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Sample records for synthetic diamond crystals

  1. ESR studies of high-energy phosphorus-ion implanted synthetic diamond crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoya, J. [University of Library and Information Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kanda, H.; Morita, Y.; Ohshima, T.

    1997-03-01

    Phosphorus is among potential n-type dopants in diamond. High pressure synthetic diamond crystals of type IIa implanted with high energy (9-18 MeV) phosphorus ions have been studied by using electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. The intensity and the linewidth of the ESR signal attributed to the dangling bond of the amorphous phase varied with the implantation dose, suggesting the nature of the amorphization varies with the dose. The ESR signals of point defects have been observed in the low dose as-implanted crystals and in the high dose crystals annealed at high temperature and at high pressure. (author)

  2. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J; Caliste, D; Fernandez, B; Eon, D; Härtwig, J; Barbay, C; Mer-Calfati, C; Tranchant, N; Arnault, J C; Lafford, T A; Baruchel, J

    2017-04-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc. ) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples.

  3. Near-infrared refractive index of synthetic single crystal and polycrystalline diamonds at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurov, V. Yu.; Bushuev, E. V.; Popovich, A. F.; Bolshakov, A. P.; Ashkinazi, E. E.; Ralchenko, V. G.

    2017-12-01

    We measured the refractive index n(T) and thermo-optical coefficient β(T) = (1/n)(dn/dT) of high quality synthetic diamonds from room temperature to high temperatures, up to 1520 K, in near-infrared spectral range at wavelength 1.56 μm, using a low-coherence interferometry. A type IIa single crystal diamond produced by high pressure-high temperature technique and a transparent polycrystalline diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition were tested and revealed a very close n(T) behavior, with n = 2.384 ± 0.001 at T = 300 K, monotonically increasing to 2.428 at 1520 K. The n(T) data corrected to thermal expansion of diamond are well fitted with 3rd order polynomials, and alternatively, with the Bose-Einstein model with an effective oscillator frequency of 970 cm-1. Almost linear n(T) dependence is observed above 800 K. The thermo-optical coefficient is found to increase monotonically from (0.6 ± 0.1) × 10-5 K-1 (300 K) to (2.0 ± 0.1) × 10-5 K-1 (1300 K) with a tendency to saturation at >1200 K. These β(T) values are an order of magnitude lower than those known for Si, GaAs, and InP. The obtained results significantly extend the temperature range, where the refractive index of diamond was previously measured.

  4. A novel synthetic single crystal diamond device for in vivo dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, G., E-mail: giuseppe.prestopino@uniroma2.it; Tonnetti, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G. [INFN–Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, Roma 00133 (Italy); Falco, M. D.; Bagalà, P. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, Tor Vergata University General Hospital, Viale Oxford 81, Roma 00133 (Italy); Pimpinella, M.; Guerra, A. S.; De Coste, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, ENEA-INMRI C R Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, Roma 00123 (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Aim of the present work is to evaluate the synthetic single crystal diamond Schottky photodiode developed at the laboratories of “Tor Vergata” University in Rome in a new dosimeter configuration specifically designed for offline wireless in vivo dosimetry (IVD) applications. Methods: The new diamond based dosimeter, single crystal diamond detector (SCDD-iv), consists of a small unwired detector and a small external reading unit that can be connected to commercial electrometers for getting the detector readout after irradiation. Two nominally identical SCDD-iv dosimeter prototypes were fabricated and tested. A basic dosimetric characterization of detector performances relevant for IVD application was performed under irradiation with {sup 60}Co and 6 MV photon beams. Preirradiation procedure, response stability, short and long term reproducibility, leakage charge, fading effect, linearity with dose, dose rate dependence, temperature dependence, and angular response were investigated. Results: The SCDD-iv is simple, with no cables linked to the patient and the readout is immediate. The range of response with dose has been tested from 1 up to 12 Gy; the reading is independent of the accumulated dose and dose rate independent in the range between about 0.5 and 5 Gy/min; its temperature dependence is within 0.5% between 25 and 38 °C, and its directional dependence is within 2% from 0° to 90°. The combined relative standard uncertainty of absorbed dose to water measurements is estimated lower than the tolerance and action level of 5%. Conclusions: The reported results indicate the proposed novel offline dosimeter based on a synthetic single crystal diamond Schottky photodiode as a promising candidate for in vivo dosimetry applications with photon beams.

  5. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications1 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J.; Caliste, D.; Fernandez, B.; Eon, D.; Härtwig, J.; Mer-Calfati, C.; Tranchant, N.; Arnault, J. C.; Lafford, T. A.; Baruchel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc.) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples. PMID:28381981

  6. Analysis of laser-generated plasma ionizing radiation by synthetic single crystal diamond detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marinelli, M.; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; Margarone, Daniele; Velyhan, Andriy; Krása, Josef; Krouský, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 272, May (2013), s. 104-108 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0087; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; OPVK 3 Laser Zdroj(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279; OP VK 2 LaserGen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087; 7FP LASERLAB-EUROPE(XE) 228334 Program:EE; FP7 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : single crystal diamond * diamond detector * laser-generated plasma * ionizing radiation * time-of-fight spectrometer Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.538, year: 2013

  7. Comparison of natural and synthetic diamond X-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansley, S P; Betzel, G T; Metcalfe, P; Reinisch, L; Meyer, J

    2010-12-01

    Diamond detectors are particularly well suited for dosimetry applications in radiotherapy for reasons including near-tissue equivalence and high-spatial resolution resulting from small sensitive volumes. However, these detectors have not become commonplace due to high cost and poor availability arising from the need for high-quality diamond. We have fabricated relatively cheap detectors from commercially-available synthetic diamond fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. Here, we present a comparison of one of these detectors with the only commercially-available diamond-based detector (which uses a natural diamond crystal). Parameters such as the energy dependence and linearity of charge with dose were investigated at orthovoltage energies (50-250 kV), and dose-rate dependence of charge at linear accelerator energy (6 MV). The energy dependence of a synthetic diamond detector was similar to that of the natural diamond detector, albeit with slightly less variation across the energy range. Both detectors displayed a linear response with dose (at 100 kV) over the limited dose range used. The sensitivity of the synthetic diamond detector was 302 nC/Gy, compared to 294 nC/Gy measured for the natural diamond detector; however, this was obtained with a bias of 246.50 V compared to a bias of 61.75 V used for the natural diamond detector. The natural diamond detector exhibited a greater dependency on dose-rate than the synthetic diamond detector. Overall, the synthetic diamond detector performed well in comparison to the natural diamond detector.

  8. Shape analysis of synthetic diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Mullan, C

    1997-01-01

    Two-dimensional images of synthetic industrial diamond particles were obtained using a camera, framegrabber and PC-based image analysis software. Various methods for shape quantification were applied, including two-dimensional shape factors, Fourier series expansion of radius as a function of angle, boundary fractal analysis, polygonal harmonics, and comer counting methods. The shape parameter found to be the most relevant was axis ratio, defined as the ratio of the minor axis to the major axis of the ellipse with the same second moments of area as the particle. Axis ratio was used in an analysis of the sorting of synthetic diamonds on a vibrating table. A model was derived based on the probability that a particle of a given axis ratio would travel to a certain bin. The model described the sorting of bulk material accurately but it was found not to be applicable if the shape mix of the feed material changed dramatically. This was attributed to the fact that the particle-particle interference was not taken int...

  9. An investigation of the role of defect levels on the radiation response of synthetic diamond crystals when used as sensors for the detection of mammography X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, Nicholas

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluates the role of defects on the performances of synthetic diamond sensors on exposure to mammography X-rays. Through systematic investigations, the main cause of instability of response of examined sensors necessitating pre-irradiation was isolated and ascribed to the presence of ambient light which has the effect of emptying shallow trapping levels. The changes in response between measurements in light and dark conditions varied from 2.8 ± 1.2% to 63.0 ± 0.3%. Sensitivities between 0.4 and 6.7nCGy -1 mm -3 determined for the sensors varied with defect levels. The study indicates that differences in crystal quality due to the presence and influence of defects would cause a discrepancy in the dosimetric performances of various diamond detectors. Once a sensor plate is selected (based on the influence of defect levels) and coupled to the probe housing with the response of the diamond sensor stabilised and appropriately shielded from ambient light, daily priming is not needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic compression of synthetic diamond windows (final report for LDRD project 93531).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2008-09-01

    Diamond is an attractive dynamic compression window for many reasons: high elastic limit,large mechanical impedance, and broad transparency range. Natural diamonds, however, aretoo expensive to be used in destructive experiments. Chemical vapor deposition techniquesare now able to produce large single-crystal windows, opening up many potential dynamiccompression applications. This project studied the behavior of synthetic diamond undershock wave compression. The results suggest that synthetic diamond could be a usefulwindow in this field, though complete characterization proved elusive.3

  11. Dependence of Crystal Quality and β Value on Synthesis Temperature in Growing Gem Diamond Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong-Yu, Xiao; Xiao-Peng, Jia; Shang-Sheng, Li; Yu, Tian; Ya-Fei, Zhang; Guo-Feng, Huang; Li-Qiu; Hong-An, Ma; Chuan-Yi, Zang

    2008-01-01

    High quality Ib gem diamond single crystals were synthesized in cubic anvil high-pressure apparatus (SPD-6 × 1200) under 5.4 GPa and 1230°C-1280°C. The (100) face of seed crystal was used as growth face, and Ni 70 Mn 25 Co 5 alloy was used as solvent/catalyst. The dependence of crystal quality and β value (the ratio of height to diameter of diamond crystal) on synthesis temperature was studied. When the synthesis temperature is between 1230°C and 1280°C, the β value of the synthetic high-quality gem diamond crystals is between 0.4 and 0.6. The results show that when the β value is between 0.4 and 0.45, the synthetic diamonds are sheet-shape crystals; however, when the β value is between 0.45 and 0.6, the synthetic diamonds are tower-shape crystals. In addition, when the β value is less than 0.4, skeleton crystals will appear. When the β value is more than 0.6, most of the synthetic diamond crystals are inferior crystals

  12. Ultratough single crystal boron-doped diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, Russell J [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Mao, Ho-Kwang [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Yan, Chih-Shiue [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Liang, Qi [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC

    2015-05-05

    The invention relates to a single crystal boron doped CVD diamond that has a toughness of at least about 22 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a method of manufacturing single crystal boron doped CVD diamond. The growth rate of the diamond can be from about 20-100 .mu.m/h.

  13. Synthetic diamond devices for medical dosimetry applied to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descamps, C.

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this thesis, lead in the framework of an integrated European project entitled M.A.E.S.T.R.O. for ' Methods and Advanced Equipment for Simulation and Treatment in Radio Oncology', was to develop and test synthetic diamond detector in clinical environment for new modalities used in radiotherapy. Diamond is a good candidate for the detection of high energy beams in medical fields. It can be used for passive dosimetry, as thermoluminescent dosimeters or for active dosimetry as ionisation chambers. These two applications are presented here. Concerning the thermoluminescence, several impurities or dopants (boron, phosphorus, and nitrogen) have been incorporated in the diamond films during growth, in order to modify the material dosimetric properties and a detailed study of nitrogen-containing films is proposed. The second part presents the results obtained in active dosimetry. Two guide lines were followed: the measurement set-up optimisation and the material modification. The first dosimetric studies under radiotherapy beams concerning nitrogen-containing polycrystalline diamond as well as high purity single crystal diamond are conclusive. The detectors behaviours are in agreement with the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (author)

  14. The Many Facets of Diamond Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri N. Palyanov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This special issue is intended to serve as a multidisciplinary forum covering broad aspects of the science, technology, and application of synthetic and natural diamonds. This special issue contains 12 papers, which highlight recent investigations and developments in diamond research related to the diverse problems of natural diamond genesis, diamond synthesis and growth using CVD and HPHT techniques, and the use of diamond in both traditional applications, such as mechanical machining of materials, and the new recently emerged areas, such as quantum technologies. The results presented in the contributions collected in this special issue clearly demonstrate that diamond occupies a very special place in modern science and technology. After decades of research, this structurally very simple material still poses many intriguing scientific questions and technological challenges. It seems undoubted that diamond will remain the center of attraction for many researchers for many years to come.

  15. Spotting a fake[Telling natural and synthetic diamonds apart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, S. [Diamond Trading Company, Maidenhead, Berkshire (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: simon.lawson@dtc.com

    2006-06-15

    Diamonds are highly prized for their dazzling appearance and hardness, but would you be able to spot one that had been created in the laboratory? Simon Lawson describes how physics-based techniques can distinguish between natural and synthetic stones. For the last 50 years or so we have been able to make synthetic diamonds that replicate the superlative physical and chemical properties of natural diamonds, and these are used largely for industrial applications. But in the mind of the consumer, there is far more to a diamond than its hardness or brilliance. Research commissioned by the Diamond Trading Company (DTC) has shown that 94% of women surveyed prefer natural diamonds over synthetic ones as a symbol of love, possibly as a result of the immense age of natural stones. One of the key research activities at the DTC is therefore to ensure that synthetic diamonds can be spotted easily. (U.K.)

  16. Magnetic phase of the Fe-containing inclusions in synthetic diamond grits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bharuth-Ram, K.; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2002-01-01

    Synthetic diamond grits used in cutting and polishing tools ate produced in the high-temperature high-pressure Process in Which Fe/Ni or Fe/Co alloys ate used as solvent-catalysts. When the grits crystallize some of the solvents catalyst metal is trapped as inclusions in the crystals. The size...

  17. Investigations of high mobility single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromson, D.; Descamps, C.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, P.; Nesladek, M.; Isambert, A.

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic properties of diamond make this material theoretically very suitable for applications in medical physics. Until now ionization chambers have been fabricated from natural stones and are commercialized by PTW, but their fairly high costs and long delivery times have often limited their use in hospital. The properties of commercialized intrinsic polycrystalline diamond were investigated in the past by many groups. The results were not completely satisfactory due to the nature of the polycrystalline material itself. In contrast, the recent progresses in the growth of high mobility single crystal synthetic diamonds prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique offer new alternatives. In the framework of the MAESTRO project (Methods and Advanced Treatments and Simulations for Radio Oncology), the CEA-LIST is studying the potentialities of synthetic diamond for new techniques of irradiation such as intensity modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present the growth and characteristics of single crystal diamond prepared at CEA-LIST in the framework of the NoRHDia project (Novel Radiation Hard CVD Diamond Detector for Hadrons Physics), as well as the investigations of high mobility single crystal CVD diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring: dosimetric analysis performed with the single crystal diamond detector in terms of stability and repeatability of the response signal, signal to noise ratio, response speed, linearity of the signal versus the absorbed dose, and dose rate. The measurements performed with photon beams using radiotherapy facilities demonstrate that single crystal CVD diamond is a good alternative for air ionization chambers for beam quality control.

  18. Prospects for the synthesis of large single-crystal diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khmelnitskiy, R A

    2015-01-01

    The unique properties of diamond have stimulated the study of and search for its applications in many fields, including optics, optoelectronics, electronics, biology, and electrochemistry. Whereas chemical vapor deposition allows the growth of polycrystalline diamond plates more than 200 mm in diameter, most current diamond application technologies require large-size (25 mm and more) single-crystal diamond substrates or films suitable for the photolithography process. This is quite a challenge, because the largest diamond crystals currently available are 10 mm or less in size. This review examines three promising approaches to fabricating large-size diamond single crystals: growing large-size single crystals, the deposition of heteroepitaxial diamond films on single-crystal substrates, and the preparation of composite diamond substrates. (reviews of topical problems)

  19. Engineering NV centres in Synthetic Diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthew Markham

    2014-01-01

    The quantum properties of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) centre in diamond has prompted rapid growth in diamond research. This initial growth was driven by the fact the NV centre provides an 'easy' to manipulate quantum system along with opening up the possibility of a new material to deliver a solid state quantum computer. The NV defect is now moving from a quantum curiosity to a commercial development platform for a range of application such as as gyroscopes, timing and magnetometry as well as the more traditional quantum technologies such as quantum encryption and quantum simulation. These technologies are pushing the development needs of the material, and the processing of that material. The paper will describes the advances in CVD diamond synthesis with special attention to getting NV defects close to the surface of the diamond and how to process the material for diamond quantum optical applications. (author)

  20. Photoluminescent properties of single crystal diamond microneedles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykhin, Sergey A.; Ismagilov, Rinat R.; Tuyakova, Feruza T.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Fedotov, Pavel V.; Ermakova, Anna; Siyushev, Petr; Katamadze, Konstantin G.; Jelezko, Fedor; Rakovich, Yury P.; Obraztsov, Alexander N.

    2018-01-01

    Single crystal needle-like diamonds shaped as rectangular pyramids were produced by combination of chemical vapor deposition and selective oxidation with dimensions and geometrical characteristics depending on the deposition process parameters. Photoluminescence spectra and their dependencies on wavelength of excitation radiation reveal presence of nitrogen- and silicon-vacancy color centers in the diamond crystallites. Photoluminescence spectra, intensity mapping, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy indicate that silicon-vacancy centers are concentrated at the crystallites apex while nitrogen-vacancy centers are distributed over the whole crystallite. Dependence of the photoluminescence on excitation radiation intensity demonstrates saturation and allows estimation of the color centers density. The combination of structural parameters, geometry and photoluminescent characteristics are prospective for advantageous applications of these diamond crystallites in quantum information processing and optical sensing.

  1. Custom synthesized diamond crystals as state of the art radiation dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keddy, R.J.; Nam, T.L.; Fallon, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The fact that as a radiation detector, diamond is a stable, non-toxic and tissue equivalent (Z = 6) material makes it an ideal candidate for in vivo radiation dosimetry or the dosimetry of general radiation fields in environmental monitoring. Natural diamond crystals, however, have the disadvantage that no two crystals can be guaranteed to have the same response characteristics. This disadvantage can be overcome by synthesizing the crystals under controlled conditions and by using very selective chemistry. Such synthetic diamonds can be used as thermoluminescence dosimeters where they exhibit characteristics comparable to presently available commercial TLD's or they can be used as ionization chambers to produce either ionization currents or pulses where the small physical size of the diamond (1 mm 3 ) and possibilities of digital circuitry makes miniaturization an extremely attractive possibility. It has also been found that they can perform as scintillation detectors. Aspects of the performance characteristics of such diamonds in all three modes are described

  2. Compressive strength of synthetic diamond grits containing metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. H. P.; Li, Z.; Hyde, A. M.

    2000-12-01

    Synthetic diamonds made by high-temperature and high-pressure synthesis using an Fe-Co solvent/catalyst leave nanoparticles of the solvent/catalyst within the diamond matrix. These nanoparticles strongly affect the magnetic properties of the diamond. The magnetization versus field was compatible with the response of superparamagnetic particles. The mean size and separation of the inclusions were calculated. The inclusion size was found to be constant to within 10%, whereas the saturation magnetization varied by a factor of 100. A transmission electron microscope image of a single inclusion from a Fe-Co/diamond grit showed a dark, iron-rich core surrounded by a halo of material of intermediate contrast to the lighter diamond matrix. The size of the core is consistent with the magnetization measurements while the halo is of similar size to that determined by small-angle neutron scattering. The compressive strength increased linearly with the inclusion separation.

  3. Chemical vapour deposition synthetic diamond: materials, technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmer, R S; Brandon, J R; Clewes, S L; Dhillon, H K; Dodson, J M; Friel, I; Inglis, P N; Madgwick, T D; Markham, M L; Mollart, T P; Perkins, N; Scarsbrook, G A; Twitchen, D J; Whitehead, A J; Wilman, J J; Woollard, S M

    2009-01-01

    Substantial developments have been achieved in the synthesis of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond in recent years, providing engineers and designers with access to a large range of new diamond materials. CVD diamond has a number of outstanding material properties that can enable exceptional performance in applications as diverse as medical diagnostics, water treatment, radiation detection, high power electronics, consumer audio, magnetometry and novel lasers. Often the material is synthesized in planar form; however, non-planar geometries are also possible and enable a number of key applications. This paper reviews the material properties and characteristics of single crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond, and how these can be utilized, focusing particularly on optics, electronics and electrochemistry. It also summarizes how CVD diamond can be tailored for specific applications, on the basis of the ability to synthesize a consistent and engineered high performance product.

  4. Ultratough CVD single crystal diamond and three dimensional growth thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, Russell J [Washington, DC; Mao, Ho-kwang [Washington, DC; Yan, Chih-shiue [Washington, DC

    2009-09-29

    The invention relates to a single-crystal diamond grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition that has a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention also relates to a method of producing a single-crystal diamond with a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a process for producing a single crystal CVD diamond in three dimensions on a single crystal diamond substrate.

  5. Optical characterization of single-crystal diamond grown by DC arc plasma jet CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Li-fu; Zhao, Yun; Wei, Jun-jun; Liu, Jin-long; Li, Cheng-ming; Lü, Fan-xiu

    2017-12-01

    Optical centers of single-crystal diamond grown by DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were examined using a low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) technique. The results show that most of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) complexes are present as NV- centers, although some H2 and H3 centers and B-aggregates are also present in the single-crystal diamond because of nitrogen aggregation resulting from high N2 incorporation and the high mobility of vacancies under growth temperatures of 950-1000°C. Furthermore, emissions of radiation-induced defects were also detected at 389, 467.5, 550, and 588.6 nm in the PL spectra. The reason for the formation of these radiation-induced defects is not clear. Although a Ni-based alloy was used during the diamond growth, Ni-related emissions were not detected in the PL spectra. In addition, the silicon-vacancy (Si-V)-related emission line at 737 nm, which has been observed in the spectra of many previously reported microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) synthetic diamonds, was absent in the PL spectra of the single-crystal diamond prepared in this work. The high density of NV- centers, along with the absence of Ni-related defects and Si-V centers, makes the single-crystal diamond grown by DC arc plasma jet CVD a promising material for applications in quantum computing.

  6. Enhancing the mechanical properties of single-crystal CVD diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qi; Yan, Chih-Shiue; Meng, Yufei; Lai, Joseph; Krasnicki, Szczesny; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2009-09-09

    Approaches for enhancing the strength and toughness of single-crystal diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at high growth rates are described. CVD processes used to grow single-crystal diamond in high density plasmas were modified to incorporate boron and nitrogen. Semi-quantitative studies of mechanical properties were carried out using Vickers indentation techniques. The introduction of boron in single-crystal CVD diamond can significantly enhance the fracture toughness of this material without sacrificing its high hardness (∼78 GPa). Growth conditions were varied to investigate its effect on boron incorporation and optical properties by means of photoluminescence, infrared, and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. Boron can be readily incorporated into single-crystal diamond by the methods used, but with nitrogen addition, the incorporation of boron was hindered. The spectroscopic measurements indicate that nitrogen and boron coexist in the diamond structure, which helps explain the origin of the enhanced fracture toughness of this material. Further, low pressure/high temperature annealing can enhance the intrinsic hardness of single-crystal CVD diamond by a factor of two without appreciable loss in fracture toughness. This doping and post-growth treatment of diamond may lead to new technological applications that require enhanced mechanical properties of diamond.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of p-type boron-doped IIb diamond large single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shang-Sheng; Li Xiao-Lei; Su Tai-Chao; Jia Xiao-Peng; Ma Hong-An; Huang Guo-Feng; Li Yong

    2011-01-01

    High-quality p-type boron-doped IIb diamond large single crystals are successfully synthesized by the temperature gradient method in a china-type cubic anvil high-pressure apparatus at about 5.5 GPa and 1600 K. The morphologies and surface textures of the synthetic diamond crystals with different boron additive quantities are characterized by using an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope respectively. The impurities of nitrogen and boron in diamonds are detected by micro Fourier transform infrared technique. The electrical properties including resistivities, Hall coefficients, Hall mobilities and carrier densities of the synthesized samples are measured by a four-point probe and the Hall effect method. The results show that large p-type boron-doped diamond single crystals with few nitrogen impurities have been synthesized. With the increase of quantity of additive boron, some high-index crystal faces such as {113} gradually disappear, and some stripes and triangle pits occur on the crystal surface. This work is helpful for the further research and application of boron-doped semiconductor diamond. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  8. Conduction in ion implanted single crystal diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunn, J.D.; Parikh, N.R.; Swanson, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    We have implanted sodium, phosphorus and arsenic into single crystal type IIa diamond as possible n-type dopants. Particular emphasis was applied to the implantation of sodium at different temperatures and doses; combined implantation energies of 55,80 and 120 keV were used to provide a uniformly doped layer over approximately 100 nm depth. The implanted layers exhibited semiconducting behavior with a single exponential activation energy between 0.40 and 0.48 eV, as determined by temperature dependent resistance measurements. A sample implanted to a concentration of 5.10 19 Na + /cm 3 at 550 degrees C exhibited a single activation energy of 0.415 eV over a temperature range from 25 to 500 degrees C. Thermal annealing above 900 degrees C was found to remove implantation damage as measured by optical absorption and RBS/channeling. However, concomitant increases in the resistance and the activation energy were observed. Implantation of 22 Ne was used to introduce a damage density equivalent to the 23 Na implant, while not introducing an electrically active species. The activation energy and electrical resistance were similar but higher than those produced by implantation with sodium. We conclude that the electrical properties of the Na-implanted samples were at least partly due to electrically active Na, but that residual implantation damage was still important

  9. Nitrogen aggregation in Ib type synthetic diamonds at low pressure and high-temperature annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazyuchits, N.M.; Rusetskij, M.S.; Latushko, Ya.I.; Kazyuchits, V.N.; Zajtsev, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    A new technique for annealing of diamonds at low pressure and high temperature (LPHT) is considered. The absorption spectra of synthetic Ib diamonds are given before and after annealing. This is evident from a comparison of the spectra that nitrogen aggregation process takes place at the LPHT annealing diamond. (authors)

  10. Custom synthesized diamond crystals as state of the art radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keddy, R.J.; Nam, T.L.; Fallon, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The fact that as a radiation detector, diamond is a stable, non-toxic and tissue equivalent (Z=6) material, makes it an ideal candidate for in vivo radiation dosimetry or the dosimetry of general radiation fields in environmental monitoring. Natural diamond crystals have the disadvantage, however, that no two crystals can be guaranteed to have the same response characteristics. This disadvantage can be overcome by synthesizing the crystals under controlled conditions and by using very selective chemistry. Such synthetic diamonds can be used as thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) where they exhibit characteristics comparable to presently available commercial TLDs or they can be used as ionization chambers to produce either ionization currents or pulses where the small physical size of the diamond (1 mm 3 ) and possibilities of digital circuitry makes miniaturization an extremely attractive possibility. It has also been found that they can perform as scintillation detectors. This contribution describes aspects of the performance characteristics of such diamonds in all three modes. 24 refs., 14 figs

  11. Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kady, Ihab F; Olsson, Roy H; Hopkins, Patrick; Reinke, Charles; Kim, Bongsang

    2013-08-13

    Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals can simultaneously have a large Seebeck coefficient, high electrical conductivity, and low thermal conductivity. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials can enable improved thermoelectric devices, such as thermoelectric generators and coolers, with improved performance. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials and devices can be fabricated using techniques that are compatible with standard microelectronics.

  12. Trapezoidal diffraction grating beam splitters in single crystal diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Marcell; Graziosi, Teodoro; Quack, Niels

    2018-02-01

    Single Crystal Diamond has been recognized as a prime material for optical components in high power applications due to low absorption and high thermal conductivity. However, diamond microstructuring remains challenging. Here, we report on the fabrication and characterization of optical diffraction gratings exhibiting a symmetric trapezoidal profile etched into a single crystal diamond substrate. The optimized grating geometry diffracts the transmitted optical power into precisely defined proportions, performing as an effective beam splitter. We fabricate our gratings in commercially available single crystal CVD diamond plates (2.6mm x 2.6mm x 0.3mm). Using a sputter deposited hard mask and patterning by contact lithography, the diamond is etched in an inductively coupled oxygen plasma with zero platen power. The etch process effectively reveals the characteristic {111} diamond crystal planes, creating a precisely defined angled (54.7°) profile. SEM and AFM measurements of the fabricated gratings evidence the trapezoidal shape with a pitch of 3.82μm, depth of 170 nm and duty cycle of 35.5%. Optical characterization is performed in transmission using a 650nm laser source perpendicular to the sample. The recorded transmitted optical power as function of detector rotation angle shows a distribution of 21.1% in the 0th order and 23.6% in each +/-1st order (16.1% reflected, 16.6% in higher orders). To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of diffraction gratings with trapezoidal profile in single crystal diamond. The fabrication process will enable beam splitter gratings of custom defined optical power distribution profiles, while antireflection coatings can increase the efficiency.

  13. Morphological Features of Diamond Crystals Dissolved in Fe0.7S0.3 Melt at 4 GPa and 1400°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, V. M.; Zhimulev, E. I.; Pomazanskiy, B. S.; Zemnuhov, A. L.; Chepurov, A. A.; Afanasiev, V. P.; Chepurov, A. I.

    2018-01-01

    An experimental study of the dissolution of natural and synthetic diamonds in a sulfur-bearing iron melt (Fe0.7S0.3) with high P-T parameters (4 GPa, 1400°C) was performed. The results demonstrated that under these conditions, octahedral crystals with flat faces and rounded tetrahexahedral diamond crystals are transformed into rounded octahedroids, which have morphological characteristics similar to those of natural diamonds from kimberlite. It was suggested that, taking into account the complex history of individual natural diamond crystals, including the dissolution stages, sulfur-bearing metal melts up to sulfide melts were not only diamond-forming media during the early evolution of the Earth, but also natural solvents of diamond in the mantle environment before the formation of kimberlitic melts.

  14. Diamond drumhead crystals for X-ray optics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolodziej, Tomasz; Vodnala, Preeti; Terentyev, Sergey; Blank, Vladimir; Shvyd' ko, Yuri

    2016-07-14

    Thin (<50 µm) and flawless diamond single crystals are essential for the realization of numerous advanced X-ray optical devices at synchrotron radiation and free-electron laser facilities. The fabrication and handling of such ultra-thin components without introducing crystal damage and strain is a challenge. Drumhead crystals, monolithic crystal structures composed of a thin membrane furnished with a surrounding solid collar, are a solution ensuring mechanically stable strain-free mounting of the membranes with efficient thermal transport. Diamond, being one of the hardest and most chemically inert materials, poses significant difficulties in fabrication. Reported here is the successful manufacture of diamond drumhead crystals in the [100] orientation using picosecond laser milling. Subsequent high-temperature treatment appears to be crucial for the membranes to become defect free and unstrained, as revealed by X-ray topography on examples of drumhead crystals with a 26 µm thick (1 mm in diameter) and a 47 µm thick (1.5 × 2.5 mm) membrane.

  15. Diamond turning of Si and Ge single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, P.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single-point diamond turning studies have been completed on Si and Ge crystals. A new process model was developed for diamond turning which is based on a critical depth of cut for plastic flow-to-brittle fracture transitions. This concept, when combined with the actual machining geometry for single-point turning, predicts that {open_quotes}ductile{close_quotes} machining is a combined action of plasticity and fracture. Interrupted cutting experiments also provide a meant to directly measure the critical depth parameter for given machining conditions.

  16. Strength and deformation of shocked diamond single crystals: Orientation dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J. M.; Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2018-03-01

    Understanding and quantifying the strength or elastic limit of diamond single crystals is of considerable scientific and technological importance, and has been a subject of long standing theoretical and experimental interest. To examine the effect of crystalline anisotropy on strength and deformation of shocked diamond single crystals, plate impact experiments were conducted to measure wave profiles at various elastic impact stresses up to ˜120 GPa along [110] and [111] crystal orientations. Using laser interferometry, particle velocity histories and shock velocities in the diamond samples were measured and were compared with similar measurements published previously for shock compression along the [100] direction. Wave profiles for all three orientations showed large elastic wave amplitudes followed by time-dependent inelastic deformation. From the measured wave profiles, the elastic limits were determined under well characterized uniaxial strain loading conditions. The measured elastic wave amplitudes for the [110] and [111] orientations were lower for higher elastic impact stress (stress attained for an elastic diamond response), consistent with the result reported previously for [100] diamond. The maximum resolved shear stress (MRSS) on the {111}⟨110⟩ slip systems was determined for each orientation, revealing significant orientation dependence. The MRSS values for the [100] and [110] orientations (˜33 GPa) are 25%-30% of theoretical estimates; the MRSS value for the [111] orientation is significantly lower (˜23 GPa). Our results demonstrate that the MRSS depends strongly on the stress component normal to the {111} planes or the resolved normal stress (RNS), suggesting that the RNS plays a key role in inhibiting the onset of inelastic deformation. Lower elastic wave amplitudes at higher peak stress and the effect of the RNS are inconsistent with typical dislocation slip mechanisms of inelastic deformation, suggesting instead an inelastic response

  17. Dedicated multichannel readout ASIC coupled with single crystal diamond for dosimeter application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbri, A; Notaristefani, F De; Galasso, M; Cencelli, V Orsolini; Falco, M D; Marinelli, M; Tortora, L; Verona, C; Rinati, G Verona

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the tests of a low-noise, multi-channel readout integrated circuit used as a readout electronic front-end for a diamond multi-pixel dosimeter. The system is developed for dose distribution measurement in radiotherapy applications. The first 10-channel prototype chip was designed and fabricated in a 0.18 um CMOS process. Every channel includes a charge integrator with a 10 pF capacitor and a double slope A/D converter. The diamond multi-pixel detector, based on CVD synthetic single crystal diamond Schottky diodes, is made by a 3 × 3 sensor matrix. The overall device has been tested under irradiation with 6 MeV radio therapeutic photon beams at the Policlinico ''Tor Vergata'' (PTV) hospital. Measurements show a 20 fA RMS leakage current from the front-end input stage and a negligible dark current from the diamond detector, a stable temporal response and a good linear behaviour as a function of both dose and dose rate. These characteristics were common to each tested channel.

  18. Radiation attenuation by single-crystal diamond windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, M.; Pruteanu, C. G.; Donnelly, M. -E.; Molaison, J. J.; dos Santos, A. M.; Loveday, J. S.; Boehler, R.; Tulk, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    As artificial diamond becomes more cost effective it is likely to see increasing use as a window for sample environment equipment used in diffraction experiments. Such windows are particularly useful as they exhibit exceptional mechanical properties in addition to being highly transparent to both X-ray and neutron radiation. A key application is in high-pressure studies, where diamond anvil cells (DACs) are used to access extreme sample conditions. However, despite their utility, an important consideration when using single-crystal diamond windows is their interaction with the incident beam. In particular, the Bragg condition will be satisfied for specific angles and wavelengths, leading to the appearance of diamond Bragg spots on the diffraction detectors but also, unavoidably, to loss of transmitted intensity of the beam that interacts with the sample. This effect can be particularly significant for energy-dispersive measurements, for example, in time-of-flight neutron diffraction work using DACs. This article presents a semi-empirical approach that can be used to correct for this effect, which is a prerequisite for the accurate determination of diffraction intensities.

  19. Increase of linear size uniformity of synthetic diamond grinding powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilnitskaya, G.; Bogatyreva, G.; Novikov, N.; Shepelev, A.; Nevstryev, G.; Leshchenko, O.

    2008-07-01

    It has been shown in article that increase of powder uniformity is achieved by carrying out additional sorting of powders in the sizes and form of grains. The sorting process includes the following stages: chemical rounding of diamond grains by strong oxidants; special grain size classification on sieves with mesh sizes corresponded to geometrical progression of twentieth (R-20) and fortieth (R-40) number series; additional separation of diamond grains in narrow graininess by grain form. Diamond powder of AC6 100/80 series has been produced by this technology, as a result of that the content of basic fraction runs up 85%.

  20. Morphology of Diamond Layers Grown on Different Facets of Single Crystal Diamond Substrates by a Microwave Plasma CVD in CH4-H2-N2 Gas Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny E. Ashkinazi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Epitaxial growth of diamond films on different facets of synthetic IIa-type single crystal (SC high-pressure high temperature (HPHT diamond substrate by a microwave plasma CVD in CH4-H2-N2 gas mixture with the high concentration (4% of nitrogen is studied. A beveled SC diamond embraced with low-index {100}, {110}, {111}, {211}, and {311} faces was used as the substrate. Only the {100} face is found to sustain homoepitaxial growth at the present experimental parameters, while nanocrystalline diamond (NCD films are produced on other planes. This observation is important for the choice of appropriate growth parameters, in particular, for the production of bi-layer or multilayer NCD-on-microcrystalline diamond (MCD superhard coatings on tools when the deposition of continuous conformal NCD film on all facet is required. The development of the film morphology with growth time is examined with SEM. The structure of hillocks, with or without polycrystalline aggregates, that appear on {100} face is analyzed, and the stress field (up to 0.4 GPa within the hillocks is evaluated based on high-resolution mapping of photoluminescence spectra of nitrogen-vacancy NV optical centers in the film.

  1. Single crystal diamond detectors grown by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuve, C.; Angelone, M.; Bellini, V.; Balducci, A.; Donato, M.G.; Faggio, G.; Marinelli, M.; Messina, G.; Milani, E.; Morgada, M.E.; Pillon, M.; Potenza, R.; Pucella, G.; Russo, G.; Santangelo, S.; Scoccia, M.; Sutera, C.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2007-01-01

    The detection properties of heteropitaxial (polycrystalline, pCVD) and homoepitaxial (single crystal, scCVD) diamond films grown by microwave chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in the Laboratories of Roma 'Tor Vergata' University are reported. The pCVD diamond detectors were tested with α-particles from different sources and 12 C ions produced by 15MV Tandem accelerator at Southern National Laboratories (LNS) in Catania (Italy). pCVDs were also used to monitor 14MeV neutrons produced by the D-T plasma at Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, U.K. The limit of pCVDs is the poor energy resolution. To overcome this problem, we developed scCVD diamonds using the same reactor parameters that optimized pCVD diamonds. scCVD were grown on a low cost (100) HPHT single crystal substrate. A detector 110μm thick was tested under α-particles and under 14MeV neutron irradiation. The charge collection efficiency spectrum measured under irradiation with a triple α-particle source shows three clearly resolved peaks, with an energy resolution of about 1.1%. The measured spectra under neutron irradiation show a well separated C(n,α 0 ) 9 Be12 reaction peak with an energy spread of 0.5MeV for 14.8MeV neutrons and 0.3MeV for 14.1MeV neutrons, which are fully compatible with the energy spread of the incident neutron beams

  2. Diamond coated dental bur machining of natural and synthetic dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M J; Sein, H; Ahmed, W

    2004-12-01

    Diamond coatings are attractive for cutting processes due to their high hardness, low friction coefficient, excellent wear resistance and chemical inertness. The application of diamond coatings on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) burs has been the subject of much attention in recent years in order to improve cutting performance and tool life. WC-Co burs containing 6% Co and 94% WC with an average grain size 1-3 micron were used in this study. In order to improve the adhesion between diamond and the bur it is necessary to etch away the surface Co to prepare it for subsequent diamond growth. Hot filament chemical vapour deposition (H.F.C.V.D.) with a modified vertical filament arrangement has been employed for the deposition of diamond films. Diamond film quality and purity has been characterised using scanning electron microscopy (S.E.M.) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The performance of diamond coated WC-Co burs, uncoated WC-Co burs, and diamond embedded (sintered) burs have been compared by drilling a series of holes into various materials such as human teeth, and model tooth materials such as borosilicate glass and acrylic. Flank wear has been used to assess the wear rates of the burs when machining natural and synthetic dental materials such as those described above.

  3. Investigation of element contents of natural diamond crystals of different gemological features by INAA and autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamrayeva, D.S.; Ulugmuradov, S.; Didyk, A.Y.; Gasanov, M.; Solodova, J.P.; Sedova, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The work presented aims at understanding the role of Co, Ni, Ti, Cr, Mn, Cu impurities on the natural diamond ( Type Ι ) quality, microstructure and morphology having different gemological features for identification their deposit. An according of the Kimberly Process there is Certification Scheme for regulating trade in diamonds to exclude 'bloody' diamonds. The 'four C's' criteria (color, clarity, carat weight, cut) had for decades been used by gemologists worldwide to evaluate precious gem diamonds. Those four parameters were believed to determine the value of the stones. Some 10 years ago gemologists added to those traditional criteria a fifth C, signifying Confidence. The role of the fifth C in pricing precious stones increased over time. An according of the Kimberly Process it is necessary to determine diamond deposit. Impurity content of natural diamonds is basic feature to for identification their deposit. We have used autoradiographic technique for investigation of spatial impurity distributions in natural diamond crystals. It is based on the secondary beta irradiation registration. Impurities were identified by energy lines of the gamma spectra obtained and by half-life periods. We bring information which allow to clarify the spatial distributions of Co, Ni, Ti, Cr, Mn, Cu impurities depended inner morphology of diamond crystal. It was established several types of impurity distributions depending from inner morphology of diamond crystals. Results of INAA and autoradiographic study of natural diamonds use for to make of international data for identification their deposit

  4. Optical engineering of diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Rabeau, James R

    2013-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive book on the engineering of diamond optical devices. It will give readers an up-to-date account of the properties of optical quality synthetic diamond (single crystal, nanodiamond and polycrystalline) and reviews the large and growing field of engineering of diamond-based optical devices, with applications in quantum computation, nano-imaging, high performance lasers, and biomedicine. It aims to provide scientists, engineers and physicists with a valuable resource and reference book for the design and performance of diamond-based optical devices.

  5. Performance evaluation of synthetic diamond to realize ionisation chamber for radiotherapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero Waryn, M.J.

    2005-09-01

    This work focuses on the optimisation of synthetic CVD diamond quality to realize ionisation chambers for radiotherapy. Diamonds samples have been synthesized and characterized using thermally stimulated measurement. These measurements showed the presence of trapping levels due to crystalline defects or impurities in material. The study of the response of these samples under irradiation has showed a correlation between the charged state of traps (priming and overshoot phenomena) and the response of the detector (stabilization of the signal). To remove the overshoot phenomenon which prevents from reproducible measurements, we used a specific operating set up controlling the device temperature. This technique enables to neutralize these instable phenomena and to use CVD diamond for ionisation chamber fabrication. (author)

  6. Performance of a beam-multiplexing diamond crystal monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Diling; Feng, Yiping; Stoupin, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    A double-crystal diamond monochromator was recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source. It enables splitting pulses generated by the free electron laser in the hard x-ray regime and thus allows the simultaneous operations of two instruments. Both monochromator crystals are High......-Pressure High-Temperature grown type-IIa diamond crystal plates with the (111) orientation. The first crystal has a thickness of ∼100 μm to allow high reflectivity within the Bragg bandwidth and good transmission for the other wavelengths for downstream use. The second crystal is about 300 μm thick and makes...

  7. CVD diamond for electronic devices and sensors

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic diamond is diamond produced by using chemical or physical processes. Like naturally occurring diamond it is composed of a three-dimensional carbon crystal. Due to its extreme physical properties, synthetic diamond is used in many industrial applications, such as drill bits and scratch-proof coatings, and has the potential to be used in many new application areas A brand new title from the respected Wiley Materials for Electronic and Optoelectronic Applications series, this title is the most up-to-date resource for diamond specialists. Beginning with an introduction to the pr

  8. Synthetic diamond devices for medical dosimetry applied to radiotherapy; Etude et developpement de dispositifs en diamant synthetique pour la dosimetrie medicale: applications en radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descamps, C

    2007-06-15

    The aim of this thesis, lead in the framework of an integrated European project entitled M.A.E.S.T.R.O. for ' Methods and Advanced Equipment for Simulation and Treatment in Radio Oncology', was to develop and test synthetic diamond detector in clinical environment for new modalities used in radiotherapy. Diamond is a good candidate for the detection of high energy beams in medical fields. It can be used for passive dosimetry, as thermoluminescent dosimeters or for active dosimetry as ionisation chambers. These two applications are presented here. Concerning the thermoluminescence, several impurities or dopants (boron, phosphorus, and nitrogen) have been incorporated in the diamond films during growth, in order to modify the material dosimetric properties and a detailed study of nitrogen-containing films is proposed. The second part presents the results obtained in active dosimetry. Two guide lines were followed: the measurement set-up optimisation and the material modification. The first dosimetric studies under radiotherapy beams concerning nitrogen-containing polycrystalline diamond as well as high purity single crystal diamond are conclusive. The detectors behaviours are in agreement with the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (author)

  9. Defects of diamond single crystal grown under high temperature and high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Qingcai, E-mail: suqc@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan, P. R. China, 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, P. R. China, 250061 (China); Shandong Engineering Research Center for Superhard Materials, Zoucheng, P. R. China 273500 (China); Zhang, Jianhua [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, P. R. China, 250061 (China); Li, Musen [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan, P. R. China, 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, P. R. China, 250061 (China); Shandong Engineering Research Center for Superhard Materials, Zoucheng, P. R. China 273500 (China)

    2013-11-01

    The diamond single crystal, synthesized with Fe–Ni–C–B system of catalyst under high temperature and high pressure, had been observed by field emission scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. The presence of a cellular structure suggested that the diamond grew from melted catalyst solution and there existed a zone of component supercooling zone in front of the solid–liquid interface. The main impurities in the diamond crystal was (FeNi){sub 23}C{sub 6}. The triangle screw pit revealed on the (111) plane was generated by the screw dislocation meeting the diamond (111) plane at the points of emergence of dislocations. A narrow twin plane was formed between the two (111) plane. - Highlights: • High pressure, high temperature synthesis of diamond single crystal. • Fe–Ni–C–B used as catalyst, graphite as carbon source. • The main impurity in the diamond crystal was (FeNi){sub 23}C{sub 6}. • Surface defects arose from screw dislocations and stacking faults.

  10. Prismatic dislocation loops and concentric dislocation loops in HPHT-grown diamond single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.-W.; Li, M.-S.; Zou, Z.-D.; Gong, Z.-G.; Hao, Z.-Y.

    2003-01-01

    As-grown diamond single crystals grown from Fe-Ni-C system under high temperature-high pressure were examined by transmission electron microscopy. There exist prismatic dislocation loops and concentric dislocation loops in the diamond, which are related to the nonequilibrium nature of the diamond synthesis process. The prismatic dislocation loops may be formed by vacancy condensation during rapid cooling from high temperature, and the Burgers vector of the dislocation is determined by diffraction contrast as 1/2 . Moire fringes formed by two overlapping (1 1 1) close-packed planes were used to study concentric dislocation loops. The concentric dislocation loops may be derived from thermal stress caused by the inclusions in the diamond, which cause a strain field due to the thermal contraction difference between the inclusions and the diamond during cooling from high temperature

  11. Effects of copper-based alloy on the synthesis of single-crystal diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Li Xue; Ma Hong An; Jia Xiao Peng; Wakatsuki, M; Zou Guang Tian

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic effects of copper-based alloys in diamond growth have been investigated. A single crystal of diamond has been obtained by the temperature gradient method (TGM), using Cu-Mn-Co and Cu-Co alloys as catalysts. It was found that the melted Cu-Mn-Co and Cu-Co alloys show low viscosity. The eutectic temperatures of these two alloys with graphite were between 1130 and 1150 deg. C, and the temperature of the transition to diamond was over 1300 deg. C at 5.5 GPa. High-quality diamond could not be obtained in Cu-Co alloy by the TGM. Our results suggest that adding Cu to a catalyst cannot decrease the reaction temperature for diamond growth.

  12. Synthetic diamond devices for radiotherapy applications: Thermoluminescent dosimeter and ionisation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descamps, C.; Tromson, D.; Mer, C.; Nesladek, M.; Bergonzo, P.

    2006-01-01

    In radiotherapy field, the major usage of dosimeters is in the measurement of the dose received by the patient during radiotherapy (in-vivo measurements) and in beam calibration and uniformity checks. Diamond exhibits several interesting characteristics that make it a good candidate for radiation detection. It is indeed soft-tissue equivalent (Z=6 compared to Z=7.42 for human tissue), mechanically robust and relatively insensitive to radiation damage, chemically stable and non toxic. Moreover, the recent availability of synthetic samples, grown under controlled conditions using the chemical vapour deposition (C.V.D.) technique, allowed decreasing the high cost and the long delivery time of diamond devices. Diamond can be use for off-line dosimetry as thermoluminescent dosimeters or for on-line dosimetry as ionisation chamber [2,3]. These both applications are reported here. For this study, samples were grown in the laboratory and devices were then tested under X-ray irradiations and in clinical environment under medical cobalt source. The work described in this paper was performed in the framework of the European Integrated Project M.A.E.S.T.R.O., Methods and Advanced Equipment for Simulation and Treatment in Radio-Oncology, (6. FP) which is granted by the European Commission.The first results of this study clearly show that C.V.D. diamond detectors are suitable for dosimetry in radiotherapy applications. Moreover, for both T.L. dosimeters and ionisation chambers applications, and even though the sensitivity is subsequently reduced, nitrogen incorporation in films seems to significantly improve the dosimetric characteristics of the devices. Therefore, the optimisation of the material quality appears as a very important issue in order to increase the dosimetric characteristics of devices and more particularly, for use as thermoluminescent dosimeters, other impurities (Nickel, Phosphorus) will be tested. For ionisation chamber applications, experiments with

  13. Dosimetry of cone-defined stereotactic radiosurgery fields with a commercial synthetic diamond detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Johnny E; Crowe, Scott B; Hill, Robin; Freeman, Nigel; Trapp, J V

    2014-11-01

    Small field x-ray beam dosimetry is difficult due to lack of lateral electronic equilibrium, source occlusion, high dose gradients, and detector volume averaging. Currently, there is no single definitive detector recommended for small field dosimetry. The objective of this work was to evaluate the performance of a new commercial synthetic diamond detector, namely, the PTW 60019 microDiamond, for the dosimetry of small x-ray fields as used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Small field sizes were defined by BrainLAB circular cones (4-30 mm diameter) on a Novalis Trilogy linear accelerator and using the 6 MV SRS x-ray beam mode for all measurements. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured and compared to an IBA SFD and a PTW 60012 E diode. Cross profiles were measured and compared to an IBA SFD diode. Field factors, ΩQclin,Qmsr (fclin,fmsr) , were calculated by Monte Carlo methods using BEAMnrc and correction factors, kQclin,Qmsr (fclin,fmsr) , were derived for the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector. For the small fields of 4-30 mm diameter, there were dose differences in the PDDs of up to 1.5% when compared to an IBA SFD and PTW 60012 E diode detector. For the cross profile measurements the penumbra values varied, depending upon the orientation of the detector. The field factors, ΩQclin,Qmsr (fclin,fmsr) , were calculated for these field diameters at a depth of 1.4 cm in water and they were within 2.7% of published values for a similar linear accelerator. The corrections factors, kQclin,Qmsr (fclin,fmsr) , were derived for the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector. The authors conclude that the new PTW 60019 microDiamond detector is generally suitable for relative dosimetry in small 6 MV SRS beams for a Novalis Trilogy linear equipped with circular cones.

  14. X-ray beam monitor made by thin-film CVD single-crystal diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E; Prestopino, G; Verona, C; Verona-Rinati, G; Angelone, M; Pillon, M; Kachkanov, V; Tartoni, N; Benetti, M; Cannatà, D; Di Pietrantonio, F

    2012-11-01

    A novel beam position monitor, operated at zero bias voltage, based on high-quality chemical-vapor-deposition single-crystal Schottky diamond for use under intense synchrotron X-ray beams was fabricated and tested. The total thickness of the diamond thin-film beam monitor is about 60 µm. The diamond beam monitor was inserted in the B16 beamline of the Diamond Light Source synchrotron in Harwell (UK). The device was characterized under monochromatic high-flux X-ray beams from 6 to 20 keV and a micro-focused 10 keV beam with a spot size of approximately 2 µm × 3 µm square. Time response, linearity and position sensitivity were investigated. Device response uniformity was measured by a raster scan of the diamond surface with the micro-focused beam. Transmissivity and spectral responsivity versus beam energy were also measured, showing excellent performance of the new thin-film single-crystal diamond beam monitor.

  15. Opal-like photonic crystal with diamond lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Santamaria, F; López, C; Meseguer, F; Miyazaki, H T; Sánchez-Dehesa, J

    2002-01-01

    In this contribution, a method to fabricate a diamond structure with a complete PBG in the near infrared is proposed. The procedure starts by building an opal composed of two types of microspheres (organic and inorganic) in a body-centered-cubic symmetry by means of a micro- robotic technique. Then, the organic particles may be selectively removed to obtain a diamond structure of inorganic particles. Once this structure is assembled its filling fraction may be controlled by sintering. Subsequently this template can be infiltrated with an adequate high refractive index material. In this way, the method can be extended to make diamond inverse opals of, for instance, silicon with gap to mid gap ratios as large as 13% for moderate filling fractions. An overview of micromanipulation as well as previous experimental results will be offered to show the feasibility of this method. (24 refs).

  16. Channeling implantation of high energy carbon ions in a diamond crystal: Determination of the induced crystal amorphization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erich, M.; Kokkoris, M.; Fazinić, S.; Petrović, S.

    2018-02-01

    This work reports on the induced diamond crystal amorphization by 4 MeV carbon ions implanted in the 〈1 0 0〉 oriented crystal and its determination by application of RBS/C and EBS/C techniques. The spectra from the implanted samples were recorded for 1.2, 1.5, 1.75 and 1.9 MeV protons. For the two latter ones the strong resonance of the nuclear elastic scattering 12C(p,p0)12C at 1.737 MeV was explored. The backscattering channeling spectra were successfully fitted and the ion beam induced crystal amorphization depth profile was determined using a phenomenological approach, which is based on the properly defined Gompertz type dechanneling functions for protons in the 〈1 0 0〉 diamond crystal channels and the introduction of the concept of ion beam amorphization, which is implemented through our newly developed computer code CSIM.

  17. Applications Of Diamond In Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, M.; van Enckevort, W. J. P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews existing and new applications of single crystal diamond, both natural and synthetic, in optical science. The traditional application is as transmissive components, making use of the very wide spectral transmission range, high thermal conductivity, and chemical inertness of diamond. Diamond windows for corrosive environments are well known; diamond surgical endoscope components are under development; and the use of sharpened diamonds as combined surgical cutting instruments and light pipes for internal illumination of the edge is commercial reality. The superb ability of diamond to conduct heat, combined with its very low thermal expansion coefficient makes it suitable for the transmission of high power laser energy, though there is a problem currently being addressed of a high surface reflection coefficient. It is very probable that CVD diamond-like films will form good anti-reflection coatings for diamond. In new applications, the technology of making diamond lenses is being developed. The use of diamond as a detector of ionising radiation is well known, but recent work shows its possibilities in thermoluminescent as well as conduction and pulse counting modes. There are further possibilities of using diamond for the detection and measurement of optical radiation. Examples are low, medium, and high intensity far ultraviolet (literature and the mechanical and thermal design of diamond "heat sink" substrates for semiconductor laser diodes is advancing rapidly.

  18. Free-standing nanomechanical and nanophotonic structures in single-crystal diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burek, Michael John

    Realizing complex three-dimensional structures in a range of material systems is critical to a variety of emerging nanotechnologies. This is particularly true of nanomechanical and nanophotonic systems, both relying on free-standing small-scale components. In the case of nanomechanics, necessary mechanical degrees of freedom require physically isolated structures, such as suspended beams, cantilevers, and membranes. For nanophotonics, elements like waveguides and photonic crystal cavities rely on light confinement provided by total internal reflection or distributed Bragg reflection, both of which require refractive index contrast between the device and surrounding medium (often air). Such suspended nanostructures are typically fabricated in a heterolayer structure, comprising of device (top) and sacrificial (middle) layers supported by a substrate (bottom), using standard surface nanomachining techniques. A selective, isotropic etch is then used to remove the sacrificial layer, resulting in free-standing devices. While high-quality, crystalline, thin film heterolayer structures are readily available for silicon (as silicon-on-insulator (SOI)) or III-V semiconductors (i.e. GaAs/AlGaAs), there remains an extensive list of materials with attractive electro-optic, piezoelectric, quantum optical, and other properties for which high quality single-crystal thin film heterolayer structures are not available. These include complex metal oxides like lithium niobate (LiNbO3), silicon-based compounds such as silicon carbide (SiC), III-V nitrides including gallium nitride (GaN), and inert single-crystals such as diamond. Diamond is especially attractive for a variety of nanoscale technologies due to its exceptional physical and chemical properties, including high mechanical hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity. Optically, it is transparent over a wide wavelength range (from 220 nm to the far infrared), has a high refractive index (n ~ 2.4), and is host to a vast

  19. Quartz crystal microbalance gas sensor with nanocrystalline diamond sensitive layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varga, Marián; Laposa, A.; Kulha, Pavel; Kroutil, J.; Husák, M.; Kromka, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 252, č. 11 (2015), s. 2591-2597 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : gas sensor * nanocrystalline diamond * quartz resonator * thickness shear mode Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.522, year: 2015

  20. Multimodal analysis of diamond crystals and layers using RISE microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Váňa, R.; Dluhoš, J.; Varga, Marián; Schmid, Ch.; Kromka, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, Aug (2017), s. 2280-2281 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD15003 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diamond * RISE microscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  1. Dosimetry of cone-defined stereotactic radiosurgery fields with a commercial synthetic diamond detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, Johnny E.; Crowe, Scott B.; Trapp, J. V.; Hill, Robin; Freeman, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Small field x-ray beam dosimetry is difficult due to lack of lateral electronic equilibrium, source occlusion, high dose gradients, and detector volume averaging. Currently, there is no single definitive detector recommended for small field dosimetry. The objective of this work was to evaluate the performance of a new commercial synthetic diamond detector, namely, the PTW 60019 microDiamond, for the dosimetry of small x-ray fields as used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Small field sizes were defined by BrainLAB circular cones (4–30 mm diameter) on a Novalis Trilogy linear accelerator and using the 6 MV SRS x-ray beam mode for all measurements. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured and compared to an IBA SFD and a PTW 60012 E diode. Cross profiles were measured and compared to an IBA SFD diode. Field factors, Ω Q clin ,Q msr f clin ,f msr , were calculated by Monte Carlo methods using BEAMnrc and correction factors, k Q clin ,Q msr f clin ,f msr , were derived for the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector. Results: For the small fields of 4–30 mm diameter, there were dose differences in the PDDs of up to 1.5% when compared to an IBA SFD and PTW 60012 E diode detector. For the cross profile measurements the penumbra values varied, depending upon the orientation of the detector. The field factors, Ω Q clin ,Q msr f clin ,f msr , were calculated for these field diameters at a depth of 1.4 cm in water and they were within 2.7% of published values for a similar linear accelerator. The corrections factors, k Q clin ,Q msr f clin ,f msr , were derived for the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector. Conclusions: The authors conclude that the new PTW 60019 microDiamond detector is generally suitable for relative dosimetry in small 6 MV SRS beams for a Novalis Trilogy linear equipped with circular cones

  2. Structure analysis on synthetic emerald crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Lee, Jiann-Shing; Huang, Eugene; Liao, Ju-Hsiou

    2013-05-01

    Single crystals of emerald synthesized by means of the flux method were adopted for crystallographic analyses. Emerald crystals with a wide range of Cr3+-doping content up to 3.16 wt% Cr2O3 were examined by X-ray single crystal diffraction refinement method. The crystal structures of the emerald crystals were refined to R 1 (all data) of 0.019-0.024 and w R 2 (all data) of 0.061-0.073. When Cr3+ substitutes for Al3+, the main adjustment takes place in the Al-octahedron and Be-tetrahedron. The effect of substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ in the beryl structure results in progressively lengthening of the Al-O distance, while the length of the other bonds remains nearly unchanged. The substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ may have caused the expansion of a axis, while keeping the c axis unchanged in the emerald lattice. As a consequence, the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Be bonding angles are found to decrease, while the angle of Si-O-Be increases as the Al-O distance increases during the Cr replacement.

