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Sample records for synthetic uric acid

  1. Uric acid test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... for testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  2. Uric acid - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003616.htm Uric acid urine test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid ...

  3. Uric acid - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acid in blood Images Blood test Uric acid crystals References Edwards NL. Crystal deposition diseases. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. ... M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn ...

  4. Uric acid nephrolithiasis: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicerello, Elisa

    2018-04-01

    Uric acid nephrolithiasis appears to increase in prevalence. While a relationship between uric acid stones and low urinary pH has been for long known, additional association with various metabolic conditions and pathophysiological basis has recently been elucidated. Some conditions such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome disease, excessive dietary intake, and increased endogenous uric acid production and/or defect in ammoniagenesis are associated with low urinary pH. In addition, the phenomenon of global warming could result in an increase in areas with greater climate risk for uric acid stone formation. There are three therapeutic steps to be taken for management of uric acid stones: identification of urinary pH profiles, assessment of urinary volume status, and identification of disorders leading to excessive uric acid production. However, the most important factor for uric acid stone formation is acid urinary pH, which is a prerequisite for uric acid precipitation. This article reviews recent insights into the pathophysiology of uric acid stones and their management.

  5. Uric acid and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Lario, Bonifacio; Macarrón-Vicente, Jesús

    2010-11-01

    Uric acid (UA) is the end product of purine metabolism in humans due to the loss of uricase activity by various mutations of its gene during the Miocene epoch, which led to humans having higher UA levels than other mammals. Furthermore, 90% of UA filtered by the kidneys is reabsorbed, instead of being excreted. These facts suggest that evolution and physiology have not treated UA as a harmful waste product, but as something beneficial that has to be kept. This has led various researchers to think about the possible evolutionary advantages of the loss of uricase and the subsequent increase in UA levels. It has been argued that due to the powerful antioxidant activity of UA, the evolutionary benefit could be the increased life expectancy of hominids. For other authors, the loss of uricase and the increase in UA could be a mechanism to maintain blood pressure in times of very low salt ingestion. The oldest hypothesis associates the increase in UA with higher intelligence in humans. Finally, UA has protective effects against several neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting it could have interesting actions on neuronal development and function. These hypotheses are discussed from an evolutionary perspective and their clinical significance. UA has some obvious harmful effects, and some, not so well-known, beneficial effects as an antioxidant and neuroprotector.

  6. Uric acid in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, M; De Keyser, J

    Peroxynitrite, a reactive oxidant formed by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide at sites of inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS), is capable of damaging tissues and cells. Uric acid, a natural scavenger of peroxynitrite, reduces inflammatory demyelination in experimental allergic

  7. Serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarla, Sara; Struglia, Manuela; Giorgini, Paolo; Striuli, Rinaldo; Necozione, Stefano; Properzi, Giuliana; Ferri, Claudio

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the relationship among serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome. Anthropometric parameters, serum uric acid and metabolic parameters were evaluated in 139 subjects. Serum uric acid levels were significantly higher in subjects with than without metabolic syndrome (p metabolic syndrome components (p for trend uric acid significantly correlated with various anthropometric and serum metabolic parameters. Serum uric acid levels were higher in individuals with rather than without metabolic syndrome and raised gradually as the number of metabolic syndrome components increased. The relationship between serum uric acid levels and various metabolic parameters suggests that uric acid might be considered as a component of metabolic syndrome. Hyperuricemia is a common finding in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Recent studies indicated that hyperuricemia may be also a predictor of metabolic syndrome development.

  8. Uric acid and blood pressure: exploring the role of uric acid production in The Maastricht Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Lieke E J M; Boonen, Annelies; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Schram, Miranda T; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Henry, Ronald M A; Kroon, Abraham A; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Arts, Ilja C W

    2017-10-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species by increased uric acid production has been suggested as a possible underlying mechanism for the association between uric acid and high blood pressure (BP). We, therefore, investigated the association between serum uric acid concentration and 24-h urinary uric acid excretion, as proxy for uric acid production, with ambulatory 24-h blood pressure and hypertension. Cross-sectional analyses were conducted among 2555 individuals [52% men, mean age 60.0 ± 8.2 years; 27% type 2 diabetes (by design)] from The Maastricht Study. Multivariable regression analyses were performed to investigate the association of serum uric acid and 24-h urinary uric acid excretion with 24-h pulse pressure, 24-h mean arterial pressure (MAP), and hypertension. After adjustment for traditional hypertension risk factors, serum uric acid concentration (per SD of 81 μmol/l) was associated with higher 24-h MAP [β 0.63 mmHg; confidence interval (CI) 0.27-1.00] and positively associated with hypertension (odds ratio 1.43; CI 1.27-1.61). Urinary uric acid excretion (per SD of 140 mg/day/1.73 m) was associated with higher 24-h MAP (β 0.79 mmHg; CI 0.46-1.12) and with hypertension (odds ratio 1.13; CI 1.02-1.25). There was no significant association between serum and 24-h urinary uric acid excretion with 24-h pulse pressure. There was no interaction with sex or age for the aforementioned associations. Higher serum and urinary uric acid concentrations were associated with higher 24-h MAP and hypertension. These results suggest that serum and 24-urinary uric acid concentrations, the latter as proxy for uric acid production are, independent of each other, associated with BP and hypertension.

  9. 21 CFR 862.1775 - Uric acid test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Uric acid test system. 862.1775 Section 862.1775....1775 Uric acid test system. (a) Identification. A uric acid test system is a device intended to measure uric acid in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the diagnosis...

  10. Theobromine inhibits uric acid crystallization. A potential application in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grases, Felix; Rodriguez, Adrian; Costa-Bauza, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    To assess the capacity of methylxanthines (caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine) to inhibit uric acid crystallization, and to evaluate their potential application in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. The ability of methylxathines to inhibit uric acid nucleation was assayed turbidimetrically. Crystal morphology and its modification due to the effect of theobromine were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The ability of theobromine to inhibit uric acid crystal growth on calculi fragments resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was evaluated using a flow system. The turbidimetric assay showed that among the studied methylxanthines, theobromine could markedly inhibit uric acid nucleation. SEM images showed that the presence of theobromine resulted in thinner uric acid crystals. Furthermore, in a flow system theobromine blocked the regrowth of post-ESWL uric acid calculi fragments. Theobromine, a natural dimethylxanthine present in high amounts in cocoa, acts as an inhibitor of nucleation and crystal growth of uric acid. Therefore, theobromine may be clinically useful in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis.

  11. Theobromine inhibits uric acid crystallization. A potential application in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Grases

    Full Text Available To assess the capacity of methylxanthines (caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine to inhibit uric acid crystallization, and to evaluate their potential application in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis.The ability of methylxathines to inhibit uric acid nucleation was assayed turbidimetrically. Crystal morphology and its modification due to the effect of theobromine were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The ability of theobromine to inhibit uric acid crystal growth on calculi fragments resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL was evaluated using a flow system.The turbidimetric assay showed that among the studied methylxanthines, theobromine could markedly inhibit uric acid nucleation. SEM images showed that the presence of theobromine resulted in thinner uric acid crystals. Furthermore, in a flow system theobromine blocked the regrowth of post-ESWL uric acid calculi fragments.Theobromine, a natural dimethylxanthine present in high amounts in cocoa, acts as an inhibitor of nucleation and crystal growth of uric acid. Therefore, theobromine may be clinically useful in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis.

  12. Theobromine Inhibits Uric Acid Crystallization. A Potential Application in the Treatment of Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grases, Felix; Rodriguez, Adrian; Costa-Bauza, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the capacity of methylxanthines (caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine) to inhibit uric acid crystallization, and to evaluate their potential application in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. Materials and Methods The ability of methylxathines to inhibit uric acid nucleation was assayed turbidimetrically. Crystal morphology and its modification due to the effect of theobromine were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The ability of theobromine to inhibit uric acid crystal growth on calculi fragments resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was evaluated using a flow system. Results The turbidimetric assay showed that among the studied methylxanthines, theobromine could markedly inhibit uric acid nucleation. SEM images showed that the presence of theobromine resulted in thinner uric acid crystals. Furthermore, in a flow system theobromine blocked the regrowth of post-ESWL uric acid calculi fragments. Conclusions Theobromine, a natural dimethylxanthine present in high amounts in cocoa, acts as an inhibitor of nucleation and crystal growth of uric acid. Therefore, theobromine may be clinically useful in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. PMID:25333633

  13. Uric Acid in Pregnancy: New Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Santillan, Armando Alberto; Briones Garduño, Jesus Carlos; Diaz de Leon Ponce, Manuel Antonio

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between hyperuricemia and hypertensive disorders is well established; however, until today, the role of uric acid in the clinical course of severe preeclampsia has not been elucidated. Some recent studies suggest that at the time of presentation, subjects with severe preeclampsia frequently have significantly elevated serum uric acid levels, and that the degree of elevation correlates with the severity of the maternal syndrome and fetal morbimortality. In this chapter, we present our workgroup experience. In 2016, we designed a prospective, cross-sectional comparative study. A sample of 200 patients - 100 with severe preeclampsia and 100 with normotensive pregnancy - was obtained. Plasmatic uric acid levels were recorded in units of mg/dL as clinical variables and as laboratory and fetal growth data. We considered uric acid equal to or more than 6.0 mg/dL as the elevated level. To relate the significance of elevated uric acid levels with variables, chi-square tests and Mann-Whitney U test were applied. Any p value equal or uric acid levels among both groups. In comparison with the healthy patients, patients with severe preeclampsia and uric acid greater than 6 mg/dl presented significant differences in relation to fetal complications and maternal laboratory and clinical variables. Our conclusion is that values equal to or greater than 6 mg/dL of serum uric acid in patients with severe preeclampsia may be a valuable biomarker for preeclampsia and an association with the presence of adverse fetal and maternal effects. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Uric Acid, Hyperuricemia and Vascular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ming; Yang, Fan; Yang, Irene; Yin, Ying; Luo, Jin Jun; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid is the product of purine metabolism. It is known that hyperuricemia, defined as high levels of blood uric acid, is the major etiological factor of gout. A number of epidemiological reports have increasingly linked hyperuricemia with cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Studies highlighting the pathogenic mechanisms of uric acid point to an inflammatory response as the primary mechanism for inducing gout and possibly contributing to uric acid's vascular effects. Monosodium urate (MSU) crystals induce an inflammatory reaction, which are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These TLRs then activate NALP3 inflammasome. MSU also triggers neutrophil activation and further produces immune mediators, which lead to a proinflammatory response. In addition, soluble uric acid can also mediate the generation of free radicals and function as a pro-oxidant. This review summarizes the epidemiological studies of hyperuricemia and cardiovascular disease, takes a brief look at hyperuricemia and its role in neurological diseases, and highlights the studies of the advanced pathological mechanisms of uric acid and inflammation. PMID:22201767

  15. Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: A Systemic Metabolic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Orson W.

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid nephrolithiasis is characteristically a manifestation of a systemic metabolic disorder. It has a prevalence of about 10% among all stone formers, the third most common type of kidney stone in the industrialized world. Uric acid stones form primarily due to an unduly acid urine; less deciding factors are hyperuricosuria and a low urine volume. The vast majority of uric acid stone formers have the metabolic syndrome, and not infrequently, clinical gout is present as well. A universal finding is a low baseline urine pH plus insufficient production of urinary ammonium buffer. Persons with gastrointestinal disorders, in particular chronic diarrhea or ostomies, and patients with malignancies with a large tumor mass and high cell turnover comprise a less common but nevertheless important subset. Pure uric acid stones are radiolucent but well visualized on renal ultrasound. A 24 h urine collection for stone risk analysis provides essential insight into the pathophysiology of stone formation and may guide therapy. Management includes a liberal fluid intake and dietary modification. Potassium citrate to alkalinize the urine to a goal pH between 6 and 6.5 is essential, as undissociated uric acid deprotonates into its much more soluble urate form. PMID:25045326

  16. Regulation of uric acid metabolism and excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuolo, Jessica; Oppedisano, Francesca; Gratteri, Santo; Muscoli, Carolina; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2016-06-15

    Purines perform many important functions in the cell, being the formation of the monomeric precursors of nucleic acids DNA and RNA the most relevant one. Purines which also contribute to modulate energy metabolism and signal transduction, are structural components of some coenzymes and have been shown to play important roles in the physiology of platelets, muscles and neurotransmission. All cells require a balanced quantity of purines for growth, proliferation and survival. Under physiological conditions the enzymes involved in the purine metabolism maintain in the cell a balanced ratio between their synthesis and degradation. In humans the final compound of purines catabolism is uric acid. All other mammals possess the enzyme uricase that converts uric acid to allantoin that is easily eliminated through urine. Overproduction of uric acid, generated from the metabolism of purines, has been proven to play emerging roles in human disease. In fact the increase of serum uric acid is inversely associated with disease severity and especially with cardiovascular disease states. This review describes the enzymatic pathways involved in the degradation of purines, getting into their structure and biochemistry until the uric acid formation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Recent advances on uric acid transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liuqing; Shi, Yingfeng; Zhuang, Shougang; Liu, Na

    2017-01-01

    Uric acid is the product of purine metabolism and its increased levels result in hyperuricemia. A number of epidemiological reports link hyperuricemia with multiple disorders, such as kidney diseases, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Recent studies also showed that expression and functional changes of urate transporters are associated with hyperuricemia. Uric acid transporters are divided into two categories: urate reabsorption transporters, including urate anion transporter 1 (URAT1), organic anion transporter 4 (OAT4) and glucose transporter 9 (GLUT9), and urate excretion transporetrs, including OAT1, OAT3, urate transporter (UAT), multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4), ABCG-2 and sodium-dependent phosphate transport protein. In the kidney, uric acid transporters decrease the reabsorption of urate and increase its secretion. These transporters’ dysfunction would lead to hyperuricemia. As the function of urate transporters is important to control the level of serum uric acid, studies on the functional role of uric acid transporter may provide a new strategy to treat hyperuricemia associated diseases, such as gout, chronic kidney disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, coronary heart disease, diabetes and other disorders. This review article summarizes the physiology of urate reabsorption and excretion transporters and highlights the recent advances on their roles in hyperuricemia and various diseases. PMID:29246027

  18. Urine alkalization facilitates uric acid excretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyama Issei

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increase in the incidence of hyperuricemia associated with gout as well as hypertension, renal diseases and cardiovascular diseases has been a public health concern. We examined the possibility of facilitated excretion of uric acid by change in urine pH by managing food materials. Methods Within the framework of the Japanese government's health promotion program, we made recipes which consist of protein-rich and less vegetable-fruit food materials for H+-load (acid diet and others composed of less protein but vegetable-fruit rich food materials (alkali diet. Healthy female students were enrolled in this consecutive 5-day study for each test. From whole-day collected urine, total volume, pH, organic acid, creatinine, uric acid and all cations (Na+,K+,Ca2+,Mg2+,NH4+ and anions (Cl-,SO42-,PO4- necessary for the estimation of acid-base balance were measured. Results Urine pH reached a steady state 3 days after switching from ordinary daily diets to specified regimens. The amount of acid generated ([SO42-] +organic acid-gut alkai were linearly related with those of the excretion of acid (titratable acidity+ [NH4+] - [HCO3-], indicating that H+ in urine is generated by the metabolic degradation of food materials. Uric acid and excreted urine pH retained a linear relationship, where uric acid excretion increased from 302 mg/day at pH 5.9 to 413 mg/day at pH 6.5, despite the fact that the alkali diet contained a smaller purine load than the acid diet. Conclusion We conclude that alkalization of urine by eating nutritionally well-designed food is effective for removing uric acid from the body.

  19. Urine alkalization facilitates uric acid excretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Increase in the incidence of hyperuricemia associated with gout as well as hypertension, renal diseases and cardiovascular diseases has been a public health concern. We examined the possibility of facilitated excretion of uric acid by change in urine pH by managing food materials. Methods Within the framework of the Japanese government's health promotion program, we made recipes which consist of protein-rich and less vegetable-fruit food materials for H+-load (acid diet) and others composed of less protein but vegetable-fruit rich food materials (alkali diet). Healthy female students were enrolled in this consecutive 5-day study for each test. From whole-day collected urine, total volume, pH, organic acid, creatinine, uric acid and all cations (Na+,K+,Ca2+,Mg2+,NH4+) and anions (Cl-,SO42-,PO4-) necessary for the estimation of acid-base balance were measured. Results Urine pH reached a steady state 3 days after switching from ordinary daily diets to specified regimens. The amount of acid generated ([SO42-] +organic acid-gut alkai) were linearly related with those of the excretion of acid (titratable acidity+ [NH4+] - [HCO3-]), indicating that H+ in urine is generated by the metabolic degradation of food materials. Uric acid and excreted urine pH retained a linear relationship, where uric acid excretion increased from 302 mg/day at pH 5.9 to 413 mg/day at pH 6.5, despite the fact that the alkali diet contained a smaller purine load than the acid diet. Conclusion We conclude that alkalization of urine by eating nutritionally well-designed food is effective for removing uric acid from the body. PMID:20955624

  20. Effects of Uric Acid on Exercise-induced Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    平井, 富弘

    2001-01-01

    We studied effects of uric acid on exercise― induced oxidative stress in humans based on a hypothesis that uric acid acts as an antioxidant to prevent from exercise―induced oxidative stress. Relation between uric acid level in plasma and increase of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS)after the cycle ergometer exercise was examined. Thiobarbituricacid reactive substance in plasma increased after the ergometer exercise. High uric acid in plasma did not result in low increase of TBARS...

  1. Uric acid in major depressive and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Black, Catherine N.; Bot, Mariska; Scheffer, Peter G.; Snieder, Harold; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Uric acid has neuroprotective effects, owing to its antioxidant properties. Lowered antioxidant capacity, causing increased oxidative stress, may be involved in affective disorders and might be altered by antidepressants. This study investigated the association of plasma uric acid, the

  2. Serum Uric Acid Levels among Nigerians with Essential Hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is an ongoing debate on the role of serum uric acid as an independent risk factor for hypertension and renal disease. This study determined the serum uric acid levels of Nigerians with essential hypertension and also evaluated the association between serum uric acid levels and blood pressure of these patients.

  3. ISONIAZID-ASSOCIATED URIC ACID RETENTION IN THE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mubbashir Ahmed

    Probenecid increases the urinary excretion of uric acid by inhibition of reabsorption [16]. There is considerable evidence that higher concentrations of uric acid in Uromastix hardwickii blood are due to the dominant action of INH. However, it is difficult to say that INH decreases the reabsorption or inhibits the excretion of uric ...

  4. Effect of uric acid on oxidative damage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buňková, Radka; Papežíková, Ivana; Podborská, Martina; Lojek, Antonín

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 14 (2007), s170-s171 E-ISSN 1213-7103. [Mezioborová česko-slovenská toxikologická konference /12./. Praha, 11.06.2007-13.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/07/P539 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : uric acid * lipid peroxidation * HPLC Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  5. Clinical Study of Uric Acid Urolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yii-Her Chou

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Uric acid urolithiasis develops from various causes. To investigate the clinical and biochemical presentation of patients with uric acid urolithiasis, a retrospective study was designed. A total of 46 cases were enrolled between January 2004 and December 2005. The compositions of the stones were analyzed by infrared spectrophotometry. There were 39 males (84.8% and seven females (15.2%, with a mean age of 61.5 ± 10.6 years and mean body mass index (BMI of 26.7 ± 3.1 kg/m2. The stone location was kidney in 10 (21.7%, ureter in 22 (41.8%, and bladder in 14 (30.5%. Multiple stones were diagnosed in 36 patients (78.3%. Pre-existing comorbidities included diabetes mellitus in 11 patients (23.9%, hypertension in 23 (50%, gout in 13 (28.2%, and benign prostatic hyperplasia in 14 (30.4%. Mean serum creatinine and uric acid was 1.6 ± 0.6 mg/dL and 7.6 ± 1.8 mg/dL, respectively. There were 27 patients (58% with creatinine > 1.4 mg/dL. The mean urinary pH was 5.42 ± 0.46. Patients with uric acid urolithiasis were predominantly male, older, with higher BMI, multiple stone presentation, with lower urinary pH, and hyperuricemia. Exacerbation of the renal function should also be of concern because of the high proportion of patients with renal insufficiency diagnosed in this study.

  6. Uric acid stones increase the risk of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ching-Chia; Chien, Tsu-Ming; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Chun-Nung; Chou, Yii-Her

    2018-02-28

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical characteristics of uric acid stones and their potential risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 401 patients (196 with uric acid stone and 205 without) were enrolled from our database of patients with urolithiasis. We analyzed the clinical demographic features, stone location, urine chemistries, and renal function. There was a significant difference (p uric acid group. Patients with uric acid stones had much lower pH of urine (p uric acid level (p = 0.002). Notably, those with uric acid stones had worse eGFR than those with non-uric acid stones. Multivariate analysis confirmed that age over 60 years (ORs = 9.19; 95% CI 3.5-24.3), female sex (ORs = 4.01; 95% CI 1.8-9.0), hyperuricemia (ORs = 8.47; 95% CI 1.6-43.5), and uric acid stone (OR = 2.86; 95% CI 1.2-6.7) were the independent predictors of poor prognoses in CKD. Therefore, an association exists between uric acid stones and higher prevalence of CKD. Patients with uric acid stones may need close monitoring of renal function during follow-up.

  7. Uric acid excretion predicts increased aggression in urban adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrug, Sylvie; Mrug, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Elevated levels of uric acid have been linked with impulsive and disinhibited behavior in clinical and community populations of adults, but no studies have examined uric acid in relation to adolescent aggression. This study examined the prospective role of uric acid in aggressive behavior among urban, low income adolescents, and whether this relationship varies by gender. A total of 84 adolescents (M age 13.36years; 50% male; 95% African American) self-reported on their physical aggression at baseline and 1.5years later. At baseline, the youth also completed a 12-h (overnight) urine collection at home which was used to measure uric acid excretion. After adjusting for baseline aggression and age, greater uric acid excretion predicted more frequent aggressive behavior at follow up, with no significant gender differences. The results suggest that lowering uric acid levels may help reduce youth aggression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Uric acid as a mediator of diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalal, Diana I; Maahs, David M; Hovind, Peter

    2011-01-01

    evidence has emerged in the past decade to suggest uric acid is an inflammatory factor and may play a role in endothelial dysfunction. This has lead our group and others to explore the role of uric acid in the onset and progression of DN. In this review, we highlight some of the animal and human studies...... that implicate uric acid in DN. Based on the evidence we review, we conclude the need for properly planned randomized controlled studies to decrease uric acid levels and assess the impact of such therapy on diabetic kidney disease....

  9. Serum urea and uric acid concentration in pregnant women in sub ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pregnant blackAfrican women. Uric acid levels for the pregnant women were significantly raised, and the relationship between uric acid elevation and gestational proteinuric hypertensionwas discussed. In conclusion, we recommend that uric acid ...

  10. Metabolic syndrome and the genesis of uric acid stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalouf, Naim M

    2011-01-01

    Uric acid stones are significantly more common among nephrolithiasis patients with type 2 diabetes, obesity, and/or the metabolic syndrome. The principal metabolic feature responsible for this association is an overly acidic urine, which leads to the precipitation of sparingly soluble uric acid crystals in urine and subsequent development of stones. The unduly acidic urine in uric acid stone formers is caused by a combination of excessive dietary intake of animal proteins and a defect in renal ammoniagenesis and/or excretion that leads to impaired buffering and amplifies the acidic urine caused by an increased acid excretion. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Plasmodium-induced inflammation by uric acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie M Orengo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of erythrocytes with the Plasmodium parasite causes the pathologies associated with malaria, which result in at least one million deaths annually. The rupture of infected erythrocytes triggers an inflammatory response, which is induced by parasite-derived factors that still are not fully characterized. Induced secretion of inflammatory cytokines by these factors is considered a major cause of malaria pathogenesis. In particular, the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF is thought to mediate most of the life-threatening pathologies of the disease. Here we describe the molecular characterization of a novel pathway that results in the secretion of TNF by host cells. We found that erythrocytes infected by Plasmodium accumulate high concentrations of hypoxanthine and xanthine. Degradation of Plasmodium-derived hypoxanthine/xanthine results in the formation of uric acid, which triggers the secretion of TNF. Since uric acid is considered a "danger signal" released by dying cells to alert the immune system, Plasmodium appears to have co-evolved to exploit this warning system. Identifying the mechanisms used by the parasite to induce the host inflammatory response is essential to develop urgently needed therapies against this disease.

  12. Physiological functions and pathogenic potential of uric acid: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ridi, Rashika; Tallima, Hatem

    2017-09-01

    Uric acid is synthesized mainly in the liver, intestines and the vascular endothelium as the end product of an exogenous pool of purines, and endogenously from damaged, dying and dead cells, whereby nucleic acids, adenine and guanine, are degraded into uric acid. Mentioning uric acid generates dread because it is the established etiological agent of the severe, acute and chronic inflammatory arthritis, gout and is implicated in the initiation and progress of the metabolic syndrome. Yet, uric acid is the predominant anti-oxidant molecule in plasma and is necessary and sufficient for induction of type 2 immune responses. These properties may explain its protective potential in neurological and infectious diseases, mainly schistosomiasis. The pivotal protective potential of uric acid against blood-borne pathogens and neurological and autoimmune diseases is yet to be established.

  13. Physiological functions and pathogenic potential of uric acid: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashika El Ridi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Uric acid is synthesized mainly in the liver, intestines and the vascular endothelium as the end product of an exogenous pool of purines, and endogenously from damaged, dying and dead cells, whereby nucleic acids, adenine and guanine, are degraded into uric acid. Mentioning uric acid generates dread because it is the established etiological agent of the severe, acute and chronic inflammatory arthritis, gout and is implicated in the initiation and progress of the metabolic syndrome. Yet, uric acid is the predominant anti-oxidant molecule in plasma and is necessary and sufficient for induction of type 2 immune responses. These properties may explain its protective potential in neurological and infectious diseases, mainly schistosomiasis. The pivotal protective potential of uric acid against blood-borne pathogens and neurological and autoimmune diseases is yet to be established.

  14. Uric acid contributes greatly to hepatic antioxidant capacity besides protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, T; Sorimachi, M

    2017-12-20

    Uric acid is the end-product of purine nucleotide metabolism and an increase in uric acid concentration in the body results in hyperuricemia, ultimately leading to gout. However, uric acid is a potent antioxidant and interacts with reactive oxygen species (ROS) to be non-enzymatically converted to allantoin. Uric acid accounts for approximately 60 % of antioxidant capacity in the plasma; however, its contribution to tissue antioxidant capacity is unknown. In this study, the contribution of uric acid to tissue antioxidant capacity and its conversion to allantoin by scavenging ROS in tissue were examined. The results showed that a decrease in hepatic uric acid content via allopurinol administration significantly reduced hepatic total-radical trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP) content in protein-free cytosol. Additionally, treating protein-free cytosol with uricase led to a further reduction of hepatic TRAP content. Allantoin was also detected in the solution containing protein-free cytosol that reacted with ROS. These findings suggest that in the absence of protein, uric acid contributes greatly to antioxidant capacity in the liver, where uric acid is converted to allantoin by scavenging ROS.

  15. Nasal secretion of the ozone scavenger uric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peden, D.B.; Swiersz, M.; Ohkubo, K.; Hahn, B.; Emery, B.; Kaliner, M.A. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Uric acid, an important scavenger of ozone, has been identified as the major low molecular weight antioxidant in baseline and cholinergically induced nasal secretions. The purpose of this study was to determine the specific tissue source of uric acid in airway secretions. The secretion of uric acid is increased by cholinergic stimulation and correlates closely with the secretion of lactoferrin (a nasal glandular protein), suggesting that submucosal glands are involved. Indeed, nasal turbinate tissue was found to contain uric acid. However, careful analysis of nasal turbinate tissue failed to reveal the presence of xanthine oxidase, the enzyme responsible for uric acid synthesis. These data suggest that uric acid might be taken up secondarily by glands from plasma. This possibility was strengthened by the observation that lowering the plasma urate level with probenecid concomitantly lowered urate secretion. These findings are consistent with the hypotheses that the principal source of uric acid in nasal secretions is plasma and that uric acid is taken up, concentrated, and secreted by nasal glands.

  16. Serum Uric Acid Levels among Nigerians with Essential Hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    renal disease. This study determined the serum uric acid levels of Nigerians with essential hypertension and also evaluated .... Table 1: Blood Pressure, Serum Uric Acid, Lipid profile in patients with essential hypertension and control subjects. (Mean+ SEM) .... where rats developed high blood pressure in about 3 to 5 weeks ...

  17. Correlation of uric acid levels and parameters of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibičková, Ľ; Langová, K; Vaverková, H; Kubíčková, V; Karásek, D

    2017-07-18

    Hyperuricemia has been described as associated with the risk of development metabolic syndrome; however the relationship between the uric acid level and particular parameters of metabolic syndrome remained unclear. We performed a cross-sectional study on a cohort of 833 dyslipidemic patients and correlated their levels of uric acid with parameters of insulin resistance, lipid metabolism, C-reactive protein, anthropometric parameters. We also defined patients with hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype and compered their uric acid levels with those without this phenotype. We found that levels of uric acid are associated with parameters of metabolic syndrome. Specifically, dyslipidemia characteristic for metabolic syndrome (low HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides) correlates better with uric acid levels than parameters of insulin resistance. Also waist circumference correlates better with uric acid levels than body mass index. Patients with hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype had higher levels of uric acid when compared with patients without this phenotype. Serum uric acid levels are even in low levels linearly correlated with parameters of metabolic syndrome (better with typical lipid characteristics than with parameters of insulin resistance) and could be associated with higher cardiovascular risk.

  18. Prevalence of renal uric acid stones in the adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchieri, Alberto; Montanari, Emanuele

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate uric acid renal stone prevalence rates of adults in different countries of the world. PubMed was searched for papers dealing with "urinary calculi and prevalence or composition" for the period from January 1996 to June 2016. Alternative searches were made to collect further information on specific topics. The prevalence rate of uric acid stones was computed by the general renal stone prevalence rate and the frequency of uric acid stones in each country. After the initial search, 2180 papers were extracted. Out of them, 79 papers were selected after the reading of the titles and of the abstracts. For ten countries, papers relating to both the renal stone prevalence in the general population and the frequency of uric stones were available. Additional search produced 13 papers that completed information on 11 more countries in 5 continents. Estimated prevalence rate of uric acid stones was >0.75% in Thailand, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Iran, South Africa (white population), United States and Australia; ranged 0.50-0.75% in Turkey, Israel, Italy, India (Southern), Spain, Taiwan, Germany, Brazil; and uric acid stone formation. A hot and dry climate increases fluid losses reducing urinary volume and urinary pH. A diet rich in meat protein causes low urinary pH and increased uric acid excretion. On the other hand, uric acid stone formation is frequently associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes type 2 that are linked to dietary energy excess mainly from carbohydrate and saturated fat and also present with low urine pH values. An epidemic of uric acid stone formation could be if current nutritional trends will be maintained both in developed countries and in developing countries and the areas of greater climatic risk for the formation of uric acid stones will enlarge as result of the "global warming".

  19. The Association of Albuminuria With Tubular Reabsorption of Uric Acid : Results From a General Population Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheven, Lieneke; Joosten, Michel M.; de Jong, Paul E.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    Background-Elevated albuminuria as well as an increased serum uric acid concentration is associated with poor cardiovascular outcome. We questioned whether these 2 variables (albuminuria and serum uric concentration) may be interrelated via tubular uric acid reabsorption. Methods and

  20. Uric Acid and Cardiovascular Events: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Graciela; Grammer, Tanja B.; Silbernagel, Günther; Huang, Jie; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Ritz, Eberhard; März, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and diets rich in uric acid–raising components appear to account for the increased prevalence of hyperuricemia in Westernized populations. Prevalence rates of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, CKD, and cardiovascular disease are also increasing. We used Mendelian randomization to examine whether uric acid is an independent and causal cardiovascular risk factor. Serum uric acid was measured in 3315 patients of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study. We calculated a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) for uric acid concentration based on eight uric acid–regulating single nucleotide polymorphisms. Causal odds ratios and causal hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a two-stage regression estimate with the GRS as the instrumental variable to examine associations with cardiometabolic phenotypes (cross-sectional) and mortality (prospectively) by logistic regression and Cox regression, respectively. Our GRS was not consistently associated with any biochemical marker except for uric acid, arguing against pleiotropy. Uric acid was associated with a range of prevalent diseases, including coronary artery disease. Uric acid and the GRS were both associated with cardiovascular death and sudden cardiac death. In a multivariate model adjusted for factors including medication, causal HRs corresponding to each 1-mg/dl increase in genetically predicted uric acid concentration were significant for cardiovascular death (HR, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 2.81) and sudden cardiac death (HR, 2.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.16 to 5.00). These results suggest that high uric acid is causally related to adverse cardiovascular outcomes, especially sudden cardiac death. PMID:25788527

  1. Uric acid increases erythrocyte aggregation: Implications for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloop, Gregory D; Bialczak, Jessica K; Weidman, Joseph J; St Cyr, J A

    2016-10-05

    Uric acid may be a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, although the data conflict and the mechanism by which it may cause cardiovascular disease is uncertain. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that uric acid, an anion at physiologic pH, can cause erythrocyte aggregation, which itself is associated with cardiovascular disease. Normal erythrocytes and erythrocytes with a positive direct antiglobulin test for surface IgG were incubated for 15 minutes in 14.8 mg/dL uric acid. Erythrocytes without added uric acid were used as controls. Erythrocytes were then examined microscopically for aggregation. Aggregates of up to 30 erythrocytes were noted when normal erythrocytes were incubated in uric acid. Larger aggregates were noted when erythrocytes with surface IgG were incubated in uric acid. Aggregation was negligible in controls. These data show that uric acid causes erythrocyte aggregation. The most likely mechanism is decreased erythrocyte zeta potential. Erythrocyte aggregates will increase blood viscosity at low shear rates and increase the risk of atherothrombosis. In this manner, hyperuricemia and decreased zeta potential may be risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  2. Level of Salivary Uric Acid in Gingivitis and Periodontitis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ihsan Rizal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal disease is common chronic adult condition. Antioxidants are present in the body fluid as protection against free radical. Uric acid is one of antioxidants that can be found in saliva. Moreover, the relationship among the antioxidant enzymes activities and clinical periodontal status were investigated. Objectives: The aim of the study was to observe uric acid level activities in the saliva of gingivitis and periodontitis patients. Methods: Six patients with gingivitis and six patients with periodontitis in Dental Hospital Trisakti University were included in the study. Clinical condition of each subject, the plaque index, and probing depth were determined. The salivary uric acid level was measured using the Folin-Wu method. Result: Salivary uric acid levels in the periodontitis patients with a mean ± SD  7.40 ± 0.31  (p = 0.004 were found to be higher compared to the gingivitis patients (mean ± SD = 6.84 ± 0.19. In addition, there were no significant differences in salivary uric acid levels between gender (p = 0.641. Conclusion: Uric acid levels in periodontitis patients were found to be higher than in gingivitis patients. Moreover, uric acid has more role on periodontitis than in gingivitis as an antioxidant agent.

  3. Serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Wen; Chang, Tsui-Yen; Chen, Jong-Dar

    2010-06-01

    A positive association between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome has been reported, but little information is available about the association between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese adults. We performed a cross-sectional study of 2085 men and 1557 women. All of the participants underwent a health screening during the period from January 2005 to December 2005 at a health center of the Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. The results showed that hyperuricemia was significantly associated with increased risk for hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, and high blood pressure in men and women. The risk of metabolic syndrome was significantly higher in the fourth quartile than in the first quartile of uric acid level in men (odds ratio [OR], 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-2.14) and women (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.39-3.93). In addition, uric acid level was inversely associated with hyperglycemia in men. The ORs of hyperglycemia for the second, third, and fourth quartile of uric acid were 0.69 (95% CI, 0.46-1.03), 0.55 (95% CI, 0.37-0.83), and 0.45 (95% CI, 0.29-0.69), respectively, compared with the lowest quartile of uric acid. The results demonstrate that there is a positive association between serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome and an inverse association between uric acid and fasting plasma glucose in Taiwanese adults. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fluorometric determination of uric acid in bovine milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Moyes, Kasey

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to validate a new fast method for determination of uric acid in milk. The method is based on an enzymatic-fluorometric technique that requires minimal pre-treatment of milk samples. The present determination of uric acid is based on the enzymatic oxidation...... of uric acid to 5-hydroxyisourate via uricase where the liberated hydrogen peroxide reacts with 10-acetyl-3,7-dihydroxyphenoxazine via peroxidase and the fluorescent product, resorufin, is measured fluorometrically. Fresh composite milk samples (n=1,072) were collected from both Jersey (n=38) and Danish...... and expected uric acid concentrations. A positive correlation (r=0·96; Puric acid concentrations using the present method and a reference assay. Storage at 4°C for 24 h resulted in lower (Puric acid concentrations in milk when compared with no storage or samples stored...

  5. Isoniazid-Associated Uric Acid Retention in the Lizard, Uromastix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reduction in uric acid excretion was observed following oral administration of 0.06 mg isoniazid per day for 5, 10 and 15 days to three groups of Uromastix hardwickii lizards. The rise of serum uric acid levels in the treated groups was 60 per cent higher on day 5, and about 4 and 5 times greater than in control groups on day ...

  6. Efficacy of Vitamin C in Lowering Serum Uric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, M R; Haq, S M; Saleh, A A; Hakim, F; Azad, A K

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of vitamin C in reducing serum uric acid (UA). This study was a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial conducted in the Department of Rheumatology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2007 and August 2008. Study participants were included from out patient department (OPD) of Rheumatology of BSMMU suffering from various Rheumatological problems other than gouty arthritis. All of the participants were non-smokers, non-alcoholics, and randomized to take either placebo or vitamin C (500 mg/day) for 12 weeks. A total of 98 subjects were enrolled in the study; 71 completed the trial, with 34 in the placebo group and 37 receiving vitamin C. Serum uric acid levels were not significantly reduced in the experimental group and they increased in the placebo group. In the vitamin C group, the mean change was -0.32mg/dl [95% confidence interval -0.73, 0.77], whereas in the placebo group, the mean change was +0.12mg/dl [95% confidence interval was -0.22, 0.47]. Subgroups were defined by sex, body mass index, and quartiles of baseline serum uric acid levels. In a subgroup analysis, vitamin C lowered serum uric acid significantly in those who had comparatively higher baseline uric acid levels. Although vitamin C did not lower serum uric acid significantly, participants with higher baseline serum uric acid levels experienced a significant uric acid lowering effect, but as the sample size was very small, it is difficult to draw any definitive conclusion.

  7. Association between serum uric acid level and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Mi; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Cho, Hye Min; Oh, Sun Min; Choi, Dong Phil; Suh, Il

    2012-05-01

    Serum uric acid levels have been reported to be associated with a variety of cardiovascular conditions. However, the direct association between uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome remains controversial. Thus, we evaluated the association of serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome in a community-based cohort study in Korea. We performed cross-sectional analysis of baseline data of 889 males and 1491 females (aged 38 to 87) who participated in baseline examinations of the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study: Kanghwa study. Blood samples were collected after at least an 8 hour fast. Uric acid quartiles were defined as follows: Metabolic syndrome was defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III Criteria with adjusted waist circumference cutoffs (90 cm for males; 80 cm for females). The association between serum uric acid quartiles and metabolic syndrome was assessed using multivariate logistic regression. The odds ratio for having metabolic syndrome in the highest versus lowest quartiles of serum uric acid levels was 2.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60 to 4.46) in males and 2.14 (95% CI, 1.50 to 3.05) in females after adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol intake, body mass index, total cholesterol, HbA1c, albumin, γ-glutamyltransferase, blood urea nitrogen, and log C-reactive protein. The number of metabolic abnormalities also increased gradually with increasing serum uric acid levels (adjusted p for trend uric acid levels are positively associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome in Korean males and females.

  8. Association between serum uric acid level and metabolic syndrome components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejatinamini, Sara; Ataie-Jafari, Asal; Qorbani, Mostafa; Nikoohemat, Shideh; Kelishadi, Roya; Asayesh, Hamid; Hosseini, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Serum uric acid levels is reported to be associated with a variety of cardiometabolic risk factors; however, its direct association with metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains controversial. Thus, we examined the association of serum uric acid concentrations with the MetS components. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria. This case-control study comprised 101 non-smoking individuals (41 in the MetS group and 60 in the non-MetS group). Blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, lipid profiles, uric acid, and anthropometric measures were determined, and body composition was assessed by using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). After adjustment for confounding factors, serum uric acid was significantly higher in MetS group than non-MetS group (5.70 ± 1.62 vs 4.97 ± 1.30 mg/dL, respectively, P = 0.001). After controlling for age, sex and body mass index in partial correlation analysis, uric acid was positively correlated with triglycerides, and negatively with HDL-C. In multiple logistic regression analysis, every 1 mg/dl elevation in the serum uric acid level increased the risk of MetS approximately by 2-folds (OR: 2.11, 95 % CI: 1.30-3.41). This study showed that those individuals with MetS have higher uric acid levels; the association of uric acid and MetS components supports that it might be an additional components of MetS.

  9. Role of insulin resistance in uric acid nephrolithiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hanhan; Klett, Dane E; Littleton, Raymond; Elder, Jack S; Sammon, Jesse D

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of uric acid stones. Although not completely understood, its role is supported by many studies demonstrating increased prevalence of uric acid stones in patients with metabolic syndrome and in particular insulin resistance, a major component of metabolic syndrome. This review presents epidemiologic studies demonstrating the association between metabolic syndrome and nephrolithiasis in general as well as the relationship between insuli...

  10. Uric acid detection using uv-vis spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norazmi, N.; Rasad, Z. R. Abdul; Mohamad, M.; Manap, H.

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this research is to detect uric acid (UA) concentration using Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectrometer in the Ultraviolet (UV) region. Absorption technique was proposed to detect different uric acid concentrations and its UV absorption wavelength. Current practices commonly take a lot of times or require complicated structures for the detection process. By this proposed spectroscopic technique, every concentration can be detected and interpreted into an absorbance value at a constant wavelength peak in the UV region. This is due to the chemical characteristics belong to the uric acid since it has a particular absorption cross-section, σ which can be calculated using Beer’s Lambert law formula. The detection performance was displayed using Spectrasuite sofware. It showed fast time response about 3 seconds. The experiment proved that the concentrations of uric acid were successfully detected using UV-Vis spectrometer at a constant absorption UV wavelength, 294.46 nm in a low time response. Even by an artificial sample of uric acid, it successfully displayed a close value as the ones reported with the use of the medical sample. It is applicable in the medical field and can be implemented in the future for earlier detection of abnormal concentration of uric acid.

  11. Uric Acid as a Cause of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christopher; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Jensen, Thomas; Tolan, Dean R; Sánchez-Lozada, L Gabriela; Johnson, Richard J

    2018-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is common in subjects with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. For many years, hyperuricemia was attributed to the effects of insulin resistance to reduce urinary excretion of uric acid, and it was believed that uric acid may not have any causal role in the metabolic syndrome. However, in recent years, hyperuricemia has been found to independently predict the development of diabetes. Experimental studies have also shown that hyperuricemia may mediate insulin resistance, fatty liver, and dyslipidemia in both fructose-dependent and fructose-independent models of metabolic syndrome. The mechanism for uric acid-induced insulin resistance appears to be mediated by the development of mitochondrial oxidative stress and impairment of insulin-dependent stimulation of nitric oxide in endothelial cells. Pilot studies in humans have reported a potential benefit of lowering serum uric acid on insulin resistance. Large clinical trials are recommended. If uric acid is shown to be a mediator of incident type 2 diabetes in humans, then lowering serum uric acid would represent a simple and inexpensive way to help prevent the development of diabetes and to slow the epidemic. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Rational pharmacotherapy (RPT) in goutology: Define the serum uric acid target & treat-to-target patient cohort and review on urate lowering therapy (ULT) applying synthetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Tim L

    2015-07-01

    A gout revolution is at hand as can be seen from the number of publications and our recent increase in a better understanding of gout regarding imaging, regarding pathogenetic involvement of crystals, cells and cytokines, as well as regarding new pharmacotherapeutic options. We should now focus on rational pharmacotherapy to significantly improve gout care. With modern combinations of xanthine oxidase inhibition PLUS uricosuric all serum urate concentrations can be targeted. The pharmacotherapeutic literature of synthetic urate lowering treatment is reviewed and a plea is given for rational pharmacotherapy combining different modes of action aiming at the rheumatologically predefined optimal serum urate concentrations instead of a more reluctant approach to just lower a serum urate to any lower level with a fixed dose allopurinol. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  13. Uric acid in major depressive and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Catherine N; Bot, Mariska; Scheffer, Peter G; Snieder, Harold; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2018-01-01

    Uric acid has neuroprotective effects, owing to its antioxidant properties. Lowered antioxidant capacity, causing increased oxidative stress, may be involved in affective disorders and might be altered by antidepressants. This study investigated the association of plasma uric acid, the greatest contributor to blood antioxidant capacity, with major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders. Data were from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety including patients with current (N = 1648), remitted (N = 609) MDD and/or anxiety disorders (of which N = 710 antidepressant users) and 618 controls. Diagnoses were established with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Symptom severity was assessed with the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms-Self Report, Beck Anxiety Inventory and Fear Questionnaire. Uric acid was measured in plasma. Analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic, health and lifestyle variables. Plasma uric acid adjusted mean levels were lower in current MDD and/or anxiety disorder(s) (289μmol/l) compared to remitted disorders (298μmol/l, p uric acid. Limitations include the lack of data on dietary intake which could be a potential confounding factor. From these cross-sectional findings, the association between uric acid and psychopathology cannot be inferred to be causal. This large scale study finds plasma uric acid levels are lower in current, but not remitted, MDD and/or anxiety disorders, according to a dose-response gradient. This suggests the involvement of decreased antioxidant status in affective disorders, and points to their potential as an avenue for treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Uric acid and chronic kidney disease: which is chasing which?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard J.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jalal, Diana; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Kang, Duk-Hee; Ritz, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    Serum uric acid is commonly elevated in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but was historically viewed as an issue of limited interest. Recently, uric acid has been resurrected as a potential contributory risk factor in the development and progression of CKD. Most studies documented that an elevated serum uric acid level independently predicts the development of CKD. Raising the uric acid level in rats can induce glomerular hypertension and renal disease as noted by the development of arteriolosclerosis, glomerular injury and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Pilot studies suggest that lowering plasma uric acid concentrations may slow the progression of renal disease in subjects with CKD. While further clinical trials are necessary, uric acid is emerging as a potentially modifiable risk factor for CKD. Gout was considered a cause of CKD in the mid-nineteenth century [1], and, prior to the availability of therapies to lower the uric acid level, the development of end-stage renal disease was common in gouty patients. In their large series of gouty subjects Talbott and Terplan found that nearly 100% had variable degrees of CKD at autopsy (arteriolosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis) [2]. Additional studies showed that during life impaired renal function occurred in half of these subjects [3]. As many of these subjects had urate crystals in their tubules and interstitium, especially in the outer renal medulla, the disease became known as gouty nephropathy. The identity of this condition fell in question as the presence of these crystals may occur in subjects without renal disease; furthermore, the focal location of the crystals could not explain the diffuse renal scarring present. In addition, many subjects with gout also had coexistent conditions such as hypertension and vascular disease, leading some experts to suggest that the renal injury in gout was secondary to these latter conditions rather than to uric acid per se [4]. Indeed, gout was

  15. Serum uric acid levels are associated with homeostasis model assessment in obese nondiabetic patients: HOMA and uric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde-Barrera, Cesar I; Estrada-García, Teresa; Lozano-Nuevo, Jose J; Garro-Almendaro, Ana K; López-Saucedo, Catalina; Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F

    2017-10-01

    Hyperuricemia leads to insulin resistance, whereas insulin resistance decreases renal excretion of uric acid. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether there is a correlation between serum uric acid levels with homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) 1 in nondiabetic patients. We evaluated 88 nondiabetic patients, in whom uric acid levels were measured, in all of them HOMA of β-cell function (HOMA 1B) and HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA 1IR) scores were performed. Uric acid and the HOMA 1 values were correlated using the Pearson coefficient. We did not find any correlation between uric acid levels with both HOMA 1B ( r = 0.102, p = 0.343), nor with HOMA 1IR ( r = 0.158, p = 0.117). When patients were analyzed by sex, we found a significant correlation with HOMA 1IR (0.278, p = 0.01), but not with HOMA 1B (0.138, p = 0.257) in women. We found a correlation with HOMA 1B in men ( r = 0.37, p = 0.044), but not with HOMA 1IR: 0.203, p = 0.283. The analysis performed based on body mass index did not show correlation in the patients with normal weight, (HOMA 1B r = 0.08, p = 0.5, HOMA 1IR = 0.034, p = 0.793), nor in the patients who were overweight (HOMA 1B: r = 0.05, p = 0.76, HOMA 1IR r = 0.145, p = 0.43). However, a significant correlation between uricemia with both HOMA 1B (0.559, p HOMA 1IR (0.326, p < 0.05), was observed in obese patients. Our results suggest that serum uric acid levels seem to be associated with insulin resistance in women, and in obese patients, but not in nonobese men. Uric acid also modifies β-cell function in men and in obese patients.

  16. Uric acid, an important antioxidant contributing to survival in termites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasaki, Eisuke; Sakurai, Hiroki; Nitao, Masaru; Matsuura, Kenji; Iuchi, Yoshihito

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated spontaneously in all organisms and cause oxidative damage to biomolecules when present in excess. Accumulated oxidative damage accelerates aging; enhanced antioxidant capacity may be a positive factor for longevity. Recently, numerous studies of aging and longevity have been performed using short-lived animals, however, longevity mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show that a termite Reticulitermes speratus that is thought to be long-lived eusocial insect than other solitary insects uses large quantities of uric acid as an antioxidant against ROS. We demonstrated that the accumulation of uric acid considerably increases the free radical-scavenging activity and resistance against ultraviolet-induced oxidative stress in laboratory-maintained termites. In addition, we found that externally administered uric acid aided termite survival under highly oxidative conditions. The present data demonstrates that in addition to nutritional and metabolic roles, uric acid is an essential antioxidant for survival and contributes significantly to longevity. Uric acid also plays important roles in primates but causes gout when present in excess in humans. Further longevity studies of long-lived organisms may provide important breakthroughs with human health applications. PMID:28609463

  17. Relationship Between Serum Uric Acid Levels and Intrarenal Hemodynamic Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Uedono

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hyperuricemia has been reported to affect renal hemodynamics in rat models. We evaluate the relationship between serum uric acid and intrarenal hemodynamic parameters in humans, utilizing the plasma clearance of para-aminohippurate (CPAH and inulin (Cin. Methods: Renal and glomerular hemodynamics were assessed by simultaneous measurement of CPAH and Cin in 58 subjects. Of these, 19 subjects were planned to provide a kidney for transplantation; 26 had diabetes without proteinuria; and 13 had mild proteinuria. Renal and glomerular hemodynamics were calculated using Gomez`s formulae. Results: Cin was more than 60 ml/min/1.73m2 in all subjects. Serum uric acid levels correlated significantly with vascular resistance at the afferent arteriole (Ra (r = 0.354, p = 0.006 but not with that of the efferent arteriole (Re. Serum uric acid levels (β = 0.581, p = a after adjustment for several confounders (R2 = 0.518, p = Conclusions: These findings suggest, for the first time in humans, that higher serum uric acid levels are associated significantly with Ra in subjects with Cin > 60 ml/min/1.73m2. The increase in Ra in subjects with higher uric acid levels may be related to dysfunction of glomerular perfusion.

  18. Kinetics and enthalpy of crystallization of uric acid dihydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sádovská, Galina; Honcová, Pavla; Sádovský, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The kinetic constant and growth order of crystallization of uric acid dihydrate was calculated. • The equation describing first-order crystal growth was derived. • The enthalpy of crystallization of uric acid dihydrate was determined. - Abstract: The kinetics of crystallization of uric acid dihydrate in aqueous solution with a constant ionic strength 0.3 mol dm −3 NaCl and at thermodynamic and physiological temperature (25 and 37 °C) was studied using isoperibolic reaction twin calorimeter. The enthalpy of crystallization Δ cr H = −47.3 ± 0.9 and −46.2 ± 1.4 kJ mol −1 and kinetic constant k g = 2.0 × 10 −8 and 9.6 × 10 −8 m 4 s −1 mol −1 were determined at 25 and 37 °C, respectively

  19. Levels of uric acid in erectile dysfunction of different aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barassi, Alessandra; Corsi Romanelli, Massimiliano Marco; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Dozio, Elena; Damele, Clara Anna Linda; Vaccalluzzo, Liborio; Di Dario, Marco; Goi, Giancarlo; Papini, Nadia; Massaccesi, Luca; Colpi, Giovanni Maria; Melzi d'Eril, Gian Vico

    2018-01-12

    Erectile dysfunction is a common disease characterized by endothelial dysfunction. The aetiology of ED is often multifactorial but evidence is being accumulated in favor of the proper function of the vascular endothelium that is essential to achieving and maintaining penile erection. Uric acid itself causes endothelial dysfunction via decreased nitric oxide production. This study aims to evaluate the serum uric acid (SUA) levels in 180 ED patients, diagnosed with the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) and 30 non-ED control. Serum uric acid was analyzed with a commercially available kit using ModularEVO (Roche, Monza, Italy). Within-assay and between-assay variations were 3.0% and 6.0%, respectively. Out of the ED patients, 85 were classified as arteriogenic (A-ED) and 95 as non-arteriogenic (NA-ED) with penile-echo-color-Doppler. Uric acid levels (median and range in mg/dL) in A-ED patients (5.8, 4.3-7.5) were significantly higher (p uric acid levels in patients with mild A-ED (IIEF-5 16-20) and severe/complete A-ED (IIEF-5 ≤ 10) that were 5.4 (range 4.3-6.5) mg/dL and 6.8 (range 6.4-7.2) mg/dL, respectively. There was no difference between the levels of uric acid in patients with different degree of NA-ED. Our findings reveal that SUA is a marker of ED but only of ED of arteriogenic aetiology.

  20. Serum uric acid and target organ damage in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Sandra N; Odia, Osaretin J

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular mortality, as it acts through its effects on target organs, such as the heart and kidneys. Hyperuricemia increases cardiovascular risk in patients with hypertension. To assess the relationship between serum uric acid and target organ damage (left ventricular hypertrophy and microalbuminuria) in untreated patients with essential hypertension. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 130 (85 females, 45 males) newly diagnosed, untreated patients with essential hypertension. Sixty-five healthy age- and sex-matched non-hypertensive individuals served as controls for comparison. Left ventricular hypertrophy was evaluated by cardiac ultrasound scan, and microalbuminuria was assessed in an early morning midstream urine sample by immunoturbidimetry. Blood samples were collected for assessing uric acid levels. Mean serum uric acid was significantly higher among the patients with hypertension (379.7±109.2 μmol/L) than in the controls (296.9±89.8 μmol/L; P<0.001), and the prevalence of hyperuricemia was 46.9% among the hypertensive patients and 16.9% among the controls (P<0.001). Among the hypertensive patients, microalbuminuria was present in 54.1% of those with hyperuricemia and in 24.6% of those with normal uric acid levels (P=0.001). Similarly, left ventricular hypertrophy was more common in the hypertensive patients with hyperuricemia (70.5% versus 42.0%, respectively; P=0.001). There was a significant linear relationship between mean uric acid levels and the number of target organ damage (none versus one versus two: P=0.012). These results indicate that serum uric acid is associated with target organ damage in patients with hypertension, even at the time of diagnosis; thus, it is a reliable marker of cardiovascular damage in our patient population.

  1. [Percentage of uric acid calculus and its metabolic character in Dongjiang River valley].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Hong-Heng; An, Geng

    2009-02-15

    To study the percentage of uric acid calculus in uroliths and its metabolic character in Dongjiang River valley. To analyze the chemical composition of 290 urinary stones by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and study the ratio changes of uric acid calculus. Uric acid calculus patients and healthy people were studied. Personal characteristics, dietary habits were collected. Conditional logistic regression was used for data analysis and studied the dietary risk factors of uric acid calculus. Patients with uric acid calculus, calcium oxalate and those without urinary calculus were undergone metabolic evaluation analysis. The results of uric acid calculus patients compared to another two groups to analysis the relations between the formation of uric acid calculus and metabolism factors. Uric acid calculi were found in 53 cases (18.3%). The multiple logistic regression analysis suggested that low daily water intake, eating more salted and animal food, less vegetable were very closely associated with uric acid calculus. Comparing to calcium oxalate patients, the urine volume, the value of pH, urine calcium, urine oxalic acid were lower, but uric acid was higher than it. The value of pH, urine oxalic acid and citric acid were lower than them, but uric acid and urine calcium were higher than none urinary calculus peoples. Blood potassium and magnesium were lower than them. The percentage of uric acid stones had obvious advanced. Less daily water intake, eating salted food, eating more animal food, less vegetables and daily orange juice intake, eating sea food are the mainly dietary risk factors to the formation of uric acid calculus. Urine volume, the value of pH, citric acid, urine calcium, urine uric acid and the blood natrium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, uric acid have significant influence to the information of uric acid stones.

  2. Metabolic Syndrome, Alcohol Consumption and Genetic Factors Are Associated with Serum Uric Acid Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Stibůrková, Blanka; Pavlíková, Markéta; Sokolová, Jitka; Kožich, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Objective Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans, and increased serum uric acid concentrations lead to gout. The objective of the current study was to identify factors that are independently associated with serum uric acid concentrations in a cohort of Czech control individuals. Methods The cohort consisted of 589 healthy subjects aged 18–65 years. We studied the associations between the serum uric acid concentration and the following: (i) demographic, anthropometric and ...

  3. Serum uric acid and appropriate cutoff value for prediction of metabolic syndrome among Chinese adults

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Mei-lin; Gao, Yu-xia; Wang, Xuan; Chang, Hong; Huang, Guo-wei

    2012-01-01

    The relation between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome is observed not only with frank hyperuricemia but also with serum uric acid levels within the normal range. The current ?normal? range set for hyperuricemia often fails to identify patients with potential metabolic disorders. We investigate the association between serum uric acid within the normal range and incident metabolic syndrome risk, and further to determine the optimal cut-off value of serum uric acid for the diagnosis or pre...

  4. Relationship between Uric Acid Level and Achievement Motivation. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ernst F.; French, John R. P., Jr.

    In an investigation of the relationship of uric acid (a metabolic end product) to achievement, this study hypothesized that a person's serum urate level (a factor often associated with gout) is positively related to achievement need as well as indicators of actual achievement. (Speed of promotion and number of yearly publications were chosen as…

  5. The effect of essential hypertension on serum uric acid level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawed, S.; Khawaja, T.F.; Sultan, M.A.; Ahmad, S.

    2005-01-01

    Patient with arterial hypertension and no definable cause are said to have essential, primary or idiopathic hypertension. A total of 100 patients suffering from essential hypertension and 100 control subjects with almost same mean age and sex distribution were enrolled in this study. Levels of serum uric acid, total cholesterol, TG, and HDL-c were determined by enzymatic colorimetric method. Serum LDL-c and VLDL-c was calculated by using Friedewald and Wilson's formulae. The study was aimed to find out the levels of serum uric acid and lipid profile in patients with essential hypertension and to compare them with levels of normal healthy individuals. Results show increased level of serum uric acid and lipid parameters except for HDL-c, which was significantly, decreased in patients with essential hypertension as compared to the control subjects. Variations in aforementioned parameters were also observed on comparing the obese and the non-obese patients. It can be concluded from the present study that the essential hypertension is associated with abnormalities in the levels of serum uric acid and lipid profile. (author)

  6. Could Uric acid have a Pathogenic Role in Chronic Allograft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) is the primary cause of chronic graft failure after kidney transplantation. The pathogenesis of CAD involves both antigen-dependent and antigen-independent mechanisms. Serum uric acid could have a role in both mechanisms. Review: Hyperuricemia in subjects with renal ...

  7. Plasma kinetics of 14C-uric acid in bulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetinkaya, N.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma kinetics of uric acid were followed by 14C labelled uric acid to measure the effects of feed intake upon kinetic parameters. Two bulls (average L W 346±79 kg) were given an intravenous administration of a tracer (8-14C-uric acid, 250μCi/50 ml) by single injection via a jugular catheter. Animals were fed a mixed diet containing 30% wheat straw and 70% compounded feed as 95 and 60 % of the voluntary intake. Voluntary intakes were 8 kg/d as fed for two bulls. Blood samples, were collected at 0, 0.5,1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24 and 28 h after tracer administration. Fractional rates of clearance from the blood and pool size of compartments in the blood were estimated using plasma 8-14C-counts, following the method proposed by Chen and Franklin. The mean values of fractional rates (K 2,1 , K 1,2 ) and compartments pool size (V 1 , V 2 ) and the total pool size of compartments I and 2 at 60% and 95% feeding level were 1.97 and 1.44, 1.06 and 0.78; 76.9 L and 94.5 L, 137.01 L and 163.51 L; 214.0 L and 250.3 L respectively. Plasma kinetic parameters of 14C-uric acid were not affected at different feed intakes

  8. Influence of dark chocolate administration on uric acid, liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To assess the influence of dark chocolate administration on uric acid, liver enzymes, glucose and lactate responses to summaximal exercise test in male swimmers. Subjects. Eleven competitive swimmers from the athletic club Academic, Sofia volunteered for the study. Design. A randomised study of two periods ...

  9. Salivary uric acid as a noninvasive biomarker of metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soukup Maria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated serum uric acid is associated with obesity, hypertension and metabolic syndrome. Because a linear relationship exists between serum and salivary uric acid (SUA concentration, saliva testing may be a useful noninvasive approach for monitoring cardiometabolic risk. The goal of this pilot study was to determine if SUA is increased in patients with metabolic syndrome and to investigate correlations between SUA and individual cardiometabolic risk factors. Findings Volunteers between the ages of 18 and 65 without conditions known to affect serum uric acid levels were recruited. Height, weight, blood pressure and waist circumference were measured and a full lipid panel along with fasting blood glucose was obtained. Saliva samples were collected and uric acid levels were determined. 78 volunteers, 35% of whom had metabolic syndrome, completed the study. SUA was significantly elevated in patients with metabolic syndrome (p=.002. The incidence of metabolic syndrome in the 4th quartile for SUA was 67% compared to 25% in quartiles1-3 combined. Significant correlations were seen between SUA and systolic blood pressure (r=.440, p=.000, diastolic blood pressure ( r=.304, p=.007, waist circumference (r=.332, p=.003, BMI ( r=.269, p=.018, fasting blood glucose ( r=.341, p=.002, triglycerides (r=.410, p=.000, HDL ( r=.237, p=.036 and the number of cardiometabolic risk factors present (r=0.257, p=.023. Conclusions These results suggest that SUA may be a useful biomarker for noninvasive monitoring of cardiometabolic risk. Larger studies are needed to validate this approach.

  10. Salivary uric acid as a noninvasive biomarker of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Maria; Biesiada, Izabela; Henderson, Aaron; Idowu, Benmichael; Rodeback, Derek; Ridpath, Lance; Bridges, Edward G; Nazar, Andrea M; Bridges, Kristie Grove

    2012-04-19

    Elevated serum uric acid is associated with obesity, hypertension and metabolic syndrome. Because a linear relationship exists between serum and salivary uric acid (SUA) concentration, saliva testing may be a useful noninvasive approach for monitoring cardiometabolic risk. The goal of this pilot study was to determine if SUA is increased in patients with metabolic syndrome and to investigate correlations between SUA and individual cardiometabolic risk factors. Volunteers between the ages of 18 and 65 without conditions known to affect serum uric acid levels were recruited. Height, weight, blood pressure and waist circumference were measured and a full lipid panel along with fasting blood glucose was obtained. Saliva samples were collected and uric acid levels were determined. 78 volunteers, 35% of whom had metabolic syndrome, completed the study. SUA was significantly elevated in patients with metabolic syndrome (p=.002). The incidence of metabolic syndrome in the 4th quartile for SUA was 67% compared to 25% in quartiles1-3 combined. Significant correlations were seen between SUA and systolic blood pressure (r=.440, p=.000), diastolic blood pressure ( r=.304, p=.007), waist circumference (r=.332, p=.003), BMI ( r=.269, p=.018), fasting blood glucose ( r=.341, p=.002), triglycerides (r=.410, p=.000), HDL ( r=.237, p=.036) and the number of cardiometabolic risk factors present (r=0.257, p=.023). These results suggest that SUA may be a useful biomarker for noninvasive monitoring of cardiometabolic risk. Larger studies are needed to validate this approach.

