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Sample records for synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide probe

  1. Use of oligodeoxynucleotide signature probes for identification of physiological groups of methylotrophic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsien, H.C.; Bratina, B.J.; Tsuji, K.; Hanson, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotide sequences that uniquely complemented 16S rRNAs of each group of methylotrophs were synthesized and used as hybridization probes for the identification of methylotrophic bacteria possessing the serine and ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathways for formaldehyde fixation. The specificity of the probes was determined by hybridizing radiolabeled probes with slot-blotted RNAs of methylotrophs and other eubacteria followed by autoradiography. The washing temperature was determined experimentally to be 50 and 52 degrees C for 9-α (serine pathway) and 10-γ (RuMP pathway) probes, respectively. RNAs isolated from serine pathway methylotrophs bound to probe 9-α, and RNAs from RuMP pathway methylotrophs bound to probe 10-γ. Nonmethylotrophic eubacterial RNAs did not bind to either probe. The probes were also labeled with fluorescent dyes. Cells fixed to microscope slides were hybridized with these probes, washed, and examined in a fluorescence microscope equipped with appropriate filter sets. Cells of methylotrophic bacteria possessing the serine or RuMP pathway specifically bind probes designed for each group. Samples with a mixture of cells of type I and II methanotrophs were detected and differentiated with single probes or mixed probes labeled with different fluorescent dyes, which enabled the detection of both types of cells in the same microscopic field

  2. Synthetic Human TLR9-LRR11 Peptide Attenuates TLR9 Signaling by Binding to and thus Decreasing Internalization of CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xichun; Li, Bin; Kuang, Mei; Liu, Xin; Cen, Yanyan; Qin, Rongxin; Ding, Guofu; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2016-02-22

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 is an endosomal receptor recognizing bacterial DNA/CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN). Blocking CpG ODN/TLR9 activity represents a strategy for therapeutic prevention of immune system overactivation. Herein, we report that a synthetic peptide (SP) representing the leucine-rich repeat 11 subdomain of the human TLR9 extracellular domain could attenuate CpG ODN/TLR9 activity in RAW264.7 cells by binding to CpG ODN and decreasing its internalization. Our results demonstrate that preincubation with SP specifically inhibited CpG ODN- but not lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and lipopeptide (PAM3CSK4)-stimulated TNF-α and IL-6 release. Preincubation of SP with CpG ODN dose-dependently decreased TLR9-driven phosphorylation of IκBα and ERK and activation of NF-κB/p65. Moreover, SP dose-dependently decreased FAM-labeled CpG ODN internalization, whereas non-labeled CpG ODN reversed the inhibition. The KD value of SP-CpG ODN binding was within the micromolar range. Our results demonstrated that SP was a specific inhibitor of CpG ODN/TLR9 activity via binding to CpG ODN, leading to reduced ODN internalization and decreased activation of subsequent pathways within cells. Thus, SP could be used as a potential CpG ODN antagonist to block TLR9 signaling.

  3. Synthetic Human TLR9-LRR11 Peptide Attenuates TLR9 Signaling by Binding to and thus Decreasing Internalization of CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xichun Pan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR 9 is an endosomal receptor recognizing bacterial DNA/CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN. Blocking CpG ODN/TLR9 activity represents a strategy for therapeutic prevention of immune system overactivation. Herein, we report that a synthetic peptide (SP representing the leucine-rich repeat 11 subdomain of the human TLR9 extracellular domain could attenuate CpG ODN/TLR9 activity in RAW264.7 cells by binding to CpG ODN and decreasing its internalization. Our results demonstrate that preincubation with SP specifically inhibited CpG ODN- but not lipopolysaccharide (LPS- and lipopeptide (PAM3CSK4-stimulated TNF-α and IL-6 release. Preincubation of SP with CpG ODN dose-dependently decreased TLR9-driven phosphorylation of IκBα and ERK and activation of NF-κB/p65. Moreover, SP dose-dependently decreased FAM-labeled CpG ODN internalization, whereas non-labeled CpG ODN reversed the inhibition. The KD value of SP-CpG ODN binding was within the micromolar range. Our results demonstrated that SP was a specific inhibitor of CpG ODN/TLR9 activity via binding to CpG ODN, leading to reduced ODN internalization and decreased activation of subsequent pathways within cells. Thus, SP could be used as a potential CpG ODN antagonist to block TLR9 signaling.

  4. Prevention and Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Primates by Using Synthetic Type D/A Oligodeoxynucleotides Expressing CpG Motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Barbara; Wang, Vivian; Sacks, David L.; Seder, Robert A; Verthelyi, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing CpG motifs mimic microbial DNA and are recognized by toll-like receptor 9 on immune cells. The resulting response limits the early spread of infectious organisms and promotes the development of adaptive immunity. In this regard, CpG ODN show promise as immunoprotective agents and as vaccine adjuvants. Previous studies of nonhuman primates showed that administration of CpG ODN type D (also known as type A) at the site of infection 3 days before and after a challenge with Leishmania major enhanced host resistance and reduced the lesion's severity. In this study, we show that systemic administration of D/A ODN limits the size of lesions following an intradermal infection with L. major. Importantly, the reduced morbidity was not associated with a reduction in long-term immunity, as such treated macaques were still protected following a secondary challenge. Finally, administration of D/A ODN to macaques that had established cutaneous lesions reduced the severity of the lesions, suggesting a potential role for CpG ODN in L. major treatment. Together, these findings support the development of clinical studies to assess the use of CpG ODN types D/A as immunoprotective and therapeutic agents. PMID:16041009

  5. Synthetic Nucleotides as Probes of DNA Polymerase Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Walsh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic code is continuously expanding with new nucleobases designed to suit specific research needs. These synthetic nucleotides are used to study DNA polymerase dynamics and specificity and may even inhibit DNA polymerase activity. The availability of an increasing chemical diversity of nucleotides allows questions of utilization by different DNA polymerases to be addressed. Much of the work in this area deals with the A family DNA polymerases, for example, Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, which are DNA polymerases involved in replication and whose fidelity is relatively high, but more recent work includes other families of polymerases, including the Y family, whose members are known to be error prone. This paper focuses on the ability of DNA polymerases to utilize nonnatural nucleotides in DNA templates or as the incoming nucleoside triphosphates. Beyond the utility of nonnatural nucleotides as probes of DNA polymerase specificity, such entities can also provide insight into the functions of DNA polymerases when encountering DNA that is damaged by natural agents. Thus, synthetic nucleotides provide insight into how polymerases deal with nonnatural nucleotides as well as into the mutagenic potential of nonnatural nucleotides.

  6. Inhibition of leukemia cell proliferation by receptor-mediated uptake of c-myb antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citro, G; Perrotti, D; Cucco, C; D'Agnano, I; Sacchi, A; Zupi, G; Calabretta, B

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of human leukemia HL-60 cells to an oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to an 18-base sequence (codons 2-7) of c-myb-encoded mRNA has previously been shown to result in inhibition of cell proliferation. Because HL-60 cells express high levels of transferrin receptor we adapted a DNA delivery system based on receptor-mediated endocytosis to introduce myb oligomers complexed with a transferrin-polylysine conjugate into those cells. A DNA.RNA duplex resistant to S1 nuclease digestion was detected as early as 12 hr after culture of HL-60 cells in the presence of the myb antisense/transferrin-polylysine complex. Exposure of HL-60 cells to the myb antisense/transferrin-polylysine complex resulted in rapid and profound inhibition of proliferation and loss of cell viability much more pronounced than that occurring in cells exposed to free myb antisense oligodeoxynucleotides. The transferrin-polylysine/myb sense complex or the transferrin-polylysine conjugate alone had no effect on HL-60 cell proliferation and viability. These findings indicate that myb synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides enter efficiently into HL-60 by transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis and exert a profound biological effect. Such a delivery system could exploit other ligand-receptor interactions for the selective delivery of oncogene-targeted antisense oligodeoxynucleotides. Images PMID:1495997

  7. Synthetic Empirical Chorus Wave Model From Combined Van Allen Probes and Cluster Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapitov, O. V.; Mourenas, D.; Artemyev, A. V.; Mozer, F. S.; Hospodarsky, G.; Bonnell, J.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2018-01-01

    Chorus waves are among the most important natural electromagnetic emissions in the magnetosphere as regards to their potential effects on electron dynamics. They can efficiently accelerate or precipitate electrons trapped in the outer radiation belt, producing either fast increases of relativistic particle fluxes or auroras at high latitudes. Accurately modeling their effects, however, requires detailed models of their wave power and obliquity distribution as a function of geomagnetic activity in a particularly wide spatial domain, rarely available based solely on the statistics obtained from only one satellite mission. Here we seize the opportunity of synthesizing data from the Van Allen Probes and Cluster spacecraft to provide a new comprehensive chorus wave model in the outer radiation belt. The respective spatial coverages of these two missions are shown to be especially complementary and further allow a good cross calibration in the overlap domain. We used 4 years (2012-2016) of Van Allen Probes VLF data in the chorus frequency range up to 12 kHz at latitudes lower than 20°, combined with 10 years of Cluster VLF measurements up to 4 kHz in order to provide a full coverage of geomagnetic latitudes up to 45° in the chorus frequency range 0.1fce-0.8fce. The resulting synthetic statistical model of chorus wave amplitude, obliquity, and frequency is presented in the form of analytical functions of latitude and Kp in three different magnetic local time sectors and for two ranges of L shells outside the plasmasphere. Such a synthetic and reliable chorus model is crucially important for accurately modeling global acceleration and loss of electrons over the long run in the outer radiation belt, allowing a comprehensive description of electron flux variations over a very wide energy range.

  8. Cloned polynucleotide and synthetic oligonucleotide probes used in colony hybridization are equally efficient in the identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommerfelt, H.; Kalland, K.H.; Raj, P.; Moseley, S.L.; Bhan, M.K.; Bjorvatn, B.

    1988-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease-generated polynucleotide and synthetically produced oligonucleotide gene probes used in colony hybridization assays proved to be efficient for the detection and differentiation of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. To compare their relative efficiencies, these two sets of probes were radiolabeled with 32 P and were applied to 74 strains of E. coli with known enterotoxin profiles and to 156 previously unexamined E. coli isolates. The enterotoxigenic bacteria Vibrio cholerae O1, Vibrio cholerae non-O1 (NAG), Yersinia enterocolitica, and E. coli harboring the plasmid vectors of the polynucleotide gene probes were examined for further evaluation of probe specificity. The two classes of probes showed a perfect concordance in their specific detection and differentiation of enterotoxigenic E. coli. In the analysis of six strains, the signal strength on autoradiography after hybridization with oligonucleotides was weaker than that obtained after hybridization with polynucleotide probes. The probes did not hybridize with DNA from V. cholerae O1, V. cholerae non-O1 (NAG), or Y. enterocolitica. The strains of E. coli harboring the plasmid vectors of the polynucleotide gene probes were, likewise, negative in the hybridization assays

  9. Cloned polynucleotide and synthetic oligonucleotide probes used in colony hybridization are equally efficient in the identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommerfelt, H.; Kalland, K.H.; Raj, P.; Moseley, S.L.; Bhan, M.K.; Bjorvatn, B.

    1988-11-01

    Restriction endonuclease-generated polynucleotide and synthetically produced oligonucleotide gene probes used in colony hybridization assays proved to be efficient for the detection and differentiation of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. To compare their relative efficiencies, these two sets of probes were radiolabeled with /sup 32/P and were applied to 74 strains of E. coli with known enterotoxin profiles and to 156 previously unexamined E. coli isolates. The enterotoxigenic bacteria Vibrio cholerae O1, Vibrio cholerae non-O1 (NAG), Yersinia enterocolitica, and E. coli harboring the plasmid vectors of the polynucleotide gene probes were examined for further evaluation of probe specificity. The two classes of probes showed a perfect concordance in their specific detection and differentiation of enterotoxigenic E. coli. In the analysis of six strains, the signal strength on autoradiography after hybridization with oligonucleotides was weaker than that obtained after hybridization with polynucleotide probes. The probes did not hybridize with DNA from V. cholerae O1, V. cholerae non-O1 (NAG), or Y. enterocolitica. The strains of E. coli harboring the plasmid vectors of the polynucleotide gene probes were, likewise, negative in the hybridization assays.

  10. Synthetic White-light Imagery for the Wide-field Imager for Solar Probe Plus (WISPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liewer, P. C.; Thernisien, A. F.; Vourlidas, A.; Howard, R.; DeForest, C. E.; DeJong, E.; Desai, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar Probe Plus trajectory, approaching within 10 solar radii, will enable the white light imager, WISPR, to fly through corona features now only imaged remotely. The dependency of the Thomson scattering on the imaging geometry (distance and angle from the Sun) dictates that the outer WISPR telescope will be sensitive to the emission from plasma close to the spacecraft, in contrast to the situation for imaging from Earth orbit. Thus WISPR will be the first 'local' imager providing a crucial link between the large-scale corona and SPP's in-situ measurements. The high speed at perihelion will provide tomographic-like views of coronal structures at ≤1° resolution. As SPP approaches perihelion, WISPR, with a 95° radial by 58° transverse field of view, will resolve the fine-scale structure with high spatial resolution. To prepare for this unprecedented viewing of the structure of the inner corona, we are creating synthetic white light images and animations from the WISPR viewpoint using the white-light ray-tracing package developed at NRL (available through SolarSoft). We will present simulated observations of multi-strand models of coronal streamers and flux ropes of various size and make comparisons with views from Earth, Solar Orbiter and SPP. Analysis techniques for WISPR images will also be discussed.

  11. Immunostimulatory CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides cause extramedullary murine hemopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparwasser, T; Hültner, L; Koch, E S; Luz, A; Lipford, G B; Wagner, H

    1999-02-15

    Bacterial DNA and the synthetic CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) derived thereof have attracted attention because they activate cells of the adaptive immune system (lymphocytes) and the innate immune system (APCs) in a sequence-dependent manner. Here, we addressed whether CpG-ODNs affect hemopoiesis. Challenging mice with immunostimulatory CpG-ODN sequences led to transient splenomegaly, with a maximum increase of spleen weight at day 6. The induction of splenomegaly by CpG-ODNs was sequence-specific, dose-dependent, and associated with an increase in splenic cell count, in numbers of granulocyte-macrophage CFUs (GM-CFUs), and early erythroid progenitors (burst-forming units-erythroid). The transfer of spleen cells from CpG-ODN-pretreated animals into lethally irradiated syngeneic mice yielded an increase of spleen CFUs. Furthermore, the challenge of sublethally irradiated mice with CpG-ODNs caused radioprotective effects, in that recovery of GM-CFUs and cytotoxic T cell function was enhanced. The increase in GM-CFU and CTL function correlated with an enhanced resistance to Listeria infection in irradiated mice. We conclude from these data that CpG-ODNs trigger extramedullary hemopoiesis, and that this finding could be of therapeutic relevance in myelosuppression.

  12. Synthetic peptide monolayers: Probing structure, attachment, and hydration conduction with STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, David Joseph

    2000-10-01

    Although the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has been used in many studies of proteins and other biological molecules, the interpretation of the data has been hampered by a limited understanding of image contrast and tip-sample interactions. It has been recognized that adsorbed water can carry the currents necessary for STM imaging, and it has been speculated that the mechanism of charge transport is based on the exchange of protons along hydrogen-bonded networks. While a water film facilitates the imaging of proteins, it hampers efforts to use STM to probe the electronic structure of redox proteins. The physics of charge transfer in proteins and the intricacies of imaging large molecules with STM can be studied using synthetic proteins. A protein designed with engineerable electron transfer properties, a hydrophilic exterior and mechanisms for attachment to surfaces has been studied using both STM and fixed-electrode conductivity measurements. The effects of immobilization strategy on image quality were investigated by preparing monolayers using self-assembly, Langmuir-Blodgett and monolayer insertion techniques and imaging these films in both humid air and vacuum. The molecules were easily imaged in humid air due to the adsorbed water film, but dehydration in vacuum introduced a conductance gap which prevented the proteins from being imaged within a wide voltage range. The molecules were subjected to large forces when the tip scanned over them without retracting from the surface and peptides were displaced in ways which reflected the strength of their attachment to the surface. In the course of these studies, new STM imaging phenomena have been observed including meniscus-limited lateral resolution, and intermittent imaging of covalently attached molecules. The conductivity of protein films deposited between fixed electrodes depended strongly on hydration, and the experimental arrangement provides a platform for further study of the mechanism of conduction

  13. DETECTION OF COMPLEXES OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDES WITH POLYMERIC CARRIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Vlizlo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The new method for detection of cationic oligoelectrolytes conjugates with oligodeoxyonucleotides, based on free diffusion of these substances in 0.8% agarose gels is developed. It enables to simplify and reduce the cost of visual identification of the best carrier among various polymer compounds and to uncover the fact of complex formation between the interacting agents resulting in formation of a ring precipitation. The universality of the proposed methodological approach is confirmed by interaction of coligodeoxynucleotides with other cationic polymer of natural origin, namely chitosan. Comparative analysis of our approach applicationto turbidimetry data concerning coligodeoxynucleotides complexes and their electrophoresis showed some advantages, among them are the ability to screen simultaneously a large number of polymeric carriers and no need for using of more expensive equipment and materials. To conclude the complexing occurrence it is enough nanomol amounts of oligodeoxynucleotide.

  14. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection–based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization. PMID:26054766

  15. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-Ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection-based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization.

  16. Synthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Manferdini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally materials have been associated with a series of physical properties that can be used as inputs to production and manufacturing. Recently we witnessed an interest in materials considered not only as ‘true matter’, but also as new breeds where geometry, texture, tooling and finish are able to provoke new sensations when they are applied to a substance. These artificial materials can be described as synthetic because they are the outcome of various qualities that are not necessarily true to the original matter, but they are the combination of two or more parts, whether by design or by natural processes. The aim of this paper is to investigate the potential of architectural surfaces to produce effects through the invention of new breeds of artificial matter, using micro-scale details derived from Nature as an inspiration.

  17. DNA polymorphisms in the Sahiwal breed of Zebu cattle revealed by synthetic oligonucleotide probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shashikanth; Yadav, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    Genomic DNA of 15 randomly selected unrelated animals and from two sire families (11 animals) of the Sahiwal breed of Zebu cattle were investigated. Four oligonucleotide probes - (GTG) 5 , (TCC) 5 , (GT) 8 and (GT) 12 - were used on genomic DNA digested with restriction enzymes AluI, HinfI, MboI, EcoRI and HaeIII in different combinations. All four probes produced multiloci fingerprints with differing levels of polymorphisms. Total bands and shared bands in the fingerprints of each individual were in the range of 2.5 to 23.0 KB. Band number ranged from 9 to 17, with 0.48 average band sharing. Probes (GT) 8 , (GT) 12 and (TCC) 5 produced fingerprinting patterns of medium to low polymorphism, whereas probe (GTG) 5 produced highly polymorphic patterns. Probe (GTG) 5 in combination with the HaeIII enzyme was highly polymorphic with a heterozygosity level of 0.85, followed by (GT) 8 , (TCC) 5 and (GT) 12 with heterozygosity levels of 0.70, 0.65 and 0.30, respectively. Probe GTG 5 or its complementary sequence CAC 5 produced highly polymorphic fingerprints, indicating that the probe can be used for analysing population structure, parentage verification and identifying loci controlling quantitative traits and fertility status. (author)

  18. Volumetric Synthetic Aperture Imaging with a Piezoelectric 2-D Row-Column Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Engholm, Mathias; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann

    2016-01-01

    The synthetic aperture (SA) technique can be used for achieving real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D row-column addressed transducers. This paper investigates SA volumetric imaging performance of an in-house prototyped 3 MHz λ/2-pitch 62+62 element piezoelectric 2-D row-column addres......The synthetic aperture (SA) technique can be used for achieving real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D row-column addressed transducers. This paper investigates SA volumetric imaging performance of an in-house prototyped 3 MHz λ/2-pitch 62+62 element piezoelectric 2-D row...

  19. Probing multivalent interactions in a synthetic host-guest complex by dynamic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez Casado, A.; Dam, H.H.; Yilmaz, M.D.; Florea, D.; Florea, Daniel; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    Multivalency is present in many biological and synthetic systems. Successful application of multivalency depends on a correct understanding of the thermodynamics and kinetics of this phenomenon. In this Article, we address the stability and strength of multivalent bonds with force spectroscopy

  20. Enzyme-Free Detection of Mutations in Cancer DNA Using Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probes and Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miotke, Laura; Maity, Arindam; Ji, Hanlee

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rapid reliable diagnostics of DNA mutations are highly desirable in research and clinical assays. Current development in this field goes simultaneously in two directions: 1) high-throughput methods, and 2) portable assays. Non-enzymatic approaches are attractive for both types......) and finally, detection by fluorescence microscopy. The LNA containing probes display high binding affinity and specificity to DNA containing mutations, which allows for the detection of mutation abundance with an intercalating EvaGreen dye. We used a second probe, which increases the overall number of base...... pairs in order to produce a higher fluorescence signal by incorporating more dye molecules. Indeed we show here that using EvaGreen dye and LNA probes, genomic DNA containing BRAF V600E mutation could be detected by fluorescence microscopy at low femtomolar concentrations. Notably, this was at least...

  1. Direct production of mouse disease models by embryo microinjection of TALENs and oligodeoxynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefers, Benedikt; Meyer, Melanie; Ortiz, Oskar; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Hansen, Jens; Wurst, Wolfgang; Kühn, Ralf

    2013-03-05

    The study of genetic disease mechanisms relies mostly on targeted mouse mutants that are derived from engineered embryonic stem (ES) cells. Nevertheless, the establishment of mutant ES cells is laborious and time-consuming, restricting the study of the increasing number of human disease mutations discovered by high-throughput genomic analysis. Here, we present an advanced approach for the production of mouse disease models by microinjection of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides into one-cell embryos. Within 2 d of embryo injection, we created and corrected chocolate missense mutations in the small GTPase RAB38; a regulator of intracellular vesicle trafficking and phenotypic model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Because ES cell cultures and targeting vectors are not required, this technology enables instant germline modifications, making heterozygous mutants available within 18 wk. The key features of direct mutagenesis by TALENs and oligodeoxynucleotides, minimal effort and high speed, catalyze the generation of future in vivo models for the study of human disease mechanisms and interventions.

  2. Tracking developmentally regulated post-synthetic processing of homogalacturonan and chitin using reciprocal oligosaccharide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Kračun, Stjepan K.; Rydahl, Maja G.

    2014-01-01

    Polysaccharides are major components of extracellular matrices and are often extensively modified post-synthetically to suit local requirements and developmental programmes. However, our current understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics and functional significance of these modifications...... binding is mediated by the unique stereochemical arrangement of oppositely charged amino and carboxy groups. Conjugation of oligosaccharides to fluorophores or gold nanoparticles enables direct and rapid imaging of homogalacturonan and chitosan with unprecedented precision in diverse plant, fungal...

  3. Synthetic α-Conotoxin Mutants as Probes for Studying Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors and in the Development of Novel Drug Leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Armishaw

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available α-Conotoxins are peptide neurotoxins isolated from venomous marine cone snails that are potent and selective antagonists for different subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. As such, they are valuable probes for dissecting the role that nAChRs play in nervous system function. In recent years, extensive insight into the binding mechanisms of α-conotoxins with nAChRs at the molecular level has aided in the design of synthetic analogs with improved pharmacological properties. This review examines the structure-activity relationship studies involving α-conotoxins as research tools for studying nAChRs in the central and peripheral nervous systems and their use towards the development of novel therapeutics.

  4. In Situ Probing and Synthetic Control of Cationic Ordering in Ni-Rich Layered Oxide Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jianqing [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; School of Energy, College of Physics, Optoelectronics & Energy, Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 P. R. China; Zhang, Wei [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Huq, Ashfia [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Misture, Scott T. [Kazuo Inamori School of Engineering, Alfred University, Alfred NY 14802 USA; Zhang, Boliang [Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge LA 70803 USA; Guo, Shengmin [Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge LA 70803 USA; Wu, Lijun [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Zhu, Yimei [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Chen, Zonghai [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Pan, Feng [School of Advanced Materials, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Guangdong 518055 P. R. China; Bai, Jianming [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Wang, Feng [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA

    2016-10-17

    Ni-rich layered oxides (LiNi1-xMxO2; M = Co, Mn, ...) are appealing alternatives to conventional LiCoO2 as cathodes in Li-ion batteries for automobile and other large-scale applications due to their high theoretical capacity and low cost. However, preparing stoichiometric LiNi1-xMxO2 with ordered layer structure and high reversible capacity, has proven difficult due to cation mixing in octahedral sites. Herein, in situ studies of synthesis reactions and the associated structural ordering in preparing LiNiO2 and the Co-substituted variant, LiNi0.8Co0.2O2, are made, to gain insights into synthetic control of the structure and electrochemical properties of Ni-rich layered oxides. Results from this study indicate a direct transformation of the intermediate from the rock salt structure into hexagonal phase, and during the process, Co substitution facilities the nucleation of a Co-rich layered phase at low temperatures and subsequent growth and stabilization of solid solution Li(Ni, Co)O-2 upon further heat treatment. Optimal conditions are identified from the in situ studies and utilized to obtain stoichiometric LiNi0.8Co0.2O2 that exhibits high capacity (up to 200 mA h g(-1) ) with excellent retention. The findings shed light on designing high performance Ni-rich layered oxide cathodes through synthetic control of the structural ordering in the materials.

  5. GENETIC VARIATION IN RED RASPBERRIES (RUBUS IDAEUS L.; ROSACEAE) FROM SITES DIFFERING IN ORGANIC POLLUTANTS COMPARED WITH SYNTHETIC TANDEM REPEAT DNA PROBES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two synthetic tandem repetitive DNA probes were used to compare genetic variation at variable-number-tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci among Rubus idaeus L. var. strigosus (Michx.) Maxim. (Rosaceae) individuals sampled at eight sites contaminated by pollutants (N = 39) and eight adjacent...

  6. Detection of defects in electron-irradiated synthetic silica quartz probed by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watauchi, Satoshi; Uedono, Akira; Ujihira, Yusuke; Yoda, Osamu.

    1994-01-01

    Defects in amorphous SiO 2 films, formed on MOS(metal/oxide/semiconductor) devices as gates, perturb its operation. The positron annihilation techniques, were applied to the study of the annealing behavior of the defects, introduced in the high purity synthetic quartz glass by the irradiation of 3-MeV electrons up to the 1x10 18 e - /cm 2 dosage. It was proved that the positron annihilation techniques were sufficiently sensitive to detect the defects in the electron-irradiated silica glasses. Three types of open-space defects were detected by the positron lifetime measurements. These can be attributed to monovacancy or divacancy type defects, vacancy clusters, and open-volume defects. A high formation probability (∼90%) of positroniums(Ps) was found in unirradiated specimens. These Ps were considered to be formed in open-volume defects. The formation probability of Ps was drastically decreased by the electron irradiation. But the size of open-volume defects was kept unchanged by the irradiation. These facts suggest that vacancy-type defects were introduced by the electron irradiation and that positrons were trapped in these defects. By the isochronal annealing in nitrogen atmosphere, the lifetime component (τ 2 ) and its relative intensity (I 2 ), attributed to positrons trapped in monovacancy or divacancy type defects and annihilated there, changed remarkably. τ 2 was constant in the temperature range up to 300degC, getting slightly shorter between 300degC and 700degC, and constant above 700degC. I 2 decreased gradually up to 300degC, constant between 300degC and 550degC, decreased above 550degC, and constant above 700degC. This revealed that the behavior of the defects, in which positrons were trapped, change by the elevation of the annealing temperature. (author)

  7. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides are potent enhancers of radio- and chemoresponses of murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Kathryn A.; Neal, Robert; Hunter, Nancy; Ariga, Hisanori; Ang, Kian; Milas, Luka

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated cytosine-guanine (CpG) motifs bind to Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and stimulate both innate and adaptive immune reactions and possess anti-tumor activity. We recently reported that CpG ODN 1826 strongly enhances radioresponse of both immunogenic [Milas L, Mason K, Ariga H, et al. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide enhances tumor response to radiation. Cancer Res 2004;64:5074-7] and non-immunogenic [Mason KA, Ariga H, Neal R, et al. Targeting toll-like receptor-9 with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides enhances tumor response to fractionated radiotherapy. Clin Cancer Res 2005;11:361-9] murine tumors. Using two immunogenic murine tumors, a fibrosarcoma (FSa) and a mammary carcinoma (MCa-K), the present study explored whether CpG ODN 1826 also improves the response of murine tumors to the chemotherapeutic agent docetaxel (DOC). Materials and methods: CpG ODN 1826 (100 μg) was given sc three times: when leg tumors were 6 mm, when they grew to 8 mm and again 1 week later. DOC (33 mg/kg iv) and local tumor radiation (10 Gy) were given when tumors were 8 mm. Effects of the treatments were assayed by tumor growth delay, defined as days for tumors to grow from 8 to 12 mm in diameter. Results: Treatment with CpG ODN 1826 resulted in strongly enhanced response of FSa tumors to radiation and MCa-K tumors to the chemotherapeutic agent DOC. Enhancement of tumor treatment response was demonstrated by a strong prolongation in the primary tumor treatment endpoint, tumor growth delay. Coincidentally, this treatment also resulted in a higher rate of tumor cure than that observed after tumor radiotherapy or chemotherapy alone. When all three agents were combined the effect was comparable to that of the combination of CpG ODN 1826 with radiation in the case of FSa or of the combination of CpG ODN 1826 with DOC in the case of MCa-K. Conclusion: Overall results show that CpG ODN 1826 can markedly improve tumor response

  8. Increased detectability of somatic changes in the DNA from human tumours after probing with "synthetic" and "genome-derived" hypervariable multilocus probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagoda, P J; Seitz, G; Epplen, J T

    1989-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting with two minisatellite (33.15, M13) and two simple repeat probes [(GACA)4, (CAC)5/(GTG)s] was performed to screen for somatic changes in the DNA from various solid human tumours in comparison with constitutional DNA from the same patient. Loss of bands or changes in band...... intensities were observed. Together the probes 33.15 and (CAC)5/(GTG)5 detected deviating fingerprint patterns in 63% of the colorectal carcinomas investigated. In mammary and stomach carcinomas, only 1/11 and 2/11 tumours, respectively, showed differences with either of the three probes, 33.15, (GACA)4...

  9. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide nanomedicines for the prophylaxis or treatment of cancers, infectious diseases, and allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Unmethylated cytosine-guanine dinucleotide-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs), which are synthetic agonists of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), activate humoral and cellular immunity and are being developed as vaccine adjuvants to prevent or treat cancers, infectious diseases, and allergies. Free CpG ODNs have been used in many clinical trials implemented to verify their effects. However, recent research has reported that self-assembled CpG ODNs, protein/peptide-CpG ODN conjugates, and nanomaterial-CpG ODN complexes demonstrate higher adjuvant effects than free CpG ODNs, owing to their improved uptake efficiency into cells expressing TLR9. Moreover, protein/peptide-CpG ODN conjugates and nanomaterial-CpG ODN complexes are able to deliver CpG ODNs and antigens (or allergens) to the same types of cells, which enables a higher degree of prophylaxis or therapeutic effect. In this review, the author describes recent trends in the research and development of CpG ODN nanomedicines containing self-assembled CpG ODNs, protein/peptide-CpG ODN conjugates, and nanomaterial-CpG ODN complexes, focusing mainly on the results of preclinical and clinical studies.

  10. Biotinylation of Deoxyguanosine at the Abasic Site in Double-Stranded Oligodeoxynucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biotinylation of deoxyguanosine at an abasic site in double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides was studied. The biotinylation of deoxyguanosine is achieved by copper-catalyzed click reaction after the conjugation of the oligodeoxynucleotide with 2-oxohex-5-ynal. The biotinylation enables visualization of the biotinylated oligodeoxynucleotides by chemiluminescence on a nylon membrane. In order to investigate the biotinylated site, the biotinylated oligodeoxynucleotides were amplified by the DNA polymerase chain reaction. Replacement of guanine opposing the abasic site with adenine generated by the activity of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase of DNA polymerase was detected by DNA sequencing analysis and restriction endonuclease digestion. This study suggests that 2-oxohex-5-ynal may be useful for the detection of the unpaired deoxyguanosine endogenously generated at abasic sites in genomic DNA.

  11. Short hairpin-loop-structured oligodeoxynucleotides reduce HSV-1 replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Jochen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Herpes simplex virus (HSV is known as an infectious agent and widespread in the human population. The symptoms of HSV infections can range from mild to life threatening, especially in immune-compromised individuals. HSV infections are commonly treated with the guanosine analogue Aciclovir, but reports of resistance are increasing. Efforts are made to establish single-stranded antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (as and small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNAs for antiviral treatment. Recently, another class of short interfering nucleic acids, partially double-stranded hairpin loop-structured 54 mer oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs, was shown to allow hydrolysis of HIV RNA by binding to the viral RNA. This leads to a substrate for the viral RNase H. To assess the potential of such ODNs for inhibition of HSV-1 replication, five partially double-stranded ODNs were designed based on the sequences of known siRNAs against HSV-1 with antiviral activity. Three of them are directed against early and two against leaky late genes. Primary human lung fibroblasts, MRC-5, and African green monkey kidney cells, Vero, were transfected with ODNs and subsequently infected. The effect on HSV-1 replication was determined by analyzing the virus titer in cell culture supernatants by quantitative PCR and plaque assays. An inhibitory effect was observed with all five selected ODNs, with two cases showing statistical significance in both cell types. The observed effect was sequence-specific and dose dependent. In one case the ODN was more efficient than a previously described siRNA directed against the same target site in the mRNA of UL5, a component of the helicase/primase complex. HSV-1 virions and ODNs can be applied simultaneously without transfection reagent, but at a 50-fold higher concentration to Vero cells with similar efficiencies. The results underline the potential of partially double-stranded hairpin loop-structured ODNs as antiviral agents.

  12. Custom-Designed MLPA Using Multiple Short Synthetic Probes Application to Methylation Analysis of Five Promoter CpG Islands in Tumor and Urine Specimens from Patients with Bladder Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serizawa, R.R.; Ralfkiaer, U.; Dahl, C.

    2010-01-01

    this assay to analyze DNA from tumor tissue and corresponding urine samples from patients with bladder cancer. Our data show that the use of multiple short synthetic probes provides a simple means for custom-designed MS-MLPA analysis. (J Mol Diagn 2010, 12:402-408; DOI: 10.2353/jmoldx.2010.090152)......Ligation of two oligonucleotide probes hybridized adjacently to a DNA template has been widely used for detection of genome alterations. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique allows simultaneous screening of multiple target sequences in a single reaction by using......-stranded bacteriophage vector to introduce a sequence of defined length between the primer binding site and the specific target sequence. Here we demonstrate that differences in amplicon length can be achieved by using multiple short synthetic probes for each target sequence. When joined by a DNA ligase, these probes...

  13. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen

  14. Short hairpin-looped oligodeoxynucleotides reduce hepatitis C virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broecker Felix

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV is a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Standard therapy consists of a combination of interferon-alpha and ribavirin, but many patients respond poorly, especially those infected with HCV genotypes 1 and 4. Furthermore, standard therapy is associated with severe side-effects. Thus, alternative therapeutic approaches against HCV are needed. Findings Here, we studied the effect of a new class of antiviral agents against HCV, short, partially double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs, on viral replication. We targeted the 5’ nontranslated region (5’ NTR of the HCV genome that has previously been shown as effective target for small interfering RNAs (siRNAs in vitro. One of the investigated ODNs, ODN 320, significantly and efficiently reduced replication of HCV replicons in a sequence-, time- and dose-dependent manner. ODN 320 targets a genomic region highly conserved among different HCV genotypes and might thus be able to inhibit a broad range of genotypes and subtypes. Conclusions ODNs provide an additional approach for inhibition of HCV, might be superior to siRNAs in terms of stability and cellular delivery, and suitable against HCV resistant to standard therapy. This study underlines the potential of partially double-stranded ODNs as antiviral agents.

  15. Custom-Designed MLPA Using Multiple Short Synthetic Probes Application to Methylation Analysis of Five Promoter CpG Islands in Tumor and Urine Specimens from Patients with Bladder Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serizawa, R.R.; Ralfkiaer, U.; Dahl, C.

    2010-01-01

    Ligation of two oligonucleotide probes hybridized adjacently to a DNA template has been widely used for detection of genome alterations. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique allows simultaneous screening of multiple target sequences in a single reaction by using p...... this assay to analyze DNA from tumor tissue and corresponding urine samples from patients with bladder cancer. Our data show that the use of multiple short synthetic probes provides a simple means for custom-designed MS-MLPA analysis.......Ligation of two oligonucleotide probes hybridized adjacently to a DNA template has been widely used for detection of genome alterations. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique allows simultaneous screening of multiple target sequences in a single reaction by using......-stranded bacteriophage vector to introduce a sequence of defined length between the primer binding site and the specific target sequence. Here we demonstrate that differences in amplicon length can be achieved by using multiple short synthetic probes for each target sequence. When joined by a DNA ligase, these probes...

  16. An antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeted against the type IIβ regulatory subunit mRNA of protein kinase inhibits cAMP-induced differentiation in HL-60 leukemia cells without affecting phorbol ester effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortora, G.; Clair, T.; Cho-Chung, Y.S.

    1990-01-01

    The type II β regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (RII β ) has been hypothesized to play an important role in the growth inhibition and differentiation induced by site-selective cAMP analogs in human cancer cells, but direct proof of this function has been lacking. To address this tissue, HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells were exposed to RII β antisense synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide, and the effects on cAMP-induced growth regulation were examined. Exposure of these cells to RII β antisense oligodeoxynucleotide resulted in a decrease in cAMP analog-induced growth inhibition and differentiation without apparent effect on differentiation induced by phorbol esters. This loss in cAMP growth regulatory function correlated with a decrease in basal and induced levels of RII β protein. Exposure to RII β sense, RI α and RII α antisense, or irrelevant oligodeoxynucleotides had no such effect. These results show that the RII β regulatory subunit of protein kinase plays a critical role in the cAMP-induced growth regulation of HL-60 leukemia cells

  17. Custom-Designed MLPA Using Multiple Short Synthetic Probes Application to Methylation Analysis of Five Promoter CpG Islands in Tumor and Urine Specimens from Patients with Bladder Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serizawa, R.R.; Ralfkiaer, U.; Dahl, C.

    2010-01-01

    this assay to analyze DNA from tumor tissue and corresponding urine samples from patients with bladder cancer. Our data show that the use of multiple short synthetic probes provides a simple means for custom-designed MS-MLPA analysis. (J Mol Diagn 2010, 12:402-408; DOI: 10.2353/jmoldx.2010.090152)......Ligation of two oligonucleotide probes hybridized adjacently to a DNA template has been widely used for detection of genome alterations. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique allows simultaneous screening of multiple target sequences in a single reaction by using...... pairs of probes that carry tails for binding of common amplification primers. Resolution of the various targets is achieved by electrophoresis on the basis of pre-defined differences in amplicon length. In the conventional MLPA approach, one of the two target probes is generated by cloning in a single-stranded...

  18. Enantioselective skin permeation of ibuprofen enantiomers: mechanistic insights from ATR-FTIR and CLSM studies based on synthetic enantiomers as naphthalimide fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Qi-en; Quan, Peng; Mu, Mao; Zhang, Xinfu; Zhao, Hanqing; Zhang, Yu; You, Song; Xiao, Yi; Fang, Liang

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of different skin permeability of ibuprofen racemate and enantiomers. The percutaneous permeation of ibuprofen racemate and enantiomers through rabbit normal skin and damaged skin (without stratum corneum [SC]) was investigated in vitro using side-by-side diffusion cells. With the melting temperature-membrane transport model, the flux ratio of enantiomer/racemate was calculated from their thermodynamic properties obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) study was performed to evaluate the interaction between the enantiomers and the SC. New fluorescent probes were designed and utilized in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) study for visualization of the enantioselective permeation of the enantiomers through the intact rabbit skin. The flux of (S)-ibuprofen through normal skin was significantly higher than that of (RS)-ibuprofen and (R)-ibuprofen (p skin, there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). The predicted flux ratio of (S)-ibuprofen/(RS)-ibuprofen (2.50) was in close agreement with the experimentally determined ratio (2.48). These results were supported by ATR-FTIR and CLSM studies that indicated that a chiral environment of the skin led to the enantioselective permeation of enantiomers. The chiral nature of the SC and the different physicochemical properties of the enantiomers should be taken into account in the assessment of different skin permeability of the racemate and enantiomers. The synthetic fluorescent probes used in this study could visualize the enantioselective permeation of the chiral compounds across the skin.

  19. Hybridization with synthetic oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szostak, J.W.; Stiles, J.I.; Tye, B.K.; Sherman, F.; Wu, R.

    1978-01-01

    Procedures are described for the use of synthetic oligonucleotides for Southern blot experiments and gene bank screening, and the effect of various mismatches on the efficiency of hybridization is demonstrated. The following topics are discussed: sensitivity vs. specificity, hybridization of a 12-mer to the lambda endolysin gene; hybridization of oligonucleotide probes to the E. coli lac operator; hybridization of synthetic probes to the CYC1 gene of yeast; and cloning eucaryotic genes. (HLW)

  20. In situ hybridization of cytokine mRNA using alkaline phosphatase-labelled oligodeoxynucleotide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Bettina Hjelm; Fenger, Christina; Finsen, B.

    2013-01-01

    In situ hybridization is a powerful tool for visualizing cellular gene expression in morphologically preserved brain tissue giving precise information on the regional expression of specific mRNA sequences in cells of diverse phenotype. Here, we describe a sensitive, simple, and robust method using...

  1. Inhibitory effects of unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotides on MHC class I-deficient and -proficient HPV16-associated tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reiniš, Milan; Šímová, Jana; Bubeník, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 7 (2006), s. 1836-1842 ISSN 0020-7136 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA301/04/0492 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HPV16 * immunotherapy * CpG oligodeoxynucleotides Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.693, year: 2006

  2. Probing Framework-Restricted Metal Axial Ligation and Spin State Patterns in a Post-Synthetically Reduced Iron-Porphyrin-Based Metal–Organic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheryavy, Pavel; Lahanas, Nicole; Velasco, Ever; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Lockard, Jenny V.

    2016-04-07

    An iron porphyrin-based metal organic framework, PCN-222(Fe) is investigated upon post-synthetic reduction with piperidine. Fe K-edge X-ray absorption and Kβ mainline emission spectroscopy measurements reveal the local coor-dination geometry, oxidation and spin state changes experi-enced by the Fe sites upon reaction with this axially coordi-nating reducing agent. Analysis and fitting of these data con-firm the binding pattern predicted by a space filling model of the structurally constrained pore environments. These results are further support by UV-vis diffuse reflectance, IR and Raman spectroscopy data.

  3. Response of porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells to CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Søren; Verthelyi, D.; Klinman, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    -6, IL-12 and TNF-alpha. By screening a large panel (>100) of ODNs, the palindromic hexamer 'ATCGAT' was identified as being optimally active in all animals examined (N = 10). These findings are the first to establish the immunostimulatory activity of CpG ODN in pigs, and suggest that the therapeutic......Exposure to bacterial DNA generates a "danger signal" that stimulates cellular elements of the mammalian immune system to proliferate and/or secrete cytokines. Stimulation is critically dependent on hexameric motifs that contain an unmethylated CpG dinucleotide: these are commonly found...... in bacterial but not vertebrate DNA. Different motifs are optimally stimulatory in different species. This work examines whether oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing CpG motifs stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells from pigs. Results show that pigs respond to CpG ODN by proliferating and secreting IL...

  4. Intramuscular administration of a synthetic CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide modulates functional responses of neutrophils of neonatal foals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah D Cohen

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play an important role in protecting against infection. Foals have age-dependent deficiencies in neutrophil function that may contribute to their predisposition to infection. Thus, we investigated the ability of a CpG-ODN formulated with Emulsigen to modulate functional responses of neutrophils in neonatal foals. Eighteen foals were randomly assigned to receive either a CpG-ODN with Emulsigen (N = 9 or saline intramuscularly at ages 1 and 7 days. At ages 1, 3, 9, 14, and 28, blood was collected and neutrophils were isolated from each foal. Neutrophils were assessed for basal and Rhodococcus equi-stimulated mRNA expression of the cytokines interferon-γ (IFN-γ, interleukin (IL-4, IL-6, and IL-8 using real-time PCR, degranulation by quantifying the amount of β-D glucuronidase activity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation using flow cytometry. In vivo administration of the CpG-ODN formulation on days 1 and 7 resulted in significantly (P<0.05 increased IFN-γ mRNA expression by foal neutrophils on days 3, 9, and 14. Degranulation was significantly (P<0.05 lower for foals in the CpG-ODN-treated group than the control group at days 3 and 14, but not at other days. No effect of treatment on ROS generation was detected. These results indicate that CpG-ODN administration to foals might improve innate and adaptive immune responses that could protect foals against infectious diseases and possibly improve responses to vaccination.

  5. Synthetic peptides reproducing tissue transglutaminase-gliadin complex neo-epitopes as probes for antibody detection in celiac disease patients' sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pisa, Margherita; Pascarella, Simona; Scrima, Mario; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Real-Fernández, Feliciana; Chelli, Mario; Renzi, Daniela; Calabrò, Antonio; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Papini, Anna Maria; Rovero, Paolo

    2015-02-12

    Celiac disease (CD) patients usually present high levels of circulating IgA antibodies directed to different antigens, in particular tissue transglutaminase (tTG), gliadin (Glia), and endomysium. A series of synthetic peptide constructs containing cross-linked tTG and Glia deamidated peptides have been synthesized. Peptides were tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays against celiac disease patients' sera versus normal blood donors, and their conformational features were evaluated by molecular modeling techniques. Four peptides were recognized as epitopes by autoantibodies (IgG class) circulating in CD patients' sera before gluten-free diet. The peptide II, containing Ac-tTG(553-564)-NH2 sequence cross-linked with deamidated Ac-α2-Glia(63-71)-NH2, was able to identify specific disease antibodies with a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 94.4%. Structural conformations of the linear fragments Ac-tTG(553-564)-NH2 and Ac-α2-Glia(63-71)-NH2 and the corresponding cross-linked peptide II were calculated by molecular modeling. Results showed that cross-linking is determinant to assume conformations, which are not accessible to the linear fragments.

  6. Dengue-1 envelope protein domain III along with PELC and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides synergistically enhances immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yi Chiang

    Full Text Available The major weaknesses of subunit vaccines are their low immunogenicity and poor efficacy. Adjuvants can help to overcome some of these inherent defects with subunit vaccines. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of the newly developed water-in-oil-in-water multiphase emulsion system, termed PELC, in potentiating the protective capacity of dengue-1 envelope protein domain III. Unlike aluminum phosphate, dengue-1 envelope protein domain III formulated with PELC plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides induced neutralizing antibodies against dengue-1 virus and increased the splenocyte secretion of IFN-γ after in vitro re-stimulation. The induced antibodies contained both the IgG1 and IgG2a subclasses. A rapid anamnestic neutralizing antibody response against a live dengue virus challenge was elicited at week 26 after the first immunization. These results demonstrate that PELC plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides broaden the dengue-1 envelope protein domain III-specific immune responses. PELC plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides is a promising adjuvant for recombinant protein based vaccination against dengue virus.