  3. Single-crystal diamond nanomechanical resonators with quality factors exceeding one million.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y; Boss, J M; Moores, B A; Degen, C L

    2014-04-08

    Diamond has gained a reputation as a uniquely versatile material, yet one that is intricate to grow and process. Resonating nanostructures made of single-crystal diamond are expected to possess excellent mechanical properties, including high-quality factors and low dissipation. Here we demonstrate batch fabrication and mechanical measurements of single-crystal diamond cantilevers with thickness down to 85 nm, thickness uniformity better than 20 nm and lateral dimensions up to 240 μm. Quality factors exceeding one million are found at room temperature, surpassing those of state-of-the-art single-crystal silicon cantilevers of similar dimensions by roughly an order of magnitude. The corresponding thermal force noise for the best cantilevers is ~5·10(-19) N Hz(-1/2) at millikelvin temperatures. Single-crystal diamond could thus directly improve existing force and mass sensors by a simple substitution of resonator material. Presented methods are easily adapted for fabrication of nanoelectromechanical systems, optomechanical resonators or nanophotonic devices that may lead to new applications in classical and quantum science.

  4. Hemispherical Brillouin zone imaging of a diamond-type biological photonic crystal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Michielsen, Kristel; De Raedt, Hans; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    2012-01-01

    The brilliant structural body colours of many animals are created by three-dimensional biological photonic crystals that act as wavelength-specific reflectors. Here, we report a study on the vividly coloured scales of the diamond weevil, Entimus imperialis. Electron microscopy identified the chitin

  5. Thermochemical micro imprinting of single-crystal diamond surface using a nickel mold under high-pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imoto, Yuji; Yan, Jiwang

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A Ni mold and thermochemically imprinted microstructures on diamond. - Highlights: • A thermochemical method for micro machining/patterning of diamond is proposed. • Various kinds of microstructures were imprinted on diamond using a Ni mold. • A graphite layer is formed during imprinting which can be removed by acid. • The processing depth depends strongly on pressure and temperature. - Abstract: Single-crystal diamond is an important material for cutting tools, micro electro mechanical systems, optical devices, and semiconductor substrates. However, the techniques for producing microstructures on diamond surface with high efficiency and accuracy have not been established. This paper proposes a thermochemical imprinting method for transferring microstructures from a nickel (Ni) mold onto single-crystal diamond surface. The Ni mold was micro-structured by a nanoindenter and then pressed against the diamond surface under high temperature and pressure in argon atmosphere. Results show that microstructures on the Ni mold were successfully transferred onto the diamond surface, and their depth increased with both pressure and temperature. Laser micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analyses indicate that a graphite layer was formed over the contact area between diamond and Ni during pressing, and after washing by a mixed acid, the graphite layer could be completely removed. This study demonstrated the feasibility of a cost-efficient fabrication method for large-area microstructures on single-crystal diamond.

  6. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, Harris; Gan, K.K.; Kass, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2009, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2013, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  7. Single-crystal and polycrystalline diamond erosion studies in Pilot-PSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, D.; Aussems, D.; Ning, N.; Bystrov, K.; Gicquel, A.; Achard, J.; Brinza, O.; Addab, Y.; Martin, C.; Pardanaud, C.; Khrapak, S.; Cartry, G.

    2018-03-01

    Diamond is a promising candidate for enhancing the negative-ion surface production in the ion sources for neutral injection in fusion reactors; hence evaluation of its reactivity towards hydrogen plasma is of high importance. Single crystal and polycrystalline diamond samples were exposed in Pilot-PSI with the D+ flux of (4‒7)·1024 m-2s-1 and the impact energy of 7-9 eV per deuteron at different surface temperatures; under such conditions physical sputtering is negligible, however chemical sputtering is important. Net chemical sputtering yield Y = 9.7·10-3 at/ion at 800 °C was precisely measured ex-situ using a protective platinum mask (5 × 10 × 2 μm) deposited beforehand on a single crystal followed by the post-mortem analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The structural properties of the exposed diamond surface were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Gross chemical sputtering yields were determined in-situ by means of optical emission spectroscopy of the molecular CH A-X band for several surface temperatures. A bell-shaped dependence of the erosion yield versus temperature between 400 °C and 1200 °C was observed, with a maximum yield of ∼1.5·10-2 at/ion attained at 900 °C. The yields obtained for diamond are relatively high (0.5-1.5)·10-2 at/ion, comparable with those of graphite. XPS analysis shows amorphization of diamond surface within 1 nm depth, in a good agreement with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. MD was also applied to study the hydrogen impact energy threshold for erosion of [100] diamond surface at different temperatures.

  8. Investigation of surface and sub-surface damage in high quality synthetic diamonds by X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence in-plane diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussone, Genziana; Lafford, Tamzin A.; Masiello, Fabio; Carbone, Gerardina; Schuelli, Tobias U.; Rommeveaux, Amparo Vivo; Haertwig, Juergen [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6, Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Gibaud, Alain [Laboratoire PEC, Universite du Maine le Mans, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72 085 Le Mans (France); Connell, Simon H. [University of Johannesburg, cnr Kingsway Ave and University Rd, Auckland Park, 2006, Johannesburg (South Africa); Wormington, Matthew [Jordan Valley Semiconductors Inc., 8601 Cross Park Drive, Suite 200, Austin, TX 78754-4578 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    High quality single-crystal synthetic diamond is the most suitable material for selected X-ray optical applications in the latest generation X-ray light sources. Excellent heat handling properties, as well as low absorption, coupled with high perfection in the crystal bulk and very good surface quality, are crucial for such applications. In recent years, some progress has been made in the fields of surface treatments and growth techniques. Conventional scaife polishing is largely ineffective on the diamond (111) surface. To overcome this disadvantage, one possibility is to use the Hot Metal polishing technique. An investigation of surface and sub-surface damage of Hot Metal polished and cleaved surfaces, has been carried out using depth-sensitive non-destructive X-ray techniques. The near surface crystalline quality was studied as a function of depth using in-plane grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Additionally, X-ray reflectivity was used to investigate the density, thickness and roughness of near-surface layers. The measurements enable us to estimate the thickness of the affected sub-surface layer. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Influence of the microstructure of a diamond-containing composite material on the tool cutting ability when grinding a diamond single crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Kuzei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the methods of electronic scanning microstructure and X-ray analysis, the influence of the structure of diamond-containing composite materials on the cutting ability of the tool for circular grinding of diamond single crystals has been studied. It is shown that the use of an oxide-hydroxide glass with a spreading temperature of 570–590 K as a precursor of the binder leads to the formation of melt films on the surface of silicon carbide and diamond particles at 600–630 K and the glass content in the batch is 10 vol. %. The conversion of oxidehydroxide glass films to oxide films proceeds at 700–775 K during the sintering of the composite material. Depending on the volume content of the glass in the charge, the porosity of the compact, three types of structure of composite materials are distinguished: a volumetric skeleton of glass-clad diamond particles and silicon carbide with pores at the sites of multiple compounds; a frame made of glass-clad diamond particles and silicon carbide with glass pores in places of multiple connections; a matrix of glass and the particles of diamond, silicon carbide and pores located in it. The maximum cutting ability of the tool for circular grinding of diamond is provided by a composite material with a structure of the first type.

  10. Applications of diamond crystal ATR FTIR spectroscopy to the characterization of ambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiliano, Michel; Asia, Laurence; Onoratini, Gérard; Mille, Gilbert

    2007-08-01

    Diamond crystal ATR FTIR spectroscopy is a rapid technique with virtually no sample preparation which requires small sample amounts and showed potential in the study of ambers. FTIR spectra of ambers present discriminating patterns and can be used to distinguish amber from immature resins as copal, to determine local or Baltic origin of archaeological ambers and to detect most of the falsifications encountered in the amber commercialisation.

  11. Effective extraction of photoluminescence from a diamond layer with a photonic crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondič, Lukáš; Dohnalová, Kateřina; Ledinský, Martin; Kromka, Alexander; Babchenko, Oleg; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2011), s. 346-350 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA MŠk LC510; GA AV ČR KJB100100903 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100100902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : photonic crystals * spontaneous emission * light extraction * diffraction * nanocrystalline diamond films Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 10.774, year: 2011

  12. Observations on the crystallization of spodumene from aqueous solutions in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianking; Chou, I-Ming; Yuan, Shunda; Burruss, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Crystallization experiments were conducted in a new type of hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC; type V) using LiAlSi2O6 (S) gel and H2O (W) as starting materials. A total of 21 experiments were performed at temperatures up to 950°C and pressures up to 788 MPa. In the samples with relatively low W/S ratios, many small crystals formed in the melt phase during cooling. In those with high W/S ratios, only a few crystals with smooth surfaces crystallized from the aqueous fluid in the presence of melt droplets, which were gradually consumed during crystal growth, indicating rapid transfer of material from the melt to the crystals through the aqueous fluid. The nucleation of crystals started at 710 (±70)°C and 520 (±80) MPa, and crystal growth ended at 570 (±40)°C and 320 (±90) MPa, with the cooling P-T path within the stability field of spodumene + quartz in the S-W system. The observed linear crystal growth rates in the aqueous phase, calculated by dividing the maximum length of a single crystal by the duration of the entire growth step, were 4.7 × 10−6 and 5.7 × 10−6 cm s−1 for the cooling rates of 0.5 and 1°C min−1, respectively. However, a rapid crystal growth rate of 3.6 × 10−5 cm s−1 in the aqueous fluid was observed when the components were supplied by nearby melt droplets. Our results show that when crystals nucleate in the aqueous fluid instead of the melt phase, there are fewer nuclei formed, and they grow much faster due to the low viscosity of the aqueous fluid, which accelerates diffusion of components for the growth of crystals. Therefore, the large crystals in granitic pegmatite can crystallize directly from aqueous fluids rather than hydrosilicate melt.

  13. Advanced Fabrication of Single-Crystal Diamond Membranes for Quantum Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Challier

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Many promising applications of single crystal diamond and its color centers as sensor platform and in photonics require free-standing membranes with a thickness ranging from several micrometers to the few 100 nm range. In this work, we present an approach to conveniently fabricate such thin membranes with up to about one millimeter in size. We use commercially available diamond plates (thickness 50 μ m in an inductively coupled reactive ion etching process which is based on argon, oxygen and SF 6 . We thus avoid using toxic, corrosive feed gases and add an alternative to previously presented recipes involving chlorine-based etching steps. Our membranes are smooth (RMS roughness <1 nm and show moderate thickness variation (central part: <1 μ m over ≈200 × 200 μ m 2 . Due to an improved etch mask geometry, our membranes stay reliably attached to the diamond plate in our chlorine-based as well as SF 6 -based processes. Our results thus open the route towards higher reliability in diamond device fabrication and up-scaling.

  14. Hemispherical Brillouin zone imaging of a diamond-type biological photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Michielsen, Kristel; De Raedt, Hans; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    2012-01-01

    The brilliant structural body colours of many animals are created by three-dimensional biological photonic crystals that act as wavelength-specific reflectors. Here, we report a study on the vividly coloured scales of the diamond weevil, Entimus imperialis. Electron microscopy identified the chitin and air assemblies inside the scales as domains of a single-network diamond (Fd3m) photonic crystal. We visualized the topology of the first Brillouin zone (FBZ) by imaging scatterometry, and we reconstructed the complete photonic band structure diagram (PBSD) of the chitinous photonic crystal from reflectance spectra. Comparison with calculated PBSDs indeed showed a perfect overlap. The unique method of non-invasive hemispherical imaging of the FBZ provides key insights for the investigation of photonic crystals in the visible wavelength range. The characterized extremely large biophotonic nanostructures of E. imperialis are structurally optimized for high reflectance and may thus be well suited for use as a template for producing novel photonic devices, e.g. through biomimicry or direct infiltration from dielectric material. PMID:22188768

  15. Pulse-height defect in single-crystal CVD diamond detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beliuskina, O.; Imai, N. [The University of Tokyo, Center for Nuclear Study, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Strekalovsky, A.O.; Aleksandrov, A.A.; Aleksandrova, I.A.; Ilich, S.; Kamanin, D.V.; Knyazheva, G.N.; Kuznetsova, E.A.; Mishinsky, G.V.; Pyatkov, Yu.V.; Strekalovsky, O.V.; Zhuchko, V.E. [JINR, Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Devaraja, H.M. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Heinz, C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Giessen (Germany); Heinz, S. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Giessen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Hofmann, S.; Kis, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Maurer, J.; Traeger, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Pomorski, M. [CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensor Laboratory, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-02-15

    The pulse-height versus deposited energy response of a single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector was measured for ions of Ti, Cu, Nb, Ag, Xe, Au, and of fission fragments of {sup 252} Cf at different energies. For the fission fragments, data were also measured at different electric field strengths of the detector. Heavy ions have a significant pulse-height defect in CVD diamond material, which increases with increasing energy of the ions. It also depends on the electrical field strength applied at the detector. The measured pulse-height defects were explained in the framework of recombination models. Calibration methods known from silicon detectors were modified and applied. A comparison with data for the pulse-height defect in silicon detectors was performed. (orig.)

  16. Measurement of Neutron Reaction Cross Sections in Carbon using a Single Crystal Diamond Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillon, M.; Angelone, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi, 45 0044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Krasa, A.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Schillebeeckx, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, - 2440 Geel (Belgium); Sergi, M. L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania e INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)

    2011-12-13

    A single crystal diamond detector was exposed to the quasi mono-energetic neutron fields in the energy range from 7 MeV to 20.5 MeV produced by the Van de Graaff neutron generator of the EC-JRC-IRMM. Pulse Height Spectra (PHS) of the neutron interaction with the diamond (carbon) were recorded in order to derive the experimental response function of this detector to neutrons in view of its use as a compact fast neutron spectrometer. Several peaks produced by outgoing charged particles produced when neutrons interact with carbon were identified using the reaction Q-values. The corresponding nuclear reactions, such as (n,{alpha}), (n,p), (n,d) for different excitation states were identified in the PHS. The analysis of the peaks allows the derivation of some neutron reaction cross sections in carbon. The results are presented in this paper together with the associated uncertainties.

  17. Measurement of Neutron Reaction Cross Sections in Carbon using a Single Crystal Diamond Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, M.; Angelone, M.; Krása, A.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Sergi, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    A single crystal diamond detector was exposed to the quasi mono-energetic neutron fields in the energy range from 7 MeV to 20.5 MeV produced by the Van de Graaff neutron generator of the EC-JRC-IRMM. Pulse Height Spectra (PHS) of the neutron interaction with the diamond (carbon) were recorded in order to derive the experimental response function of this detector to neutrons in view of its use as a compact fast neutron spectrometer. Several peaks produced by outgoing charged particles produced when neutrons interact with carbon were identified using the reaction Q-values. The corresponding nuclear reactions, such as (n,α), (n,p), (n,d) for different excitation states were identified in the PHS. The analysis of the peaks allows the derivation of some neutron reaction cross sections in carbon. The results are presented in this paper together with the associated uncertainties.

  18. Enhanced physicochemical properties of polydimethylsiloxane based microfluidic devices and thin films by incorporating synthetic micro-diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, Sidra; Cabot, Joan M; Macdonald, Niall P; Kalsoom, Umme; Farajikhah, Syamak; Innis, Peter C; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Lewis, Trevor W; Breadmore, Michael C; Paull, Brett

    2017-11-08

    Synthetic micro-diamond-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite microfluidic chips and thin films were produced using indirect 3D printing and spin coating fabrication techniques. Microfluidic chips containing up to 60 wt% micro-diamond were successfully cast and bonded. Physicochemical properties, including the dispersion pattern, hydrophobicity, chemical structure, elasticity and thermal characteristics of both chip and films were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the micro-diamond particles were embedded and interconnected within the bulk material of the cast microfluidic chip, whereas in the case of thin films their increased presence at the polymer surface resulted in a reduced hydrophobicity of the composite. The elastic modulus increased from 1.28 for a PDMS control, to 4.42 MPa for the 60 wt% composite, along with a three-fold increase in thermal conductivity, from 0.15 to 0.45 W m -1 K -1 . Within the fluidic chips, micro-diamond incorporation enhanced heat dissipation by efficient transfer of heat from within the channels to the surrounding substrate. At a flow rate of 1000 μL/min, the gradient achieved for the 60 wt% composite chip equalled a 9.8 °C drop across a 3 cm long channel, more than twice that observed with the PDMS control chip.

  19. Diamond-Structure Photonic Crystals Composed of Ceramic Spheres in Resin and Their Microwave Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Takuji; Kageyama, Keisuke; Takagi, Hiroshi; Sakabe, Yukio; Kirihara, Soshu; Miyamoto, Yoshinari

    2007-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals with a diamond structure composed of TiO2 ceramic spheres in a resin matrix were fabricated by stereolithography. The lattice constant was 12 mm. The diameter of the spheres was about 5 mm. These photonic crystals composed of ceramic spheres showed four complete photonic band gaps at around 5.7 GHz between the 2nd and 3rd bands, 7.8 GHz between the 8th and 9th bands, 10.4 GHz between the 24th and 25th bands, and 13.1 GHz between the 54th and 55th bands. The propagation characteristics of microwaves propagating through the photonic crystals agreed well with the calculated results using the plane-wave expansion method.

  20. Ion channeling in natural and synthetic beryl crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, C.R.; Diehl, R.; Goetzberger, A.

    1980-01-01

    The transmission of ions by channeling through natural beryl and synthetic emerald has been studied extensively. The transmission ratios depend upon the angle of incidence with a full half width of less than 0.32 0 . While the maximum ratio obtained up to now is only 4 x 10 -4 for 350 keV protons through a crystal of 21 μm thickness, the energy of the transmitted ions is high, the loss being in the order of a few keV/μm. About 60-80% of the particles emerging from the rear surface are ionized. By varying the ion species transmission could be observed up to atomic number 9. It is assumed that the transmission is facilitated by the existence of an electron free channel core. Higher transmission ratios can be expected for sufficiently perfect crystals. (orig.) 891 CDS/orig. 892 MB

  1. Diamond photonic crystal slab: leaky modes and modified photoluminescence emission of surface-deposited quantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondič, Lukáš; Babchenko, Oleg; Varga, Marián; Kromka, Alexander; Čtyroký, Jiří; Pelant, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, Dec (2012), s. 1-6 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0794; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA101120804; GA AV ČR KJB100100903; GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/10/0046 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : photonic crystal * diamond * photoluminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.927, year: 2012 http://www.nature.com/srep/2012/121203/srep00914/full/srep00914.html

  2. Development of a beam condition monitor for use in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider using synthetic diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Hernando, L; Ilgner, C; MacPherson, A; Oh, A; Pernegger, H; Pritchard, T; Stone, R; Worm, S

    2004-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will collide two counter rotating proton beams, each with a store energy about 350MJ; enough to melt 550kg of copper. If there is failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damage not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen to monitor last increments of particle flux near the interaction point and if necessary, to generate an abort signal to the LHC accelerator control, to dump the beams. Due to its radiation hardness and minimal services requirements, synthetic CVD diamond is being considered as BCM sensor option. (12 refs).

  3. I19, the small-molecule single-crystal diffraction beamline at Diamond Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Harriott; Barnett, Sarah A; Christensen, Kirsten E; Teat, Simon J; Allan, David R

    2012-05-01

    The dedicated small-molecule single-crystal X-ray diffraction beamline (I19) at Diamond Light Source has been operational and supporting users for over three years. I19 is a high-flux tunable-wavelength beamline and its key details are described in this article. Much of the work performed on the beamline involves structure determination from small and weakly diffracting crystals. Other experiments that have been supported to date include structural studies at high pressure, studies of metastable species, variable-temperature crystallography, studies involving gas exchange in porous materials and structural characterizations that require analysis of the diffuse scattering between Bragg reflections. A range of sample environments to facilitate crystallographic studies under non-ambient conditions are available as well as a number of options for automation. An indication of the scope of the science carried out on the beamline is provided by the range of highlights selected for this paper.

  4. Investigation of singularities of integral intensity of the relativistic particle bremsstrahlung radiation in a diamond crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avakyan, R.O.; Armaganyan, A.A.; Arutyunyan, L.G.; Iskandaryan, A.G.; Taroyan, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The results are given of the theoretical processing of experimental data on the investigation of orientational dependences of integral intensity of coherent bremsstrahlung radiation (CBR) of superfast electrons in a diamond crystal. It is shown that in the case of ''point effect'' right up to the electrons incident angle, which is 0.1 mrad with respect to the crystallographic plane, the CBR theory gives a good description of experimental data. In the case of ''row effect'', in order to account for the divergence between the theory and experiment at small incident angles of electrons with respect to the crystallographic axis, it is assumed that the multiple scattering angle has an orientational dependence. By fitting the theoretical curve to experimental points the dependences are obtained of the multiple scattering angle change on the crystal orientation with respect to the electron beam

  5. Growth and characterization of single-crystal CVD diamond for radiation detection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranchant, N.

    2008-01-01

    This work aimed at the study of the synthesis of single crystal diamond using the Microwave enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition technique (MPCVD). The work enabled the development and optimisation of the growth conditions, from the study of the crystalline quality, of the material purity, and of its electronic properties. The assessment of the transport properties was the most determinant: the use of the time of flight (TOF) technique has enabled the measurement of the carrier mobilities and of their kinetic properties as a function of the temperature. When coupled with collected charge efficiency measurements, the work led to remarkable carrier mobility values obtained in the synthesised crystals (3000 cm 2 .V-1.s -1 ). Prepared samples were mounted as detection devices and used successfully in real conditions for the monitoring of ultra-fast pulses, as well as for neutron fluency monitoring, and for medical dosimeters for radiotherapy applications. (author)

  6. Cryptic iridescence in a fossil weevil generated by single diamond photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Maria E; Saranathan, Vinod; Locatelli, Emma R; Noh, Heeso; Briggs, Derek E G; Orr, Patrick J; Cao, Hui

    2014-11-06

    Nature's most spectacular colours originate in integumentary tissue architectures that scatter light via nanoscale modulations of the refractive index. The most intricate biophotonic nanostructures are three-dimensional crystals with opal, single diamond or single gyroid lattices. Despite intense interest in their optical and structural properties, the evolution of such nanostructures is poorly understood, due in part to a lack of data from the fossil record. Here, we report preservation of single diamond (Fd-3m) three-dimensional photonic crystals in scales of a 735,000 year old specimen of the brown Nearctic weevil Hypera diversipunctata from Gold Run, Canada, and in extant conspecifics. The preserved red to green structural colours exhibit near-field brilliancy yet are inconspicuous from afar; they most likely had cryptic functions in substrate matching. The discovery of pristine fossil examples indicates that the fossil record is likely to yield further data on the evolution of three-dimensional photonic nanostructures and their biological functions. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Tracking performance of a single-crystal and a polycrystalline diamond pixel-detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menasce, D.; et al.

    2013-06-01

    We present a comparative characterization of the performance of a single-crystal and a polycrystalline diamond pixel-detector employing the standard CMS pixel readout chips. Measurements were carried out at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility, FTBF, using protons of momentum 120 GeV/c tracked by a high-resolution pixel telescope. Particular attention was directed to the study of the charge-collection, the charge-sharing among adjacent pixels and the achievable position resolution. The performance of the single-crystal detector was excellent and comparable to the best available silicon pixel-detectors. The measured average detection-efficiency was near unity, ε = 0.99860±0.00006, and the position-resolution for shared hits was about 6 μm. On the other hand, the performance of the polycrystalline detector was hampered by its lower charge collection distance and the readout chip threshold. A new readout chip, capable of operating at much lower threshold (around 1 ke$-$), would be required to fully exploit the potential performance of the polycrystalline diamond pixel-detector.

  8. Kelvin probe characterization of buried graphitic microchannels in single-crystal diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, E.; Battiato, A.; Olivero, P.; Vittone, E.; Picollo, F.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present an investigation by Kelvin Probe Microscopy (KPM) of buried graphitic microchannels fabricated in single-crystal diamond by direct MeV ion microbeam writing. Metal deposition of variable-thickness masks was adopted to implant channels with emerging endpoints and high temperature annealing was performed in order to induce the graphitization of the highly-damaged buried region. When an electrical current was flowing through the biased buried channel, the structure was clearly evidenced by KPM maps of the electrical potential of the surface region overlying the channel at increasing distances from the grounded electrode. The KPM profiling shows regions of opposite contrast located at different distances from the endpoints of the channel. This effect is attributed to the different electrical conduction properties of the surface and of the buried graphitic layer. The model adopted to interpret these KPM maps and profiles proved to be suitable for the electronic characterization of buried conductive channels, providing a non-invasive method to measure the local resistivity with a micrometer resolution. The results demonstrate the potential of the technique as a powerful diagnostic tool to monitor the functionality of all-carbon graphite/diamond devices to be fabricated by MeV ion beam lithography

  9. Amorphous diamond-structured photonic crystal in the feather barbs of the scarlet macaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haiwei; Dong, Biqin; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhan, Tianrong; Shi, Lei; Zi, Jian; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2012-07-03

    Noniridescent coloration by the spongy keratin in parrot feather barbs has fascinated scientists. Nonetheless, its ultimate origin remains as yet unanswered, and a quantitative structural and optical description is still lacking. Here we report on structural and optical characterizations and numerical simulations of the blue feather barbs of the scarlet macaw. We found that the sponge in the feather barbs is an amorphous diamond-structured photonic crystal with only short-range order. It possesses an isotropic photonic pseudogap that is ultimately responsible for the brilliant noniridescent coloration. We further unravel an ingenious structural optimization for attaining maximum coloration apparently resulting from natural evolution. Upon increasing the material refractive index above the level provided by nature, there is an interesting transition from a photonic pseudogap to a complete bandgap.

  10. Amorphous diamond-structured photonic crystal in the feather barbs of the scarlet macaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haiwei; Dong, Biqin; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhan, Tianrong; Shi, Lei; Zi, Jian; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Noniridescent coloration by the spongy keratin in parrot feather barbs has fascinated scientists. Nonetheless, its ultimate origin remains as yet unanswered, and a quantitative structural and optical description is still lacking. Here we report on structural and optical characterizations and numerical simulations of the blue feather barbs of the scarlet macaw. We found that the sponge in the feather barbs is an amorphous diamond-structured photonic crystal with only short-range order. It possesses an isotropic photonic pseudogap that is ultimately responsible for the brilliant noniridescent coloration. We further unravel an ingenious structural optimization for attaining maximum coloration apparently resulting from natural evolution. Upon increasing the material refractive index above the level provided by nature, there is an interesting transition from a photonic pseudogap to a complete bandgap. PMID:22615350

  11. A new on-line luminometer and beam conditions monitor using single crystal diamond sensors

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Instrumentation near the beam-pipe requires extremely radiation hard sensors. Inside CMS two rings instrumented with 12 single crystal diamond sensors each are installed on both sides of the interaction point. The sensors are subdivided in two pads, and each pad is read out by a dedicated fast radiation hard ASIC in 130 nm CMOS technology. Due to the excellent time resolution collision products will be separated from machine induced background. In the backend a dead-time less histogramming unit is used, and a fast microTCA system with GHz sampling rate is under development. The detector will measure both the on-line luminosity and the background bunch-by-bunch. The performance of a prototype detector in a test-beam will be reported, and results from the operation during data taking will be presented.

  12. Fine Structure in the Secondary Electron Emission Peak for Diamond Crystal with (100) Negative Electron Affinity Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnin, V. M.; Krainsky, I. L.

    1998-01-01

    A fine structure was discovered in the low-energy peak of the secondary electron emission spectra of the diamond surface with negative electron affinity. We studied this structure for the (100) surface of the natural type-IIb diamond crystal. We have found that the low-energy peak consists of a total of four maxima. The relative energy positions of three of them could be related to the electron energy minima near the bottom of the conduction band. The fourth peak, having the lowest energy, was attributed to the breakup of the bulk exciton at the surface during the process of secondary electron emission.

  13. Mechanical design of thin-film diamond crystal mounting apparatus for coherence preservation hard x-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Deming, E-mail: shu@aps.anl.gov; Shvyd’ko, Yuri V.; Stoupin, Stanislav; Kim, Kwang-Je [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, U.S.A (United States)

    2016-07-27

    A new thin-film diamond crystal mounting apparatus has been designed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) for coherence preservation hard x-ray optics with optimized thermal contact and minimized crystal strain. This novel mechanical design can be applied to new development in the field of: x-ray optics cavities for hard x-ray free-electron laser oscillators (XFELOs), self-seeding monochromators for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) with high average thermal loading, high heat load diamond crystal monochromators and beam-sharing/beam-split-and-delay devices for XFEL facilities and future upgraded high-brightness coherent x-ray source in the MBA lattice configuration at the APS.

  14. Low propagation loss in a one-port SAW resonator fabricated on single-crystal diamond for super-high-frequency applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Satoshi; Odawara, Tatsuya; Yamada, Haruya; Omori, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Ken-Ya; Torii, Hironori; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Shikata, Shinichi

    2013-05-01

    Diamond has the highest known SAW phase velocity, sufficient for applications in the gigahertz range. However, although numerous studies have demonstrated SAW devices on polycrystalline diamond thin films, all have had much larger propagation loss than single-crystal materials such as LiNbO3. Hence, in this study, we fabricated and characterized one-port SAW resonators on single-crystal diamond substrates synthesized using a high-pressure and high-temperature method to identify and minimize sources of propagation loss. A series of one-port resonators were fabricated with the interdigital transducer/ AlN/diamond structure and their characteristics were measured. The device with the best performance exhibited a resonance frequency f of 5.3 GHz, and the equivalent circuit model gave a quality factor Q of 5509. Thus, a large fQ product of approximately 2.9 × 10(13) was obtained, and the propagation loss was found to be only 0.006 dB/wavelength. These excellent properties are attributed mainly to the reduction of scattering loss in a substrate using a single-crystal diamond, which originated from the grain boundary of diamond and the surface roughness of the AlN thin film and the diamond substrate. These results show that single-crystal diamond SAW resonators have great potential for use in low-noise super-high-frequency oscillators.

  15. Spatial response of synthetic microDiamond and diode detectors measured with kilovoltage synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Duncan J; Beveridge, Toby; Lehmann, Joerg; Oliver, Christopher P; Stevenson, Andrew W; Livingstone, Jayde

    2018-02-01

    To map the spatial response of four solid-state radiation detectors of types commonly used for radiotherapy dosimetry. PTW model 60016 Diode P, 60017 Diode E, 60018 Diode SRS, and 60019 microDiamond detectors were radiographed using a high resolution conventional X-ray system. Their spatial response was then investigated using a 0.1 mm diameter beam of 95 keV average energy photons generated by a synchrotron. The detectors were scanned through the beam while their signal was recorded as a function of position, to map the response. These 2D response maps were created in both the end-on and side-on orientations. The results show the location and size of the active region. End-on, the active area was determined to be centrally located and within 0.2 mm of the manufacturer's specified diameter. The active areas of the 60016 Diode P, 60017 Diode E, 60018 Diode SRS detectors are uniform to within approximately 5%. The 60019 microDiamond showed local variations up to 30%. The extra-cameral signal in the microDiamond was calculated from the side-on scan to be approximately 8% of the signal from the active element. The spatial response of four solid-state detectors has been measured. The technique yielded information about the location and uniformity of the active area, and the extra-cameral signal, for the beam quality used. © 2017 Commonwealth of Australia. Medical Physics © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine. This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced without prior written permission. Requests and enquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be directed in the first instance to John Wiley & Sons Ltd of The Atrium, Southern Gate, Chichester, West Sussex P019 8SQ UNITED KINGDOM; alternatively to ARPANSA.

  16. Inclusions in diamonds from Snap Lake kimberlites (Slave Craton, Canada): Geochemical features of crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, O. A.; Logvinova, A. M.; Pokhilenko, N. P.

    2017-05-01

    The results of integrated studies of inclusion-containing diamonds from kimberlites of the Snap Lake dike complex (Canada) are presented. Features of the morphology, defect-impurity composition, and internal structure of the diamonds were determined by optic and scanning microscopy. The chemical composition of crystalline inclusions (olivine, garnet, and pyroxene) in diamonds was studied using a microanalyzer with an electronic probe. The inclusions of ultramafic paragenesis in the diamond (87%) are predominant. Carbonates, sulfide and hydrated silicate phases were found only in multiphase microinclusions. The large phlogopite inclusion studied was similar in composition to earlier studied nanosize inclusions of high-silica mica in diamonds from Snap Lake kimberlites. Revealed features of studied diamonds and presence of high-silica mica suggest that diamonds from Snap Lake have formed as the result of interaction between enriched in volatile and titanium high-potassium carbonate-silicate melts and peridotitic substrate at the base of thick lithospheric mantle.

  17. Large-surface-area diamond (111) crystal plates for applications in high-heat-load wavefront-preserving X-ray crystal optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Antipov, Sergey; Butler, James E; Kolyadin, Alexander V; Katrusha, Andrey

    2016-09-01

    Fabrication and results of high-resolution X-ray topography characterization of diamond single-crystal plates with large surface area (10 mm × 10 mm) and (111) crystal surface orientation for applications in high-heat-load X-ray crystal optics are reported. The plates were fabricated by laser-cutting of the (111) facets of diamond crystals grown using high-pressure high-temperature methods. The intrinsic crystal quality of a selected 3 mm × 7 mm crystal region of one of the studied samples was found to be suitable for applications in wavefront-preserving high-heat-load crystal optics. Wavefront characterization was performed using sequential X-ray diffraction topography in the pseudo plane wave configuration and data analysis using rocking-curve topography. The variations of the rocking-curve width and peak position measured with a spatial resolution of 13 µm × 13 µm over the selected region were found to be less than 1 µrad.

  18. Electronic properties of single crystal CVD diamond and its suitability for particle detection in hadron physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomorski, Michal

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the study on the suitability of single-crystal CVD diamond for particle-detection systems in present and future hadron physics experiments. Different characterization methods of the electrical and the structural properties were applied to gain a deeper understanding of the crystal quality and the charge transport properties of this novel semiconductor material. First measurements regarding the radiation tolerance of diamond were performed with sensors heavily irradiated with protons and neutrons. Finally, detector prototypes were fabricated and successfully tested in various experiments as time detectors for minimum ionizing particles as well as for spectroscopy of heavy ions at the energy ranges available at the SIS and the UNILAC facilities of GSI. (orig.)

  19. Electronic properties of single crystal CVD diamond and its suitability for particle detection in hadron physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomorski, Michal

    2008-08-07

    This work presents the study on the suitability of single-crystal CVD diamond for particle-detection systems in present and future hadron physics experiments. Different characterization methods of the electrical and the structural properties were applied to gain a deeper understanding of the crystal quality and the charge transport properties of this novel semiconductor material. First measurements regarding the radiation tolerance of diamond were performed with sensors heavily irradiated with protons and neutrons. Finally, detector prototypes were fabricated and successfully tested in various experiments as time detectors for minimum ionizing particles as well as for spectroscopy of heavy ions at the energy ranges available at the SIS and the UNILAC facilities of GSI. (orig.)

  20. Temperature and field dependent Mossbauer studies of the metallic inclusions in synthetic MDAS diamond grits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bharuth-Ram, K.; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Mørup, Steen

    2001-01-01

    at temperatures of 300 K and 80 K, in zero field and in an external field of 0.60 T, on the metallic inclusions in these grits. The Mossbauer spectra of the inclusions are rather complex, reflecting the contributions of several different magnetic phases. Our results show that the temperature variation......Mossbauer spectroscopy of the metallic inclusions in diamond grits produced in high-temperature high-pressure synthesis have revealed varying but interesting results. The MDAS(1) grits synthesized with Fe/Ni solvent-catalysts show Mossbauer spectra that vary with grit size, with the ferromagnetic...... of the Mossbauer spectra is not due to superparamagnetic relaxation of ferromagnetic inclusions but rather to magnetic ordering temperatures of the order of room temperature. Based on the spectral lineshapes and elemental analyses, we suggest the inclusions in the 63-75 mum grits contain iron mainly in Fe...

  1. Temperature and field dependent Mossbauer studies of the metallic inclusions in synthetic MDAS diamond grits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bharuth-Ram, K.; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Mørup, Steen

    2001-01-01

    order observed in the larger grits collapsing as one went to smaller grit sizes. Two sets of De Beers MDAS diamond grits of US mesh size 400-500 (d=30-38 mum) and 200-230 (d=63-75 mum) were selected for temperature- and field-dependent investigations. Transmission Mossbauer measurements were made...... of the Mossbauer spectra is not due to superparamagnetic relaxation of ferromagnetic inclusions but rather to magnetic ordering temperatures of the order of room temperature. Based on the spectral lineshapes and elemental analyses, we suggest the inclusions in the 63-75 mum grits contain iron mainly in Fe......-Ni alloys with composition in the vicinity of 70 at.% Fe, and those in the 30-38 mum grits contain, in addition to Fe-Ni alloys, a phase with hyperfine parameters close to those of a Fe-Co alloy....

  2. The effect of temperature on the secondary electron emission yield from single crystal and polycrystalline diamond surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, A.; Prawer, S.; Rubanov, S.; Ahkvlediani, R.; Michaelson, Sh.; Hoffman, A.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of temperature in the 293-473 K range, on the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield of single crystal and polycrystalline diamond film surfaces is reported. For the polycrystalline films the SEE yield was found to decay as function of electron irradiation dose while for the single crystal an increase occurs first, followed by a decrease. For both surfaces, the SEE yield increases significantly upon heating and obtained a nearly constant value with electron dose at 473 K. These effects are explained as due to the temperature dependence of the electron beam induced hydrogen desorption and surface band bending.

  3. Superior wear resistance of aggregated diamond nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dub, Sergey; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2006-04-01

    The hardness of single-crystal diamond is superior to all other known materials, but its performance as a superabrasive is limited because of its low wear resistance. This is the consequence of diamond's low thermal stability (it graphitizes at elevated temperature), low fracture toughness (it tends to cleave preferentially along the octahedral (111) crystal plains), and large directional effect in polishing (some directions appear to be "soft", i.e., easy to abrade, because diamond is anisotropic in many of its physical properties). Here we report the results of measurements of mechanical properties (hardness, fracture toughness, and Young's modulus) of aggregated diamond nanorods (ADNRs) synthesized as a bulk sample. Our investigation has shown that this nanocrystalline material has the fracture toughness 11.1 +/- 1.2 MPa.m(0.5), which exceeds that of natural and synthetic diamond (that varies from 3.4 to 5.0 MPa.m(0.5)) by 2-3 times. At the same time, having a hardness and Young's modulus comparable to that of natural diamond and suppressed because of the random orientation of nanorods "soft" directions, ADNR samples show the enhancement of wear resistance up to 300% in comparison with commercially available polycrystalline diamonds (PCDs). This makes ADNRs extremely prospective materials for applications as superabrasives.

  4. Enhanced Extraction of Silicon-Vacancy Centers Light Emission Using Bottom-Up Engineered Polycrystalline Diamond Photonic Crystal Slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondič, Lukáš; Varga, Marian; Hruška, Karel; Fait, Jan; Kapusta, Peter

    2017-03-28

    Silicon vacancy (SiV) centers are optically active defects in diamond. The SiV centers, in contrast to nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers, possess narrow and efficient luminescence spectrum (centered at ≈738 nm) even at room temperature, which can be utilized for quantum photonics and sensing applications. However, most of light generated in diamond is trapped in the material due to the phenomenon of total internal reflection. In order to overcome this issue, we have prepared two-dimensional photonic crystal slabs from polycrystalline diamond thin layers with high density of SiV centers employing bottom-up growth on quartz templates. We have shown that the spectral overlap between the narrow light emission of the SiV centers and the leaky modes extracting the emission into almost vertical direction (where it can be easily detected) can be obtained by controlling the deposition time. More than 14-fold extraction enhancement of the SiV centers photoluminescence was achieved compared to an uncorrugated sample. Computer simulation confirmed that the extraction enhancement originates from the efficient light-matter interaction between light emitted from the SiV centers and the photonic crystal slab.

  5. Use of a miniature diamond-anvil cell in high-pressure single-crystal neutron Laue diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binns, Jack; Kamenev, Konstantin V; McIntyre, Garry J; Moggach, Stephen A; Parsons, Simon

    2016-05-01

    The first high-pressure neutron diffraction study in a miniature diamond-anvil cell of a single crystal of size typical for X-ray diffraction is reported. This is made possible by modern Laue diffraction using a large solid-angle image-plate detector. An unexpected finding is that even reflections whose diffracted beams pass through the cell body are reliably observed, albeit with some attenuation. The cell body does limit the range of usable incident angles, but the crystallographic completeness for a high-symmetry unit cell is only slightly less than for a data collection without the cell. Data collections for two sizes of hexamine single crystals, with and without the pressure cell, and at 300 and 150 K, show that sample size and temperature are the most important factors that influence data quality. Despite the smaller crystal size and dominant parasitic scattering from the diamond-anvil cell, the data collected allow a full anisotropic refinement of hexamine with bond lengths and angles that agree with literature data within experimental error. This technique is shown to be suitable for low-symmetry crystals, and in these cases the transmission of diffracted beams through the cell body results in much higher completeness values than are possible with X-rays. The way is now open for joint X-ray and neutron studies on the same sample under identical conditions.

  6. Use of a miniature diamond-anvil cell in high-pressure single-crystal neutron Laue diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Binns

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The first high-pressure neutron diffraction study in a miniature diamond-anvil cell of a single crystal of size typical for X-ray diffraction is reported. This is made possible by modern Laue diffraction using a large solid-angle image-plate detector. An unexpected finding is that even reflections whose diffracted beams pass through the cell body are reliably observed, albeit with some attenuation. The cell body does limit the range of usable incident angles, but the crystallographic completeness for a high-symmetry unit cell is only slightly less than for a data collection without the cell. Data collections for two sizes of hexamine single crystals, with and without the pressure cell, and at 300 and 150 K, show that sample size and temperature are the most important factors that influence data quality. Despite the smaller crystal size and dominant parasitic scattering from the diamond-anvil cell, the data collected allow a full anisotropic refinement of hexamine with bond lengths and angles that agree with literature data within experimental error. This technique is shown to be suitable for low-symmetry crystals, and in these cases the transmission of diffracted beams through the cell body results in much higher completeness values than are possible with X-rays. The way is now open for joint X-ray and neutron studies on the same sample under identical conditions.

  7. Use of a miniature diamond-anvil cell in high-pressure single-crystal neutron Laue diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binns, Jack; Kamenev, Konstantin V.; McIntyre, Garry J.; Moggach, Stephen A.; Parsons, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The first high-pressure neutron diffraction study in a miniature diamond-anvil cell of a single crystal of size typical for X-ray diffraction is reported. This is made possible by modern Laue diffraction using a large solid-angle image-plate detector. An unexpected finding is that even reflections whose diffracted beams pass through the cell body are reliably observed, albeit with some attenuation. The cell body does limit the range of usable incident angles, but the crystallographic completeness for a high-symmetry unit cell is only slightly less than for a data collection without the cell. Data collections for two sizes of hexamine single crystals, with and without the pressure cell, and at 300 and 150 K, show that sample size and temperature are the most important factors that influence data quality. Despite the smaller crystal size and dominant parasitic scattering from the diamond-anvil cell, the data collected allow a full anisotropic refinement of hexamine with bond lengths and angles that agree with literature data within experimental error. This technique is shown to be suitable for low-symmetry crystals, and in these cases the transmission of diffracted beams through the cell body results in much higher completeness values than are possible with X-rays. The way is now open for joint X-ray and neutron studies on the same sample under identical conditions. PMID:27158503

  8. Tool wear of a single-crystal diamond tool in nano-groove machining of a quartz glass plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Masahiko; Nakajima, Satoshi; Terano, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    Tool wear characteristics of a diamond tool in ductile mode machining are presented in this paper. Nano-groove machining of a quartz glass plate was conducted to examine the tool wear rate of a single-crystal diamond tool. Effects of lubrication on the tool wear rate were also evaluated. A numerical simulation technique was developed to evaluate the tool temperature and normal stress acting on the wear surface. From the simulation results it was found that the tool temperature does not increase during the machining experiment. It is also demonstrated that tool wear is attributed to the abrasive wear mechanism, but the effect of the adhesion wear mechanism is minor in nano-groove machining. It is found that the tool wear rate is reduced by using water or kerosene as a lubricant. (paper)

  9. Charge density analysis of SiO sub 2 under pressures over 50 GPa using a new diamond anvil cell for single-crystal structure analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanaka, T; Komatsu, Y; Sumiya, H

    2002-01-01

    Single-crystal structure analysis of SiO sub 2 stishovite, (rutile type, P4 sub 2 /mnm z = 2) was carried out using the newly devised diamond anvil cell. The electron-density distribution was investigated at high pressures up to 50 GPa using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8 and a laboratory x-ray source generator of Ag K alpha rotating anode generator. Using large diamond crystal windows instead of beryllium for the cell has several advantages for single-crystal diffraction study supplying the large Q-value.

  10. Inclusions related to catalyst and medium for transmitting pressure in diamond single crystals grown at high temperature and high pressure from the Fe-C system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Longwei; Li Musen; Hao Zhaoyin; Zhang Jiongfa

    2001-01-01

    Inclusion entrapment in a crystal is one of the most important characteristics for the crystal growth technique from solution. Diamond single crystals grown from the Fe-C system at high temperature-high pressure usually contain inclusions related to the molten catalyst and the medium (pyrophyllite) for transmitting pressure. During the growth of the diamond, the inclusions are trapped by the growth front or are formed through reaction between the contaminants trapped in the diamond. In the present article, the inclusions related to the catalyst and pyrophyllite were systemically examined by transmission electron microscopy. The chemical composition and crystal structure of the inclusions were, for the first time, determined by selected area electron diffraction pattern combined with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. It was shown that the inclusions are mainly composed of orthorhombic Fe 3 C, orthorhombic FeSi 2 , hexagonal SiO 2 and face-centred cubic SiC. (author)

  11. Diffusion synthetic acceleration methods for the diamond-differenced discrete-ordinates equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcouffe, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A class of acceleration schemes is investigated which resembles the conventional synthetic method in that they utilize the diffusion operator in the transport iteration schemes. The accelerated iteration involves alternate diffusion and transport solutions where coupling between the equations is achieved by using a correction term applied to either the diffusion coefficient, the removal cross section, or the source of the diffusion equation. The methods involving the modification of the diffusion coefficient and of the removal term yield nonlinear acceleration schemes and are used in k/sub eff/ calculations, while the source term modification approach is linear at least before discretization, and is used for inhomogeneous source problems. A careful analysis shows that there is a preferred differencing method which eliminates the previously observed instability of the conventional synthetic method. Use of this preferred difference scheme results in an acceleration method which is at the same time stable and efficient. This preferred difference approach renders the source correction scheme, which is linear in its continuous form, nonlinear in its differenced form. An additional feature of these approaches is that they may be used as schemes for obtaining improved diffusion solutions for approximately twice the cost of a diffusion calculation. Numerical experimentation on a wide range of problems in one and two dimensions indicates that improvement from a factor of two to ten over rebalance or Chebyshev acceleration is obtained. The improvement is most pronounced in problems with large regions of scattering material where the unaccelerated transport solutions converge very slowly

  12. Prototyping and performance study of a single crystal diamond detector for operation at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Arvind; Topkar, Anita, E-mail: anita@barc.gov.in; Das, D.

    2017-06-21

    Prototype single crystal diamond detectors with different types of metallization and post metallization treatment were fabricated for the applications requiring fast neutron measurements in the Indian Test Blanket Module (TBM) at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Experiment. The detectors were characterized by leakage current measurements to ascertain that the leakage currents are low and breakdown voltages are higher than the voltage required for full charge collection. The detector response to charged particles was evaluated using a {sup 238+239} Pu dual energy alpha source. The detectors showed an energy resolution of about 2% at 5.5 MeV. In order to study their suitability for the operation at higher temperatures, leakage current variation and alpha response were studied up to 300 °C. At 300 °C, peaks corresponding to 5.156 MeV and 5.499 MeV alphas could be separated and there was no significant degradation of energy resolution. Finally, the detector response to fast neutrons was evaluated using a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) neutron generator. The observed spectrum showed peaks corresponding to various channels of n-C interactions with a clear isolated peak corresponding to ~8.5 MeV alphas. The detectors also showed high sensitivity of 3.4×10{sup −2} cps/n/(cm{sup 2} s)–4.5×10{sup −2} cps/n/(cm{sup 2} s) and excellent linearity of response in terms of count rate at different neutron flux in the observed range of 3.2×10{sup 5} n/(cm{sup 2} s) to 2.0×10{sup 6} n/(cm{sup 2} s).

  13. Prototyping and performance study of a single crystal diamond detector for operation at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Arvind; Topkar, Anita; Das, D.

    2017-06-01

    Prototype single crystal diamond detectors with different types of metallization and post metallization treatment were fabricated for the applications requiring fast neutron measurements in the Indian Test Blanket Module (TBM) at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Experiment. The detectors were characterized by leakage current measurements to ascertain that the leakage currents are low and breakdown voltages are higher than the voltage required for full charge collection. The detector response to charged particles was evaluated using a 238+239 Pu dual energy alpha source. The detectors showed an energy resolution of about 2% at 5.5 MeV. In order to study their suitability for the operation at higher temperatures, leakage current variation and alpha response were studied up to 300 °C. At 300 °C, peaks corresponding to 5.156 MeV and 5.499 MeV alphas could be separated and there was no significant degradation of energy resolution. Finally, the detector response to fast neutrons was evaluated using a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) neutron generator. The observed spectrum showed peaks corresponding to various channels of n-C interactions with a clear isolated peak corresponding to 8.5 MeV alphas. The detectors also showed high sensitivity of 3.4×10-2 cps/n/(cm2 s)-4.5×10-2 cps/n/(cm2 s) and excellent linearity of response in terms of count rate at different neutron flux in the observed range of 3.2×105 n/(cm2 s) to 2.0×106 n/(cm2 s).

  14. Design, Build & Test of a Double Crystal Monochromator for Beamlines I09 & I23 at the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J.; Lee, T.; Alcock, S.; Patel, H.

    2013-03-01

    A high stability Double Crystal Monochromator has been developed at The Diamond Light Source for beamlines I09 and I23. The design specification was a cryogenic, fixed exit, energy scanning monochromator, operating over an energy range of 2.1 - 25 keV using a Si(111) crystal set. The novel design concepts are the direct drive, air bearing Bragg axis, low strain crystal mounts and the cooling scheme. The instrument exhibited superb stability and repeatability on the B16 Test Beamline. A 20 keV Si(555), 1.4 μrad rocking curve was demonstrated. The DCM showed good stability without any evidence of vibration or Bragg angle nonlinearity.

  15. Note: Laser ablation technique for electrically contacting a buried implant layer in single crystal diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, M. P.; Baldwin, J. W.; Butler, J. E.; Pate, B. B.; Feygelson, T. I.

    2011-01-01

    The creation of thin, buried, and electrically conducting layers within an otherwise insulating diamond by annealed ion implantation damage is well known. Establishing facile electrical contact to the shallow buried layer has been an unmet challenge. We demonstrate a new method, based on laser micro-machining (laser ablation), to make reliable electrical contact to a buried implant layer in diamond. Comparison is made to focused ion beam milling.

  16. Focusing of white synchrotron radiation using large-acceptance cylindrical refractive lenses made of single – crystal diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polikarpov, M., E-mail: polikarpov.maxim@mail.ru [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14a, 23600 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Snigireva, I. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble 38043 (France); Snigirev, A. [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14a, 23600 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble 38043 (France)

    2016-07-27

    Large-aperture cylindrical refractive lenses were manufactured by laser cutting of single-crystal diamond. Five linear single lenses with apertures of 1 mm and the depth of the structure of 1.2 mm were fabricated and tested at the ESRF ID06 beamline performing the focusing of white-beam synchrotron radiation. Uniform linear focus was stable during hours of exposure, representing such lenses as pre-focusing and collimating devices suitable for the front-end sections of today synchrotron radiation sources.

  17. Enhanced extraction of silicon-vacancy centers light emission using bottom-up engineered polycrystalline diamond photonic crystal slabs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondič, Lukáš; Varga, Marián; Hruška, Karel; Fait, J.; Kapusta, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2017), s. 2972-2981 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-09692Y; GA MŠk LD15003; GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : photonic crystal * diamond * silicon vacancy center Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.); Physical chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 13.942, year: 2016

  18. Focusing of white synchrotron radiation using large-acceptance cylindrical refractive lenses made of single – crystal diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polikarpov, M.; Snigireva, I.; Snigirev, A.

    2016-01-01

    Large-aperture cylindrical refractive lenses were manufactured by laser cutting of single-crystal diamond. Five linear single lenses with apertures of 1 mm and the depth of the structure of 1.2 mm were fabricated and tested at the ESRF ID06 beamline performing the focusing of white-beam synchrotron radiation. Uniform linear focus was stable during hours of exposure, representing such lenses as pre-focusing and collimating devices suitable for the front-end sections of today synchrotron radiation sources.

  19. The hardness of synthetic products obtained from cooled and crystallized basaltic melts (in Romanian)

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Ogrean

    2001-01-01

    The Hardness of Synthetic Products Obtained from Cooled and Crystallized Basaltic Melts. Hardness is one of the main properties of the products obtained from cooled and crystallized basaltic melts under a controlled thermal regime. It influences the abrasion tear resistance of the resulted material. The microhardness measurements on the samples (bricks, boards, gutters, armour plates, tubes) indicated Vickers hardness value between 757–926 for the materials obtained from Şanovita basalts (Tim...

  20. High-pressure crystal structure investigation of synthetic Fe2SiO4 spinel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestola, F.; Balic Zunic, Tonci; Koch-Müller, M.

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structure of Fe2SiO4 spinel at room temperature was investigated at seven different pressures by X-ray diffraction, using a diamond anvil cell to examine the influence of Fe substitution on ringwoodite behaviour at high pressure. The results compared with those of a pure Mg endmember...... show that the substitution of Fe into the spinel structure causes only small changes in the compression rate of coordination polyhedra and the distortion of the octahedron. The data show that the compression rate for the octahedron and tetrahedron in (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 can be considered statistically equal...

  1. Perspectives of application of synthetic diamonds in polyurethane compositions for development of new high thermal conductivity system of isolation of powerful turbogenerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kensits'kij, O.G.; Vigovs'kij, O.V.; Khvalyin, D.Yi.

    2017-01-01

    Reviewed and analyzed components of modern high-voltage insulation of electrical machines. The expediency of increasing of heat-conducting properties of the system of isolation of stator winding of powerful turbogenerators is justified. The main ways of improving heat transfer in the insulation system the stator windings of the turbogenerators are presented and analyzed. Perspectives of application of composite material based on polyurethane with additives of synthetic diamonds for development of new high thermal conductivity system of isolation of powerful electrical machines are analyzed. The technology by which was created the prototype of the insulating material with the application of diamond powder in a polyurethane composition is described. Executed laboratory experimental researches of the electrophysical parameters of the sample developed insulating material. That showed the perspective of this direction of perfection of isolation.