  11. (Monodora myristica) on reduced glutathione, uric acid levels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effect of the methanolic extract of. Aframomum sceptrum and Monodora myristica on the reduced glutathione (GSH) and uric acid levels in the plasma and liver of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced-diabetic rats. The possible hepatic damage resulting from the administration of the spices was also

  12. Serum uric acid and target organ damage in essential hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofori SN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sandra N Ofori, Osaretin J OdiaDepartment of Internal Medicine, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NigeriaBackground: Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular mortality, as it acts through its effects on target organs, such as the heart and kidneys. Hyperuricemia increases cardiovascular risk in patients with hypertension.Objective: To assess the relationship between serum uric acid and target organ damage (left ventricular hypertrophy and microalbuminuria in untreated patients with essential hypertension.Patients and methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 130 (85 females, 45 males newly diagnosed, untreated patients with essential hypertension. Sixty-five healthy age- and sex-matched non-hypertensive individuals served as controls for comparison. Left ventricular hypertrophy was evaluated by cardiac ultrasound scan, and microalbuminuria was assessed in an early morning midstream urine sample by immunoturbidimetry. Blood samples were collected for assessing uric acid levels.Results: Mean serum uric acid was significantly higher among the patients with hypertension (379.7±109.2 µmol/L than in the controls (296.9±89.8 µmol/L; P<0.001, and the prevalence of hyperuricemia was 46.9% among the hypertensive patients and 16.9% among the controls (P<0.001. Among the hypertensive patients, microalbuminuria was present in 54.1% of those with hyperuricemia and in 24.6% of those with normal uric acid levels (P=0.001. Similarly, left ventricular hypertrophy was more common in the hypertensive patients with hyperuricemia (70.5% versus 42.0%, respectively; P=0.001. There was a significant linear relationship between mean uric acid levels and the number of target organ damage (none versus one versus two: P=0.012.Conclusion: These results indicate that serum uric acid is associated with target organ damage in patients with hypertension, even at the time of diagnosis; thus, it is a reliable

  13. Circulating Levels of Uric Acid and Risk for Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F; Morales-López, Herlinda; Garro-Almendaro, Ana K; Vargas-Ayala, German; Durán-Salgado, Montserrat B; Huerta-Ramírez, Saul; Lozano-Nuevo, Jose J

    2017-01-01

    Hyperuricemia leads to insulin resistance, whereas insulin resistance decreases renal excretion of uric acid, both mechanisms link elevated serum uric acid with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the probability for the development of metabolic syndrome in low-income young adults with hyperuricaemia. We evaluated 103 patients less than 40 years of age, from a low-income population, and without history of cardiovascular disease, in all of them the presence of metabolic syndrome was assessed in accordance with the International Diabetes Federation criteria. In all patients, fasting serum uric acid levels were measured; hyperuricaemia was defined as serum uric acid values 6.5 mg/dl in men and 5.1 mg/dl in women. Statistical analysis was performed with odds ratio. 83 of our patients (80.5%) suffered metabolic syndrome, the odds ratio for the presence of metabolic syndrome in patients with hyperuricaemia was 5.1 (p=0.002, I.C 1.8- 14.5). When patients were evaluated by gender a significantly association between hyperuricaemia and metabolic syndrome was found in women (odds ratio 3.6, p=0.048, C.I. 1.0-12.9), and men (odds ratio 10.2, p= 0.015, IC 1.5-13.2). When uric acid was correlated with the components of metabolic syndrome, we only found a positive correlation with waist circumference (r=0.483). Our results showed a significant association between hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome in low-income young adults in Mexico. DR is associated with estimated risk of CVD in type 2 diabetic patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Dietary Sodium Modifies Serum Uric Acid Concentrations in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Alwyn S; Walker, Robert J; MacGinley, Robert J; Kelly, Jaimon; Merriman, Tony R; Major, Tanya J; Johnson, Richard J

    2017-11-06

    Subjects with hypertension are frequently obese or insulin resistant, both conditions in which hyperuricemia is common. Obese and insulin-resistant subjects are also known to have blood pressure that is more sensitive to changes in dietary sodium intake. Whether hyperuricemia is a resulting consequence, moderating or contributing factor to the development of hypertension has not been fully evaluated and very few studies have reported interactions between sodium intake and serum uric acid. We performed further analysis of our randomized controlled clinical trials (Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry #12609000161224 and #12609000292279) designed to assess the effects of modifying sodium intake on concentrations of serum markers, including uric acid. Uric acid and other variables (including blood pressure, renin, and aldosterone) were measured at baseline and 4 weeks following the commencement of low (60 mmol/day), moderate (150 mmol/day), and high (200-250 mmol/day) dietary sodium intake. The median aldosterone-to-renin ratio was 1.90 [pg/ml]/[pg/ml] (range 0.10-11.04). Serum uric acid fell significantly in both the moderate and high interventions compared to the low sodium intervention. This pattern of response occurred when all subjects were analyzed, and when normotensive or hypertensive subjects were analyzed alone. Although previously reported in hypertensive subjects, these data provide evidence in normotensive subjects of an interaction between dietary sodium intake and serum uric acid. As this interaction is present in the absence of hypertension, it is possible it could play a role in hypertension development, and will need to be considered in future trials of dietary sodium intake. The trials were registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry as ACTRN12609000161224 and ACTRN1260. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Fluorometric determination of uric acid in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Torben; Moyes, Kasey M

    2010-11-01

    The primary objective of this study is to validate a new fast method for determination of uric acid in milk. The method is based on an enzymatic-fluorometric technique that requires minimal pre-treatment of milk samples. The present determination of uric acid is based on the enzymatic oxidation of uric acid to 5-hydroxyisourate via uricase where the liberated hydrogen peroxide reacts with 10-acetyl-3,7-dihydroxyphenoxazine via peroxidase and the fluorescent product, resorufin, is measured fluorometrically. Fresh composite milk samples (n=1,072) were collected from both Jersey (n=38) and Danish Holstein (n=106) cows from one local herd. The average inter- and intra-assay variations were 7·1% and 3·0%, respectively. Percent recovery averaged 103·4, 107·0 and 107·5% for samples spiked with 20, 40 or 60 μm of standard, respectively, with a correlation (r=0·98; Pmilk when compared with no storage or samples stored at -18°C for 24 h. Addition of either allopurinol (a xanthine oxidase inhibitor) or dimethylsulfoxide (a solvent for allopurinol) did not affect milk uric acid concentrations (P=0·96) and may indicate that heat treatment before storage and analysis was sufficient to degrade xanthine oxidase activity in milk. No relationship was observed between milk uric acid and milk yield and milk components. Authors recommend a single heat treatment (82°C for 10 min) followed by either an immediate analysis of fresh milk samples or storage at -18°C until further analysis.

  16. Uric acid and allopurinol aggravate absence epileptic activity in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Renáta Krisztina; Dobolyi, Árpád; Kovács, Zsolt

    2018-05-01

    Uric acid has a role in several physiological and pathophysiological processes. For example, uric acid may facilitate seizure generalization while reducing uric acid level may evoke anticonvulsant/antiepileptic effects. Allopurinol blocks the activity of xanthine oxidase, by which allopurinol inhibits catabolism of hypoxanthine to xanthine and uric acid and, as a consequence, decreases the level of uric acid. Although the modulation of serum uric acid level is a widely used strategy in the treatment of certain diseases, our knowledge regarding the effects of uric acid on epileptic activity is far from complete. Thus, the main aim of this study was the investigation of the effect of uric acid on absence epileptic seizures (spike-wave discharges: SWDs) in a model of human absence epilepsy, the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rat. We investigated the influence of intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected uric acid (100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg), allopurinol (50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg), a cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 (COX-1 and COX-2) inhibitor indomethacin (10 mg/kg) and inosine (500 mg/kg) alone and the combined application of allopurinol (50 mg/kg) with uric acid (100 mg/kg) or inosine (500 mg/kg) as well as indomethacin (10 mg/kg) with uric acid (100 mg/kg) and inosine (500 mg/kg) with uric acid (100 mg/kg) on absence epileptic activity. We demonstrated that both uric acid and allopurinol alone significantly increased the number of SWDs whereas indomethacin abolished the uric acid-evoked increase in SWD number. Our results suggest that uric acid and allopurinol have proepileptic effects in WAG/Rij rats. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Parabanic acid is the singlet oxygen specific oxidation product of uric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Sayaka; Ohkubo, Yuki; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Fujisawa, Akio

    2017-11-01

    Uric acid quenches singlet oxygen physically or reacts with it, but the oxidation product has not been previously characterized. The present study determined that the product is parabanic acid, which was confirmed by LC/TOFMS analysis. Parabanic acid was stable at acidic pH (acid at neutral or alkaline pH. The total yields of parabanic acid and oxaluric acid based on consumed uric acid were ~100% in clean singlet oxygen production systems such as UVA irradiation of Rose Bengal and thermal decomposition of 3-(1,4-dihydro-1,4-epidioxy-4-methyl-1-naphthyl)propionic acid. However, the ratio of the amount of uric acid consumed to the total amount of singlet oxygen generated was less than 1/180, indicating that most of the singlet oxygen was physically quenched. The total yields of parabanic acid and oxaluric acid were high in the uric acid oxidation systems with hydrogen peroxide plus hypochlorite or peroxynitrite. They became less than a few percent in peroxyl radical-, hypochlorite- or peroxynitrite-induced oxidation of uric acid. These results suggest that parabanic acid could be an in vivo probe of singlet oxygen formation because of the wide distribution of uric acid in human tissues and extracellular spaces. In fact, sunlight exposure significantly increased human skin levels of parabanic acid.

  18. Uric Acid or 1-Methyl Uric Acid in the Urinary Bladder Increases Serum Glucose, Insulin, True Triglyceride, and Total Cholesterol Levels in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Balasubramanian

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In animals deprived of food for a long period, a drop in the fat mass below 5% of the total body mass results in an increase in blood glucocorticoids and uric acid levels, followed by foraging activity. Since the glucocorticoids increase the uric acid excretion, an increase in the level of uric acid in the bladder urine could be the signal for this feeding behaviour and subsequent fat storage. Accumulation of fat is associated with hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, hyperlipidaemia, and hypercholesterolaemia as seen in the metabolic syndrome or hibernation. It is hypothesized that uric acid or its structurally related compound, 1-methyl uric acid (one of the metabolites of the methyl xanthines namely caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine present in coffee, tea, cocoa, and some drugs, can act on the urinary bladder mucosa and increases the blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride, and cholesterol levels. In rats, perfusion of the urinary bladder with saturated aqueous solution of uric acid or 1-methyl uric acid results in a significant increase in the serum levels of glucose, insulin, true triglyceride, and total cholesterol in comparison with perfusion of the bladder with distilled water at 20, 40, and 80 min. The uric acid or the 1-methyl uric acid acts on the urinary bladder mucosa and increases the serum glucose, insulin, true triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels.

  19. Uric acid disrupts hypochlorous acid production and the bactericidal activity of HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Larissa A C; Lopes, João P P B; Kaihami, Gilberto H; Silva, Railmara P; Bruni-Cardoso, Alexandre; Baldini, Regina L; Meotti, Flavia C

    2018-06-01

    Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans and is an alternative physiological substrate for myeloperoxidase. Oxidation of uric acid by this enzyme generates uric acid free radical and urate hydroperoxide, a strong oxidant and potentially bactericide agent. In this study, we investigated whether the oxidation of uric acid and production of urate hydroperoxide would affect the killing activity of HL-60 cells differentiated into neutrophil-like cells (dHL-60) against a highly virulent strain (PA14) of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. While bacterial cell counts decrease due to dHL-60 killing, incubation with uric acid inhibits this activity, also decreasing the release of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF- α). In a myeloperoxidase/Cl - /H 2 O 2 cell-free system, uric acid inhibited the production of HOCl and bacterial killing. Fluorescence microscopy showed that uric acid also decreased the levels of HOCl produced by dHL-60 cells, while significantly increased superoxide production. Uric acid did not alter the overall oxidative status of dHL-60 cells as measured by the ratio of reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione. Our data show that uric acid impairs the killing activity of dHL-60 cells likely by competing with chloride by myeloperoxidase catalysis, decreasing HOCl production. Despite diminishing HOCl, uric acid probably stimulates the formation of other oxidants, maintaining the overall oxidative status of the cells. Altogether, our results demonstrated that HOCl is, indeed, the main relevant oxidant against bacteria and deviation of myeloperoxidase activity to produce other oxidants hampers dHL-60 killing activity. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Uric acid ameliorates indomethacin-induced enteropathy in mice through its antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Yuichi; Tomita, Kengo; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Furuhashi, Hirotaka; Shirakabe, Kazuhiko; Takajo, Takeshi; Maruta, Koji; Sato, Hirokazu; Narimatsu, Kazuyuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Okada, Yoshikiyo; Kurihara, Chie; Watanabe, Chikako; Komoto, Shunsuke; Nagao, Shigeaki; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Miura, Soichiro; Hokari, Ryota

    2017-11-01

    Uric acid is excreted from blood into the intestinal lumen, yet the roles of uric acid in intestinal diseases remain to be elucidated. The study aimed to determine whether uric acid could reduce end points associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced enteropathy. A mouse model of NSAID-induced enteropathy was generated by administering indomethacin intraperitoneally to 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice, and then vehicle or uric acid was administered orally. A group of mice treated with indomethacin was also concurrently administered inosinic acid, a uric acid precursor, and potassium oxonate, an inhibitor of uric acid metabolism, intraperitoneally. For in vitro analysis, Caco-2 cells treated with indomethacin were incubated in the presence or absence of uric acid. Oral administration of uric acid ameliorated NSAID-induced enteropathy in mice even though serum uric acid levels did not increase. Intraperitoneal administration of inosinic acid and potassium oxonate significantly elevated serum uric acid levels and ameliorated NSAID-induced enteropathy in mice. Both oral uric acid treatment and intraperitoneal treatment with inosinic acid and potassium oxonate significantly decreased lipid peroxidation in the ileum of mice with NSAID-induced enteropathy. Treatment with uric acid protected Caco-2 cells from indomethacin-induced oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and cytotoxicity. Uric acid within the intestinal lumen and in serum had a protective effect against NSAID-induced enteropathy in mice, through its antioxidant activity. Uric acid could be a promising therapeutic target for NSAID-induced enteropathy. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Serum Uric Acid Level as a Prognostic Marker in Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Woo; Choi, Sun Mi; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Lee, Sang-Min

    2017-01-01

    Uric acid acts as both a pathogenic inflammatory mediator and an antioxidative agent. Several studies have shown that uric acid level correlates with the incidence, severity, and prognosis of pulmonary diseases. However, the association between uric acid level and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has not been studied. This study was conducted to elucidate how serum uric acid level is related with clinical prognosis of ARDS. A retrospective cohort study with propensity score matching was conducted at a medical intensive care unit of a tertiary teaching hospital. The medical records of patients diagnosed with ARDS admitted from 2005 through 2011 were reviewed. Two hundred thirty-seven patients with ARDS met the inclusion criteria. Patients with a serum uric acid level uric acid group, and those with a level ≥3 mg/dL were classified into the normal to high uric acid group. We selected 40 patients in each group using propensity score matching. A higher percentage of patients in the low uric acid group experienced clinical improvement in ARDS. More patients died from sepsis in the normal to high uric acid group. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that a low serum uric acid level was significantly associated with better survival rate. In patients with ARDS, a low serum uric acid level may be a prognostic marker of a low risk of in-hospital mortality.

  2. The Effects of Lowering Uric Acid Levels Using Allopurinol on Components of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbach, Esther J; Bowden, Rodney G; Griggs, Jackson O; Beaujean, A Alexander; Doyle, Eva I; Doyle, Robert D

    2012-04-01

    Researchers have reported an independent direct relationship between lipid levels and hyperuricemia with MetS. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between serum uric acid levels and lipids among patients on allopurinol. A retrospective secondary data analysis was conducted on 66 adult patients from a family health clinic in Central Texas. Medical records used were recorded during a nine year period (2002 - 2010) ascertaining the relationship between uric acid and lipids. Spearman correlations revealed a weak correlation between uric acid and total cholesterol, a weak correlation between uric acid and triglycerides and LDL-C. A weak inverse correlation was discovered between uric acid and HDL-C. A moderate correlation was discovered when all lipid variables combined were compared to uric acid. We discovered LDL-C and triglycerides to be significant predictors of uric acid with weak correlations. Additionally, weak correlations existed between uric acid and total cholesterol and HDL-C with an inverse relationship discovered with HDL-C. These findings support the literature suggesting that uric acid is more likely to be associated with total cholesterol and triglycerides. In addition, new discoveries serve as an indication that LDL-C may also be associated with uric acids levels. The mechanism by which uric acid may regulate lipids is elusive but suggestions have included suppression of lipid peroxidase and decreases in critical lipase activity.

  3. Uric acid turnover in man by chromatographic measurement of the specific activity of 14C-uric acid in plasma and urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, R.; Vitali, C.; Clerico, A.; Pilo, A.; Fusani, L.; Mariani, G.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for the determination of uric acid turnover, based on the measurement of 14C-uric specific radioactivity in plasma and urine after its chromatographic purification through P2 Biogel columns. This gel specifically adsorbs uric acid, so that possible radioactivity due to allantoin and/or other metabolites is not included in the measurement. A group of 4 normal control subjects and 8 patients with non-tophaceous gout were submitted to the investigation. After measuring the plasma disappearance curve of 14C-uric acid over 72 hours, the non-compartmental approach was employed to compute the total removal rate of uric acid, its distribution volumes and the size of its total body pool. By measuring urine radioactivity over the same period, the removal rate of uric acid through kidneys was determined, by the urine/plasma ratio. The extrarenal excretion of uric acid was then determined as the difference between the total removal rate and the renal removal rate. The total removal rate of uric acid resulted to be 382.8 mg/day/m 2 bs in the control group, decreased by 11% in 4 hypoexcretory gouty patients, and increased by 34% in 4 hyperproducing gouty patients. The total pool of uric acid (567 mg/m 2 bs in normals) was markedly increased in the gouty patients, by about 65%, irrespective of hypoexcretion of hyperproduction. The extrarenal fraction of uric acid removal resulted to be about 38% of the total removal, both in the control subjects and in the gouty patients, irrespective of hypoexcretion or hyperproduction of uric acid. (author)

  4. The Association of Albuminuria With Tubular Reabsorption of Uric Acid: Results From a General Population Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheven, Lieneke; Joosten, Michel M.; de Jong, Paul E.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated albuminuria as well as an increased serum uric acid concentration is associated with poor cardiovascular outcome. We questioned whether these 2 variables (albuminuria and serum uric concentration) may be interrelated via tubular uric acid reabsorption. Methods and Results Included were 7688 participants of the PREVEND Study, an observational, general population‐based cohort study. Linear regression analyses were used to test associations of baseline albuminuria with baseline serum uric acid concentration and tubular uric acid reabsorption (calculated as [100−fractional uric acid excretion]%). Cox regression analyses were used to study the association of baseline serum uric acid and albuminuria with incident cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In cross‐sectional analyses, albuminuria was associated positively with serum uric acid concentration, both crude and after adjustment for potential confounders (both Puric acid reabsorption, again both crude and after adjustment for potential confounders (both Puric acid were associated with incident cardiovascular events (Hazard Ratios 1.09 [1.03 to 1.17], P=0.01 and 1.19 [1.09 to 1.30], Puric acid being less predictive for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the presence of high albuminuria and vice versa. Conclusions Albuminuria is strongly associated with tubular uric acid reabsorption, and consequently with serum uric acid concentration. This phenomenon may explain in part why albuminuria is associated with cardiovascular outcome. PMID:24772520

  5. Biochemical and dietary factors of uric acid stone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchieri, Alberto; Montanari, Emanuele

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical characteristics of "pure" uric acid renal stone formers (UA-RSFs) with that of mixed uric acid/calcium oxalate stone formers (UC-RSFs) and to identify which urinary and dietary risk factors predispose to their formation. A total of 136 UA-RSFs and 115 UC-RSFs were extracted from our database of renal stone formers. A control group of 60 subjects without history of renal stones was considered for comparison. Data from serum chemistries, 24-h urine collections and 24-h dietary recalls were considered. UA-RSFs had a significantly (p = 0.001) higher body mass index (26.3 ± 3.6 kg/m 2 ) than UC-RSFs, whereas body mass index of UA-RSFs was higher but not significantly than in controls (24.6 ± 4.7) (p = 0.108). The mean urinary pH was significantly lower in UA-RSFs (5.57 ± 0.58) and UC-RSFs (5.71 ± 0.56) compared with controls (5.83 ± 0.29) (p = 0.007). No difference of daily urinary uric acid excretion was observed in the three groups (p = 0.902). Daily urinary calcium excretion was significantly (p = 0.018) higher in UC-RSFs (224 ± 149 mg/day) than UA-RSFs (179 ± 115) whereas no significant difference was observed with controls (181 ± 89). UA-RSFs tend to have a lower uric acid fractional excretion (0.083 ± 0.045% vs 0.107+/-0.165; p = 0.120) and had significantly higher serum uric acid (5.33 ± 1.66 vs 4.78 ± 1.44 mg/dl; p = 0.007) than UC-RSFs. The mean energy, carbohydrate and vitamin C intakes were higher in UA-SFs (1987 ± 683 kcal, 272 ± 91 g, 112 ± 72 mg) and UC-SFs (1836 ± 74 kcal, 265 ± 117, 140 ± 118) with respect to controls (1474 ± 601, 188 ± 84, 76 ± 53) (p = 0.000). UA-RSFs should be differentiated from UC-RSFs as they present lower urinary pH, lower uric acid fractional excretion and higher serum uric acid. On the contrary, patients with UC-RSFs show urinary risk factors

  6. Serum uric acid and acute kidney injury: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Hahn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury causes great morbidity and mortality in both the community and hospital settings. Understanding the etiological factors and the pathophysiological principles resulting in acute kidney injury is essential in prompting appropriate therapies. Recently hyperuricemia has been recognized as a potentially modifiable risk factor for acute kidney injury, including that associated with cardiovascular surgery, radiocontrast administration, rhabdomyolysis, and associated with heat stress. This review discussed the evidence that repeated episodes of acute kidney injury from heat stress and dehydration may also underlie the pathogenesis of the chronic kidney disease epidemic that is occurring in Central America (Mesoamerican nephropathy. Potential mechanisms for how uric acid might contribute to acute kidney injury are also discussed, including systemic effects on renal microvasculature and hemodynamics, and local crystalline and noncrystalline effects on the renal tubules. Pilot clinical trials also show potential benefits of lowering uric acid on acute kidney injury associated with a variety of insults. In summary, there is mounting evidence that hyperuricemia may have a significant role in the development of acute kidney injury. Prospective, placebo controlled, randomized trials are needed to determine the potential benefit of uric acid lowering therapy on kidney and cardio-metabolic diseases.

  7. Kinetics and enthalpy of crystallization of uric acid dihydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sádovská, Galina, E-mail: galina.sadovska@upce.cz; Honcová, Pavla; Sádovský, Zdeněk

    2013-08-20

    Highlights: • The kinetic constant and growth order of crystallization of uric acid dihydrate was calculated. • The equation describing first-order crystal growth was derived. • The enthalpy of crystallization of uric acid dihydrate was determined. - Abstract: The kinetics of crystallization of uric acid dihydrate in aqueous solution with a constant ionic strength 0.3 mol dm{sup −3} NaCl and at thermodynamic and physiological temperature (25 and 37 °C) was studied using isoperibolic reaction twin calorimeter. The enthalpy of crystallization Δ{sub cr}H = −47.3 ± 0.9 and −46.2 ± 1.4 kJ mol{sup −1}and kinetic constant k{sub g} = 2.0 × 10{sup −8} and 9.6 × 10{sup −8} m{sup 4} s{sup −1} mol{sup −1} were determined at 25 and 37 °C, respectively.

  8. Sugar, Uric Acid, and the Etiology of Diabetes and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard J.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Sanchez-Lozada, L. Gabriela; Shafiu, Mohamed; Sundaram, Shikha; Le, Myphuong; Ishimoto, Takuji; Sautin, Yuri Y.; Lanaspa, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The intake of added sugars, such as from table sugar (sucrose) and high-fructose corn syrup has increased dramatically in the last hundred years and correlates closely with the rise in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Fructose is a major component of added sugars and is distinct from other sugars in its ability to cause intracellular ATP depletion, nucleotide turnover, and the generation of uric acid. In this article, we revisit the hypothesis that it is this unique aspect of fructose metabolism that accounts for why fructose intake increases the risk for metabolic syndrome. Recent studies show that fructose-induced uric acid generation causes mitochondrial oxidative stress that stimulates fat accumulation independent of excessive caloric intake. These studies challenge the long-standing dogma that “a calorie is just a calorie” and suggest that the metabolic effects of food may matter as much as its energy content. The discovery that fructose-mediated generation of uric acid may have a causal role in diabetes and obesity provides new insights into pathogenesis and therapies for this important disease. PMID:24065788

  9. The hippocampal response to psychosocial stress varies with salivary uric acid level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Adam M; Wheelock, Muriah D; Harnett, Nathaniel G; Mrug, Sylvie; Granger, Douglas A; Knight, David C

    2016-12-17

    Uric acid is a naturally occurring, endogenous compound that impacts mental health. In particular, uric acid levels are associated with emotion-related psychopathology (e.g., anxiety and depression). Therefore, understanding uric acid's impact on the brain would provide valuable new knowledge regarding neural mechanisms that mediate the relationship between uric acid and mental health. Brain regions including the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus underlie stress reactivity and emotion regulation. Thus, uric acid may impact emotion by modifying the function of these brain regions. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a psychosocial stress task to investigate the relationship between baseline uric acid levels (in saliva) and brain function. Results demonstrate that activity within the bilateral hippocampal complex varied with uric acid concentrations. Specifically, activity within the hippocampus and surrounding cortex increased as a function of uric acid level. The current findings suggest that uric acid levels modulate stress-related hippocampal activity. Given that the hippocampus has been implicated in emotion regulation during psychosocial stress, the present findings offer a potential mechanism by which uric acid impacts mental health. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Low uric acid is a risk factor in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, LingLing; Liu, YongBing; Xue, HuiPing; Xue, Jin; Sun, KaiXuan; Wu, LinFeng; Hou, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) represents a transitional stage between normal aging and dementia. Uric acid is a water-soluble antioxidant found in the body. Many recent studies have found that uric acid plays an important role in cognitive impairment, although the effects of uric acid on MCI are not clear. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between uric acid and MCI. Using a random sampling method, this study investigated 58 patients with MCI and 57 healthy elderly from January 2016 to November 2016. Demographic information was collected, the subjects were evaluated using the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE), and uric acid was measured in fasting venous blood. A total of 57 (49.6%) participants are healthy and 58 (50.4%) participants had MCI. The uric acid level was significantly lower in the patients with MCI (292.28±63.71 μmol/L) than in the normal controls (322.49±78.70 μmol/L; P uric acid level (all P uric acid was a protective factor for MCI (odds ratio =0.999, 95% CI =0.987-0.999). A low uric acid level is a risk factor for MCI, and an appropriate increase in uric acid can be used to slow down the occurrence and development of MCI.

  11. Uric acid association with pulsatile and steady components of central and peripheral blood pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepeytre, Fanny; Lavoie, Pierre-Luc; Troyanov, Stéphan; Madore, François; Agharazii, Mohsen; Goupil, Rémi

    2018-03-01

    Whether the cardiovascular risk attributed to elevated uric acid levels may be explained by changes in central and peripheral pulsatile and/or steady blood pressure (BP) components remains controversial. In a cross-sectional analysis of normotensive and untreated hypertensive participants of the CARTaGENE populational cohort, we examined the relationship between uric acid, and both pulsatile and steady components of peripheral and central BP, using sex-stratified linear regressions. Of the 20 004 participants, 10 161 individuals without antihypertensive or uric acid-lowering drugs had valid pulse wave analysis and serum uric acid levels. In multivariate analysis, pulsatile components of BP were not associated with uric acid levels, whereas steady components [mean BP (MBP), peripheral and central DBP] were all associated with higher levels of uric acid levels in women and men (all P uric acid levels but not for MBP-adjusted cSBP. Peripheral and cSBP, which are aggregate measures of pulsatile and steady BP, were also associated with uric acid levels in women (β = 0.063 and 0.072, respectively, both P uric acid levels. Serum uric acid levels appear to be associated with both central and peripheral steady but not pulsatile BP, regardless of sex.

  12. The Development of Reproducible and Selective Uric Acid Biosensor by Using Electrodeposited Polytyramine as Matrix Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manihar Situmorang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A versatile method for the construction of reproducible and high selective uric acid biosensor is explained. Electrodeposited polytyramine is used as biosensor matrixes due to its compatibility to immobilize enzyme uric oxidase in the membrane electrode. The precise control over the charge passed during deposition of polytyramine allows concomitant control over the thickness of the deposited enzyme layers onto the surface of the electrode. The uric acid biosensor showed a sensitive response to uric acid with a linear calibration curve lies in the concentration range of 0.1–2.5 mM, slope 0.066 µA mM-1, and the limit detection was 0.01 mM uric acid (S/N = 3. The biosensor shown excellent reproducibility, the variation between response curves for uric acid lies between RSD 1% at low concentrations and up to RSD 6% at saturation concentration. Uric acid biosensor is free from normal interference. The biosensor showed good stability and to be applicable to determine uric acid in real samples. Analysis of uric acid in the reference standard serum samples by the biosensor method are all agreed with the real value from supplier. Standard samples were also analyzed independently by two methods: the present biosensor method and the standard UV-Vis spectrophotometry method, gave a correlation coefficient of 0.994. This result confirms that the biosensor method meets the rigid demands expected for uric acid in real samples.

  13. Does Altered Uric Acid Metabolism Contribute to Diabetic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Ambreen; Zager, Philip

    2018-03-01

    Multiple experimental and clinical studies have identified pathways by which uric acid may facilitate the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with diabetes. However, it remains uncertain if the association of uric acid with CKD represents a pathogenic effect or merely reflects renal impairment. In contrast to many published reports, a recent Mendelian randomization study did not identify a causal link between uric acid and CKD in people with type 1 diabetes. Two recent multicenter randomized control trials, Preventing Early Renal Function Loss in Diabetes (PERL) and FEbuxostat versus placebo rAndomized controlled Trial regarding reduced renal function in patients with Hyperuricemia complicated by chRonic kidney disease stage 3 (FEATHER), were recently designed to assess if uric acid lowering slows progression of CKD. We review the evidence supporting a role for uric acid in the pathogenesis of CKD in people with diabetes and the putative benefits of uric acid lowering.

  14. Anorexia nervosa and uric acid beyond gout: An idea worth researching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeunovic Ostojic, Mladena; Maas, Joyce

    2018-02-01

    Uric acid is best known for its role in gout-the most prevalent inflammatory arthritis in humans-that is also described as an unusual complication of anorexia nervosa (AN). However, beyond gout, uric acid could also be involved in the pathophysiology and psychopathology of AN, as it has many biological functions serving as a pro- and antioxidant, neuroprotector, neurostimulant, and activator of the immune response. Further, recent research suggests that uric acid could be a biomarker of mood dysfunction, personality traits, and behavioral patterns. This article discusses the hypothesis that uric acid in AN may not be a mere innocent bystander determined solely by AN behavior and its medical complications. In contrast, the relation between uric acid and AN may have evolutionary origin and may be reciprocal, where uric acid regulates some features and pathophysiological processes of AN, including weight and metabolism regulation, oxidative stress, immunity, mood, cognition, and (hyper)activity. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Uric acid in metabolic syndrome: From an innocent bystander to a central player

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Jensen, Thomas; Solak, Yalcin; Le, Myphuong; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; Rivard, Chris; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid, once viewed as an inert metabolic end-product of purine metabolism, has been recently incriminated in a number of chronic disease states, including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and chronic kidney disease. Several experimental and clinical studies support a role for uric acid as a contributory causal factor in these conditions. Here we discuss some of the major mechanisms linking uric acid to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. At this time the key to understanding the importance of uric acid in these diseases will be the conduct of large clinical trials in which the effect of lowering uric acid on hard clinical outcomes is assessed. Elevated uric acid may turn out to be one of the more important remediable risk factors for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26703429

  16. Uric acid in metabolic syndrome: From an innocent bystander to a central player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Jensen, Thomas; Solak, Yalcin; Le, Myphuong; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; Rivard, Chris; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    Uric acid, once viewed as an inert metabolic end-product of purine metabolism, has been recently incriminated in a number of chronic disease states, including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and chronic kidney disease. Several experimental and clinical studies support a role for uric acid as a contributory causal factor in these conditions. Here we discuss some of the major mechanisms linking uric acid to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. At this time the key to understanding the importance of uric acid in these diseases will be the conduct of large clinical trials in which the effect of lowering uric acid on hard clinical outcomes is assessed. Elevated uric acid may turn out to be one of the more important remediable risk factors for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  17. The Role of Uric Acid in Hypertension of Adolescents, Prehypertension and Salt Sensitivity of Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Hu, Jia-Wen; Lv, Yong-Bo; Chu, Chao; Wang, Ke-Ke; Zheng, Wen-Ling; Cao, Yu-Meng; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2017-02-13

    Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism. Metabolic disorders of uric acid are associated with many disease states. Substantial evidence suggests the possible role of uric acid as a mediator of high blood pressure. Elevated uric acid is closely associated with new onset essential hypertension in adolescents and prehypertension; and urate-lowering agents can significantly improve these early stages of hypertension. Uric acid also influences salt sensitivity of blood pressure through two phases. Local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation initiates renal damage, arteriolopathy, and endothelium dysfunction, which is followed by the dysregulation of sodium homeostasis, thereby leading to increased salt sensitivity. In this review we summarize the available evidence to contribute to a better understanding of the casual relationship between uric acid and early or intermediate stages of hypertension. We hope our review can contribute to the prevention of hypertension or provide new insights into a treatment that would slow the progression of hypertension.

  18. Uric acid, an important screening tool to detect inborn errors of metabolism: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinge, Eresha; Kularatnam, Grace Angeline Malarnangai; Dilanthi, Hewa Warawitage; Vidanapathirana, Dinesha Maduri; Jayasena, Kandana Liyanage Subhashinie Priyadarshika Kapilani Menike; Chandrasiri, Nambage Dona Priyani Dhammika; Indika, Neluwa Liyanage Ruwan; Ratnayake, Pyara Dilani; Gunasekara, Vindya Nandani; Fairbanks, Lynette Dianne; Stiburkova, Blanka

    2017-09-06

    Uric acid is the metabolic end product of purine metabolism in humans. Altered serum and urine uric acid level (both above and below the reference ranges) is an indispensable marker in detecting rare inborn errors of metabolism. We describe different case scenarios of 4 Sri Lankan patients related to abnormal uric acid levels in blood and urine. CASE 1: A one-and-half-year-old boy was investigated for haematuria and a calculus in the bladder. Xanthine crystals were seen in microscopic examination of urine sediment. Low uric acid concentrations in serum and low urinary fractional excretion of uric acid associated with high urinary excretion of xanthine and hypoxanthine were compatible with xanthine oxidase deficiency. CASE 2: An 8-month-old boy presented with intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, screaming episodes, microcephaly, facial dysmorphism and severe neuro developmental delay. Low uric acid level in serum, low fractional excretion of uric acid and radiological findings were consistent with possible molybdenum cofactor deficiency. Diagnosis was confirmed by elevated levels of xanthine, hypoxanthine and sulfocysteine levels in urine. CASE 3: A 3-year-10-month-old boy presented with global developmental delay, failure to thrive, dystonia and self-destructive behaviour. High uric acid levels in serum, increased fractional excretion of uric acid and absent hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme level confirmed the diagnosis of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. CASE 4: A 9-year-old boy was investigated for lower abdominal pain, gross haematuria and right renal calculus. Low uric acid level in serum and increased fractional excretion of uric acid pointed towards hereditary renal hypouricaemia which was confirmed by genetic studies. Abnormal uric acid level in blood and urine is a valuable tool in screening for clinical conditions related to derangement of the nucleic acid metabolic pathway.

  19. High serum uric acid concentration predicts poor survival in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Cai-Feng; Feng, Pin-Ning; Yao, Zhen-Rong; Yu, Xue-Gao; Lin, Wen-Bin; Qian, Yuan-Min; Guo, Yun-Miao; Li, Lai-Sheng; Liu, Min

    2017-10-01

    Uric acid is a product of purine metabolism. Recently, uric acid has gained much attraction in cancer. In this study, we aim to investigate the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of serum uric acid concentration in breast cancer patients. A total of 443 female patients with histopathologically diagnosed breast cancer were included. After a mean follow-up time of 56months, survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. To further evaluate the prognostic significance of uric acid concentrations, univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were applied. Of the clinicopathological parameters, uric acid concentration was associated with age, body mass index, ER status and PR status. Univariate analysis identified that patients with increased uric acid concentration had a significantly inferior overall survival (HR 2.13, 95% CI 1.15-3.94, p=0.016). In multivariate analysis, we found that high uric acid concentration is an independent prognostic factor predicting death, but insufficient to predict local relapse or distant metastasis. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that high uric acid concentration is related to the poor overall survival (p=0.013). High uric acid concentration predicts poor survival in patients with breast cancer, and might serve as a potential marker for appropriate management of breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Impulsivity is Associated with Uric Acid: Evidence from Humans and Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutin, Angelina R.; Cutler, Roy G.; Camandola, Simonetta; Uda, Manuela; Feldman, Neil H.; Cucca, Francesco; Zonderman, Alan B.; Mattson, Mark P.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schlessinger, David; Terracciano, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to control impulses varies greatly, and difficulty with impulse control can have severe consequences; in the extreme, it is the defining feature of many psychiatric disorders. Evidence from disparate lines of research suggests that uric acid is elevated in psychiatric disorders characterized by high impulsivity, such as ADHD and bipolar disorder. The present research tests the hypothesis that impulsivity is associated with higher uric acid in humans and mice. Methods Using two longitudinal, non-clinical community samples (total N=6883), we test whether there is an association between uric acid and normal variation in trait impulsivity measured with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. We also examined the effect of uric acid on behavior by comparing wild-type mice (WT), which naturally have low levels of uric acid, to mice genetically modified (UOX) to accumulate high levels of uric acid. Results In both human samples, the emotional aspects of trait impulsivity, specifically Impulsiveness and Excitement-Seeking, were associated with higher levels of uric acid concurrently and when uric acid was measured 3–5 years later. Consistent with the human data, the UOX mice displayed significantly more exploratory and novelty-seeking behavior than the WT mice. Conclusion Higher uric acid was associated with impulsivity in both humans and mice. The identification of biological markers of impulsivity may lead to a better understanding of the physiological mechanisms involved in impulsivity, and may suggest potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23582268

  1. Relationship between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome: an analysis by structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenli; Song, Kun; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Qing; Li, Wen; Jiao, Huanli; Wang, Guolin; Huang, Guowei

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the nature of the relationships between uric acid and metabolic syndrome (MetS) components. Body mass index, waist circumference, serum uric acid, fasting glucose, lipid profiles, and blood pressure were measured in 13,811 subjects aged between 18 and 85 years of age. Two structural equation models (SEMs) were used to test a hypothesis regarding the linking roles of uric acid in the occurrence of MetS components in male and female separately. The findings of the SEM demonstrated that increased uric acid level was associated with fasting glucose (beta = 0.221, P uric acid level was associated with decreased fasting glucose (beta = -0.071, P uric acid and lipid profiles than those between uric acid and other MetS components. By using SEM, we were able to confirm the intimate relationships between uric acid and MetS components, particularly in women. The associations between uric acid and MetS components were gender specific, and the nature of such association requires further exploration. Copyright © 2012 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Serum uric acid may not be involved in the development of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q; Lau, S; Tong, M; Wei, J; Shen, F; Zhao, J; Zhao, M

    2016-02-01

    Higher serum levels of uric acid are associated with preeclampsia and may signal an early change in preeclampsia. However there is less evidence suggesting there is a meaningful association between uric acid and the development of preeclampsia. A total of 877 women with preeclampsia at presentation and 580 normotensive pregnancies were retrospectively recruited from January 2009 to May 2014. In addition, 5556 pregnant women were also prospectively recruited from September 2012 to December 2013. Retrospective serum levels of uric acid were obtained from women with preeclampsia at the time of presentation (n=877), and serum levels of uric acid in the first, second and third trimester were prospectively collected in women who later developed preeclampsia (n=78), as well as those who did not (n=5478). The serum levels of uric acid were significantly increased in women with preeclampsia at presentation from retrospective samples and this increase correlated with the time of onset and the severity of preeclampsia. However, in prospective samples, serum levels of uric acid were not increased in the first and second trimesters in women who later developed preeclampsia compared with those who did not. The serum level of uric acid in the first and second trimesters in women who developed preeclampsia was not different. Our results demonstrate that the serum levels of uric acid were only increased after the presentation of clinical symptoms of preeclampsia. Therefore, it is likely that uric acid is not involved in the development of preeclampsia and cannot be an early prediction biomarker of this disease.

  3. High plasma uric acid concentration: causes and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Oliveira Erick

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High plasma uric acid (UA is a precipitating factor for gout and renal calculi as well as a strong risk factor for Metabolic Syndrome and cardiovascular disease. The main causes for higher plasma UA are either lower excretion, higher synthesis or both. Higher waist circumference and the BMI are associated with higher insulin resistance and leptin production, and both reduce uric acid excretion. The synthesis of fatty acids (tryglicerides in the liver is associated with the de novo synthesis of purine, accelerating UA production. The role played by diet on hyperuricemia has not yet been fully clarified, but high intake of fructose-rich industrialized food and high alcohol intake (particularly beer seem to influence uricemia. It is not known whether UA would be a causal factor or an antioxidant protective response. Most authors do not consider the UA as a risk factor, but presenting antioxidant function. UA contributes to > 50% of the antioxidant capacity of the blood. There is still no consensus if UA is a protective or a risk factor, however, it seems that acute elevation is a protective factor, whereas chronic elevation a risk for disease.

  4. Increase of uric acid synthesis in irradiated chicken's embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyda, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    Several important intermediate and end products of uric acid metabolism as well as their corresponding enzymatic reactions were studied in 16 day-old chicken embryos which had been one or more times irradiated or respectively treated with ammonium chloride. After sublethal X-irradiation and at the time of the second irradiation with 800 R, the activity of the glutamine synthetase and the xanthin dehydrogenase in the kidneys of the embryos was increased. In contrast to this the glutamate dehydrogenase activity was moderately decreased. Two hours after the main irradiation the uric acid values as well as the amount of fixed nitrogen in the blood serum of previously-irradiated embryos are noticeably higher than the comparative data in non-previously irradiated animals. The glutamic acid values increase after the second irradiation, but still remain lower than with the non-previously irradiated animals. I achieved concuring ressults when I treated the embryos with ammonium chloride instead of radiation. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Effect of urine pH changed by dietary intervention on uric acid clearance mechanism of pH-dependent excretion of urinary uric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The finding reported in a previous paper - alkalization of urine facilitates uric acid excretion - is contradictory to what one might expect to occur: because food materials for the alkalization of urine contain fewer purine bodies than those for acidification, less uric acid in alkaline urine should have been excreted than in acid urine. To make clear what component of uric acid excretion mechanisms is responsible for this unexpected finding, we simultaneously collected data for the concentration of both creatinine and uric acid in serum as well as in urine, in order to calculate both uric acid and creatinine clearances. Methods Within the framework of the Japanese government’s health promotion program, we made recipes which consisted of protein-rich and less vegetable-fruit food materials for H + -load (acidic diet) and others composed of less protein and more vegetable-fruit rich food materials (alkaline diet). This is a crossover study within some limitations. Healthy female students, who had no medical problems at the regular physical examination provided by the university, were enrolled in this consecutive 5-day study for each test. From whole-day collected urine, total volume, pH, organic acid, creatinine, uric acid, titratable acid and all cations (Na+,K+,Ca2+,Mg2+,NH4+) and anions (Cl−,SO42−,PO4−) necessary for the estimation of acid–base balance were measured. In the early morning before breakfast of the 1st, 3rd and 5th experimental day, we sampled 5 mL of blood to estimate the creatinine and uric acid concentration in serum. Results and discussion Urine pH reached a steady state 3 days after switching from ordinary daily diets to specified regimens. The amount of acid generated ([SO42−] + organic acid − gut alkali)was linearly related with the excretion of acid (titratable acid + [NH4+] − [HCO3−]), indicating that H + in urine is generated by the metabolic degradation of food materials. Uric acid

  6. Effect of urine pH changed by dietary intervention on uric acid clearance mechanism of pH-dependent excretion of urinary uric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanbara Aya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The finding reported in a previous paper - alkalization of urine facilitates uric acid excretion - is contradictory to what one might expect to occur: because food materials for the alkalization of urine contain fewer purine bodies than those for acidification, less uric acid in alkaline urine should have been excreted than in acid urine. To make clear what component of uric acid excretion mechanisms is responsible for this unexpected finding, we simultaneously collected data for the concentration of both creatinine and uric acid in serum as well as in urine, in order to calculate both uric acid and creatinine clearances. Methods Within the framework of the Japanese government’s health promotion program, we made recipes which consisted of protein-rich and less vegetable-fruit food materials for H + -load (acidic diet and others composed of less protein and more vegetable-fruit rich food materials (alkaline diet. This is a crossover study within some limitations. Healthy female students, who had no medical problems at the regular physical examination provided by the university, were enrolled in this consecutive 5-day study for each test. From whole-day collected urine, total volume, pH, organic acid, creatinine, uric acid, titratable acid and all cations (Na+,K+,Ca2+,Mg2+,NH4+ and anions (Cl−,SO42−,PO4− necessary for the estimation of acid–base balance were measured. In the early morning before breakfast of the 1st, 3rd and 5th experimental day, we sampled 5 mL of blood to estimate the creatinine and uric acid concentration in serum. Results and discussion Urine pH reached a steady state 3 days after switching from ordinary daily diets to specified regimens. The amount of acid generated ([SO42−] + organic acid − gut alkaliwas linearly related with the excretion of acid (titratable acid + [NH4+] − [HCO3−], indicating that H + in urine is generated by the metabolic degradation of

  7. The effect of uric acid on homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papezikova, Ivana; Pekarova, Michaela; Lojek, Antonin; Kubala, Lukas

    2009-01-01

    Elevated plasma uric acid indicates an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction. However, the role of uric acid in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction is still a matter of debate. It is not clear whether uric acid is a real causative risk factor, an inert marker, or even a protective molecule with respect to its antioxidant properties. We have studied the effect of uric acid on intact endothelial cells as well as cells with homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were treated with uric acid (100 - 600 muM) and homocysteine (100 muM) or with uric acid only. After 24 hours, the cells were stimulated with 1 mug/ml of calcium ionophore A23187, and nitric oxide (NO) production was measured electrochemically with the use of a NO-sensitive microelectrode. The expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1179 was estimated with the use of Western blotting. Interaction between NO and uric acid was measured with a NO electrode. Superoxide generation was measured with the use of the fluorescence dye MitoSox Red. Homocysteine strongly diminished A23187-induced NO release. 100 muM uric acid slightly restored NO production; higher concentrations were ineffective. Interestingly, a dose-dependent decrease of NO release was observed in the cells treated only with uric acid. Uric acid did not scavenge NO and did not change eNOS protein expression or phosphorylation at Ser1179, but dose-dependently increased superoxide production in A23187-stimulated cells. In conclusion, uric acid decreased NO bioavailability and enhanced superoxide generation in A23187-stimulated bovine aortic endothelial cells.

  8. Uric acid as one of the important factors in multifactorial disorders – facts and controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasalic, Daria; Marinkovic, Natalija; Feher-Turkovic, Lana

    2012-01-01

    With considering serum concentration of the uric acid in humans we are observing hyperuricemia and possible gout development. Many epidemiological studies have shown the relationship between the uric acid and different disorders such are obesity, metabolic syndrome, hypertension and coronary artery disease. Clinicians and investigators recognized serum uric acid concentration as very important diagnostic and prognostic factor of many multifactorial disorders. This review presented few clinical conditions which are not directly related to uric acid, but the concentrations of uric acid might have a great impact in observing, monitoring, prognosis and therapy of such disorders. Uric acid is recognized as a marker of oxidative stress. Production of the uric acid includes enzyme xanthine oxidase which is involved in producing of radical-oxigen species (ROS). As by-products ROS have a significant role in the increased vascular oxidative stress and might be involved in atherogenesis. Uric acid may inhibit endothelial function by inhibition of nitric oxide-function under conditions of oxidative stress. Down regulation of nitric oxide and induction of endothelial dysfunction might also be involved in pathogenesis of hypertension. The most important and well evidenced is possible predictive role of uric acid in predicting short-term outcome (mortality) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients and stroke. Nephrolithiasis of uric acid origin is significantly more common among patients with the metabolic syndrome and obesity. On contrary to this, uric acid also acts is an “antioxidant”, a free radical scavenger and a chelator of transitional metal ions which are converted to poorly reactive forms. PMID:22384520

  9. Extra-Renal Elimination of Uric Acid via Intestinal Efflux Transporter BCRP/ABCG2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomi, Atsushi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Fujita, Takuya; Tamai, Ikumi

    2012-01-01

    Urinary excretion accounts for two-thirds of total elimination of uric acid and the remainder is excreted in feces. However, the mechanism of extra-renal elimination is poorly understood. In the present study, we aimed to clarify the mechanism and the extent of elimination of uric acid through liver and intestine using oxonate-treated rats and Caco-2 cells as a model of human intestinal epithelium. In oxonate-treated rats, significant amounts of externally administered and endogenous uric acid were recovered in the intestinal lumen, while biliary excretion was minimal. Accordingly, direct intestinal secretion was thought to be a substantial contributor to extra-renal elimination of uric acid. Since human efflux transporter BCRP/ABCG2 accepts uric acid as a substrate and genetic polymorphism causing a decrease of BCRP activity is known to be associated with hyperuricemia and gout, the contribution of rBcrp to intestinal secretion was examined. rBcrp was confirmed to transport uric acid in a membrane vesicle study, and intestinal regional differences of expression of rBcrp mRNA were well correlated with uric acid secretory activity into the intestinal lumen. Bcrp1 knockout mice exhibited significantly decreased intestinal secretion and an increased plasma concentration of uric acid. Furthermore, a Bcrp inhibitor, elacridar, caused a decrease of intestinal secretion of uric acid. In Caco-2 cells, uric acid showed a polarized flux from the basolateral to apical side, and this flux was almost abolished in the presence of elacridar. These results demonstrate that BCRP contributes at least in part to the intestinal excretion of uric acid as extra-renal elimination pathway in humans and rats. PMID:22348008

  10. Association Between Serum Levels of Uric Acid and Blood Pressure Tracking in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bohyun; Lee, Hye Ah; Lee, Sung Hee; Park, Bo Mi; Park, Eun Ae; Kim, Hae Soon; Cho, Su Jin; Park, Hyesook

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that high levels of serum uric acid of very early life are a result of the in-utero environment and may lead to elevated blood pressure (BP) in adulthood. However, serum uric acid levels can change throughout life. We investigated the effect of serum uric acid levels in childhood on the BP tracking and analysed BP according to changes in serum uric acid levels in early life. A total of 449 children from the Ewha Birth and Growth Cohort study underwent at least 2 follow-up examinations. Data were collected across 3 check-up cycles. Serum uric acid levels, BP, and anthropometric characteristics were assessed at 3, 5, and 7 years of age. Children with a serum uric acid level higher than the median values had significantly increased systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP at 3 years of age. Baseline serum uric acid levels measured at 3 years of age, significantly affected subsequent BP in the sex and body mass index adjusted longitudinal data analysis (P uric acid over time, subjects with high uric acid levels at both 3 and 5 years of age had the highest SBP at 7 years of age. These findings suggest the importance of maintaining an adequate level of serum uric acids from the early life. Appropriate monitoring and intervention of uric acid levels in a high-risk group can reduce the risk of a future increased BP. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Metabolic syndrome, alcohol consumption and genetic factors are associated with serum uric acid concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibůrková, Blanka; Pavlíková, Markéta; Sokolová, Jitka; Kožich, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans, and increased serum uric acid concentrations lead to gout. The objective of the current study was to identify factors that are independently associated with serum uric acid concentrations in a cohort of Czech control individuals. The cohort consisted of 589 healthy subjects aged 18-65 years. We studied the associations between the serum uric acid concentration and the following: (i) demographic, anthropometric and other variables previously reported to be associated with serum uric acid concentrations; (ii) the presence of metabolic syndrome and the levels of metabolic syndrome components; and (iii) selected genetic variants of the MTHFR (c.665C>T, c.1286A>C), SLC2A9 (c.844G>A, c.881G>A) and ABCG2 genes (c.421C>A). A backward model selection procedure was used to build two multiple linear regression models; in the second model, the number of metabolic syndrome criteria that were met replaced the metabolic syndrome-related variables. The models had coefficients of determination of 0.59 and 0.53. The serum uric acid concentration strongly correlated with conventional determinants including male sex, and with metabolic syndrome-related variables. In the simplified second model, the serum uric acid concentration positively correlated with the number of metabolic syndrome criteria that were met, and this model retained the explanatory power of the first model. Moderate wine drinking did not increase serum uric acid concentrations, and the urate transporter ABCG2, unlike MTHFR, was a genetic determinant of serum uric acid concentrations. Metabolic syndrome, moderate wine drinking and the c.421C>A variant in the ABCG gene are independently associated with the serum uric acid concentration. Our model indicates that uric acid should be clinically monitored in persons with metabolic syndrome.

  12. Metabolic syndrome, alcohol consumption and genetic factors are associated with serum uric acid concentration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanka Stibůrková

    Full Text Available Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans, and increased serum uric acid concentrations lead to gout. The objective of the current study was to identify factors that are independently associated with serum uric acid concentrations in a cohort of Czech control individuals.The cohort consisted of 589 healthy subjects aged 18-65 years. We studied the associations between the serum uric acid concentration and the following: (i demographic, anthropometric and other variables previously reported to be associated with serum uric acid concentrations; (ii the presence of metabolic syndrome and the levels of metabolic syndrome components; and (iii selected genetic variants of the MTHFR (c.665C>T, c.1286A>C, SLC2A9 (c.844G>A, c.881G>A and ABCG2 genes (c.421C>A. A backward model selection procedure was used to build two multiple linear regression models; in the second model, the number of metabolic syndrome criteria that were met replaced the metabolic syndrome-related variables.The models had coefficients of determination of 0.59 and 0.53. The serum uric acid concentration strongly correlated with conventional determinants including male sex, and with metabolic syndrome-related variables. In the simplified second model, the serum uric acid concentration positively correlated with the number of metabolic syndrome criteria that were met, and this model retained the explanatory power of the first model. Moderate wine drinking did not increase serum uric acid concentrations, and the urate transporter ABCG2, unlike MTHFR, was a genetic determinant of serum uric acid concentrations.Metabolic syndrome, moderate wine drinking and the c.421C>A variant in the ABCG gene are independently associated with the serum uric acid concentration. Our model indicates that uric acid should be clinically monitored in persons with metabolic syndrome.

  13. Regulation of xanthine dehydrogensase gene expression and uric acid production in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Ryan D; Hsu, Alan C-Y; Nichol, Kristy S; Jones, Bernadette; Knight, Darryl A; Wark, Peter A B; Hansbro, Philip M; Hirota, Jeremy A

    2017-01-01

    The airway epithelium is a physical and immunological barrier that protects the pulmonary system from inhaled environmental insults. Uric acid has been detected in the respiratory tract and can function as an antioxidant or damage associated molecular pattern. We have demonstrated that human airway epithelial cells are a source of uric acid. Our hypothesis is that uric acid production by airway epithelial cells is induced by environmental stimuli associated with chronic respiratory diseases. We therefore examined how airway epithelial cells regulate uric acid production. Allergen and cigarette smoke mouse models were performed using house dust mite (HDM) and cigarette smoke exposure, respectively, with outcome measurements of lung uric acid levels. Primary human airway epithelial cells isolated from clinically diagnosed patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were grown in submerged cultures and compared to age-matched healthy controls for uric acid release. HBEC-6KT cells, a human airway epithelial cell line, were grown under submerged monolayer conditions for mechanistic and gene expression studies. HDM, but not cigarette smoke exposure, stimulated uric acid production in vivo and in vitro. Primary human airway epithelial cells from asthma, but not COPD patients, displayed elevated levels of extracellular uric acid in culture. In HBEC-6KT, production of uric acid was sensitive to the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) inhibitor, allopurinol, and the ATP Binding Cassette C4 (ABCC4) inhibitor, MK-571. Lastly, the pro-inflammatory cytokine combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ elevated extracellular uric acid levels and XDH gene expression in HBEC-6KT cells. Our results suggest that the active production of uric acid from human airway epithelial cells may be intrinsically altered in asthma and be further induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  14. Regulation of xanthine dehydrogensase gene expression and uric acid production in human airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan D Huff

    Full Text Available The airway epithelium is a physical and immunological barrier that protects the pulmonary system from inhaled environmental insults. Uric acid has been detected in the respiratory tract and can function as an antioxidant or damage associated molecular pattern. We have demonstrated that human airway epithelial cells are a source of uric acid. Our hypothesis is that uric acid production by airway epithelial cells is induced by environmental stimuli associated with chronic respiratory diseases. We therefore examined how airway epithelial cells regulate uric acid production.Allergen and cigarette smoke mouse models were performed using house dust mite (HDM and cigarette smoke exposure, respectively, with outcome measurements of lung uric acid levels. Primary human airway epithelial cells isolated from clinically diagnosed patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD were grown in submerged cultures and compared to age-matched healthy controls for uric acid release. HBEC-6KT cells, a human airway epithelial cell line, were grown under submerged monolayer conditions for mechanistic and gene expression studies.HDM, but not cigarette smoke exposure, stimulated uric acid production in vivo and in vitro. Primary human airway epithelial cells from asthma, but not COPD patients, displayed elevated levels of extracellular uric acid in culture. In HBEC-6KT, production of uric acid was sensitive to the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH inhibitor, allopurinol, and the ATP Binding Cassette C4 (ABCC4 inhibitor, MK-571. Lastly, the pro-inflammatory cytokine combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ elevated extracellular uric acid levels and XDH gene expression in HBEC-6KT cells.Our results suggest that the active production of uric acid from human airway epithelial cells may be intrinsically altered in asthma and be further induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  15. Regulation of xanthine dehydrogensase gene expression and uric acid production in human airway epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Ryan D.; Hsu, Alan C-Y.; Nichol, Kristy S.; Jones, Bernadette; Knight, Darryl A.; Wark, Peter A. B.; Hansbro, Philip M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The airway epithelium is a physical and immunological barrier that protects the pulmonary system from inhaled environmental insults. Uric acid has been detected in the respiratory tract and can function as an antioxidant or damage associated molecular pattern. We have demonstrated that human airway epithelial cells are a source of uric acid. Our hypothesis is that uric acid production by airway epithelial cells is induced by environmental stimuli associated with chronic respiratory diseases. We therefore examined how airway epithelial cells regulate uric acid production. Materials and methods Allergen and cigarette smoke mouse models were performed using house dust mite (HDM) and cigarette smoke exposure, respectively, with outcome measurements of lung uric acid levels. Primary human airway epithelial cells isolated from clinically diagnosed patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were grown in submerged cultures and compared to age-matched healthy controls for uric acid release. HBEC-6KT cells, a human airway epithelial cell line, were grown under submerged monolayer conditions for mechanistic and gene expression studies. Results HDM, but not cigarette smoke exposure, stimulated uric acid production in vivo and in vitro. Primary human airway epithelial cells from asthma, but not COPD patients, displayed elevated levels of extracellular uric acid in culture. In HBEC-6KT, production of uric acid was sensitive to the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) inhibitor, allopurinol, and the ATP Binding Cassette C4 (ABCC4) inhibitor, MK-571. Lastly, the pro-inflammatory cytokine combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ elevated extracellular uric acid levels and XDH gene expression in HBEC-6KT cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that the active production of uric acid from human airway epithelial cells may be intrinsically altered in asthma and be further induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:28863172

  16. Intestinal tract is an important organ for lowering serum uric acid in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yu; Yin, Hua; Gao, Zhiyi; Li, Yue; Gao, Tao; Duan, Jinlian; Yang, Rong; Dong, Xianxiang; Zhang, Lumei; Duan, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    The kidney was recognized as a dominant organ for uric acid excretion. The main aim of the study demonstrated intestinal tract was an even more important organ for serum uric acid (SUA) lowering. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated normally or with antibiotics, uric acid, adenine, or inosine of the same molar dose orally or intraperitoneally for 5 days. Rat's intestinal tract was equally divided into 20 segments except the cecum. Uric acid in serum and intestinal segment juice was assayed. Total RNA in the initial intestinal tract and at the end ileum was extracted and sequenced. Protein expression of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and urate oxidase (UOX) was tested by Western blot analysis. The effect of oral UOX in lowering SUA was investigated in model rats treated with adenine and an inhibitor of uric oxidase for 5 days. SUA in the normal rats was 20.93±6.98 μg/ml, and total uric acid in the intestinal juice was 308.27±16.37 μg, which is two times more than the total SUA. The uric acid was very low in stomach juice, and attained maximum in the juice of the first segment (duodenum) and then declined all the way till the intestinal end. The level of uric acid in the initial intestinal tissue was very high, where XDH and most of the proteins associated with bicarbonate secretion were up-regulated. In addition, SUA was decreased by oral UOX in model rats. The results suggested that intestinal juice was an important pool for uric acid, and intestinal tract was an important organ for SUA lowering. The uric acid distribution was associated with uric acid synthesis and secretion in the upper intestinal tract, and reclamation in the lower.

  17. DASH diet and change in serum uric acid over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Olive; Miller, Edgar R; Gelber, Allan C; Choi, Hyon K; Appel, Lawrence J; Juraschek, Stephen P

    2017-06-01

    The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet lowers serum uric acid (SUA) levels compared to the typical American (control) diet. However, the time required for the DASH diet to take effect is unknown. We analyzed data from a parallel arm, randomized-controlled trial in pre-hypertensive or hypertensive adults (N = 103), comparing the effects of DASH or a control diet on SUA measured at 30, 60, and 90 days. Effects were examined overall and within stratified subgroups based on baseline SUA status (SUA ≥6 mg/dL vs DASH lowered SUA by 0.5 mg/dL at 30 and 90 days. Among participants with baseline SUA ≥6 mg/dL, DASH lowered SUA by 0.8 and 1.0 mg/dL at 30 and 90 days, respectively. These findings demonstrate that the DASH diet reduces SUA within 30 days, with a sustained effect at 90 days, which is informative for healthcare providers counseling patients on time course expectations for uric acid reduction in response to dietary modification.