  7. Systematic evaluation of oligodeoxynucleotide binding and hybridization to modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Anika; Hampel, Silke; Rieger, Christiane; Kunhardt, David; Schendel, Darja; Füssel, Susanne; Schwenzer, Bernd; Erdmann, Kati

    2017-07-17

    In addition to conventional chemotherapeutics, nucleic acid-based therapeutics like antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODN) represent a novel approach for the treatment of bladder cancer (BCa). An efficient delivery of AS-ODN to the urothelium and then into cancer cells might be achieved by the local application of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). In the present study, pristine MWCNT and MWCNT functionalized with hydrophilic moieties were synthesized and then investigated regarding their physicochemical characteristics, dispersibility, biocompatibility, cellular uptake and mucoadhesive properties. Finally, their binding capacity for AS-ODN via hybridization to carrier strand oligodeoxynucleotides (CS-ODN), which were either non-covalently adsorbed or covalently bound to the different MWCNT types, was evaluated. Pristine MWCNT were successfully functionalized with hydrophilic moieties (MWCNT-OH, -COOH, -NH 2 , -SH), which led to an improved dispersibility and an enhanced dispersion stability. A viability assay revealed that MWCNT-OH, MWCNT-NH 2 and MWCNT-SH were most biocompatible. All MWCNT were internalized by BCa cells, whereupon the highest uptake was observed for MWCNT-OH with 40% of the cells showing an engulfment. Furthermore, all types of MWCNT could adhere to the urothelium of explanted mouse bladders, but the amount of the covered urothelial area was with 2-7% rather low. As indicated by fluorescence measurements, it was possible to attach CS-ODN by adsorption and covalent binding to functionalized MWCNT. Adsorption of CS-ODN to pristine MWCNT, MWCNT-COOH and MWCNT-NH 2 as well as covalent coupling to MWCNT-NH 2 and MWCNT-SH resulted in the best binding capacity and stability. Subsequently, therapeutic AS-ODN could be hybridized to and reversibly released from the CS-ODN coupled via both strategies to the functionalized MWCNT. The release of AS-ODN at experimental conditions (80 °C, buffer) was most effective from CS-ODN adsorbed to MWCNT-OH and

  8. Double-stranded RNA transcribed from vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide acts as transcription factor decoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiao [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Gang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Department of Infectious Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710038, Shaanxi Province (China); Wang, Honghong [No. 518 Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Xi’an 710043, Shaanxi Province (China); Wang, Jiayin [The Genome Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63108 (United States); Zhao, Lina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Xu, Li, E-mail: lxuhelen@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Liu, Zhiguo, E-mail: liuzhiguo@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • A shRNA vector based transcription factor decoy, VB-ODN, was designed. • VB-ODN for NF-κB inhibited cell viability in HEK293 cells. • VB-ODN inhibited expression of downstream genes of target transcription factors. • VB-ODN may enhance nuclear entry ratio for its feasibility of virus production. - Abstract: In this study, we designed a short hairpin RNA vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide (VB-ODN) carrying transcription factor (TF) consensus sequence which could function as a decoy to block TF activity. Specifically, VB-ODN for Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) could inhibit cell viability and decrease downstream gene expression in HEK293 cells without affecting expression of NF-κB itself. The specific binding between VB-ODN produced double-stranded RNA and NF-κB was evidenced by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, similar VB-ODNs designed for three other TFs also inhibit their downstream gene expression but not that of themselves. Our study provides a new design of decoy for blocking TF activity.

  9. Employment of Oligodeoxynucleotide plus Interleukin-2 Improves Cytogenetic Analysis in Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Bardi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To compare the efficiency of novel mitogenic agents and traditional mitosis inductors, 18 patients with splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL were studied. Three cultures using oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN plus interleukin-2 (IL-2, or TPA, or LPS were setup in each patient. Seventeen/18 cases with ODN+IL2 had moderate/good proliferation (94,4% as compared with 10/18 cases with TPA and LPS (55% (P=.015; 14/18 (77,7% cases with ODN+IL2 had sufficient good quality of banding as compared with 8/18 cases (44,4% with TPA and LPS. The karyotype could be defined from ODN+IL2-stimulated cultures in all 18 patients, 14 of whom (77,7% had a cytogenetic aberration, whereas clonal aberrations could be documented in 9 and in 3 cases by stimulation with LPS and TPA, respectively. Recurrent chromosome aberrations in our series were represented by aberrations of chromosome 14q in 5 patients, by trisomy 12 and 7q deletion in 4 cases each, and by abnormalities involving 11q and 13q in two cases each. These findings show that stimulation with ODN+IL2 offers more mitotic figures of better quality and results in an increased rate of clonal aberrations in SMZL, making this method ideal for prospective studies aiming at the definition of the prognostic impact of cytogenetic aberrations in this disorder.

  10. Response of porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells to CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Søren; Verthelyi, D.; Klinman, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to bacterial DNA generates a "danger signal" that stimulates cellular elements of the mammalian immune system to proliferate and/or secrete cytokines. Stimulation is critically dependent on hexameric motifs that contain an unmethylated CpG dinucleotide: these are commonly found in bacter......Exposure to bacterial DNA generates a "danger signal" that stimulates cellular elements of the mammalian immune system to proliferate and/or secrete cytokines. Stimulation is critically dependent on hexameric motifs that contain an unmethylated CpG dinucleotide: these are commonly found...... in bacterial but not vertebrate DNA. Different motifs are optimally stimulatory in different species. This work examines whether oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing CpG motifs stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells from pigs. Results show that pigs respond to CpG ODN by proliferating and secreting IL......-6, IL-12 and TNF-alpha. By screening a large panel (>100) of ODNs, the palindromic hexamer 'ATCGAT' was identified as being optimally active in all animals examined (N = 10). These findings are the first to establish the immunostimulatory activity of CpG ODN in pigs, and suggest that the therapeutic...

  11. Oligodeoxynucleotide nanostructure formation in the presence of polypropyleneimine dendrimers and their uptake in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Alex M; Santhakumaran, Latha M; Nair, Sandhya K; Amenta, Peter S; Thomas, Thresia; He, Huixin; Thomas, T J

    2006-01-01

    We studied the efficacy of five generations of polypropyleneimine (PPI) dendrimer to provoke nanostructure formation from a 21-nucleotide antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN). Nanostructure formation was observed with all generations of dendrimer by light scattering and microscopic techniques. The efficacy of the dendrimers increased with generation number. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology of the structures at different condensation stages. Based on the observed nanostructures, we propose a zipping condensation mechanism, which is very different from the condensation pathways of high molecular weight DNA polymers. Electron microscopy showed the presence of toroidal nanoparticles. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that the nanostructures formed with G-4 and G-5 dendrimers could undergo facile cellular uptake in a breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, whereas nanostructures formed with G-1 to G-3 dendrimers lacked this ability. Nanoparticles formed with G-1 to G-3 dendrimers showed significantly lower zeta potential (5.2-6.5 mV) than those (12-18 mV) of particles formed with G-4 and G-5 dendrimers. These results show that the structure and charge density of the dendrimers are important in ODN nanoparticle formation and cellular transport and that G-4 and G-5 dendrimers are useful in cellular delivery of antisense ODN

  12. Double-stranded RNA transcribed from vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide acts as transcription factor decoy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Xiao; Gang, Yi; Wang, Honghong; Wang, Jiayin; Zhao, Lina; Xu, Li; Liu, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A shRNA vector based transcription factor decoy, VB-ODN, was designed. • VB-ODN for NF-κB inhibited cell viability in HEK293 cells. • VB-ODN inhibited expression of downstream genes of target transcription factors. • VB-ODN may enhance nuclear entry ratio for its feasibility of virus production. - Abstract: In this study, we designed a short hairpin RNA vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide (VB-ODN) carrying transcription factor (TF) consensus sequence which could function as a decoy to block TF activity. Specifically, VB-ODN for Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) could inhibit cell viability and decrease downstream gene expression in HEK293 cells without affecting expression of NF-κB itself. The specific binding between VB-ODN produced double-stranded RNA and NF-κB was evidenced by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, similar VB-ODNs designed for three other TFs also inhibit their downstream gene expression but not that of themselves. Our study provides a new design of decoy for blocking TF activity

  13. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as TLR9 agonists: therapeutic applications in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Yanal M; Clay, Timothy M

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are part of the innate immune system, and they belong to the pattern recognition receptors (PRR) family. The PRR family is designed to recognize and bind conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns, which are not generated by the host and are restricted and essential to micro-organisms. TLR9, which recognizes unmethylated CpG (cytosine guanosine dinucleotide), is a very promising target for therapeutic activation. Stimulation of TLR9 activates human plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B cells, and results in potent T helper-1 (T(h)1)-type immune responses and antitumor responses in mouse tumor models and in patients. Several pharmaceutical companies, such as Pfizer, Idera, and Dynavax, are developing CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) for the treatment of cancer, along with other conditions, such as infections and allergy. CpG ODNs have shown promising results as vaccine adjuvants and in combination with cancer immunotherapy. Several TLR9 agonists are being developed and have entered clinical trials to evaluate their safety and efficacy for the treatment of several hematopoietic and solid tumors. In this review, we discuss the use of CpG ODNs in several phase I and II clinical trials for the treatment of NHL, renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and non-small cell lung cancer, either alone or in combination with other agents.

  14. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  15. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  16. Synthetic Cannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslihan Okan Ibiloglu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic cannabinoids which is a subgroup of cannabinoids are commonly used for recreational drug use throughout the whole world. Although both marijuana and synthetic cannabinoids stimulate the same receptors, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2, studies have shown that synthetic cannabinoids are much more potent than marijuana. The longer use of synthetic cannabinoids can cause severe physical and psychological symptoms that might even result in death, similar to many known illicit drugs. Main treatment options mostly involve symptom management and supportive care. The aim of this article is to discuss clinical and pharmacological properties of the increasingly used synthetic cannabinoids. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2017; 9(3.000: 317-328

  17. [Effect of AP-1 decoy oligodeoxynucleotides on neonatal rat cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuang-lun; Wang, Jing-feng; Nie, Ru-qiong; Yuan, Wo-liang; Li, Fei; Lin, Mao-huan

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effects of AP-1 decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) on angiotensin II (AngII)-induced proliferation and collagen synthesis in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). The CFs of neonatal SD rats were cultured in serum-free medium for 24 h and stimulated with 10(-7) mol/L AngII in the presence of AP-1 decoy ODNs or mutational AP-1 decoy ODNs at varied concentrations. MTT assay was employed for quantitative evaluation of the CF proliferation. Collagen synthesis in the CFs was assessed with hydroxyproline, and the cell cycle distribution determined with flow cytometry (FCM). With the increase of the concentration of AP-1 decoy ODNs, the absorbance at 490 nm (OD490) of the CFs decreased gradually as shown by MTT assay. Treatment with 100 or 200 nmol/L AP-1 decoy ODNs resulted in significantly lowered OD490 of the CFs as compared with that of AngII group. The concentration of hydroxyproline increased significantly after treatment with 10(-7) mol/L AngII in comparison with the control group (P<0.05). Hydroxyproline concentration in cells treated with 100 or 200 nmol/L AP-1 decoy ODNs was significantly lower than that in the 10(-7) mol/L AngII-treated cells. AP-1 decoy ODNs decreased the cell percentage in S phase and increased hydroxyproline concentration, but increased the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase. AP-1 decoy ODNs at 100 and 200 nmol/L did not obviously affect AngII-induced CF proliferation and collagen synthesis (P<0.01). AP-1 decoy can inhibit AngII-induced rat CF proliferation and collagen synthesis possibly by affecting the cell cycle distribution.

  18. 5'-Phosphate oligodeoxynucleotides enhance the phosphodiester-CpG DNA-induced inflammatory response in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kiyota, Tsuyoshi; Uno, Shota; Toyota, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Rei; Narita, Miwako; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2011-02-01

    Dying cells release genomic DNA into the surroundings where the DNA is first degraded to oligodeoxynucleotides, then to nucleotides, nucleosides and so on. Given that the unmethylated CpG dinucleotide (CpG motif), which is characteristic of bacterial DNA, is also contained in mammalian DNA and has been reported to be involved in the exacerbation of DNA-associated autoimmune diseases, we investigated whether nucleotides and nucleosides affect immune responses to phosphodiester (PO)-CpG DNA. Addition of non-CpG DNA to RAW264.7, murine macrophage-like cells, induced no significant TNF-α production irrespective of treatment with DNase I; however, DNase I-treated, but not untreated, non-CpG DNA increased the PO-CpG DNA-mediated TNF-α production. This increase was not observed with phosphorothioate-CpG DNA or ligands for TLR3, TLR4 or TLR7. Deoxynucleotides with a 5'-phosphate showed similar effects to those of DNase I-treated non-CpG DNA, but DNase II-treated DNA or deoxynucleosides did not. Subcutaneous injection of PO-CpG DNA into the mouse footpad induced little swelling of the paw; however, significant swelling was observed when DNase I-treated DNA was co-injected with PO-CpG DNA. These results imply that PO-CpG DNA-dependent inflammatory responses are increased by DNA molecules with a 5'-phosphate; such molecules could therefore be considered as exacerbating factors for CpG motif-related inflammation. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. AP-1 Oligodeoxynucleotides Reduce Aortic Elastolysis in a Murine Model of Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Rawa; Zaradzki, Marcin; Remes, Anca; Seppelt, Philipp; Kunze, Reiner; Schröder, Hannes; Schwill, Simon; Ensminger, Stephan M; Robinson, Peter N; Karck, Matthias; Müller, Oliver J; Hecker, Markus; Wagner, Andreas H; Kallenbach, Klaus

    2017-12-15

    Marfan syndrome is characterized by high expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) associated with medial elastolysis and aortic root aneurysm. We aimed to reduce aortic elastolysis through decrease of MMP expression with decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (dODNs) neutralizing the transcription factor activating factor-1 (AP-1). AP-1 abundance in nuclear extracts as well as MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression were significantly increased in isolated mAoSMC of mgR/mgR Marfan mice compared to wild-type cells. Exposure to AP-1 neutralizing dODNs resulted in a significant reduction of basal and interleukin-1β-stimulated MMP expression and activity in mAoSMCs. Moreover, increased migration and formation of superoxide radical anions was substantially decreased in mAoSMCs by AP-1 dODN treatment. Aortic grafts from donor Marfan mice were treated with AP-1- dODN ex vivo and implanted as infrarenal aortic interposition grafts in mgR/mgR mice. Pretreatment of aortic grafts with AP-1 dODN led to reduced elastolysis, macrophage infiltration, and MMP activity. Permeability of the endothelial monolayer was increased for dODN in mgR/mgR aortae with observed loss of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin, enabling dODN to reach the tunica media. Targeting AP-1 activity offers a new potential strategy to treat the vascular phenotype associated with Marfan syndrome. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A nucleic acid probe labeled with desmethyl thiazole orange: a new type of hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligonucleotide for live-cell RNA imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sugizaki, Kaori; Yuki, Mizue; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Shuji; Sueoka, Takuma; Hayashi, Gosuke; Wang, Dan Ohtan

    2013-01-14

    A new fluorescent nucleotide with desmethyl thiazole orange dyes, D'(505), has been developed for expansion of the function of fluorescent probes for live-cell RNA imaging. The nucleoside unit of D'(505) for DNA autosynthesis was soluble in organic solvents, which made the preparation of nucleoside units and the reactions in the cycles of DNA synthesis more efficient. The dyes of D'(505)-containing oligodeoxynucleotide were protonated below pH 7 and the oligodeoxynucleotide exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission through the control of excitonic interactions of the dyes of D'(505). The simplified procedure and effective hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission produced multicolored hybridization-sensitive fluorescent probes, which were useful for live-cell RNA imaging. The acceptor-bleaching method gave us information on RNA in a specific cell among many living cells.

  1. Synthetic oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Synthetic lubricants are discussed by chemical class and their general strengths and weaknesses in terms of lubrication properties are analyzed. Comparative ratings are given for 14 chemical classes and are used as a guide for lubricant selection. The effects of chemical structure on the properties of the lubricant are described with special emphasis on thermal stability. The diversity of synthetic lubricants which is provided by the wide range of properties permits many applications, some of which are reported.

  2. Synthetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, George E.; Cain, Joel M.

    1996-02-01

    The Advanced Distributed Simulation (ADS) Synthetic Environments Program seeks to create robust virtual worlds from operational terrain and environmental data sources of sufficient fidelity and currency to interact with the real world. While some applications can be met by direct exploitation of standard digital terrain data, more demanding applications -- particularly those support operations 'close to the ground' -- are well-served by emerging capabilities for 'value-adding' by the user working with controlled imagery. For users to rigorously refine and exploit controlled imagery within functionally different workstations they must have a shared framework to allow interoperability within and between these environments in terms of passing image and object coordinates and other information using a variety of validated sensor models. The Synthetic Environments Program is now being expanded to address rapid construction of virtual worlds with research initiatives in digital mapping, softcopy workstations, and cartographic image understanding. The Synthetic Environments Program is also participating in a joint initiative for a sensor model applications programer's interface (API) to ensure that a common controlled imagery exploitation framework is available to all researchers, developers and users. This presentation provides an introduction to ADS and the associated requirements for synthetic environments to support synthetic theaters of war. It provides a technical rationale for exploring applications of image understanding technology to automated cartography in support of ADS and related programs benefitting from automated analysis of mapping, earth resources and reconnaissance imagery. And it provides an overview and status of the joint initiative for a sensor model API.

  3. Selection of effective antisense oligodeoxynucleotides with a green fluorescent protein-based assay. Discovery of selective and potent inhibitors of glutathione S-transferase Mu expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, P.A.; Rosema, B.S.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Manoharan, M.; van Berkel, T.J.; Biessen, E.A.; Bijsterbosch, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) are frequently used for the down-regulation of protein expression. Because the majority of potential antisense sequences lacks effectiveness, fast screening methods for the selection of effective AS-ODNs are needed. We describe a new cellular screening assay

  4. Selection of effective antisense oligodeoxynucleotides with a green fluorescent protein-based assay. Discovery of selective and potent inhibitors of glutathione S-transferase Mu expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, P.A.; Rosema, B.S.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Manoharan, M.; van Berkel, T.J.; Biessen, E.A.; Bijsterbosch, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) are frequently used for the down-regulation of protein expression. Because the majority of potential antisense sequences lacks effectiveness, fast screening methods for the selection of effective AS-ODNs are needed. We describe a new cellular screening assay

  5. Selection of effective antisense oligodeoxynucleotides with a green fluorescent protein-based assay. Discovery of selective and potent inhibitors of glutathione S-transferase Mu expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ’t Hoen, Peter a.C; Rosema, Bram-Sieben; Commandeur, Jan N M; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Manoharan, Muthiah; van Berkel, Theo J C; Biessen, Eric A L; Bijsterbosch, Martin K

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) are frequently used for the down-regulation of protein expression. Because the majority of potential antisense sequences lacks effectiveness, fast screening methods for the selection of effective AS-ODNs are needed. We describe a new cellular screening assay

  6. Synthetic Plant Defense Elicitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin eBektas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To defend themselves against invading pathogens plants utilize a complex regulatory network that coordinates extensive transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming. Although many of the key players of this immunity-associated network are known, the details of its topology and dynamics are still poorly understood. As an alternative to forward and reverse genetic studies, chemical genetics-related approaches based on bioactive small molecules have gained substantial popularity in the analysis of biological pathways and networks. Use of such molecular probes can allow researchers to access biological space that was previously inaccessible to genetic analyses due to gene redundancy or lethality of mutations. Synthetic elicitors are small drug like molecules that induce plant defense responses, but are distinct from known natural elicitors of plant immunity. While the discovery of the some synthetic elicitors had already been reported in the 1970s, recent breakthroughs in combinatorial chemical synthesis now allow for inexpensive high-throughput screens for bioactive plant defense-inducing compounds. Along with powerful reverse genetics tools and resources available for model plants and crop systems, comprehensive collections of new synthetic elicitors will likely allow plant scientists to study the intricacies of plant defense signaling pathways and networks in an unparalleled fashion. As synthetic elicitors can protect crops from diseases, without the need to be directly toxic for pathogenic organisms, they may also serve as promising alternatives to conventional biocidal pesticides, which often are harmful for the environment, farmers and consumers. Here we are discussing various types of synthetic elicitors that have been used for studies on the plant immune system, their modes-of-action as well as their application in crop protection.

  7. Synthetic Rutile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burastero, J.

    1975-01-01

    This work is about the laboratory scale investigation of the conditions in the rutile synthetic production from one me nita in Aguas Dulces reservoir. The iron mineral is chlorinated and volatilized selectively leaving a residue enriched in titanium dioxide which can be used as a substitute of rutile mineral

  8. Synthetic Cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Brooke; Yepes, Andres; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs), also known under the brand names of "Spice," "K2," "herbal incense," "Cloud 9," "Mojo" and many others, are becoming a large public health concern due not only to their increasing use but also to their unpredictable toxicity and abuse potential. There are many types of SCBs, each having a unique binding affinity for cannabinoid receptors. Although both Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and SCBs stimulate the same receptors, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), studies have shown that SCBs are associated with higher rates of toxicity and hospital admissions than is natural cannabis. This is likely due to SCBs being direct agonists of the cannabinoid receptors, whereas THC is a partial agonist. Furthermore, the different chemical structures of SCBs found in Spice or K2 may interact in unpredictable ways to elicit previously unknown, and the commercial products may have unknown contaminants. The largest group of users is men in their 20s who participate in polydrug use. The most common reported toxicities with SCB use based on studies using Texas Poison Control records are tachycardia, agitation and irritability, drowsiness, hallucinations, delusions, hypertension, nausea, confusion, dizziness, vertigo and chest pain. Acute kidney injury has also been strongly associated with SCB use. Treatment mostly involves symptom management and supportive care. More research is needed to identify which contaminants are typically found in synthetic marijuana and to understand the interactions between different SBCs to better predict adverse health outcomes.

  9. Visualizing Chemical Bonds in Synthetic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Laura C.; Ruth, Anthony; Green, David B.; Janko, Boldizsar; Gomes, Kenjiro K.

    The use of synthetic quantum systems makes it possible to study phenomena that cannot be probed by conventional experiments. We created synthetic molecules using atomic manipulation and directly imaged the chemical bonds using tunneling spectroscopy. These synthetic systems allow us to probe the structure and electronic properties of chemical bonds in molecules, including those that would be unstable in nature, with unprecedented detail. The experimental images of electronic states in our synthetic molecules show a remarkable match to the charge distribution predicted by density functional theory calculations. The statistical analysis of the spectroscopy of these molecules can be adapted in the future to quantify aromaticity, which has been difficult to quantify universally thus far due to vague definitions. We can also study anti-aromatic molecules which are unstable naturally, to illuminate the electronic consequences of antiaromaticity.

  10. Synthetic Botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian R; Pollak, Bernardo; Purswani, Nuri; Patron, Nicola; Haseloff, Jim

    2017-07-05

    Plants are attractive platforms for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. Plants' modular and plastic body plans, capacity for photosynthesis, extensive secondary metabolism, and agronomic systems for large-scale production make them ideal targets for genetic reprogramming. However, efforts in this area have been constrained by slow growth, long life cycles, the requirement for specialized facilities, a paucity of efficient tools for genetic manipulation, and the complexity of multicellularity. There is a need for better experimental and theoretical frameworks to understand the way genetic networks, cellular populations, and tissue-wide physical processes interact at different scales. We highlight new approaches to the DNA-based manipulation of plants and the use of advanced quantitative imaging techniques in simple plant models such as Marchantia polymorpha. These offer the prospects of improved understanding of plant dynamics and new approaches to rational engineering of plant traits. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Synthetic Brainbows

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Brainbow is a genetic engineering technique that randomly colorizes cells. Biological samples processed with this technique and imaged with confocal microscopy have distinctive colors for individual cells. Complex cellular structures can then be easily visualized. However, the complexity of the Brainbow technique limits its applications. In practice, most confocal microscopy scans use different florescence staining with typically at most three distinct cellular structures. These structures are often packed and obscure each other in rendered images making analysis difficult. In this paper, we leverage a process known as GPU framebuffer feedback loops to synthesize Brainbow-like images. In addition, we incorporate ID shuffing and Monte-Carlo sampling into our technique, so that it can be applied to single-channel confocal microscopy data. The synthesized Brainbow images are presented to domain experts with positive feedback. A user survey demonstrates that our synthetic Brainbow technique improves visualizations of volume data with complex structures for biologists.

  12. Selective reversible deuteriation of oligodeoxynucleotides: simplification of two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect NMR spectra assignment of a non-self-complementary dodecamer duplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brush, C.K.; Stone, M.P.; Harris, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides are reversibly deuteriated at the purine C8 and cytosine C5 positions with deuterioammonium bisulfite at pD 7.8. The exchange reaction is complete after 48 h at 65 0 C. When an oligomer deuteriated under these conditions is analyzed by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the purine H8 and cytosine H5 proton signals are selectively removed from the spectrum. A non-self-complementary oligodeoxynucleotide that has been deuteriated in this manner may be annealed with its complement and the resulting heteroduplex analyzed by two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOESY) spectroscopy. The intense cytosine H5-H6 cross-peaks are also removed from the spectrum of the deuteriated strand, which further simplifies interpretation since these strong cross-peaks often interfere with less intense NOE cross-peaks arising from dipolar coupling between purine H8 or pyrimidine H6 and deoxyribose anomeric protons. The resulting spectral simplification allows unambiguous assignments to be made on NOEs that otherwise may be difficult to distinguish. The deuteriation procedure is demonstrated with the sequence d(CGTTATAATGCG)-d(CGCATTATAACG), which has previously been assigned by traditional NOESY methods. Although the assignment of this dodecadeoxynucleotide may be completed without deuteriation, several NOEs must be assigned indirectly because of degeneracies in the chemical shift of the purine H8 protons. This methodology should have wide applicability to NMR spectral interpretation of oligodeoxynucleotides, particularly to oligonucleotides of 12 bases or longer

  13. Polyethyleneimine-functionalized boron nitride nanospheres as efficient carriers for enhancing the immunostimulatory effect of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang HJ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Huijie Zhang,1 Shini Feng,1 Ting Yan,1 Chunyi Zhi,2 Xiao-Dong Gao,1 Nobutaka Hanagata3,41The Key Laboratory of Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, School of Biotechnology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowlong, Hong Kong SAR, People’s Republic of China; 3Biomaterials Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, Ibaraki, Japan; 4Nanotechnology Innovation Station, National Institute for Materials Science, Ibaraki, JapanAbstract: CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, these molecules are promising therapeutic agents and vaccine adjuvants against various diseases. In this study, we developed a novel CpG ODNs delivery system based on polyethyleneimine (PEI-functionalized boron nitride nanospheres (BNNS. PEI was coated on the surface of BNNS via electrostatic interactions. The prepared BNNS–PEI complexes had positive zeta potential and exhibited enhanced dispersity and stability in aqueous solution. In vitro cytotoxicity assays revealed that the BNNS–PEI complexes with concentrations up to 100 µg/mL exhibited no obvious cytotoxicity. Furthermore, the positively charged surface of the BNNS–PEI complexes greatly improved the loading capacity and cellular uptake efficiency of CpG ODNs. Class B CpG ODNs loaded on the BNNS–PEI complexes enhanced the production of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α from peripheral blood mononuclear cells compared with CpG ODNs directly loaded on BNNS. Contrary to the free CpG ODNs or CpG ODNs directly loaded on BNNS, class B CpG ODNs loaded on the BNNS–PEI complexes induced interferon-α simultaneously. PEI coating may have changed the physical form of class B CpG ODNs on BNNS, which further affected their interaction with Toll-like receptor 9 and induced interferon

  14. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  15. Synthetic biology: an emerging engineering discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Allen A; Lu, Timothy K

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, synthetic biology has emerged as an engineering discipline for biological systems. Compared with other substrates, biology poses a unique set of engineering challenges resulting from an incomplete understanding of natural biological systems and tools for manipulating them. To address these challenges, synthetic biology is advancing from developing proof-of-concept designs to focusing on core platforms for rational and high-throughput biological engineering. These platforms span the entire biological design cycle, including DNA construction, parts libraries, computational design tools, and interfaces for manipulating and probing synthetic circuits. The development of these enabling technologies requires an engineering mindset to be applied to biology, with an emphasis on generalizable techniques in addition to application-specific designs. This review aims to discuss the progress and challenges in synthetic biology and to illustrate areas where synthetic biology may impact biomedical engineering and human health.

  16. The protein DIIIC-2, aggregated with a specific oligodeoxynucleotide and adjuvanted in alum, protects mice and monkeys against DENV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Lázaro; Marcos, Ernesto; Izquierdo, Alienys; Lazo, Laura; Valdés, Iris; Ambala, Peris; Ochola, Lucy; Hitler, Rikoi; Suzarte, Edith; Álvarez, Mayling; Kimiti, Prisilla; Ndung'u, James; Kariuki, Thomas; Guzmán, María Guadalupe; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported the ability of the chimeric protein DIIIC-2 (domain III of the dengue envelope protein fused to the capsid protein of dengue-2 virus), to induce immunity and protection in mice, when it is highly aggregated with a non-defined oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) and adjuvanted in alum. In this work, three different defined ODNs were studied as aggregating agents. Our results suggest that the nature of the ODN influences the capacity of protein DIIIC-2 to activate cell-mediated immunity in mice. Consequently, the ODN 39M was selected to perform further experiments in mice and nonhuman primates. Mice receiving the preparation 39M-DIIIC-2 were solidly protected against dengue virus (DENV) challenge. Moreover, monkeys immunized with the same preparation developed neutralizing antibodies, as measured by four different neutralization tests varying the virus strains and the cell lines used. Two of the immunized monkeys were completely protected against challenge, whereas the third animal had a single day of low-titer viremia. This is the first work describing the induction of short-term protection in monkeys by a formulation that is suitable for human use combining a recombinant protein from DENV with alum.

  17. Vaccination with Toxoplasma lysate antigen and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides: comparison of immune responses in intranasal versus intramuscular administrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Malky, Mohamed A; Al-Harthi, Saeed A; Mohamed, Raafat T; EL Bali, Mohamed A; Saudy, Niveen S

    2014-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is one of the most successful intracellular protozoan parasites on earth and highly prevalent in most warm-blooded vertebrates. There are no drugs that target the chronic cyst stage of this infection; therefore, development of an effective vaccine would be an important advance in disease control. Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) which contain immunostimulatory CG motifs (CpG ODN) can promote T-helper 1 (Th1) responses, an adjuvant activity that is desirable for vaccination against intracellular pathogen. In this study, we compare the immune responses of Toxoplasma susceptible C57BL/6 mice following intranasal and intramuscular vaccination with Toxoplasma lysate antigen (TLA) with or without CpG ODN as adjuvant. Immunized and control non-immunized mice were challenged with 85 cyst of the moderately virulent Beverley strain of T. gondii. Intranasal vaccination gave significantly a higher protection compared to other groups as indicated by prolonged survival and significantly reduced brain cyst burden (P intramuscular vaccination enhanced humoral immunity towards a type Th1 pattern characterized by a significant increase of specific IgG and Ig2a. Our results suggest that intranasal administration of CpG/TLA would provide a stable, pronounced, and effective vaccine against toxoplasmosis through stimulation of Th1 cellular immunity and mucosal IgA.

  18. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning.......A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...

  19. Counting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  20. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  1. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-loaded PAMAM dendrimer-coated magnetic nanoparticles promote apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi Pourianazar, Negar; Gunduz, Ufuk

    2016-03-01

    One major application of nanotechnology in cancer treatment involves designing nanoparticles to deliver drugs, oligonucleotides, and genes to cancer cells. Nanoparticles should be engineered so that they could target and destroy tumor cells with minimal damage to healthy tissues. This research aims to develop an appropriate and efficient nanocarrier, having the ability of interacting with and delivering CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODNs) to tumor cells. CpG-ODNs activate Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), which can generate a signal cascade for cell death. In our study, we utilized three-layer magnetic nanoparticles composed of a Fe3O4 magnetic core, an aminosilane (APTS) interlayer and a cationic poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer. This will be a novel targeted delivery system to enhance the accumulation of CpG-ODN molecules in tumor cells. The validation of CpG-ODN binding to DcMNPs was performed using agarose gel electrophoresis, UV-spectrophotometer, XPS analyses. Cytotoxicity of conjugates was assessed in MDA-MB231 and SKBR3 cancer cells based on cell viability by XTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Our results indicated that the synthesized DcMNPs having high positive charges on their surface could attach to CpG-ODN molecules via electrostatic means. These nanoparticles with the average sizes of 40±10nm bind to CpG-ODN molecules efficiently and induce cell death in MDA-MB231 and SKBR3 tumor cells and could be considered a suitable targeted delivery system for CpG-ODN in biomedical applications. The magnetic core of these nanoparticles represents a promising option for selective drug targeting as they can be concentrated and held in position by means of an external magnetic field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Nanostructure of polyplexes formed between cationic diblock copolymer and antisense oligodeoxynucleotide and its influence on cell transfection efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiubo; Pan, Fang; Zhang, ZhuoQi; Grant, Colin; Ma, YingHua; Armes, Steven P; Tang, YiQing; Lewis, Andrew L; Waigh, Thomas; Lu, Jian R

    2007-11-01

    Although various cationic polymers have been used to condense anionically charged DNA to improve their transfection efficiency, there is still a lack of fundamental understanding about how to control the nanostructure and charge of the polyplexes formed and how to relate such information to cell transfection efficiency. In this work, we have synthesized a weak cationic and phosphorylcholine-containing diblock copolymer and used it as a model vector to deliver an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) into HeLa cells. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to determine the copolymer/ODN polyplex structure. The SANS data revealed the formation of polyplex nanocylinders at high copolymer (N)/ODN (P) charge ratios, where N symbolizes the amine groups on the copolymer and P symbolizes the phosphate groups. However, the cylindrical lengths remained constant, indicating that the ODN binding over this region did not alter the cylindrical shape of the copolymer in solution. As the N/P ratio decreased and became close to unity the polyplex diameters remained constant, but their lengths increased substantially, suggesting the end-to-end bridging by ODN binding between copolymer cylinders. As the N/P ratios went below unity (with ODN in excess), the polyplex diameters increased substantially, indicating different ODN bridging to bundle the small polyplexes together. Transfection studies from HeLa cells indicated a steady increase in transfection efficiency with increasing cationic charge and decreasing polyplex size. Cell growth inhibition assay showed significant growth inhibition by the polyplexes coupled with weak cytotoxicity, indicating effective ODN delivery. While this study has confirmed the overall charge effect, it has also revealed progressive structural changes of the polyplexes against varying charge ratio, thereby providing useful insight into the mechanistic process behind the ODN delivery.

  3. oprM as a new target for reversion of multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Meng, Jingru; Jia, Min; Ma, Xue; He, Gonghao; Yu, Jichen; Wang, Rutao; Bai, Hui; Hou, Zheng; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2010-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA) is one of the leading Gram-negative organisms associated with nosocomial infections. The increasing frequency of MDR-PA has represented a huge challenge in conventional antibacterial therapy. The loss of effectiveness of commonly used antibiotics calls for the immediate need to develop an alternative strategy for combating MDR-PA infections. The multiantibiotic resistance of MDR-PA is largely attributable to the production of multidrug efflux pumps, MexAB-OprM. OprM forms the antibiotic-ejecting duct and plays a crucial role in exporting incoming chemotherapeutic agents across the membranes. Disruption of the OprM expression may inhibit the function of multidrug efflux pumps and lead to restoration of MDR-PA susceptibility to antibiotics. In this study, we developed a novel anion liposome for encapsulating and delivering specific anti-oprM phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (PS-ODN617) and polycation polyethylenimine (PEI) complexes. The additions of the encapsulated anti-oprM PS-ODN617/PEI to MDR-PA isolates caused a significant reduction of oprM expression and inhibition of MDR-PA growth in the presence of piperacillin in a concentration-dependent manner. The encapsulated PS-ODN617 treatment also reduced minimal inhibitory concentrations of five most commonly used antibiotics to the sensitive margin values on MDR-PA clinical isolates, respectively. The results of present study firstly indicate that PS-ODN targeted to oprM can significantly restore the susceptibility of MDR-PA to existing antibiotics, which appears to be a novel strategy for treating MDR-PA infections. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides Induce Differential Cytokine and Chemokine Gene Expression Profiles in Dapulian and Landrace Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiaqing; Yang, Dandan; Wang, Hui; Li, Chuanhao; Zeng, Yongqing; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides containing unmethylated CpG motifs (CpG ODN) mimic the immunostimulatory activity of microbial DNA by interacting with Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) to activate both the innate and adaptive immune responses in different species. However, few studies have been published to compare the effects of CpG ODN on different pig breeds. Therefore, in this study, whole blood gene expression profiles of DPL and Landrace pigs treated with CpG ODN were studied using RNA-seq technology. Five Hundred differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between the two breeds. DPL pigs had significantly higher number of immune-relevant DEGs than the Landrace pigs after CpG ODN treatment. Pathway analysis showed that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and chemokine signaling pathway were the major enriched pathways of the immune-relevant DEGs. Further in vitro experiments showed that PBMCs of the DPL pigs had significantly higher levels of TLR9 mRNA than those of the Landrace pigs, both before and after CpG ODN stimulation. Cytokine and chemokine induction in the PBMCs of both breeds were also measured after CpG ODN stimulation. Our data showed that mRNA levels of cytokines (IFNα, IL8, IL12 p40) and chemokines (CXCL9, CXCL13) were significantly higher in the PBMCs of the DPL pigs than those of the Landrace pigs. Taken together, our data provide new information regarding the pig breed difference in response to CpG ODN stimulation and that higher levels of TLR9 mRNA in DPL pigs may be a major contributor for disease resistance.

  5. The Effect of TLR9 Agonist CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides on the Intestinal Immune Response of Cobia (Rachycentron canadum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omkar Byadgi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytosine-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN motifs of bacterial DNA are recognized through toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 and are potent activators of innate immunity. However, the interaction between TLR9 and CpG ODN in aquatic species has not been well characterized. Hence, cobia TLR9 isoform B (RCTLR9B was cloned and its expression and induction in intestine were investigated. RCTLR9B cDNA consists of 3113bp encoding 1009 amino acids containing three regions, leucine rich repeats, transmembrane domain, and toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR domain. Intraperitoneal injection of CpG ODN 2395 upregulated RCTLR9 A and B and MyD88 and also induced the expressions of Mx, chemokine CC, and interleukin IL-1β. Cobia intraperitoneally injected with CpG ODN 1668 and 2395 had increased survival rates after challenge with Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida. In addition, formulation of CpG ODN with formalin-killed bacteria (FKB and aluminum hydroxide gel significantly increased expressions of RCTLR9 A (50 folds and B (30 folds isoforms at 10 dpi (CpG ODN 1668 and MyD88 (21 folds at 6 dpv (CpG ODN 2395. Subsequently, IL-1β increased at 6 dpv in 1668 group. No histopathological damage and inflammatory responses were observed in the injected cobia. Altogether, these results facilitate CpG ODNs as an adjuvant to increase bacterial disease resistance and efficacy of vaccines in cobia.

  6. Effects of intratracheal administration of nuclear factor-kappaB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides on long-term cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation and pathology in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yu-Tao; He, Bei; Wang, Yu-Zhu; Wang, Jing

    2009-01-01

    Abstract To determine if nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation may be a key factor in lung inflammation and respiratory dysfunction, we investigated whether NF-κB can be blocked by intratracheal administration of NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), and whether decoy ODN-mediated NF-κB inhibition can prevent smoke-induced lung inflammation, respiratory dysfunction, and improve pathological alteration in the small airways and lung parenchyma in the long-term smoke-induced mouse model syste...

  7. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Pollution Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  9. Probe specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    Specificity and complementarity of hadron and electron probes must be systematically developed to answer three questions currently asked in intermediate energy nuclear physics: what is nucleus structure at short distances, what is nature of short range correlations, what is three body force nature [fr

  10. Plant synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wusheng; Stewart, C Neal

    2015-05-01

    Plant synthetic biology is an emerging field that combines engineering principles with plant biology toward the design and production of new devices. This emerging field should play an important role in future agriculture for traditional crop improvement, but also in enabling novel bioproduction in plants. In this review we discuss the design cycles of synthetic biology as well as key engineering principles, genetic parts, and computational tools that can be utilized in plant synthetic biology. Some pioneering examples are offered as a demonstration of how synthetic biology can be used to modify plants for specific purposes. These include synthetic sensors, synthetic metabolic pathways, and synthetic genomes. We also speculate about the future of synthetic biology of plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthetic antifreeze peptide

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A synthetic antifreeze peptide and a synthetic gene coding for the antifreeze peptide have been produced. The antifreeze peptide has a greater number of repeating amino acid sequences than is present in the native antifreeze peptides from winter flounder upon which the synthetic antifreeze peptide was modeled. Each repeating amino acid sequence has two polar amino acid residues which are spaced a controlled distance apart so that the antifreeze peptide may inhibit ice formation. The synthetic...

  12. Emulsified nanoparticles containing inactivated influenza virus and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides critically influences the host immune responses in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsi Huang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Antigen sparing and cross-protective immunity are regarded as crucial in pandemic influenza vaccine development. Both targets can be achieved by adjuvantation strategy to elicit a robust and broadened immune response. We assessed the immunogenicity of an inactivated H5N1 whole-virion vaccine (A/Vietnam/1194/2004 NIBRG-14, clade 1 formulated with emulsified nanoparticles and investigated whether it can induce cross-clade protecting immunity.After formulation with PELC, a proprietary water-in-oil-in-water nanoemulsion comprising of bioresorbable polymer/Span(R85/squalene, inactivated virus was intramuscularly administered to mice in either one-dose or two-dose schedule. We found that the antigen-specific serum antibody responses elicited after two doses of non-adjuvanted vaccine were lower than those observed after a single dose of adjuvanted vaccine, PELC and the conventional alum adjuvant as well. Moreover, 5 microg HA of PELC-formulated inactivated virus were capable of inducing higher antibodies than those obtained from alum-adjuvanted vaccine. In single-dose study, we found that encapsulating inactivated virus into emulsified PELC nanoparticles could induce better antibody responses than those formulated with PELC-adsorbed vaccine. However, the potency was rather reduced when the inactivated virus and CpG (an immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide containing unmethylated cytosine-guanosine motifs were co-encapsulated within the emulsion. Finally, the mice who received PELC/CpG(adsorption-vaccine could easily and quickly reach 100% of seroprotection against a homologous virus strain and effective cross-protection against a heterologous virus strain (A/Whooper swan/Mongolia/244/2005, clade 2.2.Encapsulating inactivated H5N1 influenza virus and CpG into emulsified nanoparticles critically influences the humoral responses against pandemic influenza. These results demonstrated that the use of PELC could be as antigen-sparing in preparation for a

  13. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  14. Molecular Imaging Probe Development using Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Phung, Duy Linh; Girgis, Mark D.; Wu, Anna M.; Tomlinson, James S.; Shen, Clifton K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the latest advancement of microfluidics in molecular imaging probe development. Due to increasing needs for medical imaging, high demand for many types of molecular imaging probes will have to be met by exploiting novel chemistry/radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of suitable probes. The microfluidic-based probe synthesis is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional systems. Numerous chemical reactions have been successfully performed in micro-reactors and the results convincingly demonstrate with great benefits to aid synthetic procedures, such as purer products, higher yields, shorter reaction times compared to the corresponding batch/macroscale reactions, and more benign reaction conditions. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples of molecular imaging probe syntheses using microfluidics, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and their potential limitations are discussed here. PMID:22977436

  15. Mammalian synthetic biology for studying the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Melina; Xiang, Joy S; Smolke, Christina D

    2017-01-02

    Synthetic biology is advancing the design of genetic devices that enable the study of cellular and molecular biology in mammalian cells. These genetic devices use diverse regulatory mechanisms to both examine cellular processes and achieve precise and dynamic control of cellular phenotype. Synthetic biology tools provide novel functionality to complement the examination of natural cell systems, including engineered molecules with specific activities and model systems that mimic complex regulatory processes. Continued development of quantitative standards and computational tools will expand capacities to probe cellular mechanisms with genetic devices to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the cell. In this study, we review synthetic biology tools that are being applied to effectively investigate diverse cellular processes, regulatory networks, and multicellular interactions. We also discuss current challenges and future developments in the field that may transform the types of investigation possible in cell biology. © 2017 Mathur et al.

  16. [From synthetic biology to synthetic humankind].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouvel, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an historical survey of the expression "synthetic biology" in order to identify its main philosophical components. The result of the analysis is then used to investigate the meaning of the notion of "synthetic man". It is shown that both notions share a common philosophical background that can be summed up by the short but meaningful assertion: "biology is technology". The analysis allows us to distinguish two notions that are often confused in transhumanist literature: the notion of synthetic man and the notion of renewed man. The consequences of this crucial distinction are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthetic Cathinones ("Bath Salts")

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cathinones? Behavioral therapy can be used to treat addiction to synthetic cathinones. Examples include: cognitive-behavioral therapy contingency management, or motivational incentives—providing rewards to ...

  18. Quantum synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Jitrik, Oliverio; Uhlmann, Jeffrey; Venegas-Andraca, Salvador E.

    2017-05-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) uses sensor motion to generate finer spatial resolution of a given target area. In this paper we explore the theoretical potential of quantum synthetic aperture quantum radar (QSAR). We provide theoretical analysis and simulation results which suggest that QSAR can provide improved detection performance over classical SAR in the high-noise low-brightness regime.

  19. Designing synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapakis, Christina M

    2014-03-21

    Synthetic biology is frequently defined as the application of engineering design principles to biology. Such principles are intended to streamline the practice of biological engineering, to shorten the time required to design, build, and test synthetic gene networks. This streamlining of iterative design cycles can facilitate the future construction of biological systems for a range of applications in the production of fuels, foods, materials, and medicines. The promise of these potential applications as well as the emphasis on design has prompted critical reflection on synthetic biology from design theorists and practicing designers from many fields, who can bring valuable perspectives to the discipline. While interdisciplinary connections between biologists and engineers have built synthetic biology via the science and the technology of biology, interdisciplinary collaboration with artists, designers, and social theorists can provide insight on the connections between technology and society. Such collaborations can open up new avenues and new principles for research and design, as well as shed new light on the challenging context-dependence-both biological and social-that face living technologies at many scales. This review is inspired by the session titled "Design and Synthetic Biology: Connecting People and Technology" at Synthetic Biology 6.0 and covers a range of literature on design practice in synthetic biology and beyond. Critical engagement with how design is used to shape the discipline opens up new possibilities for how we might design the future of synthetic biology.

  20. Cyclodiphosphazanes as synthetic probes: PC/PN bond formation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phosphano-indoles were synthesized in a fairly straightforward route from the reaction of simple cyclodiphosphazanes [XP(-N-t-Bu)2PY] [X=Y=NH--Bu (1a); X=Y=NH-i-Pr (1b)] with o-aminophenyl functionalized propargyl alcohols. The reaction occurs via an allene intermediate formed by PIII-O-C→PV(O)-C ...

  1. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  2. Synthetic biological networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, Eric; Süel, Gürol M

    2013-01-01

    Despite their obvious relationship and overlap, the field of physics is blessed with many insightful laws, while such laws are sadly absent in biology. Here we aim to discuss how the rise of a more recent field known as synthetic biology may allow us to more directly test hypotheses regarding the possible design principles of natural biological networks and systems. In particular, this review focuses on synthetic gene regulatory networks engineered to perform specific functions or exhibit particular dynamic behaviors. Advances in synthetic biology may set the stage to uncover the relationship of potential biological principles to those developed in physics. (review article)

  3. Synthetic Base Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M.; Fotheringham, J. D.; Hoyes, T. J.; Mortier, R. M.; Orszulik, S. T.; Randles, S. J.; Stroud, P. M.

    The chemical nature and technology of the main synthetic lubricant base fluids is described, covering polyalphaolefins, alkylated aromatics, gas-to-liquid (GTL) base fluids, polybutenes, aliphatic diesters, polyolesters, polyalkylene glycols or PAGs and phosphate esters.Other synthetic lubricant base oils such as the silicones, borate esters, perfluoroethers and polyphenylene ethers are considered to have restricted applications due to either high cost or performance limitations and are not considered here.Each of the main synthetic base fluids is described for their chemical and physical properties, manufacture and production, their chemistry, key properties, applications and their implications when used in the environment.