  2. Diamond monochromators for APS undulator-A beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasdell, R.C.; Assoufid, L.A.; Mills, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    There has been considerable interest in the use of diamonds in high heat load monochromators (HHLMs) in the last several years. The superb thermal and mechanical properties of single crystal diamonds serve to minimize distortions caused by a given thermal load, while the low x-ray absorption cross-section reduces both the total power deposited in the crystal as well as the peak (volumetric) power density. The primary obstacle for the widespread use of diamonds at present is a lack of ready availability of perfect single crystals of the desired size and orientation. Although it is possible to obtain near-perfect natural diamonds of the size and orientation required for use on an undulator beamline, the selection process is generally one of trial and error. Near perfect synthetic diamonds can currently be obtained in the minimum necessary size (typically 4-5 mm on a side). A collaborative agreement has been made between the staff of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), and the Super Photon Ring-8 GeV (SPring-8) to explore the use of diamonds as high heat load monochromators and is on-going. One of the avenues of research is to push for improved perfection and size of synthetic diamonds. Sumitomo Electric Corporation of Japan has agreed to work with staff from SPring-8 to grow [100] oriented perfect single crystal diamonds of 10 x 10 x 1 mm 3 size by 1996/1997 (from which one could also cut pieces with the large face parallel to the (111) planes). They have taken the first step in producing an essentially perfect 4 x 4 x 1 mm 3 type II diamond with less than 5 μrad (1 arc second) strain (measured over the entire surface). The authors believe progress in the production of synthetic diamonds, as well as improvement in ties with suppliers of natural diamonds, should make available a relatively large number of high quality diamonds of moderate size within the next several years

  3. Coupling of single nitrogen-vacancy defect centers in diamond nanocrystals to optical antennas and photonic crystal cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, Janik; Kewes, Guenter; Schell, Andreas W.; Aichele, Thomas; Benson, Oliver [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Berlin (Germany); Nuesse, Nils; Schoengen, Max; Loechel, Bernd [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Hanke, Tobias; Leitenstorfer, Alfred [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, Universitaet Konstanz, Konstanz (Germany); Bratschitsch, Rudolf [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, Universitaet Konstanz, Konstanz (Germany); Technische Universitaet Chemnitz, Institut fuer Physik, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    We demonstrate the ability to modify the emission properties and enhance the interaction strength of single-photon emitters coupled to nanophotonic structures based on metals and dielectrics. Assembly of individual diamond nanocrystals, metal nanoparticles, and photonic crystal cavities to meta-structures is introduced. Experiments concerning controlled coupling of single defect centers in nanodiamonds to optical nanoantennas made of gold bowtie structures are reviewed. By placing one and the same emitter at various locations with high precision, a map of decay rate enhancements was obtained. Furthermore, we demonstrate the formation of a hybrid cavity quantum electrodynamics system in which a single defect center is coupled to a single mode of a gallium phosphite photonic crystal cavity. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Raman spectroscopy of isotopically pure ({sup 12}C, {sup 13}C) and isotopically mixed ({sup 12.5}C) diamond single crystals at ultrahigh pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enkovich, P. V., E-mail: enkovich@hppi.troitsk.ru; Brazhkin, V. V.; Lyapin, S. G.; Novikov, A. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Institute for High-Pressure Physics (Russian Federation); Kanda, H. [National Institute for Materials Science (Japan); Stishov, S. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Institute for High-Pressure Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    The Raman scattering by isotopically pure {sup 12}C and {sup 13}C diamond single crystals and by isotopically mixed {sup 12.5}C diamond single crystals is studied at a high accuracy. The studies are performed over a wide pressure range up to 73 GPa using helium as a hydrostatic pressure-transferring medium. It is found that the quantum effects, which determine the difference between the ratio of the Raman scattering frequencies in the {sup 12}C and {sup 13}C diamonds and the classical ratio (1.0408), increase to 30 GPa and then decrease. Thus, inversion in the sign of the quantum contribution to the physical properties of diamond during compression is detected. Our data suggest that the maximum possible difference between the bulk moduli of the {sup 12}C and {sup 13}C diamonds is 0.15%. The investigation of the isotopically mixed {sup 12.5}C diamond shows that the effective mass, which determines the Raman frequency, decreases during compression from 12.38 au at normal pressure to 12.33 au at 73 GPa.

  5. Hierarchical self-assembly of telechelic star polymers: from soft patchy particles to gels and diamond crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capone, Barbara; Coluzza, Ivan; Blaak, Ronald; Likos, Christos N; Verso, Federica Lo

    2013-01-01

    The design of self-assembling materials in the nanometer scale focuses on the fabrication of a class of organic and inorganic subcomponents that can be reliably produced on a large scale and tailored according to their vast applications for, e.g. electronics, therapeutic vectors and diagnostic imaging agent carriers, or photonics. In a recent publication (Capone et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 238301), diblock copolymer stars have been shown to be a novel system, which is able to hierarchically self-assemble first into soft patchy particles and thereafter into more complex structures, such as the diamond and cubic crystal. The self-aggregating single star patchy behavior is preserved from extremely low up to high densities. Its main control parameters are related to the architecture of the building blocks, which are the number of arms (functionality) and the fraction of attractive end-monomers. By employing a variety of computational and theoretical tools, ranging from the microscopic to the mesoscopic, coarse-grained level in a systematic fashion, we investigate the crossover between the formation of microstructure versus macroscopic phase separation, as well as the formation of gels and networks in these systems. We finally show that telechelic star polymers can be used as building blocks for the fabrication of open crystal structures, such as the diamond or the simple-cubic lattice, taking advantage of the strong correlation between single-particle patchiness and lattice coordination at finite densities. (paper)

  6. Hierarchical self-assembly of telechelic star polymers: from soft patchy particles to gels and diamond crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Barbara; Coluzza, Ivan; Blaak, Ronald; Lo Verso, Federica; Likos, Christos N.

    2013-09-01

    The design of self-assembling materials in the nanometer scale focuses on the fabrication of a class of organic and inorganic subcomponents that can be reliably produced on a large scale and tailored according to their vast applications for, e.g. electronics, therapeutic vectors and diagnostic imaging agent carriers, or photonics. In a recent publication (Capone et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 238301), diblock copolymer stars have been shown to be a novel system, which is able to hierarchically self-assemble first into soft patchy particles and thereafter into more complex structures, such as the diamond and cubic crystal. The self-aggregating single star patchy behavior is preserved from extremely low up to high densities. Its main control parameters are related to the architecture of the building blocks, which are the number of arms (functionality) and the fraction of attractive end-monomers. By employing a variety of computational and theoretical tools, ranging from the microscopic to the mesoscopic, coarse-grained level in a systematic fashion, we investigate the crossover between the formation of microstructure versus macroscopic phase separation, as well as the formation of gels and networks in these systems. We finally show that telechelic star polymers can be used as building blocks for the fabrication of open crystal structures, such as the diamond or the simple-cubic lattice, taking advantage of the strong correlation between single-particle patchiness and lattice coordination at finite densities.

  7. Surface finish in ultra-precision diamond turning of single-crystal silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayomoh, M.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.

    2015-10-01

    Silicon is an optical material widely used in the production of infrared optics. However, silicon as a brittle material exhibits some difficulties when ultra-precision machined by mono-crystalline single point diamond. Finish turning of silicon with mono- crystalline diamond inserts results in accelerated tool wear rates if the right combination of the machining parameters is not properly selected. In this study, we conducted a series of machining tests on an ultra-high precision machine tool using finish turning conditions when using mono-crystalline diamond inserts with negative rake angle and relatively big nose radius. The study yields some recommendations on the best combination of machining parameters that will result in maximum material removal rates with smallest possible surface finish. In this work, standard non-controlled waviness diamond inserts having nose radius of about 1.5 mm, rake angle of negative 25°, and clearance angle of 5° were used to produce flat surfaces on silicon disk. From the results, it has been established that feed rate has the most influential effect followed by the depth of cut and cutting speed.

  8. Diamond monochromator for high heat flux synchrotron x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Smither, R.K.; Davey, S.; Purohit, A.

    1992-12-01

    Single crystal silicon has been the material of choice for x-ray monochromators for the past several decades. However, the need for suitable monochromators to handle the high heat load of the next generation synchrotron x-ray beams on the one hand and the rapid and on-going advances in synthetic diamond technology on the other make a compelling case for the consideration of a diamond mollochromator system. In this Paper, we consider various aspects, advantage and disadvantages, and promises and pitfalls of such a system and evaluate the comparative an monochromator subjected to the high heat load of the most powerful x-ray beam that will become available in the next few years. The results of experiments performed to evaluate the diffraction properties of a currently available synthetic single crystal diamond are also presented. Fabrication of diamond-based monochromator is within present technical means

  9. Transformation and Crystallization Energetics of Synthetic and Biogenic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radha, A. V. [Peter A. Rock Thermochemistry Lab. and Nanomaterials in the Environment, Agriculture, and Technology Organized Research Unit (NEAT ORU), Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Forbes, Tori Z. [Peter A. Rock Thermochemistry Lab. and Nanomaterials in the Environment, Agriculture, and Technology Organized Research Unit (NEAT ORU), Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Killian, Christopher E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Gilbert, P.U.P.A [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Navrotsky, Alexandra [Peter A. Rock Thermochemistry Lab. and Nanomaterials in the Environment, Agriculture, and Technology Organized Research Unit (NEAT ORU), Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a metastable phase often observed during low temperature inorganic synthesis and biomineralization. ACC transforms with aging or heating into a less hydrated form, and with time crystallizes to calcite or aragonite. The energetics of transformation and crystallization of synthetic and biogenic (extracted from California purple sea urchin larval spicules, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) ACC were studied using isothermal acid solution calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Transformation and crystallization of ACC can follow an energetically downhill sequence: more metastable hydrated ACC → less metastable hydrated ACC→anhydrous ACC ~ biogenic anhydrous ACC→vaterite → aragonite → calcite. In a given reaction sequence, not all these phases need to occur. The transformations involve a series of ordering, dehydration, and crystallization processes, each lowering the enthalpy (and free energy) of the system, with crystallization of the dehydrated amorphous material lowering the enthalpy the most. ACC is much more metastable with respect to calcite than the crystalline polymorphs vaterite or aragonite. The anhydrous ACC is less metastable than the hydrated, implying that the structural reorganization during dehydration is exothermic and irreversible. Dehydrated synthetic and anhydrous biogenic ACC are similar in enthalpy. The transformation sequence observed in biomineralization could be mainly energetically driven; the first phase deposited is hydrated ACC, which then converts to anhydrous ACC, and finally crystallizes to calcite. The initial formation of ACC may be a first step in the precipitation of calcite under a wide variety of conditions, including geological CO₂ sequestration.

  10. Diamond bio electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions.

  11. Properties of boron-doped epitaxial diamond layers grown on (110) oriented single crystal substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mortet, Vincent; Pernot, J.; Jomard, F.; Soltani, A.; Remeš, Zdeněk; Barjon, J.; D´Haen, J.; Haenen, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, Mar (2015), s. 29-34 ISSN 0925-9635 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-31783S Grant - others:EU(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0306 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diamond * boron * doping * crystalline orientation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.125, year: 2015

  12. Ultimate strength of crystals, nanoparticles and nano-ceramics having diamond-like structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Zakarian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for calculating the interplanar interaction energy of diamond-like structure ceramics at free surface of stock material in pseudopotential method has been developed. We have considered uniaxial [111] deformation of materials and obtained the “inverse Hall–Petch’s law” for strength. It is shown that nanoceramics has higher strength than the nanoparticles included in its composition.

  13. Effects of Cr 3+ impurity concentration on the crystallography of synthetic emerald crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Huang, Eugene; Lee, Jan-Shing; Yu, Shu-Cheng

    2011-06-01

    Flux method has been adopted for the synthesis of emerald crystals using PbO-V 2O 5 as a flux in order to study the crystallography of the synthetic crystals. In general, the hue of green color of emerald deepens with the addition of Cr 3+. The molar volume of the synthesized crystals was found to increase with the incorporation of Cr 2O 3 dopant. The substitution of Cr 3+ for Al 3+ in the octahedral sites of beryl results in the expansion of a-axis, while c-axis remains nearly unchanged. The maximum Cr 2O 3-content allowed in the crystal lattice of emerald has been found to be about 3.5 wt%. When the doping Cr 2O 3-content exceeds 3.5 wt%, a significant anomaly in lattice parameters starts to take place, accompanying the precipitation of an unknown phase in the emerald matrix.

  14. Spin liquid in a single crystal of the frustrated diamond lattice antiferromagnet CoAl2O4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaharko, O.; Christensen, Niels Bech; Cervellino, A.

    2011-01-01

    We study the evidence for spin liquid in the frustrated diamond lattice antiferromagnet CoAl2O4 by means of single-crystal neutron scattering in zero and applied magnetic fields. The magnetically ordered phase appearing below T-N = 8 K remains nonconventional down to 1.5 K. The magnetic Bragg peaks...... at the q = 0 positions are broad and their line shapes have strong Lorentzian contributions. Additionally, the peaks are connected by weak diffuse streaks oriented along the directions. The observed short-range magnetic correlations are explained within the spiral spin-liquid model. The specific...... shape of the energy landscape of the system, with an extremely flat energy minimum around q = 0 and many low-lying excited spiral states with q = , results in thermal population of this manifold at finite temperatures. The agreement between the experimental results and the spiral spin-liquid model...

  15. Metastable State Diamond Growth and its Applications to Electronic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, David Guang-Kai

    Diamond which consists of a dense array of carbon atoms joined by strong covalent bonds and formed into a tetrahedral crystal structure has remarkable mechanical, thermal, optical and electrical properties suitable for many industrial applications. With a proper type of doping, diamond is also an ideal semiconductor for high performance electronic devices. Unfortunately, natural diamond is rare and limited by its size and cost, it is not surprising that people continuously look for a synthetic replacement. It was believed for long time that graphite, another form of carbon, may be converted into diamond under high pressure and temperature. However, the exact condition of conversion was not clear. In 1939, O. I. Leipunsky developed an equilibrium phase diagram between graphite and diamond based on thermodynamic considerations. In the phase diagram, there is a low temperature (below 1000^ circC) and low pressure (below 1 atm) region in which diamond is metastable and graphite is stable, therefore establishes the conditions for the coexistence of the two species. Leipunsky's pioneer work opened the door for diamond synthesis. In 1955, the General Electric company (GE) was able to produce artificial diamond at 55k atm pressure and a temperature of 2000^ circC. Contrary to GE, B. Derjaguin and B. V. Spitzyn in Soviet Union, developed a method of growing diamonds at 1000^circC and at a much lower pressure in 1956. Since then, researchers, particularly in Soviet Union, are continuously looking for methods to grow diamond and diamond film at lower temperatures and pressures with slow but steady progress. It was only in the early 80's that the importance of growing diamond films had attracted the attentions of researchers in the Western world and in Japan. Recent progress in plasma physics and chemical vapor deposition techniques in integrated electronics technology have pushed the diamond growth in its metastable states into a new era. In this research, a microwave plasma

  16. Selective data analysis for diamond detectors in neutron fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Christina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Detectors based on synthetic chemical vapor deposition diamond gain importance in various neutron applications. The superior thermal robustness and the excellent radiation hardness of diamond as well as its excellent electronic properties make this material uniquely suited for rough environments, such as nuclear fission and fusion reactors. The intrinsic electronic properties of single-crystal diamond sensors allow distinguishing various interactions in the detector. This can be used to successfully suppress background of γ-rays and charged particles in different neutron experiments, such as neutron flux measurements in thermal nuclear reactors or cross-section measurements in fast neutron fields. A novel technique of distinguishing background reactions in neutron experiments with diamond detectors will be presented. A proof of principle will be given on the basis of experimental results in thermal and fast neutron fields.

  17. Post-Synthetic Anisotropic Wet-Chemical Etching of Colloidal Sodalite ZIF Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Civan; Ariñez-Soriano, Javier; Carné-Sánchez, Arnau; Guillerm, Vincent; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2015-11-23

    Controlling the shape of metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals is important for understanding their crystallization and useful for myriad applications. However, despite the many advances in shaping of inorganic nanoparticles, post-synthetic shape control of MOFs and, in general, molecular crystals remains embryonic. Herein, we report using a simple wet-chemistry process at room temperature to control the anisotropic etching of colloidal ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 crystals. Our work enables uniform reshaping of these porous materials into unprecedented morphologies, including cubic and tetrahedral crystals, and even hollow boxes, by an acid-base reaction and subsequent sequestration of leached metal ions. Etching tests on these ZIFs reveal that etching occurs preferentially in the crystallographic directions richer in metal-ligand bonds; that, along these directions, the etching rate tends to be faster on the crystal surfaces of higher dimensionality; and that the etching can be modulated by adjusting the pH of the etchant solution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Hybrid Group IV Nanophotonic Structures Incorporating Diamond Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyuan Linda; Ishiwata, Hitoshi; Babinec, Thomas M; Radulaski, Marina; Müller, Kai; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G; Dory, Constantin; Dahl, Jeremy; Edgington, Robert; Soulière, Veronique; Ferro, Gabriel; Fokin, Andrey A; Schreiner, Peter R; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicholas A; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-01-13

    We demonstrate a new approach for engineering group IV semiconductor-based quantum photonic structures containing negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV(-)) color centers in diamond as quantum emitters. Hybrid diamond-SiC structures are realized by combining the growth of nano- and microdiamonds on silicon carbide (3C or 4H polytype) substrates, with the subsequent use of these diamond crystals as a hard mask for pattern transfer. SiV(-) color centers are incorporated in diamond during its synthesis from molecular diamond seeds (diamondoids), with no need for ion-implantation or annealing. We show that the same growth technique can be used to grow a diamond layer controllably doped with SiV(-) on top of a high purity bulk diamond, in which we subsequently fabricate nanopillar arrays containing high quality SiV(-) centers. Scanning confocal photoluminescence measurements reveal optically active SiV(-) lines both at room temperature and low temperature (5 K) from all fabricated structures, and, in particular, very narrow line widths and small inhomogeneous broadening of SiV(-) lines from all-diamond nanopillar arrays, which is a critical requirement for quantum computation. At low temperatures (5 K) we observe in these structures the signature typical of SiV(-) centers in bulk diamond, consistent with a double lambda. These results indicate that high quality color centers can be incorporated into nanophotonic structures synthetically with properties equivalent to those in bulk diamond, thereby opening opportunities for applications in classical and quantum information processing.

  19. Microwave Heating of Crystals with Gold Nanoparticles and Synovial Fluid under Synthetic Skin Patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLemore, Gabrielle L; Toker, Salih; Boone-Kukoyi, Zainab; Ajifa, Hillary; Lansiquot, Carisse; Nwawulu, Chinenye; Onyedum, Stanley; Kioko, Bridgit M; Aslan, Kadir

    2017-09-30

    Gout is a disease with elusive treatment options. Reduction of the size of l-alanine crystals as a model crystal for gouty tophi with the use of a monomode solid-state microwave was examined as a possible therapeutic aid. The effect of microwave heating on l-alanine crystals in the presence of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in solution and synovial fluid (SF) in a plastic pouch through a synthetic skin patch was investigated. In this regard, three experimental paradigms were employed: Paradigm 1 includes the effect of variable microwave power (5-10 W) and variable heating time (5-60 s) and Au NPs in water (20 nm size, volume of 10 μL) in a plastic pouch (1 × 2 cm 2 in size). Paradigm 2 includes the effect of a variable volume of 20 nm Au NPs in a variable volume of SF up to 100 μL in a plastic pouch at a constant microwave power (10 W) for 30 s. Paradigm 3 includes the effect of constant microwave power (10 W) and microwave heating time (30 s), constant volume of Au NPs (100 μL), and variable size of Au NPs (20-200 nm) placed in a plastic pouch through a synthetic skin patch. In these experiments, an average of 60-100% reduction in the size of an l-alanine crystal (initial size = 450 μm) without damage to the synthetic skin or increasing the temperature of the samples beyond the physiological range was reported.

  20. High speed dry machining of MMCs with diamond tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The increasing use of metal matrix composites (MMCs) has raised new issues in their machining. Industrial demands for higher speed and dry machining of MMCs with improved component production to closer tolerances have driven the development of new tool materials. In particular, the wear characteristics of synthetic diamond tooling satisfy many of the requirements imposed in cutting these highly abrasive workpieces. The use of diamond tool materials, such as polycrystalline diamond (PCD), has resulted in tool life improvements which, allied with environmental considerations, show great potential for the development of dry cutting. This paper explores the wear characteristics of PCD, which is highly suited to the dry machining of particulate silicon carbide MMCs. Also, two further diamond tool materials are evaluated - chemical vapor deposition (CVD) thick layer diamond and synthetic single crystal diamond. Their suitability for the efficient machining of high volume fraction MMC materials is shown and their potential impact an the subsequent acceptance and integration of MMCs into engineering components is discussed. (author)

  1. Structure and properties of diamond and diamond-like films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausing, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This section is broken into four parts: (1) introduction, (2) natural IIa diamond, (3) importance of structure and composition, and (4) control of structure and properties. Conclusions of this discussion are that properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond films can compare favorably with natural diamond, that properties are anisotropic and are a strong function of structure and crystal perfection, that crystal perfection and morphology are functions of growth conditions and can be controlled, and that the manipulation of texture and thereby surface morphology and internal crystal perfection is an important step in optimizing chemically deposited diamond films for applications.

  2. The hardness of synthetic products obtained from cooled and crystallized basaltic melts (in Romanian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ogrean

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hardness of Synthetic Products Obtained from Cooled and Crystallized Basaltic Melts. Hardness is one of the main properties of the products obtained from cooled and crystallized basaltic melts under a controlled thermal regime. It influences the abrasion tear resistance of the resulted material. The microhardness measurements on the samples (bricks, boards, gutters, armour plates, tubes indicated Vickers hardness value between 757–926 for the materials obtained from Şanovita basalts (Timiş district and between 539–958 respectively, in case of the Racoş basalts (Braşov district. There is a certain variation of the hardness within the same sample, in various measurement points, within the theoretical limits of the hardnesses of the pyroxenes and that of the spinels.

  3. The influence of strong crystalline fields on QED-processes investigated using diamond crystals to crystals in $\\gamma, \\gamma$ colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Uggerhøj, Erik

    2002-01-01

    The very recent indications of Higgs-candidates at CERN have led to a strong interest in new types of facilities like high-energy photon colliders. This again leads to a search for strong high-energy gamma sources. In the present paper it is shown that single crystals are unique radiators due to the strong crystalline fields of 10/sup 12/ V /cm or more, in which incident particles move over very large distances (~100 mu m). Along axes, radiation emission and energy loss is enhanced more than two orders of magnitude. This dramatic effect loads to radiation cooling followed by capture to high-lying channeling states. The radiation is emitted in the forward angular cone of 40 mu rad or less. In the planar cases certain incident directions give hard photons with an intensity ~10 times the normal coherent bremsstrahlung. Therefore, in general, crystals turn out to be very interesting gamma -sources for photo production and coming gamma , gamma colliders. (10 refs).

  4. The accuracy of the crystal chemical parameters at high-pressure conditions from single-crystal X-ray diffraction in diamond-anvil cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Periotto, Benedetta

    applications also in the materials science as it can provide useful information about the properties and performance of new materials. Over the past decades, the research in this field has been strongly developed due to the advances in computer capabilities and to the technological improvements of X......-ray instruments. At the same time, the high-pressure experiments have benefited by the strong improvements on the high-pressure devices, in particular the diamond-anvil cell (DAC). The aim of this research project is to assess the quality of the data obtained by means of the single-crystal X-ray diffraction...... started with a comparison between two different DACs, in order to define the capabilities of one of the most common types of pressure device, the ETH-type DAC. Application examples of data quality analysis have been conducted on pyroxenes (NaInSi2O6, orthoenstatite MgSiO3 and LiCrSi2O6), which...

  5. Single Crystals Grown Under Unconstrained Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Ichiro

    Based on detailed investigations on morphology (evolution and variation in external forms), surface microtopography of crystal faces (spirals and etch figures), internal morphology (growth sectors, growth banding and associated impurity partitioning) and perfection (dislocations and other lattice defects) in single crystals, we can deduce how and by what mechanism the crystal grew and experienced fluctuation in growth parameters through its growth and post-growth history under unconstrained condition. The information is useful not only in finding appropriate way to growing highly perfect and homogeneous single crystals, but also in deciphering letters sent from the depth of the Earth and the Space. It is also useful in discriminating synthetic from natural gemstones. In this chapter, available methods to obtain molecular information are briefly summarized, and actual examples to demonstrate the importance of this type of investigations are selected from both natural minerals (diamond, quartz, hematite, corundum, beryl, phlogopite) and synthetic crystals (SiC, diamond, corundum, beryl).

  6. Bismuth-ceramic nanocomposites through ball milling and liquid crystal synthetic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, Timothy Michael

    Three methods were developed for the synthesis of bismuth-ceramic nanocomposites, which are of interest due to possible use as thermoelectric materials. In the first synthetic method, high energy ball milling of bismuth metal with either MgO or SiO2 was found to produce nanostructured bismuth dispersed on a ceramic material. The morphology of the resulting bismuth depended on its wetting behavior with respect to the ceramic: the metal wet the MgO, but did not wet on the SiO2. Differential Scanning Calorimetry measurements on these composites revealed unusual thermal stability, with nanostructure retained after multiple cycles of heating and cooling through the metal's melting point. The second synthesis methodology was based on the use of lyotropic liquid crystals. These mixtures of water and amphiphilic molecules self-assemble to form periodic structures with nanometer-scale hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. A novel shear mixing methodology was developed for bringing together reactants which were added to the liquid crystals as dissolved salts. The liquid crystals served to mediate synthesis by acting as nanoreactors to confine chemical reactions within the nanoscale domains of the mesophase, and resulted in the production of nanoparticles. By synthesizing lead sulfide (PbS) and bismuth (Bi) particles as proof-of-concept, it was shown that nanoparticle size could be controlled by controlling the dimensionality of the nanoreactors through control of the liquid crystalline phase. Particle size was shown to decrease upon going from three-dimensionally percolating nanoreactors, to two dimensional sheet-like nanoreactors, to one dimensional rod-like nanoreactors. Additionally, particle size could be controlled by varying the precursor salt concentration. Since the nanoparticles did not agglomerate in the liquid crystal immediately after synthesis, bismuth-ceramic nanocomposites could be prepared by synthesizing Bi nanoparticles and mixing in SiO2 particles which

  7. A new on-line luminometer and beam conditions monitor using single crystal diamond sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Karacheban, Olena

    2015-01-01

    Instrumentation near the beam-pipe requires extremely radiation hardsensors. Inside CMS two rings instrumented with 12 single crystal diamondsensors each are installed on both sides of the interaction point. Thesensors are subdivided in two pads, and each pad is read out by adedicated fast radiation hard ASIC in 130 nm CMOS technology.Due to the excellent time resolution collision products will be separatedfrom machine induced background. In the backend a dead-time lesshistogramming unit is udsed, and a fast microTCA system with GHz samplingrate is under development.The detector will measure both the on-line luminosity and the backgroundbunch-by-bunch.The performance of a prototype detector in a test-beam will be reported,and results from the operation during data taking will be presented.

  8. Thermal expansion of diamond at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri V

    2010-02-26

    Temperature variation of a lattice parameter of a synthetic diamond crystal (type IIa) was measured using high-energy-resolution x-ray Bragg diffraction in backscattering. A 2 order of magnitude improvement in the measurement accuracy allowed us to directly probe the linear thermal expansion coefficient at temperatures below 100 K. The lowest value measured was 2x10{-9} K-1. It was found that the coefficient deviates from the expected Debye law (T3) while no negative thermal expansion was observed. The anomalous behavior might be attributed to tunneling states due to low concentration impurities.

  9. Process of optical excitation and relaxation of color center in synthetic diamond and its application to optoelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Yoshio

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation of high-pressure synthesized diamond is carried out by using a nuclear reactor or a linac. Then, the effect of annealing on the color centers is observed. A study is made to identify different color centers and to provide techniques to control their introduction. Investigations cover the relation of color center formation with annealing temperature, dependence of color center formation on radiation dose, migration of H3 center and hydrogen, and applicability of five different color centers to optoelectronics. Next, a study is made of the formation and relaxation of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in a metastable excited state produced by optical excitation. An optical gain is essential to provide laser. Optical amplification is measured at the vibronic emission band of the NV center. An increase in absorption is detected, indicating that the NV center will not provide laser. In the optical excitation-relaxation process, the relaxation proceeds via a metastable state. Finally, hole burning of ZPL of the NV center is observed in the temperature range from 20K to 80K, and some of its features are described. (N.K.)

  10. Design, Build and Test of a Double Crystal Monochromator for Beamlines I09 and I23 at the Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J; Lee, T; Alcock, S; Patel, H

    2013-01-01

    A high stability Double Crystal Monochromator has been developed at The Diamond Light Source for beamlines I09 and I23. The design specification was a cryogenic, fixed exit, energy scanning monochromator, operating over an energy range of 2.1 – 25 keV using a Si(111) crystal set. The novel design concepts are the direct drive, air bearing Bragg axis, low strain crystal mounts and the cooling scheme. The instrument exhibited superb stability and repeatability on the B16 Test Beamline. A 20 keV Si(555), 1.4 μrad rocking curve was demonstrated. The DCM showed good stability without any evidence of vibration or Bragg angle nonlinearity.

  11. Synthetical bone-like and biological hydroxyapatites: a comparative study of crystal structure and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Smilja; Veselinović, Ljiljana; Lukić, Miodrag J; Karanović, Ljiljana; Bračko, Ines; Ignjatović, Nenad; Uskoković, Dragan

    2011-08-01

    Phase composition, crystal structure and morphology of biological hydroxyapatite (BHAp) extracted from human mandible bone, and carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHAp), synthesized by the chemical precipitation method, were studied by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman (R) spectroscopy techniques, combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Structural and microstructural parameters were determined through Rietveld refinement of recorded XRD data, performed using the FullProf computing program, and TEM. Microstructural analysis shows anisotropic extension along the [00l] crystallographic direction (i.e. elongated crystallites shape) of both investigated samples. The average crystallite sizes of 10 and 8 nm were estimated for BHAp and CHAp, respectively. The FTIR and R spectroscopy studies show that carbonate ions substitute both phosphate and hydroxyl ions in the crystal structure of BHAp as well as in CHAp, indicating that both of them are mixed AB-type of CHAp. The thermal behaviour and carbonate content were analysed using thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis. The carbonate content of about 1 wt.% and phase transition, at near 790 °C, from HAp to β-tricalcium phosphate were determined in both samples. The quality of synthesized CHAp powder, particularly, the particle size distribution and uniformity of morphology, was analysed by a particle size analyser based on laser diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy, respectively. These data were used to discuss similarity between natural and synthetic CHAp. Good correlation between the unit cell parameters, average crystallite size, morphology, carbonate content and crystallographic positions of carbonate ions in natural and synthetic HAp samples was found. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd

  12. Radiation emission and its influence on the motion of multi-GeV electrons and positrons incident on a single diamond crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Kirsebom, K; Uggerhøj, Erik; Elsener, K; Ballestrero, S; Sona, P; Connell, S H; Sellschop, J P Friedel; Vilakazi, Z Z

    2001-01-01

    A few years ago the CERN NA-43 collaboration installed an upgraded detector system which allows a detailed analysis of the particle motion before, during and after penetration of a crystal. Also, essentially perfect diamond crystals were produced by the collaborators from Schonland Research Centre. These facts have led to new and very detailed investigations of QED-processes in strong crystalline fields. Along axial directions the radiation emission is enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude. For incidence on a 0.7 mm thick diamond crystal of well-aligned 149 GeV electrons, 35% give rise to a high energy photon peak at approximately=120 GeV. For 243 GeV electrons and approximately=200 GeV photons, this number decreases to 25%-which may be an indication of quantum suppression. Different measurements of the photon multiplicities show that in most cases positrons and electrons emit equal number of photons. The dramatic radiation emission leads to a strong reduction in transverse energy and all electrons in...

  13. Synthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Manferdini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally materials have been associated with a series of physical properties that can be used as inputs to production and manufacturing. Recently we witnessed an interest in materials considered not only as ‘true matter’, but also as new breeds where geometry, texture, tooling and finish are able to provoke new sensations when they are applied to a substance. These artificial materials can be described as synthetic because they are the outcome of various qualities that are not necessarily true to the original matter, but they are the combination of two or more parts, whether by design or by natural processes. The aim of this paper is to investigate the potential of architectural surfaces to produce effects through the invention of new breeds of artificial matter, using micro-scale details derived from Nature as an inspiration.

  14. Dimer self-organization of impurity ytterbium ions in synthetic forsterite single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, V. F.; Sukhanov, A. A.; Dudnikova, V. B.; Zharikov, E. V.; Lis, D. A.; Subbotin, K. A.

    2017-07-01

    Paramagnetic centers formed by impurity Yb3+ ions in synthetic forsterite (Mg2SiO4) grown by the Czochralski technique are studied by X-band CW and pulsed EPR spectroscopy. These centers are single ions substituting magnesium in two different crystallographic positions denoted M1 and M2, and dimer associates formed by two Yb3+ ions in nearby positions M1. It is established that there is a pronounced mechanism favoring self-organization of ytterbium ions in dimer associates during the crystal growth, and the mechanism of the spin-spin coupling between ytterbium ions in the associate has predominantly a dipole-dipole character, which makes it possible to control the energy of the spin-spin interaction by changing the orientation of the external magnetic field. The structural computer simulation of cluster ytterbium centers in forsterite crystals is carried out by the method of interatomic potentials using the GULP 4.0.1 code (General Utility Lattice Program). It is established that the formation of dimer associates in the form of a chain parallel to the crystallographic axis consisting of two ytterbium ions with a magnesium vacancy between them is the most energetically favorable for ytterbium ions substituting magnesium in the position M1.

  15. Extended Physicochemical Characterization of the Synthetic Anticoagulant Pentasaccharide Fondaparinux Sodium by Quantitative NMR and Single Crystal X-ray Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildt, William de; Kooijman, Huub; Funke, Carel; Üstün, Bülent; Leika, Afranina; Lunenburg, Maarten; Kaspersen, Frans; Kellenbach, Edwin

    2017-01-01

    Fondaparinux sodium is a synthetic pentasaccharide representing the high affinity antithrombin III binding site in heparin. It is the active pharmaceutical ingredient of the anticoagulant drug Arixtra(®). The single crystal X-ray structure of Fondaparinux sodium is reported, unequivocally confirming

  16. CVD diamond metallization and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraimovitch, D.; Adelberd, A.; Marunko, S.; Lefeuvre, G.; Ruzin, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this study we compared three diamond substrate grades: polycrystalline, optical grade single crystal, and electronic grade single crystal for detector application. Beside the bulk type, the choice of contact material, pre-treatment, and sputtering process details have shown to alter significantly the diamond detector performance. Characterization of diamond substrate permittivity and losses indicate grade and crystallinity related, characteristic differences for frequencies in 1 kHz-1 MHz range. Substantial grade related variations were also observed in surface electrostatic characterization performed by contact potential difference (CPD) mode of an atomic force microscope. Study of conductivity variations with temperature reveal that bulk trap energy levels are also dependent on the crystal grade.

  17. CVD diamond metallization and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraimovitch, D., E-mail: dimitryf@mail.tau.ac.il [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Adelberd, A.; Marunko, S. [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Lefeuvre, G. [Micron Semiconductor Ltd. Royal Buildings, Marlborough Road, Lancing Business Park, BN15 8SJ (United Kingdom); Ruzin, A. [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2017-02-11

    In this study we compared three diamond substrate grades: polycrystalline, optical grade single crystal, and electronic grade single crystal for detector application. Beside the bulk type, the choice of contact material, pre-treatment, and sputtering process details have shown to alter significantly the diamond detector performance. Characterization of diamond substrate permittivity and losses indicate grade and crystallinity related, characteristic differences for frequencies in 1 kHz–1 MHz range. Substantial grade related variations were also observed in surface electrostatic characterization performed by contact potential difference (CPD) mode of an atomic force microscope. Study of conductivity variations with temperature reveal that bulk trap energy levels are also dependent on the crystal grade.

  18. Medical applications of diamond particles & surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Roger J Narayan; Ryan D. Boehm; Anirudha V. Sumant

    2011-01-01

    Diamond has been considered for use in several medical applications due to its unique mechanical, chemical, optical, and biological properties. In this paper, methods for preparing synthetic diamond surfaces and particles are described. In addition, recent developments involving the use of diamond in prostheses, sensing, imaging, and drug delivery applications are reviewed. These developments suggest that diamond-containing structures will provide significant improvements in the diagnosis and...

  19. Conductive diamond electrodes for water purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Martínez-Huitle

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, synthetic diamond has been studied for its application in wastewater treatment, electroanalysis, organic synthesis and sensor areas; however, its use in the water disinfection/purification is its most relevant application. The new electrochemistry applications of diamond electrodes open new perspectives for an easy, effective, and chemical free water treatment. This article highlights and summarizes the results of a selection of papers dealing with electrochemical disinfection using synthetic diamond films.

  20. Freeform Fabrication of Magnetophotonic Crystals with Diamond Lattices of Oxide and Metallic Glasses for Terahertz Wave Control by Micro Patterning Stereolithography and Low Temperature Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maasa Nakano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Micrometer order magnetophotonic crystals with periodic arranged metallic glass and oxide glass composite materials were fabricated by stereolithographic method to reflect electromagnetic waves in terahertz frequency ranges through Bragg diffraction. In the fabrication process, the photo sensitive acrylic resin paste mixed with micrometer sized metallic glass of Fe72B14.4Si9.6Nb4 and oxide glass of B2O3·Bi2O3 particles was spread on a metal substrate, and cross sectional images of ultra violet ray were exposed. Through the layer by layer stacking, micro lattice structures with a diamond type periodic arrangement were successfully formed. The composite structures could be obtained through the dewaxing and sintering process with the lower temperature under the transition point of metallic glass. Transmission spectra of the terahertz waves through the magnetophotonic crystals were measured by using a terahertz time domain spectroscopy.

  1. Growth and characterization of single-crystal CVD diamond for radiation detection applications; Synthese et caracterisation de diamants monocristallins pour applications de detecteur de rayonnements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranchant, N

    2008-01-15

    This work aimed at the study of the synthesis of single crystal diamond using the Microwave enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition technique (MPCVD). The work enabled the development and optimisation of the growth conditions, from the study of the crystalline quality, of the material purity, and of its electronic properties. The assessment of the transport properties was the most determinant: the use of the time of flight (TOF) technique has enabled the measurement of the carrier mobilities and of their kinetic properties as a function of the temperature. When coupled with collected charge efficiency measurements, the work led to remarkable carrier mobility values obtained in the synthesised crystals (3000 cm{sup 2}.V-1.s{sup -1}). Prepared samples were mounted as detection devices and used successfully in real conditions for the monitoring of ultra-fast pulses, as well as for neutron fluency monitoring, and for medical dosimeters for radiotherapy applications. (author)

  2. Oxygen distribution and speciation in bulk of monocrystalline diamonds and its correlations with other impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiryaev, Andrei; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Hainschwang, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Oxygen in diamond lattice remains elusive impurity. Mass-spectrometry and nuclear probes show presence of oxygen in all diamonds in concentrations ranging from vs O concentrations show clear correlations, obeyed as for several analyses spots on individual diamonds as well as for sets of diamonds. Notably, the slopes of the N-O correlations differ between diamonds showing CO2 absorption in IR and for "normal" diamonds. As expected, O contents are higher in the former group, suggesting that in CO2-rich diamonds oxygen is present both the lattice and in microscopic inclusions. This study is the first work showing correlation of structural nitrogen impurity with oxygen content of diamonds, thus providing strong analytical support for earlier hypothesis [2] that O may be present as a lattice impurity in natural diamonds. Theoretical calculations of relative stabilities of oxygen in diamond show a very strong dependence on the position of the Fermi level in the crystal [4, 5]. According to these results oxygen behaviour in diamond and, in particular, its diffusivity strongly depends on the nitrogen concentration and speciation. Though the O-N pair appears to be a stable defect at low temperatures, mutual repulsion of positively charged N and O ions creates a vacancy-like state in between them [5]. Since most impurities in diamond diffuse by a vacancy-assisted mechanism, such a configuration may be destroyed by annealing. The calculated strength of the C-O bond in diamond is lower than the C-C bond and preferential breaking of the C-O bond seems plausible. Therefore, despite its relatively common presence, oxygen is not always detected by spectroscopic methods if no annealing has been performed. Apparently, the presence of O hinders IR-activity of N-related defects. From the geochemical point of view the existence of oxygen as a lattice impurity in diamond is of considerable interest. First of all, it adds another important isotopic system in addition to C and N. Second

  3. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  4. Fingerprinting diamonds using ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVries, R.C.; Reihl, R.F.; Tuft, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    It is possible to ion implant patterns in diamond crystals at fluences below that which would impart visible damage and then to reveal those patterns by electrostatic charging and dusting. The charge distribution - and therefore the dust attachment - is related to the difference in electrical conductivity between the implanted region and the rest of the crystal. The technique may have applicability for ''fingerprinting'' or personalizing diamond gemstones. (author)

  5. Development of diamond coated tool and its performance in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    In recent years, low pressure synthesis of diamond coating from gas phase on a suitable tool substrate has opened up new opportunities to expand applications of diamond tools widely. In fact a coated diamond tool combines the strengths of both single crystal diamond and PCD compact in one cutting tool and has better.

  6. PREFACE: Science's gem: diamond science 2009 Science's gem: diamond science 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainwood, Alison; Newton, Mark E.; Stoneham, Marshall

    2009-09-01

    diamond's exceptional properties for quantum information processing [2], a topic on which there have been many recent papers, and where a diamond colour centre single photon source is already commercially available. Biomedical applications of diamond are recognised, partly tribological and partly electrochemical, but lie outside the present group of papers. Processing and controlling diamond surfaces and interfaces with other materials in their environment are critical steps en route to exploitation. Boron-doped diamond has already found application in electro-analysis and in the bulk oxidation of dissolved species in solution [3]. Energy-related applications—ranging from high-power electronics [3] to a potential first wall of fusion reactors [4]—are further exciting potential applications. Even small and ugly diamonds have value. Their mechanical properties [5] dominate, with significant niche applications such as thermal sinks. The major applications for diamond to date exploit only a fraction of diamond's special properties: visual for status diamonds, and mechanical for working diamonds. Diamond physics reaches well beyond the usual laboratory, to the geological diamond formation processes in the Earth's mantle. Characterization of natural gem diamonds [6, 7] is one part of the detective story that allows us to understand the conditions under which they formed. It was only half a century ago that the scientific and technological challenges of diamond synthesis were met systematically. Today, most of the recent research on diamond has concentrated on synthetics, whether created using high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) techniques or chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The HPHT synthesis of diamond has advanced dramatically [8, 9] to the extent that dislocation birefringence [10] can be largely eliminated. In silicon technology, the elimination of dislocations was a major step in microelectronics. Now, even diamond can be synthesised containing virtually no

  7. Pushing the boundaries of high power lasers: low loss, large area CVD diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Benjamin; Schoofs, Frank; Olsson-Robbie, Stefan; Bennett, Andrew; Balmer, Richard

    2018-02-01

    Synthetic CVD diamond has exceptional properties, including broad spectral transmission, physical and chemical robustness, and the highest thermal conductivity of any known material, making diamond an attractive material for medium to high power optical and laser applications, minimizing the detrimental effects of thermal lensing and radiation damage. Example applications include ATR prisms, Raman laser crystals, extra- and intra-cavity laser cooling. In each case the demands on the fundamental material properties and fabrication routes are slightly different. In recent years, there has been good progress in the development of low-loss, single crystal diamond, suitable for higher power densities, higher pulse rates and more demanding intra- and extra-cavity thermal management. The adoption of single crystal diamond in this area has however, been hindered by the availability of large area, low birefringence plates. To address this, we report a combination of CVD growth and processing methods that have enabled the manufacture of large, low defect substrates. A final homoepitaxial, low absorption synthesis stage has produced plates with large area (up to 16 mm edge length), low absorption (αdiamond parts, optimizing them for use in a state-of-the-art femto-second pulsed Ti:Sa thin disk gain module, all made in collaboration with the wider European FP7 funded Ti:Sa TD consortium.

  8. Diamond pixel modules

    CERN Document Server

    Gan, K K; Robichaud, A; Potenza, R; Kuleshov, S; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Wermes, N; Dulinski, W; Eremin, V; Smith, S; Sopko, B; Olivero, P; Gorisek, A; Chren, D; Kramberger, G; Schnetzer, S; Weilhammer, P; Martemyanov, A; Hugging, F; Pernegger, H; Lagomarsino, S; Manfredotti, C; Mishina, M; Trischuk, W; Dobos, D; Cindro, V; Belyaev, V; Duris, J; Claus, G; Wallny, R; Furgeri, A; Tuve, C; Goldstein, J; Sciortino, S; Sutera, C; Asner, D; Mikuz, M; Lo Giudice, A; Velthuis, J; Hits, D; Griesmayer, E; Oakham, G; Frais-Kolbl, H; Bellini, V; D'Alessandro, R; Cristinziani, M; Barbero, M; Schaffner, D; Costa, S; Goffe, M; La Rosa, A; Bruzzi, M; Schreiner, T; de Boer, W; Parrini, G; Roe, S; Randrianarivony, K; Dolenc, I; Moss, J; Brom, J M; Golubev, A; Mathes, M; Eusebi, R; Grigoriev, E; Tsung, J W; Mueller, S; Mandic, I; Stone, R; Menichelli, D

    2011-01-01

    With the commissioning of the LHC in 2010 and upgrades expected in 2015, ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond has been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and all LHC experiments. This material is now being considered as a sensor material for use very close to the interaction region where the most extreme radiation conditions exist Recently the RD42 collaboration constructed, irradiated and tested polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond sensors to the highest fluences expected at the super-LHC. We present beam test results of chemical vapor deposition diamond up to fluences of 1.8 x 10(16) protons/cm(2) illustrating that both polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds follow a single damage curve. We also present beam test results of irradiated complete diamond pixel m...

  9. Homogenization Experiments of Crystal-Rich Inclusions in Spodumene from Jiajika Lithium Deposit, China, under Elevated External Pressures in a Hydrothermal Diamond-Anvil Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiankang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive studies of the crystal-rich inclusions (CIs hosted in minerals in pegmatite have resulted in substantially different models for the formation mechanism of the pegmatite. In order to evaluate these previously proposed formation mechanisms, the total homogenization processes of CIs hosted in spodumene from the Jiajika pegmatite deposit in Sichuan, China, were observed in situ under external H2O pressures in a new type of hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC. The CIs in a spodumene chip were loaded in the sample chamber of HDAC with water, such that the CIs were under preset external H2O pressures during heating to avoid possible decrepitation. Our in situ observations showed that the crystals within the CIs were dissolved in carbonic-rich aqueous fluid during heating and that cristobalite was usually the first mineral being dissolved, followed by zabuyelite and silicate minerals until their total dissolution at temperatures between 500 and 720°C. These observations indicated that the minerals within the CIs were daughter minerals crystallized from an entrapped carbonate- and silica-rich aqueous solution and therefore provided useful information for evaluating the formation models of granitic pegmatites.

  10. The crystal structure of synthetic kutinaite, Cu14Ag6As7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karanovic, Ljiljana; Poleti, Dejan; Makovicky, Emil

    2002-01-01

    kutinaite, X-ray diffraction, powder method, crystal structure, icosahedral alloy, arsenide, metal clusters......kutinaite, X-ray diffraction, powder method, crystal structure, icosahedral alloy, arsenide, metal clusters...

  11. Full characterization of laser-accelerated ion beams using Faraday cup, silicon carbide, and single-crystal diamond detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margarone, Daniele; Krása, Josef; Giuffrida, L.; Picciotto, A.; Torrisi, L.; Nowak, T.; Musumeci, P.; Velyhan, Andriy; Prokůpek, Jan; Láska, Leoš; Mocek, Tomáš; Ullschmied, Jiří; Rus, Bedřich

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 10 (2011), "103302-1"-"103302-8" ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/1165; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : aluminium * chemical sensors * diamond * electrostatics * iodine * ion beams * thin films * lasers * time of flight spectrometers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2011 http://jap.aip.org/ resource /1/japiau/v109/i10/p103302_s1

  12. Diamond Sensors for Energy Frontier Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Schnetzer, Steve

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the use of diamond sensors in high-energy, high-i ntensity collider experiments. Re- sults from diamond sensor based beam conditions monitors in the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are presented and pla ns for diamond based luminosity monitors for the upcoming LHC run are described. We describe recent measurements on single crystal diamond sensors that indicate a polarization effec t that causes a reduction of charge col- lection efficiency as a function of particle flux. We conclude by describing new developments on the promising technology of 3D diamond sensors.

  13. Setting Boundaries with Memory: Generation of Topological Boundary States in Floquet-Induced Synthetic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Yuval; Refael, Gil

    2018-03-01

    When a d -dimensional quantum system is subjected to a periodic drive, it may be treated as a (d +1 )-dimensional system, where the extra dimension is a synthetic one. This approach, however, affords only a limited level of control of the effective potential along the synthetic direction. In this work, we introduce a new mean for controlling the Floquet synthetic dimension. We show that arbitrary potentials, as well as edges in the synthetic dimension, could be introduced using a memory component in the system's dynamics. We demonstrate this principle by exploring topological edge states propagating normal to synthetic dimensions. Such systems may act as an optical isolator which allows the transmission of light in a directional way. Also, we suggest an experimental realization of the memory effect in spins coupled to nanofabricated Weyl semimetal surface states.

  14. Ion implantation into diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Susumu

    1994-01-01

    The graphitization and the change to amorphous state of diamond surface layer by ion implantation and its characteristics are reported. In the diamond surface, into which more than 10 16 ions/cm 2 was implanted, the diamond crystals are broken, and the structure changes to other carbon structure such as amorphous state or graphite. Accompanying this change of structure, the electric conductivity of the implanted layer shows two discontinuous values due to high resistance and low resistance. This control of structure can be done by the temperature of the base during the ion implantation into diamond. Also it is referred to that by the base temperature during implantation, the mutual change of the structure between amorphous state and graphite can be controlled. The change of the electric resistance and the optical characteristics by the ion implantation into diamond surface, the structural analysis by Raman spectroscopy, and the control of the structure of the implanted layer by the base temperature during implantation are reported. (K.I.)

  15. Radiation damage studies on synthetic NaCl crystals and natural rock salt for waste disposal applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaffky, R.W.; Swyler, K.J.; Levy, P.W.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation damage studies are being made on synthetic NaCl and natural rock salt crystals from various localities, including potential repository sites. Measurements are being made with equipment for recording the radiation induced F-center and colloid particle absorption bands during irradiation with 1.5 MeV electrons at various temperatures. A technique has been developed to resolve the overlapping F-center and colloid bands. The resulting spectra and curves of absorption vs. dose provide information on colloid particle size and concentration, activation energies for processes occurring during colloid formation, and additional data suggesting that both strain and radiation induced dislocations contribute to the colloid formation process

  16. Diamond-based photoconductors for deep UV detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balducci, A.; Bruzzi, M.; De Sio, A.; Donato, M.G.; Faggio, G.; Marinelli, M.; Messina, G.; Milani, E.; Morgada, M.E.; Pace, E.; Pucella, G.; Santangelo, S.; Scoccia, M.; Scuderi, S.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2006-01-01

    This work reports on the development and characterization of bi-dimensional deep-UV sensor arrays based on synthetic diamond to address the requirements of space-born astrophysical experiments. The material was synthesized at the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' where both heteroepitaxial polycrystalline diamond films and homoepitaxial single-crystal diamonds are grown using a tubular MWCVD reactor. The quality of chemical vapour deposited diamond was characterized by cathodoluminescence, photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy and thermally stimulated currents. Then, suitable samples were selected and used to fabricate photoconductive single-pixel and 2D array devices by evaporating metal contacts on the growth surface. The electro-optical characterization of the devices was carried out in a wide spectral region, ranging from 120 to 2400 nm. A deuterium lamp and a 0.5 m vacuum monochromator were used to measure the detector responsivity under continuous monochromatic irradiation in the 120-250 nm spectral range, while an optical parametric oscillator tunable laser producing 5 ns pulses was used as light source from 210 up to 2400 nm. Time response, signal-to-noise ratio, responsivity and visible rejection factor were evaluated and the results are hereafter summarized

  17. CVD diamond windows for infrared synchrotron applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sussmann, R.S.; Pickles, C.S.J.; Brandon, J.R.; Wort, C.J.H.; Coe, S.E.; Wasenczuk, A.; Dodge, C.N.; Beale, A.C.; Krehan, A.J.; Dore, P.; Nucara, A.; Calvani, P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the attributes that make diamond a unique material for infrared synchrotron beam experiments. New developments in diamond synthesised by Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) promise to extend the range of applications which have been hitherto limited by the availability and cost of large-size single-crystal diamond. Polycrystalline CVD diamond components such as large (100 mm) diameter windows with extremely good transparency over a wide spectral range are now commercially available. Properties of CVD diamond of relevance to optical applications, such as mechanical strength, thermal conductivity and absolute bulk absorption, are discussed. It is shown that although some of the properties of CVD diamond (similar to other polycrystalline industrial ceramics) are affected by the grain structure, currently produced CVD diamond optical components have the quality and performance required for numerous demanding applications

  18. Modular design of synthetic protein mimics. Characterization of the helical conformation of a 13-residue peptide in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karle, I.L.; Flippen-Anderson, J.L.; Uma, K.; Balaram, P.

    1989-01-01

    The incorporation of α-aminoisobutyryl (Aib) residues into peptide sequences facilitates helical folding. Aib-containing sequences have been chosen for the design of rigid helical segments in a modular approach to the construction of a synthetic protein mimic. The helical conformation of the synthetic peptide Boc-Aib-(Val-Ala-Leu-Aib) 3 -OMe in crystals is established by X-ray diffraction. The 13-residue apolar peptide adopts a helical form in the crystal with seven α-type hydrogen bonds in the middle and 3 10 -type hydrogen bonds at either end. The helices stack in columns, zigzag rather than linear, by means of direct NH hor-ellipsis OC head to tail hydrogen bonds. Leucyl side chains are extended on one side of the helix and valyl side chains on the other side. Water molecules form hydrogen bonds with several backbone carbonyl oxygens that also participate in α-helix hydrogen bonds. There is no apparent distortion of the helix caused by hydration

  19. Diamond turning of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  20. Characterization of diamond amorphized by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, W.R.; Lee, E.H.

    1992-01-01

    Single crystal diamond has been implanted at 1 MeV with 2 x 10 20 Ar/m 2 . Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeled geometry revealed a broad amorphized region underlying a thin, partially crystalline layer. Raman spectroscopy disclosed modifications in the bonding characteristic of the appearance of non-diamond carbon. The complementary nature of the two analysis techniques is demonstrated. The Knoop hardness of the implanted diamond was reduced by implantation

  1. Mineral resource of the month: diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    The article presents information on diamond, which is regarded as the world's most popular gemstone. It states that there is strength in the covalent bonding between its carbon atoms, resulting to the strength of its physical properties. The presence of colors in diamonds may be attributed to the impurities that settle in the crystal lattice. Diamonds have been used as decorative items since the ancient era.

  2. The mechanical and strength properties of diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, J E

    2012-12-01

    Diamond is an exciting material with many outstanding properties; see, for example Field J E (ed) 1979 The Properties of Diamond (London: Academic) and Field J E (ed) 1992 The Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond (London: Academic). It is pre-eminent as a gemstone, an industrial tool and as a material for solid state research. Since natural diamonds grew deep below the Earth's surface before their ejection to mineable levels, they also contain valuable information for geologists. The key to many of diamond's properties is the rigidity of its structure which explains, for example, its exceptional hardness and its high thermal conductivity. Since 1953, it has been possible to grow synthetic diamond. Before then, it was effectively only possible to have natural diamond, with a small number of these found in the vicinity of meteorite impacts. Techniques are now available to grow gem quality synthetic diamonds greater than 1 carat (0.2 g) using high temperatures and pressures (HTHP) similar to those found in nature. However, the costs are high, and the largest commercially available industrial diamonds are about 0.01 carat in weight or about 1 mm in linear dimension. The bulk of synthetic diamonds used industrially are 600 µm or less. Over 75% of diamond used for industrial purposes today is synthetic material. In recent years, there have been two significant developments. The first is the production of composites based on diamond; these materials have a significantly greater toughness than diamond while still maintaining very high hardness and reasonable thermal conductivity. The second is the production at low pressures by metastable growth using chemical vapour deposition techniques. Deposition onto non-diamond substrates was first demonstrated by Spitsyn et al 1981 J. Cryst. Growth 52 219-26 and confirmed by Matsumoto et al 1982 Japan J. Appl. Phys. 21 L183-5. These developments have added further to the versatility of diamond. Two other groups of

  3. Bending diamonds by femtosecond laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Peter; Esberg, Jakob; Kirsebom, Kim

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method based on femtosecond laser ablation for the fabrication of statically bent diamond crystals. Using this method, curvature radii of 1 m can easily be achieved, and the curvature obtained is very uniform. Since diamond is extremely tolerant to high radiation doses, partly due...

  4. Large diamonds grown at high pressure conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Kanda, H

    2000-01-01

    A technique has been established to grow large diamonds up to 2 cm. The crystals are bulky polyhedron with yellow, blue, green or brown color as well as colorless, which depend on impurities. The impurities incorporated into the diamond are limited, i.e. nitrogen, boron, nickel, cobalt, silicon and phosphorus.

  5. Diamond nanophotonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Beha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the coupling of single color centers in diamond to plasmonic and dielectric photonic structures to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Nanometer spatial control in the creation of single color centers in diamond is achieved by implantation of nitrogen atoms through high-aspect-ratio channels in a mica mask. Enhanced broadband single-photon emission is demonstrated by coupling nitrogen–vacancy centers to plasmonic resonators, such as metallic nanoantennas. Improved photon-collection efficiency and directed emission is demonstrated by solid immersion lenses and micropillar cavities. Thereafter, the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the guided modes of micropillar resonators is discussed along with experimental results. Finally, we present a gas-phase-doping approach to incorporate color centers based on nickel and tungsten, in situ into diamond using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The fabrication of silicon–vacancy centers in nanodiamonds by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is discussed in addition.