  18. Serum uric acid, protein intake and mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Christina; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Streja, Elani; Rhee, Connie M; Catabay, Christina J; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2017-10-01

    The association between serum uric acid (SUA) and mortality has been conflicting among studies using hemodialysis (HD) patients. Given the close link between purine and protein in foods, we hypothesized that normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), a dietary protein intake surrogate, modifies the SUA-mortality association in the HD population. We identified 4298 patients who initiated HD and had one or more SUA measurement in a contemporary cohort of HD patients over 5 years (1 January 2007-31 December 2011), and examined survival probability according to the first uric acid measurement, adjusting for dialysis vintage, case-mix and malnutrition-inflammation complex-related variables. Mean SUA concentration was 6.6 ± 1.8 mg/dL. There was a consistent association of higher SUA with better nutritional status and lower all-cause mortality irrespective of adjusted models (Ptrend 6.0-7.0 mg/dL) showed no significant mortality risk [hazard ratio (HR) 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72-1.13], while the lowest category (patients with low nPCR (nutritional marker in HD patients. Contrary to the general population, low but not high SUA is associated with higher all-cause mortality in HD patients, especially in those with low protein intake. Nutritional features of SUA warrant additional studies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  19. Wearable salivary uric acid mouthguard biosensor with integrated wireless electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jayoung; Imani, Somayeh; de Araujo, William R; Warchall, Julian; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Paixão, Thiago R L C; Mercier, Patrick P; Wang, Joseph

    2015-12-15

    This article demonstrates an instrumented mouthguard capable of non-invasively monitoring salivary uric acid (SUA) levels. The enzyme (uricase)-modified screen printed electrode system has been integrated onto a mouthguard platform along with anatomically-miniaturized instrumentation electronics featuring a potentiostat, microcontroller, and a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) transceiver. Unlike RFID-based biosensing systems, which require large proximal power sources, the developed platform enables real-time wireless transmission of the sensed information to standard smartphones, laptops, and other consumer electronics for on-demand processing, diagnostics, or storage. The mouthguard biosensor system offers high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability towards uric acid detection in human saliva, covering the concentration ranges for both healthy people and hyperuricemia patients. The new wireless mouthguard biosensor system is able to monitor SUA level in real-time and continuous fashion, and can be readily expanded to an array of sensors for different analytes to enable an attractive wearable monitoring system for diverse health and fitness applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Extended Gate Field-Effect Transistor Biosensors for Point-Of-Care Testing of Uric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Weihua; Reed, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    An enzyme-free redox potential sensor using off-chip extended-gate field effect transistor (EGFET) with a ferrocenyl-alkanethiol modified gold electrode has been used to quantify uric acid concentration in human serum and urine. Hexacyanoferrate (II) and (III) ions are used as redox reagent. The potentiometric sensor measures the interface potential on the ferrocene immobilized gold electrode, which is modulated by the redox reaction between uric acid and hexacyanoferrate ions. The device shows a near Nernstian response to uric acid and is highly specific to uric acid in human serum and urine. The interference that comes from glucose, bilirubin, ascorbic acid, and hemoglobin is negligible in the normal concentration range of these interferents. The sensor also exhibits excellent long term reliability and is regenerative. This extended gate field effect transistor based sensor is promising for point-of-care detection of uric acid due to the small size, low cost, and low sample volume consumption.

  1. The diurnal variation in urine acidification differs between normal individuals and uric acid stone formers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Mary Ann; Maalouf, Naim M.; Poindexter, John; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Sakhaee, Khashayar; Moe, Orson W.

    2012-01-01

    Many biologic functions follow circadian rhythms driven by internal and external cues that synchronize and coordinate organ physiology to diurnal changes in the environment and behavior. Urinary acid-base parameters follow diurnal patterns and it is thought these changes are due to periodic surges in gastric acid secretion. Abnormal urine pH is a risk factor for specific types of nephrolithiasis and uric acid stones are typical of excessively low urine pH. Here we placed 9 healthy volunteers and 10 uric acid stone formers on fixed metabolic diets to study the diurnal pattern of urinary acidification. All showed clear diurnal trends in urinary acidification but none of the patterns were affected by inhibitors of the gastric proton pump. Uric acid stone formers had similar patterns of change through the day but their urine pH was always lower compared to healthy volunteers. Uric acid stone formers excreted more acid (normalized to acid ingestion) with the excess excreted primarily as titratable acid rather than ammonium. Urine base excretion was also lower in uric acid stone formers (normalized to base ingestion) along with lower plasma bicarbonate concentrations during part of the day. Thus, increased net acid presentation to the kidney and the preferential use of buffers, other than ammonium, result in much higher concentrations of un-dissociated uric acid throughout the day and consequently an increased risk of uric acid stones. PMID:22297671

  2. Serum uric acid levels and leukocyte nitric oxide production in multiple sclerosis patients outside relapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, JP; Ramsaransing, GSM; Heerserna, DJ; Heerings, M; Wilczak, N; De Keyser, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: A number of studies found that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have low serum levels of uric acid. It is unclear whether this represents a primary deficit or secondary effect. Uric acid is a scavenger of peroxynitrite, which is the product of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide.

  3. Uric acid demonstrates neuroprotective effect on Parkinson's disease mice through Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting-Ting; Hao, Dong-Lin; Wu, Bo-Na; Mao, Lun-Lin; Zhang, Jin

    2017-12-02

    Uric acid has neuroprotective effect on Parkinson's disease (PD) by inhibiting oxidative damage and neuronal cell death. Our previous study has shown that uric acid protected dopaminergic cell line damage through inhibiting accumulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). This study aimed to investigate its in vivo neuroprotective effect. PD was induced by MPTP intraperitoneally injection for 7 d in male C57BL/6 mice. Mice were treated with either uric acid (intraperitoneally injection 250 mg/kg) or saline for a total of 13 d. We showed that uric acid improved behavioral performances and cognition of PD mice, increased TH-positive dopaminergic neurons and decreased GFAP-positive astrocytes in substantia nigra (SN). Uric acid increased mRNA and protein expressions of Nrf2 and three Nrf2-responsive genes, including γ-glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (γ-GCLC), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NQO1. Uric acid significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD), CAT, glutathione (GSH) levels and decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level in SN regions of MPTP-treated mice. Uric acid inhibited the hippocampal expression of IL-1β and decreased serum and hippocampus levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). In conclusion, uric acid demonstrates neuroprotective properties for dopaminergic neurons in PD mice through modulation of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Association of plasma uric acid with ischaemic heart disease and blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Tom M; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benn, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    To assess the associations between both uric acid levels and hyperuricaemia, with ischaemic heart disease and blood pressure, and to explore the potentially confounding role of body mass index.......To assess the associations between both uric acid levels and hyperuricaemia, with ischaemic heart disease and blood pressure, and to explore the potentially confounding role of body mass index....

  5. Uric Acid as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality in Overweight/Obese Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skak-Nielsen, Helle; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Finer, Nick

    2013-01-01

    The predictive value of serum uric acid (SUA) for adverse cardiovascular events among obese and overweight patients is not known, but potentially important because of the relation between hyperuricaemia and obesity.......The predictive value of serum uric acid (SUA) for adverse cardiovascular events among obese and overweight patients is not known, but potentially important because of the relation between hyperuricaemia and obesity....

  6. Uric Acid Secretion from Adipose Tissue and Its Increase in Obesity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Yu; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Sekimoto, Ryohei; Nagao, Hirofumi; Shirakura, Takashi; Kato, Kenta; Imaizumi, Keiichiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Mizuho; Maeda, Norikazu; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is often accompanied by hyperuricemia. However, purine metabolism in various tissues, especially regarding uric acid production, has not been fully elucidated. Here we report, using mouse models, that adipose tissue could produce and secrete uric acid through xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) and that the production was enhanced in obesity. Plasma uric acid was elevated in obese mice and attenuated by administration of the XOR inhibitor febuxostat. Adipose tissue was one of major organs that had abundant expression and activities of XOR, and adipose tissues in obese mice had higher XOR activities than those in control mice. 3T3-L1 and mouse primary mature adipocytes produced and secreted uric acid into culture medium. The secretion was inhibited by febuxostat in a dose-dependent manner or by gene knockdown of XOR. Surgical ischemia in adipose tissue increased local uric acid production and secretion via XOR, with a subsequent increase in circulating uric acid levels. Uric acid secretion from whole adipose tissue was increased in obese mice, and uric acid secretion from 3T3-L1 adipocytes was increased under hypoxia. Our results suggest that purine catabolism in adipose tissue could be enhanced in obesity. PMID:23913681

  7. Effect of uric acid on inflammatory COX-2 and ROS pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oğuz, Nurgül; Kırça, Mustafa; Çetin, Arzu; Yeşilkaya, Akın

    2017-10-01

    Hyperuricemia is thought to play a role in cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including hypertension, coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. However, exactly how uric acid contributes to these pathologies is unknown. An underlying mechanism of inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis, includes enhanced production of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and superoxide anion. Here, we aimed to examine the effect of uric acid on inflammatory COX-2 and superoxide anion production and to determine the role of losartan. Primarily cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were time and dose-dependently induced by uric acid and COX-2 and superoxide anion levels were measured. COX-2 levels were determined by ELISA, and superoxide anion was measured by the superoxide dismutase (SOD)-inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome c method. Uric acid elevated COX-2 levels in a time-dependent manner. Angiotensin-II receptor blocker, losartan, diminished uric-acid-induced COX-2 elevation. Uric acid also increased superoxide anion level in VSMCs. Uric acid plays an important role in CVD pathogenesis by inducing inflammatory COX-2 and ROS pathways. This is the first study demonstrating losartan's ability to reduce uric-acid-induced COX-2 elevation.

  8. Serum Uric Acid Levels in Oral Cancer Patients Seen at Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Toxicity by oxygen radicals has been considered as an important cause of cancer. It is proposed that the antioxidant properties of uric acid may act to prevent formation of oxygen radicals and thereby protect against carcinogenesis. This study aims to assess the role of uric acid in the aetiology of oral cancer.

  9. A Mendelian Randomization Study of Circulating Uric Acid and Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, Ivonne; Holmes, Michael V.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Beulens, Joline W J; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Huerta, José María; Palmer, Tom M.; Arriola, Larraitz; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Fagherazzi, Guy; Franks, Paul W.; Gavrila, Diana; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay T ee; Kühn, Tilman; Molina-Montes, Esther; Mortensen, Lotte M axild; Nilsson, Peter M.; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quirós, J. Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sala, Núria; Schmidt, Julie A.; Scott, Robert A.; Sieri, Sabina; Slimani, Nadia; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; Tjonneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C.; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Langenberg, Claudia; Riboli, Elio; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the causal effect of circulating uric acid concentrations on type 2 diabetes risk. A Mendelian randomization study was performed using a genetic score with 24 uric acid-associated loci. We used data of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

  10. Uric acid in plants and microorganisms: Biological applications and genetics - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Rehab M; Abdel-Rahman, Tahany M; Naguib, Rasha M

    2017-09-01

    Uric acid increased accumulation and/or reduced excretion in human bodies is closely related to pathogenesis of gout and hyperuricemia. It is highly affected by the high intake of food rich in purine. Uric acid is present in both higher plants and microorganisms with species dependent concentration. Urate-degrading enzymes are found both in plants and microorganisms but the mechanisms by which plant degrade uric acid was found to be different among them. Higher plants produce various metabolites which could inhibit xanthine oxidase and xanthine oxidoreductase, so prohibit the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine then to uric acid in the purine metabolism. However, microorganisms produce group of degrading enzymes uricase, allantoinase, allantoicase and urease, which catalyze the degradation of uric acid to the ammonia. In humans, researchers found that several mutations caused a pseudogenization (silencing) of the uricase gene in ancestral apes which exist as an insoluble crystalloid in peroxisomes. This is in contrast to microorganisms in which uricases are soluble and exist either in cytoplasm or peroxisomes. Moreover, many recombinant uricases with higher activity than the wild type uricases could be induced successfully in many microorganisms. The present review deals with the occurrence of uric acid in plants and other organisms specially microorganisms in addition to the mechanisms by which plant extracts, metabolites and enzymes could reduce uric acid in blood. The genetic and genes encoding for uric acid in plants and microorganisms are also presented.

  11. Association of serum uric acid level and blood pressure in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savira, M.; Rusdiana; Syahputra, M.

    2018-03-01

    Uric acid is an end product of purine degradation in humans and primarily excreted through urine. In adulthood, concentrations rise steadily over time and vary with height, body weight, blood pressure, renal function, and alcohol intake. Uric acid is known as anti-oxidant, it has a beneficial role in diseases. Elevated serum uric acid associated with anincreased risk of cardiovascular disease. It has been found that elevated levels of uric acid associated with high risks of acomplication of type 2 diabetes mellitus and It has astrong association between elevated uric acid levels and obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular and renal disorders. The aim of the study analyzed the association between serum uric acid level and blood pressure in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. This research is descriptive analytic research with a cross sectional design included 50 diabetic subjects aged over 40 years old. Subjects picked by consecutive sampling then we examined the weight, height, waist size, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, and serum uric acid level. Statistical analysis using chi-square found that there was no significant association between serum uric acid level and systole and diastole pressure in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (p>0.005).

  12. Uric acid, renal function and risk of hypoglycaemia in Chinese type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanfeng; Ji, Linong; Mu, Yiming; Hong, Tianpei; Ji, Qiuhe; Guo, Lixin; Huang, Qin; Yang, Xilin

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to explore independent associations between serum uric acid and hypoglycaemia, and whether mildly increased serum uric acid exacerbated the association between mild decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and hypoglycaemia. A cross-sectional survey of 6713 inpatients with type 2 diabetes and eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and admitted to 81 tertiary care hospitals in China was conducted. Self-reported asymptotic hypoglycaemia with plasma glucose ≤3.9 mmol/L, hypoglycaemia episodes with symptoms in 1 month or hypoglycaemia that needed assistance from other people in 3 months before hospitalization was used to define hypoglycaemia. Binary logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios of serum uric acid for hypoglycaemia. Three measures, that is, relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI), attributable proportion due to interaction and synergy index (S) were used to estimate the effect of mildly decreased eGFR on the association of serum uric acid with hypoglycaemia. Serum uric acid was associated with hypoglycaemia in an ordinal manner (P for trend uric acid levels ≥ versus uric acid levels ≥ versus uric acid was associated with increased risk of hypoglycaemia and enhanced the association between mildly decreased eGFR and hypoglycaemia in type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Uric acid, carotid intima-media thickness and body composition in prepubertal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassols, J; Martínez-Calcerrada, J M; Prats-Puig, A; Carreras-Badosa, G; Díaz-Roldán, F; Osiniri, I; Riera-Pérez, E; de Zegher, F; Ibáñez, L; López-Bermejo, A

    2016-10-01

    Increased uric acid is an independent biomarker for cardiovascular disease in obese adolescents and adults. We investigated whether uric acid relates to carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in prepubertal children, and whether body mass index (BMI) and preperitoneal fat modulate this association. 359 asymptomatic prepubertal Caucasian children were stratified according to BMI categories (171 with BMI-SDS 50th centile). Uric acid levels, insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance; HOMA-IR), C-reactive protein (CRP), triacylglycerol (TG), systolic blood pressure (SBP), abdominal fat and cIMT (both by ultrasound) were assessed. Uric acid was associated with several cardiovascular risk factors, namely higher HOMA-IR, CRP, TG, BMI, waist, SBP, preperitoneal fat and cIMT (all P uric acid and cIMT (both P uric acid was preferentially related to cIMT in heavier children (β = 0.247, P uric acid is associated with cIMT in asymptomatic prepubertal children. Both higher BMI and preperitoneal fat aggravate the potential risk of atherosclerotic disease imposed by higher concentrations of uric acid. © 2015 World Obesity.

  14. Serum uric acid concentration in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus during diet or glibenclamide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, I.H.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate serum uric acid concentration in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This is a case control study conducted in Al-Wafa Diabetic Center in Mosul over a period of one year starting from January 1, 2005 to January 1, 2006. Serum glucose concentration and uric acid concentration were measured in both control and patient's groups (group 1 patients on diet therapy, group 2 patients on glibenclamide therapy and group 3 involve naturopathic patients). Serum glucose concentration was high in the diabetic groups as compared with the control group (P 0.2) except in group-3 (P<0.05). A negative correlation was reported between hyperglycemia and uric acid concentration of the different groups. Serum uric acid concentration is slightly reduced in type 2 diabetic patients particularly in the complicated patients with peripheral neuropathy and this may be due to the oxidative stress that decreases the antioxidant capacity of the body involving uric acid. (author)

  15. Cichorium intybus L. promotes intestinal uric acid excretion by modulating ABCG2 in experimental hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Lin, Zhijian; Zhang, Bing; Nie, Anzheng; Bian, Meng

    2017-01-01

    Excessive production and/or reduced excretion of uric acid could lead to hyperuricemia, which could be a major cause of disability. Hyperuricemia has received increasing attention in the last few decades due to its global prevalence. Cichorium intybus L., commonly known as chicory, is a perennial herb of the asteraceae family. It was previously shown to exert potent hypouricemic effects linked with decreasing uric acid formation in the liver by down-regulating the activity of xanthine oxidase, and increasing uric acid excretion by up-regulating the renal OAT3 mRNA expression. The present study aimed to evaluate its extra-renal excretion and possible molecular mechanism underlying the transporter responsible for intestinal uric acid excretion in vivo. Chicory was administered intragastrically to hyperuricemic rats induced by drinking 10% fructose water. The uricosuric effect was evaluated by determining the serum uric acid level as well as the intestinal uric acid excretion by HPLC. The location and expression levels of ATP-binding cassette transporter, sub-family G, member 2 (ABCG2) in jejunum and ileum were analyzed. The administration of chicory decreased the serum uric acid level significantly and increased the intestinal uric acid excretion obviously in hyperuricemic rats induced by 10% fructose drinking. Staining showed that ABCG2 was expressed in the apical membrane of the epithelium and glands of the jejunum and ileum in rats. Further examination showed that chicory enhanced the mRNA and protein expressions of ABCG2 markedly in a dose-dependent manner in jejunum and ileum. These findings indicate that chicory increases uric acid excretion by intestines, which may be related to the stimulation of intestinal uric acid excretion via down-regulating the mRNA and protein expressions of ABCG2.

  16. Admission uric acid levels and length of expectant management in preterm preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urato, A C; Bond, B; Craigo, S D; Norwitz, E R; Paulus, J K; Strohsnitter, W C

    2012-10-01

    Uric acid is known to be elevated in preeclampsia. We sought to determine if uric acid levels on admission correlate with the length of expectant management in preterm patients with preeclampsia. A retrospective chart review was conducted on singleton preeclamptic pregnancies delivered between 24 0/7 and 37 0/7 weeks' gestation at Tufts Medical Center between January 2005 and December 2007. Patients with a multiple gestation and those transferred or discharged before delivery were excluded. Data regarding signs and symptoms of preeclampsia, laboratory values, pregnancy complications and outcome were abstracted from the medical records. Correlation between admission uric acid level and days of expectant management was assessed. The relative risk (RR) was used to estimate the effect of uric acid levels on expectant management length >7 days. Mantel-Haenszel χ(2) values were used to construct 95% confidence intervals (CIs) around the RR. Four hundred seventy-one charts were reviewed. Of these, 190 met inclusion criteria. In all, 55 patients (28.9%) were managed expectantly for >1 week. Admission uric acid level correlated with days of expectant management (Pmanagement for >1 week among women with low uric acid level (7.0; 95% CI: 3.34 to 14.68). Women with medium uric acid levels at admission also had a higher likelihood of prolonging pregnancy relative to women with high uric acid levels (RR: 2.81; 95% CI: 1.32 to 5.96) (P-value for trend management in preterm patients with preeclampsia. Pregnancy prolongation for >1 week is significantly more likely in patients with low and medium uric acid levels at the time of admission. Uric acid levels may be helpful in assessing disease severity and counseling preeclamptic patients regarding likelihood of extended expectant management.

  17. Study of Serum Uric Acid Levels in Myocardial Infarction and Its Association With Killip Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrpooya, Maryam; Larti, Farnoosh; Nozari, Younes; Sattarzadeh-Badkoobeh, Roya; Zand Parsa, Amir Farhang; Zebardast, Jayran; Tavoosi, Anahita; Shahbazi, Fatemeh

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to compare the serum level of uric acid in patients with and without heart failure and also to determine the association between uric acid level and clinical status by Killip class in patients with STEMI. This case-control study was conducted on 50 consecutives as control group and 50 patients with acute heart failure, (20 patients had acute STEMI), who documented by both clinical conditions and echocardiography assessment. The mean plasma level of uric acid in the case group was 7.6±1.6 milligrams/deciliter (mg/dL) and in the control group was 4.5±1.5 respectively (Puric acid and Killip classes (Puric acid level between HFrEF (HF with reduced EF) and severe LV systolic dysfunction (0.049). In STEMI patients with culprit LAD, mean uric acid was significantly higher than cases with culprit LCX [(9.7±0.98 versus 8.6±0.52 respectively) P=0.012]. Regarding  treatment plan in patients with STEMI, mean level of uric acid in those considered for CABG was significantly higher than who were considered for PCI, 9.9±0.82 versus 8.9±0.76 respectively, P=0.029. In STEMI patients with higher killip class, higher level of uric acid was seen. Also, the severity of LV systolic dysfunction was associated with higher level of uric acid.

  18. Simultaneous detection of dopamine, ascorbic acid, and uric acid at electrochemically pretreated carbon nanotube biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwarappan, Subbiah; Liu, Guodong; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2010-02-01

    In this work we have evaluated the performance of electrochemically pretreated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) toward the electrochemical detection of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid at physiological pH. Results indicated that the electrochemically pretreated SWCNTs showed a selective and enhanced electroanalytical response with minimal electrode fouling toward the detection of dopamine than their untreated counterparts. The observed behavior is attributed to the negatively charged layer present on the SWCNTs originating from the rupture of the basal plane present on the end caps following electrochemical pretreatment. The rupture of basal plane is evident from surface Raman measurements. The negatively charged surface selectively allows the cationic dopamine toward the electrode and repels the anionic ascorbate and uric acid when they coexist in the same solution under physiological pH. A limit of detection of about 15 nM is obtained with these electrodes for the detection of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid. The performance of electrochemically pretreated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was studied toward the electrochemical detection of dopamine. These SWCNTs showed a selective and enhanced response toward the detection of dopamine. A limit of detection of about 15 nM is obtained with these electrodes for the detection of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecularly imprinted titania nanoparticles for selective recognition and assay of uric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujahid, Adnan; Khan, Aimen Idrees; Afzal, Adeel; Hussain, Tajamal; Raza, Muhammad Hamid; Shah, Asma Tufail; uz Zaman, Waheed

    2015-06-01

    Molecularly imprinted titania nanoparticles are su ccessfully synthesized by sol-gel method for the selective recognition of uric acid. Atomic force microscopy is used to study the morphology of uric acid imprinted titania nanoparticles with diameter in the range of 100-150 nm. Scanning electron microscopy images of thick titania layer indicate the formation of fine network of titania nanoparticles with uniform distribution. Molecular imprinting of uric acid as well as its subsequent washing is confirmed by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy measurements. Uric acid rebinding studies reveal the recognition capability of imprinted particles in the range of 0.01-0.095 mmol, which is applicable in monitoring normal to elevated levels of uric acid in human blood. The optical shift (signal) of imprinted particles is six times higher in comparison with non-imprinted particles for the same concentration of uric acid. Imprinted titania particles have shown substantially reduced binding affinity toward interfering and structurally related substances, e.g. ascorbic acid and guanine. These results suggest the possible application of titania nanoparticles in uric acid recognition and quantification in blood serum.

  20. Uric acid deposits and estivation in the invasive apple-snail, Pomacea canaliculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud-Billoud, Maximiliano; Abud, María A; Cueto, Juan A; Vega, Israel A; Castro-Vazquez, Alfredo

    2011-04-01

    The physiological ability to estivate is relevant for the maintenance of population size in the invasive Pomacea canaliculata. However, tissue reoxygenation during arousal from estivation poses the problem of acute oxidative stress. Uric acid is a potent antioxidant in several systems and it is stored in specialized tissues of P. canaliculata. Changes in tissue concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), uric acid and allantoin were measured during estivation and arousal in P. canaliculata. Both TBARS and uric acid increased two-fold during 45 days estivation, probably as a consequence of concomitant oxyradical production during uric acid synthesis by xanthine oxidase. However, after arousal was induced, uric acid and TBARS dropped to or near baseline levels within 20 min and remained low up to 24h after arousal induction, while the urate oxidation product allantoin continuously rose to a maximum at 24h after induction, indicating the participation of uric acid as an antioxidant during reoxygenation. Neither uric acid nor allantoin was detected in the excreta during this 24h period. Urate oxidase activity was also found in organs of active snails, but activity shut down during estivation and only a partial and sustained recovery was observed in the midgut gland. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biological Activities of Uric Acid in Infection Due to Enteropathogenic and Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Jacqueline E.; Lis, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    In previous work, we identified xanthine oxidase (XO) as an important enzyme in the interaction between the host and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and Shiga-toxigenic E. coli (STEC). Many of the biological effects of XO were due to the hydrogen peroxide produced by the enzyme. We wondered, however, if uric acid generated by XO also had biological effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Uric acid triggered inflammatory responses in the gut, including increased submucosal edema and release of extracellular DNA from host cells. While uric acid alone was unable to trigger a chloride secretory response in intestinal monolayers, it did potentiate the secretory response to cyclic AMP agonists. Uric acid crystals were formed in vivo in the lumen of the gut in response to EPEC and STEC infections. While trying to visualize uric acid crystals formed during EPEC and STEC infections, we noticed that uric acid crystals became enmeshed in the neutrophilic extracellular traps (NETs) produced from host cells in response to bacteria in cultured cell systems and in the intestine in vivo. Uric acid levels in the gut lumen increased in response to exogenous DNA, and these increases were enhanced by the actions of DNase I. Interestingly, addition of DNase I reduced the numbers of EPEC bacteria recovered after a 20-h infection and protected against EPEC-induced histologic damage. PMID:26787720

  2. Association of serum uric acid with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeisi, A; Ostovar, A; Vahdat, K; Rezaei, P; Darabi, H; Moshtaghi, D; Nabipour, I

    2017-02-01

    To explore the independent correlation between serum uric acid and low-grade inflammation (measured by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, hs-CRP) in postmenopausal women. A total of 378 healthy Iranian postmenopausal women were randomly selected in a population-based study. Circulating hs-CRP levels were measured by highly specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and an enzymatic calorimetric method was used to measure serum levels of uric acid. Pearson correlation coefficient, multiple linear regression and logistic regression models were used to analyze the association between uric acid and hs-CRP levels. A statistically significant correlation was seen between serum levels of uric acid and log-transformed circulating hs-CRP (r = 0.25, p uric acid levels (β = 0.20, p uric acid levels (odds ratio =1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.18-1.96). Higher serum uric acid levels were positively and independently associated with circulating hs-CRP in healthy postmenopausal women.

  3. Uric Acid Levels Can Predict Metabolic Syndrome and Hypertension in Adolescents: A 10-Year Longitudinal Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Lun Sun

    Full Text Available The relationships between uric acid and chronic disease risk factors such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension have been studied in adults. However, whether these relationships exist in adolescents is unknown. We randomly selected 8,005 subjects who were between 10 to 15 years old at baseline. Measurements of uric acid were used to predict the future occurrence of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. In total, 5,748 adolescents were enrolled and followed for a median of 7.2 years. Using cutoff points of uric acid for males and females (7.3 and 6.2 mg/dl, respectively, a high level of uric acid was either the second or third best predictor for hypertension in both genders (hazard ratio: 2.920 for males, 5.222 for females; p<0.05. However, uric acid levels failed to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus, and only predicted metabolic syndrome in males (hazard ratio: 1.658; p<0.05. The same results were found in multivariate adjusted analysis. In conclusion, a high level of uric acid indicated a higher likelihood of developing hypertension in both genders and metabolic syndrome in males after 10 years of follow-up. However, uric acid levels did not affect the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in both genders.

  4. Exploring the association between bipolar disorder and uric acid: A mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Francesco; Crocamo, Cristina; Gennaro, Giulia Maria; Castagna, Gloria; Trotta, Giulia; Clerici, Massimo; Carrà, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Recent evidence shows that bipolar disorder might be associated with a purinergic system dysfunction. This study aimed at (i) testing the association between bipolar disorder and uric acid serum levels, and (ii) clarifying whether this relationship is mediated by metabolic syndrome and other relevant metabolic parameters. Patients consecutively admitted to a Mental Health Inpatient Unit, with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder or other severe mental disorders, and an appropriate healthy control sample, were included in this cross-sectional, exploratory study. We performed linear regression analyses, to explore factors associated with uric acid levels, and formal tests of mediation to assess mediating effect of candidate variables. 176 individuals with mental disorders and 89 healthy controls met inclusion criteria. Bipolar disorder was the only diagnostic subgroup significantly associated with increased uric acid levels. Furthermore, male gender, metabolic syndrome, as well as abdominal circumference and triglycerides levels, had a significant effect on uric acid. Relevant mediation analyses showed that the estimated effect between bipolar disorder and uric acid levels was only partially mediated by metabolic abnormalities. This study suggests a direct association between bipolar disorder and uric acid levels, only partially mediated by metabolic abnormalities. It seems consistent with results of previous studies highlighting a purinergic dysfunction in bipolar disorder and the role that purinergic modulators, lowering uric acid levels, could have in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of serum uric acid levels on the arginase pathway in women with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, S; Ozcelik, E; Kebapci, N; Temel, H E; Demirci, F; Ergun, B; Demirustu, C

    2016-02-01

    Elevated serum uric acid levels and increased arginase activity are risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The aim of the present study was to investigate effects of serum uric acid levels on the arginase pathway in women with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Serum arginase activity, and nitrite and uric acid levels were measured in 48 women with MetS and in 20 healthy controls. The correlation of these parameters with components of MetS was also evaluated. Our data show statistically higher arginase activity and uric acid levels but lower nitrite levels in women with MetS compared to controls. Serum uric acid levels were negatively correlated with HDL cholesterol, nitrite levels and positively with Body Mass Index, waist to hip ratio, triglyceride and total cholesterol levels, systolic blood pressure, Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance-Index, serum arginase activity, and LDL-cholesterol levels in women with MetS. Results of the present study suggest that serum uric acid levels may contribute to the pathogenesis of MetS through a process mediated by arginase pathway, and serum arginase activity and nitrite and uric acid levels can be used as indicators of CVD in women with MetS.

  6. Green Tea Extract (Camellia sinensis L. Effects on Uric Acid Levels on Hyperuricemia Rats (Rattus norvegicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putranty Widha Nugraheni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Uric acid is the end product of purine degradation. When uric acid levels exceed normal limits, it will build up and cause hyperuricemia. Allopurinol is one of the most effective and common medicine for hyperuricemia, but it brings serious side effects, therefore it is needed alternative therapy for hyperuricemia. One plant that may be expected to low uric acid levels is green tea (Camellia sinensis L., that contains many antioxidants polyphenols, especially flavonoids. Flavonoid has strong antioxidant properties, act as free radical and metal scavengers, and also xanthine oxidase (XOD inhibitors. This study investigates the potential of green tea using various doses of 150 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg, and 600 mg/kg of body weight in 24 white male rats (Rattus norvegicus Wistar strain that has been received high purine diet in 60 consecutive days. This study used DHBSA methods to measure uric acid levels in blood serum and urine that excreted 8 hours before surgery. Green tea extract that contains polyphenol can inhibit XOD activities, therefore, it leads to decrease uric acid level in blood and increase the excretion through urine by modulating urate gene transporter. A therapy with 600 mg/kg body weight of GTE is the most effective dose to decrease uric acid levels in serum and to increase excretion of exceeding uric acid significantly (p < 0.01, from One Way ANOVA and Tukey analysis.

  7. Uric Acid, Metabolic Syndrome and Atherosclerosis: The Chicken or the Egg, Which Comes First?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pergola, Giovanni; Cortese, Francesca; Termine, Gaetano; Meliota, Giovanni; Carbonara, Rossella; Masiello, Michele; Cortese, Anna M; Silvestris, Francesco; Caccavo, Domenico; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2018-01-01

    A great debate in literature exists nowadays on the role of uric acid as a marker of cardiovascular and metabolic organ damage or a risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic disease. The study aimed to determine the relationship among serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis, by means of carotid intima media-thickness, in a cohort of 811 otherwise healthy overweight/obese subjects, without overt atherosclerosis not using any kind of drug. Uric acid levels were positively related to male gender, waist circumference, BMI, systolic and diastolic pressure levels, fasting insulin, fasting glucose, HOMA-IR, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, the presence of metabolic syndrome and the number of the components of metabolic syndrome and negatively related to HDL cholesterol levels. No correlation was found between uric acid and carotid intima media thickness. At the multiple regression analysis, only waist circumference and triglycerides (positively) and HDL-cholesterol (negatively) maintained an independent association with uric acid as dependent variable, while age, female gender and uric acid showed a significant independent association with metabolic syndrome as dependent variable. Moreover, the analysis of the odd ratios showed that the risk of developing metabolic syndrome was consistent with uric acid levels ranging from 3 mg/dl to 8 mg/dl. The presence of metabolic syndrome does not seem to provide hyperuricemia. By contrast, higher serum uric acid level may predict the risk of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, our results suggest that uric acid cannot be considered a risk factor for early atherosclerosis, at least when assessed using carotid ultrasound. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Genetic variation underlying renal uric acid excretion in Hispanic children: the Viva La Familia Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittoor, Geetha; Haack, Karin; Mehta, Nitesh R; Laston, Sandra; Cole, Shelley A; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Butte, Nancy F; Voruganti, V Saroja

    2017-01-17

    Reduced renal excretion of uric acid plays a significant role in the development of hyperuricemia and gout in adults. Hyperuricemia has been associated with chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease in children and adults. There are limited genome-wide association studies associating genetic polymorphisms with renal urate excretion measures. Therefore, we investigated the genetic factors that influence the excretion of uric acid and related indices in 768 Hispanic children of the Viva La Familia Study. We performed a genome-wide association analysis for 24-h urinary excretion measures such as urinary uric acid/urinary creatinine ratio, uric acid clearance, fractional excretion of uric acid, and glomerular load of uric acid in SOLAR, while accounting for non-independence among family members. All renal urate excretion measures were significantly heritable (p uric acid clearance with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in zinc finger protein 446 (ZNF446) (rs2033711 (A/G), MAF: 0.30). The minor allele (G) was associated with increased uric acid clearance. Also, we found suggestive associations of uric acid clearance with SNPs in ZNF324, ZNF584, and ZNF132 (in a 72 kb region of 19q13; p <1 × 10 -6 , MAFs: 0.28-0.31). For the first time, we showed the importance of 19q13 region in the regulation of renal urate excretion in Hispanic children. Our findings indicate differences in inherent genetic architecture and shared environmental risk factors between our cohort and other pediatric and adult populations.

  9. Serum uric acid levels and cerebral microbleeds in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wi-Sun Ryu

    Full Text Available Unlike experimental studies indicating a neuroprotective property of uric acid, clinical studies have shown that elevated levels of uric acid are associated with a risk of ischemic stroke. However, the association of uric acid with cerebral hemorrhage has seldom been tested. We aimed to elucidate the association between uric acid and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs, a hemorrhage-prone cerebral microangiopathy. Seven hundred twenty-four patients with ischemic stroke who were consecutively admitted to our hospital were included in this study. We collected demographic, clinical, and laboratory data, including uric acid level, and examined the presence of CMBs using T2*-weighted gradient-echo MRI. We used logistic regression analysis to examine an independent association between uric acid and CMBs. Two-hundred twenty-six patients had CMBs (31.2%. After adjusting for possible confounders, elevated uric acid was independently associated with the presence of CMBs (the highest quartile vs. lowest quartile, adjusted odd ratio [OR], 1.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-3.39. This association retained in patients with deep or infratentorial CMBs (with or without lobar CMBs but not among those with lobar CMBs. In addition, this association was robust among patients with hypertension (the highest quartile vs. lowest quartile, adjusted OR, 2.74; 95% CI, 1.43-5.24. In contrast, we did not find the association in patients without hypertension. We demonstrated that serum uric acid is independently associated with the presence of CMBs. In particular, the relation between uric acid and CMBs was robust in hypertensive patients.

  10. Serum uric acid levels and cerebral microbleeds in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Wi-Sun; Kim, Chi Kyung; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Seung-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Unlike experimental studies indicating a neuroprotective property of uric acid, clinical studies have shown that elevated levels of uric acid are associated with a risk of ischemic stroke. However, the association of uric acid with cerebral hemorrhage has seldom been tested. We aimed to elucidate the association between uric acid and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), a hemorrhage-prone cerebral microangiopathy. Seven hundred twenty-four patients with ischemic stroke who were consecutively admitted to our hospital were included in this study. We collected demographic, clinical, and laboratory data, including uric acid level, and examined the presence of CMBs using T2*-weighted gradient-echo MRI. We used logistic regression analysis to examine an independent association between uric acid and CMBs. Two-hundred twenty-six patients had CMBs (31.2%). After adjusting for possible confounders, elevated uric acid was independently associated with the presence of CMBs (the highest quartile vs. lowest quartile, adjusted odd ratio [OR], 1.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-3.39). This association retained in patients with deep or infratentorial CMBs (with or without lobar CMBs) but not among those with lobar CMBs. In addition, this association was robust among patients with hypertension (the highest quartile vs. lowest quartile, adjusted OR, 2.74; 95% CI, 1.43-5.24). In contrast, we did not find the association in patients without hypertension. We demonstrated that serum uric acid is independently associated with the presence of CMBs. In particular, the relation between uric acid and CMBs was robust in hypertensive patients.

  11. The role of uric acid in metabolic syndrome in patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Solak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis patients have increased risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Uric acid is a metabolic marker associated with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. Uric acid levels increase in psoriasis as well. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of uric acid in metabolic syndrome in patients with psoriasis. Materials and Methods: Chronic plaque psoriasis patients who presented to the dermatology outpatient clinics in a university-affiliated training and research hospital and age- and gender-matched healthy individuals were included in the study. Waist circumference, height and weight measurements in both groups were recorded, and body mass index was calculated. Serum uric acid, urea, creatinine, C-reactive protein, fasting blood glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, triglyceride and insulin levels were determined. Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance status were evaluated. The findings were compared statistically. Results: Seventy patients with chronic plaque psoriasis (37 females, 33 males and 60 healthy individuals (31 females, 29 males were included in the study. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and uric acid levels were found to be higher in the psoriasis group than in control group (p=0.003 and p=0.008, respectively. Serum uric acid levels and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index scores were higher in psoriasis patients with metabolic syndrome than in those without metabolic syndrome when psoriasis patients were evaluated separately (p=0.041, p=0.024, respectively. A positive correlation was observed between abdominal circumference and serum uric acid levels in psoriasis patients (p=0.003, r=0.350 Conclusion: The results of this study show that uric acid levels are elevated in psoriasis patients with metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was also significantly higher. Hence, patients should be followed up for development

  12. SGLT2 inhibitor lowers serum uric acid through alteration of uric acid transport activity in renal tubule by increased glycosuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chino, Yukihiro; Samukawa, Yoshishige; Sakai, Soichi; Nakai, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Jun-ichi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2014-01-01

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors have been reported to lower the serum uric acid (SUA) level. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for this reduction, SUA and the urinary excretion rate of uric acid (UEUA) were analysed after the oral administration of luseogliflozin, a SGLT2 inhibitor, to healthy subjects. After dosing, SUA decreased, and a negative correlation was observed between the SUA level and the UEUA, suggesting that SUA decreased as a result of the increase in the UEUA. The increase in UEUA was correlated with an increase in urinary d-glucose excretion, but not with the plasma luseogliflozin concentration. Additionally, in vitro transport experiments showed that luseogliflozin had no direct effect on the transporters involved in renal UA reabsorption. To explain that the increase in UEUA is likely due to glycosuria, the study focused on the facilitative glucose transporter 9 isoform 2 (GLUT9ΔN, SLC2A9b), which is expressed at the apical membrane of the kidney tubular cells and transports both UA and d-glucose. It was observed that the efflux of [14C]UA in Xenopus oocytes expressing the GLUT9 isoform 2 was trans-stimulated by 10 mm d-glucose, a high concentration of glucose that existed under SGLT2 inhibition. On the other hand, the uptake of [14C]UA by oocytes was cis-inhibited by 100 mm d-glucose, a concentration assumed to exist in collecting ducts. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the UEUA could potentially be increased by luseogliflozin-induced glycosuria, with alterations of UA transport activity because of urinary glucose. PMID:25044127

  13. Growth inhibition by nitrocompounds of selected uric acid-utilizing microorganisms isolated from poultry manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W K; Anderson, R C; Ratliff, A L; Nisbet, D J; Ricke, S C

    2006-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the potential ability of nitrocompounds to reduce ammonia volatilization by inhibiting uric acid-utilizing microorganisms. Experiment I was conducted to evaluate the effects of nitrocompounds on the growth of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms isolated from poultry manure during six-hour incubation. There were five treatments: (1) control, (2) 50 mM nitroethane, (3) 50 mM nitroethanol, (4) 50 mM nitropropanol, and (5) 50 mM nitropropionic acid. Optical density values of nitrocompounds were significantly lower than that of control at two, four, and six hours. Plate counts of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms after six-hour incubation exhibited that nitrocompounds greatly reduced the growth of these microorganisms except for the nitroethane (P nitrocompounds on growth of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms compared to non-nitrocompounds such as ethanol, propanol, and propionic acid. Experiments II and III consisted of seven treatments: (1) control, (2) nitroethanol, (3) nitropropanol, (4) nitropropionic acid, (5) ethanol, (6) propanol, and (7) propionic acid. The incubation times of Experiments II and III were 6 and 24 h, respectively. The nitrocompounds were significantly more successful in inhibiting growth of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms compared to those non-nitrocompounds. These results suggest that nitrocompounds exhibit potential to reduce ammonia volatilization in poultry manure by inhibiting growth of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms.

  14. Immobilization of uricase on ZnO nanorods for a reagentless uric acid biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fenfen; Wang Xiaoli; Ai Shiyun; Sun Zhengdong; Wan Qiao; Zhu Ziqiang; Xian Yuezhong; Jin Litong; Yamamoto, Katsunobu

    2004-01-01

    A reagentless uric acid (UA) biosensor based on uricase immobilized on ZnO nanorods was developed. Direct electrochemistry and thermal stability of immobilized uricase were studied. The ZnO nanorods derived electrode retained the enzyme bioactivity and could enhance the electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode. This sensor showed a high thermal stability up to 85 deg. C and an electrocatalytic activity to the oxidation of uric acid without the presence of an electron mediator. The electrocatalytic response showed a linear dependence on the uric acid concentration ranging from 5.0 x 10 -6 to 1.0 x 10 -3 mol L -1 with a detection limit of 2.0 x 10 -6 mol L -1 at 3σ. The apparent K M app value for the uric acid sensor was estimated to be 0.238 mM, showing a high affinity

  15. Green synthesis of carbon dots from pork and application as nanosensors for uric acid detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunxi; Jiao, Yang; Hu, Feng; Yang, Yaling

    2018-02-01

    In this work, a green, simple, economical method was developed in the synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots using pork as carbon source. The as-prepared carbon dots exhibit exceptional advantages including high fluorescent quantum yield (17.3%) and satisfactory chemical stability. The fluorescence of carbon dots based nanosensor can be selectively and efficiently quenched by uric acid. This phenomenon was used to develop a fluorescent method for facile detection of uric acid within a linear range of 0.1-100 μM and 100-500 μM, with a detection limit of 0.05 μM (S/N = 3). Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied in the determination of uric acid in human serum and urine samples with satisfactory recoveries, which suggested that the new nanosensors have great prospect toward the detection of uric acid in human fluids.

  16. Serum uric acid as a new player in the development of diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovind, Peter; Rossing, Peter; Johnson, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy is complex and still not fully elucidated. Uric acid has been associated with renal disease, even though hyperuricemia may be a marker of or by itself be responsible for microvascular disease in diabetes. In animal models, elevated level of uric acid can...... lead to arteriolopathy of preglomerular vessels, impaired autoregulation, glomerular hypertension, as well as endothelial dysfunction. Kidney damage in hyperuricemic rats is not dependent on blood pressure, and instead involves the renin-angiotensin system. In patients with diabetes, serum uric acid...... early in the course of diabetes is significantly, and independent of confounders, associated with later development of persistent macroalbuminuria. Therefore, uric acid may be a novel and important player in the pathogenesis of microvascular complications in diabetes. A dose-response relationship...

  17. Imprinted zeolite modified carbon paste electrode as a potentiometric sensor for uric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanah, Miratul; Widati, Alfa Akustia; Fitri, Sarita Aulia

    2016-03-01

    Imprinted zeolite modified carbon paste electrode (carbon paste-IZ) has been developed and applied to determine uric acid by potentiometry. The imprinted zeolite (IZ) was synthesized by the mole ratio of uric acid/Si of 0.0306. The modified electrode was manufactured by mass ratio of carbon, IZ and solid paraffin was 40:25:35. The modified electrode had shown the measurement range of 10-5 M to 10-2 M with Nernst factor of 28.6 mV/decade, the detection limit of 5.86 × 10-6 M and the accuracy of 95.3 - 105.0%. Response time of the electrode for uric acid 10-5 M - 10-2 M was 25 - 44 s. The developed electrode showed the high selectivity toward uric acid in the urea matrix. Life time of the carbon paste-IZ electrode was 10 weeks.

  18. Serum uric acid concentrations are directly associated with the presence of benign multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simental-Mendía, Esteban; Simental-Mendía, Luis E; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    It has been reported that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) exhibit lower serum uric acid levels; however, the association between uric acid concentrations and benign MS (BMS) has not been assessed. Hence, the objective of the present study was to determine whether the serum concentrations of uric acid are associated with the presence of BMS. Men and non-pregnant women over 16 years of age with diagnosis of MS were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Expanded Disability Status Scale score acid were exclusion criteria. According to subtype of disease, the eligible patients were allocated into groups with BMS and other varieties of MS. A logistic regression analysis was conducted in order to evaluate the association between serum concentrations of uric acid and BMS. A total of 106 patients were included, 39 in the group with BMS and 67 in the group with other varieties of MS. The logistic regression analysis adjusted by age, sex, and disease duration showed that increased concentrations of uric acid, indeed within the physiological levels, are significantly associated with the presence of BMS (OR = 2.60; 95% CI: 1.55-4.38, p uric acid, indeed within the physiological range, are likely linked to the presence of BMS.

  19. Serum uric acid and appropriate cutoff value for prediction of metabolic syndrome among Chinese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei-Lin; Gao, Yu-Xia; Wang, Xuan; Chang, Hong; Huang, Guo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    The relation between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome is observed not only with frank hyperuricemia but also with serum uric acid levels within the normal range. The current "normal" range set for hyperuricemia often fails to identify patients with potential metabolic disorders. We investigate the association between serum uric acid within the normal range and incident metabolic syndrome risk, and further to determine the optimal cut-off value of serum uric acid for the diagnosis or prediction of metabolic syndrome. A total of 7399 Chinese adults (2957 men and 4442 women; ≥20 years) free of metabolic syndrome were followed for 3 years. During the 3-year follow-up, 1190 normouricemic individuals developed metabolic syndrome (16.1%). After adjusting the associated variables, the top quartile of serum uric acid levels was associated with higher metabolic syndrome development compared with the bottom quartile in men (hazard ratio (HR), 1.29; puric acid to identify metabolic syndrome were 6.3 mg/dl in men and 4.9 mg/dl in women. Our results suggested that high baseline serum uric acid levels within the normal range predict future development of metabolic syndrome after 3 y of follow-up.

  20. U-Shaped Association between Serum Uric Acid Level and Risk of Mortality: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Kweon; Chang, Yoosoo; Kim, Inah; Ryu, Seungho

    2018-04-25

    In addition to the controversy regarding the association between hyperuricemia and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, few studies have examined the impact of low uric acid level on mortality. The present study evaluated the relationship of both low and high uric acid level with the risk of all-cause and cause-specific mortality in a large sample of Korean adults over a full range of uric acid levels. A cohort study was performed for 375,163 South Korean men and women who underwent a health checkup from 2002 to 2012. Vital status and cause of death were ascertained from the national death records. Hazard ratios for mortality outcomes were estimated using Cox-proportional hazards regression analysis. During a total of 2,060,721.9 person-years of follow-up, 2,020 participants died, with 287 CVD deaths and 963 cancer deaths. Low and high uric acid levels were associated with increased all-cause, CVD, and cancer mortality. The multivariable adjusted HRs (95% CI) for all-cause mortality in the lowest uric acid categories (uric acid categories (>9.5 mg/dl for men and >8.5 mg/dl for women) were 2.39 (1.57-3.66) and 3.77 (1.17-12.17), respectively. In this large cohort study of men and women, both low and high uric acid levels were predictive of increased mortality, supporting a U-shaped association between serum uric acid and adverse health outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Uric Acid Spherulites in the Reflector Layer of Firefly Light Organ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, King-Siang; Sheu, Hwo-Shuenn; Hua, Tzu-En; Kang, Mei-Hua; Li, Chia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background In firefly light organs, reflector layer is a specialized tissue which is believed to play a key role for increasing the bioluminescence intensity through reflection. However, the nature of this unique tissue remains elusive. In this report, we investigated the role, fine structure and nature of the reflector layer in the light organ of adult Luciola cerata. Principal Findings Our results indicated that the reflector layer is capable of reflecting bioluminescence, and contains abundant uric acid. Electron microscopy (EM) demonstrated that the cytosol of the reflector layer's cells is filled with densely packed spherical granules, which should be the uric acid granules. These granules are highly regular in size (∼700 nm in diameter), and exhibit a radial internal structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses revealed that an intense single peak pattern with a d-spacing value of 0.320 nm is specifically detected in the light organ, and is highly similar to the diffraction peak pattern and d-spacing value of needle-formed crystals of monosodium urate monohydrate. However, the molar ratio evaluation of uric acid to various cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+) in the light organ deduced that only a few uric acid molecules were in the form of urate salts. Thus, non-salt uric acid should be the source of the diffraction signal detected in the light organ. Conclusions In the light organ, the intense single peak diffraction signal might come from a unique needle-like uric acid form, which is different from other known structures of non-salt uric acid form. The finding of a radial structure in the granules of reflector layer implies that the spherical uric acid granules might be formed by the radial arrangement of needle-formed packing matter. PMID:23441187

  2. Serum uric acid level predicts adverse outcomes after myocardial revascularization or cardiac valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeroni, Davide; Bini, Matteo; Camaiora, Umberto; Castiglioni, Paolo; Moderato, Luca; Bosi, Davide; Geroldi, Simone; Ugolotti, Pietro T; Brambilla, Lorenzo; Brambilla, Valerio; Coruzzi, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Background High levels of serum uric acid have been associated with adverse outcomes in cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infarction and heart failure. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the prognostic role of serum uric acid levels in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial revascularization and/or cardiac valve surgery. Design We performed an observational prospective cohort study. Methods The study included 1440 patients with available serum uric acid levels, prospectively followed for 50 ± 17 months. Mean age was 67 ± 11 years; 781 patients (54%) underwent myocardial revascularization, 474 (33%) cardiac valve surgery and 185 (13%) valve-plus-coronary artery by-pass graft surgery. The primary endpoints were overall and cardiovascular mortality while secondary end-points were combined major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events. Results Serum uric acid level mean values were 286 ± 95 µmol/l and elevated serum uric acid levels (≥360 µmol/l or 6 mg/dl) were found in 275 patients (19%). Overall mortality (hazard ratio = 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.5-3.0; p uric acid levels, even after adjustment for age, gender, arterial hypertension, diabetes, glomerular filtration rate, atrial fibrillation and medical therapy. Moreover, strong positive correlations between serum uric acid level and probability of overall mortality ( p uric acid levels predict mortality and adverse cardiovascular outcome in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization and/or cardiac valve surgery even after the adjustment for age, gender, arterial hypertension, diabetes, glomerular filtration rate and medical therapy.

  3. Uric acid priming in human monocytes is driven by the AKT–PRAS40 autophagy pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crişan, Tania O.; Cleophas, Maartje C. P.; Novakovic, Boris; Erler, Kathrin; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Netea, Mihai G.; Dinarello, Charles A.; Joosten, Leo A. B.

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic triggers are important inducers of the inflammatory processes in gout. Whereas the high serum urate levels observed in patients with gout predispose them to the formation of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, soluble urate also primes for inflammatory signals in cells responding to gout-related stimuli, but also in other common metabolic diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms through which uric acid selectively lowers human blood monocyte production of the natural inhibitor IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and shifts production toward the highly inflammatory IL-1β. Monocytes from healthy volunteers were first primed with uric acid for 24 h and then subjected to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence or absence of MSU. Transcriptomic analysis revealed broad inflammatory pathways associated with uric acid priming, with NF-κB and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling strongly increased. Functional validation did not identify NF-κB or AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, but uric acid priming induced phosphorylation of AKT and proline-rich AKT substrate 40 kDa (PRAS 40), which in turn activated mTOR. Subsequently, Western blot for the autophagic structure LC3-I and LC3-II (microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3) fractions, as well as fluorescence microscopy of LC3-GFP–overexpressing HeLa cells, revealed lower autophagic activity in cells exposed to uric acid compared with control conditions. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species production was diminished by uric acid priming. Thus, the Akt–PRAS40 pathway is activated by uric acid, which inhibits autophagy and recapitulates the uric acid-induced proinflammatory cytokine phenotype. PMID:28484006

  4. Uric acid priming in human monocytes is driven by the AKT-PRAS40 autophagy pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crişan, Tania O; Cleophas, Maartje C P; Novakovic, Boris; Erler, Kathrin; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; Joosten, Leo A B

    2017-05-23

    Metabolic triggers are important inducers of the inflammatory processes in gout. Whereas the high serum urate levels observed in patients with gout predispose them to the formation of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, soluble urate also primes for inflammatory signals in cells responding to gout-related stimuli, but also in other common metabolic diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms through which uric acid selectively lowers human blood monocyte production of the natural inhibitor IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and shifts production toward the highly inflammatory IL-1β. Monocytes from healthy volunteers were first primed with uric acid for 24 h and then subjected to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence or absence of MSU. Transcriptomic analysis revealed broad inflammatory pathways associated with uric acid priming, with NF-κB and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling strongly increased. Functional validation did not identify NF-κB or AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, but uric acid priming induced phosphorylation of AKT and proline-rich AKT substrate 40 kDa (PRAS 40), which in turn activated mTOR. Subsequently, Western blot for the autophagic structure LC3-I and LC3-II (microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3) fractions, as well as fluorescence microscopy of LC3-GFP-overexpressing HeLa cells, revealed lower autophagic activity in cells exposed to uric acid compared with control conditions. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species production was diminished by uric acid priming. Thus, the Akt-PRAS40 pathway is activated by uric acid, which inhibits autophagy and recapitulates the uric acid-induced proinflammatory cytokine phenotype.

  5. Uric acid level and erectile dysfunction in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Yalcin; Akilli, Hakan; Kayrak, Mehmet; Aribas, Alpay; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Turk, Suleyman; Perez-Pozo, Santos E; Covic, Adrian; McFann, Kim; Johnson, Richard J; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a frequent complaint of elderly subjects and is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Uric acid is also associated with endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and CVD, raising the hypothesis that an increased serum uric acid might predict ED in patients who are at risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). This study aims to evaluate the association of serum uric acid levels with presence and severity of ED in patients presenting with chest pain of presumed cardiac origin. This is a cross-sectional study of 312 adult male patients with suspected CAD who underwent exercise stress test (EST) for workup of chest pain and completed a sexual health inventory for men survey form to determine the presence and severity of ED. Routine serum biochemistry (and uric acid levels) were measured. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess risk factors for ED. The short version of the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire diagnosed ED (cutoff score ≤ 21). Serum uric acid levels were determined. Patients with chest pain of suspected cardiac origin underwent an EST. One hundred forty-nine of 312 (47.7%) male subjects had ED by survey criteria. Patients with ED were older and had more frequent CAD, hypertension, diabetes and impaired renal function, and also had significantly higher levels of uric acid, fibrinogen, glucose, C-reactive protein, triglycerides compared with patients without ED. Uric acid levels were associated with ED by univariate analysis (odds ratio = 1.36, P = 0.002); however, this association was not observed in multivariate analysis adjusted for estimated glomerular filtration rate. Subjects presenting with chest pain of presumed cardiac origin are more likely to have ED if they have elevated uric acid levels. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  6. Association between the antioxidant uric acid and depression and antidepressant medication use in 96 989 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, M K; Kobylecki, C J; Afzal, S

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the last decade, several studies have suggested that depression is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant defenses. We tested the hypothesis that high levels of the antioxidant uric acid are associated with lower risk of hospitalization with depression...... and use of prescription antidepressant medication. METHOD: We examined plasma levels of the antioxidant uric acid in 96 989 individuals from two independent cohort studies. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression models were multivariable adjusted for age, gender, alcohol, smoking...

  7. Uric Acid Levels Can Predict Metabolic Syndrome and Hypertension in Adolescents: A 10-Year Longitudinal Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hai-Lun; Pei, Dee; Lue, Ko-Huang; Chen, Yen-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between uric acid and chronic disease risk factors such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension have been studied in adults. However, whether these relationships exist in adolescents is unknown. We randomly selected 8,005 subjects who were between 10 to 15 years old at baseline. Measurements of uric acid were used to predict the future occurrence of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. In total, 5,748 adolescents were enrolled and ...

  8. Biological Activities of Uric Acid in Infection Due to Enteropathogenic and Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Crane, John K.; Broome, Jacqueline E.; Lis, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    In previous work, we identified xanthine oxidase (XO) as an important enzyme in the interaction between the host and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and Shiga-toxigenic E. coli (STEC). Many of the biological effects of XO were due to the hydrogen peroxide produced by the enzyme. We wondered, however, if uric acid generated by XO also had biological effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Uric acid triggered inflammatory responses in the gut, including increased submucosal edema and re...

  9. Uric acid promotes left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in mice fed a Western diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Guanghong; Habibi, Javad; Bostick, Brian P; Ma, Lixin; DeMarco, Vincent G; Aroor, Annayya R; Hayden, Melvin R; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Sowers, James R

    2015-03-01

    The rising obesity rates parallel increased consumption of a Western diet, high in fat and fructose, which is associated with increased uric acid. Population-based data support that elevated serum uric acids are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. However, the mechanism by which excess uric acid promotes these maladaptive cardiac effects has not been explored. In assessing the role of Western diet-induced increases in uric acid, we hypothesized that reductions in uric acid would prevent Western diet-induced development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, cardiac stiffness, and impaired diastolic relaxation by reducing growth and profibrotic signaling pathways. Four-weeks-old C57BL6/J male mice were fed excess fat (46%) and fructose (17.5%) with or without allopurinol (125 mg/L), a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, for 16 weeks. The Western diet-induced increases in serum uric acid along with increases in cardiac tissue xanthine oxidase activity temporally related to increases in body weight, fat mass, and insulin resistance without changes in blood pressure. The Western diet induced cardiomyocte hypertrophy, myocardial oxidative stress, interstitial fibrosis, and impaired diastolic relaxation. Further, the Western diet enhanced activation of the S6 kinase-1 growth pathway and the profibrotic transforming growth factor-β1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway and macrophage proinflammatory polarization. All results improved with allopurinol treatment, which lowered cardiac xanthine oxidase as well as serum uric acid levels. These findings support the notion that increased production of uric acid with intake of a Western diet promotes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, inflammation, and oxidative stress that lead to myocardial fibrosis and associated impaired diastolic relaxation. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Activity and Stability of Biofilm Uricase of Lactobacillus plantarum for Uric Acid Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iswantini, Dyah; Rachmatia, Rescy; Diana, Novita Rose; Nurhidayat, Novik; Akhiruddin; Saprudin, Deden

    2016-01-01

    Research of uric acid biosensor used a Lactobacillus plantarum was successfully conducted. Lactobacillus plantarum could produce uricase that could be used as uric acid biosensor. Therefore, lifetime of bacteria were quite short that caused the bacteria could not detect uric acid for a long time. To avoid this problem, development of biofilm for uric acid biosensor is important. Biofilms is a structured community of bacterial cells, stick together and are able to maintain a bacteria in an extreme environments. The purpose of present study was to determine and compare the activity of uricase produced by L. plantarum, deposited whithin biofilm and planktonic bacteria on glassy carbon electrode (GCEb & GCE), also to determine the stability of biofilm. The optimization process was conducted by using temperature, pH, and substrate concentration as the parameters. It showed that the activity of uricase within biofilm was able to increase the oxidation current. GCEb and GCE yielded the oxidation current in the amount of 47.24 μA and 23.04 μA, respectively, under the same condition. Results indicated that the optimum condition for uric acid biosensor using biofilm were pH 10, temperature of 40 oC, and uric acid concentration of 5 mM. The stability of GCEb decreased after 10 hours used, with decreasing percentage over 86.33%. This low stability probably caused by the unprotected active site of the enzyme that the enzyme is easier to experience the denaturation.

  11. Development of carbon paste electrodes modified by molecularly imprinted polymer as potentiometry sensor of uric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanah, Miratul; Darmokoesoemo, Handoko; Widayanti, Nesti; Kadmi, Yassine; Elmsellem, Hicham; Kusuma, Heri Septya

    The development of carbon paste electrodes modified by molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for the potentiometric analysis of uric acid was carried out in this study. The aim of the study was to determine the optimum composition of the electrode constituent material, the optimum pH of the uric acid solution, and the performance of the electrode, which was measured by its response time, measurement range, Nernst factor, detection limits, selectivity coefficient, precision, accuracy, and life time. MIP was made from methyl methacrylate as the monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker, and uric acid as the template. Electrodes that give optimum performance were produced from carbon, MIP, and paraffin with a ratio of 40:25:35 (% w/w). The obtained results show that the measurement of uric acid solution gives optimum results at pH 5, Nernst factor of 30.19 mV/decade, and a measurement range of 10-6-10-3 M. The minimum detection limit of this method was 3.03.10-6 M, and the precision and accuracy toward uric acid with concentration of 10-6-10-3 M ranged between 1.36-2.03% and 63.9-166%. The selectivity coefficient value was less than 1, which indicated that the electrode was selective against uric acid and not interfered with by urea. This electrode has a response time of less than 2 min; its life time is 8 weeks with 104 usage times.