  4. Synthetic Biological Membrane (SBM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ultimate goal of the Synthetic Biological Membrane project is to develop a new type of membrane that will enable the wastewater treatment system required on...

  5. Mammalian Synthetic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Martella, Andrea; Pollard, Steven M; Dai, Junbiao; Cai, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    The enabling technologies of synthetic biology are opening up new opportunities for engineering and enhancement of mammalian cells. This will stimulate diverse applications in many life science sectors such as regenerative medicine, development of biosensing cell lines, therapeutic protein production, and generation of new synthetic genetic regulatory circuits. Harnessing the full potential of these new engineering-based approaches requires the design and assembly of large DNA constructs-pote...

  6. Very high-accuracy calibration of radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, very high-accuracy calibration of the radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe is described. An open-ended waveguide near-field probe has been used in a recent measurement of the C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Antenna Subsystem for the Sentinel 1 mission of the Europ......In this paper, very high-accuracy calibration of the radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe is described. An open-ended waveguide near-field probe has been used in a recent measurement of the C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Antenna Subsystem for the Sentinel 1 mission...

  7. New treatment of periodontal diseases by using NF-kappaB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides via prevention of bone resorption and promotion of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hideo; Nakagami, Hironori; Morita, Shosuke; Tsukamoto, Ikuyo; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Nakagami, Futoshi; Shimosato, Takashi; Minobe, Noriko; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2009-09-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is involved in osteoclast differentiation and activation. Thus, the blockade of the NF-kappaB pathway might be a novel therapeutic strategy for treating bone metabolic diseases. Periodontitis is subgingival inflammation caused by bacterial infection; this disease also is thought to be a chronic focal point responsible for systemic diseases. In this study, NF-kappaB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) were topically applied for experimental periodontitis in a debris-accumulation model and wound healing in a bone-defect model of beagle dogs to investigate the effect of decoy ODN on bone metabolism. Application of NF-kappaB decoy ODN significantly reduced interleukin-6 activity in crevicular fluid and improved alveolar bone loss in the analysis of dental radiographs and DEXA. Direct measurement of exposed root that lost alveolar bone support revealed that NF-kappaB decoy treatment dramatically protected bone from loss. In a bone-defect model, NF-kappaB decoy ODN promoted the healing process as compared with control scrambled decoy in micro-CT analysis. Overall, inhibition of NF-kappaB by decoy strategy prevented the progression of bone loss in periodontitis and promoted the wound healing in bone defects through the inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption. Targeting of NF-kappaB might be a potential therapy in various bone metabolic diseases.

  8. Dual activity of phosphorothioate CpG oligodeoxynucleotides on HIV: reactivation of latent provirus and inhibition of productive infection in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Carsten; Ullrich, Anett; Lamla, Stefan; Dittmer, Ulf; Rethwilm, Axel; Koutsilieri, Eleni

    2006-12-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) bind to toll-like receptor-9 (TLR-9) and activate immune cells with antigen-presenting activity, including B cells and dendritic cells. Here we show that treatment of the latently human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected T cell line ACH-2 with the CpG ODNs 2006 or 2040 triggers activation of viral gene expression, demonstrating that CpG-signaling activity can also be found in T cells. The CpG ODNs g12AAC and g12GTC had no effect on virus reactivation. In contrast to the stimulating effects on viral gene expression in latently infected cells, CpG ODNs potently suppressed HIV replication in productively infected MT4 T cells or PBLs. Inhibition of virus replication was not related to the CpG motif but similarly occurred with non-CpG phosphorothioate (PTO)-ODNs. Thus, virus inhibition was likely caused by the PTO backbone of the CpG ODNs, probably by interfering with events prior to integration of the viral cDNA into the host genome. The ability of CpG PTO-ODNs to trigger reactivation of latent HIV in combination with their antiviral activity on productive infection makes this substance class an interesting candidate for further test to asses their potential as supplements in HIV therapy.

  9. Transcriptomic Insights into the Response of Placenta and Decidua Basalis to the CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide Stimulation in Non-Obese Diabetic Mice and Wild-Type Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Rui Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine infection is one of the most frequent causes of miscarriage. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN can mimic intrauterine infection. CpG ODN-induced embryo-resorption was observed consistently in the NK-cell deficient non-obese diabetic (NOD mice but not in the wild-type (WT mice. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of differential pregnancy outcomes, differentially expressed genes (DEGs in the placenta and decidua basalis was revealed by RNA-Seq with CpG ODN or control ODN treatment. Common DEGs in the WT and NOD mice were enriched in antimicrobial/antibacterial humoral responses that may be activated as a primary response to bacterial infection. The susceptibility to CpG ODN-induced embryo-resorption in the NOD mice might mainly be attributed to M1 macrophage polarization and the immunodeficient status, such as the down-regulation in antigen processing and presentation, allograft rejection, and natural killer cell mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast, the WT mice with normal immune systems could activate multiple immune responses and be resistant to CpG ODN-induced embryo-resorption, such as M2 macrophage differentiation and activation regulated by complement component C1q and peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR signaling pathways. Collectively, this study suggests that the immunodeficient status of NOD mice and the macrophage polarization regulated by C1q and PPAR signaling might be the basis for differential pregnancy outcomes between the NOD and WT mice.

  10. Human T-cell leukemia virus type I tax transformation is associated with increased uptake of oligodeoxynucleotides in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, I; Shinohara, T; Minor, T; Bibbs, L; Bilakovics, J; Nerenberg, M

    1992-12-25

    We have utilized antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to modulate transcriptional activation by the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) tax gene, the major transcriptional regulator of this virus. 3'-Terminal phosphorothioate-modified antisense ODNs were shown to efficiently inhibit Tax protein expression both in vitro and in vivo. Terminal substitution did not affect the affinity of ODNs for their target sequence but conferred a 9-fold increase in tax inhibition in vitro. When delivered into mice by intraperitoneal injection, ODNs inhibited tax expression in established tumors by 90%. Unmanipulated tax-transformed mouse fibroblasts, or HTLV-I-transformed human lymphocytes, showed at least 5-fold higher ODN binding and uptake over control cells. Balb/3T3 cell binding was induced to similar levels by cellular activators. This suggests that constitutive activation by tax transformation may increase susceptibility of HTLV-I-transformed cells to antisense therapy, providing a rationale for the use of antisense ODN therapeutics in HTLV-I-associated diseases.

  11. Effect of cisplatin and c-myb antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides combination on a human colon carcinoma cell line in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bufalo, D.; Cucco, C.; Leonetti, C.; Citro, G.; D'Agnano, I.; Benassi, M.; Geiser, T.; Zon, G.; Calabretta, B.; Zupi, G.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the effect of c-myb antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides [(S)ODNs] and cisplatin (CDDP) combination on the human colon carcinoma cell line LoVo Dx both in vitro and in nude mice bearing LoVo Dx solid tumour. We show that antisense (S)ODN treatment decreases c-myb mRNA and protein expression, induces growth arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, and inhibits cell proliferation. In vivo treatment with c-myb antisense (S)ODNs results in a reduction in tumour growth. A greater inhibition of cell proliferation in vitro and a higher increase of tumour growth inhibition and growth delay in vivo were obtained with the combination of (S)ODNs and CDDP than when the two agents were administered separately. This comparative study, using the same tumour cell line in vitro and in vivo, suggests that c-myb antisense (S)ODNs might be useful in the therapy of colon cancer in combination with antineoplastic drugs. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:8695353

  12. THE ORNL ATOM PROBE

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, M.

    1986-01-01

    The ORNL Atom Probe is a microanalytical tool for studies in materials science. The instrument is a combination of a customized version of the vacuum system of the VG FIM-100 atom probe, an ORNL-designed microcomputer-controlled digital timing system, and a double curved CEMA Imaging Atom Probe detector. The atom probe combines four instruments into one - namely a field ion microscope, an energy compensated time-of-flight mass spectrometer, an imaging atom probe, and a pulsed laser atom probe.

  13. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  14. Synthetic guide star generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Stephen A [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  15. Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2008-01-01

    A synthetic aperture focusing (SAF) technique denoted Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) suitable for 2D and 3D imaging is presented. The technique differ from prior art of SAF in the sense that SAF is performed on pre-beamformed data contrary to channel data. The objective...... is stored. The second stage applies the focused image lines from the first stage as input data. The SASB method has been investigated using simulations in Field II and by off-line processing of data acquired with a commercial scanner. The performance of SASB with a static image object is compared with DRF...

  16. What Are Synthetic Cannabinoids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... market and are intended to produce the same effects as illegal drugs. Some of these substances may have been around for years but have reentered the market in altered chemical forms, or due to renewed popularity. False Advertising Synthetic cannabinoid products are often labeled "not for ...

  17. Towards a synthetic chloroplast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Agapakis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of eukaryotic cells is widely agreed to have proceeded through a series of endosymbiotic events between larger cells and proteobacteria or cyanobacteria, leading to the formation of mitochondria or chloroplasts, respectively. Engineered endosymbiotic relationships between different species of cells are a valuable tool for synthetic biology, where engineered pathways based on two species could take advantage of the unique abilities of each mutualistic partner.We explored the possibility of using the photosynthetic bacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 as a platform for studying evolutionary dynamics and for designing two-species synthetic biological systems. We observed that the cyanobacteria were relatively harmless to eukaryotic host cells compared to Escherichia coli when injected into the embryos of zebrafish, Danio rerio, or taken up by mammalian macrophages. In addition, when engineered with invasin from Yersinia pestis and listeriolysin O from Listeria monocytogenes, S. elongatus was able to invade cultured mammalian cells and divide inside macrophages.Our results show that it is possible to engineer photosynthetic bacteria to invade the cytoplasm of mammalian cells for further engineering and applications in synthetic biology. Engineered invasive but non-pathogenic or immunogenic photosynthetic bacteria have great potential as synthetic biological devices.

  18. Synthetic Metabolic Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    topics, lists of the necessary materials and reagents, step-by-step, readily reproducible laboratory protocols, and tips on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls. Authoritative and practical, Synthetic Metabolic Pathways: Methods and Protocols aims to ensure successful results in the further study...

  19. Synthetic growth reference charts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanussen, Michael; Stec, Karol; Aßmann, Christian; Meigen, Christof; Van Buuren, Stef

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To reanalyze the between-population variance in height, weight, and body mass index (BMI), and to provide a globally applicable technique for generating synthetic growth reference charts. Methods: Using a baseline set of 196 female and 197 male growth studies published since 1831, common

  20. A formidable synthetic challenge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Isolation and characterization of maoecrystal V, a C19 terpenoid, having potent and selective cytotoxicity towards HeLa cells was recently reported. Unusually complex pentacyclic molecular structure, presence of spirofused rings and several stereogenic centres posed a great synthetic challenge. In this short review, efforts ...

  1. Synthetic antiferromagnetic spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duine, R. A.; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Stiles, M. D.

    2018-03-01

    Spintronic and nanomagnetic devices often derive their functionality from layers of different materials and the interfaces between them. We discuss the opportunities that arise from synthetic antiferromagnets consisting of two or more ferromagnetic layers that are separated by metallic spacers or tunnel barriers and have antiparallel magnetizations.

  2. Synthetic antifreeze peptide and synthetic gene coding for its production

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A synthetic antifreeze peptide and a synthetic gene coding for the antifreeze peptide have been produced. The antifreeze peptide has a greater number of repeating amino acid sequences than is present in the native antifreeze peptides from winter flounder upon which the synthetic antifreeze peptide was modeled. Each repeating amino acid sequence has two polar amino acid residues which are spaced a controlled distance apart so that the antifreeze peptide may inhibit ice formation. The synthetic...

  3. Electrical resistivity probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  4. A palindromic CpG-containing phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotide as a mucosal adjuvant stimulates plasmacytoid dendritic cell-mediated T(H1 immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Maeyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs, resembling bacterial DNA, are currently tested in clinical trials as vaccine adjuvants. They have the nuclease-resistant phosphorothioate bond; the immune responses elicited differ according to the CpG ODN sequence and vaccination method. To develop a CpG ODN that can induce plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC-mediated T(H1 immunity through the mucosa, we constructed phosphodiester G9.1 comprising one palindromic CpG motif with unique polyguanosine-runs that allows degradation similar to naturally occurring bacterial DNA. METHODS: T(H1 and T(H2 immunity activation was evaluated by cytokine production pattern and T-bet/GATA-3 ratio in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mouse bone marrow cells. Adjuvanticity was evaluated in mice administered G9.1 with diphtheria toxoid (DT through nasal vaccination. RESULTS: G9.1 exhibited stronger IFN-α-inducing activity than A-class CpG ODN2216 and increased T-bet/GATA-3 ratio by enhancing T-bet expression. Nasally administered G9.1 plus DT induced DT-specific mucosal IgA and serum IgG, but not IgE, responses with antitoxin activity in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, possibly due to IFN/BAFF production. Induction of T(H1, but not T(H2-type Abs depended completely on pDCs, the first in vivo demonstration by CpG ODNs. CONCLUSIONS: G9.1 is a promising mucosal adjuvant for induction of pDC-mediated T(H1 immunity.

  5. Coinjection with CpG-Containing Immunostimulatory Oligodeoxynucleotides Reduces the Pathogenicity of a Live Vaccine against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis but Maintains Its Potency and Durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Susana; Tabbara, Khaled; Belkaid, Yasmine; Bertholet, Sylvie; Verthelyi, Daniela; Klinman, Dennis; Seder, Robert A.; Sacks, David L.

    2003-01-01

    The inoculation of live, nonattenuated Leishmania major to produce a lesion in a selected site that heals, referred to as leishmanization, is to date the only vaccine against leishmaniasis that has proven to be effective in humans. Its use has been restricted or abandoned entirely, however, due to safety concerns. In an attempt to develop a leishmanization protocol that minimizes pathology while maintaining long-term protection, live parasites were coinjected with CpG-containing immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) alone or in combination with whole-cell lysates of heat-killed L. major promastigotes bound to alum (ALM). C57BL/6 mice infected intradermally by using L. major plus CpG ODN with or without ALM developed few or no dermal lesions and showed an early containment of parasite growth, while mice infected with L. major with or without ALM developed sizable dermal lesions that required up to 10 weeks to heal. The CpG ODNs provoked a transient inflammation that included an early recruitment and accumulation of gamma interferon-producing CD4+ lymphocytes in the site. Attenuation of the live vaccine did not compromise its ability to confer long-term immunity, as mice receiving L. major and CpG ODN plus ALM were totally protected against reinfection with L. major for up to 6 months. By comparison, the immunity elicited by two efficient nonlive vaccines began to wane by 6 months. Our results suggest that immune modulation using CpG ODNs might be a practical approach to improving the safety of a highly effective live vaccine that has already been widely applied. PMID:12933855

  6. In vitro and in vivo reversal of multidrug resistance in a human leukemia-resistant cell line by mdr1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucco, C; Calabretta, B

    1996-10-01

    A major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) by tumor cells. Overexpression of the mdrl gene product P-glycoprotein (P-170) is characteristic of such cells. In this study, in vitro and in vivo reversion of MDR was attempted in a human leukemia cell line resistant to vincristine (HL-60/Vinc) using an 18-mer mdr1 antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide ([S]ODN) in combination with vincristine. As control of sequence specificity, both sense and scrambled [S]ODNs were used. The ability of these [S]ODNs to reverse MDR was studied in vitro and in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. In vitro treatment with antisense [S]ODNs restored vincristine sensitivity of HL-60/Vinc cells, whereas no changes in drug sensitivity were observed upon treatment with the sense or scrambled sequence. The in vitro effects correlated with inhibition of P-170 expression in HL-60/Vinc cells exposed to the mdr1 antisense [S]ODNs. In vivo reversal of MDR was obtained in SCID mice given injections of HL-60/Vinc cells and systemically treated with [S]ODNs plus vincristine, as indicated by a significantly prolonged survival of SCID mice that received the combination therapy of mdr1 antisense [S]ODNs + vincristine. Treatments with mdr1 antisense or scrambled [S]ODNs, vincristine, or scrambled [S]ODNs + vincristine had no effect on survival. These results suggest that the use of mdr1 antisense ODNs in combination with standard antineoplastic drugs might be useful in reversing MDR in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Standardization in synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Kristian M; Arndt, Katja M

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic Biology is founded on the idea that complex biological systems are built most effectively when the task is divided in abstracted layers and all required components are readily available and well-described. This requires interdisciplinary collaboration at several levels and a common understanding of the functioning of each component. Standardization of the physical composition and the description of each part is required as well as a controlled vocabulary to aid design and ensure interoperability. Here, we describe standardization initiatives from several disciplines, which can contribute to Synthetic Biology. We provide examples of the concerted standardization efforts of the BioBricks Foundation comprising the request for comments (RFC) and the Registry of Standardized Biological parts as well as the international Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition.

  8. Optical synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilovitsh, Asaf; Zach, Shlomo; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2013-06-01

    A method is proposed for increasing the resolution of an object and overcoming the diffraction limit of an optical system installed on top of a moving imaging system, such as an airborne platform or satellite. The resolution improvement is obtained via a two-step process. First, three low resolution differently defocused images are captured and the optical phase is retrieved using an improved iterative Gershberg-Saxton based algorithm. The phase retrieval allows numerical back propagation of the field to the aperture plane. Second, the imaging system is shifted and the first step is repeated. The obtained optical fields at the aperture plane are combined and a synthetically increased lens aperture is generated along the direction of movement, yielding higher imaging resolution. The method resembles a well-known approach from the microwave regime called the synthetic aperture radar in which the antenna size is synthetically increased along the platform propagation direction. The proposed method is demonstrated via Matlab simulation as well as through laboratory experiment.

  9. Bubble shape and orientation determination with a four-point optical fibre probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guet, S.; Luther, S.; Ooms, G.

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new method to estimate the aspect ratio and orientation of bubbles by using their time series obtained with a four-point optical-fibre probe. The feasibility and accuracy of the method was first analysed by using synthetic bubble–probe interaction data and single bubble experiments in

  10. Synthetic cannabis and respiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinwala, Felecia N; Gupta, Mayank

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, synthetic cannabis use has been increasing in appeal among adolescents, and its use is now at a 30 year peak among high school seniors. The constituents of synthetic cannabis are difficult to monitor, given the drug's easy accessibility. Currently, 40 U.S. states have banned the distribution and use of some known synthetic cannabinoids, and have included these drugs in the Schedule I category. The depressive respiratory effect in humans caused by synthetic cannabis inhalation has not been thoroughly investigated in the medical literature. We are the first to report, to our knowledge, two cases of self-reported synthetic cannabis use leading to respiratory depression and necessary intubation.

  11. High temperature probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  12. Microneurosurgical water probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogády, P; Wurm, G

    2005-04-01

    When constructing the micro-neurosurgical water ball probe, the authors have simply combined the properties of a ball probe with an irrigational function and the supportive role of water current to form a new irrigating ball dissector. The micro-instrument has an outlet mechanism with which the surgeon can regulate the flow of physiological solution into the operational field. Its point has the properties of a ball probe, and the overall bayonet shape facilitates surgical interventions in deep tissues under microscopic control. The water probe therefore enables the surgeon to perform precise mechanical preparation supported by a regulated current of water and a targeted irrigation in the operational field. The physiological solution in the pressure infusion cuff is under minimal pressure and directly connected to the probe. Due to the fact that one device can be used for various purposes the water ball probe represents an advantageous alternative to conventional micro-neurosurgical preparation.

  13. Implementation of real-time duplex synthetic aperture ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Larsen, Lee; Kjeldsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a real-time duplex synthetic aperture imaging system, implemented on a commercially available tablet. This includes real-time wireless reception of ultrasound signals and GPU processing for B-mode and Color Flow Imaging (CFM). The objective of the work is to investigate the im...... and that the required bandwidth between the probe and processing unit is within the current Wi-Fi standards....

  14. Adsorption of polar aromatic hydrocarbons on synthetic calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lene; Grahl-Madsen, Laila; Grøn, Christian

    1996-01-01

    The wettability of hydrocarbon reservoirs depends on how and to what extent the organic compounds are adsorbed onto the surfaces of calcite, quartz and clay. A model system of synthetic call cite, cyclohexane and the three probe molecules: benzoic acid, benzyl alcohol and benzylamine, have been...... of magnitude of Delta G degrees for the adsorption process implies the formation of a strong bond between the calcite surface and the adsorbate molecules. Copyright (C) 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  15. Evaluation of synthetic linear motor-molecule actuation energetics

    OpenAIRE

    Brough, Branden; Northrop, Brian H.; Schmidt, Jacob J.; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Houk, Kendall N.; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2006-01-01

    By applying atomic force microscope (AFM)-based force spectroscopy together with computational modeling in the form of molecular force-field simulations, we have determined quantitatively the actuation energetics of a synthetic motor-molecule. This multidisciplinary approach was performed on specifically designed, bistable, redox-controllable [2]rotaxanes to probe the steric and electrostatic interactions that dictate their mechanical switching at the single-molecule level. The fusion of expe...

  16. Synthetic cannabinoids revealing adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, Avi; Benninger, Felix; Djaldetti, Ruth

    2016-02-01

    We report a 41-year-old man who presented with a first generalized tonic-clonic seizure after recent consumption of a synthetic cannabinoid. MRI showed extensive bilateral, mainly frontal, white matter lesions. Blood analysis for very long chain fatty acids was compatible with adrenoleukodystrophy, and a missense mutation in the ABCD1 gene confirmed the diagnosis. We hypothesize that cannabinoid use might have contributed to metabolic decompensation with subacute worsening of the underlying condition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CASH vs. SYNTHETIC CDOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviu Eduard Dinca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, in the recent post-crisis aftermath, global asset managers are constantly searching new ways to optimize their investment portfolios while financial and banking institutions around the world are exploring new alternatives to better secure their financing and refinancing demands altogether with the enhancement of their risk management capabilities. We will exhibit herewith a comparison between the true-sale and synthetic CDO securitizations as financial markets-based funding, investment and risks mitigation techniques, highlighting certain key structuring and implementation specifics on each of them.

  18. Synthetic collective intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Ricard; Amor, Daniel R; Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Conde-Pueyo, Núria; Carbonell-Ballestero, Max; Montañez, Raúl

    2016-10-01

    Intelligent systems have emerged in our biosphere in different contexts and achieving different levels of complexity. The requirement of communication in a social context has been in all cases a determinant. The human brain, probably co-evolving with language, is an exceedingly successful example. Similarly, social insects complex collective decisions emerge from information exchanges between many agents. The difference is that such processing is obtained out of a limited individual cognitive power. Computational models and embodied versions using non-living systems, particularly involving robot swarms, have been used to explore the potentiality of collective intelligence. Here we suggest a novel approach to the problem grounded in the genetic engineering of unicellular systems, which can be modified in order to interact, store memories or adapt to external stimuli in collective ways. What we label as Synthetic Swarm Intelligence defines a parallel approach to the evolution of computation and swarm intelligence and allows to explore potential embodied scenarios for decision making at the microscale. Here, we consider several relevant examples of collective intelligence and their synthetic organism counterparts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Oligodeoxynucleotides Can Transiently Up- and Downregulate CHS Gene Expression in Flax by Changing DNA Methylation in a Sequence-Specific Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Dzialo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chalcone synthase (CHS has been recognized as an essential enzyme in the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway. Apart from the leading role in the production of phenolic compounds with many valuable biological activities beneficial to biomedicine, CHS is well appreciated in science. Genetic engineering greatly facilitates expanding knowledge on the function and genetics of CHS in plants. The CHS gene is one of the most intensively studied genes in flax. In our study, we investigated engineering of the CHS gene through genetic and epigenetic approaches. Considering the numerous restrictions concerning the application of genetically modified (GM crops, the main purpose of this research was optimization of the plant's modulation via epigenetics. In our study, plants modified through two methods were compared: a widely popular agrotransformation and a relatively recent oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN strategy. It was recently highlighted that the ODN technique can be a rapid and time-serving antecedent in quick analysis of gene function before taking vector-mediated transformation. In order to understand the molecular background of epigenetic variation in more detail and evaluate the use of ODNs as a tool for predictable and stable gene engineering, we concentrated on the integration of gene expression and gene-body methylation. The treatment of flax with a series of short oligonucleotides homologous to a different part of CHS gene isoforms revealed that those directed to regulatory gene regions (5′- and 3′-UTR activated gene expression, directed to non-coding region (introns caused gen activity reduction, while those homologous to a coding region may have a variable influence on its activity. Gene expression changes were accompanied by changes in its methylation status. However, only certain (CCGG motifs along the gene sequence were affected. The analyzed DNA motifs of the CHS flax gene are more accessible for methylation when located within a Cp

  20. A single, low dose oral antigen exposure in newborn piglets primes mucosal immunity if administered with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and polyphosphazene adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, J Alex; Ng, Siew Hon; Wilson, Heather L

    2014-10-15

    By definition, soluble antigens ingested orally trigger mucosal tolerance such that any subsequent re-exposure by a systemic route results in suppression of immunity. We propose that antigens introduced in extreme early life can readily traverse the gut wall and therefore circumvent induction of mucosal tolerance and instead induce immunity. Piglets were drenched with low-doses of ovalbumin (OVA; 5mg or 0.05 mg) alone, OVA plus adjuvants (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and PCEP polyphosphazene) or saline within 6h of birth. At 28 days of age, they were administered 10mg OVA plus 1:1 Montanide adjuvant (or saline) via the intraperitoneal (i.p.) route or via the oral route. Serum was obtained on day 28 and day 49 to measure OVA-specific antibodies titres. All piglets boosted orally with OVA plus Montanide, regardless of prior OVA exposure, failed to induce immunity. As expected, piglets drenched with saline but boosted via the i.p. route with OVA plus Montanide showed significant induction of anti-OVA IgA, IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 relative to saline control piglets. Newborn animals drenched with 5mg or 0.05 mg OVA failed to induce oral immunity. A second intramuscular injection in adulthood triggered immunity in the piglets that were drenched with 0.05 mg OVA and boosted initially by the i.p. route suggesting that some systemic lymphocytes were primed despite initial lack of induction of humoral immunity. In contrast, piglets orally immunized with 5mg or 0.05 mg OVA plus adjuvants resulted in significant induction of anti-OVA IgA (5mg only), IgM, IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 in serum relative to saline control piglets as well as significant induction of anti-OVA IgA, IgM (5mg only) IgG, IgG1 (5mg only) or IgG2 relative to piglets drenched with OVA alone. These data clearly show that the response was sensitive to the oral vaccine components and was not simply a response to the i.p. immunization at day 28. This work demonstrates that newborn piglets respond to oral antigens with immunity

  1. [Immunostimulatory CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) in an orthotopic murine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) model. Effect on local cytokine expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbert, P J; Schrader, A J; Hofmann, R; Hegele, A

    2008-09-01

    CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) are potent stimulators of the innate immune system. They promote a Th1-biased immune response with antineoplastic potential. We recently demonstrated antitumoral effects of CpG-ODN in murine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) models. The purpose of the present work was to more precisely define the immunological nature of this immunotherapeutic approach to TCC.MB-49 TCC was established in female C57/Bl6 mice by intravesical tumor cell instillation after poly-L-lysine conditioning of the bladder (day 0) as described previously. Three groups of six mice were treated: intravesical instillation of 50 microl PBS on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 (group 1, untreated control); 10 nmol CpG 1668 on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 (group 2); and 10 nmol GpC 1668 on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 (group 3). Six native bladders served as no-treatment/no-tumor controls (group 4). Mice were sacrificed on day 11; bladders and draining lymph nodes were removed, and mRNA was prepared for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Samples were analyzed on a Bio-Rad iCycler for IL 10, TGF-beta, IL 12, and IFNgamma expression; threshold values were compared to beta-actin as housekeeping gene.Tumor take was 100%. Three animals in group 1 had to be sacrificed in advance due to rapid tumor progression. Relative cytokine expression was comparable in groups 1 and 4. IL-10, IL-12, TGF-beta, and IFNgamma were overexpressed in groups 2 and 3. CpG-ODN treatment of murine TCC results in overexpression of both classic Th1 cytokines (IL 12 and IFNgamma) and the Th2 marker IL 10. TGF-beta expression is increased as well. These phenomena are not induced by the growing TCC but by CpG-ODN therapy. They are accompanied by an objective clinical response, as we were able to show recently. Immunostimulatory DNA holds promise to be a novel therapeutic agent in TCC.

  2. Effects of intratracheal administration of nuclear factor-kappaB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides on long-term cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation and pathology in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yu-Zhu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To determine if nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation may be a key factor in lung inflammation and respiratory dysfunction, we investigated whether NF-κB can be blocked by intratracheal administration of NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs, and whether decoy ODN-mediated NF-κB inhibition can prevent smoke-induced lung inflammation, respiratory dysfunction, and improve pathological alteration in the small airways and lung parenchyma in the long-term smoke-induced mouse model system. We also detected changes in transcriptional factors. In vivo, the transfection efficiency of NF-κB decoy ODNs to alveolar macrophages in BALF was measured by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-labeled NF-κB decoy ODNs and flow cytometry post intratracheal ODN administration. Pulmonary function was measured by pressure sensors, and pathological changes were assessed using histology and the pathological Mias software. NF-κB and activator protein 1(AP-1 activity was detected by the electrophoretic motility shift assay (EMSA. Mouse cytokine and chemokine pulmonary expression profiles were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and lung tissue homogenates, respectively, after repeated exposure to cigarette smoke. After 24 h, the percentage of transfected alveolar macrophages was 30.00 ± 3.30%. Analysis of respiratory function indicated that transfection of NF-κB decoy ODNs significantly impacted peak expiratory flow (PEF, and bronchoalveolar lavage cytology displayed evidence of decreased macrophage infiltration in airways compared to normal saline-treated or scramble NF-κB decoy ODNs smoke exposed mice. NF-κB decoy ODNs inhibited significantly level of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP 1α and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1 in lung homogenates compared to normal saline-treated smoke exposed mice. In contrast, these NF-κB decoy ODNs-treated mice showed significant increase in the

  3. Effects of intratracheal administration of nuclear factor-kappaB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides on long-term cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation and pathology in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Tao; He, Bei; Wang, Yu-Zhu; Wang, Jing

    2009-08-25

    To determine if nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation may be a key factor in lung inflammation and respiratory dysfunction, we investigated whether NF-kappaB can be blocked by intratracheal administration of NF-kappaB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), and whether decoy ODN-mediated NF-kappaB inhibition can prevent smoke-induced lung inflammation, respiratory dysfunction, and improve pathological alteration in the small airways and lung parenchyma in the long-term smoke-induced mouse model system. We also detected changes in transcriptional factors. In vivo, the transfection efficiency of NF-kappaB decoy ODNs to alveolar macrophages in BALF was measured by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled NF-kappaB decoy ODNs and flow cytometry post intratracheal ODN administration. Pulmonary function was measured by pressure sensors, and pathological changes were assessed using histology and the pathological Mias software. NF-kappaB and activator protein 1(AP-1) activity was detected by the electrophoretic motility shift assay (EMSA). Mouse cytokine and chemokine pulmonary expression profiles were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue homogenates, respectively, after repeated exposure to cigarette smoke. After 24 h, the percentage of transfected alveolar macrophages was 30.00 +/- 3.30%. Analysis of respiratory function indicated that transfection of NF-kappaB decoy ODNs significantly impacted peak expiratory flow (PEF), and bronchoalveolar lavage cytology displayed evidence of decreased macrophage infiltration in airways compared to normal saline-treated or scramble NF-kappaB decoy ODNs smoke exposed mice. NF-kappaB decoy ODNs inhibited significantly level of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) 1alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1) in lung homogenates compared to normal saline-treated smoke exposed mice. In contrast, these NF-kappaB decoy ODNs-treated mice showed

  4. TLR9 ligand (CpG oligodeoxynucleotide induces CLL B-cells to differentiate into CD20+ antibody-secreting cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein eGhamlouch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most frequent adult leukemia in the Western world. It is a heterogeneous disease characterized by clonal proliferation and the accumulation of CD5+ mature B lymphocytes. However, the normal counterpart from which the latter cells arise has not yet been identified. CD27 expression and gene expression profiling data suggest that CLL cells are related to memory B-cells. In vitro, memory B-cells differentiate into plasma cells when stimulated with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG. The objective of the present study was therefore to investigate the ability of CpG, in the context of CD40 ligation, to induce the differentiation of CLL B-cells into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs. CD20+CD38− CLL B-cells were stimulated with a combination of CpG, CD40 ligand and cytokines (CpG/CD40L/c in a two-step, seven-day culture system. We found that the CpG/CD40L/c culture system prompted CLL B-cells to differentiate into CD19+CD20+CD27+CD38- ASCs. These cells secreted large amounts of IgM and had the same shape as plasma cells. However, only IgMs secreted by ASCs that had differentiated from unmutated CLL B-cells were poly/autoreactive. Class-switch recombination to IgG and IgA was detected in cells expressing the activation-induced cytidine deaminase gene (AICDA. Although these ASCs expressed high levels of the transcription factors PRDM1 (BLIMP1, IRF4 and XBP1s, they did not downregulate expression of PAX5. Our results suggest that CLL B-cells can differentiate into ASCs, undergo class-switch recombination and produce poly/autoreactive antibodies. Furthermore, our findings may be relevant for (i identifying the normal counterpart of CLL B-cells and (ii developing novel treatment strategies in CLL.

  5. Probe tests microweld strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Probe is developed to test strength of soldered, brazed or microwelded joints. It consists of a spring which may be adjusted to the desired test pressure by means of a threaded probe head, and an indicator lamp. Device may be used for electronic equipment testing.

  6. Space Synthetic Biology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David; Roman, Monsi; Mansell, James (Matt)

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an effort to make genetic engineering more useful by standardizing sections of genetic code. By standardizing genetic components, biological engineering will become much more similar to traditional fields of engineering, in which well-defined components and subsystems are readily available in markets. Specifications of the behavior of those components and subsystems can be used to model a system which incorporates them. Then, the behavior of the novel system can be simulated and optimized. Finally, the components and subsystems can be purchased and assembled to create the optimized system, which most often will exhibit behavior similar to that indicated by the model. The Space Synthetic Biology project began in 2012 as a multi-Center effort. The purpose of this project was to harness Synthetic Biology principals to enable NASA's missions. A central target for application was to Environmental Control & Life Support (ECLS). Engineers from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) ECLS Systems Development Branch (ES62) were brought into the project to contribute expertise in operational ECLS systems. Project lead scientists chose to pursue the development of bioelectrochemical technologies to spacecraft life support. Therefore, the ECLS element of the project became essentially an effort to develop a bioelectrochemical ECLS subsystem. Bioelectrochemical systems exploit the ability of many microorganisms to drive their metabolisms by direct or indirect utilization of electrical potential gradients. Whereas many microorganisms are capable of deriving the energy required for the processes of interest (such as carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation) from sunlight, it is believed that subsystems utilizing electrotrophs will exhibit smaller mass, volume, and power requirements than those that derive their energy from sunlight. In the first 2 years of the project, MSFC personnel conducted modeling, simulation, and conceptual design efforts to assist the

  7. Life after the synthetic cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self-replicating ......Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self...

  8. Synthetic biology and occupational risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John; Murashov, Vladimir; Schulte, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging interdisciplinary field of biotechnology that involves applying the principles of engineering and chemical design to biological systems. Biosafety professionals have done an excellent job in addressing research laboratory safety as synthetic biology and gene editing have emerged from the larger field of biotechnology. Despite these efforts, risks posed by synthetic biology are of increasing concern as research procedures scale up to industrial processes in the larger bioeconomy. A greater number and variety of workers will be exposed to commercial synthetic biology risks in the future, including risks to a variety of workers from the use of lentiviral vectors as gene transfer devices. There is a need to review and enhance current protection measures in the field of synthetic biology, whether in experimental laboratories where new advances are being researched, in health care settings where treatments using viral vectors as gene delivery systems are increasingly being used, or in the industrial bioeconomy. Enhanced worker protection measures should include increased injury and illness surveillance of the synthetic biology workforce; proactive risk assessment and management of synthetic biology products; research on the relative effectiveness of extrinsic and intrinsic biocontainment methods; specific safety guidance for synthetic biology industrial processes; determination of appropriate medical mitigation measures for lentiviral vector exposure incidents; and greater awareness and involvement in synthetic biology safety by the general occupational safety and health community as well as by government occupational safety and health research and regulatory agencies.

  9. Finding Hope in Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takala, Tuija

    2017-04-01

    For some, synthetic biology represents great hope in offering possible solutions to many of the world's biggest problems, from hunger to sustainable development. Others remain fearful of the harmful uses, such as bioweapons, that synthetic biology can lend itself to, and most hold that issues of biosafety are of utmost importance. In this article, I will evaluate these points of view and conclude that although the biggest promises of synthetic biology are unlikely to become reality, and the probability of accidents is fairly substantial, synthetic biology could still be seen to benefit humanity by enhancing our ethical understanding and by offering a boost to world economy.

  10. Synthetic Aperture Compound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Munk

    Medical ultrasound imaging is used for many purposes, e.g. for localizing and classifying cysts, lesions, and other processes. Almost any mass is first observed using B-mode imaging and later classified using e.g. color flow, strain, or attenuation imaging. It is therefore important that the B......, it is demonstrated through theoretical considerations that the compound effect achieved is close to a theoretical maximum for the amount of compounding attainable and using a -pitch convex array transducer, the first in-vivo images are created. The computational demands for an implementation are massive...... and the limiting factor is the amount of memory IO resources available. An equally high demand for memory throughput is found in the computer gaming industry, where a large part of the processing takes place on the graphics processing unit (GPU). Using the GPU, a framework for synthetic aperture imaging...

  11. Transionospheric synthetic aperture imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gilman, Mikhail; Tsynkov, Semyon

    2017-01-01

    This landmark monograph presents the most recent mathematical developments in the analysis of ionospheric distortions of SAR images and offers innovative new strategies for their mitigation. As a prerequisite to addressing these topics, the book also discusses the radar ambiguity theory as it applies to synthetic aperture imaging and the propagation of radio waves through the ionospheric plasma, including the anisotropic and turbulent cases. In addition, it covers a host of related subjects, such as the mathematical modeling of extended radar targets (as opposed to point-wise targets) and the scattering of radio waves off those targets, as well as the theoretical analysis of the start-stop approximation, which is used routinely in SAR signal processing but often without proper justification. The mathematics in this volume is clean and rigorous – no assumptions are hidden or ambiguously stated. The resulting work is truly interdisciplinary, providing both a comprehensive and thorough exposition of the field,...

  12. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2012-11-16

    Metabolic engineering emerged 20 years ago as the discipline occupied with the directed modification of metabolic pathways for the microbial synthesis of various products. As such, it deals with the engineering (design, construction, and optimization) of native as well as non-natural routes of product synthesis, aided in this task by the availability of synthetic DNA, the core enabling technology of synthetic biology. The two fields, however, only partially overlap in their interest in pathway engineering. While fabrication of biobricks, synthetic cells, genetic circuits, and nonlinear cell dynamics, along with pathway engineering, have occupied researchers in the field of synthetic biology, the sum total of these areas does not constitute a coherent definition of synthetic biology with a distinct intellectual foundation and well-defined areas of application. This paper reviews the origins of the two fields and advances two distinct paradigms for each of them: that of unit operations for metabolic engineering and electronic circuits for synthetic biology. In this context, metabolic engineering is about engineering cell factories for the biological manufacturing of chemical and pharmaceutical products, whereas the main focus of synthetic biology is fundamental biological research facilitated by the use of synthetic DNA and genetic circuits.

  14. Synthetic cannabinoids: new matrix addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antsyborov A.V.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available the majority of synthetic cannabinoids (SC, belongs to the group of so-called designer drugs distributed through illegal online shopping. The first reports of this group of psychoactive substances appeared in the 70s of the last century. Today, according to various estimates, there are over 160 varieties of synthetic cannabinoids, and this figure is increasing annually due to the synthesis of new substances in the group. This group of substances is designed to «copy» the psychoactive effects of cannabis. Initially, these substances were created solely for research purposes, to study the endocannabinoid system of the person. Natural THC is a partial agonist of cannabinoid receptors. Synthetic cannabinoids are full agonists CB1R and CB2R types of cannabinoid receptors. Most countries in the world, including Russia, at the legislative level have taken restrictive measures for preventing the spread of this group of substances. In order to circumvent the legislative measures, the producers of synthetic cannabinoids regularly changing the chemical formula. Each year, an increasing number of emergency hospital admissions associated with the use of synthetic cannabinoids in the peer-reviewed literature describes the deaths directly attributable to medical complications after taking synthetic cannabinoids. Numerous studies have proven the possibility of developing psychological dependence due to the use of synthetic cannabinoids. The proposed review of the literature is presented for the purpose of organizing data in the field of synthetic cannabinoids.

  15. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Zegers (Netty)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps

  16. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the

  17. Imaging with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Massonnet, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Describing a field that has been transformed by the recent availability of data from a new generation of space and airborne systems, the authors offer a synthetic geometrical approach to the description of synthetic aperture radar, one that addresses physicists, radar specialists, as well as experts in image processing.  

  18. Synthetic biology of polyketide synthases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuzawa, Satoshi; Backman, Tyler W.H.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2018-01-01

    ). The modules are composed of enzymatic domains that share sequence and functional similarity across all known PKSs. We have used the nomenclature of synthetic biology to classify the enzymatic domains and modules as parts and devices, respectively, and have generated detailed lists of both. In addition, we...... realize the potential that synthetic biology approaches bring to this class of molecules....

  19. Neutrons as a probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizumi, Masashi

    1993-01-01

    As an introduction to the symposium a brief overview will be given about the features of neutrons as a probe. First it will be pointed out that the utilization of neutrons as a probe for investigating the structural and dynamical properties of condensed matters is a benign gift eventuated from the release of atomic energy initiated by Enrico Fermi exactly half century ago. Features of neutrons as a probe are discussed in accordance with the four basic physical properties of neutrons as an elementary particle; (1) no electric charge (the interaction with matter is nuclear), (2) the mass of neutron is 1 amu, (3) spin is 1/2 and (4) neutrons have magnetic dipole moment. Overview will be given on the uniqueness of neutrons as a probe and on the variety in the way they are used in the wide research area from the pure science to the industrial applications. (author)

  20. Noninvasive ultrasonic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.R.; Galer, D.R.; Leard, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    An ultrasonic probe is described for insonifying the ascending aorta of a supine or reclining human patient from a location within the suprasternal notch of the patient. The probe comprises: a transducer head and an elongated handle; housing propagates ultrasonic energy and for intercept-frequency-shifted, reflected radiant energy; the handle has a proximate portion and a distal portion and a non-circular cross-sectional configuration with at least one longitudinal edge which furnishes a gripping surface; this facilitates tactile positioning of the probe; the transducer head is integral with the handle of the probe at the exposed end of the proximate portion; the transducer head has a generally arcuate cross-sectional configuration and a generally trapezoidal profile; the transducer head is oriented at right angles to the proximate portion of the handle and has an exposed, patient contacting end in which the transducer means are located; this facilitates the orientation of the transducer means housed in the head relative to the ascending aorta of the patient; and the distal end portion of the elongated probe handle is integral with and immovably oriented at a severe angle relative to the proximate end of that handle, and lies in the same plane as the proximate end of the handle; the transducer head of the probe is placed with facility within the suprasternal notch of the patient by an operator positioned behind the head of the patient

  1. Computing with synthetic protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbet, Alexis; Molina, Franck; Amar, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    In this article we present a new kind of computing device that uses biochemical reactions networks as building blocks to implement logic gates. The architecture of a computing machine relies on these generic and composable building blocks, computation units, that can be used in multiple instances to perform complex boolean functions. Standard logical operations are implemented by biochemical networks, encapsulated and insulated within synthetic vesicles called protocells. These protocells are capable of exchanging energy and information with each other through transmembrane electron transfer. In the paradigm of computation we propose, protoputing, a machine can solve only one problem and therefore has to be built specifically. Thus, the programming phase in the standard computing paradigm is represented in our approach by the set of assembly instructions (specific attachments) that directs the wiring of the protocells that constitute the machine itself. To demonstrate the computing power of protocellular machines, we apply it to solve a NP-complete problem, known to be very demanding in computing power, the 3-SAT problem. We show how to program the assembly of a machine that can verify the satisfiability of a given boolean formula. Then we show how to use the massive parallelism of these machines to verify in less than 20 min all the valuations of the input variables and output a fluorescent signal when the formula is satisfiable or no signal at all otherwise.

  2. Synthetic biology: lessons from the history of synthetic organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Brian J; Lim, Wendell A

    2007-09-01

    The mid-nineteenth century saw the development of a radical new direction in chemistry: instead of simply analyzing existing molecules, chemists began to synthesize them--including molecules that did not exist in nature. The combination of this new synthetic approach with more traditional analytical approaches revolutionized chemistry, leading to a deep understanding of the fundamental principles of chemical structure and reactivity and to the emergence of the modern pharmaceutical and chemical industries. The history of synthetic chemistry offers a possible roadmap for the development and impact of synthetic biology, a nascent field in which the goal is to build novel biological systems.

  3. Spicing things up: synthetic cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaderna, Max; Addy, Peter H; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2013-08-01

    Recently, products containing synthetic cannabinoids, collectively referred to as Spice, are increasingly being used recreationally. The availability, acute subjective effects-including self-reports posted on Erowid-laboratory detection, addictive potential, and regulatory challenges of the Spice phenomenon are reviewed. Spice is sold under the guise of potpourri or incense. Unlike delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the synthetic cannabinoids present in Spice are high-potency, high-efficacy, cannabinoid receptor full agonists. Since standard urine toxicology does not test for the synthetic cannabinoids in Spice, it is often used by those who want to avoid detection of drug use. These compounds have not yet been subjected to rigorous testing in humans. Acute psychoactive effects include changes in mood, anxiety, perception, thinking, memory, and attention. Adverse effects include anxiety, agitation, panic, dysphoria, psychosis, and bizarre behavior. Psychosis outcomes associated with Spice provide additional data linking cannabinoids and psychosis. Adverse events necessitating intervention by Poison Control Centers, law enforcement, emergency responders, and hospitals are increasing. Despite statutes prohibiting the manufacture, distribution, and sale of Spice products, manufacturers are replacing banned compounds with newer synthetic cannabinoids that are not banned. There is an urgent need for better research on the effects of synthetic cannabinoids to help clinicians manage adverse events and to better understand cannabinoid pharmacology in humans. The reported psychosis outcomes associated with synthetic cannabinoids contribute to the ongoing debate on the association between cannabinoids and psychosis. Finally, drug detection tests for synthetic cannabinoids need to become clinically available.