  6. High thermal conductivity of diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Patrick M.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this educational exercise were to demonstrate the high rate of heat flow from a synthetic diamond coupon and to compare it to a commonly used thermal conductor, such as copper. The principles of heat transfer by conduction and convection may also be demonstrated. A list of equipment and supplies and the procedure for the experiment are presented.

  7. Crystal structures, in-silico study and anti-microbial potential of synthetic monocarbonyl curcuminoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ud Din, Zia; Serrano, N. F. G.; Ademi, Kastriot; Sousa, C. P.; Deflon, Victor Marcelo; Maia, Pedro Ivo da Silva; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson

    2017-09-01

    In this work the screening of 20 unsymmetrical chalcone and curcuminoids analogues in regard of their antimicrobial properties was conducted. Electron donating groups in the aromatic rings in the chalcone and curcuminoid derivatives produced higher antimicrobial effect. Compounds 1, 9 and 15 exhibited good activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. These compounds were further evaluated against nine micro-organisms of pathological interest. Pharmmaper was used for target fishing of compounds against important bacterial targets. Molecular Docking helped to verify the results of these compounds against the selected bacterial target D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase (PDB ID: 1PW1). The crystal structure of ligand and docked conformers in the active site of 1PW1 were analyzed. As a result structure-activity relationships are proposed. Structures of compounds 14 and 16 were obtained through single crystals X-ray diffraction studies. Compound 14 crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/c with unit cell dimensions a = 13.1293(3) Å, b = 17.5364(4) Å, c = 15.1433(3) Å, β = 95.6440(10), V = 3469.70(13) Å3 and Z = 8. Compound 16 crystallizes in triclinic space group Pī with unit cell dimensions a = 6.8226(4) Å, b = 7.2256(4) Å, c = 18.1235(12) Å, β = 87.322(4), V = 850.57(9) Å3 and Z = 2.

  8. Ultimate Atomic Bling: Nanotechnology of Diamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, Jeremy

    2010-05-25

    Diamonds exist in all sizes, from the Hope Diamond to minuscule crystals only a few atoms across. The smallest of these diamonds are created naturally by the same processes that make petroleum. Recently, researchers discovered that these 'diamondoids' are formed in many different structural shapes, and that these shapes can be used like LEGO blocks for nanotechnology. This talk will discuss the discovery of these nano-size diamonds and highlight current SLAC/Stanford research into their applications in electronics and medicine.

  9. A Mathematica package for calculation of planar channeling radiation spectra of relativistic electrons channeled in a diamond-structure single crystal (quantum approach)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadegan, B.

    2013-03-01

    The presented Mathematica code is an efficient tool for simulation of planar channeling radiation spectra of relativistic electrons channeled along major crystallographic planes of a diamond-structure single crystal. The program is based on the quantum theory of channeling radiation which has been successfully applied to study planar channeling at electron energies between 10 and 100 MeV. Continuum potentials for different planes of diamond, silicon and germanium single crystals are calculated using the Doyle-Turner approximation to the atomic scattering factor and taking thermal vibrations of the crystal atoms into account. Numerical methods are applied to solve the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. The code is designed to calculate the electron wave functions, transverse electron states in the planar continuum potential, transition energies, line widths of channeling radiation and depth dependencies of the population of quantum states. Finally the spectral distribution of spontaneously emitted channeling radiation is obtained. The simulation of radiation spectra considerably facilitates the interpretation of experimental data. Catalog identifier: AEOH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 446 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 209805 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica. Computer: Platforms on which Mathematica is available. Operating system: Operating systems on which Mathematica is available. RAM: 1 MB Classification: 7.10. Nature of problem: Planar channeling radiation is emitted by relativistic charged particles during traversing a single crystal in direction parallel to a crystallographic plane. Channeling is modeled as the motion

  10. Anisotropic diamond etching through thermochemical reaction between Ni and diamond in high-temperature water vapour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hiraku; Kato, Hiromitsu; Makino, Toshiharu; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Tsubasa; Inokuma, Takao; Tokuda, Norio

    2018-04-27

    Diamond possesses excellent physical and electronic properties, and thus various applications that use diamond are under development. Additionally, the control of diamond geometry by etching technique is essential for such applications. However, conventional wet processes used for etching other materials are ineffective for diamond. Moreover, plasma processes currently employed for diamond etching are not selective, and plasma-induced damage to diamond deteriorates the device-performances. Here, we report a non-plasma etching process for single crystal diamond using thermochemical reaction between Ni and diamond in high-temperature water vapour. Diamond under Ni films was selectively etched, with no etching at other locations. A diamond-etching rate of approximately 8.7 μm/min (1000 °C) was successfully achieved. To the best of our knowledge, this rate is considerably greater than those reported so far for other diamond-etching processes, including plasma processes. The anisotropy observed for this diamond etching was considerably similar to that observed for Si etching using KOH.

  11. Charge-collection efficiency of single-crystal CVD diamond detector for low-energy charged particles with energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yuki, E-mail: sato.yuki@jaea.go.jp [Collaborative Laboratories for Advanced Decommissioning Science (CLADS), Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2–4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Murakami, Hiroyuki [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2–1Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shimaoka, Takehiro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Kaneko, Junichi H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2016-10-21

    The performance of a diamond detector created from a single-crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition was studied for application in detecting charged particles having energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV. Energy peaks of different low-energy ions were clearly observed. However, we observed that the pulse height for individual incident ions decreases with increasing atomic number of the ions. We estimated the charge collection efficiency of the generated charge carriers by the incident charged particles. The charge collection efficiencies are 97.0 ± 0.7% for 2 MeV helium-ions (He{sup +}). On the other hand, compared with that of He{sup +}, silicon-ions (Si{sup +}) and gold-ions (Au{sup 3+}) show low charge collection efficiency: 70.6 ± 2.2% and 29.5 ± 4.2% for 2 MeV-Si{sup +} and 2 MeV-Au{sup 3+}, respectively. We also found that the charge collection efficiency decreases as the generated charge density inside the diamond crystal increases.

  12. Effect of diamond on structure and properties of confined water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsanov, Stepan S.; Batsanov, Andrei S.

    2016-05-01

    The molar volume of water adsorbed on the surface of micro- and nano-powders of diamond was determined from the measured densities of dry and variously hydrated diamond powders. This volume decreases near the diamond surface and in the first adsorbed monolayer can be as low as half that of bulk water. This effect can be attributed to breakdown of the hydrogen bond network, as confirmed by IR spectroscopy and calorimetrical data for crystal hydrates of diamond.

  13. Economical and technical aspects of producing of diamond impregnated tools

    OpenAIRE

    Borowiecka-Jamrozek, Joanna; Lachowski, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In the paper the analysis of dynamics of mining, production and prices of industrial diamonds and cobalt was performed during 1900-2011 years. Cobalt is using as a based material used for matrix of diamond impregnated tools for cutting of natural stones. Until the early 1950s the developments in diamond tools were relatively slow. In that period only mined diamond crystals were available. Much faster developments in the tool manufacturing technology was caused by development the production...

  14. Ion channelling in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derry, T.E.

    1978-06-01

    Diamond is one of the most extreme cases from a channelling point of view, having the smallest thermal vibration amplitude and the lowest atomic number of commonly-encountered crystals. These are the two parameters most important for determining channelling behaviour. It is of consiberable interest therefore to see how well the theories explaining and predicting the channeling properties of other substance, succeed with diamond. Natural diamond, although the best available form for these experiments, is rather variable in its physical properties. Part of the project was devoted to considering and solving the problem of obtaining reproducible results representative of the ideal crystal. Channelling studies were performed on several good crystals, using the Rutherford backscattering method. Critical angles for proton channelling were measured for incident energies from 0.6 to 4.5 MeV, in the three most open axes and three most open planes of the diamond structure, and for α-particle channelling at 0.7 and 1.0 MeV (He + ) in the same axes and planes. For 1.0 MeV protons, the crystal temperature was varied from 20 degrees Celsius to 700 degrees Celsius. The results are presented as curves of backscattered yield versus angle in the region of each axis or plane, and summarised in the form of tables and graphs. Generally the critical angles, axial minimum yields, and temperature dependence are well predicted by the accepted theories. The most valuable overall conclusion is that the mean thermal vibration amplitude of the atoms in a crytical determines the critical approach distance to the channel walls at which an ion can remain channelled, even when this distance is much smaller than the Thomas-Fermi screening distance of the atomic potential, as is the case in diamond. A brief study was made of the radiation damage caused by α-particle bombardment, via its effect on the channelling phenomenon. It was possible to hold damage down to negligible levels during the

  15. Crystal violet: Study of the photo-fading of an early synthetic dye in aqueous solution and on paper with HPLC-PDA, LC-MS and FORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Confortin, D.; Neevel, H.; Brustolon, M.; Franco, L.; Kettelarij, A.J.; Williams, R.M.; van Bommel, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    The photo-fading of crystal violet (CV), one of the earliest synthetic dyes and an ink component, is examined both in solution and on paper. Aqueous solutions of CV were exposed to UV light (365nm) and samples were taken at constant time intervals and analysed with a High Performance Liquid

  16. Diamond's 2-billion-year growth charts tectonic shift in early Earth's carbon cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davies, G.R.; Gress, M.U.

    2017-01-01

    A study of tiny mineral 'inclusions' within diamonds from Botswana has shown that diamond crystals can take billions of years to grow. One diamond was found to contain silicate material that formed 2.3 billion years ago in its interior and a 250 million-year-old garnet crystal towards its outer rim,

  17. Facet‐Controlled Synthetic Strategy of Cu2O‐Based Crystals for Catalysis and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Shape‐dependent catalysis and sensing behaviours are primarily focused on nanocrystals enclosed by low‐index facets, especially the three basic facets ({100}, {111}, and {110}). Several novel strategies have recently exploded by tailoring the original nanocrystals to greatly improve the catalysis and sensing performances. In this Review, we firstly introduce the synthesis of a variety of Cu2O nanocrystals, including the three basic Cu2O nanocrystals (cubes, octahedra and rhombic dodecahedra, enclosed by the {100}, {111}, and {110} facets, respectively), and Cu2O nanocrystals enclosed by high‐index planes. We then discuss in detail the three main facet‐controlled synthetic strategies (deposition, etching and templating) to fabricate Cu2O‐based nanocrystals with heterogeneous, etched, or hollow structures, including a number of important concepts involved in those facet‐controlled routes, such as the selective adsorption of capping agents for protecting special facets, and the impacts of surface energy and active sites on reaction activity trends. Finally, we highlight the facet‐dependent properties of the Cu2O and Cu2O‐based nanocrystals for applications in photocatalysis, gas catalysis, organocatalysis and sensing, as well as the relationship between their structures and properties. We also summarize and comment upon future facet‐related directions. PMID:27980909

  18. An Insight into the Pharmacophores of Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitors from Synthetic and Crystal Structural Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen,G.; Wang, H.; Robinson, H.; Cai, J.; Wan, Y.; Ke, H.

    2008-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) have been used as drugs for treatment of male erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. An insight into the pharmacophores of PDE5 inhibitors is essential for development of second generation of PDE5 inhibitors, but has not been completely illustrated. Here we report the synthesis of a new class of the sildenafil derivatives and a crystal structure of the PDE5 catalytic domain in complex with 5-(2-ethoxy-5-(sulfamoyl)-3-thienyl)-1-methyl-3-propyl-1, 6-dihydro-7H-pyrazolo[4, 3-d]pyrimidin-7-one (12). Inhibitor 12 induces conformational change of the H-loop (residues 660-683), which is different from any of the known PDE5 structures. The pyrazolopyrimidinone groups of 12 and sildenafil are well superimposed, but their sulfonamide groups show a positional difference of as much as 1.5 Angstroms . The structure-activity analysis suggests that a small hydrophobic pocket and the H-loop of PDE5 are important for the inhibitor affinity, in addition to two common elements for binding of almost all the PDE inhibitors: the stack against the phenylalanine and the hydrogen bond with the invariant glutamine. However, the PDE5-12 structure does not provide a full explanation to affinity changes of the inhibitors. Thus alternatives such as conformational change of the M-loop are open and further structural study is required.

  19. On-Chip Quantum Repeater in Diamond for Space-Based Quantum Communication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The focus of my research is on the optical properties of diamond. A diamond is composed of a crystal arrangement of carbon atoms and it is this structure that gives...

  20. Investigation of planar channeling radiation on diamond and quartz crystals at electron energies between 14 and 34 MeV and probing the influence of ultrasonic waves on channeling radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadegan, B.

    2007-11-15

    Measurements of planar channeling radiation (CR) have been performed at the electron beam of ELBE within an energy range between 14 and 34 MeV and for thicknesses of the diamond crystals between 42.5 and 500 {mu}m. Absolute CR photon yields have for the first time been obtained for the above given ranges of electron energy and crystal thickness. The square-root dependence of the planar CR photon yield on the thickness of diamond crystals has been confirmed. A systematic quantitative investigation of the influence of the crystal thickness on the CR line shape has for the first time been performed. The mean-squared multiple-scattering angle effective for planar CR observed in forward direction has been found to be weaker as assumed from scattering in amorphous targets. Scaling laws deduced from the measured CR data are of advantage for the operation of a CR source. The second part of this thesis deals with the possibility of stimulation of CR emission by means of ultrasonic vibrations excited in a piezoelectric single crystal. Since the knowledge of the CR spectra generated on undisturbed quartz crystals is a necessary precondition for some investigation of the influence of US, planar CR has for the first time been measured at medium electron energies for a variety of planes in quartz. As a consequence of the hexagonal structure of this crystal, relative intense CR could be registered even out of planes with indices larger than one. On the base of the non-linear optics method, occupation functions and spectral distributions of planar CR have been calculated for channeling of 20 MeV electrons in the (01 anti 15) plane of a 20 {mu}m thick quartz crystal at resonant influence of ultrasound (US). The resonance frequencies have been deduced from the measurements of CR spectra performed on quartz. First experimental investigations of the influence of US on CR started at ELBE aimed at the study of the effect of non-resonant ultrasonic vibrations excited in a 500 {mu}m thick

  1. Investigation of planar channeling radiation on diamond and quartz crystals at electron energies between 14 and 34 MeV and probing the influence of ultrasonic waves on channeling radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azadegan, B.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of planar channeling radiation (CR) have been performed at the electron beam of ELBE within an energy range between 14 and 34 MeV and for thicknesses of the diamond crystals between 42.5 and 500 μm. Absolute CR photon yields have for the first time been obtained for the above given ranges of electron energy and crystal thickness. The square-root dependence of the planar CR photon yield on the thickness of diamond crystals has been confirmed. A systematic quantitative investigation of the influence of the crystal thickness on the CR line shape has for the first time been performed. The mean-squared multiple-scattering angle effective for planar CR observed in forward direction has been found to be weaker as assumed from scattering in amorphous targets. Scaling laws deduced from the measured CR data are of advantage for the operation of a CR source. The second part of this thesis deals with the possibility of stimulation of CR emission by means of ultrasonic vibrations excited in a piezoelectric single crystal. Since the knowledge of the CR spectra generated on undisturbed quartz crystals is a necessary precondition for some investigation of the influence of US, planar CR has for the first time been measured at medium electron energies for a variety of planes in quartz. As a consequence of the hexagonal structure of this crystal, relative intense CR could be registered even out of planes with indices larger than one. On the base of the non-linear optics method, occupation functions and spectral distributions of planar CR have been calculated for channeling of 20 MeV electrons in the (01 anti 15) plane of a 20 μm thick quartz crystal at resonant influence of ultrasound (US). The resonance frequencies have been deduced from the measurements of CR spectra performed on quartz. First experimental investigations of the influence of US on CR started at ELBE aimed at the study of the effect of non-resonant ultrasonic vibrations excited in a 500 μm thick

  2. Modifying thin film diamond for electronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baral, B.

    1999-01-01

    The unique combination of properties that diamond possesses are being exploited in both electronic and mechanical applications. An important step forward in the field has been the ability to grow thin film diamond by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) methods and to control parameters such as crystal orientation, dopant level and surface roughness. An extensive understanding of the surface of any potential electronic material is vital to fully comprehend its behaviour within device structures. The surface itself ultimately controls key aspects of device performance when interfaced with other materials. This study has provided insight into important chemical reactions on polycrystalline CVD diamond surfaces, addressing how certain surface modifications will ultimately affect the properties of the material. A review of the structure, bonding, properties and potential of diamond along with an account of the current state of diamond technology and CVD diamond growth is provided. The experimental chapter reviews bulk material and surface analytical techniques employed in this work and is followed by an investigation of cleaning treatments for polycrystalline CVD diamond aimed at removing non-diamond carbon from the surface. Selective acid etch treatments are compared and contrasted for efficacy with excimer laser irradiation and hydrogen plasma etching. The adsorption/desorption kinetics of potential dopant-containing precursors on polycrystalline CVD diamond surfaces have been investigated to compare their effectiveness at introducing dopants into the diamond during the growth stage. Both boron and sulphur-containing precursor compounds have been investigated. Treating polycrystalline CVD diamond in various atmospheres / combination of atmospheres has been performed to enhance electron field emission from the films. Films which do not emit electrons under low field conditions can be modified such that they emit at fields as low as 10 V/μm. The origin of this enhancement

  3. Laser activation of diamond surface for electroless metal plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenov, S. M.; Shafeev, G. A.; Laptev, V. A.; Loubnin, E. N.

    1994-04-01

    Selective area electroless nickel and copper deposition onto the surface of diamond single crystals and polycrystalline diamond films has been realized. Three methods of laser-assisted activation of diamond surface were applied: (i) prenucleation of diamond surface with a thin layer of palladium catalyst via laser-induced decomposition of a palladium acetyl-acetonate [Pd(acac)2] solid film; (ii) deposition of palladium by means of the decomposition of Pd(acac)2 dissolved in dimethylformamide; (iii) laser-induced damage of diamond surface.

  4. High-pressure-high-temperature treatment of natural diamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Royen, J V

    2002-01-01

    The results are reported of high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) treatment experiments on natural diamonds of different origins and with different impurity contents. The diamonds are annealed in a temperature range up to 2000 sup o C at stabilizing pressures up to 7 GPa. The evolution is studied of different defects in the diamond crystal lattice. The influence of substitutional nitrogen atoms, plastic deformation and the combination of these is discussed. Diamonds are characterized at room and liquid nitrogen temperature using UV-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry and photoluminescence spectrometry. The economic implications of diamond HPHT treatments are discussed.

  5. Development of a diamond dosimeter for measuring the absorbed dose in small beams used in stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsolat, F.

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a relatively recent technique used for the treatment of small benign and malignant tumors with small radiation beams. The clinical efficiency of this technique has been proved. However, the measurement of absolute and relative dose in small beams is not possible currently due to the lack of suited detectors for these measurements. In small beam dosimetry, the detector has to be as close as possible to tissue equivalence and exhibit a small detection volume due to the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. Characteristics of diamond (water equivalent material Z=6, high density) make it an ideal candidate to fulfil most of small beam dosimetry requirements. In this thesis, we developed a dosimeter prototype for small beams, based on CVD synthetic single crystal diamond. The diamond samples were characterized optically and their detection properties were investigated under X-rays and alpha-particles. First diamond dosimeter prototypes were tested with small beams produced by several stereotactic machines. Studies using Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to optimize the parameters involved in the detector response in small beams. This leaded to a final diamond dosimeter prototype that respects all radiotherapy centers requirements, in both standard and small beams. (author) [fr

  6. Recent Advances in Diamond Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Trischuk, W.

    2008-01-01

    With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2009, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2012, ATLAS and CMS are planning for detector upgrades for their innermost layers requiring radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is now planned for all LHC experiments. This material is now being considered as an alternate sensor for use very close to the interaction region of the super LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Recently the RD42 collaboration constructed, irradiated and tested polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond sensors to the highest fluences available. We present beam test results of chemical vapor deposition diamond up to fluences of 1.8 x 10^16 protons/cm^2 showing that both polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds follow a single damage curve allowing one t...

  7. Study of high-overtone bulk acoustic resonators based on the Me1/AlN/Me2/(100) diamond piezoelectric layered structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, B. P.; Kvashnin, G. M.; Telichko, A. V.; Gordeev, G. I.; Burkov, S. I.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-07-01

    The Me1/AlN/Me2/(100) diamond structure has been theoretically analyzed and experimentally investigated in the range 0.5-10 GHz using high-overtone bulk acoustic resonators with different electrodes topologies based on the Al/AlN/Mo/(100) diamond structure. The maximum quality parameter Q × f ≈ 1014 Hz was obtained at f = 9.5 GHz. The layered structure has been analyzed using the developed HBAR software v. 2.3. It is demonstrated that the features in the frequency dependences of the parameters of such resonators are related to the behavior of a loaded thin-film piezoelectric transducer. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experiment. The frequency dependences of the equivalent parameters of the resonators have been calculated. It is shown that the synthetic type IIa diamond single crystal in combination with aluminum nitride is promising for implementation of high-Q acoustoelectronic microwave devices.

  8. An Analysis of the Retention of a Diamond Particle in a Metallic Matrix after Hot Pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borowiecka-Jamrozek J.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with computer modelling of the retention of a synthetic diamond particle in a metallic matrix produced by powder metallurgy. The analyzed sintered powders can be used as matrices for diamond impregnated tools. First, the behaviour of sintered cobalt powder was analyzed. The model of a diamond particle embedded in a metallic matrix was created using Abaqus software. The preliminary analysis was performed to determine the mechanical parameters that are independent of the shape of the crystal. The calculation results were compared with the experimental data. Next, sintered specimens obtained from two commercially available powder mixtures were studied. The aim of the investigations was to determine the influence of the mechanical and thermal parameters of the matrix materials on their retentive properties. The analysis indicated the mechanical parameters that are responsible for the retention of diamond particles in a matrix. These mechanical variables have been: the elastic energy of particle, the elastic energy of matrix and the radius of plastic zone around particle.

  9. Diamonds on Diamond: structural studies at extreme conditions on the Diamond Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, M I

    2015-03-06

    Extreme conditions (EC) research investigates how the structures and physical and chemical properties of materials change when subjected to extremes of pressure and temperature. Pressures in excess of one million times atmospheric pressure can be achieved using a diamond anvil cell, and, in combination with high-energy, micro-focused radiation from a third-generation synchrotron such as Diamond, detailed structural information can be obtained using either powder or single-crystal diffraction techniques. Here, I summarize some of the research drivers behind international EC research, and then briefly describe the techniques by which high-quality diffraction data are obtained. I then highlight the breadth of EC research possible on Diamond by summarizing four examples from work conducted on the I15 and I19 beamlines, including a study which resulted in the first research paper from Diamond. Finally, I look to the future, and speculate as to the type of EC research might be conducted at Diamond over the next 10 years. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Mean carrier transport properties and charge collection dynamics of single-crystal, natural type IIa diamonds from ion-induced conductivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sung Su [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Ion-induced conductivity has been used to investigate the detector characteristics of diamond detectors. Both integrated-charge, and time-resolved current measurements were performed to examine the mean carrier transport properties of diamond and the dynamics of charge collection under highly-localized and high-density excitation conditions. The integrated-charge measurements were conducted with a standard pulse-counting system with 241Am radioactivity as the excitation source for the detectors. The time-resolved current measurements were performed using a 70 GHz random sampling oscilloscope with the detectors incorporated into high-speed microstrip transmission lines and the excitation source for these measurements was an ion beam of either 5-MeV He+ or 10-MeV Si3+. The detectors used in both experiments can be described as metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) devices where a volume of the detector material is sandwiched between two metal plates. A charge collection model was developed to interpret the integrated-charge measurements which enabled estimation of the energy required to produce an electron-hole pair (ϵdi) and the mean carrier transport properties in diamond, such as carrier mobility and lifetime, and the behavior of the electrical contacts to diamond.

  11. Investigations of the coherent hard photon yields from (50-300) GeV/c electrons/positrons in the strong crystalline fields of diamond, Si, and Ge crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the influence of strong fields on QED-processes like: Emission of coherent radiation and pair-production when multi-hundred GeV electrons/positrons and photons penetrate single crystals near axial/planar directions. The targets will be diamond, Si, Ge and W crystals.\\\\\\\\ QED is a highly developed theory and has been investigated experimentally in great detail. In recent years it has become technically possible to investigate QED-processes in very strong electromagnetic fields around the characteristic strong field E$_{0}$ = m$^{2}$c$^{3}$/eh = 1.32.10$^{16}$ V/cm. The work of such a field over the Compton length equals the electron mass. The theoretical description of QED in such fields is beyond the framework of perturbation theory. Such fields are only obtained in laboratories for a) heavy ion collisions b) interactions of multi-GeV electrons with extremely intense laser fields and in oriented crystals. In fact it turns out that crystals are unique for this type of e...

  12. A Review on the Low-Dimensional and Hybridized Nanostructured Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongdong Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, besides the breakthrough of high-rate growth of chemical vapor deposited single-crystal diamonds, numerous nanostructured diamond films have been rapidly developed in the research fields of the diamond-based sciences and industrial applications. The low-dimensional diamonds of two-dimensional atomic-thick nanofilms and nanostructural diamond on the surface of bulk diamond films have been theoretically and experimentally investigated. In addition, the diamond-related hybrid nanostructures of n-type oxide/p-type diamond and n-type nitride/p-type diamond, having high performance physical and chemical properties, are proposed for further applications. In this review, we first briefly introduce the three categories of diamond nanostructures and then outline the current advances in these topics, including their design, fabrication, characterization, and properties. Finally, we address the remaining challenges in the research field and the future activities.

  13. Diamond particle detectors systems in high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gan, Kock Kiam

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using diamond detect or s has matured from devices based on a rather large pads to highly granular pixelated device s . The ATLAS experiment has recently installed a diamond pixel detector, the Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM), to measure the luminosity in the upgraded LHC with higher instantaneous luminosity. Polycrystalline diamonds were used to fabricate the diamond pixel modules. The design , production, and test beam result s are described. CMS also has a similar plan to construct a diamond based luminosity monitor, the Pixel Luminos ity Telescope s (PLT) . In a pilot run using single crystal diamond, the pulse height was found to depend on the luminosity . Consequently the collaboration decided to use silicon instead due to time constrain ts .

  14. Diamond Provenance Through Shape, Colour, Surface Features and Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J.

    2002-05-01

    The physical properties of diamond provide a possible means by which run-of-mine productions may be identified. Such properties as shape, the regularity and angularity of the crystal form, the level of transparency, colour, syngenetic inclusion content and surface feature characteristics, all as a function of diamond size, can classify diamond productions. In early work, up to 1500 diamonds in specific sizes ranging from just under 2mm up to 6mm were evaluated. Using this procedure, most of the diamonds from the main mines in southern Africa have now been classified. Within South Africa, the mine at Swartruggens is the only one to have measurable levels of cube-shaped diamonds and an absence of the spinel twin form of diamond, more commonly known as the macle. In Botswana, the proportion of cube related forms at Jwaneng is about four times that at Orapa. Whilst the common diamond colours, colourless, yellow and brown, occur in most mines, there is a marked change in the proportion of transparent green-coated diamonds with depth in mines such as Finsch and Jwaneng. Individual mines may also have very small proportions of distinctive diamond colours, such as pinks at the Argyle mine in Australia and blues in the Premier mine in South Africa. More recently, classification emphasis has shifted away from large numbers of diamonds examined and particular attention has been paid to surface features, which reflect changes to the diamond either whilst still in the kimberlite, or subsequently during transport to an alluvial source. A classification of diamonds at the Venetia mine, South Africa, for example, showed that the proportion of diamonds with the feature referred to as corrosion sculpture, was distinctive between kimberlite types within the mine. With alluvial diamonds, transport causes further defects, particularly a general increase in the proportion of diamonds with surface features referred to as percussion marks and edge abrasion. The above observational

  15. Application of a single-crystal CVD diamond detector for simultaneous measurement of ions and X-rays from laser plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ryc, L.; Krása, Josef; Nowak, T.; Kravárik, J.; Klír, J.; Krouský, Eduard; Lorusso, A.; Margarone, Daniele; Nassisi, V.; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skála, Jiří; Ullschmied, Jiří; Velyhan, Andriy

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 165, 6-10 (2010), s. 481-487 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 228334 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : diamond detector * laser plasma * x-ray emission * ion emission Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.660, year: 2010

  16. Diamond growth on an array of seeds: The revolution of diamond production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, James C.; Sung, Michael; Sung, Emily

    2006-01-01

    The consumption of saw diamond grits is a measure of a nation's constructional activities. The per capita consumption for the world is about 0.7 carats in 2004, and in China, about 3 carats. The manufacture of large saw diamond grits requires stringent control of pressure and temperature that only a few companies can master. However, with the implementation of a novel diamond seeding technology, large saw diamond grits of extreme quality can be mass produced. With this breakthrough, the prices of saw grit will plummet in the near future that should benefit the constructional industry worldwide. Moreover, electronic or thermal grade of large diamond crystals may be produced for applications in semiconductor, electronic or optical industry

  17. Diamond MEMS: wafer scale processing, devices, and technology insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond has long held the promise of revolutionary new devices: impervious chemical barriers, smooth and reliable microscopic machines, and tough mechanical tools. Yet it's been an outsider. Laboratories have been effectively growing diamond crystals for at least 25 years, but the jump to market viability has always been blocked by the expense of diamond production and inability to integrate with other materials. Advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes have given rise to a hierarchy of carbon films ranging from diamond-like carbon (DLC) to vapor-deposited diamond coatings, however. All have pros and cons based on structure and cost, but they all share some of diamond's heralded attributes. The best performer, in theory, is the purest form of diamond film possible, one absent of graphitic phases. Such a material would capture the extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and chemical inertness of natural diamond. Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., Romeoville, Ill., is the first company to develop a distinct chemical process to create a marketable phase-pure diamond film. The material, called UNCD® (for ultrananocrystalline diamond), features grain sizes from 3 to 300 nm in size, and layers just 1 to 2 microns thick. With significant advantages over other thin films, UNCD is designed to be inexpensive enough for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, microelectromechanical machines (MEMS), cell phone circuitry, radio frequency devices, and even biosensors.

  18. Effects of surface treatment on the diamond deposition and performance of ceramic cutting tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.L.; Guidoboni, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon nitride cutting tool inserts with tool geometry TPGN 433 were pre-treated ultrasonically with different procedures before diamond deposition by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nucleation densities and deposition rates were compared with those of untreated inserts and inserts polished with diamond paste. An increase in diamond nucleation density was observed for samples with different pre-treatments relative to untreated substrates. A continuous diamond coating was obtained after deposition for 1 h for the sample polished with diamond paste before deposition while only discrete diamond crystals were obtained for samples without any pre-treatment. However, no significant differences in diamond crystal size, morphology and deposition rates were observed for different pre-treatments after long periods of deposition time. No significant difference in tool life was observed for the diamond-coated inserts with and without pre-treatment when tested with an Al-Si alloy. (orig.)

  19. Microinclusions in polycrystalline diamonds: insights into processes of diamond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wirth, R.; Enzmann, F.; Schwarz, J. O.; Kronz, A.

    2009-04-01

    Polycrystalline diamond aggregates (framesites) contain silicates of eclogitic and peridotitic affinity (e.g. Kurat and Dobosi, 2000). The minerals occur mostly in interstices and are intimately intergrown with the diamonds, indicating contemporaneous crystallization within the diamond stability field in the Earth's mantle. In addition to silicates, rarer phases such as Fe-carbide can sometimes be found in framesites that record unusually low local oxygen fugacity at the time of their formation (Jacob et al., 2004). Furthermore, while most gem-sized diamonds have old, often Archaean formation ages, some polycrystalline diamond aggregates have been shown to form directly preceding the kimberlite eruption (Jacob et al., 2000). Thus, these samples may provide a unique source of information on the nature and timing of small scale processes that lead to diamond formation and complement evidence from gem-sized diamonds. Here, we present a study of micro- and nano-inclusions in diamonds from a polycrystalline diamond aggregate (framesite) from the Orapa Mine (Botswana) and combine results from TEM/FIB analyses with high-resolution computerized micro-tomography (HR-µCT) and electron microprobe analyses to further constrain the formation of diamond in the Earth's mantle. Results In total, 14 microinclusions from fifteen FIB foils were investigated. Micro- and nano-inclusions identified by TEM were smaller than 1µm down to ca. 50nm in size, and are both monomineralic and multi-phase. The cavities are often lath-shaped and oriented parallel to each other; many show lattice dislocations in the surrounding diamond. In addition, inclusions are found along open cracks within the diamond single crystals. Mineral phases in the microinclusions comprise rutile, omphacite and a FeS phase (pyrrhotite). The multiphase inclusions most often consist of cavities that are only partly occupied (less than 50% of the total space), suggesting that the empty space was originally filled by a

  20. Crystal structure of mineral grechishchevite synthetic analogue and Hg-X (X=S, Se, Te) bonds topology in structures of mercury chalcogenhalides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervukhina, N.V.; Borisov, S.V.; Magarill, S.A.; Naumov, D.Yu.; Vasil'ev, V.I.; Nenashev, B.G.

    2004-01-01

    Structural studies of synthetic analog of mineral grechishchevite Hg 3 S 2 Br 1.00 Cl 0.50 I 0.50 were conducted, the mineral crystal structure was refined, the results of the studies being analyzed. For chalcogenhalides Hg 3 X 2 Hal 2 (X=S, Se, Te; Hal=Cl, Br, I) inventory was taken of intergrowing isolated and infinite, i.e. continuous, layered and carcass, covalently bonded Hg-X-radicals into pseudocubical matrix from halide ions [ru

  1. The crystal structure of Pd.sub.3./sub.HgTe.sub.3./sub., the synthetic analogue of temagamite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laufek, F.; Vymazalová, A.; Drábek, M.; Dušek, Michal; Navrátil, Jiří; Černošková, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 4 (2016), s. 825-834 ISSN 0935-1221 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : temagamite * crystal structure * crystal-structure solution * Pd-Hg telluride Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 1.362, year: 2016

  2. Use of the diamond to the detection of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mer, C.; Tromson, D.; Brambilla, A.; Foulon, F.; Guizard, B.; Bergonzo

    2001-01-01

    Diamond synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a valuable material for the detection of particles: broad forbidden energy band, high mobility of electron-hole pairs, and a short life-time of charge carriers. Diamond layers have been used in alpha detectors or gamma dose ratemeters designed to be used in hostile environment. Diamond presents a high resistance to radiation and corrosion. The properties of diamond concerning the detection of particles are spoilt by the existence of crystal defects even in high quality natural or synthesized diamond. This article presents recent works that have been performed in CEA laboratories in order to optimize the use of CVD diamond in particle detectors. (A.C.)

  3. Conditions of origin of natural diamonds of peridotite affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, F. R.; Finnerty, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    Studies of mineral inclusions in natural diamonds and rare diamondiferous xenoliths from kimberlites show that most diamonds are associated with a dunite or harzburgite paragenesis. The diamondiferous periodites and dunites have predominantly coarse or tabular textures that suggest low-temperature (less than 1100 C) equilibration. Application of the K(D) Fe/Mg(Ga/Ol) geothermometer of O'Neill and Wood to analytical data for the minerals in these rocks shows that most have equilibrated below 1100 C. Application of this thermometer to pairs of olivine and garnet crystals included in individual diamonds indicates that the diamonds have crystallized in the range 900-1300 C, with a majority of estimated equilibration temperatures falling in the range below 1150 C. Comparison of these estimates of equilibration temperature with the zone of invariant vapor composition solidus for kimberlite and garnet lherzolite determined by Eggler and Wendlandt (1979) suggests that many diamonds may have formed in subsolidus events.

  4. Graphene-on-diamond devices with increased current-carrying capacity: carbon sp2-on-sp3 technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie; Liu, Guanxiong; Sumant, Anirudha V; Goyal, Vivek; Balandin, Alexander A

    2012-03-14

    Graphene demonstrated potential for practical applications owing to its excellent electronic and thermal properties. Typical graphene field-effect transistors and interconnects built on conventional SiO(2)/Si substrates reveal the breakdown current density on the order of 1 μA/nm(2) (i.e., 10(8) A/cm(2)), which is ~100× larger than the fundamental limit for the metals but still smaller than the maximum achieved in carbon nanotubes. We show that by replacing SiO(2) with synthetic diamond, one can substantially increase the current-carrying capacity of graphene to as high as ~18 μA/nm(2) even at ambient conditions. Our results indicate that graphene's current-induced breakdown is thermally activated. We also found that the current carrying capacity of graphene can be improved not only on the single-crystal diamond substrates but also on an inexpensive ultrananocrystalline diamond, which can be produced in a process compatible with a conventional Si technology. The latter was attributed to the decreased thermal resistance of the ultrananocrystalline diamond layer at elevated temperatures. The obtained results are important for graphene's applications in high-frequency transistors, interconnects, and transparent electrodes and can lead to the new planar sp(2)-on-sp(3) carbon-on-carbon technology. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  5. Thermoluminescent properties of CVD diamond: applications to ionising radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitfils, A.

    2007-09-01

    Remarkable properties of synthetic diamond (human soft tissue equivalence, chemical stability, non-toxicity) make this material suitable for medical application as thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). This work highlights the interest of this material as radiotherapy TLD. In the first stage of this work, we looked after thermoluminescent (TL) and dosimetric properties of polycrystalline diamond made by Chemically Vapor Deposited (CVD) synthesis. Dosimetric characteristics are satisfactory as TLD for medical application. Luminescence thermal quenching on diamond has been investigated. This phenomenon leads to a decrease of dosimetric TL peak sensitivity when the heating rate increases. The second part of this work analyses the use of synthetic diamond as TLD in radiotherapy. Dose profiles, depth dose distributions and the cartography of an electron beam obtained with our samples are in very good agreement with results from an ionisation chamber. It is clearly shown that CVD) diamond is of interest to check beams of treatment accelerators. The use of these samples in a control of treatment with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy underlines good response of synthetic diamond in high dose gradient areas. These results indicate that CVD diamond is a promising material for radiotherapy dosimetry. (author)

  6. Synthetic Hemozoin (β-Hematin) Crystals Nucleate at the Surface of Neutral Lipid Droplets that Control Their Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambele, Melvin A.; Sewell, B. Trevor; Cummings, Franscious R.; Smith, Peter J.; Egan, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Emulsions of monopalmitoylglycerol (MPG) and of a neutral lipid blend (NLB), consisting of MPG, monostearoylglycerol, dipalmitoylglycerol, dioleoylglycerol and dilineoylglycerol (4:2:1:1:1), the composition associated with hemozoin from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, have been used to mediate the formation of β-hematin microcrystals. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction and electron spectroscopic imaging/electron energy loss spectroscopy (ESI/EELS) have been used to characterize both the lipid emulsion and β-hematin crystals. The latter have been compared with β-hematin formed at a pentanol/aqueous interface and with hemozoin both within P. falciparum parasites and extracted from the parasites. When lipid and ferriprotoporphyrin IX solutions in 1:9 v/v acetone/methanol were thoroughly pre-mixed either using an extruder or ultrasound, β-hematin crystals were found formed in intimate association with the lipid droplets. These crystals resembled hemozoin crystals, with prominent {100} faces. Lattice fringes in TEM indicated that these faces made contact with the lipid surface. The average length of these crystals was 0.62 times the average diameter of NLB droplets and their size distributions were statistically equivalent after 10 min incubation, suggesting that the lipid droplets also controlled the sizes of the crystals. This most closely resembles hemozoin formation in the helminth worm Schistosoma mansoni, while in P. falciparum, crystal formation appears to be associated with the much more gently curved digestive vacuole membrane which apparently leads to formation of much larger hemozoin crystals, similar to those formed at the flat pentanol-water interface. PMID:24244110

  7. Diamond Beamline I16 (Materials and Magnetism)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, S. P.; Bombardi, A.; Marshall, A. R.; Williams, J. H.; Barlow, G.; Day, A. G.; Pearson, M. R.; Woolliscroft, R. J.; Walton, R. D.; Beutier, G.; Nisbet, G.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the key features and performance specifications of a facility for high-resolution single-crystal x-ray diffraction at Diamond Light Source. The scientific emphasis of the beamline is materials- and x-ray-physics, including resonant and magnetic scattering. We highlight some of the more novel aspects of the beamline design.

  8. Synthesis of silicon carbide coating on diamond by microwave heating of diamond and silicon powder: A heteroepitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leparoux, S. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)], E-mail: susanne.leparoux@empa.ch; Diot, C. [Consultant, allee de Mozart 10, F-92300 Chatillon (France); Dubach, A. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Vaucher, S. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2007-10-15

    When a powder mixture of diamond and silicon is heated by microwaves, heteroepitaxial growth of SiC is observed on the (1 1 1) as well as on the (1 0 0) faces of the diamond. The SiC over-layer was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of triangular silicon carbide on the (1 1 1) faces of diamond while prismatic crystals are found on the (1 0 0) faces. The crystal growth seems to be favored in the plane parallel to the face (1 1 1)

  9. Synthesis of silicon carbide coating on diamond by microwave heating of diamond and silicon powder: A heteroepitaxial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leparoux, S.; Diot, C.; Dubach, A.; Vaucher, S.

    2007-01-01

    When a powder mixture of diamond and silicon is heated by microwaves, heteroepitaxial growth of SiC is observed on the (1 1 1) as well as on the (1 0 0) faces of the diamond. The SiC over-layer was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of triangular silicon carbide on the (1 1 1) faces of diamond while prismatic crystals are found on the (1 0 0) faces. The crystal growth seems to be favored in the plane parallel to the face (1 1 1)

  10. Diamonds for beam instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesmayer, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Diamond is perhaps the most versatile, efficient and radiation tolerant material available for use in beam detectors with a correspondingly wide range of applications in beam instrumentation. Numerous practical applications have demonstrated and exploited the sensitivity of diamond to charged particles, photons and neutrons. In this paper, a brief description of a generic diamond detector is given and the interaction of the CVD diamond detector material with protons, electrons, photons and neutrons is presented. Latest results of the interaction of sCVD diamond with 14 MeV mono-energetic neutrons are shown.

  11. crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Huang, Yisheng; Zhang, Lizhen; Lin, Zhoubin; Sun, Shijia; Wang, Guofu

    2014-07-01

    A Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal with dimensions of ϕ 17 × 30 mm3 was grown by the Czochralski method. The thermal expansion coefficients of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal are 1.32 × 10-5 K-1 along c-axis and 1.23 × 10-5 K-1 along a-axis, respectively. The spectroscopic characteristics of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal were investigated. The Judd-Ofelt theory was applied to calculate the spectral parameters. The absorption cross sections at 805 nm are 2.17 × 10-20 cm2 with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 15 nm for π-polarization, and 2.29 × 10-20 cm2 with a FWHM of 14 nm for σ-polarization. The emission cross sections are 3.19 × 10-20 cm2 for σ-polarization and 2.67 × 10-20 cm2 for π-polarization at 1,064 nm. The fluorescence quantum efficiency is 67 %. The quasi-cw laser of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal was performed. The maximum output power is 80 mW. The slope efficiency is 7.12 %. The results suggest Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal as a promising laser crystal fit for laser diode pumping.

  12. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  13. Controlled incorporation of mid-to-high Z transition metals in CVD diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S O; Wang, Y M; El-Dasher, B; Teslich, N E; Hamza, A V; Obloh, H; Mueller-Sebert, W; Wolfer, M; Fuchs, T; Grimm, M; Kriele, A; Wild, C

    2010-01-08

    We report on a general method to fabricate transition metal related defects in diamond. Controlled incorporation of Mo and W in synthetic CVD diamond was achieved by adding volatile metal precursors to the diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth process. Effects of deposition temperature, grain structure and precursor exposure on the doping level were systematically studied, and doping levels of up to 0.25 at.% have been achieved. The metal atoms are uniformly distributed throughout the diamond grains without any indication of inclusion formation. These results are discussed in context of the kinetically controlled growth process of CVD diamond.

  14. Nanosculptures on round surfaces of natural diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepurov, A. A.; Kosolobov, S. S.; Shcheglov, D. V.; Sonin, V. M.; Chepurov, A. I.; Latyshev, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    The results of a study using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy comprising the micromorphology of the ditrigonal and trigonal layers on surfaces near the edges of octahedral diamond crystals from the Udachnaya-Eastern kimberlite pipe in Yakutia are presented. The studied surface sculptures are elongated parallel to the direction and have similar morphological features, characterized by a wavy profile across the lamination, the absence of flat areas at the micro- and nanolevel. It is proposed that both sculpture types were formed as a result of dissolution under natural conditions. This suggestion is corroborated by the revelation of negative trigons on the octahedral facets of the studied diamonds.

  15. Origin, state of the art and some prospects of the diamond CVD

    CERN Document Server

    Spitsyn, B V; Alexenko, A E

    2000-01-01

    A short review on the diamond CVD origin, together with its state of the art and some prospects was given. New hybrid methods of the diamond CVD permit to gain 1.2 to 6 times of growth rate in comparison with ordinary diamond CVD's. Recent results on n-type diamond film synthesis through phosphorus doping in the course of the CVD process are briefly discussed. In comparison with high-pressure diamond synthesis, the CVD processes open new facets of the diamond as ultimate crystal for science and technology evolution. It was stressed that, mainly on the basis of new CVDs of diamond, the properties of natural diamond are not only reproduced, but can be surpassed. As examples, mechanical (fracture resistance), physical (thermal conductivity), and chemical (oxidation stability) properties are mentioned. Some present issues in the field are considered.

  16. Diamond dosimetry: Outcomes of the CANDIDO and CONRAD INFN projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucciolini, M.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Casati, M.; Cirrone, P.; Cuttone, G.; De Angelis, C.; Lovik, I.; Onori, S.; Raffaele, L.; Sciortino, S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the main results of the study, carried out in the framework of the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) projects, namely CANDIDO and CONRAD, on natural and synthetic diamond-based dosimeters for clinical radiotherapy. Characteristics of diamond such as radiation hardness, high sensitivity, tissue equivalence, etc., make this material interesting for dosimetry applications. For some years, natural diamonds have been commercially available for on-line radiotherapy dosimetry. Nevertheless, recent developments in the 'Chemical Vapour Deposition' (CVD) technique have addressed the attention on synthetic samples that potentially could be grown at low cost and with features suitable for dosimetric use. Several samples, differently grown and with different electrical contacts, have been compared by measuring their current response during irradiation with high-energy photon, electron and proton beams. Properties of dosimetric interest such as linearity, pre-irradiation dose, dose rate dependence, stability and rise time have been investigated. The results obtained so far within the INFN collaboration demonstrate the suitability of natural diamond detectors for many radiotherapy applications and the great potential of CVD diamond-based devices even though, at present, the commercial natural diamond dosimeters have a better behaviour with respect to the synthetic samples. Further efforts have to be made mainly to improve the dynamic of response and performance stability

  17. Diamond-cleaning investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derry, T.E.

    Four parcels of diamonds which either had or had not been cleaned using the usual techniques, chiefly involving etch in molten potassium nitrate were supplied by De Beers Diamond Research Laboratories. Each parcel contained about 40 stones, amounting to about 10 carats. Half the diamonds in each parcel were cleaned by a standard procedure involving half an hours ultrasonic agitation in a 20% solution of the commercial detergent 'Contrad' which is effectively a surfactant and chelating agent. Visual comparisons by a number of observers who were not told the stones' histories, established that these diamonds generally had a more sparkling appearance after the cleaning procedure had been applied

  18. Diamond growth in mantle fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Bureau, Hélène; Frost, Daniel J.; Bolfan-casanova, Nathalie; Leroy, Clémence; Esteve, Imène; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    International audience; In the upper mantle, diamonds can potentially grow from various forms of media (solid, gas, fluid) with a range of compositions (e.g. graphite, C–O–H fluids, silicate or carbonate melts). Inclusions trapped in diamonds are one of the few diagnostic tools that can constrain diamond growth conditions in the Earth's mantle. In this study, inclusion-bearing diamonds have been synthesized to understand the growth conditions of natural diamonds in the upper mantle. Diamonds ...

  19. Dechanneling of protons in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearick, R.W.; Derry, T.E.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    1989-01-01

    The axial dechanneling of protons in natural diamond crystals selected for low defect levels has been studied for beam energies of 1.0--8.9 MeV and crystal temperatures from 20--600 degree C. Measurements of the dechanneled-ion yield were taken along the three major axes left-angle 110 right-angle, left-angle 111 right-angle, and left-angle 100 right-angle. The data have been analyzed in terms of the diffusion model of dechanneling and generally good agreement between experiment and theory is obtained. The theory indicates that the predominant contribution to the dechanneling is from the electronic scattering. A scaling of the energy-dependent data for a given axis with a distance characteristic of the electronic scattering is observed. This scaling holds approximately for all data in the three axes considered. Measurements of the yield as a function of temperature indicate that the theory underestimates the nuclear scattering

  20. Tracing the depositional history of Kalimantan diamonds by zircon provenance and diamond morphology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueter, Nico; Soesilo, Joko; Fedortchouk, Yana; Nestola, Fabrizio; Belluco, Lorenzo; Troch, Juliana; Wälle, Markus; Guillong, Marcel; Von Quadt, Albrecht; Driesner, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Diamonds in alluvial deposits in Southeast Asia are not accompanied by indicator minerals suggesting primary kimberlite or lamproite sources. The Meratus Mountains in Southeast Borneo (Province Kalimantan Selatan, Indonesia) provide the largest known deposit of these so-called "headless" diamond deposits. Proposals for the origin of Kalimantan diamonds include the adjacent Meratus ophiolite complex, ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes, obducted subcontinental lithospheric mantle and undiscovered kimberlite-type sources. Here we report results from detailed sediment provenance analysis of diamond-bearing Quaternary river channel material and from representative outcrops of the oldest known formations within the Alino Group, including the diamond-bearing Campanian-Maastrichtian Manunggul Formation. Optical examination of surfaces of diamonds collected from artisanal miners in the Meratus area (247 stones) and in West Borneo (Sanggau Area, Province Kalimantan Barat; 85 stones) points toward a classical kimberlite-type source for the majority of these diamonds. Some of the diamonds host mineral inclusions suitable for deep single-crystal X-ray diffraction investigation. We determined the depth of formation of two olivines, one coesite and one peridotitic garnet inclusion. Pressure of formation estimates for the peridotitic garnet at independently derived temperatures of 930-1250 °C are between 4.8 and 6.0 GPa. Sediment provenance analysis includes petrography coupled to analyses of detrital garnet and glaucophane. The compositions of these key minerals do not indicate kimberlite-derived material. By analyzing almost 1400 zircons for trace element concentrations with laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) we tested the mineral's potential as an alternative kimberlite indicator. The screening ultimately resulted in a small subset of ten zircons with a kimberlitic affinity. Subsequent U-Pb dating resulting in Cretaceous ages plus a detailed chemical reflection make

  1. Impact of supersaturation ratio on phosphorus recovery from synthetic anaerobic digester supernatant through a struvite crystallization fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shayok; Lobanov, Sergey; Lo, Victor K

    2018-02-15

    Over the past few decades, several technologies have been developed to recover phosphorus (P) as struvite from wastewater. Although these technologies have achieved reasonable P-removal efficiencies, these technologies are associated with several shortcomings such as high capital and operating costs, longer crystallization time and production of low-quality product. This study focussed on the development of an efficient technology by designing a new fluidized bed reactor (FBR) and determining its optimum operating conditions. The supersaturation ratio is the most important process parameter for struvite recovery. This study exerted effort to establish a range of supersaturation ratios in order to achieve optimum P-removal and recovery with a lesser amount of fine crystals produced. Bench-scale FBR used in this study was able to accomplish 90% P-removal with 18% P-recovery. P-removal efficiency was observed to be increasing with an increase in the initial supersaturation ratio up to a value of 6.5. On the other hand, an increase in the supersaturation ratio resulted in a lower P-recovery efficiency with an increase in fines production. The supersaturation ratio from 5.5 to 6.0 was found to be optimum for efficient operation of the reactor.

  2. Bases of the Mantle-Carbonatite Conception of Diamond Genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, Yuriy; Spivak, Anna; Kuzyura, Anastasia

    2016-04-01

    In the mantle-carbonatite conception of diamond genesis, the results of physic-chemical experiments are coordinated with the data of analytic mineralogy of primary inclusions in natural diamonds. Generalization of the solutions of principal genetic problems constitutes the bases of the conception. The solutions are following: (1) it is grounded that diamond-parental melts of the upper mantle have peridotite/eclogite - carbonatite - carbon compositions, of the transition zone - (wadsleite↔ringwoodite) - majorite - stishovite - carbonatite - carbon compositions, and of the lower mantle - periclase/wustite - bridgmanite - Ca-perovskite -stishovite - carbonatite - carbon compositions; (2) a construction of generalized diagrams for the diamond-parental media, which reveal changeable compositions of the growth melts of diamonds and associated phases, their genetic relations to the mantle substance, and classification connections of the primary inclusions in natural diamonds; (3) experimental equilibrium phase diagrams of syngenesis of diamonds and primary inclusions, which characterize the nucleation and growth conditions of diamonds and a capture of paragenetic and xenogenetic minerals by the growing diamonds; (4) a determination of the phase diagrams of diamonds and inclusions syngenesis under the regime of fractional crystallization, which discover the regularities of ultrabasic-basic evolution and paragenesis transitions in the diamond-forming systems of the upper and lower mantle. The evidence of the physic-chemically united mode of diamond genesis at the mantle depths with different mineralogy is obtained. References. Litvin Yu.A. (2007). High-pressure mineralogy of diamond genesis. In: Advances in High-Pressure Mineralogy (edited by Eiji Ohtani), Geological Society of America Special paper 421, 83-103. Litvin Yu.A. (2012). Experimental study of physic-chemical conditions of natural diamond formation on an example of the eclogite-carbonatite-sulphide-diamond

  3. Radiation hard diamond sensors for future tracking applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Boer, W. de; Borchi, E.

    2006-01-01

    Progress in experimental particle physics in the coming decade depends crucially upon the ability to carry out experiments in high-radiation areas. In order to perform these complex and expensive experiments, new radiation hard technologies must be developed. This paper discusses the use of diamond detectors in future tracking applications and their survivability in the highest radiation environments. We present results of devices constructed with the newest polycrystalline and single crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond and their tolerance to radiation

  4. Diamond films: Historical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messier, R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of notes and published international articles about the development of methods of depositing diamond films. Vapor deposition articles are included from American, Russian, and Japanese publications. The international competition to develop new deposition methodologies is stressed. The current status of chemical vapor deposition of diamond is assessed.

  5. Investing in Diamonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, Luc

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the risk-return characteristics of investment grade gems (white diamonds, colored diamonds and other types of gems including sapphires, rubies, and emeralds). The transactions are coming from gem auctions and span the period 1999-2012. Over our time frame, the annual nominal USD

  6. Semiconductor Diamond Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-31

    andJ.P. Sudano Departamento de Fisica-.1*/ CTA, 12225, SdoJosd dos Campos, SP, Brazil (Received_12 September1990; accepted 26 November 1990) Experimental...that ’the deposition of diamond was a -codeposition process in 3 which both diamond bondag units and graphitic bonding units were being deposited 3

  7. STABLE DIAMOND GRINDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Gutsalenko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper generalizes on the one hand theory of kinematic-geometrical simulation of grinding processes by means of tools with working part as binding matrix with abrasive grains located in it in random manner, for example diamond grains, and on the other hand practical performance of combined grinding process, based on introduction of additional energy as electric discharges and called by the organization-developer (Kharkov Polytechnic Institute «diamond-spark grinding» as applied to processing by means of diamond wheel. Implementation of diamond-spark grinding technologies on the basis of developed generalized theoretical approach allows to use the tool with prescribed tool-life, moreover to make the most efficient use of it up to full exhausting of tool-life, determined by diamond-bearing thickness. Development is directed forward computer-aided manufacturing.

  8. Fabrication of Diamond Based Sensors for Use in Extreme Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopi K. Samudrala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrical and magnetic sensors can be lithographically fabricated on top of diamond substrates and encapsulated in a protective layer of chemical vapor deposited single crystalline diamond. This process when carried out on single crystal diamond anvils employed in high pressure research is termed as designer diamond anvil fabrication. These designer diamond anvils allow researchers to study electrical and magnetic properties of materials under extreme conditions without any possibility of damaging the sensing elements. We describe a novel method for the fabrication of designer diamond anvils with the use of maskless lithography and chemical vapor deposition in this paper. This method can be utilized to produce diamond based sensors which can function in extreme environments of high pressures, high and low temperatures, corrosive and high radiation conditions. We demonstrate applicability of these diamonds under extreme environments by performing electrical resistance measurements during superconducting transition in rare earth doped iron-based compounds under high pressures to 12 GPa and low temperatures to 10 K.

  9. Tailoring of crystal phase and Néel temperature of cobalt monoxides nanocrystals with synthetic approach conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindra, A. V.; Behera, B. C.; Padhan, P. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Lebedev, O. I.; Prellier, W. [Laboratoire CRISMAT, CNRS UMR 6508, ENSICAEN, 6 Bd du Marechal Juin, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France)

    2014-07-21

    Cobalt monoxide (CoO) nanocrystals were synthesized by thermal decomposition of cobalt oleate precursor in a high boiling point organic solvent 1-octadecene. The X-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy studies suggest that pure face-centered-cubic (fcc) phase of CoO can be synthesized in the temperature range of 569–575 K. Thermolysis product at higher synthesis temperature 585 K is a mixture of fcc and hexagonal-closed-packed (hcp) phases. These nanocrystals are single crystals of CoO and exhibit mixture of two types of morphologies; one is nearly spherical with 5–25 nm diameter, and other one is 5–10 nm thick flake. The pure fcc-CoO nanocrystals show enhanced, and mixture of fcc- and hcp-CoO nanocrystals show reduced antiferromagnetic ordering temperature. Such results provide new opportunities for optimizing and enhancing the properties and performance of cobalt oxide nanomaterials.