  12. EDTA assisted synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for electrochemical sensing of uric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanchana, P.; Sekar, C., E-mail: Sekar2025@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles have been synthesized using EDTA as organic modifier by a simple microwave irradiation method and its application for the selective determination of uric acid (UA) has been demonstrated. Electrochemical behavior of uric acid at HA nanoparticle modified glassy carbon electrode (E-HA/GCE) has been investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and amperometry. The E-HA modified electrode exhibits efficient electrochemical activity towards uric acid sensing without requiring enzyme or electron mediator. Amperometry studies revealed that the fabricated electrode has excellent sensitivity for uric acid with the lowest detection limit of 142 nM over a wide concentration range from 1 × 10{sup −7} to 3 × 10{sup −5} M. Moreover, the studied E-HA modified GC electrode exhibits a good reproducibility and long-term stability and an admirable selectivity towards the determination of UA even in the presence of potential interferents. The analytical performance of this sensor was evaluated for the detection of uric acid in human urine and blood serum samples. - Highlights: • EDTA- hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles have been synthesized by microwave irradiation method. • A novel amperometric Uric Acid biosensor has been fabricated using E-HA/GCE. • The fabricated sensor exhibits a wide linear range, good stability and high reproducibility. • The sensor was applied for the detection of UA in human blood serum and urine.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum-Derived Uric Acid Precipitates Induce Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Hoef, Diana L.; Coppens, Isabelle; Holowka, Thomas; Ben Mamoun, Choukri; Branch, OraLee; Rodriguez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is characterized by cyclical fevers and high levels of inflammation, and while an early inflammatory response contributes to parasite clearance, excessive and persistent inflammation can lead to severe forms of the disease. Here, we show that Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes contain uric acid precipitates in the cytoplasm of the parasitophorous vacuole, which are released when erythrocytes rupture. Uric acid precipitates are highly inflammatory molecules that are considered a danger signal for innate immunity and are the causative agent in gout. We determined that P. falciparum-derived uric acid precipitates induce maturation of human dendritic cells, increasing the expression of cell surface co-stimulatory molecules such as CD80 and CD86, while decreasing human leukocyte antigen-DR expression. In accordance with this, uric acid accounts for a significant proportion of the total stimulatory activity induced by parasite-infected erythrocytes. Moreover, the identification of uric acid precipitates in P. falciparum- and P. vivax-infected erythrocytes obtained directly from malaria patients underscores the in vivo and clinical relevance of our findings. Altogether, our data implicate uric acid precipitates as a potentially important contributor to the innate immune response to Plasmodium infection and may provide a novel target for adjunct therapies. PMID:23405174

  14. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is associated with increased uric acid concentrations: A population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagy, Iftach; Salman, Amjad Abu; Kezerle, Louise; Erez, Offer; Yoel, Idan; Barski, Leonid

    Peri-partum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a clinical heart failure that usually develops during the final stage of pregnancy or the first months following delivery. High maternal serum uric acid concentrations have been previous associated with heart failure and preeclampsia. 1) To explored the clinical characteristics of PPCM patients; and 2) to determine the association between maternal serum uric acid concentrations and PPCM. This is a retrospective population based case control study. Cases and controls were matched 1:4 (for gestational age, medical history of cardiac conditions and creatinine); conditional logistic regression was used to identify clinical parameters that were associated with PPCM. The prevalence of peripartum cardiomyopathy at our institution was 1-3832 deliveries (42/160,964). In a matched multivariate analysis high maternal serum uric acid concentrations were associated with PPCM (O.R 1.336, 95% C.I 1.003-1.778). Uric acid concentrations were higher within the Non-Jewish patients and mothers of male infant with PPCM in compare to those without PPCM (p value 0.003 and 0.01 respectively). PPCM patients had increased maternal serum uric acid concentrations. This observation aligns with previous report regarding the increased uric acid concentration in women with preeclampsia and congestive heart failure, suggestive of a common underlying mechanism that mediates the myocardial damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Association between Serum Uric Acid and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guntur Darmawan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is known to be associated with some metabolic disorders. Recent studies suggested the role of uric acid in NAFLD through oxidative stress and inflammatory process. This study is aimed to evaluate the association between serum uric acid and NAFLD. Methods: a systematic literature review was conducted using Pubmed and Cochrane library. The quality of all studies was assessed using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE. All data were analyzed using REVIEW MANAGER 5.3. Results: eleven studies from America and Asia involving 100,275 subjects were included. The pooled adjusted OR for NAFLD was 1.92 (95% CI: 1.66-2.23; p<0.00001. Subgroup analyses were done based on study design, gender, non-diabetic subjects, non-obese subjects. All subgroup analyses showed statistically significant adjusted OR and most of which having low to moderate heterogeneity. Two studies revealed relationship between increased serum uric acid levels and severity of NAFLD. No publication bias was observed. Conclusion: our study demonstrated association between serum uric acid level and NAFLD. This finding brings a new insight of uric acid in clinical practice. Increased in serum uric acid levels might serve as a trigger for physician to screen for NAFLD.

  16. Leptin and uric acid as predictors of metabolic syndrome in jordanian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidat, Ahmad A; Ahmad, Mousa N; Haddad, Fares H; Azzeh, Firas S

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a set of interrelated metabolic risk factors that increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Studies regarding the specificity and sensitivity of serum levels of leptin and uric acid as predictors of MetS are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum levels of leptin and uric acid in terms of their specificity and sensitivity as predictors of MetS in the studied Jordanian group. In this cross sectional study, 630 adult subjects (308 men and 322 women) were recruited from the King Hussein Medical Center (Amman, Jordan). The diagnosis of MetS was made according to the 2005 International Diabetes Federation criteria. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the efficacy of serum levels of leptin and uric acid as predictors of MetS in the studied Jordanian group. Study results showed that for identification of subjects with MetS risk, area under the curve (AUC) for leptin was 0.721 and 0.683 in men and women, respectively. Serum uric acid levels in men showed no significant association with any MetS risk factors and no significant AUC, while uric acid AUC was 0.706 in women. Serum leptin levels can be useful biomarkers for evaluation of the risk of MetS independent of baseline obesity in both men and women. On the other hand, serum uric acid levels predicted the risk of MetS only in women.

  17. Uric Acid - key ingredient in the recipe for cardiorenal metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Kunal; Malhotra, Kunal; Sowers, James; Aroor, Annayya

    2013-10-01

    Elevated serum uric acid levels are a frequent finding in persons with obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular and kidney disease as well as in those with the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS). The increased consumption of a fructose-rich Western diet has contributed to the increasing incidence of the CRS, obesity and diabetes especially in industrialized populations. There is also increasing evidence that supports a causal role of high dietary fructose driving elevations in uric acid in association with the CRS. Animal and epidemiological studies support the notion that elevated serum uric acid levels play an important role in promoting insulin resistance and hypertension and suggest potential pathophysiological mechanisms that contribute to the development of the CRS and associated cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. To this point, elevated serum levels of uric acid appear to contribute to impaired nitric oxide production/endothelial dysfunction, increased vascular stiffness, inappropriate activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, enhanced oxidative stress, and maladaptive immune and inflammatory responses. These abnormalities, in turn, promote vascular, cardiac and renal fibrosis as well as associated functional abnormalities. Small clinical trials have suggested that uric acid-lowering therapies may be beneficial in such patients; however, a consensus on the treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia is lacking. Larger randomized controlled trials need to be performed in order to critically evaluate the beneficial effect of lowering serum uric acid in patients with the CRS and those with diabetes and/or hypertension.

  18. Uric Acid – Key Ingredient in the Recipe for Cardiorenal Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Kunal; Malhotra, Kunal; Sowers, James; Aroor, Annayya

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum uric acid levels are a frequent finding in persons with obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular and kidney disease as well as in those with the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS). The increased consumption of a fructose-rich Western diet has contributed to the increasing incidence of the CRS, obesity and diabetes especially in industrialized populations. There is also increasing evidence that supports a causal role of high dietary fructose driving elevations in uric acid in association with the CRS. Animal and epidemiological studies support the notion that elevated serum uric acid levels play an important role in promoting insulin resistance and hypertension and suggest potential pathophysiological mechanisms that contribute to the development of the CRS and associated cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. To this point, elevated serum levels of uric acid appear to contribute to impaired nitric oxide production/endothelial dysfunction, increased vascular stiffness, inappropriate activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, enhanced oxidative stress, and maladaptive immune and inflammatory responses. These abnormalities, in turn, promote vascular, cardiac and renal fibrosis as well as associated functional abnormalities. Small clinical trials have suggested that uric acid-lowering therapies may be beneficial in such patients; however, a consensus on the treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia is lacking. Larger randomized controlled trials need to be performed in order to critically evaluate the beneficial effect of lowering serum uric acid in patients with the CRS and those with diabetes and/or hypertension. PMID:24454316

  19. Relationship between uric acid and metabolic syndrome according to menopausal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Jung; Park, Hyun Tae; Cho, Geum Joon; Yi, Kyung Wook; Ahn, Ki Hoon; Shin, Jung-Ho; Kim, Tak; Kim, Young Tae; Hur, Jun Young; Kim, Sun Haeng

    2011-06-01

    Uric acid, the levels of which have been shown to increase after menopause, has been associated with metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome has also been determined to increase after menopause. Therefore, we surmised that menopausal status-specific analyses for the characterisation of the relationship between uric acid and the metabolic syndrome were warranted. We included 1644 patients: 1018 premenopausal women and 626 postmenopausal women, all of whom participated in annual health examinations at Anam Hospital in Seoul, Korea, from January 2008 through December 2008. On the multivariate logistic regression analysis, uric acid was identified as an independent risk factor for metabolic syndrome in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Uric acid levels had different relationships with blood pressure based on menopausal status, however, no such relationships with fasting glucose or age were found. Increased uric acid levels were associated with increased risk for metabolic syndrome in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. In studies regarding uric acid and metabolic syndrome in women, the effects of menopausal status should be considered.

  20. Uric acid levels in subjects with bipolar disorder: A comparative meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Francesco; Crocamo, Cristina; Mazza, Mario Gennaro; Clerici, Massimo; Carrà, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Previous research has hypothesised increased uric acid levels, possibly because of an amplified purinergic metabolism and a reduced adenosine activity, in subjects with bipolar disorder. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at estimating if individuals with bipolar disorder had uric acid levels higher than both healthy controls and subjects with major depression (trait marker hypothesis). It also tested if uric acid levels could differ in different phases of bipolar disorder (state marker hypothesis). Meta-analyses were carried out generating pooled standardized mean differences (SMDs), using random-effects models. Heterogeneity between studies was estimated using the I(2) index. Relevant sensitivity and meta-regression analyses were conducted. We searched main Electronic Databases, identifying twelve studies that met our inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses showed increased uric acid levels in individuals with bipolar disorder as compared with both healthy controls (SMD = 0.65, p uric acid levels were higher in manic/mixed phases as compared with depressive ones (SMD = 0.34; p = 0.04, I(2) = 58.8%), a sensitivity analysis did not confirm the association. In sum, our meta-analysis shows that subjects with bipolar disorder have uric acid levels higher than healthy controls. The potential role of factors that might clarify the nature of this association deserves additional research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Serum uric acid in new and recent onset primary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N N Anand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyperuricemia is common among adults with prehypertension, especially when the microalbuminuria is present. Hyperuricemia precedes the development of hypertension. Aim: (1 To find the association of hyperuricemia in new-onset hypertensive patients. (2 To find the association of hyperuricemia in hypertensive patients with regard to gender and risk factors such as smoking and central obesity. Material and Methods: A total of 50 adults aged between 20 and 50 years who had mild early hypertension were selected for the study. Fifty controls without hypertension were enrolled and investigated. Results: The association between uric acid (UA and hypertension was analyzed using Student′s t-test and statistical difference were assessed using Pearson coefficient. The study showed a significant difference in UA between the hypertensive subjects and the normotensive controls. There was not a significant difference between waist abnormality, smoking and UA in cases. Males have a higher degree of hyperuricemia than females in hypertensive patients. Conclusion: Serum UA is strongly associated with blood pressure (BP in new and recent onset primary hypertension. The remarkable association of UA with BP in adults is consistent with recent animal model data and the hypothesis that the UA might have a pathogenic role in the development of hypertension.

  2. Relation between uric acid and Alzheimer's disease in elderly Jordanians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-khateeb, Eman; Althaher, Arwa; Al-khateeb, Mohammed; Al-Musawi, Hanan; Azzouqah, Ola; Al-Shweiki, Samir; Shafagoj, Yanal

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that oxidative injuries have a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Uric acid (UA) has a contradictory effect on cognitive function and several lines of evidence suggest that UA may modulate outcome in neurological diseases. Many studies investigated serum UA levels in AD patients, but to date, results from these observational studies are conflicting. In this study, we assess whether serum UA levels would be altered in the AD Jordanian patients compared to those of the healthy controls. Serum UA and lipid profile levels were measured in 41 AD patients and 40 healthy controls. RESULTS were statistically evaluated at p level of significance. The Arabic version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE-A) was used to evaluate the cognitive functions of all participants. Demographic variables indicate that individuals that are illiterate demonstrate a 7.5 fold (p = 0.033) increase in risk of developing AD. The AD group shows 12.6% lower serum UA level than control subjects and the difference between groups is statistically significant (p = 0.033). No significant differences could be found between the two groups in lipid profile levels. Pearson correlation coefficients and Multivarient linear regression show no significant correlation between MMSE and continuous variables in AD patients except for age. The results suggest that serum UA levels are significantly lower in AD patients in comparison to control subjects. UA may have a protective role against AD; however this role needs further investigations.

  3. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and serum uric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Beibei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is considered the manifestation of metabolic syndrome (MS in the liver. Besides glucose and lipid metabolic disorders, the level of serum uric acid (SUA is also associated with the progression of NAFLD. This article reviews the research achievements in the association between SUA and NAFLD and points out that SUA can independently predict the risks of MS, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in both healthy people and patients. Its mechanism may be that SUA increases the expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS/thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP through inducing ROS, and then it activates the NLR pyrin domain containing 3 inflammasome and induces the secretion of interleukin. Both basic and clinical research show that the drugs reducing SUA can inhibit the TXNIP pathway, reduce the blood glucose level, and alleviate liver ROS, inflammation, steatosis, and fibrosis. This article suggests that SUA may be a promising therapeutic method for NAFLD and needs further basic and clinical research.

  4. Serum uric acid levels correlate with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikbilek, A; Gencer, Z K; Saydam, L; Zararsiz, G; Tanik, N; Ozkiris, M

    2014-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a frequently encountered condition that can severely affect the quality of life. In this study, we aimed to assess the possible relations between serum uric acid (SUA) levels and BPPV. Fifty patients with BPPV, and 40 age- and sex-matched control subjects were enrolled in the study. All the patients and controls underwent a complete audio-vestibular test battery including the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and supine roll test for posterior semicircular canal (PSC) and horizontal semicircular canal, respectively. Routine hematological and biochemical analyses were performed in both groups. In the BPPV group, measurements of SUA levels were repeated 1 month after the vertigo attack. The lipid profiles and SUA levels were higher in patients with BPPV than detected in controls (P vertigo attack compared with the values obtained during the attack (P 0.05). Elevated SUA is positively correlated with BPPV, requiring further efforts to clarify the exact mechanism. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  5. Serum uric acid levels and hormone therapy type: a retrospective cohort study of postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae H; Song, Gwan G; Lee, Young H; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Hyun, Myung H; Choi, Sung J

    2018-01-01

    Serum uric acid levels increase in postmenopausal women, but decrease when hormone therapy (HT) is administered. No study has, however, evaluated the effects of different types of HT on serum uric acid levels. We therefore examined whether estrogen therapy (ET), estrogen plus progestogen therapy (EPT), and tibolone use affected serum uric acid levels in this population. We performed a retrospective cohort study of postmenopausal women. From 2005 to 2015, postmenopausal women who had undergone blood uric acid-level testing at least twice were enrolled. Participants were grouped according to HT regimen: ET, EPT, or tibolone. The nonhormone therapy group did not receive HT. Differences in serum uric acid levels were examined in each group. Our analysis was adjusted to accommodate different follow-up intervals for individual participants. Multiple variables were adjusted using the Tukey-Kramer method. Age, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, estimated glomerular filtration rate, alcohol consumption, smoking status, and comedications were also adjusted. After adjusting for multiple variables, the serum uric acid level increased to 0.87 ± 0.27 mg/dL (least squares mean ± standard error) in the nonhormone therapy group, and serum uric levels in the EPT group were found to be significantly lower (-0.38 ± 0.29 mg/dL, P uric acid levels in the ET and tibolone groups did not, however, differ significantly from the nonhormone therapy group level. We attribute our findings to the effects of progestogen, rather than estrogen.

  6. Uric acid is associated with nutritional status in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Lee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purines, mainly contained in meats, are metabolized finally to uric acid in humans. Although digestion of meat is impaired in end-stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis owing to anorexia and decreased taste, hyperuricemia is common in these patients. In this cross-sectional study, we analyzed demographic characteristics, normalized protein nitrogen appearance (nPNA, serum albumin concentration, and serum uric acid levels and other laboratory parameters in sixty patients on maintenance hemodialysis. There were 33 (55% males and 27 (45% females. The mean age was 62.9±14.3 years and the mean body mass index was 22.7±3.8 kg/m2. The mean serum uric acid level was 7.2±1.2 mg/dL, with the range of 5.1–10.8 mg/dL. There was a statistically significant correlation between serum uric level and nPNA (p < 0.05. The serum uric acid level was also positively correlated with blood urea nitrogen level (p < 0.01 and serum phosphorus level (p < 0.05. Our results suggest that serum uric acid level is associated with nutritional status, and might be a possible marker for protein nutrition in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

  7. Review of concepts and controversies of uric acid as antioxidant and pro- oxidant and ndash; an uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Amar Nagesh Kumar; Pathiputhuru Aruna; Jupalle Nagaiah Naidu; Robby Kumar; Anuj Kumar Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid, the end product of purine catabolism in humans and is known for its crystal deposition at higher concentrations (>7 mg/dl) in gout. Less is known about its antioxidant property and the beneficial effects in various diseases. It is thought that high concentration of uric acid in humans is an evolutionary advantage and it is also hypothesized that high concentration of uric acid is to compensate the antioxidant capacity of ascorbic acid which is lost in humans during ...

  8. Exploration into Uric and Cardiovascular Disease: Uric Acid Right for heArt Health (URRAH) Project, A Study Protocol for a Retrospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desideri, Giovambattista; Virdis, Agostino; Casiglia, Edoardo; Borghi, Claudio

    2018-02-09

    The relevance of cardiovascular role played by levels of serum uric acid is dramatically growing, especially as cardiovascular risk factor potentially able to exert either a direct deleterious impact or a synergic effect with other cardiovascular risk factors. At the present time, it still remains undefined the threshold level of serum uric acid able to contribute to the cardiovascular risk. Indeed, the available epidemiological case studies are not homogeneous, and some preliminary data suggest that the so-called "cardiovascular threshold limit" may substantially differ from that identified as a cut-off able to trigger the acute gout attack. In such scenario, there is the necessity to clarify and quantify this threshold value, to insert it in the stratification of risk algorithm scores and, in turn, to adopt proper prevention and correction strategies. The clarification of the relationship between circulating levels of uric acid and cardio-nephro-metabolic disorders in a broad sample representative of general population is critical to identify the threshold value of serum uric acid better discriminating the increased risk associated with uric acid. The Uric acid Right for heArt Health (URRAH) project has been designed to define, as primary objective, the level of uricemia above which the independent risk of cardiovascular disease may increase in a significantly manner in a general Italian population.

  9. Uric Acid and the Risks of Kidney Failure and Death in Individuals With CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anand; Kaze, Arnaud D; McMullan, Ciaran J; Isakova, Tamara; Waikar, Sushrut S

    2018-03-01

    Serum uric acid concentrations increase in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and may lead to tubular injury, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and intrarenal inflammation. Whether uric acid concentrations are associated with kidney failure and death in CKD is unknown. Prospective observational cohort study. 3,885 individuals with CKD stages 2 to 4 enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) between June 2003 and September 2008 and followed up through March 2013. Baseline uric acid concentrations. Kidney failure (initiation of dialysis therapy or transplantation) and all-cause mortality. During a median follow-up of 7.9 years, 885 participants progressed to kidney failure and 789 participants died. After adjustment for demographic, cardiovascular, and kidney-specific covariates, higher uric acid concentrations were independently associated with risk for kidney failure in participants with estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) ≥ 45mL/min/1.73m 2 (adjusted HR per 1-standard deviation greater baseline uric acid, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.12-1.75), but not in those with eGFRsuric acid concentration and all-cause mortality was J-shaped (P=0.007). Potential residual confounding through unavailable confounders; lack of follow-up measurements to adjust for changes in uric acid concentrations over time. Uric acid concentration is an independent risk factor for kidney failure in earlier stages of CKD and has a J-shaped relationship with all-cause mortality in CKD. Adequately powered randomized placebo-controlled trials in CKD are needed to test whether urate lowering may prove to be an effective approach to prevent complications and progression of CKD. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparison of antioxidant properties of uric acid, allantoin and allantoic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papežíková, Ivana; Lojek, Antonín; Číž, Milan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 14 (2007), s247-S248 E-ISSN 1213-7103. [Mezioborová česko-slovenská toxikologická konference /12./. Praha, 11.06.2007-13.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/07/P539 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : uric acid * antioxidants * allantoin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  11. Uric Acid Levels Can Predict Metabolic Syndrome and Hypertension in Adolescents: A 10-Year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai-Lun; Pei, Dee; Lue, Ko-Huang; Chen, Yen-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between uric acid and chronic disease risk factors such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension have been studied in adults. However, whether these relationships exist in adolescents is unknown. We randomly selected 8,005 subjects who were between 10 to 15 years old at baseline. Measurements of uric acid were used to predict the future occurrence of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. In total, 5,748 adolescents were enrolled and followed for a median of 7.2 years. Using cutoff points of uric acid for males and females (7.3 and 6.2 mg/dl, respectively), a high level of uric acid was either the second or third best predictor for hypertension in both genders (hazard ratio: 2.920 for males, 5.222 for females; puric acid levels failed to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus, and only predicted metabolic syndrome in males (hazard ratio: 1.658; puric acid indicated a higher likelihood of developing hypertension in both genders and metabolic syndrome in males after 10 years of follow-up. However, uric acid levels did not affect the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in both genders.

  12. Uric Acid Excretion Predicts Increased Blood Pressure Among American Adolescents of African Descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrug, Sylvie; Mrug, Michal; Morris, Anjana Madan; Reynolds, Nina; Patel, Anita; Hill, Danielle C; Feig, Daniel I

    2017-04-01

    Hyperuricemia predicts the incidence of hypertension in adults and its treatment has blood pressure (BP)-lowering effects in adolescents. To date, no studies have examined the predictive usage of hyperuricemia or urinary uric acid excretion on BP changes in adolescents. Mechanistic models suggest that uric acid impairs both endothelial function and vascular compliance, which would potentially exacerbate a myriad of hypertensive mechanisms, yet little is known about interaction of uric acid and other hypertension risk factors. The primary study was aimed at the effects of stress on BP in adolescents. A community sample of 84 low-income, urban adolescents (50% male, 95% African American, mean age = 13.36 ± 1 years) was recruited from public schools. Youth completed a 12-hour (overnight) urine collection at home and their BP was measured during rest and in response to acute psychosocial stress. Seventy-six of the adolescents participated in a follow-up visit at 1.5 years when their resting BP was reassessed. In this substudy, we assessed the relationship of renal urate excretion and BP reactivity. After adjusting for resting BP levels at baseline and other covariates, higher levels of uric acid excretion predicted greater BP reactivity to acute psychosocial stress and higher resting BP at 18 months. Urinary excretion of uric acid can serve as an alternative, noninvasive measure of serum uric acid levels that are predictive of BP changes. As hyperuricemia-associated hypertension is treatable, urban adolescents may benefit from routine screening for hyperuricemia or high uric acid excretion. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Correlation between serum uric acid level and acute renal injury after coronary artery bypass grafting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, D Q; Du, J; Zheng, Z; Tang, Y; Zou, L; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, H T

    2017-07-11

    Objective: To evaluate whether early postoperative serum uric acid level can predict postoperative acute renal injury (AKI) among patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods: The study retrospectively enrolled 1 306 patients undergoing CABG in Fuwai Hospital between September 2012 and December 2013. The patients were divided into 5 groups by the concentrations of serum uric acid measured on the morning of the first postoperative day, and uric acid categories were as follow: less than 195 μmol/L (Q1 group, 262 cases), 195-236 μmol/L (Q2 group, 263 cases), 237-280 μmol/L (Q3 group, 260 cases), 281-336 μmol/L (Q4 group, 261 cases), more than 336 μmol/L (Q5 group, 260 cases). The primary end points were AKI (RIFLE criteria), severe AKI (AKI≥stage Ⅰ), postoperative continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) requirement, in-hospital death, length of stay in hospital and intensive care unit(ICU). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was used to determine the ability of the early postoperative serum uric acid level as a risk factor for postoperative AKI prediction. Results: Among the 1 306 patients enrolled in the study, AKI was found in 335 patients (25.65%). After adjusting for variables that were different between the 5 groups, the Q5 group had significantly higher risk of AKI, AKI≥ stage Ⅰ and the requirement of CRRT ( P uric acid levels alone were used (both P uric acid was a better predictor than serum creatinine( P uric acid concentration within 12 hours after operation is an independent predictor of postoperative AKI in patients undergoing CABG, which could be used to identify patients at high risk for AKI.

  14. Uric Acid Level Has a J-Shaped Association with Arterial Stiffness in Korean Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungbin; Jung, Young-Hyo; Kwon, Yu-Jin; Park, Byoungjin

    2017-11-01

    Uric acid has been reported to function both as an oxidant or antioxidant depending on the context. A previous study in the Korean population reported a positive linear association between serum uric acid level and arterial stiffness in men, but little is known about how serum uric acid level is related to the risk of increased arterial stiffness in Korean postmenopausal women. We performed a cross-sectional study of 293 subjects who participated in a health examination program run by the health promotion center of Gangnam Severance Hospital between October 2007 and July 2010. High brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was defined as a brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity of more than 1,450 cm/s. The odds ratios (ORs) for high brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis across uric acid quartiles after adjusting for other indicators of cardiovascular risk. The 293 postmenopausal women were divided into quartiles according to uric acid level. The mean brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity values of each quartile were as follows: Q1, 1,474 cm/s; Q2, 1,375 cm/s; Q3, 1,422 cm/s; Q4, 1,528 cm/s. The second quartile was designated as the control group based on mean brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity value. Multivariate adjusted ORs (95% confidence intervals) for brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity across the uric acid quartiles were 2.642 (Q1, 1.095-6.3373), 1.00, 4.305 (Q3, 1.798-10.307), and 4.375 (Q4, 1.923-9.949), after adjusting for confounding variables. Serum uric acid level has a J-shaped association with arterial stiffness in Korean postmenopausal women.

  15. Melatonin protects against uric acid-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and triglyceride accumulation in C2C12 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarman, Gerald J; Andrew, Brittany M; Blackhurst, Dee M; Ojuka, Edward O

    2017-04-01

    Excess uric acid has been shown to induce oxidative stress, triglyceride accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver and is an independent predictor of type-2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle plays a dominant role in type 2 diabetes and presents a large surface area to plasma uric acid. However, the effects of uric acid on skeletal muscle are underinvestigated. Our aim was therefore to characterize the effects of excessive uric acid on oxidative stress, triglyceride content, and mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle C 2 C 12 myotubes and assess how these are modulated by the antioxidant molecule melatonin. Differentiated C 2 C 12 myotubes were exposed to 750 µM uric acid or uric acid + 10 nM melatonin for 72 h. Compared with control, uric acid increased triglyceride content by ~237%, oxidative stress by 32%, and antioxidant capacity by 135%. Uric acid also reduced endogenous ROUTINE respiration, complex II-linked oxidative phosphorylation, and electron transfer system capacities. Melatonin counteracted the effects of uric acid without further altering antioxidant capacity. Our data demonstrate that excess uric acid has adverse effects on skeletal muscle similar to those previously reported in hepatocytes and suggest that melatonin at a low physiological concentration of 10 nM may be a possible therapy against some adverse effects of excess uric acid. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Few studies have investigated the effects of uric acid on skeletal muscle. This study shows that hyperuricemia induces mitochondrial dysfunction and triglyceride accumulation in skeletal muscle. The findings may explain why hyperuricemia is an independent predictor of diabetes. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. [Atorvastatin improves reflow after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction by decreasing serum uric acid level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ling; Ye, Lu; Wang, Kun; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Chunjia

    2016-05-25

    Objective: To investigate the effect of atorvastatin on reflow in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and its relation to serum uric acid levels. Methods: One hundred and fourteen STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups:55 cases received oral atorvastatin 20 mg before PCI (routine dose group) and 59 cases received oral atorvastatin 80 mg before PCI (high dose group). According to the initial serum uric acid level, patients in two groups were further divided into normal uric acid subgroup and hyperuricemia subgroup. The changes of uric acid level and coronary artery blood flow after PCI were observed. Correlations between the decrease of uric acid, the dose of atorvastatin and the blood flow of coronary artery after PCI were analyzed. Results: Serum uric acid levels were decreased after treatment in both groups (all P uric acid level ( P uric acid level in patients with hyperuricemia decreased more significantly in the high dose group ( P uric acid levels in two groups ( P >0.05). Among 114 patients, there were 19 cases without reflow after PCI (16.7%). In the routine dose group, there were 12 patients without reflow, in which 3 had normal uric acid and 9 had high uric acid levels ( P uric acid and 5 had high uric acid ( P uric acid levels and improve reflow after PCI in patients with STEMI.

  17. Association between Serum Uric Acid and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, Guntur; Hamijoyo, Laniyati; Hasan, Irsan

    2017-04-01

    non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is known to be associated with some metabolic disorders. Recent studies suggested the role of uric acid in NAFLD through oxidative stress and inflammatory process. This study is aimed to evaluate the association between serum uric acid and NAFLD. a systematic literature review was conducted using Pubmed and Cochrane library. The quality of all studies was assessed using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE). All data were analyzed using REVIEW MANAGER 5.3. eleven studies from America and Asia involving 100,275 subjects were included. The pooled adjusted OR for NAFLD was 1.92 (95% CI: 1.66-2.23; puric acid levels and severity of NAFLD. No publication bias was observed. our study demonstrated association between serum uric acid level and NAFLD. This finding brings a new insight of uric acid in clinical practice. Increased in serum uric acid levels might serve as a trigger for physician to screen for NAFLD.

  18. Association of serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonakdaran, Shokoufeh; Kharaqani, Banafsheh

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between elevated serum uric acid level and metabolic syndrome (MS) has been debated. There is no data concerning this relation in Iranian population-based studies. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of hyperuricamia and its association with MS in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). This was a cross- sectional study in 1978 diabetic patients. Hyperuricamia was defined as uric acid ≥ 7 and ≥ 5.5 mg/dl for men and women respectively. Diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was based on ATPIII criteria. Clinical and biochemical parameters in hyperuricaemic and normouricaemic patients compared with other. The prevalence of hyperuricaemia and metabolic syndrome was 12.7% and 65.5% respectively. The prevalence of MS significantly increased in the highest quartile of uric acid levels compared with lowest quartile (74.4% vs 55.9%, puric acid had positive association with cholesterol, triglyceride, non-HDL cholesterol and a negative association with fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and HDL cholesterol. Possible independent biochemical predictors of hyperuricamia were cholesterol, triglyceride, creatnine and FBS. The prevalence of MS and its components increases with increasing levels of uric acid in type 2 diabetes. Regular assessment of uric acid could give information for predicting of MS and prevention of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes.

  19. Uric acid inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV in vitro is dependent on the intracellular formation of triuret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohandas, Rajesh; Sautina, Laura; Beem, Elaine; Schuler, Anna; Chan, Wai-Yan; Domsic, John; McKenna, Robert; Johnson, Richard J; Segal, Mark S

    2014-08-01

    Uric acid affects endothelial and adipose cell function and has been linked to diseases such as hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Interestingly uric acid has been shown to increase endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) mobilization, a potential mechanism to repair endothelial injury. Since EPC mobilization is dependent on activity of the enzyme CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)IV, we examined the effect uric acid will have on CD26/DPPIV activity. Uric acid inhibited the CD26/DPPIV associated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells but not human recombinant (hr) CD26/DPPIV. However, triuret, a product of uric acid and peroxynitrite, could inhibit cell associated and hrCD26/DPPIV. Increasing or decreasing intracellular peroxynitrite levels enhanced or decreased the ability of uric acid to inhibit cell associated CD26/DPPIV, respectively. Finally, protein modeling demonstrates how triuret can act as a small molecule inhibitor of CD26/DPPIV activity. This is the first time that uric acid or a uric acid reaction product has been shown to affect enzymatic activity and suggests a novel avenue of research in the role of uric acid in the development of clinically important diseases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Association between serum uric acid and the metabolic syndrome among a middle- and old-age Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiayun; Yuan, Jing; Yao, Ping; Yang, Binyao; Gui, Lixuan; Zhang, Xiaomin; Guo, Huan; Wang, Youjie; Chen, Weihong; Wei, Sheng; Miao, Xiaoping; Li, Xiulou; Min, Xinwen; Yang, Handong; Fang, Weimin; Liang, Yuan; Hu, Frank B; Wu, Tangchun; He, Meian

    2013-08-01

    Our aim was to study whether there is causal association between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome (MetS). A cross-sectional study was performed, including a total of 27,009 subjects (23,345 subjects having uric acid data) from the Dongfeng-Tongji Cohort study. The MetS was defined by the International Diabetes Foundation criteria of 2005. Association analysis was performed by logistic regression. A genetic risk score was calculated by adding the uric acid increasing alleles in two SNPs (rs11722228 in SLC2A9 and rs2231142 in ABCG2) which were identified from our genome-wide association study on uric acid levels. The causal association was examined by mendelian randomization analysis. Among a middle- and old-age Chinese population, serum uric acid concentrations were strongly associated with the risk of MetS and its several components (P uric acid effects. Each additional uric acid increasing allele in the genetic risk score was associated with 3 % increased MetS risk (OR = 1.03, 95 % CI 0.98-1.09; P = 0.23). Further adjustment for serum uric acid attenuated the trend of individual SNP and genetic risk score with increased MetS risk (all OR uric acid was associated with MetS risk in a middle- and old-age Chinese population. Whether this association was causal remained to be investigated in the future studies.

  1. Uric Acid Inhibition of Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV In Vitro is Dependent on the Intracellular Formation of Triuret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohandas, Rajesh; Sautina, Laura; Beem, Elaine; Schuler, Anna; Chan, Wai-Yan; Domsic, John; McKenna, Robert; Johnson, Richard J.; Segal, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid affects endothelial and adipose cell function and has been linked to diseases such as hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Interestingly uric acid has been shown to increase endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) mobilization, a potential mechanism to repair endothelial injury. Since EPC mobilization is dependent on activity of the enzyme CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)IV, we examined the effect uric acid has on CD26/DPPIV activity. Uric acid inhibited the CD26/DPPIV associated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells but not human recombinant (hr)CD26/DPPIV. However, triuret, a product of uric acid and peroxynitrite, could inhibit cell associated and hrCD26/DPPIV. Increasing or decreasing intracellular peroxynitrite levels enhanced or decreased the ability of uric acid to inhibit cell associated CD26/DPPIV respectively. Last, protein modeling demonstrates how triuret can act as a small molecule inhibitor of CD26/DPPIV activity. This is the first time that uric acid or a uric acid reaction product has been shown to affect enzymatic activity and suggests a novel avenue of research in the role of uric acid in the development of clinically important diseases. PMID:24925478

  2. Temporal Relationship Between Uric Acid Concentration and Risk of Diabetes in a Community-based Study Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraschek, Stephen P.; McAdams-Demarco, Mara; Miller, Edgar R.; Gelber, Allan C.; Maynard, Janet W.; Pankow, James S.; Young, Hunter; Coresh, Josef; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Some observational studies have identified elevated uric acid concentration as a risk factor for diabetes, while others have found an inverse relationship. We examined both the association of uric acid level with incident diabetes and the change in uric acid concentration after a diabetes diagnosis. We analyzed data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study and quantified the independent association between uric acid level and incident diabetes via Cox proportional hazards models. The association between duration of diabetes and change in uric acid level was examined via linear regression. Among 11,134 participants without diagnosed diabetes at baseline (1987–1989), there were 1,294 incident cases of diabetes during a median of 9 years of follow-up (1987–1998). Uric acid level was associated with diabetes even after adjustment for risk factors (per 1 mg/dL, hazard ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval: 1.13, 1.23), and the association remained significant after adjustment for fasting glucose and insulin levels. Among participants with diabetes (n = 1,510), every additional 5 years’ duration of diabetes was associated with a 0.10-mg/dL (95% confidence interval: 0.04, 0.15) lower uric acid level after adjustment. We conclude that uric acid concentration rises prior to diagnosis of diabetes and then declines with diabetes duration. Future studies investigating uric acid as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease should adequately account for the impact and timing of diabetes development. PMID:24418684

  3. serum albumin, creatinine, uric acid and hypertensive disorders of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2003-08-08

    Aug 8, 2003 ... pregnancy using single estimation of serum protein, creatinine and uric in serum samples of healthy primigravidae with singleton pregnancy. ... developing the disease early in pregnancy. This is because ... as hypertension, diabetes mellitus or renal disease and drug use. This was followed by a complete ...

  4. Fluorescence quenching behaviour of uric acid interacting with water-soluble cationic porphyrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena, E-mail: makarska@hektor.umcs.lublin.pl [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University M. C. Sklodowska Sq. 2, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Borowski, Piotr [Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University M. C. Sklodowska Sq. 3, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2015-04-15

    The process of association between 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H{sub 2}TTMePP) and uric acid as well as its sodium salt has been studied in aqueous NaOH solution analysing its absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra. The fluorescence quenching effect observed during interactions porphyrin-uric acid compounds points at the fractional accessibility of the fluorophore for the quencher. The association and fluorescence quenching constants are of the order of magnitude of 10{sup 5} mol{sup −1}. The fluorescence lifetimes and the quantum yields of the porphyrin anionic form were established. The results demonstrate that uric acid and its sodium salt can interact with H{sub 2}TTMePP at basic pH and through formation of stacking complexes are able to quench its ability to emission. - Highlights: • Association study of water soluble cationic porphyrin with uric acid. • Porphyrin absorption spectra undergo the bathochromic and hypochromic effects. • Uric acid interacts with porphyrin in inhibiting manner, quenching its emission. • Fluorescence quenching effect testifies for the partial inactivation of a porphyrin. • The association and fluorescence quenching constants were calculated.

  5. Fluorescence quenching behaviour of uric acid interacting with water-soluble cationic porphyrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena; Borowski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The process of association between 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H 2 TTMePP) and uric acid as well as its sodium salt has been studied in aqueous NaOH solution analysing its absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra. The fluorescence quenching effect observed during interactions porphyrin-uric acid compounds points at the fractional accessibility of the fluorophore for the quencher. The association and fluorescence quenching constants are of the order of magnitude of 10 5 mol −1 . The fluorescence lifetimes and the quantum yields of the porphyrin anionic form were established. The results demonstrate that uric acid and its sodium salt can interact with H 2 TTMePP at basic pH and through formation of stacking complexes are able to quench its ability to emission. - Highlights: • Association study of water soluble cationic porphyrin with uric acid. • Porphyrin absorption spectra undergo the bathochromic and hypochromic effects. • Uric acid interacts with porphyrin in inhibiting manner, quenching its emission. • Fluorescence quenching effect testifies for the partial inactivation of a porphyrin. • The association and fluorescence quenching constants were calculated

  6. Association of serum uric acid with blood urea and serum creatinine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, A.U.; Ahmad, Z.; Rehman, J.U.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hyperuricemia can cause serious health problems including renal insufficiency. Hyperuricemia is associated with many diseases including Hypertension, Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertriglyceridemia and Obesity. Objective of the present study was to study the Association of Serum Uric Acid with Blood Urea and Serum Creatinine. Methods: Eighty subjects, aged above 40, having blood urea more than 40 mg/dl and serum Creatinine more than 1.3 mg/dl were selected. 52.5 % subjects were male. Eighty subjects were selected as control group matching the age and sex with study group with normal blood urea and serum Creatinine. Results: Serum Uric Acid was found to be raised in 33 patients. Mean Serum Uric Acid value was 6.98+-2.021 in males (p<0.05) and 5.054+-2.324 in females (p<0.05). Conclusion: Serum Uric Acid is raised in patients with impaired renal function (p<0.05). Levels of increased Serum Uric Acid were not significantly associated with the cause of renal disease. (author)

  7. Uric Acid Induces Renal Inflammation via Activating Tubular NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yang; Fang, Li; Jiang, Lei; Wen, Ping; Cao, Hongdi; He, Weichun; Dai, Chunsun; Yang, Junwei

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a pathologic feature of hyperuricemia in clinical settings. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here, infiltration of T cells and macrophages were significantly increased in hyperuricemia mice kidneys. This infiltration of inflammatory cells was accompanied by an up-regulation of TNF-α, MCP-1 and RANTES expression. Further, infiltration was largely located in tubular interstitial spaces, suggesting a role for tubular cells in hyperuricemia-induced inflammation. In cultured tubular epithelial cells (NRK-52E), uric acid, probably transported via urate transporter, induced TNF-α, MCP-1 and RANTES mRNA as well as RANTES protein expression. Culture media of NRK-52E cells incubated with uric acid showed a chemo-attractive ability to recruit macrophage. Moreover uric acid activated NF-κB signaling. The uric acid-induced up-regulation of RANTES was blocked by SN 50, a specific NF-κB inhibitor. Activation of NF-κB signaling was also observed in tubule of hyperuricemia mice. These results suggest that uric acid induces renal inflammation via activation of NF-κB signaling. PMID:22761883

  8. EDTA assisted synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for electrochemical sensing of uric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchana, P; Sekar, C

    2014-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles have been synthesized using EDTA as organic modifier by a simple microwave irradiation method and its application for the selective determination of uric acid (UA) has been demonstrated. Electrochemical behavior of uric acid at HA nanoparticle modified glassy carbon electrode (E-HA/GCE) has been investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and amperometry. The E-HA modified electrode exhibits efficient electrochemical activity towards uric acid sensing without requiring enzyme or electron mediator. Amperometry studies revealed that the fabricated electrode has excellent sensitivity for uric acid with the lowest detection limit of 142 nM over a wide concentration range from 1 × 10(-7) to 3 × 10(-5)M. Moreover, the studied E-HA modified GC electrode exhibits a good reproducibility and long-term stability and an admirable selectivity towards the determination of UA even in the presence of potential interferents. The analytical performance of this sensor was evaluated for the detection of uric acid in human urine and blood serum samples. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Risk of Incident Hypertriglyceridemia: A Longitudinal Population-based Epidemiological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rongjiong; Ren, Ping; Chen, Qingmei; Yang, Tianmeng; Chen, Changxi; Mao, Yushan

    2017-09-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is one of lipid metabolism abnormalities; however, it is still debatable whether serum uric acid is a cause or a consequence of hypertriglyceridemia. We performed the study to investigate the longitudinal association between serum uric acid levels and hypertriglyceridemia. The study included 4190 subjects without hypertriglyceridemia. The subjects had annual health examinations for 8 years to assess incident hyperglyceridemia, and the subjects were divided into groups based on the serum uric acid quartile. Cox regression models were used to analyze the risk factors of development hypertriglyceridemia. During follow-up, 1461 (34.9%) subjects developed hypertriglyceridemia over 8 years of follow-up. The cumulative incidence of hypertriglyceridemia was 28.2%, 29.1%, 36.9%, and 45.6% in quartile 1,2,3 and 4, respectively ( P for trend uric acid levels were independently and positively associated with the risk of incident hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia has become a serious public health problem. This longitudinal study demonstrates that high serum uric acid levels increase the risk of hypertriglyceridemia. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  10. Low antioxidant status of serum bilirubin, uric acid, albumin and creatinine in patients with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dehao; Su, Zhongqian; Wu, Shengjie; Bi, Yong; Li, Xiang; Li, Jia; Lou, Kangliang; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Oxidative stress and low antioxidant status play a major role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune condition targeting the neuromuscular junction, and its antioxidant status is still controversial. Our study aimed to investigate the correlation between the clinical characteristics of MG and the serum antioxidant status of bilirubin (Tbil, Dbil and Ibil), uric acid, albumin and creatinine. We measured serum antioxidant molecule levels of bilirubin (Tbil, Dbil and Ibil), uric acid, albumin and creatinine in 380 individuals, including 166 MG and 214 healthy controls. We found that MG patients had significantly lower serum levels of bilirubin (Tbil, Dbil and Ibil), uric acid, albumin and creatinine than healthy controls, whether male or female. Moreover, it was also shown in our study that uric acid, albumin and creatinine levels in patients with MG were correlated with disease activity and classifications performed by the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America. Our findings demonstrated that serum levels of bilirubin (Tbil, Dbil and Ibil), uric acid, albumin and creatinine were reduced in patients with MG. This suggested an active oxidative process in MG patients who had low antioxidant status.

  11. [The role of uric acid in the insulin resistance in children and adolescents with obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miranda, Josiane Aparecida; Almeida, Guilherme Gomide; Martins, Raissa Isabelle Leão; Cunha, Mariana Botrel; Belo, Vanessa Almeida; dos Santos, José Eduardo Tanus; Mourão-Júnior, Carlos Alberto; Lanna, Carla Márcia Moreira

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the association between serum uric acid levels and insulin resistance in children and adolescents with obesity. Cross-sectional study with 245 children and adolescents (134 obese and 111 controls), aged 8 to 18 years. The anthropometric variables (weight, height and waist circumference), blood pressure and biochemical parameters were collected. The clinical characteristics of the groups were analyzed by t-test or chi-square test. To evaluate the association between uric acid levels and insulin resistance the Pearson's test and logistic regression were applied. The prevalence of insulin resistance was 26.9%. The anthropometric variables, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and biochemical variables were significantly higher in the obese group (p<0.001), except for the high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol. There was a positive and significant correlation between anthropometric variables and uric acid with HOMA-IR in the obese and in the control groups, which was higher in the obese group and in the total sample. The logistic regression model that included age, gender and obesity, showed an odds ratio of uric acid as a variable associated with insulin resistance of 1.91 (95%CI 1.40 to 2.62; p<-0.001). The increase in serum uric acid showed a positive statistical correlation with insulin resistance and it is associated with and increased risk of insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Maternal fructose drives placental uric acid production leading to adverse fetal outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Zeenat A.; Thompson, Alysha; Chi, Maggie; Cusumano, Andrew; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Al-Hammadi, Noor; Saben, Jessica L.; Moley, Kelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal metabolic diseases increase offspring risk for low birth weight and cardiometabolic diseases in adulthood. Excess fructose consumption may confer metabolic risks for both women and their offspring. However, the direct consequences of fructose intake per se are unknown. We assessed the impact of a maternal high-fructose diet on the fetal-placental unit in mice in the absence of metabolic syndrome and determined the association between maternal serum fructose and placental uric acid levels in humans. In mice, maternal fructose consumption led to placental inefficiency, fetal growth restriction, elevated fetal serum glucose and triglyceride levels. In the placenta, fructose induced de novo uric acid synthesis by activating the activities of the enzymes AMP deaminase and xanthine oxidase. Moreover, the placentas had increased lipids and altered expression of genes that control oxidative stress. Treatment of mothers with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol reduced placental uric acid levels, prevented placental inefficiency, and improved fetal weights and serum triglycerides. Finally, in 18 women delivering at term, maternal serum fructose levels significantly correlated with placental uric acid levels. These findings suggest that in mice, excess maternal fructose consumption impairs placental function via a xanthine oxidase/uric acid-dependent mechanism, and similar effects may occur in humans. PMID:27125896

  13. Uric acid level as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker of cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venícius Djalma da Rosa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have suggested an association between hyperuricemia and cardiovascular diseases, resulting in a causal relationship, increased cardiovascular morbidity and improving clinical outcomes by means of pharmacotherapy for reducing uric acid levels. Though still uncertain, most studies suggest that levels of uric acid might be a useful and inexpensive biomarker for diagnosis and / or prognosis. Therefore, this literature review presents the most recent major evidence of uric acid related to cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, coronary artery disease, heart failure, hypertension, myocardial infarction and mortality from cardiovascular disease. The most controversial data refer to coronary artery disease, possibly because it is a syndrome that includes two conditions - unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction - which makes the analysis low in specificity. Several articles have demonstrated that uric acid, especially hyperuricemia, is a good diagnosis predictor (hypertension and acute myocardial infarction and prognosis (coronary artery disease and heart failure, however few studies have evaluated the performance of the marker in terms of ROC curve, making it impossible to deliver well-founded conclusions in this regard. Considering the results of most of the evidence, accessibility and low cost of measurements of uric acid levels, we recommend to integrate both the evaluation of hyperuricemia and the analysis of other risk factors.

  14. Refrigeration is not necessary for measurement of uric acid in patients treated with rasburicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Neal I; Melanson, Stacy E F; McDonnell, Anne; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Jarolim, Petr

    2013-05-01

    Rasburicase, used for hyperuricemia of tumor lysis syndrome, retains activity at room temperature (RT) in in vitro studies. Cold-temperature handling is recommended for uric acid measurements in patients receiving rasburicase: collection in prechilled tubes, transportation on ice, and 4°C centrifugation. We performed a prospective study of these requirements. A total of 65 pairs of blood samples were collected from 34 patients, 12-24 h after receiving rasburicase. The effect of temperature on uric acid concentration was tested on paired samples handled either at RT or when cold: centrifugation (18 sample pairs), collection tube (14 pairs), transportation (24 pairs), and nine pairs were retested after 1 h at RT. No significant temperature effect was seen on the uric acid measurements for any of the cold-handling steps: proportional, absolute biases were -1.4%, -0.06 mg/dL (centrifugation), -1.5%, +0.02 mg/dL (tube temperature), and -2.2%, -0.01 mg/dL (transportation). A 20% negative bias was seen in samples retested after 1 h at RT. Cold handling (prechilled tubes, iced transportation, 4°C centrifugation) was equivalent to RT for immediate measurement. An additional 1 h delay at RT led to a 20% decrease in uric acid. The cold handling measures required by the manufacturer are not necessary for uric acid testing of patients receiving rasburicase treatment, if testing is performed without delay.

  15. Elimination of sulfates from wastewaters by natural aluminosilicate modified with uric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. De Los Santos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural aluminosilicate activated by a heat/acid treatment, followed by modification with uric acid was used to remove sulfates for treatment of wastewater effluent. Natural aluminosilicates were studied in every stage of the modification (namely activation, modification with uric acid, and after sulfates absorption by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, spectroscopy X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, surface area (BET, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and Z potential. More than 60% of the initial concentration of sulfates (500 mg/l was removed with the natural aluminosilicate modified with uric acid. Absorption isotherms rendered a mechanism with contributions from both Langmuir and Freundlich mechanisms. This study opens the path for the use of natural and abundant local material to remove sulfates using a modifier already present in wastewater effluents as contaminant.

  16. Serum uric acid levels during leprosy reaction episodes

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    Yvelise T. Morato-Conceicao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes that occur mainly in the multibacillary forms of the disease. The reactions are classified as type 1 (reverse reaction or type 2 (erythema nodosum leprosum. Leprosy-associated oxidative stress has been widely demonstrated. Several recent studies have shown uric acid (UA to have antioxidative effects under pathologic conditions. The objective of this study was to assess serum levels of UA in patients with leprosy reactions, with the aim of monitoring their levels before and after treatment, compared with levels in leprosy patients without reactions. Methods. The study included patients aged 18–69 years assisted at a leprosy treatment reference center in the Central Region of Brazil. Patients who were pregnant; were using immunosuppressant drugs or immunobiologicals; or had an autoimmune disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or tuberculosis were excluded. Upon recruitment, all individuals were clinically assessed for skin lesions and neural or systemic impairment. Some patients had already completed treatment for leprosy, while others were still undergoing treatment or had initiated treatment after being admitted. The treatment of the reactional episode was started only after the initial evaluation. Laboratory assessments were performed upon admission (baseline and at approximately 30 and 60 days (time points 1 and 2, respectively. Results. A total of 123 leprosy patients were recruited between June 2012 and June 2015; among them, 56, 42, and 25 presented with type 1, type 2, and no reactions, respectively. Serum UA levels were significantly reduced in patients with type 2 leprosy reactions compared with patients in the control group and remained lower in the two subsequent assessments, after initiation of anti-reaction treatments, with similar values to those recorded before the treatment. Discussion. The decreased serum UA levels in

  17. Suitable Concentrations of Uric Acid Can Reduce Cell Death in Models of OGD and Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Yang, Ning; Lin, Shao-Peng; Zhang, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral infarction (CI) is a common clinical cerebrovascular disease, and to explore the pathophysiological mechanisms and seek effective treatment means are the hotspot and difficult point in medical research nowadays. Numerous studies have confirmed that uric acid plays an important role in CI, but the mechanism has not yet been clarified. When treating HT22 and BV-2 cells with different concentrations of uric acid, uric acid below 450 μM does not have significant effect on cell viability, but uric acid more than 500 μM can significantly inhibit cell viability. After establishing models of OGD (oxygen-glucose deprivation) with HT22 and BV-2 cells, uric acid at a low concentration (50 μM) cannot improve cell viability and apoptosis, and Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels during OGD/reoxygenation; a suitable concentration (300 μM) of uric acid can significantly improve cell viability and apoptosis, and reduce ROS production during OGD/reoxygenation; but a high concentration (1000 μM) of uric acid can further reduce cell viability and enhance ROS production. After establishing middle cerebral artery occlusion of male rats with suture method, damage and increase of ROS production in brain tissue could be seen, and after adding suitable concentration of uric acid, the degree of brain damage and ROS production was reduced. Therefore, different concentrations of uric acid should have different effect, and suitable concentrations of uric acid have neuroprotective effect, and this finding may provide guidance for study on the clinical curative effect of uric acid.

  18. Is uric acid an indicator of metabolic syndrome in the first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes?

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    Rezvan Salehidoost

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine whether uric acid levels are associated with the components of metabolic syndrome and whether uric acid is a significant factor for development of metabolic syndrome in the first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients as high risk group. Materials and Methods: A total of 694 (182 male and 512 female, aged 30-69 years first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients during 2007-2011 were enrolled. The height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, lipid profile and uric acid concentrations were measured. Metabolic syndrome was defined by NCEP-ATP III. Results: Uric acid was associated with waist circumference, blood pressure, triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol level in both sexes (r = 0.1-0.3, P < 0.05. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the fourth quartile of uric acid (64.4% of male and 60.2% of female population was significantly more than those in the first (25.5% of male and 31.2% of female population and second quartiles (33.3% of male and 32.0% of female population. The mean of uric acid in people with metabolic syndrome was significantly higher than in those without (6.6 ± 1.2 mg/ dL vs. 5.8 ± 1.2 mg/dL; P = 0.0001.The age-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval of uric acid for metabolic syndrome in univariate analysis were [1.60 (1.23-2.07; P = 0.008] for men and [1.61 (1.34-1.92; P = 0.0001] for women but the effect of uric acid in multivariate logistic regression was not significant. Conclusions: Uric acid is associated with majority of the metabolic syndrome components. People with metabolic syndrome have higher uric acid levels. However, uric acid probably is not an independent factor to predict the metabolic syndrome.

  19. Is uric acid an indicator of metabolic syndrome in the first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehidoost, Rezvan; Aminorroaya, Ashraf; Zare, Maryam; Amini, Massoud

    2012-11-01

    To determine whether uric acid levels are associated with the components of metabolic syndrome and whether uric acid is a significant factor for development of metabolic syndrome in the first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients as high risk group. A total of 694 (182 male and 512 female, aged 30-69 years) first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients during 2007-2011 were enrolled. The height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, lipid profile and uric acid concentrations were measured. Metabolic syndrome was defined by NCEP-ATP III. Uric acid was associated with waist circumference, blood pressure, triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol level in both sexes (r = 0.1-0.3, P metabolic syndrome in the fourth quartile of uric acid (64.4% of male and 60.2% of female population) was significantly more than those in the first (25.5% of male and 31.2% of female population) and second quartiles (33.3% of male and 32.0% of female population). The mean of uric acid in people with metabolic syndrome was significantly higher than in those without (6.6 ± 1.2 mg/dL vs. 5.8 ± 1.2 mg/dL; P = 0.0001). The age-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of uric acid for metabolic syndrome in univariate analysis were [1.60 (1.23-2.07); P = 0.008] for men and [1.61 (1.34-1.92); P = 0.0001] for women but the effect of uric acid in multivariate logistic regression was not significant. Uric acid is associated with majority of the metabolic syndrome components. People with metabolic syndrome have higher uric acid levels. However, uric acid probably is not an independent factor to predict the metabolic syndrome.

  20. Simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid, uric acid and homovanillic acid at copper modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvaraju, T.; Ramaraj, R.

    2007-01-01

    The copper was deposited on glassy carbon (GC) and indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes by electrochemical method. The copper structures on electrode were characterized by atomic force microscope, X-ray diffractometeric pattern and differential pulse voltammetric studies. Optimal conditions for uniform growth of copper structures on the electrode were established. Voltammetric sensor was fabricated using the copper deposited GC electrode for the simultaneous detection and determination of uric acid (UA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in the presence of excess concentrations of ascorbic acid (AA). The voltammetric signals due to AA and UA oxidation were well separated with a potential difference of 400 mV and AA did not interfere with the measurement of UA and HVA at the GC/Cu electrode. Linear calibration curves were obtained in the concentration range 1-40 μM for AA and 20-50 μM for UA at physiological pH and a detection limit of 10 nM of UA in the presence of 10-fold excess concentrations of AA was achieved. The simultaneous detection of submicromolar concentrations of AA, UA and HVA was achieved at the GC/Cu electrode. The practical utility of the present GC/Cu modified electrode was demonstrated by measuring the AA content in Vitamin C tablet, UA content in human urine and blood serum samples with satisfactory results

  1. Proton-coupled electron transfer promotes the reduction of ferrylmyoglobin by uric acid under physiological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Zawadzki, Andressa; Cardoso, Daniel R.; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2017-01-01

    The hypervalent muscle pigment ferrylmyoglobin, MbFe(IV)]O, is not reduced by urate monoanions at physiological conditions despite a strong driving force of around 30 kJ mol1 while for low pH, uric acid was found to reduce protonated ferrylmyoglobin, MbFe(IV)]O,H+, efficiently in a bimolecular...... reaction with k1 ¼ 1.1 0.1 103 L mol1 s1, DH‡ ¼ 66.1 0.1 kJ mol1 and DS‡ ¼ 35.2 0.2 J mol1 K1. For intermediate pH, like for anaerobic muscles and for meat, proton-oupled electron transfer occurs in a transition state, {MbFe(IV)]O/H+/urate}‡, which is concluded to be formed from uric acid and Mb...... in uric acid concentration may serve as an inherent protection against radical formation by ferrylmyoglobin...

  2. Analysis of the binding interaction in uric acid - Human hemoglobin system by spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2017-05-01

    The binding interaction between human hemoglobin and uric acid has been studied for the first time, by UV-vis absorption and steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence techniques. Characteristic effects observed for human hemoglobin intrinsic fluorescence during interaction with uric acid at neutral pH point at the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes. All the calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer parameters confirm the existence of static quenching. The results of synchronous fluorescence measurements indicate that the fluorescence quenching of human hemoglobin originates both from Trp and Tyr residues and that the addition of uric acid could significantly hinder the physiological functions of human hemoglobin.

  3. Identification of low-frequency variants associated with gout and serum uric acid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulem, Patrick; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Walters, G Bragi

    2011-01-01

    ,506 individuals for whom serum uric acid measurements were available. We identified a low-frequency missense variant (c.1580C>G) in ALDH16A1 associated with gout (OR = 3.12, P = 1.5 × 10(-16), at-risk allele frequency = 0.019) and serum uric acid levels (effect = 0.36 s.d., P = 4.5 × 10(-21)). We confirmed.......48 s.d., P = 4.5 × 10(-16)). This variant is close to a common variant previously associated with serum uric acid levels. This work illustrates how whole-genome sequencing data allow the detection of associations between low-frequency variants and complex traits....

  4. Identification of low-frequency variants associated with gout and serum uric acid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulem, Patrick; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Walters, G Bragi

    2011-01-01

    the association with gout by performing Sanger sequencing on 6,017 Icelanders. The association with gout was stronger in males relative to females. We also found a second variant on chromosome 1 associated with gout (OR = 1.92, P = 0.046, at-risk allele frequency = 0.986) and serum uric acid levels (effect = 0......We tested 16 million SNPs, identified through whole-genome sequencing of 457 Icelanders, for association with gout and serum uric acid levels. Genotypes were imputed into 41,675 chip-genotyped Icelanders and their relatives, for effective sample sizes of 968 individuals with gout and 15.......48 s.d., P = 4.5 × 10(-16)). This variant is close to a common variant previously associated with serum uric acid levels. This work illustrates how whole-genome sequencing data allow the detection of associations between low-frequency variants and complex traits....

  5. Serum uric acid levels and long-term outcomes in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaoka, Tokiko; Mochizuki, Toshio; Takei, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku

    2014-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but data regarding the relationship between serum uric acid levels and the long-term outcomes of CKD patients have been limited. The present study evaluated the associations between baseline serum uric acid levels with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The subjects of this study were 551 stage 2-4 CKD patients. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relationship between serum uric acid tertiles and all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, 50 % reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and development of ESRD, initially without adjustment, and then after adjusting for several groups of covariates. The mean age of the study subjects was 58.5 years, 59.3 % were men, and 10.0 % had diabetes. The mean eGFR was 42.02 ± 18.52 ml/min/1.73 m(2). In all subjects, the mean serum uric acid level was 6.57 ± 1.35 mg/dl, and 52.2 % of study subjects were on hypouricemic therapy (allopurinol; 48.3 %) at baseline. Thirty-one patients (6.1 %) died during a follow-up period of approximately 6 years. There was no significant association between serum uric acid level and all-cause mortality, CVD mortality, development of ESRD and 50 % reduction in eGFR in the unadjusted Cox models. In the adjusted models, hyperuricemia was found to be associated with all-cause mortality and CVD mortality after adjustment with CVD risk factors, kidney disease factors, and allopurinol, but not associated with development of ESRD and 50 % reduction in eGFR. The results of this study showed that hyperuricemia but not serum uric acid levels were associated with all-cause mortality, CVD mortality after adjustments with CVD risk factors, kidney disease factors, and allopurinol in stage 2-4 CKD patients.

  6. Admission Serum Uric Acid Levels and In-Hospital Outcomes in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

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    Abu Sadique Abdullah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uric acid is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Hospital admission for ischemic heart disease (IHD is increasing rapidly in our country. Although studies were conducted abroad regarding association of serum uric acid with in-hospital outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS, no data is yet available to show the association in our country. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the association of serum uric acid level on admission with in-hospital outcomes of the patients with ACS. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional comparative study was done in the Department of Cardiology, Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH from January to December 2012. After proper ethical consideration total 93 ACS patients were enrolled in the study by nonrandom sampling. Serum uric acid of all subjects was measured within 24 hours of admission. Then in-hospital outcomes were observed in all subjects. Results: The frequency of hyperuricemia among ACS patients was 24.7% (22.54% in male and 31.82% in female. Hyperuricemic patients significantly developed heart failure (30.4% vs 11.4%, p=0.032 and conduction defect (13.0% vs 1.4%, p=0.017 than normouricemic subjects. The mean ejection fraction was significantly lower in hyperuricemic patients than patients with normal uric acid level (50.87 ± 10.27% vs 55.94 ± 6.66%. The mean ± SD duration of hospital stay of hyperuricemic group was significantly longer in patients with ACS (8.26 ± 1.18 vs 7.51±1.18 days, p=0.010. Conclusion: The measurement of serum uric acid level, an easily available and inexpensive biochemical tool, might turn out as a valuable risk marker for prediction of in-hospital outcomes in patients with ACS.

  7. Uric acid is associated with inflammation, coronary microvascular dysfunction, and adverse outcomes in postmenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Megha; Matteson, Eric L.; Herrmann, Joerg; Gulati, Rajiv; Rihal, Charanjit S.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid is a risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) in postmenopausal women but the association with inflammation and coronary microvascular endothelial dysfunction (CED) is not well-defined. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship of serum uric acid (SUA), inflammatory markers and CED. In this prospective cohort study, serum uric acid, hsCRP levels, and neutrophil count were measured in 229 postmenopausal women who underwent diagnostic catheterization, were found to have no obstructive CAD and underwent coronary microvascular function testing, to measure coronary blood flow (CBF) response to intracoronary acetylcholine. The average age was 58 years (IQR 52, 66) years. Hypertension was present in 48%, type 2 diabetes mellitus in 5.6%, and hyperlipidemia in 61.8%. CED was diagnosed in 59% of postmenopausal women. Mean uric acid level was 4.7 ± 1.3 mg/dL. Postmenopausal women with CED had significantly higher SUA compared to patients without CED (4.9 ± 1.3 vs. 4.4 ± 1.3 mg/dL; p=0.02). There was a significant correlation between SUA and % change in CBF to acetylcholine (p=0.009), and this correlation persisted in multivariable analysis. SUA levels were significantly associated with increased neutrophil count (p=0.02) and hsCRP levels (p=0.006) among patients with CED, but not those without CED. Serum uric acid is associated with coronary microvascular endothelial dysfunction in postmenopausal women and may be related to inflammation. These findings link serum uric acid levels to early coronary atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. PMID:27993955

  8. Serum Uric Acid as a Predictor of Perinatal Outcome in Women with Pre-Eclampsia

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    Jwan Muhammad Zangana

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Pre-eclampsia is one of the medical complication of pregnancy and contributes significantly to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Hyperuricemia is often associated with preeclampsia. The objective of this study was to assess serum uric acid in group of women with pre-eclampsia and to evaluate its diagnostic effect on perinatal outcome. Patients and methods: This is a hospital-based cross-sectional study conducted in Maternity Teaching Hospital in Erbil city, Iraq. Convenient sample size of 200 participants preeclamptic pregnant women with ≥ 34 weeks of gestation in different level of hypertension were included. After getting informed consent from participant who were diagnosed with pre-eclampsia (hypertension and proteinuria, all sociodemographic information was collected from 1st June 2017 to 19th January 2018. Blood samples were obtained to assess serum uric acid besides other investigation routinely done and fetal outcome (birth weight, gestational age, intrauterine death, Apgar score, admission to neonatal care unit, intrauterine growth restriction and early neonatal death was evaluated. Results: Serum uric acid was ≥ 6 mg/dL in 127 (63.5% among all pre-eclamptic women. There was positive significant association between means of serum uric acid at different levels of hypertension with p=0.000 in ANOVA and x2 test. This study revealed significant association between increased level of serum uric acid and bad fetal outcome (birth weight, gestational age, intrauterine death, Apgar score, admission to neonatal care unit, intrauterine growth restriction and early neonatal death and Apgar score in 1st minute. Conclusion: This study revealed significant raised level of serum uric acid among pre-eclamptic women and significant effect on fetal outcome and perinatal morbidity and mortality.

