country is given. The part dealing with surface decontamination problems is dedicated to contaminant sources in gas and water-cooled reactors, to decontaminating agents used in reactor technology, and to the description of most important methods used in decontamination practice. A short evaluation of protective coatings from the point of view of their further successful decontamination is given. (orig./HK) [de

  15. Decontaminant wash composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie-Swanson, J.

    1986-01-01

    A wash for removing skin contaminants such as cobalt-60 comprises an alkyl dimethyl betaine, a non-ionic surfactant and water. In the exemplified composition, the betaine and the non-ionic surfactant are mixed in equal proportions with a larger volume of distilled water and the resulting wash was found to be capable of decontaminating pork skin of cobalt-60 contaminant. (author)

  16. Surface decontamination using dry ice snow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jungdong; Park, Kwangheon; Lee, Bumsik; Kim Yangeun

    1999-01-01

    An adjustable nozzle for controlling the size of dry ice snow was developed. The converging/diverging nozzle can control the size of snows from sub-microns to 10 micron size. Using the nozzle, a surface decontamination device was made. The removal mechanisms of surface contaminants are mechanical impact, partial dissolving and evaporation process, and viscous flow. A heat supply system is added for the prevention of surface ice layer formation. The cleaning power is slightly dependent on the size of snow. Small snows are the better in viscous flow cleaning, while large snows are slightly better in dissolving and sublimation process. Human oils like fingerprints on glass were easy to remove. Decontamination ability was tested using a contaminated pump-housing surface. About 40 to 80% of radioactivity was removed. This device is effective in surface-decontamination of any electrical devices like detector, controllers which cannot be cleaned in aqueous solution. (author)

  17. Chemical production processes and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, Johnathan E.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; White, James F.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2014-06-17

    Hydrogenolysis systems are provided that can include a reactor housing an Ru-comprising hydrogenolysis catalyst and wherein the contents of the reactor is maintained at a neutral or acidic pH. Reactant reservoirs within the system can include a polyhydric alcohol compound and a base, wherein a weight ratio of the base to the compound is less than 0.05. Systems also include the product reservoir comprising a hydrogenolyzed polyhydric alcohol compound and salts of organic acids, and wherein the moles of base are substantially equivalent to the moles of salts or organic acids. Processes are provided that can include an Ru-comprising catalyst within a mixture having a neutral or acidic pH. A weight ratio of the base to the compound can be between 0.01 and 0.05 during exposing.

  18. Selection of technical and economic purification system wastewater, applying the assessment of the water decontamination; Seleccion tecnico-economica del sistema de depuracion de aguas residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Miranda, J. P.

    2009-07-01

    The decontamination in water bodies can be realised among others by treatments at the end of the tube. For it is necessary to apply to a methodology or procedure for economic the technical selection of alternatives for the handling or treatments of liquid residues at the end of the tube. Calculation example, a study of case (municipality) in the Savannah of Bogota was developed (Colombia), where the technical valuation of the best alternative of treatment at the end of the tube was observed that stops the case of the analysis, the optimal system is the percolating filter from the plant of comparison of removal efficiencies, costs of investment, operation and maintenance, as well as the specific qualitative valuation of each alternative. (Author) 27 refs.

  19. Efficacy of scalp hair decontamination following exposure to vapours of sulphur mustard simulants 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide and methyl salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiandore, Marie; Piram, Anne; Lacoste, Alexandre; Prevost, Philippe; Maloni, Pascal; Torre, Franck; Asia, Laurence; Josse, Denis; Doumenq, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Chemical warfare agents are an actual threat and victims' decontamination is a main concern when mass exposure occurs. Skin decontamination with current protocols has been widely documented, as well as surface decontamination. However, considering hair ability to trap chemicals in vapour phase, we investigated hair decontamination after exposure to sulphur mustard simulants methyl salicylate and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide. Four decontamination protocols were tested on hair, combining showering and emergency decontamination (use of Fuller's earth or Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion RSDL ® ). Both simulants were recovered from hair after treatment, but contents were significantly reduced (42-85% content allowance). Showering alone was the least efficient protocol. Concerning 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide, protocols did not display significant differences in decontamination efficacy. For MeS, use of emergency decontaminants significantly increased showering efficacy (10-20% rise), underlining their usefulness before thorough decontamination. Our results highlighted the need to extensively decontaminate hair after chemical exposure. Residual amounts after decontamination are challenging, as their release from hair could lead to health issues. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1982-01-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently being designed to convert Savannah River Plant liquid, high-level radioactive waste into a solid form, such as borosilicate glass. To prevent the spread of radioactivity, the outside of the canisters of waste glass must have very low levels of smearable radioactive contamination before they are removed from the DWPF. Several techniques were considered for canister decontamination: high-pressure water spray, electropolishing, chemical dissolution, and abrasive blasting. An abrasive blasting technique using a glass frit slurry has been selected for use in the DWPF. No additional equipment is needed to process waste generated from decontamination. Frit used as the abrasive will be mixed with the waste and fed to the glass melter. In contrast, chemical and electrochemical techniques require more space in the DWPF, and produce large amounts of contaminated by-products, which are difficult to immobilize by vitrification

  1. Systems metabolic engineering for chemicals and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Wook; Kim, Tae Yong; Jang, Yu-Sin; Choi, Sol; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-08-01

    Metabolic engineering has contributed significantly to the enhanced production of various value-added and commodity chemicals and materials from renewable resources in the past two decades. Recently, metabolic engineering has been upgraded to the systems level (thus, systems metabolic engineering) by the integrated use of global technologies of systems biology, fine design capabilities of synthetic biology, and rational-random mutagenesis through evolutionary engineering. By systems metabolic engineering, production of natural and unnatural chemicals and materials can be better optimized in a multiplexed way on a genome scale, with reduced time and effort. Here, we review the recent trends in systems metabolic engineering for the production of chemicals and materials by presenting general strategies and showcasing representative examples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of citric acid for large parts decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, M.E.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory and field studies have been performed to identify and evaluate chemical decontamination agents to replace ammonium carbonate, an environmentally unacceptable compound, in the decontamination facility for large process equipment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Preliminary screening of over 40 possible decontamination agents on the basis of efficiency, availability, toxicity, cost, corrosiveness, and practicality indicated sodium carbonate and citric acid to be the most promising. Extensive laboratory studies were performed with these two reagents. Corrosion rates, decontamination factors, uranium recovery efficiencies, technetium ( 99 Tc)/ion exchange removal effects, and possible environmental impacts were determined or investigated. Favorable results were found in all areas. Detailed monitoring and analysis during two-week trial periods in which sodium carbonate and citric acid were used in the large parts decontamination facility resulted in similar evaluation and conclusions. Because it has cleaning properties not possessed by sodium carbonate, and because it eliminated several operational problems by incorporating two acidic decontamination reagents (citric and nitric acids) instead of one basic reagent (sodium or ammonium carbonate) and one acidic reagent (nitric acid), citric acid was selected for one-year field testing. On the basis of its excellent performance in the field tests, citric acid is recommended as a permanent replacement for ammonium carbonate in the decontamination facility for large process equipment

  3. The role of metal complexes in nuclear reactor decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, A.A.M.; Raghavan, P.S.; Gopalan, R. [Madras Christian College, Tambaram, Chennai (India); Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC) (IN). Water and Steam Chemistry Lab. (WSCL)

    2006-07-15

    Chemical decontamination is the process of removal of radioactivity from corrosion products formed on structural materials in the nuclear reactors. These corrosion products cause problems for the operation and maintenance of the plants. Removal of the radioactive contaminants can be achieved by dissolving the oxide from the system surface using organic complexing agents in low concentrations known as dilute chemical decontamination (DCD) formulations. These organic complexing agents attack the oxide surface and form metal complexes, which further accelerate the dissolution process. The stability of the complexes plays an important role in dissolving the radioactive contaminated oxides. In addition, the DCD process is operated through ion exchange resins for the removal of the dissolved metal ions and radioactive nuclides. In the present study, the kinetics of dissolution of various model corrosion products such as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and maghemite ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) have been studied in the presence of complexing agents such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), hydroxyethylethylenediaminepentaacetic acid (HEEDTA), and 2,6 pyridinedicarboxylic acid (PDCA). The reductive roles of metal complexes and organic reducing agents are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Cladding hull decontamination process: preliminary development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, B.; Bryan, G.H.

    1979-12-01

    An investigation of the chemical and radioactive properties of fuel hulls was conducted to assist in a decontamination process development effort. The removal of zirconium oxide layers from zirconium was accomplished by a treatment in 600 0 C HF followed by a dilute aqueous reagent. Similar treatment in fused alkali-zirconium fluoride salt baths was examined. A remotely operated small batch facility was developed and process parameters determined. 16 figures, 9 tables

  5. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, P.

    2004-01-01

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports

  6. Surface decontamination using microemulsion of F-AOT in liquid/supercritical CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, C. H.; Gho, M. S.; Park, G. H.; Kim, H. D.; Kim, H. W.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional chemical decontamination method for surface decontamination cause not only the 2nd radioactive wastes, but also corrosion and defect on the surface of equipment. If CO 2 is used as a solvent for decontamination of radioactive contaminants, the waste can be effectively reduced by recycling of CO 2 where only contaminants are left as wastes during evaporation of CO 2 . Polar material can be dissolved by microemulsion using F-AOT and HNO 3 (1M). We use these two technique for surface decontamination. Cu and Ni specimens made by electroplating Conventional chemical decontamination method for surface decontamination cause not only the 2nd radioactive wastes, but also corrosion and defect on the surface of equipment. If CO 2 is used as a solvent for decontamination of radioactive contaminants, the waste can be effectively reduced by recycling of CO 2 where only contaminants are left as wastes during evaporation of CO 2 . Polar material can be dissolved by microemulsion using F-AOT and HNO 3 (1M). We use these two technique for surface decontamination. Cu and Ni specimens made by electroplating on the QCM surface. The QCM was used for the quantitative analysis. In the case of Cu, The 0.054μg/sec and 0.024μg/sec of decontamination efficiency were obtained in LCO 2 /ScCO 2 microemulsion respectively. The 0.066μg/sec of decontamination efficiency was obtained in the case of Ni

  7. An experimental study on decontamination by surface condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Hae

    1974-01-01

    Surface decontamination is one of the very important problem to be completely solved in the isotope laboratory where there is always the possibility of radioactive contamination, i.e., on the floors, walls, working tables and benches etc., Isotope laboratories require surface covering of material which can be easily and effectively decontaminated. These experiment were done to find an effective decontamination procedure for kind of surfaces which usually are found in radioisotope laboratories and the best type of surface material, that is, one which is easily decontaminated from the point of view of radiation health and safely. This study is presented to guide radioisotope laboratories in Korea which may need to renovate existing unsafe facilities. In some contaminated facilities entirely new installations may be required. Twelve types of surface material are used for study in this experiment. These include 10 cm square of stainless steel, aluminum, ceramic and mosaic tiles, glass, acrylic, formica board, asphalt tile and coated wood with 4 kinds of paints. Stepwise decontamination was performed with various decontamination procedures following a spill of I 1 31 on the center of the surface material being tested. Twelve different decontamination procedures were tested. These included wet wiping with water and detergent, or dry wiping, or removing with gummed paper. Additional chemical procedures used 10% solution of hydrochloric acid, or surface acid, or ammonium citrate, or potassium iodide, or acetone or carbon tetrachloride. The final testing method was abrasion of the test surfaces. Brief analysis of experimental results on the decontaminability on the tested surface showed: 1. Metallic surfaces such as stainless steel or aluminum, or glass, or a piece of ceramic tile or acrylic are recommended as the surface materials for isotope laboratories because these are easily decontaminated by wet wiping only. 2. Formica board, asphalt tile and wood are not easily

  8. Laser decontamination of epoxy painted concrete surfaces in nuclear plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthofer, A.; Lippmann, W.; Hurtado, A.

    2014-04-01

    Laser technology offers an efficient decontamination of surfaces contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) by precise application of highly focused laser beam power. In the context of nuclear decommissioning all walls and floors of a reactor building have to be cleaned from chemical-toxic substances. State of the art is a manual and mechanic ablation and a subsequent treatment in a hazardous waste incinerator. In this study, alternatively, a laser-based system exhibiting, decontamination rates of up to 6.4 m2/h has been operated using a 10 kW diode laser in continuous wave (CW) mode with a spot size of 45×10 mm2 and a wavelength of 980-1030 nm. The system allows a rapid heating of the surfaces up to temperatures of more than 1000 °C leading to ablation and thermal decomposition of PCB in one process step. Thermal quenching prevents formation of polychlorinated dioxines (PCDD) and polychlorinate furans (PCDF) in the flue gas. Additionally, an in situ measurement system based on laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is developed to monitor the thermal decomposition of PCB. For initial experiments samples covered with epoxy paint were used to evaluate the process and to carry out finite element based simulations. In this paper, experimental results of ablation tests by laser irradiation of epoxy painted concrete are presented and discussed.

  9. Sunflowers to decontaminate water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Sunflowers offer a new method of decontamination. 55 kilograms (dry weight) of sunflowers are able to decontaminate all the cesium 137 and the strontium 90 polluting a pond situated at one kilometer from Tchernobyl. These flowers are able to decrease 95% in 24 hours the uranium concentration in the american site of Ashtabula in Ohio getting this water from 350 parts by milliards to less than 5 parts by milliards. The radioactivity should stocked in the roots at concentrations 5 000 to 10 000 times higher than water concentration. The cost is cheaper than micro filtration and precipitation (2-6 dollars for 4 000 liters of water against 80 dollars for others technologies). when sunflowers are radioactive they can be reduced in dust and vitrified and stocked as solid radioactive wastes. (N.C.)

  10. Metal decontamination efforts at the Rocky Flats Plant: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getty, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    The presentation will focus briefly on past, present and future metal decontamination efforts at the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant (RFP) operated under contract by EG and G, Inc., Past efforts at metal decontamination included investigation of electrodecontamination (electropolishing), chemical cleaning and vibratory finishing technologies. Present work includes electrodecontamination, solid carbon dioxide blasting and high pressure water treatments. Future metal decontamination development efforts will evaluate current industry practices and emerging technologies to determine applicability to RFP conditions

  11. Some aspects of radioactive contamination and decontamination of the Chernobyl' NPP accident zone territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlenko, Yu.N.; Nad''yarnykh, G.V.; Teplitskij, A.L.; Shilin, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Data are presented on the radioactive contamination of the 30-km zone, on the radionuclide (RN) distribution in soils and on the RN migration in grounds. During 1986-1988 were tested over 20 techniques for territory decontamination and were found out the most optimal ones. The first stage of decontamination was removal of an upper contaminated soil layer. The second stage was prolonged chemical fixation of dusting decontaminated soil areas. 3 tabs

  12. Decommissioning and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadoumont, J.; Cantrel, E.; Valenduc, P.; Noynaert, L.

    2009-01-01

    The SCK-CEN has built a large know-how in decommissioning and decontamination, thanks to its BR3 decommissioning project. In 2007, the decommissioning activities at BR3 have been continued according to the strategy. This article discusses main realisations the following domains: decommissioning of the neutron shield tank and installation of new ventilation for the controlled area, dismantling of the former one and characterization of the stack

  13. A simple and feasible method of effectiveness evaluation on radioactive decontamination action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lin; Geng Xiaobing; Sun Jian; Wang Jihong; Guo Lijun

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive decontamination is a vital task in nuclear emergency response. The assessment of decontamination effectiveness is of great importance to decision-making. An index system for effectiveness evaluation of radioactive decontamination action in nuclear emergency response is produced. A method of decontamination effectiveness evaluation based on analytic hierarchy process and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation is presented. Index weights are determined through analytic hierarchy process. And scores of objects in each hierarchy are judged by fuzzy comprehensive evaluation. Then comprehensive effectiveness of the top object can be obtained, which can offer a basis for decision-making of decontamination action. (authors)

  14. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomasney, H.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. The primary objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach as a means to achieve ''release levels'' which could be consistent with unrestricted use of a decontaminated building. The secondary objectives were: To establish process parameters; to quantify the economics; to ascertain the ALARA considerations; and to evaluate wasteform and waste volume. The work carried out to this point has achieved promising results to the extent that ISOTRON reg-sign has been authorized to expand the planned activity to include the fabrication of a prototype version of a commercial device

  15. Local strategies for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.; Ramzaev, V.; Antsypov, G.; Sobotovich, E.; Anisimova, L.

    1996-01-01

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, t and return from experience allowed to assess radiological efficiencies (e.g. 'decontamination factor') and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then, those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimization of decontamination strategies. Results will be presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies, and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement, and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined here

  16. Experiences with decontaminating tritium-handling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maienschein, J.L.; Garcia, F.; Garza, R.G.; Kanna, R.L.; Mayhugh, S.R.; Taylor, D.T.

    1991-07-01

    Tritium-handling apparatus has been decontaminated as part of the shutdown of the LLNL Tritium Facility. Two stainless-steel gloveboxes that had been used to process lithium deuteride-tritide (LiDT) salt were decontaminated using the Portable Cleanup System so that they could be flushed with room air through the facility ventilation system. Further surface decontamination was performed by scrubbing the interior with paper towels and ethyl alcohol or Swish trademark. The surface contamination, as shown by swipe surveys, was reduced from 4x10 4 --10 6 disintegrations per minute (dpm)/cm 2 to 2x10 2 --4x10 4 dpm/cm 2 . Details on the decontamination operation are provided. A series of metal (palladium and vanadium) hydride storage beds have been drained of tritium and flushed with deuterium in order to remove as much tritium as possible. The bed draining and flushing procedure is described, and a calculational method is presented which allows estimation of the tritium remaining in a bed after it has been drained and flushed. Data on specific bed draining and flushing are given

  17. Liquid abrasive grit blasting literature search and decontamination scoping tests report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, R.L.