  10. Excitation of hypersonic acoustic waves in diamond-based piezoelectric layered structure on the microwave frequencies up to 20GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, B P; Kvashnin, G M; Novoselov, A S; Bormashov, V S; Golovanov, A V; Burkov, S I; Blank, V D

    2017-07-01

    First ultrahigh frequency (UHF) investigation of quality factor Q for the piezoelectric layered structure «Al/(001)AlN/Mo/(100) diamond» has been executed in a broad frequency band from 1 up to 20GHz. The record-breaking Q·f quality parameter up to 2.7·10 14 Hz has been obtained close to 20GHz. Frequency dependence of the form factor m correlated with quality factor has been analyzed by means of computer simulation, and non-monotonic frequency dependence can be explained by proper features of thin-film piezoelectric transducer (TFPT). Excluding the minimal Q magnitudes measured at the frequency points associated with minimal TFPT effectiveness, one can prove a rule of Qf∼f observed for diamond on the frequencies above 1GHz and defined by Landau-Rumer's acoustic attenuation mechanism. Synthetic IIa-type diamond single crystal as a substrate material for High-overtone Bulk Acoustic Resonator (HBAR) possesses some excellent acoustic properties in a wide microwave band and can be successfully applied for design of acoustoelectronic devices, especially the ones operating at a far UHF band. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Science's gem: Diamond science 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Mainwood, A.; Newton, M. E.; Stoneham, M.

    2009-01-01

    Natural diamond has been valued for its appearance and mechanical properties for at least two thousand years. As a gem stone diamond is unsurpassed. However, scientific work, especially in the last 20 years, has demonstrated that diamond has numerous surprising properties and many unique ones. Some of the extreme properties have been known for many years, but the true scale of diamond's other highly desirable features is still only coming to light as control in the synthesis of diamond, and h...

  12. From atomic lines to the diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soukiassian, P.; CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette; Dujardin, G.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is widely used in industrial applications. Exceptional semi-conductor properties added to an ability to sustain high temperatures (up to 1000 K) and chemical inertia make SiC a material of a great interest in electronics. SiC is used in semi-conductor detectors designed to operate in harsh conditions. The observation of SiC crystal surfaces by means of a tunnel effect microscope has revealed prominent and regular lines of either silicon or carbon atoms. These lines are parallel and can be used as a die ready to receive a metallic deposition, in that manner the space between 2 lines could be turned into a 2 atom broad conductive track. This perspective opens new ways for SiC in electronic applications.The atomic lines made up of carbon define a plane in which atoms have the same type of bound as in a diamond crystal. These lines could be used to favour the growth of mono-crystal diamond films and then produce a SiC-diamond combined material which could be very promising for the next generation of particle detectors. (A.C.)

  13. Metasomatic Diamond Formation revealed by X-Ray CT Scanning of Diamondiferous Eclogites from Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, S. H.; Kahle, R. L.; Shaw-Kahle, B.; Gurney, J. J.; du Plessis, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a private collection of diamondiferous eclogite xenoliths has been made available for non-destructive investigation. All samples have at least one diamond visible. The samples are predominantly sourced from the Excelsior and Newlands mines (South Africa), with additional samples from Roberts Victor mine (South Africa) and Orapa (Botswana). 3D volume models of the samples were created using X-ray tomography. The 3D images reveal abundant secondary veining that is clearly younger than the eclogite. Diamonds are located in fluid pathways and occur in both altered garnet and altered clinopyroxene. Most of the veining is unrelated to the spatial positioning of diamond in the samples. In some instances, early veining has annealed or partially annealed, suggesting a range in timing of at least some of the several metasomatic events that have affected the rock. Importantly, in the most graphic examples, a clear distinction can be seen between diamond-bearing and non-diamond-bearing veins, even where sulphide is present in abundance in the non-diamond-bearing veins. The amount of diamond detected in the xenoliths varies from a single crystal to well over 50 diamonds forming more than 9% of the rock. This extreme value contrasts with the diamond recovery from currently viable diamond mines of less than 2ppm or 0.0002%. The morphology of the diamonds includes step-faced flat-faced octahedra, single crystals and aggregates. This is particularly a feature of diamonds in the Excelsior specimens. In the samples from Newlands and Orapa, in contrast, diamond surfaces reflect resorption processes such as rounding and corrosion of the diamonds. The following conclusions can be drawn from this study: Diamonds in this collection, sourced from within the Kalahari craton, appear to have formed by a metasomatic process during which fluids infiltrated pre-existing mantle-derived eclogite; Several metasomatic events have occurred during the residence of the eclogite in the

  14. Preliminary results from a novel CVD diamond detector system for molecular imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahon, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    A novel biomolecular imaging system incorporating a Chemical Vapour Deposition diamond detector is in development. The synthetic diamond is used as a UV detector to image nucleic acids in electrophoresis gels. The microstrip diamond detector currently has a spatial resolution of 30 μm. Preliminary results are presented which include: QE measurements of diamond detectors, detector time response, detector UV response and current detection limits of biomolecules in gel. The potential applications of the technology, and its significant advantages in speed and sensitivity over the current systems are discussed

  15. Nuclear techniques of analysis in diamond synthesis and annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Gonon, P.; Walker, R.; Dooley, S.; Bettiol, A.; Pearce, J. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear techniques of analysis have played an important role in the study of synthetic and laser annealed diamond. These measurements have mainly used ion beam analysis with a focused MeV ion beam in a nuclear microprobe system. A variety of techniques have been employed. One of the most important is nuclear elastic scattering, sometimes called non-Rutherford scattering, which has been used to accurately characterise diamond films for thickness and composition. This is possible by the use of a database of measured scattering cross sections. Recently, this work has been extended and nuclear elastic scattering cross sections for both natural boron isotopes have been measured. For radiation damaged diamond, a focused laser annealing scheme has been developed which produces near complete regrowth of MeV phosphorus implanted diamonds. In the laser annealed regions, proton induced x-ray emission has been used to show that 50 % of the P atoms occupy lattice sites. This opens the way to produce n-type diamond for microelectronic device applications. All these analytical applications utilize a focused MeV microbeam which is ideally suited for diamond analysis. This presentation reviews these applications, as well as the technology of nuclear techniques of analysis for diamond with a focused beam. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Nuclear techniques of analysis in diamond synthesis and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Gonon, P.; Walker, R.; Dooley, S.; Bettiol, A.; Pearce, J.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear techniques of analysis have played an important role in the study of synthetic and laser annealed diamond. These measurements have mainly used ion beam analysis with a focused MeV ion beam in a nuclear microprobe system. A variety of techniques have been employed. One of the most important is nuclear elastic scattering, sometimes called non-Rutherford scattering, which has been used to accurately characterise diamond films for thickness and composition. This is possible by the use of a database of measured scattering cross sections. Recently, this work has been extended and nuclear elastic scattering cross sections for both natural boron isotopes have been measured. For radiation damaged diamond, a focused laser annealing scheme has been developed which produces near complete regrowth of MeV phosphorus implanted diamonds. In the laser annealed regions, proton induced x-ray emission has been used to show that 50 % of the P atoms occupy lattice sites. This opens the way to produce n-type diamond for microelectronic device applications. All these analytical applications utilize a focused MeV microbeam which is ideally suited for diamond analysis. This presentation reviews these applications, as well as the technology of nuclear techniques of analysis for diamond with a focused beam. 9 refs., 6 figs

  17. Twinning of cubic diamond explains reported nanodiamond polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Péter; Garvie, Laurence A J; Buseck, Peter R

    2015-12-16

    The unusual physical properties and formation conditions attributed to h-, i-, m-, and n-nanodiamond polymorphs has resulted in their receiving much attention in the materials and planetary science literature. Their identification is based on diffraction features that are absent in ordinary cubic (c-) diamond (space group: Fd-3m). We show, using ultra-high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) images of natural and synthetic nanodiamonds, that the diffraction features attributed to the reported polymorphs are consistent with c-diamond containing abundant defects. Combinations of {113} reflection and rotation twins produce HRTEM images and d-spacings that match those attributed to h-, i-, and m-diamond. The diagnostic features of n-diamond in TEM images can arise from thickness effects of c-diamonds. Our data and interpretations strongly suggest that the reported nanodiamond polymorphs are in fact twinned c-diamond. We also report a new type of twin ( rotational), which can give rise to grains with dodecagonal symmetry. Our results show that twins are widespread in diamond nanocrystals. A high density of twins could strongly influence their applications.

  18. Measurement & Minimization of Mount Induced Strain on Double Crystal Monochromator Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J.; Alcock, S. G.

    2013-03-01

    Opto-mechanical mounts can cause significant distortions to monochromator crystals and mirrors if not designed or implemented carefully. A slope measuring profiler, the Diamond-NOM [1], was used to measure the change in tangential slope as a function of crystal clamping configuration and load. A three point mount was found to exhibit the lowest surface distortion (Diamond Light Source.

  19. Friction and wear properties of diamonds and diamond coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    The recent development of chemical vapor deposition techniques for diamond growth enables bearings to be designed which exploit diamond's low friction and extreme resistance to wear. However, currently produced diamond coatings differ from natural diamond surfaces in that they are polycrystalline and faceted, and often contain appreciable amounts of non-diamond material (i.e. graphitic or amorphous carbon). Roughness, in particular, influences the friction and wear properties; rough coatings severely abrade softer materials, and can even wear natural diamond sliders. Nevertheless, the best available coatings exhibit friction coefficients as low as those of natural diamond and are highly resistant to wear. This paper reviews the tribological properties of natural diamond, and compares them with those of chemical vapor deposited diamond coatings. Emphasis is placed on the roles played by roughness and material transfer in controlling frictional behavior. (orig.)

  20. Transport properties of polycrystalline boron doped diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, J.R. de [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, INPE/LAS, S.J. Campos, SP 12227-010 (Brazil); Berengue, O.M. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP Departamento de Física, Guaratinguetá 12.516-410 (Brazil); Moro, J. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia de São Paulo, Bragança Paulista 12929-600 (Brazil); Ferreira, N.G. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, INPE/LAS, S.J. Campos, SP 12227-010 (Brazil); Chiquito, A.J. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Física, São Carlos 13565-905 (Brazil); Baldan, M.R., E-mail: baldan@las.inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, INPE/LAS, S.J. Campos, SP 12227-010 (Brazil)

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Synthetic boron doped diamond films were grown by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. • We characterized the films by hall effects as a function of temperature and magnetic field. • The resistivity was investigated. • The conduction mechanism was dominated by variable range hopping (VRH). - Abstract: The influence of doping level in the electronic conductivity and resistivity properties of synthetic diamond films grown by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) was investigated. Eight different doping level concentrations varied from 500 to 30,000 ppm were considered. The polycrystalline morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectra was strongly affected by the addition of boron. The electric characterization by Hall effect as a function of temperature and magnetic field showed that at sufficiently low temperatures, electrical conduction is dominated by variable range hopping (VRH) conducting process. The resistivity was also investigated by temperature-dependent transport measurements in order to investigate the conduction mechanism in the doped samples. The samples exhibited the VRH (m = 1/4) mechanism in the temperature range from 77 to 300 K. The interface between metal, and our HFCVD diamond was also investigated for the lower doped samples.

  1. Quantum Computing in Diamond

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prawer, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this proposal is to demonstrate the key elements needed to construct a logical qubit in diamond by exploiting the remarkable quantum properties of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) optical centre...

  2. Functionalized diamond nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Beaujuge, Pierre M.

    2014-10-21

    A diamond nanoparticle can be functionalized with a substituted dienophile under ambient conditions, and in the absence of catalysts or additional reagents. The functionalization is thought to proceed through an addition reaction.

  3. Study of wear resistance of diamond grinding tool, a layer which contains the dispersed abrasive powders of composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.І. Lavrinenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of the study opportunities of application compacted structured by nanocarbon bond dispersed powders of synthetic, natural diamond and boron carbide in the grinding wheels for the processing of cemented carbide. For this purpose were selected Diamond powders AC 6 125/100 and on their surface was damaged composite material based on sub-micron (3/0 fractions of natural diamond powders, as well as boron carbide micropowders, compacted carbon pile method physicochemical synthesis at a pressure lower than atmospheric pressure. In this paper, the main task was to compare features of the operational characteristics of the diamond community, primarily their durability when used in their working layer dispersed of abrasive powders of new composite materials based on natural diamond and boron carbide and set conditions for their effective application in grinding wheels. In this paper, the main task was to compare features of the operational characteristics of the diamond community, primarily their durability when used in their working layer dispersed of abrasive powders of new composite materials based on natural diamond and boron carbide and set conditions for their effective application in grinding wheels. It is shown that partial (50 % or total replacement of synthetic diamonds compacted powders that contain diamonds, surrounded by the original coating of mìcropowders natural diamond or boron carbide mìcropowders structured by nanocarbon bond, allows you to significantly increase wear resistance diamond grinding wheels.

  4. Diamond and silicon pixel detectors in high radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen

    2012-10-15

    Diamond pixel detector is a promising candidate for tracking of collider experiments because of the good radiation tolerance of diamond. The diamond pixel detector must withstand the radiation damage from 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2}, which is the expected total fluence in High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The performance of diamond and silicon pixel detectors are evaluated in this research in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Single-crystal diamond pixel detectors with the most recent readout chip ATLAS FE-I4 are produced and characterized. Based on the results of the measurement, the SNR of diamond pixel detector is evaluated as a function of radiation fluence, and compared to that of planar-silicon ones. The deterioration of signal due to radiation damage is formulated using the mean free path of charge carriers in the sensor. The noise from the pixel readout circuit is simulated and calculated with leakage current and input capacitance to the amplifier as important parameters. The measured SNR shows good agreement with the calculated and simulated results, proving that the performance of diamond pixel detectors can exceed the silicon ones if the particle fluence is more than 10{sup 15} particles per cm{sup 2}.

  5. Solid-state 13C magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy characterization of particle size structural variations in synthetic nanodiamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Todd M.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-state 13 C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to quantify the different carbon species observed in synthetically produced nanodiamonds. Two different diamond-like carbon species were observed using 13 C MAS NMR, which have been attributed to a highly ordered crystalline diamond phase and a disordered crystalline diamond phase. The relative ratio of these different diamond phases was found to vary with the particle size of the nanodiamond materials

  6. Diamond electronic properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kania, Don R

    1995-01-01

    The use of diamond in electronic applications is not a new idea, but limitations in size and control of properties restricted the use of diamond to a few specialised applications. The vapour-phase synthesis of diamond, however, has facilitated serious interest in the development of diamond-based electronic devices. The process allows diamond films to be laid down over large areas. Both intrinsic and doped diamond films have a unique combination of extreme properties for high speed, high power and high temperature applications. The eleven chapters in Diamond: Electronic Properties and Applications, written by the world's foremost experts on the subject, give a complete characterisation of the material, in both intrinsic and doped forms, explain how to grow it for electronic applications, how to use the grown material, and a description of both passive and active devices in which it has been used with success. Diamond: Electronic Properties and Applications is a compendium of the available literature on the sub...

  7. SU-E-T-153: Detector-Grade CVD Diamond for Radiotherapy Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansley, S; Betzel, G; McKay, D; Meyer, J

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the use of commercially available detector-grade synthetic diamond films made via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as x- ray detectors for radiotherapy dosimetry. A detector was fabricated using high-quality single crystal CVD diamond films (0.5 × 3 × 3 mm̂3) with 0.4 mm̂3 sensitive volumes, which were encapsulated with PMMA. The detector was placed in a (30 × 30 × 30 cm̂3) PTW water phantom. Six- and ten-MV photons from an Elekta Synergy linac were measured using an SSD of 90 cm and typically a 10-cm phantom depth with a 10 × 10 cm̂2 field size in the central axis of the beam. Data acquisition was performed using a PTW UNIDOS E electrometer with a 100-V bias. The detector was evaluated by measuring leakage current, priming dose, response dynamics, dose linearity, dependence on dose rate, percent depth dose (6 and 10 MV photons) and output factors. Some measurements were compared with a Si diode detector, 0.04 and/or 0.13-cc ion chamber(s). Leakage currents were negligible (∼1 pA) given the overall average sensitivity of the material (680 nC/Gy at 100 V). Detector current rise and fall times were detectors as expected. The type of diamond tested has potential to be used for small field dosimetry due to its small sensitive volume and high sensitivity. Further experiments are ongoing and detector packaging is yet to be optimized. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. Nanophotonic quantum interface for nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiwen Chu

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have emerged as a promising solid-state platform for quantum communication, quantum information processing and nanoscale sensing with optical read-out. Engineering light-matter interactions is crucial for the practical realization of these systems. I will present our work toward realizing individual NV centers embedded in nanofabricated hybrid photonic crystal cavities consisting of single crystal diamond and PMMA based Bragg structures. Devices with quality factors up to 3,000 coupled to NV centers have been implemented, leading to substantial Purcell enhancement of zero-phonon line. We investigate the optical coherence properties of NV centers inside these nanoscale structures and report on first cavity QED experiments with such systems. Applications of diamond nanophotonic devices for quantum networks and nonlinear optics with single photons will be discussed. (author)

  9. Crystal structure and spectroscopic behavior of synthetic novgorodovaite Ca2(C2O4)Cl2·2H2O and its twinned triclinic heptahydrate analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Oscar E.; Echeverría, Gustavo A.; González-Baró, Ana C.; Baran, Enrique J.

    2018-02-01

    Synthetic novgorodovaite analog Ca2(C2O4)Cl2·2H2O is identical to its natural counterpart. It crystallizes in the monoclinic I2/ m space group with a = 6.9352(3), b = 7.3800(4), c = 7.4426(3) Å, β = 94.303(4)°, V = 379.85(3) Å3 and Z = 2. The heptahydrate analog, Ca2(C2O4)Cl2·7H2O, crystallizes as triclinic twins in the P \\overline{1} space group with a = 7.3928(8), b = 8.9925(4), c = 10.484(2) Å, α = 84.070(7), β = 70.95(1), γ = 88.545(7)°, V = 655.3(1) Å3 and Z = 2. The crystal packing of both calcium oxalate-chloride double salts favors the directional bonding of oxalate, C2O4 2-, ligands to calcium ions as do other related calcium oxalate minerals. The π-bonding between C and O atoms of the C2O4 2- oxalate group leaves sp 2-hydridised orbitals of the oxygen atoms available for bonding to Ca. Thus, the Ca-O bonds in both calcium oxalate-chloride double salts are directed so as to lie in the plane of the oxalate group. This behavior is reinforced by the short O···O distances between the oxygens attached to a given carbon atom, which favors them bonding to a shared Ca atom in bidentate fashion. Strong bonding in the plane of the oxalate anion and wide spacing perpendicular to that plane due to repulsion between oxalate π-electron clouds gives rise to a polymerized structural units which are common to both hydrates, explaining the nearly equal cell constants 7.4 Å which are defined by the periodicity of Ca-oxalate chains in the framework (monoclinic b ≈ triclinic a). When compared with novgorodovaite, the higher water content of Ca2(C2O4)Cl2·7H2O leads to some major differences in their structures and ensuing physical properties. While novgorodovaite has a three-dimensional framework structure, in the higher hydrate, the highly polar water molecules displace chloride ions from the calcium coordination sphere and surround them through OwH···Cl hydrogen bonds. As a result, polymerization in Ca2(C2O4)Cl2·7H2O solid is limited to the formation

  10. Diamond amorphization in neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaenko, V.A.; Gordeev, V.G.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the results on neutron irradiation of the diamond in a nuclear reactor. It is shown that the neutron irradiation stimulates the diamond transition to the amorphous state. At a temperature below 750 o K the time required for the diamond-graphite transition decreases with decreasing irradiation temperature. On the contrary, in irradiation at higher temperatures the time of diamond conversion into the amorphous state increases with decreasing but always remains shorter than in the absence of irradiation. (author)

  11. Superhard BC(3) in cubic diamond structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Hanyu; Li, Quan; Gao, Bo; Wang, Yanchao; Li, Hongdong; Chen, Changfeng; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-09

    We solve the crystal structure of recently synthesized cubic BC(3) using an unbiased swarm structure search, which identifies a highly symmetric BC(3) phase in the cubic diamond structure (d-BC(3)) that contains a distinct B-B bonding network along the body diagonals of a large 64-atom unit cell. Simulated x-ray diffraction and Raman peaks of d-BC(3) are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Calculated stress-strain relations of d-BC(3) demonstrate its intrinsic superhard nature and reveal intriguing sequential bond-breaking modes that produce superior ductility and extended elasticity, which are unique among superhard solids. The present results establish the first boron carbide in the cubic diamond structure with remarkable properties, and these new findings also provide insights for exploring other covalent solids with complex bonding configurations.

  12. Diamond x-ray optics: Transparent, resilient, high-resolution, and wavefront preserving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Blank, Vladimir; Terentyev, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Diamond features a unique combination of outstanding physical properties perfect for numerous x-ray optics applications, where traditional materials such as silicon fail to perform. In the last two decades, impressive progress has been achieved in synthesizing diamond with high crystalline perfection, in manufacturing efficient, resilient, high-resolution, wavefront-preserving diamond optical components, and in implementing them in cutting-edge x-ray instruments. Diamond optics are essential for tailoring x-rays to the most challenging needs of x-ray research. Furthermore, they are becoming vital for the generation of fully coherent hard x-rays by seeded x-ray free-electron lasers. In this article, we review progress in manufacturing flawless diamond crystal components and their applications in diverse x-ray optical devices, such as x-ray monochromators, beam splitters, high-reflectance backscattering mirrors, lenses, phase plates, diffraction gratings, bent-crystal spectrographs, and windows.

  13. Mechanically induced degradation of diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwelen, F V

    1996-01-01

    bombardment a mechanically induced graphitisation, as opposed to a thermally activated transformation, may occur locally on collision with the CVD diamond. Two types of diamond-graphite interfaces were observed: (111) planes of diamond parallel to the a-b planes of graphite and (111) planes of diamond, smoothly within the plane, connected to a-b planes of graphite. The thesis concludes with a summary of the results, conclusions and recommendations for further work. This thesis deals with the wear of diamond occurring during frictional sliding contact between diamonds. In the introduction, a literature survey on friction, wear and polishing behaviour of diamond, with some emphasis on the anisotropy, is presented and earlier work is discussed. A review of the existing theories is given, a new hypothesis is proposed and key-experiments for verification are identified. Electron microscopical techniques such as High Resolution Electron Microscopy (HREM) imaging and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy are described a...

  14. Determination of output factor for 6 MV small photon beam: comparison between Monte Carlo simulation technique and microDiamond detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krongkietlearts, K; Tangboonduangjit, P; Paisangittisakul, N

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the life's quality for a cancer patient, the radiation techniques are constantly evolving. Especially, the two modern techniques which are intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are quite promising. They comprise of many small beam sizes (beamlets) with various intensities to achieve the intended radiation dose to the tumor and minimal dose to the nearby normal tissue. The study investigates whether the microDiamond detector (PTW manufacturer), a synthetic single crystal diamond detector, is suitable for small field output factor measurement. The results were compared with those measured by the stereotactic field detector (SFD) and the Monte Carlo simulation (EGSnrc/BEAMnrc/DOSXYZ). The calibration of Monte Carlo simulation was done using the percentage depth dose and dose profile measured by the photon field detector (PFD) of the 10×10 cm 2 field size with 100 cm SSD. Comparison of the values obtained from the calculations and measurements are consistent, no more than 1% difference. The output factors obtained from the microDiamond detector have been compared with those of SFD and Monte Carlo simulation, the results demonstrate the percentage difference of less than 2%. (paper)

  15. Diamond and biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nebel, C.E.; Shin, D.; Rezek, Bohuslav; Tokuda, N.; Uetsuka, H.; Watanabe, H.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 4, - (2007), s. 439-461 ISSN 1742-5689 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : diamond * biofunctionalization * DNA hybridization detection Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.088, year: 2007

  16. CVD diamond - fundamental phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbrough, W.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams addresses the basic physical processes involved in the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Different methods of deposition are illustrated. For each method, observations are made of the prominent advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Chemical mechanisms of nucleation are introduced.

  17. Influence of defects on diamond detection properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromson, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    This work focuses on the study of the influence of defects on the detection properties of diamond. Devices are fabricated using natural as well as synthetic diamond samples grown using the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Optical studies with infrared and Raman spectrometry are used to characterise the material properties as well as thermoluminescence and thermally stimulated current measurements. These thermally stimulated analyses reveal the presence of several trapping levels with emission temperatures below or near room temperature as well as an important level near 550 K. The influence of these defects on the alpha and X-ray detector responses is studied as a function of the initial state of the detectors (thermal treatment, irradiation) and of the measurement conditions (time, temperature). The results show a significant correlation between the charged state of traps, namely filled or empty and the response of the detectors. It appears that filling and emptying the traps respectively enhances the sensitivity and stability of detection devices to be used at room temperature and decreases the detection properties at higher temperature. Localised measurements are also used to study the spatial inhomogeneity of natural and CVD diamond samples from the 2D mapping of the detector responses. Non uniformity are attributed to a non-isotropic distribution of defects in natural diamonds. By comparing the detector responses to the topographical map of CVD samples a correlation appears between grains and grain boundaries with the variation of the detector sensitivity. Devices fabricated for detection applications with CVD samples are presented and namely for the monitoring and profiling of synchrotron beams as well as dose rate measurements in harsh environments. (author) [fr

  18. Novel phase of carbon, ferromagnetism, and conversion into diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Jagdish; Bhaumik, Anagh

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new phase of carbon (referred to as Q-carbon) and address fundamental issues related to direct conversion of carbon into diamond at ambient temperatures and pressures in air without any need for catalyst and presence of hydrogen. The Q-carbon is formed as result of quenching from super undercooled state by using high-power nanosecond laser pulses. We discuss the equilibrium phase diagram (P vs. T) of carbon and show that by rapid quenching kinetics can shift thermodynamic graphite/diamond/liquid carbon triple point from 5000 K/12 GPa to super undercooled carbon at atmospheric pressure in air. It is shown that nanosecond laser heating of diamond-like amorphous carbon on sapphire, glass, and polymer substrates can be confined to melt carbon in a super undercooled state. By quenching the carbon from the super undercooled state, we have created a new state of carbon (Q-carbon) from which nanodiamond, microdiamond, microneedles, and single-crystal thin films are formed depending upon the nucleation and growth times allowed for diamond formation. The Q-carbon quenched from liquid is a new state of solid carbon with a higher mass density than amorphous carbon and a mixture of mostly fourfold sp 3 (75%–85%) with the rest being threefold sp 2 bonded carbon (with distinct entropy). It is expected to have new and improved mechanical hardness, electrical conductivity, chemical, and physical properties, including room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) and enhanced field emission. Here we present interesting results on RTFM, enhanced electrical conductivity and surface potential of Q-carbon to emphasize its unique properties. The Q-carbon exhibits robust bulk ferromagnetism with estimated Curie temperature of about 500 K and saturation magnetization value of 20 emu g −1 . From the Q-carbon, diamond phase is nucleated and a variety of micro- and nanostructures and large-area single-crystal diamond sheets are grown by allowing growth times

  19. The role of ion-implantation in the realization of spintronic devices in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalish, Rafi

    2012-02-01

    The application of single photons emitted by specific quantum systems is promising for quantum computers, cryptography and for other future nano-applications. These heavily rely on ion implantation both for selective single ion implantations as well as for the introduction of controlled damage with specific properties. Of particular promise is the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV -) defect center in diamond. This center has many desirable luminescence properties required for spintronic devices operational at room temperature, including a long relaxation time of the color center, emission of photons in the visible and the fact that it is produced in diamond, a material with outstanding mechanical and optical properties. This center is usually realized by nitrogen and/or vacancy producing ion implantations into diamond which, following annealing, leads to the formation of the desired NV - center. The single photons emitted by the decay of this center have to be transported to allow their exploitation. This can be best done by realizing very thin wave guides in single crystal diamond with/or without nano-scale cavities in the same diamond in which NV centers are produced. For this, advantage is taken of the unique property of heavily ion-damaged diamond to be converted, following annealing, to etchable graphite. Thus a free standing submicron thick diamond membrane containing the NV center can be obtained. If desirable, specific photonic crystal structures can be realized in them by the use of FIB. The various ion-implantation schemes used to produce NV centers in diamond, free standing diamond membranes, and photonic crystal structures in them are reviewed. The scientific problems and the technological challenges that have to be solved before actual practical realization of diamond based spintronic devices can be produced are discussed.

  20. Indigenous development of diamond detectors for monitoring neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Arvind; Amit Kumar; Topkar, Anita; Pithawa, C.K.

    2013-01-01

    High purity synthetic chemically vapor deposited (CVD) diamond has several outstanding characteristics that make it as an important material for detector applications specifically for extreme environmental conditions like high temperature, high radiation, and highly corrosive environments. Diamond detectors are especially considered promising for monitoring fast neutrons produced by the D-T nuclear fusion reactions in next generation fusion facilities such as ITER. When fast neutrons interact with carbon, elastic, inelastic and (n,α) type reactions can occur. These reactions can be employed for the detection of fast neutrons using diamond. We have initiated the development of diamond detectors based on synthetic CVD substrates. In this paper, the first test of a polycrystalline CVD diamond detector with fast neutrons is reported. The test results demonstrate that this detector can be used for monitoring fast neutrons. The diamond detectors have been fabricated using 5 mm x 5 mm, 300 μm polycrystalline diamond substrates. Aluminum metallization has been used on both sides of the detector to provide electrical contacts. The performance of fabricated detectors was first evaluated using current and capacitance measurements. The leakage current was observed to be stable and about a few pAs for voltages up to 300V. The capacitance-voltage characteristics showed a constant capacitance which is as expected. To confirm the response of the detector to charged particles, the pulse height spectrum (PHS) was obtained using 238 Pu- 239 Pu dual α- source. The PHS showed a continuum without any peak due to polycrystalline nature of diamond film. The response of the detector to fast neutrons has been studied using the fast neutron facility at NXF, BARC. The PHS obtained for a neutron yield of 4 x 10 8 n/s is shown. The average counts per second (cps) measured for diamond detector for different neutron yields is shown. The plot shows linearity with coefficient of determination R

  1. Band alignment and defects of the diamond zinc oxide heterojunction; Bandstruktur und Defekte der Diamant-Zinkoxid-Heterostruktur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geithner, Peter

    2008-09-12

    Zinc oxide films were grown on diamond single crystals by rf sputtering of zinc oxide. The valence and conduction band offset was determined by photoelectron spectroscopy. A deep defect occurring in the zinc oxide films on diamond was characterized by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. (orig.)

  2. n-type diamond growth by phosphorus doping on (0 0 1)-oriented surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiromitsu; Makino, Toshiharu; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Okushi, Hideyo

    2007-01-01

    The properties of phosphorus incorporation for n-type doping of diamond are discussed and summarized. Doping of (0 0 1)-oriented diamond is introduced and compared with results achieved on (1 1 1) diamond. This review describes detailed procedures and conditions of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (CVD) growth and characteristics of electrical properties of phosphorus-doped diamond. The phosphorus incorporation was characterized by SIMS analysis including mapping. n-type conductivity is evaluated by Hall-effect measurements over a temperature regime of 300-1000 K. The crystal perfection of (0 0 1)-oriented n-type diamond is also evaluated by x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction and cathodoluminescence analyses. The results show that phosphorus atoms are incorporated into the diamond network during (0 0 1) CVD diamond growth and that phosphorus acts as a donor as in (1 1 1)-oriented diamond. This result eliminates the restriction on substrate orientation, which had previously created a bottleneck in the development of diamond electronic devices. (review article)

  3. Effect of Slag Composition on the Crystallization Kinetics of Synthetic CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Shaghayegh; Barati, Mansoor

    2018-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO (CSAM) slags was studied with the aid of single hot thermocouple technique (SHTT). Kinetic parameters such as the Avrami exponent (n), rate coefficient (K), and effective activation energy of crystallization (E A ) were obtained by kinetic analysis of data obtained from in situ observation of glassy to crystalline transformation and image analysis. Also, the dependence of nucleation and growth rates of crystalline phases were quantified as a function of time, temperature, and slag basicity. Together with the observations of crystallization front, they facilitated establishing the dominant mechanisms of crystallization. In an attempt to predict crystallization rate under non-isothermal conditions, a mathematical model was developed that employs the rate data of isothermal transformation. The model was validated by reproducing an experimental continuous cooling transformation diagram purely from isothermal data.

  4. Results on the Coherent Interaction of High Energy Electrons and Photons in Oriented Single Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballestrero, S.; Biino, C.; Birol, I.; Cenci, P.; Connell, S.H.; Eichblatt, S.; Fonseca, T.; Freund, A.; Gorini, B.; Groess, R.; Ispirian, K.; Ketel, T.J.; Kononets, Yu.V.; Lopez, A.; Mangiarotti, A.; van Rens, B.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Shieh, M.; Sona, P.; Strakhovenko, V.; Uggerhoj, E.; Uggerhj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Unel, G.; Velasco, M.; Vilakazi, Z.Z.; Wessely, O.; Kononets, Yu.V.

    2005-01-01

    The CERN-NA-59 experiment examined a wide range of electromagnetic processes for multi-GeV electrons and photons interacting with oriented single crystals. The various types of crystals and their orientations were used for producing photon beams and for converting and measuring their polarisation. The radiation emitted by 178 GeV unpolarised electrons incident on a 1.5 cm thick Si crystal oriented in the Coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB) and the String-of-Strings (SOS) modes was used to obtain multi-GeV linearly polarised photon beams. A new crystal polarimetry technique was established for measuring the linear polarisation of the photon beam. The polarimeter is based on the dependence of the Coherent Pair Production (CPP) cross section in oriented single crystals on the direction of the photon polarisation with respect to the crystal plane. Both a 1 mm thick single crystal of Germanium and a 4 mm thick multi-tile set of synthetic Diamond crystals were used as analyzers of the linear polarisation. A birefringence ...

  5. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  6. Thermally induced defects in industrial diamond

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the authors make use of laser heating of HTHP industrial diamond, as well as the optically measured temperature profile of the diamond surface, to study temperature induced changes to the diamond structure, both chemically...

  7. Grain boundaries and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline diamond films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busmann, H.-G.; Pageler, A.; Gruen, D. M.

    1999-08-06

    Phase-pure nanocrystalline diamond thin films grown from plasmas of a hydrogen-poor carbon argon gas mixture have been analyzed regarding their hardness and elastic moduli by means of a microindentor and a scanning acoustic microscope.The films are superhard and the moduli rival single crystal diamond. In addition, Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm shows a peak at 1438 l/cm and no peak above 1500 l/cm, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy a shake-up loss at 4.2 eV. This gives strong evidence for the existence of solitary double bonds in the films. The hardness and elasticity of the films then are explained by the assumption, that the solitary double bonds interconnect the nanocrystals in the films, leading to an intergrain boundary adhesion of similar strength as the intragrain diamond cohesion. The results are in good agreement with recent simulations of high-energy grain boundaries.

  8. Superstrong micro-grained polycrystalline diamond compact through work hardening under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Zhan, Guodong; Wang, Qiang; Yan, Xiaozhi; Liu, Fangming; Wang, Pei; Lei, Li; Peng, Fang; Kou, Zili; He, Duanwei

    2018-02-01

    We report an approach to strengthen micro-grained polycrystalline diamond (MPD) compact through work hardening under high pressure and high temperature, in which both hardness and fracture toughness are simultaneously boosted. Micro-sized diamond powders are treated without any additives under a high pressure of 14 GPa and temperatures ranging from 1000 °C to 2000 °C. It was found that the high pressure and high temperature environments could constrain the brittle feature and cause a severe plastic deformation of starting diamond grains to form a mutual bonded diamond network. The relative density is increased with temperature to nearly fully dense at 1600 °C. The Vickers hardness of the well-prepared MPD bulks at 14 GPa and 1900 °C reaches the top limit of the single crystal diamond of 120 GPa, and the near-metallic fracture toughness of the sample is as high as 18.7 MPa m1/2.

  9. Source assemblage types for cratonic diamonds from X-ray synchrotron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestola, F.; Alvaro, M.; Casati, M. N.; Wilhelm, H.; Kleppe, A. K.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Domeneghetti, M. C.; Harris, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    Three single crystals of clinopyroxene trapped within three different gem-quality diamonds from the Udachnaya kimberlite (Siberia, Russia) were analysed in situ by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to obtain information on their chemical composition and infer source assemblage type. A non-destructive approach was used with high-energy (≈ 60 keV; λ ≈ 0.206 Å) at I15, the extreme-conditions beamline at Diamond Light Source. A dedicated protocol was used to center the mineral inclusions located deep inside the diamonds in the X-ray beam. Our results reveal that two of the inclusions can be associated with peridotitic paragenesis whereas the third is eclogitic. This study also demonstrates that this non-destructive experimental approach is extremely efficient in evaluating the origin of minerals trapped in their diamond hosts.

  10. Hadean diamonds in zircon from Jack Hills, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menneken, Martina; Nemchin, Alexander A; Geisler, Thorsten; Pidgeon, Robert T; Wilde, Simon A

    2007-08-23

    Detrital zircons more than 4 billion years old from the Jack Hills metasedimentary belt, Yilgarn craton, Western Australia, are the oldest identified fragments of the Earth's crust and are unique in preserving information on the earliest evolution of the Earth. Inclusions of quartz, K-feldspar and monazite in the zircons, in combination with an enrichment of light rare-earth elements and an estimated low zircon crystallization temperature, have previously been used as evidence for early recycling of continental crust, leading to the production of granitic melts in the Hadean era. Here we present the discovery of microdiamond inclusions in Jack Hills zircons with an age range from 3,058 +/- 7 to 4,252 +/- 7 million years. These include the oldest known diamonds found in terrestrial rocks, and introduce a new dimension to the debate on the origin of these zircons and the evolution of the early Earth. The spread of ages indicates that either conditions required for diamond formation were repeated several times during early Earth history or that there was significant recycling of ancient diamond. Mineralogical features of the Jack Hills diamonds-such as their occurrence in zircon, their association with graphite and their Raman spectroscopic characteristics-resemble those of diamonds formed during ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism and, unless conditions on the early Earth were unique, imply a relatively thick continental lithosphere and crust-mantle interaction at least 4,250 million years ago.

  11. An overview of noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Xe) contents and isotope signals in terrestrial diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, S.; Jones, A. P.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Kelley, S. P.; Stuart, F. M.

    2013-11-01

    The noble gas geochemistry of different types of terrestrial diamond including coated stones, alluvial diamonds, framesites, carbonados and impact diamonds yields a wealth of information on the sources of volatiles responsible for diamond formation. We present an illustrated compilation of published analyses of noble gases in different types of natural diamond. Noble gases in diamond record primary signatures from the mantle indicative of their integrated sources, and, the contribution of different metasomatic agents including subducting fluids and kimberlitic melt sampled during diamond growth. In addition, they show evidence of secondary processes such as resorption. Most data are available for coated stones, which trap abundant volatile-rich microscopic inclusions in their rims. While the coated stones are dominated by Mid-Oceanic-Ridge-Basalt (MORB) type noble gas signatures, the other diamond types contain predominantly crustal and atmospheric components although some mantle gases may be present, the latter indicated in elevated 20Ne/22Ne and/or 129Xe/132Xe ratios relative to atmospheric values. Some alluvial diamonds have very high 3He/4He that may represent the presence of a solar component trapped during their formation, but are just as likely to be the result of cosmogenic 3He implantation during their prolonged residence at the Earth's surface. Oceanic-Island-Basalt (OIB) type noble gases occur in nanometer sized inclusions in metamorphic diamond from Kazakhstan, yet their significance as a fingerprint of mantle processes is not fully understood. Implanted noble gases occur near the outer surfaces of individual crystals, and are generally not a major hindrance for the study of mantle signatures, except for polycrystalline diamond like framesites with small grain size. Some diamonds including the polycrystalline carbonados, are dominated by crustal noble gases with no discernible mantle component evidenced by very low 3He/4He and 20Ne/22Ne ratios, and very

  12. Solid-vapour reactions as a post-synthetic modification tool for molecular crystals: the enclathration of benzene and toluene by Werner complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusi, Matteo; Barbour, Leonard J

    2013-04-04

    The enclathration of benzene and toluene by Werner complexes has been described. In the case of toluene, time-lapse PXRD analysis reveals that solid-liquid and solid-vapour reactions proceed according to different pathways. These preliminary results suggest that solid-liquid reactions destroy the host structure, whereas the solid-vapour reactions allow post-synthetic modification.

  13. Microstructural evolution of diamond growth during HFCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J.

    1994-01-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to study the nucleation and growth mechanism of diamond by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. A novel technique has shown a direct evidence for the formation of the diamond-like carbon layer 8-14 nm thick in which small diamond micro-crystallites were embedded. These diamond micro-crystallites were formed as a result of transformation of diamond-like carbon into diamond. The diamond micro-crystallites present in the amorphous diamond-like carbon layer provided nucleation sites for diamond growth. Large diamond crystallites were observed to grow from these micro-crystallites. The mechanism of diamond growth will be presented based on experimental findings.

  14. Study of the effects of focused high-energy boron ion implantation in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ynsa, M. D.; Agulló-Rueda, F.; Gordillo, N.; Maira, A.; Moreno-Cerrada, D.; Ramos, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    Boron-doped diamond is a material with a great technological and industrial interest because of its exceptional chemical, physical and structural properties. At modest boron concentrations, insulating diamond becomes a p-type semiconductor and at higher concentrations a superconducting metal at low temperature. The most conventional preparation method used so far, has been the homogeneous incorporation of boron doping during the diamond synthesis carried out either with high-pressure sintering of crystals or by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of films. With these methods, high boron concentration can be included without distorting significantly the diamond crystalline lattice. However, it is complicated to manufacture boron-doped microstructures. A promising alternative to produce such microstructures could be the implantation of focused high-energy boron ions, although boron fluences are limited by the damage produced in diamond. In this work, the effect of focused high-energy boron ion implantation in single crystals of diamond is studied under different irradiation fluences and conditions. Micro-Raman spectra of the sample were measured before and after annealing at 1000 °C as a function of irradiation fluence, for both superficial and buried boron implantation, to assess the changes in the diamond lattice by the creation of vacancies and defects and their degree of recovery after annealing.

  15. Transient current induced in thin film diamonds by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shin-ichiro; Makino, Takahiro; Ohshima, Takeshi; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Kada, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    Single crystal diamond is a suitable material for the next generation particle detectors because of the superior electrical properties and the high radiation tolerance. In order to investigate charge transport properties of diamond particle detectors, transient currents generated in diamonds by single swift heavy ions (26 MeV O 5+ and 45 MeV Si 7+ ) are investigated. We also measured two dimensional maps of transient currents by single ion hits. In the case of 50 μm-thick diamond, both the signal height and the collected charge are reduced by the subsequent ion hits and the charge collection time is extended. Our results are thought to be attributable to the polarization effect in diamond and it appears only when the transient current is dominated by hole current. In the case of 6 μm-thick diamond membrane, an “island” structure is found in the 2D map of transient currents. Signals in the islands shows different applied bias dependence from signals in other regions, indicating different crystal and/or metal contact quality. Simulation study of transient currents based on the Shockley-Ramo theorem clarifies that accumulation of space charges changes distribution of electric field in diamond and causes the polarization effect.

  16. NCD Diamond Semiconductor System for Advanced Power Electronics Systems Integration : CRADA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha [AKHAN Semiconductor, Inc., Hoffman Estates, IL (United States)

    2016-07-22

    The integration of 2D materials such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) with diamond (3D) was achieved by forming an heterojunction between these two materials and its electrical performance was studied experimentally. The device charactertics did show good rectifying nature when p-type single crystal diamond was integrated with n-type MoS2. These results are very encouraging indicating possible applications in semiconductor electronics, however further studies are required for a detailed understanding of the transport phenomena at the MoS2/diamond interface.

  17. Research Update: Direct conversion of amorphous carbon into diamond at ambient pressures and temperatures in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Jagdish; Bhaumik, Anagh

    2015-01-01

    We report on fundamental discovery of conversion of amorphous carbon into diamond by irradiating amorphous carbon films with nanosecond lasers at room-temperature in air at atmospheric pressure. We can create diamond in the form of nanodiamond (size range <100 nm) and microdiamond (>100 nm). Nanosecond laser pulses are used to melt amorphous diamondlike carbon and create a highly undercooled state, from which various forms of diamond can be formed upon cooling. The quenching from the super undercooled state results in nucleation of nanodiamond. It is found that microdiamonds grow out of highly undercooled state of carbon, with nanodiamond acting as seed crystals

  18. Immobilization of a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 mimotope-derived synthetic peptide on Au and its potential application for detection of herceptin in human serum by quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yuqin; Singh, Pankaj R; Chisti, Mohammad M; Mernaugh, Ray; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2011-12-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are antigenically similar to human antibodies and are difficult to detect in assays of human serum samples without the use of the therapeutic antibody's complementary antigen. Herein for the first time, we established a platform to detect Herceptin in solutions by using a small (synthetic peptide immobilized on the surface of a Au quartz electrode. We used the HER2 mimotope as a substitute for the HER2 receptor protein in piezoimmunosensor or quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) assays to detect Herceptin in human serum. We demonstrated that assay sensitivity was dependent upon the amino acids used to tether and link the peptide to the sensor surface and the buffers used to carry out the assays. The detection limit of the piezoimmunosensor assay was 0.038 nM with a linear operating range of 0.038-0.859 nM. Little nonspecific binding to other therapeutic antibodies (Avastin and Rituxan) was observed. Levels of Herceptin in serum samples obtained from treated patients, as ascertained using the synthetic peptide-based QCM assay, were typical for those treated with Herceptin. The findings of this study are significant in that low-cost synthetic peptides could be used in a QCM assay, in lieu of native or recombinant antigens or capture antibodies, to rapidly detect a therapeutic antibody in human serum. The results suggested that a synthetic peptide bearing a particular functional sequence could be applied for developing a new generation of affinity-based immunosensors to detect a broad range of clinical biomarkers.

  19. Surface temperature measurements of diamond

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Diamond has the highest thermal conductivity among known materials, and as such finds uses as an industrial tool in areas where dissipation of excess heat is a requirement. In this investigation we set up a laser system to heat a diamond sample...

  20. Interfacial characteristics of diamond/aluminum composites with high thermal conductivity fabricated by squeeze-casting method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Longtao, E-mail: longtaojiang@163.com [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Pingping [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xiu, Ziyang [Skate Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Chen, Guoqin [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lin, Xiu [Heilongjiang Academy of Industrial Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Dai, Chen; Wu, Gaohui [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-08-15

    In this work, aluminum matrix composites reinforced with diamond particles (diamond/aluminum composites) were fabricated by squeeze casting method. The material exhibited a thermal conductivity as high as 613 W / (m · K). The obtained composites were investigated by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope in terms of the (100) and (111) facets of diamond particles. The diamond particles were observed to be homogeneously distributed in the aluminum matrix. The diamond{sub (111)}/Al interface was found to be devoid of reaction products. While at the diamond{sub (100)}/Al interface, large-sized aluminum carbides (Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}) with twin-crystal structure were identified. The interfacial characteristics were believed to be responsible for the excellent thermal conductivity of the material. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Squeeze casting method was introduced to fabricate diamond/Al composite. • Sound interfacial bonding with excellent thermal conductivity was produced. • Diamond{sub (111)}/ aluminum interface was firstly characterized by TEM/HRTEM. • Physical combination was the controlling bonding for diamond{sub (111)}/aluminum. • The growth mechanism of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} was analyzed by crystallography theory.

  1. Electrochemical applications of CVD diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor-Moreno, Gustavo

    2002-01-01

    Diamond technology has claimed an important role in industry since non-expensive methods of synthesis such as chemical vapour deposition allow to elaborate cheap polycrystalline diamond. This fact has increased the interest in the scientific community due to the outstanding properties of diamond. Since Pleskov published in 1987 the first paper in electrochemistry, many researchers around the world have studied different aspects of diamond electrochemistry such as reactivity, electrical structure, etc. As part of this worldwide interest these studies reveal new information about diamond electrodes. These studies report investigation of diamond electrodes characterized using structural techniques like scanning electrode microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. A new electrochemical theory based on surface states is presented that explains the metal and the semiconductor behaviour in terms of the doping level of the diamond electrode. In an effort to characterise the properties of diamond electrodes the band edges for hydrogen and oxygen terminated surface are located in organic solvent, hence avoiding possible interference that are present in aqueous solution. The determination of the band edges is performed by Mott-Schottky studies. These allow the calculation of the flat band potential and therefore the band edges. Additional cyclic voltammetric studies are presented for both types of surface termination. Mott-Schottky data and cyclic voltammograms are compared and explained in terms of the band edge localisation. Non-degenerately p-type semiconductor behaviour is presented for hydrogen terminated boron doped diamond. Graphitic surface states on oxidised surface boron doped diamond are responsible for the electrochemistry of redox couples that posses similar energy. Using the simple redox couple 1,4-benzoquinone effect of surface termination on the chemical behaviour of diamond is presented. Hydrogen sublayers in diamond electrodes seem to play an important role for the

  2. Plasmon scattering in electron and hole doped diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazempour, Ali; Morshedloo, Toktam

    2018-02-01

    By using a first principle method, we address the plasmon manipulation of diamond crystal as a function of electron and hole doped concentration ranging from light to the heavy doping regime. Our results indicate that with increasing doping concentration plasmon resonances shift to lower energies into the near ultraviolet. Further, for electron and hole doped material, bulk plasmon dispersion shows a different trend compared with undoped crystal particularly at the small momentum transfer which is attributed to strong inhomogeneity of electron charge density. Eventually, by comparison of phonon linewidths a general discussion is presented about possible mechanisms of plasmon-phonon coupling. At heavy doping regime, near the zone edge, optical phonons have the most growing contribution in bulk plasmon damping which may lead to enhanced plasmon-assisted Raman scattering for doped diamond.

  3. Synthetic Cannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslihan Okan Ibiloglu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic cannabinoids which is a subgroup of cannabinoids are commonly used for recreational drug use throughout the whole world. Although both marijuana and synthetic cannabinoids stimulate the same receptors, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2, studies have shown that synthetic cannabinoids are much more potent than marijuana. The longer use of synthetic cannabinoids can cause severe physical and psychological symptoms that might even result in death, similar to many known illicit drugs. Main treatment options mostly involve symptom management and supportive care. The aim of this article is to discuss clinical and pharmacological properties of the increasingly used synthetic cannabinoids. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2017; 9(3.000: 317-328

  4. Investigation of the physics of diamond MEMS : diamond allotrope lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalizniak, I.; Olivero, P.; Jamieson, D.N.; Prawer, S.; Reichart, P.; Rubanov, S.; Petriconi, S.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a novel lithography process in which ion induced phase transfomations of diamond form sacrificial layers allowing the fabrication of small structures including micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). We have applied this novel lithography to the fabrication of diamond microcavities, cantilevers and optical waveguides. In this paper we present preliminary experiments directed at the fabrication of suspended diamond disks that have the potential for operation as optical resonators. Such structures would be very durable and resistant to chemical attack with potential applications as novel sensors for extreme environments or high temperature radiation detectors. (author). 3 refs., 3 figs

  5. Thermal applications of low-pressure diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubner, R.; Lux, B.

    1997-01-01

    During the last decade several applications of low-pressure diamond were developed. Main products are diamond heat-spreaders using its high thermal conductivity, diamond windows with their high transparency over a wide range of wavelengths and wear resistant tool coatings because of diamonds superhardness. A short description of the most efficient diamond deposition methods (microwave, DC-glow discharge, plasma-jet and arc discharge) is given. The production and applications of diamond layers with high thermal conductivity will be described. Problems of reproducibility of diamond deposition, the influence of impurities, the heat conductivity in electronic packages, reliability and economical mass production will be discussed. (author)

  6. Test Beam Results of a 3D Diamond Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dunser, Marc

    2015-01-01

    3D pixel technology has been used successfully in the past with silicon detectors for tracking applications. Recently, a first prototype of the same 3D technology has been produced on a chemical vapour deposited single-crystal diamond sensor. This device has been subsequently tested in a beam test at CERN’s SPS accelerator in a beam of 120 GeV protons. Details on the production and results of testbeam data are presented.

  7. Diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber for thermal neutron detection at the VR-1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomorski, Michal; Mer-Calfati, Christine; Foulon, Francois; Sklenka, Lubomir; Rataj, Jan; Bily, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Diamond exhibits a combination of properties which makes it attractive for neutron detection in hostile conditions. In the particular case of detection in a nuclear reactor, it is resilient to radiation, exhibits a natural low sensitivity to gamma rays, and its small size (as compared with that of gas ionisation chambers) enables fluency monitoring with a high position resolution. We report here on the use of synthetic CVD diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber with U-235 converting material for in-core thermal neutron monitoring. Two types of thin diamond detectors were developed for this application. The first type of detector is fabricated using thin diamond membrane obtained by etching low-cost commercially available single crystal CVD intrinsic diamond, so called 'optical grade' material. Starting from a few hundred of micrometre thick samples, the sample is sliced with a laser and then plasma etched down to a few tenths of micrometre. Here we report the result obtained with a 17 μm thick device. The detection surface of this detector is equal to 1 mm 2 . Detectors with surfaces up to 1 cm 2 can be fabricated with this technique. The second type of detector is fabricated by growing successively two thin films of diamond, by the microwave enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique, on HPHT single crystal diamond. A first, a film of boron doped (p+) single crystal diamond, a few microns thick, is deposited. Then a second film of intrinsic diamond with a thickness of a few tens of microns is deposited. This results in a P doped, Intrinsic, Metal structure (PIM) structure in which the intrinsic volume id the active part of the detector. Here we report the results obtained with a 20 μm thick intrinsic whose detection surface is equal to 0.5 mm 2 , with the possibility to enlarge the surface of the detector up to 1 cm 2 . These two types of detector were tested at the VR-1 research reactor at the Czech Technical University in Prague. The

  8. X-ray topography of natural diamonds on the VEPP-3 SR beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuper, K.E.; Zedgenizov, D.A.; Ragozin, A.L.; Shatsky, V.S.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray topography (XRT) images were obtained using a double-crystal topographic method, with a magnification system in the Laue case. The experiment was performed at the beamline station 'Microscopy and tomography' of the VEPP-3 synchrotron radiation source. Two asymmetrically cut crystals in the Kirkpatrick-Baez scheme were used to increase the spatial resolution. The usage of an asymmetrically cut crystal with a magnification factor of 20 allows us to improve spatial resolution in registered images. A series of slabs of natural diamonds from kimberlite pipes and placers of the Siberian platform was examined. This study confirmed the high efficiency of the XRT method to recover information on the internal structure of natural diamonds. Together with other mineralogical data, the features of internal structure determined by this way are important to deduce the origin and history of growth of natural diamonds.

  9. Study of imperfect natural diamonds with the application of the X-ray synchrotron radiation (the 'Laue-SR' method)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rylov, G.M.; Yefimova, E.S.; Sobolev, N.V.; Kulipanov, G.N.; Kondratyev, V.I.; Tolochko, B.P.; Sharafutdinov, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    The 'Laue-SR' method has been realised for fast gathering experimental data in the study of imperfect natural and synthesised diamonds which are hard to investigate with the conventional X-ray methods. Time to obtain a diffraction pattern with the use of the polychromatic SR is shorter by several orders; the resolution of the image of substructure defects of a crystal lattice (as compared to the conventional Laue method) is improved by an order and does not vanish even at large disorientation or other non-coherent disturbances of the crystal lattice. The 'Laue-SR' method is especially appropriate for the study of intact, sufficiently large diamond crystals (up to 5 mm), since the diamond has a small coefficient of the X-ray absorption and is practically transparent in the operational range of the SR waves, λ=0.5-1.5 A. This method was shown to be applied successfully for an accelerated study of a large bulk of imperfect natural diamond crystals without any preliminary preparation and without their destruction, which enlarges the information output in the study and, besides that, increases significantly the efficiency of the work. X-ray 'Laue-SR' topograms of imperfect diamonds with different types of distortions of the crystal lattice by natural processes during the formation of the diamonds and by epigenetic impacts are shown

  10. Diamond: a material for acoustic devices

    OpenAIRE

    MORTET, Vincent; WILLIAMS, Oliver; HAENEN, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Diamond has been foreseen to replace silicon for high power, high frequency electronic applications or for devices that operates in harsh environments. However, diamond electronic devices are still in the laboratory stage due to the lack of large substrates and the complexity of diamond doping. On another hand, surface acoustic wave filters based on diamond are commercially available. Diamond is especially suited for acoustic applications because of its exceptional mechanical properties. The ...

  11. Correlated carbon and oxygen isotope signatures in eclogitic diamonds with coesite inclusions: A SIMS investigation of diamonds from Guaniamo, Argyle and Orapa mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, D. J.; Page, Z.; Harte, B.; Valley, J.; Channer, D.; Jaques, L.