  4. Synthetic Biology and Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, K.K.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology, application of synthetic chemistry to biology, is a broad term that covers the engineering of biological systems with structures and functions not found in nature to process information, manipulate chemicals, produce energy, maintain cell environment and enhance human health. Synthetic biology devices contribute not only to improve our understanding of disease mechanisms, but also provide novel diagnostic tools. Methods based on synthetic biology enable the design of novel strategies for the treatment of cancer, immune diseases metabolic disorders and infectious diseases as well as the production of cheap drugs. The potential of synthetic genome, using an expanded genetic code that is designed for specific drug synthesis as well as delivery and activation of the drug in vivo by a pathological signal, was already pointed out during a lecture delivered at Kuwait University in 2005. Of two approaches to synthetic biology, top-down and bottom-up, the latter is more relevant to the development of personalized medicines as it provides more flexibility in constructing a partially synthetic cell from basic building blocks for a desired task. PMID:22907209

  5. DNA adducts of acrolein: site-specific synthesis of an oligodeoxynucleotide containing 6-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropyrimido[1,2-a]purin-10(3H)-one, an acrolein adduct of guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechev, Lubomir V; Kozekov, Ivan D; Brock, Angela K; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Harris, Thomas M

    2002-05-01

    3-(2-Deoxy-beta-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-6-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropyrimido[1,2-a]purin-10(3H)-one is formed in low yield by the reaction of acrolein with 2'-deoxyguanosine. The nucleoside and an oligodeoxynucleotide containing it have been synthesized. For preparation of the nucleoside 2'-deoxyguanosine was alkylated at the N1 position using 1-bromo-3-butene to give 1-(3-butenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine. Oxidation with OsO(4) and N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide to give the 3,4-dihydroxybutyl adduct followed by oxidation with NaIO(4) gave the 1-(3-oxopropyl) adduct which cyclized spontaneously to yield the title compound as a rapidly epimerizing mixture of two diastereomers. Reduction of the nucleoside with NaBH(4) gave the unfunctionalized compound plus 1-(3-hydroxypropyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine showing that epimerization was occurring via both the imine and the 1-(3-oxopropyl) adduct. Reduction with NaCNBH(3) gave exclusively unfunctionalized 3-(2-deoxy-beta-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropyrimido[1,2-a]purin-10(3H)-one. The phosphoramidite reagent needed for preparation of oligonucleotides was prepared from 1-(3-butenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine by glycolation after protection of the 3' and 5' hydroxyl groups as silyl derivatives. Acetylation of the vicinal hydroxyl groups and the exocyclic amino group followed by removal of silyl protection gave the protected nucleoside. Protection of the 5' hydroxyl group as the 4,4'-dimethoxytrityl ether followed by phosphitylation with 2-cyanoethyl-N,N,N',N'-tetraisopropylphosphorodiamidite gave the prosphoramidite reagent which was used to prepare a 12-mer oligodeoxynucleotide.

  6. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Gillian

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) allows all-weather, day and night, surface surveillance and has the ability to detect, classify and geolocate objects at long stand-off ranges. Bistatic SAR, where the transmitter and the receiver are on separate platforms, is seen as a potential means of countering the vulnerability of conventional monostatic SAR to electronic countermeasures, particularly directional jamming, and avoiding physical attack of the imaging platform. As the receiving platform can be totally passive, it does not advertise its position by RF emissions. The transmitter is not susceptible to jamming and can, for example, operate at long stand-off ranges to reduce its vulnerability to physical attack. This thesis examines some of the complications involved in producing high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery. The effect of bistatic operation on resolution is examined from a theoretical viewpoint and analytical expressions for resolution are developed. These expressions are verified by simulation work using a simple 'point by point' processor. This work is extended to look at using modern practical processing engines for bistatic geometries. Adaptations of the polar format algorithm and range migration algorithm are considered. The principal achievement of this work is a fully airborne demonstration of bistatic SAR. The route taken in reaching this is given, along with some results. The bistatic SAR imagery is analysed and compared to the monostatic imagery collected at the same time. Demonstrating high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery using two airborne platforms represents what I believe to be a European first and is likely to be the first time that this has been achieved outside the US (the UK has very little insight into US work on this topic). Bistatic target characteristics are examined through the use of simulations. This also compares bistatic imagery with monostatic and gives further insight into the utility of bistatic SAR.

  7. Synthetic biology for therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abil, Zhanar; Xiong, Xiong; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-02-02

    Synthetic biology is a relatively new field with the key aim of designing and constructing biological systems with novel functionalities. Today, synthetic biology devices are making their first steps in contributing new solutions to a number of biomedical challenges, such as emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance and cancer therapy. This review discusses some synthetic biology approaches and applications that were recently used in disease mechanism investigation and disease modeling, drug discovery and production, as well as vaccine development and treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and metabolic disorders.

  8. The Ethics of Synthetic Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Andreas

    The dissertation analyses and discusses a number of ethical issues that have been raised in connection with the development of synthetic biology. Synthetic biology is a set of new techniques for DNA-level design and construction of living beings with useful properties. The dissertation especially......) popular responsesto them succeed, and whether the objections are ultimately persuasive.2. Given that synthetic biology is a new technology, there is a certain degree of uncertainty about its ultimate effects, and many perceive the technology as risky. I discuss two common approaches in risk regulation...

  9. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  10. Convective heat flow probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  11. Tissue Harmonic Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for tissue harmonic synthetic aperture imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of synthetic aperture imaging in ultrasound, which has shown great potentials in the clinic. Suggestions for synthetic aperture tissue...... system complexity compared to conventional synthetic aperture techniques. In this project, SASB is sought combined with a pulse inversion technique for 2nd harmonic tissue harmonic imaging. The advantages in tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are expected to further improve the image quality of SASB....... The first part of the scientific contribution investigates an implementation of pulse inversion for THI on the experimental ultrasound system SARUS. The technique is initially implemented for linear array transducers and then expanded for convex array transducers. The technique is evaluated based on spatial...

  12. Adaptive Synthetic Forces: Situation Awareness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Randall

    2001-01-01

    ...: perception, comprehension, and prediction. Building on these ideas, we developed techniques for improving the situation awareness in synthetic helicopter pilots for the ModSAF military simulation by giving them more human-like perception...

  13. Designing synthetic networks in silico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Robert W.; Sluijs, van Bob; Fleck, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Background: Evolution has led to the development of biological networks that are shaped by environmental signals. Elucidating, understanding and then reconstructing important network motifs is one of the principal aims of Systems & Synthetic Biology. Consequently, previous research has focused

  14. Synthetic Biology for Specialty Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Kelly A; Alper, Hal S

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we address recent advances in the field of synthetic biology and describe how those tools have been applied to produce a wide variety of chemicals in microorganisms. Here we classify the expansion of the synthetic biology toolbox into three different categories based on their primary function in strain engineering-for design, for construction, and for optimization. Next, focusing on recent years, we look at how chemicals have been produced using these new synthetic biology tools. Advances in producing fuels are briefly described, followed by a more thorough treatment of commodity chemicals, specialty chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. Throughout this review, an emphasis is placed on how synthetic biology tools are applied to strain engineering. Finally, we discuss organism and host strain diversity and provide a future outlook in the field.

  15. Is synthetic biology mechanical biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Sune

    2015-12-01

    A widespread and influential characterization of synthetic biology emphasizes that synthetic biology is the application of engineering principles to living systems. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency to express the engineering approach to organisms in terms of what seems to be an ontological claim: organisms are machines. In the paper I investigate the ontological and heuristic significance of the machine analogy in synthetic biology. I argue that the use of the machine analogy and the aim of producing rationally designed organisms does not necessarily imply a commitment to mechanical biology. The ideal of applying engineering principles to biology is best understood as expressing recognition of the machine-unlikeness of natural organisms and the limits of human cognition. The paper suggests an interpretation of the identification of organisms with machines in synthetic biology according to which it expresses a strategy for representing, understanding, and constructing living systems that are more machine-like than natural organisms.

  16. Programming languages for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, P; Naveen, F; Rao, Chanchala Uma Maheswara; Nair, Achuthsankar S

    2010-12-01

    In the backdrop of accelerated efforts for creating synthetic organisms, the nature and scope of an ideal programming language for scripting synthetic organism in-silico has been receiving increasing attention. A few programming languages for synthetic biology capable of defining, constructing, networking, editing and delivering genome scale models of cellular processes have been recently attempted. All these represent important points in a spectrum of possibilities. This paper introduces Kera, a state of the art programming language for synthetic biology which is arguably ahead of similar languages or tools such as GEC, Antimony and GenoCAD. Kera is a full-fledged object oriented programming language which is tempered by biopart rule library named Samhita which captures the knowledge regarding the interaction of genome components and catalytic molecules. Prominent feature of the language are demonstrated through a toy example and the road map for the future development of Kera is also presented.

  17. Multispectral imaging probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  18. Performance Evaluation of a Synthetic Aperture Real-Time Ultrasound System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates the signal-to-noise ratio, the time stability, and the phase difference of the sampling in the experimental ultrasound scanner SARUS: A synthetic aperture, real-time ultrasound system. SARUS has 1024 independent transmit and receive channels and is capable of handling 2D probes...

  19. Generating realistic synthetic meteoroid orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, Denis; Brown, Peter G.; Campbell-Brown, Margaret

    2017-11-01

    Context. Generating a synthetic dataset of meteoroid orbits is a crucial step in analysing the probabilities of random grouping of meteoroid orbits in automated meteor shower surveys. Recent works have shown the importance of choosing a low similarity threshold value of meteoroid orbits, some pointing out that the recent meteor shower surveys produced false positives due to similarity thresholds which were too high. On the other hand, the methods of synthetic meteoroid orbit generation introduce additional biases into the data, thus making the final decision on an appropriate threshold value uncertain. Aims. As a part of the ongoing effort to determine the nature of meteor showers and improve automated methods, it was decided to tackle the problem of synthetic meteoroid orbit generation, the main goal being to reproduce the underlying structure and the statistics of the observed data in the synthetic orbits. Methods. A new method of generating synthetic meteoroid orbits using the Kernel Density Estimation method is presented. Several types of approaches are recommended, depending on whether one strives to preserve the data structure, the data statistics or to have a compromise between the two. Results. The improvements over the existing methods of synthetic orbit generation are demonstrated. The comparison between the previous and newly developed methods are given, as well as the visualization tools one can use to estimate the influence of different input parameters on the final data.

  20. Time–frequency analysis of submerged synthetic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhay; Saha, Arun K.; Panigrahi, P. K.

    2017-12-01

    The coherent structures transport the finite body of fluid mass through rolling which plays an important role in heat transfer, boundary layer control, mixing, cooling, propulsion and other engineering applications. A synthetic jet in the form of a train of vortex rings having coherent structures of different length scales is expected to be useful in these applications. The propagation and sustainability of these coherent structures (vortex rings) in downstream direction characterize the performance of synthetic jet. In the present study, the velocity signal acquired using the S-type hot-film probe along the synthetic jet centerline has been taken for the spectral analysis. One circular and three rectangular orifices of aspect ratio 1, 2 and 4 actuating at 1, 6 and 18 Hz frequency have been used for creating different synthetic jets. The laser induced fluorescence images are used to study the flow structures qualitatively and help in explaining the velocity signal for detection of coherent structures. The study depicts four regions as vortex rollup and suction region (X/D h ≤ 3), steadily translating region (X/D h ≤ 3–8), vortex breakup region (X/Dh ≤ 4–8) and dissipation of small-scale vortices (X/D h ≤ 8–15). The presence of coherent structures localized in physical and temporal domain is analyzed for the characterization of synthetic jet. Due to pulsatile nature of synthetic jet, analysis of velocity time trace or signal in time, frequency and combined time–frequency domain assist in characterizing the signatures of coherent structures. It has been observed that the maximum energy is in the first harmonic of actuation frequency, which decreases slowly in downstream direction at 6 Hz compared to 1 and 18 Hz of actuation.

  1. [Evaluation of synthetic peptide vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease type A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hua; Liu, Xinsheng; Fang, Yuzhen; Jiang, Shoutian; Pan, Li; Lv, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhongwang; Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Yonglu

    2013-06-04

    We developed a synthetic vaccine against foot-and-mouth disease type A. We studied two peptide-based vaccines containing residues 131 to 159 of VP1, 20 to 35 of VP4, 21 to 35 of 3A and 29 to 42 of 3B of the AF/72 strain of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) coupled with a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (5'-TCGCGAACGTTCGCCCGATCGTCGGTA-3') in guinea pigs. We assayed the FMDV-specific IgG level, serum neutralizing antibody titer, splenic lymphocytes proliferative capacity and peripheral blood T lymphocyte CD4-CD8 subsets distribution. The data show that high dose did not ensure a good immunity. In our study, 8% (4/5) of peptide 364-2.5-inoculated guinea pigs (2.5 microg of peptide 364 per animal) were protected against AF/72 strain challenge, while the protection ratio from other peptide-immunized groups was lower except the inactivated vaccine-inoculated group which showed a full protection. Our results also indicated that the stimulatory ability of CD4+ T lymphocyte response played a key role in evaluating effective FMDV vaccine. The highest percentage of CD4+ T lymphocyte was 36.6% appeared in inactivated vaccine-immunized guinea pigs, the second was 33.7% in peptide 364-2.5-vaccinated group, whereas the remaining ranged from 18.1% to 27.7%. There was no obvious relation between CD8+ T cells and anti-FMDV infection; our data showed that the CD4/CD8 ratio was not always appropriate for assessing the immune system status. In general, we not only designed an effective vaccine against FMDV type A, but also discovered some useful information of humoral and cellular responses induced by foot-and-mouth disease vaccines.

  2. Freedom and Responsibility in Synthetic Genomics: The Synthetic Yeast Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliva, Anna; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D; Mathews, Debra J H

    2015-08-01

    First introduced in 2011, the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) PROJECT is a large international synthetic genomics project that will culminate in the first eukaryotic cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a fully synthetic genome. With collaborators from across the globe and from a range of institutions spanning from do-it-yourself biology (DIYbio) to commercial enterprises, it is important that all scientists working on this project are cognizant of the ethical and policy issues associated with this field of research and operate under a common set of principles. In this commentary, we survey the current ethics and regulatory landscape of synthetic biology and present the Sc2.0 Statement of Ethics and Governance to which all members of the project adhere. This statement focuses on four aspects of the Sc2.0 PROJECT: societal benefit, intellectual property, safety, and self-governance. We propose that such project-level agreements are an important, valuable, and flexible model of self-regulation for similar global, large-scale synthetic biology projects in order to maximize the benefits and minimize potential harms. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Probing the Solar Interior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 3. Probing the Solar Interior Hearing the Heartbeats of the Sun. Ashok Ambastha. General ... Author Affiliations. Ashok Ambastha1. Joint In-Charge Udaipur Solar Observatory Physical Research laboratory P.O. Box No. 198 Udaipur 313 001, India ...

  4. Probing the Solar Interior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 3. Probing the Solar Interior Hearing the Heartbeats of the Sun. Ashok Ambastha. General Article Volume 3 Issue 3 March 1998 pp 18-31. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Terahertz scanning probe microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapwijk, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides aterahertz scanning probe microscope setup comprising (i) a terahertz radiation source configured to generate terahertz radiation; (ii) a terahertz lens configured to receive at least part of the terahertz radiation from the terahertz radiation source; (iii) a cantilever unit

  6. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  7. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  8. Thermal conductivity probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navickas, J.

    1969-01-01

    Low-mass probe accurately measures the thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam /and other thermal insulating materials/ while exposed to either hydrogen of helium permeation in temperature ranges from ambient to cryogenic. The thermal conductivity of a specimen is determined from an experimentally determined increase in temperature.

  9. Meeting Report: Synthetic Biology Jamboree for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology (the name is derived from an analogy to synthetic chemistry) has recognized itself as a "field" only since about 2002. Synthetic biology has gotten some high-profile attention recently, but most people are not aware the field even exists. Synthetic biologists apply engineering principles to genomic circuits to…

  10. Measurement of steep aspheric surfaces using an anamorphic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Amiya; Coupland, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic aperture interferometry has been previously proposed as a possible in-process method to measure aspheric form (R. Tomlinson, Appl. Opt.42, 701, 2003.APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701). Preliminary demonstration utilized a scanning probe consisting of a pair of bare single mode fibers to perform source and receive functions. It was found that this probe did not have sufficient numerical aperture (NA) to measure steep surfaces and that simply increasing the NA decreases the light gathering efficiency substantially. In this paper, we introduce supplementary optics to increase the NA, and the light gathering efficiency has been increased by adopting an anamorphic design. A spherical test optic of known form is measured to demonstrate the capability of the new probe design

  11. Measurement of steep aspheric surfaces using an anamorphic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Amiya; Coupland, Jeremy

    2008-04-01

    Synthetic aperture interferometry has been previously proposed as a possible in-process method to measure aspheric form (R. Tomlinson, Appl. Opt.42, 701, 2003.APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701). Preliminary demonstration utilized a scanning probe consisting of a pair of bare single mode fibers to perform source and receive functions. It was found that this probe did not have sufficient numerical aperture (NA) to measure steep surfaces and that simply increasing the NA decreases the light gathering efficiency substantially. In this paper, we introduce supplementary optics to increase the NA, and the light gathering efficiency has been increased by adopting an anamorphic design. A spherical test optic of known form is measured to demonstrate the capability of the new probe design.

  12. Control theory meets synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Domitilla; Dy, Aaron J; Qian, Yili

    2016-07-01

    The past several years have witnessed an increased presence of control theoretic concepts in synthetic biology. This review presents an organized summary of how these control design concepts have been applied to tackle a variety of problems faced when building synthetic biomolecular circuits in living cells. In particular, we describe success stories that demonstrate how simple or more elaborate control design methods can be used to make the behaviour of synthetic genetic circuits within a single cell or across a cell population more reliable, predictable and robust to perturbations. The description especially highlights technical challenges that uniquely arise from the need to implement control designs within a new hardware setting, along with implemented or proposed solutions. Some engineering solutions employing complex feedback control schemes are also described, which, however, still require a deeper theoretical analysis of stability, performance and robustness properties. Overall, this paper should help synthetic biologists become familiar with feedback control concepts as they can be used in their application area. At the same time, it should provide some domain knowledge to control theorists who wish to enter the rising and exciting field of synthetic biology. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Synthetic biology, metaphors and responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Carmen; Nerlich, Brigitte

    2017-08-29

    Metaphors are not just decorative rhetorical devices that make speech pretty. They are fundamental tools for thinking about the world and acting on the world. The language we use to make a better world matters; words matter; metaphors matter. Words have consequences - ethical, social and legal ones, as well as political and economic ones. They need to be used 'responsibly'. They also need to be studied carefully - this is what we want to do through this editorial and the related thematic collection. In the context of synthetic biology, natural and social scientists have become increasingly interested in metaphors, a wave of interest that we want to exploit and amplify. We want to build on emerging articles and books on synthetic biology, metaphors of life and the ethical and moral implications of such metaphors. This editorial provides a brief introduction to synthetic biology and responsible innovation, as well as a comprehensive review of literature on the social, cultural and ethical impacts of metaphor use in genomics and synthetic biology. Our aim is to stimulate an interdisciplinary and international discussion on the impact that metaphors can have on science, policy and publics in the context of synthetic biology.

  14. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  15. Microfluidic Technologies for Synthetic Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kuk Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic technologies have shown powerful abilities for reducing cost, time, and labor, and at the same time, for increasing accuracy, throughput, and performance in the analysis of biological and biochemical samples compared with the conventional, macroscale instruments. Synthetic biology is an emerging field of biology and has drawn much attraction due to its potential to create novel, functional biological parts and systems for special purposes. Since it is believed that the development of synthetic biology can be accelerated through the use of microfluidic technology, in this review work we focus our discussion on the latest microfluidic technologies that can provide unprecedented means in synthetic biology for dynamic profiling of gene expression/regulation with high resolution, highly sensitive on-chip and off-chip detection of metabolites, and whole-cell analysis.

  16. US Competitiveness in Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronvall, Gigi Kwik

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging technical field that aims to make biology easier to engineer; the field has applications in strategically important sectors for the US economy. While the United States currently leads in synthetic biology R&D, other nations are heavily investing in order to boost their economies, which will inevitably diminish the US leadership position. This outcome is not entirely negative--additional investments will expand markets--but it is critical that the US government take steps to remain competitive: There are applications from which the US population and economy may benefit; there are specific applications with importance for national defense; and US technical leadership will ensure that US experts have a leading role in synthetic biology governance, regulation, and oversight. Measures to increase competitiveness in S&T generally are broadly applicable for synthetic biology and should be pursued. However, the US government will also need to take action on fundamental issues that will affect the field's development, such as countering anti-GMO (genetically modified organism) sentiments and anti-GMO legislation. The United States should maintain its regulatory approach so that it is the product that is regulated, not the method used to create a product. At the same time, the United States needs to ensure that the regulatory framework is updated so that synthetic biology products do not fall into regulatory gaps. Finally, the United States needs to pay close attention to how synthetic biology applications may be governed internationally, such as through the Nagoya Protocol of the Convention on Biological Diversity, so that beneficial applications may be realized.

  17. Synthetic biology as red herring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Beth

    2013-12-01

    It has become commonplace to say that with the advent of technologies like synthetic biology the line between artifacts and living organisms, policed by metaphysicians since antiquity, is beginning to blur. But that line began to blur 10,000 years ago when plants and animals were first domesticated; and has been thoroughly blurred at least since agriculture became the dominant human subsistence pattern many millennia ago. Synthetic biology is ultimately only a late and unexceptional offshoot of this prehistoric development. From this perspective, then, synthetic biology is a red herring, distracting us from more thorough philosophical consideration of the most truly revolutionary human practice-agriculture. In the first section of this paper I will make this case with regard to ontology, arguing that synthetic biology crosses no ontological lines that were not crossed already in the Neolithic. In the second section I will construct a parallel case with regard to cognition, arguing that synthetic biology as biological engineering represents no cognitive advance over what was required for domestication and the new agricultural subsistence pattern it grounds. In the final section I will make the case with regard to human existence, arguing that synthetic biology, even if wildly successful, is not in a position to cause significant existential change in what it is to be human over and above the massive existential change caused by the transition to agriculture. I conclude that a longer historical perspective casts new light on some important issues in philosophy of technology and environmental philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  19. Synthetic biology and its promises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel De Cózar Escalante

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology is a new science and emerging technology, or rather a technoscience, which converges with others such as nanotechnology, information technology, robotics, artificial intelligence and neuroscience. All have common features that could have highly concerning social and environmental impacts. With its ambitious goals of controlling complexity, redesigning and creating new living entities, synthetic biology perfectly exemplifies the new bioeconomic reality. This requires expanding the focus of the discussion beyond the limited comparative analysis of risks and benefits, to address uncertainties, reassign responsibilities and initiate a thorough social assessment of what is at stake.

  20. Synthetic methodologies for carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoping; Zhou, Xufeng; Qian, Yitai

    2010-05-04

    Carbon nanomaterials have advanced rapidly over the last two decades and are among the most promising materials that have already changed and will keep on changing human life. Development of synthetic methodologies for these materials, therefore, has been one of the most important subjects of carbon nanoscience and nanotechnology, and forms the basis for investigating the physicochemical properties and applications of carbon nanomaterials. In this Research News article, several synthetic strategies, including solvothermal reduction, solvothermal pyrolysis, hydrothermal carbonization, and soft-chemical exfoliation are specifically discussed and highlighted, which have been developed for the synthesis of novel carbon nanomaterials over the last decade.

  1. Heavy ion beam probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickok, R L

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included.

  2. Heavy ion beam probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickok, R.L.

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included

  3. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  4. Novel Eddycurrent Probe Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    oVCut MVc AVu inc F C -- -(1)(-jlOOO AZC (23)0 --2--M F1 (23) If the Thevenin source voltages, V0, are adjusted so that Vinc is the same for both the...as small as 1.2 cm. The differential probe assembly was spring loaded about a pivot post (see Figure 12) so it could scan noncircular or eccentric

  5. Induced current heating probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatcher, G.; Ferguson, B.G.; Winstanley, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    An induced current heating probe is of thimble form and has an outer conducting sheath and a water flooded flux-generating unit formed from a stack of ferrite rings coaxially disposed in the sheath. The energising coil is made of solid wire which connects at one end with a coaxial water current tube and at the other end with the sheath. The stack of ferrite rings may include non-magnetic insulating rings which help to shape the flux. (author)

  6. Atom probe crystallography

    OpenAIRE

    Gault, Baptiste; Moody, Michael P.; Cairney, Julie M.; Ringer, Simon P.

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses new developments in the emerging area of “atom probe crystallography”, a materials characterization tool with the unique capacity to reveal both composition and crystallographic structure at the atomic scale. This information is crucial for the manipulation of microstructure for the design of both structural and functional materials with optimized mechanical, electric, optoelectronic, magnetic, or superconducting properties that will find application in, for example, nan...

  7. Probing gravitation with pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Radio pulsars are fascinating and extremely useful objects. Despite our on-going difficulties in understanding the details of their emission physics, they can be used as precise cosmic clocks in a wide-range of experiments - in particular for probing gravitational physics. While the reader should consult the contributions to these proceedings to learn more about this exciting field of discovering, exploiting and understanding pulsars, we will concentrate here on on the usage of pulsars as gravity labs.

  8. Nanoscale thermal probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Yue

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem.

  9. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  10. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  11. Where Synthetic Biology Meets ET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. And what about the limits for life? Can we create organisms that expand the envelope for life? In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  12. Future of synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barath, F. T.

    1978-01-01

    The present status of the applications of Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs) is reviewed, and the technology state-of-the art as represented by the Seasat-A and SIR-A SARs examined. The potential of SAR applications, and the near- and longer-term technology trends are assessed.

  13. Digital 'faces' of synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Kathrin

    2013-06-01

    In silicio design plays a fundamental role in the endeavour to synthesise biological systems. In particular, computer-aided design software enables users to manage the complexity of biological entities that is connected to their construction and reconfiguration. The software's graphical user interface bridges the gap between the machine-readable data on the algorithmic subface of the computer and its human-amenable surface represented by standardised diagrammatic elements. Notations like the Systems Biology Graphical Notation (SBGN), together with interactive operations such as drag & drop, allow the user to visually design and simulate synthetic systems as 'bio-algorithmic signs'. Finally, the digital programming process should be extended to the wet lab to manufacture the designed synthetic biological systems. By exploring the different 'faces' of synthetic biology, I argue that in particular computer-aided design (CAD) is pushing the idea to automatically produce de novo objects. Multifaceted software processes serve mutually aesthetic, epistemic and performative purposes by simultaneously black-boxing and bridging different data sources, experimental operations and community-wide standards. So far, synthetic biology is mainly a product of digital media technologies that structurally mimic the epistemological challenge to take both qualitative as well as quantitative aspects of biological systems into account in order to understand and produce new and functional entities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthetic peptides for diagnostic use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meloen, R.H.; Langedijk, J.P.M.; Langeveld, J.P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Synthetic peptides representing relevant B-cell epitopes are, potentially, ideal antigens to be used in diagnostic assays because of their superior properties with respect to quality control as compared to those of biologically derived molecules and the much higher specificity that sometimes can be

  15. Analysis of the Synthetic Jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dančová, Petra; Vít, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2009), s. 11-17 ISSN 1803-0203 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200760801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : synthetic jet * actuator * nominal frequency Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics

  16. Methods for preparing synthetic freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E J; Davison, W; Hamilton-Taylor, J

    2002-03-01

    Synthetic solutions that emulate the major ion compositions of natural waters are useful in experiments aimed at understanding biogeochemical processes. Standard recipes exist for preparing synthetic analogues of seawater, with its relatively constant composition, but, due to the diversity of freshwaters, a range of compositions and recipes is required. Generic protocols are developed for preparing synthetic freshwaters of any desired composition. The major problems encountered in preparing hard and soft waters include dissolving sparingly soluble calcium carbonate, ensuring that the ionic components of each concentrated stock solution cannot form an insoluble salt and dealing with the supersaturation of calcium carbonate in many hard waters. For acidic waters the poor solubility of aluminium salts requires attention. These problems are overcome by preparing concentrated stock solutions according to carefully designed reaction paths that were tested using a combination of experiment and equilibrium modeling. These stock solutions must then be added in a prescribed order to prepare a final solution that is brought into equilibrium with the atmosphere. The example calculations for preparing hard, soft and acidic freshwater surrogates with major ion compositions the same as published analyses, are presented in a generalized fashion that should allow preparation of any synthetic freshwater according to its known analysis.

  17. Development of Mackintosh Probe Extractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Noor Khazanah A.; Kaamin, Masiri; Suwandi, Amir Khan; Sahat, Suhaila; Jahaya Kesot, Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic probing is a continuous soil investigation technique, which is one of the simplest soil penetration test. It basically consist of repeatedly driving a metal tipped probe into the ground using a drop weight of fixed mass and travel. Testing was carried out continuously from ground level to the final penetration depth. Once the soil investigation work done, it is difficult to pull out the probe rod from the ground, due to strong soil structure grip against probe cone and prevent the probe rod out from the ground. Thus, in this case, a tool named Extracting Probe was created to assist in the process of retracting the probe rod from the ground. In addition, Extracting Probe also can reduce the time to extract the probe rod from the ground compare with the conventional method. At the same time, it also can reduce manpower cost because only one worker involve to handle this tool compare with conventional method used two or more workers. From experiment that have been done we found that the time difference between conventional tools and extracting probe is significant, average time difference is 155 minutes. In addition the extracting probe can reduce manpower usage, and also labour cost for operating the tool. With all these advantages makes this tool has the potential to be marketed.

  18. Protease-sensitive synthetic prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Colby

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrP(C undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrP(Sc. Frequently, PrP(Sc is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, but not recPrP monomers or oligomers, transmitted disease to transgenic mice (n = 164, denoted Tg9949 mice, that overexpress N-terminally truncated PrP. Tg9949 control mice (n = 174 did not spontaneously generate prions although they were prone to late-onset spontaneous neurological dysfunction. When synthetic prion isolates from infected Tg9949 mice were serially transmitted in the same line of mice, they exhibited sPrP(Sc and caused neurodegeneration. Interestingly, these protease-sensitive prions did not shorten the life span of Tg9949 mice despite causing extensive neurodegeneration. We inoculated three synthetic prion isolates into Tg4053 mice that overexpress full-length PrP; Tg4053 mice are not prone to developing spontaneous neurological dysfunction. The synthetic prion isolates caused disease in 600-750 days in Tg4053 mice, which exhibited sPrP(Sc. These novel synthetic prions demonstrate that conformational changes in wild-type PrP can produce mouse prions composed exclusively of sPrP(Sc.

  19. Mobile Probing Kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Sørensen, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Mobile Probing Kit is a low tech and low cost methodology for obtaining inspiration and insights into user needs, requirements and ideas in the early phases of a system's development process. The methodology is developed to identify user needs, requirements and ideas among knowledge workers...... characterized as being highly nomadic and thus potential users of mobile and ubiquitous technologies. The methodology has been applied in the 1ST MAGNET Beyond project in order to obtain user needs and requirements in the process of developing pilot services. We report on the initial findings from applying...... this methodology in the early phases of this large scale research and development process....

  20. The opacity of spiral galaxy disks VII. The accuracy of galaxy counts as an extinction probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, BW; Gonzalez, RA; Allen, RJ; van der Kruit, PC

    2005-01-01

    The "Synthetic Field Method" (SFM) was introduced by Gonzalez et al. (1998, ApJ, 506, 152) to calibrate numbers of distant galaxies as a probe of extinction in a foreground spiral disk. Gonzalez et al. (2003, AJ, 125, 1182) studied the effect of the foreground disk on these numbers using simulations

  1. Unnatural amino acids as probes of ligand-receptor interactions and their conformational consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Ahern, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    -edge synthetic and chemical biological approaches. Here we summarize recent advances in the use of site-directed incorporation of unnatural amino acids and chemical probes to study ligand-receptor interactions, determine the location of binding sites, and examine the downstream conformational consequences...

  2. Probe-Fed Stacked Microstrip Patch Antenna for High-Resolution Polarimetric C-Band SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granholm, Johan; Skou, Niels

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes a C-band, dual-linear polarization wideband antenna for use in the next-generation of the Danish high-resolution, airborne polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system, EMISAR. The design and performance of a probe-fed, stacked microstrip patch element, operating from 4...

  3. High spatial resolution Kelvin probe force microscopy with coaxial probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Keith A; Westervelt, Robert M; Satzinger, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a widely used technique to measure the local contact potential difference (CPD) between an AFM probe and the sample surface via the electrostatic force. The spatial resolution of KPFM is intrinsically limited by the long range of the electrostatic interaction, which includes contributions from the macroscopic cantilever and the conical tip. Here, we present coaxial AFM probes in which the cantilever and cone are shielded by a conducting shell, confining the tip–sample electrostatic interaction to a small region near the end of the tip. We have developed a technique to measure the true CPD despite the presence of the shell electrode. We find that the behavior of these probes agrees with an electrostatic model of the force, and we observe a factor of five improvement in spatial resolution relative to unshielded probes. Our discussion centers on KPFM, but the field confinement offered by these probes may improve any variant of electrostatic force microscopy. (paper)

  4. Failure of a VapA/CpG oligodeoxynucleotide vaccine to protect foals against experimental Rhocococcus equi pneumonia despite induction of VapA-specific antibody and interferon-γ response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Katharina L; Lopez, A Marianela; Manning, Stephen T; Marques, Fernando J; Brownlie, Robert; Allen, Andrew L; Sangster, Anna E; Mutwiri, George; Gerdts, Volker; Potter, Andrew; Townsend, Hugh G G

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated the immunogenic and protective potential of a recombinant VapA/CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) 2395 vaccine in neonatal foals undergoing experimental Rhodococcus equi challenge. Foals (n = 8) were vaccinated by intramuscular injection on days 1 and 15 of the study; control foals (n = 7) received a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution. All foals were challenged by intrabronchial administration of 5 × 10⁶ R. equi 103⁺ on day 29. Bronchoalveolar lavages were done on days 15, 29, and 36 and total cell count, differential cell count, rVapA-stimulated cell proliferation and interferon (IFN)-γ mRNA expression determined. Clinical examination, complete blood (cell) counts, serology for VapA-specific antibodies, and culture of nasal and fecal swabs were done on days 1, 15, 29, 36, 43, and 50. Foals were humanely euthanized on day 50 and severity of pneumonia scored on a 4-point scale. Vaccination resulted in a significant increase in VapA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) production, with total IgG and IgG(T) being increased by day 15. Expression of VapA-specific IFN-γ mRNA by BAL cells was increased in the vaccinated foals following challenge. Postmortem lung severity scores did not differ between groups. Two foals shed virulent R. equi in feces; however, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revealed the isolates to be different from the challenge strain.

  5. Microbial Extremophiles for Earth and Beyond: Pushing the Boundaries with Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2017-01-01

    All organisms live in a multi-dimensional physical and chemical niche space. Discoveries in the 20th century enormously expanded the range of what was considered "habitable." However, the current diversity of life on Earth begs the question of what terrestrial life - or indeed, another life form - would be capable of. With the needs of both modern laboratory science and the burgeoning field of biotechnology, as well as our deeply held desire to answer the question "are we alone in the universe?, we are exploiting the tools of synthetic biology to probe the question of whether we can create "synthetic extremophiles" or, as our lab has dubbed them, "Hell Cells."

  6. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Trudy M [Berkeley, CA; Nikanjam, Mina [Richmond, CA

    2012-08-28

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  7. Synthetic biology character and impact

    CERN Document Server

    Pade, Christian; Wigger, Henning; Gleich, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Biology is already an object of intensive debate. However, to a great extent the discussion to date has been concerned with fundamental ethical, religious and philosophical questions. By contrast, based on an investigation of the field’s scientific and technological character, this book focuses on new functionalities provided by synthetic biology and explores the associated opportunities and risks. Following an introduction to the subject and a discussion of the most central paradigms and methodologies, the book provides an overview of the structure of this field of science and technology. It informs the reader about the current stage of development, as well as topical problems and potential opportunities in important fields of application. But not only the science itself is in focus. In order to investigate its broader impact, ecological as well as ethical implications will be considered, paving the way for a discussion of responsibilities in the context of a field at a transitional crossroads be...

  8. Design Automation in Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Evan; Madsen, Curtis; Roehner, Nicholas; Densmore, Douglas

    2017-04-03

    Design automation refers to a category of software tools for designing systems that work together in a workflow for designing, building, testing, and analyzing systems with a target behavior. In synthetic biology, these tools are called bio-design automation (BDA) tools. In this review, we discuss the BDA tools areas-specify, design, build, test, and learn-and introduce the existing software tools designed to solve problems in these areas. We then detail the functionality of some of these tools and show how they can be used together to create the desired behavior of two types of modern synthetic genetic regulatory networks. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  9. Engineering Ecosystems and Synthetic Ecologies#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, Michael T; Wang, Harris H

    2012-01-01

    Microbial ecosystems play an important role in nature. Engineering these systems for industrial, medical, or biotechnological purposes are important pursuits for synthetic biologists and biological engineers moving forward. Here, we provide a review of recent progress in engineering natural and synthetic microbial ecosystems. We highlight important forward engineering design principles, theoretical and quantitative models, new experimental and manipulation tools, and possible applications of microbial ecosystem engineering. We argue that simply engineering individual microbes will lead to fragile homogenous populations that are difficult to sustain, especially in highly heterogeneous and unpredictable environments. Instead, engineered microbial ecosystems are likely to be more robust and able to achieve complex tasks at the spatial and temporal resolution needed for truly programmable biology. PMID:22722235

  10. Synthetic greenhouse gases under control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horisberger, B.; Karlaganis, G.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses new Swiss regulations on the use of synthetic materials that posses a considerable greenhouse-warming potential. Synthetic materials such as hydro-chlorofluorocarbons HCFCs, perfluoride-hydrocarbons and sulphur hexafluoride have, in recent years, replaced chlorofluorocarbons CFCs, which were banned on account of their ozone depletion characteristics. The use of these persistent substances is now being limited to applications where more environment-friendly alternatives are not available. The measures decreed in the legislation, which include a general ban on HCFCs as of 2004 and a ban on the export of installations and equipment that use ozone-depleting refrigerants are described. Details on the legislation's effects on the Swiss refrigeration industry are listed and discussed

  11. Compounding in synthetic aperture imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. M.; Jensen, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    from multiple spherical emissions to synthesize multiple transmit and receive apertures, corresponding to imaging the tissue from multiple directions. The many images are added incoherently, to produce a single compound image. Using a 192-element, 3.5-MHz, λ-pitch transducer, it is demonstrated from...... tissue-phantom measurements that the speckle is reduced and the contrast resolution improved when applying synthetic aperture compound imaging. At a depth of 4 cm, the size of the synthesized apertures is optimized for lesion detection based on the speckle information density. This is a performance...... measure for tissue contrast resolution which quantifies the tradeoff between resolution loss and speckle reduction. The speckle information density is improved by 25% when comparing synthetic aperture compounding to a similar setup for compounding using dynamic receive focusing. The cystic resolution...

  12. Characterization of Synthetic Peptides by Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman; Højrup, Peter; Hansen, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-MS of synthetic peptides.

  13. Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kady, Ihab F; Olsson, Roy H; Hopkins, Patrick; Reinke, Charles; Kim, Bongsang

    2013-08-13

    Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals can simultaneously have a large Seebeck coefficient, high electrical conductivity, and low thermal conductivity. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials can enable improved thermoelectric devices, such as thermoelectric generators and coolers, with improved performance. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials and devices can be fabricated using techniques that are compatible with standard microelectronics.

  14. Steel desulphurization with synthetic slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heput, T.; Ardelean, E.; Socalici, A.; Maksay, S.; Gavanescu, A.

    2007-07-01

    Generally speaking, sulfur is considered a harmful element for steel quality, reason why all the technological steps are being taken in order to eliminate it from the metal bath. This paper deals with the influence of the chemical composition, on the slag quantity and of the batch stirring condition upon the desulfurization process in the casting ladle by treatment with synthetic slag. The experiments were made at an open-hearth plant with the steel tapping in two ladles (the desulfurization was made with synthetic slag at one ladle while the other one was considered standard) and at the electric steel plant and for the synthetic slag formation a mix was used, made, according to several receipts, of : lime (50-75%), fluorine (0-17%); bauxite (0-32%) and aluminous slag (8-22%). The data were processed in the calculation programs EXCEL and MATLAB, which resulted in a series of correlations between the desulfurization degree and the chemical composition of the slag, respectively the slag quantity both for the charges bubbled with Argon and the un bubbled ones. (Author) 5 refs.

  15. Hydrogen speciation in synthetic quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, R.D.; Kirby, S.H.; Rossman, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    The dominant hydrogen impurity in synthetic quartz is molecular H2O. H-OH groups also occur, but there is no direct evidence for the hydrolysis of Si-O-Si bonds to yield Si-OH HO-Si groups. Molecular H2O concentrations in the synthetic quartz crystals studied range from less than 10 to 3,300 ppm (H/Si), and decrease smoothly by up to an order of magnitude with distance away from the seed. OH- concentrations range from 96 to 715 ppm, and rise smoothly with distance away from the seed by up to a factor of three. The observed OH- is probably all associated with cationic impurities, as in natural quartz. Molecular H2O is the dominant initial hydrogen impurity in weak quartz. The hydrolytic weakening of quartz may be caused by the transformation H2O + Si-O-Si ??? 2SiOH, but this may be a transitory change with the SiOH groups recombining to form H2O, and the average SiOH concentration remaining very low. Synthetic quartz is strengthened when the H2O is accumulated into fluid inclusions and cannot react with the quartz framework. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  16. The Galaxy Evolution Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jason; Galaxy Evolution Probe Team

    2018-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Probe (GEP) is a concept for a far-infrared observatory to survey large regions of sky for star-forming galaxies from z = 0 to beyond z = 3. Our knowledge of galaxy formation is incomplete and requires uniform surveys over a large range of redshifts and environments to accurately describe mass assembly, star formation, supermassive black hole growth, interactions between these processes, and what led to their decline from z ~ 2 to the present day. Infrared observations are sensitive to dusty, star-forming galaxies, which have bright polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features and warm dust continuum in the rest-frame mid infrared and cooler thermal dust emission in the far infrared. Unlike previous far-infrared continuum surveys, the GEP will measure photometric redshifts commensurate with galaxy detections from PAH emission and Si absorption features, without the need for obtaining spectroscopic redshifts of faint counterparts at other wavelengths.The GEP design includes a 2 m diameter telescope actively cooled to 4 K and two instruments: (1) An imager covering 10 to 300 um with 25 spectral resolution R ~ 8 bands (with lower R at the longest wavelengths) to detect star-forming galaxies and measure their redshifts photometrically. (2) A 23 – 190 um, R ~ 250 dispersive spectrometer for redshift confirmation and identification of obscured AGN using atomic fine-structure lines. Lines including [Ne V], [O IV], [O III], [O I], and [C II] will probe gas physical conditions, radiation field hardness, and metallicity. Notionally, the GEP will have a two-year mission: galaxy surveys with photometric redshifts in the first year and a second year devoted to follow-up spectroscopy. A comprehensive picture of star formation in galaxies over the last 10 billion years will be assembled from cosmologically relevant volumes, spanning environments from field galaxies and groups, to protoclusters, to dense galaxy clusters.Commissioned by NASA, the

  17. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Khlopov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  18. Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, Brett; Furukawa, Brian; Tanner, Nichole T

    2014-12-01

    Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is a minimally invasive diagnostic technique that allows real-time sampling of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes and central pulmonary lesions. Its utility in diagnosing both malignant and nonmalignant diseases has led to an increased uptake and use by pulmonologists over the past decade. Because of the robust evidence supporting its safety and diagnostic yield, EBUS is now the first guideline recommended test for staging in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It has also a role in providing tissue for molecular analysis, thereby guiding in the selection of agents in the new era of personalized chemotherapies in the treatment of NSCLC. The following review highlights the evidence for EBUS in diagnosing mediastinal pathology and addresses technique, training, and competency and future directions for this technology. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Printability of Synthetic Papers by Electrophotography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozália Szentgyörgyvölgyi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the printability of synthetic papers by the electrophotography technique. Prints of cmyk colour fields from 20% to 100% raster tone values were printed on three types of synthetic papers (one film synthetic paper and two fiber synthetic papers. The investigation of the appearance included densitometric measurement of the cmyk prints. The results have shown differences in the optical density and optical tone value between cmyk prints made on various synthetic papers. The highest optical density and the increase of the optical tone value were observed on the film synthetic paper, where cmyk prints were more saturated. The highest abrasion resistance of cmyk prints was obtained from the fibre synthetic paper.

  20. Synthetic biology: Emerging bioengineering in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhandono, Sony

    2017-05-01

    The development of synthetic biology will shape the new era of science and technology. It is an emerging bioengineering technique involving genetic engineering which can alter the phenotype and behavior of the cell or the new product. Synthetic biology may produce biomaterials, drugs, vaccines, biosensors, and even a recombinant secondary metabolite used in herbal and complementary medicine, such as artemisinin, a malaria drug which is usually extracted from the plant Artemisia annua. The power of synthetic biology has encouraged scientists in Indonesia, and is still in early development. This paper also covers some research from an Indonesian research institute in synthetic biology such as observing the production of bio surfactants and the enhanced production of artemisinin using a transient expression system. Synthetic biology development in Indonesia may also be related to the iGEM competition, a large synthetic biology research competition which was attended by several universities in Indonesia. The application of synthetic biology for drug discovery will be discussed.

  1. Non-inductive current probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christen Kjeldahl

    1977-01-01

    The current probe described is a low-cost, shunt resistor for monitoring current pulses in e.g., pulsed lasers. Rise time is......The current probe described is a low-cost, shunt resistor for monitoring current pulses in e.g., pulsed lasers. Rise time is...

  2. Gene probes: principles and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aquino de Muro, Marilena; Rapley, Ralph

    2002-01-01

    ... of labeled DNA has allowed genes to be mapped to single chromosomes and in many cases to a single chromosome band, promoting significant advance in human genome mapping. Gene Probes: Principles and Protocols presents the principles for gene probe design, labeling, detection, target format, and hybridization conditions together with detailed protocols, accom...

  3. Synthetic Biology Guides Biofuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Connor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of microbial processes for the production of renewable liquid fuels has increased with concerns about the current fuel economy. The development of advanced biofuels in particular has risen to address some of the shortcomings of ethanol. These advanced fuels have chemical properties similar to petroleum-based liquid fuels, thus removing the need for engine modification or infrastructure redesign. While the productivity and titers of each of these processes remains to be improved, progress in synthetic biology has provided tools to guide the engineering of these processes through present and future challenges.

  4. Synthetic Fourier transform light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeoreh; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Youngchan; Hillman, Timothy R; Min, Bumki; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-09-23

    We present synthetic Fourier transform light scattering, a method for measuring extended angle-resolved light scattering (ARLS) from individual microscopic samples. By measuring the light fields scattered from the sample plane and numerically synthesizing them in Fourier space, the angle range of the ARLS patterns is extended up to twice the numerical aperture of the imaging system with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Extended ARLS patterns of individual microscopic polystyrene beads, healthy human red blood cells (RBCs), and Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized RBCs are presented.

  5. Synthetic carbonaceous fuels and feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Meyer

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to the use of a three compartment electrolytic cell in the production of synthetic carbonaceous fuels and chemical feedstocks such as gasoline, methane and methanol by electrolyzing an aqueous sodium carbonate/bicarbonate solution, obtained from scrubbing atmospheric carbon dioxide with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution, whereby the hydrogen generated at the cathode and the carbon dioxide liberated in the center compartment are combined thermocatalytically into methanol and gasoline blends. The oxygen generated at the anode is preferably vented into the atmosphere, and the regenerated sodium hydroxide produced at the cathode is reused for scrubbing the CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere.

  6. Synthetic Biology Guides Biofuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Michael R.; Atsumi, Shota

    2010-01-01

    The advancement of microbial processes for the production of renewable liquid fuels has increased with concerns about the current fuel economy. The development of advanced biofuels in particular has risen to address some of the shortcomings of ethanol. These advanced fuels have chemical properties similar to petroleum-based liquid fuels, thus removing the need for engine modification or infrastructure redesign. While the productivity and titers of each of these processes remains to be improved, progress in synthetic biology has provided tools to guide the engineering of these processes through present and future challenges. PMID:20827393

  7. Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando

    The main objective of this project was to continue the development of a synthetic aperture vector flow estimator. This type of estimator is capable of overcoming two of the major limitations in conventional ultrasound systems: 1) the inability to scan large region of interest with high temporal......, this thesis showed that novel information can be obtained with vector velocity methods providing quantitative estimates of blood flow and insight into the complexity of the hemodynamics dynamics. This could give the clinician a new tool in assessment and treatment of a broad range of diseases....