    1993-10-01

    Past decontamination and solvent recovery activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) have resulted in the accumulation of 1.5 million gallons of radioactively contaminated sodium-bearing liquid waste. Future decontamination activities at the ICPP could result in the production of 5 million gallons or more of sodium-bearing waste using the current decontamination techniques of chemical/water flushes and steam jet cleaning. With the curtailment of reprocessing at the ICPP, the focus of decontamination is shifting from maintenance for continued operation of the facilities to decommissioning. As decommissioning plans are developed, new decontamination methods must be used which result in higher decontamination factors and generate lower amounts of sodium-bearing secondary waste. The primary initiative of the WINCO Decontamination Development Program is the development of methods to eliminate/minimize the use of sodium-bearing decontamination chemicals. One method that was chosen for cold scoping studies during FY-93 was abrasive grit blasting. Abrasive grit blasting has been used in many industries and a vast amount of research and development has already been conducted. However, new grits, process improvements and ICPP applicability was investigated. This evaluation report is a summary of the research efforts and scoping tests using the liquid abrasive grit blasting decontamination technique. The purpose of these scoping tests was to determine the effectiveness of three different abrasive grits: plastic beads, glass beads and alumina oxide

  18. Liquid abrasive grit blasting literature search and decontamination scoping tests report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, R.L.

    1993-10-01

    Past decontamination and solvent recovery activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) have resulted in the accumulation of 1.5 million gallons of radioactively contaminated sodium-bearing liquid waste. Future decontamination activities at the ICPP could result in the production of 5 million gallons or more of sodium-bearing waste using the current decontamination techniques of chemical/water flushes and steam jet cleaning. With the curtailment of reprocessing at the ICPP, the focus of decontamination is shifting from maintenance for continued operation of the facilities to decommissioning. As decommissioning plans are developed, new decontamination methods must be used which result in higher decontamination factors and generate lower amounts of sodium-bearing secondary waste. The primary initiative of the WINCO Decontamination Development Program is the development of methods to eliminate/minimize the use of sodium-bearing decontamination chemicals. One method that was chosen for cold scoping studies during FY-93 was abrasive grit blasting. Abrasive grit blasting has been used in many industries and a vast amount of research and development has already been conducted. However, new grits, process improvements and ICPP applicability was investigated. This evaluation report is a summary of the research efforts and scoping tests using the liquid abrasive grit blasting decontamination technique. The purpose of these scoping tests was to determine the effectiveness of three different abrasive grits: plastic beads, glass beads and alumina oxide.

  19. Manual on decontamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The manual is intended for those who are responsible for the organization and implementation of decontamination programmes for facilities where radioactive materials are handled mainly on a laboratory scale. It contains information and guidelines on practical methods for decontaminating working spaces, equipment, laboratory benches and protective clothing. Useful information is also provided on the removal of loose skin contamination from personnel by mild, non-medical processes. Methods of removing skin contamination needing medical supervision, or of internal decontamination, which is entirely a medical process, are not covered in this manual. Large-scale decontamination of big nuclear facilities is also considered as outside its scope

  20. Compact chemical energy system for seismic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Raymond P.; Hedges, Robert O.; Kammerman, Alan B.; Albright, James N.

    1998-01-01

    A chemical energy system is formed for producing detonations in a confined environment. An explosive mixture is formed from nitromethane (NM) and diethylenetriamine (DETA). A slapper detonator is arranged adjacent to the explosive mixture to initiate detonation of the mixture. NM and DETA are not classified as explosives when handled separately and can be safely transported and handled by workers in the field. In one aspect of the present invention, the chemicals are mixed at a location where an explosion is to occur. For application in a confined environment, the chemicals are mixed in an inflatable container to minimize storage space until it is desired to initiate an explosion. To enable an inflatable container to be used, at least 2.5 wt % DETA is used in the explosive mixture. A barrier is utilized that is formed of a carbon composite material to provide the appropriate barrel geometry and energy transmission to the explosive mixture from the slapper detonator system.

  1. Decontamination tests of some materials used in installations and individual equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestre, E.; Sautiez, N.; Kerdelleau, J. de

    1962-01-01

    After having indicated the definitions of some contamination and decontamination characteristics (susceptibility to contamination, decontamination gain, percentage of removed activity) and rankings used to assess chemical resistance to various chemical agents, this report contains results (resistance to contamination and chemical resistance) of decontamination and chemical tests performed on various materials: floor coatings, paints (vinyl-based, Epikote resin and urethane-based paint, and so on), peelable paints and coatings, individual materials and equipment (rubber, synthetic fibres, other textiles), materials (metals, ceramics, graphite and polythene)

  2. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-26

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  3. Successful field and laboratory tests of advanced phytoremediation systems for decontamination of petroleum and salt impacted soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, B.; Huang, X.D.; Gerhardt, K.; Gurska, J.; Yu, X.M.; MacNeill, G.; Lu, X.; Nykamp, J.; Glick, B.; Wang, W.; Wang, H.; Wu, S.; Knezevich, N.; Gerwing, P. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada)]|[Earthmaster Environmental Strategies Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Waterloo Environmental Biotechnology Inc., Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This presentation discussed the advantages of phytoremediation and provided an overview of a phytoremediation tests results for petroleum and salt remediation. Several examples of remediation methods were discussed, including the dig and dump method; soil incineration; chemical extraction; electrokinetic separation and land farming/natural attenuation. The advantages of phytoremediation include improved natural structure and texture of soil; suitability to most regions and climates because it is driven by solar energy; cost effectiveness and technically feasible; reasonable time frame for restoration; promotion of high rhizosphere activity by plants; and effective use at remote sites. The development and proof of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) enhanced phytoremediation systems (PEPS) was then addressed. A description of the PEPS was provided. This presentation also reviewed the interaction of a PGPR containing ACC deaminase with a plant seed or root; research and development of the PEPS for PHC remediation; the use of petroleum remediation on an Imperial Oil Sarnia land farm; proof of concept of the application of the PEPS for PHC remediation in Hinton, Alberta; and development of the PEPS for salt impacted sites. Field work and the characteristics of soils were also examined. It was concluded that the PEPS has great potential for efficient remediation of organic, salt and metal contaminated sites and that PGPR alleviates stress and promotes growth resulting in low ethylene and high auxin content. tabs., figs.

  4. Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.; Consani, Keith A.

    1993-08-24

    This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

  5. Microbiological decontamination of natural honey by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, W.; Owczarczyk, H.B.; Kedzia, B.; Holderna-Kedzia, E.; Madajczyk, D.

    2000-01-01

    Degree of microbiological decontamination, organoleptic and physico-chemical properties of natural honeys were investigated after radiation treatment. Seven kinds of honeys were irradiated with the beams of 10 MeV electrons from a 10 kW linear accelerator ''Elektronika 10-10'' at the dose 10 kGy. It was shown, that after irradiation, the total count of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and moulds decrease by 99%. The antibiotic value in investigated honeys increased in turn from 1.67 to 2.67 after irradiation. Such factors and parameters of investigated honeys as their consistency, content of water and saccharose, acidity, the diastase and 5-HMF values were not changed significantly after irradiation. Decontamination by irradiation is a process which allows us to obtain high microbiological purity of honeys. It is especially needed, when honeys are used in surgical treatment of injuries and in nutrition of babies with food deficiency

  6. Technologies and devices for micro chemical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; van den Berg, Albert

    2000-01-01

    This article describes recent developments at MESA+ in the field of miniaturised systems for chemical synthesis and analysis, also frequently referred to as "Lab-on-a-Chip". Several examples of siliconbased devices will be discussed, like micro pipettes for DNA studies, chips for cation analysis in

  7. System chemical biology studies of endocrine disruptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Oprea, Tudor I.

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) alter hormonal balance and other physiological systems through inappropriate developmental or adult exposure, perturbing the reproductive function of further generations. While disruption of key receptors (e.g., estrogen, androgen, and thyroid) at the ligand...... effects resulting in the perturbation of different proteins associated to particular diseases (e.g., cryptorchidism) were evaluated....

  8. Chemical sensing underclothing system for testing PPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slabotinsky, J.; Kralik, L.; Bradka, S.; Castulik, P.

    2009-01-01

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) when worn is subjected to pressure differentials across the garment due to ambient wind flow, by body movement and breathing creating the bellows effect, which may force hazardous chemicals vapor or aerosol through the closures, joints, outlet valves and/or clothing protective fabric. Thus the design, fit, size or improper donning of the protective garment will influence chemical-agent penetration. In order to determine penetration of chemical-protective garments by chemical vapor or aerosol, it is necessary to test the entire suit system, including seams, closures, outlet valves and areas of transition with other protective equipment, that is, at the ankles, waist, wrists, neck etc. In order to identify penetration of chemical vapor or aerosol through protective assembly, the Man-in-Simulant Test (MIST) with passive adsorptive devices (PADs) is used, when adsorbed challenging agent (simulant) is desorbed from the PAD and quantified. The current MIST method is failing in complexity of leak detection, due to limited number of passive collection points fixed on human body or a mannequin and very labor extensive work associated with allocation of 20-40 PADs and quantification of adsorbed agent. The Czech approach to detect and quantify penetration/permeation of chemical agent is based on chemical sensing underclothing enable to change the color when exposed with simulant or even with real CW agent. Color intensity and shape of stains on sensing fabric are processed with Laboratory Universal Computer Image Analysis (LUCIA) allowing determining the quantity and the allocation of the penetrating noxious agent(s). This method allows for example calculate individual doses of exposure, the breakthrough coefficient of protective garment as whole and uniquely precise allocation of penetration/permeation shortfalls. Presentation is providing detailed description of imaging system with nickname 'LUCY' in combination with testing mannequin

  9. ANALYTICAL SYNTHESIS OF CHEMICAL REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Labutin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the analytical synthesis of the synergetic control system of chemical reactor for the realization of a complex series-parallel exothermal reaction has been solved. The synthesis of control principles is performed using the analytical design method of aggregated regulators. Synthesized nonlinear control system solves the problem of stabilization of the concentration of target component at the exit of reactor and also enables one to automatically transfer to new production using the equipment.

  10. Preliminary Scoping and Assessment Study of the Potential Impacts of Community-wide Radiological Events and Subsequent Decontamination Activities on Drinking Water and Wastewater Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; Tomasko, D.; Chen, S.Y.; Hais, A.; MacKinney, J.; Janke, R.

    2006-01-01

    Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, there has been a great deal of concern about further attacks within the United States, particularly attacks using weapons of mass destruction (WMD) or other unconventional weapons, such as a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or 'dirty bomb', which is a type of RDD. During all phases of an RDD event, secondary impacts on drinking water and wastewater systems would be possible. Secondary impacts refer to those impacts that would occur when the water systems were not the direct or intended target of the specific event. Secondary impacts would include (1) fallout from an event occurring elsewhere on water supply reservoirs and (2) runoff into storm water and sewer systems during precipitation events or as a result of cleanup and decontamination activities. To help address potential secondary impacts, a scoping and assessment study was conducted for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Homeland Security Research Center to support its water security program. The study addresses the potential impacts on water resources and infrastructure that could result from the use of an RDD, including potential impacts from the initial attack as well as from subsequent cleanup efforts. Eight radionuclides are considered in the assessment: Am-241, Cf-252, Cs-137, Co-60, Ir-192, Pu-238, Ra-226, and Sr-90. (authors)

  11. Microfabricated Gas Phase Chemical Analysis Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; HELLER,EDWIN J.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; LEWIS,PATRICK R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; WONG,CHUNGNIN C.

    1999-09-16

    A portable, autonomous, hand-held chemical laboratory ({micro}ChemLab{trademark}) is being developed for trace detection (ppb) of chemical warfare (CW) agents and explosives in real-world environments containing high concentrations of interfering compounds. Microfabrication is utilized to provide miniature, low-power components that are characterized by rapid, sensitive and selective response. Sensitivity and selectivity are enhanced using two parallel analysis channels, each containing the sequential connection of a front-end sample collector/concentrator, a gas chromatographic (GC) separator, and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector. Component design and fabrication and system performance are described.

  12. Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munday, E.B.

    1993-12-01

    Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF 6 , which is generated from the reaction of ClF 3 with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps

  13. Endocrine Disrupting Chemical Impacts on Aquatic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, Susan

    2014-07-01

    We often talk about the importance of water, but one area that's often overlooked is the safety of our water supply. How many people actually think about the purity of their water when they turn on the tap? We may have real reason to be concerned because our water delivery systems and treatment technology seem to be stuck in the past, relying on old water treatment and water delivery systems. While these systems still do a great job filtering out particles, parasites and bacteria, they usually fail to remove 21st century contaminants like pesticides, industrial chemicals, lead, pharmaceuticals and arsenic. Indeed our water contains already a whole plethora of things in daily commerce and pharmaceuticals are increasingly showing up in the water supply, including antibiotics, anti-convulsants, mood altering medications and sex hormones. As the world's dependence on chemicals grows, our water supplies will continue to feel the effects, which inevitably will touch every person on this planet...

  14. Decontamination solution development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This study was conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP). The objective of this study was to identify decontamination solutions capable of removing radioactive contaminants and grout from the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) process equipment and to determine the impact of these solutions on equipment components and disposal options. The reference grout used in this study was prepared with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) and a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % blast furnace slag, 28 wt % fly ash, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement

  15. Decontamination of latex gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutot, P.; Schipfer, P.; Blachere, A.

    1969-01-01

    Initially the latex gloves used in controlled zones were processed after use as radioactive waste. In view of the continually increasing number used, however, the persons in charge of the SPRAR have considered the possibility of decontaminating the gloves and using them again after control. The recovery installations which have been developed were initially designed rather crudely and operated irregularly; they have been progressively improved as a result of the experience acquired; today they are more really an industrial concern, equipped with automatic machinery. In 1967 it has been possible with this set-up to recover 247000 pairs of gloves, representing nearly 70 per cent of the number treated. (author) [fr

  16. Process and device for decontamination of the waste gas of the fuel circuit of a fusion reactor from tritium and/or deuterium in waste gas containing them in chemically bound form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzhorn, R.D.; Glugla, M.

    1987-01-01

    The invention concerns a process and a device for the decontamination of the wate gases of the fuel circuit of a fusion reactor from tritum and/or deuterium in waste gas containing them in chemically bound form, in which the waste gas is taken over an oxidation catalyst and then over a hot metal bed, tritium and/or deuterium is released from its compounds, separated from the waste gas and is returned to the fuel circuit. The process is intended to prevent losses of tritum and/or deuterium by permeation and the high loading of the hot metal getter materials, as occurs in the previously known corresponding process, and to avoid the formation of nitrogen oxides. This is achieved by: a) The catalytic oxidation reaction being carried out at a temperature of 200 0 C to 300 0 C. b) The gas mixture then being brought into contact with a hot metal bed at 200 0 C to 300 0 C to remove the remaining O 2 and for the selective conversion of the proportion of water into the hydrogen isotope. c) The gas mixture being brought into contact with a diaphragm made of palladium or a palladium-silver alloy at 400 0 C to 450 0 C to decompose the ammonia, all the released hydrogen isotope being passed through the diaphragm, separated from the remaining waste gas flow and removed. (orig.) [de

  17. Decontamination and decommissioning technology tree and the current status of the technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H. J.; Kim, G. N.; Lee, K. W.; Chol, W. K.; Jung, C. H.; Kim, C. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kwon, S. O.; Chung, C. M.

    2001-03-01

    A technology tree diagram was developed on the basis of the necessary technologies applicable to the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The technology tree diagram is consist of 6 main areas such as characterization, decontamination, decommissioning and remote technology, radwaste management, site restoration, and decommissioning plan and engineering. Characterization is divided into 4 regions such as sampling and data collection, general characterization, chemical analysis and radiological analysis. Decontamination is also divided into 4 regions such as chemical decontamination, mechanical decontamination, the other decontamination technologies and new decontamination technologies. Decommissioning and remote technology area is divided into 4 regions such as cutting techniques, decommissioning technologies, new developing technologies and remote technologies. Radwaste management area is divided into 5 regions such as solid waste treatment, sludge treatment, liquid waste treatment, gas waste treatment and thermal treatment. Site restoration area is divided into 3 regions such as the evaluation of site contamination, soil decontamination and ground water decontamination. Finally, permission, decommissioning process, cost evaluation, quality assurance and the estimation of radionuclide inventory were mentioned in the decommissioning plan and engineering area. The estimated items for each technology are applicable domestic D and D facilities, D and D problem area and contamination/requirement, classification of D and D technology, similar technology, principle and overview of technology, status, science technology needs, implementation needs, reference and contact point

  18. Decontamination and decommissioning technology tree and the current status of the technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H.J.; Kim, G.N.; Lee, K.W.; Chol, W.K.; Jung, C.H.; Kim, C.J.; Kim, S.H.; Kwon, S.O.; Chung, C.M

    2001-03-01

    A technology tree diagram was developed on the basis of the necessary technologies applicable to the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The technology tree diagram is consist of 6 main areas such as characterization, decontamination, decommissioning and remote technology, radwaste management, site restoration, and decommissioning plan and engineering. Characterization is divided into 4 regions such as sampling and data collection, general characterization, chemical analysis and radiological analysis. Decontamination is also divided into 4 regions such as chemical decontamination, mechanical decontamination, the other decontamination technologies and new decontamination technologies. Decommissioning and remote technology area is divided into 4 regions such as cutting techniques, decommissioning technologies, new developing technologies and remote technologies. Radwaste management area is divided into 5 regions such as solid waste treatment, sludge treatment, liquid waste treatment, gas waste treatment and thermal treatment. Site restoration area is divided into 3 regions such as the evaluation of site contamination, soil decontamination and ground water decontamination. Finally, permission, decommissioning process, cost evaluation, quality assurance and the estimation of radionuclide inventory were mentioned in the decommissioning plan and engineering area. The estimated items for each technology are applicable domestic D and D facilities, D and D problem area and contamination/requirement, classification of D and D technology, similar technology, principle and overview of technology, status, science technology needs, implementation needs, reference and contact point.