    2006-12-01

    Using ion microprobes and secondary-ion mass spectrometry we have analyzed the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of eclogite-suite diamonds and their coesite inclusions, respectively, from three suites of diamonds of Proterozoic age. Extremely high (for the mantle) oxygen isotope values (delta 18O of +10.2 to +16.9 per mil VSMOW) are preserved in coesites included in eclogitic diamonds from Guaniamo, Venezuela (Schulze et al., Nature, 2003), providing compelling evidence for an origin of their eclogite hosts by subduction of sea water altered ocean floor basalts. In situ SIMS analyses of their host diamonds yield carbon isotope values (delta 13C) of -12 to -18 per mil PDB. SIMS analyses of coesite inclusions from Argyle, Australia diamonds previously analyzed by combustion methods for d13C composition (Jaques et al., Proc. 4th Kimb. Conf, 1989), also yield anomalously high d18O values (+6.8 to +16.0 per mil VSMOW), that correlate with the anomalously low carbon isotope values (-10.3 to -14.1 per mil PDB). One coesite-bearing diamond from Orapa, Botswana analyzed in situ by SIMS has a d18O value of the coesite of +8.5 per mil VSMOW and a d13C value of the adjacent diamond host of -9.0 per mil PDB. A second Orapa stone has a SIMS carbon isotope compositional range of d13C = -14 to -16 per mil PDB, but the coesite is too small for ion probe analysis. At each of these localities, carbon isotope values of coesite-bearing diamonds that are lower than typical of mantle carbon are correlated with oxygen isotope compositions of included coesites that are substantially above the common mantle oxygen isotope range. Such results are not in accord with diamond genesis models involving formation of eclogitic diamonds from igneous melts undergoing fractionation in the mantle or by crystallization from primordial inhomogeneities in Earth's mantle. By analogy with the oxygen isotope compositions of altered ocean floor basalts and Alpine (subduction zone) eclogites they are

  12. The construction of a diamond detector for ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgemeister, E.A.; Schouten, W.

    1984-01-01

    The construction, performance and radiotherapy applications of synthetic diamond detectors are described. A diamond with linear dimensions of 0.8 mm and two opposite faces of graphite is glued to the inside of an aluminium cap of 2 mm diameter and 0.1 mm wall thickness. An aluminium bar is glued to the other graphite face and fixed inside the cap. The cap and bar are connected to electrical leads, so that heavy metals are at some distance from the radiosensitive element. The response to 60 Co shows rotational symmetry when the detector is irradiated perpendicularly to its axis. The effective measurement point lies nearly on the axis. The radiosensitivity of diamond is independent of the photon energy at effective values between 0.2 and 3 MeV and decreases gradually below 0.2 MeV. Because of their small size, diamond detectors prove very useful for accurate measurement of steep dose gradients. They are therefore applied in electron beams and in the penumbra and build-up regions of megavolt photon beams. The construction and electrical specifications of the detector also allow for dosimetry in vivo, e.g. rectal dosimetry. (author)

  13. A Novel Dual Air-Bearing Fixed-χ Diffractometer for Small-Molecule Single-Crystal X-ray Diffraction on Beamline I19 at Diamond Light Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David . R Allan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we describe the development of a novel dual air-bearing fixed-χ diffractometer for beamline I19 at Diamond Light Source. The diffractometer is designed to facilitate the rapid data collections possible with a Dectris Pilatus 2M pixel-array photon-counting detector, while allowing remote operation in conjunction with a robotic sample changer. The sphere-of-confusion is made as small as practicably possible, through the use of air-bearings for both the ω and φ axes. The design and construction of the new instrument is described in detail and an accompanying paper by Johnson et al. (also in this issue will provide a user perspective of its operation.

  14. High-heat-load studies of silicon and diamond monochromators using the APS/CHESS prototype undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.M.; Lee, W.K.; Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B.

    1994-01-01

    The results of the latest high-heat-load studies made on the APS/CHESS prototype undulator are summarized. Four different crystals were tested: two slotted, symmetrically cut silicon crystals and a core-drilled, asymmetrically cut silicon crystal and a diamond crystal that was jet cooled using water. The purpose of the silicon crystal tests was to reevaluate the surface power loading at which appreciable degradation of the diffraction efficiency was observed. The diamond tests, allotted only a brief period of time during the testing period, were our first attempt at using diamonds for high-heat-flux x-ray monochromators and were performed primarily to gain first-hand experience with diamond monochromators. Measurements with the silicon crystal at 5 keV reconfirmed our previous measurements of performance degradation at around 4-6 watts/mm 2 using liquid gallium with slotted coolant channels. A value of only 2 watts/mm 2 was observed to cause a degradation of the diffraction performance at 15 keV with the same crystals due to the increased sensitivity to strain because of the reduced Darwin widths. The performance of the asymmetric crystal, with its core-drilled coolant channels, was not found to be as good as that of the slotted crystals. This was probably due to poorer heat transfer properties of the core-drilled geometry in combination with the narrowing of the rocking curves because of the asymmetric cut. Fabrication issues for construction of the gallium-cooled crystals is also discussed. Although the diamonds were only successfully tested at low total power the results were very encouraging and motivated us to accelerate our program on the use of diamonds for high-heat-load monochromators

  15. Deterministic Nanopatterning of Diamond Using Electron Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, James; Fronzi, Marco; Elbadawi, Christopher; Nikam, Vikram; Pritchard, Joshua; Fröch, Johannes E; Duong, Ngoc My Hanh; Ford, Michael J; Aharonovich, Igor; Lobo, Charlene J; Toth, Milos

    2018-03-27

    Diamond is an ideal material for a broad range of current and emerging applications in tribology, quantum photonics, high-power electronics, and sensing. However, top-down processing is very challenging due to its extreme chemical and physical properties. Gas-mediated electron beam-induced etching (EBIE) has recently emerged as a minimally invasive, facile means to dry etch and pattern diamond at the nanoscale using oxidizing precursor gases such as O 2 and H 2 O. Here we explain the roles of oxygen and hydrogen in the etch process and show that oxygen gives rise to rapid, isotropic etching, while the addition of hydrogen gives rise to anisotropic etching and the formation of topographic surface patterns. We identify the etch reaction pathways and show that the anisotropy is caused by preferential passivation of specific crystal planes. The anisotropy can be controlled by the partial pressure of hydrogen and by using a remote RF plasma source to radicalize the precursor gas. It can be used to manipulate the geometries of topographic surface patterns as well as nano- and microstructures fabricated by EBIE. Our findings constitute a comprehensive explanation of the anisotropic etch process and advance present understanding of electron-surface interactions.

  16. Decrease of FIB-induced lateral damage for diamond tool used in nano cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Centre of MicroNano Manufacturing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xu, Zongwei, E-mail: zongweixu@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Centre of MicroNano Manufacturing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Fang, Fengzhou, E-mail: fzfang@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Centre of MicroNano Manufacturing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu, Bing; Xiao, Yinjing; Chen, Jinping [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Centre of MicroNano Manufacturing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Xibin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Liu, Hongzhong [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • We mainly aim to characterize and decrease the FIB-induced damage on diamond tool. • Raman and XPS methods were used to characterize the nanoscale FIB-induced damage. • Lower energy FIB can effectively lessen the FIB-induced damage on diamond tool. • The diamond tools’ performance was greatly improved after FIB process optimization. • 6 nm chip thickness of copper was achieved by diamond tool with 22 nm edge radius. - Abstract: Diamond cutting tools with nanometric edge radius used in ultra-precision machining can be fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) technology. However, due to the nanoscale effects, the diamond tools performance and the cutting edge lifetime in nano cutting would be degraded because of the FIB-induced nanoscale lateral damage. In this study, the methods of how to effectively characterize and decrease the FIB-induced lateral damage for diamond tool are intensively studied. Based on the performance optimization diamond machining tools, the controllable chip thickness of less than 10 nm was achieved on a single-crystal copper in nano cutting. In addition, the ratio of minimum thickness of chip (MTC) to tool edge radius of around 0.3–0.4 in nano cutting is achieved. Methods for decreasing the FIB-induced damage on diamond tools and adding coolant during the nano cutting are very beneficial in improving the research of nano cutting and MTC. The nano cutting experiments based on the sharp and high performance of diamond tools would validate the nano cutting mechanisms that many molecular dynamic simulation studies have put forward and provide new findings for nano cutting.

  17. The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

    2012-11-28

    Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

  18. Synthetic oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Synthetic lubricants are discussed by chemical class and their general strengths and weaknesses in terms of lubrication properties are analyzed. Comparative ratings are given for 14 chemical classes and are used as a guide for lubricant selection. The effects of chemical structure on the properties of the lubricant are described with special emphasis on thermal stability. The diversity of synthetic lubricants which is provided by the wide range of properties permits many applications, some of which are reported.

  19. Lattice Parameter of Polycrystalline Diamond in the Low-Temperature Range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paszkowicz, W.; Piszora, P.; Lasocha, W.; Margiolaki, I.; Brunelli, M.; Fitch, A.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice parameter for polycrystalline diamond is determined as a function of temperature in the 4-300 K temperature range. In the range studied, the lattice parameter, expressed in angstrom units, of the studied sample increases according to the equation a = 3.566810(12) + 6.37(41) x 10 -14 T 4 (approximately, from 3.5668 to 3.5673 A). This increase is larger than that earlier reported for pure single crystals. The observed dependence and the resulting thermal expansion coefficient are discussed on the basis of literature data reported for diamond single crystals and polycrystals. (authors)

  20. CVD diamond detectors and dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manfredotti, C.; Fizzotti, F.; LoGiudice, A.; Paolini, C.; Oliviero, P.; Vittone, E.; Torino Univ., Torino

    2002-01-01

    Natural diamond, because of its well-known properties of tissue-equivalence, has recorded a wide spreading use in radiotherapy planning with electron linear accelerators. Artificial diamond dosimeters, as obtained by Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) could be capable to offer the same performances and they can be prepared in different volumes and shapes. The dosimeter sensitivity per unit volume may be easily proved to be better than standard ionization microchamber. We have prepared in our laboratory CVD diamond microchamber (diamond tips) in emispherical shape with an external diameter of 200 μm, which can be used both as X-ray beam profilometers and as microdosimeters for small field applications like stereotaxy and also for in vivo applications. These dosimeters, which are obtained on a wire substrate that could be either metallic or SiC or even graphite, display good performances also as ion or synchrotron X-rays detectors

  1. DIAMONDS: Engineering Distributed Object Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng, Evan

    1997-01-01

    This report describes DIAMONDS, a research project at Syracuse University, that is dedicated to producing both a methodology and corresponding tools to assist in the development of heterogeneous distributed software...

  2. Structural characterization of hard materials by transmission electron microscopy (TEM): Diamond-Silicon Carbide composites and Yttria-stabilized Zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon Seok

    2008-10-01

    Diamond-Silicon Carbide (SiC) composites are excellent heat spreaders for high performance microprocessors, owing to the unparalleled thermal conductivity of the former component. Such a combination is obtained by the infiltration of liquid silicon in a synthetic diamond compact, where a rigid SiC matrix forms by the reaction between the raw materials. As well as the outstanding thermal properties, this engineered compound also retains the extreme hardness of the artificial gem. This makes it difficult to perform structural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), for it is not possible to produce thin foils out of this solid by conventional polishing methods. For the first time, a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB) instrument successfully allowed site-specific preparation of electron-transparent specimens by the lift-out technique. Subsequent TEM studies revealed that the highest concentration of structural defects occurs in the vicinity of the diamond-SiC interfaces, which are believed to act as the major barriers to the transport of thermal energy. Diffraction contrast analyses showed that the majority of the defects in diamond are isolated perfect screw or 60° dislocations. On the other hand, SiC grains contain partial dislocations and a variety of imperfections such as microtwins, stacking faults and planar defects that are conjectured to consist of antiphase (or inversion) boundaries. Clusters of nanocrystalline SiC were also observed at the diamond-SiC boundaries, and a specific heteroepitaxial orientation relationship was discovered for all cubic SiC that grows on diamond {111} facets. Yttria-stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) is the most common electrolyte material for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. It is an ionic conductor in which charge transfer is achieved by the transport of oxygen ions (O 2-). Like the diamond composite above, it is hard and brittle, and difficult to make into electron transparent TEM samples. Provided an effective

  3. Diamond photodiodes for x-ray application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Distel, James R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smedley, John [BNL; Keister, Jeffrey W [BNL; Muller, Erik [STONY BROOK UNIV.; Jordan - Sweet, Jean [WATSON RESEARCH CENTER; Bohon, Jen [CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIV.; Dong, Bin [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    Single crystal high purity CVD diamonds have been metallized and calibrated as photodiodes at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Current mode responsivity measurements have been made over a wide range (0.2-28 keV) of photon energies across several beamlines. Linear response has been achieved over ten orders of magnitude of incident flux, along with uniform spatial response. A simple model of responsivity has been used to describe the results, yielding a value of 13.3 {+-} 0.5 eV for the mean pair creation energy. The responsivity vs. photon energy data show a dip for photon energies near the carbon edge (284 eV), indicating incomplete charge collection for carriers created less than one micron from the metallized layer.

  4. Diamond photodiodes for x-ray application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distel, James R.; Smedley, John; Keister, Jeffrey W.; Muller, Erik; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Bohon, Jen; Dong, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Single crystal high purity CVD diamonds have been metallized and calibrated as photodiodes at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Current mode responsivity measurements have been made over a wide range (0.2-28 keV) of photon energies across several beamlines. Linear response has been achieved over ten orders of magnitude of incident flux, along with uniform spatial response. A simple model of responsivity has been used to describe the results, yielding a value of 13.3 ± 0.5 eV for the mean pair creation energy. The responsivity vs. photon energy data show a dip for photon energies near the carbon edge (284 eV), indicating incomplete charge collection for carriers created less than one micron from the metallized layer.

  5. Quantum photonic networks in diamond

    KAUST Repository

    Lončar, Marko

    2013-02-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have enabled the opportunity to fabricate nanoscale optical devices and chip-scale systems in diamond that can generate, manipulate, and store optical signals at the single-photon level. In particular, nanophotonics has emerged as a powerful interface between optical elements such as optical fibers and lenses, and solid-state quantum objects such as luminescent color centers in diamond that can be used effectively to manipulate quantum information. While quantum science and technology has been the main driving force behind recent interest in diamond nanophotonics, such a platform would have many applications that go well beyond the quantum realm. For example, diamond\\'s transparency over a wide wavelength range, large third-order nonlinearity, and excellent thermal properties are of great interest for the implementation of frequency combs and integrated Raman lasers. Diamond is also an inert material that makes it well suited for biological applications and for devices that must operate in harsh environments. Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013.

  6. Trace elements in diamonds from the Premier, Finsch, and Jagersfontein mines, and their petrogenetic significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesq, H.W.; Bibby, D.M.; Erasmus, C.S.; Kable, E.J.D.

    1975-01-01

    Neutron-activation studies of the impurity chemistry of more than 1500 natural diamonds from three South African kimberlite sources, Premier, Finsch, and Jagersfontein, provide evidence for the presence of submicroscopic inclusions of a quenched (or temperature re-equilibrated) melt from which these diamonds crystallized. These microscopic inclusions of parental magma contain variable amounts of fluids rich in water and carbon dioxide, as well as iron-nickelcopper-cobalt sulphides, and a major silicate phase, which is remarkably constant in composition irrespective of the source of the diamonds and the age of emplacement of their host kimberlite. These microscopic inclusions are present in varying amounts in all the diamonds that were analysed, and may even dominate the impurity chemistry of diamonds having observable mineral inclusions. An estimate of the composition of the major elements in the silicate melt indicates that the diamonds that were investigated crystallized from picritic magma rich in water and carbon dioxide in the presence of immiscible iron-nickel-copper-cobalt sulphides [af

  7. Spectroscopic properties and radiation damage investigation of a diamond based Schottky diode for ion-beam therapy microdosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verona, C.; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, G. [INFN - Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Roma (Italy); Magrin, G.; Solevi, P.; Mayer, R. [EBG MedAustron Marie Curie-St. 5, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Grilj, V.; Jakšić, M. [Ruder Boškovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-11-14

    In this work, a detailed analysis of the properties of a novel microdosimeter based on a synthetic single crystal diamond is reported. Focused ion microbeams were used to investigate the device spectropscopic properties as well as the induced radiation damage effects. A diamond based Schottky diode was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition with a very thin detecting region, about 400 nm thick (approximately 1.4 μm water equivalent thickness), corresponding to the typical size in microdosimetric measurements. A 200 × 200 μm{sup 2} square metallic contact was patterned on the diamond surface by standard photolithography to define the sensitive area. Experimental measurements were carried out at the Ruder Boškovic′ Institute microbeam facility using 4 MeV carbon and 5 MeV silicon ions. Ion beam induced charge maps were employed to characterize the microdosimeter response in terms of its charge collection properties. A stable response with no evidence of polarization or memory effects was observed up to the maximum investigated ion beam flux of about 1.7 × 10{sup 9} ions·cm{sup −2}·s{sup −1}. A homogeneity of the response about 6% was found over the sensitive region with a well-defined confinement of the response within the active area. Tests of the radiation damage effect were performed by selectively irradiating small areas of the device with different ion fluences, up to about 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. An exponential decrease of the charge collection efficiency was observed with a characteristic decay constant of about 4.8 MGy and 1 MGy for C and Si ions, respectively. The experimental data were analyzed by means of GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. A direct correlation between the diamond damaging effect and the Non Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) fraction was found. In particular, an exponential decay of the charge collection efficiency with an exponential decay as a function of NIEL is observed, with a characteristic constant of about

  8. Influence of grain boundaries on elasticity and thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, Markus; Daccache, Layal; Horvat, Sebastian; Brühne, Kai; Jacob, Timo; Fecht, Hans-Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Diamond combines several outstanding material properties such as the highest thermal conductivity and highest elastic moduli of all materials. This makes diamond an interesting candidate for a multitude of applications. Nonetheless, nanocrystalline diamond films, layers and coatings, usually show properties different to those of single crystalline diamond. This is usually attributed to the larger volume fraction of the grain boundaries with atomic structure different from the single crystal. In this work we measured Young's modulus and thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline diamond films with average grain sizes ranging from 6 to 15 nm. The measured thermal conductivities are modeled considering the thermal boundary conductance between grains as well as a grain size effect on the phonon mean free path. We make a comparison between elastic modulus and thermal boundary conductance of the grain boundaries G k for different nanocrystalline diamond films. We conclude that the grain boundaries thermal boundary conductance G k is a measure of the cohesive energy of the grain boundaries and therefore also of the elastic modulus of the nanocrystalline diamond films.

  9. Effect of pulse biasing on the morphology of diamond films grown by hot filament CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beake, B.D.; Hussain, I.U.; Rego, C.; Ahmed, W.

    1999-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of diamond due to its unique mechanical, optical and electronic properties, which make it useful for many applications. For use in optical and electronic applications further developments in the CVD process are required to control the surface morphology and crystal size of the diamond films. These will require a detailed understanding of both the nucleation and growth processes that effect the properties. The technique of bias enhanced nucleation (BEN) of diamond offers better reproducibility than conventional pre-treatment methods such as mechanical abrasion. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been used study the surface modification of diamond films on silicon substrates during pulse biased growth in a hot filament CVD reactor. Pre-abraded silicon substrates were subjected to a three-step sequential growth process: (i) diamond deposition under standard CVD conditions, (ii) bias pre-treatment and (iii) deposition under standard conditions. The results show that the bias pre-treatment time is a critical parameter controlling the surface morphology and roughness of the diamond films deposited. Biasing reduces the surface roughness from 152 nm for standard CVD diamond to 68 nm for the 2.5 minutes pulse biased film. Further increase in the bias time results in an increase in surface roughness and crystallite size. (author)

  10. Proton recoil detector of fusion neutrons using natural diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda, R. J.; Barnes, Cris W.; Han, S. S.; Staples, P. A.; Wagner, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    Diamond, with its high radiation damage resistance, is an attractive alternative to silicon for neutron measurements in next step fusion experiments. A 200-μm-thick type IIa natural diamond with Ti/Au contacts was tested at the LAMPF-WNR facility by time-of-flight neutron energy identification. The crystal, having a carrier lifetime of up to 1 ns, was arranged in a low-energy-resolution, high-sensitivity proton recoil telescope consisting of a polyethylene radiator and a low-energy-proton Teflon filter. This arrangement is similar to the triton burnup monitor of Croft et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1418 (1993)], where a silicon photodiode was used as a recoil proton detector. The observed sensitivity for 14 MeV neutrons (DT) is (1.25±0.15)×10-3 counts/neutron. However, a high contribution of neutron-induced events in the diamond, mainly carbon (A=12) recoils, was observed. A one-dimensional calculation for the detector response to carbon recoil and proton deposition is compared to the measurements. Poor energy resolution of the diamond detector precludes pulse height discrimination between direct 2.5 MeV neutrons events and proton events corresponding to 14 MeV neutrons. Therefore, an overall DT/DD neutron sensitivity ratio of only ˜6.5 is achieved. This value is much lower than the ratio of 540 reported by Croft et al. in their silicon (A=28) monitor.

  11. The isotopic dating of crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuliani, G.; Cheilletz, A.

    1995-01-01

    The first part of this work deals with the answer to the question : why are the crystals dated ? Then, some isotopic dating methods are described : U-Th-Pb, K-Ar, 40 Ar/ 39 Ar, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, fission traces, carbon 14 methods. Examples concerning emeralds and diamonds are given. (O.L.). 12 refs., 2 figs

  12. Band gap opening in strongly compressed diamond observed by x-ray energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamboa, E. J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; MacDonald, M. J.; Zastrau, U.; Gauthier, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Granados, E.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    The extraordinary mechanical and optical properties of diamond are the basis of numerous technical applications and make diamond anvil cells a premier device to explore the high-pressure behavior of materials. However, at applied pressures above a few hundred GPa, optical probing through the anvils becomes difficult because of the pressure-induced changes of the transmission and the excitation of a strong optical emission. Such features have been interpreted as the onset of a closure of the optical gap in diamond, and can significantly impair spectroscopy of the material inside the cell. In contrast, a comparable widening has been predicted for purely hydrostatic compressions, forming a basis for the presumed pressure stiffening of diamond and resilience to the eventual phase change to BC8. We here present the first experimental evidence of this effect at geo-planetary pressures, exceeding the highest ever reported hydrostatic compression of diamond by more than 200 GPa and any other measurement of the band gap by more than 350 GPa. We here apply laser driven-ablation to create a dynamic, high pressure state in a thin, synthetic diamond foil together with frequency-resolved x-ray scattering as a probe. The frequency shift of the inelastically scattered x-rays encodes the optical properties and, thus, the behavior of the band gap in the sample. Using the ultra-bright x-ray beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we observe an increasing direct band gap in diamond up to a pressure of 370 GPa. This finding points to the enormous strains in the anvils and the impurities in natural Type Ia diamonds as the source of the observed closure of the optical window. Our results demonstrate that diamond remains an insulating solid to pressures approaching its limit strength.

  13. Band gap opening in strongly compressed diamond observed by x-ray energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamboa, E. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fletcher, L. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lee, H. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); MacDonald, M. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zastrau, U. [High-Energy Density Science Group, Hamburg (Germany); Gauthier, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gericke, D. O. [Univ. of Warwick (United Kingdom); Vorberger, J. [Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres, Dresden (Germany); Granados, E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hastings, J. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-01-25

    The extraordinary mechanical and optical properties of diamond are the basis of numerous technical applications and make diamond anvil cells a premier device to explore the high-pressure behavior of materials. However, at applied pressures above a few hundred GPa, optical probing through the anvils becomes difficult because of the pressure-induced changes of the transmission and the excitation of a strong optical emission. Such features have been interpreted as the onset of a closure of the optical gap in diamond, and can significantly impair spectroscopy of the material inside the cell. In contrast, a comparable widening has been predicted for purely hydrostatic compressions, forming a basis for the presumed pressure stiffening of diamond and resilience to the eventual phase change to BC8. We here present the first experimental evidence of this effect at geo-planetary pressures, exceeding the highest ever reported hydrostatic compression of diamond by more than 200 GPa and any other measurement of the band gap by more than 350 GPa. We here apply laser driven-ablation to create a dynamic, high pressure state in a thin, synthetic diamond foil together with frequency-resolved x-ray scattering as a probe. The frequency shift of the inelastically scattered x-rays encodes the optical properties and, thus, the behavior of the band gap in the sample. Using the ultra-bright x-ray beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we observe an increasing direct band gap in diamond up to a pressure of 370 GPa. This finding points to the enormous strains in the anvils and the impurities in natural Type Ia diamonds as the source of the observed closure of the optical window. Our results demonstrate that diamond remains an insulating solid to pressures approaching its limit strength.

  14. Natural and CVD type diamond detectors as dosimeters in hadrontherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Rafaele, L.; Sabini, M.G.; De Angelis, C.; Onori, S.; Pacilio, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Bruzzi, M.; Sciortino, S.

    2003-01-01

    Diamond is potentially a suitable material for use as radiation dosimeter; the wide band gap results in low dark currents and low sensitivity to visible light, the high carrier mobility can give rapid response, the very high density of strong bonds in the crystal structure make diamond very resistant to radiation damage; moreover it is tissue equivalent. The more recent advances in the synthesis of polycrystalline diamond by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) techniques have allowed the synthesis of material with electronic properties suitable for dosimetric application. In this paper we will report the results obtained in the study of the response of a natural diamond dosimeter and a CVD one irradiated with 62 AMeV proton beams to demonstrate their possible application in protontherapy

  15. Diamond-turning HP-21 beryllium to achieve an optical surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, D.K.; Hauschildt, H.W.; Bryan, J.B.

    1975-01-01

    Investigation of diamond turning on beryllium was made in anticipation of obtaining an optical finish. Although results of past experiences were poor, it was decided to continue diamond turning on beryllium beyond initial failures. By changing speed and using coolant, partial success was achieved. Tool wear was the major problem. Tests were made to establish and plot wear as a function of cutting speed and time. Slower speeds did cause lower wear rates, but at no time did wear reach an acceptable level. The machine, tools, and procedure used were chosen based on the results of preliminary attempts and on previous experience. It was unnecessary to use an air-bearing spindle because tool failure governed the best finish that could be expected. All tools of diamond composition, whether single crystal or polycrystalline, wore at unacceptable rates. Based on present technology, it must be concluded that beryllium cannot be feasibly diamond turned to achieve an optical finish. (22 fig.)

  16. Misfit accommodation mechanism at the heterointerface between diamond and cubic boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Zhongchang; Kato, Takeharu; Shibata, Naoya; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2015-02-17

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (c-BN) are the top two hardest materials on the Earth. Clarifying how the two seemingly incompressible materials can actually join represents one of the most challenging issues in materials science. Here we apply the temperature gradient method to grow the c-BN single crystals on diamond and report a successful epitaxial growth. By transmission electron microscopy, we reveal a novel misfit accommodation mechanism for a {111} diamond/c-BN heterointerface, that is, lattice misfit can be accommodated by continuous stacking fault networks, which are connected by periodically arranged hexagonal dislocation loops. The loops are found to comprise six 60° Shockley partial dislocations. Atomically, the carbon in diamond bonds directly to boron in c-BN at the interface, which electronically induces a two-dimensional electron gas and a quasi-1D electrical conductivity. Our findings point to the existence of a novel misfit accommodation mechanism associated with the superhard materials.

  17. Synthetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, George E.; Cain, Joel M.

    1996-02-01

    The Advanced Distributed Simulation (ADS) Synthetic Environments Program seeks to create robust virtual worlds from operational terrain and environmental data sources of sufficient fidelity and currency to interact with the real world. While some applications can be met by direct exploitation of standard digital terrain data, more demanding applications -- particularly those support operations 'close to the ground' -- are well-served by emerging capabilities for 'value-adding' by the user working with controlled imagery. For users to rigorously refine and exploit controlled imagery within functionally different workstations they must have a shared framework to allow interoperability within and between these environments in terms of passing image and object coordinates and other information using a variety of validated sensor models. The Synthetic Environments Program is now being expanded to address rapid construction of virtual worlds with research initiatives in digital mapping, softcopy workstations, and cartographic image understanding. The Synthetic Environments Program is also participating in a joint initiative for a sensor model applications programer's interface (API) to ensure that a common controlled imagery exploitation framework is available to all researchers, developers and users. This presentation provides an introduction to ADS and the associated requirements for synthetic environments to support synthetic theaters of war. It provides a technical rationale for exploring applications of image understanding technology to automated cartography in support of ADS and related programs benefitting from automated analysis of mapping, earth resources and reconnaissance imagery. And it provides an overview and status of the joint initiative for a sensor model API.

  18. Diamonds: Exploration, mines and marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, George H.; Janse, A. J. A. (Bram)

    2009-11-01

    The beauty, value and mystique of exceptional quality diamonds such as the 603 carat Lesotho Promise, recovered from the Letseng Mine in 2006, help to drive a multi-billion dollar diamond exploration, mining and marketing industry that operates in some 45 countries across the globe. Five countries, Botswana, Russia, Canada, South Africa and Angola account for 83% by value and 65% by weight of annual diamond production, which is mainly produced by four major companies, De Beers, Alrosa, Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton (BHPB), which together account for 78% by value and 72% by weight of annual diamond production for 2007. During the last twelve years 16 new diamond mines commenced production and 4 re-opened. In addition, 11 projects are in advanced evaluation and may begin operations within the next five years. Exploration for diamondiferous kimberlites was still energetic up to the last quarter of 2008 with most work carried out in Canada, Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Botswana. Many kimberlites were discovered but no new economic deposits were outlined as a result of this work, except for the discovery and possible development of the Bunder project by Rio Tinto in India. Exploration methods have benefitted greatly from improved techniques of high resolution geophysical aerial surveying, new research into the geochemistry of indicator minerals and further insights into the formation of diamonds and the relation to tectonic/structural events in the crust and mantle. Recent trends in diamond marketing indicate that prices for rough diamonds and polished goods were still rising up to the last quarter of 2008 and subsequently abruptly sank in line with the worldwide financial crisis. Most analysts predict that prices will rise again in the long term as the gap between supply and demand will widen because no new economic diamond discoveries have been made recently. The disparity between high rough and polished prices and low share prices of publicly

  19. Laser Raman microprobe spectroscopy as a diagnostic for the characterisation of diamond and diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, C.

    1990-10-01

    Invariably when manufacturing an artificial diamond film a mixture of carbon is deposited - tetragonally bonded (diamond), trigonally bonded (graphite) and other allotropic crystalline forms and amorphous carbons. This imposes a need for careful analysis to determine exactly what carbon types constitute the films. Raman spectroscopy is particularly sensitive to crystal and atomic structure and has a number of advantages which make it one of the most useful techniques for interrogating diamond and DLC thin films. Although Raman spectroscopy alone cannot fully characterise the film, it can give more information than simply what particular form of carbon or other impurities are present in the film. It can be used to determine the ratio of sp 2 to sp 3 bonding within the film, and to some extent the crystallite or domain size and the internal stress of the film. The use of laser Raman microprobe spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool in the analysis of diamond and DLC thin films is demonstrated for a variety of carbon films on various substrates and the characterisation of these films is discussed. (author)

  20. Are diamond nanoparticles cytotoxic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrand, Amanda M; Huang, Houjin; Carlson, Cataleya; Schlager, John J; Omacr Sawa, Eiji; Hussain, Saber M; Dai, Liming

    2007-01-11

    Finely divided carbon particles, including charcoal, lampblack, and diamond particles, have been used for ornamental and official tattoos since ancient times. With the recent development in nanoscience and nanotechnology, carbon-based nanomaterials (e.g., fullerenes, nanotubes, nanodiamonds) attract a great deal of interest. Owing to their low chemical reactivity and unique physical properties, nanodiamonds could be useful in a variety of biological applications such as carriers for drugs, genes, or proteins; novel imaging techniques; coatings for implantable materials; and biosensors and biomedical nanorobots. Therefore, it is essential to ascertain the possible hazards of nanodiamonds to humans and other biological systems. We have, for the first time, assessed the cytotoxicity of nanodiamonds ranging in size from 2 to 10 nm. Assays of cell viability such as mitochondrial function (MTT) and luminescent ATP production showed that nanodiamonds were not toxic to a variety of cell types. Furthermore, nanodiamonds did not produce significant reactive oxygen species. Cells can grow on nanodiamond-coated substrates without morphological changes compared to controls. These results suggest that nanodiamonds could be ideal for many biological applications in a diverse range of cell types.

  1. Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tu, Chia-Hao [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang Chi [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsin-Li [Industrial Technology Research Institute - South, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Yonhua [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Auciello, Orlando [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

  2. Synthetic Rutile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burastero, J.

    1975-01-01

    This work is about the laboratory scale investigation of the conditions in the rutile synthetic production from one me nita in Aguas Dulces reservoir. The iron mineral is chlorinated and volatilized selectively leaving a residue enriched in titanium dioxide which can be used as a substitute of rutile mineral

  3. Organophosphonate biofunctionalization of diamond electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterino, R; Csiki, R; Wiesinger, M; Sachsenhauser, M; Stutzmann, M; Garrido, J A; Cattani-Scholz, A; Speranza, Giorgio; Janssens, S D; Haenen, K

    2014-08-27

    The modification of the diamond surface with organic molecules is a crucial aspect to be considered for any bioapplication of this material. There is great interest in broadening the range of linker molecules that can be covalently bound to the diamond surface. In the case of protein immobilization, the hydropathicity of the surface has a major influence on the protein conformation and, thus, on the functionality of proteins immobilized at surfaces. For electrochemical applications, particular attention has to be devoted to avoid that the charge transfer between the electrode and the redox center embedded in the protein is hindered by a thick insulating linker layer. This paper reports on the grafting of 6-phosphonohexanoic acid on OH-terminated diamond surfaces, serving as linkers to tether electroactive proteins onto diamond surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the formation of a stable layer on the surface. The charge transfer between electroactive molecules and the substrate is studied by electrochemical characterization of the redox activity of aminomethylferrocene and cytochrome c covalently bound to the substrate through this linker. Our work demonstrates that OH-terminated diamond functionalized with 6-phosphonohexanoic acid is a suitable platform to interface redox-proteins, which are fundamental building blocks for many bioelectronics applications.

  4. Diamond and diamond-like films for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of transparency templates which describe the goals of the Office of Transportation Materials (OTM) Tribology Program. The positions of personnel on the OTM are listed. The role and mission of the OTM is reviewed. The purpose of the Tribology Program is stated to be `to obtain industry input on program(s) in tribology/advanced lubricants areas of interest`. The objective addressed here is to identify opportunities for cost effective application of diamond and diamond-like carbon in transportation systems.

  5. Charge Collection and Propagation in Diamond X-Ray Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keister, J.W.; Smedley, J.; Dimitrov, D.; Busby, R.

    2009-01-01

    Diamond is a unique material for x-ray energy conversion. Its high thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion make it ideal for high heat load environments. However, its large bandgap, while offering insensitivity to visible light, makes charge trapping more likely (thermal detrapping less likely) than in silicon; energy conversion efficiency is also 3-4 times less even under the best conditions. High material strength and x-ray transmission also are potentially useful features for certain applications in x-ray science. Limitations to charge collection efficiency such as recombination and charge trapping have been investigated quantitatively using quasi-continuous tunable synchrotron radiation under flexible biasing schemes as well using detailed Monte Carlo Simulations. In the case of charge collection efficiency, the magnitude of the applied field, initial particle energy, and probe depth are adjusted. The diffusion and drift of photo-generated charge clouds are explicitly considered for the specific energy loss behavior of diamond. While recombination loss at the entrance window of diamond diodes is qualitatively similar to a treatment for an additional 'dead' carbon window layer, the observed field and photon energy dependence implies that the more sophisticated model is more correct quantitatively. In addition, charge propagation in diamond is unique in that photoconductive gain is possible. Effectively, charge trapping of one carrier leads to screening of the applied field. In order to avoid photoconductive gain, either blocking contacts or explicit detrapping is required. Quantitative analysis of photoconductive gain as a function of applied field, x-ray power, waveform and photon energy offers insight into the fundamental limitations of state of the art single crystal diamond. Simple models are proposed to assist in extrapolating the observed behavior towards useful detector devices.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Superconductivity in CVD diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yoshihiko

    2009-06-01

    A beautiful jewel of diamond is insulator. However, boron doping can induce semiconductive, metallic and superconducting properties in diamond. When the boron concentration is tuned over 3 × 1020 cm-3, diamonds enter the metallic region and show superconductivity at low temperatures. The metal-insulator transition and superconductivity are analyzed using ARPES, XAS, NMR, IXS, transport and magnetic measurements and so on. This review elucidates the physical properties and mechanism of diamond superconductor as a special superconductivity that occurs in semiconductors.

  7. Ultralong spin coherence time in isotopically engineered diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Neumann, Philipp; Twitchen, Daniel; Markham, Matthew; Kolesov, Roman; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Isoya, Junichi; Achard, Jocelyn; Beck, Johannes; Tissler, Julia; Jacques, Vincent; Hemmer, Philip R.; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2009-05-01

    As quantum mechanics ventures into the world of applications and engineering, materials science faces the necessity to design matter to quantum grade purity. For such materials, quantum effects define their physical behaviour and open completely new (quantum) perspectives for applications. Carbon-based materials are particularly good examples, highlighted by the fascinating quantum properties of, for example, nanotubes or graphene. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis and application of ultrapure isotopically controlled single-crystal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond with a remarkably low concentration of paramagnetic impurities. The content of nuclear spins associated with the 13C isotope was depleted to 0.3% and the concentration of other paramagnetic defects was measured to be CVD diamond can be used to detect external magnetic fields with a sensitivity reaching 4nTHz-1/2 and subnanometre spatial resolution.

  8. Radiation hardness of diamond and silicon sensors compared

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Wim; Furgeri, Alexander; Mueller, Steffen; Sander, Christian; Berdermann, Eleni; Pomorski, Michal; Huhtinen, Mika

    2007-01-01

    The radiation hardness of silicon charged particle sensors is compared with single crystal and polycrystalline diamond sensors, both experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that for Si- and C-sensors, the NIEL hypothesis, which states that the signal loss is proportional to the Non-Ionizing Energy Loss, is a good approximation to the present data. At incident proton and neutron energies well above 0.1 GeV the radiation damage is dominated by the inelastic cross section, while at non-relativistic energies the elastic cross section prevails. The smaller inelastic nucleon-Carbon cross section and the light nuclear fragments imply that at high energies diamond is an order of magnitude more radiation hard than silicon, while at energies below 0.1 GeV the difference becomes significantly smaller.

  9. Diamond Quantum Devices in Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuzhou; Jelezko, Fedor; Plenio, Martin B; Weil, Tanja

    2016-06-01

    The currently available techniques for molecular imaging capable of reaching atomic resolution are limited to low temperatures, vacuum conditions, or large amounts of sample. Quantum sensors based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond offer great potential to achieve single-molecule detection with atomic resolution under ambient conditions. Diamond nanoparticles could also be prepared with implanted NV centers, thereby generating unique nanosensors that are able to traffic into living biological systems. Therefore, this technique might provide unprecedented access and insight into the structure and function of individual biomolecules under physiological conditions as well as observation of biological processes down to the quantum level with atomic resolution. The theory of diamond quantum sensors and the current developments from their preparation to sensing techniques have been critically discussed in this Minireview. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Diamonds at the golden point

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Alongside the CMS Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) – installed last month (see here) – lie diamond detectors. No ordinary gems, these lab-grown diamonds will be playing a vital role in Run 2: differentiating signals from collision products with those from the beam background.   The BCM detector's green "c-shaped" printed circuit board is mounted on the PLT/BCM carbon-fibre carriage ready for installation. Earlier this year, the CMS BRIL project installed beam condition monitors (BCM) at the heart of the CMS detector. Designed to measure the online luminosity and beam background as close as possible to the LHC beam pipe, the BCMs use radiation-hard diamonds to differentiate between background and collision signals. The BCM also protects the CMS silicon trackers from damaging beam losses, by aborting the beam if the signal currents measured are above an acceptable threshold. These new BCMs are designed with Run 2 bunches in mind. &ldq...

  11. Thermoluminescent properties of CVD diamond: applications to ionising radiation dosimetry; Proprietes thermoluminescentes du diamant CVD: applications a la dosimetrie des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitfils, A

    2007-09-15

    Remarkable properties of synthetic diamond (human soft tissue equivalence, chemical stability, non-toxicity) make this material suitable for medical application as thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). This work highlights the interest of this material as radiotherapy TLD. In the first stage of this work, we looked after thermoluminescent (TL) and dosimetric properties of polycrystalline diamond made by Chemically Vapor Deposited (CVD) synthesis. Dosimetric characteristics are satisfactory as TLD for medical application. Luminescence thermal quenching on diamond has been investigated. This phenomenon leads to a decrease of dosimetric TL peak sensitivity when the heating rate increases. The second part of this work analyses the use of synthetic diamond as TLD in radiotherapy. Dose profiles, depth dose distributions and the cartography of an electron beam obtained with our samples are in very good agreement with results from an ionisation chamber. It is clearly shown that CVD) diamond is of interest to check beams of treatment accelerators. The use of these samples in a control of treatment with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy underlines good response of synthetic diamond in high dose gradient areas. These results indicate that CVD diamond is a promising material for radiotherapy dosimetry. (author)

  12. Nature of type IaB diamonds from the Mir kimberlite pipe (Yakutia): evidence from spectroscopic observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuryeva, Olga P.; Rakhmanova, Mariana I.; Zedgenizov, Dmitry A.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the specific features of structural defects of type IaB diamonds from the Mir kimberlite pipe (Yakutian diamondiferous province) have been characterized using FTIR and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Mineral inclusions in these diamonds [olivine (Ol), orthopyroxene (OPx), chromite (Chr), sulphide (Sf)] correspond to associations of peridotite rocks at the base of the lithosphere. Nitrogen content in type IaB diamonds shows significant variations, suggesting different growth media and/or several growth stages. A specific feature of these diamonds is the absence or very small amount of platelets, which may be related to annealing during their long-term residence at the temperatures of the base of the lithosphere. All studied diamonds show the presence of hydrogen defects that are active in IR spectra with an intense line at 3107 cm-1, and additional weaker lines at 3085 and 3237 cm-1, which correlated with high nitrogen content. Type IaB diamonds are also characterized by the presence of nitrogen-nickel luminescence centres S2, S3 and 523.2 nm. This feature distinguishes them from superdeep diamonds with extreme nitrogen aggregation states, which clearly attest to different growth conditions and crystallization media of type IaB diamonds from the Mir kimberlite pipe.

  13. A Novel Low-Loss Diamond-Core Porous Fiber for Polarization Maintaining Terahertz Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Raonaqul; Habib, Selim; Hasanuzzaman, G. K. M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the numerical design optimization of a new kind of relatively simple porous-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) for terahertz (THz) waveguiding. A novel twist is introduced in the regular hexagonal PCF by including a diamond-shaped porous-core inside the hexagonal cladding. The numerical...

  14. first-principle calculation of electrons charge density in the diamond

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. A computational study of the total electrons charge density in the diamond-structure semiconductor crystals has been performed. In a typical modern electronic structure calculation, the charge density is obtained from a certain density functional, however, the charge density in this work was obtained from.

  15. Surface states and photo-induced charge transfer on oxygen-terminated chemical vapor deposition diamond

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Deferme, W.; Macková, Anna; Haenen, K.; Nesladek, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 6 (2011), 063701/1-063701/3 ISSN 0021-8979 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : CRYSTAL CVD-DIAMOND * TRANSPORT * MOBILITY Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2011

  16. Diamond radiation detectors II. CVD diamond development for radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Interest in radiation detectors has supplied some of the impetus for improving the electronic properties of CVD diamond. In the present discussion, we will restrict our attention to polycrystalhne CVD material. We will focus on the evolution of these materials over the past decade and the correlation of detector performance with other properties of the material

  17. Investigation of Applications of Diamond Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    CN /H2 Figure 10. Schematic-of DQ dlscharge CVD diamond aRoaratu. D C MICROWAVE SUBSTRATE 7UBSTRATE / GAS GAS INLET INLET REACTOR MICROWAVE EI1A~G EN...Diamond films were synthesized using a DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor developed for diamond deposition. Deposition protocol was a...a 10-fold increase in the life of steel bearings. 111 NORMALIZED RESISTANCE TO WEAR CHROMIUM == 1.0, EXTRAP TO DIAMOND Diamond 7- 6 7F z (1) 7 U N 3

  18. Clinopyroxenes still trapped in diamonds: high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction as a chemical probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Nicola; Nestola, Fabrizio; Alvaro, Matteo; Wilhelm, Heribert; Kleppe, Annette; Nimis, Paolo; Harris, Jeffrey W.

    2014-05-01

    Clinopyroxenes are mainly Ca-Na-Fe-Mg-silicates constituting a significant portion of the Earth's upper mantle up to 20% of such shell of our planet. They could be found as typical mineral inclusions in diamonds being diopsidic and omphacitic in composition and, together with garnets, cover a key role in providing indications concerning the source rock in which the diamond crystallize. In detail, it is well known that eclogitic diamonds are characterized by clinopyroxenes with omphacitic compositions (about Ca0.5Na0.5Mg0.5Al0.5Si2O6) whereas peridotitic diamonds show clinopyroxenes very rich in the diopside end-member (CaMgSi2O6). In order to get direct chemical composition on the inclusions, and therefore on the diamond origin source, it is obviously necessary to extract them breaking and/or polishing the diamond host. However, a non-destructive investigation of an inclusion still trapped in a diamond is useful and important for different reasons: (1) the inclusions could be under pressure and their crystal structure can be modified if the pressure is released by the extraction; (2) the residual pressure on the inclusion can provide information about the formation pressure of the diamond (e.g. Nestola et al. 2011 and references therein); (3) the morphology and growth relationships of the inclusion with the host diamond can provide indications about its protogenetic vs. syngenetic and/or epigenetic nature; and (4) preservation of the diamond surface growth features can maintain crucial information on late oxidation processes (Fedortchouk et al. 2011). However the available methods to measure the composition of the inclusions implies to destroy the sample. The aim of this work is to obtain chemical information on the inclusions still trapped in their diamond host and therefore to indicate the diamond origin without extracting the inclusions. The work was carried out by single crystal X-ray diffraction using a new experimental approach by high energy synchrotron

  19. Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook It is SUPER EASY to fundraise on facebook! You can add a "donate" button to a post to show your friends that you're raising money for the Shwachman Diamond ... more Fundraising Idea - Casual for a Cure This is a simple fundraising ... Recent News #GivingTuesday - November 28 Fundraising on Facebook Fundraising Idea - Casual for a Cure An SDS ...

  20. Diamond/diamond-like carbon coated nanotube structures for efficient electron field emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijevic, Steven (Inventor); Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a nanotube coated with diamond or diamond-like carbon, a field emitter cathode comprising same, and a field emitter comprising the cathode. It is also directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from a field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes by coating the nanotube with diamond or diamond-like carbon. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from an electron field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes, which method comprises coating the nanotubes with diamond or diamond-like carbon.

  1. CVD diamond sensor for UV-photon detection

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Gervino, G; Lamarina, A M; Palmisano, C; Periale, R; Picchi, P

    2012-01-01

    A new generation of UV photosensors, based on single crystal Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamonds to work optically coupled with large volume two-phase liquid-Ar (LAr) or liquid-Xe (LXe) detectors nowadays under design for the next generation of WIMPs experiments, is under development. Preliminary tests and first calibrations show these devices can have better performance than the existing UV sensitive detectors (higher photosensitivity and better signal-to-noise ratio). I-V characteristics, dark current measurements, linearity response to X-ray irradiation, and alpha-particle energy resolution are reported and discussed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Measurements and Studies of Secondary Electron Emission of Diamond Amplified Photocathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu,Q.

    2008-10-01

    The Diamond Amplified Photocathode (DAP) is a novel approach to generating electrons. By following the primary electron beam, which is generated by traditional electron sources, with an amplifier, the electron beam available to the eventual application is increased by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude in current. Diamond has a very wide band gap of 5.47eV which allows for a good negative electron affinity with simple hydrogenation, diamond can hold more than 2000MV/m field before breakdown. Diamond also provides the best rigidity among all materials. These two characters offer the capability of applying high voltage across very thin diamond film to achieve high SEY and desired emission phase. The diamond amplifier also is capable of handling a large heat load by conduction and sub-nanosecond pulse input. The preparation of the diamond amplifier includes thinning and polishing, cleaning with acid etching, metallization, and hydrogenation. The best mechanical polishing available can provide high purity single crystal diamond films with no less than 100 {micro}m thickness and <15 nm Ra surface roughness. The ideal thickness for 700MHz beam is {approx}30 {micro}m, which requires further thinning with RIE or laser ablation. RIE can achieve atomic layer removal precision and roughness eventually, but the time consumption for this procedure is very significant. Laser ablation proved that with <266nm ps laser beam, the ablation process on the diamond can easily achieve removing a few microns per hour from the surface and <100nm roughness. For amplifier application, laser ablation is an adequate and efficient process to make ultra thin diamond wafers following mechanical polishing. Hydrogenation will terminate the diamond surface with monolayer of hydrogen, and form NEA so that secondary electrons in the conduction band can escape into the vacuum. The method is using hydrogen cracker to strike hydrogen atoms onto the bare diamond surface to form H-C bonds. Two independent

  3. Synthetic Cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Brooke; Yepes, Andres; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs), also known under the brand names of "Spice," "K2," "herbal incense," "Cloud 9," "Mojo" and many others, are becoming a large public health concern due not only to their increasing use but also to their unpredictable toxicity and abuse potential. There are many types of SCBs, each having a unique binding affinity for cannabinoid receptors. Although both Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and SCBs stimulate the same receptors, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), studies have shown that SCBs are associated with higher rates of toxicity and hospital admissions than is natural cannabis. This is likely due to SCBs being direct agonists of the cannabinoid receptors, whereas THC is a partial agonist. Furthermore, the different chemical structures of SCBs found in Spice or K2 may interact in unpredictable ways to elicit previously unknown, and the commercial products may have unknown contaminants. The largest group of users is men in their 20s who participate in polydrug use. The most common reported toxicities with SCB use based on studies using Texas Poison Control records are tachycardia, agitation and irritability, drowsiness, hallucinations, delusions, hypertension, nausea, confusion, dizziness, vertigo and chest pain. Acute kidney injury has also been strongly associated with SCB use. Treatment mostly involves symptom management and supportive care. More research is needed to identify which contaminants are typically found in synthetic marijuana and to understand the interactions between different SBCs to better predict adverse health outcomes.

  4. Influence of the X-site composition on tourmaline's crystal structure: investigation of synthetic K-dravite, dravite, oxy-uvite, and magnesio-foitite using SREF and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, E. J.; Wunder, B.; Ertl, A.; Koch-Müller, M.; Rhede, D.; Scheidl, K.; Giester, G.; Heinrich, W.

    2016-02-01

    The crystal structures of synthetic K-dravite [XKYMg 3 Z Al 6 T Si6O18(BO3) 3 V (OH) 3 W (OH)], dravite [XNaYMg 3 Z Al 6 T Si6O18(BO3) 3 V (OH) 3 W (OH)], oxy-uvite [XCaYMg 3 Z Al 6 T Si6O18(BO3) 3 V (OH) 3 W O], and magnesio-foitite [X☐Y(Mg2Al)ZAl 6 T Si6O18(BO3) 3 V (OH) 3 W (OH)] are investigated by polarized Raman spectroscopy, single-crystal structure refinement (SREF), and powder X-ray diffraction. The use of compositionally simple tourmalines characterized by electron microprobe analysis facilitates the determination of site occupancy in the SREF and band assignment in the Raman spectra. The synthesized K-dravite, oxy-uvite, and magnesio-foitite have significant Mg-Al disorder between their octahedral sites indicated by their respective average and bond lengths. The Y- and Z-site compositions of oxy-uvite (YMg1.52Al1.48(10) and ZAl4.90Mg1.10(15)) and magnesio-foitite (YAl1.62Mg1.38(18) and ZAl4.92Mg1.08(24)) are refined from the electron densities at each site. The Mg-Al ratio of the Y and Z sites is also determined from the relative integrated peak intensities of the Raman bands in the O-H stretching vibrational range (3250-3850 cm-1), producing values in good agreement with the SREF data. The unit cell volume of tourmaline increases from magnesio-foitite (1558.4(3) Å3) to dravite (1569.5(4)-1571.7(3) Å3) to oxy-uvite (1572.4(2) Å3) to K-dravite (1588.1(2) Å3), mainly due to lengthening of the crystallographic c-axis. The increase in the size of the X-site coordination polyhedron from dravite (Na) to K-dravite (K) is accommodated locally in the crystal structure, resulting in the shortening of the neighboring O1- H1 bond. In oxy-uvite, Ca2+ is locally associated with a deprotonated W (O1) site, whereas vacant X sites are neighbored by protonated W ( O1) sites. Increasing the size of the X-site-occupying ion does not detectably affect bonding between the other sites; however, the higher charge of Ca and the deprotonated W ( O1) site in oxy-uvite are

  5. Optically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarisation in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Schwartz, Ilai; Chen, Qiong; Schulze-Sünninghausen, David; Carl, Patrick; Höfer, Peter; Retzker, Alexander; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Isoya, Junichi; Luy, Burkhard; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depends strongly on nuclear spin polarisation and, motivated by this observation, dynamical nuclear spin polarisation has recently been applied to enhance MRI protocols (Kurhanewicz et al 2011 Neoplasia 13 81). Nuclear spins associated with the 13C carbon isotope (nuclear spin I = 1/2) in diamond possess uniquely long spin lattice relaxation times (Reynhardt and High 2011 Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spectrosc. 38 37). If they are present in diamond nanocrystals, especially when strongly polarised, they form a promising contrast agent for MRI. Current schemes for achieving nuclear polarisation, however, require cryogenic temperatures. Here we demonstrate an efficient scheme that realises optically induced 13C nuclear spin hyperpolarisation in diamond at room temperature and low ambient magnetic field. Optical pumping of a nitrogen-vacancy centre creates a continuously renewable electron spin polarisation which can be transferred to surrounding 13C nuclear spins. Importantly for future applications we also realise polarisation protocols that are robust against an unknown misalignment between magnetic field and crystal axis.

  6. Investigation of the electric field in irradiated diamond sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Barvich, Tobias; Boer, Wim de; Dierlamm, Alexander; Eber, Robert; Nuernberg, Andreas; Steck, Pia [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (IEKP), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) (Germany); Dabrowski, Anne; Guthoff, Moritz [CERN (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    The Beam Condition Monitoring Leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC. As detectors 32 poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors are positioned in a ring around the beam pipe at a distance of +/-1.8 m and +/-14.4 m from the interaction point. The radiation hardness of the diamond sensors in terms of measured signal during operation was significantly lower than expected based on laboratory measurements. At high particle rates, like they occur during the operation of the LHC, charge carriers can be trapped in defects created by radiation. This space charge is expected to modify the electrical field in the sensor bulk and hence to reduce the charge collection efficiency. This modified electrical field has been indirectly measured in the laboratory using the Transient Current Technique (TCT) method in irradiated single crystal CVD diamond. This rate dependent effect was simulated with the software 'SILVACO ATLAS' and the obtained electrical field was used to calculate a TCT measurement pulse. The results of the TCT measurements will be compared to the simulation.

  7. Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond nanowires with enhanced electrochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalini, Jayakumar; Lin, Yi-Chieh; Chang, Ting-Hsun; Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Chen, Huang-Chin; Lin, I.-Nan; Lee, Chi-Young; Tai, Nyan-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    The effects of N 2 incorporation in Ar/CH 4 plasma on the electrochemical properties and microstructure of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films are reported. While the electrical conductivity of the films increased monotonously with increasing N 2 content (up to 25%) in the plasma, the electrochemical behavior was optimized for UNCD films grown in (Ar–10% N 2 )/CH 4 plasma. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the main factor resulting in high conductivity in the films was the formation of needle-like nanodiamond grains and the induction graphite layer encapsulating these grains. The electrochemical process for N 2 -incorporated UNCD films can readily be activated due to the presence of nanographite along the grain boundaries of the films. The formation of needle-like diamond grains was presumably due to the presence of CN species that adhered to the existing nanodiamond clusters, which suppressed radial growth of the nanodiamond crystals, promoting anisotropic growth and the formation of needle-like nanodiamond. The N 2 -incorporated UNCD films outperformed other electrochemical electrode materials, such as boron-doped diamond and glassy carbon, in that the UNCD electrodes could sense dopamine, urea, and ascorbic acid simultaneously in the same mixture with clear resolution

  8. Generation of Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond with Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jin-Ming; Chen, Xiang-Dong; Fan, Le-Le; Gong, Zhao-Jun; Zou, Chong-Wen; Sun, Fang-Wen; Han, Zheng-Fu; Guo, Guang-Can

    2012-03-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy defect color centers are created in a high purity single crystal diamond by nitrogen-ion implantation. Both optical spectrum and optically detected magnetic resonance are measured for these artificial quantum emitters. Moreover, with a suitable mask, a lattice composed of nitrogen-vacancy centers is fabricated. Rabi oscillation driven by micro-waves is carried out to show the quality of the ion implantation and potential in quantum manipulation. Along with compatible standard lithography, such an implantation technique shows high potential in future to make structures with nitrogen-vacancy centers for diamond photonics and integrated photonic quantum chip.