  8. Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels

    2008-01-01

    of the thesis considers a method for estimating the two-dimensional velocity vector within the image plane. This method, called synthetic aperture vector flow imaging, is first shortly reviewed. The main contribution of this work is partly an analysis of the method with respect to focusing effects, motion...... estimation. The method can be used for increasing the frame rate of color flow maps or alternatively for a new imaging modality entitled quadroplex imaging, featuring a color flow map and two independent spectrograms at a high frame rate. The second is an alternative method for ultrasonic vector velocity...

  9. Protease-Sensitive Synthetic Prions

    OpenAIRE

    Colby, David W.; Wain, Rachel; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Legname, Giuseppe; Palmer, Christina G.; Nguyen, Hoang-Oanh B.; Lemus, Azucena; Cohen, Fred E.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2010-01-01

    Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrPC) undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrPSc. Frequently, PrPSc is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s) prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec) PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, but no...

  10. Nanobits: customizable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Shaik, Hassan Uddin; Sardan Sukas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    We present here a proof-of-principle study of scanning probe tips defined by planar nanolithography and integrated with AFM probes using nanomanipulation. The so-called 'nanobits' are 2-4 mu m long and 120-150 nm thin flakes of Si3N4 or SiO2, fabricated by electron beam lithography and standard...... or dislocation of the tips of the nanobit after several scans. This approach allows an unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of scanning probe tips to the surface topology or to the specific application....... silicon processing. Using a microgripper they were detached from an array and fixed to a standard pyramidal AFM probe or alternatively inserted into a tipless cantilever equipped with a narrow slit. The nanobit-enhanced probes were used for imaging of deep trenches, without visible deformation, wear...

  11. Water cooled static pressure probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  12. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  13. Mobile Probes in Mobile Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Blomhøj, Ulla; Duvaa, Uffe

    In this paper experiences from using mobile probes in educational design of a mobile learning application is presented. The probing process stems from the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. In the project, the mobile phone was not only acting...... as an agent for acquiring empirical data (as the situation in hitherto mobile probe settings) but was also the technological medium for which data should say something about (mobile learning). Consequently, not only the content of the data but also the ways in which data was delivered and handled, provided...... a valuable dimension for investigating mobile use. The data was collected at the same time as design activities took place and the collective data was analysed based on user experience goals and cognitive processes from interaction design and mobile learning. The mobile probe increased the knowledge base...

  14. Wearable probes for service design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullane, Aaron; Laaksolahti, Jarmo Matti; Svanæs, Dag

    2014-01-01

    by service employees in reflecting on the delivery of a service. In this paper, we present the ‘wearable probe’, a probe concept that captures sensor data without distracting service employees. Data captured by the probe can be used by the service employees to reflect and co-reflect on the service journey......Probes are used as a design method in user-centred design to allow end-users to inform design by collecting data from their lives. Probes are potentially useful in service innovation, but current probing methods require users to interrupt their activity and are consequently not ideal for use......, helping to identify opportunities for service evolution and innovation....

  15. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-specific goose TLR21 initiates an anti-viral immune response against NGVEV but not AIV strain H9N2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yulin; Yan, Bing; Chen, Shun; Chen, Hongjun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Sun, Kunfeng; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue; Jing, Bo; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-03-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize components of pathogens and mediate the host innate immune response. TLR21 is a TLR that specifically recognizes exogenous double-stranded DNA and rapidly signals to downstream innate immune factors. This study reports the cDNA of goose TLR21 and identifies its immune characteristics. The goose TLR21 is 3161 base pairs and encodes a 975 amino acid protein. As predicted, the goose transmembrane protein TLR21 has a signal peptide, leucine-rich repeat regions, a transmembrane domain, and a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain. Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic analyses showed that goose TLR21 has homology to chicken TLR21. The tissue distribution of TLR21 suggested that it has high transcript levels in immune-associated tissues, especially in the bursa of Fabricius, the Hadrian gland, and the thymus. After challenge with agonist ODN2006 and new type gosling viral enteritis virus (NGVEV), significant induction of TLR21 production, pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6, and interferons were observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Both synthetic DNA (ODN2006) and viral DNA (NGVEV) can be recognized by goose TLR21, which leads to a rapid up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-viral molecules. In vivo, avian influenza A virus H9N2 and NGVEV were used to infect goslings, which was followed by a significant up-regulation of TLR21 mRNA transcripts in multiple tissues of NGVEV-infected geese. In general, goose TLR21 plays an important role in binding invading pathogenic DNA viruses, which subsequently triggers an innate immune response; furthermore, it acts as a functional homologue of mammalian TLR9, as TLR21 recognizes a mammalian TLR9 agonist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Tracking the emergence of synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Philip; Kwon, Seokbeom; Youtie, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging domain that combines biological and engineering concepts and which has seen rapid growth in research, innovation, and policy interest in recent years. This paper contributes to efforts to delineate this emerging domain by presenting a newly constructed bibliometric definition of synthetic biology. Our approach is dimensioned from a core set of papers in synthetic biology, using procedures to obtain benchmark synthetic biology publication records, extract keywords from these benchmark records, and refine the keywords, supplemented with articles published in dedicated synthetic biology journals. We compare our search strategy with other recent bibliometric approaches to define synthetic biology, using a common source of publication data for the period from 2000 to 2015. The paper details the rapid growth and international spread of research in synthetic biology in recent years, demonstrates that diverse research disciplines are contributing to the multidisciplinary development of synthetic biology research, and visualizes this by profiling synthetic biology research on the map of science. We further show the roles of a relatively concentrated set of research sponsors in funding the growth and trajectories of synthetic biology. In addition to discussing these analyses, the paper notes limitations and suggests lines for further work.

  17. Transient Astrophysics Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan; Transient Astrophysics Probe Team

    2018-01-01

    The Transient Astrophysics Probe (TAP) is a wide-field multi-wavelength transient mission proposed for flight starting in the late 2020s. The mission instruments include unique “Lobster-eye” imaging soft X-ray optics that allow a ~1600 deg2 FoV; a high sensitivity, 1 deg2 FoV soft X-ray telescope; a 1 deg2 FoV Infrared telescope with bandpass 0.6-3 micron; and a set of 8 NaI gamma-ray detectors. TAP’s most exciting capability will be the observation of tens per year of X-ray and IR counterparts of GWs involving stellar mass black holes and neutron stars detected by LIGO/Virgo/KAGRA/LIGO-India, and possibly several per year X-ray counterparts of GWs from supermassive black holes, detected by LISA and Pulsar Timing Arrays. TAP will also discover hundreds of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including tidal disruption events, supernova shock breakouts, and Gamma-Ray Bursts from the epoch of reionization.

  18. Steerable Doppler transducer probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidel, H.F.; Greenwood, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    An ultrasonic diagnostic probe is described which is capable of performing ultrasonic imaging and Doppler measurement consisting of: a hollow case having an acoustic window which passes ultrasonic energy and including chamber means for containing fluid located within the hollow case and adjacent to a portion of the acoustic window; imaging transducer means, located in the hollow case and outside the fluid chamber means, and oriented to direct ultrasonic energy through the acoustic window toward an area which is to be imaged; Doppler transducer means, located in the hollow case within the fluid chamber means, and movably oriented to direct Doppler signals through the acoustic window toward the imaged area; means located within the fluid chamber means and externally controlled for controllably moving the Doppler transducer means to select one of a plurality of axes in the imaged area along which the Doppler signals are to be directed; and means, located external to the fluid chamber means and responsive to the means for moving, for providing an indication signal for identifying the selected axis

  19. Repurposing ribosomes for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Kim, Do Soon; Jewett, Michael C

    2017-10-01

    The translation system is the cell's factory for protein biosynthesis, stitching together hundreds to thousands of amino acids into proteins, which are required for the structure, function, and regulation of living systems. The extraordinary synthetic capability of this system, which includes the ribosome and its associated factors required for polymerization, has driven extensive efforts to harness it for societal use in areas as diverse as energy, materials, and medicine. A powerful example is recombinant protein production, which has impacted the lives of patients through the synthesis of biopharmaceuticals such as insulin. In nature, however, only limited sets of monomers are utilized, thereby resulting in limited sets of biopolymers (i.e., proteins). Expanding nature's repertoire of ribosomal monomers could yield new classes of enzymes, therapeutics, materials, and chemicals with diverse, genetically encoded chemistry. Here, we discuss recent progress towards engineering ribosomes both in vivo and in vitro. These fundamental and technical breakthroughs open doors for advanced applications in biotechnology and synthetic biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA recognition by synthetic constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Elena; Mosquera, Jesús; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2011-09-05

    The interaction of transcription factors with specific DNA sites is key for the regulation of gene expression. Despite the availability of a large body of structural data on protein-DNA complexes, we are still far from fully understanding the molecular and biophysical bases underlying such interactions. Therefore, the development of non-natural agents that can reproduce the DNA-recognition properties of natural transcription factors remains a major and challenging goal in chemical biology. In this review we summarize the basics of double-stranded DNA recognition by transcription factors, and describe recent developments in the design and preparation of synthetic DNA binders. We mainly focus on synthetic peptides that have been designed by following the DNA interaction of natural proteins, and we discuss how the tools of organic synthesis can be used to make artificial constructs equipped with functionalities that introduce additional properties to the recognition process, such as sensing and controllability. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Towards developing algal synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaife, Mark Aden; Smith, Alison Gail

    2016-06-15

    The genetic, physiological and metabolic diversity of microalgae has driven fundamental research into photosynthesis, flagella structure and function, and eukaryotic evolution. Within the last 10 years these organisms have also been investigated as potential biotechnology platforms, for example to produce high value compounds such as long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, pigments and antioxidants, and for biodiesel precursors, in particular triacylglycerols (TAGs). Transformation protocols, molecular tools and genome sequences are available for a number of model species including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, although for both species there are bottlenecks to be overcome to allow rapid and predictable genetic manipulation. One approach to do this would be to apply the principles of synthetic biology to microalgae, namely the cycle of Design-Build-Test, which requires more robust, predictable and high throughput methods. In this mini-review we highlight recent progress in the areas of improving transgene expression, genome editing, identification and design of standard genetic elements (parts), and the use of microfluidics to increase throughput. We suggest that combining these approaches will provide the means to establish algal synthetic biology, and that application of standard parts and workflows will avoid parallel development and capitalize on lessons learned from other systems. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Shape analysis of synthetic diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Mullan, C

    1997-01-01

    Two-dimensional images of synthetic industrial diamond particles were obtained using a camera, framegrabber and PC-based image analysis software. Various methods for shape quantification were applied, including two-dimensional shape factors, Fourier series expansion of radius as a function of angle, boundary fractal analysis, polygonal harmonics, and comer counting methods. The shape parameter found to be the most relevant was axis ratio, defined as the ratio of the minor axis to the major axis of the ellipse with the same second moments of area as the particle. Axis ratio was used in an analysis of the sorting of synthetic diamonds on a vibrating table. A model was derived based on the probability that a particle of a given axis ratio would travel to a certain bin. The model described the sorting of bulk material accurately but it was found not to be applicable if the shape mix of the feed material changed dramatically. This was attributed to the fact that the particle-particle interference was not taken int...

  3. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-enhanced humoral immune response and production of antibodies to prion protein PrPSc in mice immunized with 139A scrapie-associated fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Daryl S; Kascsak, Regina B; Lafauci, Giuseppe; Meeker, Harry C; Ye, Xuemin; Flory, Michael J; Kim, Jae Il; Schuller-Levis, Georgia B; Levis, William R; Wisniewski, Thomas; Carp, Richard I; Kascsak, Richard J

    2007-06-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to a protease-resistant conformer, the srapie form of PrP (PrP(Sc)). Humoral immune responses to nondenatured forms of PrP(Sc) have never been fully characterized. We investigated whether production of antibodies to PrP(Sc) could occur in PrP null (Prnp(-/-)) mice and further, whether innate immune stimulation with the TLR9 agonist CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) 1826 could enhance this process. Whether such stimulation could raise anti-PrP(Sc) antibody levels in wild-type (Prnp(+/+)) mice was also investigated. Prnp(-/-) and Prnp(+/+) mice were immunized with nondenatured 139A scrapie-associated fibrils (SAF), with or without ODN 1826, and were tested for titers of PrP-specific antibodies. In Prnp(-/-) mice, inclusion of ODN 1826 in the immunization regime increased anti-PrP titers more than 13-fold after two immunizations and induced, among others, antibodies to an N-terminal epitope, which were only present in the immune repertoire of mice receiving ODN 1826. mAb 6D11, derived from such a mouse, reacts with the N-terminal epitope QWNK in native and denatured forms of PrP(Sc) and recombinant PrP and exhibits a K(d) in the 10(-)(11) M range. In Prnp(+/+) mice, ODN 1826 increased anti-PrP levels as much as 84% after a single immunization. Thus, ODN 1826 potentiates adaptive immune responses to PrP(Sc) in 139A SAF-immunized mice. These results represent the first characterization of humoral immune responses to nondenatured, infectious PrP(Sc) and suggest methods for optimizing the generation of mAbs to PrP(Sc), many of which could be used for diagnosis and treatment of prion diseases.

  4. Ex vivo gene editing of the dystrophin gene in muscle stem cells mediated by peptide nucleic acid single stranded oligodeoxynucleotides induces stable expression of dystrophin in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nik-Ahd, Farnoosh; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which result in the complete absence of dystrophin protein throughout the body. Gene correction strategies hold promise to treating DMD. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated the ability of peptide nucleic acid single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (PNA-ssODNs) to permanently correct single-point mutations at the genomic level. In this study, we show that PNA-ssODNs can target and correct muscle satellite cells (SCs), a population of stem cells capable of self-renewing and differentiating into muscle fibers. When transplanted into skeletal muscles, SCs transfected with correcting PNA-ssODNs were able to engraft and to restore dystrophin expression. The number of dystrophin-positive fibers was shown to significantly increase over time. Expression was confirmed to be the result of the activation of a subpopulation of SCs that had undergone repair as demonstrated by immunofluorescence analyses of engrafted muscles using antibodies specific to full-length dystrophin transcripts and by genomic DNA analysis of dystrophin-positive fibers. Furthermore, the increase in dystrophin expression detected over time resulted in a significant improvement in muscle morphology. The ability of transplanted cells to return into quiescence and to activate upon demand was confirmed in all engrafted muscles following injury. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using gene editing strategies to target and correct SCs and further establish the therapeutic potential of this approach to permanently restore dystrophin expression into muscle of DMD patients. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  5. Effect of sublingual administration with a native or denatured protein allergen and adjuvant CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or cholera toxin on systemic T(H)2 immune responses and mucosal immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Feng; Wang, Chih-Chien; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Chu, Chia-Hsiang; Peng, Ho-Jen

    2007-11-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy has been recently used for allergic diseases, but its mechanisms are still unclear. To examine the effect of sublingual administration of a native or denatured allergen alone or plus adjuvant on systemic T(H)2 responses and mucosal immunity in mice. Naive or sensitized BALB/c mice were sublingually vaccinated biweekly for 3 weeks with ovalbumin (OVA) or urea-denatured OVA (CM-OVA) only or plus adjuvant CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) or cholera toxin (CT). Two weeks later, their specific serum IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgE, and saliva secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody responses and the cytokine profiles of spleen and cervical lymph node cells were investigated. Specific SIgA antibody responses were induced by vaccination with CM-OVA plus CpG or CT. Whereas vaccination with CM-OVA and CpG enhanced T(H)1 responses but inhibited IgE production, vaccination with CT and CM-OVA or OVA increased cervical lymph node cell production of interleukin (IL) 4, IL-5, and IL-6 and serum IgG1 antibody responses. In previously sensitized mice, sublingual vaccination with OVA or CM-OVA plus CT or CpG stimulated mucosal SIgA antibody responses, but did not enhance ongoing IgE antibody responses. Sublingual vaccination with OVA or CM-OVA plus adjuvant CT or CpG all can induce systemic and mucosal immunity, but CM-OVA plus CpG had the best prophylactic and therapeutic effects on IgE antibody production. It is likely that sublingual vaccines may have a role for the prophylaxis and immunotherapy of allergic reactions.

  6. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, MaryJoe K; Ruder, Warren C

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  7. Word selection affects perceptions of synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonidandel Scott

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Members of the synthetic biology community have discussed the significance of word selection when describing synthetic biology to the general public. In particular, many leaders proposed the word "create" was laden with negative connotations. We found that word choice and framing does affect public perception of synthetic biology. In a controlled experiment, participants perceived synthetic biology more negatively when "create" was used to describe the field compared to "construct" (p = 0.008. Contrary to popular opinion among synthetic biologists, however, low religiosity individuals were more influenced negatively by the framing manipulation than high religiosity people. Our results suggest that synthetic biologists directly influence public perception of their field through avoidance of the word "create".

  8. Synthetic biology - the state of play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitney, Richard; Freemont, Paul

    2012-07-16

    Just over two years ago there was an article in Nature entitled "Five Hard Truths for Synthetic Biology". Since then, the field has moved on considerably. A number of economic commentators have shown that synthetic biology very significant industrial potential. This paper addresses key issues in relation to the state of play regarding synthetic biology. It first considers the current background to synthetic biology, whether it is a legitimate field and how it relates to foundational biological sciences. The fact that synthetic biology is a translational field is discussed and placed in the context of the industrial translation process. An important aspect of synthetic biology is platform technology, this topic is also discussed in some detail. Finally, examples of application areas are described. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, MaryJoe K; Ruder, Warren C

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems. (review)

  10. Probing the Probes: Fitness Factors For Small Molecule Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Workman, Paul; Collins, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Chemical probes for interrogating biological processes are of considerable current interest. Cell permeable small molecule tools have a major role in facilitating the functional annotation of the human genome, understanding both physiological and pathological processes, and validating new molecular targets. To be valuable, chemical tools must satisfy necessary criteria and recent publications have suggested objective guidelines for what makes a useful chemical probe. Although recognizing that...

  11. A synthetic zero air standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    A Synthetic Zero Air Standard R. E. Hill-Pearce, K. V. Resner, D. R. Worton, P. J. Brewer The National Physical Laboratory Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW UK We present work towards providing traceability for measurements of high impact greenhouse gases identified by the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) as critical for global monitoring. Standards for these components are required with challengingly low uncertainties to improve the quality assurance and control processes used for the global networks to better assess climate trends. Currently the WMO compatibility goals require reference standards with uncertainties of < 100 nmolmol-1 for CO2 (northern hemisphere) and < 2 nmolmol-1 for CH4 and CO. High purity zero gas is required for both the balance gas in the preparation of reference standards and for baseline calibrations of instrumentation. Quantification of the amount fraction of the target components in the zero gas is a significant contributor to the uncertainty and is challenging due to limited availability of reference standard at the amount fraction of the measurand and limited analytical techniques with sufficient detection limits. A novel dilutor was used to blend NPL Primary Reference Gas Mixtures containing CO2, CH4 and CO at atmospheric amount fractions with a zero gas under test. Several mixtures were generated with nominal dilution ratios ranging from 2000:1 to 350:1. The baseline of two cavity ring down spectrometers was calibrated using the zero gas under test after purification by oxidative removal of CO and hydrocarbons to < 1 nmolmol-1 (SAES PS15-GC50) followed by the removal of CO2 and water vapour to < 100 pmolmol-1 (SAES MC190). Using the standard addition method.[1] we have quantified the amount fraction of CO, CO2, and CH4 in scrubbed whole air (Scott Marrin) and NPL synthetic zero air. This is the first synthetic zero air standard with a matrix of N2, O2 and Ar closely matching ambient composition with gravimetrically assigned

  12. Synthetic approaches to uniform polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Monzur; Brocchini, Steve

    2006-12-30

    Uniform polymers are characterised by a narrow molecular weight distribution (MWD). Uniformity is also defined by chemical structure in respect of (1) monomer orientation, sequence and stereo-regularity, (2) polymer shape and morphology and (3) chemical functionality. The function of natural polymers such as polypeptides and polynucleotides is related to their conformational structure (e.g. folded tertiary structure). This is only possible because of their high degree of uniformity. While completely uniform synthetic polymers are rare, polymers with broad structure and MWD are widely used in medicine and the biomedical sciences. They are integral components in final dosage forms, drug delivery systems (DDS) and in implantable devices. Increasingly uniform polymers are being used to develop more complex medicines (e.g. delivery of biopharmaceuticals, enhanced formulations or DDS's for existing actives). In addition to the function imparted by any new polymer it will be required to meet stringent specifications in terms of cost containment, scalability, biocompatibility and performance. Synthetic polymers with therapeutic activity are also being developed to exploit their polyvalent properties, which is not possible with low molecular weight molecules. There is need to utilise uniform polymers for applications where the polymer may interact with the systemic circulation, tissues or cellular environment. There are also potential applications (e.g. stimuli responsive coatings) where uniform polymers may be used for their more defined property profile. While it is not yet practical to prepare synthetic polymers to the same high degree of uniformity as proteins, nature also effectively utilises many polymers with lower degrees of uniformity (e.g. polysaccharides, poly(amino acids), polyhydroxyalkanoates). In recent years it has become possible to prepare with practical experimental protocols sufficient quantities of polymers that display many aspects of uniformity. This

  13. Fluorescent Reporters and Biosensors for Probing the Dynamic Behavior of Protein Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. González-Vera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Probing the dynamic activities of protein kinases in real-time in living cells constitutes a major challenge that requires specific and sensitive tools tailored to meet the particular demands associated with cellular imaging. The development of genetically-encoded and synthetic fluorescent biosensors has provided means of monitoring protein kinase activities in a non-invasive fashion in their native cellular environment with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we review existing technologies to probe different dynamic features of protein kinases and discuss limitations where new developments are required to implement more performant tools, in particular with respect to infrared and near-infrared fluorescent probes and strategies which enable improved signal-to-noise ratio and controlled activation of probes.

  14. Geo synthetic-reinforced Pavement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zornberg, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    Geo synthetics have been used as reinforcement inclusions to improve pavement performance. while there are clear field evidence of the benefit of using geo synthetic reinforcements, the specific conditions or mechanisms that govern the reinforcement of pavements are, at best, unclear and have remained largely unmeasured. Significant research has been recently conducted with the objectives of: (i) determining the relevant properties of geo synthetics that contribute to the enhanced performance of pavement systems, (ii) developing appropriate analytical, laboratory and field methods capable of quantifying the pavement performance, and (iii) enabling the prediction of pavement performance as a function of the properties of the various types of geo synthetics. (Author)

  15. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  16. Characterization of Synthetic Peptides by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman; Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI-TOF-MS an......Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI...

  17. Synthetic biology assemblies for sustainable space exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The work utilized synthetic biology to create sustainable food production processes by developing technology to efficiently convert inedible crop waste to...

  18. Synthetic biology: engineering molecular computers

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Complicated systems cannot survive the rigors of a chaotic environment, without balancing mechanisms that sense, decide upon and counteract the exerted disturbances. Especially so with living organisms, forced by competition to incredible complexities, escalating also their self-controlling plight. Therefore, they compute. Can we harness biological mechanisms to create artificial computing systems? Biology offers several levels of design abstraction: molecular machines, cells, organisms... ranging from the more easily-defined to the more inherently complex. At the bottom of this stack we find the nucleic acids, RNA and DNA, with their digital structure and relatively precise interactions. They are central enablers of designing artificial biological systems, in the confluence of engineering and biology, that we call Synthetic biology. In the first part, let us follow their trail towards an overview of building computing machines with molecules -- and in the second part, take the case study of iGEM Greece 201...

  19. Preparation of synthetic standard minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrick, C.C.; Bustamante, S.J.; Charls, R.W.; Cowan, R.E.; Hakkila, E.A.; Hull, D.E.; Olinger, B.W.; Roof, R.B.; Sheinberg, H.; Herrick, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    A number of techniques for synthetic mineral preparations have been examined. These techniques include hot-pressing in graphite dies at moderate pressures, high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis in a piston and cylinder apparatus, isostatic pressing under helium gas pressures, hydrous mineral preparations using water as the pressure medium, explosion-generated shock waves, and radiofrequency heating. Minerals suitable for equation-of-state studies (three-inch, high-density discs), for thermodynamic property determinations (low-density powders) and for microprobe standards (fusion-cast microbeads) have been prepared. Mechanical stress-strain calculations in the piston-cylinder apparatus have been initiated and their integration with thermal stress calculations is currently under investigation

  20. Synthetic biology of antimicrobial discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K.

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic discovery has a storied history. From the discovery of penicillin by Sir Alexander Fleming to the relentless quest for antibiotics by Selman Waksman, the stories have become like folklore, used to inspire future generations of scientists. However, recent discovery pipelines have run dry at a time when multidrug resistant pathogens are on the rise. Nature has proven to be a valuable reservoir of antimicrobial agents, which are primarily produced by modularized biochemical pathways. Such modularization is well suited to remodeling by an interdisciplinary approach that spans science and engineering. Herein, we discuss the biological engineering of small molecules, peptides, and non-traditional antimicrobials and provide an overview of the growing applicability of synthetic biology to antimicrobials discovery. PMID:23654251

  1. Synthetic aperture interferometry: error analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Amiya; Coupland, Jeremy

    2010-07-10

    Synthetic aperture interferometry (SAI) is a novel way of testing aspherics and has a potential for in-process measurement of aspherics [Appl. Opt.42, 701 (2003)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701 A method to measure steep aspherics using the SAI technique has been previously reported [Appl. Opt.47, 1705 (2008)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.001705 Here we investigate the computation of surface form using the SAI technique in different configurations and discuss the computational errors. A two-pass measurement strategy is proposed to reduce the computational errors, and a detailed investigation is carried out to determine the effect of alignment errors on the measurement process.

  2. Synthetic aperture interferometry: error analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Amiya; Coupland, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic aperture interferometry (SAI) is a novel way of testing aspherics and has a potential for in-process measurement of aspherics [Appl. Opt.42, 701 (2003)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701 A method to measure steep aspherics using the SAI technique has been previously reported [Appl. Opt.47, 1705 (2008)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.001705 Here we investigate the computation of surface form using the SAI technique in different configurations and discuss the computational errors. A two-pass measurement strategy is proposed to reduce the computational errors, and a detailed investigation is carried out to determine the effect of alignment errors on the measurement process.

  3. Microorganism Utilization for Synthetic Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morford, Megan A.; Khodadad, Christina L.; Caro, Janicce I.; Spencer, LaShelle E.; Richards, Jeffery T.; Strayer, Richard F.; Birmele, Michele N.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    A desired architecture for long duration spaceflight, like aboard the International Space Station or for future missions to Mars, is to provide a supply of fresh food crops for the astronauts. However, some crops can create a high proportion of inedible plant waste. The main goal of the Synthetic Biology project, Cow in a Column, was to produce the components of milk (sugar, lipid, protein) from inedible plant waste by utilizing microorganisms (fungi, yeast, bacteria). Of particular interest was utilizing the valuable polysaccharide, cellulose, found in plant waste, to naturally fuel-through microorganism cellular metabolism- the creation of sugar (glucose), lipid (milk fat), and protein (casein) in order to produce a synthetic edible food product. Environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, carbon source, aeration, and choice microorganisms were optimized in the laboratory and the desired end-products, sugars and lipids, were analyzed. Trichoderma reesei, a known cellulolytic fungus, was utilized to drive the production of glucose, with the intent that the produced glucose would serve as the carbon source for milk fat production and be a substitute for the milk sugar lactose. Lipid production would be carried out by Rhodosporidium toruloides, yeast known to accumulate those lipids that are typically found in milk fat. Results showed that glucose and total lipid content were below what was expected during this phase of experimentation. In addition, individual analysis of six fatty acids revealed that the percentage of each fatty acid was lower than naturally produced bovine milk. Overall, this research indicates that microorganisms could be utilized to breakdown inedible solid waste to produce useable products. For future work, the production of the casein protein for milk would require the development of a genetically modified organism, which was beyond the scope of the original project. Additional trials would be needed to further refine the required

  4. Probing and Manipulating Ultracold Fermi Superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei

    Ultracold Fermi gas is an exciting field benefiting from atomic physics, optical physics and condensed matter physics. It covers many aspects of quantum mechanics. Here I introduce some of my work during my graduate study. We proposed an optical spectroscopic method based on electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) as a generic probing tool that provides valuable insights into the nature of Fermi paring in ultracold Fermi gases of two hyperfine states. This technique has the capability of allowing spectroscopic response to be determined in a nearly non-destructive manner and the whole spectrum may be obtained by scanning the probe laser frequency faster than the lifetime of the sample without re-preparing the atomic sample repeatedly. Both quasiparticle picture and pseudogap picture are constructed to facilitate the physical explanation of the pairing signature in the EIT spectra. Motivated by the prospect of realizing a Fermi gas of 40K atoms with a synthetic non-Abelian gauge field, we investigated theoretically BEC-HCS crossover physics in the presence of a Rashba spin-orbit coupling in a system of two-component Fermi gas with and without a Zeeman field that breaks the population balance. A new bound state (Rashba pair) emerges because of the spin-orbit interaction. We studied the properties of Rashba pairs using a standard pair fluctuation theory. As the two-fold spin degeneracy is lifted by spin-orbit interaction, bound pairs with mixed singlet and triplet pairings (referred to as rashbons) emerge, leading to an anisotropic superfluid. We discussed in detail the experimental signatures for observing the condensation of Rashba pairs by calculating various physical observables which characterize the properties of the system and can be measured in experiment. The role of impurities as experimental probes in the detection of quantum material properties is well appreciated. Here we studied the effect of a single classical impurity in trapped ultracold Fermi

  5. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  6. A three dimensional probe positioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Furno, I.; Dorf, L.; Lapenta, G.

    2008-01-01

    In order to sort out the physics that is important in many plasma experiments, data in three dimensions (3D) are becoming necessary. Access to the usual cylindrical vacuum vessel is typically restricted to radially or axially insertable probes that can pivot. The space that can be explored usually has significant restrictions either because probe travel must be along a travel path, or a 'wobbly' probe positioner requires one to map between a moveable coordinate system and a preferred laboratory coordinate system. This could for example introduce errors in measurements of vector quantities such as magnetic field or flow. We describe the design and implementation of a 3D probe positioner that slides in two dimensions on a double O-ring seal and radially inserts along the third dimension. The net result is that a 3D space can be explored in a laboratory Cartesian reference frame.

  7. Pneumatic probe with laser interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkens, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    Improvements to upgrade the accuracy of Rotacon probes by a complete redesign of probe to include a Michelson interferometer to replace the existing long-range capacity transducer are described. This has resulted in a compact and interchangeable probe cartridge with a 3 μin. resolution and accuracy; the cartridge can be installed and replaced in the Rotacon gauge with the minimum of realignment, which should reduce our dependence on operator skill. In addition, the stylus contact force can be reduced to 750 mg for the contacting types, but an alternative feature, which we are still developing, will use a gas jet cushion in place of the stylus to provide a noncontacting version of the same basic probe cartridge. This device is very sensitive to external vibration effects because it is virtually frictionless

  8. pyXSIM: Synthetic X-ray observations generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZuHone, John A.; Hallman, Eric. J.

    2016-08-01

    pyXSIM simulates X-ray observations from astrophysical sources. X-rays probe the high-energy universe, from hot galaxy clusters to compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes and many interesting sources in between. pyXSIM generates synthetic X-ray observations of these sources from a wide variety of models, whether from grid-based simulation codes such as FLASH (ascl:1010.082), Enzo (ascl:1010.072), and Athena (ascl:1010.014), to particle-based codes such as Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and AREPO, and even from datasets that have been created “by hand”, such as from NumPy arrays. pyXSIM can also manipulate the synthetic observations it produces in various ways and export the simulated X-ray events to other software packages to simulate the end products of specific X-ray observatories. pyXSIM is an implementation of the PHOX (ascl:1112.004) algorithm and was initially the photon_simulator analysis module in yt (ascl:1011.022); it is dependent on yt.

  9. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. (Nestle Research Centre, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  10. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H.

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α- 32 P-labeled probe

  11. DIGITAL CONTACT POTENTIAL DIFFERENCE PROBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. U. Pantsialeyeu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the technique of analog contact potential difference probes well developed. Due to the influence of various parasitic factors, analog probes has substantial errors. The integration time for automatic CPD compensation should be at least several seconds to achieve high accuracy measurements. The speed and the accuracy are essential, for example, for Scanning Kelvin Probes. The purpose of this paper is to develop a digital contact potential difference probe, with a higher accuracy and speed of measurements as compared to analog probe. The digital probe made on base of 32-bit microprocessor with a Cortex M4 core. Measuring cycle consists of at least two successive determinations of the output signal amplitude at different compensation voltage generated by the microcontroller. It allows synchronizing of the generated oscillations and reading of the measuring signals. Data arrays processed in real time of the Digital Signal Processing by microprocessor. In this case is possible computation of the root mean square value or determination of the desired spectral line of the signal after fast Fourier transformation. Both methods permit eliminate of random noise and spurious harmonics. The method provides the digital contact potential difference probe operation in large signal mode and with a large signal/noise ratio. This eliminates the error associated with the zero signal finding. Also the integration time for automatic CPD compensation of the measured value is not necessary, which significantly reduces the measurement time and eliminates errors of compensation and DAC. In addition, the microcontroller could control the movement of the probe during scanning and transfer data to the host computer on interface USB, etc.

  12. Probing Aggrecan Interactions with Ions by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Preethi; Dimitriadis, Emilios; Basser, Peter; Horkay, Ferenc

    2010-03-01

    Aggrecan (MW 2 MDa) is a highly charged bottle-brush shape biological polymer found in the extracellular matrix of tissues. It consists of a protein backbone (400nm long), to which about 100 linear chains of negatively-charged glucosaminoglycans are attached approximately 4 nm apart. The high charge density of the aggrecan bottle-brush allows it to imbibe water, thereby maintaining tissue hydration and permeability, while also binding to cell-signaling molecules. In solution, aggrecan molecules respond differently to varying salt conditions, than other charged biological and synthetic polyelectrolytes like DNA and poly(acrylic acid) (Horkay, 2008). To probe the nature of its interactions with charged surfaces, we looked at the absorption patterns of aggrecan assemblies on controlled surfaces (polylysine, mica) under different ionic conditions, using Atomic Force Microscopy. We propose a simple model of the charge interactions, which relates the surface-adsorption patterns to the solution structures. The study may help understanding how aggrecan loss or degradation with age and joint disease affects tissue microstructure and physical properties.

  13. Chemical Reductive Transformations of Synthetic Organic Compounds. Probe Compound Studies and Mechanistic Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peyton, Gary

    2001-01-01

    .... A kinetic model that was previously developed to describe the results of batch AOP treatment by H2O2/UV did not give satisfactory predictive results obtained when extended to describe flow experiments...

  14. Probing cleavage promiscuity of heparinase III towards chemoenzymatically synthetic heparan sulfate oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guixin; Shao, Meng; Gao, Xin; Wang, Fengshan; Liu, Chunhui

    2017-10-01

    An insightful investigation into specificity of bacterial heparinase III has been intriguingly difficult due to heterogeneity of polymeric substrates. Herein, we chemoenzymatically synthesized a tailored library of HS oligosaccharides as substrates. A ∼15-fold reactivity difference to heparinase III was found between trisaccharides bearing different primary cleavage sites. Variable glucosamine modification decreased reactivity of trisaccharides by >20-fold compared with their counterpart primary substrates, while iduronate-containing secondary linkage showed slightly less sensitivity. The 2-sulfated iduronate residue extremely reduced reactivity to its adjacent primary site at reducing end of oligosaccharides, but showed marginal influence on the non-reducing site. Moreover, oligosaccharide susceptibility to digestion was size-dependent and had an obvious preference for the internal linkages over those near to non-reducing/reducing ends. Surface plasmon resonance revealed cleavage promiscuity attributed to different affinities or incorrect binding of substrates to the enzyme. The attractive information on heparinase III will be valuable in characterizing heparin and HS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Metrics for rapid quality control in RNA structure probing experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Krishna; Shih, Nathan P; Deng, Fei; Ledda, Mirko; Li, Bo; Aviran, Sharon

    2016-12-01

    The diverse functionalities of RNA can be attributed to its capacity to form complex and varied structures. The recent proliferation of new structure probing techniques coupled with high-throughput sequencing has helped RNA studies expand in both scope and depth. Despite differences in techniques, most experiments face similar challenges in reproducibility due to the stochastic nature of chemical probing and sequencing. As these protocols expand to transcriptome-wide studies, quality control becomes a more daunting task. General and efficient methodologies are needed to quantify variability and quality in the wide range of current and emerging structure probing experiments. We develop metrics to rapidly and quantitatively evaluate data quality from structure probing experiments, demonstrating their efficacy on both small synthetic libraries and transcriptome-wide datasets. We use a signal-to-noise ratio concept to evaluate replicate agreement, which has the capacity to identify high-quality data. We also consider and compare two methods to assess variability inherent in probing experiments, which we then utilize to evaluate the coverage adjustments needed to meet desired quality. The developed metrics and tools will be useful in summarizing large-scale datasets and will help standardize quality control in the field. The data and methods used in this article are freely available at: http://bme.ucdavis.edu/aviranlab/SPEQC_software CONTACT: saviran@ucdavis.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Automated Change Detection for Synthetic Aperture Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Automated Change Detection for Synthetic Aperture Sonar...R. Azimi-Sadjadi and S. Srinivasan, “Coherent Change Detection and Classification in Synthetic Aper - ture Radar Imagery Using Canonical Correlation

  17. Synthetic aperture radar: principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, N.A.; Yahya, K.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper an introduction to synthetic aperture radar is presented. Synthetic aperture radar is a relatively new remote sensing platform and the technology has matured a lot in the last two decades. This paper introduces the concepts behind SAR principles as well as the major areas where this new technology has shown additional information. (author)

  18. Synthetic Biology in Health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passel, van M.W.J.; Lam, C.M.C.; Martins dos Santos, V.A.P.; Suarez Diez, M.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology draws on the understanding from genetics, biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, and computational sciences to (re-)design and (re-)engineer biological functions. Here we address how synthetic biology can be possibly deployed to promote health and tackle disease. We discuss how

  19. Metal immobilization in soils using synthetic zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osté, L.A.; Lexmond, T.M.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2002-01-01

    In situ immobilization of heavy metals in contaminated soils is a technique to improve soil quality. Synthetic zeolites are potentially useful additives to bind heavy metals. This study selected the most effective zeolite in cadmium and zinc binding out of six synthetic zeolites (mordenite-type,

  20. Synthetic biology: from mainstream to counterculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleator, Roy D

    2016-09-01

    Existing at the interface of science and engineering, synthetic biology represents a new and emerging field of mainstream biology. However, there also exists a counterculture of Do-It-Yourself biologists, citizen scientists, who have made significant inroads, particularly in the design and development of new tools and techniques. Herein, I review the development and convergence of synthetic biology's mainstream and countercultures.

  1. Synergistic Synthetic Biology: Units in Concert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosset, Jean-Yves; Carbonell, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims at translating the methods and strategies from engineering into biology in order to streamline the design and construction of biological devices through standardized parts. Modular synthetic biology devices are designed by means of an adequate elimination of cross-talk that makes circuits orthogonal and specific. To that end, synthetic constructs need to be adequately optimized through in silico modeling by choosing the right complement of genetic parts and by experimental tuning through directed evolution and craftsmanship. In this review, we consider an additional and complementary tool available to the synthetic biologist for innovative design and successful construction of desired circuit functionalities: biological synergies. Synergy is a prevalent emergent property in biological systems that arises from the concerted action of multiple factors producing an amplification or cancelation effect compared with individual actions alone. Synergies appear in domains as diverse as those involved in chemical and protein activity, polypharmacology, and metabolic pathway complementarity. In conventional synthetic biology designs, synergistic cross-talk between parts and modules is generally attenuated in order to verify their orthogonality. Synergistic interactions, however, can induce emergent behavior that might prove useful for synthetic biology applications, like in functional circuit design, multi-drug treatment, or in sensing and delivery devices. Synergistic design principles are therefore complementary to those coming from orthogonal design and may provide added value to synthetic biology applications. The appropriate modeling, characterization, and design of synergies between biological parts and units will allow the discovery of yet unforeseeable, novel synthetic biology applications. PMID:25022769

  2. Synergistic Synthetic Biology: Units in Concert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trosset, Jean-Yves; Carbonell, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims at translating the methods and strategies from engineering into biology in order to streamline the design and construction of biological devices through standardized parts. Modular synthetic biology devices are designed by means of an adequate elimination of cross-talk that makes circuits orthogonal and specific. To that end, synthetic constructs need to be adequately optimized through in silico modeling by choosing the right complement of genetic parts and by experimental tuning through directed evolution and craftsmanship. In this review, we consider an additional and complementary tool available to the synthetic biologist for innovative design and successful construction of desired circuit functionalities: biological synergies. Synergy is a prevalent emergent property in biological systems that arises from the concerted action of multiple factors producing an amplification or cancelation effect compared with individual actions alone. Synergies appear in domains as diverse as those involved in chemical and protein activity, polypharmacology, and metabolic pathway complementarity. In conventional synthetic biology designs, synergistic cross-talk between parts and modules is generally attenuated in order to verify their orthogonality. Synergistic interactions, however, can induce emergent behavior that might prove useful for synthetic biology applications, like in functional circuit design, multi-drug treatment, or in sensing and delivery devices. Synergistic design principles are therefore complementary to those coming from orthogonal design and may provide added value to synthetic biology applications. The appropriate modeling, characterization, and design of synergies between biological parts and units will allow the discovery of yet unforeseeable, novel synthetic biology applications.

  3. Steel desulphurization with synthetic slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heput, T.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, sulphur is considered a harmful element for steel quality, reason why all the technological steps are being taken in order to eliminate it from the metal bath. This paper deals with the influence of the chemical composition, on the slag quantity and of the bath stirring condition upon the desulphurization process in the casting ladle by treatment with synthetic slag. The experiments were made at an open-hearth plant with the steel tapping in two ladles (the desulphurization was made with synthetic slag at one ladle while the other one was considered standard and at the electric steel plant and for the synthetic slag formation a mix was used, made, according to several receipts, of: lime (50-75%, fluorine (0-17%, bauxite (0-32% and aluminous slag (8-22%. The data were processed in the calculation programs EXCEL and MATLAB, which resulted in a series of correlations between the desulphurization degree and the chemical composition of the slag, respectively the slag quantity both for the charges bubbled with Argon and the unbubbled ones.

    En general, el azufre es considerado un elemento nocivo para la calidad del acero y, por eso, en la práctica, se toman todas las medidas de orden tecnológico para su eliminación del baño metálico. En este trabajo se analiza la influencia de la composición química, de la cantidad de escoria y del estado de agitación del baño sobre el proceso de desulfuración en la cuchara para fundir por tratamiento con escoria sintética. Los experimentos se han realizado en una acería evacuando el acero en dos ollas (en una cuchara se efectuó la desulfuración con escoria sintética y a la otra se consideró como patrón y en un acería eléctrica y para la formación de la escoria sintética se utilizó una mezcla producida según muchas recetas, formada por: cal (50-75%, fluorina (0-17%, bauxita (0-32% y escoria aluminosa (8-22%. Los datos han sido procesados en los programas de c

  4. GENETIC DIVERSITY OF TYPHA LATIFOLIA (TYPHACEAE) AND THE IMPACT OF POLLUTANTS EXAMINED WITH TANDEM-REPETITIVE DNA PROBES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic diversity at variable-number-tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci was examined in the common cattail, Typha latifolia (Typhaceae), using three synthetic DNA probes composed of tandemly repeated "core" sequences (GACA, GATA, and GCAC). The principal objectives of this investigation w...

  5. Philosophy of Systems and Synthetic Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Sara

    2017-01-01

    This entry aims to clarify how systems and synthetic biology contribute to and extend discussions within philosophy of science. Unlike fields such as developmental biology or molecular biology, systems and synthetic biology are not easily demarcated by a focus on a specific subject area or level...... computational approaches, about the relation between living and artificial systems, and about the implications of interdisciplinary research for science and society. The entry can be openly accessed at the webpage of the Stanford Encyclopaedia of Philosophy: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/systems-synthetic-biology/...... of organization. Rather, they are characterized by the development and application of mathematical, computational, and synthetic modeling strategies in response to complex problems and challenges within the life sciences. Proponents of systems and synthetic biology often stress the necessity of a perspective...

  6. Mammalian synthetic biology: emerging medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Zoltán; Pereira, Hugo Sant'Ana; Homma, Takayuki; Pedrigi, Ryan M.; Krams, Rob

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss new emerging medical applications of the rapidly evolving field of mammalian synthetic biology. We start with simple mammalian synthetic biological components and move towards more complex and therapy-oriented gene circuits. A comprehensive list of ON–OFF switches, categorized into transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational, is presented in the first sections. Subsequently, Boolean logic gates, synthetic mammalian oscillators and toggle switches will be described. Several synthetic gene networks are further reviewed in the medical applications section, including cancer therapy gene circuits, immuno-regulatory networks, among others. The final sections focus on the applicability of synthetic gene networks to drug discovery, drug delivery, receptor-activating gene circuits and mammalian biomanufacturing processes. PMID:25808341

  7. Sub-10-nm intracellular bioelectronic probes from nanowire-nanotube heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tian-Ming; Duan, Xiaojie; Jiang, Zhe; Dai, Xiaochuan; Xie, Ping; Cheng, Zengguang; Lieber, Charles M

    2014-01-28

    The miniaturization of bioelectronic intracellular probes with a wide dynamic frequency range can open up opportunities to study biological structures inaccessible by existing methods in a minimally invasive manner. Here, we report the design, fabrication, and demonstration of intracellular bioelectronic devices with probe sizes less than 10 nm. The devices are based on a nanowire-nanotube heterostructure in which a nanowire field-effect transistor detector is synthetically integrated with a nanotube cellular probe. Sub-10-nm nanotube probes were realized by a two-step selective etching approach that reduces the diameter of the nanotube free-end while maintaining a larger diameter at the nanowire detector necessary for mechanical strength and electrical sensitivity. Quasi-static water-gate measurements demonstrated selective device response to solution inside the nanotube, and pulsed measurements together with numerical simulations confirmed the capability to record fast electrophysiological signals. Systematic studies of the probe bandwidth in different ionic concentration solutions revealed the underlying mechanism governing the time response. In addition, the bandwidth effect of phospholipid coatings, which are important for intracellular recording, was investigated and modeled. The robustness of these sub-10-nm bioelectronics probes for intracellular interrogation was verified by optical imaging and recording the transmembrane resting potential of HL-1 cells. These ultrasmall bioelectronic probes enable direct detection of cellular electrical activity with highest spatial resolution achieved to date, and with further integration into larger chip arrays could provide a unique platform for ultra-high-resolution mapping of activity in neural networks and other systems.

  8. IVVS probe mechanical concept design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.rossi@enea.it; Neri, Carlo; De Collibus, Mario Ferri; Mugnaini, Giampiero; Pollastrone, Fabio; Crescenzi, Fabio

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ENEA designed, developed and tested a laser based In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS). • IVVS mechanical design has been revised from 2011 to 2013 to meet ITER requirements. • Main improvements are piezoceramic actuators and a step focus system. • Successful qualification activities validated the concept design for ITER environment. - Abstract: ENEA has been deeply involved in the design, development and testing of a laser based In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) required for the inspection of ITER plasma-facing components. The IVVS probe shall be deployed into the vacuum vessel, providing high resolution images and metrology measurements to detect damages and possible erosion. ENEA already designed and manufactured an IVVS probe prototype based on a rad-hard concept and driven by commercial micro-step motors, which demonstrated satisfying viewing and metrology performances at room conditions. The probe sends a laser beam through a reflective rotating prism. By rotating the axes of the prism, the probe can scan all the environment points except those present in a shadow cone and the backscattered light signal is then processed to measure the intensity level (viewing) and the distance from the probe (metrology). During the last years, in order to meet all the ITER environmental conditions, such as high vacuum, gamma radiation lifetime dose up to 5 MGy, cumulative neutron fluence of about 2.3 × 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}, temperature of 120 °C and magnetic field of 8 T, the probe mechanical design was significantly revised introducing a new actuating system based on piezo-ceramic actuators and improved with a new step focus system. The optical and mechanical schemes have been then modified and refined to meet also the geometrical constraints. The paper describes the mechanical concept design solutions adopted in order to fulfill IVVS probe functional performance requirements considering ITER working environment and geometrical constraints.