  19. Electrochemical Decontamination of Painted and Heavily Corroded Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczak, S.; Anderson, J.; Dziewinski, J.

    1998-01-01

    The radioactive metal wastes that are generated from nuclear fuel plants and radiochemical laboratories are mainly contaminated by the surface deposition of radioactive isotopes. There are presently several techniques used in removing surface contamination involving physical and chemical processes. However, there has been very little research done in the area of soiled, heavily oxidized, and painted metals. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been developing electrochemical procedures for the decontamination of bare and painted metal objects. These methods have been found to be effective on highly corroded as well as relatively new metals. This study has been successful in decontaminating projectiles and shrapnel excavated during environmental restoration projects after 40+ years of exposure to the elements. Heavily corroded augers used in sampling activities throughout the area were also successfully decontaminated. This process has demonstrated its effectiveness and offers several advantages over the present metal decontamination practices of media blasting and chemical solvents. These advantages include the addition of no toxic or hazardous chemicals, low operating temperature and pressure, and easily scaleable equipment. It is in their future plans to use this process in the decontamination of gloveboxes destined for disposal as TRU waste

  20. Mass Casualty Decontamination in the United States: An Online Survey of Current Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Sarah; Symons, Charles; Carter, Holly; Jones, Emma; Larner, Joanne; Matar, Hazem; Chilcott, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Mass casualty decontamination is a public health intervention that would be employed by emergency responders following a chemical, biological, or radiological incident. The decontamination of large numbers of casualties is currently most often performed with water to remove contaminants from the skin surface. An online survey was conducted to explore US fire departments' decontamination practices and their preparedness for responding to incidents involving mass casualty decontamination. Survey respondents were asked to provide details of various aspects of their decontamination procedures, including expected response times to reach casualties, disrobing procedures, approaches to decontamination, characteristics of the decontamination showering process, provision for special populations, and any actions taken following decontamination. The aim of the survey was to identify any differences in the way in which decontamination guidance is implemented across US states. Results revealed that, in line with current guidance, many US fire departments routinely use the “ladder-pipe system” for conducting rapid, gross decontamination of casualties. The survey revealed significant variability in ladder-pipe construction, such as the position and number of fire hoses used. There was also variability in decontamination characteristics, such as water temperature and water pressure, detergent use, and shower duration. The results presented here provide important insights into the ways in which implementation of decontamination guidance can vary between US states. These inconsistencies are thought to reflect established perceived best practices and local adaptation of response plans to address practical and logistical constraints. These outcomes highlight the need for evidence-based national guidelines for conducting mass casualty decontamination. PMID:27442794

  1. Development of a CB Resistant Durable, Flexible Hydration System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Peyton W; Zeller, Frank T; Bulluck, John W; Dingus, Michael L

    2002-01-01

    A durable, flexible hydration system resistant to contamination by contact with VX, GD, and HD chemical agents, as well as damage by the decontaminants sodium hypochlorite and DS-2 is being developed for aviator use...

  2. The Use of Vaporous Hydrogen Peroxide for Building Decontamination Final Report CRADA No. TC-2053-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verce, M. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schwartz, L. I. [Strategic Technology Enterprises, Inc., Mentor, OH (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between LLNL and STE to investigate the use of vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP®) to decontaminate spore-contaminated heating, ventilation, and cooling (HV AC) systems in a trailer sized room. LLNL's effort under this CRADA was funded by DOE's Chemical and Biological National Security Program (CBNP), which later became part of Department of Homeland Security in 2004.

  3. Cost and effectiveness of decontamination strategies in radiation contaminated areas in Fukushima in regard to external radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Naito, Wataru; Nakanishi, Junko

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of decontamination strategies in the special decontamination areas in Fukushima in regard to external radiation dose. A geographical information system (GIS) was used to relate the predicted external dose in the affected areas to the number of potential inhabitants and the land use in the areas. A comprehensive review of the costs of various decontamination methods was conducted as part of the analysis. The results indicate that aerial decontamination in the special decontamination areas in Fukushima would be effective for reducing the air dose rate to the target level in a short period of time in some but not all of the areas. In a standard scenario, analysis of cost and effectiveness suggests that decontamination costs for agricultural areas account for approximately 80% of the total decontamination cost, of which approximately 60% is associated with storage. In addition, the costs of decontamination per person per unit area are estimated to vary greatly. Appropriate selection of decontamination methods may significantly decrease decontamination costs, allowing more meaningful decontamination in terms of the limited budget. Our analysis can help in examining the prioritization of decontamination areas from the viewpoints of cost and effectiveness in reducing the external dose. Decontamination strategies should be determined according to air dose rates and future land-use plans.

  4. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2004-11-23

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

  5. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarek, R.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports

  6. Personnel decontamination and preventive skin care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Skin contamination arises from contact with contaminated aqueous solutions and from transmission of radioactively contaminated dirt particles. As long as the surface of the skin is neither inflamed nor showing any lesions, normally only a limited part of the top layer (epidermis), i.e. the upper layers of the stratum corneum, is contaminated. The intact horny layer has a barrier function protecting against the penetration of chemicals and dirt particles. The horny layer can be damaged by water, solvents, alkaline substances, and acids. In general, it is safe to say that the horny layer acts as a natural barrier to the penetration of liquid and particulate impurities into lower layers of the skin. As long as the horny layer is intact and free from lesions, the risk of incorporation can be considered low. When decontaminating and cleansing the skin, also in daily skin cleansing, care must be taken to prevent the acid protective layer and the horny layer from being compromised. Daily cleansing and cleansing for decontamination must be carried out with a mild, weakly acidic detergent. In addition, prevention should be achieved daily by applying a non-greasy skin lotion to protect the skin. Following a systematic regular regimen in skin cleansing and preventive skin care as well as a specific approach in skin decontamination and cleansing will avoid damage to the skin and remove any contamination incurred. This approach comprises a three-pronged concept, namely skin protection, cleansing and care. (orig.)

  7. Metallic surfaces decontamination by using laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, Fabrice; Lecardonnel, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Metal surface cleaning appears to be one of the major priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. The research and the development of a new technology that is able to meet the actual requirements (i.e. waste volume minimization, liquid effluents and chemicals free process...) seems to be the main commitment. Currently, a wide panel of technologies already exists (e.g. blasting, disk sander, electro-decontamination...) but for some of them, the efficiency is limited (e.g, Dry Ice blasting) and for others, the wastes production (liquid and/or solid) remains an important issue. One answer could be the use of a LASER light process. Since a couple of years, the Clean- Up Business Unit of the AREVA group investigates this decontamination technology. Many tests have been already performed in inactive (i.e. on simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides) or active conditions (i.e. pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and metallic pieces covered with grease). The paper will describe the results obtained in term of decontamination efficiency during all our validation process. Metallographic characterizations (i.e. SEM, X-ray scattering) and radiological analysis will be provided. We will also focus our paper on the future deployment of the LASER technology and its commercial use at La Hague reprocessing facility in 2013. (authors)

  8. Use of laser ablation in nuclear decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, Fabrice; Lecardonnel, Xavier; Damerval, Frederique

    2012-09-01

    The development and the use of clean decontamination process appear to be one of the main priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. This is especially due to the fact of wastes minimization which is one of the principal commitments. One answer would be to use a photonic process such as the LASER process. The principle of this process is based on the absorption, by the contaminant, of the photon's energy. This energy then will propagate into the material and create some mechanical waves responsible of the interfaces embrittlement and de-cohesion. As we can see, this process so called LASER ablation does not use any chemicals and allows us to avoid any production of liquid waste. Since now a couple of years, the Clean-Up Business Unit of AREVA group (BE/CL) investigates this new decontamination technology. Many tests have been done in inactive conditions on various simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides firstly in order to estimate its efficiency but also to fully qualify it. After that, we decided to move on hot tests to fully validate this new process and to show its interest for the nuclear industry. Those hot tests have been done on two kinds of contaminated material (on tank pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and on metallic pieces covered with grease). Some information such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray scattering spectroscopy and decontamination factors (DF) will be provided in this paper. (authors)

  9. Vigorous decontamination tests of steel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostinelli, A.; Bregani, F.; Pascali, R.; Ronchetti, C.

    1982-01-01

    Among operative deCommissioning problems, the chemical decontamination of metallic surfaces of LWR, mainly with the use of high vigorous reagents, is being studied in particular. ENEL research activities, partially financed by the European Community Commission, began at the end of 1980, and are being developed by CRTN, Centro di Ricerca Termica e Nucleare, in close connection with ENEL-DPT and CISE. The main aim is the identification, development, and assessment of vigorous decontamination techniques taking into account the amount and disposal cost of liquid radwaste. The test materials come from the primary loop of the BWR-Garigliano plant. Activity levels, mainly due to 60 Co, range from about 0.01 μCi/cm 2 for predecontaminated material to some μCi/cm 2 for virgin material. Moreover, traces of 90 Sr-Y beta pure emitter and alpha emitters are monitored. Research is at first carried out by screening static tests for the optimization of etching static parameters (time, temperature, reagent concentrations). Reagent effectiveness will then be tested in a special experimental loop (DECO), in dynamic conditions simulating in-situ real procedures of decontamination. Hydrofluoric, nitric and hydrochloric acids and mixtures of them have been used for the first tests. Sometimes total oxide removal is possible, and when this takes place, the final contamination levels are in accordance with limits indicated for unrestricted release materials in some countries. 18 references, 13 figures, 5 tables

  10. Research on decontamination technology. Study on protective clothing for decontamination work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimoto, Kaoru; Endo, Hiromu

    2012-01-01

    This report is a summary of study on protective clothing used for decontamination work of radioactive materials by conducting full-system testing in terms of protection performance. As a result of this study, we have validated that the protective clothing effectively inhibit particulate matter from attaching onto a body surface. (author)

  11. Modification of the Decontamination Facility at the Kruemmel NPP - 13451

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klute, Stefan; Kupke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    walls are welded gap-free and all rough edges are rounded off. All wetted parts are steel grade 1.4301 or higher. In an extension to the high pressure water decontamination box, 2 ultrasonic ponds and one washing station for small components as provide by new construction. A long pond with 3.25 m length for the decontamination of large components (e.g. turbine blades, pump rotors, driving rods) was installed. For the handling heavy components, a 2 t crane was installed. New construction of a mechanical effluent treatment facility including oil separator was connected to the existing effluent storage tank provided by the customer. One exhaust air filtration system is provided for each decontamination box, with the following requirements. The exhaust air is sent back to the room (recirculated air system). Dry blasting box including raw separator with dust collection in 200 l drum, filter for suspended particles; High pressure water decontamination box and wet area with water separator, pre-separator, filter for suspended particles. Installation of a steel platform at building height +12.85 above the decontamination boxes + 8.50 m for the erection of the high pressure water facilities, the recirculating air filter system, the air compressor and the respiratory air supply unit. The aforementioned components are placed on the steel platform and have been encased in a sound-lowering and accessible manner. New construction of the entire E and C technology for the TU system including modification of the supply lines from the switch gear. All devices are to be operated automatically. Dry blasting box, high pressure water decontamination box and wet area are designed to guarantee a unitary 'exterior view' of the decontamination facility. (authors)

  12. MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project.

  13. MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project

  14. Irradiation as an alternative environment friendly method for microbiological decontamination of herbal raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, P.; Kedzia, B.; Migdal, W.; Owczarczyk, H.B.

    1998-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of herbal raw materials is a serious problem in the production of therapeutical preparations. A good quality of the product, according to the pharmaceutical requirements may be achieved by applying suitable methods of decontamination. The decontamination treatments should be fast and effective against all microorganisms. It should ensure the decontamination of both packaging and the product in order to act effectively against all the microorganisms present and must not reduce the sensory and technological qualities of the commodities. In the paper, the results of comparative investigations on the microbiological decontamination of herbal raw materials by chemical (ethylene oxide, methyl bromide) and physical method (irradiation) are presented. Decontamination of herbal raw materials by irradiation is a method by choice. It is because chemical methods have been recognized recently as not safe to the consumer. Irradiation, in turn, is technically feasible, very effective and friendly enough to environment process

  15. Magnetite Dissolution Performance of HYBRID-II Decontamination Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seonbyeong; Lee, Woosung; Won, Huijun; Moon, Jeikwon; Choi, Wangkyu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we conducted the magnetite dissolution performance test of HYBRID-II (Hydrazine Based Reductive metal Ion Decontamination with sulfuric acid) as a part of decontamination process development. Decontamination performance of HYBRID process was successfully tested with the results of the acceptable decontamination factor (DF) in the previous study. While following-up studies such as the decomposition of the post-decontamination HYBRID solution and corrosion compatibility on the substrate metals of the target reactor coolant system have been continued, we also seek for an alternate version of HYBRID process suitable especially for decommissioning. Inspired by the relationship between the radius of reacting ion and the reactivity, we replaced the nitrate ion in HYBRID with bigger sulfate ion to accommodate the dissolution reaction and named HYBRID-II process. As a preliminary step for the decontamination performance, we tested the magnetite dissolution performance of developing HYBRID-II process and compared the results with those of HYBRID process. HYBRID process developed previously is known have the acceptable decontamination performance, but the relatively larger volume of secondary waste induced by anion exchange resin to treat nitrate ion is the one of the problems related in the development of HYBRID process to be applicable. Therefore we alternatively devised HYBRID-II process using sulfuric acid and tested its dissolution of magnetite in numerous conditions. From the results shown in this study, we can conclude that HYBRID-II process improves the decontamination performance and potentially reduces the volume of secondary waste. Rigorous tests with metal oxide coupons obtained from reactor coolant system will be followed to prove the robustness of HYBRID-II process in the future

  16. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  17. Ultrasonic decontamination robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patenaude, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    An ultrasonic decontamination robot removes radioactive contamination from the internal surface of the inlet and outlet headers, divider plate, tube sheet, and lower portions of tubes of a nuclear power plant steam generator. A programmable microprocessor controller guides the movement of a robotic arm mounted in the header manway. An ultrasonic transducer having a solvent delivery subsystem through which ultrasonic action is achieved is moved by the arm over the surfaces. A solvent recovery suction tube is positioned within the header to remove solvent therefrom while avoiding interference with the main robotic arm. The solvent composition, temperature, pressure, viscosity, and purity are controlled to optimize the ultrasonic scrubbing action. The ultrasonic transducer is controlled at a power density, frequency, and on-off mode cycle such as to optimize scrubbing action within the range of transducer-to-surface distance and solvent layer thickness selected for the particular conditions encountered. Both solvent and transducer control actions are optimized by the programmable microprocessor. (author)

  18. Actual situation on the field of decontamination in Slovak and Czech NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prazska, M.; Rezbarik, J.; Solcanyi, M.; Trtilek, R.

    2002-01-01

    Many decontamination methods for various applications have proved to provide good results at Slovak and Czech nuclear power plants. A number of mechanical, chemical and electrochemical decontamination methods are available. The selection of a suitable method and decontamination technology is the result of a multicriterial optimization. The plants use the decontamination procedures described in the design documentation. New decontamination procedures aiming to minimize secondary radioactive wastes and corrosion attack on the basic material are being developed. No standardized qualification process, however, exists for such new procedures and large efforts are to be made to introduce them into practice. Methods for decommissioning purposes are based on static or dynamic application of decontamination solutions such as a mixture of formic acid + complexing agent + corrosion inhibitor or dilute HNO 3 . A process consisting in treatment in a solution containing formic acid + complexing agent + corrosion inhibitor (total concentration 3 - 4 mass %, temperature 30 - 35 deg C), whose effect is enhanced by the application of ultrasound (0.4 - 0.5 W per cm 2 decontaminated area) in a specially designed bath, is recommended for segmented metallic parts, which can be then released into the environment and recycled. Electrochemical decontamination in a bath is another efficient decontamination method to achieve unrestricted release of the material into the environment. Efficient decontamination of various highly contaminated materials can be attained by using an electrolyte solution based on citric acid (100 g.dm -3 ) + nitric acid (20 g.dm -3 ) + NH 4 NO 3 (50 g.dm -3 ) and applying a current density of 100 - 200 mA.cm -2 , electrolyte temperature 25 - 50 deg C, with one decontamination cycle period not exceeding 30 minutes. The best results are obtained by electrolysis followed by mechanical treatment using ultrasound. Electrochemical decontamination using a spraying

  19. CO{sub 2} pellet blasting literature search and decontamination scoping tests report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, K.E.