  9. Serum Uric Acid Correlation with Echocardiographic Indices in Children with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

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    Shahrokh Rajaei

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMP is a myocardial disease characterized by dilated left ventricle or both ventricles and reduced contractility of the myocardium. In patients suffering from DCMP, the serum level of uric acid may increase. This research was designed to evaluate the effect of the serum level of uric acid on systolic and diastolic functions in patients with DCMP.Methods: This case-control study was performed on 30 patients with DCMP aged between 1 month and 12 years who were consistent with a control group in terms of age and gender. Patients suffering from congenital and acquired cardiac, renal, metabolic, endocrine, musculoskeletal, neurologic, vascular, and hematologic diseases were excluded. After physical examination, chest X-ray, and electrocardiography, systolic and diastolic parameters were measured via echocardiography, and fasting serum uric acid level was measured. The data were analyzed using the t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient.Results: The average age of the patients in the case and control groups was 7.28 and 7.13 years, respectively. There were 15 boys, and the rest were girls. The serum uric acid level in the case and control groups was 6.22 and 3.31 mg/dl, respectively; the difference was statistically significant (P value <0.01. There was a significant correlation between serum uric acid level and left ventricular isovolumic contraction, interventricular septal diameter, left ventricular septal diameter in diastole, and fractional shortening (P value <0.05.Conclusion: In children with DCMP, the serum level of uric acid increases significantly and this increase is significantly correlated with some of left heart echocardiographic parameters. This test is of predictive value for disease progression.

  10. Prenatal Earthquake Exposure and Midlife Uric Acid Levels Among Chinese Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chunpeng; Li, Yanping; Cui, Liufu; Cai, Jianfang; Shi, Jihong; Cheng, Feon W; Li, Yuqing; Curhan, Gary C; Wu, Shouling; Gao, Xiang

    2017-05-01

    To test whether prenatal exposure to earthquake (as a surrogate for acute prenatal stress) could have unfavorable effects on uric acid levels later in life. We included 536 individuals who had been prenatally exposed to the Tangshan earthquake in 1976, and 536 sex- and age-matched individuals without that exposure. Serum uric acid concentrations were measured based on fasting blood samples, which were repeatedly collected in 2006, 2008, and 2010. Mean uric acid concentrations in 2010 and the increasing rate from 2006 to 2010 were compared between the 2 groups, after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, serum concentrations of glucose, triglycerides, C-reactive protein level, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and other potential confounders. We also used multiple logistic regression to estimate the risk of hyperuricemia (>416 μmole/liter in men or >357 μmole/liter in women) in 2010 by calculating the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) after adjustment for the previously mentioned covariates. Participants with prenatal exposure to the earthquake had higher concentrations of serum uric acid (adjusted means 315 μmole/liter versus 296 μmole/liter; P = 0.001) and a higher likelihood of having hyperuricemia (multivariate adjusted OR 1.70 [95% CI 1.09-2.66]) in 2010 relative to those without the exposure. Prenatal exposure to the earthquake was consistently significantly associated with a faster increase in uric acid concentration from 2006 to 2010 (P earthquake was associated with higher serum uric acid and higher odds of hyperuricemia in early adulthood. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Significant association between parathyroid hormone and uric acid level in men

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    Chin KY

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kok-Yong Chin,1 Soelaiman Ima Nirwana,1 Wan Zurinah Wan Ngah21Department of Pharmacology, 2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaBackground: Previous reports of patients undergoing parathyroidectomy and of patients receiving teriparatide as antiosteoporotic treatment have suggested a plausible relationship between parathyroid hormone (PTH and uric acid. However, similar data at population level were lacking. The current study aimed to determine the relationship between PTH and uric acid in a group of apparently healthy Malaysian men.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 380 Malay and Chinese men aged 20 years and above, residing in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. Their body anthropometry was measured, and their fasting blood samples were collected for biochemical analysis. The relationship between PTH and uric acid was analyzed using regression analysis.Results: Increased serum PTH level was significantly associated with increased serum uric acid level (β=0.165; P=0.001. Increased PTH level was also significantly associated with the condition of hyperuricemia in the study population (odds ratio [OR], 1.045; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.017–1.075; P=0.002. All analyses were adjusted for age, body mass index, vitamin D, total calcium, inorganic phosphate, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels.Conclusion: There is a significant positive relationship between PTH level and uric acid level in Malaysian men. This relationship and its clinical significance should be further investigated in a larger longitudinal study. Keywords: hyperuricemia, Asian, cross-sectional study, uric acid, urate

  12. Uric acid improves glucose-driven oxidative stress in human ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Sergio; Llull, Laura; Renú, Arturo; Laredo, Carlos; Perez, Belén; Vila, Elisabet; Torres, Ferrán; Planas, Anna M; Chamorro, Ángel

    2015-05-01

    A study was undertaken to test in a subgroup reanalysis of the URICO-ICTUS trial whether uric acid is superior to placebo in improving the functional outcome in patients with acute stroke and hyperglycemia. Patients were part of the URICO-ICTUS trial, a double-blind study that compared the administration of uric acid versus placebo in stroke patients treated with alteplase within 4.5 hours of onset. The effect of therapy on the rate of excellent outcome at 90 days (modified Rankin Scale ≤ 2) in each tertile of admission glucose was assessed with multivariate adjusted models in 409 of the 421 randomized patients who had available pretreatment glucose levels. The effect of therapy on infarct growth was assessed in 72 patients who had longitudinal multimodal brain imaging. Uric acid was associated with an increased rate of excellent outcome in patients with glucose levels in the upper tertile range (odds ratio [OR] = 2.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-8.3). However, the effect was not apparent for patients in the middle tertile (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 0.8-3.6) or lower tertile of glucose (OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 0.5-2.6). Uric acid therapy was more effective than placebo in limiting infarct growth in the upper tertile range (Mann-Whitney U test, p = 0.04) but not in the middle tertile (p = 0.95) or lower tertile of glucose (p = 0.30). Uric acid also proved superior to placebo in reducing infarct growth in patients with early recanalization. Uric acid therapy was associated with reduced infarct growth and improved outcome in patients with hyperglycemia during acute stroke. © 2015 American Neurological Association.

  13. The association between concentration of Uric Acid and metabolic syndrome among adolescents

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    Homeira Rashidi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabolic syndromes are known as a set of risk factors for the development of cardio-vascular disease and diabetes in the individual. The association between concentration of uric acid and metabolic syndrome in adolescents has yet to be established thoroughly. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between uric acid and metabolic syndrome in a sample of adolescents. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from September 23, 2009 to September 22, 2010 in Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran. In this study, 240 individuals aged 10-19 years were randomly selected among participants of the Ahvaz MetS study (120 subjects normal and 120 subjects MetS. The serum levels of UA were measured by a colorimetric method. In the normal group, anyone with abdominal obesity, high systolic or diastolic blood pressure, High-density lipoprotein (HDL≤40 mg/dl, TG≤110 mg/dl, fasting blood sugar (FBS≤100 mg/dl or diabetes was excluded from the study. History of Anticonvulsive drugs or steroids use was the criteria for exclusion for both groups. Results: Of the 240 subjects aged a mean of 14.95±2.64 years, mean of uric acid in metabolic syndrome group was 4.8±1.4 mg/dl and in the control group was 4.18±1.01 mg/d (P=0.001. Participants were divided into three groups based on uric acid levels: ≤4.9 mg/dl, 4.9-5.7 mg/dl and >5.7 mg/dl. The risk of metabolic syndrome was significantly higher in third group of uric acid than the second and first group (odds ratio [OR], 3.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.70 - 8.04 and (OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 2.42-14.35, P<0.001. In addition, uric acid level was inversely associated with hyperglycemia. The ORs of hypertriglyceridemia for the second and third group of uric acid were 4.36 (95% CI, 2.01- 9.47 5.75 (95% CI, 2.43-13.61 respectively, compared with lowest group of UA. Conclusion: The results showed that hyperuricemia was significantly linked with increased risk for

  14. Relation between uric acid and metabolic syndrome in subjects with cardiometabolic risk

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Hellen Abreu da; Carraro, Júlia Cristina Cardoso; Bressan, Josefina; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify possible relations between serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome and its components in a population with cardiometabolic risk. Methods This cross-sectional study included 80 subjects (46 women), with mean age of 48±16 years, seen at the Cardiovascular Health Program. Results The prevalence of hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome was 6.3% and 47.1%, respectively. Uric acid level was significantly higher in individuals with metabolic syndrome (5.1±1.6mg/dL), a...

  15. Could be serum uric acid a risk factor for thrombosis and/or uveitis in Behcet's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atıl, Avcı; Deniz, Avcı

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Serum uric acid level increases in many inflammatory conditions. Uric acid triggers the vascular inflammation and artery damage, which causes to an increased risk of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. It is not clear in the literature whether uric acid contributes to uveitis by similar mechanisms. We investigated whether uric acid level increases in Behcet's disease patients with thrombosis or anterior uveitis. Patients and methods We reviewed the medical records of 914 Behcet's disease. After screening for exclusion criteria, there were 50 Behcet's disease patients with thrombotic complication and as the control group 202 BD patients without any vascular complication were included to the study. In the Anterior uveitis group, there were 53 Behcet's disease patients. The Control group consisted of 39 Behçet's disease patients without eye findings. Results Mean uric acid value was 4.96 ± 1.06 mg/dl in Behcet's disease patients with thrombosis whereas 4.08 ± 0.94 mg/dl in controls, indicating a significant difference ( p uric acid level was greater in Behcet's disease patients that have a thrombotic complication compared to those without thrombotic complication. Uric acid seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of thrombosis. It is concluded that the elevation of serum uric acid level in patients with anterior uveitis with Behcet's disease is not statistically significant.

  16. Anti-Salmonella and uric acid-preserving effect of pine bark tannin in composted poultry litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poultry litter contains appreciable amounts of uric acid which makes it a good crude protein supplement for ruminants, but the litter must be treated to kill bacterial pathogens. Presently, we examined the antimicrobial and uric acid-preserving activity of pine bark tannin during the early stage of...

  17. High serum uric acid levels are a protective factor against unfavourable neurological functional outcome in patients with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Fang; Li, Jiao-Xing; Sun, Xun-Sha; Lai, Rong; Sheng, Wen-Li

    2018-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the association between serum uric acid levels at the onset and prognostic outcome in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Methods We retrospectively analysed the outcomes of 1166 patients with ischaemic stroke who were hospitalized in our centre during August 2008 to November 2012. Correlations of serum uric acid levels and prognostic outcomes were analysed. Results Men had higher serum uric acid levels and better neurological functional outcomes compared with women. There was a strong negative correlation between serum uric acid levels and unfavourable neurological functional outcomes. Generalized estimated equation analysis showed that a higher serum uric acid level (>237 µmol/L) was a protective factor for neurological functional outcome in male, but not female, patients. Among five trial of ORG 10172 in acute stroke treatment classification subtypes, only patients with the large-artery atherosclerosis subtype had a significant protective effect of serum uric acid levels on neurological outcome. Conclusions Our study shows that high serum uric acid levels are a significant protective factor in men and in the large-artery atherosclerosis subtype in patients with ischaemic stroke. This is helpful for determining the prognostic value of serum uric acid levels for neurological outcome of acute ischaemic stroke.

  18. Accurately Diagnosing Uric Acid Stones from Conventional Computerized Tomography Imaging: Development and Preliminary Assessment of a Pixel Mapping Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Vishnu; De, Shubha; Shkumat, Nicholas; Marchini, Giovanni; Monga, Manoj

    2018-02-01

    Preoperative determination of uric acid stones from computerized tomography imaging would be of tremendous clinical use. We sought to design a software algorithm that could apply data from noncontrast computerized tomography to predict the presence of uric acid stones. Patients with pure uric acid and calcium oxalate stones were identified from our stone registry. Only stones greater than 4 mm which were clearly traceable from initial computerized tomography to final composition were included in analysis. A semiautomated computer algorithm was used to process image data. Average and maximum HU, eccentricity (deviation from a circle) and kurtosis (peakedness vs flatness) were automatically generated. These parameters were examined in several mathematical models to predict the presence of uric acid stones. A total of 100 patients, of whom 52 had calcium oxalate and 48 had uric acid stones, were included in the final analysis. Uric acid stones were significantly larger (12.2 vs 9.0 mm, p = 0.03) but calcium oxalate stones had higher mean attenuation (457 vs 315 HU, p = 0.001) and maximum attenuation (918 vs 553 HU, p uric acid stones. A combination of stone size, attenuation intensity and attenuation pattern from conventional computerized tomography can distinguish uric acid stones from calcium oxalate stones with high sensitivity and specificity. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Serum uric acid concentrations and SLC2A9 genetic variation in Hispanic children: The Viva La Familia Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated concentrations of serum uric acid are associated with increased risk of gout and renal and cardiovascular diseases. Genetic studies in adults have consistently identified associations of solute carrier family 2, member 9 (SLC2A9), polymorphisms with variation in serum uric acid. However, it...

  20. Serum uric acid as a surrogate marker of favorable response to bevacizumab treatment in patients with metastatic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcukbiricik, F; Kanbay, M; Solak, Y; Bilici, A; Kanıtez, M; Balık, E; Mandel, N M

    2016-11-01

    Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody which is a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor. It obscures vascularization of tumor tissue and damages intratumoral microcirculation. The damaged intratumoral microcirculation leads to tissue hypoxia and results in increase of uric acid level. The main aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between uric acid change and response to bevacizumab therapy. This study included a total of 158 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who had received bevacizumab therapy. The number of male patients was 100 (63.3 %) while female patients number was 58 (37.7 %). The median age was 61 (29-83). There was relationship between increase of uric acid level of third month uric acid level and stable disease (p uric acid level (p uric acid level (p uric acid in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who favorably responded to chemotherapy with bevacizumab. But further studies are justified to test whether monitoring uric acid levels might predict clinical outcomes of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  1. The association between serum uric acid and the incidence of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus: The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Schaft, N. (Niels); A. Brahimaj (Adela); K.-X. Wen (Ke-Xin); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Dehghan (Abbas)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Limited evidence is available about the association between serum uric acid and sub-stages of the spectrum from normoglycaemia to type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to investigate the association between serum uric acid and risk of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  2. Effect and mechanism of dioscin from Dioscorea spongiosa on uric acid excretion in animal model of hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Jin, Lijun; Liu, Jinchang; Wang, Wei; Yu, Haiyang; Li, Jian; Chen, Qian; Wang, Tao

    2018-03-25

    Dioscin, a spirostane glycoside, the rhizoma of Dioscorea septemloba (Diocoreacea) is used for diuresis, rheumatism, and joints pain. Given the poor solubility and stability of Dioscin, we proposed a hypothesis that Dioscin's metabolite(s) are the active substance(s) in vivo to contribute to the reducing effects on serum uric acid levels. The aim of this study is to identify the active metabolite(s) of Dioscin in vivo and to explore the mechanism of its antihyperuricemic activity. After oral administration of Dioscin in potassium oxonate (PO) induced hyperuricemia rats and adenine-PO induced hyperuricemia mice models, serum uric acid and creatinine levels, clearance of uric acid and creatinine, fractional excretion of uric acid, and renal pathological lesions were determined were used to evaluate the antihyperuricemic effects. Renal glucose transporter-9 (GLUT-9) and organic anion transporter-1 (OAT-1) expressions were analyzed by western blotting method. Renal uric acid excretion was evaluated using stably urate transporter-1 (URAT-1) transfected human epithelial kidney cell line. Intestinal uric acid excretion was evaluated by measuring the transcellular transport of uric acid in HCT116 cells. In hyperuricemia rats, both 25 and 50mg/kg of oral Dioscin decreased serum uric acid levels over 4h. In the hyperuricemia mice, two weeks treatment of Dioscin significantly decreased serum uric acid and creatinine levels, increased clearance of uric acid and creatinine, increased fractional excretion of uric acid, and reduced renal pathological lesions caused by hyperuricemia. In addition, renal GLUT -9 was significantly down-regulated and OAT-1 was up-regulated in Dioscin treated hyperuricemia mice. Dioscin's metabolite Tigogenin significantly inhibited uric acid re-absorption via URAT1 from 10 to 100μM. Diosgenin and Tigogenin increased uric acid excretion via ATP binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2). Decreasing effect of Dioscin on serum uric acid level and

  3. Preliminary Use of Uric Acid as a Biomarker for Wading Birds on Everglades Tree Islands, Florida, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Anne L.; Orem, William H.; Newman, Susan; Gawlik, Dale E.; Lerch, Harry E.; Corum, Margo D.; Van Winkle, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of organic biomarkers and concentrations of phosphorus in soil cores can potentially be used as proxies for historic population densities of wading birds on tree islands in the Florida Everglades. This report focuses on establishing a link between the organic biomarker uric acid found in wading bird guano and the high phosphorus concentrations in tree island soils in the Florida Everglades. Uric acid was determined in soil core sections, in surface samples, and in bird guano by using a method of high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) developed for this purpose. Preliminary results show an overall correlation between uric acid and total phosphorus in three soil cores, with a general trend of decreasing concentrations of both uric acid and phosphorus with depth. However, we have also found no uric acid in a soil core having high concentrations of phosphorus. We believe that this result may be explained by different geochemical circumstances at that site.

  4. Determination of uric acid in the presence of ascorbic acid with hexacyanoferrate lanthanum film modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guangfeng; Meng Jian; Liu Hongying; Jiao Shoufeng; Zhang Wei; Chen Daolei; Fang Bin

    2008-01-01

    A glassy carbon electrode modified with LaHCF was constructed and was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS). The resulting LaHCF modified glassy carbon electrode had a good catalytic character on uric acid (UA) and was used to detect uric acid and ascorbic acid (AA) simultaneously. This modified electrode exhibits potent and persistent electron-mediating behavior followed by well-separated oxidation peaks towards UA and AA with activation overpotential. For UA and AA in mixture, one can well separate from the other with a potential large enough to allow the determination of one in presence of the other. The DPV peak currents obtained increased linearly on the UA in the range of 2.0 x 10 -7 to 1.0 x 10 -4 mol/L with the detection limit (signal-to-noise ratio was 3) for UA 1.0 x 10 -7 mol/L. The proposed method showed excellent selectivity and stability, and the determination of UA and AA simultaneously in urine was satisfactory

  5. Spectrophotometric determination of uric acid and some redeterminations of its solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, D.R.; Plunkett, M.A.; Richards, F.A.

    1954-01-01

    The present study was initiated in order to develop a rapid and accurate method for the determination of uric acid in fresh, brackish, and sea water. It was found that the spectrophotometric determination of uric acid based upon its reaction with arsenophosphotungstic acid reagent in the presence of cyanide ion meets this objective. The absorbancy of the blue complex was measured at 890 m??. Slight variations from Beer's law were generally found. The results show the effects of pH, reaction time, concentration of reagents, and temperature upon color development and precipitate formation. Disodium dihydrogen ethylenediamine tetraacetate (Versene) was used as a buffering and complexirig agent. The results are significant in that they give the absorption spectrum of the blue complex and the effects of variables upon its absorbancy. Studies were made with the method to determine the stability of reagents and standard solutions and to determine the rate of bacterial decomposition of uric acid. Measurements of the solubility of uric acid are reported.

  6. Relation between uric acid and metabolic syndrome in subjects with cardiometabolic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Hellen Abreu da; Carraro, Júlia Cristina Cardoso; Bressan, Josefina; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify possible relations between serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome and its components in a population with cardiometabolic risk. Methods This cross-sectional study included 80 subjects (46 women), with mean age of 48±16 years, seen at the Cardiovascular Health Program. Results The prevalence of hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome was 6.3% and 47.1%, respectively. Uric acid level was significantly higher in individuals with metabolic syndrome (5.1±1.6mg/dL), as compared to those with no syndrome or with pre-syndrome (3.9±1.2 and 4.1±1.3mg/dL, respectively; puric acid levels were significantly higher in men presenting abdominal obesity, and among women with abdominal obesity, lower HDL-c levels and higher blood pressure (pUric acid concentrations were positively related to the occurrence of metabolic syndrome and its components, and there were differences between genders. Our results indicate serum uric acid as a potential biomarker for patients with cardiometabolic risk.

  7. Use of azure-D2 for the measurement of uric acid in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, E J; Price, C P

    1995-09-01

    It has been suggested that achieving a chromogenic endpoint with an absorbance read at 600 nm or greater will reduce the degree of spectral interference in many colorimetric methods. We have examined a uricase/peroxidase-based system utilising a novel oxygen acceptor (azure-D2) as chromogen which produces a chromophor with an absorbance which can be measured at 600 nm (Synermed). Results (median, range, mumol/l) obtained on patient sera (n = 113) using the Synermed method (297; 38-847) were lower than those obtained using a 293 nm uricase method (Du Pont Ltd., 312; 62-874) (p 0.05) from the method group mean (Synermed = -29.315 + 1.0570 NEQAS). Bilirubin had a negative effect (p 0.05) but both ascorbic acid (100 mumol/l reducing uric acid by 68 mumol/l) and N-acetylcysteine (3 mmol/l reducing uric acid by 95 mumol/l) had significant negative effects (p 0.05) but serum storage for 72 hours at room temperature resulted in a significant (p < 0.0005) increase in measured uric acid. The Synermed method is a precise and accurate assay for serum uric acid. However, although generally showing low levels of spectral interference, chemical interferences in the assay from antioxidant components of serum may be problematic. This paper shows that the use of longer wavelengths of detection can reduce the significance of common spectral interferences.

  8. The serum uric acid concentration is not causally linked to diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola, Aila J; Sandholm, Niina; Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Dahlström, Emma; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies have shown a relationship between uric acid concentration and progression of renal disease. Here we studied causality between the serum uric acid concentration and progression of diabetic nephropathy in 3895 individuals with type 1 diabetes in the FinnDiane Study. The renal status was assessed with the urinary albumin excretion rate and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at baseline and at the end of the follow-up. Based on previous genomewide association studies on serum uric acid concentration, 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with good imputation quality were selected for the SNP score. This score was used to assess the causality between serum uric acid and renal complications using a Mendelian randomization approach. At baseline, the serum uric acid concentration was higher with worsening renal status. In multivariable Cox regression analyses, baseline serum uric acid concentration was not independently associated with progression of diabetic nephropathy over a mean follow-up of 7 years. However, over the same period, baseline serum uric acid was independently associated with the decline in eGFR. In the cross-sectional logistic regression analyses, the SNP score was associated with the serum uric acid concentration. Nevertheless, the Mendelian randomization showed no causality between uric acid and diabetic nephropathy, eGFR categories, or eGFR as a continuous variable. Thus, our results suggest that the serum uric acid concentration is not causally related to diabetic nephropathy but is a downstream marker of kidney damage. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Association between vitamin D insufficiency and elevated serum uric acid among middle-aged and elderly Chinese Han women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Association between vitamin D insufficiency and hyperuricemia has not been reported so far. We aimed to study the association of vitamin D insufficiency with elevated serum uric acid among middle-aged and elderly Chinese Han women. METHODS: We collected data from participants residing in Jinchang district of Suzhou from January to May, 2010. Serum uric acid, 25-hydroxy vitamin D and other traditional biomarkers including fasting plasma glucose and blood lipids were determined in 1726 women aged above 30 years. Association between vitamin D insufficiency and elevated uric acid was analyzed in premenopausal and postmenopausal women, respectively. RESULTS: Among postmenopausal women, 25-hydroxy vitamin D level of participants with elevated uric acid was lower than that of those with normal uric acid (median [interquartile range]: 35[28-57] vs 40[32-58], µg/L; P = 0.006. Elevated uric acid was more prevalent in participants with vitamin D insufficiency compared to those without vitamin D insufficiency (16.50% vs 8.08%; P<0.001. Association between vitamin D insufficiency and elevated uric acid was not significant among premenopausal women. However, participants with vitamin D insufficiency were more likely to have elevated uric acid compared with those without vitamin D insufficiency among postmenopausal women (OR, 95% CI: 2.38, 1.47-3.87. Moreover, after excluding individuals with diabetes and/or hypertension, the association of vitamin D insufficiency with elevated uric acid was still significant (OR, 95% CI: 2.48, 1.17-5.44. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D insufficiency was significantly associated with elevated uric acid among postmenopausal Chinese Han women. This study suggested that a clinical trial should be conducted to confirm the association of vitamin D insufficiency with hyperuricemia.

  10. Association of uric acid with risk factors for chronic kidney disease and metabolic syndrome in patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Shingo; Tsutsui, Kensuke; Fujii, Takurou; Yamazaki, Kouji; Anzawa, Ryuko; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2010-01-01

    Hyperuricemia has recently been recognized to not only be a predictor of cardiovascular disease but also a marker of metabolic syndrome. We examined the association between uric acid levels and various clinical parameters, including the components of metabolic syndrome, in essential hypertension. One hundred forty-six untreated Japanese hypertensive patients (mean 58.3 years) without overt cardiovascular disease were divided into low and high uric acid groups by the median uric acid value (cut-off: 6.3 for men and 4.4 mg/dL for women). The high uric acid group had higher serum creatinine (0.74 vs. 0.67 mg/dL, p = 0.019) and a larger body mass index (BMI) (25.2 vs. 23.6 kg/m(2), p = 0.018) compared to the low group. Men from the high uric acid group were younger and had higher blood pressure (BP) than men from the low group. Uric acid levels were correlated with creatinine in both genders, with blood pressure, triglycerides in men only, and with BMI, fasting glucose in women only. Multiple regression analysis also indicated a significant correlation of uric acid with creatinine in both genders, with triglycerides in men, and with glucose in women. Metabolic syndrome (modified NCEP-ATPIII definition) was found in 37.0% of the high uric acid group (men 45.0, women 27.3%) and 20.8% of the low group. Results suggest that an increase of uric acid is associated with impaired renal function and constitutes a risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Uric acid may also be a useful index for initial risk stratification of untreated patients with essential hypertension.

  11. Association of a common nonsynonymous variant in GLUT9 with serum uric acid levels in old order amish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Patrick F; Parsa, Afshin; Chang, Yen-Pei C; Weir, Matthew R; O'Connell, Jeffery R; Mitchell, Braxton D; Shuldiner, Alan R

    2008-09-01

    Uric acid is the primary end product of purine metabolism. Increased serum uric acid levels have been associated with gouty arthritis as well as with a variety of cardiovascular-related phenotypes. This study was undertaken to investigate associations between uric acid levels and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A 500,000-SNP genome-wide association study of serum uric acid levels was performed in a cohort of Old Order Amish from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The scan confirmed a previously identified region on chromosome 4 to be strongly associated with uric acid levels (P = 4.2 x 10(-11) for rs10489070). Followup genotyping revealed that a nonsynonymous coding SNP (Val253Ile; rs16890979) in GLUT9 was most strongly associated with uric acid levels, with each copy of the minor allele associated with a decrease of 0.47 mg/dl in the uric acid level (95% confidence interval 0.31-0.63 [P = 1.43 x 10(-11)]). The effect of this variant tended to be stronger in women than in men (P = 0.16 for sex-genotype interaction). The genotype effect was not modified by the inclusion of several cardiovascular risk factors, suggesting that GLUT9 is directly related to uric acid homeostasis. The SNP identified in the genome-wide scan in the Amish population (rs10489070) was also significantly associated with gout in the Framingham Heart Study (P = 0.004). Our findings indicate that GLUT9, which is expressed in the kidney, may be a novel regulator of uric acid elimination and that a common nonsynonymous variant in this gene contributes to abnormalities in uric acid homeostasis and gout.

  12. Serum uric acid in relation to endogenous reproductive hormones during the menstrual cycle: findings from the BioCycle study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Sunni L.; Dasharathy, Sonya S.; Pollack, Anna Z.; Perkins, Neil J.; Mattison, Donald R.; Cole, Stephen R.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Schisterman, Enrique F.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do uric acid levels across the menstrual cycle show associations with endogenous estradiol (E2) and reproductive hormone concentrations in regularly menstruating women? SUMMARY ANSWER Mean uric acid concentrations were highest during the follicular phase, and were inversely associated with E2 and progesterone, and positively associated with FSH. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY E2 may decrease serum levels of uric acid in post-menopausal women; however, the interplay between endogenous reproductive hormones and uric acid levels among regularly menstruating women has not been elucidated. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The BioCycle study was a prospective cohort study conducted at the University at Buffalo research centre from 2005 to 2007, which followed healthy women for one (n = 9) or 2 (n = 250) menstrual cycle(s). PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Participants were healthy women aged 18–44 years. Hormones and uric acid were measured in serum eight times each cycle for up to two cycles. Marginal structural models with inverse probability of exposure weights were used to evaluate the associations between endogenous hormones and uric acid concentrations. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Uric acid levels were observed to vary across the menstrual cycle, with the lowest levels observed during the luteal phase. Every log-unit increase in E2 was associated with a decrease in uric acid of 1.1% (β = −0.011; 95% confidence interval (CI): −0.019, −0.004; persistent-effects model), and for every log-unit increase in progesterone, uric acid decreased by ∼0.8% (β = −0.008; 95% CI: −0.012, −0.004; persistent-effects model). FSH was positively associated with uric acid concentrations, such that each log-unit increase was associated with a 1.6% increase in uric acid (β = 0.016; 95% CI: 0.005, 0.026; persistent-effects model). Progesterone and FSH were also associated with uric acid levels in acute-effects models. Of 509 cycles, 42 were anovulatory

  13. The association between uric acid levels and different clinical manifestations of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Trine R; Gerke, Oke; Diederichsen, Axel C P

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Uric acid (UA) has been associated with the presence and severity of coronary artery disease. To further assess the role of UA role in coronary artery disease, we investigated UA levels in both healthy asymptomatic middle-aged individuals and in different subgroups of hospitalized patients...

  14. Comparison of antioxidant properties of uric acid and its catabolic products

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papežíková, Ivana; Lojek, Antonín; Číž, Milan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2005), S37 [Cells VI - Biological Days /18./. 24.10.2005-26.10.2005, České Budějovice] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/04/0897 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : antioxidant * uric acid * allantoin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  15. Identification of low-frequency variants associated with gout and serum uric acid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulem, Patrick; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Walters, G Bragi

    2011-01-01

    We tested 16 million SNPs, identified through whole-genome sequencing of 457 Icelanders, for association with gout and serum uric acid levels. Genotypes were imputed into 41,675 chip-genotyped Icelanders and their relatives, for effective sample sizes of 968 individuals with gout and 15......,506 individuals for whom serum uric acid measurements were available. We identified a low-frequency missense variant (c.1580C>G) in ALDH16A1 associated with gout (OR = 3.12, P = 1.5 × 10(-16), at-risk allele frequency = 0.019) and serum uric acid levels (effect = 0.36 s.d., P = 4.5 × 10(-21)). We confirmed...... the association with gout by performing Sanger sequencing on 6,017 Icelanders. The association with gout was stronger in males relative to females. We also found a second variant on chromosome 1 associated with gout (OR = 1.92, P = 0.046, at-risk allele frequency = 0.986) and serum uric acid levels (effect = 0...

  16. Taurine decreased uric acid levels in hyperuricemic rats and alleviated kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ying; Sun, Fang; Gao, Yongchao; Yang, Jiancheng; Wu, Gaofeng; Lin, Shumei; Hu, Jianmin

    2017-07-29

    Hyperuricemia can lead to direct kidney damage. Taurine participates in several renal physiological processes and has been shown as a renoprotective agent. It has been reported that taurine could reduce uric acid levels in diabetic rats, but to date there was no research on the effects of taurine on hyperuricemic rats with kidney injury. In present study, hyperuricemic rat models were induced by intragastric administration of adenine and ethambutol hydrochloride for 10 days, and taurine (1% or 2%) were added in the drinking water 7 days in advance for consecutively 17 days. The results showed that taurine alleviated renal morphological and pathological changes as well as kidney dysfunction in hyperuricemic rats. Taurine could efficiently decrease the elevated xanthine oxidase activities in hyperuricemic rats, indicating its effect on the regulation of uric acid formation. The reabsorption and secretion of uric acid are dependent on a number of urate transporters. Expressions of three urate transporters were significantly down-regulated in hyperuricemic rats, while taurine prevented the decrease of mRNA and protein expression levels of these urate transporters. The results indicate that taurine might play a role in the regulation of renal uric acid excretion. Therefore, taurine could be a promising agent for the treatment of hyperuricemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Uric acid is not associated with diabetic nephropathy and other complications in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilemann-Lyberg, Sascha; Hansen, Tine Willum; Persson, Frederik

    2018-01-01

    Background: To examine the association between plasma uric acid (UA) and the presence of diabetic complications including diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods: This study, which is cross-sectional in design, included 676 Caucasian type 1...

  18. The effect of uric acid on homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction in bovine aortic endothelial cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papežíková, Ivana; Pekarová, Michaela; Lojek, Antonín; Kubala, Lukáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1 (2009), s. 112-115 ISSN 0172-780X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/07/P539 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : uric acid * homocysteine * endothelial dysfunction Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.047, year: 2009

  19. Effect of a reduction in uric acid on renal outcomes during losartan treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miao, Yan; Ottenbros, Stefan A; Laverman, Goos D

    2011-01-01

    Emerging data show that increased serum uric acid (SUA) concentration is an independent risk factor for end-stage renal disease. Treatment with the antihypertensive drug losartan lowers SUA. Whether reductions in SUA during losartan therapy are associated with renoprotection is unclear. We...

  20. Serum Uric Acid, Hyperuricemia and Body Mass Index in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Yen, Chia-Feng; Fang, Wen-Hui; Wu, Sheng-Ru; Chien, Wu-Chien; Loh, Ching-Hui; Chu, Cordia M.

    2009-01-01

    The aims of the preset study were to describe the profile of serum uric acid, the prevalence of hyperuricemia and its risk factors among children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 941 children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities (aged 4-18 years) who participated in annual health…

  1. Chemiluminescence of graphene quantum dots and its application to the determination of uric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amjadi, Mohammad, E-mail: amjadi@tabrizu.ac.ir; Manzoori, Jamshid L.; Hallaj, Tooba

    2014-09-15

    We report on the chemiluminescence (CL) of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) induced by direct chemical oxidation. GQDs were prepared by a simple carbonization method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that Ce(IV) could oxidize GQDs to produce a relatively intense CL emission. The mechanism of CL generation was investigated based on the fluorescence and CL emission spectra. It was attributed to the radiative recombination of oxidant-injected holes and thermally excited electrons in the GQDs. In order to show the analytical application potential of GQDs-Ce(IV) CL system, it was applied to the determination of uric acid. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed CL system exhibited excellent analytical performance for determination of uric acid in the range of 1.0×10{sup −6} M–5.0×10{sup −4} M with a limit of detection of 5.0×10{sup −7} M. The method was applied to the determination of uric acid in human plasma and urine samples, with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • Chemiluminescence of graphene quantum dots by direct oxidation was studied. • Intense CL is produced by reaction of graphene quantum dots with Ce(IV). • The new CL system was applied to determination of uric acid in plasma and urine.

  2. Serum uric acid and lipid profiles in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuai; He, Shuang; Shang, Jun-Kui; Ma, Ming-Ming; Xu, Chang-Shui; Shi, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Jie-Wen

    2016-02-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare, rapidly progressive, and fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting the central nervous system. Brain lipid homeostasis and oxidative stress seem to play an important role in the disease pathogenesis. But little was known whether serum lipids and uric acid (a natural antioxidant) levels changed in patients with prion disease. Here we retrospectively reviewed and compared the serum lipids and uric acid levels of 19 probable sporadic CJD patients and 26 healthy control subjects. We found that the serum uric acid levels in sporadic CJD patients were significantly lower than that in controls (P=0.01). Serum triglycerides, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) were similar in sporadic CJD patients and controls. However, LDL/HDL ratio was lower in sporadic CJD patients (P=0.003). The low serum uric acid and LDL/HDL ratio levels in sporadic CJD indicate that dysfunction in the lipid homeostasis and oxidative stress is associated with sporadic prion disease. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Effect of optimum jogging in a hot environment on uric acid metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Naoto; Ito, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the effect of optimum jogging in a hot environment on uric acid metabolism. Six male subjects performed jogging at each optimum speed. The distance of jogging was 8000 m (400 m track x 20 laps). Each jogging was performed twice, once in the summer season (Sept.) and once in the winter season (March). Blood samples were collected before and at 0, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 24 h after each jogging. Urine was also collected before (after 60 min at rest) and from the onset of jogging until 24 h after. The wet bulb globe temperature (W.B.G.T.) during jogging ranged from 24.9 to 27.8 degrees C in the summer and from 5.9 to 11.4 degrees C in the winter. There was no difference in the duration of each jogging between summer and winter. However, the heart rate (H.R.) during jogging in the summer was higher than that in the winter. Serum uric acid at each rest ranged from, on average, 6.2 to 6.4 (mg/dl). After jogging in the summer, serum uric acid rose significantly (p jogging but also a hot environment affects uric acid metabolism, especially the increase of purine nucleotide degradation.

  4. The association between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome among adolescents in northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Nan; Li, Ping; Jiang, Ran-Hua; Li, Ling; Li, Xue; Li, Liang; Liu, Cong; Tian, Cong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Data about the association between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome in healthy adolescents are sparse. This study examined this association and determined the optimal cutoffs for serum uric acid to predict metabolic syndrome among healthy adolescents. During 2010-2011, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 927 adolescents (53.0% boys) aged 11-16 years from junior and senior high schools in northeast China. All participants received a physical examination and gave venous blood samples. Serum uric acid was positively associated with abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension in boys and with abdominal obesity and dyslipidemia in girls. For those with hyperurecemia, the odds ratios (95% CI) for metabolic syndrome were 7.67 (95% CI, 2.58~22.78) for boys and 4.77 (95% CI, 1.01~22.60) for girls. SUA was a better predictor of metabolic syndrome than fasting glucose, though not as good as waist circumference. Among adolescents in China, serum uric acid level may be a useful predictor of metabolic syndrome.

  5. Positive association between metabolic syndrome and serum uric acid in Wuhan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuan-Qing; Yang, Hong; Zheng, Ju-Sheng; Zeng, Xiao-Yun; Zeng, Wen; Fan, Zhi-Fen; Chen, Min; Wang, Ling; Li, Duo

    2017-03-01

    The objective was to determine whether serum uric acid concentrations were associated with metabolic syndrome in a population from Wuhan. 5,628 subjects (2,838 men, 2,790 women) aged 18-80 years were recruited in Wuhan, China. Biochemical parameters of venous blood were measured by standard methods and metabolic syndrome was defined by Chinese Diabetes Society criteria. Association analysis was performed by logistic regression. 8.2% of the included subjects were confirmed as having metabolic syndrome and 14.4% were confirmed as having hyperuricemia. After multivariable adjustment, logistic regression showed the odds ratios of metabolic syndrome for subjects in the highest quartile of serum uric acid concentration was 2.84 (95% CI: 2.09-3.86) compared with those in the lowest quartile and no gender difference was found. For each component of metabolic syndrome, subjects in the highest quartile of serum uric acid concentrations had increased multivariable odds ratios for high BMI (OR: 3.29, 95% CI: 2.71-3.98), for hypertension (OR: 3.54, 95% CI: 2.93-3.86), for dyslipidemia (OR: 2.49, 95% CI: 1.98-3.14), but not for hyperglycemia (OR: 1.21, 95% CI: 0.87-1.67). Odd ratio of metabolic syndrome was significantly positively associated with serum uric acid concentration among the present sample of 5,628 subjects in Wuhan.

  6. Uric acid metabolism in patients with primary gout and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, J M; Puig, J G; Torres, Rosa J; de Miguel, Eugenio; Martínez, Pedro; Vázquez, J J

    2010-06-01

    Forty-four patients (40 males) with a mean age of 58 years were included in this pilot study. Mean serum urate concentration in patients with and without the metabolic syndrome (MS) was 8.8 mg/dL and 8.1 mg/dL, respectively. Urinary uric acid excretion was 543 mg/day/1.73 m(2) in the former and 609 mg/day/1.73 m(2) in the latter. Uric acid to creatinine ratio was 0.37 mg/mg in patients with the MS and 0.42 mg/mg in those without the MS. Mean serum urate increased from 8.6 mg/dL in subjects with three or more MS components to 10.3 mg/dL in those with five MS components. Serum urate was markedly lower in patients with mild MS (9 patients, 8.6 mg/dL) as compared to severe MS (10 patients, 9.2 mg/dL). In contrast, urinary uric acid to creatinine ratio was 0.42 mg/mg in patients with gout and mild MS and 0.33 mg/mg in gout patients with severe MS. Uric acid underexcretion appears to be more severe in gout patients with the MS. This disturbance appears to be related to the severity of the MS.

  7. PREVALENCE OF HYPERURICAEMIA IN PATIENTS WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME AND ITS ASSOCIATION WITH SERUM URIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakassh Sreedharan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Metabolic syndrome is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. According to International Diabetes Federation, the risk factor associated with metabolic syndrome are central obesity, hypertension, increased fasting glucose, triglyceride level and decreased HDL. Recent studies also found that hyperuricaemia is also associated with insulin resistance and increased cardiovascular disease related morbidity. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences with an objective to find the prevalence of hyperuricaemia among patients with metabolic syndrome and also to find the association of risk factor of metabolic syndrome with serum uric acid level. MATERIALS AND METHODS 103 patients (49 males and 54 females who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in the study. Detailed medical history and physical examination including height, weight, BMI, waist circumference and blood pressure were recorded. Five millilitre of fasting blood sample was taken for lipid profile, serum uric acid and fasting blood glucose. Chi-square test was done to find out the association between metabolic syndrome and risk factors of hyperuricaemia with ‘p’ value of 0.05. Exercise had negative influence on uric acid level in both gender, 41% less in males and 14% less in females. Diet also had positive influence on uric acid levels in both male and female. CONCLUSION The prevalence of hyperuricaemia among males is higher than females. The risk factors of metabolic syndrome like obesity, hypertension and increased cholesterol level are associated with hyperuricaemia.

  8. Replication of the five novel loci for uric acid concentrations and potential mediating mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, Pim; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Johnson, Toby; Caulfield, Mark J.; Navis, Gerjan

    2010-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) is the final catabolic product of purine metabolism and elevated levels are associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A recent meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies totalling 28 141 participants identified five novel loci associated with serum UA levels. In our

  9. Are high uric acid levels in patients with early pre-eclampsia an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To compare the perinatal mortality rates of pre-eclamptic patients with high, normal and low uric acid levels. Design. Prospective analytic study. Setting. Tertiary hospital to which many patients with severe pre-eclampsia are referred. Subjects. Two hundred and twenty-nine patients with severe pre-eclampsia.

  10. Serum uric acid and chronic kidney disease: The role of hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Sedaghat (Sanaz); E.J. Hoorn (Ewout); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); A. Hofman (Albert); O.H. Franco (Oscar); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Dehghan (Abbas)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: There are inconsistent findings on the role of hyperuricemia as an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension has been implicated as a factor influencing the association between serum uric acid and CKD. In this population-based study we

  11. Are high uric acid levels in patients with early pre-eclampsia an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eclampsia.1.2 Perinatal mortality is markedly raised when maternal plasma urate concentrations are raised, especially .... As the use of antihypertensive drugs is associated with increased uric acid values,lJ,l. it is possible that this medication might have ...

  12. Determination of uric acid level by polyaniline and poly (allylamine: Based biosensor

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    Nasrul Wathoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The uric acid biosensor has been much developed by immobilizing uricase enzyme into the membrane of conductive polymer and the membrane of polyelectrolyte such as polyaniline (PANI and poly (allylamine (PAA respectively. The purpose of this research was to create a new amperometric uric acid biosensor by immobilization of uricase in combination between PANI and PAA membranes. The working electrode was Pt plate (0.5 mm. The auxiliary and the reference electrode were Pt wire 0.4 mm and Ag/AgCl respectively. Uricase, uric acid, PAA, pyrrole and glutaraldehyde were supplied from Sigma. All other chemical was obtained from Merck. The biosensor was created by immobilizing of uricase by a glutaraldehyde crosslinking procedure on PANI composite film on the surface of a platinum electrode while the polyelectrolyte layer of PAA were prepared via layer-by-layer assembly on the electrode, functioning as H 2 O 2 -selective film. Standard of deviation, coefficient of variation (CV and coefficient of correlation (r analysis were used in this study. The biosensor had a good linearity with a correlation coefficient of 0.993 and it could be used up to 27 times with the CV value of 3.97%. The presence of other compounds such as glucose and ascorbic acid gave 1.3 ± 1.13% and 3.27 ± 2.29% respectively on the interference effect toward the current response of uric acid biosensor. The polymer combination of PANI and PAA can be used as a selective matrix of uric acid biosensor.

  13. Association of serum uric acid levels with osteoporosis and bone turnover markers in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dan-Dan; Wang, Jie; Hou, Xu-Hong; Bao, Yu-Qian; Zhang, Zhen-Lin; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Wei-Ping

    2018-04-01

    Recent evidence shows that uric acid is protective against some neurological diseases, but can be detrimental in many metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. In this study, we examined the association between serum uric acid levels and bone metabolism in Chinese males and postmenopausal females. A total of 943 males and 4256 postmenopausal females were recruited in Shanghai. The levels of serum uric acid and bone turnover markers (BTMs) were detected along with other biochemical traits. In addition, the fat distribution was calculated through MRI and image analysis software, and bone mineral density (BMD) was determined using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. For postmenopausal females, the prevalence of osteoporosis was significantly lower in the hyperuricemia group compared with the normouricemic group (P=4.65E-06). In females, serum uric acid level was significantly associated with osteoporosis, with odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 0.844 [0.763; 0.933] (P=0.0009) after adjusting for age, body mass index, HbA1c, lean mass, visceral and subcutaneous fat areas, albumin, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3], and parathyroid hormone (PTH). In females, serum uric acid level was positively correlated with the BMD of the femoral neck (β±SE: 0.0463±0.0161; P=0.0042), total hip (β±SE: 0.0433±0.0149; P=0.0038) and L1-4 (β±SE: 0.0628±0.0165; P=0.0001) after further adjusting for age, BMI, HbA1c, lean mass, VFA, SFA, albumin, 25(OH)D3 and PTH. Regarding BTMs, serum uric acid level was negatively correlated with N-terminal procollagen of type I collagen (PINP) in females (β±SE: -0.1311±0.0508; P=0.0100). In summary, our results suggest that uric acid has a protective effect on bone metabolism independent of body composition in Chinese postmenopausal females.

  14. Serum uric acid levels and mortality in the Japanese population: the Yamagata (Takahata) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Keita; Konta, Tsuneo; Ichikawa, Kazunobu; Sato, Hiroko; Suzuki, Natsuko; Kabasawa, Asami; Suzuki, Kazuko; Hirayama, Atsushi; Shibata, Yoko; Watanabe, Tetsu; Kato, Takeo; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Kayama, Takamasa; Kubota, Isao

    2016-12-01

    Serum uric acid level is regulated by gender, dietary habit, genetic predisposition, and renal function, and is associated with the development of renal and cardiovascular diseases. This study prospectively investigated the association between serum uric acid levels and mortality in a community-based population. Three thousand four hundred and eighty-seven subjects regardless of the antihyperuricemic medication (45 % male; mean age 62 years old) from the Takahata town in Japan participated in this study and were followed up for 8 years (median 7.5 years). We examined the association between serum uric acid levels at baseline and the all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively, in this population. One hundred seventy-nine subjects died during the follow-up period, with 49 deaths attributed to cardiovascular causes. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the all-cause mortality was significantly higher along with the increase in serum uric acid levels at baseline among female (Log-rank P uric acid ≥7.0 mg/dL) was an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively, in female [hazard ratio (HR) 5.92, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.10-14.6 for all-cause mortality, and HR 10.7, 95 % CI 1.76-50.2 for cardiovascular mortality], but not male subjects. Hyperuricemia was an independent risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in female, but not among the male subjects in a community-based population.

  15. Serum uric acid levels contribute to new renal damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reátegui-Sokolova, C; Ugarte-Gil, Manuel F; Gamboa-Cárdenas, Rocío V; Zevallos, Francisco; Cucho-Venegas, Jorge M; Alfaro-Lozano, José L; Medina, Mariela; Rodriguez-Bellido, Zoila; Pastor-Asurza, Cesar A; Alarcón, Graciela S; Perich-Campos, Risto A

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to determine whether uric acid levels contribute to new renal damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. This prospective study was conducted in consecutive patients seen since 2012. Patients had a baseline visit and follow-up visits every 6 months. Patients with ≥2 visits were included; those with end-stage renal disease (regardless of dialysis or transplantation) were excluded. Renal damage was ascertained using the SLICC/ACR damage index (SDI). Univariable and multivariable Cox-regression models were performed to determine the risk of new renal damage. Uric acid was included as a continuous and dichotomous (per receiving operating characteristic curve) variable. Multivariable models were adjusted for age at diagnosis, disease duration, socioeconomic status, SLEDAI, SDI, serum creatinine, baseline use of prednisone, antimalarials, and immunosuppressive drugs. One hundred and eighty-six patients were evaluated; their mean (SD) age at diagnosis was 36.8 (13.7) years; nearly all patients were mestizo. Disease duration was 7.7 (6.8) years. Follow-up time was 2.3 (1.1) years. The SLEDAI was 5.2 (4.3) and the SDI 0.8 (1.1). Uric acid levels were 4.5 (1.3) mg/dl. During follow-up, 16 (8.6%) patients developed at least one new point in the renal domain of the SDI. In multivariable analyses, uric acid levels (continuous and dichotomous) at baseline predicted the development of new renal damage (HR 3.21 (1.39-7.42), p 0.006; HR 18.28 (2.80-119.48), p 0.002; respectively). Higher uric acid levels contribute to the development of new renal damage in SLE patients independent of other well-known risk factors for such occurrence.

  16. Uric acid promotes apoptosis in human proximal tubule cells by oxidative stress and the activation of NADPH oxidase NOX 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Verzola

    Full Text Available Mild hyperuricemia has been linked to the development and progression of tubulointerstitial renal damage. However the mechanisms by which uric acid may cause these effects are poorly explored. We investigated the effect of uric acid on apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK-2. Increased uric acid concentration decreased tubule cell viability and increased apoptotic cells in a dose dependent manner (up to a 7-fold increase, p<0.0001. Uric acid up-regulated Bax (+60% with respect to Ctrl; p<0.05 and down regulated X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein. Apoptosis was blunted by Caspase-9 but not Caspase-8 inhibition. Uric acid induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane, elevations in reactive oxygen species and a pronounced up-regulation of NOX 4 mRNA and protein (p<0.05. In addition, both reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis was prevented by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI as well as by Nox 4 knockdown. URAT 1 transport inhibition by probenecid and losartan and its knock down by specific siRNA, blunted apoptosis, suggesting a URAT 1 dependent cell death. In summary, our data show that uric acid increases the permissiveness of proximal tubule kidney cells to apoptosis by triggering a pathway involving NADPH oxidase signalling and URAT 1 transport. These results might explain the chronic tubulointerstitial damage observed in hyperuricaemic states and suggest that uric acid transport in tubular cells is necessary for urate-induced effects.

  17. Uric Acid-Induced Adipocyte Dysfunction Is Attenuated by HO-1 Upregulation: Potential Role of Antioxidant Therapy to Target Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Komal; Hilgefort, Jordan; Banks, George; Gilliam, Chelsea; Stevens, Sarah; Ansinelli, Hayden A.; Getty, Morghan; Abraham, Nader G.; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    2016-01-01

    Increased uric acid levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. To examine the mechanisms by which this occurs, we hypothesized that an increase in heme oxygenase 1, a potent antioxidant gene, will decrease uric acid levels and adipocyte dysfunction via suppression of ROS and xanthine oxidase (XO) levels. We examined the effect of uric acid on adipogenesis in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the presence and absence of cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), an HO-1 inducer, and tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), an HO activity inhibitor. Uric acid increased adipogenesis by increasing NADPH oxidase expression and elevation in the adipogenesis markers C/EBPα, PPARγ, and Mest, while decreasing small lipid droplets and Wnt10b levels. We treated MSCs with fructose, a fuel source that increases uric acid levels. Our results showed that fructose increased XO expression as compared to the control and concomitant treatment with CoPP significantly decreased XO expression and uric acid levels. These beneficial effects of CoPP were reversed by SnMP, supporting a role for HO activity in mediating these effects. These findings demonstrate that increased levels of HO-1 appear crucial in modulating the phenotype of adipocytes exposed to uric acid and in downregulating XO and NADPH oxidase levels. PMID:26681956

  18. Uric Acid-Induced Adipocyte Dysfunction Is Attenuated by HO-1 Upregulation: Potential Role of Antioxidant Therapy to Target Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komal Sodhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased uric acid levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. To examine the mechanisms by which this occurs, we hypothesized that an increase in heme oxygenase 1, a potent antioxidant gene, will decrease uric acid levels and adipocyte dysfunction via suppression of ROS and xanthine oxidase (XO levels. We examined the effect of uric acid on adipogenesis in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in the presence and absence of cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP, an HO-1 inducer, and tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP, an HO activity inhibitor. Uric acid increased adipogenesis by increasing NADPH oxidase expression and elevation in the adipogenesis markers C/EBPα, PPARγ, and Mest, while decreasing small lipid droplets and Wnt10b levels. We treated MSCs with fructose, a fuel source that increases uric acid levels. Our results showed that fructose increased XO expression as compared to the control and concomitant treatment with CoPP significantly decreased XO expression and uric acid levels. These beneficial effects of CoPP were reversed by SnMP, supporting a role for HO activity in mediating these effects. These findings demonstrate that increased levels of HO-1 appear crucial in modulating the phenotype of adipocytes exposed to uric acid and in downregulating XO and NADPH oxidase levels.

  19. Effects of uric acid-lowering therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaole; Xu, Boyang; Yan, Bingjuan; Qiao, Xi; Wang, Lihua

    2017-01-01

    The effects of uric acid-lowering therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain uncertain. Therefore, we undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the effects of uric acid-lowering agents on major clinical outcomes of CKD. According to the pre-specified protocol that was registered with PROSPERO (No. CRD42016038030), we searched systematically in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for trials up to February 2016. Prospective, randomized, controlled trials assessing the effects of uric acid-lowering agents on cardiovascular and kidney outcomes in patients with CKD were included. Random-effects analytical methods were used. Sixteen eligible trials were identified, providing data for 1,211 patients with CKD, including 146 kidney failure events and 69 cardiovascular events. Uric acid-lowering therapy produced a 55% relative risk (RR) reduction (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 31-64) for kidney failure events (P uric acid-lowering therapy recipients, 95% CI, 1.86-6.35) and the standardized mean differences in the change in proteinuria or albuminuria (-0.23 units of standard deviation greater in uric acid-lowering therapy recipients; 95% CI, -0.43 to -0.04) were also statistically significant. Uric acid-lowering therapy seemed to improve kidney outcomes and reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in adults with CKD.

  20. Conversion of Uric Acid into Ammonium in Oil-Degrading Marine Microbial Communities: a Possible Role of Halomonads

    KAUST Repository

    Gertler, Christoph

    2015-04-29

    Uric acid is a promising hydrophobic nitrogen source for biostimulation of microbial activities in oil-impacted marine environments. This study investigated metabolic processes and microbial community changes in a series of microcosms using sediment from the Mediterranean and the Red Sea amended with ammonium and uric acid. Respiration, emulsification, ammonium and protein concentration measurements suggested a rapid production of ammonium from uric acid accompanied by the development of microbial communities containing hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria after 3 weeks of incubation. About 80 % of uric acid was converted to ammonium within the first few days of the experiment. Microbial population dynamics were investigated by Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis and Illumina sequencing as well as by culture-based techniques. Resulting data indicated that strains related to Halomonas spp. converted uric acid into ammonium, which stimulated growth of microbial consortia dominated by Alcanivorax spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Several strains of Halomonas spp. were isolated on uric acid as the sole carbon source showed location specificity. These results point towards a possible role of halomonads in the conversion of uric acid to ammonium utilized by hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York

  1. Uric acid predicts mortality and ischaemic stroke in subjects with diastolic dysfunction: the Tromsø Study 1994-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvik, Jon V; Schirmer, Henrik; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Storhaug, Hilde M; Jenssen, Trond G; Eriksen, Bjørn O; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B; Løchen, Maja-Lisa; Wilsgaard, Tom; Solbu, Marit D

    2017-05-01

    To investigate whether serum uric acid predicts adverse outcomes in persons with indices of diastolic dysfunction in a general population. We performed a prospective cohort study among 1460 women and 1480 men from 1994 to 2013. Endpoints were all-cause mortality, incident myocardial infarction, and incident ischaemic stroke. We stratified the analyses by echocardiographic markers of diastolic dysfunction, and uric acid was the independent variable of interest. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated per 59 μmol/L increase in baseline uric acid. Multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazards models showed that uric acid predicted all-cause mortality in subjects with E/A ratio 1.5 (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.09-2.09, P for interaction between E/A ratio category and uric acid = 0.02). Elevated uric acid increased mortality risk in persons with E-wave deceleration time 220 ms (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.01-2.12 and HR 1.13, 95% CI 1.02-1.26, respectively; P for interaction = 0.04). Furthermore, in participants with isovolumetric relaxation time ≤60 ms, mortality risk was higher with increasing uric acid (HR 4.98, 95% CI 2.02-12.26, P for interaction = 0.004). Finally, elevated uric acid predicted ischaemic stroke in subjects with severely enlarged left atria (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.03-2.53, P for interaction = 0.047). Increased uric acid was associated with higher all-cause mortality risk in subjects with echocardiographic indices of diastolic dysfunction, and with higher ischaemic stroke risk in persons with severely enlarged left atria.

  2. Correlation of retinal nerve fibre layer and macular thickness with serum uric acid among type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuthinee-Naidu, Munisamy-Naidu; Zunaina, Embong; Azreen-Redzal, Anuar; Nyi-Nyi, Naing

    2017-06-14

    Uric acid is a final breakdown product of purine catabolism in humans. It's a potent antioxidant and can also act as a pro-oxidant that induces oxidative stress on the vascular endothelial cells, thus mediating progression of diabetic related diseases. Various epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest that uric acid has a role in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We conducted a cross-sectional study to evaluate the correlation of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) and macular thickness with serum uric acid in type 2 diabetic patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Eye Clinic, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan between the period of August 2013 till July 2015 involving type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with no diabetic retinopathy and with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR). An evaluation for RNFL and macular thickness was measured using Spectralis Heidelberg optical coherence tomography. Six ml of venous blood was taken for the measurement of serum uric acid and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1 C ). A total of 180 diabetic patients were recruited (90 patients with no diabetic retinopathy and 90 patients with NPDR) into the study. The mean level of serum uric acid for both the groups was within normal range and there was no significance difference between the two groups. Based on gender, both male and female gender showed significantly higher level of mean serum uric acid in no diabetic retinopathy group (p = 0.004 respectively). The mean serum uric acid was significantly higher in patient with HbA1 C  uric acid in both the groups. Serum uric acid showed a poor correlation with RNFL and macular thickness among type 2 diabetic patients.

  3. Maternal serum uric acid level and maternal and neonatal complications in preeclamptic women: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharnia, Maryam; Mirblouk, Fariba; Kazemi, Soudabeh; Pourmarzi, Davood; Mahdipour Keivani, Mina; Dalil Heirati, Seyedeh Fatemeh

    2017-09-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with maternal and neonatal complications. It has been indicated that increased uric acid might have a predictive role on preeclampsia. We aimed to investigate the relationship between the level of uric acid with maternal and neonatal complications in women with preeclampsia. In this cross-sectional study, 160 singleton preeclamptic women at more than 28 wk gestational age were included. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelet count, liver and uric acid tests, and maternal and neonatal complications were assessed. The severity of preeclampsia, placental abruption, preterm labor, thrombocytopenia, elevated alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (ALT and AST), HELLP syndrome, eclampsia and required hospitalization in the ICU was considered as the maternal complication. Fetal complications were: small for gestational age (SGA), intrauterine fetal death, hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit, and Apgar score uric acid in women with severe preeclampsia was significantly higher than non-severe preeclampsia (p=0.031), also in those with an abnormal liver test (p=0.009). The mean level of uric acid in women with preterm delivery was significantly higher than women with term delivery (p=0.0001). Also, the level of uric acid had no effect on neonatal hospitalization in neonate invasive care unit. Based on logistic regression, the incidence of severe preeclampsia not affected by decreased or increased serum levels of uric acid. With higher level of uric acid in server preeclampsia we can expected more complications such as hepatic dysfunction and preterm delivery. Thus serum uric acid measurement can be helpful marker for severe preeclampsia.

  4. Circulating uric acid levels and subsequent development of cancer in 493,281 individuals: findings from the AMORIS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Andrew; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Garmo, Hans; Holmberg, Lars; Malmström, Håkan; Lambe, Mats; Hammar, Niklas; Walldius, Göran; Jungner, Ingmar; Wulaningsih, Wahyu

    2017-06-27

    Serum uric acid has been suggested to be associated with cancer risk. We aimed to study the association between serum uric acid and cancer incidence in a large Swedish cohort. A positive association was found between uric acid levels and overall cancer risk, and results were similar with adjustment for glucose, triglycerides and BMI. Hazard ratio (HR) for overall cancer for the 4th quartile of uric acid compared to the 1st was 1.08 (95% CI: 1.05-1.11) in men and 1.12 (1.09 - 1.16) in women. Site-specific analysis showed a positive association between uric acid and risk of colorectal, hepatobiliary, kidney, non-melanoma skin, and other cancers in men and of head and neck and other cancers in women. An inverse association was observed for pulmonary and central nervous system (CNS) cancers in men and breast, lymphatic and haematological, and CNS malignancies in women. We included 493,281 persons aged 20 years and older who had a measurement of serum uric acid and were cancer-free at baseline in the AMORIS study. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to investigate sex-specific quartiles of serum uric acid in relation to cancer risk in men and women. Analysis was further adjusted for serum glucose, triglycerides and, where available, BMI. Site-specific analysis was performed for major cancers. Altered uric acid levels were associated with risk of overall and some specific cancers, further indicating the potential role of uric acid metabolism in carcinogenesis.

  5. [Serum uric acid is associated with disease severity and an important predictor for clinical outcome in patients with pulmonary hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, D L; Zhang, C J; Huang, Y G; Huang, T; Li, H Z

    2017-06-24

    Objective: The growing body of literature showed a link between uric acid and pulmonary hypertension (PH), but the impact of hyperuremia on outcome of patients with PH has not been well defined. Therefore, the present study was performed to analyze the impact of uric acid on outcome of PH patients. Methods: One hundred seventy-three PH patients (112 females, mean age 38 years old), who were hospitalized in our department between January 2010 and December 2015, were included in our study, the PH diagnosis was made based on right heart catheterization examination result (mean pulmonary artery pressure≥25 mmHg(1 mmHg=0.133 kPa)). PH patients were divided into mild to moderate PH group (Rp/Rs≤0.6, n =97) and severe PH group (Rp/Rs>0.6, n =76). Fifty-one patients (33 females, mean age 45 years old) without PH based on right heart catheterization were included as control subjects. All participants were followed up for a median of 24 months(6-71 months). Clinical endpoints were defined as cardiogenic death or heart-and-lung transplantation. Results: Uric acid was positively correlated with pulmonary vascular resistance( r =0.398, P uric acid level was significantly higher in patients with severe PH than in patients with mild-to-moderate PH and the control subjects (both P uric acid level to predict the outcome of PH patients (sensitivity 50%, specificity 72%). During follow-up, patients with higher level of uric acid (>425.5 μmol/L) were linked with poorer clinical outcome compared to patients with uric acid uric acid is associated with the severity of PH and higher uric acid level serves as an important predictor for poor clinical outcome of PH patients.