  9. Generation of Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond with Ion Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Jin-Ming; Chen Xiang-Dong; Gong Zhao-Jun; Sun Fang-Wen; Han Zheng-Fu; Guo Guang-Can; Fan Le-Le; Zou Chong-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy defect color centers are created in a high purity single crystal diamond by nitrogen-ion implantation. Both optical spectrum and optically detected magnetic resonance are measured for these artificial quantum emitters. Moreover, with a suitable mask, a lattice composed of nitrogen-vacancy centers is fabricated. Rabi oscillation driven by micro-waves is carried out to show the quality of the ion implantation and potential in quantum manipulation. Along with compatible standard lithography, such an implantation technique shows high potential in future to make structures with nitrogen-vacancy centers for diamond photonics and integrated photonic quantum chip

  10. Experimental investigation of parametric X radiation in silicon, quartz and diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adishchev, Yu.N.; Apanasevich, A.P.; Afanasenko, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental investigation of parametric X radiation (PXR) of silicon, quartz and diamond crystals is carried out. Angular distributions and energy dependence of PXR yield for a silicon crystal of 375 and 1300 μm in thick at 275-500 MeV electron energies are measured. PXR of a quartz crystal of 100 μm in thick under 19 and 90 deg angles is detected experimentally for the first time. Angular distributions of PXR of a diamond monocrystal of 350 μm in thick at 370, 500 and 900 MeV electron energies are investigated. The characteristic feature of PXR is the fact that the type of azimuthal dependence of angular distribution is determined by the degree of PXR polarization. 3 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Synthetic Botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian R; Pollak, Bernardo; Purswani, Nuri; Patron, Nicola; Haseloff, Jim

    2017-07-05

    Plants are attractive platforms for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. Plants' modular and plastic body plans, capacity for photosynthesis, extensive secondary metabolism, and agronomic systems for large-scale production make them ideal targets for genetic reprogramming. However, efforts in this area have been constrained by slow growth, long life cycles, the requirement for specialized facilities, a paucity of efficient tools for genetic manipulation, and the complexity of multicellularity. There is a need for better experimental and theoretical frameworks to understand the way genetic networks, cellular populations, and tissue-wide physical processes interact at different scales. We highlight new approaches to the DNA-based manipulation of plants and the use of advanced quantitative imaging techniques in simple plant models such as Marchantia polymorpha. These offer the prospects of improved understanding of plant dynamics and new approaches to rational engineering of plant traits. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  12. Synthetic Brainbows

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Brainbow is a genetic engineering technique that randomly colorizes cells. Biological samples processed with this technique and imaged with confocal microscopy have distinctive colors for individual cells. Complex cellular structures can then be easily visualized. However, the complexity of the Brainbow technique limits its applications. In practice, most confocal microscopy scans use different florescence staining with typically at most three distinct cellular structures. These structures are often packed and obscure each other in rendered images making analysis difficult. In this paper, we leverage a process known as GPU framebuffer feedback loops to synthesize Brainbow-like images. In addition, we incorporate ID shuffing and Monte-Carlo sampling into our technique, so that it can be applied to single-channel confocal microscopy data. The synthesized Brainbow images are presented to domain experts with positive feedback. A user survey demonstrates that our synthetic Brainbow technique improves visualizations of volume data with complex structures for biologists.

  13. High-Current Cold Cathode Employing Diamond and Related Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-10-22

    The essence of this project was for diamond films to be deposited on cold cathodes to improve their emission properties. Films with varying morphology, composition, and size of the crystals were deposited and the emission properties of the cathodes that utilize such films were studied. The prototype cathodes fabricated by the methods developed during Phase I were tested and evaluated in an actual high-power RF device during Phase II. These high-power tests used the novel active RF pulse compression system and the X-band magnicon test facility at US Naval Research Laboratory. In earlier tests, plasma switches were employed, while tests under this project utilized electron-beam switching. The intense electron beams required in the switches were supplied from cold cathodes embodying diamond films with varying morphology, including uncoated molybdenum cathodes in the preliminary tests. Tests with uncoated molybdenum cathodes produced compressed X-band RF pulses with a peak power of 91 MW, and a maximum power gain of 16.5:1. Tests were also carried out with switches employing diamond coated cathodes. The pulse compressor was based on use of switches employing electron beam triggering to effect mode conversion. In experimental tests, the compressor produced 165 MW in a ~ 20 ns pulse at ~18× power gain and ~ 140 MW at ~ 16× power gain in a 16 ns pulse with a ~ 7 ns flat-top. In these tests, molybdenum blade cathodes with thin diamond coatings demonstrated good reproducible emission uniformity with a 100 kV, 100 ns high voltage pulse. The new compressor does not have the limitations of earlier types of active pulse compressors and can operate at significantly higher electric fields without breakdown.

  14. Diamond nanowires: a novel platform for electrochemistry and matrix-free mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szunerits, Sabine; Coffinier, Yannick; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2015-05-27

    Over the last decades, carbon-based nanostructures have generated a huge interest from both fundamental and technological viewpoints owing to their physicochemical characteristics, markedly different from their corresponding bulk states. Among these nanostructured materials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and more recently graphene and its derivatives, hold a central position. The large amount of work devoted to these materials is driven not only by their unique mechanical and electrical properties, but also by the advances made in synthetic methods to produce these materials in large quantities with reasonably controllable morphologies. While much less studied than CNTs and graphene, diamond nanowires, the diamond analogue of CNTs, hold promise for several important applications. Diamond nanowires display several advantages such as chemical inertness, high mechanical strength, high thermal and electrical conductivity, together with proven biocompatibility and existence of various strategies to functionalize their surface. The unique physicochemical properties of diamond nanowires have generated wide interest for their use as fillers in nanocomposites, as light detectors and emitters, as substrates for nanoelectronic devices, as tips for scanning probe microscopy as well as for sensing applications. In the past few years, studies on boron-doped diamond nanowires (BDD NWs) focused on increasing their electrochemical active surface area to achieve higher sensitivity and selectivity compared to planar diamond interfaces. The first part of the present review article will cover the promising applications of BDD NWS for label-free sensing. Then, the potential use of diamond nanowires as inorganic substrates for matrix-free laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, a powerful label-free approach for quantification and identification of small compounds, will be discussed.

  15. Diamond Nanowires: A Novel Platform for Electrochemistry and Matrix-Free Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Szunerits

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, carbon-based nanostructures have generated a huge interest from both fundamental and technological viewpoints owing to their physicochemical characteristics, markedly different from their corresponding bulk states. Among these nanostructured materials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs, and more recently graphene and its derivatives, hold a central position. The large amount of work devoted to these materials is driven not only by their unique mechanical and electrical properties, but also by the advances made in synthetic methods to produce these materials in large quantities with reasonably controllable morphologies. While much less studied than CNTs and graphene, diamond nanowires, the diamond analogue of CNTs, hold promise for several important applications. Diamond nanowires display several advantages such as chemical inertness, high mechanical strength, high thermal and electrical conductivity, together with proven biocompatibility and existence of various strategies to functionalize their surface. The unique physicochemical properties of diamond nanowires have generated wide interest for their use as fillers in nanocomposites, as light detectors and emitters, as substrates for nanoelectronic devices, as tips for scanning probe microscopy as well as for sensing applications. In the past few years, studies on boron-doped diamond nanowires (BDD NWs focused on increasing their electrochemical active surface area to achieve higher sensitivity and selectivity compared to planar diamond interfaces. The first part of the present review article will cover the promising applications of BDD NWS for label-free sensing. Then, the potential use of diamond nanowires as inorganic substrates for matrix-free laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, a powerful label-free approach for quantification and identification of small compounds, will be discussed.

  16. Topics in Nanophotonic Devices for Nitrogen-Vacancy Color Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babinec, Thomas Michael

    Recently, developments in novel and high-purity materials allow for the presence of a single, solitary crystalline defect to define the electronic, magnetic, and optical functionality of a device. The discrete nature of the active dopant, whose properties are defined by a quantum mechanical description of its structure, enables radically new quantum investigations and applications in these arenas. Finally, there has been significant development in large-scale device engineering due to mature semiconductor manufacturing techniques. The diverse set of photonic device architectures offering light confinement, guiding, and extraction is a prime example. These three paradigms - solitary dopant photonics and optoelectronics (solotronics), quantum science and technology, and device engineering - merge in the development of novel quantum photonic devices for the next generation of information processing systems. We present in this thesis a series of investigations of optical nanostructures for single optically active spins in single crystal diamond. Chapter 1 introduces the Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) color center, summarizes its applications, and motivates the need for their integration into photonic structures. Chapter 2 describes two prototype nanobeam photonic crystal cavities for generating strong light-matter interactions with NV centers. The first device consists of a silicon nitride photonic crystal nanobeam cavity with high quality factor Q ˜ 10 5 and small mode volume V ˜ 0.5*(λ/n)3. The second device consists of a monolithic diamond nanobeam cavity fabricated with the focused ion beam (FIB) directly in a single crystal diamond sample. Chapter 3 presents a high-efficiency source of single photons consisting of a single NV center in a photonic diamond nanowire. Early FIB prototypes are described, as is the first successful realization of the device achieved via reactive ion etching nanowires in a single crystal diamond containing NV centers, and finally a variation

  17. Diamond nanowires: fabrication, structure, properties, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Wu, Liangzhuan; Zhi, Jinfang

    2014-12-22

    C(sp(3) )C-bonded diamond nanowires are wide band gap semiconductors that exhibit a combination of superior properties such as negative electron affinity, chemical inertness, high Young's modulus, the highest hardness, and room-temperature thermal conductivity. The creation of 1D diamond nanowires with their giant surface-to-volume ratio enhancements makes it possible to control and enhance the fundamental properties of diamond. Although theoretical comparisons with carbon nanotubes have shown that diamond nanowires are energetically and mechanically viable structures, reproducibly synthesizing the crystalline diamond nanowires has remained challenging. We present a comprehensive, up-to-date review of diamond nanowires, including a discussion of their synthesis along with their structures, properties, and applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Ultrananocrystalline diamond contacts for electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik

    2017-12-12

    A method of forming electrical contacts on a diamond substrate comprises producing a plasma ball using a microwave plasma source in the presence of a mixture of gases. The mixture of gases include a source of a p-type or an n-type dopant. The plasma ball is disposed at a first distance from the diamond substrate. The diamond substrate is maintained at a first temperature. The plasma ball is maintained at the first distance from the diamond substrate for a first time, and a UNCD film, which is doped with at least one of a p-type dopant and an n-type dopant, is disposed on the diamond substrate. The doped UNCD film is patterned to define UNCD electrical contacts on the diamond substrate.

  19. Diamond turning machine controller implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

  20. Characterization of a microDiamond detector in high-dose-per-pulse electron beams for intra operative radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Venanzio, C; Marinelli, Marco; Tonnetti, A; Verona-Rinati, G; Falco, M D; Pimpinella, M; Ciccotelli, A; De Stefano, S; Felici, G; Marangoni, F

    2015-12-01

    To characterize a synthetic diamond dosimeter (PTW Freiburg microDiamond 60019) in high dose-per-pulse electron beams produced by an Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT) dedicated accelerator. The dosimetric properties of the microDiamond were assessed under 6, 8 and 9 MeV electron beams by a NOVAC11 mobile accelerator (Sordina IORT Technologies S.p.A.). The characterization was carried out with dose-per-pulse ranging from 26 to 105 mGy per pulse. The microDiamond performance was compared with an Advanced Markus ionization chamber and a PTW silicon diode E in terms of dose linearity, percentage depth dose (PDD) curves, beam profiles and output factors. A good linearity of the microDiamond response was verified in the dose range from 0.2 Gy to 28 Gy. A sensitivity of 1.29 nC/Gy was measured under IORT electron beams, resulting within 1% with respect to the one obtained in reference condition under (60)Co gamma irradiation. PDD measurements were found in agreement with the ones by the reference dosimeters, with differences in R50 values below 0.3 mm. Profile measurements evidenced a high spatial resolution of the microDiamond, slightly worse than the one of the silicon diode. The penumbra widths measured by the microDiamond resulted approximately 0.5 mm larger than the ones by the Silicon diode. Output factors measured by the microDiamond were found within 2% with those obtained by the Advanced Markus down to 3 cm diameter field sizes. The microDiamond dosimeter was demonstrated to be suitable for precise dosimetry in IORT applications under high dose-per-pulse conditions. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  2. Thin film diamond microstructure applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roppel, T.; Ellis, C.; Ramesham, R.; Jaworske, D.; Baginski, M. E.; Lee, S. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Selective deposition and abrasion, as well as etching in atomic oxygen or reduced-pressure air, have been used to prepare patterned polycrystalline diamond films which, on further processing by anisotropic Si etching, yield the microstructures of such devices as flow sensors and accelerometers. Both types of sensor have been experimentally tested in the respective functions of hot-wire anemometer and both single- and double-hinged accelerometer.

  3. Diamond synthesis by lasers: recent progress

    OpenAIRE

    Ristić,Gordana S.; Trtica,Milan S.; Miljanić,Šćepan S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an up-to-date critical review of methods for diamond synthesis by lasers. A provisional classification of synthesizing methods is carried out, in order to present a varied and heterogeneous experimental work that is as clear as possible. Laser diamond CVD methods involve chemical processes in a carbon-containing system induced by specific absorption of laser radiation, while diamond PVD methods involve physical processes induced by an intense, highly-directed laser beam. D...

  4. Study of diamond film growth and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Sacharial

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to study diamond film growth and its properties in order to enhance the laser damage threshold of substrate materials. Calculations were performed to evaluate laser induced thermal stress parameter, R(sub T) of diamond. It is found that diamond has several orders of magnitude higher in value for R(sub T) compared to other materials. Thus, the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of diamond is much higher. Diamond films were grown using a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) system at various conditions of gas composition, pressure, temperature, and substrate materials. A 0.5 percent CH4 in H2 at 20 torr were ideal conditions for growing of high quality diamond films on substrates maintained at 900 C. The diamond films were polycrystalline which were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The top surface of the growing film is always rough due to the facets of polycrystalline film while the back surface of the film replicates the substrate surface. An analytical model based on two dimensional periodic heat flow was developed to calculate the effective in-plane (face parallel) diffusivity of a two layer system. The effective diffusivity of diamond/silicon samples was measured using a laser pulse technique. The thermal conductivity of the films was measured to be 13.5 W/cm K, which is better than that of a type Ia natural diamond. Laser induced damage experiments were performed on bare Si substrates, diamond film coated Si, and diamond film windows. Significant improvements in the LIDT were obtained for diamond film coated Si compared to the bare Si.

  5. Comparison between beryllium and diamond-backing plates in diamond-anvil cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Periotto, Benedetta; Nestola, Fabrizio; Balic Zunic, Tonci

    2011-01-01

    A direct comparison between two complete intensity datasets, collected on the same sample loaded in two identical diamond-anvil pressure cells equipped, respectively, with beryllium and diamond backing plates was performed. The results clearly demonstrate that the use of diamond-backing plates...

  6. Impedance analysis of Al2O3/H-terminated diamond metal-oxide-semiconductor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Meiyong; Liu, Jiangwei; Sang, Liwen; Coathup, David; Li, Jiangling; Imura, Masataka; Koide, Yasuo; Ye, Haitao

    2015-02-01

    Impedance spectroscopy (IS) analysis is carried out to investigate the electrical properties of the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure fabricated on hydrogen-terminated single crystal diamond. The low-temperature atomic layer deposition Al2O3 is employed as the insulator in the MOS structure. By numerically analysing the impedance of the MOS structure at various biases, the equivalent circuit of the diamond MOS structure is derived, which is composed of two parallel capacitive and resistance pairs, in series connection with both resistance and inductance. The two capacitive components are resulted from the insulator, the hydrogenated-diamond surface, and their interface. The physical parameters such as the insulator capacitance are obtained, circumventing the series resistance and inductance effect. By comparing the IS and capacitance-voltage measurements, the frequency dispersion of the capacitance-voltage characteristic is discussed.

  7. Undoped CVD diamond films for electrochemical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosinska, Lidia; Fabisiak, Kazimierz; Paprocki, Kazimierz; Kowalska, Magdalena; Popielarski, Pawel; Szybowicz, Miroslaw

    2013-01-01

    By using different deposition conditions, the CVD diamond films with different qualities and orientation were grown by the hot-filament CVD technique. The object of this article is to summarize and discuss relation between structural, physical and electrochemical properties of different diamond electrodes. The physical properties of the Hot Filament CVD microcrystalline diamond films are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. In presented studies two different electrodes were used of the diamond grain sizes around 200 nm and 10 μm, as it was estimated from SEM picture. The diamond layers quality was checked on basis of FWHM (Full width at Half Maximum) of 1332 cm −1 diamond Raman peak. The ratio of sp 3 /sp 2 carbon bonds was determined by 1550 cm −1 G band and 1350 cm −1 D band in the Raman spectrum. The electrochemical properties were analyzed using (CV) cyclic voltammetry measurements in aqueous solutions. The sensitivity of undoped diamond electrodes depends strongly on diamond film quality and concentration of amorphous carbon phase in the diamond layer

  8. CVD diamond substrates for electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, H.

    1996-03-01

    In this study the applicability of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond as a material for heat spreaders was investigated. Economical evaluations on the production of heat spreaders were also performed. For the diamond synthesis the hot-filament and microwave method were used respectively. The deposition parameters were varied in a way that free standing diamond layers with a thickness of 80 to 750 microns and different qualities were obtained. The influence of the deposition parameters on the relevant film properties was investigated and discussed. With both the hot-filament and microwave method it was possible to deposit diamond layers having a thermal conductivity exceeding 1200 W/mK and therefore to reach the quality level for commercial uses. The electrical resistivity was greater than 10 12 Ωcm. The investigation of the optical properties was done by Raman-, IR- and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. Because of future applications of diamond-aluminium nitride composites as highly efficient heat spreaders diamond deposition an AIN was investigated. An improved substrate pretreatment prior to diamond deposition showed promising results for better performance of such composite heat spreaders. Both free standing layers and diamond-AIN composites could be cut by a CO2 Laser in Order to get an exact size geometry. A reduction of the diamond surface roughness was achieved by etching with manganese powder or cerium. (author)

  9. Diamond synthesis by lasers: recent progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana S. Ristić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an up-to-date critical review of methods for diamond synthesis by lasers. A provisional classification of synthesizing methods is carried out, in order to present a varied and heterogeneous experimental work that is as clear as possible. Laser diamond CVD methods involve chemical processes in a carbon-containing system induced by specific absorption of laser radiation, while diamond PVD methods involve physical processes induced by an intense, highly-directed laser beam. Different methods involving coupled, simultaneous action of lasers and classic CVD agents are suggested and discussed as prospective approaches for diamond synthesis.

  10. Research of wear of working surfaces of a diamond tool at the elimination of emergency situations in areas of destruction of building structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Kuzej

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of wear of the diamond tool during the elimination of emergency situations connected with the destruction of building structures for the cutting of concrete constructions have been investigated. It is established that in the conditions of cutting the temperature in the zone of frictional contact of crystals of diamond with concrete rises to 1700 K. This leads to the introduction of products of wear in the channels of microcracks on the surface of the crystal and the formation of an impaired surface layer, in which the main cracks that destroy the crystal originate. Thus, the leading mechanism of the wear of diamond crystals – fragile destruction – is accompanied by mechanisms of fatigue failure and adhesion wear.

  11. Reactivity of electrogenerated free hydroxyl radicals and activation of dioxygen on boron-doped diamond electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Kapalka, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic boron-doped diamond (BDD) thin film is an electrode material with high chemical and dimensional stability, low background current and a very wide potential window of water stability. Upon anodic polarization, BDD generates hydroxyl radicals that mediate the oxidation processes in the vicinity of the electrode surface. These hydroxyl radials are assumed to be free, i.e., not adsorbed on the electrode surface. Hydroxyl radicals are formed on BDD during water discharge, which is the ra...

  12. Ab initio modelling of transition metals in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, M; Mainwood, A

    2003-01-01

    Transition metals (TM) from the first transition series are commonly used as solvent catalysts in the synthesis of diamond by high pressure, high temperature processes. Ab initio calculations on these metals, in finite clusters of tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, enable us to investigate trends in their stability and properties. By carrying out systematic studies of interstitial, substitutional and semi-vacancy TM defects, we show that the electronic structure of the TMs is complicated by the presence of 'dangling bonds' when the TM disrupts the crystal lattice: interstitial defects conform to the Ludwig-Woodbury (LW) model, whilst substitutional and semi-vacancy defects move from approximating the LW model early in the transition series to approaching the vacancy model for the heavier metals. Multi-configurational self-consistent field methods allow genuine many-electron states to be modelled; for neutral interstitial, and all substitutional TMs, the crystal fields are found to exceed the exchange energies in strength. Consequently, low spin states are found for these defects. We find substitutional defects to be the most stable, but that semi-vacancy TMs are very similar in energy to the substitutional defects late in the transition series; interstitial defects are only metastable in diamond. Given appropriate charge compensators neutral and positively charged interstitial TM defects were stable, while negatively charged species appeared to be strongly disfavoured

  13. All diamond self-aligned thin film transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbi, Jennifer [Champaign, IL

    2008-07-01

    A substantially all diamond transistor with an electrically insulating substrate, an electrically conductive diamond layer on the substrate, and a source and a drain contact on the electrically conductive diamond layer. An electrically insulating diamond layer is in contact with the electrically conductive diamond layer, and a gate contact is on the electrically insulating diamond layer. The diamond layers may be homoepitaxial, polycrystalline, nanocrystalline or ultrananocrystalline in various combinations.A method of making a substantially all diamond self-aligned gate transistor is disclosed in which seeding and patterning can be avoided or minimized, if desired.

  14. Three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of diamond chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, W J; May, P W; Allan, N L; Harvey, J N

    2015-06-07

    A three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo model has been developed to simulate the chemical vapor deposition of a diamond (100) surface under conditions used to grow single-crystal diamond (SCD), microcrystalline diamond (MCD), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films. The model includes adsorption of CHx (x = 0, 3) species, insertion of CHy (y = 0-2) into surface dimer bonds, etching/desorption of both transient adsorbed species and lattice sidewalls, lattice incorporation, and surface migration but not defect formation or renucleation processes. A value of ∼200 kJ mol(-1) for the activation Gibbs energy, ΔG(‡) etch, for etching an adsorbed CHx species reproduces the experimental growth rate accurately. SCD and MCD growths are dominated by migration and step-edge growth, whereas in NCD and UNCD growths, migration is less and species nucleate where they land. Etching of species from the lattice sidewalls has been modelled as a function of geometry and the number of bonded neighbors of each species. Choice of appropriate parameters for the relative decrease in etch rate as a function of number of neighbors allows flat-bottomed etch pits and/or sharp-pointed etch pits to be simulated, which resemble those seen when etching diamond in H2 or O2 atmospheres. Simulation of surface defects using unetchable, immobile species reproduces other observed growth phenomena, such as needles and hillocks. The critical nucleus for new layer growth is 2 adjacent surface carbons, irrespective of the growth regime. We conclude that twinning and formation of multiple grains rather than pristine single-crystals may be a result of misoriented growth islands merging, with each island forming a grain, rather than renucleation caused by an adsorbing defect species.

  15. Boron doped diamond synthesized from detonation nanodiamond in a C-O-H fluid at high pressure and high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhov, Fedor M.; Abyzov, Andrey M.; Takai, Kazuyuki

    2017-12-01

    Boron doped diamond (BDD) was synthesized under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) of 7 GPa, 1230 °C in a short time of 10 s from a powder mixtures of detonation nanodiamond (DND), pentaerythritol C5H8(OH)4 and amorphous boron. SEM, TEM, XRD, XPS, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy indicated that BDD nano- and micro-crystals have formed by consolidation of DND particles (4 nm in size). XRD showed the enlargement of crystallites size to 6-80 nm and the increase in diamond lattice parameter by 0.02-0.07% without appearance of any microstrains. Raman spectroscopy was used to estimate the content of boron atoms embedded in the diamond lattice. It was found that the Raman diamond peak shifts significantly from 1332 cm-1 to 1290 cm-1 without appearance of any non-diamond carbon. The correlation between Raman peak position, its width, and boron content in diamond is proposed. Hydrogenated diamond carbon in significant amount was detected by IR spectroscopy and XPS. Due to the doping with boron content of about 0.1 at%, the electrical conductivity of the diamond achieved approximately 0.2 Ω-1 cm-1. Reaction mechanism of diamond growth (models of recrystallization and oriented attachment) is discussed, including the initial stages of pentaerythritol pyrolysis and thermal desorption of functional groups from the surface of DND particles with the generation of supercritical fluid of low-molecular substances (H2O, CH4, CO, CO2, etc.), as well as byproducts formation (B2O3, B4C).

  16. Diamond Growth in the Subduction Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, H.; Frost, D. J.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Leroy, C.; Estève, I.

    2014-12-01

    Natural diamonds are fabulous probes of the deep Earth Interior. They are the evidence of the deep storage of volatile elements, carbon at first, but also hydrogen and chlorine trapped as hydrous fluids in inclusions. The study of diamond growth processes in the lithosphere and mantle helps for our understanding of volatile elements cycling between deep reservoirs. We know now that inclusion-bearing diamonds similar to diamonds found in nature (i.e. polycrystalline, fibrous and coated diamonds) can grow in hydrous fluids or melts (Bureau et al., GCA 77, 202-214, 2012). Therefore, we propose that the best environment to promote such diamonds is the subduction factory, where highly hydrous fluids or melts are present. When oceanic plates are subducted in the lithosphere, they carry an oceanic crust soaked with seawater. While the slabs are traveling en route to the mantle, dehydration processes generate saline fluids highly concentrated in NaCl. In the present study we have experimentally shown that diamonds can grow from the saline fluids (up to 30 g/l NaCl in water) generated in subducted slabs. We have performed multi-anvil press experiments at 6-7 GPa and from 1300 to 1400°C during 6:00 hours to 30:00 hours. We observed large areas of new diamond grown in epitaxy on pure diamond seeds in salty hydrous carbonated melts, forming coated gems. The new rims are containing multi-component primary inclusions. Detailed characterizations of the diamonds and their inclusions have been performed and will be presented. These experimental results suggest that multi-component salty fluids of supercritical nature migrate with the slabs, down to the deep mantle. Such fluids may insure the first stage of the deep Earth's volatiles cycling (C, H, halogen elements) en route to the transition zone and the lower mantle. We suggest that the subduction factory may also be a diamond factory.

  17. Comparative investigation of surface transfer doping of hydrogen terminated diamond by high electron affinity insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verona, C.; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, G. [Dip. di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Ciccognani, W.; Colangeli, S.; Limiti, E. [Dip. di Ingegneria Elettronica, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2016-07-14

    We report on a comparative study of transfer doping of hydrogenated single crystal diamond surface by insulators featured by high electron affinity, such as Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, WO{sub 3}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and MoO{sub 3}. The low electron affinity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was also investigated for comparison. Hole transport properties were evaluated in the passivated hydrogenated diamond films by Hall effect measurements, and were compared to un-passivated diamond films (air-induced doping). A drastic improvement was observed in passivated samples in terms of conductivity, stability with time, and resistance to high temperatures. The efficiency of the investigated insulators, as electron accepting materials in hydrogenated diamond surface, is consistent with their electronic structure. These surface acceptor materials generate a higher hole sheet concentration, up to 6.5 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}, and a lower sheet resistance, down to 2.6 kΩ/sq, in comparison to the atmosphere-induced values of about 1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} and 10 kΩ/sq, respectively. On the other hand, hole mobilities were reduced by using high electron affinity insulator dopants. Hole mobility as a function of hole concentration in a hydrogenated diamond layer was also investigated, showing a well-defined monotonically decreasing trend.

  18. Plasmon resonance enhanced temperature-dependent photoluminescence of Si-V centers in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shaoheng [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Song, Jie; Wang, Qiliang; Liu, Junsong; Li, Hongdong, E-mail: hdli@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang, Baolin [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-11-23

    Temperature dependent optical property of diamond has been considered as a very important factor for realizing high performance diamond-based optoelectronic devices. The photoluminescence feature of the zero phonon line of silicon-vacancy (Si-V) centers in Si-doped chemical vapor deposited single crystal diamond (SCD) with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) induced by gold nanoparticles has been studied at temperatures ranging from liquid nitrogen temperature to 473 K, as compared with that of the SCD counterpart in absence of the LSPR. It is found that with LSPR the emission intensities of Si-V centers are significantly enhanced by factors of tens and the magnitudes of the redshift (width) of the emissions become smaller (narrower), in comparison with those of normal emissions without plasmon resonance. More interestingly, these strong Si-V emissions appear remarkably at temperatures up to 473 K, while the spectral feature was not reported in previous studies on the intrinsic Si-doped diamonds when temperatures are higher than room temperature. These findings would lead to reaching high performance diamond-based devices, such as single photon emitter, quantum cryptography, biomarker, and so forth, working under high temperature conditions.

  19. Carbon isotope fractionation during diamond growth in depleted peridotite: Counterintuitive insights from modelling water-maximum CHO fluids as multi-component systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachel, T.; Chacko, T.; Luth, R. W.

    2017-09-01

    Because of the inability of depleted cratonic peridotites to effectively buffer oxygen fugacities when infiltrated by CHO or carbonatitic fluids, it has been proposed recently (Luth and Stachel, 2014) that diamond formation in peridotites typically does not occur by rock-buffered redox reactions as previously thought but by an oxygen-conserving reaction in which minor coexisting CH4 and CO2 components in a water-rich fluid react to form diamond (CO2 + CH4 = 2C + 2H2O). In such fluid-buffered systems, carbon isotope fractionation during diamond precipitation occurs in the presence of two dominant fluid carbon species. Carbon isotope modelling of diamond precipitation from mixed CH4- and CO2-bearing fluids reveals unexpected fundamental differences relative to diamond crystallization from a single carbon fluid species: (1) irrespective of which carbon fluid species (CH4 or CO2) is dominant in the initial fluid, diamond formation is invariably associated with progressive minor (units), the carbon isotope composition of the first-precipitated diamond decreases by 3.7‰. The tight mode in δ13C of - 5 ± 1 ‰ for diamonds worldwide places strict constraints on the dominant range of XCO2 in water-rich fluids responsible for diamond formation. Specifically, precipitation of diamonds with δ13C values in the range -4 to -6‰ from mantle-derived fluids with an average δ13C value of -5‰ (derived from evidence not related to diamonds) requires that diamond-forming fluids were relatively reduced and had methane as the dominant carbon species (XCO2 = 0.1-0.5). Application of our model to a recently published set of in-situ carbon isotope analyses for peridotitic diamonds from Marange, Zimbabwe (Smit et al., 2016), which contain CH4 fluid inclusions, allows us to perfectly match the observed co-variations in δ13 C, δ15 N and N content and at the same time explain the previously counter-intuitive observation of progressive 13C enrichment in diamonds that appear to have

  20. Diamond film growth with modification properties of adhesion between substrate and diamond film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setasuwon P.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Diamond film growth was studied using chemical vapor deposition (CVD. A special equipment was build in-house, employing a welding torch, and substrate holder with a water-cooling system. Acetylene and oxygen were used as combustion gases and the substrate was tungsten carbide cobalt. It was found that surface treatments, such as diamond powder scratching or acid etching, increase the adhesion and prevent the film peel-off. Diamond powder scratching and combined diamond powder scratching with acid etching gave the similar diamond film structure with small grain and slightly rough surface. The diamond film obtained with both treatments has high adhesion and can withstand internal stress better than ones obtained by untreated surface or acid etching alone. It was also found that higher substrate temperature produced smoother surface and more uniform diamond grain.

  1. Molecular Models of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajshekhar

    Liquid crystal elastomers combine the elastic properties of conventional rubbers with the optical properties of liquid crystals. This dual nature gives rise to unusual physical properties, including the stress induced transition from a polydomain state, consisting of multiple nematic regions with independent orientations, to a monodomain state consisting of a single nematic region with a uniform director. We propose several molecular-scale coarse-grained models of liquid crystal elastomers with varying degrees of resolution. The models employ the Gay-Berne soft potential, and exhibit the chain connectivity of a diamond network. Simulation results show that these models are able to capture the polydomain state exhibited by liquid crystal elastomers in the absence of any external stress. When subjected to uniaxial stress, our models exhibit a polydomain to monodomain transition. We explain that the polydomain state occurs through the aggregation of liquid crystal molecules assisted by crosslinking sites, and conclude that the transition mechanism to the monodomain state is based on the reorientation of nematic domains along the direction of applied stress. Our modeling efforts are primarily focused on three models. The first two models consider the effects of rigid and flexible crosslinkers in liquid crystal elastomers with a diamond topology for chain connectivity. The third model deviates from the diamond network topology and adopts a random network topology.

  2. Ultrasonically Assisted Single Point Diamond Turning of Optical Mold of Tungsten Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanjie Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To realize high efficiency, low/no damage and high precision machining of tungsten carbide used for lens mold, a high frequency ultrasonic vibration cutting system was developed at first. Then, tungsten carbide was precisely machined with a polycrystalline diamond (PCD tool assisted by the self-developed high frequency ultrasonic vibration cutting system. Tool wear mechanism was investigated in ductile regime machining of tungsten carbide. The cutter back-off phenomenon in the process was analyzed. The subsequent experimental results of ultra-precision machining with a single crystal diamond tool showed that: under the condition of high frequency ultrasonic vibration cutting, nano-scale surface roughness can be obtained by the diamond tool with smaller tip radius and no defects like those of ground surface were found on the machined surface. Tool wear mechanisms of the single crystal diamond tool are mainly abrasive wear and micro-chipping. To solve the problem, a method of inclined ultrasonic vibration cutting with negative rake angle was put forward according to force analysis, which can further reduce tool wear and roughness of the machined surface. The investigation was important to high efficiency and quality ultra-precision machining of tungsten carbide.

  3. Fluctuations of electrical and mechanical properties of diamond induced by interstitial hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Chun-Qiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    While experimental evidence demonstrates that the presence of hydrogen (H) impurities in diamond films plays a significant role in determining their physical properties, the small radius of the H atom makes detecting such impurities quite a challenging task. In the present work, first-principles calculations were employed to provide an insight into the effects of the interstitial hydrogen on the electrical and mechanical properties of diamond crystals at the atomic level. The migrated pathways of the interstitial hydrogen are dictated by energetic considerations. Some new electronic states are formed near the Fermi level. The interstitial hydrogen markedly narrows the bandgap of the diamond and weakens the diamond crystal. The obvious decrement of the critical strain clearly implies the presence of an H-induced embrittlement effect. Project supported by the Project of Construction of Innovative Teams and Teacher Career Development for Universities and Colleges under Beijing Municipality, China (Grant No. IDHT20140504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51402009), and the Foundation for Young Scholars of Beijing University of Technology, China.

  4. Synthetic chemistry with periodic mesostructures at high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Manik; Landskron, Kai

    2013-11-19

    Over the last two decades, researchers have studied extensively the synthesis of mesostructured materials, which could be useful for drug delivery, catalytic cracking of petroleum, or reinforced plastics, among other applications. However, until very recently researchers used only temperature as a thermodynamic variable for synthesis, completely neglecting pressure. In this Account, we show how pressure can affect the synthetic chemistry of periodic mesoporous structures with desirable effects. In its simplest application, pressure can crystallize the pore walls of periodic mesoporous silicas, which are difficult to crystallize otherwise. The motivation for the synthesis of periodic mesoporous silica materials (with pore sizes from 2 to 50 nm) 20 years ago was to replace the microporous zeolites (which have pore sizes of amorphous nature of the mesoporous materials' channel walls. To address this problem, we developed the concept of "nanocasting at high pressure". Through this approach, we produced hitherto-unavailable, periodic mesostructured silicas with crystalline pore walls. In nanocasting, we compress a periodic mesostructured composite (e.g. a periodic mesoporous silica with carbon-filled pores) and subsequently heat it to induce the selective crystallization of one of the two phases. We attain the necessary high pressure for synthesis using piston-cylinder and multianvil apparatuses. Using periodic mesostructured silica/carbon nanocomposites as starting material, we have produced periodic mesoporous coesite and periodic mesoporous quartz. The quartz material is highly stable under harsh hydrothermal conditions (800°C in pure steam), verifying that crystallinity in the channel walls of periodic mesoporous silicas increases their hydrothermal stability. Even without including the carbon phase in the silica pores, we could obtain mesoporous coesite materials. We found similar behavior for periodic mesoporous carbons, which convert into transparent, mesoporous

  5. Conflict diamonds — unfinished business | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-22

    Jul 22, 2011 ... In March 2002, an international meeting in Ottawa, Canada concluded a remarkable agreement to end "conflict" or "blood" diamonds. Conflict diamonds have been used by rebels in Sierra Leone, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Angola to buy weapons and to fuel horrific wars that have so far, ...

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyrovets, I.I.; Gritsyna, V.I.; Dudnik, S.F.; Opalev, O.A.; Reshetnyak, O.M.; Strel'nitskij, V.E.

    2008-01-01

    The brief review of the literature is devoted to synthesis of nanocrystalline diamond films. It is shown that the CVD method is an effective way for deposition of such nanostructures. The basic technological methods that allow limit the size of growing diamond crystallites in the film are studied.

  7. Diamond-based molecular platform for photoelectrochemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhong, Y.L.; Midya, A.; Ng, Z.; Chen, Z.; Daenen, M.; Nesládek, Miloš; Loh, K.P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 51 (2008), s. 17218-17219 ISSN 0002-7863 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : boron doped diamond thin film * photocurrent conversion * organic/diamond interface Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 8.091, year: 2008

  8. The Returns on Investment Grade Diamonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: This paper examines the risk-return characteristics of investment grade gems (white diamonds, colored diamonds and other types of gems including sapphires, rubies, and emeralds). The transactions are coming from gem auctions and span the period 1999-2012. Over our time frame, the annual

  9. Trading diamonds for guns | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Jul 15, 2011 ... Their report, The Heart of the Matter: Sierra Leone, Diamonds and Human Security, has attracted worldwide attention since it was published last year and has contributed to major changes in the international diamond industry. In 1999, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and several ...

  10. Hexagonal Diamonds (Lonsdaleite) Discovered in the K/T Impact Layer in Spain and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, T. E.; Wittke, J. H.; West, A.; Kennett, J. P.; Kennett, D. J.; Que Hee, S. S.; Wolbach, W. S.; Stich, A.; Mercer, C.; Weaver, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by selected area diffraction (SAED), which displayed characteristic reflections corresponding to lattice planar spacings of 2.18, 1.26, 1.09, and 0.82 A. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) confirmed their carbon composition. With exposure to long-wave ultraviolet (365 nm) radiation, clusters of lonsdaleite crystals exhibited a blue fluorescence that is characteristic of many diamonds. Individual crystals were angular to sub-rounded in shape and ranged in size from 20 to 1000 nm, with a mean size of about 50 nm. This discovery represents (1) the strongest available evidence for K/T diamond formation during the impact; (2) the first discovery of K/T diamonds outside North America; and (3) the first occurrence of any form of K/T diamonds in the Southern Hemisphere, about 12,000 km from the Chicxulub Crater in Mexico.

  11. Diamond detector technology: status and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Harris; Artuso, M; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bartosik, M; Beacham, J; Beck, H P; Bellini,, V; Belyaev, V; Bentele, B; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bes, A; Brom, J-M; Bruzzi, M; Cerv, M; Chiodini, G; Chren, D; Cindro, V; Claus, G; Collot, J; Cumalat, J; Dabrowski, A; D'Alessandro, R; De Boer, W; Dehning, B; Dorfer, C; Dunser, M; Eremin, V; Eusebi, R; Forcolin, G; Forneris, J; Frais-Kölbl, H; Gan, K K; Gastal, M; Giroletti, C; Goffe, M; Goldstein, J; Golubev, A; Gorišek, A; Grigoriev, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grummer, A; Gui, B; Guthoff, M; Haughton, I; Hiti, B; Hits, D; Hoeferkamp, M; Hofmann, T; Hosslet, J; Hostachy, J-Y; Hügging, F; Hutton, C; Jansen, H; Janssen, J; Kanxheri, K; Kasieczka, G; Kass, R; Kassel, F; Kis, M; Kramberger, G; Kuleshov, S; Lacoste, A; Lagomarsino, S; Lo Giudice, A; Lukosi, E; Maazouzi, C; Mandic, I; Mathieu, C; Mcfadden, N; Menichelli, M; Mikuž, M; Morozzi, A; Moss, J; Mountain, R; Murphy, S; Muškinja, M; Oh, A; Oliviero, P; Passeri, D; Pernegger, H; Perrino, R; Picollo, F; Pomorski, M; Potenza, R; Quadt, A; Re, A; Reichmann, M; Riley, G; Roe, S; Sanz, D; Scaringella, M; Schaefer, D; Schmidt, C J; Schnetzer, S; Schreiner, T; Sciortino, S; Scorzoni, A; Seidel, S; Servoli, L; Sopko, B; Sopko, V; Spagnolo, S; Spanier, S; Stenson, K; Stone, R; Sutera, C; Taylor, Aaron; Traeger, M; Tromson, D; Trischuk, W; Tuve, C; Uplegger, L; Velthuis, J; Venturi, N; Vittone, E; Wagner, Stephen; Wallny, R; Wang, J C; Weingarten, J; Weiss, C; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Yamouni, M; Zavrtanik, M

    2017-01-01

    The status of material development of poly-crystalline chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond is presented. We also present beam test results on the independence of signal size on incident par-ticle rate in charged particle detectors based on un-irradiated and irradiated poly-crystalline CVD diamond over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 10 MHz/cm2. The pulse height of the sensors was measured with readout electronics with a peaking time of 6 ns. In addition the first beam test results from 3D detectors made with poly-crystalline CVD diamond are presented. Finally the first analysis of LHC data from the ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM) which is based on pixelated poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors bump-bonded to pixel readout elec-tronics is shown.

  12. Nanostructured Diamond Device for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijalkowski, M; Karczemska, A; Lysko, J M; Zybala, R; KozaneckI, M; Filipczak, P; Ralchenko, V; Walock, M; Stanishevsky, A; Mitura, S

    2015-02-01

    Diamond is increasingly used in biomedical applications because of its unique properties such as the highest thermal conductivity, good optical properties, high electrical breakdown voltage as well as excellent biocompatibility and chemical resistance. Diamond has also been introduced as an excellent substrate to make the functional microchip structures for electrophoresis, which is the most popular separation technique for the determination of analytes. In this investigation, a diamond electrophoretic chip was manufactured by a replica method using a silicon mold. A polycrystalline 300 micron-thick diamond layer was grown by the microwave plasma-assisted CVD (MPCVD) technique onto a patterned silicon substrate followed by the removal of the substrate. The geometry of microstructure, chemical composition, thermal and optical properties of the resulting free-standing diamond electrophoretic microchip structure were examined by CLSM, SFE, UV-Vis, Raman, XRD and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and by a modified laser flash method for thermal property measurements.

  13. The Charge Collection Properties of CVD Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, T; Oh, A; Steuerer, J; Wagner, A; Zeuner, W; Behnke, Ties; Hüntemeyer, Petra; Oh, Alexander; Steuerer, Johannes; Wagner, Albrecht; Zeuner, Wolfram

    1998-01-01

    The charge collection properties of CVD diamond have been investigated with ionising radiation. In this study two CVD diamond samples, prepared with electrical contacts have been used as solid state ionisation chambers. The diamonds have been studied with beta particles and 10 keV photons, providing a homogeneous ionisation density and with protons and alpha particles which are absorbed in a thin surface layer. For the latter case a strong decrease of the signal as function of time is observed, which is attributed to polarisation effects inside the diamond. Spatially resolved measurements with protons show a large variation of the charge collection efficiency, whereas for photons and minimum ionising particles the response is much more uniform and in the order of 18%. These results indicate that the applicability of CVD diamond as a position sensitive particle detector depends on the ionisation type and appears to be promising for homogeneous ionisation densities as provided by relativistic charged particles.

  14. Diamond sensors for future high energy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmair, Felix, E-mail: bachmair@phys.ethz.ch

    2016-09-21

    With the planned upgrade of the LHC to High-Luminosity-LHC [1], the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation tolerant technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond sensors are an established technology as beam condition monitors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. The RD42-collaboration at CERN is leading the effort to use CVD diamond as a material for tracking detectors operating in extreme radiation environments. An overview of the latest developments from RD42 is presented including the present status of diamond sensor production, a study of pulse height dependencies on incident particle flux and the development of 3D diamond sensors.

  15. Study of imperfect natural diamonds with the application of the X-ray synchrotron radiation (the 'Laue-SR' method)

    CERN Document Server

    Rylov, G M; Sobolev, N V; Kulipanov, G N; Kondratyev, V I; Tolochko, B P; Sharafutdinov, M R

    2001-01-01

    The 'Laue-SR' method has been realised for fast gathering experimental data in the study of imperfect natural and synthesised diamonds which are hard to investigate with the conventional X-ray methods. Time to obtain a diffraction pattern with the use of the polychromatic SR is shorter by several orders; the resolution of the image of substructure defects of a crystal lattice (as compared to the conventional Laue method) is improved by an order and does not vanish even at large disorientation or other non-coherent disturbances of the crystal lattice. The 'Laue-SR' method is especially appropriate for the study of intact, sufficiently large diamond crystals (up to 5 mm), since the diamond has a small coefficient of the X-ray absorption and is practically transparent in the operational range of the SR waves, lambda=0.5-1.5 A. This method was shown to be applied successfully for an accelerated study of a large bulk of imperfect natural diamond crystals without any preliminary preparation and without their destru...

  16. The Structure and Characteristics of Tribological Systems with Diamond Like Carbon Coatings under Ionic Liquid Lubrication Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madej M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The results from the tests on tribological a-C:H diamond coatings deposited by PACVD (plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition on 100Cr6 steel components are presented in this work. Mechanical properties - nanohardness and Young’s modulus - were assessed by instrumented indentation. Tribological tests were conducted with T-01M tester in a ball-on-disc test under dry and boundary friction conditions. Selected ionic liquids - synthetic new generation lubricants - were used for lubrication. The results from the experiments indicate that diamond-like coatings improved tribological characteristics of the friction pairs tested, with the ionic liquids intensifying this effect.

  17. Quantum chemical simulation of hydrogen like states in silicon and diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gel'fand, R.B.; Gordeev, V.A.; Gorelkinskij, Yu.V.

    1989-01-01

    The quantum-chemical methods of the complete neglect of differential overlap (CNDO) and intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO) are used to calculate the electronic structure of atomic hydrogen (muonium) located at different interstital sites of the silicon and diamond crystal lattices. The electronic g- and hyperfine interaction tensors of the impure atom are determined.The results obtained are compared with the experimental data on the 'normal' (Mu') and 'anomalous' (Mu * ) muonium centers as well as on the hydrogen-bearing Si-AA9 EPR center which is a hydrogen-bearing analogue of (Mu * ). The most likely localization sites for hydrogen (muonium) atoms in silicon and diamond crystals are established. 22 refs

  18. Cold cathodes on ultra-dispersed diamond base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimova, A.N.; Zhirnov, V.V.; Chubun, N.N.; Belobrov, P.I.

    1998-01-01

    Prospects of application of nano diamond powders for fabrication of cold cathodes are discussed.Cold cathodes based on silicon pointed structures with nano diamond coatings were prepared.The deposition technique of diamond coating was dielectrophoresis from suspension of nano diamond powder in organic liquids.The cathodes were tested in sealed prototypes of vacuum electronic devices

  19. Nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinpeng; Ocola, Leonidas E; Divan, Ralu S; Sumant, Anirudha V

    2012-02-24

    We report the fabrication of horizontally aligned ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) nanowires (NWs) via two different approaches. First, with the top-down approach by using electron beam lithography (EBL) and reactive ion etching (RIE) with a photo resist layer as an etch mask. Using this approach, we demonstrate fabrication of 50 µm long UNCD NWs with widths as narrow as 40 nm. We further present an alternative approach to grow UNCD NWs at pre-defined positions through a selective seeding process. No RIE was needed either to etch the NWs or to remove the mask. In this case, we achieved UNCD NWs with lengths of 50 µm and smallest width of 90 nm respectively. Characterization of these nanowires by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that the UNCD NWs are well defined and fully released, with no indication of residual stress. Characterization using visible and ultraviolet (UV) Raman spectroscopy indicates that in both fabrication approaches, UNCD NWs maintain their intrinsic diamond structure.

  20. The contact heat conductance at diamond-OFHC copper interface with GaIn eutectic as a heat transfer medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assoufid, L.; Khounsary, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the contact heat conductance across a single diamond crystal interface with OFHC copper (Cu) are reported. Gallium-indium (GaIn) eutectic was used as an interstitial material. Contact conductance data are important in the design and the prediction of the performance of x-ray diamond monochromators under high-heat-load conditions. Two sets of experiments were carried out. In one, the copper surface in contact with diamond was polished and then electroless plated with 1 μm of nickel, while in the other, the copper contact surface was left as machined. Measured average interface heat conductances are 44.7 ±8 W/cm 2 -K for nonplated copper and 23.0 ±3 W/cm 2 -K for nickel-plated copper. For reference, the thermal contact conductances at a copper-copper interface (without diamond) were also measured, and the results are reported. A typical diamond monochromator, 0.2 mm thick, will absorb about 44 W under a standard undulator beam at the Advanced Photon Source. The measured conductance for nickel-plated copper suggests that the temperature drop across the interface of diamond and nickel-plated copper, with a 20 mm 2 contact area, will be about 10 degree C. Therefore temperature rises are rather modest, and the accuracy of the measured contact conductances presented here are sufficient for design purposes

  1. Continuous observation of polarization effects in thin SC-CVD diamond detector designed for heavy ion microbeam measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, Wataru, E-mail: kada.wataru@gunma-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-machi, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Iwamoto, Naoya [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Satoh, Takahiro [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Onoda, Shinobu [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Grilj, Veljko; Skukan, Natko [Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 1016, 10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Koka, Masashi [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Ohshima, Takeshi [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Jakšić, Milko [Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 1016, 10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Kamiya, Tomihiro [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Continuous irradiation effects on a thin-film diamond detector were investigated for the utilization of these films as a detector for heavy ion microbeams. Temporal signal degradation in the energy spectrum was frequently observed during the focused heavy ion microbeam irradiation. To measure the temporal response to the each ion incidents, focused heavy ion microbeam with different beam fluence rates were irradiated to a single crystal (SC)-CVD diamond film detector with thickness of 50 μm. The responses to each ion were continuously observed and characterized by ion beam-induced charge (IBIC) measurement system. Heavy ions with short penetration path in diamond generate the large difference in mean path of electrons and holes, which is inverted by changing bias polarity. Signal degradation condition was relied on the bias polarity under the irradiation of heavy ions with short penetration length in the diamond. The continuous observation of IBIC signals revealed that temporal degradation in pulse height of signals, so called polarization effects, seems to be mainly caused by the hole trapping in this diamond crystal.

  2. The Geopolitical Setting of Conflict Diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    2002-05-01

    September 11, 2001 will live in infamy. Ideological differences have also led to senseless atrocities in Angola, Congo Republic, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. Hundreds of thousands have died, scores mutilated, and millions displaced. These have gone virtually unnoticed for decades. Unnoticed that is until it became evident that these barbaric acts were fueled by the sale or bartering of diamonds for arms, or by more ingenious ways that are less traceable. There is no end in sight. Industry has long recognized that about 20% of diamonds reaching the open market are smuggled from operating mines, and more recently that an additional 4% originates from conflict diamond sources. Diamond identification by laser inscription, ion implantation, or certification protocols are subject to fraudulent tampering. And these applied methods are thwarted if cutting and polishing centers are infiltrated, or if terrorist facilities are independently established. Mark ups are substantial (40-60%) from raw material to finished product. Tracking the paths of rough stones from mines to faceted gems is impractical because some 30-50 million cts of top quality material, or about 100 million stones, would require branding each year. Moreover, the long standing tradition of site-holdings and the bourse system of mixing or matching diamonds, inadvertently ensures regional anonymity. Conflict diamonds are mined in primary kimberlites and from widely dispersed alluvial fields in tropical jungle. Landscapes, eroded by 1-5 vertical km over 100 Ma, have transformed low grade primary deposits into unconsolidated sedimentary bonanzas. The current value of stones retrieved, by motivated diggers and skillful jiggers, in rebel held territories, is impossible to determine, but in 1993 amounted to tens of millions USD. Diamonds over 100 cts continue to surface at premier prices. Borders are porous, diamonds flow easily, and armed networks are permeable and mobile. Diamonds form at great depths (over 200 km

  3. Thin diamond films for tribological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, M.S.; Meilunas, R.; Ong, T.P.; Chang, R.P.H.

    1989-01-01

    Diamond films have been deposited on Si, Mo and many other substrates by microwave and radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Although the adhesion between the diamond film and most of the metal substrates is poor due to residual thermal stress from the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients, the authors have developed processes to promote the growth of uniform and continuous diamond films with enhanced adhesion to metal substrates for tribological applications. The tribological properties of these films are measured using a ring-on-block tribotester. The coefficients of friction of diamond films sliding against a 52100 steel ring under the same experimental conditions are found to be significantly different depending on the morphology, grain size and roughness of the diamond films. However, under all cases tested, it is found that for uniform and continuous diamond films with small grain size of 1-3 micrometers, the coefficient of friction of the diamond film sliding against a steel ring under lubrication of a jet of mineral oil is about 0.04

  4. CVD diamond for nuclear detection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergonzo, P.; Brambilla, A.; Tromson, D.; Mer, C.; Guizard, B.; Marshall, R.D.; Foulon, F.

    2002-01-01

    Chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond is a remarkable material for the fabrication of radiation detectors. In fact, there exist several applications where other standard semiconductor detectors do not fulfil the specific requirements imposed by corrosive, hot and/or high radiation dose environments. The improvement of the electronic properties of CVD diamond has been under intensive investigations and led to the development of a few applications that are addressing specific industrial needs. Here, we report on CVD diamond-based detector developments and we describe how this material, even though of a polycrystalline nature, is readily of great interest for applications in the nuclear industry as well as for physics experiments. Improvements in the material synthesis as well as on device fabrication especially concern the synthesis of films that do not exhibit space charge build up effects which are often encountered in CVD diamond materials and that are highly detrimental for detection devices. On a pre-industrial basis, CVD diamond detectors have been fabricated for nuclear industry applications in hostile environments. Such devices can operate in harsh environments and overcome limitations encountered with the standard semiconductor materials. Of these, this paper presents devices for the monitoring of the alpha activity in corrosive nuclear waste solutions, such as those encountered in nuclear fuel assembly reprocessing facilities, as well as diamond-based thermal neutron detectors exhibiting a high neutron to gamma selectivity. All these demonstrate the effectiveness of a demanding industrial need that relies on the remarkable resilience of CVD diamond

  5. STRUCTURING OF DIAMOND FILMS USING MICROSPHERE LITHOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Domonkos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the structuring of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond thin films is demonstrated. The structuring of the diamond films is performed using the technique of microsphere lithography followed by reactive ion etching. Specifically, this paper presents a four-step fabrication process: diamond deposition (microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition, mask preparation (by the standard Langmuir-Blodgett method, mask modification and diamond etching. A self-assembled monolayer of monodisperse polystyrene (PS microspheres with close-packed ordering is used as the primary template. Then the PS microspheres and the diamond films are processed in capacitively coupled radiofrequency plasma  using different plasma chemistries. This fabrication method illustrates the preparation of large arrays of periodic and homogeneous hillock-like structures. The surface morphology of processed diamond films is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. The potential applications of such diamond structures in various fields of nanotechnology are also briefly discussed.

  6. Phosphorylated nano-diamond/ Polyimide Nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyler-Çiǧil, Asli; Çakmakçi, Emrah; Kahraman, Memet Vezir

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a novel route to synthesize polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond films with improved thermal and mechanical properties was developed. Surface phosphorylation of nano-diamond was performed in dichloromethane. Phosphorylation dramatically enhanced the thermal stability of nano-diamond. Poly(amic acid) (PAA), which is the precursor of PI, was successfully synthesized with 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-oxydianiline (4,4'-ODA) in the solution of N,N- dimethylformamide (DMF). Pure BTDA-ODA polyimide films and phosphorylated nanodiamond containing BTDA-ODA PI films were prepared. The PAA displayed good compatibility with phosphorylated nano-diamond. The morphology of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structure of polyimide and polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by FTIR. SEM and FTIR results showed that the phosphorylated nano-diamond was successfully prepared. Thermal properties of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA results showed that the thermal stability of (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond film was increased

  7. Cathodoluminescence of natural, plastically deformed pink diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillou, E; Post, J E; Rose, T; Butler, J E

    2012-12-01

    The 49 type I natural pink diamonds examined exhibit color restricted to lamellae or bands oriented along {111} that are created by plastic deformation. Pink diamonds fall into two groups: (1) diamonds from Argyle in Australia and Santa Elena in Venezuela are heavily strained throughout and exhibit pink bands alternating with colorless areas, and (2) diamonds from other localities have strain localized near the discrete pink lamellae. Growth zones are highlighted by a blue cathodoluminescence (CL) and crosscut by the pink lamellae that emit yellowish-green CL that originates from the H3 center. This center probably forms by the recombination of nitrogen-related centers (A-aggregates) and vacancies mobilized by natural annealing in the Earth's mantle. Twinning is the most likely mechanism through which plastic deformation is accommodated for the two groups of diamonds. The plastic deformation creates new centers visible through spectroscopic methods, including the one responsible for the pink color, which remains unidentified. The differences in the plastic deformation features, and resulting CL properties, for the two groups might correlate to the particular geologic conditions under which the diamonds formed; those from Argyle and Santa Elena are deposits located within Proterozoic cratons, whereas most diamonds originate from Archean cratons.

  8. Synthesis, structure and properties of blödite-type solid solutions, Na2Co1-x Cu x (SO4)2·4H2O (0 crystal structure of synthetic kröhnkite, Na2Cu(SO4)2·2H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinova, Delyana; Wildner, Manfred; Bancheva, Tsvetelina; Stoyanova, Radostina; Georgiev, Mitko; Stoilova, Donka G.

    2018-03-01

    Based on different experimental methods—crystallization processes in aqueous solutions, infrared spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and TG-DTA-DSC measurements—it has been established that copper ions are included in sodium cobalt sulfate up to about 18 mol%, thus forming limited solid solutions Na2Co1-x Cu x (SO4)2·4H2O (0 crystallization of Co-free kröhnkite. The solid solutions were characterized by vibrational and EPR spectroscopy. DSC measurements reveal that the copper concentration increase leads to increasing values of the enthalpy of dehydration (ΔH deh) and decreasing values of the enthalpy of formation (ΔH f). The crystal structures of synthetic kröhnkite, Na2Cu(SO4)2·2H2O, as well as of three Cu2+-bearing mixed crystals of Co-blödite, Na2Co1-x Cu x (SO4)2·4H2O with x (Cu) ranging from 0.03 to 0.15, have been investigated from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The new data for the structure of synthetic kröhnkite facilitated to clarify structural discrepancies found in the literature for natural kröhnkite samples, traced back to a mix-up of lattice parameters. The crystal structures of Co-dominant Na2Co1-x Cu x (SO4)2·4H2O solid solutions reveal a comparatively weak influence of the Jahn-Teller-affected Cu2+ guest cations up to the maximum content of x (Cu) = 0.15. The response of the MO2(H2O)4 octahedral shape by increased bond-length distortion with Cu content is clear cut (but limited), mainly concerning the M-OH2 bond lengths, whereas other structural units are hardly affected. However, the specific type of imposed distortion seems to play an important role impeding higher Cu/Co replacement ratios.