    1993-12-01

    Past decontamination and solvent recovery activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) have resulted in the accumulation of 1.5 million gallons of radioactively contaminated sodium-bearing liquid waste. Future decontamination activities at the ICPP could result in the production of 5 million gallons or more of sodium-bearing waste using current decontamination techniques. Chemical decontamination flushes have provided a satisfactory level of decontamination. However, this method generates large amounts of sodium-bearing secondary waste. Steam jet cleaning has also been used with a great deal of success but cannot be used on concrete or soft materials. With the curtailment of reprocessing at the ICPP, the focus of decontamination is shifting from maintenance for continued operation of the facilities to decommissioning. Treatment of sodium-bearing waste is a particularly difficult problem due to the high content of alkali metals in the sodium-bearing liquid waste. It requires a very large volume of cold chemical additive for calcination. In addition, the sodium content of the sodium-bearing waste exceeds the limit that can be incorporated into vitrified waste without the addition of glass-forming compounds (primarily silicon) to produce an acceptable immobilized waste form. The primary initiatives of the Decontamination Development Program is the development of methods to eliminate/minimize the use of sodium-bearing decontamination chemicals and to minimize all liquid decontamination wastes. One method chosen for cold scoping studies during FY-93 was CO{sub 2} pellet blasting. CO{sub 2} pellet blasting has been used extensively by commercial industries for general cleaning. However, using this method for decontamination of nuclear materials is a fairly new concept. The following report discusses the research and scoping tests completed on CO{sub 2} pellet blasting.

  20. Chemical detection system and related methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Chichester, David L.; Egger, Ann E.; Krebs, Kenneth M.; Seabury, Edward H.; Van Siclen, Clinton D.; Wharton, C. Jayson; Zabriskie, John M.

    2017-06-27

    A chemical detection system includes a frame, an emitter coupled to the frame, and a detector coupled to the frame proximate the emitter. The system also includes a shielding system coupled to the frame and positioned at least partially between the emitter and the detector, wherein the frame positions a sensing surface of the detector in a direction substantially parallel to a plane extending along a front portion of the frame. A method of analyzing composition of a suspect object includes directing neutrons at the object, detecting gamma rays emitted from the object, and communicating spectrometer information regarding the gamma rays. The method also includes presenting a GUI to a user with a dynamic status of an ongoing neutron spectroscopy process. The dynamic status includes a present confidence for a plurality of compounds being present in the suspect object responsive to changes in the spectrometer information during the ongoing process.

  1. Assessing cost and effectiveness of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Naito, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Despite the enormous cost of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture, it is not clear what levels of reduction in external radiation exposure are possible in the Special Decontamination Area, the Intensive Contamination Survey Areas and the whole of Fukushima. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture in its entirety. Using a geographic information system, we calculated the costs of removal, storage containers, transport, and temporary and interim storage facilities as well as the reduction in air dose rate for a cumulative external exposure for 9000 1 km × 1 km mesh units incorporating 51 municipalities. The decontamination cost for the basic scenario, for which forested areas within 20 m of habitation areas were decontaminated, was JPY2.53–5.12 trillion; the resulting reduction in annual external dose was about 2500 person-Sv. The transport, storage, and administrative costs of decontamination waste and removed soil reached JPY1.55–2.12 trillion under this scenario. Although implementing decontamination of all forested areas provides some major reductions in the external radiation dose for the average inhabitant, decontamination costs could potentially exceed JPY16 trillion. These results indicate that technologies for reducing the volume of decontamination waste and removed soil should be considered to reduce storage costs and that further discussions about forest decontamination policies are needed. - Highlights: • Evaluation of cost and effectiveness of decontaminating Fukushima Prefecture. • Reductions in external exposure under various decontamination scenarios were similar. • Decontamination costs for the basic scenario were estimated at JPY2.53–5.12 trillion.

  2. In vitro evaluation of different chemical agents for the decontamination of gutta-percha cones Avaliação in vitro de diferentes agentes de descontaminação de cones de guta-percha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Emílio de Souza

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effectiveness of three disinfectants used in Dentistry for decontamination of gutta-percha cones. Sixty gutta-percha cones were contaminated with standardized pure cultures of five species of microorganisms (Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Candida albicans ATCC CBS-ICB/USP 562, Bacillus subtilis spores ATCC 6633 and Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175. The cones were treated with 10% polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine aqueous solution (PVP-I; Groups 1 and 2, 5.25% aqueous sodium hypochlorite (Groups 3 and 4 and paraformaldehyde tablets (Group 5. All chemical agents were efficient for the cold sterilization of gutta-percha cones in short time periods.A eficiência de três desinfetantes usados em Odontologia foi estudada na descontaminação de 60 cones de guta-percha contaminados com culturas puras e padronizadas de cinco cepas de microrganismos (Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Candida albicans ATCC CBS-ICB/USP 562, Bacillus subtilis em esporos ATCC 6633 e Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175. Os cones foram tratados com solução aquosa de polivinilpirrolidona-iodo 10% (PVP-I; Grupos 1 e 2, solução aquosa de hipoclorito de sódio 5,25% (Grupos 3 e 4 e pastilhas de formaldeído (Grupo 5. Nossos resultados indicam que todos os agentes químicos foram eficientes para a esterilização a frio dos cones de guta-percha em curtos espaços de tempo.

  3. Solid Waste Decontamination by Thermal Desorption and Catalytic Oxidation Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolcová, Olga; Topka, Pavel; Soukup, Karel; Jirátová, Květa; Váňová, H.; Kaštánek, František

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 9 (2014), s. 1279-1282 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/059 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thermal desorption * catalytic oxidation * soil decontamination Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.468, year: 2014

  4. Minimal impact, waterless decontamination technologies for improving food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathogen contamination of produce, meats, poultry, shellfish, and other foods remains an ongoing concern. Chemical sanitizers are widely employed for foods and food contact surfaces. However, there is growing interest in the development of minimal impact, waterless decontamination processes that wil...

  5. Decontamination of Wastewater Contaminated by Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaštánek, František; Kaštánek, P.; Demnerová, K.; Maléterová, Ywetta

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2004), s. 131-138 ISSN 0273-1223 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : decontamination * hydrogen peroxide * underground water Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.586, year: 2004

  6. Safety assessment of the Area 6 Decontamination Pad and Laundry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilton, M.W.; Orcutt, J.A.

    1984-10-01

    The Safety Assessment of the Area 6 Decontamination Pad and Laundry, prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1A, identifies and evaluates potential radiation and chemical hazards to personnel, and impacts on the environment. Site and facility characteristics, as well as routine and nonroutine operations are discussed. Hypothetical incidents and accidents are described and evaluated. 3 figures, 1 table

  7. Contamination and decontamination of skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, J.; Knajfl, J.

    1983-01-01

    In external contamination the beta radiation dose is the prevalent component of the total dose absorbed by the skin. There exist four types of radionUclide bonds to the skin: mechanical retention of solid particles or solution on the surface and in the pores, physical adsorption of nondissociated molecules or colloids, the ion exchange effect, and chemisorption. Radionuclides then penetrate the skin by transfollicular transfer. The total amount of radioactive substances absorbed into the skin depends on the condition of the skin. Skin is decontaminated by washing with lukewarm water and soap or with special decontamination solutions. The most widely used components of decontamination solutions are detergents, chelaton, sodium hexametaphosphate, oxalic acid, citric acid. The main principles of the decontamination of persons are given. (M.D.)

  8. Technology development and demonstration for TRIGA research reactor decontamination, decommissioning and site restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Ki Jung; Lee, Byung Jik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction to research reactor decommissioning plan at KAERI, the background of technology development and demonstration, and the current status of the system decontamination technology for TRIGA reactors, concrete decontamination and dust treatment technologies, wall ranging robot and graphic simulation of dismantling processes, soil decontamination and restoration technology, recycling or reuse technologies for radioactive metallic wastes, and incineration technology demonstration for combustible wastes. 9 figs

  9. Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite for decontamination of sulfur mustard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen Kumar, J.; Prasad, G.K., E-mail: gkprasad2001@yahoo.com; Ramacharyulu, P.V.R.K.; Garg, P.; Ganesan, K.

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. They were prepared by precipitation pyrolysis method and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Obtained data indicated the presence of mesopores with diameter ranging from 2 to 80 nm and the materials exhibited relatively high surface area 86 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} when compared to the individual metal oxide nanoparticles. Reactive sites of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied by infrared spectroscopy technique using pyridine as a probe molecule. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard when compared to single component metal oxides and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Highlights: • Preparation of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • CuO–ZnO with better surface area was synthesized by precipitation pyrolysis. • Decontamination of HD using mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • HD decontaminated by elimination and hydrolysis reactions.

  10. Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite for decontamination of sulfur mustard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praveen Kumar, J.; Prasad, G.K.; Ramacharyulu, P.V.R.K.; Garg, P.; Ganesan, K.

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. They were prepared by precipitation pyrolysis method and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Obtained data indicated the presence of mesopores with diameter ranging from 2 to 80 nm and the materials exhibited relatively high surface area 86 m 2 g −1 when compared to the individual metal oxide nanoparticles. Reactive sites of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied by infrared spectroscopy technique using pyridine as a probe molecule. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard when compared to single component metal oxides and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Highlights: • Preparation of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • CuO–ZnO with better surface area was synthesized by precipitation pyrolysis. • Decontamination of HD using mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • HD decontaminated by elimination and hydrolysis reactions

  11. Introduction of new decontamination techniques using carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kwang Heon; Kim, Hak Won; Kim, Hong Du; Koh, Moon Sung; Kim, Yang Eun; Lee, Bum Sik; Park, Hyun Taek

    2001-01-01

    Green technology is being developed up to a point that is feasible not only in an environmental sense, but also in an economical veiwpoint. This paper introduces two case studies that applied green technology into nuclear industry. 1) Nuclear laundry: A laundry machine that uses liquid and supercritical CO 2 as a solvent for decontamination of contaminated working dresses in nuclear power plants was developed. The machine consists of a 16 liter reactor, a recovery system with compressors, and storage tanks. All CO 2 used in cleaning is fully recovered and reused in next cleaning, resulting in no production of secondary nuclear waste, Decontamination factor is still lower than that in the methods currently used in the plant. Nuclear laundry using CO 2 looks promising with technical improvements-surfactants and mechanical agitation. 2) CO 2 nozzle decontamination: An adjustable nozzle for controlling the size of dry ice snow was developed. Using the developed nozzle, a surface decontamination device was made. Human oils like fingerprints on glass were easy to remove. Decontamination ability was tested using a contaminated pump-housing surface. About 40 to 80% of radioactivity was removed. This device is effective in surface-decontamination of any electrical devices like detector, controllers which cannot be cleaned in aqueous solution

  12. Oxidation of Ce(III) in Foam Decontaminant by Ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Yoon, I. H.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K.; Yang, H. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. S. [Gachon University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant is composed of a surfactant and nanoparticles for the generation and maintenance of foam, and a chemical decontamination agent made of Ce(IV) dissolved in nitric acid. Ce(IV) will be reduced to Ce(III) through the decontamination process. Oxidizing cerium(III) can be reused as a decontamination agent, Ce(IV). Oxidation treatment technology by ozone uses its strong oxidizing power. It can be regarded as an environmentally friendly process, because ozone cannot be stored and transported like other industrial gases (because it quickly decays into diatomic oxygen) and must therefore be produced on site, and used ozone can decompose immediately. The ozonation treatment of Ce(III) in foam decontaminant containing a surfactant is necessary for the effective regeneration of Ce(III). Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) into Ce(IV) in the nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing surfactant. This study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) in nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing a TBS surfactant. The oxidation conversion rate of Ce(III) was increased with an increase in the flow rate of the gas mixture and ozone injection amount. The oxidation time required for the 100% oxidation conversion of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) at a specific ozone injection amount can be predicted from these experimental data.

  13. Decontamination and decommission of a radiochemical laboratory building complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoubek, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Handling of unsealed radioactive substances for research and development purposes in chemical or pharmaceutical industries or research centres as well as production of radioactive substances (e.g. for applications in nuclear medicine or industry) requires operation of special radiochemical laboratories. In general, operation of radiochemical laboratories is strongly regulated by the government and national authorities. The operator needs a permit related to radiological protection. In general, technical requirements for such facilities are very high. To ensure high safety standards with respect to the employees and the environment, several radiological protection measures have to be taken. These measures (for example special shielding or ventilation and waste water systems) depend on various factors, e.g. activity in use, kind of nuclides, chemical properties and volatility of substances. In order to close-down such radiochemical laboratories some radiological protection measures have to be maintained to ensure protection of both humans and the environment induced by possible residual contaminations within the facility including technical inventory. However, a later reuse of the facility as a non-radioactive facility requires removal of all radioactive contamination with respect to national regulation. Resulting radioactive wastes have to be disposed of under control of competent authorities. Based on the experience of a decontamination and decommission project for a former radiochemical laboratory complex, the main steps necessary to release such a facility are discussed. Analytical aspects of initial conditions, necessary organisational structures within the project, resources needed estimation and exploration of the radiological situation in the laboratory, elaboration of a measuring strategy and decontamination methods as well as different waste disposal routes in relation to different waste types are reported. (author)

  14. Effects of some decontaminating agents on the purification of radioactive sewage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantel, J.; Cohen, P.

    1958-01-01

    The efficiency of different decontaminating agents on the processing of radioactive sewage was studied. Versene, which is often used, decreases very slightly the efficiency of the chemical treatment. (author) [fr

  15. A DECONTAMINATION PROCESS FOR METAL SCRAPS FROM THE DECOMMISSIONING OF TRR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, T.Y.; Gan, J.S.; Lin, K.M.; Chung, Z.J.

    2003-02-27

    A decontamination facility including surface condition categorizing, blasting, chemical/electrochemical cleaning, very low radioactivity measuring, and melting, is being established at INER. The facility will go into operation by the end of 2004. The main purpose is to clean the dismantled metal wastes from the decommissioning of Taiwan Research Reactor (TRR). The pilot test shows that over 70% of low level metal waste can be decontaminated to very low activity and can be categorized as BRC (below regulatory concern) waste. All the chemical decontamination technologies applied are developed by INER. In order to reduce the secondary wastes, chemical reagents will be regenerated several times with a selective precipitation method. The exhausted chemical reagent will be solidified with INER's patented process. The total secondary waste is estimated about 0.1-0.3 wt.% of the original waste. This decontamination process is accessed to be economic and feasible.

  16. The smallest chemical reaction system with bistability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Thomas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bistability underlies basic biological phenomena, such as cell division, differentiation, cancer onset, and apoptosis. So far biologists identified two necessary conditions for bistability: positive feedback and ultrasensitivity. Results Biological systems are based upon elementary mono- and bimolecular chemical reactions. In order to definitely clarify all necessary conditions for bistability we here present the corresponding minimal system. According to our definition, it contains the minimal number of (i reactants, (ii reactions, and (iii terms in the corresponding ordinary differential equations (decreasing importance from i-iii. The minimal bistable system contains two reactants and four irreversible reactions (three bimolecular, one monomolecular. We discuss the roles of the reactions with respect to the necessary conditions for bistability: two reactions comprise the positive feedback loop, a third reaction filters out small stimuli thus enabling a stable 'off' state, and the fourth reaction prevents explosions. We argue that prevention of explosion is a third general necessary condition for bistability, which is so far lacking discussion in the literature. Moreover, in addition to proving that in two-component systems three steady states are necessary for bistability (five for tristability, etc., we also present a simple general method to design such systems: one just needs one production and three different degradation mechanisms (one production, five degradations for tristability, etc.. This helps modelling multistable systems and it is important for corresponding synthetic biology projects. Conclusion The presented minimal bistable system finally clarifies the often discussed question for the necessary conditions for bistability. The three necessary conditions are: positive feedback, a mechanism to filter out small stimuli and a mechanism to prevent explosions. This is important for modelling bistability with

  17. Decontamination of radioactive contaminated protective wear using dry cleaning solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthiah, Pushpa; Chitra, S.; Paul, Biplob

    2013-01-01

    Liquid waste generated by conventional decontamination of radioactive contaminated cotton protective wear using detergent affects the chemical treatment of the plant. To reduce the generation of aqueous detergent waste, dry cleaning of cotton protective wear, highly soiled with oil and grease towards decontamination was tried with organic solvents. Mineral turpentine oil (MTO) among various other organic solvents was identified as a suitable organic solvent. As MTO leaves characteristic odour on the cloth, various commercial fragrances for the removal of the odour were tried. Application of the optimised dry cleaning solvent and commercial fragrance was adopted in plant scale operation. (author)

  18. Decontamination of the equipment in the acids recovery cell in the fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Akira; Kusano, Toshitsugu

    1985-01-01

    In the cell where an acids recovery evaporator tank is set, there are also installed its associated components such as the solution feed system and a receiving tank. When maintenance etc. are to be conducted within the cell, the equipment etc. must be decontaminated to eliminate the personnel exposure. In the acid recovery process, there is involved ruthenium-106, for which the decontamination reagents must be selected. As such, the decontamination proceeded first with nitric acid + sodium hydroxide solution and then alkaline potassium permanganate solution + nitric acid + EDTA.2Na. Decontamination was made twice in 1979 and 1983. Described are the selection of decontamination reagents and decontamination works performed in the acids recovery cell. (Mori, K.)

  19. 29 CFR 1910.161 - Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. 1910.161 Section... § 1910.161 Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. (a) Scope and application. This section applies to all fixed extinguishing systems, using dry chemical as the extinguishing agent, installed to meet a...