  6. Association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and uric acid with the metabolic syndrome components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Santosh Kumar; Khatiwada, Saroj; Pandey, Sunil; Kc, Rajendra; Das, Binod Kumar Lal; Baral, Nirmal; Lamsal, Madhab

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been found to be associated with inflammatory molecules. This study was conducted among 125 MetS patients at B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal to find an association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and serum uric acid with MetS components. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, medical history and blood samples were taken. Estimation of hs-CRP, serum uric acid, blood glucose, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was done. hs-CRP had positive correlation with blood glucose (r = 0.2, p = 0.026) and negative with HDL cholesterol (r = -0.361, p uric acid had positive correlation with waist circumference (r = 0.178, p = 0.047). Patients with elevated hs-CRP and uric acid had higher waist circumference (p = 0.03), diastolic BP (p = 0.002) and lower HDL cholesterol (p = 0.004) than others. Elevated hs-CRP and high uric acid were individually associated with higher odds for low HDL cholesterol (7.992; 1.785-35.774, p = 0.002) and hyperglycemia (2.471; 1.111-5.495, p = 0.029) respectively. Combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid was associated with severity of MetS (p uric acid. The present study demonstrates that hs-CRP and serum uric acid are associated with MetS components, and the combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid is associated with the increase in severity of MetS.

  7. Reproductive factors and serum uric acid levels in females from the general population: the KORA F4 study.

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    Doris Stöckl

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hyperuricemia is associated with an increased risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. There are pronounced sex differences in the levels of uric acid. It is largely unknown whether or not reproductive parameters which induce hormonal changes are responsible for this. We examined if there are associations between reproductive parameters and uric acid levels in a female population-based sample. METHODS: In this cross-sectional analysis, data of 1530 women aged 32 to 81 years participating in the KORA F4 study, conducted between 2006 and 2008 in Southern Germany were used. Reproductive parameters were obtained by standardized interviews. Uric acid levels were tested by the uricase method. The whole study sample and stratified in pre- and postmenopausal women was analyzed. RESULTS: Menopausal status and earlier age at menarche were associated with higher serum uric acid levels (age-adjusted: p-values 0.003, <0.001 respectively; after multivariable adjustment, including BMI: p-values 0.002, 0.036. A history of oral contraceptive use showed an association with uric acid levels only after multivariable adjustment (p-value 0.009. Hot flushes showed an association with uric acid levels only after age-adjustment (p-value 0.038, but lost significance after adding other confounders. Other reproductive factors, including parity, current or ever use of hormone replacement therapy, current use of oral contraceptives, hysterectomy, bilateral oophorectomy, or depressive mood related to menopausal transition were not associated with uric acid levels. CONCLUSIONS: Postmenopausal status, earlier age at menarche and a history of oral contraceptive use were independently associated with higher serum uric acid concentrations in women from the general population. Further studies, especially longitudinal population-based studies investigating the relationship of female reproductive parameters with uric acid levels are necessary to confirm our findings.

  8. Uric acid lowering therapies for preventing or delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Anna L; Singer, Richard F; Walters, Giles D

    2017-10-30

    Non-randomised data have shown a link between hyperuricaemia and the progression or development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). If this is correct, urate lowering therapy might form an important part of chronic kidney disease care, reducing risks for cardiovascular outcomes and end-stage kidney disease. This review aims to study the benefits and harms of uric acid lowering therapy on the progression of CKD and other cardiovascular endpoints. We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register to 20 July 2017 through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. Studies contained in the Specialised Register are identified through search strategies specifically designed for CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE; handsearching conference proceedings; and searching the International Clinical Trials Register (ICTRP) Search Portal and ClinicalTrials.gov. All randomised controlled trials testing primary urate lowering therapy in patients with or without CKD. Two authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data. Statistical analyses were performed using a random effects model and results expressed as risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes or mean difference (MD) for continuous outcomes, or standardised mean difference (SMD) if different scales were used. Twelve studies (1187 participants) were included in the review. Risk of bias was unclear for the majority of domains in each study.Uric acid lowering therapy may make little or no difference in death at six months (2 studies, 498 participants: RR 1.66, 95% CI 0.61 to 4.48) or two years (2 studies, 220 participants): RR 0.13, 95% CI 0.02 to 1.06) (low certainty evidence). Uric acid lowering therapy may make little of no difference (low certainty evidence) in the incidence of ESKD at one or two years. Kidney function may be improved by uric acid lowering therapy at one year with a reduction in serum creatinine (2 studies, 83

  9. Pulse radiolytic study of the oxidation reaction of uric acid in presence of bovine serum albumin: evidence of possible complex formation in the transient state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.; Gopinathan, C.

    1996-01-01

    The pulse radiolytic and spectrophotometric study of uric acid in presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been carried out. In the spectrophotometric study there is no evidence for ground state interaction between BSA and uric acid. The reaction of CCl 3 OO . radical with uric acid produces a transient having absorption maximum at 330 nm and that with BSA produces transient having absorption maximum at 410 nm. In a composition of equal concentration of uric acid and BSA the CCl 3 OO . radical produces a transient absorption spectrum which shows two peaks at 330 nm and 350 nm and a shoulder at 410 nm. The peak at 350 nm is ascribed due to weak complex formation between BSA and uric acid radicals. The rate constant of CCl 3 OO . radical with uric acid increases with the increase in BSA concentration which is explained as protection of BSA by uric acid from radical attack. (author). 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Association of Serum Uric Acid with Preeclampsia: A Case Control Study

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    Razia Sultana

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preeclampsia (PE is still one of the important causes of maternal and fetal mortality in Bangladesh. Many researches have been done to identify a unique screening test that would predict the risk of developing PE before the classic symptoms appear. One of the most accessible and easiest screening tests is serum uric acid measurement. Numerous studies have demonstrated a relation between elevated maternal serum uric acid levels and adverse maternal and fetal outcome. Among several pathophysiologic factors the most commonly accepted explanation for hyperuricemia in PE is increased reabsorption and decreased excretion of uric acid.Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess the association of serum uric acid with preeclampsia.Materials and method: A case control study was conducted in the department of Biochemistry, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka from July 2010 to June 2011. A total number of 100 pregnant women in third trimester of pregnancy attending in Obstetrics and Gynaecology department of Dhaka Medical College Hospital were selected purposively as study subjects. Among them 50 pregnant women with preeclampsia were selected as cases and 50 normal healthy pregnant women as controls.Results: Most of the study subjects were within 21 – 30 years of age group and mean age in case and control was 24.06±3.71 and 24.66±3.22 years respectively, which was not statistically different. Mean gestational age in case and control was 33.50±2.55 weeks and 33.60±2.95 weeks respectively, which was also not statistically different. Among the study subjects majority was primi in both groups (case 76%, contol 58% showing no statistical significance. Majority of the subjects in both groups were irregular in their antenatal checkup (case 52%, contol 40%. Uric acid concentration was measured in all the study subjects. The mean serum uric acid concentration in cases and controls were 7.01±1.90 mg/dl and 4.55±1.63 mg/dl respectively. This

  11. Racial/Ethnic and Gender Differences in the Relationship between Uric Acid and Metabolic Syndrome in Adolescents: An Analysis of NHANES 1999–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, Mark D.; Dong, Lili; Gurka, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Among adolescents uric acid is associated with insulin resistance, hypertension and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and in adults high uric acid levels are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Objective Determine whether the relationship of uric acid with MetS varies in adolescents by race/ethnicity and gender. Methods We used linear regression to evaluate associations between uric acid and other MetS-associated clinical and laboratory measures among 3,296 non-Hispanic-white, non-Hispanic-black and Hispanic adolescents age 12–19y participating in the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Survey (1999–2006). Results Overall, non-Hispanic-white males and females had the highest uric acid levels among the three racial/ethnic groups. In each racial/ethnic group there were higher uric acid levels for those adolescents with vs. without MetS. However, the extent of the MetS-related increase in uric acid level varied by race and gender. Among males, MetS was associated with the greatest increases in uric acid among non-Hispanic whites. However, among females, the MetS-related increase in uric acid was greatest among non-whites. Non-Hispanic-white females exhibited the lowest degrees of correlation between levels of uric acid and MetS-associated variables. Uric acid levels did not correlate with insulin levels in non-Hispanic-white females. Conclusions These data suggest the relationship between uric acid and MetS varies by race/ethnicity and gender. In particular, non-Hispanic-white males exhibit a strong relationship and non-Hispanic-white females exhibit a relatively poor correlation between uric acid and MetS-related factors. These data may have implications for the use of uric acid as a marker of future risk among adolescents. PMID:22000606

  12. Racial/ethnic and sex differences in the relationship between uric acid and metabolic syndrome in adolescents: an analysis of National Health and Nutrition Survey 1999-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, Mark D; Dong, Lili; Gurka, Matthew J

    2012-04-01

    Among adolescents, uric acid is associated with insulin resistance, hypertension, and the metabolic syndrome (MetS); and in adults, high uric acid levels are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The objective was to determine whether the relationship of uric acid with MetS varies in adolescents by race/ethnicity and sex. We used linear regression to evaluate associations between uric acid and other MetS-associated clinical and laboratory measures among 3296 non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic adolescents aged 12 to 19 years participating in the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Survey (1999-2006). Overall, non-Hispanic white males and females had the highest uric acid levels among the 3 racial/ethnic groups. In each racial/ethnic group, there were higher uric acid levels for those adolescents with vs without MetS. However, the extent of the MetS-related increase in uric acid level varied by race and sex. Among males, MetS was associated with the greatest increases in uric acid among non-Hispanic whites. However, among females the MetS-related increase in uric acid was greater among non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics. Non-Hispanic white females exhibited the lowest degrees of correlation between levels of uric acid and MetS-associated variables. Uric acid levels did not correlate with insulin levels in non-Hispanic white females. These data suggest that the relationship between uric acid and MetS varies by race/ethnicity and sex. In particular, non-Hispanic white males exhibit a strong relationship and non-Hispanic white females exhibit a relatively poor correlation between uric acid and MetS-related factors. These data may have implications for the use of uric acid as a marker of future risk among adolescents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The relationship between training status, blood pressure and uric acid in adults and elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapé, Atila Alexandre; Jacomini, André Mourão; Muniz, Jaqueline Jóice; Sertorio, Jonas Tadeu Cau; Tanus-Santos, José Eduardo; do Amaral, Sandra Lia; Zago, Anderson Saranz

    2013-06-21

    Hypertension can be generated by a great number of mechanisms including elevated uric acid (UA) that contribute to the anion superoxide production. However, physical exercise is recommended to prevent and/or control high blood pressure (BP). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between BP and UA and whether this relationship may be mediated by the functional fitness index. All participants (n = 123) performed the following tests: indirect maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), AAHPERD Functional Fitness Battery Test to determine the general fitness functional index (GFFI), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), body mass index (BMI) and blood sample collection to evaluate the total-cholesterol (CHOL), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c), triglycerides (TG), uric acid (UA), nitrite (NO2) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (T-BARS). After the physical, hemodynamic and metabolic evaluations, all participants were allocated into three groups according to their GFFI: G1 (regular), G2 (good) and G3 (very good). Baseline blood pressure was higher in G1 when compared to G3 (+12% and +11%, for SBP and DBP, respectively, pblood pressure and the oxidative stress produced by uric acid may be mediated by training status.

  14. Menopause, postmenopausal hormone use and serum uric acid levels in US women - The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Elisabeth (Elisabeth); H.K. Choi (Hyon)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Despite the substantial prevalence of gout in the ageing female population, female hormonal influence has not been comprehensively examined. We evaluated and quantified the potential independent association between menopause, postmenopausal hormone use and serum uric acid

  15. Silver nanoparticles plasmon resonance-based method for the determination of uric acid in human plasma and urine samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjadi, M.; Rahimpour, E.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a simple and sensitive colorimetric procedure for the quantification of trace amounts of uric acid. It is based on the finding that uric acid in a medium containing ammonia and sodium hydroxide at 65 0 C can reduce silver ions to form yellow silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). These are stabilized in solution by using poly(vinyl alcohol) as a capping agent. The yellow color of the solution that results from the localized surface plasmon resonance of Ag NPs can be observed by the bare eye. The absorbance at 415 nm is proportional to the concentration of uric acid which therefore can be determined quantitatively. The calibration curve is linear in the concentration range from 10 to 200 nM, with a limit of detection of 3.3 nM. The method was successfully applied to the determination of uric acid in human plasma and urine samples. (author)

  16. Relation of serum uric acid to an exaggerated systolic blood pressure response to exercise testing in men with normotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae, Sae Young; Bunsawat, Kanokwan; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Kim, Yeon Soo; Touyz, Rhian M; Park, Jeong Bae; Franklin, Barry A

    2018-03-01

    The authors investigated the hypothesis that high serum uric acid concentrations may be related to an exaggerated systolic blood pressure (SBP) response to maximal exercise testing in men with normotension, independent of potential confounding variables. In 4640 healthy men with normotension who underwent maximal treadmill exercise testing and fasting blood chemistry studies, including serum uric acid concentrations, an exaggerated SBP response, defined as SBP ≥ 210 mm Hg, was detected in 152 men (3.3%). After adjusting for potential confounders, participants in the highest quartile of serum uric acid (>6.6 mg/dL) had a higher odds ratio of demonstrating an exaggerated SBP to maximal exercise (odds ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-3.86) compared with participants in the lowest quartile of serum uric acid (response to maximal exercise testing in men with normotension, independent of established coronary risk factors. ©2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Detection of hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid in γ-irradiated aqueous solution of cytosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tsuya; Shirai, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    The aqueous solution of cytosine of 3.6 x 10 -2 M was irradiated with gamma -ray (60 megarad) in nitrogen-saturated glass ampules, and freeze-dried, then the residue obtained was changed to trimethylsilylacid, and this was analyzed by paper chromatography, UV spectrometry, and/or gas-liquid chromatography. Hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid were detected in this solution, in addition to some other compounds already known to be produced by gamma -irradiation, e.g., TMS-uracil, TMS-6-hydroxyuracil and TMS-hypoxanthine. It was presumed that these compounds were formed by the recombination of the primary radiolytic products. Uric acid formation by this mechanism was confirmed by gamma -irradiation of the mixture that contained urea, and 5- and 6-hydroxyuracil. (Kaihara, S.)

  18. Pulse radiolytic investigation of the hypoxanthine-xanthine-uric acid system: evidence for transient species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria, J.; Pasquier, C.; Ferradini, C.; Pucheault, J.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation in aqueous solutions of hypoxanthine into xanthine and xanthine into uric acid by OH radicals has been investigated using pulse radiolysis and fast kinetic absorption spectrophotometry. After hypoxanthine irradiations the spectrum of transient R 1 has been characterized. This radical is formed with a rate constant k/sub (Hyx+OH) = 6.5 x 10 9 M -1 sec -1 and disappears by disproportionation leading to xanthine and hypoxanthine with a rate constant 2K/sub (R 1 + r 1 / = 1.3 x 10 8 M -1 sec - 1 . After xanthine irradiations a radical intermediate R 2 is formed with a rate constant k/sub(X+ OH)/= 5.2 x 10 8 M -1 sec -1 and disappears through a second-order reaction 2K/sub (R 2 + R 2 )/ = 2.0 x 10 8 M -1 sec -1 . Finally, after aeration only uric acid and xanthine are measured

  19. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of uric acid urolithiasis: A narrative review

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    A. Abou-Elela

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An in-depth comprehension of the epidemiology as well as pathophysiology of uric acid urolithiasis is important for the identification, treatment, and prophylaxis of calculi in these patients. Persistently low urinary pH, hyperuricosuria, and low urinary volume are the most important factors in pathogenesis of uric acid urolithiasis. Other various causes of calculus formation comprises of chronic diarrhea, renal hyperuricosuria, insulin resistance, primary gout, extra purine in the diet, neoplastic syndromes, and congenital hyperuricemia. Non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography is the radiologic modality of choice for early assessment of patients with renal colic. Excluding situations where there is acute obstruction, rising blood chemistry, severe infection, or unresolved pain, the initial management ought to be medical dissolution by oral chemolysis since this method has proved to be effective in most of the cases.

  20. An Amperometric Biosensor for Uric Acid Determination Prepared From Uricase Immobilized in Polyaniline-Polypyrrole Film

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    Fatma Arslan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A new amperometric uric acid biosensor was developed by immobilizing uricase by a glutaraldehyde crosslinking procedure on polyaniline-polypyrrole (pani-ppy composite film on the surface of a platinum electrode. Determination of uric acid was performed by the oxidation of enzymatically generated H2O2 at 0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The linear working range of the biosensor was 2.5×10-6 – 8.5×10-5 M and the response time was about 70 s. The effects of pH, temperature were investigated and optimum parameters were found to be 9.0, 55 oC, respectively. The stability and reproducibility of the enzyme electrode have been also studied.

  1. Serum uric acid level is associated with metabolic syndrome and microalbuminuria in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Sook; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Ahn, Chul Woo; Lim, Dong Jun; Shin, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Hwan; Cho, Jae Hyoung; Yoon, Kun Ho; Kang, Moo Il; Cha, Bong Yun; Son, Ho Young

    2011-01-01

    To determine the relationship between serum uric acid, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and albuminuria in type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 504 Korean patients with type 2 diabetes aged 57.3 years were retrospectively evaluated for clinical histories, anthropometric measurements, and biochemical studies. Urinary albumin excretion (UAE) was measured by a 24-h urine collection. Prevalence of MetS increased according to the quartiles of uric acid levels (≤3.7, 3.8 to 4.5, 4.6 to 5.5, and >5.5 mg/dl; 52.1%, 52.1%, 57.5%, and 71.6%, respectively, Puric acid levels. Serum uric acid levels had significantly increased risk of albuminuria [odds ratio (OR) 1.425, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.085-1.873] after adjusting for age, gender, and conventional risk factors. Uric acid level remains a significant predictor for abnormal albuminuria after adjusting for MetS presence as well as the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) (OR 1.414, 95% CI 1.071-1.868). An elevated uric acid level was significantly associated with MetS and was an independent predictor of albuminuria after adjusting for conventional risk factors and MetS. Regular measurements of uric acid level could give information for predicting the presence of MetS and albuminuria in Korean type 2 diabetic patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Review of concepts and controversies of uric acid as antioxidant and pro- oxidant and ndash; an uncertainty

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    Amar Nagesh Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Uric acid, the end product of purine catabolism in humans and is known for its crystal deposition at higher concentrations (>7 mg/dl in gout. Less is known about its antioxidant property and the beneficial effects in various diseases. It is thought that high concentration of uric acid in humans is an evolutionary advantage and it is also hypothesized that high concentration of uric acid is to compensate the antioxidant capacity of ascorbic acid which is lost in humans during the course of evolution. In the extracelluar environment, uric acid can scavenge free radicals like hydroxyl radical, singlet oxygen and peroxynitrite radical therefore, it is considered as a powerful antioxidant. On the other hand uric acid depending upon the chemical milieu, changing its property and at times it acts as pro oxidant and is associated with the pathobiochemistry in developing various diseases like hypertension, cardio vascular diseases, ischemia reperfusion injury, diabetes mellitus, non alcoholic fatty liver disorders etc. In this review, we tried to summarize the evolutionary advantages of hyperuricaemia, effects of both antioxidant property and pro-oxidant nature of uric acid in various disease conditions.

  3. Plasma uric acid and tumor volume are highly predictive of outcome in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients receiving intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hui; Lin, Huan-Xin; Ge, Nan; Wang, Hong-Zhi; Sun, Rui; Hu, Wei-Han

    2013-01-01

    The combined predictive value of plasma uric acid and primary tumor volume in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has not yet been determined. In this retrospective study, plasma uric acid level was measured after treatment in 130 histologically-proven NPC patients treated with IMRT. Tumor volume was calculated from treatment planning CT scans. Overall (OS), progression-free (PFS) and distant metastasis-free (DMFS) survival were compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log rank test, and Cox multivariate and univariate regression models were created. Patients with a small tumor volume (<27 mL) had a significantly better DMFS, PFS and OS than patients with a large tumor volume. Patients with a high post-treatment plasma uric acid level (>301 μmol/L) had a better DMFS, PFS and OS than patients with a low post-treatment plasma uric acid level. Patients with a small tumor volume and high post-treatment plasma uric acid level had a favorable prognosis compared to patients with a large tumor volume and low post-treatment plasma uric acid level (7-year overall OS, 100% vs. 48.7%, P <0.001 and PFS, 100% vs. 69.5%, P <0.001). Post-treatment plasma uric acid level and pre-treatment tumor volume have predictive value for outcome in NPC patients receiving IMRT. NPC patients with a large tumor volume and low post-treatment plasma uric acid level may benefit from additional aggressive treatment after IMRT

  4. Association of Serum Uric Acid Levels with Leg Ischemia in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease after Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoda, Yoko; Hirooka, Shigeki; Orita, Hiroyuki; Wakabayashi, Ichiro

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the relationships of serum uric acid levels with the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) after treatment. Subjects were male patients diagnosed with PAD. Atherosclerosis at the common carotid artery was evaluated based on its intima-media thickness (IMT). Leg arterial flow was evaluated by measuring ankle-brachial index (ABI) and exercise-induced decrease in ABI. Among various risk factors including age, blood pressure, adiposity, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and blood lipid, blood glucose, uric acid, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein levels, only uric acid levels showed significant correlations with ABI [Pearson's correlation coefficient, -0.292 (p<0.01)] and leg exercise-induced decrease in ABI [Pearson's correlation coefficient, 0.236 (p< 0.05)]. However, there was no significant correlation between uric acid levels and maximum or mean IMT. Odds ratios of subjects with the 3rd tertile versus subjects with the 1st tertile for uric acid levels were significantly higher than the reference level of 1.00 for low ABI [4.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.45-13.65, p<0.01)] and for high % decrease in ABI after exercise [4.31 (95% confidence interval, 1.34-13.82, p<0.05)]. The associations of uric acid levels with the indicators of leg ischemia were also found after adjustment for age, history of revascularization therapy, diabetes, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index, triglyceride levels, and renal function. Uric acid levels are associated with the degree of leg ischemia in patients with PAD. Further interventional studies are needed to determine whether the correction of uric acid levels is effective in preventing the progression of PAD.

  5. Uric Acid Level Has a U-shaped Association with Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Vasospastic Angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwag, Hye Bin; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Park, Taek Kyu; Song, Young Bin; Hahn, Joo Yong; Choi, Jin Ho; Lee, Sang Hoon; Gwon, Hyeon Cheol; Choi, Seung Hyuk

    2017-08-01

    No data are available on the association of serum uric acid and vasospastic angina (VSA) which has endothelial dysfunction as a possible pathophysiologic mechanism. Low uric acid level might cause adverse outcomes in VSA in connection with endothelial dysfunction. We enrolled 818 VSA patients whose uric acid level was measured at admission. Patients were categorized according to tertiles of uric acid level: group I, ≤ 4.8 mg/dL; group II, 4.9-5.9 mg/dL; and group III, ≥ 6.0 mg/dL. Primary outcome was major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), defined as a composite of cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction (MI), ischemic stroke, coronary revascularization, and rehospitalization for angina. Median follow-up duration was 49.2 months. Median uric acid values were 4.1 mg/dL for group I, 5.4 mg/dL for group II, and 6.7 mg/dL for group III. In the overall population, group II had a significantly lower incidence of MACE compared to group I (47 [17.1%] vs. 66 [24.6%]; hazard ratio [HR], 1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-2.26; P = 0.040) and a tendency of lower incidence of MACEs compared to Group III (47 [17.1%] vs. 62 [22.5%]; HR, 1.44; 95% CI, 0.98-2.13; P = 0.067). Among group I patients, those who received nitrates had a higher incidence of MACEs than those without nitrate therapy (P uric acid level was associated with adverse clinical outcomes, while high uric acid level had a trend toward an increase in it. Use of nitrate in patients with low uric acid level might have adverse effects on clinical outcomes of VSA. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  6. Serum uric acid concentration and metabolic syndrome among elderly Koreans: The Korean Urban Rural Elderly (KURE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hansol; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Song, Bo Mi; Park, Ji Hye; Lee, Ju-Mi; Yoon, Da-Lim; Yoon, Young Mi; Rhee, Yumie; Youm, Yousik; Kim, Chang Oh

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that elevated serum uric acid concentration is an independent risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, few studies have focused on elderly populations. Thus, we investigated the association of serum uric acid concentration with metabolic syndrome in community-dwelling elderly Koreans. This cross-sectional analysis included 2940 participants (986 men and 1954 women) aged 65 years or older who participated in a baseline health assessment for the Korean Urban Rural Elderly cohort study from 2012 to 2014. Serum uric acid concentration was analyzed using both continuous and dichotomous variables. Hyperuricemia was defined as a uric acid concentration ≥7.0 mg/dL in men and ≥6.0 mg/dL in women. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the 2009 harmonizing definition. Multiple logistic regression models were used to investigate independent association between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome, after adjusting for age, body mass index, LDL cholesterol, glycated hemoglobin, blood urea nitrogen, estimated glomerular filtration rate health behaviors, and medications. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components increased significantly according to uric acid concentration in both sexes. The adjusted odds ratios for having metabolic syndrome per 1.0mg/dL higher uric acid concentration were 1.16 (95% CI: 1.03-1.31) in men and 1.27 (95% CI: 1.13-1.42) in women. Hyperuricemia was also associated with metabolic syndrome, with adjusted odds ratios of 1.71 (95% CI: 1.11-2.63) in men and 1.55 (95% CI: 1.05-2.29) in women. Elevated serum uric acid concentration was independently associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome in community-dwelling elderly Koreans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Is uric acid an indicator of metabolic syndrome in the first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes?

    OpenAIRE

    Salehidoost, Rezvan; Aminorroaya, Ashraf; Zare, Maryam; Amini, Massoud

    2012-01-01

    Background: To determine whether uric acid levels are associated with the components of metabolic syndrome and whether uric acid is a significant factor for development of metabolic syndrome in the first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients as high risk group. Materials and Methods: A total of 694 (182 male and 512 female, aged 30-69 years) first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients during 2007-2011 were enrolled. The height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, fastin...

  8. Serum uric acid concentrations and SLC2A9 genetic variation in Hispanic children: the Viva La Familia Study1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voruganti, V Saroja; Laston, Sandra; Haack, Karin; Mehta, Nitesh R; Cole, Shelley A; Butte, Nancy F; Comuzzie, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elevated concentrations of serum uric acid are associated with increased risk of gout and renal and cardiovascular diseases. Genetic studies in adults have consistently identified associations of solute carrier family 2, member 9 (SLC2A9), polymorphisms with variation in serum uric acid. However, it is not known whether the association of serum uric acid with SLC2A9 polymorphisms manifests in children. Objective: The aim was to investigate whether variation in serum uric acid is under genetic influence and whether the association with SLC2A9 polymorphisms generalizes to Hispanic children of the Viva La Familia Study. Design: We conducted a genomewide association study with 1.1 million genetic markers in 815 children. Results: We found serum uric acid to be significantly heritable [h2 ± SD = 0.45 ± 0.08, P = 5.8 × 10−11] and associated with SLC2A9 variants (P values between 10−16 and 10−7). Several of the significantly associated polymorphisms were previously identified in studies in adults. We also found positive genetic correlations between serum uric acid and BMI z score (ρG = 0.45, P = 0.002), percentage of body fat (ρG = 0.28, P = 0.04), fat mass (ρG = 0.34, P = 0.02), waist circumference (ρG = 0.42, P = 0.003), and waist-to-height ratio (ρG = 0.46, P = 0.001). Conclusions: Our results show that variation in serum uric acid in Hispanic children is under considerable genetic influence and is associated with obesity-related phenotypes. As in adults, genetic variation in SLC2A9 is associated with serum uric acid concentrations, an important biomarker of renal and cardiovascular disease risk, in Hispanic children. PMID:25833971

  9. Serum uric acid concentrations and SLC2A9 genetic variation in Hispanic children: the Viva La Familia Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voruganti, V Saroja; Laston, Sandra; Haack, Karin; Mehta, Nitesh R; Cole, Shelley A; Butte, Nancy F; Comuzzie, Anthony G

    2015-04-01

    Elevated concentrations of serum uric acid are associated with increased risk of gout and renal and cardiovascular diseases. Genetic studies in adults have consistently identified associations of solute carrier family 2, member 9 (SLC2A9), polymorphisms with variation in serum uric acid. However, it is not known whether the association of serum uric acid with SLC2A9 polymorphisms manifests in children. The aim was to investigate whether variation in serum uric acid is under genetic influence and whether the association with SLC2A9 polymorphisms generalizes to Hispanic children of the Viva La Familia Study. We conducted a genomewide association study with 1.1 million genetic markers in 815 children. We found serum uric acid to be significantly heritable [h(2) ± SD = 0.45 ± 0.08, P = 5.8 × 10(-11)] and associated with SLC2A9 variants (P values between 10(-16) and 10(-7)). Several of the significantly associated polymorphisms were previously identified in studies in adults. We also found positive genetic correlations between serum uric acid and BMI z score (ρG = 0.45, P = 0.002), percentage of body fat (ρG = 0.28, P = 0.04), fat mass (ρG = 0.34, P = 0.02), waist circumference (ρG = 0.42, P = 0.003), and waist-to-height ratio (ρG = 0.46, P = 0.001). Our results show that variation in serum uric acid in Hispanic children is under considerable genetic influence and is associated with obesity-related phenotypes. As in adults, genetic variation in SLC2A9 is associated with serum uric acid concentrations, an important biomarker of renal and cardiovascular disease risk, in Hispanic children. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Serum uric acid as a novel marker for uterine atony and post-spinal vasopressor use during cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacheva, V P; Soens, M A; Tsen, L C

    2013-07-01

    Serum uric acid is a marker for oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Because oxidative stress can result in diminished uterine contractility and impaired vascular relaxation, we hypothesized that an elevated serum uric acid level in women undergoing neuraxial anesthesia for cesarean delivery would be associated with greater uterine atony, as measured by supplemental uterotonic agent use and blood loss, and less hypotension, as measured by total vasopressor use. All records of patients (n=2527) undergoing cesarean delivery in 2009 were reviewed. Serum uric acid was measured within 24h of delivery in 509 patients; data from 345 patients with singleton pregnancies undergoing neuraxial anesthesia were analyzed. Demographic data, medical and obstetric history, anesthetic management and peripartum course were evaluated. ANOVA, Chi-square, and multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses were performed. Increased serum uric acid correlated positively with preeclampsia and the need for supplemental uterotonic agents (odds ratio 1.53, 95%CI 1.2-2.0, P=0.002), but not blood loss. The presence of preeclampsia also correlated with greater supplemental uterotonic agent use (P=0.01). The correlation between serum uric acid and post-spinal vasopressor use (i.e., none, moderate, and high) was of borderline significance (P=0.05). In patients without diabetes, serum uric acid levels correlated inversely with post-spinal vasopressor use (P=0.04). Elevated serum uric acid in parturients undergoing cesarean delivery with neuraxial anesthesia correlated with increased use of supplemental uterotonic agents and decreased use of post-spinal vasopressors. Further validation of this study is required to determine if serum uric acid in parturients can serve as a reliable predictor for higher and lower occurrences of uterine atony and spinal-induced hypotension, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Patients with gout differ from healthy subjects in renal response to changes in serum uric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Miner, Jeffrey N

    2017-03-01

    Our objectives were to determine whether a change in serum uric acid (sUA) resulted in a corresponding change in the fractional excretion of uric acid (FEUA) and whether the renal response was different in patients with gout versus healthy subjects. FEUA was calculated from previously published studies and four new phase I studies in healthy subjects and/or patients with gout before and after treatment to lower or raise sUA. Treatments included xanthine oxidase inhibitors to lower sUA as well as infusion of uric acid and provision of a high-purine diet to raise sUA. Plots were created of FEUA versus sUA before and after treatment. For the phase I studies, percent change in FEUA per mg/dL change in sUA was calculated separately for healthy subjects and patients with gout, and compared using Student's t test. Analysis of previously published data and the new phase I clinical data indicates that changing sUA by a non-renal mechanism leads to a change in FEUA. The magnitude of change is greater in subjects with higher baseline FEUA versus patients with gout. Healthy subjects excrete more urate than do patients with gout at physiological urate-filtered load; this difference disappears when the urate-filtered load is decreased to ∼5000mg/24hours. These observations are consistent with a less saturated urate reabsorption system in patients with gout versus healthy subjects, resulting in elevated retention of uric acid. Further investigation could lead to the discovery of mechanisms responsible for the etiology of hyperuricemia/gout. Copyright © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Uric acid promotes vascular stiffness, maladaptive inflammatory responses and proteinuria in western diet fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroor, Annayya R; Jia, Guanghong; Habibi, Javad; Sun, Zhe; Ramirez-Perez, Francisco I; Brady, Barron; Chen, Dongqing; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Manrique, Camila; Nistala, Ravi; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Demarco, Vincent G; Meininger, Gerald A; Sowers, James R

    2017-09-01

    Aortic vascular stiffness has been implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in obese individuals. However, the mechanism promoting these adverse effects are unclear. In this context, promotion of obesity through consumption of a western diet (WD) high in fat and fructose leads to excess circulating uric acid. There is accumulating data implicating elevated uric acid in the promotion of CVD and CKD. Accordingly, we hypothesized that xanthine oxidase(XO) inhibition with allopurinol would prevent a rise in vascular stiffness and proteinuria in a translationally relevant model of WD-induced obesity. Four-week-old C57BL6/J male mice were fed a WD with excess fat (46%) and fructose (17.5%) with or without allopurinol (125mg/L in drinking water) for 16weeks. Aortic endothelial and extracellular matrix/vascular smooth muscle stiffness was evaluated by atomic force microscopy. Aortic XO activity, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and aortic endothelial sodium channel (EnNaC) expression were evaluated along with aortic expression of inflammatory markers. In the kidney, expression of toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) and fibronectin were assessed along with evaluation of proteinuria. XO inhibition significantly attenuated WD-induced increases in plasma uric acid, vascular XO activity and oxidative stress, in concert with reductions in proteinuria. Further, XO inhibition prevented WD-induced increases in aortic EnNaC expression and associated endothelial and subendothelial stiffness. XO inhibition also reduced vascular pro-inflammatory and maladaptive immune responses induced by consumption of a WD. XO inhibition also decreased WD-induced increases in renal TLR4 and fibronectin that associated proteinuria. Consumption of a WD leads to elevations in plasma uric acid, increased vascular XO activity, oxidative stress, vascular stiffness, and proteinuria all of which are attenuated with allopurinol administration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  13. Determination of uric acid in plasma and allantoic fluid of chicken embryos by capillary electrophoresis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějčková, J.; Tůma, P.; Samcová, E.; Zemanová, Zdeňka

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 12 (2007), s. 1947-1952 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/04/0972 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA203/07/0896 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : capillary electrophoresis * microsamples of plasma * uric acid Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.632, year: 2007

  14. Low serum uric acid concentration augments insulin effects on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porchia, Leonardo M; Gonzalez-Mejia, M Elba; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Ruiz-Vivanco, Guadalupe; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2017-12-22

    Insulin and uric acid were shown affect the prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), but no studies examine their interaction. Therefore, we conducted this study to determine their biological interaction in subjects from central Mexico. 433 subjects were enrolled for a cross-sectional study. MetS was defined according to the Harmonizing Definition. Hyperuricemia was defined as ≥7.0 mg/dL in males and ≥5.8 mg/dL in females. Hyperinsulinemia was defined as ≥11.0 μU/mL. Pearson correlation coefficient (r) was calculated to determine the association between uric acid or insulin and MetS. Logistic regression was used to determine the risk (odds ratio) of developing MetS. Biological interactions were determined by the PROCESS Macro and Anderson's method. Insulin and uric acid levels were elevated in MetS positive group (p 7.0 mg/dL. When the cohort was separated by hyperinsulinemia and hyperuricemia, there was a significant risk of developing MetS for subjects with hyperuricemia (odds ratio = 2.3; 95%CI: 1.1-4.8, p < .05), hyperinsulinemia (odds ratio = 3.1; 95%CI: 1.9-4.9, p < .05), or both (odds ratio = 7.4; 95%CI: 3.2-17.2, p < .05); however, there was no multiplicative or additive interaction. Here, we show that uric acid and insulin augments the prevalence of MetS; however, no biological interaction was determined for hyperuricemia and hyperinsulinemia. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum uric acid concentrations in a Xhosa community in the Transkei of Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beighton, P; Daynes, G; Soskolne, C L

    1976-01-01

    Serum uric acid (SUA) concentrations were measured in specimens obtained from 479 respondents aged 15 and over during an epidemiological survey of bone and joint conditions in a tribal Xhosa community living in the Transkei, Southern Africa. Population SUA levels in the Xhosa were significantly lower than those previously observed in South Africa Negro groups in rural and urban environments. This finding agrees with the observations that population SUA concentrations tend to rise with increasing complexity of life style. PMID:1275585

  16. Resistance Training in Type 2 Diabetic Patients Improves Uric Acid Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sousa Moisés S.S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance training (RT can provide several benefits for individuals with Type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance training on the strength levels and uric acid (UA concentration in individuals with Type 2 diabetes. The study included 68 patients (57.7±9.0 years that participated in an organized program of RT for 12 weeks. The volunteers were divided into two groups: an experimental group (EG; n=34 that performed the resistance training program consisting of seven exercises executed in an alternating order based on segments; and a control group (CG; n=34 that maintained their normal daily life activities. Muscle strength and uric acid were measured both pre- and post-experiment. The results showed a significant increase in strength of the subjects in the EG for all exercises included in the study (p<0.001. Comparing the strength levels of the post-test, intergroup differences were found in supine sitting (p<0.001, leg extension (p<0.001, shoulder press (p<0.001, leg curl (p=0.001, seated row (p<0.001, leg press (p=0.001 and high pulley (p<0.001. The measured uric acid was significantly increased in both experimental and control groups (p<0.001 and p=0.001, respectively. The intergroup comparison showed a significant increase for the EG (p=0.024. We conclude that the training program was effective for strength gains despite an increase in uric acid in Type 2 diabetics.

  17. Pepsinogen I/II ratio is related to glucose, triacylglycerol, and uric acid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Muhei; Fukui, Michiaki; Kuroda, Masaaki; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Goji; Oda, Yohei; Naito, Yuji; Toda, Hitoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Nakamura, Naoto

    2012-04-01

    Under- and overnutrition are associated with a worse prognosis and constitute independent risk factors for morbidity and mortality. It is increasingly important to understand the factors that affect nutritional and metabolic statuses. The purpose of this study was to assess the relation between the pepsinogen I/II ratio and several biochemical markers. A cross-sectional study was performed in 1985 subjects who underwent a health screening test. Subjects had no medications for hyperuricemia, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, or hypertension. All subjects were classified into two groups. Subjects with a pepsinogen I/II ratio below 3 were defined as having atrophic gastritis. The relations between the pepsinogen I/II ratio and several biochemical markers, including total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, uric acid, cholinesterase, and glucose levels, were evaluated. The presence of atrophic gastritis was significantly associated with age, smoking status, alcohol consumption, body mass index, and triacylglycerol, uric acid, cholinesterase, and hemoglobin levels. Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that the pepsinogen I/II ratio was an independent determinant of glucose level (β = 0.104, P < 0.0001), triacylglycerol level (β = 0.072, P = 0.0014), uric acid level (β = 0.048, P = 0.0138), and hemoglobin (β = 0.037, P = 0.0429) after adjustments for age, sex, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and body mass index. The pepsinogen I/II ratio was related to glucose, triacylglycerol, and uric acid levels. Such an association fosters the idea that a decreased pepsinogen I/II ratio seems favorable for the prevention of overnutrition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Almond supplementation reduces serum uric acid in coronary artery disease patients: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jamshed, Humaira; Gilani, Anwar-ul-Hassan; Sultan, Fateh Ali Tipoo; Amin, Faridah; Arslan, Jamshed; Ghani, Sumaira; Masroor, Madiha

    2016-01-01

    Objective Elevated serum uric acid (UA), a biomarker of renal insufficiency, is also an independent prognostic marker for morbidity in coronary artery disease (CAD) and poses serious health risks. This study reports the effect of almond consumption on UA in CAD patients. Study design A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted with three groups: no-intervention (NI), Pakistani almonds (PA) or American almonds (AA). Patients were recruited from the Cardiology Clinics, Aga Khan Univers...

  19. 3-D periodic mesoporous nickel oxide for nonenzymatic uric acid sensors with improved sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Cao, Yang; Chen, Yong; Zhou, Yang; Huang, Qingyou

    2015-12-01

    3-D periodic mesoporous nickel oxide (NiO) particles with crystalline walls have been synthesized through the microwave-assisted hard template route toward the KIT-6 silica. It was investigated as a nonenzymatic amperometric sensor for the detection of uric acid. 3-D periodic nickel oxide matrix has been obtained by the hard template route from the KIT-6 silica template. The crystalline nickel oxide belonged to the Ia3d space group, and its structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The analysis results showed that the microwave-assisted mesoporous NiO materials were more appropriate to be electrochemical sensors than the traditional mesoporous NiO. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) revealed that 3-D periodic NiO exhibited a direct electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of uric acid in sodium hydroxide solution. The enzyme-less amperometric sensor used in the detection of uric acid with detection limit of 0.005 μM (S/N = 3) over wide linear detection ranges up to 0.374 mM and with a high sensitivity of 756.26 μA mM-1 cm-2, and a possible mechanism was also given in the paper.

  20. Serum uric acid level in hypertensive patients with acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burki, L.; Mehmood, A.

    2013-01-01

    To estimate serum uric acid level in hypertensive patients with acute myocardial infarction and hypertensive patients without myocardial infarction. Study Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Department of Medicine, Mayo Hospital, Lahore. Duration of study with dates Study was carried over a period of six months from 01-01-2007 to 30-06-2007. Subjects and methods Eighty hypertensive patients were included in the study out of which 40 patients with acute myocardial infarction were put in MI group and 40 patients without any history of myocardial infarction were labeled as non-MI group. Results Mean age of the patients in MI group and non-MI was found to be 50.0+-12.4 and 51.8+-10.1 years, respectively. Results of Serum uric acid level in MI group were 6.9+-1.0 mg/dl (0.407 +- 0.059 mmol/L ) and in non-MI group were 5.8+-1.5 mg/dl (0.342 +- 0.088 mmol/L) (p<0.001). (where 1 mmol/L = 16.78 mg/dl or 1 mg/dl = 0.059 mmol/L). Conclusion The present study proved that raised serum uric acid level can cause hypertension and further rise can lead to MI. (author)

  1. GLUCOSE, TOTAL PROTEINS, URIC ACID AND TRIGL YCERIDES CONCENTRATIONS IN BLOOD OF ATIVE LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Mahmood Bhatti, Tanzeela Talat and Rozina Sardar

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken, to estimate levels of glucose, total proteins, albumins, uric acid and triglycerides in plasma of Desi and Naked Neck laying hens. The experimental birds received ration containing 16 per cent crude protein and were housed in open sheds. The mean values (mg/dL observed in Desi hens were 226.736+15.20 glucose, 1.624+0.224 albumin, 5.203+1.078 total proteins, 4.633+1.875 uric acid and 529.800+554.74 triglycerides. In Naked neck hens, the mean values were found to be 231.818+31.376 glucose, 1.562+0.287 albumins, 4.533+0.797total proteins, 4.157+1.336 uric acid and 791.200+320.474 triglycerides. There was no difference (P<0.05 in mean values of blood parameters between both the native laying hens which suggested that in identical genetical mechanism regulated concentrations of blood chemical constituents under study.

  2. D-tagatose, a stereoisomer of D-fructose, increases blood uric acid concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemann, B; Toubro, S; Holst, J J; Rehfeld, J F; Bibby, B M; Astrup, A

    2000-08-01

    D-Fructose has been found to increase uric acid production by accelerating the degradation of purine nucleotides, probably due to hepatocellular depletion of inorganic phosphate (Pi) by an accumulation of ketohexose-1-phosphate. The hyperuricemic effect of D-tagatose, a stereoisomer of D-fructose, may be greater than that of D-fructose, as the subsequent degradation of D-tagatose-1-phosphate is slower than the degradation of D-fructose-1-phosphate. We tested the effect of 30 g oral D-tagatose versus D-fructose on plasma uric acid and other metabolic parameters in 8 male subjects by a double-blind crossover design. Both the peak concentration and 4-hour area under the curve (AUC) of serum uric acid were significantly higher after D-tagatose compared with either 30 g D-fructose or plain water. The decline in serum Pi concentration was greater at 50 minutes after D-tagatose versus D-fructose. The thermogenic and lactacidemic responses to D-tagatose were blunted compared with D-fructose. D-Tagatose attenuated the glycemic and insulinemic responses to a meal that was consumed 255 minutes after its administration. Moreover, both fructose and D-tagatose increased plasma concentrations of cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). The metabolic effects of D-tagatose occurred despite its putative poor absorption.

  3. Evaluation of uric acid levels, thyroid function, and anthropometric parameters in Japanese children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niegawa, Tomomi; Takitani, Kimitaka; Takaya, Ryuzo; Ishiro, Manabu; Kuroyanagi, Yuichi; Okasora, Keisuke; Minami, Yukako; Matsuda, Takuya; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2017-09-01

    Down syndrome, caused by trisomy 21, is characterized by congenital abnormalities as well as mental retardation. From the neonatal stage through adolescence, patients with Down syndrome often have several complications. Thus, it is important to attain knowledge of the prevalence of these comorbidities in children with Down syndrome. We, therefore, evaluated the biochemical data, thyroid function, and anthropometric parameters, and analyzed the association among them in Japanese children and early adolescents with Down syndrome. There was no difference in the prevalence of obesity and overweight between boys and girls. The level of uric acid was higher in boys than in girls. Moreover, the prevalence of hyperuricemia was also higher in boys than in girls (approximately 32% and 10%, respectively). The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism in children with Down syndrome was approximately 20%, with no significant sex differences. The levels of uric acid and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate were positively associated with age, while the levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone and free thyroxine had a negative association with age. Overall, children with Down syndrome, exhibit a higher incidence of hyperuricemia. Therefore, uric acid levels, as well as thyroid function, from childhood to early adulthood should be monitored in this patient cohort.

  4. Relationship between serum uric acid levels and metabolic syndrome in Chinese postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P J; Ma, F; Lou, H P; Zhu, Y N; Chen, Y

    2014-04-01

    Serum uric acid levels have been reported to be associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, few studies specifically examining the relationship between serum uric acid (SUA) levels and MetS in postmenopausal women have been reported in China. Thus, we conducted this study in order to assess the relationship between SUA levels and MetS in Chinese postmenopausal women. A cross-sectional study of 1022 Chinese postmenopausal women (aged 42-80 years) who participated in annual health check-ups was employed. MetS was defined by National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III criteria (NCEP-ATP III). Of all the participants, 385 women were diagnosed with MetS (MetS group) and the others were without MetS (non-MetS group). SUA quartiles were defined as follows: Q1, metabolic syndrome in the highest SUA quartile vs. the lowest quartile was 3.768 (2.386-5.950) for all women (p uric acid quartile (p for trend < 0.001). Higher SUA levels are positively and independently associated with the presence of MetS in Chinese postmenopausal women.

  5. Serum uric acid: a marker of metabolic syndrome and subclinical atherosclerosis in Korean men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengyun; Bian, Luqin; Choi, Yoonho

    2012-08-01

    Serum uric acid (SUA) is a potential risk factor for atherosclerosis. We assessed the relationship between SUA and subclinical atherosclerosis in Korean men (n = 3010). Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and ultrasonographic measurements of coronary artery calcification (CAC) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), respectively, are markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. Odds ratios (ORs) of CAC score and cIMT across SUA levels were 1.101 (P = .046) and 1.266 (P = .002), respectively, after adjustment for several variables. The independent association between CAC and cIMT was observed (OR = 1.231, P uric acid was independently associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) with an OR of 1.415 (P Metabolic syndrome was only independently associated with cIMT, with an OR of 2.103 (P = .003). High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was positively correlated with SUA (r = .125, P uric acid level is independently associated with CAC, cIMT, and MetS in Korean men.

  6. Synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride by reaction of melamine and uric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dante, Roberto C., E-mail: rcdante@yahoo.com [Laboratorio de Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Martin-Ramos, Pablo, E-mail: pablomartinramos@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Correa-Guimaraes, Adriana, E-mail: acg@iaf.uva.es [Laboratorio de Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Martin-Gil, Jesus, E-mail: jesusmartingil@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Ingenieria Agricola y Forestal, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: {yields} Graphitic carbon nitrides by CVD of melamine and uric acid on alumina. {yields} The building blocks of carbon nitrides are heptazine nuclei. {yields} Composite particles with alumina core and carbon nitride coating. - Abstract: Graphitic carbon nitrides were synthesized starting from melamine and uric acid. Uric acid was chosen because it thermally decomposes, and reacts with melamine by condensation at temperatures in the range of 400-600 deg. C. The reagents were mixed with alumina and subsequently the samples were treated in an oven under nitrogen flux. Alumina favored the deposition of the graphitic carbon nitrides layers on the exposed surface. This method can be assimilated to an in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Infrared (IR) spectra, as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, are in accordance with the formation of a graphitic carbon nitride with a structure based on heptazine blocks. These carbon nitrides exhibit poor crystallinity and a nanometric texture, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The thermal degradation of the graphitic carbon nitride occurs through cyano group formation, and involves the bridging tertiary nitrogen and the bonded carbon, which belongs to the heptazine ring, causing the ring opening and the consequent network destruction as inferred by connecting the IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results. This seems to be an easy and promising route to synthesize graphitic carbon nitrides. Our final material is a composite made of an alumina core covered by carbon nitride layers.

  7. Association between Serum Uric Acid Levels and Sleep Variables: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2005–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Constance Wiener

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disordered breathing as well as high serum uric acid levels are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, studies evaluating the relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and hyperuricemia are limited. We examined the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination survey's sleep variables and high serum uric acid among 6491 participants aged ≥20 years. The sleep variables included sleep duration, snoring, snorting, and daytime sleepiness. The main outcome was high serum uric acid level, defined as levels of serum uric acid >6.8 mg/dL in males and >6.0 mg/dL in females. We found that snoring more than 5 nights per week, daytime sleepiness, and an additive composite score of sleep variables were associated with high serum uric acid in the age- , sex-adjusted model and in a multivariable model adjusting for demographic and lifestyle/behavioral risk factors. The association was attenuated with the addition of variables related to clinical outcomes such as depression, diabetes, hypertension, and high-cholesterol levels. Our results indicate a positive relationship between sleep variables, including the presence of snoring, snorting, and daytime sleepiness, and high serum uric acid levels.

  8. Associations between serum uric acid levels and the incidence of nonfatal stroke: a nationwide community-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Keita; Konta, Tsuneo; Hirayama, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Kazunobu; Kubota, Isao; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Moriyama, Toshiki; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Narita, Ichiei; Kondo, Masahide; Shibagaki, Yugo; Kasahara, Masato; Asahi, Koichi; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2017-06-01

    Hyperuricemia is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events and mortality. This study investigated the association between serum uric acid and the incidence of nonfatal stroke in a Japanese community-based population. We used a nationwide database of 155,322 subjects (aged 40-73, male 39 %) who participated in the annual "Specific Health Check and Guidance in Japan" checkup from 2008 to 2010. We examined the relationship between the quintiles of serum uric acid levels at baseline and the incidence of nonfatal stroke during a 2-year study period using self-reported data. The crude incidence of nonfatal stroke was significantly associated with serum uric acid levels at baseline, showing the lowest values in subjects with the 3rd quintile (Q3: men, 5.0-5.6; women, 3.8-4.3) of uric acid levels (mg/dL) and the highest values in subjects with the highest quintile (Q5: men ≥7.1, women ≥5.5) both in men and women (P uric acid levels for incident stroke was high, irrespective of characteristics such as age, sex, and renal function. This study has shown that serum uric acid is independently associated with the incidence of nonfatal stroke in the general Japanese population.

  9. Higher Serum Uric Acid May Contribute to Cerebral Infarction in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: a Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Xiaoning

    2017-01-01

    Higher levels of serum uric acid tend to increase the diabetes-related complications. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate whether the higher serum uric acid levels were associated with cerebral infarction in type 2 diabetes patients. We searched for relevant studies in the PubMed, Embase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, China BioMedicine, and VIP database until August 2015. All observational studies comparing serum uric acid levels in type 2 diabetic patients with and without cerebral infarction were included. We calculated the ratio of means (RoM) of serum uric acid by mean cerebral infarction /mean diabetic control from the individual studies and then pooled RoM and its 95 % confidence intervals (CI). A total of 23 eligible studies were identified. Pooled estimates indicated that type 2 diabetes patients with cerebral infarction were associated with 29 % (RoM 1.29; 95 % CI 1.26-1.31) higher serum uric acid levels than those without cerebral infarction in a random effect model. Subgroup analyses based on gender indicated that RoM was 1.23 (95 % CI 1.09-1.38) for men and 1.12 (95 % CI 0.98-1.27) for women. This meta-analysis suggests that higher serum uric acid levels may contribute to cerebral infarction in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  10. Uric acid: a starring role in the intricate scenario of metabolic syndrome with cardio-renal damage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellato, Davide; Morrone, Luigi Francesco; Di Giorgio, Chiara; Gesualdo, Loreto

    2012-02-01

    Elevated uric acid levels are a common finding in patients with metabolic syndrome and in those with cardiovascular and renal disease, but the meaning of this elevation is still unclear. In patients with chronic kidney diseases, it could merely reflect the reduction in glomerular filtration rate: but uric acid levels are known to be elevated in people, also in younger ones, prior to the development of hypertension or renal disease, independently of several risk factors. Multiple potential mechanisms suggest a causative role for uric acid in vascular disease. Uric acid has been shown to be involved in metabolic pathways that lead to oxidative stress, endothelial disfunction, and to a vascular and systemic inflammatory response. Moreover, the elevation in uric acid levels observed after fructose ingestion, with a consequent reduction in nitric oxide, may lead to a reduced glucose uptake in the skeletal muscle, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Besides these bench research data, also clinical studies showed the beneficial effects of lowering uric acid therapies on several markers of cardiovascular and renal disease. To date, however, there is no evidence indicating that such therapies, that are not free of risk, may reduce cardiovascular events; so that to manage our prescriptions, we need larger, prospective, interventional data.

  11. Association of Serum Uric Acid Concentration with Diabetic Retinopathy and Albuminuria in Taiwanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ching-Chao; Lin, Pi-Chen; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Chen, Szu-Chia; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Lin, Kun-Der; Hsu, Wei-Hao

    2016-08-02

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) may experience chronic microvascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic nephropathy (DN) during their lifetime. In clinical studies, serum uric acid concentration has been found to be associated with DR and DN. The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the increases in serum uric acid level and the severity of DR and albuminuria in Taiwanese patients with type 2 DM. We recorded serum uric acid concentration, the severity of DR, and the severity of albuminuria by calculating urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) in 385 patients with type 2 DM. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, a high uric acid concentration was a risk factor for albuminuria (odds ratio (OR), 1.227; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.015-1.482; p = 0.034) and DR (OR, 1.264; 95% CI = 1.084-1.473; p = 0.003). We also demonstrated that there was a higher concentration of serum uric acid in the patients with more severe albuminuria and DR. In conclusion, an increased serum uric acid level was significantly correlated with the severity of albuminuria and DR in Taiwanese patients with type 2 DM.

  12. Lower uric acid is associated with poor short-term outcome and a higher frequency of posterior arterial involvement in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanxiang; Reynolds, Gavin P; Wang, Wenmin; Wei, Xianwen

    2018-03-06

    Uric acid has neuroprotective properties in experimental and clinical studies of neurodegenerative disease. It is, however, associated with increased risk of stroke, yet, despite some inconsistent findings, increasing evidence suggests it may also be related to improved stroke outcomes. We have determined whether there is an effect of plasma uric acid on the short-term outcome of stroke patients in a general hospital setting using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). We also investigated the relationship of uric acid with other clinical correlates. Plasma uric acid was determined in 108 acute ischemic stroke patients and their mRS scores measured. Patients with a poor outcome (mRS > 2) had significantly lower uric acid than those with a better outcome; this remained after correcting for the effect of sex on uric acid concentrations. There was no significant association with other epidemiological factors or with cognitive function determined by Mini-Mental State Examination. An association between uric acid and the cerebral circulation was also found in which lower uric acid occurs with posterior artery involvement. These findings demonstrate in a naturalistic cohort of patients the association of uric acid with short-term disability following ischemic stroke. They also raise the question of whether uric acid may influence the regional brain involvement in stroke.

  13. Delphinidin immobilized on silver nanoparticles for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, noradrenalin, uric acid, and tryptophan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Nasirizadeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the fabrication of a new modified electrode for electrocatalytic oxidation of noradrenalin, based on the delphinidin immobilized on silver nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the redox properties of this modified electrode. The surface charge transfer rate constant (ks and the charge transfer coefficient (α for the electron transfer between the glassy carbon electrode and the immobilized delphinidin were calculated. The differential pulse voltammetry exhibited two linear dynamic ranges and a detection limit of 0.40μM for noradrenalin determination. Moreover, the present electrode could separate the oxidation peak potentials of ascorbic acid, noradrenalin, uric acid, and tryptophan in a mixture. The usefulness of this nanosensor was also investigated for the determination of ascorbic acid, noradrenalin, and uric acid in pharmaceutical and biological fluid samples with satisfactory results.

  14. 3-D periodic mesoporous nickel oxide for nonenzymatic uric acid sensors with improved sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Wei; Cao, Yang; Chen, Yong; Zhou, Yang; Huang, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The enzyme-less amperometric sensor based on 3-D periodic mesoporous NiO nanomaterials used in the detection of uric acid with detection limit of 0.005 μM (S/N = 3) over wide linear detection ranges up to 0.374 mM and with a high sensitivity of 756.26 μA mM −1 cm −2 . - Highlights: • Microwave-assisted method was used to fabricate the 3-D periodic mesoporous NiO particles. • The mesoporous nickel oxide was applied to nonenzymatic uric acid biosensor. • The detection limit is 0.005 μM over wide linear detection ranges up to 0.374 mM. • The sensitivity is 756.26 μA mM −1 cm −2 . - Abstract: 3-D periodic mesoporous nickel oxide (NiO) particles with crystalline walls have been synthesized through the microwave-assisted hard template route toward the KIT-6 silica. It was investigated as a nonenzymatic amperometric sensor for the detection of uric acid. 3-D periodic nickel oxide matrix has been obtained by the hard template route from the KIT-6 silica template. The crystalline nickel oxide belonged to the Ia3d space group, and its structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N 2 adsorption–desorption, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The analysis results showed that the microwave-assisted mesoporous NiO materials were more appropriate to be electrochemical sensors than the traditional mesoporous NiO. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) revealed that 3-D periodic NiO exhibited a direct electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of uric acid in sodium hydroxide solution. The enzyme-less amperometric sensor used in the detection of uric acid with detection limit of 0.005 μM (S/N = 3) over wide linear detection ranges up to 0.374 mM and with a high sensitivity of 756.26 μA mM −1 cm −2 , and a possible mechanism was also given in the paper.

  15. Urea, Uric Acid, Prolactin and fT4 Concentrations in Aqueous Humor of Keratoconus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachon, Tanja; Stachon, Axel; Hartmann, Ulrike; Seitz, Berthold; Langenbucher, Achim; Szentmáry, Nóra

    2017-06-01

    Keratoconus is a noninflammatory disease of the cornea associated with progressive thinning and conical shape. Metabolic alterations in the urea cycle, with changes in collagen fibril stability, oxidative stress, thyroid hormones and prolactin with regulatory effect on biosynthesis and biomechanical stability of corneal stroma, may all play a role in keratoconus etiology. Our purpose was to determine urea, uric acid, prolactin and free thyroxin (fT4) concentrations in human aqueous humor (hAH) of keratoconus and cataract patients. hAH was collected from 100 keratoconus (penetrating keratoplasty) (41.9 ± 14.9 years, 69 males) and 100 cataract patients (cataract surgery) (71.2 ± 12.4 years, 58 males). Urea, uric acid, prolactin and fT4 concentrations were measured by Siemens clinical chemistry or immunoassay system. For statistical analysis, a generalized linear model (GLM) was used. Urea concentration was 11.88 ± 3.03 mg/dl in keratoconus and 16.44 ± 6.40 mg/dl in cataract patients, uric acid 2.04 ± 0.59 mg/dl in keratoconus and 2.18 ± 0.73 mg/dl in cataract groups. Prolactin concentration was 3.18 ± 0.34 ng/ml in keratoconus and 3.33 ± 0.32 ng/ml in cataract patients, fT4 20.57 ± 4.76 pmol/l in KC and 19.06 ± 3.86 pmol/l in cataract group. Urea concentration was effected through gender (p = 0.039), age (p = 0.001) and diagnosis (p = 0.025). Uric acid concentration was not effected through any of the analyzed parameters (p > 0.056). Prolactin and fT4 concentration were effected only through diagnosis (p = 0.009 and p = 0.006). Urea and prolactin concentrations are decreased, fT4 concentration is increased in aqueous humor of keratoconus patients, and uric acid concentration remains unchanged. Urea concentration in aqueous humor is also increased in older and male patients. Therefore, metabolic disorder and hormonal balance may both have an impact on keratoconus development. Further studies are necessary to assess the specific impact.

  16. 3-D periodic mesoporous nickel oxide for nonenzymatic uric acid sensors with improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wei; Cao, Yang, E-mail: caowang507@163.com; Chen, Yong; Zhou, Yang; Huang, Qingyou

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: The enzyme-less amperometric sensor based on 3-D periodic mesoporous NiO nanomaterials used in the detection of uric acid with detection limit of 0.005 μM (S/N = 3) over wide linear detection ranges up to 0.374 mM and with a high sensitivity of 756.26 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. - Highlights: • Microwave-assisted method was used to fabricate the 3-D periodic mesoporous NiO particles. • The mesoporous nickel oxide was applied to nonenzymatic uric acid biosensor. • The detection limit is 0.005 μM over wide linear detection ranges up to 0.374 mM. • The sensitivity is 756.26 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. - Abstract: 3-D periodic mesoporous nickel oxide (NiO) particles with crystalline walls have been synthesized through the microwave-assisted hard template route toward the KIT-6 silica. It was investigated as a nonenzymatic amperometric sensor for the detection of uric acid. 3-D periodic nickel oxide matrix has been obtained by the hard template route from the KIT-6 silica template. The crystalline nickel oxide belonged to the Ia3d space group, and its structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The analysis results showed that the microwave-assisted mesoporous NiO materials were more appropriate to be electrochemical sensors than the traditional mesoporous NiO. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) revealed that 3-D periodic NiO exhibited a direct electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of uric acid in sodium hydroxide solution. The enzyme-less amperometric sensor used in the detection of uric acid with detection limit of 0.005 μM (S/N = 3) over wide linear detection ranges up to 0.374 mM and with a high sensitivity of 756.26 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, and a possible mechanism was also given in the paper.