  9. Science with Synthetic Stellar Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Robyn Ellyn

    2018-04-01

    A new generation of observational projects is poised to revolutionize our understanding of the resolved stellar populations of Milky-Way-like galaxies at an unprecedented level of detail, ushering in an era of precision studies of galaxy formation. In the Milky Way itself, astrometric, spectroscopic and photometric surveys will measure three-dimensional positions and velocities and numerous chemical abundances for stars from the disk to the halo, as well as for many satellite dwarf galaxies. In the Local Group and beyond, HST, JWST and eventually WFIRST will deliver pristine views of resolved stars. The groundbreaking scale and dimensionality of this new view of resolved stellar populations in galaxies challenge us to develop new theoretical tools to robustly compare these surveys to simulated galaxies, in order to take full advantage of our new ability to make detailed predictions for stellar populations within a cosmological context. I will describe a framework for generating realistic synthetic star catalogs and mock surveys from state-of-the-art cosmological-hydrodynamical simulations, and present several early scientific results from, and predictions for, resolved stellar surveys of our Galaxy and its neighbors.

  10. Synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Abhigyan; Vemparala, Satyavani; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Tew, Gregory N

    2008-01-01

    Infectious diseases and antibiotic resistance are now considered the most imperative global healthcare problem. In the search for new treatments, host defense, or antimicrobial, peptides have attracted considerable attention due to their various unique properties; however, attempts to develop in vivo therapies have been severely limited. Efforts to develop synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides (SMAMPs) have increased significantly in the last decade, and this review will focus primarily on the structural evolution of SMAMPs and their membrane activity. This review will attempt to make a bridge between the design of SMAMPs and the fundamentals of SMAMP-membrane interactions. In discussions regarding the membrane interaction of SMAMPs, close attention will be paid to the lipid composition of the bilayer. Despite many years of study, the exact conformational aspects responsible for the high selectivity of these AMPs and SMAMPs toward bacterial cells over mammalian cells are still not fully understood. The ability to design SMAMPs that are potently antimicrobial, yet nontoxic to mammalian cells has been demonstrated with a variety of molecular scaffolds. Initial animal studies show very good tissue distribution along with more than a 4-log reduction in bacterial counts. The results on SMAMPs are not only extremely promising for novel antibiotics, but also provide an optimistic picture for the greater challenge of general proteomimetics.

  11. Online professionalism: A synthetic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chretien, Katherine C; Tuck, Matthew G

    2015-04-01

    The rise of social media has increased connectivity and blurred personal and professional boundaries, bringing new challenges for medical professionalism. Whether traditional professionalism principles apply to the online social media space remains unknown. The purpose of this synthetic literature review was to characterize the original peer-reviewed research studies published between 1 January 2000-1 November 2014 on online professionalism, to assess methodologies and approaches used, and to provide insights to guide future studies in this area. The investigators searched three databases and performed manual searches of bibliographies to identify the 32 studies included. Most studies originated in the USA. Cross-sectional surveys and analyses of publicly available online content were the most common methodologies employed. Studies covered the general areas of use and privacy, assessment of unprofessional online behaviours, consensus-gathering of what constitutes unprofessional or inappropriate online behaviours, and education and policies. Studies were of variable quality; only around half of survey studies had response rates of 50% or greater. Medical trainees were the most common population studied. Future directions for research include public perspectives of online professionalism, impact on patient trust, and how to use social media productively as medical professionals.

  12. Modeling magnetically driven synthetic microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Hassan; Alexeev, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    Using computer simulations and theory, we examine how to design magnetically-responsive synthetic microcapsules that able to move in a steady manner in microfluidic channels. These compliant fluid-filled capsules encompass superparamagnetic nanoparticles in their solid shells and, thereby, can be manipulated by alternating magnetic forces. To model the magnetic capsules propelled in fluid-filled microchannels, we employ a hybrid computational method for fluid-structure interactions. This method integrates the lattice Boltzmann model for the fluid dynamics and the lattice spring model for the micromechanics of solids. We show that in circulating magnetic field the capsules propel along sticky microchannel walls. The direction of capsule motion depends on the relative location of the solid surface, whereas the propulsion speed can be regulated through the wall adhesiveness, amplitude and frequency of magnetic forces, and elasticity of capsule's shell. The results indicate that such mobile fluid-filled containers could find application in lab-on-chip systems for controlled delivery of minute amounts of fluidic samples.

  13. Synthetic and Natural Lipase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białecka-Florjańczyk, Ewa; Fabiszewska, Agata Urszula; Krzyczkowska, Jolanta; Kuryłowicz, Alina

    2016-06-30

    Lipases are enzymes that catalyse the hydrolysis of ester bonds of triglycerides ranging among biocatalysts of considerable physiological significance and industrial potential. Better understanding of the catalytic functions and achieving the possibility to control the biocatalysis process, in particular exploring some activators and inhibitors of lipases, seems to be crucial in the context of novel applications. The lipase activity is a function of interfacial composition: the enzyme can be there activated as well as denaturated or deactivated and the interface is an appropriate site for modulating lipolysis. Lipase inhibitor, interacts directly with the enzyme and inhibits lipase action. Alternatively, some compounds can postpone the lipolytic reaction via adsorption to the interphase or to the substrate molecules. The aim of this review is to summarise the current knowledge concerning human, animal and microbial lipase inhibitors, which were grouped into two categories: synthetic lipase inhibitors (including phosphonates, boronic acids and fats analogues) and natural compounds (including β-lactones and some botanical foodstuffs - plant extracts and plant metabolites, mainly polyphenols and saponins as well as peptides and some dietary fibers). The topics discussed include also inhibition issues from the viewpoint of obesity treatment. Among natural compounds able to inhibit lipase activity are β-lactones including orlistat. Orlistat is the only registered drug for obesity treatment in many countries, especially pancreatic lipase which is responsible for the hydrolysis of over 80% of total dietary fats. Its effectiveness in obesity treatment was also described.

  14. Synthetic properties of starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitherer, Claus; Heckman, Timothy M.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of an extensive grid of evolutionary synthesis models for populations of massive stars. The parameter space has been chosen to correspond to conditions typically found in objects like giant H II regions, H II galaxies, blue compact dwarf galaxies, nuclear starbursts, and infrared luminous starburst galaxies. The models are based on the most up-to-date input physics for the theory of stellar atmospheres, stellar winds, and stellar evolution. A population of massive stars is not only important in terms of its output of radiation but also via its deposition of mechanical energy. The output of radiative and mechanical luminosity is compared at various starburst epochs. In a supernova dominated instantaneous starburst, the mechanical luminosity can be as large as almost 10% of the total radiative luminosity. This occurs when most massive O stars have disappeared, and the synthetic spectrum in the optical and near-ultraviolet is dominated by B and A stars. During this epoch, the output of ionizing radiation below 912 A becomes very small, as indicated by a very large Lyman discontinuity and a very small ratio of ionizing over mechanical luminosity. We discuss the relevance of these results for the interpretation of starburst galaxies, active galactic nuclei, and the energetics of the interstellar medium.

  15. Silica precipitation by synthetic minicollagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiher, Felix; Schatz, Michaela; Steinem, Claudia; Geyer, Armin

    2013-03-11

    Oligomeric Pro-Hyp-Gly- (POG-) peptides, wherein the collagenous triple helix is supported by C-terminal capping, exhibit silica precipitation properties (O, Hyp = (2S,4R)hydroxyproline). As quantified by a molybdate assay, the length of the covalently tethered triple helix (number of POG units) determines the amount of amorphous silica obtained from silicic acid solution. Although lacking charged side chains, the synthetic collagens precipitate large quantities of silicic acid resulting in micrometer-sized spheres of varying surface morphologies as analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Similar precipitation efficiencies on a fast time scale of less than 10 min were previously described only for biogenic diatom proteins and sponge collagen, respectively, which have a considerably higher structural complexity and limited accessibility. The minicollagens described here provide an unexpected alternative to the widely used precipitation conditions, which generally depend on (poly-)amines in phosphate buffer. Collagen can form intimate connections with inorganic matter. Hence, silica-enclosed collagens have promising perspectives as composite materials.

  16. Synthetic sustained gene delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ankit; Mallapragada, Surya K

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy today is hampered by the need of a safe and efficient gene delivery system that can provide a sustained therapeutic effect without cytotoxicity or unwanted immune responses. Bolus gene delivery in solution results in the loss of delivered factors via lymphatic system and may cause undesired effects by the escape of bioactive molecules to distant sites. Controlled gene delivery systems, acting as localized depot of genes, provide an extended sustained release of genes, giving prolonged maintenance of the therapeutic level of encoded proteins. They also limit the DNA degradation in the nuclease rich extra-cellular environment. While attempts have been made to adapt existing controlled drug delivery technologies, more novel approaches are being investigated for controlled gene delivery. DNA encapsulated in nano/micro spheres of polymers have been administered systemically/orally to be taken up by the targeted tissues and provide sustained release once internalized. Alternatively, DNA entrapped in hydrogels or scaffolds have been injected/implanted in tissues/cavities as platforms for gene delivery. The present review examines these different modalities for sustained delivery of viral and non-viral gene-delivery vectors. Design parameters and release mechanisms of different systems made with synthetic or natural polymers are presented along with their prospective applications and opportunities for continuous development.

  17. In vivo evaluation of the effects of simultaneous inhibition of GLUT-1 and HIF-1α by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides on the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma using micro 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-Fang; Zhao, Xin; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Lu, Zhong-Jie; Zhao, Kui; Fan, Jun; Zhou, Min-Li

    2017-05-23

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) are two important hypoxic markers associated with the radioresistance of cancers including laryngeal carcinoma. We evaluated whether the simultaneous inhibition of GLUT-1 and HIF-1α expression improved the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma. We explored whether the expression of HIF-1α and GLUT-1 was correlated with 2'-deoxy-2'-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) uptake and whether 18F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) was appropriate for early evaluation of the response of laryngeal carcinoma to targeted treatment in vivo. To verify the above hypotheses, an in vivo model was applied by subcutaneously injecting Hep-2 (2 × 107/mL × 0.2 mL) and Tu212 cells (2 × 107/mL × 0.2 mL) into nude mice. The effects of HIF-1α antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) (100 μg) and GLUT-1 AS-ODNs (100 μg) on the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma were assessed by tumor volume and weight, microvessel density (MVD), apoptosis index (AI) and necrosis in vivo based on a full factorial (23) design. 18F-FDG-PET/CT was taken before and after the treatment of xenografts. The relationships between HIF-1α and GLUT-1 expression and 18F-FDG uptake in xenografts were estimated and the value of 18F-FDG-PET/CT was assessed after treating the xenografts. 10 Gy X-ray irradiation decreased the weight of Hep-2 xenografts 8 and 12 days after treatment, and the weights of Tu212 xenografts 8 days after treatment. GLUT-1 AS-ODNs decreased the weight of Tu212 xenografts 12 days after treatment. There was a synergistic interaction among the three treatments (GLUT-1 AS-ODNs, HIF-1α AS-ODNs and 10Gy X-ray irradiation) in increasing apoptosis, decreasing MVD, and increasing necrosis in Hep-2 xenografts 8 days after treatment (p effect (necrosis, apoptosis). Simultaneous inhibition of HIF-1α and GLUT-1 expression might increase the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma, decreasing MVD

  18. Synthetic Protocol for AFCS: A Biologically Active Fluorescent Castasterone Analog Conjugated to an Alexa Fluor 647 Dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winne, Johan M; Irani, Niloufer G; Van den Begin, Jos; Madder, Annemieke

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic derivatization of hormonally active brassinosteroids (BRs) can provide useful small molecule tools to probe BR signaling pathways, such as fluorescent analogs. However, most biologically active BRs are not suitable for direct chemical conjugation techniques because their derivatization typically requires extensive synthetic work and chemistry expertise. Here, we describe an operationally simple, two-step procedure to prepare and purify an Alexa Fluor 647-castasterone (AFCS) from commercially available materials. The reported strategy is also amenable to the introduction of various other amine-based labeling groups.

  19. Synthetic Biology: Mapping the Scientific Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Paul; Hall, Stephen; Burton, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    This article uses data from Thomson Reuters Web of Science to map and analyse the scientific landscape for synthetic biology. The article draws on recent advances in data visualisation and analytics with the aim of informing upcoming international policy debates on the governance of synthetic biology by the Subsidiary Body on Scientific, Technical and Technological Advice (SBSTTA) of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. We use mapping techniques to identify how synthetic biology can best be understood and the range of institutions, researchers and funding agencies involved. Debates under the Convention are likely to focus on a possible moratorium on the field release of synthetic organisms, cells or genomes. Based on the empirical evidence we propose that guidance could be provided to funding agencies to respect the letter and spirit of the Convention on Biological Diversity in making research investments. Building on the recommendations of the United States Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues we demonstrate that it is possible to promote independent and transparent monitoring of developments in synthetic biology using modern information tools. In particular, public and policy understanding and engagement with synthetic biology can be enhanced through the use of online interactive tools. As a step forward in this process we make existing data on the scientific literature on synthetic biology available in an online interactive workbook so that researchers, policy makers and civil society can explore the data and draw conclusions for themselves. PMID:22539946

  20. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    to perform real-time measurements with little or no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is now considered an invaluable analytical tool, finding application in several fields including medicine, defense and process control. When combined with fiber optics technology, Raman spectroscopy allows......The design and development of an all-in-fiber probe for Raman spectroscopy are presented in this Thesis. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique able to probe a sample based on the inelastic scattering of monochromatic light. Due to its high specificity and reliability and to the possibility...... for the realization of flexible and minimally-invasive devices, able to reach remote or hardly accessible samples, and to perform in-situ analyses in hazardous environments. The work behind this Thesis focuses on the proof-of-principle demonstration of a truly in-fiber Raman probe, where all parts are realized...

  1. Gamma-ray imaging probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    External nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging of early primary and metastatic lung cancer tumors is difficult due to the poor sensitivity and resolution of existing gamma cameras. Nonimaging counting detectors used for internal tumor detection give ambiguous results because distant background variations are difficult to discriminate from neighboring tumor sites. This suggests that an internal imaging nuclear medicine probe, particularly an esophageal probe, may be advantageously used to detect small tumors because of the ability to discriminate against background variations and the capability to get close to sites neighboring the esophagus. The design, theory of operation, preliminary bench tests, characterization of noise behavior and optimization of such an imaging probe is the central theme of this work

  2. Spaser as a biological probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Weingold, Robert; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nolan, Jacqueline; Harrington, Walter; Kuchyanov, Alexander S.; Parkhomenko, Roman G.; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid; Biris, Alexandru S.; Plekhanov, Alexander I.; Stockman, Mark I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding cell biology greatly benefits from the development of advanced diagnostic probes. Here we introduce a 22-nm spaser (plasmonic nanolaser) with the ability to serve as a super-bright, water-soluble, biocompatible probe capable of generating stimulated emission directly inside living cells and animal tissues. We have demonstrated a lasing regime associated with the formation of a dynamic vapour nanobubble around the spaser that leads to giant spasing with emission intensity and spectral width >100 times brighter and 30-fold narrower, respectively, than for quantum dots. The absorption losses in the spaser enhance its multifunctionality, allowing for nanobubble-amplified photothermal and photoacoustic imaging and therapy. Furthermore, the silica spaser surface has been covalently functionalized with folic acid for molecular targeting of cancer cells. All these properties make a nanobubble spaser a promising multimodal, super-contrast, ultrafast cellular probe with a single-pulse nanosecond excitation for a variety of in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications.

  3. Simultaneous detection of DNA from ten food allergens by ligation-dependent probe amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Karl-Heinz; Demmel, Anja; Ehlert, Alexandra; Hupfer, Christine; Busch, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The simultaneous detection of DNA from different potentially allergenic food ingredients by a ligation-dependent probe amplification (LPA) system is described. The approach allows the detection of several targets in a one-tube assay. Synthetic oligonucleotides were designed to detect DNA from peanut, cashew nut, pecan nut, pistachio nut, hazelnut, sesame seeds, macadamia nut, almond, walnut and brazil nut. The specificity of the system was tested with DNA from more than 50...

  4. Synthetic gauge fields and many-body physics in an optical lattice clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Andrew P.; Wall, Michael L.; Li, Shuming; Zhang, Xibo; Cooper, Nigel R.; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2015-05-01

    We propose the implementation of a synthetic gauge field in a 1D optical lattice clock and explore the resulting single-particle and many-body physics. The system can realize an effective two-leg ladder by using the two clock states as a synthetic dimension, together with the tunneling-coupled 1D lattice sites. A large flux per plaquette is naturally generated because the clock laser imprints a phase that varies significantly across lattice sites. We propose to use standard spectroscopic tools - Ramsey and Rabi spectroscopy - to probe the band structure and reveal signatures of the spin-orbit coupling, including chiral edge states and the modification of single-particle physics due to s-wave and p-wave interactions. These effects can be probed in spite of the relatively high temperatures (~ micro Kelvin) and weak interactions, thanks to the exquisite precision and sensitivity of the JILA Sr optical lattice clock. We also discuss the exciting possibility of using the nuclear spin degrees of freedom to realize more exotic synthetic dimension topologies and flux patterns. Supported by JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PIF- 1211914, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI, and NDSEG.

  5. Defining the Synthetic Biology Supply Chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Hund, Gretchen E.; Bonheyo, George T.; Diggans, James; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Gehrig, Lindsey; Greaves, Mark

    2017-08-01

    In this article, a team of experts in synthetic biology, data analytics, and national security describe the overall supply chain surrounding synthetic biology. The team analyzes selected interactions within that network to better understand the risks raised by synthetic biology and identifies opportunities for risk mitigation. To introduce the concept, the article will briefly describe how an understanding of supply chains has been important in promoting nuclear nonproliferation objectives. The article concludes by assessing the structure and networks identified in the supply chains to reveal potential opportunities for future biodefense research and development; options for additional information exchange; and means to interdict, detect, or deter suspicious activity.

  6. Synthetic Biology: game changer in intelectual property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens Landeweerd

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology can be considered a game changer that plays an important role in the current NBIC, or BINC convergence of nano-, bio-, info and cognitive sciences. Although most synthetic biology experts are unaware of it, the field appeals to the imagination in its adherence to targets that were usually associated with premodern alchemist science. This paper elaborates several aspects of synthetic biology as well as its consequences for long held notions of intellectual property and the ontological categories of scientific discovery on the one hand and engineering on the other, the distinction between natural and artificial, the grown and the made.

  7. Risky recreation: synthetic cannabinoids have dangerous effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Teena M; Newell, Donna

    2012-08-01

    Use of synthetic marijuana (also known as spice, K2, aroma, and eclipse) is often viewed by young people as harmless recreation. Until recently, the substance was freely available in U.S. convenience stores and head shops, and it is still available via the Internet. Emerging evidence shows a wide range of responses to the drug, including paranoia, aggressive behavior, anxiety, and short-term memory deficits. Synthetic cannabinoids are not currently detectable via standard toxicology tests. Recognition and management of synthetic cannabinoid use are discussed. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Fast Parametric Beamformer for Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a real-time delay-and-sum synthetic aperture beamformer. The beamforming delays and apodization coefficients are described parametrically. The image is viewed as a set of independent lines that are defined in 3-D by their origin, direction....... The implementation of the beamformer is optimized with respect to the architecture of a novel synthetic aperture real-time ultrasound scanner (SARUS), in which 4 channels are processed by the same set of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA). In synthetic transmit aperture imaging, low-resolution images are formed...

  9. Grand challenges in space synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Amor A; Montague, Michael G; Cumbers, John; Hogan, John A; Arkin, Adam P

    2015-12-06

    Space synthetic biology is a branch of biotechnology dedicated to engineering biological systems for space exploration, industry and science. There is significant public and private interest in designing robust and reliable organisms that can assist on long-duration astronaut missions. Recent work has also demonstrated that such synthetic biology is a feasible payload minimization and life support approach as well. This article identifies the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead in the field of space synthetic biology, while highlighting relevant progress. It also outlines anticipated broader benefits from this field, because space engineering advances will drive technological innovation on Earth. © 2015 The Authors.

  10. Radioactive Probes on Ferromagnetic Surfaces

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    On the (broad) basis of our studies of nonmagnetic radioactive probe atoms on magnetic surfaces and at interfaces, we propose to investigate the magnetic interaction of magnetic probe atoms with their immediate environment, in particular of rare earth (RE) elements positioned on and in ferromagnetic surfaces. The preparation and analysis of the structural properties of such samples will be performed in the UHV chamber HYDRA at the HMI/Berlin. For the investigations of the magnetic properties of RE atoms on surfaces Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) measurements and Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) in the UHV chamber ASPIC (Apparatus for Surface Physics and Interfaces at CERN) are proposed.

  11. Probing nuclear matter with dileptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1986-06-01

    Dileptons are shown to be of interest in helping probe extreme conditions of temperature and density in nuclear matter. The current state of experimental knowledge about dileptons is briefly described, and their use in upcoming experiments with light ions at CERN SPS are reviewed, including possible signatures of quark matter formation. Use of dileptons in an upcoming experiment with a new spectrometer at Berkeley is also discussed. This experiment will probe the nuclear matter equation of state at high temperature and density. 16 refs., 8 figs

  12. [Progress in synthetic biology of "973 Funding Program" in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Wang, Ying

    2015-06-01

    This paper reviews progresses made in China from 2011 in areas of "Synthetic Biology" supported by State Basic Research 973 Program. Till the end of 2014, 9 "synthetic biology" projects have been initiated with emphasis on "microbial manufactures" with the 973 Funding Program. Combined with the very recent launch of one project on "mammalian cell synthetic biology" and another on "plant synthetic biology", Chinese "synthetic biology" research reflects its focus on "manufactures" while not giving up efforts on "synthetic biology" of complex systems.

  13. A comparative study of the defluoridation efficiency of synthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of the defluoridation efficiency of synthetic dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and lacunar hydroxyapatite (L-HAp): An application of synthetic solution and Koundoumawa field water.

  14. Evaluation of Synthetic Hydrocarbon Instrument Bearing Oils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rebuck, Neal

    1982-01-01

    The work reported herein resulted from the testing of three viscosity grade synthetic hydrocarbon oils to determine their suitability as replacements for Specification MIL-L-83176 superrefined mineral oils...

  15. CRISPR and the Rebirth of Synthetic Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidari, Raheleh; Shaw, David Martin; Elger, Bernice Simone

    Emergence of novel genome engineering technologies such as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) has refocused attention on unresolved ethical complications of synthetic biology. Biosecurity concerns, deontological issues and human right aspects of genome editing have

  16. Synthetic biology platform technologies for antimicrobial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braff, Dana; Shis, David; Collins, James J

    2016-10-01

    The growing prevalence of antibiotic resistance calls for new approaches in the development of antimicrobial therapeutics. Likewise, improved diagnostic measures are essential in guiding the application of targeted therapies and preventing the evolution of therapeutic resistance. Discovery platforms are also needed to form new treatment strategies and identify novel antimicrobial agents. By applying engineering principles to molecular biology, synthetic biologists have developed platforms that improve upon, supplement, and will perhaps supplant traditional broad-spectrum antibiotics. Efforts in engineering bacteriophages and synthetic probiotics demonstrate targeted antimicrobial approaches that can be fine-tuned using synthetic biology-derived principles. Further, the development of paper-based, cell-free expression systems holds promise in promoting the clinical translation of molecular biology tools for diagnostic purposes. In this review, we highlight emerging synthetic biology platform technologies that are geared toward the generation of new antimicrobial therapies, diagnostics, and discovery channels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthetic biology of fungal natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Derek J.; Valiante, Vito; Unkles, Shiela E.; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an ever-expanding field in science, also encompassing the research area of fungal natural product (NP) discovery and production. Until now, different aspects of synthetic biology have been covered in fungal NP studies from the manipulation of different regulatory elements and heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways to the engineering of different multidomain biosynthetic enzymes such as polyketide synthases or non-ribosomal peptide synthetases. The following review will cover some of the exemplary studies of synthetic biology in filamentous fungi showing the capacity of these eukaryotes to be used as model organisms in the field. From the vast array of different NPs produced to the ease for genetic manipulation, filamentous fungi have proven to be an invaluable source for the further development of synthetic biology tools. PMID:26284053

  18. Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences (AFS), in collaboration with the MIT Space Systems Laboratory (MIT-SSL), proposed the Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO) program...

  19. Synthetic analogs of bacterial quorum sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Rashi [Los Alamos, NM; Ganguly, Kumkum [Los Alamos, NM; Silks, Louis A [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-12-06

    Bacterial quorum-sensing molecule analogs having the following structures: ##STR00001## and methods of reducing bacterial pathogenicity, comprising providing a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria which produce natural quorum-sensing molecule; providing a synthetic bacterial quorum-sensing molecule having the above structures and introducing the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule into the biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria. Further is provided a method of targeted delivery of an antibiotic, comprising providing a synthetic quorum-sensing molecule; chemically linking the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule to an antibiotic to produce a quorum-sensing molecule-antibiotic conjugate; and introducing the conjugate into a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria susceptible to the antibiotic.

  20. Synthetic analogs of bacterial quorum sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Rashi S.; Ganguly, Kumkum; Silks, Louis A.

    2013-01-08

    Bacterial quorum-sensing molecule analogs having the following structures: ##STR00001## and methods of reducing bacterial pathogenicity, comprising providing a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria which produce natural quorum-sensing molecule; providing a synthetic bacterial quorum-sensing molecule having the above structures and introducing the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule into the biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria. Further is provided a method of targeted delivery of an antibiotic, comprising providing a synthetic quorum-sensing molecule; chemically linking the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule to an antibiotic to produce a quorum-sensing molecule-antibiotic conjugate; and introducing the conjugate into a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria susceptible to the antibiotic.

  1. Defining the Synthetic Biology Supply Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazar, Sarah L; Hund, Gretchen E; Bonheyo, George T; Diggans, James; Bartholomew, Rachel A; Gehrig, Lindsey; Greaves, Mark

    Several recent articles have described risks posed by synthetic biology and spurred vigorous discussion in the scientific, commercial, and government communities about how to best detect, prevent, regulate, and respond to these risks. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) deep experience working with dual-use technologies for the nuclear industry has shown that analysis of supply chains can reveal security vulnerabilities and ways to mitigate security risk without hindering beneficial research and commerce. In this article, a team of experts in synthetic biology, data analytics, and national security describe the overall supply chain surrounding synthetic biology to illustrate new insights about the effectiveness of current regulations, the possible need for different screening approaches, and new technical solutions that could help identify or mitigate risks in the synthetic biology supply chain.

  2. SUB-SLAB PROBE INSTALLATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sub-slab sampling has become an integral part of vapor intrusion investigations. It is now recommended in guidance documents developed by EPA and most states. A method for sub-slab probe installation was devised in 2002, presented at conferences through 2005, and finally docume...

  3. Resolution analysis by random probing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fichtner, Andreas; van Leeuwen, T.

    2015-01-01

    We develop and apply methods for resolution analysis in tomography, based on stochastic probing of the Hessian or resolution operators. Key properties of our methods are (i) low algorithmic complexity and easy implementation, (ii) applicability to any tomographic technique, including full‐waveform

  4. Seismic probing of Fennoscandian lithosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bock, G.; Achauer, U.; Alinaghi, A.; Ansorge, J.; Bruneton, M.; Friederich, W.; Grad, M.; Guterch, A.; Hjelt, S. E.; Plomerová, Jaroslava

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 50 (2001), s. 621, 628-629 ISSN 0096-3941 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3012908 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : seismic probing * lithosphere * Fennoscandia * SVEKALAPKO * Europrobe Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  5. 14C-labeling of synthetic peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chersi, A.; Trinca, M.L.; Camera, M.

    1988-01-01

    Two methods are described for the labelling of synthetic peptides using iodo[ 14 C]acetic acid. The first procedure may be employed when the synthetic fragment contains a cysteine with a free sulfhydryl group. Alternatively, a commercial amino-protected cysteine may be carboxymethylated using radioactive iodoacetic acid. This derivative can be added to the growing peptide chain in the manual or automatic solid-phase synthesis of the fragment. 9 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table

  6. 14C-labeling of synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Trinca, M L; Camera, M

    1988-06-13

    Two methods are described for the labeling of synthetic peptides using iodo[14C]acetic acid. The first procedure may be employed when the synthetic fragment contains a cysteine with a free sulfhydryl group. Alternatively, a commercial amino-protected cysteine may be carboxymethylated using radioactive iodoacetic acid. This derivative can be added to the growing peptide chain in the manual or automatic solid-phase synthesis of the fragment.

  7. Design and construction of "synthetic species".

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an area of biological research that combines science and engineering. Here, I merge the principles of synthetic biology and regulatory evolution to create a new species with a minimal set of known elements. Using preexisting transgenes and recessive mutations of Drosophila melanogaster, a transgenic population arises with small eyes and a different venation pattern that fulfils the criteria of a new species according to Mayr’s Biological Species Concept. The population de...

  8. Synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles with tunable susceptibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Wilson, Robert J.; Earhart, Christopher M.; Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert; Wang, Shan X.

    2009-01-01

    High-moment monodisperse disk-shaped Co–Fe magnetic nanoparticles, stable in aqueous solution, were physically fabricated by using nanoimprinted templates and vacuum deposition techniques. These multilayer synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles exhibit nearly zero magnetic remanence and coercivity, and susceptibilities which can be tuned by exploiting interlayer magnetic interactions. In addition, a low cost method of scaling up the production of sub-100 nm synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles is demonstrated. PMID:19529797

  9. Synthetic Sling Failure - Evaluations and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, C. S. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Mackey, Thomas C. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-10-26

    The information and evaluations provided in this report were compiled to address the recurring problem of synthetic sling failure. As safety is the number one priority in all work aspects, a solution must be devised to prevent accidents from occurring. A total of thirteen cases regarding synthetic sling failure were evaluated in order to determine their causes, effects, and preventative measures. From the collected data, it was found that all cases in which the synthetic sling contacted the edge of its load resulted in sling failure. It is required that adequate synthetic sling protection devices be used to protect slings in any lift where the sling comes in direct contact with the edge or corner of its load. However, there are no consensus codes or standards stating the type, material, or purpose of the type of protective device used to protect the sling from being cut. Numerous industry standards and codes provide vague descriptions on how to protect synthetic slings. Without a clear, concise statement of how to protect synthetic slings, it is common for inadequate materials and sling protection devices to be used in an attempt to meet the intent of these requirements. The use of an inadequate sling protection device is the main cause of synthetic sling failure in all researched cases. Commercial sling protection devices come in many shapes and sizes, and have a variety of names, as well as advertised uses. 'Abrasion pads' and 'wear protectors' are two different names for products with the same intended purpose. There is no distinguishable way to determine the extent of sling protection which these devices will provide, or what specific scenarios they are made for. This creates room for error in a field where error is unacceptable. This report provides a recommended action for hoisting and rigging activities which require synthetic slings to contact a load, as well as recommended changes to industry standards which will benefit overall

  10. Speculative synthetic chemistry and the nitrogenase problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sonny C.; Holm, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    There exist a limited but growing number of biological metal centers whose properties lie conspicuously outside the realm of known inorganic chemistry. The synthetic analogue approach, broadly directed, offers a powerful exploratory tool that can define intrinsic chemical possibilities for these sites while simultaneously expanding the frontiers of fundamental inorganic chemistry. This speculative application of analogue study is exemplified here in the evolution of synthetic efforts inspired by the cluster chemistry of biological nitrogen fixation. PMID:12642670

  11. The Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL) provides a community standard for communicating designs in synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdzicki, Michal; Clancy, Kevin P; Oberortner, Ernst; Pocock, Matthew; Quinn, Jacqueline Y; Rodriguez, Cesar A; Roehner, Nicholas; Wilson, Mandy L; Adam, Laura; Anderson, J Christopher; Bartley, Bryan A; Beal, Jacob; Chandran, Deepak; Chen, Joanna; Densmore, Douglas; Endy, Drew; Grünberg, Raik; Hallinan, Jennifer; Hillson, Nathan J; Johnson, Jeffrey D; Kuchinsky, Allan; Lux, Matthew; Misirli, Goksel; Peccoud, Jean; Plahar, Hector A; Sirin, Evren; Stan, Guy-Bart; Villalobos, Alan; Wipat, Anil; Gennari, John H; Myers, Chris J; Sauro, Herbert M

    2014-06-01

    The re-use of previously validated designs is critical to the evolution of synthetic biology from a research discipline to an engineering practice. Here we describe the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL), a proposed data standard for exchanging designs within the synthetic biology community. SBOL represents synthetic biology designs in a community-driven, formalized format for exchange between software tools, research groups and commercial service providers. The SBOL Developers Group has implemented SBOL as an XML/RDF serialization and provides software libraries and specification documentation to help developers implement SBOL in their own software. We describe early successes, including a demonstration of the utility of SBOL for information exchange between several different software tools and repositories from both academic and industrial partners. As a community-driven standard, SBOL will be updated as synthetic biology evolves to provide specific capabilities for different aspects of the synthetic biology workflow.

  12. Cell-free biology: exploiting the interface between synthetic biology and synthetic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D Calvin; Jewett, Michael C

    2012-10-01

    Just as synthetic organic chemistry once revolutionized the ability of chemists to build molecules (including those that did not exist in nature) following a basic set of design rules, cell-free synthetic biology is beginning to provide an improved toolbox and faster process for not only harnessing but also expanding the chemistry of life. At the interface between chemistry and biology, research in cell-free synthetic systems is proceeding in two different directions: using synthetic biology for synthetic chemistry and using synthetic chemistry to reprogram or mimic biology. In the coming years, the impact of advances inspired by these approaches will make possible the synthesis of nonbiological polymers having new backbone compositions, new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthetic Cannabinoids: Psychopharmacology, Clinical Aspects, Psychotic Onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinotti, Giovanni; Santacroce, Rita; Papanti, Duccio; Elgharably, Yasmine; Prilutskaya, Mariya; Corazza, Ornella

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic Cannabinoids (SC) are the widest and most diffused class of Novel Psychoactive Substances. The short- and long- term health risks associated with the consumption of SC are often unknown to both users and health professionals. This review aims to provide a synthesis of the most recent and relevant insights on the pharmacology, clinical and psychopathological aspects of SC. A structured search of two bibliographic databases (PubMed and Scopus) was undertaken according to inclusion/exclusion criteria. The following terms "synthetic cannabinoid*", "synthetic cannabimimetic*", "synthetic cannabis", "synthetic marijuana" and "Spice AND cannabinoid*" were used as search strings. 162 relevant results, mainly published in the past two years were revealed. Most results emerged for the keyword "synthetic cannabinoid*", followed by the combination "Spice* AND "cannabinoid*". Most papers were epidemiological, forensic, toxicologic, or analytical. The results of studies were systematized according their contribution to the comprehension of pharmacological, clinical and psychopathological effects of SC. Fifteen SC-related fatality cases were reviewed according to their histories, pathology and toxicology findings. The findings of this review confirm the importance of prompt and reliable information available for health professionals More specific analytic techniques and designed preventive strategies are required to face unprecedented SC challenge. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Synthetic biology era: Improving antibiotic's world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Trampe, Silvia; Ceapa, Corina D; Manzo-Ruiz, Monserrat; Sánchez, Sergio

    2017-06-15

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogen microorganisms is problematic in the context of the current spectrum of available medication. The poor specificity and the high toxicity of some available molecules have made imperative the search for new strategies to improve the specificity and to pursue the discovery of novel compounds with increased bioactivity. Using living cells as platforms, synthetic biology has counteracted this problem by offering novel pathways to create synthetic systems with improved and desired functions. Among many other biotechnological approaches, the advances in synthetic biology have made it possible to design and construct novel biological systems in order to look for new drugs with increased bioactivity. Advancements have also been made in the redesigning of RNA and DNA molecules in order to engineer antibiotic clusters for antibiotic overexpression. As for the production of these antibacterial compounds, yeasts and filamentous fungi as well as gene therapy are utilized to enhance protein solubility. Specific delivery is achieved by creating chimeras using plant genes into bacterial hosts. Some of these synthetic systems are currently in clinical trials, proving the proficiency of synthetic biology in terms of both pharmacological activities as well as an increase in the biosafety of treatments. It is possible that we may just be seeing the tip of the iceberg, and synthetic biology applications will overpass expectations beyond our present knowledge. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. A synthetic lymph node containing inactivated Treponema pallidum cells elicits strong, antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Lola V; Drapp, Rebecca L

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the use of a synthetic lymph node (SLN) for delivery of Treponema pallidum (Tp) antigens. Immune responses of C57BL/6 mice were analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after SLN implantation. Group 1 mice received SLN with no antigen; Group 2, SLN with formalin-inactivated Tp (f-Tp); and Group 3, SLN with f-Tp plus a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide. When tested by ELISA, sera from Group 2 and Group 3 mice showed stronger IgG antibody reactivity than sera from Group 1 mice to sonicates of f-Tp or untreated Tp, but not to sonicate of normal rabbit testicular extract at all times. The IgG1 level was higher than IgG2c level for Group 2 mice at all times and for Group 3 mice at 4 and 8 weeks. IgG1 and IgG2c levels were nearly equivalent for Group 3 mice at 12 weeks. Immunoblotting showed that IgG from Group 2 and Group 3 mice recognized several Tp proteins at all times. Supernatants of splenocytes from Group 2 and Group 3 mice contained significantly more IFNγ than those from Group 1 mice after stimulation with f-Tp at all times. A significant level of IL-4 was not detected in any supernatants. These data show that strong humoral and cellular immune responses to Tp can be elicited via a SLN. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Intracellular production of hydrogels and synthetic RNA granules by multivalent molecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hideki; Lee, Albert A.; Afshar, Ali Sobhi; Watanabe, Shigeki; Rho, Elmer; Razavi, Shiva; Suarez, Allister; Lin, Yu-Chun; Tanigawa, Makoto; Huang, Brian; Derose, Robert; Bobb, Diana; Hong, William; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Goutsias, John; Inoue, Takanari

    2018-01-01

    Some protein components of intracellular non-membrane-bound entities, such as RNA granules, are known to form hydrogels in vitro. The physico-chemical properties and functional role of these intracellular hydrogels are difficult to study, primarily due to technical challenges in probing these materials in situ. Here, we present iPOLYMER, a strategy for a rapid induction of protein-based hydrogels inside living cells that explores the chemically inducible dimerization paradigm. Biochemical and biophysical characterizations aided by computational modelling show that the polymer network formed in the cytosol resembles a physiological hydrogel-like entity that acts as a size-dependent molecular sieve. We functionalize these polymers with RNA-binding motifs that sequester polyadenine-containing nucleotides to synthetically mimic RNA granules. These results show that iPOLYMER can be used to synthetically reconstitute the nucleation of biologically functional entities, including RNA granules in intact cells.

  17. In vivo visualization of robotically implemented synthetic tracked aperture ultrasound (STRATUS) imaging system using curvilinear array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic aperture for ultrasound is a technique utilizing a wide aperture in both transmit and receive to enhance the ultrasound image quality. The limitation of synthetic aperture is the maximum available aperture size limit determined by the physical size of ultrasound probe. We propose Synthetic-Tracked Aperture Ultrasound (STRATUS) imaging system to overcome the limitation by extending the beamforming aperture size through ultrasound probe tracking. With a setup involving a robotic arm, the ultrasound probe is moved using the robotic arm, while the positions on a scanning trajectory are tracked in real-time. Data from each pose are synthesized to construct a high resolution image. In previous studies, we have demonstrated the feasibility through phantom experiments. However, various additional factors such as real-time data collection or motion artifacts should be taken into account when the in vivo target becomes the subject. In this work, we build a robot-based STRATUS imaging system with continuous data collection capability considering the practical implementation. A curvilinear array is used instead of a linear array to benefit from its wider capture angle. We scanned human forearms under two scenarios: one submerged the arm in the water tank under 10 cm depth, and the other directly scanned the arm from the surface. The image contrast improved 5.51 dB, and 9.96 dB for the underwater scan and the direct scan, respectively. The result indicates the practical feasibility of STRATUS imaging system, and the technique can be potentially applied to the wide range of human body.

  18. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  19. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  20. Real-time Implementation of Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging on a Consumer-level Tablet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Ianni, Tommaso; Kjeldsen, Thomas Kim; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a 2-D vector flow imaging (VFI) method based on synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) and directional transverse oscillation is implemented on a commercially available tablet. The SASB technique divides the beamforming process in two parts, whereby the required data rate...... and processed by a first-stage beamformer in a fixed focus. The data were subsequently transferred to an HTC Nexus 9 tablet through an ASUS RT-AC68U Wi-Fi router to simulate a wireless probe. The second-stage beamforming of the B-mode and flow data and the velocity estimation were implemented on the tablet’s...

  1. Where do pulse oximeter probes break?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crede, S; Van der Merwe, G; Hutchinson, J; Woods, D; Karlen, W; Lawn, J

    2014-06-01

    Pulse oximetry, a non-invasive method for accurate assessment of blood oxygen saturation (SPO2), is an important monitoring tool in health care facilities. However, it is often not available in many low-resource settings, due to expense, overly sophisticated design, a lack of organised procurement systems and inadequate medical device management and maintenance structures. Furthermore medical devices are often fragile and not designed to withstand the conditions of low-resource settings. In order to design a probe, better suited to the needs of health care facilities in low-resource settings this study aimed to document the site and nature of pulse oximeter probe breakages in a range of different probe designs in a low to middle income country. A retrospective review of job cards relating to the assessment and repair of damaged or faulty pulse oximeter probes was conducted at a medical device repair company based in Cape Town, South Africa, specializing in pulse oximeter probe repairs. 1,840 job cards relating to the assessment and repair of pulse oximeter probes were reviewed. 60.2 % of probes sent for assessment were finger-clip probes. For all probes, excluding the neonatal wrap probes, the most common point of failure was the probe wiring (>50 %). The neonatal wrap most commonly failed at the strap (51.5 %). The total cost for quoting on the broken pulse oximeter probes and for the subsequent repair of devices, excluding replacement components, amounted to an estimated ZAR 738,810 (USD $98,508). Improving the probe wiring would increase the life span of pulse oximeter probes. Increasing the life span of probes will make pulse oximetry more affordable and accessible. This is of high priority in low-resource settings where frequent repair or replacement of probes is unaffordable or impossible.

  2. Synthetic biology with artificially expanded genetic information systems. From personalized medicine to extraterrestrial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Steven A; Hutter, Daniel; Sismour, A Michael

    2003-01-01

    Over 15 years ago, the Benner group noticed that the DNA alphabet need not be limited to the four standard nucleotides known in natural DNA. Rather, twelve nucleobases forming six base pairs joined by mutually exclusive hydrogen bonding patterns are possible within the geometry of the Watson-Crick pair (Fig. 1). Synthesis and studies on these compounds have brought us to the threshold of a synthetic biology, an artificial chemical system that does basic processes needed for life (in particular, Darwinian evolution), but with unnatural chemical structures. At the same time, the artificial genetic information systems (AEGIS) that we have developed have been used in FDA-approved commercial tests for managing HIV and hepatitis C infections in individual patients, and in a tool that seeks the virus for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). AEGIS also supports the next generation of robotic probes to search for genetic molecules on Mars, Europa, and elsewhere where NASA probes will travel.

  3. Probe-based recording technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naberhuis, Steve

    2002-01-01

    The invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) prompted researchers to contemplate whether such technology could be used as the basis for the storage and retrieval of information. With magnetic data storage technology facing limits in storage density due to the thermal instability of magnetic bits, the super-paramagnetic limit, the heir-apparent for information storage at higher densities appeared to be variants of the STM or similar probe-based storage techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). Among these other techniques that could provide replacement technology for magnetic storage, near-field optical scanning optical microscopy (NSOM or SNOM) has also been investigated. Another alternative probe-based storage technology called atomic resolution storage (ARS) is also currently under development. An overview of these various technologies is herein presented, with an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages inherent in each particularly with respect to reduced device dimensions. The role of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) is emphasized

  4. 21 CFR 172.888 - Synthetic petroleum wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic petroleum wax. 172.888 Section 172.888... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.888 Synthetic petroleum wax. Synthetic petroleum wax may be safely used in or on foods in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Synthetic petroleum wax is a...

  5. Distance probes of dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; Allen, S. W.; Baltay, C.; Cahn, R. N.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Dalal, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Denney, K. D.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Finley, D. A.; Freedman, W. L.; Ho, S.; Holz, D. E.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S. M.; Kessler, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Linder, E. V.; Martini, P.; Nugent, P. E.; Perlmutter, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Riess, A. G.; Rubin, D.; Sako, M.; Suntzeff, N. V.; Suzuki, N.; Thomas, R. C.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Woosley, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    This document presents the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). We summarize the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  6. The Van Allen Probes mission

    CERN Document Server

    Burch, James

    2014-01-01

    This collection of articles provides broad and detailed information about NASA’s Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes) twin-spacecraft Earth-orbiting mission. The mission has the objective of achieving predictive understanding of the dynamic, intense, energetic, dangerous, and presently unpredictable belts of energetic particles that are magnetically trapped in Earth’s space environment above the atmosphere. It documents the science of the radiation belts and the societal benefits of achieving predictive understanding. Detailed information is provided about the Van Allen Probes mission design, the spacecraft, the science investigations, and the onboard instrumentation that must all work together to make unprecedented measurements within a most unforgiving environment, the core of Earth’s most intense radiation regions.
 This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers active in space science, solar-terrestrial interactions and studies of the up...

  7. A computerized Langmuir probe system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, L. S.; Bydder, E. L.; Carnegie, D. A.

    2003-07-01

    For low pressure plasmas it is important to record entire single or double Langmuir probe characteristics accurately. For plasmas with a depleted high energy tail, the accuracy of the recorded ion current plays a critical role in determining the electron temperature. Even for high density Maxwellian distributions, it is necessary to accurately model the ion current to obtain the correct electron density. Since the electron and ion current saturation values are, at best, orders of magnitude apart, a single current sensing resistor cannot provide the required resolution to accurately record these values. We present an automated, personal computer based data acquisition system for the determination of fundamental plasma properties in low pressure plasmas. The system is designed for single and double Langmuir probes, whose characteristics can be recorded over a bias voltage range of ±70 V with 12 bit resolution. The current flowing through the probes can be recorded within the range of 5 nA-100 mA. The use of a transimpedance amplifier for current sensing eliminates the requirement for traditional current sensing resistors and hence the need to correct the raw data. The large current recording range is realized through the use of a real time gain switching system in the negative feedback loop of the transimpedance amplifier.