  20. Decontamination by cleaning with fluorocarbon surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, R.; Benson, C.E.; Meyers, E.S.; Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1994-02-01

    In the nuclear industry, facilities and their components inevitably become contaminated with radioactive materials. This report documents the application of a novel particle-removal process developed by Entropic Systems, Inc. (ESI), to decontaminate critical instruments and parts that are contaminated with small radioactive particles that adhere to equipment surfaces. The tests were performed as a cooperative effort between ESI and the Chemical Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ESI developed a new, environmentally compatible process to remove small particles from solid surfaces that is more effective than spraying or sonicating with CFC-113. This process uses inert perfluorinated liquids as working media; the liquids have zero ozone-depleting potential, are nontoxic and nonflammnable, and are generally recognized as nonhazardous materials. In the ESI process, parts to be cleaned are first sprayed or sonicated with a dilute solution of a high-molecular-weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid to effect particle removal. The parts are then rinsed with the perfluorinated liquid to remove the fluorocarbon surfactant applied in the first step, and the residual rinse liquid is then evaporated from the parts into an air or nitrogen stream from which it is recovered. Nuclear contamination is inherently a surface phenomenon. The presence of radioactive particles is responsible for all ''smearable'' contamination and, if the radioactive particles are small enough, for some of the fixed contamination. Because radioactivity does not influence the physical chemistry of particle adhesion, the ESI process should be just as effective in removing radioactive particles as it is in removing nonradioactive particles

  1. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Jarek

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs documents. The updates

  2. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Jarek

    2005-08-29

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs

  3. Research and development of treatment techniques for LLW from decommissioning: Decontamination and volume reduction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, T.; Kameo, Y.; Nakashio, N.

    2001-01-01

    For the purpose of reducing the amount and/or volume of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) arising from decommissioning of nuclear reactor, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing four decontamination techniques. They are: (a) Gas-carrying abrasive method, (b) In-situ remote electropolishing method for pipe system before dismantling, (c) Bead reaction - thermal shock method, and (d) Laser induced chemical method for components after dismantling. JAERI in developing techniques are also carrying out melting tests of metal and non-metal. Melting was confirmed to be effective in reducing the volume, homogenizing, and furthermore stabilizing non-metallic wastes. (author)

  4. Biotic Strategies for Toxic Heavy Metal Decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rupesh K; Sharma, Vinay

    2017-01-01

    In the modern age of globalization and fast industrialization, the environmental matters are fetching more and more annoyance for human being. Patents reveal that heavy metals occur in immobilized form in sediments and as aggregates in nature. However due to the different human activities like ore mining and industrial processes, the natural biogeochemical cycles are disordered instigating amplified deposition of heavy metals in aquatic environments. The most common pollution causing heavy metals are considered to be the mercury, arsenic, lead, copper, silver, cadmium. The goal of this work is to identify the biological action of heavy metal-contaminated water and sediments which can be categorized into bioaccumulation, biosorption, oxidation/ reduction, leaching, degradation, and phytoremediation. Among the various biological methods for decontamination of heavy metals from water, biosorption is known to be the most affordable, economical and efficient option for the management of capacious water bodies encompassing low concentrations of heavy metals. However, the physicochemical properties of the aquatic bodies that would extremely affect the performances of biosorbents should be prudently measured. The precipitation is efficient in decontamination/removal of relatively high concentrations of metals in water. The bioleaching of searched sediments in regulated systems is a speedy process as compared with phytoremediation. In order to decontaminate the heavy metals from water, biological methods are very proficient and useful. These methods can be very efficient in cleaning up environment. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Successful full-scale deployments of advanced PGPR enhanced phytoremediation systems (PEPS) for decontamination of petroleum and salt impacted soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, B.; Huang, X.D.; Gerhardt, K.; Yu, X.M.; Liddycoat, S.; Lu, X.; Nykamp, J.; McCallum, B.; MacNeill, G.; Mosley, P.; Gurska, J.; Knezevich, N.; Zhong, H.; Gerwing, P. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation described a phytoremediation system designed to remediate salt and petroleum contaminated sites. Phytoremediation techniques are cheaper than traditional methods of remediating soils. The phytoremediation process is comprised of volatilization, phytodegradation, and chelation processes. Plants uptake contaminants via a rhizodegradation process. The plants provide biomass for rapid remediation with a restoration time frame of between 2 to 3 years. PGPR enhanced phytoremediation systems (PEPS) have been studied over a 10 year period and successfully applied at polycyclic hydrocarbon (PHC) contaminated sites, gas stations, and salt-contaminated sites throughout Canada. Soils are tilled in order to expose contaminants to sunlight. hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are then applied, followed by the application of a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) phytoremediation system that is typically applied to grass species prior to planting. Case studies of full-scale sites used to prove the concept for both salt and hydrocarbon contaminated soils were presented. tabs., figs.

  6. Los Alamos DP West Plutonium Facility decontamination project, 1978-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garde, R.; Cox, E.J.; Valentine, A.M.

    1982-09-01

    The DP West Plutonium Facility operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico was decontaminated between April 1978 and April 1981. The facility was constructed in 1944 to 1945 to produce plutonium metal and fabricate parts for nuclear weapons. It was continually used as a plutonium processing and research facility until mid-1978. Decontamination operations included dismantling and removing gloveboxes and conveyor tunnels; removing process systems, utilities, and exhaust ducts; and decontaminating all remaining surfaces. This report describes glovebox and conveyor tunnel separations, decontamination techniques, health and safety considerations, waste management procedures, and costs of the operation

  7. Self-Cleaning Coatings and Materials for Decontaminating Field-Deployable Land and Water-Based Optical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Robert; Underwood, Lauren; Holekamp, Kara; May, George; Spiering, Bruce; Davis, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    This technology exploits the organic decomposition capability and hydrophilic properties of the photocatalytic material titanium dioxide (TiO2), a nontoxic and non-hazardous substance, to address contamination and biofouling issues in field-deployed optical sensor systems. Specifically, this technology incorporates TiO2 coatings and materials applied to, or integrated as a part of, the optical surfaces of sensors and calibration sources, including lenses, windows, and mirrors that are used in remote, unattended, ground-based (land or maritime) optical sensor systems. Current methods used to address contamination or biofouling of these optical surfaces in deployed systems are costly, toxic, labor intensive, and non-preventative. By implementing this novel technology, many of these negative aspects can be reduced. The functionality of this innovative self-cleaning solution to address the problem of contamination or biofouling depends on the availability of a sufficient light source with the appropriate spectral properties, which can be attained naturally via sunlight or supplemented using artificial illumination such as UV LEDs (light emitting diodes). In land-based or above-water systems, the TiO2 optical surface is exposed to sunlight, which catalyzes the photocatalytic reaction, facilitating both the decomposition of inorganic and organic compounds, and the activation of superhydrophilic properties. Since underwater optical surfaces are submerged and have limited sunlight exposure, supplementary UV light sources would be required to activate the TiO2 on these optical surfaces. Nighttime operation of land-based or above-water systems would require this addition as well. For most superhydrophilic self-cleaning purposes, a rainwater wash will suffice; however, for some applications an attached rainwater collector/ dispenser or other fresh water dispensing system may be required to wash the optical surface and initiate the removal of contaminates. Deployment of this

  8. New decontamination technologies for environmental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; McCoy, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    The technologies discussed represent a versatile collection of tools and approaches for environmental decontamination applications. The fixatives provide a means for gaining and maintaining control of large contaminated areas, for decontaminating large surface areas, and for protecting equipment and supplies used in decontamination operations. The other decontamination techniques together provide a method for removing loose surface contamination from almost all classes of materials and surfaces. These techniques should have wide application both as direct decontamination processes and for the cleaning of tools and equipment used in the decontamination operations

  9. Decontamination and winter conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenild, C.; Tveten, U.

    1984-12-01

    The report deals with two decontamonation experiments under winter conditions. A snow-covered parking lot was contaminated, and the snow was subsequently removed using standard snow-moving equipment. The snow left behind was collected and the content of contaminant was determined. A non-radioactive contaminant was used. A decontamination factor exceeding 100 was obtained. Although the eksperimental conditions were close to ideal, it is reason to believe that extremely efficient removal of deposited materials on a snow surface is achivable. In another investigation, run-off from agricultural surface, contaminated while covered with snow, was measured A lycimeter was used in this experiment. A stable layer of ice and snow was allowed to form before contamination. The run-off water was collected at each thaw period until all snow and ice was gone. Cs-134 was used as contaminant. Roughly 30% of the Cs-134 with which the area was contaminated ran off with the melt water. Following a reactor accident situation, this would have given a corresponding reduction in the long term doses. Both of these experiments show that consequence calculation assumptions, as they are currently applied to large accident assessment, tend to overestimate the consequences resulting from accidents taking place under winter conditions

  10. Decontamination tests on tritium-contaminated materials; Essais de decontamination de materiel contamine par du tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutot, P.; Schipfer, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Chusclan (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule

    1967-07-01

    These tests are designed to try out various processes liable to be applied to the decontamination of a material contaminated with tritium. The samples are thin stainless- steel slabs contaminated in the laboratory with elements extracted from industrial installations. The measurement of the initial and residual activities is carried out using an open-window BERTHOLD counter. The best results are obtained by passing a current of pre-heated (300 deg. C) air containing water vapour. This process makes it possible to reach a decontamination factor of 99.5 per cent in 4 hours. In a vacuum, the operation has to be prolonged to 100 hours in order to obtain a decontamination factor of 99.2 per cent. Wet-chemical or electrolytic treatments are efficient but their use is limited by the inherent corrosion risks. A study of the reappearance of the contamination has made it possible to observe that this phenomenon occurs whatever the process used. (authors) [French] Ces essais ont pour but d'experimenter divers procedes susceptibles d'etre appliques a la decontamination du materiel contamine par du tritium. Les echantillons sont constitues par des plaquettes d'acier inoxydable contamines en laboratoire et par des elements extraits d'installations industrielles. Les mesures d'activites initiales et residuelles sont effectuees au moyen d'un compteur BERTHOLD a fenetre ouverte. Les meilleurs resultats sont obtenus par balayage d'air prechauffe a 300 deg. C et additionne de vapeur d'eau. Ce procede permet d'atteindre en 4 heures un facteur de decontamination de 99,5 pour cent. Sous vide, l'operation doit etre poursuivie pendant 100 heures pour porter le facteur de decontamination a 99,2 pour cent. Les traitements par voie chimique humide et par voie electrolytique sont efficaces mais la corrosion qu'ils risquent d'engendrer limite considerablement leur champ d'application. Une etude sur la resurgence de la

  11. Effects of some decontaminating agents on the purification of radioactive sewage; Influence de quelques agents decontaminants sur l'epuration d'eaux residuaires radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantel, J.; Cohen, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The efficiency of different decontaminating agents on the processing of radioactive sewage was studied. Versene, which is often used, decreases very slightly the efficiency of the chemical treatment. (author) [French] On a etudie l'influence de differents agents decontaminants sur l'efficacite du traitement d'eaux residuaires radioactives. Le Versene, souvent utilise, ne gene pratiquement pas l'efficacite du traitement chimique employe. (auteur)

  12. Successful field tests of a multi-process phytoremediation system for decontamination of persistent petroleum and organic contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, B.M.; Huang, X.D.; Gurska, Y.; Gerhardt, K.E.; Wang, W.; Lampi, M.A.; Zhang, C.; Khalid, A.; Isherwood, D.; Chang, P.; Wang, H.; Dixon, D.G.; Glick, B.R. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    A large number of aquatic and terrestrial environments are polluted with various levels of toxicants. Metals, organics and total petroleum hydrocarbons from anthropogenic sources pose a risk to both human health and the health of ecosystems. Although these persistent contaminants are difficult to remediate, several industrial sites throughout North America are being remediated as part of land reclamation and restoration programs. This paper addressed the issue of phytoremediation for removing contaminants from soils. Phytoremediation is considered to be a viable remediation strategy because the increased biomass of plants, relative to the biomass of soil microbes in the absence of plants, allows for higher throughput. Extensive root systems can infiltrate large volumes of soil, thus promoting degradation of contaminants over a wide area. This paper described a newly developed multi-process phytoremediation system with accelerated remediation kinetics to effectively remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHC) from soils. The system combines land farming/sunlight exposure; inoculation of contaminant degrading bacteria; and, plant growth with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria which mitigates the effects of stress ethylene in plants. The primary factor for success was the interaction between the plant and the plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Several field tests were conducted following successful greenhouse tests. Results at a TPH contaminated site in Sarnia, Ontario showed that over a 2 year period, 60 to 70 per cent remediation of 15 per cent TPH was achieved. At a site in Turner Valley, Alberta, 35 per cent remediation of 1 per cent recalcitrant TPH was achieved, while a DDT contaminated site near Simcoe, Ontario had nearly 30 per cent of CHC removed in a 3 month period. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  13. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-component DNAPLS with surfactant solutions. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Laboratory studies were conducted at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY) while numerical simulation and field work were undertaken by INTERA Inc. in collaboration with Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc. at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Kentucky. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). Ten of these were capable of solubilizing TCE to concentrations greater than 15,000 mg/L, compared to its aqueous solubility of 1,100 mg/L. Four surfactants were identified as good solubilizers of all three chlorinated solvents. Of these, a secondary alcohol ethoxylate was the first choice for in situ testing because of its excellent solubilizing ability and its low propensity to sorb. However, this surfactant did not meet the Commonwealth of Kentucky`s acceptance criteria. Consequently, it was decided to use a surfactant approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration as a food-grade additive. As a 1% micellar-surfactant solution, this sorbitan monooleate has a solubilization capacity of 16,000 mg TCE/L, but has a higher propensity to sorb to clays than has the alcohol ethoxylate.

  14. Modeling Complex Chemical Systems: Problems and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Non-equilibrium plasmas in complex gas mixtures are at the heart of numerous contemporary technologies. They typically contain dozens to hundreds of species, involved in hundreds to thousands of reactions. Chemists and physicists have always been interested in what are now called chemical reduction techniques (CRT's). The idea of such CRT's is that they reduce the number of species that need to be considered explicitly without compromising the validity of the model. This is usually achieved on the basis of an analysis of the reaction time scales of the system under study, which identifies species that are in partial equilibrium after a given time span. The first such CRT that has been widely used in plasma physics was developed in the 1960's and resulted in the concept of effective ionization and recombination rates. It was later generalized to systems in which multiple levels are effected by transport. In recent years there has been a renewed interest in tools for chemical reduction and reaction pathway analysis. An example of the latter is the PumpKin tool. Another trend is that techniques that have previously been developed in other fields of science are adapted as to be able to handle the plasma state of matter. Examples are the Intrinsic Low Dimension Manifold (ILDM) method and its derivatives, which originate from combustion engineering, and the general-purpose Principle Component Analysis (PCA) technique. In this contribution we will provide an overview of the most common reduction techniques, then critically assess the pros and cons of the methods that have gained most popularity in recent years. Examples will be provided for plasmas in argon and carbon dioxide.

  15. Report on practical use of new decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, Hideyuki; Ono, Masahiro

    2000-03-01

    For removing surface contamination of a solid waste with radioactivity, technology of laser cleaning and vacuum arc cleaning has the possibility to obtain the high decontamination rate. We made a research for practical uses of these methods as a new cleaning technology from published papers and patents. From these results, we discussed about an applicability of laser cleaning and vacuum arc cleaning to decontaminate a body of centrifugal separator. At first, we investigate the solid surface cleaning technology with a laser or a vacuum arc from published papers in the world and the patents in Japan. The results were listed in tables. Each information was abstracted into a technical data sheet and sorted into a related technology (system or equipment). We also investigate the decontamination technology by the same way and the results were abstracted into technical data sheets and sorted into related technologies, too. As an application of the above research, we considered the process and the system for decontaminating a body of centrifugal separators (cylinders). In the system, the cleaning head is set inside the cylinder and the inner surface contaminated by radioactivity is removed by the irradiation of a YAG laser, a CO2 laser or a vacuum arc. The cylinder is rotated by rotational rings and moved towards the direction of the central axis and the whole inner surface of the cylinder is cleaned with a constant cleaning rate. We also estimated the costs of each decontamination technology. (author)

  16. A State of the Art Report on the Case Study of Hot Cell Decontamination and Refurbishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Moon, J. K.; Park, G. I.; Song, K. C

    2008-08-15

    As the increase of the operation age of the domestic high radiation facilities such as IMEF, PIEF and DFDF, the necessity of decontamination and refurbishment of hot cells in these facilities is also increased. In the near future, the possibilities of refurbishment of hot cells in compliance with the new regulations, the reuse of hot cells for the other purposes and the decommissioning of the facilities also exist. To prepare against the decontamination and refurbishment of hot cells, the reports on the refurbishment, decommissioning and decontamination experiences of hot cells in USA, Japan, France, Belgium and Great Britain were investigated. ANL of USA performed the project on the decontamination of hot cells. The purpose of the project was to practically eliminate the radioactive emissions of Rn-220 to the environment and to restore the hot cells to an empty restricted use condition. The five hot cells were emptied and decontaminated for restricted use. Chemical processing facility in JAEA of Japan was used for the reprocessing study of spent fuels, hot cells in CPF were refurbished from 1995 for the tests of the newly developed reprocessing process. In a first stage, decommissioning and decontamination were fully performed by the remote operation Then, decommissioning and decontamination were performed manually. By the newly developed process, they reported that the radiation exposure of workers were satisfactorily reduced. In the other countries, they also make an effort for the refurbishment and decontamination of hot cells and it is inferred that they accumulate experiences in these fields.

  17. Liquid decontaminants for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Decontaminants used in the nuclear field must meet a variety of requirements. On the one hand, the washing process must remove radioactive contamination and conventional dirt from the items washed. On the other hand, subsequent disposal of the washing water arisings must be feasible by the usual waste disposal pathway. One aspect of particular importance is unproblematic treatment of the radioactively contaminated waste water, as a rule low to medium active, whose final storage must be ensured. Decontaminants must not impair waste treatment processes, such as evaporation, filtration, and centrifuging, as well as further treatment of the concentrates and residues arising which are worked into matrix materials (cementation, bituminization), in drum drying or roller mill drying. For reasons of safety at work and environmental quality, also aspects of human toxicology and ecotoxicology must be taken into account. In this way, handling decontaminants will not jeopardize the health of personnel or cause potential long-term environmental damage. Liquid decontaminants, compared to powders, offer the advantage of automatic dosage. The liquid product is dosed accurately as a function of the washing program used. Liquid decontaminants can be handled safely in hot laundries without causing skin and eye contacts. (orig.)