  17. Relationship between plasma adiponectin, retinol-binding protein 4 and uric Acid in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Seok; Ihm, Sang-Hyun; Park, Hun-Jun; Shin, Woo-Seung; Kim, Pum-Jun; Chang, Kiyuk; Kim, Hee-Yeol; Youn, Ho-Joong; Chung, Wook-Sung; Seung, Ki Bae; Kim, Jae-Hyung

    2011-04-01

    Adipokines have been suggested for their potential use in tracking the clinical progress in the subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS). To investigate the relationship between the serum levels of adipokines {adiponectin and retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4)} and the serum level of uric acid in hypertensive (HTN) patients with MS. In this study, 38 totally untreated HTN patients were enrolled. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure (BP) were taken in the 12 HTN patients without MS and the 26 HTN patients with MS. Fasting blood samples were collected for measurement of adiponectin, RBP4, nitric oxide (NO), glucose, creatinine, uric acid, lipid profile and insulin. The HTN with MS group had significant higher values of body mass index, waist length, serum uric acid and triglyceride levels than the HTN without MS group. Compared to the HTN without MS group, the HTN with MS group showed significantly lower adiponectin (p=0.030), NO (p=0.003) and high density lipoprotein levels (puric acid level (R=-0.413, p=0.036), and serum RBP4 levels positively correlated with uric acid level (R=0.527, p=0.006) in the HTN with MS group. Multiple linear regression analysis using RBP4 and adiponectin levels as the dependent variables showed that uric acid level correlated with serum RBP4 level (p=0.046) and adiponectin level (p=0.044). The HTN with MS group showed a correlation with two types of adipokines (adiponectin, RBP4) and uric acid. Adiponectin, RBP4 and uric acid may be important components associated with MS, especially when associated with hypertension.

  18. Serum uric acid and renal function in patients with type 1 diabetes: a nationwide study in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Marcela Haas; Santos, Deborah Conte; Barros, Bianca Senger Vasconcelos; de Melo, Laura Gomes Nunes; Gomes, Marilia Brito

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes nephropathy is a microvascular complication associated with high morbidity and mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes, and its pathogenesis is not fully understood. Our aim was to evaluate the association between levels of serum uric acid and renal function assessed by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria in patients with type 1 diabetes. This is a multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study with 1686 patients, conducted between August 2011 and August 2014 in 14 public clinics from ten Brazilian cities. Renal function was estimated by CKD-EPI (adults) and by Schwartz (adolescents). We analyzed 1686 patients, aged 30.1 ± 12.0, with 15.4 ± 9.3 years of duration of diabetes; 55.8% were female and 54.0% were Caucasians. Serum uric acid was related to renal function, with a mean of 4.8 ± 1.4 (in the normal renal function group) vs 5.2 ± 2.0 (GFR ≥ 60 ml/min and albuminuria) vs 6.5 ± 2.6 mg/dl (GFR uric acid and GFR (r = - 0.316, p uric acid. Considering only patients with normal renal function (n = 1170), a decrease of 2.04 ml/min in the GFR for every increase of 1 mg/dl in Serum uric acid was noted using multivariate analysis. Patients with higher levels of serum uric acid have worse renal function, independently of HbA1c or duration of diabetes, which persisted even in patients with normal renal function. Further prospective studies are necessary to establish if patients with higher serum uric acid may have an elevated risk for developing chronic kidney disease.

  19. Relevance of uric acid and asymmetric dimethylarginine for modeling cardiovascular risk prediction in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Afsar, Baris; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Unal, Hilmi Umut; Karaman, Murat; Saglam, Mutlu; Eyileten, Tayfun; Gezer, Mustafa; Verim, Samet; Oguz, Yusuf; Vural, Abdulgaffar; Ortiz, Alberto; Johnson, Richard J; Covic, Adrian; Yilmaz, Mahmut Ilker

    2016-07-01

    Both elevated serum uric acid and serum asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that combined elevation of uric acid and ADMA amplifies the risk of all-cause mortality and/or cardiovascular events (CVE) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 259 patients with CKD stages 1-5 were followed up in a time-to-event analysis for all-cause mortality and fatal and non-fatal CVE (including death, stroke, and myocardial infarction). Baseline measurements included serum uric acid and ADMA and endothelial function [ultrasound determined flow-mediated dilatation (FMD)]. As a measure of endothelial function, log FMD value was positively associated with log eGFR, but negatively associated with log ADMA and log uric acid levels. During follow-up (median 38 months), 24 (9.3 %) deaths, 90 (34.7 %) CVE, and 95 (36.7 %) deaths and CVE (composite outcome) occurred. In the univariate Cox analysis, patients with both serum uric acid and ADMA levels above the median had an increased risk of all-cause mortality, CVE, and the composite outcome (HR 5.06, 95 % CI 2.01-12.76; HR 4.75, 95 % CI 2.98-7.59; and HR 4.13, 95 % CI 2.66-6.43, respectively). However, after adjustment for renal-specific risk factors (glomerular filtration rate, proteinuria, and hsCRP), this association was maintained only for CVE and the composite outcome. The addition of both biomarkers into a model with traditional and renal-specific risk factors did not increase the prediction abilities of the model for none of the three outcomes. Elevated serum uric acid and ADMA levels are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk, but their combination does not improve risk prediction. The effects are not additive, possibly because uric acid may lie in the causal pathway by which ADMA acts.

  20. Green tea polyphenols decreases uric acid level through xanthine oxidase and renal urate transporters in hyperuricemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Tan, Ming-Liang; Li, Kai-Kai; Leung, Ping-Chung; Ko, Chun-Hay

    2015-12-04

    Green tea is a Chinese materia medica with the main functions of "inducing urination and quenching thirst". Green tea polyphenols (GTP) are generally acknowledged as the main active fraction with multiple pharmacological functions in green tea. However, the effect of GTP on hyperuricemia is not clear till now. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of GTP on serum level of uric acid in potassium oxonate (PO)-induced hyperuricemic mice, and explore the underlying mechanisms from two aspects of production and excretion of uric acid. PO and GTP were intragastricly administered to mice for consecutive 7 days. Serum level of uric acid, and xanthine oxidase (XOD) activity in serum and liver were examined. Simultaneously, expression of XOD protein in liver was analyzed by Western blot assay. Expressions of urate transporters including urate-anion transporter (URAT) 1, organic anion transporter (OAT) 1 and 3 in kidney were analyzed by immunohistochemistry staining method. 300 and 600 mg/kg GTP significantly decreased serum level of uric acid of hyperuricemic mice in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Besides, 300 and 600 mg/kg GTP markedly reduced XOD activity in serum and liver of hyperuricemic mice (both p<0.01). Furthermore, 300 and 600 mg/kg GTP clearly reduced XOD expression in liver, as well as reduced URAT1 expression and increased OAT1 and OAT3 expressions in kidney of hyperuricemic mice (p<0.05 or p<0.01). These results demonstrated that GTP had the effect of lowering uric acid through decreasing the uric acid production and increasing uric acid excretion. Our study suggested that GTP would be a promising candidate as a novel hypouricaemic agent for further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Uric acid therapy improves the outcomes of stroke patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator and mechanical thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Ángel; Amaro, Sergio; Castellanos, Mar; Gomis, Meritxell; Urra, Xabier; Blasco, Jordi; Arenillas, Juan F; Román, Luis S; Muñoz, Roberto; Macho, Juan; Cánovas, David; Marti-Fabregas, Joan; Leira, Enrique C; Planas, Anna M

    2017-06-01

    Background Numerous neuroprotective drugs have failed to show benefit in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, making the search for new treatments imperative. Uric acid is an endogenous antioxidant making it a drug candidate to improve stroke outcomes. Aim To report the effects of uric acid therapy in stroke patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. Methods Forty-five patients with proximal vessel occlusions enrolled in the URICO-ICTUS trial received intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator within 4.5 h after stroke onset and randomized to intravenous 1000 mg uric acid or placebo (NCT00860366). These patients also received mechanical thrombectomy because a brain computed tomogaphy angiography confirmed the lack of proximal recanalization at the end of systemic thrombolysis. The primary outcome was good functional outcome at 90 days (modified Rankin Score 0-2). Safety outcomes included mortality, symptomatic intracerebral bleeding, and gout attacks. Results The rate of successful revascularization was >80% in the uric acid and the placebo groups but good functional outcome was observed in 16 out of 24 (67%) patients treated with uric acid and 10 out of 21 (48%) treated with placebo (adjusted Odds Ratio, 6.12 (95% CI 1.08-34.56)). Mortality was observed in two out of 24 (8.3%) patients treated with uric acid and one out of 21 (4.8%) treated with placebo (adjusted Odds Ratio, 3.74 (95% CI 0.06-226.29)). Symptomatic cerebral bleeding and gout attacks were similar in both groups. Conclusions Uric acid therapy was safe and improved stroke outcomes in stroke patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis followed by thrombectomy. Validation of this simple strategy in a larger trial is urgent.

  2. Norepinephrine-modified glassy carbon electrode for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zare, H.R.; Memarzadeh, F.; Ardakani, M. Mazloum; Namazian, M.; Golabi, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation of norepinephrine (NE) on a preactivated glassy carbon electrode leads to the formation of a deposited layer of about 4.2 x 10 -10 mol cm -2 at the surface of the electrode. The electron transfer rate constant, k s , and charge transfer coefficient, α, for electron transfer between the electrode and immobilized NE film were calculated as 44 s -1 and 0.46, respectively. The NE-modified glassy carbon electrode exhibited good electrocatalytic properties towards ascorbic acid (AA) oxidation in phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) with an overpotential of about 475 mV lower than that of the bare electrode. The electrocatalytic response was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, amperometry and rotating disk voltammetry. The overall number of electrons involved in the catalytic oxidation of AA and the number of electrons involved in the rate-determining step are 2 and 1, respectively. The rate constant for the catalytic oxidation of AA was evaluated by RDE voltammetry and an average value of k h was found to be 8.42 x 10 3 M -1 s -1 . Amperometric determination of AA in stirred solution exhibits a linear range of 2.0-1300.0 μM (correlation coefficient 0.9999) and a detection limit of 0.076 μM. The precision of amperometry was found to be 1.9% for replicate determination of a 49.0 μM solution of AA (n = 6). In differential pulse voltammetric measurements, the NE-modified glassy carbon electrode can separate the AA and uric acid (UA) signals. Ascorbic acid oxidizes at more negative potential than UA. Also, the simultaneous determination of UA and AA is achieved at the NE-modified electrode

  3. Photoresponsive surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods for uric acid detection in physiological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Qian [The Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry of Chongqing Municipality, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Department of Science and Environmental Studies, The Hong Kong Institute of Education (Hong Kong); Li, Zai-yong; Wei, Yu-bo; Yang, Xia; Liu, Lan-tao [The Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry of Chongqing Municipality, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Gong, Cheng-bin, E-mail: gongcbtq@swu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry of Chongqing Municipality, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Ma, Xue-bing [The Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry of Chongqing Municipality, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Lam, Michael Hon-wah [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Chow, Cheuk-fai, E-mail: cfchow@ied.edu.hk [Department of Science and Environmental Studies, The Hong Kong Institute of Education (Hong Kong)

    2016-09-01

    A photoresponsive surface molecularly imprinted polymer for uric acid in physiological fluids was fabricated through a facile and effective method using bio-safe and biocompatible ZnO nanorods as a support. The strategy was carried out by introducing double bonds on the surface of the ZnO nanorods with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods was then prepared by surface polymerization using uric acid as template, water-soluble 5-[(4-(methacryloyloxy)phenyl)diazenyl]isophthalic acid as functional monomer, and triethanolamine trimethacryl ester as cross-linker. The surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods showed good photoresponsive properties, high recognition ability, and fast binding kinetics toward uric acid, with a dissociation constant of 3.22 × 10{sup −5} M in aqueous NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} buffer at pH = 7.0 and a maximal adsorption capacity of 1.45 μmol g{sup −1}. Upon alternate irradiation at 365 and 440 nm, the surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods can quantitatively uptake and release uric acid. - Highlights: • Novel surface molecularly imprinted polymer on ZnO nanorods was synthesized. • ZnO-SMIP showed good selectivity toward uric acid in physiological fluids. • ZnO-SMIP displayed good photoresponsive properties.

  4. Fructose suppresses uric acid excretion to the intestinal lumen as a result of the induction of oxidative stress by NADPH oxidase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Chihiro; Ogura, Jiro; Sasaki, Shunichi; Okamoto, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Masaki; Kuwayama, Kaori; Narumi, Katsuya; Iseki, Ken

    2017-03-01

    A high intake of fructose increases the risk for hyperuricemia. It has been reported that long-term fructose consumption suppressed renal uric acid excretion and increased serum uric acid level. However, the effect of single administration of fructose on excretion of uric acid has not been clarified. We used male Wistar rats, which were orally administered fructose (5g/kg). Those rats were used in each experiment at 12h after administration. Single administration of fructose suppressed the function of ileal uric acid excretion and had no effect on the function of renal uric acid excretion. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) predominantly contributes to intestinal excretion of uric acid as an active homodimer. Single administration of fructose decreased BCRP homodimer level in the ileum. Moreover, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox), recovered the suppression of the function of ileal uric acid excretion and the Bcrp homodimer level in the ileum of rats that received single administration of fructose. Single administration of fructose decreases in BCRP homodimer level, resulting in the suppression the function of ileal uric acid excretion. The suppression of the function of ileal uric acid excretion by single administration of fructose is caused by the activation of Nox. The results of our study provide a new insight into the mechanism of fructose-induced hyperuricemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid based on tryptophan functionalized graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Qianwen; He, Zhifang; He, Qian; Luo, Ai; Yan, Kaiwang; Zhang, Dongxia [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry and Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Geography and Environment Science, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 (China); Lu, Xiaoquan, E-mail: Luxq@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry and Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 (China); Zhou, Xibin, E-mail: zhouxb@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry and Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Geography and Environment Science, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Trp-GR was synthesized by utilizing a facile ultrasonic method. • The material as prepared had well dispersivity in water and better conductivity than pure GR. • Trp-GR/GCE showed excellent potential for the determination of AA, DA and UA. • The proposed method was applied for the analysis of AA, DA and UA in real samples. - Abstract: A new type of tryptophan-functionalized graphene nanocomposite (Trp-GR) was synthesized by utilizing a facile ultrasonic method via π–π conjugate action between graphene (GR) and tryptophan (Trp) molecule. The material as prepared had well dispersivity in water and better conductivity than pure GR. The surface morphology of Trp-GR was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA) were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) on the surface of Trp-GR. The separation of the oxidation peak potentials for AA–DA, DA–UA and UA–AA was about 182 mV, 125 mV and 307 mV, which allowed simultaneously determining AA, DA, and UA. Differential pulse voltammetery (DPV) was used for the determination of AA, DA, and UA in their mixture. Under optimum conditions, the linear response ranges for the determination of AA, DA, and UA were 0.2–12.9 mM, 0.5–110 μM, and 10–1000 μM, with the detection limits (S/N = 3) of 10.09 μM, 0.29 μM and 1.24 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the modified electrode was investigated for real sample analysis.

  6. A novel nanocomposites sensor for epinephrine detection in the presence of uric acids and ascorbic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Xiaoquan, E-mail: luxq@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry and Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, LanZhou, 730070 (China); Li Yaya; Du Jie; Zhou Xibin; Xue Zhonghua; Liu Xiuhui; Wang Zhihua [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry and Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, LanZhou, 730070 (China)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {center_dot} A novel PPy/AuNPs/SWCNTs nanomaterials biosensor was prepared to the selective determination of EP. {center_dot} The methods we employed to prepare PPy/AuNPs/SWCNTs nanomaterials are extremely simple. {center_dot} The PPy/AuNPs/SWCNTs nanocomposites biosensor we got from the results of experiments can totally eliminate the interference from AA and distinguish EP from UA. - Abstract: A novel nanocomposites film of conducting polymers including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), polypyrrole (PPy) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified electrode has been applied in voltammetric sensors to detect epinephrine (EP) sensitively when ascorbic acids (AA) and uric acids (UA) exist. The nanocomposites film of conducting polymers which show an excellent electrocatalystic activity for the oxidation of EP and UA was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical methods. The catalytic peak currents obtained from differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) increased linearly with increasing EP concentrations in the range of 4.0 x 10{sup -9}-1.0 x 10{sup -7} M with a detection limit of 2.0 x 10{sup -9} M (S/N = 3), respectively. The results showed that the nanocomposites of conducting polymers can selectively determine EP in the coexistence of a large amount of UA and AA. In addition, the sensor exhibited excellent sensitivity, selectivity and stability. The PPy/AuNPs/SWCNTs nanocomposites film can also be satisfactorily used for detecting EP in epinephrine hydrochloride injection when contain AA and UA, which also shows good recovery for determination of EP in some biological fluids.

  7. Effect of Uric Acid Lowering on Renin-Angiotensin-System Activation and Ambulatory BP: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, Ciaran J; Borgi, Lea; Fisher, Naomi; Curhan, Gary; Forman, John

    2017-05-08

    Higher serum uric acid levels, even within the reference range, are strongly associated with increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and risk of incident hypertension. However, the effect of lowering serum uric acid on RAS activity in humans is unknown, although the data that lowering serum uric acid can reduce BP are conflicting. In a double-blind placebo-controlled trial conducted from 2011 to 2015, we randomly assigned 149 overweight or obese adults with serum uric acid ≥5.0 mg/dl to uric acid lowering with either probenecid or allopurinol, or to placebo. The primary endpoints were kidney-specific and systemic RAS activity. Secondary endpoints included mean 24-hour systolic BP, mean awake and asleep BP, and nocturnal dipping. Allopurinol and probenecid markedly lowered serum uric acid after 4 and 8 weeks compared with placebo (mean serum uric acid in allopurinol, probenecid, and placebo at 8 weeks was 2.9, 3.5, and 5.6 mg/dl, respectively). The change in kidney-specific RAS activity, measured as change in the median (interquartile range) renal plasma flow response to captopril (in ml/min per 1.73 m 2 ) from baseline to 8 weeks, was -4 (-25 to 32) in the probenecid group ( P =0.83), -4 (-16 to 9) in the allopurinol group ( P =0.32), and 1 (-21 to 17) in the placebo group ( P =0.96), with no significant treatment effect ( P =0.77). Similarly, plasma renin activity and plasma angiotensin II levels did not significantly change with treatment. The change in mean (±SD) 24-hour systolic BPs from baseline to 8 weeks was -1.6±10.1 with probenecid ( P =0.43), -0.4±6.1 with allopurinol ( P =0.76), and 0.5±6.0 with placebo ( P =0.65); there was no significant treatment effect ( P =0.58). Adverse events occurred in 9%, 12%, and 2% of those given probenecid, allopurinol, or placebo, respectively. In contrast to animal experiments and observational studies, this randomized, placebo-controlled trial found that uric acid lowering had no effect on kidney

  8. Serum uric acid levels are associated with high blood pressure in Chinese children and adolescents aged 10-15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuo; He, Chun-Hui; Ma, Yi-Tong; Yang, Yi-Ning; Ma, Xiang; Fu, Zhen-Yan; Li, Xiao-Mei; Xie, Xiang; Yu, Zi-Xiang; Chen, You; Liu, Fen; Chen, Bang-Dang; Nakayama, Tomohiro

    2014-05-01

    The present study examined the association between uric acid levels and high blood pressure in a multiethnic study of Chinese children and adolescents. The participants were divided into four different groups according to the uric acid quartiles. Three logistic regression models were conducted to investigate the relationship between the high blood pressure and uric acid levels. Model 1 adjusted age, sex and ethnicity. Model 2 adjusted age, sex, ethnicity, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, estimated glomerular filtration rate, fasting glucose and waist circumference. Model 3 adjusted all the confounding factors in model 2 except the waist circumference and BMI. The concentrations of uric acid in high blood pressure participants and normotensive participants were compared with or without adjustment for confounding factors. A total of 3778 participants aged 10-15 years from the Xinjiang Congenital Heart Disease Survey were included in the present study. The percentages of the high blood pressure in the four different uric acid quartiles were 7.4, 8.6, 9.6 and 11.8%, respectively. In model 1, 2 and 3 of the logistic regression, the participants in the third and fourth uric acid quartiles had significantly higher chance of suffering the high blood pressure when compared with the participants in the first uric acid quartile [odds ratio 1.608, 1.587, 1.597, P = 0.005, 0.015, 0.015, respectively, between participants in the first quartile and the third quartile; odds ratio 1.981, 1.945, 1.810, P = 0.001, 0.002, 0.007, respectively, between participants in the first quartile and the fourth quartile). The concentrations of serum uric acid were 220.7 μmol/l in high blood pressure participants and 204.1 μmol/l in normotensive participants (P = 0.024). After adjustment for confounding factors, the concentrations of serum uric acid were 219.7 vs. 204.5 μmol/l in one model (P high blood pressure.

  9. Effects of allopurinol on plasma uric acid levels in normouricaemic and hyperuricaemic green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Divers, S J; Martinez-Jimenez, D; Bush, S; Latimer, K S; Zwart, P; Kroeze, E J B Veldhuis

    2008-01-26

    A two-phase cross-over therapeutic study was performed with 19 green iguanas (Iguana iguana) maintained within a preferred optimum temperature range of 26 to 37 degrees C. During phase 1, they were fed a normal vegetarian diet and medicated orally with either allopurinol or a placebo control once a day for seven days. Uric acid concentrations, total protein, packed-cell volumes (pcv) and bodyweights were recorded from each lizard before and after treatment to determine the effects of allopurinol. In phase 2, after a 10-day washout period, the iguanas were fed a high protein diet to induce hyperuricaemia. Normo- and hyperuricaemic iguanas that received 24.2 (3.2) mg/kg allopurinol had significantly lower mean (sd) uric acid concentrations (100.3 [53.1] micromol/l) than the controls (159.3 [100.3] micromol/l). There were no detectable interactions between the doses of allopurinol or placebo, and the iguanas' diet, weight, pcv or total protein. The allopurinol was well tolerated, and there was no significant clinical, gross or histological evidence of hepatic or renal toxicity in the iguanas that received the drug. However, in the kidneys of the hyperuricaemic iguanas that did not receive allopurinol there were proliferative changes in the glomeruli and degeneration of tubular epithelia. Allopurinol given orally at 25 mg/kg daily is able to reduce plasma uric acid levels by 41 to 45 per cent, and is therefore recommended for the treatment of hyperuricaemia in the green iguana.

  10. Effects of a fermented barley extract on subjects with slightly high serum uric acid or mild hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokazono, Hideki; Omori, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Tetsuro; Akaoka, Ieo; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2010-01-01

    The uric acid-lowering effect and safety of a fermented barley extract P (FBEP) prepared from barley-shochu distillery by-products were investigated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, double-blinded study. A total of 111 subjects with serum uric acid levels of 6.0-7.9 mg/dl were provided with either a drink containing 2 g/d of FBEP (test group) or a placebo drink. After 12 weeks, the serum uric acid levels changed by -0.21+/-0.56 mg/dl in the test group, showing a significant decrease in comparison to those of the placebo group (+0.02+/-0.54 mg/dl). Additionally, the uric acid clearance in the test group showed a tendency to increase after 12 weeks more than in the placebo group (p=0.054). No abnormalities in the physical and clinical tests were observed, and no adverse diagnostic findings were attributed to the intake of the test meal. These results demonstrated the benefits and safety of the FBEP treatment to subjects with slightly high serum uric acid or mild hyperuricemia.

  11. Associations of uric acid and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) with obesity and components of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A P S; Choi, K C; Ho, C S; Chan, M H M; Ozaki, R; Chan, C W H; Chan, J C N

    2013-10-01

    The combined effect of uric acid, gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and cardiovascular risk factors clustering in the youth remains under-explored. The objective of this study was to examine the association between uric acid, GGT, obesity and the individual components of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. We performed a cross-sectional observational study of 2067 children and adolescents (875 boys and 1192 girls) aged 6-20 years who were healthy volunteers and were recruited from primary and secondary schools in Hong Kong between 2007 and 2008. Subjects were divided into two strata (75th percentile as cut-off) for comparison between odds of cardiovascular risk factors. After adjustment by multivariable logistic regression, subjects in upper stratum, i.e., >75th percentile, of either serum uric acid or GGT levels were associated with obesity, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level and high blood pressure (adjusted odds ratios [AOR] ranged from 1.63 to 5.82, all P uric acid and GGT in the association with obesity, low HDL-C and high blood pressure (AOR ranged from 2.60 to 10.69, all P Uric acid and GGT have combined effect in association with obesity and other cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents. © 2012 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  12. Serum uric acid level and its association with metabolic syndrome and carotid atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Yang, Zhen; Lu, Bin; Wen, Jie; Ye, Zi; Chen, Lili; He, Min; Tao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weiwei; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Qu, Shen; Hu, Renming

    2011-08-04

    We aimed to investigate whether elevated serum uric acid concentrations are associated with higher risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and carotid atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional survey in Shanghai, with a total of 395 men and 631 women age 41 to 92 years. The carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and carotid atherosclerotic plaques (PLQ) were measured by B-mode ultrasound. MetS was defined according to the updated National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for Asian Americans. Uric acid levels were negatively associated with duration of diabetes, fasting plasma glucose, glycohemoglobin, eGFR, HDL-cholesterol (all P uric acid levels, the risks were substantially higher for MetS [odds ratio 3.97, (95% confidence interval 2.58-6.13)] (P uric acid levels after multiple adjustment. These associations remained significant after further adjustment for potential confounders. Serum uric acid level is associated with MetS and is an independent risk factor for carotid atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  13. Usefulness of dual-energy computed tomography with and without dedicated software in identifying uric acid kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, R; Luque, M P; Ciudin, A; Paño, B; Buñesch, L; Sebastia, C; Nicolau, C

    2016-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the usefulness of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) with and without dedicated software in identifying uric acid kidney stones in vivo. We studied 65 kidney stones in 63 patients. All stones were analyzed in vivo by DECT and ex vivo by spectrophotometry. We evaluated the diagnostic performance in identifying uric acid stones with DECT by analyzing the radiologic densities with dedicated software and without using it (through manual measurements) as well as by analyzing the attenuation ratios of the stones in both energies with and without the dedicated software. The six uric acid stones included were correctly identified by evaluating the attenuation ratios with a cutoff of 1.21, both with the dedicated software and without it, yielding perfect diagnostic performance without false positives or false negatives. The study of the attenuations of the stones obtained the following values on the receiver operating characteristic curves in the classification of the uric acid stones: 0.92 for the measurements done with the software and 0.89 for the manual measurements; a cutoff of 538 HU yielded 84% (42/50) diagnostic accuracy for the software and 83.1% (54/65) for the manual measurements. DECT enabled the uric acid stones to be identified correctly through the calculation of the ratio of the attenuations in the two energies. The results obtained with the dedicated software were similar to those obtained manually. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of raised serum uric acid level on perinatal and maternal outcome in cases of pregnancy-induced hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qumrun Nassa Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find out the effects of raised serum uric acid level on perinatal and maternal outcome in cases of pregnancy-induced hypertension. One hundred pregnant women with gestational period beyond 28 weeks with pregnancy-induced hypertension-preeclampsia and eclampsia were included in this study and divided into two groups. Group A (n=65 patients with a serum uric acid level >6 mg/dL was compared to Group B (n=35 patients with a uric acid level <6 gm/dL. It revealed that high uric acid level in patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension was a risk factor for several maternal complications like postpartum hemorrhage (Group A, 17.4%; Group B, 22.6%, postpartum eclampsia (Group A, 10.1%; Group B, 9.7%, abruptio placentae (Group A, 8.7%; Group B, 6.4%, HELLP syndrome (Group A, 2.9%; Group B, 0% and pulmonary edema (Group A, 4.3%; Group B, 0%. In case of perinatal outcome, the birth weight, intrauterine growth retardation, intrauterine death, stillbirth and neonatal death rate were worse in Group A 1.9 kg, 66.7, 19, 7 and 8% in comparison to Group B, where those were 2.1, 13, 6, 2, and 2% respectively. In conclusion, high uric acid in blood in patient with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy is a risk factor for several maternal complications.

  15. A proposal for identifying the low renal uric acid clearance phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indraratna, Praveen L; Stocker, Sophie L; Williams, Kenneth M; Graham, Garry G; Jones, Graham; Day, Richard O

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of the genetic basis of hyperuricaemia is a subject of intense interest. However, clinical studies commonly include hyperuricaemic patients without distinguishing between 'over-producers' or 'under-excretors' of urate. The statistical power of studies of genetic polymorphisms of genes encoding renal urate transporters is diluted if 'over-producers' of uric acid are included. We propose that lower than normal fractional renal clearance of urate is a better inclusion criterion for these studies. We also propose that a single daytime spot urine sample for calculation of fractional renal clearance of urate should be preferred to calculation from 24-hour urine collections.

  16. Improved sensitivity and selectivity of uric acid voltammetric sensing with mechanically grinded carbon/graphite electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasoň, Stanislav; Vetterl, Vladimír; Jelen, František; Fojta, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 6 (2009), s. 1864-1873 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200040651; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/07/1195; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/08/1688; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : grinded carbon electrodes * voltammetry * uric acid Subject RIV: AQ - Safety, Health Protection, Human - Machine Impact factor: 3.325, year: 2009

  17. Serum uric acid and progression of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilemann-Lyberg, S; Lindhardt, M; Persson, Frederik

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Uric acid (UA) is a risk factor for CKD. We evaluated UA in relation to change in GFR in patients with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Post hoc analysis of a trial of losartan in diabetic nephropathy, mean follow-up 3 years (IQR 1.5-3.5). UA was measured at baseline. Primary end-point was change.......088). In a linear model including baseline covariates (UAER, GFR, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol) UA was associated with decline in GFR (r2 = 0.45, p type 1 diabetic patients with overt nephropathy....

  18. A Potentiometric Indirect Uric Acid Sensor Based on ZnO Nanoflakes and Immobilized Uricase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman Ali, Syed M.; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; Kashif, Muhammad; Hashim, Uda; Willander, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    In the present work zinc oxide nanoflakes (ZnO-NF) structures with a wall thickness around 50 to 100 nm were synthesized on a gold coated glass substrate using a low temperature hydrothermal method. The enzyme uricase was electrostatically immobilized in conjunction with Nafion membrane on the surface of well oriented ZnO-NFs, resulting in a sensitive, selective, stable and reproducible uric acid sensor. The electrochemical response of the ZnO-NF-based sensor vs. a Ag/AgCl reference electrode was found to be linear over a relatively wide logarithmic concentration range (500 nM to 1.5 mM). In addition, the ZnO-NF structures demonstrate vast surface area that allow high enzyme loading which results provided a higher sensitivity. The proposed ZnO-NF array-based sensor exhibited a high sensitivity of ∼66 mV/ decade in test electrolyte solutions of uric acid, with fast response time. The sensor response was unaffected by normal concentrations of common interferents such as ascorbic acid, glucose, and urea. PMID:22736977

  19. Interaction of uranium(VI) with bioligands present in human biological fluids. The case study of urea and uric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, A.A.A.; Geipel, G.; Bernhard, G. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2013-05-01

    The complexation of uranium(VI) with bioligands found in human biological fluids, viz, urea and uric acid in aqueous solutions, has been investigated using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) at room temperature, I = 0.1 M (NaClO4) and pH (3 for uric acid; 4 for urea). In both complex systems a static quench effect with increasing ligand concentration and no peaks shift upon complexation were observed. With uranium(VI) both ligands formed a fairly weak 1:1 complex with average stability constants of log {beta}{sub 110} = 4.67 {+-} 0.29 for uric acid and log {beta}{sub 110} = 3.79 {+-} 0.15 and 2.12 {+-} 0.18 for relatively low and relatively high urea concentrations, respectively. Application of the newly generated data on the U(VI) speciation modelling in biofluids, e.g., human urine was also discussed.

  20. Interaction of uranium(VI) with bioligands present in human biological fluids. The case study of urea and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A.A.A.; Geipel, G.; Bernhard, G.

    2013-01-01

    The complexation of uranium(VI) with bioligands found in human biological fluids, viz, urea and uric acid in aqueous solutions, has been investigated using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) at room temperature, I = 0.1 M (NaClO4) and pH (3 for uric acid; 4 for urea). In both complex systems a static quench effect with increasing ligand concentration and no peaks shift upon complexation were observed. With uranium(VI) both ligands formed a fairly weak 1:1 complex with average stability constants of log β 110 = 4.67 ± 0.29 for uric acid and log β 110 = 3.79 ± 0.15 and 2.12 ± 0.18 for relatively low and relatively high urea concentrations, respectively. Application of the newly generated data on the U(VI) speciation modelling in biofluids, e.g., human urine was also discussed.

  1. Early-onset metabolic syndrome in mice lacking the intestinal uric acid transporter SLC2A9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBosch, Brian J; Kluth, Oliver; Fujiwara, Hideji; Schürmann, Annette; Moley, Kelle

    2014-08-07

    Excess circulating uric acid, a product of hepatic glycolysis and purine metabolism, often accompanies metabolic syndrome. However, whether hyperuricaemia contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome or is merely a by-product of other processes that cause this disorder has not been resolved. In addition, how uric acid is cleared from the circulation is incompletely understood. Here we present a genetic model of spontaneous, early-onset metabolic syndrome in mice lacking the enterocyte urate transporter Glut9 (encoded by the SLC2A9 gene). Glut9-deficient mice develop impaired enterocyte uric acid transport kinetics, hyperuricaemia, hyperuricosuria, spontaneous hypertension, dyslipidaemia and elevated body fat. Allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, can reverse the hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia. These data provide evidence that hyperuricaemia per se could have deleterious metabolic sequelae. Moreover, these findings suggest that enterocytes may regulate whole-body metabolism, and that enterocyte urate metabolism could potentially be targeted to modulate or prevent metabolic syndrome.

  2. Quantification of urinary uric acid in the presence of thymol and thimerosal by high-performance liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Whitson, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed as an alternative to automated enzymatic analysis of uric acid in human urine preserved with thymol and/or thimerosal. Uric acid (tR = 10 min) and creatinine (tR = 5 min) were separated and quantified during isocratic elution (0.025 M acetate buffer, pH 4.5) from a mu Bondapak C18 column. The uric-acid peak was identified chemically by incubating urine samples with uricase. The thymol/thimerosal peak appeared at 31 min during the washing step and did not interfere with the analysis. We validated the high-performance liquid chromatographic method for linearity, precision and accuracy, and the results were found to be excellent.

  3. Disposable biosensor based on cathodic electrochemiluminescence of tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) for uric acid determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesta-Claver, J.; Rodríguez-Gómez, R. [ECsens, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Campus Fuentenueva, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Capitán-Vallvey, L.F., E-mail: lcapitan@ugr.es [ECsens, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Campus Fuentenueva, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2013-04-03

    Highlights: ► Cathodic ECL offers conventional and non-aggressive analysis conditions. ► The ECL hydrogen peroxide/ruthenium complex system for uric acid determination is novel. ► The ruthenium complex is electrochemically immobilized on graphite screen-printed electrodes. ► The quantification of the uric acid is based on a Stern–Volmer type equation. ► The use of the cathodic ECL working methodology reduces interferences during analysis. -- Abstract: A new method for uric acid (UA) determination based on the quenching of the cathodic ECL of the tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium(II)–uricase system is described. The biosensor is based on a double-layer design containing first tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}) electrochemically immobilized on graphite screen-printed cells and uricase in chitosan as a second layer. The uric acid biosensing is based on the ECL quenching produced by uric acid over the cathodic ECL caused by immobilized Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} in the presence of uricase. The use of a −1.1 V pulse for 1 s with a dwelling time of 10 s makes it possible to estimate the initial enzymatic rate, which is used as the analytical signal. The Stern–Volmer type calibration function shows a dynamic range from 1.0 × 10{sup −5} to 1.0 × 10{sup −3} M with a limit of detection of 3.1 × 10{sup −6} M and an accuracy of 13.6% (1.0 × 10{sup −4} M, n = 5) as relative standard deviation. Satisfactory results were obtained for urine samples, creating an affordable alternative for uric acid determination.

  4. Xanthine oxidase and uric acid as independent predictors of albuminuria in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klisic, Aleksandra; Kocic, Gordana; Kavaric, Nebojsa; Jovanovic, Milovan; Stanisic, Verica; Ninic, Ana

    2018-05-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is an important enzyme responsible for conversion of purine bases to uric acid and represents the major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in circulation. Since pathophysiological mechanism of the relationship between XO activity and urinary albumin excretion (UAE) rate is not well elucidated, we aimed to investigate this association in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). In addition, we wanted to examine whether uric acid itself plays an independent role in albuminuria onset and progression, or it is only mediated through XO activity. A total of 83 patients with DM2 (of them 56.6% females) were included in this cross-sectional study. Anthropometric, biochemical parameters and blood pressure were obtained. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that uric acid and XO were the independent predictors for albuminuria onset in patients with DM2 [odds ratio (OR) 1.015, 95% CI (1.008-1.028), p = 0.026 and OR 1.015, 95% CI (1.006-1.026), p = 0.040, respectively]. Rise in uric acid for 1 µmol/L enhanced the probability for albuminuria by 1.5%. Also, elevation in XO activity for 1 U/L increased the probability for albuminuria for 1.5%. A total of 66.7% of variation in UAE could be explained with this Model. Both XO and uric acid are independently associated with albuminuria in diabetes. Better understanding of pathophysiological relationship between oxidative stress and albuminuria could lead to discoveries of best pharmacological treatment of XO- and/or uric acid-induced ROS, in order to prevent albuminuria onset and progression.

  5. Serum Uric Acid Level Predicts Progression of IgA Nephropathy in Females but Not in Males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Nagasawa

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN is one of most common forms of glomerulonephritis. At this point, the clinical impact of hyperuricemia on IgAN is not clear. The aim of the present study was to explore the clinical impact of hyperuricemia on the progression of IgAN.Multicenter retrospective cohort study.935 IgAN patients who were diagnosed by kidney biopsy at Osaka University Hospital, Osaka General Hospital, and Osaka Rosai Hospital. were included in this study.Uric acid levels at renal biopsy.The outcome of interest was the time from the kidney biopsy to the time when a 50% increase in the baseline serum creatinine level was observed, which was defined as "progression".The baseline characteristics according to the kidney biopsy at the time of diagnosis were collected from the medical records, and included age, gender, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (use of antidiabetic drugs, serum levels of creatinine, urinary protein, smoking status, RAAS blockers and steroid therapy.An elevated serum uric acid level was an independent risk factor for progression in female patients (per 1.0 mg/dL, multivariate-adjusted incident rate ratio 1.33 [95% confidence interval 1.07, 1.64], P = 0.008 but not in male patients (1.02 [0.81, 1.29], P = 0.855. To control a confounding effect of renal function on an association between serum uric acid level and progression in female patients, age- and serum creatinine-matched and propensity score-matched analyses were performed, and these results also supported the effect by uric acid on kidney disease progression independent of basal kidney function.A cohort analyzed retorospectively.This study revealed that an elevated uric acid level was an independent risk factor for ESKD in female IgAN patients. Therefore, uric acid might be a treatable target in female IgAN patients.

  6. The Association between Serum Uric Acid Level and Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome according to Menopausal Status in Korean Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jong Kil; Hong, Gil Pyo; Han, Si Eun; Lee, Young Ju; Kim, Seung Chul; Kim, Chang Woon; Lee, Kyu Sup

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the association between serum uric acid level and metabolic syndrome according to menopausal status in Korean women. A total of 2,241 women who visited to the health promotion center at Pusan National University Hospital from 2010 to 2014 were included in this cross-sectional study. Self-report questionnaires and interviews with healthcare providers were used to assess disease history, medication history, menstrual history and body size measuring. Anthropometric measurements and laboratory results were compared as presence of metabolic syndrome and menopausal status by student-t test. Logistic regression analysis was performed between presence of metabolic syndrome and presumable predictive factors, such as age, menopause and serum uric acid. The prevalence rate of metabolic syndrome were 7.45% (63/846) in pre-menopausal group and 23.87% (333/1395) in menopausal group. Serum uric acid level was higher in menopausal women than premenopausal women (4.6 ± 1.1 vs. 4.3 ± 0.9. P = 0.000). And, its concentration was also higher in metabolic syndrome than normal women regarding of menopausal statue (premenopause 4.7 ± 1.1 vs. 4.2 ± 0.8, P = 0.001, menopause 4.9 ± 1.3 vs. 4.5 ± 1.0, P = 0.000). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed serum uric acid and age have relationship with metabolic syndrome (OR: 1.453, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.074-1.111, P = 0.000; OR: 1.092, 95% CI: 1.305-1.619, P = 0.000). We could find out some potential of uric acid as predictive factor for metabolic syndrome in premenopausal and menopausal group. Further investigation is required to clarify the relationship between serum uric acid, menopause and metabolic syndrome.

  7. Prevalence of hyperuricemia and relation of serum uric acid with cardiovascular risk factors in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamlaye C

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of hyperuricemia has rarely been investigated in developing countries. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of hyperuricemia and the association between uric acid levels and the various cardiovascular risk factors in a developing country with high average blood pressures (the Seychelles, Indian Ocean, population mainly of African origin. Methods This cross-sectional health examination survey was based on a population random sample from the Seychelles. It included 1011 subjects aged 25 to 64 years. Blood pressure (BP, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, total and HDL cholesterol, serum triglycerides and serum uric acid were measured. Data were analyzed using scatterplot smoothing techniques and gender-specific linear regression models. Results The prevalence of a serum uric acid level >420 μmol/L in men was 35.2% and the prevalence of a serum uric acid level >360 μmol/L was 8.7% in women. Serum uric acid was strongly related to serum triglycerides in men as well as in women (r = 0.73 in men and r = 0.59 in women, p Conclusions This study shows that the prevalence of hyperuricemia can be high in a developing country such as the Seychelles. Besides alcohol consumption and the use of antihypertensive therapy, mainly diuretics, serum uric acid is markedly associated with parameters of the metabolic syndrome, in particular serum triglycerides. Considering the growing incidence of obesity and metabolic syndrome worldwide and the potential link between hyperuricemia and cardiovascular complications, more emphasis should be put on the evolving prevalence of hyperuricemia in developing countries.

  8. Effect of losartan combined with amlodipine or with a thiazide on uric acid levels in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F; Garro-Almendaro, Ana K; Elizalde-Barrera, Cesar I; Suarez-Cuenca, Juan A; Duran-Salgado, Montserrat B

    2017-02-01

    Hyperuricemia leads to endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and has been associated with diseases such as hypertension. Antihypertensive drugs modify serum uric acid levels, however, few data are available about their combinations on uricemia. In this study we evaluate the effect of two combinations of losartan, with amlodipine or with hydrochlorothiazide, on serum uric acid levels in hypertensive patients. A total of 60 hypertensive patients were randomized in two groups; group LA received losartan/amlodipine (100/5 mg) once a day, whereas LH group received losartan hydrochlorothiazide (100/12.5 mg) once a day for 3 months. In both groups serum uric acid levels were measured at the beginning and end of the study. Patients were evaluated monthly for blood pressure (BP) and adverse events. Statistical analysis was performed with a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures. All patients experienced a significant reduction of BP to the same extent (LA 155/94 to 123/79, LH 157/92 to 124/78 mmHg, p > 0.05). In the LA group, serum uric acid decreased from 6.5 ± 1.6 to 4.6 ± 1.3 mg/ml ( p = 0.0001), whereas in the LH group there was a nonsignificant increase from 5.82 ± 1.4 to 5.85 ± 1.5 mg/ml, ( p = 0.936). When both groups were compared, we found a significant reduction ( p uric acid levels in the LA group. Both combinations decrease BP values to the same extent, however, LA combination showed a reduction on serum uric acid levels, which may contribute to a reduction in the metabolic risk in hypertensive patients.

  9. Disposable biosensor based on cathodic electrochemiluminescence of tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) for uric acid determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesta-Claver, J.; Rodríguez-Gómez, R.; Capitán-Vallvey, L.F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cathodic ECL offers conventional and non-aggressive analysis conditions. ► The ECL hydrogen peroxide/ruthenium complex system for uric acid determination is novel. ► The ruthenium complex is electrochemically immobilized on graphite screen-printed electrodes. ► The quantification of the uric acid is based on a Stern–Volmer type equation. ► The use of the cathodic ECL working methodology reduces interferences during analysis. -- Abstract: A new method for uric acid (UA) determination based on the quenching of the cathodic ECL of the tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium(II)–uricase system is described. The biosensor is based on a double-layer design containing first tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy) 3 2+ ) electrochemically immobilized on graphite screen-printed cells and uricase in chitosan as a second layer. The uric acid biosensing is based on the ECL quenching produced by uric acid over the cathodic ECL caused by immobilized Ru(bpy) 3 2+ in the presence of uricase. The use of a −1.1 V pulse for 1 s with a dwelling time of 10 s makes it possible to estimate the initial enzymatic rate, which is used as the analytical signal. The Stern–Volmer type calibration function shows a dynamic range from 1.0 × 10 −5 to 1.0 × 10 −3 M with a limit of detection of 3.1 × 10 −6 M and an accuracy of 13.6% (1.0 × 10 −4 M, n = 5) as relative standard deviation. Satisfactory results were obtained for urine samples, creating an affordable alternative for uric acid determination

  10. High uric acid directly inhibits insulin signalling and induces insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuzhang; Hu, Yaqiu; Huang, Tianliang; Zhang, Yongneng; Li, Zhi; Luo, Chaohuan; Luo, Yinfeng; Yuan, Huier; Hisatome, Ichiro; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Cheng, Jidong

    2014-05-16

    Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that hyperuricemia is strongly associated with abnormal glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. However, how high uric acid (HUA) level causes insulin resistance remains unclear. We aimed to determine the direct role of HUA in insulin resistance in vitro and in vivo in mice. An acute hyperuricemia mouse model was created by potassium oxonate treatment, and the impact of HUA level on insulin resistance was investigated by glucose tolerance test, insulin tolerance test and insulin signalling, including phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and Akt. HepG2 cells were exposed to HUA treatment and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), reactive oxygen species scavenger; IRS1 and Akt phosphorylation was detected by Western blot analysis after insulin treatment. Hyperuricemic mice showed impaired glucose tolerance with insulin resistance. Hyperuricemia inhibited phospho-Akt (Ser473) response to insulin and increased phosphor-IRS1 (Ser307) in liver, muscle and fat tissues. HUA induced oxidative stress, and the antioxidant NAC blocked HUA-induced IRS1 activation and Akt inhibition in HepG2 cells. This study supplies the first evidence of HUA directly inducing insulin resistance in vivo and in vitro. Increased uric acid level may inhibit IRS1 and Akt insulin signalling and induce insulin resistance. The reactive oxygen species pathway plays a key role in HUA-induced insulin resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bilateral uric acid nephrolithiasis and ureteral hypertrophy in a free-ranging river otter (Lontra canadensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Robert A.; Bildfell, Rob; Henny, Charles J.; Buhler, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    We report the first case of uric acid nephrolithiasis in a free-ranging river otter (Lontra canadensis). A 7 yr old male river otter collected from the Skagit River of western Washington (USA) had bilateral nephrolithiasis and severely enlarged ureters (one of 305 examined [0.33%]). The uroliths were 97% uric acid and 3% protein. Microscopic changes in the kidney were confined to expansion of renal calyces, minor loss of medullary tissue, and multifocal atrophy of the cortical tubules. No inflammation was observed in either kidney or the ureters. The ureters were enlarged due to marked hypertrophy of smooth muscle plus dilation of the lumen. Fusion of the major calyces into a single ureteral lumen was several cm distal to that of two adult male otters used as histopathologic control specimens. This case report is part of a large contaminant study of river otters collected from Oregon and Washington. It is important to understand diseases and lesions of the otter as part of our overall evaluation of this population.

  12. Property changes of urinary nanocrystallites and urine of uric acid stone formers after taking potassium citrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guang-Na; Ouyang, Jian-Ming; Xue, Jun-Fa; Shang, Yun-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The property changes of urinary nanocrystallites in 20 cases of uric acid (UA) stone formers after 1 week of potassium citrate (K 3 cit) intake were comparatively studied by X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nanoparticle size analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Before K 3 cit intake, the urinary crystallites mainly contained UA and calcium oxalate. After K 3 cit intake, the components changed to urate and UA; the qualities, species, and amounts of aggregated crystallites decreased; urine pH, citrate, and glycosaminoglycan excretions increased; and UA excretion, Zeta potential, and crystallite size decreased. The stability of crystallites followed the order: controls > patients after taking K 3 cit > patients before taking K 3 cit. Therefore, the components of urinary stones were closely related to the components of urinary crystallites. - Graphical abstract: The relationships among stone components, urinary crystallite components, and urine pH were established. The crystallites stability order was: controls > patients after taking K 3 cit > patients before taking K 3 cit. Highlights: • Urine crystallite property of uric acid stone former after K 3 cit intake was studied. • The components of crystallites in urine are closely related to type of stones. • After K 3 cit intake the qualities and species of crystallites decreased. • After K 3 cit intake the amount of aggregated crystallites decreased. • The stability of urinary crystallites of UA patients increased after taking K 3 cit

  13. Uric Acid is a Useful Tool to Predict Contrast-Induced Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendi, Mehmet Ali; Afsar, Baris; Oksuz, Fatih; Turak, Osman; Yayla, Cagri; Ozcan, Firat; Johnson, Richard J; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2017-08-01

    Developing contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) has a negative impact on survival and morbidity. We assessed the predictive value of serum uric acid (SUA) for the development of CIN in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who underwent pPCI. Contrast-induced nephropathy was defined an increase of ≥25% or ≥0.5 mg/dL in creatinine concentrations within 72 hours after pPCI. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to admission median SUA level. Serum uric acid level was 5.45 mg/dL, the SUA level predicted development of CIN with a sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 67%. In multiple logistic regression analysis, SUA level, diabetes mellitus, left ventricular ejection fraction <50%, contrast volume, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and C-reactive protein level emerged as independent predictors of CIN. In conclusion, elevated SUA is an independent risk factor for the development of CIN after pPCI in patients with STEMI.

  14. Serum uric acid level as a determinant of the metabolic syndrome: A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khichar, Satyendra; Choudhary, Shyama; Singh, Veer Bahadur; Tater, Priyanka; Arvinda, R V; Ujjawal, Vivek

    To determine whether elevations of uric acid levels are associated with the cluster of disorders described in metabolic syndrome and to evaluate whether hyperuricemia may be considered a component of this syndrome. One year case-control study was conducted in Bikaner, Rajasthan, India from January to December 2013. The study population consisted of 200 subjects, 100 with metabolic syndrome (case) and 100 without metabolic syndrome (control) aged between 18 and 80 years, attending OPD at PBM Hospital were studied. Controls were age and sex matched to the cases. Blood tests and all physical variables were examined using standard methods. Subjects were divided into 6 groups according to their possession of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 components of the metabolic syndrome. Statistical analysis was done using ANOVA, linear regression analysis and multivariate linear regression model. Mean serum UA level was significantly associated with all components of metabolic syndrome (pmetabolic factors increased showing a highly significant trend (pmetabolic syndrome. The current multivariate regression analysis clearly infers that uric acid can be considered as a marker and potential modifier of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Association between Sex Hormone and Blood Uric Acid in Male Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between serum uric acid (SUA level and sexual dysfunction in patients with diabetes is not well characterized. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM causes metabolic disorders, including abnormal serum uric acid (SUA levels. In this study, we enrolled 205 male patients with T2DM and investigated the relationship between sex hormone levels and SUA. Patients were divided into four groups based on SUA quartiles. On the other hand, based on the total testosterone (TT level, patients were divided into three groups; SUA and other laboratory indices were determined. Increase in SUA level was significantly associated with decreased levels of TT, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, sex hormone-binding globulin, and increased levels of dehydroepiandrosterone, age, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, glycated hemoglobin, serum creatinine, and HOMA-IR levels. SUA, waist circumference, BMI, and HOMA-IR showed a negative correlation with TT level, while age showed a positive correlation with TT level. SUA and body mass index were found to be risk factors for gonadal dysfunction. Therefore, we conclude that hypogonadism of male patients with T2DM is related to SUA level.

  16. Very unusual "needle- and pencil-like" uric acid crystals in the urine unmasked by infrared spectroscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, S; Garigali, G; Primiano, A; Gervasoni, J; Fogazzi, G B

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we describe a case with very unusual "needle- and pencil-like" crystals, partly similar to those reported by other investigators, who considered them as due to uric acid. Quite importantly, infrared spectroscopy investigation which, to our knowledge, we have been the first to perform on this type of crystals, confirmed their nature as uric acid structures. This case demonstrates that the planet of urinary crystals still has several unknown facets and still deserves exploration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Serum uric acid as a predictor for development of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes: an inception cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovind, Peter; Rossing, Peter; Tarnow, Lise

    2009-01-01

    as a predictor of persistent micro- and macroalbuminuria. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This prospective observational follow-up study consisted of an inception cohort of 277 patients followed from onset of type 1 diabetes. Of these, 270 patients had blood samples taken at baseline. In seven cases, uric acid...... level; P = 0.04). Adjustment for confounders did not change the estimate significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Uric acid level soon after onset of type 1 diabetes is independently associated with risk for later development of diabetic nephropathy....

  18. Accuracy of serum uric acid as a predictive test for maternal complications in pre-eclampsia: Bivariate meta-analysis and decision analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Corine M.; van Pampus, Maria G.; Groen, Henk; Aarnoudse, Jan G.; van den Berg, Paul P.; Mol, Ben W. J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the accuracy and clinical value of serum uric acid in predicting maternal complications in women with pre-eclampsia. An existing meta-analysis on the subject was updated. The accuracy of serum uric acid for the prediction of maternal complications was assessed

  19. Accuracy of serum uric acid as a predictive test for maternal complications in pre-eclampsia : Bivariate meta-analysis and decision analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, C.M.; van Pampus, Maria; Groen, H.; Aarnoudse, J.G.; van den Berg, P.P.; Mol, B.W.J.

    The aim of this study is to determine the accuracy and clinical value of serum uric acid in predicting maternal complications in women with pre-eclampsia. An existing meta-analysis on the subject was updated. The accuracy of serum uric acid for the prediction of maternal complications was assessed

  20. Impact of sex on uric acid levels and its relationship with the extent of coronary artery disease: A single-centre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbieri, L.; Verdoia, M.; Schaffer, A.; Marino, P.; Suryapranata, H.; Luca, G. De

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serum uric acid (SUA) elevation has been largely addressed in the past as a possible risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, uric acid has not clearly emerged as independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Several studies in literature have assessed sex-related

  1. Serum uric acid to creatinine ratio: A predictor of incident chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with preserved kidney function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liubao; Huang, Liji; Wu, Haidi; Lou, Qinglin; Bian, Rongwen

    2017-05-01

    Serum uric acid has shown to be a predictor of renal disease progression in most but not all studies. This study aims to test whether renal function-normalized serum uric acid is superior to serum uric acid as the predictor of incident chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. In this study, 1339 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate ⩾60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and normouricemia were included. Renal function-normalized serum uric acid was calculated using serum uric acid/creatinine. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the association between serum uric acid, renal function-normalized serum uric acid and incident chronic kidney disease. In total, 74 (5.53%) patients developed to chronic kidney disease 3 or greater during a median follow-up of 4 years, with older ages, longer diabetes duration and lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline. The decline rate of estimated glomerular filtration rate was positively correlated with serum uric acid/creatinine ( r = 0.219, p type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  2. Chronic kidney disease associated with decreased bone mineral density, uric acid and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bo-Lin; Loke, Song-Seng

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) is controversial. The associations among metabolic syndrome (MetS), serum uric acid and CKD are also unclear. We aimed to investigate the relationship between decreased BMD, MetS, serum uric acid and CKD in a general population. A total of 802 subjects who visited a medical center in Southern Taiwan and underwent a BMD measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) during a health examination were enrolled in this retrospective cross-sectional study. Either osteopenia or osteoporosis was defined as decreased BMD. CKD was defined as the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of less than 60 mL/min/1.73m2. Simple and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the association between variables, decreased BMD and CKD. Of the 802 subjects with a mean age of 54.4±10.2 years, the prevalence of decreased BMD was 62.9%, and CKD was 3.7%. Simple logistic analysis showed that sex (OR 3.50, 95% CI 1.21-10.12, p = 0.021), age (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07-1.21, puric acid (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.49-2.27, pmetabolic syndrome (OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.29-5.67, p = 0.009), and decreased BMD (OR 3.998, 95% CI 1.38-11.57, p = 0.011) were significantly associated with CKD. Multivariate analysis showed that age (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.03-1.07, puric acid (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.24-1.59, puric acid and MetS were significantly associated with CKD.. Further large and prospective cohort studies are necessary to investigate whether management of osteoporosis, hyperuricemia, or MetS might prevent the progression of CKD.

  3. Modified gold electrodes based on thiocytosine/guanine-gold nanoparticles for uric and ascorbic acid determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulcu, Adriana; Grosan, Camelia; Muresan, Liana Maria; Pruneanu, Stela; Olenic, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    The present paper describes the preparation of new modified surfaces for electrodes based on guanine/thiocytosine and gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were analyzed by UV–vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and it was found that they have diameters between 30 and 40 nm. The layers were characterized by specular reflectance infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-RAS) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The thickness of layers was found to be approximately 30 nm for TC layers and 300 nm for GU layers. Every layer was characterized as electrochemical sensor (by cyclic voltammetry) both for uric acid and ascorbic acid determinations, separately and in their mixture. The modified sensors have good calibration functions with good sensitivity (between 1.145 and 1.406 mA cm −2 /decade), reproducibility ( t hiocytosine (Au T C) and gold g uanine (Au G U) layers

  4. Effect of Amine Adlayer on Electrochemical Uric Acid Sensor Conducted on Electrochemically Reduced Graphene Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sumi; Kim, Kyuwon

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical biosensing efficiency of uric acid (UA) detection on an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO)-decorated electrode surface was studied by using various amine linkers used to immobilize ERGO. The amine linkers aminoethylphenyldiazonium , 2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)bis(ethylamine), 3-aminopro-pyltriethoxysilane, and polyethyleneimine were coated on indium-tin-oxide electrode surfaces through chemical or electrochemical deposition methods. ERGO-decorated surfaces were prepared by the electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO), which was immobilized on the amine-coated electrode surfaces through the electrostatic interaction between GO and the ammonium ion of the linker on the surface. We monitored the sensing results of electrochemical UA detection with differential pulse voltammetry. The ERGO-modified surface presented electrocatalytic oxidation of UA and ascorbic acid. Among the different amines tested, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane provided the best biosensing performance in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility.

  5. Effect of Amine Adlayer on Electrochemical Uric Acid Sensor Conducted on Electrochemically Reduced Graphene Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sumi; Kim, Kyuwon [Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The electrochemical biosensing efficiency of uric acid (UA) detection on an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO)-decorated electrode surface was studied by using various amine linkers used to immobilize ERGO. The amine linkers aminoethylphenyldiazonium , 2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)bis(ethylamine), 3-aminopro-pyltriethoxysilane, and polyethyleneimine were coated on indium-tin-oxide electrode surfaces through chemical or electrochemical deposition methods. ERGO-decorated surfaces were prepared by the electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO), which was immobilized on the amine-coated electrode surfaces through the electrostatic interaction between GO and the ammonium ion of the linker on the surface. We monitored the sensing results of electrochemical UA detection with differential pulse voltammetry. The ERGO-modified surface presented electrocatalytic oxidation of UA and ascorbic acid. Among the different amines tested, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane provided the best biosensing performance in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility.

  6. Electrocatalytic and simultaneous determination of isoproterenol, uric acid and folic acid at molybdenum (VI) complex-carbon nanotube paste electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitollahi, Hadi; Sheikhshoaie, Iran

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A molybdenum (VI) complex-carbon nanotube paste electrode have been fabricated. → This electrode reduced the oxidation potential of isoproterenol by about 175 mV. → It resolved the voltammetric waves of isoproterenol, uric acid and folic acid. - Abstract: This paper describes the development, electrochemical characterization and utilization of a novel modified molybdenum (VI) complex-carbon nanotube paste electrode for the electrocatalytic determination of isoproterenol (IP). The electrochemical profile of the proposed modified electrode was analyzed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) that showed a shift of the oxidation peak potential of IP at 175 mV to less positive value, compared with an unmodified carbon paste electrode. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.0 was performed to determine IP in the range from 0.7 to 600.0 μM, with a detection limit of 35.0 nM. Then the modified electrode was used to determine IP in an excess of uric acid (UA) and folic acid (FA) by DPV. Finally, this method was used for the determination of IP in some real samples.

  7. Effects of irbesartan on serum uric acid levels in patients with hypertension and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Makiko Nakamura,1 Nobuo Sasai,2 Ichiro Hisatome,3 Kimiyoshi Ichida11Department of Pathophysiology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Tokyo, Japan; 2Sasai Clinic, Kanagawa, Japan; 3Division of Regenerative Medicine and Therapeutics, Institute of Regenerative Medicine and Biofunction, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Tottori University, Tottori, JapanBackground: Hyperuricemia has been proposed to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. Since diabetes is often complicated by hypertension and hyperuricemia, efficient therapeutic strategy against these two complications is very important in diabetic treatment. It has been reported that the antihypertensive drug, irbesartan, inhibits the renal uric acid reabsorptive transporters, URAT1 and GLUT9; this result suggests that irbesartan decreases serum uric acid level (SUA.Subjects and methods: A retrospective study of 107 patients with hypertension and diabetes was performed to analyze the effects of irbesartan on blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, and SUA. The follow-up period was 6–12 months. Seventy percent of the patients were diagnosed with diabetic nephropathy stage II–IV. We excluded patients treated with drugs that influenced SUA. The multiple logistic regression analysis was introduced to identify the relative factors for SUA decline. The time-dependent SUA changes were examined in a mixed-linear model.Results: Irbesartan reduced blood pressure significantly after 1, 6, and 12 months’ treatment. No subject showed significant change in eGFR from baseline level throughout the period. The multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that SUA baseline significantly influenced SUA decline after 6–12 months. In patients whose SUA baseline was ≥5.9 mg/dL, the SUA was significantly decreased from 6.6±0.16 mg/dL to 6.2±0.16 mg/dL (P=0.010, after 12 months’ irbesartan treatment. In the SUA baseline <5.9 mg/dL group

  8. Subcellular location of the enzymes of purine breakdown in the yeast Candida famata grown on uric acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Large, Peter J.; Waterham, Hans R.; Veenhuis, Marten

    1990-01-01

    The subcellular location of the enzymes of purine breakdown in the yeast Candida famata, which grows on uric acid as sole carbon and nitrogen source, has been examined by subcellular fractionation methods. Uricase was confirmed as being peroxisomal, but the other three enzymes, allantoinase,

  9. Serum uric acid is associated with new-onset diabetes in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: The LIFE Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiik, Benedicte P; Larstorp, Anne C K; Høieggen, Aud

    2010-01-01

    It is unclear whether serum uric acid (SUA) is associated with development of new-onset diabetes (NOD) in patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). The aim of the present investigation was to test the hypothesis that SUA predicts development of NOD in these patients....

  10. Consumption of sucrose-sweetened soft drinks increases plasma levels of uric acid in overweight and obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, J M; Maersk, M; Belza, A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Sucrose-sweetened soft drinks (SSSDs) are associated with the development of metabolic disorders. Fructose is a major component of SSSDs and is demonstrated to induce uric acid (UA) production and stimulate fat accumulation independent of excess caloric intake. UA induce...

  11. Association of serum uric acid level with muscle strength and cognitive function among Chinese aged 50-74 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Dongfeng; Pang, Zengchang

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Previous studies have shown that uric acid (UA) has strong anti-oxidant properties, and that high circulating levels of UA are prospectively associated with improved muscle function and cognitive performances in elderly Caucasians. We carried out a replication study in elderly Chinese using...