  8. Synthetic biology and the technicity of biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Adrian

    2013-06-01

    The principal existing real-world application of synthetic biology is biofuels. Several 'next generation biofuel' companies-Synthetic Genomics, Amyris and Joule Unlimited Technologies-claim to be using synthetic biology to make biofuels. The irony of this is that highly advanced science and engineering serves the very mundane and familiar realm of transport. Despite their rather prosaic nature, biofuels could offer an interesting way to highlight the novelty of synthetic biology from several angles at once. Drawing on the French philosopher of technology and biology Gilbert Simondon, we can understand biofuels as technical objects whose genesis involves processes of concretisation that negotiate between heterogeneous geographical, biological, technical, scientific and commercial realities. Simondon's notion of technicity, the degree of concretisation of a technical object, usefully conceptualises this relationality. Viewed in terms of technicity, we might understand better how technical entities, elements, and ensembles are coming into being in the name of synthetic biology. The broader argument here is that when we seek to identify the newness of disciplines, their newness might be less epistemic and more logistic. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary 'build to apply' and 'build to understand' approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Cfd modeling of a synthetic jet actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dghim, Marouane; Ben Chiekh, Maher; Ben Nasrallah, Sassi

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic jet actuators show good promise as an enabling technology for innovative boundary layer flow control applied to external surfaces, like airplane wings, and to internal flows, like those occurring in a curved engine inlet. The appealing characteristics of a synthetic jet are zero-net-mass flux operation and an efficient control effect that takes advantages of unsteady fluid phenomena. The formation of a synthetic jet in a quiescent external air flow is only beginning to be understood and a rational understanding of these devices is necessary before they can be applied to the control of flows outside of the laboratory. The synthetic jet flow generated by a planar orifice is investigated here using computational approach. Computations of the 2D synthetic jet are performed with unsteady RANS modeled with the Realizable κ - ε turbulence model available in FLUENT environment. In this present work, the ability of the first order turbulence model, employed in our computations, to model the formation of the counter-rotating-vortex pair (CVP) that appears in the flow-field was investigated. Computational results were in good agreement with experimental measurements. The effectiveness of such control actuator was tested on separated boundary layer. Preliminary investigation were presented and discussed

  11. An improved synthesis of a fluorophosphonate–polyethylene glycol–biotin probe and its use against competitive substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-01-01

    Summary The fluorophosphonate (FP) moiety attached to a biotin tag is a prototype chemical probe used to quantitatively analyze and enrich active serine hydrolases in complex proteomes in an approach called activity-based protein profiling (ABPP). In this study we have designed a novel synthetic route to a known FP probe linked by polyethylene glycol to a biotin tag (FP–PEG–biotin). Our route markedly increases the efficiency of the probe synthesis and overcomes several problems of a prior synthesis. As a proof of principle, FP–PEG–biotin was evaluated against isolated protein mixtures and different rat-tissue homogenates, showing its ability to specifically target serine hydrolases. We also assessed the ability of FP–PEG–biotin to compete with substrates that have high enzyme turnover rates. The reduced protein-band intensities resulting in these competition studies demonstrate a new application of FP-based probes seldom explored before. PMID:23400700

  12. An improved synthesis of a fluorophosphonate–polyethylene glycol–biotin probe and its use against competitive substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fluorophosphonate (FP moiety attached to a biotin tag is a prototype chemical probe used to quantitatively analyze and enrich active serine hydrolases in complex proteomes in an approach called activity-based protein profiling (ABPP. In this study we have designed a novel synthetic route to a known FP probe linked by polyethylene glycol to a biotin tag (FP–PEG–biotin. Our route markedly increases the efficiency of the probe synthesis and overcomes several problems of a prior synthesis. As a proof of principle, FP–PEG–biotin was evaluated against isolated protein mixtures and different rat-tissue homogenates, showing its ability to specifically target serine hydrolases. We also assessed the ability of FP–PEG–biotin to compete with substrates that have high enzyme turnover rates. The reduced protein-band intensities resulting in these competition studies demonstrate a new application of FP-based probes seldom explored before.

  13. CONVERGENT SYNTHESIS AND EVALUATION OF 18F-LABELED AZULENIC COX2 PROBES FOR CANCER IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald D. Nolting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall objectives of this research are to (i develop azulene-based PET probes and (ii image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel 18F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8+2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional 18F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an 18F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The 18F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging and deserves further

  14. Influence of probe geometry on the response of an electrostatic probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Torben; Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1999-01-01

    The response of an electrostatic probe is examined with reference to the probe geometry. The study involves the evaluation of the probe lambda function, from which response-related characteristic parameters can be derived. These parameters enable the probe detection sensitivity Se and spatial...

  15. Synthetic aperture tissue and flow ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav

    imaging applied to medical ultrasound. It is divided into two major parts: tissue and blood flow imaging. Tissue imaging using synthetic aperture algorithms has been investigated for about two decades, but has not been implemented in medical scanners yet. Among the other reasons, the conventional scanning...... and beamformation methods are adequate for the imaging modalities in clinical use - the B-mode imaging of tissue structures, and the color mapping of blood flow. The acquisition time, however, is too long, and these methods fail to perform real-time three-dimensional scans. The synthetic transmit aperture......, on the other hand, can create a Bmode image with as little as 2 emissions, thus significantly speeding-up the scan procedure. The first part of the dissertation describes the synthetic aperture tissue imaging. It starts with an overview of the efforts previously made by other research groups. A classification...

  16. Engineering emergent multicellular behavior through synthetic adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar

    In over a decade, synthetic biology has developed increasingly robust gene networks within single cells, but constructed very few systems that demonstrate multicellular spatio-temporal dynamics. We are filling this gap in synthetic biology's toolbox by developing an E. coli self-assembly platform based on modular cell-cell adhesion. We developed a system in which adhesive selectivity is provided by a library of outer membrane-displayed peptides with intra-library specificities, while affinity is provided by consistent expression across the entire library. We further provide a biophysical model to help understand the parameter regimes in which this tool can be used to self-assemble into cellular clusters, filaments, or meshes. The combined platform will enable future development of synthetic multicellular systems for use in consortia-based metabolic engineering, in living materials, and in controlled study of minimal multicellular systems. Stanford Bio-X Bowes Fellowship.

  17. Bioinspired Chemical Communication between Synthetic Nanomotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuanrui; Chang, Xiaocong; Teymourian, Hazhir; Ramírez-Herrera, Doris E; Esteban-Fernández de Ávila, Berta; Lu, Xiaolong; Li, Jinxing; He, Sha; Fang, Chengcheng; Liang, Yuyan; Mou, Fangzhi; Guan, Jianguo; Wang, Joseph

    2018-01-02

    While chemical communication plays a key role in diverse natural processes, the intelligent chemical communication between synthetic nanomotors remains unexplored. The design and operation of bioinspired synthetic nanomotors is presented. Chemical communication between nanomotors is possible and has an influence on propulsion behavior. A chemical "message" is sent from a moving activator motor to a nearby activated (receiver) motor by release of Ag + ions from a Janus polystyrene/Ni/Au/Ag activator motor to the activated Janus SiO 2 /Pt nanomotor. The transmitted silver signal is translated rapidly into a dramatic speed change associated with the enhanced catalytic activity of activated motors. Selective and successive activation of multiple nanomotors is achieved by sequential localized chemical communications. The concept of establishing chemical communication between different synthetic nanomotors paves the way to intelligent nanoscale robotic systems that are capable of cooperating with each other. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Synthetic Biomimetic Membranes and Their Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Rok Kim

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biomimetic membranes provide biological environments to membrane proteins. By exploiting the central roles of biological membranes, it is possible to devise biosensors, drug delivery systems, and nanocontainers using a biomimetic membrane system integrated with functional proteins. Biomimetic membranes can be created with synthetic lipids or block copolymers. These amphiphilic lipids and polymers self-assemble in an aqueous solution either into planar membranes or into vesicles. Using various techniques developed to date, both planar membranes and vesicles can provide versatile and robust platforms for a number of applications. In particular, biomimetic membranes with modified lipids or functional proteins are promising platforms for biosensors. We review recent technologies used to create synthetic biomimetic membranes and their engineered sensors applications.

  19. Genome modularity and synthetic biology: Engineering systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Milsee; Kabra, Ritika; Singh, Shailza

    2018-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing projects running in various laboratories around the world has generated immense data. A systematic phylogenetic analysis of this data shows that genome complexity goes on decreasing as it evolves, due to its modular nature. This modularity can be harnessed to minimize the genome further to reduce it with the bare minimum essential genes. A reduced modular genome, can fuel progress in the area of synthetic biology by providing a ready to use plug and play chassis. Advances in gene editing technology such as the use of tailor made synthetic transcription factors will further enhance the availability of synthetic devices to be applied in the fields of environment, agriculture and health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. CSBB: synthetic biology research at Newcastle University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipat, Anil; Krasnogor, Natalio

    2017-01-01

    The Centre for Synthetic Biology and the Bioeconomy (CSBB) brings together a far-reaching multidisciplinary community across all Newcastle University's faculties — Medical Sciences, Science, Agriculture and Engineering, and Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. The CSBB focuses on many different areas of Synthetic Biology, including bioprocessing, computational design and in vivo computation, as well as improving understanding of basic molecular machinery. Such breadth is supported by major national and international research funding, a range of industrial partners in the North East of England and beyond, as well as a large number of doctoral and post-doctoral researchers. The CSBB trains the next generation of scientists through a 1-year MSc in Synthetic Biology. PMID:28620039

  1. Structural Antitumoral Activity Relationships of Synthetic Chalcones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Echeverria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Relationships between the structural characteristic of synthetic chalcones and their antitumoral activity were studied. Treatment of HepG2 cells for 24 h with synthetic 2’-hydroxychalcones resulted in apoptosis induction and dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. The calculated reactivity indexes and the adiabatic electron affinities using the DFT method including solvent effects, suggest a structure-activity relationship between the Chalcones structure and the apoptosis in HepG2 cells. The absence of methoxy substituents in the B ring of synthetic 2’-hydroxychalcones, showed the mayor structure-activity pattern along the series.

  2. Is It Time for Synthetic Biodiversity Conservation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaggio, Antoinette J; Segelbacher, Gernot; Seddon, Philip J; Alphey, Luke; Bennett, Elizabeth L; Carlson, Robert H; Friedman, Robert M; Kanavy, Dona; Phelan, Ryan; Redford, Kent H; Rosales, Marina; Slobodian, Lydia; Wheeler, Keith

    2017-02-01

    Evidence indicates that, despite some critical successes, current conservation approaches are not slowing the overall rate of biodiversity loss. The field of synthetic biology, which is capable of altering natural genomes with extremely precise editing, might offer the potential to resolve some intractable conservation problems (e.g., invasive species or pathogens). However, it is our opinion that there has been insufficient engagement by the conservation community with practitioners of synthetic biology. We contend that rapid, large-scale engagement of these two communities is urgently needed to avoid unintended and deleterious ecological consequences. To this point we describe case studies where synthetic biology is currently being applied to conservation, and we highlight the benefits to conservation biologists from engaging with this emerging technology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Enabling plant synthetic biology through genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Nicholas J; Voytas, Daniel F

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic biology seeks to create new biological systems, including user-designed plants and plant cells. These systems can be employed for a variety of purposes, ranging from producing compounds of industrial or therapeutic value, to reducing crop losses by altering cellular responses to pathogens or climate change. To realize the full potential of plant synthetic biology, techniques are required that provide control over the genetic code - enabling targeted modifications to DNA sequences within living plant cells. Such control is now within reach owing to recent advances in the use of sequence-specific nucleases to precisely engineer genomes. We discuss here the enormous potential provided by genome engineering for plant synthetic biology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tuning the dials of Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpino, James A. J.; Hancock, Edward J.; Anderson, James; Barahona, Mauricio; Stan, Guy-Bart V.; Polizzi, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic Biology is the ‘Engineering of Biology’ – it aims to use a forward-engineering design cycle based on specifications, modelling, analysis, experimental implementation, testing and validation to modify natural or design new, synthetic biology systems so that they behave in a predictable fashion. Motivated by the need for truly plug-and-play synthetic biological components, we present a comprehensive review of ways in which the various parts of a biological system can be modified systematically. In particular, we review the list of ‘dials’ that are available to the designer and discuss how they can be modelled, tuned and implemented. The dials are categorized according to whether they operate at the global, transcriptional, translational or post-translational level and the resolution that they operate at. We end this review with a discussion on the relative advantages and disadvantages of some dials over others. PMID:23704788

  5. CSBB: synthetic biology research at Newcastle University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi-Moreno, Angel; Wipat, Anil; Krasnogor, Natalio

    2017-06-15

    The Centre for Synthetic Biology and the Bioeconomy (CSBB) brings together a far-reaching multidisciplinary community across all Newcastle University's faculties - Medical Sciences, Science, Agriculture and Engineering, and Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. The CSBB focuses on many different areas of Synthetic Biology, including bioprocessing, computational design and in vivo computation, as well as improving understanding of basic molecular machinery. Such breadth is supported by major national and international research funding, a range of industrial partners in the North East of England and beyond, as well as a large number of doctoral and post-doctoral researchers. The CSBB trains the next generation of scientists through a 1-year MSc in Synthetic Biology. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Novel domain wall dynamics in synthetic antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we review fascinating new mechanisms on recently observed remarkable current driven domain wall motion in nanowires formed from perpendicularly magnetized synthetic antiferromagnets interfaced with heavy metallic layers, sources of spin-orbit torques. All the associated torques such as volumetric adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin-transfer-torque, spin-orbit torques, shape anisotropy field torques, Dzyaloshinkii-Moriya interaction torques and most importantly a new powerful torque, exchange coupling torque, will be discussed based on an analytical model that provides an intuitive description of domain wall dynamics in synthetic ferromagnets as well as synthetic antiferromagnets. In addition, the current driven DW motion in the presence of in-plane fields will be investigated, thus deepening our knowledge about the role of the exchange coupling torque, which will be of potential use for application to various novel spintronic devices.

  7. Project Prometheus and Future Entry Probe Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on project Prometheus and future entry probe missions is shown. The topics include: 1) What Is Project Prometheus?; 2) What Capabilities Can Project Prometheus Offer? What Mission Types Are Being Considered?; 3) Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO); 4) How Are Mission Opportunities Changing?; 5) Missions Of Interest a Year Ago; 6) Missions Now Being Considered For Further Study; 7) Galileo-Style (Conventional) Probe Delivery; 8) Galileo-Style Probe Support; 9) Conventional Delivery and Support of Multiple Probes; 10) How Entry Probe Delivery From an NEP Vehicle Is Different; and 11) Concluding Remarks.

  8. [HPV contamination of endocavity vaginal ultrasound probes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, I; Favre, M

    2015-02-01

    While the use of endovaginal ultrasound probes is increasing, the risk of contamination of women with endocavity vaginal probes was not assessed. In particular, the clinical significance of detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, the most common sexually transmitted viral infection, on endovaginal ultrasound probes is uncertain. The recommendations of good practice for decontamination of these probes developed by the High Council for Public Health and the Academy of Medicine have not been evaluated. The objective of this article was to review recent publications concluding to the detection of HPV and human cellular DNA after gynecological examination and disinfection of vaginal ultrasound probes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Probe Selection in Multiprobe OTA Setups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Sun, Fan; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum

    2014-01-01

    is costly, so finding ways to limit the number of probes while still reproducing the target channels accurately could make the test system both cheaper and simpler to implement. Several probe selection algorithms are presented in this paper to address this issue. The proposed techniques provide a probe...... selection framework for the channel emulation techniques published in the literature. Simulation results show that good channel emulation accuracy can be achieved with the selected subset of probes for the considered target channel models. The probe selection algorithm is further supported by measurement...... results in a practical multiprobe setup...

  10. Zero voltage mass spectrometry probes and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Wleklinski, Michael Stanley; Bag, Soumabha; Li, Yafeng

    2017-10-10

    The invention generally relates to zero volt mass spectrometry probes and systems. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system including a mass spectrometry probe including a porous material, and a mass spectrometer (bench-top or miniature mass spectrometer). The system operates without an application of voltage to the probe. In certain embodiments, the probe is oriented such that a distal end faces an inlet of the mass spectrometer. In other embodiments, the distal end of the probe is 5 mm or less from an inlet of the mass spectrometer.

  11. Probe-Dependent Negative Allosteric Modulators of the Long-Chain Free Fatty Acid Receptor FFA4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watterson, Kenneth R; Hansen, Steffen V F; Hudson, Brian D

    2017-01-01

    High-affinity and selective antagonists that are able to block the actions of both endogenous and synthetic agonists of G protein-coupled receptors are integral to analysis of receptor function and to support suggestions of therapeutic potential. Although there is great interest in the potential...... of endogenous and synthetic agonists, clear agonist probe dependence in the nature of allosteric modulation was apparent. Although AH-7614 did not antagonize the second long-chain free fatty acid receptor, free fatty acid receptor 1, the simple chemical structure of AH-7614 containing features found in many...

  12. Multi-antenna synthetic aperture radar

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a well-known remote sensing technique, but conventional single-antenna SAR is inherently limited by the minimum antenna area constraint. Although there are still technical issues to overcome, multi-antenna SAR offers many benefits, from improved system gain to increased degrees-of-freedom and system flexibility. Multi-Antenna Synthetic Aperture Radar explores the potential and challenges of using multi-antenna SAR in microwave remote sensing applications. These applications include high-resolution imaging, wide-swath remote sensing, ground moving target indica

  13. Synthetic biology approaches to engineer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Rupp, Levi J; Roybal, Kole T; Lim, Wendell A

    2015-08-01

    There is rapidly growing interest in learning how to engineer immune cells, such as T lymphocytes, because of the potential of these engineered cells to be used for therapeutic applications such as the recognition and killing of cancer cells. At the same time, our knowhow and capability to logically engineer cellular behavior is growing rapidly with the development of synthetic biology. Here we describe how synthetic biology approaches are being used to rationally alter the behavior of T cells to optimize them for therapeutic functions. We also describe future developments that will be important in order to construct safe and precise T cell therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Parity-Time Synthetic Phononic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Johan; Willatzen, Morten; Velasco, V. R.

    2016-01-01

    media, have been devised in many optical systems with the ground breaking potential to create nonreciprocal structures and one-way cloaks of invisibility. Here we demonstrate a feasible approach for the case of sound where the most important ingredients within synthetic materials, loss and gain......, are achieved through electrically biased piezoelectric semiconductors. We study first how wave attenuation and amplification can be tuned, and when combined, can give rise to a phononic PT synthetic media with unidirectional suppressed reflectance, a feature directly applicable to evading sonar detection....

  15. New Synthetic Methods for Hypericum Natural Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Insik [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Organic chemistry has served as a solid foundation for interdisciplinary research areas, such as molecular biology and medicinal chemistry. An understanding of the biological activities and structural elucidations of natural products can lead to the development of clinically valuable therapeutic options. The advancements of modern synthetic methodologies allow for more elaborate and concise natural product syntheses. The theme of this study centers on the synthesis of natural products with particularly challenging structures and interesting biological activities. The synthetic expertise developed here will be applicable to analog syntheses and to other research problems.

  16. Tunable promoters in synthetic and systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehli, Tore; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2012-01-01

    in synthetic biology. A number of tools exist to manipulate the steps in between gene sequence and functional protein in living cells, but out of these the most straight-forward approach is to alter the gene expression level by manipulating the promoter sequence. Some of the promoter tuning tools available......Synthetic and systems biologists need standardized, modular and orthogonal tools yielding predictable functions in vivo. In systems biology such tools are needed to quantitatively analyze the behavior of biological systems while the efficient engineering of artificial gene networks is central...

  17. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  18. Synthetic Aperture Ladar Imaging and Atmospheric Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    coherence factor for every retro-pair Ladar Heater Target 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 0 50 100 150 200 250 Time [sec] In te n s it y Heater On...c) 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 10 -13 10 -12 10 -11 C n 2 time [sec] 0.5 m 2 m 4 m 6 m 7.5 m DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for...optical synthetic aperture radar,” US6879279 B2, 12- Apr - 2005. [10] Z. W. Barber and J. R. Dahl, “Synthetic aperture ladar imaging demonstrations and

  19. Update on complications of synthetic suburethral slings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Carvalho, Fabrício Leite; Bellucci, Carlos Henrique Suzuki; Hemerly, Thiago Souto; Baracat, Fábio; de Bessa, Jose; Srougi, Miguel; Bruschini, Homero

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Synthetic suburethral slings have become the most widely used technique for the surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Despite its high success rates, significant complications have been reported including bleeding, urethral or bladder injury, urethral or bladder mesh erosion, intestinal perforation, vaginal extrusion of mesh, urinary tract infection, pain, urinary urgency and bladder outlet obstruction. Recent warnings from important regulatory agencies worldwide concerning safety issues of the use of mesh for urogynecological reconstruction have had a strong impact on patients as well as surgeons and manufacturers. In this paper, we reviewed the literature regarding surgical morbidity associated with synthetic suburethral slings. PMID:28266818

  20. [Salem witches, flying brooms, and synthetic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos Tejero, Manuel; Castellanos Tejero, M de los Angeles

    2002-10-01

    As supplementary material to Health Education programs about synthetic drugs, the authors present a historical summary on LSD, stramonium and khat. "Tripis", Special K and other synthetic pills contain these substances and are being widely used by youths. The history of these main hallucinogenic active ingredients has a strong tie to the mythology of witchcraft and witches: a historically interesting time period bearing a large amount of religious intolerance. The objective of this review is to end the belief today's youth have that they are taking new substances which have no risks.

  1. Tunable synthetic control of soft polymeric nanoparticle morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Halie J; White, B Tyler; Scanlon, Christopher J; Saito, Tomonori; Dadmun, Mark D

    2017-11-29

    With a growing variety of nanoparticles available, research probing the influence of particle deformability, morphology, and topology on the behavior of all polymer nanocomposites is also increasing. In particular, the behavior of soft polymeric nanoparticles in polymer nanocomposites has displayed unique behavior, but their precise performance depends intimately on the internal structure and morphology of the nanoparticle. With the goal of providing guidelines to control the structure and morphology of soft polymeric nanoparticles, we have examined monomer starved semi-batch nano-emulsion polymerizations that form organic, soft nanoparticles, to correlate the precise structure of the nanoparticle to the rate of monomer addition and crosslinking density. The synthesis method produces 5-20 nm radii polystyrene nanoparticles with tunable morphologies. We report small angle neutron scattering (SANS) results that correlate synthetic conditions to the structural characteristics of soft polystyrene nanoparticles. These results show that the measured molecular weight of the nanoparticles is controlled by the monomer addition rate, the total nanoparticle radius is controlled by the excess surfactant concentration, and the crosslinking density has a direct effect on the topology of each nanoparticle. These studies thus provide pathways to control these 3 structural characteristics of the nanoparticle. This research, therefore provides a conduit to thoroughly investigate the effect of structural features of soft nanoparticles on their individual properties and those of their polymer nanocomposites.

  2. Mechanistically Consistent Reduced Models of Synthetic Gene Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier-y-Terán-Romero, Luis; Silber, Mary; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2013-01-01

    Designing genetic networks with desired functionalities requires an accurate mathematical framework that accounts for the essential mechanistic details of the system. Here, we formulate a time-delay model of protein translation and mRNA degradation by systematically reducing a detailed mechanistic model that explicitly accounts for the ribosomal dynamics and the cleaving of mRNA by endonucleases. We exploit various technical and conceptual advantages that our time-delay model offers over the mechanistic model to probe the behavior of a self-repressing gene over wide regions of parameter space. We show that a heuristic time-delay model of protein synthesis of a commonly used form yields a notably different prediction for the parameter region where sustained oscillations occur. This suggests that such heuristics can lead to erroneous results. The functional forms that arise from our systematic reduction can be used for every system that involves transcription and translation and they could replace the commonly used heuristic time-delay models for these processes. The results from our analysis have important implications for the design of synthetic gene networks and stress that such design must be guided by a combination of heuristic models and mechanistic models that include all relevant details of the process. PMID:23663853

  3. Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique 3D-CAD-SAFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, V.; Kroening, M.; Chakhlov, S.; Fischer, W.

    2000-01-01

    Till the 80's ultrasonic holography has been used as an analyzing technique, a procedure which has been replaced by the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique 'SAFT'. This technique has been applied on metallic components in different power plants, mostly on pipe systems on pressure vessels or on specimen made of composite or concrete material. SAFT exists in different versions, either in 2D or 3D, for plane or arbitrarily shaped surfaces, for pulse echo or pitch- and catch arrangements. The defect sizes ranged from 100 μm in turbine shafts till fractures of meters in research pressure vessels. The paper covers the latest results of the SAFT-reconstruction technique under Windows NT which has been guided by the experience obtained in the field. It contributes to the currently discussed question of the possible benefit using TOFD-techniques versus pulse echo techniques; the target has been a fatigue crack in a pipe segment which was investigated by different insonification angles, wave modes and probe arrangements. The results are evaluated with respect to signal-to-noise ratio improvement; problems of TOFD are demonstrated using an animation procedure which allows to walk through the weld in three orthogonal directions. A special example will be shown from a bore hole inspection of water power station valves where the reconstruction procedure follows the radial axial insonification planes. The multi-line SAFT images can be cut according to the situation of the crack position and orientation

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of phosphorescent oligonucleotide probes for hybridisation assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Sullivan, Paul J.; Burke, Martina; Soini, Aleksi E.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2002-01-01

    Monofunctional, p-isothiocyanatophenyl-derivatives of platinum (II)-coproporphyrin-I (PtCP-NCS) were evaluated as phosphorescent labelling reagents for synthetic oligonucleotides containing a 3′- or 5′-amino modification. Synthesis and purification conditions were optimised to generate high yields and purity of PtCP-labelled oligonucleotide probes. Phosphorescent properties of the PtCP label have been shown to be largely unaffected by conjugation to oligonucleotides of various length, GC composition and label attachment site. 5′-PtCP-labelled oligonucleotides were shown to work efficiently as primers in a standard PCR. A dedicated 532 nm laser-based time-resolved fluorescence plate reader enabled highly sensitive detection of PtCP-labelled oligonucleotides and PCR products, both in solution and in agarose gels, with limits of detection in the order of 0.3 pM. A model system employing two complementary oligonucleotides labelled with PtCP and QSY® 7 dye (dark quencher) showed strong (∼20-fold) and specific proximity quenching of PtCP label upon hybridisation in solution. The potential applications of PtCP-labelled probes in hybridisation assays were discussed. PMID:12409473

  5. Soft QGP probes with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Graczykowski, Łukasz Kamil

    2016-01-01

    In heavy-ion collisions at the LHC a hot and dense medium of deconfided partons, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), is created. Its global properties can be characterized by the measurements of particles in the low transverse momentum (or "soft") regime, which represent the majority of created particles. In this report we outline a selection of measurements of the soft probes by the ALICE experiment in pp, p--Pb, and Pb--Pb collisions. The paper focuses on recent flow measurements via angular correlations and femtoscopic studies. The first ever preliminary analysis of $\\mathrm{K}^0_{\\rm S}\\mathrm{K}^{\\pm}$ femtoscopy is also presented.

  6. Synthetic drugs with anti-ageing effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Vijay K; Dureja, Janhvi; Chadha, Renu

    2009-09-01

    Although ageing is a natural wear and tear phenomenon, it can at least be postponed or prevented by certain approaches. Some chemicals that are present in the diet or in dietary supplements have been documented to have anti-ageing effects. Recently, a number of synthetic drugs used for other therapeutic indications have been shown to have anti-ageing potential.

  7. Optimization of Synthetic Aperture Image Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Jensen, Jonas; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture (SA) imaging produces high-quality images and velocity estimates of both slow and fast flow at high frame rates. However, grating lobe artifacts can appear both in transmission and reception. These affect the image quality and the frame rate. Therefore optimization of parameter...

  8. Design and construction of "synthetic species".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Moreno

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology is an area of biological research that combines science and engineering. Here, I merge the principles of synthetic biology and regulatory evolution to create a new species with a minimal set of known elements. Using preexisting transgenes and recessive mutations of Drosophila melanogaster, a transgenic population arises with small eyes and a different venation pattern that fulfils the criteria of a new species according to Mayr's Biological Species Concept. The population described here is the first transgenic organism that cannot hybridize with the original wild type population but remains fertile when crossed with other identical transgenic animals. I therefore propose the term "synthetic species" to distinguish it from "natural species", not only because it has been created by genetic manipulation, but also because it may never be able to survive outside the laboratory environment. The use of genetic engineering to design artificial species barriers could help us understand natural speciation and may have practical applications. For instance, the transition from transgenic organisms towards synthetic species could constitute a safety mechanism to avoid the hybridization of genetically modified animals with wild type populations, preserving biodiversity.

  9. Preparation of Natural and Synthetic Porous Biodegradable ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Preparation of Natural and Synthetic Porous Biodegradable Scaffolds for Infected Wounds. Characterised for their physical properties, pore size and release kinetics. Release kinetics of bioactive molecules (antibiotics) in a controlled fashion. Release pattern of the ...

  10. Super-Resolution for Synthetic Zooming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical zooming is an important feature of imaging systems. In this paper, we investigate a low-cost signal processing alternative to optical zooming—synthetic zooming by super-resolution (SR techniques. Synthetic zooming is achieved by registering a sequence of low-resolution (LR images acquired at varying focal lengths and reconstructing the SR image at a larger focal length or increased spatial resolution. Under the assumptions of constant scene depth and zooming speed, we argue that the motion trajectories of all physical points are related to each other by a unique vanishing point and present a robust technique for estimating its D coordinate. Such a line-geometry-based registration is the foundation of SR for synthetic zooming. We address the issue of data inconsistency arising from the varying focal length of optical lens during the zooming process. To overcome the difficulty of data inconsistency, we propose a two-stage Delaunay-triangulation-based interpolation for fusing the LR image data. We also present a PDE-based nonlinear deblurring to accommodate the blindness and variation of sensor point spread functions. Simulation results with real-world images have verified the effectiveness of the proposed SR techniques for synthetic zooming.

  11. Immunization with a synthetic robustoxin derivative lacking ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    has 42 amino acid residues and four disulphide bridges. If these bridges are broken, the resulting polypeptide is non- toxic. Robustoxin was chemically synthesized with all of its eight cysteine residues protected with acetamidomethyl groups in ...... G L, Moss B, Miller L H and Berzofsky J A 1987 Construction of synthetic ...

  12. A NEW SYNTHETIC FUNCTIONALIZED ANTIGEN CARRIER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DRIJFHOUT, JW; BLOEMHOFF, W

    A new synthetic functionalized antigen carrier is described. It consists of a core of seven branched lysine residues, of which each of the four N-terminal lysine residues contains two N-(S-acetylmercaptoacetyl)-glutamyl residues. After removal of the protecting S-acetyl groups affording eight thiol

  13. [Pharmacodynamics of synthetic estrogens. A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo-Aranda, I; Cortés-Gallegos, V

    1990-10-01

    Some details about the function of natural and synthetical hormonas are reviewed, particularly estrogens as ethynyl estradiol and its 3, Methyl ether (mestranol); its peripheral concentration vs tissular hormonal contents, a relationship of biological importance as the first step in its hormonal action and the cumulative local effects that could explain some intra and extracellular phenomena.

  14. [Pharmacodynamics of synthetic estrogens. Review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo-Aranda, I; Cortés-Gallegos, V

    1990-10-01

    Some details about the function of natural and synthetical hormonas are reviewed, particularly estrogens as ethynyl estradiol and its 3, Methyl ether (mestranol); its peripheral concentration vs tissular hormonal contents, a relationship of biological importance as the first step in its hormonal action and the cummulative local effects that could explain some intra and extracellular phenomena.

  15. Standardization for natural product synthetic biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Huimin; Medema, Marnix H.

    2016-01-01

    Standardization is one of the foundational features of modern-day engineering, and the use of standardized parts and processes is a key element that distinguishes bona fide synthetic biology from traditional genetic engineering. Here, we discuss the role of standardization in natural product

  16. Tunable promoters in synthetic and systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehli, Tore; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2012-01-01

    for accomplishing such altered gene expression levels are discussed here along with examples of their use, and ideas for new tools are described. The road ahead looks very promising for synthetic and systems biologists as tools to achieve just about anything in terms of tuning and timing multiple gene expression...

  17. 21 CFR 175.250 - Paraffin (synthetic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... hydrocarbons. Lower molecular-weight fractions are removed by distillation. The residue is hydrogenated and may... its components by a solvent separation method, using synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons... method E131-81a, “Standard Definitions of Terms and Symbols Relating to Molecular-Spectroscopy,” which is...

  18. Wind energy applications of synthetic aperture radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete

    Synthetic aperture radars (SAR), mounted on satellites or aircraft, have proven useful for ocean wind mapping. Wind speeds at the height 10 m may be retrieved from measurements of radar backscatter using empirical model functions. The resulting windfields are valuable in offshore wind energy...

  19. SYNTHETIC JET APPLIED TO DETECT POTENTIAL TERRORISTS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav; Peszyński, K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2010), s. 229-234 ISSN 1231-3998 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200760705; GA ČR GA101/07/1499 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : synthetic jets * annular jets * terrorism Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  20. Immobilization of radioiodine in synthetic boracite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babad, H.; Strachan, D.M.

    1982-09-23

    A nuclear waste storage product is disclosed in which radioiodine is incorporated in a synthetic boracite. The boracite may be prepared by reacting a transition metal iodide with an alkali horate under mild hydrothermal conditions, drying the reaction product, and then hot pressing.

  1. Synthetic observations of protostellar multiple systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, O.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2018-04-01

    Observations of protostars are often compared with synthetic observations of models in order to infer the underlying physical properties of the protostars. The majority of these models have a single protostar, attended by a disc and an envelope. However, observational and numerical evidence suggests that a large fraction of protostars form as multiple systems. This means that fitting models of single protostars to observations may be inappropriate. We produce synthetic observations of protostellar multiple systems undergoing realistic, non-continuous accretion. These systems consist of multiple protostars with episodic luminosities, embedded self-consistently in discs and envelopes. We model the gas dynamics of these systems using smoothed particle hydrodynamics and we generate synthetic observations by post-processing the snapshots using the SPAMCART Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. We present simulation results of three model protostellar multiple systems. For each of these, we generate 4 × 104 synthetic spectra at different points in time and from different viewing angles. We propose a Bayesian method, using similar calculations to those presented here, but in greater numbers, to infer the physical properties of protostellar multiple systems from observations.

  2. Synthetic biology for microbial heavy metal biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Haeyoung; Lee, Sang Jun

    2018-02-01

    Using recombinant DNA technology, various whole-cell biosensors have been developed for detection of environmental pollutants, including heavy metal ions. Whole-cell biosensors have several advantages: easy and inexpensive cultivation, multiple assays, and no requirement of any special techniques for analysis. In the era of synthetic biology, cutting-edge DNA sequencing and gene synthesis technologies have accelerated the development of cell-based biosensors. Here, we summarize current technological advances in whole-cell heavy metal biosensors, including the synthetic biological components (bioparts), sensing and reporter modules, genetic circuits, and chassis cells. We discuss several opportunities for improvement of synthetic cell-based biosensors. First, new functional modules must be discovered in genome databases, and this knowledge must be used to upgrade specific bioparts through molecular engineering. Second, modules must be assembled into functional biosystems in chassis cells. Third, heterogeneity of individual cells in the microbial population must be eliminated. In the perspectives, the development of whole-cell biosensors is also discussed in the aspects of cultivation methods and synthetic cells.

  3. Defined carriers for synthetic antigens: Hinge Peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Jan; Niederhafner, Petr; Gut, Vladimír; Hulačová, Hana; Maloň, Petr

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2005), s. 68 ISSN 0939-4451. [International Congress on Amino Acids and Proteins /9./. 08.08.2005-12.08.2005, Gert Lubec] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : synthetic carrier * antigen * hinge peptide Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  4. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Green synthetic route for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GDY13

    Green synthetic route for perfumery compound (2-methoxyethyl) benzene using. Li/MgO catalyst. POOJA R TAMBE and ... A mixture containing fuel and oxidizer was taken in a silica crucible and heated to form highly .... Fogler H 1995 Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering 2nd edn. Prentice-Hall,. New Delhi, India. (3).

  5. News: Synthetic biology leading to specialty chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthetic biology can combine the disciplines of biology, engineering, and chemistry productively to form molecules of great scientific and commercial value. Recent advances in the new field are explored for their connection to new tools that have been used to elucidate productio...

  6. Once more on Analytic vs. Synthetic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Materna, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2007), s. 3-43 ISSN 1425-3305 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA401/07/0451 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90090514 Keywords : analytic * synthetic * intensions * constructions * concepts * pragmatics Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  7. Synthetic tsunamis along the Israeli coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Joshua; Stiassnie, Michael

    2012-04-13

    The new mathematical model for tsunami evolution by Tobias & Stiassnie (Tobias & Stiassnie 2011 J. Geophys. Res. Oceans 116, C06026) is used to derive a synthetic tsunami database for the southern part of the Eastern Mediterranean coast. Information about coastal tsunami amplitudes, half-periods, currents and inundation levels is presented.

  8. Synthetic biology advances for pharmaceutical production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology enables a new generation of microbial engineering for the biotechnological production of pharmaceuticals and other high-value chemicals. This review presents an overview of recent advances in the field, describing new computational and experimental tools for the discovery, optimization and production of bioactive molecules, and outlining progress towards the application of these tools to pharmaceutical production systems. PMID:25744872

  9. Synthetic Biology: Applications in the Food Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ashish; Kumar, Ashwani; Aparna, S V; Mallappa, Rashmi H; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender Kumar

    2016-08-17

    Synthetic biology also termed as "genomic alchemy" represents a powerful area of science that is based on the convergence of biological sciences with systems engineering. It has been fittingly described as "moving from reading the genetic code to writing it" as it focuses on building, modeling, designing and fabricating novel biological systems using customized gene components that result in artificially created genetic circuitry. The scientifically compelling idea of the technological manipulation of life has been advocated since long time. Realization of this idea has gained momentum with development of high speed automation and the falling cost of gene sequencing and synthesis following the completion of the human genome project. Synthetic biology will certainly be instrumental in shaping the development of varying areas ranging from biomedicine, biopharmaceuticals, chemical production, food and dairy quality monitoring, packaging, and storage of food and dairy products, bioremediation and bioenergy production, etc. However, potential dangers of using synthetic life forms have to be acknowledged and adoption of policies by the scientific community to ensure safe practice while making important advancements in the ever expanding field of synthetic biology is to be fully supported and implemented.

  10. [Exogenous surfactant therapy: new synthetic surfactants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze-Masmonteil, Th

    2008-06-01

    There are numerous pulmonary conditions in which qualitative or quantitative anomalies of the surfactant system have been demonstrated. In premature newborns with immature lungs, a functional deficit in surfactant is the main physiopathologic mechanism of the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Since the landmark pilot study of Fujiwara, published more than 20 years ago, the efficacy of exogenous surfactant for the treatment of neonatal RDS has been established by numerous controlled studies and meta-analyses. Enlightened by a growing insight into both the structure and function of the different surfactant components, a new generation of synthetic surfactants has been developed. Various complementary approaches have confirmed the fundamental role of the two hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, in the surfactant system, thus opening the way to the design of analogues, either by chemical synthesis or expression in a prokaryotic system. An example of these peptide-containing synthetic surfactant preparations, lucinactant (Surfaxin), has been recently tested in comparison to a synthetic surfactant that does not contain protein as well as to animal derived surfactant preparations. Major clinical outcomes between lucinactant and animal-derived surfactant preparations were fund similar in two randomized controlled trials, opening the way to a new generation of synthetic surfactants in the near future.

  11. Using Synthetic Kerosene in Civil Jet Aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, T.A.; Melkert, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    TU Delft in the Netherlands is performing research into the effects of the use of synthetic kerosene in aircraft. The research program consists of both desk research and tests. In the desk research gas turbine simulations will be combined with payload range performance calculations to show engine

  12. Simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation of synthetic melanoidin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Being an antioxidant, melanoidin removal through purely biodegradation has been inadequate. Consequently, in the current study, simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation (SAB) was employed in a stirred tank system to remove melanoidin from synthetic wastewater. Mixed microbial consortium was immobilized onto ...

  13. Soil moisture calibration of TDR multilevel probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrarens Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Time domain reflectometry (TDR probes are increasingly used for field estimation of soil water content. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the multilevel TDR probe under field conditions. For this purpose, eight such TDR probes were installed in small plots that were seeded with beans and sorghum. Data collection from the probes was such that soil moisture readings were automated and logged using a standalone field unit. Neutron probe measurements were used to calibrate the TDR probes. Soil-probe contact and soil compaction were critical to the accuracy of the TDR, especially when a number of TDR probes are combined for a single calibration curve. If each probe is calibrated individually, approximate measurement errors were between 0.005 and 0.015 m³ m-3. However, measurement errors doubled to approximately 0.025 to 0.03 m³ m-3, when TDR probes were combined to yield a single calibration curve.

  14. Connecting synthetic chemistry decisions to cell and genome biology using small-molecule phenotypic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Bridget K; Clemons, Paul A

    2009-12-01

    Discovering small-molecule modulators for thousands of gene products requires multiple stages of biological testing, specificity evaluation, and chemical optimization. Many cellular profiling methods, including cellular sensitivity, gene expression, and cellular imaging, have emerged as methods to assess the functional consequences of biological perturbations. Cellular profiling methods applied to small-molecule science provide opportunities to use complex phenotypic information to prioritize and optimize small-molecule structures simultaneously against multiple biological endpoints. As throughput increases and cost decreases for such technologies, we see an emerging paradigm of using more information earlier in probe-discovery and drug-discovery efforts. Moreover, increasing access to public datasets makes possible the construction of 'virtual' profiles of small-molecule performance, even when multiplexed measurements were not performed or when multidimensional profiling was not the original intent. We review some key conceptual advances in small-molecule phenotypic profiling, emphasizing connections to other information, such as protein-binding measurements, genetic perturbations, and cell states. We argue that to maximally leverage these measurements in probe-discovery and drug-discovery requires a fundamental connection to synthetic chemistry, allowing the consequences of synthetic decisions to be described in terms of changes in small-molecule profiles. Mining such data in the context of chemical structure and synthesis strategies can inform decisions about chemistry procurement and library development, leading to optimal small-molecule screening collections.

  15. Caffeine in your drink: natural or synthetic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijun; Kujawinski, Dorothea M; Federherr, Eugen; Schmidt, Torsten C; Jochmann, Maik A

    2012-03-20

    Owing to possible adulteration and health concerns, it is important to discriminate between natural and synthetic food ingredients. A new method for compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) by coupling high-temperature reversed-phase liquid chromatography to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HT-RPLC/IRMS) was developed for discrimination of natural and synthetic caffeine contained in all types of drinks. The analytical parameters such as stationary phase, column inner diameter, and column temperature were optimized for the separation of caffeine directly from drinks (without extraction). On the basis of the carbon isotope analysis of 42 natural caffeine samples including coffee beans, tea leaves, guaraná powder, and maté leaves, and 20 synthetic caffeine samples from different sources by high-temperature reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry, it is concluded that there are two distinguishable groups of caffeine δ(13)C-values: one between -25 and -32‰ for natural caffeine, and the other between -33 and -38‰ for synthetic caffeine. Isotope analysis by HT-RPLC/IRMS has been applied to identify the caffeine source in 38 drinks. Four mislabeled products were detected due to added but nonlabeled synthetic caffeine with δ(13)C-values lower than -33‰. This work is the first application of HT-RPLC/IRMS to real-world food samples, which showed several advantages: simple sample preparation (only dilution), high throughput, long-term column stability, and high precision of δ(13)C-value. Thus, HT-RPLC/IRMS can be a very promising tool in stable isotope analysis of nonvolatile compounds.

  16. Eddy current flaw detecting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Harada, Yutaka; Shimone, Junri; Maeda, Kotaro

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides an eddy current-flaw detection probe facilitating quantitative evaluation, which is used for maintenance and inspection of metal fine tubes of a heat exchanger of a nuclear power plant. Namely, the probe comprises a substantially cylindrical or columnar flow detection main body to be inserted to a metal tube. Wires are wound on the circumferential surface of the flaw detection main body substantially uniformly and in parallel to form a solenoid portion having a predetermined width. Magnetic sensors are disposed on the lateral center of the solenoid portion. With such a constitution, the solenoid portion forms eddy current in the circumferential direction. The eddy current is substantially in parallel having the same intensity at the lateral central portion of the solenoid. Accordingly, the quantitative evaluation for the shape and the size of cracks in the axial direction of the tube can be conducted by the magnetic sensors disposed to the portion. In addition, since the eddy current is substantially uniform, parameters upon reverse analysis can be reduced upon determination of the shape of flaws. (I.S.)

  17. The Gravity Probe B Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    This presentation briefly describes the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) Experiment which is designed to measure parts of Einstein's general theory of relativity by monitoring gyroscope orientation relative to a distant guide star. To measure the miniscule angles predicted by Einstein's theory, it was necessary to build near-perfect gyroscopes that were approximately 50 million times more precise than the best navigational gyroscopes. A telescope mounted along the central axis of the dewar and spacecraft provided the experiment's pointing reference to a guide star. The telescope's image divide precisely split the star's beam into x-axis and y-axis components whose brightness could be compared. GP-B's 650-gallon dewar, kept the science instrument inside the probe at a cryogenic temperature for 17.3 months and also provided the thruster propellant for precision attitude and translation control. Built around the dewar, the GP-B spacecraft was a total-integrated system, comprising both the space vehicle and payload, dedicated as a single entity to experimentally testing predictions of Einstein's theory.

  18. Portal monitor incorporating smart probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartos, D.; Constantin, F.; Guta, T.

    2003-01-01

    Portal monitors are intended for detection of radioactive and special nuclear materials in vehicles, pedestrians, luggage, as well as for prevention of illegal traffic of radioactive sources. Monitors provide audio and visual alarms when radioactive and/or special nuclear materials are detected. They can be recommended to officers of customs, border guard and emergency services, civil defense, fire brigades, police and military departments or nuclear research or energetic facilities. The portal monitor developed by us consists in a portal frame, which sustains five intelligent probes having long plastic scintillator (0.5 liters each). The probes communicate, by serial transmission, with a Central Unit constructed on the basis of the 80552 microcontroller. This one manages the handshake, calculates the background, establishes the measuring time, starts and stops each measurement and makes all the other decisions. Sound signals and an infrared sensor monitor the passing through the portal and the measuring procedure. For each measurement the result is displayed on a LCD device contaminated/uncontaminated; for the contaminated case a loud and long sound signal is also issued. An RS 232 serial interface is provided in order to further developments or custom made devices. As a result, the portal monitor detects 1 μ Ci 137 Cs, spread all over a human body, in a 20 μR/h gamma background for a measuring time of 1.5 or 10 seconds giving a 99% confidence factor. (authors)

  19. Influence of probe motion on laser probe temperature in circulating blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehrlein, C; Splinter, R; Littmann, L; Tuntelder, J R; Tatsis, G P; Svenson, R H

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of probe motion on laser probe temperature in various blood flow conditions. Laser probe temperatures were measured in an in vitro blood circulation model consisting of 3.2 nm-diameter plastic tubes. A 2.0 mm-diameter metal probe attached to a 300 microns optical quartz fiber was coupled to an argon laser. Continuous wave 4 watts and 8 watts of laser power were delivered to the fiber tip corresponding to a 6.7 +/- 0.5 and 13.2 +/- 0.7 watts power setting at the laser generator. The laser probe was either moved with constant velocity or kept stationary. A thermocouple inserted in the lateral portion of the probe was used to record probe temperatures. Probe temperature changes were found with the variation of laser power, probe velocity, blood flow, and duration of laser exposure. Probe motion significantly reduced probe temperatures. After 10 seconds of 4 watts laser power the probe temperature in stagnant blood decreased from 303 +/- 18 degrees C to 113 +/- 17 degrees C (63%) by moving the probe with a velocity of 5 cm/sec. Blood flow rates of 170 ml/min further decreased the probe temperature from 113 +/- 17 degrees C to 50 +/- 8 degrees C (56%). At 8 watts of laser power a probe temperature reduction from 591 +/- 25 degrees C to 534 +/- 36 degrees C (10%) due to 5 cm/sec probe velocity was noted. Probe temperatures were reduced to 130 +/- 30 degrees C (78%) under the combined influence of 5 cm/sec probe velocity and 170 ml/min blood flow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. From noise to synthetic nucleoli: can synthetic biology achieve new insights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciechonska, Marta; Grob, Alice; Isalan, Mark

    2016-04-18

    Synthetic biology aims to re-organise and control biological components to make functional devices. Along the way, the iterative process of designing and testing gene circuits has the potential to yield many insights into the functioning of the underlying chassis of cells. Thus, synthetic biology is converging with disciplines such as systems biology and even classical cell biology, to give a new level of predictability to gene expression, cell metabolism and cellular signalling networks. This review gives an overview of the contributions that synthetic biology has made in understanding gene expression, in terms of cell heterogeneity (noise), the coupling of growth and energy usage to expression, and spatiotemporal considerations. We mainly compare progress in bacterial and mammalian systems, which have some of the most-developed engineering frameworks. Overall, one view of synthetic biology can be neatly summarised as "creating in order to understand."