  18. Ventilation system design for control of radioactive airborne particulates during the decontamination and dismantlement (D&D) of the plant one ore silos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E. III [Parsons Environmental Services, Inc., Fairfield, OH (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The Fernald facility is a 1,050-acre site located in southwest Ohio. In July 1989, production was discontinued. The Fernald site has completed its site wide Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS). In the RI/FS, a variety of response actions where identified for various Operable Unit (OU) area at the FEMP. Of the many response actions in progress at the FEMP, removal action No.17 (in OU-3), known as the Decontamination & Dismantlement (D&D) of the Plant One Ore Silos, exemplifies a state of the art nuclear air cleaning system. Constructed in 1953, Plant 1 was the Sampling Plant for the FEMP site and the receiving point for incoming ores and residues to be processed for the production of uranium metal. The contents were removed except for small amounts of residue. The objective of the removal action is to mitigate the potential for release of contaminants or potential hazards presented by the Plant One Ore Silos until total remediation of the OU-3 area is performed. All D&D work activity is controlled to prevent the release of contamination. The work areas are isolated with physical barriers and a ventilated containment system. The containment for the silo structures consists of scaffolding and polyethylene fabric sheeting (area containment). The containment material is flame-retardant and corrosion resistant in compliance with DOE Order 6430.1A. Ventilation air is filtered through portable air cleaning devices equipped with pre-filters and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters and monitored before discharge to the atmosphere. This paper will illustrate the design of the ventilation in compliance with ASME codes AG-1, N509, N510, and DOE order 6430.1A. The materials of construction and design of the ductwork, stack, portable nuclear air cleaning units, and the type of air sampler used will be addressed. Also, this paper will describe the phase approach to dismantlement and ventilation that resulted in reduced costs and waste minimization.

  19. Surgical Instrument Decontamination Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-15

    Assoc, Sci Ed 37:246, 1948. 31. Toledo RT, Escher FE, Ayers JC: "Sporicidal properties of hydrogen peroxide against food spoilage organisms," Appl...chemical disinfectants utilized was formaldehyde which combines chemically with critical bacterial cell components to prevent their replication. As the...formaldehyde which combines chemically with critical bacterial cell components to prevent their replication. As the health effects of formaldehyde

  20. Use of a multi-process phytoremediation system for decontamination of petroleum impacted soils : results of successful field trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, B.M.; Gurska, J.; Huang, X.D.; Gerhardt, K.E.; Yu, X.M.; Nykamp, J.; MacNeill, G.; Yang, S.; Lu, X.; Glick, B. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology]|[Waterloo Environmental Biotechnology Inc., Hamilton, ON (Canada); Wang, W.; Knezevich, N. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology; Gerwing, P.; Cryer, K. [Earthmaster Environmental Strategies Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Reid, N. [EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The multi-process phytoremediation system (MPPS) was developed to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) in impacted soils. Phytoremediation of persistent contaminants in soils holds significant promise for rapid remediation kinetics. MPPS effectively removes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) from soils. A plant growth promoting rhizobacteria interaction is the main element for success as it mitigates stress ethylene effects in plants, leading to high root biomass which, in turn, promotes growth of rhizosphere organisms. Field tests of the MPPS were initiated at a farm site in Sarnia, Ontario in the summer of 2004. The field was contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons from refinery oil sludge. The second field trial was performed for 3 consecutive years at a petroleum contaminated biopile in Turner Valley, Alberta. The paper presented the results of the successful field tests of the MPPS. It was concluded that increased root biomass is achieved in the contaminated soils, which leads to more efficient and complete removal of TPHs in the field. Three years of field trials of the MPPS showed that remediation continues with successive seasons. 28 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  1. Selective decontamination and antibiotic resistance in ICUs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Nienke L.; Bonten, Marc J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Selective digestive decontamination (SDD) and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) have been associated with reduced mortality and lower ICU-acquired bacteremia and ventilator-associated pneumonia rates in areas with low levels of antibiotic resistance. However, the effect of selective

  2. Decontamination technologies evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripp, J.

    1996-01-01

    Testing has been completed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on in situ recyclable abrasives grit blasting, concrete cleaning (using scabbling, chemicals and electro-kinetics) and laser light ablation of metals. Several small scale tests have also been conducted with strippable coatings, CO 2 pellet blasting and various other techniques. The results of this testing is summarized in this paper

  3. Immobilized 4-Dialkylaminopyridines: Supernucleophilic Chemical Decontaminating Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-22

    structure. ED./ T DIC. SELEC T E FEB 0 2I 188 20. DISTRIBUTION /AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21. ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OUNCLASSIFIEDAJNUMITED Cl SAME...Verlaan, P.J.T. Alferink, and G. Challa , J. Mol. Catal., 24, 235 (1984). 8. M. A. Hierl, E. P. Gamson, and I. M. Klotz, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 101, 6020

  4. Low level radioactive liquid waste decontamination by electrochemical way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronche, E.

    1994-10-01

    As part of the work on decontamination treatments for low level radioactive aqueous liquid wastes, the study of an electro-chemical process has been chosen by the C.E.A. at the Cadarache research centre. The first part of this report describes the main methods used for the decontamination of aqueous solutions. Then an electro-deposition process and an electro-dissolution process are compared on the basis of the decontamination results using genuine radioactive aqueous liquid waste. For ruthenium decontamination, the former process led to very high yields (99.9 percent eliminated). But the elimination of all the other radionuclides (antimony, strontium, cesium, alpha emitters) was only favoured by the latter process (90 percent eliminated). In order to decrease the total radioactivity level of the waste to be treated, we have optimized the electro-dissolution process. That is why the chemical composition of the dissolved anode has been investigated by a mixture experimental design. The radionuclides have been adsorbed on the precipitating products. The separation of the precipitates from the aqueous liquid enabled us to remove the major part of the initial activity. On the overall process some operations have been investigated to minimize waste embedding. Finally, a pilot device (laboratory scale) has been built and tested with genuine radioactive liquid waste. (author). 77 refs., 41 tabs., 55 figs., 4 appendixes

  5. Proposed draft standard ANS 11.18: recommendations to facilitate decontamination and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, C.E.; LaGuardia, T.S.; Jones, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of ANS Standard 11.18 is to recommend design guides to facilitate decontamination and eventual decommissioning of a remotely operated radioactive facility. This design guide contains generic recommendations to assist in the planning, selection and arrangement of equipment and materials, and the protection of surfaces to enhance system decontamination and disassembly

  6. Guide on the use of low energy electron beams for microbiological decontamination of surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Gondim, Ondina

    This Guide describes the validation and routine monitoring of microbiological decontamination of surfaces by low energy electron beams (100-200 keV). The Guide is mainly based on experience gained in connection with installation of electron beam systems for surface decontamination of pre-steriliz...

  7. Decontamination Options for Drinking Water Contaminated with Bacillus anthracis Spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raber, E; Burklund, A

    2010-02-16

    Five parameters were evaluated with surrogates of Bacillus anthracis spores to determine effective decontamination options for use in a contaminated drinking water supply. The parameters were: (1) type of Bacillus spore surrogate (B. thuringiensis or B. atrophaeus); (2) spore concentration in suspension (10{sup 2} to 10{sup 6} spores/ml); (3) chemical characteristics of decontaminant [sodium dicholor-s-triazinetrione dihydrate (Dichlor), hydrogen peroxide, potassium peroxymonosulfate (Oxone), sodium hypochlorite, and VirkonS{reg_sign}]; (4) decontaminant concentration (0.01% to 5%); and (5) decontaminant exposure time (10 min to 24 hr). Results from 162 suspension tests with appropriate controls are reported. Hydrogen peroxide at a concentration of 5%, and Dichlor and sodium hypochlorite at a concentration of 2%, were effective at spore inactivation regardless of spore type tested, spore exposure time, or spore concentration evaluated. This is the first reported study of Dichlor as an effective decontaminant for B. anthracis spore surrogates. Dichlor's desirable characteristics of high oxidation potential, high level of free chlorine, and more neutral pH than that of other oxidizers evaluated appear to make it an excellent alternative. All three oxidizers were effective against B. atrophaeus spores in meeting EPA's biocide standard of greater than a 6 log kill after a 10-minute exposure time and at lower concentrations than typically reported for biocide use. Solutions of 5% VirkonS{reg_sign} and Oxone were less effective decontaminants than other options evaluated in this study and did not meet the EPA's efficacy standard for biocides. Differences in methods and procedures reported by other investigators make quantitative comparisons among studies difficult.

  8. Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System (CCRIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CCRIS database contains chemical records with carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, tumor promotion, and tumor inhibition test results. CCRIS provides historical...

  9. Systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2012-03-01

    Throughout history, as new chemical threats arose, strategies for the defense against chemical attacks have also evolved. As a part of an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, a systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios was performed to understand how the chemical threats and attack strategies change over time. For the analysis, the difficulty in executing chemical attack was evaluated within a framework of three major scenario elements. First, historical examples of chemical terrorism were examined to determine how the use of chemical threats, versus other weapons, contributed to the successful execution of the attack. Using the same framework, the future of chemical terrorism was assessed with respect to the impact of globalization and new technologies. Finally, the efficacy of the current defenses against contemporary chemical terrorism was considered briefly. The results of this analysis justify the need for continued diligence in chemical defense.

  10. 46 CFR 154.1410 - Decontamination shower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Decontamination shower. 154.1410 Section 154.1410... Equipment § 154.1410 Decontamination shower. When Table 4 references this section, a vessel carrying the listed cargo must have a decontamination shower and an eye wash that: (a) Are on the weatherdeck; and (b...

  11. 40 CFR 170.250 - Decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Decontamination. 170.250 Section 170... PROTECTION STANDARD Standard for Pesticide Handlers § 170.250 Decontamination. (a) Requirement. During any..., decontamination supplies for washing off pesticides and pesticide residues. (b) General conditions. (1) The...

  12. Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

    2014-03-01

    , they performed a sensitivity analysis for velocity, height and polydispersity and compared results against literature data for experimental studies of CLC beds with no reaction. Finally, they present an optimization space using simple non-reactive configurations. In Subtask 5.3, through a series of experimental studies, behavior of a variety of oxygen carriers with different loadings and manufacturing techniques was evaluated under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The influences of temperature, degree of carrier conversion and thermodynamic driving force resulting from the difference between equilibrium and system O{sub 2} partial pressures were evaluated through several experimental campaigns, and generalized models accounting for these influences were developed to describe oxidation and oxygen release. Conversion of three solid fuels with widely ranging reactivities was studied in a small fluidized bed system, and all but the least reactive fuel (petcoke) were rapidly converted by oxygen liberated from the CLOU carrier. Attrition propensity of a variety of carriers was also studied, and the carriers produced by freeze granulation or impregnation of preformed substrates displayed the lowest rates of attrition. Subtask 5.4 focused on gathering kinetic data for a copper-based oxygen carrier to assist with modeling of a functioning chemical looping reactor. The kinetics team was also responsible for the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material.

  13. CHEMICAL ANALYSES OF SODIUM SYSTEMS FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, W. O.; Yunker, W. H.; Scott, F. A.

    1970-06-01

    BNWL-1407 summarizes information gained from the Chemical Analyses of Sodium Systems Program pursued by Battelle- Northwest over the period from July 1967 through June 1969. Tasks included feasibility studies for performing coulometric titration and polarographic determinations of oxygen in sodium, and the development of new separation techniques for sodium impurities and their subsequent analyses. The program was terminated ahead of schedule so firm conclusions were not obtained in all areas of the work. At least 40 coulometric titrations were carried out and special test cells were developed for coulometric application. Data indicated that polarographic measurements are theoretically feasible, but practical application of the method was not verified. An emission spectrographic procedure for trace metal impurities was developed and published. Trace metal analysis by a neutron activation technique was shown to be feasible; key to the success of the activation technique was the application of a new ion exchange resin which provided a sodium separation factor of 10{sup 11}. Preliminary studies on direct scavenging of trace metals produced no conclusive results.

  14. Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

    2011-07-01

    Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is one promising fuel-combustion technology, which can facilitate economic CO2 capture in coal-fired power plants. It employs the oxidation/reduction characteristics of a metal, or oxygen carrier, and its oxide, the oxidizing gas (typically air) and the fuel source may be kept separate. This work focused on two classes of oxygen carrier, one that merely undergoes a change in oxidation state, such as Fe3O4/Fe2O3 and one that is converted from its higher to its lower oxidation state by the release of oxygen on heating, i.e., CuO/Cu2O. This topical report discusses the results of four complementary efforts: (1) the development of process and economic models to optimize important design considerations, such as oxygen carrier circulation rate, temperature, residence time; (2) the development of high-performance simulation capabilities for fluidized beds and the collection, parameter identification, and preliminary verification/uncertainty quantification (3) the exploration of operating characteristics in the laboratory-scale bubbling bed reactor, with a focus on the oxygen carrier performance, including reactivity, oxygen carrying capacity, attrition resistance, resistance to deactivation, cost and availability (4) the identification of mechanisms and rates for the copper, cuprous oxide, and cupric oxide system using thermogravimetric analysis.

  15. Application of selective inorganic sorbents to decontamination of NPP liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguslavskij, V.B.; Galkin, V.M.; Kuz'mina, R.V.

    1987-01-01

    Sorbtion-selective and physico-chemical properties of the zirconium and titanium ferricyanides base spherical sorbents, produced by sol-gel technique, are studied. Results on the enlarged bench tests of these sorbents at decontamination of the Beloyarsk NPP low-active effluents off 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 60 Co are presented. Tests have shown high efficiency (by more, than one order) of decontamination of waste water, containing surface-active agents and detergents, off cesium radionuclides. Water decontamination for 60 Co is less effective

  16. Decontamination of FAST (CPP-666) fuel storage area stainless steel fuel storage racks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessinger, G.F.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this report was to identify and evaluate alternatives for the decontamination of the RSM stainless steel that will be removed from the Idaho Chemical Processing plant (ICPP) fuel storage area (FSA) located in the FAST (CPP-666) building, and to recommend decontamination alternatives for treating this material. Upon the completion of a literature search, the review of the pertinent literature, and based on the review of a variety of chemical, mechanical, and compound (both chemical and mechanical) decontamination techniques, the preliminary results of analyses of FSA critically barrier contaminants, and the data collected during the FSA Reracking project, it was concluded that decontamination and beneficial recycle of the FSA stainless steel produced is technically feasible and likely to be cost effective as compared to burying the material at the RWMC. It is recommended that an organic acid, or commercial product containing an organic acid, be used to decontaminate the FSA stainless steel; however, it is also recommended that other surface decontamination methods be tested in the event that this method proves unsuitable. Among the techniques that should be investigated are mechanical techniques (CO 2 pellet blasting and ultra-high pressure water blasting) and chemical techniques that are compatible with present ICPP waste streams

  17. Chapter 3. System quality in chemical and radiochemical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosskopfova, O.

    2006-01-01

    This chapter deals with the system quality in chemical and radiochemical laboratories. It contains following parts: requirement on management, system of management in laboratory, as well as system of the management

  18. Alpha Decontamination and Disassembly Pilot Facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, B.A.; Clark, H.E.

    1985-04-01

    The Alpha Decontamination and Disassembly (AD and D) Pilot Facility was built to develop and demonstrate a reference process for the decontamination and size reduction of noncombustible transuranic (TRU) waste. The goals of the reference process were to remove >99% of the surface contamination to the high-level waste tanks, and to achieve volume reduction factors greater than 15:1. Preliminary bench-scale decontamination work was accomplished at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), establishing a reference decontamination process. Initially, the pilot facility did not achieve the decontamination goals. As the program continued, and modifications to the process were made, coupon analysis idicated that 99% of the surface contamination was removed to the high-level drain system. Prior to the AD and D Pilot Facility, no size reduction work had been done at SRL. Several other Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were experimenting with plasma arc torches for size reduction work. Their methods were employed in the AD and D hot cell with moderate success. The experimental work concluded with recommendations for further testing of other size reduction techniques. 11 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Development of remote electrochemical decontamination for hot cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, A.D.; Junkison, A.R.; Pottinger, J.S.; Lain, M.J.; Neville, M.D.; Dawson, R.K.; Fletcher, P.A.; Fenn-Tye, I.A.

    1993-01-01

    Electrochemical dissolution into nitric acid has been developed as a decontamination process for metallic items, both for immersion and in-situ use. Not only is the spent electrolyte compatible with existing waste treatment routes, potentially yielding an immobilized product volume of 0.6 dm 3 /m 2 area treated, but it also suppresses any hydrogen production. Both processes have been developed from laboratory to microprocessor-controlled pilot-scale units, which have been demonstrated successfully for the treatment of genuine waste, reducing activity levels to background. For stainless steel substrates, the immersion tank process uses low current densities (10-50 A/m 2 ) in 1-5M HN0 3 for the treatment of extended areas. Decontamination factors > 10 4 can be achieved in two hours. The in-situ technique uses electropolishing in 6M HN0 3 at 1-2 A/cm 2 in an engineered head. Decontamination factors > 10 3 can be achieved in only 20 seconds. This device has also shown potential for incorporation into an integrated monitoring/decontaminating system under robotic control. Both techniques may be used remotely as a way of reducing man-dose and improving productivity during decontamination. Additional cost savings can be made over currently used techniques through the decategorization of the bulk of the waste volume, and the volume reduction of waste for interim storage and geological disposal

  20. Culturing Security System of Chemical Laboratory in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Dian Pusfitasari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has experiences on the lack of chemical security such as: a number of bombing terrors and hazardous chemicals found in food. Bomb used in terror is a homemade bomb made from chemicals which are widely spread in the research laboratories such as a mixture of pottasium chlorate, sulphur, and alumunium. Therefore, security of chemicals should be implemented to avoid the misused of the chemicals. Although it has experienced many cases of the misuse of chemicals, and many regulations and seminars related to chemical security have been held, but the implementation of chemical security is still a new thing for Indonesian citizens. The evident is coming from the interviews conducted in this study. Questions asked in this interview/survey included: the implementation of chemical safety and chemical security in laboratory; chemical inventory system and its regulation; and training needed for chemical security implementation. Respondents were basically a researcher from Government Research Institutes, University laboratories, senior high school laboratories, and service laboratories were still ambiguous in distinguishing chemical safety and chemical security. Because of this condition, most Indonesia chemical laboratories did not totally apply chemical security system. Education is very important step to raise people awareness and address this problem. Law and regulations should be sustained by all laboratory personnel activities to avoid chemical diversion to be used for harming people and environment. The Indonesia Government could also develop practical guidelines and standards to be applied to all chemical laboratories in Indonesia. These acts can help Government’s efforts to promote chemical security best practices which usually conducted by doing seminars and workshop.