  12. Uric Acid Is a Strong Risk Marker for Developing Hypertension From Prehypertension: A 5-Year Japanese Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Masanari; Hisatome, Ichiro; Niwa, Koichiro; Hara, Shigeko; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Bjornstad, Petter; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Andres-Hernando, Ana; Sato, Yuka; Jensen, Thomas; Garcia, Gabriela; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Ohno, Minoru; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Johnson, Richard J

    2018-01-01

    Prehypertension frequently progresses to hypertension, a condition associated with high morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular diseases and stroke. However, the risk factors for developing hypertension from prehypertension remain poorly understood. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the data from 3584 prehypertensive Japanese adults (52.1±11.0 years, 2081 men) found to be prehypertensive in 2004 and reexamined in 2009. We calculated the cumulative incidences of hypertension over 5 years, examined risk factors, and calculated odds ratios (ORs) for developing hypertension after adjustments for age, sex, body mass index, smoking and drinking habits, baseline systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse rate, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and serum uric acid levels. The additional analysis evaluated whether serum uric acid (hyperuricemia) constituted an independent risk factor for developing hypertension. The cumulative incidence of hypertension from prehypertension over 5 years was 25.3%. There were no significant differences between women and men (24.4% versus 26.0%; P =0.28). The cumulative incidence of hypertension in subjects with hyperuricemia (n=726) was significantly higher than those without hyperuricemia (n=2858; 30.7% versus 24.0%; P uric acid (OR, 1.149; P uric acid is a strong risk marker for developing hypertension from prehypertension. Further studies are needed to determine whether treatment of hyperuricemia in prehypertensive subjects could impede the onset of hypertension. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. A comparative study of serum uric acid, glucose, calcium and magnesium in pre-eclampsia and normal pregnancy

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    Arun Dhungana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preeclampsia is associated with liver function abnormalities and renal function impairment. The objective of this study is to compare serum uric acid, glucose, calcium and magnesium in pre-eclampsia with normal pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Normal pregnant women and pre eclamptic women of age group 20-40 years were included. Serum magnesium, calcium, glucose, uric acid were analyzed.Results: Mean serum magnesium level in preeclampsia (1.83 ± 0.21mg/dl was lesser in comparison to normal pregnant women (2.03 ± 0.16 mg/dl. Serum calcium level was lower (8.10 ±0.56mg/dl than control (9.59 ±0.62 mg/dl with p<0.001. Uric acid, glucose and lactate dehydrogenase in preeclamptic women was significantly higher than that in normal pregnant women (6.14 ± 0.85 vs.4.01 ± 0.62, p=<0.001, (94.17± 18.65 vs.86.34 ± 10.19, p=0.033 and ( 466.80 ± 97.29 vs. 194.22 ± 39.76, p=<0.001 respectively.Conclusion: There were significant changes in serum magnesium, uric acid, calcium, glucose, lactate dehydrogenase and total protein in pregnant women.

  14. Potential role of uric acid in metabolic syndrome, hypertension, kidney injury, and cardiovascular diseases: is it time for reappraisal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Zohreh; Rasheed, Kashaf; Kapusta, Daniel R; Reisin, Efrain

    2013-06-01

    Elevated serum uric acid concentration is a common laboratory finding in subjects with metabolic syndrome/obesity, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular events. Hyperuricemia has been attributed to hyperinsulinemia in metabolic syndrome and to decreased uric acid excretion in kidney dysfunction, and is not acknowledged as a main mediator of metabolic syndrome, renal disease, and cardiovascular disorder development. However, more recent investigations have altered this traditional view and shown, by providing compelling evidence, to support an independent link between hyperuricemia and increased risk of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular disorders. However, despite these new findings, controversy regarding the exact role of uric acid in inducing these diseases remains to be unfolded. Furthermore, recent data suggest that the high-fructose diet in the United State, as a major cause of hyperuricemia, may be contributing to the metabolic syndrome/obesity epidemic, diabetes, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular disorder. Our focus in this review is to discuss the available evidence supporting a role for uric acid in the development of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, renal disease, and cardiovascular disorder; and the potential pathophysiology mechanisms involved.

  15. Teneligliptin Decreases Uric Acid Levels by Reducing Xanthine Dehydrogenase Expression in White Adipose Tissue of Male Wistar Rats

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    Chihiro Moriya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of teneligliptin on uric acid metabolism in male Wistar rats and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The rats were fed with a normal chow diet (NCD or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD with or without teneligliptin for 4 weeks. The plasma uric acid level was not significantly different between the control and teneligliptin groups under the NCD condition. However, the plasma uric acid level was significantly decreased in the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared to the HFD-fed control rats. The expression levels of xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh mRNA in liver and epididymal adipose tissue of NCD-fed rats were not altered by teneligliptin treatment. On the other hand, Xdh expression was reduced significantly in the epididymal adipose tissue of the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared with that of HFD-fed control rats, whereas Xdh expression in liver did not change significantly in either group. Furthermore, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. DPP-4 treatment significantly increased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. With DPP-4 pretreatment, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh mRNA expression compared to the DPP-4-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In conclusion, our studies suggest that teneligliptin reduces uric acid levels by suppressing Xdh expression in epididymal adipose tissue of obese subjects.

  16. Are There Any Promising Biochemical Correlates of Achievement Behavior and Motivation? The Evidence for Serum Uric Acid and Serum Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasl, Stanislav V.

    1974-01-01

    This review examines the available evidence in support of the argument that serum uric acid (SUA) possesses considerable promise as an indicator of one type of biochemical influence on achievement behavior. The evidence arguing for further research into the role of serum cholesterol in achievement behavior is also examined. (Author/JR)

  17. Sacubitril/valsartan reduces serum uric acid concentration, an independent predictor of adverse outcomes in PARADIGM-HF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Ulrik M.; Køber, Lars; Jhund, Pardeep S.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Elevated serum uric acid concentration (SUA) has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but this may be due to unmeasured confounders. We examined the association between SUA and outcomes as well as the effect of sacubitril/valsartan on SUA in patients with heart ...

  18. Effect of Uric Acid-Lowering Agents on Endothelial Function: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgi, Lea; McMullan, Ciaran; Wohlhueter, Ann; Curhan, Gary C; Fisher, Naomi D; Forman, John P

    2017-02-01

    Higher levels of serum uric acid are independently associated with endothelial dysfunction, a mechanism for incident hypertension. Overweight/obese individuals are more prone to endothelial dysfunction than their lean counterparts. However, the effect of lowering serum uric acid on endothelial dysfunction in these individuals has not been examined thoroughly. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of nonhypertensive, overweight, or obese individuals with higher serum uric acid (body mass index ≥25 kg/m 2 and serum uric acid ≥5.0 mg/dL), we assigned subjects to probenecid (500-1000 mg/d), allopurinol (300-600 mg/d), or matching placebo. The primary outcome was endothelium-dependent vasodilation measured by brachial artery ultrasound at baseline and 8 weeks. By the end of the trial, 47, 49, and 53 participants had been allocated to receive probenecid, allopurinol, and placebo, respectively. Mean serum uric acid levels significantly decreased in the probenecid (from 6.1 to 3.5 mg/dL) and allopurinol groups (from 6.1 to 2.9 mg/dL) but not in the placebo group (6.1 to 5.6 mg/dL). None of the interventions produced any significant change in endothelium-dependent vasodilation (probenecid, 7.4±5.1% at baseline and 8.3±5.1% at 8 weeks; allopurinol, 7.6±6.0% at baseline and 6.2±4.8% at 8 weeks; and placebo, 6.5±3.8% at baseline and 7.1±4.9% at 8 weeks). In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, uric acid lowering did not affect endothelial function in overweight or obese nonhypertensive individuals. These data do not support the hypothesis that uric acid is causally related to endothelial dysfunction, a potential mechanism for development of hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Meta-analysis of 28,141 individuals identifies common variants within five new loci that influence uric acid concentrations.

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    Melanie Kolz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Elevated serum uric acid levels cause gout and are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. To investigate the polygenetic basis of serum uric acid levels, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association scans from 14 studies totalling 28,141 participants of European descent, resulting in identification of 954 SNPs distributed across nine loci that exceeded the threshold of genome-wide significance, five of which are novel. Overall, the common variants associated with serum uric acid levels fall in the following nine regions: SLC2A9 (p = 5.2x10(-201, ABCG2 (p = 3.1x10(-26, SLC17A1 (p = 3.0x10(-14, SLC22A11 (p = 6.7x10(-14, SLC22A12 (p = 2.0x10(-9, SLC16A9 (p = 1.1x10(-8, GCKR (p = 1.4x10(-9, LRRC16A (p = 8.5x10(-9, and near PDZK1 (p = 2.7x10(-9. Identified variants were analyzed for gender differences. We found that the minor allele for rs734553 in SLC2A9 has greater influence in lowering uric acid levels in women and the minor allele of rs2231142 in ABCG2 elevates uric acid levels more strongly in men compared to women. To further characterize the identified variants, we analyzed their association with a panel of metabolites. rs12356193 within SLC16A9 was associated with DL-carnitine (p = 4.0x10(-26 and propionyl-L-carnitine (p = 5.0x10(-8 concentrations, which in turn were associated with serum UA levels (p = 1.4x10(-57 and p = 8.1x10(-54, respectively, forming a triangle between SNP, metabolites, and UA levels. Taken together, these associations highlight additional pathways that are important in the regulation of serum uric acid levels and point toward novel potential targets for pharmacological intervention to prevent or treat hyperuricemia. In addition, these findings strongly support the hypothesis that transport proteins are key in regulating serum uric acid levels.

  20. Serum uric acid and anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yaqing; Wang, Yuge; Lu, Tingting; Li, Rui; Sun, Xiaobo; Li, Jing; Chang, Yanyu; Hu, Xueqiang; Lu, Zhengqi; Qiu, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Uric acid (UA) levels are associated with autoimmune and neurodegenerative disorders, but their relationship with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is unknown. UA levels were evaluated in 58 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, and 58 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (CTLs). Follow-up evaluations of 30 out of the 58 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis were conducted 3 months after admission. Modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores and clinical and cerebrospinal fluid parameters were evaluated in all anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients. Serum UA levels were significantly lower in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis than those in CTLs (p anti-NMDAR encephalitis are reduced during attacks compared with those in CTLs, are normalized after treatment, and are associated with disease severity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Comparison of Uric Acid Quantity with Different Food in Human Urine by Flow Injection Chemiluminescence Analysis

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    Jiajia Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the inhibitory effect of uric acid (UA on luminol-Co2+ chemiluminescence (CL system, a sensitive method for the determination of UA at nanomolar level by flow injection (FI CL was proposed. The proposed method was successfully applied to real-time monitoring of UA excretion in human 24 h urine with different food intake, showing that meats, vegetables, and porridge intake caused differential UA excretions of 879, 798, and 742 mg, respectively. It was also found that UA concentrations in urine under the three kinds of food intake simultaneously reached maximum at 2 h after meals with the values of 417, 318, and 288 μg mL−1, respectively. The UA concentration in human serum was also determined by this approach, and the possible mechanism of luminol-Co2+-UA CL reaction was discussed in detail.

  2. Electrochemical Determination of Uric Acid at CdTe Quantum Dot Modified Glassy Carbon Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Deng; Rong, Shengzhong; Zhang, Guangteng; Zhang, Yannan; Zhou, Qiang; Liu, Fenghai; Li, Miaojing; Chang, Dong; Pan, Hongzhi

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry were used to investigate the electrochemical behavior of uric acid (UA) at a CdTe quantum dot (QD) modified the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). CdTe QDs, as new semiconductor nanocrystals, can greatly improve the peak current of UA. The anodic peak current of UA was linear with its concentration between 1.0×10(-6) and 4.0×10(-4) M in 0.1 M pH 5.0 phosphate buffer solution. The LOD for UA at the CdTe electrode (1.0×10(-7) M) was superior to that of the GCE. In addition, we also determined the effects of scan rate, pH, and interferences of UA for the voltammetric behavior and detection. The results indicated that modified electrode possessed excellent reproducibility and stability. Finally, a new and efficient electrochemical sensor for detecting UA was developed.

  3. Uric acid metabolism in pre-hypertension and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Manfredi; Obradovic, Milan; Labudovic-Borovic, Milica; Nikolic, Dragana; Montalto, Giuseppe; Rizvi, Ali A; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Isenovic, Esma R

    2014-01-01

    In humans uric acid (UA) is the end product of degradation of purines. The handling of UA by the renal system is a complex process which is not fully understood. To date, several urate transporters in the renal proximal tubule have been identified. Among them, urate transporter 1 (URAT1) and a glucose transporter 9 (GLUT9) are considered of greater importance, as potential targets for treatment of hyperuricemia and the potential associated cardio-metabolic risk. Therefore, the recognition of the metabolic pathway of UA and elucidation of occurrence of hyperuricemia may provide important insights about the relationship between UA, pre-hypertension (preHT) and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We also review the available clinical studies in this field, including experimental studies dealing with the mechanisms of UA transport via different transporters, as well as current treatment options for hyperuricemia in patients with MetS, preHT or cardiovascular risk factors.

  4. Permeability of solutes through cellophanes grafted with vinyl monomers. I. Diffusion of potassium chloride, urea, and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigami, S.; Maeda, Y.; Nakamura, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The diffusive permeability of potassium chloride, urea, and uric acid through cellophanes grafted with acrylamide, acrylic acid, styrene, and N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone by γ-ray irradiation was studied. The diffusive permeability coefficients of the permeants through the grafted cellophanes were increased with increase in hydration of the grafted membranes, except for the permeation of potassium chloride through cellophanes grafted with acrylic acid. The permeation of potassium chloride, urea, and uric acid through the various grafted cellophanes is explained by the free volume concept of homogeneously water-swollen membranes. However, the behavior of the permeation of potassium chloride through cellophane grafted with acrylic acid deviated from that of nonionic membranes because of the contribution of the electrical interaction between electrolyte and charge of the membrane. 4 figures, 3 tables

  5. Property changes of urinary nanocrystallites and urine of uric acid stone formers after taking potassium citrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang-Na; Ouyang, Jian-Ming, E-mail: toyjm@jnu.edu.cn; Xue, Jun-Fa; Shang, Yun-Feng

    2013-10-15

    The property changes of urinary nanocrystallites in 20 cases of uric acid (UA) stone formers after 1 week of potassium citrate (K{sub 3}cit) intake were comparatively studied by X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nanoparticle size analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Before K{sub 3}cit intake, the urinary crystallites mainly contained UA and calcium oxalate. After K{sub 3}cit intake, the components changed to urate and UA; the qualities, species, and amounts of aggregated crystallites decreased; urine pH, citrate, and glycosaminoglycan excretions increased; and UA excretion, Zeta potential, and crystallite size decreased. The stability of crystallites followed the order: controls > patients after taking K{sub 3}cit > patients before taking K{sub 3}cit. Therefore, the components of urinary stones were closely related to the components of urinary crystallites. - Graphical abstract: The relationships among stone components, urinary crystallite components, and urine pH were established. The crystallites stability order was: controls > patients after taking K{sub 3}cit > patients before taking K{sub 3}cit. Highlights: • Urine crystallite property of uric acid stone former after K{sub 3}cit intake was studied. • The components of crystallites in urine are closely related to type of stones. • After K{sub 3}cit intake the qualities and species of crystallites decreased. • After K{sub 3}cit intake the amount of aggregated crystallites decreased. • The stability of urinary crystallites of UA patients increased after taking K{sub 3}cit.

  6. Serum uric acid and disorders of glucose metabolism: the role of glycosuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, J.A.M. [Divisão de Nefrologia, Departamento de Medicina Clínica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Kang, H.C. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Greffin, S. [Divisão de Nefrologia, Departamento de Medicina Clínica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Garcia Rosa, M.L. [Departamento de Epidemiologia e Bioestatística, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Lugon, J.R. [Divisão de Nefrologia, Departamento de Medicina Clínica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-08-22

    Hyperuricemia has been associated with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome. We studied the association between hyperuricemia and glycemic status in a nonrandomized sample of primary care patients. This was a cross-sectional study of adults ≥20 years old who were members of a community-based health care program. Hyperuricemia was defined as a value >7.0 mg/dL for men and >6.0 mg/dL for women. The sample comprised 720 participants including controls (n=257) and patients who were hypertensive and euglycemic (n=118), prediabetic (n=222), or diabetic (n=123). The mean age was 42.4±12.5 years, 45% were male, and 30% were white. The prevalence of hyperuricemia increased from controls (3.9%) to euglycemic hypertension (7.6%) and prediabetic state (14.0%), with values in prediabetic patients being statistically different from controls. Overall, diabetic patients had an 11.4% prevalence of hyperuricemia, which was also statistically different from controls. Of note, diabetic subjects with glycosuria, who represented 24% of the diabetic participants, had a null prevalence of hyperuricemia, and statistically higher values for fractional excretion of uric acid, Na excretion index, and prevalence of microalbuminuria than those without glycosuria. Participants who were prediabetic or diabetic but without glycosuria had a similarly elevated prevalence of hyperuricemia. In contrast, diabetic patients with glycosuria had a null prevalence of hyperuricemia and excreted more uric acid and Na than diabetic subjects without glycosuria. The findings can be explained by enhanced proximal tubule reabsorption early in the course of dysglycemia that decreases with the ensuing glycosuria at the late stage of the disorder.

  7. Serum uric acid and disorders of glucose metabolism: the role of glycosuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, J.A.M.; Kang, H.C.; Greffin, S.; Garcia Rosa, M.L.; Lugon, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia has been associated with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome. We studied the association between hyperuricemia and glycemic status in a nonrandomized sample of primary care patients. This was a cross-sectional study of adults ≥20 years old who were members of a community-based health care program. Hyperuricemia was defined as a value >7.0 mg/dL for men and >6.0 mg/dL for women. The sample comprised 720 participants including controls (n=257) and patients who were hypertensive and euglycemic (n=118), prediabetic (n=222), or diabetic (n=123). The mean age was 42.4±12.5 years, 45% were male, and 30% were white. The prevalence of hyperuricemia increased from controls (3.9%) to euglycemic hypertension (7.6%) and prediabetic state (14.0%), with values in prediabetic patients being statistically different from controls. Overall, diabetic patients had an 11.4% prevalence of hyperuricemia, which was also statistically different from controls. Of note, diabetic subjects with glycosuria, who represented 24% of the diabetic participants, had a null prevalence of hyperuricemia, and statistically higher values for fractional excretion of uric acid, Na excretion index, and prevalence of microalbuminuria than those without glycosuria. Participants who were prediabetic or diabetic but without glycosuria had a similarly elevated prevalence of hyperuricemia. In contrast, diabetic patients with glycosuria had a null prevalence of hyperuricemia and excreted more uric acid and Na than diabetic subjects without glycosuria. The findings can be explained by enhanced proximal tubule reabsorption early in the course of dysglycemia that decreases with the ensuing glycosuria at the late stage of the disorder

  8. Peroxidase-like activity of nanocrystalline cobalt selenide and its application for uric acid detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang QQ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quan-Quan Zhuang,1 Zhi-Hang Lin,1 Yan-Cheng Jiang,1 Hao-Hua Deng,2 Shao-Bin He,1,3 Li-Ting Su,4 Xiao-Qiong Shi,2 Wei Chen2 1Department of Pharmacy, Affiliated Quanzhou First Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Quanzhou, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, 3Department of Pharmacy, Quanzhou Infectious Disease Hospital, 4Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, Quanzhou Medical College, Quanzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Dendrite-like cobalt selenide nanostructures were synthesized from cobalt and selenium powder precursors by a solvothermal method in anhydrous ethylenediamine. The as-prepared nanocrystalline cobalt selenide was found to possess peroxidase-like activity that could catalyze the reaction of peroxidase substrates in the presence of H2O2. A spectrophotometric method for uric acid (UA determination was developed based on the nanocrystalline cobalt selenide-catalyzed coupling reaction between N-ethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl-3-methylaniline sodium salt and 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP in the presence of H2O2. Under optimum conditions, the absorbance was proportional to the concentration of UA over the range of 2.0–40 µM with a detection limit of 0.5 µM. The applicability of the proposed method has been validated by determination of UA in human serum samples with satisfactory results. Keywords: enzyme mimics, cobalt selenide, peroxidase-like activity, uric acid, human serum

  9. Uric Acid Therapy Improves Clinical Outcome in Women With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llull, Laura; Laredo, Carlos; Renú, Arturo; Pérez, Belén; Vila, Elisabet; Obach, Víctor; Urra, Xabier; Planas, Anna; Amaro, Sergio; Chamorro, Ángel

    2015-08-01

    It is unknown whether women and men with acute ischemic stroke respond similar to an antioxidant regimen administered in combination with thrombolysis. Here, we investigated the independent effect of sex on the response to uric acid (UA) therapy in patients with acute stroke treated with alteplase. In the Efficacy Study of Combined Treatment With Uric Acid and rtPA in Acute Ischemic Stroke (URICO-ICTUS) trial, 206 women and 205 men were randomized to UA 1000 mg or placebo. In this reanalysis of the trial, the primary outcome was the rate of excellent outcome at 90 days (modified Rankin Scale, 0-1, or 2, if premorbid score of 2) in women and men using regression models adjusted for confounders associated with sex. The interaction of UA levels by treatment on infarct growth was assessed in selected patients. Excellent outcome occurred in 47 of 111 (42%) women treated with UA, and 28 of 95 (29%) treated with placebo, and in 36 of 100 (36%) men treated with UA and 38 of 105 (34%) treated with placebo. Treatment and sex interacted significantly with excellent outcome (P=0.045). Thus, UA therapy doubled the effect of placebo to attain an excellent outcome in women (odd ratio [95% confidence interval], 2.088 [1.050-4.150]; P=0.036), but not in men (odd ratio [95% confidence interval], 0.999 [0.516-1.934]; P=0.997). The interactions between treatment and serum UA levels (P<0.001) or allantoin/UA ratio (P<0.001) on infarct growth were significant only in women. In women with acute ischemic stroke treated with alteplase, the administration of UA reduced infarct growth in selected patients and was better than placebo to reach excellent outcome. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00860366. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Urinary excretion of uric acid is negatively associated with albuminuria in patients with chronic kidney disease: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengqin; Guo, Hui; Zou, Jianan; Chen, Weijun; Lu, Yijun; Zhang, Xiaoli; Fu, Chensheng; Xiao, Jing; Ye, Zhibin

    2018-04-24

    Increasing evidence has shown that albuminuria is related to serum uric acid. Little is known about whether this association may be interrelated via renal handling of uric acid. Therefore, we aim to study urinary uric acid excretion and its association with albuminuria in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A cross-sectional study of 200 Chinese CKD patients recruited from department of nephrology of Huadong hospital was conducted. Levels of 24 h urinary excretion of uric acid (24-h Uur), fractional excretion of uric acid (FEur) and uric acid clearance rate (Cur) according to gender, CKD stages, hypertension and albuminuria status were compared by a multivariate analysis. Pearson and Spearman correlation and multiple regression analyses were used to study the correlation of 24-h Uur, FEur and Cur with urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR). The multivariate analysis showed that 24-h Uur and Cur were lower and FEur was higher in the hypertension group, stage 3-5 CKD and macro-albuminuria group (UACR> 30 mg/mmol) than those in the normotensive group, stage 1 CKD group and the normo-albuminuria group (UACRuric acid is negatively associated with albuminuria in patients with CKD. This phenomenon may help to explain the association between albuminuria and serum uric acid.

  11. Association between blood pressure and magnesium and uric acid levels in indigenous Argentinean children at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschler, Valeria; González, Claudio; Maccallini, Gustavo; Molinari, Claudia; Castano, Luis

    2017-07-08

    To determine the association between nontraditional risk factors such as magnesium and uric acid with blood pressure (BP) in Indigenous children. A total of 263 school-aged indigenous children living at high altitude were enrolled in a cross-sectional study in November 2011. Prehypertension (preHTN) and hypertension (HTN) were defined by systolic and/or diastolic BP ≥ 90th to magnesium levels were identified in 21.7% (57/263): 28.1% (16/57) of the children with low magnesium levels had preHTN versus 9.7% (20/206) with normal magnesium values. Furthermore, 21.8% (12/57) of the children with low magnesium levels had HTN versus 4.5% (20/206) with normal magnesium values. There was a significant association between mean arterial pressure and magnesium (r = -026), uric acid (r = 0.20), phosphorus (r = -0.17), z-BMI (r = 0.22), potassium (r = -0.10), HOMA-IR (r = 0.17), calcium (r = -0.10), and sodium (r = -0.13). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that mean arterial pressure was associated significantly and directly with BMI, age, gender, and uric acid; and inversely with magnesium, adjusted for sodium, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and HOMA-IR (R 2  = 0.43). Furthermore, multiple logistic regression analyses showed that magnesium (OR = 0.015) and uric acid (OR = 2.95) were significantly associated with preHTN. Similar results were obtained when preHTN was replaced by HTN. Our results indicate that HTN was associated inversely with magnesium and positively with uric acid in indigenous school children. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Chemometrics-assisted microfluidic paper-based analytical device for the determination of uric acid by silver nanoparticle plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedpour, Vahid; Postma, Geert J; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Jansen, Jeroen J; Suzuki, Koji; Citterio, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    This manuscript reports on the application of chemometric methods for the development of an optimized microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD). As an example, we applied chemometric methods for both device optimization and data processing of results of a colorimetric uric acid assay. Box-Behnken designs (BBD) were utilized for the optimization of the device geometry and the amount of thermal inkjet-deposited assay reagents, which affect the assay performance. Measurement outliers were detected in real time by partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) of scanned images. The colorimetric assay mechanism is based on the on-device formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through the interaction of uric acid, ammonia, and poly(vinyl alcohol) with silver ions under mild basic conditions. The yellow color originating from visible light absorption by localized surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs can be detected by the naked eye or, more quantitatively, with a simple flat-bed scanner. Under optimized conditions, the linearity of the calibration curve ranges from 0.1-5 × 10 -3 mol L -1 of uric acid with a limit of detection of 33.9 × 10 -6 mol L -1 and a relative standard of deviation 4.5% (n = 3 for determination of 5.0 × 10 -3 mol L -1 uric acid). Graphical abstract A chemometrics-assisted microfluidic paper-based analytical device was developed as a low-cost and rapid platform for the determination of uric acid (UA). The detection method is based on the chemical interaction of UA, ammonia, and polyvinyl alcohol under mild basic condition with silver ions inducing formation of yellow silver nanoparticles (AgNPs).

  13. [The Correlation between Blood Uric Acid and Goldstein Grading in Hepatolenticular Degeneration Patients with Different Chinese Medical Syndrome Types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ji-yuan; Han, Yong-zhu; Ye, Qun-rong; Hong, Ming-fan; Cai, Yong-liang; Ren, Ming-shan; Pan, Fa-ming; Wang, Xun; Yang, Ren-ming

    2015-11-01

    To observe blood uric acid levels and Goldstein grading, as well as their correlation in Wilson's disease (WD) patients with different Chinese medical syndrome types. Totally 906 WD patients in line with inclusive criteria were assigned to 6 groups, i.e., the heart spirit confused by phlegm group (HSCP, 26 cases), the phlegm-fire disturbing heart group (PFDH, 90 cases), the retention of damp-heat group (RDH, 113 cases), deficiency of qi and blood group (DQB, 168 cases), the deficiency of Gan-yin and Shen-yin group (DGYSY, 327 cases), the deficiency of Gan and Shen group (DGS, 182 cases) due to different Chinese medical syndrome types. Recruited were another 160 healthy subjects having similar ages and diet structures, who came for medical examinations, as the healthy control group. Venous blood was collected from the medial cubital vein of each-patient on an empty stomach in early mornings to detect blood uric acid levels. Results Blood uric acid levels were lower in each syndrome type group than in the healthy control group (146.08 +/- 67.24 micromol/L in the HSCP group; 157.08 +/- 69.77 micromol/L in the PFDH group; 162.58 +/- 97.72 micromol/L in the RDH group; 156.20 +/- 62.63 micromol/L in the DQB group; 161.83 +/- 111.23 micromol/L in the DGYSY group; 194.41 +/- 90.01 micromol/L in the DGS group; 242.39 +/- 87.55 micromol/L in the healthy control group, P levels were higher in the DGYSY group than in the other 5 syndrome groups (P levels decreased (P levels decreased more. Blood uric acid levels and Goldstein grading were different in various Chinese medical syndrome types. Blood uric acid levels had certain value in assessing the severity of WD.

  14. Serum Uric Acid and the Risk of Mortality During 23 Years Follow-up in the Scottish Heart Health Extended Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraschek, Stephen P.; Tunstall-Pedoe, Hugh; Woodward, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background Elevated uric acid is a prevalent condition with controversial health consequences. Observational studies disagree with regard to the relationship of uric acid with mortality, and with factors modifying this relationship. Objective We examined the association of serum uric acid with mortality in 15,083 participants in the Scottish Heart Health Extended Cohort (SHHEC) Study. Methods Serum uric acid measured at study enrollment. Death was ascertained using both the Scottish death register and record linkage. Results During a median follow-up of 23 years, there were 3,980 deaths. In Cox proportional hazards models with sexes combined, those in the highest fifth of uric acid had significantly greater mortality (HR 1.18, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.31) compared with the second fifth, after adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. This relationship was modified by sex (P-interaction = 0.002) with adjusted HRs of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.40, 2.04) and 0.99 (95% CI: 0.86, 1.14) in women and men, respectively. Compared with the second fifth, the highest fifth of uric acid was most associated with kidney-related death (HR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.31, 3.32). Conclusion Elevated uric acid is associated with earlier mortality, especially in women. Future studies should evaluate mechanisms for these interactions and explore the strong association with renal-related mortality. PMID:24534458

  15. The relationship between dialysis adequacy and serum uric acid in dialysis patients; a cross-sectional multi-center study in Iranian hemodialysis centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Eghlim; Khosravi, Arezoo; Einollahi, Behzad; Meshkati, Mehdi; Taghipour, Mehrdad; Abbaszadeh, Shahin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Uric acid is one of the most significant uremic toxins accumulating in chronic renal failure patients treated with standard dialysis. Its clearance has not any exact relation with urea and creatinine clearance. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between adequacy of dialysis and serum level of uric acid in dialysis patients of some dialysis centers in Iran. Patients and Methods: In this study 1271 hemodialysis patients who have been treated for more than 3 months were evaluated. Their information and examinations from their files in all over the country were gathered and analyzed using SPSS versin18.0. Results: In this study, a significant relationship between dialysis duration and serum level of uric acid was not detected, however, a significant relationship between patients Kt/V and uric acid (R=0.43, P =0.029) was seen. Patients who had higher adequacy of dialysis had a higher level of plasma uric acid. Conclusion: For better controlling of plasma uric acid level of hemodialysis patients, increasing of the adequacy of dialysis or its duration is not effective. Other modalities of decreasing of serum uric acid like, changing diet or lifestyle or medical therapy may be necessary.

  16. Long-term effects of L- and N-type calcium channel blocker on uric acid levels and left atrial volume in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Mitsuru; Mano, Toshiaki; Eguchi, Akiyo; Fujiwara, Shohei; Sugahara, Masataka; Hirotani, Shinichi; Tsujino, Takeshi; Komamura, Kazuo; Koshiba, Masahiro; Masuyama, Tohru

    2016-11-01

    Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction is associated with hypertension and hyperuricemia. However, it is not clear whether the L- and N-type calcium channel blocker will improve LV diastolic dysfunction through the reduction of uric acid. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of anti-hypertensive therapy, the L- and N-type calcium channel blocker, cilnidipine or the L-type calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, on left atrial reverse remodeling and uric acid in hypertensive patients. We studied 62 patients with untreated hypertension, randomly assigned to cilnidipine or amlodipine for 48 weeks. LV diastolic function was assessed with the left atrial volume index (LAVI), mitral early diastolic wave (E), tissue Doppler early diastolic velocity (E') and the ratio (E/E'). Serum uric acid levels were measured before and after treatment. After treatment, systolic and diastolic blood pressures equally dropped in both groups. LAVI, E/E', heart rate and uric acid levels decreased at 48 weeks in the cilnidipine group but not in the amlodipine group. The % change from baseline to 48 weeks in LAVI, E wave, E/E' and uric acid levels were significantly lower in the cilnidipine group than in the amlodipine group. Larger %-drop in uric acid levels were associated with larger %-reduction of LAVI (p uric acid levels.

  17. REACTIONS OF PEROXYNITRITE WITH URIC ACID: FORMATION OF REACTIVE INTERMEDIATES, ALKYLATED PRODUCTS AND TRIURET, AND IN VIVO PRODUCTION OF TRIURET UNDER CONDITIONS OF OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersch, Christine; Palii, Sergiu P.; Imaram, Witcha; Kim, Kyung Mee; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Angerhofer, Alexander; Johnson, Richard J.; Henderson, George N.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is associated with hypertension, metabolic syndrome, preeclampsia, cardiovascular disease and renal disease, all conditions associated with oxidative stress. We hypothesized that uric acid, a known antioxidant, might become prooxidative following its reaction with oxidants; and, thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases. Uric acid and 1,3-15N2-uric acid were reacted with peroxynitrite in different buffers and in the presence of alcohols, antioxidants and in human plasma. The reaction products were identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses. The reactions generate reactive intermediates that yielded triuret as their final product. We also found that the antioxidant, ascorbate, could partially prevent this reaction. Whereas triuret was preferentially generated by the reactions in aqueous buffers, when uric acid or 1,3-15N2-uric acid was reacted with peroxynitrite in the presence of alcohols, it yielded alkylated alcohols as the final product. By extension, this reaction can alkylate other biomolecules containing OH groups and others containing labile hydrogens. Triuret was also found to be elevated in the urine of subjects with preeclampsia, a pregnancy-specific hypertensive syndrome that is associated with oxidative stress, whereas very little triuret is produced in normal healthy volunteers. We conclude that under conditions of oxidative stress, uric acid can form reactive intermediates, including potential alkylating species, by reacting with peroxynitrite. These reactive intermediates could possibly explain how uric acid contributes to the pathogenesis of diseases such as the metabolic syndrome and hypertension. PMID:19219741

  18. Serum Uric Acid Could Differentiate Acute Myocardial Infarction and Unstable Angina Pectoris in Hyperuricemic Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasic, Sabaheta; Kadic, Damira; Kiseljakovic, Emina; Jadric, Radivoj; Spahic, Emina

    2017-04-01

    Serum uric acid (SUA) is the final product of purine metabolism in humans. The present study aimed to identify a potential association between serum UA and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels and to find out whether uric acid could differentiate patients presenting with the acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and unstable angina pectoris (UAP) in hyperuricemic and normouricemic acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. Eighty ACS patients, aged 50-83 years, were enrolled in the study, 40 of them presenting with AMI and 40 with UAP. Frequency of patients with serum uric level over threshold for hyperuricemia was investigated and two groups of patients were formed such as hyperuricemic and normouricemic groups (A and B groups, respectively) independently of type of ACS. Those groups of patients were also subjected to cTnI measurement. Levels of SUA are associated with the type of ACS in the hyperuricemic ACS patients (AMI versus UAP, 499(458-590), 425(400-447) mmol/L, p=0.007, respectively). Uric acid correlated significantly with cTnI, moderate positively in the group A (rho=0.358, p=0.038) and moderate negatively in the group B (r=-0.309, p=0.037) of ACS patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that cTnI and age were independently associated with the SUA levels in the group A of ACS patients. Serum uric acid differentiates AIM and UAP patients in hyperuricemic group of acute coronary syndrome. Therefore it can be used as nonspecific parameter for evaluation of the myocardial lesion extent only in hyperuricemic ACS patients. This is supported by finding that cTnI along with age predicts SUA level in hyperuricemic ACS patients.

  19. Serum uric acid concentrations in meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans: a cross-sectional analysis in the EPIC-Oxford cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Schmidt

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Circulating concentrations of uric acid may be affected by dietary components such as meat, fish and dairy products, but only a few studies have compared uric acid concentrations among individuals who exclude some or all of these foods from their diet. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in serum uric acid concentrations between meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A sample of 670 men and 1,023 women (424 meat eaters, 425 fish eaters, 422 vegetarians and 422 vegans, matched on age and sex from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Oxford cohort were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Diet was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and serum concentrations of uric acid were measured. Mean concentrations of uric acid by diet group were calculated after adjusting for age, body mass index, calcium and alcohol intake. RESULTS: In both men and women, serum uric acid concentrations differed significantly by diet group (p<0.0001 and p = 0.01, respectively. The differences between diet groups were most pronounced in men; vegans had the highest concentration (340, 95% confidence interval 329-351 µmol/l, followed by meat eaters (315, 306-324 µmol/l, fish eaters (309, 300-318 µmol/l and vegetarians (303, 294-312 µmol/l. In women, serum uric acid concentrations were slightly higher in vegans (241, 234-247 µmol/l than in meat eaters (237, 231-242 µmol/l and lower in vegetarians (230, 224-236 µmol/l and fish eaters (227, 221-233 µmol/l. CONCLUSION: Individuals consuming a vegan diet had the highest serum concentrations of uric acid compared to meat eaters, fish eaters and vegetarians, especially in men. Vegetarians and individuals who eat fish but not meat had the lowest concentrations of serum uric acid.

  20. Serum uric acid concentrations in meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans: a cross-sectional analysis in the EPIC-Oxford cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Julie A; Crowe, Francesca L; Appleby, Paul N; Key, Timothy J; Travis, Ruth C

    2013-01-01

    Circulating concentrations of uric acid may be affected by dietary components such as meat, fish and dairy products, but only a few studies have compared uric acid concentrations among individuals who exclude some or all of these foods from their diet. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in serum uric acid concentrations between meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans. A sample of 670 men and 1,023 women (424 meat eaters, 425 fish eaters, 422 vegetarians and 422 vegans, matched on age and sex) from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Oxford cohort were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Diet was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and serum concentrations of uric acid were measured. Mean concentrations of uric acid by diet group were calculated after adjusting for age, body mass index, calcium and alcohol intake. In both men and women, serum uric acid concentrations differed significantly by diet group (pvegans had the highest concentration (340, 95% confidence interval 329-351 µmol/l), followed by meat eaters (315, 306-324 µmol/l), fish eaters (309, 300-318 µmol/l) and vegetarians (303, 294-312 µmol/l). In women, serum uric acid concentrations were slightly higher in vegans (241, 234-247 µmol/l) than in meat eaters (237, 231-242 µmol/l) and lower in vegetarians (230, 224-236 µmol/l) and fish eaters (227, 221-233 µmol/l). Individuals consuming a vegan diet had the highest serum concentrations of uric acid compared to meat eaters, fish eaters and vegetarians, especially in men. Vegetarians and individuals who eat fish but not meat had the lowest concentrations of serum uric acid.

  1. Periodic variation in bile acids controls circadian changes in uric acid via regulation of xanthine oxidase by the orphan nuclear receptor PPARα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemitsu, Takumi; Tsurudome, Yuya; Kusunose, Naoki; Oda, Masayuki; Matsunaga, Naoya; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2017-12-29

    Xanthine oxidase (XOD), also known as xanthine dehydrogenase, is a rate-limiting enzyme in purine nucleotide degradation, which produces uric acid. Uric acid concentrations in the blood and liver exhibit circadian oscillations in both humans and rodents; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that XOD expression and enzymatic activity exhibit circadian oscillations in the mouse liver. We found that the orphan nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) transcriptionally activated the mouse XOD gene and that bile acids suppressed XOD transactivation. The synthesis of bile acids is known to be under the control of the circadian clock, and we observed that the time-dependent accumulation of bile acids in hepatic cells interfered with the recruitment of the co-transcriptional activator p300 to PPARα, thereby repressing XOD expression. This time-dependent suppression of PPARα-mediated transactivation by bile acids caused an oscillation in the hepatic expression of XOD, which, in turn, led to circadian alterations in uric acid production. Finally, we also demonstrated that the anti-hyperuricemic effect of the XOD inhibitor febuxostat was enhanced by administering it at the time of day before hepatic XOD activity increased. These results suggest an underlying mechanism for the circadian alterations in uric acid production and also underscore the importance of selecting an appropriate time of day for administering XOD inhibitors. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine, and uric acid by a novel electrochemical sensor based on pristine graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Shaopeng; Zhao, Bo; Tang, Heqing; Jiang, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a novel electrochemical sensor based on pristine graphene (PG) is successfully constructed to detect ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The PG is obtained by liquid-phase exfoliation of graphite and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The sensor based on PG prepared by this method to realize simultaneous determination of AA, DA, and UA is firstly reported. The linear detection ranges for AA, DA, and UA are 9.00–2314 μM, 5.00–710 μM, and 6.00–1330 μM, respectively, with detection limits of 6.45, 2.00, and 4.82 μM. This PG based sensor exhibits excellent performance for detection of AA, DA, and UA, which is much better than those electrochemical sensors based on chemical converted graphene

  3. Hierarchical nanoporous platinum-copper alloy for simultaneous electrochemical determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine, and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Dianyun; Fan, Dawei; Wang, Jinping; Xu, Caixia

    2015-01-01

    A hierarchical nanoporous PtCu alloy was fabricated by two-step dealloying of a PtCuAl precursor alloy followed by annealing. The new alloy possesses interconnected hierarchical network architecture with bimodal distributions of ligaments and pores. It exhibits high electrochemical activity towards the oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA) at working potentials of 0.32, 0.47 and 0.61 V (vs. a mercury sulfate reference electrode), respectively. The new alloy was placed on a glassy carbon electrode and then displayed a wide linear response to AA, DA, and UA in the concentration ranges from 25 to 800 μM, 4 to 20 μM, and 10 to 70 μM, respectively. The lower detection limits are 17.5 μM, 2.8 µM and 5.7 μM at an S/N ratio of 3. (author)

  4. Spectroscopic analyses and studies on respective interaction of cyanuric acid and uric acid with bovine serum albumin and melamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dandan; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Wang, Qi; Qiao, Heng

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the fluorescence quenching was used to study the interaction of cyanuric acid (CYA) and uric acid (UA) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) at two different temperatures (283 K and 310 K). The bimolecular quenching constant (Kq), apparent quenching constant (Ksv), effective binding constant (KA) and corresponding dissociation constant (KD), binding site number (n) and binding distance (r) were calculated by adopting Stern-Volmer, Lineweaver-Burk, Double logarithm and overlap integral equations. The results show that CYA and UA are both able to obviously bind to BSA, but the binding strength order is BSA + CYA < BSA + UA. And then, the interactions of CYA and UA with melamine (MEL) under the same conditions were also studied by using similar methods. The results indicates that both CYA and UA can bind together closely with melamine (MEL). It is wished that these research results would facilitate the understanding the formation of kidney stones and gout in the body after ingesting excess MEL.

  5. The impact of serum uric acid reduction on renal function and blood pressure in chronic kidney disease patients with hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takayuki; Ohishi, Kazuhisa; Takeda, Asumi; Goto, Daiki; Sato, Taichi; Ohashi, Naro; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Kato, Akihiko; Yasuda, Hideo

    2018-04-26

    Febuxostat is tolerable in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with hyperuricemia. However, the long-term effect of lowering uric acid with febuxostat on renal function and blood pressure has not been elucidated. This was a 2 years retrospective observational study. 86 CKD patients with hyperuricemia who continued with allopurinol (allopurinol group, n = 30), switched from allopurinol to febuxostat (switched group, n = 25), or were newly prescribed febuxostat (febuxostat group, n = 31) were included in this study. Serum uric acid, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), blood pressure, and urinary protein were analyzed. Moreover, the impact of serum uric acid reduction on renal function and blood pressure was assessed. Serum uric acid in the switched and febuxostat groups was significantly reduced at 6 months (switched group; 8.49 ± 1.32-7.19 ± 1.14 mg/dL, p uric acid was increased (6.86 ± 0.87-7.10 ± 0.85 mg/dL, p = 0.0213). eGFR was significantly increased (35.2 ± 12.8-37.3 ± 13.9 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , p = 0.0232), while mean arterial pressure (93.1 ± 10.8-88.2 ± 9.5 mmHg, p = 0.0039) was significantly decreased at 6 months in the febuxostat group, resulting in the retention of eGFR for 2 years. The impact of serum uric acid reduction might have beneficial effects on CKD progression and blood pressure. However, a large prospective study is needed to determine the long-term efficacy of febuxostat therapy in CKD patients with hyperuricemia.

  6. Changes of serum CRP, serum uric acid and immunoglobulin in patients with renal damage of systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Jun Long

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the expression level of serum CRP, serum uric acid and immunoglobulin (IgG, IgA and IgM in patients with renal damage of systemic lupus erythematosus, and explore their clinical application value. Methods: A total of 95 patients with SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group (LN group, n = 64 and non-lupus nephritis group (NLN group n=31 according to the diagnostic criteria of lupus nephritis, and another 35 healthy subjects were selected as normal control group. Blood samples were collected from all subjects before treatment. Serum CRP and serum uric acid concentrations were measured by ELISA. The levels of serum immunoglobulins were detected by immunoturbidimetry in the same time. Finally, the results were analyzed statistically. Results: The levels of serum CRP and serum uric acid in patients with SLE were significantly higher than those in control group. The levels of serum CRP and serum uric acid in LN group of SLE patients were significantly higher than those in NLN group and control group. Serum CRP level in NLN group was significantly higher than that in control group. Serum uric acid level in NLN group was slightly higher than that of the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant. The level of serum immunoglobulin in SLE patients was higher than that in control group. The levels of serum immunoglobulin IgG, IgA and IgM in LN group of SLE patients were significantly higher than those in NLN group and control group. The levels of serum immunoglobulin IgG, IgA and IgM in NLN group of SLE patients were all higher than those in control group. Conclusion: Humoral immune of SLE patients with renal injury was activated at different degree, B-cell hyperthyroidism, severe systemic inflammatory response and kidney damage at varying degrees. Serum CRP, serum uric acid and immunoglobulin (IgG, IgA and IgM may be involved in SLE renal injury pathological process, which is the early diagnosis of

  7. The association between serum uric acid and the incidence of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus: The Rotterdam Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schaft, Niels; Brahimaj, Adela; Wen, Ke-Xin; Franco, Oscar H; Dehghan, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    Limited evidence is available about the association between serum uric acid and sub-stages of the spectrum from normoglycaemia to type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to investigate the association between serum uric acid and risk of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Eligible participants of the Rotterdam Study (n = 8,367) were classified into mutually exclusive subgroups of normoglycaemia (n = 7,030) and prediabetes (n = 1,337) at baseline. These subgroups were followed up for incident prediabetes (n = 1,071) and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 407), respectively. We used Cox proportional hazard models to determine hazard ratios (HRs) for incident prediabetes among individuals with normoglycaemia and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus among individuals with prediabetes. The mean duration of follow-up was 7.5 years for incident prediabetes and 7.2 years for incident type 2 diabetes mellitus. A standard deviation increment in serum uric acid was significantly associated with incident prediabetes among individuals with normoglycaemia (HR 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01; 1.18), but not with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus among individuals with prediabetes (HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.94; 1.21). Exclusion of individuals who used diuretics or individuals with hypertension did not change our results. Serum uric acid was significantly associated with incident prediabetes among normoglycaemic women (HR 1.13, 95% CI 1.02; 1.25) but not among normoglycaemic men (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96; 1.21). In contrast, serum uric acid was significantly associated with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus among prediabetic men (HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.01; 1.48) but not among prediabetic women (HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.84; 1.19). Our findings agree with the notion that serum uric acid is more closely related to early-phase mechanisms in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus than late-phase mechanisms.

  8. Acupuncture for serum uric acid in patients with asymptomatic hyperuricemia: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yingjuan; Meng, Jun; Sun, Baoguo; Xiang, Ting; Zhou, Xin; Xu, Biyu; Wu, Yingzi; Chen, Zexiong; Zhang, Shijun

    2017-04-01

    Hyperuricemia (HUA) is the most common disease associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and kidney disease. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the preliminary efficacy, mechanism, and safety of acupuncture on serum uric acid in patients with asymptomatic HUA. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial among 123 patients with asymptomatic HUA was conducted. The acupoints used in the acupuncture group were bilateral Five Shu in Spleen Meridian. Each participant received the intervention once daily for 10 consecutive days. The sham group received the same treatment duration on the same acupoints by the Park Sham Device. All patients underwent measurements of serum or urine creatinine, uric acid, serum lipid profiles, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, xanthine oxidase (XOD) and urate-anion exchanger (URAT-1). At the end of the intervention, the individuals in the acupuncture group were found to have significantly less levels of serum uric acid than those in the sham group [(453±65 vs. 528±81) μmol/L, puric acid level, urine pH value and 24-hour urine volume than the sham treatment (puric acid in a Chinese HUA patient population. The mechanism might be associated with the decrease level of enzyme URAT-1. ChiCTR-TRC-13004122. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Potent human uric acid transporter 1 inhibitors: in vitro and in vivo metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wempe MF

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael F Wempe,1 Janet W Lightner,2 Bettina Miller,1 Timothy J Iwen,1 Peter J Rice,1 Shin Wakui,3 Naohiko Anzai,4 Promsuk Jutabha,4 Hitoshi Endou51Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Colorado Denver, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA; 2Department of Pharmacology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, USA; 3Department of Toxicology, Azabu University School of Veterinary Medicine, Chuo Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan; 4Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Dokkyo Medical University School of Medicine, Mibu, Shimotsuga, Tochigi, Japan; 5Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Human uric acid transporter 1 (hURAT1; SLC22A12 is a very important urate anion exchanger. Elevated urate levels are known to play a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases, chronic renal disease, diabetes, and hypertension. Therefore, the development of potent uric acid transport inhibitors may lead to novel therapeutic agents to combat these human diseases. The current study investigates small molecular weight compounds and their ability to inhibit 14C-urate uptake in oocytes expressing hURAT1. Using the most promising drug candidates generated from our structure–activity relationship findings, we subsequently conducted in vitro hepatic metabolism and pharmacokinetic (PK studies in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Compounds were incubated with rat liver microsomes containing cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and uridine 5'-diphosphoglucuronic acid. In vitro metabolism and PK samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry methods. Independently, six different inhibitors were orally (capsule dosing or intravenously (orbital sinus administered to fasting male Sprague-Dawley rats. Blood samples were collected and analyzed; these data were used to compare in vitro and in vivo metabolism and to

  10. Uric Acid Induces Hepatic Steatosis by Generation of Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura G.; Choi, Yea-Jin; Cicerchi, Christina; Kanbay, Mehmet; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A.; Ishimoto, Takuji; Li, Nanxing; Marek, George; Duranay, Murat; Schreiner, George; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Kang, Duk-Hee; Sautin, Yuri Y.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome represents a collection of abnormalities that includes fatty liver, and it currently affects one-third of the United States population and has become a major health concern worldwide. Fructose intake, primarily from added sugars in soft drinks, can induce fatty liver in animals and is epidemiologically associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in humans. Fructose is considered lipogenic due to its ability to generate triglycerides as a direct consequence of the metabolism of the fructose molecule. Here, we show that fructose also stimulates triglyceride synthesis via a purine-degrading pathway that is triggered from the rapid phosphorylation of fructose by fructokinase. Generated AMP enters into the purine degradation pathway through the activation of AMP deaminase resulting in uric acid production and the generation of mitochondrial oxidants. Mitochondrial oxidative stress results in the inhibition of aconitase in the Krebs cycle, resulting in the accumulation of citrate and the stimulation of ATP citrate lyase and fatty-acid synthase leading to de novo lipogeneis. These studies provide new insights into the pathogenesis of hepatic fat accumulation under normal and diseased states. PMID:23035112

  11. In situ fabricated iodine-adlayer assisted selective electrooxidation of uric acid in alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, Md. Rezwan [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mail Box G1-5, 4259 Nagastuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: mrmche@yahoo.com; Masud, Jahangir [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mail Box G1-5, 4259 Nagastuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Ohsaka, Takeo [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mail Box G1-5, 4259 Nagastuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: ohsaka@echem.titech.ac.jp

    2008-12-30

    This work presents the electrooxidation of uric acid (UA) at an iodine-adlayer-modified gold, Au (I|Au (poly)) electrode in 0.1 M NaOH solution using cyclic voltammetric, amperometric and open-circuit potential measurement techniques. A tremendous enhancement of the electrode activity towards the electrooxidation of UA was achieved by virtue of the simple modification of the Au (poly) electrode surface with a neutral iodine-adlayer, fabricated in situ through the spontaneous oxidative chemisorption of iodide present in the sample solution. The cyclic voltammetric peak current increases remarkably for the oxidation of UA and the peak potential shifts by 365 mV to the negative direction of potential compared to the bare Au (poly) electrode. Oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA) at the I|Au (poly) electrode takes place at the same potential as that at the bare electrode, but the peak current intensity is almost twice at the bare Au (poly) electrode as compared to the modified one. In the mixture of the AA and UA, the cyclic voltammetric signals corresponding to the oxidations of AA and UA were resolved by 340 mV. The electrode response in the mixture was highly reproducible because of the inhibition of adsorption of oxidation products and UA.

  12. A pre-anodized inlaying ultrathin carbon paste electrode for simultaneous determination of uric acid and folic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Jing’e; Shangguan, Enbo; Li, Quanmin

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: In 0.10 mol/L PBS (pH 6.00), oxidation reaction occurred at the PAIUCPE owing to uric acid (UA) loss electrons, while oxygen dissolved in the feed was reduced at the platinum electrode. Furthermore, the effect of electrode reaction at the platinum electrode on that of working electrode is detailedly discussed. Highlights: ► The simultaneous determination of UA and FA is achieved at the PAIUCPE. ► The effect of reaction at the Pt electrode on that of working electrode is discussed. ► The effect of pH on peak currents is detailedly explained for the first time. -- Abstract: A pre-anodized inlaying ultrathin carbon paste electrode (PAIUCPE) was prepared by electrochemical pretreatment. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) was applied to characterize the surface morphology of PAIUCPE and the performance of the electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The results indicated that PAIUCPE displayed excellent electrocatalysis for the oxidation of uric acid (UA) and folic acid (FA). The separated extent between the two oxidation peaks of UA and FA was 324 mV, which was enough for the simultaneous detection. In 0.10 mol/L PBS (pH 6.00), the linear scan voltammetry (LSV) response of UA and FA increased linearly with the concentration in the range of 4.0 × 10 −6 –3.5 × 10 −4 mol/L and 3.0 × 10 −6 –2.0 × 10 −4 mol/L with the detection limits of 1.1 × 10 −7 mol/L and 1.5 × 10 −7 mol/L, respectively. It was successfully used to determine UA and FA in human urine simultaneously

  13. Effects of nitrocompounds on uric acid-utilizing microorganisms, nitrogen retention, and microbial community in laying hen manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W K; Weeks, L J; Anderson, R C; Nisbet, D J; Dunkley, K; Ricke, S C

    2009-05-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate effects of nitrocompounds on growth of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms, nitrogen retention, and microbial community in laying hen manure. There were three treatments: control, 100 mM nitropropanol (NPL), and 100 mM nitropropionic acid (NPC). The mixed laying hen manure was divided into 3 groups and incubated at 23 degrees C for 7 days. On Days 0, 3, and 7, samples were collected to measure the quantity of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms, total nitrogen retention, and microbial community changes. Both nitrocompounds significantly reduced growth of the uric acid-utilizing microorganisms on Day 3 (P nitrocompounds remained until Day 7 when the experiment was terminated. NPL treatment retained significantly more manure nitrogen compared to the control on both Days 3 and 7. Manure nitrogen levels of NPC treatment were also significantly higher than the control on Day 7. We further investigated the effects of NPL and NPC on microbial community changes during a 7-day incubation. NPC treatment and control on Day 7 exhibited 94% community similarity. NPC on Day 3 and NPL on Day 7 also showed high community similarity (approximately 94%). Control on Day 0 and Day 7 yielded less than 80% community similarity. Control and NPL treatment groups on Day 3 gave the lowest community similarity (approximately 64%) compared to the other groups. This result indicated that incubation time and treatment moderately influenced microbial community changes. In summary, these results indicate that both nitrocompounds increased manure nitrogen retention by inhibiting the growth of uric acid-utilizing microorganisms, and that NPL and NPC could be used as manure treatments in order to reduce ammonia volatilization and nitrogen retention in poultry manure. Moreover, nitrocompounds may have potential as feed additives to reduce ammonia volatilization.

  14. Uric acid best predicts metabolically unhealthy obesity with increased cardiovascular risk in youth and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangge, Harald; Zelzer, Sieglinde; Puerstner, Peter; Schnedl, Wolfgang J; Reeves, Gloria; Postolache, Teodor T; Weghuber, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The obesity prevalence is growing worldwide and largely responsible for cardiovascular disease, the most common cause of death in the western world. The rationale of this study was to distinguish metabolically healthy from unhealthy overweight/obese young and adult patients as compared to healthy normal weight age matched controls by an extensive anthropometric, laboratory, and sonographic vascular assessment. Three hundred fifty five young [8 to obese(ow/ob), 56 normal weight (nw)] and 354 adult [>18-60 years, 175 (ow/ob), 179 nw)] participants of the STYJOBS/EDECTA (STYrian Juvenile Obesity Study/Early DEteCTion of Atherosclerosis) cohort were analyzed. STYJOBS/EDECTA (NCT00482924) is a crossectional study to investigate metabolic/cardiovascular risk profiles in normal and ow/ob people free of disease except metabolic syndrome (MetS). From 299 young ow/ob subjects (8-adult ow/ob subjects (>18-60 years), 79 (45%) had positive criteria for MetS. In both age groups, prevalence of MetS was greater among males. Overweight/obese subjects were divided into "healthy" (no MetS criterion except anthropometry fulfilled) and "unhealthy" (MetS positive). Although percentage body fat did not differ between "healthy" and "unhealthy" ow/ob, nuchal and visceral fat were significantly greater in the "unhealthy" group which had also significantly higher values of carotid intima media thickness (IMT). With MetS as the dependent variable, two logistic regressions including juveniles adults >18 years were performed. The potential predictor variables selected with the exception of age and gender by t test comparisons included IMT, ultrasensitive c-reactive protein (US-CRP), IL-6, malondialdehyde (MDA), oxidized LDL, leptin, adiponectin, uric acid (UA), aldosterone, cortisol, transaminases, fibrinogen. In both groups, uric acid and in adults only, leptin and adiponectin, turned out as the best predictor. Serum levels of UA are a significant predictor of unhealthy obesity in juveniles

  15. Low sensitivity for the metabolic syndrome to detect uric acid elevations in females and non-Hispanic-black male adolescents: an analysis of NHANES 1999-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, Mark D; Gurka, Matthew J

    2012-02-01

    Uric acid is tightly linked to the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and among adults higher uric acid levels are associated with future risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and renal disease. Evaluate the sensitivity of MetS to identify adolescents with elevated uric acid levels on a race/ethnicity and gender-specific basis. We evaluated 3296 male and female adolescents 12-19 y participating in the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Survey 1999-06, comprised of 67.6% non-Hispanic whites, 15.1% non-Hispanic blacks, and 17.3% Hispanics. We used a definition of MetS modified for use in adolescents and evaluated the sensitivity of a diagnosis of MetS to identify individuals with uric acid elevations (approximately the 95th percentile of uric acid by gender among normal-weight adolescents). When used as a screening test to identify individuals with uric acid elevations MetS performed more poorly among females (18.0%) than among males (37.0%) (puric acid levels among females (non-Hispanic-white 15.5%, non-Hispanic-black 19.4%, Hispanic 26.5%, p>0.05). Current criteria to diagnose MetS exhibit racial/ethnic and gender differences in the ability to identify adolescents with elevated uric acid levels, performing poorly among non-Hispanic-black males and among females. Given emerging data regarding the ability of uric acid elevations for predicting future disease, these data may have implications regarding the use of MetS as a marker of risk among all gender and racial/ethnic groups. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential changes in serum uric acid concentrations in sibutramine promoted weight loss in diabetes: results from four weeks of the lead-in period of the SCOUT trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Weeke, Peter; Brendorp, Bente

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Elevated levels of serum uric acid are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The response of uric acid to weight loss therapy (lifestyle plus sibutramine) in an overweight and obese cardiovascular high risk population was studied....... METHODS AND RESULTS: Data from a four week single-blind lead-in period of the Sibutramine Cardiovascular OUTcomes (SCOUT) study were analyzed. 2584 patients (24%) had diabetes mellitus (DM) only, 1748 (16%) had cardiovascular disease (CVD) only and 6397 (60%) had both DM + CVD. Uric acid concentrations...... (mean +/- standard deviation) at screening were significantly higher among patients with CVD compared to patients without CVD (p uric acid decreased...

  17. Menopause, postmenopausal hormone use and serum uric acid levels in US women--the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Hak (Liesbeth); H.K. Choi (Hyon)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractINTRODUCTION: Despite the substantial prevalence of gout in the ageing female population, female hormonal influence has not been comprehensively examined. We evaluated and quantified the potential independent association between menopause, postmenopausal hormone use and serum uric acid

  18. Serum uric acid is a GFR-independent long-term predictor of acute and chronic renal insufficiency: the Jerusalem Lipid Research Clinic cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Dov, Iddo Z.; Kark, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Kidney disease is commonly accompanied by hyperuricemia. However, the contribution of serum uric acid (SUA) to kidney injury is debated. Our objective was to assess the long-term prediction of renal failure by SUA.

  19. Effect of the integrated approach of yoga therapy on platelet count and uric acid in pregnancy: A multicenter stratified randomized single-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Jayashree

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Antenatal integrated yoga from the twelfth week is safe and effective in promoting a healthy progression of platelets and uric acid in women with high-risk pregnancy, pointing to healthy hemodilution and better physiological adaptation.

  20. Conductimetric Biosensor for the Detection of Uric Acid by Immobilization Uricase on Nata de Coco Membrane—Pt Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Mulyasuryani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A conductimetric enzyme biosensor for uric acid detection has been developed. The uricase, as enzyme, is isolated from Candida utilis and immobilized on a nata de coco membrane-Pt electrode. The biosensor demonstrates a linear response to urate over the concentration range 1-6 ppm and has good selectivity properties. The response is affected by the membrane thickness and pH change in the range 7.5-9.5. The response time is three minutes in aqueous solutions and in human serum samples. Application of the biosensor to the determination of uric acid in human serum gave results that compared favourably with those obtained by medical laboratory. The operational stability of the biosensor was not less than three days and the relative error is smaller than 10%.

  1. Effects of acute and repeated oral doses of D-tagatose on plasma uric acid in normal and diabetic humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, J P; Donner, T W; Sadler, J H; Levin, G V; Makris, N G

    1999-04-01

    D-tagatose, a stereoisomer of D-fructose, is a naturally occurring ketohexose proposed for use as a low-calorie bulk sweetener. Ingested D-tagatose appears to be poorly absorbed. The absorbed portion is metabolized in the liver by a pathway similar to that of D-fructose. The main purpose of this study was to determine if acute or repeated oral doses of D-tagatose would cause elevations in plasma uric acid (as is seen with fructose) in normal humans and Type 2 diabetics. In addition, effects of subchronic D-tagatose ingestion on fasting plasma phosphorus, magnesium, lipids, and glucose homeostasis were studied. Eight normal subjects and eight subjects with Type 2 diabetes participated in this two-phase study. Each group was comprised of four males and four females. In the first phase, all subjects were given separate 75 g 3-h oral glucose and D-tagatose tolerance tests. Uric acid, phosphorus, and magnesium were determined in blood samples collected from each subject at 0, 30, 60, 120, and 180 min after dose. In the 8-week phase of the study, the normals were randomly placed into two groups which received 75 g of either D-tagatose or sucrose (25 g with each meal) daily for 8 weeks. The diabetics were randomized into two groups which received either 75 g D-tagatose or no supplements of sugar daily for 8 weeks. Uric acid, phosphorus, magnesium, lipids, glycosylated hemoglobin, glucose, and insulin were determined in fasting blood plasma of all subjects at baseline (time zero) and biweekly over the 8 weeks. The 8-week test did not demonstrate an increase in fasting plasma uric acid in response to the daily intake of D-tagatose. However, a transient increase of plasma uric acid levels was observed after single doses of 75 g of D-tagatose in the tolerance test. Plasma uric acid levels were found to rise and peak at 60 min after such dosing. No clinical relevance was attributed to this treatment-related effect because excursions of plasma uric acid levels above the normal

  2. Interaction between body mass index and serum uric acid in relation to blood pressure in community-dwelling Japanese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Ryuichi; Ninomiya, Daisuke; Senzaki, Kensuke; Kumagi, Teru

    2018-01-01

    Few data is available on the association between body mass index (BMI), serum uric acid (SUA) levels and blood pressure (BP) categories in the disease continuum, when efforts for its prevention may be applicable. We performed a cross-sectional study to examine the association between BMI, SUA and BP in a community-dwelling sample of Japanese men. Individuals not on antihypertensive and uric acid lowering medications, and aged 50 to 90 years [817men aged 66 ± 9 (mean ± standard deviation) years] were recruited for the survey during a community based annual medical check-up. The main outcome was the presence of prehypertension [systolic BP (SBP) 120-139 mmHg and/or diastolic BP (DBP) 80-89 mmHg] and hypertension [SBP ≥ 140 and /or DBP ≥ 90]. In participants with a BMI of dwelling men.

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