  1. Directional neutronometric probe; Kierunkowa sonda neutronometryczna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strzelecki, M.; Owczarczyk, A.; Wieclaw, B.; Szpilowwski, S.

    1991-11-04

    The neutronometric probe for direction and rate of groundwater flow measurements has been designed. The probe consists in collimated proportional neutron counter and also collimated and shielded neutron source. The neutron source can be disconnected from the detection part of the probe and transported separately in especially designed container. In the place of measurement the source can be easily joined to the detection part. 1 fig.

  2. Exploratory comparative study on the diffusion of synthetic cannabinoids and synthetic cathinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, Cynthia L; Owens, Darlene; Madeja, Cheryl; DeAngelis, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The use of synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones in southeastern Michigan was explored using Roger's Diffusion of Innovation theory. A mixed methods approach after specific synthetic cannabinoids and cathinone compounds were scheduled was used that included analysis of treatment admissions for two years, surveys of 15 substance abuse treatment providers, and qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of 24 participants. The participant system norm supported trying new drugs, and both drugs were confirmed to have been easier to access than traditional drugs. The participants had negative views of synthetic cathinones due to one sensational news story without counterbalancing positive experiences in their social environment. Although synthetic cannabinoids were also linked to a sensational news story, it was counterbalanced by positive personal experiences. These differences contributed to greater use of synthetic cannabinoids compared to synthetic cathinones as evidenced by admissions, providers' reports, and participants' reports. All participants expressed a preference for traditional drugs, indicating that novel drugs had no relative advantage over other drugs of abuse. Diffusion of Innovation theory can provide a framework for understanding the differential use of novel drugs.

  3. Characterization of Thermal Stability of Synthetic and Semi-Synthetic Engine Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Kumar Tripathi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Engine oils undergo oxidative degradation and wears out during service. Hence it is important to characterize ageing of engine oils at different simulated conditions to evaluate the performance of existing oils and also design new formulations. This work focuses on characterizing the thermo-oxidative degradation of synthetic and semi-synthetic engine oils aged at 120, 149 and 200 °C. Apparent activation energy of decomposition of aged oils evaluated using the isoconversional Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose technique was used as a thermal stability marker. The temporal variation of stability at different ageing temperatures was corroborated with kinematic viscosity, oxidation, sulfation and nitration indices, total base number, antiwear additive content and molecular structure of the organic species present in the oils. At the lowest temperature employed, synthetic oil underwent higher rate of oxidation, while semi-synthetic oil was stable for longer time periods. At higher temperatures, the initial rate of change of average apparent activation energy of synthetic oil correlated well with a similar variation in oxidation number. A mixture of long chain linear, branched, and cyclic hydrocarbons were observed when semi-synthetic oil was degraded at higher temperatures.

  4. Bacterial and fungal deterioration of the Milan Cathedral marble treated with protective synthetic resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappitelli, Francesca [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Alimentari e Microbiologiche, University of Milan, Via Celoria 2, 20133 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: francesca.cappitelli@unimi.it; Principi, Pamela [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Alimentari e Microbiologiche, University of Milan, Via Celoria 2, 20133 Milan (Italy); Pedrazzani, Roberta [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, University of Brescia, Via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Toniolo, Lucia [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica ' Giulio Natta' , Politecnico di Milano, Via Mancinelli 7, 20133 Milan (Italy); Sorlini, Claudia [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Alimentari e Microbiologiche, University of Milan, Via Celoria 2, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    Surfaces are continuously exposed to physical, chemical and biological degradation. Among the biological agents that cause deterioration, microorganisms are of critical importance. This work is part of a research programme for the characterisation of the alterations of the Milan Cathedral (Italy). Four stone samples of the Milan Cathedral were chemically analysed and the microbiological growth assessed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that calcite was always present in each sample and one sample was also characterised by the chemical form of alteration gypsum. Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) together with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), it was possible to prove that the samples were consolidated with the synthetic acrylics and epoxy resins. The green-black biological patinas of the specimens were studied using cultivation, microscope observations and a method for single-cell detection. Sampling for fluorescent in-situ hybridisation (FISH), with ribosomal RNA targeted oligonucleotide probes, was also performed using adhesive tapes. The bulk of the prokaryotes were Bacteria but some Archaea were also found. The bacterial cells were further characterised using specific probes for Cyanobacteria, and {alpha}-, {beta}-and {gamma}-Proteobacteria. In addition, black fungi isolated from the stone and the fungi of the standard ASTM G21-96(2002) method were employed to test if the detected synthetic resins could be used as the sole source of carbon and energy. One isolated Cladosporium sp. attacked the freshly dried acrylic resin. Results show that the detected bacteria and fungi can cause severe damage both to the stone monument and its synthetic consolidants.

  5. Bacterial and fungal deterioration of the Milan Cathedral marble treated with protective synthetic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappitelli, Francesca; Principi, Pamela; Pedrazzani, Roberta; Toniolo, Lucia; Sorlini, Claudia

    2007-10-15

    Surfaces are continuously exposed to physical, chemical and biological degradation. Among the biological agents that cause deterioration, microorganisms are of critical importance. This work is part of a research programme for the characterisation of the alterations of the Milan Cathedral (Italy). Four stone samples of the Milan Cathedral were chemically analysed and the microbiological growth assessed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that calcite was always present in each sample and one sample was also characterised by the chemical form of alteration gypsum. Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) together with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), it was possible to prove that the samples were consolidated with the synthetic acrylics and epoxy resins. The green-black biological patinas of the specimens were studied using cultivation, microscope observations and a method for single-cell detection. Sampling for fluorescent in-situ hybridisation (FISH), with ribosomal RNA targeted oligonucleotide probes, was also performed using adhesive tapes. The bulk of the prokaryotes were Bacteria but some Archaea were also found. The bacterial cells were further characterised using specific probes for Cyanobacteria, and alpha-, beta-and gamma-Proteobacteria. In addition, black fungi isolated from the stone and the fungi of the standard ASTM G21-96(2002) method were employed to test if the detected synthetic resins could be used as the sole source of carbon and energy. One isolated Cladosporium sp. attacked the freshly dried acrylic resin. Results show that the detected bacteria and fungi can cause severe damage both to the stone monument and its synthetic consolidants.

  6. GC X GCTOFMS OF SYNTHETIC PYRETHROIDS IN FOODS SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethrins are natural insecticides in the extract of chrysanthemum flowers1. Pyrethroids are synthetic forms of pyrethrins, and many are halogenated (F, Cl, Br). Synthetic pyrethroids have become popular replacements for organophosphorus pesticides, which have become increasin...

  7. Synthetic differential geometry within homotopy type theory I

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Both syntheticc differential geometry and homotopy type theory pre-fer synthetic arguments to analytical ones. This paper gives a first steptowards developing synthetic differential geometry within homotopy typetheory. Model theory of this approach will be discussed in a subsequentpaper.

  8. Engineering of synthetic, stress-responsive yeast promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajkumar, Arun Stephen; Liu, Guodong; Bergenholm, David

    2016-01-01

    Advances in synthetic biology and our understanding of the rules of promoter architecture have led to the development of diverse synthetic constitutive and inducible promoters in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, the design of promoters inducibleby specific endogenous or environmental conditions...

  9. Gravity Probe B spacecraft description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Norman R; Burns, Kevin; Katz, Russell; Kirschenbaum, Jon; Mason, Gary; Shehata, Shawky

    2015-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B spacecraft, developed, integrated, and tested by Lockheed Missiles and Space Company and later Lockheed Martin Corporation, consisted of structures, mechanisms, command and data handling, attitude and translation control, electrical power, thermal control, flight software, and communications. When integrated with the payload elements, the integrated system became the space vehicle. Key requirements shaping the design of the spacecraft were: (1) the tight mission timeline (17 months, 9 days of on-orbit operation), (2) precise attitude and translational control, (3) thermal protection of science hardware, (4) minimizing aerodynamic, magnetic, and eddy current effects, and (5) the need to provide a robust, low risk spacecraft. The spacecraft met all mission requirements, as demonstrated by dewar lifetime meeting specification, positive power and thermal margins, precision attitude control and drag-free performance, reliable communications, and the collection of more than 97% of the available science data. (paper)

  10. Gravity Probe B orbit determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shestople, P; Ndili, A; Parkinson, B W; Small, H; Hanuschak, G

    2015-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite was equipped with a pair of redundant Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers used to provide navigation solutions for real-time and post-processed orbit determination (OD), as well as to establish the relation between vehicle time and coordinated universal time. The receivers performed better than the real-time position requirement of 100 m rms per axis. Post-processed solutions indicated an rms position error of 2.5 m and an rms velocity error of 2.2 mm s −1 . Satellite laser ranging measurements provided independent verification of the GPS-derived GP-B orbit. We discuss the modifications and performance of the Trimble Advance Navigation System Vector III GPS receivers. We describe the GP-B precision orbit and detail the OD methodology, including ephemeris errors and the laser ranging measurements. (paper)

  11. Nuclear probes of fundamental symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelberger, E.G.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear experiments which probe the parity (P) and time-reversal (T) symmetries and lepton-number conservation are reviewed. The P-violating NN interaction, studied in the NN system and in light nuclei, provides an unique window on ΔS=0 hadronic weak processes. Results are in accord with expectations. Sensitive searches for T-violation via detailed balance, T-odd correlations in γ and β-decay, and a possible neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) are discussed. No T-violation is observed. The EDM limit is almost good enough to eliminate one of the leading theoretical explanations for CP violation. Experimental studies of double β-decay are reviewed. Although ββ nu nu decay has been convincingly detected in geochemical experiments there is no evidence for the lepton number violating ββ decay mode

  12. Nuclear reactions as structure probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Bernard; Cugnon, Joseph; Roussel-Chomaz, Patricia; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Oliveira Santos, Francois de; Bauge, Eric; Poves, Alfredo; Keeley, Nicholas; Simenel, Cedric; Avez, Benoit; Lacroix, Denis; Baye, Daniel; Cortina-Gil, Dolores; Pons, Alexandre

    2007-09-01

    This publication gathers courses which aim at giving a view on new experiments which are performed by using radioactive beams, notably low intensity beams, in different accelerators, and allow the structure of very exotic nuclei to be characterized. Experimental as well as theoretical aspects are thus addressed. The contributions propose: a brief history of nuclear reactions and of instruments used to study them from the discovery of nucleus to the DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation); an overview of nuclear reactions; experimental techniques; the theory of collisions at low energy; resonant elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and astrophysical reactions; to probe nuclear structure with nucleons; shell model and spectroscopic factors; analysis of transfer reactions and determination of spectroscopic factors; microscopic approaches of nuclear dynamics; theoretical aspects of dissociation reactions; experimental aspects of knockout reactions; research in oenology with the chemical characterisation of defective ageing of dry white wines

  13. Pitfalls in Kelvin probe measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottinger, Oliver M.; Melzer, Christian; Seggern, Heinz von

    2009-01-01

    We report on the interpretation of thickness-dependent surface potential profiles in insulators on metal substrates measured by Kelvin probe method. The electrical potentials are calculated within a self-consistent model taking both the conductive substrate and the insulator into account. It is shown that interpreting the Kelvin potentials for different layer thicknesses as the prevailing potential profile of a thick insulator film is generally wrong. Even more controversially, the reconstruction of the potential profile in a thick insulator layer on the basis of layer-thickness-dependent Kelvin measurements alone is per se impossible. This will be demonstrated exemplarily on the basis of doped and undoped organic films on conductive substrates.

  14. The Oxford Probe: an open access five-hole probe for aerodynamic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, B F; Povey, T

    2017-01-01

    The Oxford Probe is an open access five-hole probe designed for experimental aerodynamic measurements. The open access probe can be manufactured by the end user via additive manufacturing (metal or plastic). The probe geometry, drawings, calibration maps, and software are available under a creative commons license. The purpose is to widen access to aerodynamic measurement techniques in education and research environments. There are many situations in which the open access probe will allow results of comparable accuracy to a well-calibrated commercial probe. We discuss the applications and limitations of the probe, and compare the calibration maps for 16 probes manufactured in different materials and at different scales, but with the same geometrical design. (paper)

  15. Synthetic Biology and the Imperative of Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Diéguez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic Biology has a huge capacity for the transformation of living beings, including for the transformation of the human genome in a future perhaps not too distant. There are, thus, clear connections between this potential to biological transformation and the aspirations of the supporters of human bioenhancement. The construction of completely synthetic genomes could eventually change in a definitive and irreversible way the central aspects of the human life, and it could give risen even to a new organism as different of our species as we are different of big apes. This paper discusses the main arguments offered in this debate, and points out some of the most problematic assumptions in recent proposals concerning human bioenhancement.

  16. Miniature synthetic-aperture radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Wayne; Stromfors, Richard D.

    1990-11-01

    Loral Defense Systems-Arizona has developed a high-performance synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) for small aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) reconnaissance applications. This miniature radar, called Miniature Synthetic-Aperture Radar (MSAR), is packaged in a small volume and has low weight. It retains key features of large SAR systems, including high-resolution imaging and all-weather operation. The operating frequency of MSAR can optionally be selected to provide foliage penetration capability. Many imaging radar configurations can be derived using this baseline system. MSAR with a data link provides an attractive UAV sensor. MSAR with a real-time image formation processor is well suited to installations where onboard processing and immediate image analysis are required. The MSAR system provides high-resolution imaging for short-to-medium range reconnaissance applications.

  17. Health safety issues of synthetic food colorants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amchova, Petra; Kotolova, Hana; Ruda-Kucerova, Jana

    2015-12-01

    Increasing attention has been recently paid to the toxicity of additives used in food. The European Parliament and the Council published the REGULATION (EC) No. 1333/2008 on food additives establishing that the toxicity of food additives evaluated before 20th January 2009 must be re-evaluated by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The aim of this review is to survey current knowledge specifically on the toxicity issues of synthetic food colorants using official reports published by the EFSA and other available studies published since the respective report. Synthetic colorants described are Tartrazine, Quinoline Yellow, Sunset Yellow, Azorubine, Ponceau 4R, Erythrosine, Allura Red, Patent Blue, Indigo Carmine, Brilliant Blue FCF, Green S, Brilliant Black and Brown HT. Moreover, a summary of evidence on possible detrimental effects of colorant mixes on children's behaviour is provided and future research directions are outlined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The system architecture for renewable synthetic fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridjan, Iva

    To overcome and eventually eliminate the existing heavy fossil fuels in the transport sector, there is a need for new renewable fuels. This transition could lead to large capital costs for implementing the new solutions and a long time frame for establishing the new infrastructure unless a suitable...... infrastructure is present. The system integration of synthetic fuels will therefore depend on the existing infrastructure and the possibility of continuing its exploitation to minimize the costs and maximize the use of the current infrastructure in place. The production process includes different steps...... and production plants, so it is important to implement it in the best manner possible to ensure an efficient and flexible system. The poster will provide an overview of the steps involved in the production of synthetic fuel and possible solutions for the system architecture based on the current literature...

  19. Prospects for applying synthetic biology to toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendorff, James Bruce Yarnton H; Gillam, Elizabeth M.J.

    2017-01-01

    The 30 years since the inception of Chemical Research in Toxicology, game-changing advances in chemical and molecular biology, the fundamental disciplines underpinning molecular toxicology, have been made. While these have led to important advances in the study of mechanisms by which chemicals...... damage cells and systems, there has been less focus on applying these advances to prediction, detection, and mitigation of toxicity. Over the last ∼15 years, synthetic biology, the repurposing of biological "parts" in systems engineered for useful ends, has been explored in other areas of the biomedical...... and life sciences, for such applications as detecting metabolites, drug discovery and delivery, investigating disease mechanisms, improving medical treatment, and producing useful chemicals. These examples provide models for the application of synthetic biology to toxicology, which, for the most part, has...

  20. Fusion as a source of synthetic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Steinberg, M.

    1981-01-01

    In the near-term, coal derived synthetic fuels will be used; but in the long-term, resource depletion and environmental effects will mandate synthetic fuels from inexhaustible sources - fission, fusion, and solar. Of the three sources, fusion appears uniquely suited for the efficient production of hydrogen-based fuels, due to its ability to directly generate very high process temperatures (up to approx. 2000 0 C) for water splitting reactions. Fusion-based water splitting reactions include high temperature electrolysis (HTE) of steam, thermochemical cycles, hybrid electrochemical/thermochemical, and direct thermal decomposition. HTE appears to be the simplest and most efficient process with efficiencies of 50 to 70% (fusion to hydrogen chemical energy), depending on process conditions

  1. Synthetic Dataset To Benchmark Global Tomographic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yilong; Capdeville, Yann; Maupin, Valerie; Montagner, Jean-Paul

    2006-11-01

    A new set of global synthetic seismograms calculated in a three-dimensional (3-D), heterogeneous, anisotropic, anelastic model of the Earth using the spectral element method has been released by the European network SPICE (Seismic Wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex Media: a European Network). The set consists of 7424 three-component records with a minimum period of 32 seconds, a sampling rate of one second, and a duration of 10,500 seconds. The aim of this synthetic data set is to conduct a blind test of existing global tomographic methods based on long-period data, in order to test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and by the inadequacy of data quality and coverage.

  2. The adjuvant potential of synthetic alkylglycerols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Gil, Danay; del Campo, Judith; Bracho, Gustavo; Valdés, Yolanda; Pérez, Oliver

    2006-04-12

    Alkylglycerols (AGs) have shown immune stimulant and adjuvant activity in many studies, but natural sources are not so accessible and their extraction from them is very complicated. Therefore, a group of chemists at IFAL have synthesized AG analogs. The aim of this work was to evaluate the adjuvant potential of different synthetic AGs. A mix of ovoalbumin (Ova) and AGs increase anti-Ova IgG antibodies production in sera of immunized mice. The predominant subclass was IgG1 although higher levels of IgG2a were observed as the carbon chain length of AGs increased. AGs also induced the production of IL-12 and nitric oxide (NO) in the U937 human histiocyte and J774 mouse macrophage cell lines, respectively. These results indicate that synthetic AGs are effective adjuvants for the standardized antigen, Ova.

  3. Natural and synthetic peptides with antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter; Santinoli, Claudia; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the increase of invasive fungal infections and the emergence of antifungal resistance stressed the need for new antifungal drugs. Peptides have shown to be good candidates for the development of alternative antimicrobial agents through high-throughput screening, and subsequent optimization according to a rational approach. This review presents a brief overview on antifungal natural peptides of different sources (animals, plants, micro-organisms), peptide fragments derived by proteolytic cleavage of precursor physiological proteins (cryptides), synthetic unnatural peptides and peptide derivatives. Antifungal peptides are schematically reported based on their structure, antifungal spectrum and reported effects. Natural or synthetic peptides and their modified derivatives may represent the basis for new compounds active against fungal infections.

  4. Consequentialism and the Synthetic Biology Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavey, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    This article analyzes the ethics of synthetic biology (synbio) from a consequentialist perspective, examining potential effects on food and agriculture, and on medicine, fuel, and the advancement of science. The issues of biosafety and biosecurity are also examined. A consequentialist analysis offers an essential road map to policymakers and regulators as to how to deal with synbio. Additionally, the article discusses the limitations of consequentialism as a tool for analysing synbioethics. Is it possible to predict, with any degree of plausibility, what the consequences of synthetic biology will be in 50 years, or in 100, or in 500? Synbio may take humanity to a place of radical departure from what is known or knowable.

  5. Engineering reduced evolutionary potential for synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda, Brian A.; Hammerling, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology seeks to engineer reliable and predictable behaviors in organisms from collections of standardized genetic parts. However, unlike other types of machines, genetically encoded biological systems are prone to changes in their designed sequences due to mutations in their DNA sequences after these devices are constructed and deployed. Thus, biological engineering efforts can be confounded by undesired evolution that rapidly breaks the functions of parts and systems, particularly when they are costly to the host cell to maintain. Here, we explain the fundamental properties that determine the evolvability of biological systems. Then, we use this framework to review current efforts to engineer the DNA sequences that encode synthetic biology devices and the genomes of their microbial hosts to reduce their ability to evolve and therefore increase their genetic reliability so that they maintain their intended functions over longer timescales. PMID:24556867

  6. Tools and applications in synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I Cody; Deans, Tara L

    2016-10-01

    Advances in synthetic biology have enabled the engineering of cells with genetic circuits in order to program cells with new biological behavior, dynamic gene expression, and logic control. This cellular engineering progression offers an array of living sensors that can discriminate between cell states, produce a regulated dose of therapeutic biomolecules, and function in various delivery platforms. In this review, we highlight and summarize the tools and applications in bacterial and mammalian synthetic biology. The examples detailed in this review provide insight to further understand genetic circuits, how they are used to program cells with novel functions, and current methods to reliably interface this technology in vivo; thus paving the way for the design of promising novel therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthetic studies on heterocyclic natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Marco A

    2005-08-01

    This article reviews past and ongoing research in the author's laboratory directed toward the synthesis of natural products displaying an azaspirocyclic framework, or incorporating a medium-ring nitrogen heterocycle. New synthetic technologies were devised in order to address the synthetic problems posed by the target molecules. Thus, efforts in the area of azaspirocyclic substances have relied on an oxidative amidation of phenols promoted by iodobenzene diacetate, whereas access to medium-ring nitrogen heterocycles has been secured by means of a ring expansion sequence that relies on the fragmentation of an aziridine triggered by a homo-Brook transposition. Details of the development of these technologies are presented, together with applications to the total synthesis of FR-901483, TAN-1251C, cylindricines, and mitomycinoids.

  8. Synthetic cannabimimetic agents metabolized by carboxylesterases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ragnar; Nielsen, Line M; Holm, Niels B

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabimimetic agents are a large group of diverse compounds which act as agonists at cannabinoid receptors. Since 2004, synthetic cannabinoids have been used recreationally, although several of the compounds have been shown to cause severe toxicity in humans. In this study......, the metabolism of two indazole carboxamide derivatives, AB-PINACA and AB-FUBINACA, was investigated by using human liver microsomes (HLM). For both compounds, a major metabolic pathway was the enzymatic hydrolysis of the primary amide, resulting in the major metabolites AB-PINACA-COOH and AB-FUBINACA-COOH. Other...... major metabolic pathways were mono-hydroxylation of the N-pentyl chain in AB-PINACA and mono-hydroxylation of the 1-amino-3-methyl-1-oxobutane moiety in AB-FUBINACA. To identify the enzyme(s) responsible for the amide hydrolysis, incubations with recombinant carboxylesterases and human serum, as well...

  9. The Prion Concept and Synthetic Prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legname, Giuseppe; Moda, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases caused by unconventional infectious agents, known as prions (PrP Sc ). Prions derive from a conformational conversion of the normally folded prion protein (PrP C ), which acquires pathological and infectious features. Moreover, PrP Sc is able to transmit the pathological conformation to PrP C through a mechanism that is still not well understood. The generation of synthetic prions, which behave like natural prions, is of fundamental importance to study the process of PrP C conversion and to assess the efficacy of therapeutic strategies to interfere with this process. Moreover, the ability of synthetic prions to induce pathology in animals confirms that the pathological properties of the prion strains are all enciphered in abnormal conformations, characterizing these infectious agents. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Visualization study of hybrid synthetic jets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Broučková, Zuzana; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2015), s. 581-593 ISSN 1343-8875 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-08888S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : synthetic jet * efficiency * flow visualization Subject RIV: JU - Aeronautics, Aerodynamics, Aircrafts Impact factor: 0.720, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12650-014-0256-8

  11. Integrated Optical Synthetic Aperture Radar Processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    tion Processing for Aerospace Applications. II, Langley, Virginia, (1983). Appendix C I. Abramov , Y. Owechko, A. R. Tanguay, Jr., and T. J. 45...1983). 3. I. Abramov , Y. Owechko, A. R. Tanguay, Jr., and T. J. Bicknell, "Real Time Synthetic Aperture Image Formation Utilizing an Electrooptic...LIGHT MODULATOR I. Abramov , Y. Owechko, and A.R. Tanguay, Jr. Departments of Electrical Engineering and Materials Science, and Image Processing

  12. Visualization of synthetic jet formation in air

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Broučková, Zuzana; Kordík, Jozef; Vít, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2015), s. 595-609 ISSN 1343-8875 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-08888S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : synthetic jet * flow visualization * hot-wire anemometry Subject RIV: JU - Aeronautics, Aerodynamics, Aircrafts Impact factor: 0.720, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12650-015-0273-2

  13. Applications of synthetic polymers in clinical medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Maitz, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple biological, synthetic and hybrid polymers are used for multiple medical applications. A wide range of different polymers is available, and they have further the advantage to be tunable in physical, chemical and biological properties in a wide range to match the requirements of specific applications. This review gives a brief overview about the introduction and developments of polymers in medicine in general, addressing first stable polymers, then polymers with degradability as a firs...

  14. Synthetic Biology to Engineer Bacteriophage Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rita Costa, Ana; Milho, Catarina; Azeredo, Joana; Pires, Diana Priscila

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthetic biology field have enabled the development of new molecular biology techniques used to build specialized bacteriophages with new functionalities. Bacteriophages have been engineered towards a wide range of applications including pathogen control and detection, targeted drug delivery, or even assembly of new materials.In this chapter, two strategies that have been successfully used to genetically engineer bacteriophage genomes are addressed: a yeast-based platform and bacteriophage recombineering of electroporated DNA.

  15. Synthetic Analogs of Phospholipid Metabolites as Antimalarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    aluminum , and subsequent reaction of the bis (chloromethyl) aluminum chloride formed with phosphorus trichloride . A large amount of this intermediate was in...pure form. In this synthetic scheme allyl chloride is first reacted with amixture of phosphorus trichloride and aluminum chloride to form the...compound, displacement of the chloro- aluminum groups by phosphorus trichloride , and decomplexation). The first step appears, at least on its surface, to be

  16. Synthetic aperture ladar concept for infrastructure monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbide, Simon; Marchese, Linda; Terroux, Marc; Bergeron, Alain

    2014-10-01

    Long range surveillance of infrastructure is a critical need in numerous security applications, both civilian and military. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) continues to provide high resolution radar images in all weather conditions from remote distances. As well, Interferometric SAR (InSAR) and Differential Interferometric SAR (D-InSAR) have become powerful tools adding high resolution elevation and change detection measurements. State of the art SAR systems based on dual-use satellites are capable of providing ground resolutions of one meter; while their airborne counterparts obtain resolutions of 10 cm. D-InSAR products based on these systems could produce cm-scale vertical resolution image products. Deformation monitoring of railways, roads, buildings, cellular antennas, power structures (i.e., power lines, wind turbines, dams, or nuclear plants) would benefit from improved resolution, both in the ground plane and vertical direction. The ultimate limitation to the achievable resolution of any imaging system is its wavelength. State-of-the art SAR systems are approaching this limit. The natural extension to improve resolution is to thus decrease the wavelength, i.e. design a synthetic aperture system in a different wavelength regime. One such system offering the potential for vastly improved resolution is Synthetic Aperture Ladar (SAL). This system operates at infrared wavelengths, ten thousand times smaller than radar wavelengths. This paper presents a laboratory demonstration of a scaled-down infrastructure deformation monitoring with an Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Ladar (IFSAL) system operating at 1.5 μm. Results show sub-millimeter precision on the deformation applied to the target.

  17. Quasi-Similarity Model of Synthetic Jets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav; Kordík, Jozef

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 149, č. 2 (2009), s. 255-265 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200760705; GA ČR GA101/07/1499 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : jets * synthetic jets * similarity solution Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.674, year: 2009 http://www.sciencedirect.com

  18. Spectral analysis of a synthetic jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav; Kordík, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 167, č. 2 (2011), s. 213-225 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/1499; GA AV ČR IAA200760705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : jet * synthetic jet * frequency spectrum Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.802, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924424711000628

  19. Synthetic tsunami waveform catalogs with kinematic constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Baptista

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present a comprehensive methodology to produce a synthetic tsunami waveform catalogue in the northeast Atlantic, east of the Azores islands. The method uses a synthetic earthquake catalogue compatible with plate kinematic constraints of the area. We use it to assess the tsunami hazard from the transcurrent boundary located between Iberia and the Azores, whose western part is known as the Gloria Fault. This study focuses only on earthquake-generated tsunamis. Moreover, we assume that the time and space distribution of the seismic events is known. To do this, we compute a synthetic earthquake catalogue including all fault parameters needed to characterize the seafloor deformation covering the time span of 20 000 years, which we consider long enough to ensure the representability of earthquake generation on this segment of the plate boundary. The computed time and space rupture distributions are made compatible with global kinematic plate models. We use the tsunami empirical Green's functions to efficiently compute the synthetic tsunami waveforms for the dataset of coastal locations, thus providing the basis for tsunami impact characterization. We present the results in the form of offshore wave heights for all coastal points in the dataset. Our results focus on the northeast Atlantic basin, showing that earthquake-induced tsunamis in the transcurrent segment of the Azores–Gibraltar plate boundary pose a minor threat to coastal areas north of Portugal and beyond the Strait of Gibraltar. However, in Morocco, the Azores, and the Madeira islands, we can expect wave heights between 0.6 and 0.8 m, leading to precautionary evacuation of coastal areas. The advantages of the method are its easy application to other regions and the low computation effort needed.

  20. Generation of Synthetic Turbulence in Arbitrary Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Sørensen, Niels

    2009-01-01

    A new method for generating synthetic turbulence is presented. The method is intended for generating a turbulent velocity field with a fine spatial resolution but only covering a small moving part of the rotor area of a wind turbine. For this application the Mann and Sandia methods cannot be used......-spectra a realization of a velocity field is determined by factorization and Fourier transform as in the Sandia method....

  1. Advanced synthetic holograms for security purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotačka, Libor; Vízdal, Petr; Behounek, Tomás

    2009-05-01

    Our paper deals with the recent advances in synthetically written optical security devices (DOVIDs) and holograms. The synthesized holographic security elements are recorded with a resolution reaching 500.000 dpi and are specially developed for the "layman-level" security of the most important state valuables and documents, like banknotes and identity cards. We especially pay an attention to such holographic features being impossible to originate through conventional optical holography of matrix based devices.

  2. Synthetic tsunami waveform catalogs with kinematic constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Maria Ana; Miranda, Jorge Miguel; Matias, Luis; Omira, Rachid

    2017-07-01

    In this study we present a comprehensive methodology to produce a synthetic tsunami waveform catalogue in the northeast Atlantic, east of the Azores islands. The method uses a synthetic earthquake catalogue compatible with plate kinematic constraints of the area. We use it to assess the tsunami hazard from the transcurrent boundary located between Iberia and the Azores, whose western part is known as the Gloria Fault. This study focuses only on earthquake-generated tsunamis. Moreover, we assume that the time and space distribution of the seismic events is known. To do this, we compute a synthetic earthquake catalogue including all fault parameters needed to characterize the seafloor deformation covering the time span of 20 000 years, which we consider long enough to ensure the representability of earthquake generation on this segment of the plate boundary. The computed time and space rupture distributions are made compatible with global kinematic plate models. We use the tsunami empirical Green's functions to efficiently compute the synthetic tsunami waveforms for the dataset of coastal locations, thus providing the basis for tsunami impact characterization. We present the results in the form of offshore wave heights for all coastal points in the dataset. Our results focus on the northeast Atlantic basin, showing that earthquake-induced tsunamis in the transcurrent segment of the Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary pose a minor threat to coastal areas north of Portugal and beyond the Strait of Gibraltar. However, in Morocco, the Azores, and the Madeira islands, we can expect wave heights between 0.6 and 0.8 m, leading to precautionary evacuation of coastal areas. The advantages of the method are its easy application to other regions and the low computation effort needed.

  3. Synthetic prions and other human neurodegenerative proteinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nhat Tran Thanh; Narkiewicz, Joanna; Aulić, Suzana; Salzano, Giulia; Tran, Hoa Thanh; Scaini, Denis; Moda, Fabio; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-09-02

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. The common feature of these diseases is the pathological conversion of the normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into a β-structure-rich conformer-termed PrP(Sc). The latter can induce a self-perpetuating process leading to amplification and spreading of pathological protein assemblies. Much evidence suggests that PrP(Sc) itself is able to recruit and misfold PrP(C) into the pathological conformation. Recent data have shown that recombinant PrP(C) can be misfolded in vitro and the resulting synthetic conformers are able to induce the conversion of PrP(C) into PrP(Sc)in vivo. In this review we describe the state-of-the-art of the body of literature in this field. In addition, we describe a cell-based assay to test synthetic prions in cells, providing further evidence that synthetic amyloids are able to template conversion of PrP into prion inclusions. Studying prions might help to understand the pathological mechanisms governing other neurodegenerative diseases. Aggregation and deposition of misfolded proteins is a common feature of several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other disorders. Although the proteins implicated in each of these diseases differ, they share a common prion mechanism. Recombinant proteins are able to aggregate in vitro into β-rich amyloid fibrils, sharing some features of the aggregates found in the brain. Several studies have reported that intracerebral inoculation of synthetic aggregates lead to unique pathology, which spread progressively to distal brain regions and reduced survival time in animals. Here, we review the prion-like features of different proteins involved in neurodegenerative disorders, such as α-synuclein, superoxide dismutase-1, amyloid-β and tau. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mammalian Synthetic Biology: Time for Big MACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, Andrea; Pollard, Steven M; Dai, Junbiao; Cai, Yizhi

    2016-10-21

    The enabling technologies of synthetic biology are opening up new opportunities for engineering and enhancement of mammalian cells. This will stimulate diverse applications in many life science sectors such as regenerative medicine, development of biosensing cell lines, therapeutic protein production, and generation of new synthetic genetic regulatory circuits. Harnessing the full potential of these new engineering-based approaches requires the design and assembly of large DNA constructs-potentially up to chromosome scale-and the effective delivery of these large DNA payloads to the host cell. Random integration of large transgenes, encoding therapeutic proteins or genetic circuits into host chromosomes, has several drawbacks such as risks of insertional mutagenesis, lack of control over transgene copy-number and position-specific effects; these can compromise the intended functioning of genetic circuits. The development of a system orthogonal to the endogenous genome is therefore beneficial. Mammalian artificial chromosomes (MACs) are functional, add-on chromosomal elements, which behave as normal chromosomes-being replicating and portioned to daughter cells at each cell division. They are deployed as useful gene expression vectors as they remain independent from the host genome. MACs are maintained as a single-copy and can accommodate multiple gene expression cassettes of, in theory, unlimited DNA size (MACs up to 10 megabases have been constructed). MACs therefore enabled control over ectopic gene expression and represent an excellent platform to rapidly prototype and characterize novel synthetic gene circuits without recourse to engineering the host genome. This review describes the obstacles synthetic biologists face when working with mammalian systems and how the development of improved MACs can overcome these-particularly given the spectacular advances in DNA synthesis and assembly that are fuelling this research area.

  5. The TORE SUPRA fast reciprocating RF probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C.E. Jr.; Harris, J.H.; Haste, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    A fast reciprocating ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) probe was installed and operated on TORE SUPRA during 1992/1993. The body of the probe was originally used on the ATF experiment at ORNL. The probe was adapted for use on TORE SUPRA, and mounted on one of the two fast reciprocating probe mounts. The probe consists of two orthogonal single-turn wire loops, mounted so that one loop senses toroidal RF magnetic fields and the other senses poloidal RF magnetic fields. The probe began operation in June, 1993. The probe active area is approximately 5 cm long by 2 cm, and the reciprocating mount has a slow stroke (5 cm/sec) of 30 cm by 2 cm, and the reciprocating mount has a slow stroke (5 cm/sec) of 30 cm and a fast stroke (1.5 m/sec) of about 10 cm. The probe was operated at distances from the plasma edge ranging from 30 cm to -5 cm (i.e., inside the last closed flux surface). The probe design, electronics, calibration, data acquisition and data processing are discussed. First data from the probe are presented as a function of ICRF power, distance from the plasma, loop orientation, and other plasma parameters. Initial data shows parametric instabilities do not play an important role for ICRF in the TORE SUPRA edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasmas. Additionally it is observed that the probe signal has little or no dependence on position in the SOL/plasma edge

  6. Efficacy of bio and synthetic pesticides against the American ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management for the bollworm complex in Uganda is largely synthetic chemical use with little or no biopesticide use which reduces natural enemies population and resistance development to continuous use of a single synthetic pesticide product. Therefore this study aimed at determining the efficacy of bio and synthetic ...

  7. Reasons for Synthetic THC Use among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidourek, Rebecca A.; King, Keith A.; Burbage, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic THC, also known as fake marijuana, is used by college students in the United States. The present study examined reasons for recent synthetic THC use among college students (N = 339). Students completed a 3-page survey during regularly scheduled class times. Results indicated students reported using synthetic THC for curiosity, to get…

  8. 21 CFR 172.275 - Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Coatings, Films and Related Substances § 172.275 Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives. Synthetic paraffin and succinic derivatives identified in this section may be safely...

  9. Structural and Functional Studies of Experimental HIV Synthetic Peptide Immunogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Work performed in this grant continues to address 2 major problems in HIV synthetic peptide vaccine development: (1) the ability of synthetic...In technical aim #1, intranasal immunization with HIV synthetic peptide immunogens was found to be effective for the induction of serum anti-peptide

  10. 75 FR 52752 - Request for Comments on Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Request for Comments on Synthetic Biology AGENCY... Bioethical Issues is requesting public comment on the emerging science of synthetic biology, including its... Commission has begun an inquiry into the emerging science of synthetic biology. The President asked the...

  11. 21 CFR 178.3720 - Petroleum wax, synthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Petroleum wax, synthetic. 178.3720 Section 178.3720... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3720 Petroleum wax, synthetic. Synthetic petroleum wax may be safely used in applications and under the same conditions where naturally derived petroleum wax is...

  12. Biologic and synthetic skin substitutes: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Khoo, Teng Lye; Mohd Yussof, Shah Jumaat

    2010-09-01

    The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. Skin substitutes have important roles in the treatment of deep dermal and full thickness wounds of various aetiologies. At present, there is no ideal substitute in the market. Skin substitutes can be divided into two main classes, namely, biological and synthetic substitutes. The biological skin substitutes have a more intact extracellular matrix structure, while the synthetic skin substitutes can be synthesised on demand and can be modulated for specific purposes. Each class has its advantages and disadvantages. The biological skin substitutes may allow the construction of a more natural new dermis and allow excellent re-epithelialisation characteristics due to the presence of a basement membrane. Synthetic skin substitutes demonstrate the advantages of increase control over scaffold composition. The ultimate goal is to achieve an ideal skin substitute that provides an effective and scar-free wound healing.

  13. Biologic and synthetic skin substitutes: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Ahmad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. Skin substitutes have important roles in the treatment of deep dermal and full thickness wounds of various aetiologies. At present, there is no ideal substitute in the market. Skin substitutes can be divided into two main classes, namely, biological and synthetic substitutes. The biological skin substitutes have a more intact extracellular matrix structure, while the synthetic skin substitutes can be synthesised on demand and can be modulated for specific purposes. Each class has its advantages and disadvantages. The biological skin substitutes may allow the construction of a more natural new dermis and allow excellent re-epithelialisation characteristics due to the presence of a basement membrane. Synthetic skin substitutes demonstrate the advantages of increase control over scaffold composition. The ultimate goal is to achieve an ideal skin substitute that provides an effective and scar-free wound healing.

  14. Hydrothermal synthetic strategies of inorganic semiconducting nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Weidong; Song, Shuyan; Zhang, Hongjie

    2013-07-07

    Because of their unique chemical and physical properties, inorganic semiconducting nanostructures have gradually played a pivotal role in a variety of research fields, including electronics, chemical reactivity, energy conversion, and optics. A major feature of these nanostructures is the quantum confinement effect, which strongly depends on their size, shape, crystal structure and polydispersity. Among all developed synthetic methods, the hydrothermal method based on a water system has attracted more and more attention because of its outstanding advantages, such as high yield, simple manipulation, easy control, uniform products, lower air pollution, low energy consumption and so on. Precise control over the hydrothermal synthetic conditions is a key to the success of the preparation of high-quality inorganic semiconducting nanostructures. In this review, only the representative hydrothermal synthetic strategies of inorganic semiconducting nanostructures are selected and discussed. We will introduce the four types of strategies based on exterior reaction system adjustment, namely organic additive- and template-free hydrothermal synthesis, organic additive-assisted hydrothermal synthesis, template-assisted hydrothermal synthesis and substrate-assisted hydrothermal synthesis. In addition, the two strategies based on exterior reaction environment adjustment, including microwave-assisted and magnetic field-assisted hydrothermal synthesis, will be also described. Finally, we conclude and give the future prospects of this research area.

  15. Computational modeling of synthetic microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudge, Timothy J; Steiner, Paul J; Phillips, Andrew; Haseloff, Jim

    2012-08-17

    Microbial biofilms are complex, self-organized communities of bacteria, which employ physiological cooperation and spatial organization to increase both their metabolic efficiency and their resistance to changes in their local environment. These properties make biofilms an attractive target for engineering, particularly for the production of chemicals such as pharmaceutical ingredients or biofuels, with the potential to significantly improve yields and lower maintenance costs. Biofilms are also a major cause of persistent infection, and a better understanding of their organization could lead to new strategies for their disruption. Despite this potential, the design of synthetic biofilms remains a major challenge, due to the complex interplay between transcriptional regulation, intercellular signaling, and cell biophysics. Computational modeling could help to address this challenge by predicting the behavior of synthetic biofilms prior to their construction; however, multiscale modeling has so far not been achieved for realistic cell numbers. This paper presents a computational method for modeling synthetic microbial biofilms, which combines three-dimensional biophysical models of individual cells with models of genetic regulation and intercellular signaling. The method is implemented as a software tool (CellModeller), which uses parallel Graphics Processing Unit architectures to scale to more than 30,000 cells, typical of a 100 μm diameter colony, in 30 min of computation time.

  16. Synthetic virology: engineering viruses for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Caitlin M; Kuypers, Brianna E; Lam, Michael T; Robinson, Tawana M; Zhao, Julia; Suh, Junghae

    2014-01-01

    The success of gene therapy relies heavily on the performance of vectors that can effectively deliver transgenes to desired cell populations. As viruses have evolved to deliver genetic material into cells, a prolific area of research has emerged over the last several decades to leverage the innate properties of viruses as well as to engineer new features into them. Specifically, the field of synthetic virology aims to capitalize on knowledge accrued from fundamental virology research in order to design functionally enhanced gene delivery vectors. The enhanced viral vectors, or 'bionic' viruses, feature engineered components, or 'parts', that are natural (intrinsic to viruses or from other organisms) and synthetic (such as man-made polymers or inorganic nanoparticles). Various design strategies--rational, combinatorial, and pseudo-rational--have been pursued to create the hybrid viruses. The gene delivery vectors of the future will likely criss-cross the boundaries between natural and synthetic domains to harness the unique strengths afforded by the various functional parts that can be grafted onto virus capsids. Such research endeavors will further expand and enable enhanced control over the functional capacity of these nanoscale devices for biomedicine. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Paper-based Synthetic Gene Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardee, Keith; Green, Alexander A.; Ferrante, Tom; Cameron, D. Ewen; DaleyKeyser, Ajay; Yin, Peng; Collins, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic gene networks have wide-ranging uses in reprogramming and rewiring organisms. To date, there has not been a way to harness the vast potential of these networks beyond the constraints of a laboratory or in vivo environment. Here, we present an in vitro paper-based platform that provides a new venue for synthetic biologists to operate, and a much-needed medium for the safe deployment of engineered gene circuits beyond the lab. Commercially available cell-free systems are freeze-dried onto paper, enabling the inexpensive, sterile and abiotic distribution of synthetic biology-based technologies for the clinic, global health, industry, research and education. For field use, we create circuits with colorimetric outputs for detection by eye, and fabricate a low-cost, electronic optical interface. We demonstrate this technology with small molecule and RNA actuation of genetic switches, rapid prototyping of complex gene circuits, and programmable in vitro diagnostics, including glucose sensors and strain-specific Ebola virus sensors. PMID:25417167

  18. LEVELS OF SYNTHETIC MUSKS COMPOUNDS IN AQUATIC ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthetic musk compounds are consumer chemicals manufactured as fragrance materials Due to their high worldwide usage and release, they frequently occur in the aquatic and marine environments. The U.S. EPA (ORD, Las Vegas) developed surface-water monitoring methodology and conducted a one-year monthly monitoring of synthetic musks in water and biota from Lake Mead (Nevada) as well as from combined sewage effluent streams feeding Lake Mead. Presented are the overview of the chemistry, the monitoring methodology, and the significance of synthetic musk compounds in the aquatic environment. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth coverage of each project. Briefly, each project's objective is stated below.Subtask 1: To integrate state-of-the-art technologies (polar organic chemical integrative samplers, advanced solid-phase extraction methodologies with liquid chromatography/electrospray/mass spectrometry) and apply them to studying the sources and fate of a select list of PPCPs. Application and improvement of analytical methodologies that can detect non-volatile, polar, water-soluble pharmaceuticals in source waters at levels that could be environmentally significant (at concentrations less than p

  19. Synthetic biology: Novel approaches for microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Vaca, Felipe; Anaya-Velázquez, Fernando; Franco, Bernardo

    2015-06-01

    In the past twenty years, molecular genetics has created powerful tools for genetic manipulation of living organisms. Whole genome sequencing has provided necessary information to assess knowledge on gene function and protein networks. In addition, new tools permit to modify organisms to perform desired tasks. Gene function analysis is speed up by novel approaches that couple both high throughput data generation and mining. Synthetic biology is an emerging field that uses tools for generating novel gene networks, whole genome synthesis and engineering. New applications in biotechnological, pharmaceutical and biomedical research are envisioned for synthetic biology. In recent years these new strategies have opened up the possibilities to study gene and genome editing, creation of novel tools for functional studies in virus, parasites and pathogenic bacteria. There is also the possibility to re-design organisms to generate vaccine subunits or produce new pharmaceuticals to combat multi-drug resistant pathogens. In this review we provide our opinion on the applicability of synthetic biology strategies for functional studies of pathogenic organisms and some applications such as genome editing and gene network studies to further comprehend virulence factors and determinants in pathogenic organisms. We also discuss what we consider important ethical issues for this field of molecular biology, especially for potential misuse of the new technologies. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  20. Agent-based modelling in synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorochowski, Thomas E

    2016-11-30

    Biological systems exhibit complex behaviours that emerge at many different levels of organization. These span the regulation of gene expression within single cells to the use of quorum sensing to co-ordinate the action of entire bacterial colonies. Synthetic biology aims to make the engineering of biology easier, offering an opportunity to control natural systems and develop new synthetic systems with useful prescribed behaviours. However, in many cases, it is not understood how individual cells should be programmed to ensure the emergence of a required collective behaviour. Agent-based modelling aims to tackle this problem, offering a framework in which to simulate such systems and explore cellular design rules. In this article, I review the use of agent-based models in synthetic biology, outline the available computational tools, and provide details on recently engineered biological systems that are amenable to this approach. I further highlight the challenges facing this methodology and some of the potential future directions. © 2016 The Author(s).