  1. Equilibrium Constant as Solution to the Open Chemical Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zilbergleyt, B.

    2008-01-01

    According to contemporary views, equilibrium constant is relevant only to true thermodynamic equilibria in isolated systems with one chemical reaction. The paper presents a novel formula that ties-up equilibrium constant and chemical system composition at any state, isolated or open as well. Extending the logarithmic logistic map of the Discrete Thermodynamics of Chemical Equilibria, this formula maps the system population at isolated equilibrium into the population at any open equilibrium at...

  2. Evaluating decontamination protocols for the isolation of Mycobacterium ulcerans from swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, Enid; Newman, Mercy J; Akumwena, Amos; Bannerman, Elizabeth; Pluschke, Gerd

    2017-01-05

    Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans) is the causative agent of Buruli Ulcer (BU) disease. In order to inhibit the growth of the microbial contaminants during culture of M. ulcerans, it is necessary to decontaminate BU samples with effective chemical agents. This study aimed at investigating some selected chemicals as potential decontamination agents for the isolation of M. ulcerans from swabs. Povidone iodine at 0.5 and 1% exhibited the lowest contamination and recovery rate for microbial contaminants and M. ulcerans. The most effective decontamination method was the protocol using 2% cetylpyridinium chloride/4% sodium chloride (recovery rate = 53%, contamination rate = 14%). The observed difference between the recovery rate of 2% CPC/4% NaC and the other protocols was however not statistically significant (p = 0.76). Two percent (2%) cetylpyridinium chloride/4% sodium chloride can be conveniently used as an alternative decontamination method for the isolation of M. ulcerans from swabs.

  3. Impact of LWR decontaminations on solidification, waste disposal and associated occupational exposure. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.S.

    1983-08-01

    This report describes generic and specific aspects of hard and soft chemical decontaminations and considers the radiation and thermal stability of the reagents involved. Disposal options for LWR decontamination wastes are reviewed and advantages and disadvantages related to the options are discussed. Studies indicating the potential impact of these wastes on a shallow land burial ability to retain radionuclides are summarized. Processes being considered for the management of spent ion-exchange resins are reviewed. Problems associated with the state-of-the-art of incineration, pyrolysis, wet air oxidation, acid digestion, and chemical disgestion are evaluated. The solidification and disposal of decontamination wastes are considered with respect to criteria given in the Licensing Rule for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, 10 CFR 61. These are evaluated with respect to possible solidification in cement, bitumen, and plastics. The various options in mixing decontamination wastes with normal LWR resin waste are discussed with respect to their impacts on occupational exposure. 27 tables

  4. CHEMTRAN and the Interconversion of Chemical Substructure Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Charles E.

    1973-01-01

    The need for the interconversion of chemical substructure systems is discussed and CHEMTRAN, a new service, designed especially for creating interconversion programs, is introduced. (7 references) (Author)

  5. Construction of a Linux based chemical and biological information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, László; Vágó, István; Fehér, András

    2003-01-01

    A chemical and biological information system with a Web-based easy-to-use interface and corresponding databases has been developed. The constructed system incorporates all chemical, numerical and textual data related to the chemical compounds, including numerical biological screen results. Users can search the database by traditional textual/numerical and/or substructure or similarity queries through the web interface. To build our chemical database management system, we utilized existing IT components such as ORACLE or Tripos SYBYL for database management and Zope application server for the web interface. We chose Linux as the main platform, however, almost every component can be used under various operating systems.

  6. Hazard ranking systems for chemical wastes and chemical waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, R.D.; Parker, F.L.; Crutcher, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Hazardous materials and substances have always existed in the environment. Mankind has evolved to live with some degree of exposure to toxic materials. Until recently the risk has been from natural toxins or natural background radiation. While rapid technological advances over the past few decades have improved the lifestyle of our society, they have also dramatically increased the availability, volume and types of synthetic and natural hazardous materials. Many of their effects are as yet uncertain. Products and manufacturing by-products that no longer serve a useful purpose are deemed wastes. For some waste products land disposal will always be their ultimate fate. Hazardous substances are often included in the waste products. One needs to classify wastes by degree of hazard (risk). Risk (degree of probability of loss) is usually defined for risk assessment as probability of an occurrence times the consequences of the occurrence. Perhaps even more important than the definition of risk is the choice of a risk management strategy. The choice of strategy will be strongly influenced by the decision criteria used. Those decision criteria could be utility (the greatest happiness of the greatest number), rights or technology based or some combination of the three. It is necessary to make such choices about the definition of risks and criteria for management. It is clear that these are social (i.e., political) and value choices and science has little to say on this matter. This is another example of what Alvin Weinberg has named Transcience where the subject matter is scientific and technical but the choices are social, political and moral. This paper shall deal only with the scientific and technical aspects of the hazardous waste problem to create a hazardous substances classification system

  7. Soil decontamination at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, R.L.; Hayden, J.A.; Alford, C.E.; Kochen, R.L.; Stevens, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    A soils decontamination project was initiated, to remove actinides from soils at Rocky Flats. Wet screening, attrition scrubbing with Calgon at high pH, attrition scrubbing at low pH, and cationic flotation were investigated. Pilot plant studies were carried out. Conceptual designs have been generated for mounting the process in semi-trailers

  8. Decontamination in a Russian settlement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, C.L.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Barkovsky, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    Decontamination was carried out in an area with three houses in Novo Bobovichi, Bryansk region, Russia, in the autumn of 1995. It was demonstrated that significant reductions in the dose rate both indoor (DRF = 0.34) and outdoor (DRF = 0.20) can be achieved when a controlled cleaning is undertake...

  9. ORNL decontamination and decommissioning program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    A program has been initiated at ORNL to decontaminate and decommission surplus or abandoned nuclear facilities. Program planning and technical studies have been performed by UCC-ND Engineering. A feasibility study for decommissioning the Metal Recovery Facility, a fuel reprocessing pilot plant, has been completed

  10. Pathogen Decontamination of Food Crop Soil: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtler, Joshua B

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to delineate means of decontaminating soil. This information might be used to mitigate soil-associated risks of foodborne pathogens. The majority of the research in the published literature involves inactivation of plant pathogens in soil, i.e., those pathogens harmful to fruit and vegetable production and ornamental plants. Very little has been published regarding the inactivation of foodborne human pathogens in crop soil. Nevertheless, because decontamination techniques for plant pathogens might also be useful methods for eliminating foodborne pathogens, this review also includes inactivation of plant pathogens, with appropriate discussion and comparisons, in the hopes that these methods may one day be validated against foodborne pathogens. Some of the major soil decontamination methods that have been investigated and are covered include chemical decontamination (chemigation), solarization, steaming, biofumigation, bacterial competitive exclusion, torch flaming, microwave treatment, and amendment with biochar. Other innovative means of inactivating foodborne pathogens in soils may be discovered and explored in the future, provided that these techniques are economically feasible in terms of chemicals, equipment, and labor. Food microbiology and food safety researchers should reach out to soil scientists and plant pathologists to create links where they do not currently exist and strengthen relationships where they do exist to take advantage of multidisciplinary skills. In time, agricultural output and the demand for fresh produce will increase. With advances in the sensitivity of pathogen testing and epidemiological tracebacks, the need to mitigate preharvest bacterial contamination of fresh produce will become paramount. Hence, soil decontamination technologies may become more economically feasible and practical in light of increasing the microbial safety of fresh produce.

  11. Fighting Ebola through Novel Spore Decontamination Technologies for the Military

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Doona

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractRecently, global public health organizations such as Doctors without Borders (MSF, the World Health Organization (WHO, Public Health Canada, National Institutes of Health (NIH, and the U.S. government developed and deployed Field Decontamination Kits (FDKs, a novel, lightweight, compact, reusable decontamination technology to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical devices at remote clinical sites lacking infra-structure in crisis-stricken regions of West Africa (medical waste materials are placed in bags and burned. The basis for effectuating sterilization with FDKs is chlorine dioxide (ClO2 produced from a patented invention developed by researchers at the US Army – Natick Soldier RD&E Center (NSRDEC and commercialized as a dry mixed-chemical for bacterial spore decontamination. In fact, the NSRDEC research scientists developed an ensemble of ClO2 technologies designed for different applications in decontaminating fresh produce; food contact and handling surfaces; personal protective equipment; textiles used in clothing, uniforms, tents, and shelters; graywater recycling; airplanes; surgical instruments; and hard surfaces in latrines, laundries, and deployable medical facilities. These examples demonstrate the far-reaching impact, adaptability, and versatility of these innovative technologies. We present herein the unique attributes of NSRDEC’s novel decontamination technologies and a Case Study of the development of FDKs that were deployed in West Africa by international public health organizations to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical equipment. FDKs use bacterial spores as indicators of sterility. We review the properties and structures of spores and the mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by ClO2. We also review mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by novel, emerging, and established nonthermal technologies for food preservation, such as high pressure processing, irradiation, cold plasma, and chemical sanitizers

  12. Dietary antioxidant synergy in chemical and biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sunan; Zhu, Fan

    2017-07-24

    Antioxidant (AOX) synergies have been much reported in chemical ("test-tube" based assays focusing on pure chemicals), biological (tissue culture, animal and clinical models), and food systems during the past decade. Tentative synergies differ from each other due to the composition of AOX and the quantification methods. Regeneration mechanism responsible for synergy in chemical systems has been discussed. Solvent effects could contribute to the artifacts of synergy observed in the chemical models. Synergy in chemical models may hardly be relevant to biological systems that have been much less studied. Apparent discrepancies exist in understanding the molecular mechanisms in both chemical and biological systems. This review discusses diverse variables associated with AOX synergy and molecular scenarios for explanation. Future research to better utilize the synergy is suggested.

  13. UK fast reactor components. Sodium removal decontamination and requalification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, D.M.; Bray, J.A.; Newson, I.H.

    1978-01-01

    Extensive experience gained at the U.K.A.E.A. Dounreay Nuclear Power Development Establishment is being applied to form the basis of the plant to be provided for sodium removal, decontamination, and requalification of components in future commercial fast reactors. In the first part of a three part paper, the factors to be taken into account, showing the UK philosophy and approach to maintenance and repair operations are discussed. In the second part, PFR facilities for sodium removal and decontamination are described and some examples are given of cleaning components such as pumps, charge machine, cold trap baskets, and steam generator units. Similar facilities at DFR are briefly described. In the third part of the paper a short description is given of the Harwell mass transfer loop, currently used to study the deposition of activated stainless steel corrosion products. Decontamination method for pipework specimens cut from the loop are described and results of first screening tests of various chemical decontaminants are presented. (U.K.)

  14. Contactless decontamination of hair samples: cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restolho, José; Barroso, Mário; Saramago, Benilde; Dias, Mário; Afonso, Carlos A M

    2017-02-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) have already been shown to provide efficient extraction media for several systems, and to capture volatile compounds, namely opiates. In this work, a novel, contactless, artefact-free extraction procedure for the removal of Δ 9 -tetrahrydrocannabinol (THC) from the surface of human hair is presented. To prepare in vitro cannabinoids-contaminated hair, samples were flushed with hashish smoke for 7 h. The decontamination experiments were carried at 100 °C for 24 h, according to the procedure previously described. Fifty-three ILs were screened and presented decontamination efficiencies ranging from 0 to 96 %. Although the majority of the ILs presented efficiencies above 90%, the 1-ethanol-3-methyl tetrafluoroborate (96%) was chosen for further process optimization. The Design of Experiments results demonstrated that all studied variables were significant for the process and the obtained optimum conditions were: 100 °C, 13 h and 175 mg of IL. In the work of Perrotin-Brunel et al. (J. Mol. Struct. 2011, 987, 67), it is demonstrated that, at 100 °C, full conversion of tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) into THC is obtained after 60 min. Since our decontamination takes place over 13 h at 100 °C, full conversion of THCA into THC is expected. Additionally, our method was compared with the method proposed by Cairns et al. (Forensic Sci. Int. 2004, 145, 97), through the analysis of 15 in vitro contaminated hair samples. The results demonstrated that with our method a mean extraction efficiency of 11 % higher was obtained. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Application of sorption technique for decontamination of liquid radwaste and natural water from cesium and strontium radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milyutin, V.V.; Gelis, V.M.; Penzin, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the results obtained in field tests of decontaminating radioactive natural and industrial solutions of different chemical and radionuclide composition from cesium and strontium radionuclides are reported. Decontamination of industrial reservoir water at the Production Association Mayak (Chelyabinsk Region, Russia) was performed using CMP synthetic zeolite. Efficient decontamination of the feed water is achieved after preliminary precipitation of hardness salts in the form of carbonates. Decontamination of water from the pool for spent fuel element storage from 137 Cs was conducted using NGA ferricyanide sorbent. Decontamination factors with respect to 137 Cs of 400 have been reached, the installation throughput being 100,000 by (bed volumes). Decontamination of liquid radwaste at Murmansk Shipping Co was conducted with CFB, CMP synthetic zeolites and NGA ferricyanide sorbent as well. Decontamination of D and D solutions and wastes of the special laundry resulted in decontamination factors within the range of 20--400, 10--100, and 10--30 with respect to 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and total β-activity, respectively. Installation throughput of 3,000--5,000 bv for zeolites and 8,000--10,000 bv for ferrocyanide sorbents has been reached. Results obtained prove the high efficiency of sorption technique for decontaminating solutions from cesium and strontium radionuclides

  16. Control and optimization system and method for chemical looping processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xinsheng; Joshi, Abhinaya; Lei, Hao

    2015-02-17

    A control system for optimizing a chemical loop system includes one or more sensors for measuring one or more parameters in a chemical loop. The sensors are disposed on or in a conduit positioned in the chemical loop. The sensors generate one or more data signals representative of an amount of solids in the conduit. The control system includes a data acquisition system in communication with the sensors and a controller in communication with the data acquisition system. The data acquisition system receives the data signals and the controller generates the control signals. The controller is in communication with one or more valves positioned in the chemical loop. The valves are configured to regulate a flow of the solids through the chemical loop.

  17. Evaluation of zeolite mixtures for decontamination of high-activity-level water in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, L.J.; Campbell, D.O.; Collins, E.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Wallace, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Mixtures of Linde Ionsiv IE-96 and Ionsiv A-51 zeolites were evaluated for use in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) that was installed at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2 (TMI-2) for decontaminating approx. 3000 m 3 (approx. 700,000 gal) of high-activity-level water in the containment building sump. Small-scale, tracer-level column tests were made using various mixtures of the zeolites to evaluate the capability for simultaneous removal of cesium and strontium. A column loading test was made in a hot cell using a mixture of equal parts of the zeolites to evaluate the performance of the mixture in removing cesium and strontium from a sample of TMI-2 sump water. A computerized mathematical model of the mixed-bed SDS system was used to evaluate the test data in order to select a zeolite mixture and predict system performance

  18. Cursory radiological assessment: Battelle Columbus Laboratory Decommissioning and Decontamination Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Munyon, W.J.; Mosho, G.D.; Robinet, M.J.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1988-10-01

    This document reports on the results obtained from a cursory radiological assessment of various properties at the Battelle Columbus Laboratory, Columbia, Ohio. The cursory radiological assessment is part of a preliminary investigation for the Battelle Columbus Laboratory Decommissioning and Decontamination Project. The radiological assessment of Battelle Columbus Laboratory's two sites included conducting interior and exterior building surveys and collecting and analyzing air, sewer system, and soil samples. Direct radiological surveys were made of floor, wall, and overhead areas. Smear surveys were made on various interior building surfaces as well as the exterior building vents. Air samples were collected in select areas to determine concentrations of Rn-222, Rn-220, and Rn-219 daughters, in addition to any long-lived radioactive particulates. Radon-222 concentrations were continuously monitored over a 24-hr period at several building locations using a radon gas monitoring system. The sanitary sewer systems at King Avenue, West Jefferson-North, and West Jefferson-South were each sampled at select locations. All samples were submitted to the Argonne Analytical Chemistry Laboratory for various radiological and chemical analyses. Environmental soil corings were taken at both the King Avenue and West Jefferson sites to investigate the potential for soil contamination within the first 12-inches below grade. Further subsurface investigations at the West Jefferson-North and West Jefferson-South areas were conducted using soil boring techniques. 4 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs

  19. Resolving chemistry issues in nuclear power plants: hydrogen mitigation, corrosion and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagatap, B.N.

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry plays an important role in operation and safety of nuclear power plants. This talk provides a brief overview of our work in chemistry relating to three important issues, namely, hydrogen mitigation under postulated severe accident scenario, and corrosion, its control and radiation field reduction under normal operation. Chemistry Group, BARC has developed supported noble metal catalyst for passive autocatalytic recombiner device for controlling hydrogen concentration in the containment in the event of severe accident situation. The catalyst performance is optimized for support, noble metal composition and loading, and is evaluated under varying hydrogen concentrations and in the presence of hydrocarbons, CO, CO 2 and moisture. Typical hydrogen removal rates of a full device consisting of these catalyst panels is about 2 kg/hr for 8% hydrogen in air saturated with 60% steam. Prevention of corrosion of structural materials is an important aspect in the safe operation of nuclear power plants. While corrosion manifests in several forms, we discuss here our work on flow accelerated corrosion and its mitigation through modifications in the chemistry parameters of the coolant. The coolant chemistry regime also minimizes the radiation field, and further chemical processes have been developed to decontaminate the complete reactor coolant system to reduce the radiation field. Dilute chemical decontamination process has been applied a few times in Indian PHWRs resulting in significant saving of MAN-REM. (author)

  20. Introducing DAE Systems in Undergraduate and Graduate Chemical Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandela, Ravi Kumar; Sridhar, L. N.; Rengaswamy, Raghunathan

    2010-01-01

    Models play an important role in understanding chemical engineering systems. While differential equation models are taught in standard modeling and control courses, Differential Algebraic Equation (DAE) system models are not usually introduced. These models appear naturally in several chemical engineering problems. In this paper, the introduction…

  1. Nuclear engineering questions: power, reprocessing, waste, decontamination, fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, R.D. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the chemical engineering symposium on nuclear questions. Specific questions addressed by the speakers included: nuclear power - why and how; commercial reprocessing - permanent death or resurrection; long-term management of commercial high-level wastes; long-term management of defense high-level waste; decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, engineering aspects of laser fusion I; and engineering aspects of laser fusion II. Individual papers have been input to the Energy Data Base previously

  2. Verification of wet blasting decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Sachito; Murayama, Kazunari; Yoshida, Hirohisa; Igei, Shigemitsu; Izumida, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Macoho Co., Ltd. participated in the projects of 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Ministry of the Environment' and 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Cabinet Office.' And we tested verification to use a wet blasting technology for decontamination of rubble and roads contaminated by the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of the Tokyo Electric Power Company. As a results of the verification test, the wet blasting decontamination technology showed that a decontamination rate became 60-80% for concrete paving, interlocking, dense-grated asphalt pavement when applied to the decontamination of the road. When it was applied to rubble decontamination, a decontamination rate was 50-60% for gravel and approximately 90% for concrete and wood. It was thought that Cs-134 and Cs-137 attached to the fine sludge scraped off from a decontamination object and the sludge was found to be separated from abrasives by wet cyclene classification: the activity concentration of the abrasives is 1/30 or less than the sludge. The result shows that the abrasives can be reused without problems when the wet blasting decontamination technology is used. (author)

  3. Non-destructive decontamination of building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Josef; Otahal, Petr

    2015-11-01

    For nondestructive radiation decontamination of surfaces it is necessary to use varnishes, such as ARGONNE, DG1101, DG1108, etc. This text evaluates the use of manufactured strippable coatings for radiation decontamination. To evaluate decontamination capability of such coatings the following varnishes were selected and subsequently used: AZ 1-700 and AXAL 1807S. The varnishes were tested on different building materials surfaces contaminated by short-term radioisotopes of Na-24 or La-140, in water soluble or water insoluble forms. Decontamination quality was assessed by the decontamination efficiency value, defined as the proportion of removed activity to the applied activity. It was found that decontamination efficiency of both used varnishes depends not only on the form of contaminant, but in the case of application of AXAL 1807S varnish it also depends on the method of its application on the contaminated surface. The values of the decontamination efficiency for AZ1-700 varnish range from 46% for decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from concrete surface to 98% for the decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from ceramic tile surface. The decontamination efficiency values determined for AXAL 1807S varnish range from 48% for decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from concrete surface to 96% for decontamination of an insoluble form of the radioisotope from ceramic tile surface. Comparing these values to the values given for the decontaminating varnishes we can conclude that AXAL 1807S varnish is possible to use on all materials, except highly porous materials, such as plasterboard or breeze blocks, or plastic materials. AZ 1-700 varnish can be used for all dry materials except plasterboard.

  4. Decontamination of material in the Marcoule plutonium producing centre (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodier, J.; Bouzigues, H.; Boutot, P.

    1961-01-01

    The decontamination of material in an atomic centre is an essential operation in view of the cost and the difficulties of replacement. It also makes it possible to reduce the storage of radio-active materials always an expensive task. Surfaces are contaminated by retention of radioactive products and the mechanism of the bounding forces can be explained in terms of chemical, mechanical, electrostatic and surface tension phenomena. The methods used for decontamination are either physical (section, abrasion, steam, ultrasonics) or chemical (acids, alkalis, detergents, reducing and oxidising agents). At Marcoule, chemical methods of treatment are used. This is effected in tanks, the exact composition of the liquids being regulated from a control panel. Working experience has shown that the fact of operating in humid conditions eliminates all problems of atmospheric contamination; as a result it is possible for the personnel to work without any special protective devices. Almost all the material can be re-utilized and the operations produce only a small volume of liquid waste. The decontamination workshop is operated by a small number of workers. The working costs, including capital repayment and treatment of the waste, do not exceed 15 per cent of the value of the apparatus treated. (authors) [fr

  5. Radioisotope decontamination of X-ray detector. Photostimulable phosphor plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Yoji; Hayashi, Michiko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Sadamitsu

    2012-01-01

    We tried to remove contamination of radioisotope (RI) for an X-ray detector (photostimulable phosphor plate; IP) and verified that our procedure suggested by Nishihara et al. was effective for decontamination. The procedure was as follows. First, the IP was kept for approximately twelve hours, and then it was processed [image (A)] as well as a clinical processing mode. Second, using a wet-type chemical wiper, we scavenged the IP to remove the adhered RI on its surface. Then, once again, the IP was kept for approximately fifteen hours and processed [image (B)] in order to check an effect of decontamination. Finally, the two images of (A) and (B) were analyzed using ImageJ, which can be downloaded as a free software, and a percentage of removal was calculated. The procedure was applied to two IPs using the Fuji computed tomography (FCR) 5501 plus. In the present case, the percentage of removal was approximately 96%. The removed radioisotopes in the chemical wipers were analyzed by Ge detector. Then, 134 Cs and 137 Cs were found with activities of 2.9 4.3 Bq and 3.5 5.2 Bq, respectively. For three months after that, we cannot see black spots on the IPs owing to the contamination of the RI and there are no defects caused by decontamination using a wet-type chemical wiper. (author)

  6. New decontamination techniques generating a low volume of effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document presents some decontamination techniques, their principles, characteristics and advantages and provides references on the subject. Techniques as foam and spray foam decontamination, dry steam decontamination, electro-decontamination and gel decontamination are presented. A presentation of TRIADE, cleanup dismantling servicing, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  7. Chemical agent recoveries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset shows the calculation of reported decontamination efficacies from the raw data (i.e., measured amount of chemical recovered from test coupons and positive...

  8. Chemical Emergencies - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expand Section Chemical Emergencies - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Decontamination - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF ...

  9. Development of post-decontamination process after integrated EPN treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. H.; Chung, U. S.; Lee, K. W.; Hwang, D. S.; Kim, T. J.; Hong, S. B.; Hwang, S. T.

    2010-02-01

    It is desirable to recycle or reuse the waste generated from nuclear facilities for the better economy of the nuclear industry. Metal shares a large portion of the waste and its reuse becomes a world wide interest. It is well known that the measurement of such a low radioactivity that is lower than the release criteria is not easy. It becomes more difficult when the contamination is not homogenous and the shape of metal waste is complex. In order to get the more accurate results of the measurement of low radioactivity, a melting process was proposed for homogenizing the residual contaminants and for not missing of hot spots of contamination. A induction furnace system was selected after evaluation of the processes and a furnace of 15 kg/batch scale with cooling water supply, inverter for high frequency electricity source and off gas treatment system was installed and operated. The homogeneity of the ingot was verified by using an experiment of the metal tracers and chemical tracers. The volume radioactivity limit of each nuclide was calculated. From these calculation results and comparison study with the limits valued defined in other countries and recommended by the IAEA, the criteria of volume radioactivity for the release of metal waste were proposed. In order to determine the target radioactivity in the integrated EPN decontamination, a correlation between the residual radioactivity and the public radiation dose was proposed

  10. Decontamination of radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmomo, Yoichiro

    1994-01-01

    The release of radionuclides arising from the Chernobyle accident led to widespread contamination of the northern hemisphere through fallout. This accident provided again an opportunity to investigate how and to what extent the radionuclides contamination in crops and animal derived foods could be reduced. The following topics are included in this paper. (1) How to reduce the transfer of radiostrontium and/or cesium from soil to crops: A pH increase of soil is effective for reducing their plant uptake. (2) How to reduce the transfer of radiocesium to animal derived foods: Ammonium-ferric-cyanoferrate (AFCF) should be the most effective compound for radiocesium excretion in the feces. Experiments with lactating cows and/or poultry gave extremely good results with respect to low radiocesium concentrations in milk, meat and eggs. (3) Removal coefficients of radiostrontium, cesium and iodine from contaminated leaf vegetables and cereals during food processing and culinary preparation: Though different by species, more than 80% of cesium and about 50% of strontium and iodine can be removed during culinary preparation of washing and boiling. (4) Simultaneous decontamination of radiocesium and iodine from drinking water and liquid milk: Metal ferrocyanide-anion exchange resin, specifically Fe ferrocyanide one, was successfully used for a rapid and simple decontamination of radiocesium and iodine in the liquid samples arising from the Chernobyle accident. (5) Removal of radiocesium from meat: The meat structurally contaminated with radiocesium is easily and very successfully decontaminated by pickling in NaCl solution and the decontamination is much speeded up by freezing meat before pickling. (author)

  11. Radiation decontamination of poultry viscera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamdar, S.N.; Harikumar, P.

    2008-01-01

    Application of gamma radiation for decontamination of poultry viscera was examined. Exposure to a dose of 20 kGy rendered the viscera sterile ( 10 cycles, respectively, eliminating the coliforms to o C) produced enhanced levels of TVBN and TCA soluble products accompanied by higher drip loss. Activities of proteolytic enzymes, except acid protease, did not show any significant change during post-irradiation storage at either temperature

  12. Discovery of Chemical Toxicity via Biological Networks and Systems Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, Edward; Habib, Tanwir; Guan, Xin; Escalon, Barbara; Falciani, Francesco; Chipman, J.K.; Antczak, Philipp; Edwards, Stephen; Taylor, Ronald C.; Vulpe, Chris; Loguinov, Alexandre; Van Aggelen, Graham; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Garcia-Reyero, Natalia

    2010-09-30

    Both soldiers and animals are exposed to many chemicals as the result of military activities. Tools are needed to understand the hazards and risks that chemicals and new materials pose to soldiers and the environment. We have investigated the potential of global gene regulatory networks in understanding the impact of chemicals on reproduction. We characterized effects of chemicals on ovaries of the model animal system, the Fathead minnow (Pimopheles promelas) connecting chemical impacts on gene expression to circulating blood levels of the hormones testosterone and estradiol in addition to the egg yolk protein vitellogenin. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional gene expression data to characterize chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis that governs reproduction in fathead minnows. The construction of global gene regulatory networks provides deep insights into how drugs and chemicals effect key organs and biological pathways.

  13. A remotely operated robot for decontamination tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudar, A.M.; Vandewalle, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Engineers in the Robotics Development Group at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) have developed a robot which will be used to decontaminate a pipe gallery of a tank farm used for nuclear waste storage. Personnel access is required into this pipe gallery to inspect existing pipes and perform repairs to secondary containment walls around the tank farm. Presently, the pipe gallery is littered with debris of various sizes and its surface is contaminated with activity levels up to 2.5E6 DPM (disintegrations per minute) alpha and exposure levels as high as 20 Rad/hr. Cleaning up this pipe gallery win be the mission of an all-hydraulic robotic vehicle developed in-house at WSRC caged the ''Remote Decon'' robot. The Remote Decon is a tracked vehicle which utilizes skid steering and features a six-degree-of-freedom (DOF) manipulator arm, a five-DOF front end loader type bucket with a rotating brush for scrubbing and decontaminating surfaces, and a three-DOF pan/tilt mechanism with cameras and lights. The Remote Decon system is connected to a control console via a 200 foot tethered cable. The control console was designed with ergonomics and simplicity as the main design factors and features three joysticks, video monitors, LED panels, and audible alarms

  14. Complexing properties of the main organic acids used in decontamination solutions and reactions involved in their degradation or elimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, D.; Kerrec, O.; Lantes, B.; Rosset, R.; Bayri, B.; Desbarres, J.; Jardy, A.

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents a study that, parallel with the industrial development of the decontamination chemical process, has been performed more fundamentally on the chemical properties of used products: degradation reaction during process or after decontamination and during wastes treatment. In particular, results show that the organic compounds used have no interaction with resins during radioactive wastes storage and therefore they do not present leaching risk. (authors). 8 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Pilot-scale decontamination solution test results HGTP-93-0702-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemmer, R.G.; Allen, R.P.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Fetrow, L.K.

    1993-05-01

    Decontamination solution testing constitutes a task of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The HGTP provides technical support to the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Grout Disposal Program. Cementitious grout has been identified as the waste form for low-level radioactive waste. Grout processing equipment, including mixers, pumps, and piping, will require periodic maintenance. Decontamination of components is needed to reduce radiation dose to maintenance workers. The purpose of this work was to develop and test methods for decontaminating grout processing equipment. The proposed method of decontamination is to use a mild chemical solution, such as a 6 N citric acid to dissolve the grout. The method should effectively remove grout without causing degradation of grout processing equipment

  16. Decontamination of burns contaminated with radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vykouril, L.

    1986-01-01

    The suitability of various solutions for the decontamination of burnt skin and their efficiency were tested by experiments on rats. Tested was the decontamination of undisturbed skin, second degree skin burns and third degree skin burns. Decontamination solutions used included: distilled water, jodonal (an aqueous solution of iodine, ethoxylated nonylphenols, the copolymer of ethylene oxide with propylene oxide, and phosphoric acid) and a decontamination mixture of Sapon, Komplexon (trade names of detergents) and sodium hexametaphosphate. Decontamination efficiency was 68.4% for second degree burns and 47.1% for third degree burns. Most effective was the decontamination solution with an efficiency of 72%; the efficiency of jodonal was 67% and of water - 54%. Jodonal is the most suitable: in addition, it acts as a disinfectant and antiseptic. (M.D.)

  17. Fabrication and loading of long-term stress corrosion cracking surveillance specimens for the Dresden 1 decontamination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.L.

    1979-10-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking test specimens were prepared for Dow Nuclear Services for insertion in the Dresden 1 reactor during the chemical decontamination of the primary system, and for subsequent exposure under operating conditions when the station returns to service. The specimens consist of pressurized tubes fabricated from Type-304 and -304L stainless steel, Inconel 600, Incoloy 800, and Zircaloy 2. In addition, constant radius bent-beam specimens of 3/4 hard Type-410 stainless steel were also included. All specimens were stressed to, or slightly above, their respective 0.2% offset yield strengths at the temperatures of interest

  18. Geographic assistance of decontamination strategy elaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydchuk, V.; Arapis, G.

    1996-01-01

    Those who elaborates the strategy of decontamination of vast territories is to take into consideration the heterogeneity of such elements of landscape as relief, lithology, humidity and types of soils and, vegetation, both on local and regional level. Geographic assistance includes evaluation of efficacy of decontamination technologies in different natural conditions, identification of areas of their effective application and definition of ecological damage, estimation of balances of the radionuclides in the landscapes to create background of the decontamination strategy

  19. EDF/CIDEN - ONECTRA: PWR decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, P.; Orcel, H.; Wertz, L.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of PWR circuit renewal (expected in 2011) and their decontamination, an analysis of data coming from cartography and on site decontamination measurements as well as from premise modelling by means of the PANTHERE radioprotection code, is presented. Several French PWRs have been studied. After a presentation of code principles and operation, the authors discuss the radiological context of a workstation, and give an assessment of the annual dose associated with maintenance operations with or without decontamination

  20. Closed loop chemical systems for energy storage and transmission (chemical heat pipe). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakil, H.B.; Flock, J.W.

    1978-02-01

    The work documents the anlaysis of closed loop chemical systems for energy storage and transmission, commonly referred to as the Chemical Heat Pipe (CHP). Among the various chemical reaction systems and sources investigated, the two best systems were determined to be the high temperature methane/steam reforming reaction (HTCHP) coupled to a Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR) and the lower temperature, cyclohexane dehydrogenation reaction (LTCHP) coupled to existing sources such as coal or light water reactors. Solar and other developing technologies can best be coupled to the LTCHP. The preliminary economic and technical analyses show that both systems could transport heat at an incremental cost of approximately $1.50/GJ/160 km (in excess of the primary heat cost of $2.50/GJ), at system efficiencies above 80%. Solar heat can be transported at an incremental cost of $3/GJ/160 km. The use of the mixed feed evaporator concept developed in this work contributes significantly to reducing the transportation cost and increasing the efficiency of the system. The LTCHP shows the most promise of the two systems if the technical feasibility of the cyclic closed loop chemical reaction system can be established. An experimental program for establishing this feasibility is recommended. Since the VHTR is several years away from commercial demonstration and the HTCHP chemical technology is well developed, future HTCHP programs should be aimed at VHTR and interface problems.