  9. Evidence for a mantle component shown by rare gases, C and N isotopes in polycrystalline diamonds from Orapa (Botswana) [rapid communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautheron, Cécile; Cartigny, Pierre; Moreira, Manuel; Harris, Jeff. W.; Allègre, Claude J.

    2005-12-01

    In an attempt to constrain the origin of polycrystalline diamond, combined analyses of rare gases and carbon and nitrogen isotopes were performed on six such diamonds from Orapa (Botswana). Helium shows radiogenic isotopic ratios of R/Ra = 0.14-1.29, while the neon ratios ( 21Ne/ 22Ne of up to 0.0534) reflect a component from mantle, nucleogenic and atmospheric sources. 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios of between 477 and 6056 are consistent with this interpretation. The ( 129Xe/ 130Xe) isotopic ratios range between 6.54 and 6.91 and the lower values indicate an atmospheric component. The He, Ne, Ar and Xe isotopic compositions and the Xe isotopic pattern are clear evidence for a mantle component rather than a crustal one in the source of the polycrystalline diamonds from Orapa. The δ 13C and δ 15N isotopic values of - 1.04 to - 9.79‰ and + 4.5 to + 15.5‰ respectively, lie within the range of values obtained from the monocrystalline diamonds at that mine. Additionally, this work reveals that polycrystalline diamonds may not be the most appropriate samples to study if the aim is to consider the compositional evolution of rare gases through time. Our data shows that after crystallization, the polycrystalline diamonds undergo both gas loss (that is more significant for the lighter rare gases such as He and Ne) and secondary processes (such as radiogenic, nucleogenic and fissiogenic, as well as atmospheric contamination). Finally, if polycrystalline diamonds sampled an old mantle (1-3.2 Ga), the determined Xe isotopic signatures, which are similar to present MORB mantle - no fissiogenic Xe from fission of 238U being detectable - imply either that Xe isotopic ratios have not evolved within the convective mantle since diamond crystallization, or that these diamonds are actually much younger.

  10. Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Dieter M [Downers Grove, IL

    2009-08-11

    One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

  11. Diamond deposition on siliconized stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, F.; Reinoso, M.; Huck, H.; Rosenbusch, M.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon diffusion layers in AISI 304 and AISI 316 type stainless steels were investigated as an alternative to surface barrier coatings for diamond film growth. Uniform 2 μm thick silicon rich interlayers were obtained by coating the surface of the steels with silicon and performing diffusion treatments at 800 deg. C. Adherent diamond films with low sp 2 carbon content were deposited on the diffused silicon layers by a modified hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method. Characterization of as-siliconized layers and diamond coatings was performed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Physics and applications of CVD diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Koizumi, Satoshi; Nesladek, Milos

    2008-01-01

    Here, leading scientists report on why and how diamond can be optimized for applications in bioelectronic and electronics. They cover such topics as growth techniques, new and conventional doping mechanisms, superconductivity in diamond, and excitonic properties, while application aspects include quantum electronics at room temperature, biosensors as well as diamond nanocantilevers and SAWs.Written in a review style to make the topic accessible for a wider community of scientists working in interdisciplinary fields with backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biology and engineering, this is e

  13. Residual radioactivity of treated green diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassette, Philippe; Notari, Franck; Lépy, Marie-Christine; Caplan, Candice; Pierre, Sylvie; Hainschwang, Thomas; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2017-08-01

    Treated green diamonds can show residual radioactivity, generally due to immersion in radium salts. We report various activity measurements on two radioactive diamonds. The activity was characterized by alpha and gamma ray spectrometry, and the radon emanation was measured by alpha counting of a frozen source. Even when no residual radium contamination can be identified, measurable alpha and high-energy beta emissions could be detected. The potential health impact of radioactive diamonds and their status with regard to the regulatory policy for radioactive products are discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. TEM and STEM/EELS Studies of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) Films and Diamond Films

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, X.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with microstructural and chemical investigations of thin layers of diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) which were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy. Practical aspects about the EELS technique of determining the fractions of sp2-hybridized carbon-atoms in DLC films are studied. The wear mechanism of diamond is proved by TEM to involve an atom-by-atom amorphization process driven by mechanical force.

  15. Note: Novel diamond anvil cell for electrical measurements using boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, R.; Sasama, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Takano, Y. [MANA, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan); Fujioka, M. [MANA, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Laboratory of Nano-Structure Physics, Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0020 (Japan); Irifune, T. [Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Tanaka, M.; Takeya, H. [MANA, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    A novel diamond anvil cell suitable for electrical transport measurements under high pressure has been developed. A boron-doped metallic diamond film was deposited as an electrode on a nano-polycrystalline diamond anvil using a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique combined with electron beam lithography. The maximum pressure that can be achieved by this assembly is above 30 GPa. We report electrical transport measurements of Pb up to 8 GPa. The boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes showed no signs of degradation after repeated compression.

  16. Beamline I11 at Diamond: a new instrument for high resolution powder diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S P; Parker, J E; Potter, J; Hill, T P; Birt, A; Cobb, T M; Yuan, F; Tang, C C

    2009-07-01

    The performance characteristics of a new synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction beamline (I11) at the Diamond Light Source are presented. Using an in-vacuum undulator for photon production and deploying simple x-ray optics centered around a double-crystal monochromator and a pair of harmonic rejection mirrors, a high brightness and low bandpass x-ray beam is delivered at the sample. To provide fast data collection, 45 Si(111) analyzing crystals and detectors are installed onto a large and high precision diffractometer. High resolution powder diffraction data from standard reference materials of Si, alpha-quartz, and LaB6 are used to characterize instrumental performance.

  17. Superresolution Microscopy of Single Rare-Earth Emitters in YAG and H 3 Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesov, R.; Lasse, S.; Rothfuchs, C.; Wieck, A. D.; Xia, K.; Kornher, T.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate superresolution imaging of single rare-earth emitting centers, namely, trivalent cerium, in yttrium aluminum garnet crystals by means of stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. The achieved all-optical resolution is ≈50 nm . Similar results were obtained on H 3 color centers in diamond. In both cases, STED resolution is improving slower than the conventional inverse square-root dependence on the depletion beam intensity. In the proposed model of this effect, the anomalous behavior is caused by excited state absorption and the interaction of the emitter with nonfluorescing crystal defects in its local surrounding.

  18. ULTRAFINE FLUORESCENT DIAMONDS IN NANOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanyuk M. I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is to summarize the literature data concerning ultrafine diamonds, namely their industrial production, as well as considerable photostability and biocompatibility that promote their use in modern visualization techniques. It is shown that due to the unique physical properties, they are promising materials for using in nanotechnology in the near future. Possibility of diverse surface modification, small size and large absorption surface are the basis for their use in different approaches for drug and gene delivery into a cell. The changes in the properties of nanodiamond surface modification methods of their creation, stabilization and applications are described. It can be said that fluorescent surface-modified nanodiamonds are a promising target in various research methods that would be widely used for labeling of living cells, as well as in the processes of genes and drugs delivery into a cell.

  19. Luminescence spectroscopy and microscopy applied to study gem materials: a case study of C centre containing diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainschwang, Thomas; Karampelas, Stefanos; Fritsch, Emmanuel; Notari, Franck

    2013-06-01

    The methods of luminescence spectroscopy and microscopy are widely used for the analysis of gem materials. This paper gives an overview of the most important applications of the analysis of laser and UV excited luminescence by spectroscopy and visually by microscopy with emphasis on diamond, and specifically natural type Ib diamond, little studied so far. Luminescence based techniques are paramount to the gemmological analysis of diamond, in order to determine whether it is natural, treated or synthetic. The great sensitivity of luminescence helps detect some emitting centres that are undetectable by any other analytical method. Hence, especially for diamond, luminescence is an enabling technology, as illustrated by its pioneering use of imagery for the separation of natural and synthetic diamond, and of spectroscopy for the detection of High Pressure-High Temperature treatment. For all other gemstones the applications are at the moment less numerous, but nevertheless they remain highly important. They provide quickly information on the identification of a gem material, and its treatment. Besides the study of broad band emissions caused by various colour centres, the typical PL-causing trace elements (amongst others) are chromium, manganese, uranium and rare earth elements. In pearls the study of broad band luminescence can be useful, and particularly the study of pink to red porphyrin luminescence in pearls from certain species such as Pinctada and Pteria and others can help identify the pearl-producing mollusc, or if a pearl has been dyed or not. Type Ib diamonds are representative of the importance and complexity of the analysis of luminescence by microscopy and spectroscopy. They show a wide range of sometimes very complex emissions that result in luminescence colours from green to yellow to orange or red. These emissions show generally very inhomogeneous distribution. They are caused by a range of defects, however only a few of them are well characterized.

  20. Ultra-fast calculations using diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2011-01-01

    TU Delft researchers have managed to use a piece of diamond to hold four quantum bits that can be spun, flipped and entangled with each other. This is an important step towards a working quantum computer

  1. Diamond detectors for high energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäni, L.; Alexopoulos, A.; Artuso, M.; Bachmair, F.; Bartosik, M.; Beacham, J.; Beck, H.; Bellini, V.; Belyaev, V.; Bentele, B.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bes, A.; Brom, J.-M.; Bruzzi, M.; Cerv, M.; Chiodini, G.; Chren, D.; Cindro, V.; Claus, G.; Collot, J.; Cumalat, J.; Dabrowski, A.; D'Alessandro, R.; Dauvergne, D.; de Boer, W.; Dorfer, C.; Dünser, M.; Eremin, V.; Eusebi, R.; Forcolin, G.; Forneris, J.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Gallin-Martel, M. L.; Gan, K. K.; Gastal, M.; Giroletti, C.; Goffe, M.; Goldstein, J.; Golubev, A.; Gorišek, A.; Grigoriev, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grummer, A.; Gui, B.; Guthoff, M.; Haughton, I.; Hiti, B.; Hits, D.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Hofmann, T.; Hosslet, J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hügging, F.; Hutton, C.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Kagan, H.; Kanxheri, K.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R.; Kassel, F.; Kis, M.; Konovalov, V.; Kramberger, G.; Kuleshov, S.; Lacoste, A.; Lagomarsino, S.; Lo Giudice, A.; Lukosi, E.; Maazouzi, C.; Mandic, I.; Mathieu, C.; Menichelli, M.; Mikuž, M.; Morozzi, A.; Moss, J.; Mountain, R.; Murphy, S.; Muškinja, M.; Oh, A.; Oliviero, P.; Passeri, D.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Picollo, F.; Pomorski, M.; Potenza, R.; Quadt, A.; Re, A.; Reichmann, M.; Riley, G.; Roe, S.; Sanz, D.; Scaringella, M.; Schaefer, D.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Scorzoni, A.; Seidel, S.; Servoli, L.; Smith, S.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanier, S.; Stenson, K.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Tannenwald, B.; Taylor, A.; Traeger, M.; Tromson, D.; Trischuk, W.; Tuve, C.; Uplegger, L.; Velthuis, J.; Venturi, N.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, S.; Wallny, R.; Wang, J. C.; Weingarten, J.; Weiss, C.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Yamouni, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2018-01-01

    Beam test results of the radiation tolerance study of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond against different particle species and energies is presented. We also present beam test results on the independence of signal size on incident particle rate in charged particle detectors based on un-irradiated and irradiated poly-crystalline CVD diamond over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 10 MHz/cm2. The pulse height of the sensors was measured with readout electronics with a peaking time of 6 ns. In addition functionality of poly-crystalline CVD diamond 3D devices was demonstrated in beam tests and 3D diamond detectors are shown to be a promising technology for applications in future high luminosity experiments.

  2. CVD diamond for nuclear detection applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bergonzo, P; Tromson, D; Mer, C; Guizard, B; Marshall, R D; Foulon, F

    2002-01-01

    Chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond is a remarkable material for the fabrication of radiation detectors. In fact, there exist several applications where other standard semiconductor detectors do not fulfil the specific requirements imposed by corrosive, hot and/or high radiation dose environments. The improvement of the electronic properties of CVD diamond has been under intensive investigations and led to the development of a few applications that are addressing specific industrial needs. Here, we report on CVD diamond-based detector developments and we describe how this material, even though of a polycrystalline nature, is readily of great interest for applications in the nuclear industry as well as for physics experiments. Improvements in the material synthesis as well as on device fabrication especially concern the synthesis of films that do not exhibit space charge build up effects which are often encountered in CVD diamond materials and that are highly detrimental for detection devices. On a pre-i...

  3. Diamond Detector Technology: Status and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Reichmann, M; Artuso, M; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bartosik, M; Beacham, J; Beck, H; Bellini, V; Belyaev, V; Bentele, B; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bes, A; Brom, J-M; Bruzzi, M; Cerv, M; Chiodini, G; Chren, D; Cindro, V; Claus, G; Collot, J; Cumalat, J; Dabrowski, A; D'Alessandro, R; Dauvergne, D; de Boer, W; Dorfer, C; Dünser, M; Eremin, V; Eusebi, R; Forcolin, G; Forneris, J; Frais-Kölbl, H; Gallin-Martel, L; Gallin-Martel, M L; Gan, K K; Gastal, M; Giroletti, C; Goffe, M; Goldstein, J; Golubev, A; Gorišek, A; Grigoriev, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grummer, A; Gui, B; Guthoff, M; Haughton, I; Hiti, B; Hits, D; Hoeferkamp, M; Hofmann, T; Hosslet, J; Hostachy, J-Y; Hügging, F; Hutton, C; Jansen, H; Janssen, J; Kagan, H; Kanxheri, K; Kasieczka, G; Kass, R; Kassel, F; Kis, M; Konovalov, V; Kramberger, G; Kuleshov, S; Lacoste, A; Lagomarsino, S; Lo Giudice, A; Lukosi, E; Maazouzi, C; Mandic, I; Mathieu, C; Menichelli, M; Mikuž, M; Morozzi, A; Moss, J; Mountain, R; Murphy, S; Muškinja, M; Oh, A; Oliviero, P; Passeri, D; Pernegger, H; Perrino, R; Picollo, F; Pomorski, M; Potenza, R; Quadt, A; Re, A; Riley, G; Roe, S; Sanz-Becerra, D A; Scaringella, M; Schaefer, D; Schmidt, C J; Schnetzer, S; Sciortino, S; Scorzoni, A; Seidel, S; Servoli, L; Smith, S; Sopko, B; Sopko, V; Spagnolo, S; Spanier, S; Stenson, K; Stone, R; Sutera, C; Tannenwald, B; Taylor, A; Traeger, M; Tromson, D; Trischuk, W; Tuve, C; Uplegger, L; Velthuis, J; Venturi, N; Vittone, E; Wagner, S; Wallny, R; Wang, J C; Weingarten, J; Weiss, C; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Yamouni, M; Zavrtanik, M

    2018-01-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC to the High-Luminosity-LHC will push the luminosity limits above the original design values. Since the current detectors will not be able to cope with this environment ATLAS and CMS are doing research to find more radiation tolerant technologies for their innermost tracking layers. Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond is an excellent candidate for this purpose. Detectors out of this material are already established in the highest irradiation regimes for the beam condition monitors at LHC. The RD42 collaboration is leading an effort to use CVD diamonds also as sensor material for the future tracking detectors. The signal behaviour of highly irradiated diamonds is presented as well as the recent study of the signal dependence on incident particle flux. There is also a recent development towards 3D detectors and especially 3D detectors with a pixel readout based on diamond sensors.

  4. The DIAMOND Model of Peace Support Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailey, Peter

    2005-01-01

    DIAMOND (Diplomatic And Military Operations in a Non-warfighting Domain) is a high-level stochastic simulation developed at Dstl as a key centerpiece within the Peace Support Operations (PSO) 'modelling jigsaw...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Shwachman-Diamond syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fatty, foul-smelling stools (steatorrhea); are slow to grow and gain weight (failure to thrive); and experience malnutrition. Pancreatic insufficiency often improves with age in people with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome . Skeletal abnormalities are another common feature of ...

  6. Experimental study of the diamond turning characteristics of tungsten carbide (Co 0.5%) when using a chamfered diamond bite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jae; Lee, June Key; Hwang, Yeon; Cha, Du Hwan; Kim, Hye Jeong; Kim, Jeong Ho

    2012-11-01

    Tungsten carbide (WC) is a widely used as a mold material for fabrication of glass lens because of its superior properties. Due to its extremely high hardness (R c > 90), an abrasive machining process, although unproductive and expensive, is used to fabricate the mold. In this research, the authors investigated the machining possibility of tungsten carbide by single-point diamond turning (SPDT) for fabricating high-quality optical surfaces directly. A finite element analysis (FEA) was carried out in order to investigate the effects of the chamfered length on the cutting forces and the strain rate of single-crystal diamond tools. The obtained FEA results showed that a smaller chamfered length decreased the bite strain rate. The performance characteristics in terms of surface roughness (R a ) and tool wear (VB max ) of a conventional bite and a chamfered bite under same machining conditions were studied, the results were compared. Experimental results suggest that the chamfered bite wased a better performance than the conventional bite in terms of tool wear resistance. The WC surface machined by using the chamfered bite showed a 2.26 nm roughness (R a ), which is suitable for the fabrication of glass lenses.

  7. Pressure-induced transition in the grain boundary of diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Tang, L.; Ma, C.; Fan, D.; Yang, B.; Chu, Q.; Yang, W.

    2017-12-01

    Equation of state of diamond powder with different average grain sizes was investigated using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Comparison of compression curves was made for two samples with average grain size of 50nm and 100nm. The two specimens were pre-pressed into pellets and loaded in the sample pressure chamber of the DAC separately to minimized differences of possible systematic errors for the two samples. Neon gas was used as pressure medium and ruby spheres as pressure calibrant. Experiments were conducted at room temperature and high pressures up to 50 GPa. Fitting the compression data in the full pressure range into the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state yields bulk modulus (K) and its pressure derivative (K') of 392 GPa and 5.3 for 50nm sample and 398GPa and 4.5 for 100nm sample respectively. Using a simplified core-shell grain model, this result indicates that the grain boundary has an effective bulk modulus of 54 GPa. This value is similar to that observed for carbon nanotube[1] validating the recent theoretical diamond surface modeling[2]. Differential analysis of the compression cures demonstrates clear relative compressibility change at the pressure about 20 GPa. When fit the compression data below and above this pressure separately, the effect of grain size on bulk modulus reverses in the pressure range above 20 GPa. This observation indicates a possible transition of grain boundary structure, likely from sp2 hybridization at the surface[2] towards sp3like orbital structure which behaves alike the inner crystal. [1] Jie Tang, Lu-Chang Qin, Taizo Sasaki, Masako Yudasaka, Akiyuki Matsushita, and Sumio Iijima, Compressibility and Polygonization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes under Hydrostatic Pressure, Physical Review Letters, 85(9), 1187-1198, 2000. [2] Shaohua Lu, Yanchao Wang, Hanyu Liu, Mao-sheng Miao, and Yanming Ma, Self-assembled ultrathin nanotubes on diamond (100) surface, Nature

  8. Diamond carbon sources: a comparison of carbon isotope models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkley, M.B.; Otter, M.L.; Gurney, J.J.; Hill, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    The carbon isotope compositions of approximately 500 inclusion-bearing diamonds have been determined in the past decade. 98 percent of these diamonds readily fall into two broad categories on the basis of their inclusion mineralogies and compositions. These categories are peridotitic diamonds and eclogitic diamonds. Most peridotitic diamonds have δ 13 C values between -10 and -1 permil, whereas eclogitic diamonds have δ 13 C values between -28 and +2 permil. Peridotitic diamonds may represent primordial carbon, however, it is proposed that initially inhomogeneous δ 13 C values were subsequently homogenized, e.g. during melting and convection that is postulated to have occurred during the first billion years of the earth's existence. If this is the case, then the wider range of δ 13 C values exhibited by eclogitic diamonds requires a different explanation. Both the fractionation model and the subduction model can account for the range of observed δ 13 C values in eclogitic diamonds. 16 refs., 2 figs

  9. Graphitization of diamond with a metallic coating on ferritic matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Stenio Cavalier; Oliveira, Hellen Cristine Prata de; Filgueira, Marcello

    2010-01-01

    Iron is a strong catalyst of graphitization of diamonds. This graphitization occurs mainly during the processing of composites - conventional sintering or hot pressing, and during cutting operations. Aiming to avoid or minimize this deleterious effect, there is increasing use of diamond coated with metallic materials in the production of diamond tools processed via powder metallurgy. This work studies the influence of Fe on diamond graphitization diamond-coated Ti after mixing of Fe-diamonds, hot pressing parameters were performed with 3 minutes/35MPa/900 deg C - this is the condition of pressing hot used in industry for production of diamond tools. Microstructural features were observed by SEM, diffusion of Fe in diamond was studied by EDS. Graphitization was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that Fe not activate graphitization on the diamond under the conditions of hot pressing. (author)

  10. Detection and analysis of diamond fingerprinting feature and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xin; Huang Guoliang; Li Qiang; Chen Shengyi

    2011-01-01

    Before becoming a jewelry diamonds need to be carved artistically with some special geometric features as the structure of the polyhedron. There are subtle differences in the structure of this polyhedron in each diamond. With the spatial frequency spectrum analysis of diamond surface structure, we can obtain the diamond fingerprint information which represents the 'Diamond ID' and has good specificity. Based on the optical Fourier Transform spatial spectrum analysis, the fingerprinting identification of surface structure of diamond in spatial frequency domain was studied in this paper. We constructed both the completely coherent diamond fingerprinting detection system illuminated by laser and the partially coherent diamond fingerprinting detection system illuminated by led, and analyzed the effect of the coherence of light source to the diamond fingerprinting feature. We studied rotation invariance and translation invariance of the diamond fingerprinting and verified the feasibility of real-time and accurate identification of diamond fingerprint. With the profit of this work, we can provide customs, jewelers and consumers with a real-time and reliable diamonds identification instrument, which will curb diamond smuggling, theft and other crimes, and ensure the healthy development of the diamond industry.

  11. CVD diamond deposition onto dental burs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, N.; Sein, H.

    2001-01-01

    A hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system has been modified to enable non-planar substrates, such as metallic wires and dental burs, to be uniformly coated with thin polycrystalline diamond films. Initially, diamond deposition was carried out on titanium and tantalum wires in order to test and optimize the system. High growth rates of the order of approx. 8 /hr were obtained when depositing diamond on titanium wires using the vertical filament arrangement. However, lower growth rates of the order of 4-5meu m/hr were obtained with diamond deposition on tantalum wires. To extend the work towards a practical biomedical application tungsten carbide dental burs were coated with diamond films. The as-grown films were found to be polycrystalline and uniform over the cutting tip. Finally, the costs relating to diamond CVD onto dental burs have been presented in this paper. The costs relating to coating different number of burs at a time and the effect of film thickness on costs have been included in this investigation. (author)

  12. Chemical vapor deposition diamond based multilayered radiation detector: Physical analysis of detection properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Dolbnya, I.; Sawhney, K.; Tartoni, N.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, solid state photovoltaic Schottky diodes, able to detect ionizing radiation, in particular, x-ray and ultraviolet radiation, have been developed at the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata'. We report on a physical and electrical properties analysis of the device and a detailed study of its detection capabilities as determined by its electrical properties. The design of the device is based on a metal/nominally intrinsic/p-type diamond layered structure obtained by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of homoepitaxial single crystal diamond followed by thermal evaporation of a metallic contact. The device can operate in an unbiased mode by using the built-in potential arising from the electrode-diamond junction. We compare the expected response of the device to photons of various energies calculated through Monte Carlo simulation with experimental data collected in a well controlled experimental setup i.e., monochromatic high flux x-ray beams from 6 to 20 keV, available at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron in Harwell (U.K.).

  13. Effect of chromium underlayer on the properties of nano-crystalline diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, E.; AlFaify, S.; Yoshitake, T.; Katamune, Y.; Bowden, M.; Nandasiri, M.; Ghantasala, M.; Mancini, D. C.; Thevuthasan, S.; Kayani, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigated the effect of chromium underlayer on the structure, microstructure, and composition of the nano-crystalline diamond films. Nano-crystalline diamond thin films were deposited at high temperature in microwave-induced plasma diluted with nitrogen, on single crystal silicon substrate with a thin film of chromium as an underlayer. Characterization of the film was implemented using non-Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Nanoindentation studies showed that the films deposited on chromium underlayer have higher hardness values compared to those deposited on silicon without an underlayer. Diamond and graphitic phases of the films evaluated by x-ray and optical spectroscopic analyses determined consistency between the sp2 and sp3 phases of carbon in chromium sample to that of diamond grown on silicon. Diffusion of chromium was observed using ion beam analysis which was correlated with the formation of chromium complexes by x-ray diffraction.

  14. Substrate-orientation dependent epitaxial growth of highly ordered diamond nanosheet arrays by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuguang; Ji, Xixi; Ao, Yu; Yu, Jie

    2018-02-08

    Three-dimensional ordering of two-dimensional nanomaterials has long been a challenge. Simultaneously, diamond nanomaterials are difficult to synthesize due to the harsh synthesizing conditions required. Here, we report substrate-crystal-orientation dependent growth of diamond nanosheets (DNSs) by chemical vapor deposition, which generates different DNS arrays on different substrates. The DNSs are grown by the in-plane epitaxy of the diamond {111} planes. So the arrays are highly ordered and solely determined by the spatial orientation of the {111} planes in the diamond FCC structure. The DNSs grown on the {110}, {111}, {001}, and {113} oriented substrates show inclination angles ranging from 90 to 29.5°. The DNSs with larger inclination angles grow preferentially, forming parallelogram arrays with inclination angles of 90° on the {110} substrates and parallel-line arrays with inclination angles of 80° on the {113} substrates. The density, thickness, size, and morphology of the DNSs have been well controlled. The present understanding and materials are highly promising for many applications such as sensors, catalysis, photonics, thermal management, and electronics.

  15. Plant synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wusheng; Stewart, C Neal

    2015-05-01

    Plant synthetic biology is an emerging field that combines engineering principles with plant biology toward the design and production of new devices. This emerging field should play an important role in future agriculture for traditional crop improvement, but also in enabling novel bioproduction in plants. In this review we discuss the design cycles of synthetic biology as well as key engineering principles, genetic parts, and computational tools that can be utilized in plant synthetic biology. Some pioneering examples are offered as a demonstration of how synthetic biology can be used to modify plants for specific purposes. These include synthetic sensors, synthetic metabolic pathways, and synthetic genomes. We also speculate about the future of synthetic biology of plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Developments in FTIR spectroscopy of diamonds and better constraints on diamond thermal histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Simon; Speich, Laura; Smith, Christopher; Bulanova, Galina

    2017-04-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a commonly-used technique for investigating diamonds. It gives the most useful information if spatially-resolved measurements are used [1]. In this contribution we discuss the best way to acquire and present FTIR data from diamonds, using examples from Murowa (Zimbabwe), Argyle (Australia) and Machado River (Brazil). Examples of FTIR core-to-rim line scans, maps with high spatial resolution and maps with high spectral resolution that are fitted to extract the spatial variation of different nitrogen and hydrogen defects are presented. Model mantle residence temperatures are calculated from the concentration of A and B nitrogen-containing defects in the diamonds using known times of annealing in the mantle. A new, two-stage thermal annealing model is presented that better constrains the thermal history of the diamond and that of the mantle lithosphere in which the diamond resided. The effect of heterogeneity within the analysed FTIR volume is quantitatively assessed and errors in model temperatures that can be introduced by studying whole diamonds instead of thin plates are discussed. The kinetics of platelet growth and degradation will be discussed and the potential for two separate, kinetically-controlled defect reactions to be used to constrain a full thermal history of the diamond will be assessed. [1] Kohn, S.C., Speich, L., Smith, C.B. and Bulanova, G.P., 2016. FTIR thermochronometry of natural diamonds: A closer look. Lithos, 265, pp.148-158.

  17. Synthetic antifreeze peptide

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A synthetic antifreeze peptide and a synthetic gene coding for the antifreeze peptide have been produced. The antifreeze peptide has a greater number of repeating amino acid sequences than is present in the native antifreeze peptides from winter flounder upon which the synthetic antifreeze peptide was modeled. Each repeating amino acid sequence has two polar amino acid residues which are spaced a controlled distance apart so that the antifreeze peptide may inhibit ice formation. The synthetic...

  18. Boron doped diamond electrode for the wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfaro Marco Antonio Quiroz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical studies of diamond were started more than fifteen years ago with the first paper on diamond electrochemistry published by Pleskov. After that, work started in Japan, United States of America, France, Switzerland and other countries. Over the last few years, the number of publications has increased considerably. Diamond films have been the subject of applications and fundamental research in electrochemistry, opening up a new branch known as the electrochemistry of diamond electrodes. Here, we first present a brief history and the process of diamond film synthesis. The principal objective of this work is to summarize the most important results in the electrochemical oxidation using diamond electrodes.

  19. Optimizing biosensing properties on undecylenic Acid-functionalized diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu Lin; Chong, Kwok Feng; May, Paul W; Chen, Zhi-Kuan; Loh, Kian Ping

    2007-05-08

    The optimization of biosensing efficiency on a diamond platform depends on the successful coupling of biomolecules on the surface, and also on effective signal transduction in the biorecognition events. In terms of biofunctionalization of diamond surfaces, surface electrochemical studies of diamond modified with undecylenic acid (UA), with and without headgroup protection, were performed. The direct photochemical coupling method employing UA was found to impart a higher density of carboxylic acid groups on the diamond surface compared to that using trifluoroethyl undecenoate (TFEU) as the protecting group during the coupling process. Non-faradic impedimetric DNA sensing revealed that lightly doped diamond gives better signal transduction sensitivity compared to highly doped diamond.

  20. Boron doped diamond electrode for the wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiroz Alfaro, Marco Antonio; Ferro, Sergio; Martinez-Huitle, Carlos Alberto; Vong, Yunny Meas

    2006-01-01

    Electrochemical studies of diamond were started more than fifteen years ago with the first paper on diamond electrochemistry published by Pleskov. After that, work started in Japan, United States of America, France, Switzerland and other countries. Over the last few years, the number of publications has increased considerably. Diamond films have been the subject of applications and fundamental research in electrochemistry, opening up a new branch known as the electrochemistry of diamond electrodes. Here, we first present a brief history and the process of diamond film synthesis. The principal objective of this work is to summarize the most important results in the electrochemical oxidation using diamond electrodes. (author)

  1. An automated technique for detailed ?-FTIR mapping of diamond and spectral deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Dan; Griffin, Bill; O'Neill, Craig; O'Reilly, Suzanne; Pearson, Norman; Handley, Heather

    2010-05-01

    Since the original classification of diamonds based upon their absorption in the one-phonon region of the mid-infrared (IR) range was first introduced, a vast amount of research has been carried out in this field. The result today is that IR analysis has become the principle tool for classifying diamonds based upon the concentration and aggregation state of nitrogen, the most common impurity found within their crystal lattice. These studies have shown that diamonds can contain a large range of nitrogen, from nominally nitrogen free i.e. below detection limits (termed Type II) to nitrogen rich (termed Type I) with up to 5000 ppm. It has also been shown that the nitrogen concentration, aggregation and distribution in an individual stone can be either homogeneous or heterogeneous. Nitrogen has been shown to reside within diamond in three different aggregation states. The first is in the form of single substitutional nitrogen atoms, known as C centres. Diamonds that contain nitrogen only in this form are termed Type Ib. The second aggregation state is pairs of nitrogen atoms forming A centres (termed Type IaA diamonds) and the final state is four nitrogen atoms tetrahedrally arrange around a vacancy, forming a B centre (termed Type IaB). The sequence of aggregation has been shown to progress from C centres to A centres to B centres and is a function of time and temperature. As such it is a commonly used tool in the geological study of diamonds to gauge their mantle residence time / temperature history. The first step in the sequence is thought to occur relatively quickly in geological terms; the vast age of most diamonds therefore makes Type Ib samples rare in cratonic diamond deposits. The second step takes considerably more time, meaning that the A to B centre conversion may not always continue through to completion. So diamonds containing a mixture of both A and B centres are commonly termed Type IaAB. IR analysis of diamond also has the capability of identifying

  2. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  3. Impedance analysis of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H-terminated diamond metal-oxide-semiconductor structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Meiyong, E-mail: meiyong.liao@nims.go.jp [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Liu, Jiangwei; Imura, Masataka; Koide, Yasuo [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Sang, Liwen [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Coathup, David; Li, Jiangling; Ye, Haitao, E-mail: h.ye@aston.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-23

    Impedance spectroscopy (IS) analysis is carried out to investigate the electrical properties of the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure fabricated on hydrogen-terminated single crystal diamond. The low-temperature atomic layer deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is employed as the insulator in the MOS structure. By numerically analysing the impedance of the MOS structure at various biases, the equivalent circuit of the diamond MOS structure is derived, which is composed of two parallel capacitive and resistance pairs, in series connection with both resistance and inductance. The two capacitive components are resulted from the insulator, the hydrogenated-diamond surface, and their interface. The physical parameters such as the insulator capacitance are obtained, circumventing the series resistance and inductance effect. By comparing the IS and capacitance-voltage measurements, the frequency dispersion of the capacitance-voltage characteristic is discussed.

  4. Hydrogen speciation in synthetic quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, R.D.; Kirby, S.H.; Rossman, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    The dominant hydrogen impurity in synthetic quartz is molecular H2O. H-OH groups also occur, but there is no direct evidence for the hydrolysis of Si-O-Si bonds to yield Si-OH HO-Si groups. Molecular H2O concentrations in the synthetic quartz crystals studied range from less than 10 to 3,300 ppm (H/Si), and decrease smoothly by up to an order of magnitude with distance away from the seed. OH- concentrations range from 96 to 715 ppm, and rise smoothly with distance away from the seed by up to a factor of three. The observed OH- is probably all associated with cationic impurities, as in natural quartz. Molecular H2O is the dominant initial hydrogen impurity in weak quartz. The hydrolytic weakening of quartz may be caused by the transformation H2O + Si-O-Si ??? 2SiOH, but this may be a transitory change with the SiOH groups recombining to form H2O, and the average SiOH concentration remaining very low. Synthetic quartz is strengthened when the H2O is accumulated into fluid inclusions and cannot react with the quartz framework. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Status and applications of diamond and diamond-like materials: An emerging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Recent discoveries that make possible the growth of crystalline diamond by chemical vapor deposition offer the potential for a wide variety of new applications. This report takes a broad look at the state of the technology following from these discoveries in relation to other allied materials, such as high-pressure diamond and cubic boron nitride. Most of the potential defense, space, and commercial applications are related to diamond's hardness, but some utilize other aspects such as optical or electronic properties. The growth processes are reviewed, and techniques for characterizing the resulting materials' properties are discussed. Crystalline diamond is emphasized, but other diamond-like materials (silicon carbide, amorphous carbon containing hydrogen) are also examined. Scientific, technical, and economic problem areas that could impede the rapid exploitation of these materials are identified. Recommendations are presented covering broad areas of research and development.

  6. Nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond: nanoscale sensors for physics and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirhagl, Romana; Chang, Kevin; Loretz, Michael; Degen, Christian L

    2014-01-01

    Crystal defects in diamond have emerged as unique objects for a variety of applications, both because they are very stable and because they have interesting optical properties. Embedded in nanocrystals, they can serve, for example, as robust single-photon sources or as fluorescent biomarkers of unlimited photostability and low cytotoxicity. The most fascinating aspect, however, is the ability of some crystal defects, most prominently the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center, to locally detect and measure a number of physical quantities, such as magnetic and electric fields. This metrology capacity is based on the quantum mechanical interactions of the defect's spin state. In this review, we introduce the new and rapidly evolving field of nanoscale sensing based on single NV centers in diamond. We give a concise overview of the basic properties of diamond, from synthesis to electronic and magnetic properties of embedded NV centers. We describe in detail how single NV centers can be harnessed for nanoscale sensing, including the physical quantities that may be detected, expected sensitivities, and the most common measurement protocols. We conclude by highlighting a number of the diverse and exciting applications that may be enabled by these novel sensors, ranging from measurements of ion concentrations and membrane potentials to nanoscale thermometry and single-spin nuclear magnetic resonance.

  7. The Anvils as Pressure Calibrants in the Hydrothermal Diamond Anvil Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. K.; Panero, W. R.; Stixrude, L. P.

    2003-12-01

    Throughout the crust and the upper part of the mantle, water is an important agent of heat and mass transport in processes ranging from metasomatism to magma generation in arc environments. One of the important properties of water in this regime: its ability to dissolve significant amounts of solids, presents a substantial challenge to the experimental study of water-rich systems. Many commonly used pressure standards, such as quartz and ruby, dissolve in water under the conditions accessible to the hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (up to 1200 K and 5 GPa). For this reason, it is important to develop alternative pressure calibrants. Two methods have been developed by other groups for pressure calibration in the HDAC in the presence of water. One method relies on the equation of state of the ambient fluid and the observation that the sample chamber remains approximately isochoric on heating. Disadvantages of this method include our imperfect knowledge of the equation of state of water over the relevant pressure-temperature interval, possible changes in fluid composition, and sample chamber assembly relaxation at temperatures above 800 K. The second method is based on the Raman signal from diamond chips loaded with the sample. Synthetic 13C diamond is used to avoid overlap with the much stronger signal from the anvils. Diamond is an ideal pressure sensor since it is chemically inert and unaffected by water. Therefore, we use the tips of the diamond anvils as "internal" sensors. The primary disadvantage of this method is that the stress distribution inside the anvils is non-hydrostatic and inhomogeneous, although the normal stress across the diamond-sample interface must be continuous. Using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy we are able to characterize both the inhomogeneity and the non-hydrostaticity of the diamond stress field by combining axial and radial transects with peak shapes. We find that on room temperature loading there is substantial inhomogeneity in the

  8. Crystals in crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Schmidt, I.; Carlsson, A.

    2005-01-01

    A major factor governing the performance of catalytically active particles supported on a zeolite carrier is the degree of dispersion. It is shown that the introduction of noncrystallographic mesopores into zeolite single crystals (silicalite-1, ZSM-5) may increase the degree of particle dispersion...... of the zeolite particles, particularly after thermal treatment. When using mesoporous zeolites, the particles were evenly distributed throughout the mesopore system of the zeolitic support, even after calcination, leading to nanocrystals within mesoporous zeolite single crystals....

  9. The Diamond machine protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heron, M.T.; Lay, S.; Chernousko, Y.; Hamadyk, P.; Rotolo, N.

    2012-01-01

    The Diamond Light Source Machine Protection System (MPS) manages the hazards from high power photon beams and other hazards to ensure equipment protection on the booster synchrotron and storage ring. The system has a shutdown requirement, on a beam mis-steer of under 1 msec and has to manage in excess of a thousand interlocks. This is realised using a combination of bespoke hardware and programmable logic controllers. The MPS monitors a large number of interlock signals from diagnostics instrumentation, vacuum instrumentation, photon front ends and plant monitoring subsystems. Based on logic it can then remove the source of the energy to ensure protection of equipment. Depending on requirements, interlocks are managed on a Local or a Global basis. The Global system is structured as two layers, and supports fast- and slow-response-time interlock requirements. A Global MPS module takes the interlock permits for a given interlock circuit from each of the cells of the accelerator, and, subject to all interlocks being good, produces a permit to operate the source of energy: the RF amplifier for vessel protection and the PSU for magnet protection. The Local MPS module takes fast Interlock inputs from one cell of the Storage Ring or one quadrant of the Booster. Fast interlocks are those that must drop the beam in under 400 μsec (the maximum speed of the interlock) in the event of failure. EPIC provides the user interface to the MPS system

  10. Critical components for diamond-based quantum coherent devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greentree, Andrew D; Olivero, Paolo; Draganski, Martin; Trajkov, Elizabeth; Rabeau, James R; Reichart, Patrick; Gibson, Brant C; Rubanov, Sergey; Huntington, Shane T; Jamieson, David N; Prawer, Steven

    2006-01-01

    The necessary elements for practical devices exploiting quantum coherence in diamond materials are summarized, and progress towards their realization documented. A brief review of future prospects for diamond-based devices is also provided

  11. Architecting boron nanostructure on the diamond particle surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, H.; Dai, D.; Yu, J.H.; Nishimura, K.; Sasaoka, S.; Jiang, N.

    2014-01-01

    The present study provides an efficient approach for nano-functionalization of diamond powders. Boron nanostructure can be grown on diamond particle entire surface by a simple heat-treatment process. After treatment, various boron nanoforms were grown on the diamond particle surface at different processing temperature. High-density boron nanowires (BNWs) grow on the diamond particle entire surface at 1333 K, while nanopillars cover diamond powders when the heat treatment process is performed at 1393 K. The influence of the pretreatment temperature on the microstructure and thermal conductivity of Cu/diamond composites were investigated. Cu/diamond composites with high thermal conductivity of 670 W (m K) −1 was obtained, which was achieved by the formation of large number of nanowires and nanopillars on the diamond particle surface.

  12. Nanocomposite Diamond and Nitride Films on Structural Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, Henry

    2001-01-01

    ...) An electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system was designed and used to grow diamond and diamond-like films on structural materials such as Fe-based alloys (316 stainless steel...

  13. Comparative evaluation of CVD diamond technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, T.R. [General Electric Corporate Research & Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds occurs from hydrogen-hydrocarbon gas mixtures in the presence of atomic hydrogen at subatmospheric pressures. Most CVD methods are based on different means of generating and transporting atomic hydrogen in a particular system. Evaluation of these different techniques involves their capital costs, material costs, energy costs, labor costs and the type and quality of diamond that they produce. Currently, there is no universal agreement on which is the best technique and technique selection has been largely driven by the professional background of the user as well as the particular application of interest. This article discusses the criteria for evaluating a process for low-pressure deposition of diamond. Next, a brief history of low-pressure diamond synthesis is reviewed. Several specific processes are addressed, including the hot filament process, hot filament electron-assisted chemical vapor deposition, and plasma generation of atomic hydrogen by glow discharge, microwave discharge, low pressure radio frequency discharge, high pressure DC discharge, high pressure microwave discharge jets, high pressure RF discharge, and high and low pressure flames. Other types of diamond deposition methods are also evaluated. 101 refs., 15 figs.

  14. Lubrication by Diamond and Diamondlike Carbon Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Regardless of environment (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, dry nitrogen, or water), ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) and nitrogen-ion-implanted, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films had low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6)cu mm/N(dot)m). These films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings regardless of environment. On the other hand, as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond films; polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond films; and polished and then fluorinated, coarse-grain CVD diamond films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in humid air, in dry nitrogen, and in water, but they had a high coefficient of friction and a high wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. The polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond film revealed an extremely low wear rate, far less than 10(exp 10) cu mm/N(dot)m, in water.

  15. Development of a Double Crystal Monochromator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupp, Tom; Blank, Basil; Deyhim, Alex; Benson, Curtis; Robinson, Ian; Fuoss, Paul

    2004-01-01

    A high-precision water-cooled, small offset, double crystal monochromator has been developed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) UNICAT Sector 34 beamline. The design incorporates the supports and gravity feed water cooling of two diamond or silicon crystals correctly positioned about a common rotation axis so that the incident and diffracted beam do not walk off the edges of the crystals within the energy range 6-15KeV (30 deg. < q<11. 6 deg.). In the 34ID implementation, the first crystal sees unfocussed pink beam from an undulator. The second crystal has a ±5 deg. motorized tilt motion around an axis parallel to its face and around the beam direction. In this paper preliminary measurement data obtained from Advanced Photon Source and the detail of the instrument design are presented

  16. The Mysteries of Diamonds: Bizarre History, Amazing Properties, Unique Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagan, Harris (Ohio State University)

    2008-06-24

    Diamonds have been a prized material throughout history. They are scarce and beautiful, wars have been fought over them, and they remain today a symbol of wealth and power. Diamonds also have exceptional physical properties which can lead to unique applications in science. There are now techniques to artificially synthesize diamonds of extraordinarily high quality. In this talk, Professor Kagan will discuss the history of diamonds, their bizarre properties, and their manufacture and use for 21st century science.

  17. Alluvial Diamond Resource Potential and Production Capacity Assessment of Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Peter G.; Malpeli, Katherine C.; Anum, Solomon; Phillips, Emily C.

    2010-01-01

    In May of 2000, a meeting was convened in Kimberley, South Africa, and attended by representatives of the diamond industry and leaders of African governments to develop a certification process intended to assure that rough, exported diamonds were free of conflictual concerns. This meeting was supported later in 2000 by the United Nations in a resolution adopted by the General Assembly. By 2002, the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) was ratified and signed by both diamond-producing and diamond-importing countries. Over 70 countries were included as members at the end of 2007. To prevent trade in 'conflict' diamonds while protecting legitimate trade, the KPCS requires that each country set up an internal system of controls to prevent conflict diamonds from entering any imported or exported shipments of rough diamonds. Every diamond or diamond shipment must be accompanied by a Kimberley Process (KP) certificate and be contained in tamper-proof packaging. The objective of this study was to assess the alluvial diamond resource endowment and current production capacity of the alluvial diamond-mining sector in Ghana. A modified volume and grade methodology was used to estimate the remaining diamond reserves within the Birim and Bonsa diamond fields. The production capacity of the sector was estimated using a formulaic expression of the number of workers reported in the sector, their productivity, and the average grade of deposits mined. This study estimates that there are approximately 91,600,000 carats of alluvial diamonds remaining in both the Birim and Bonsa diamond fields: 89,000,000 carats in the Birim and 2,600,000 carats in the Bonsa. Production capacity is calculated to be 765,000 carats per year, based on the formula used and available data on the number of workers and worker productivity. Annual production is highly dependent on the international diamond market and prices, the numbers of seasonal workers actively mining in the sector, and

  18. Diamond pixel detector for beam profile monitoring in COMET experiment at J-PARC

    CERN Document Server

    Cerv, M; Pernegger, H; Vageesvaran, P; Griesmayer, E

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and initial prototype results of a pixellized proton beam profile monitor for the COMET experiment at J-PARC. The goal of COMET is to look for charged lepton flavor violation by direct muon to electron conversion at a sensitivity of $0^{-19}$. An 8 GeV proton beam pulsed at 100 ns with $10^{10}$ protons/s will be used to create muons through pion production and decay. In the final experiment, the proton flux will be raised to $10^{14}$ protons/sec to increase the sensitivity. These requirements of harsh radiation tolerance and fast readout make diamond a good choice for constructing a beam profile monitor in COMET. We present first results of the characterization of single crystal diamond (scCVD) sourced from a new company, 2a systems Singapore. Our measurements indicate excellent charge collection efficiency and high carrier mobility down to cryogenic temperatures.

  19. Measurements of Sound Velocity of Diamond at the Pressure Around the Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemori, K.; Shimizu, K.; Asakura, Y.; Hayashi, D.; Nakamoto, Y.; Kagayama, T.; Sakaiya, T.; Kondo, T.; Sumiya, H.; Irifune, T.; Kurosawa, K.; Sugita, S.; Kadono, T.; Hironaka, Y.

    2011-10-01

    We have measured the sound velocity of the diamond foils at around the melting pressures (500 - 1500 GPa). Experiments were done on GEKKO-XII glass laser system with HIPER irradiation facility. Single crystal diamond foils (Ia) of 30 ~40 μm thickness were irradiated at intensities of 0.2 - 1.5 × 1014 W/cm2. We measured the sound velocity by side-on x-ray backlighting technique. Trajectories of foil surfaces were observed by x-ray streak camera. We also measured the shock velocity by two VISARs (velocity interferometer system for any reflector), and shocked temperature by an SOP (streaked optical pyrometer) in order to determine the pressure and the temperature at around the melting. Experimental data were compared with the previous theoretical studies and the percolation theory.

  20. Study of indium-defect interactions in diamond using 2-D CEEC

    CERN Document Server

    Storbeck, E J; Wahl, U; Connell, S H; Sellschop, J P Friedel

    2000-01-01

    Channeling has, since its inception, proven to be a valuable tool in locating the geometric position of atoms in the crystal lattice. Allied with powerful theoretical models, it can yield detailed information on the positions that these impurities occupy. $^{111}$In, a radioactive isotope with a conveniently short half-life, is an often-used probe of heavy-atom doping of materials. Previous work has centred on the lattice location of $^{111}$In implanted in type IIa diamond. Theoretical calculations on this `pure' system have also recently been made. We have performed the first studies of $^{111}$In implanted into various carefully selected, defect-rich diamond systems and obtained fractions for the sites occupied. The defect systems investigated include nitrogen in various configurations, boron, hydrogen and vacancies. The use of two-dimensional conversion-electron emission channeling (CEEC) has enabled the system to be studied in greater detail than with conventional one-dimensional CEEC. Coupled with the a...

  1. Novel diamond cells for neutron diffraction using multi-carat CVD anvils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehler, R; Molaison, J J; Haberl, B

    2017-08-01

    Traditionally, neutron diffraction at high pressure has been severely limited in pressure because low neutron flux required large sample volumes and therefore large volume presses. At the high-flux Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we have developed new, large-volume diamond anvil cells for neutron diffraction. The main features of these cells are multi-carat, single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds, very large diffraction apertures, and gas membranes to accommodate pressure stability, especially upon cooling. A new cell has been tested for diffraction up to 40 GPa with an unprecedented sample volume of ∼0.15 mm 3 . High quality spectra were obtained in 1 h for crystalline Ni and in ∼8 h for disordered glassy carbon. These new techniques will open the way for routine megabar neutron diffraction experiments.

  2. Novel diamond cells for neutron diffraction using multi-carat CVD anvils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehler, R.; Molaison, J. J.; Haberl, B.

    2017-08-01

    Traditionally, neutron diffraction at high pressure has been severely limited in pressure because low neutron flux required large sample volumes and therefore large volume presses. At the high-flux Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we have developed new, large-volume diamond anvil cells for neutron diffraction. The main features of these cells are multi-carat, single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds, very large diffraction apertures, and gas membranes to accommodate pressure stability, especially upon cooling. A new cell has been tested for diffraction up to 40 GPa with an unprecedented sample volume of ˜0.15 mm3. High quality spectra were obtained in 1 h for crystalline Ni and in ˜8 h for disordered glassy carbon. These new techniques will open the way for routine megabar neutron diffraction experiments.

  3. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Allen, M.G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  4. Optical Properties And Thermal Stability Of Single-Point Diamond-Machined Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogloza, A. A.; Decker, D. L.; Archibald, P. C.; O'Connor, D. A.; Bueltmann, E. R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of diamond-turned surfaces of a wide range of aluminum alloys. The alloys machined included a sand-cast A201 alloy manufactured by Specialty Aluminum Inc., conventionally extruded plate alloys 2024, 3003, 5052, 6061, 7075, and for comparison as a best and worst case possible a high-purity aluminum single crystal, and tooling plate. The surfaces were obtained by diamond single-point machining using an interferometrically controlled two-axis, air-bearing lathe. The effect of tool-rake angle and machining fluid on surface quality is examined. Surface characterization was performed by Nomarski microscopy and noncontact optical surface profilometry. The optical properties measured included absolute reflectance at 3.8 μm, total integrated scatter at 752.5 nm, and bidirectional reflection distribution function measurements at 632.8 nm. The dimensional stability of the aluminum alloys subject to thermal cycling is examined.

  5. Loading an Optical Trap with Diamond Nanocrystals Containing Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers from a Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jen-Feng; Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev; D'Urso, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    We present a simple and effective method of loading particles into an optical trap. Our primary application of this method is loading photoluminescent material, such as diamond nanocrystals containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers, for coupling the mechanical motion of the trapped crystal with the spin of the NV centers. Highly absorptive material at the trapping laser frequency, such as tartrazine dye, is used as media to attach nanodiamonds and burn into a cloud of air-borne particles as the material is swept near the trapping laser focus on a glass slide. Particles are then trapped with the laser used for burning or transferred to a second laser trap at a different wavelength. Evidence of successful loading diamond nanocrystals into the trap presented includes high sensitivity of the photoluminecscence (PL) to the excitation laser and the PL spectra of the optically trapped particles

  6. In situ inward epitaxial growth of bulk macroporous single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chenlong; Sun, Shujing; Chou, Mitch M C; Xie, Kui

    2017-12-19

    The functionalities of porous materials could be significantly enhanced if the materials themselves were in single-crystal form, which, owing to structural coherence, would reduce electronic and optical scattering effects. However, growing macroporous single crystals remains a fundamental challenge, let alone manufacturing crystals large enough to be of practical use. Here we demonstrate a straightforward, inexpensive, versatile method for creating macroporous gallium nitride single crystals on a centimetre scale. The synthetic strategy is built upon a disruptive crystal growth mechanism that utilises direct nitridation of a parent LiGaO 2 single crystal rendering an inward epitaxial growth process. Strikingly, the resulting single crystals exhibit electron mobility comparable to that for bulk crystals grown by the conventional sodium flux method. This approach not only affords control of both crystal and pore size through synthetic modification, but proves generic, thus opening up the possibility of designing macroporous crystals in a wealth of other materials.

  7. An assessment of radiotherapy dosimeters based on CVD grown diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramkumar, S.; Buttar, C.M.; Conway, J.; Whitehead, A.J.; Sussman, R.S.; Hill, G.; Walker, S.

    2001-01-01

    Diamond is potentially a very suitable material for use as a dosimeter for radiotherapy. Its radiation hardness, the near tissue equivalence and chemical inertness are some of the characteristics of diamond, which make it well suited for its application as a dosimeter. Recent advances in the synthesis of diamond by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technology have resulted in the improvement in the quality of material and increased its suitability for radiotherapy applications. We report in this paper, the response of prototype dosimeters based on two different types (CVD1 and CVD2) of CVD diamond to X-rays. The diamond devices were assessed for sensitivity, dependence of response on dose and dose rate, and compared with a Scanditronix silicon photon diode and a PTW natural diamond dosimeter. The diamond devices of CVD1 type showed an initial increase in response with dose, which saturates after ∼6 Gy. The diamond devices of CVD2 type had a response at low fields ( 1162.8 V/cm), the CVD2-type devices showed polarisation and dose-rate dependence. The sensitivity of the CVD diamond devices varied between 82 and 1300 nC/Gy depending upon the sample type and the applied voltage. The sensitivity of CVD diamond devices was significantly higher than that of natural diamond and silicon dosimeters. The results suggest that CVD diamond devices can be fabricated for successful use in radiotherapy applications

  8. Organizing the un-organized? Evidence from Indian diamond industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaveti, Indu

    2014-01-01

    The Indian diamond industry is composed of tens of thousands of firms engaged in cutting and polishing of diamonds and resides in the so-called un-organized sector. However, together, these firms produce 11 out of 12 diamonds set in jewelery worldwide. In absence of formal systems of governance, how

  9. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic change...

  10. Local Structure of Liquid Carbon Controls Diamond Nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiringhelli, L.M.; Valeriani, C.; Meijer, E.J.; Frenkel, D.

    2007-01-01

    Diamonds melt at temperatures above 4000 K. There are no measurements of the steady-state rate of the reverse process, i.e., diamond nucleation from the melt, because experiments are difficult at these extreme temperatures and pressures. Using numerical simulations, we estimate the diamond

  11. Local structure of liquid carbon controls diamond nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiringhelli, L.M.; Valeriani, C.; Meijer, E.J.; Frenkel, D.

    2009-01-01

    Diamonds melt at temperatures above 4000 K. There are no measurements of the steady-state rate of the reverse process: diamond nucleation from the melt, because experiments are difficult at these extreme temperatures and pressures. Using numerical simulations, we estimate the diamond nucleation rate

  12. Diamond as a scaffold for bone growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kate; Palamara, Joseph; Judge, Roy; Greentree, Andrew D

    2013-04-01

    Diamond is an attractive material for biomedical implants. In this work, we investigate its capacity as a bone scaffold. It is well established that the bioactivity of a material can be evaluated by examining its capacity to form apatite-like calcium phosphate phases on its surface when exposed to simulated body fluid. Accordingly, polycrystalline diamond (PCD) and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition were exposed to simulated body fluid and assessed for apatite growth when compared to the bulk silicon. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that both UNCD and PCD are capable of acting as a bone scaffold. The composition of deposited apatite suggests that UNCD and PCD are suitable for in vivo implantation with UNCD possible favoured in applications where rapid osseointegration is essential.

  13. Ultrafast Coherent Absorption in Diamond Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvounis, Artemios; Nalla, Venkatram; MacDonald, Kevin F; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2018-02-27

    Diamond is introduced as a material platform for visible/near-infrared photonic metamaterials, with a nanostructured polycrystalline diamond metasurface only 170 nm thick providing an experimental demonstration of coherent light-by-light modulation at few-optical-cycle (6 fs) pulse durations. "Coherent control" of absorption in planar (subwavelength-thickness) materials has emerged recently as a mechanism for high-contrast all-optical gating, with a speed of response that is limited only by the spectral width of the absorption line. It is shown here that a free-standing diamond membrane structured by focused ion beam milling can provide strong, spectrally near-flat absorption over a visible to near-infrared wavelength range that is wide enough (wider than is characteristically achievable in plasmonic metal metasurfaces) to facilitate coherent modulation of ultrashort optical pulses comprising only a few oscillations of electromagnetic field. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Conductivity and superconductivity in heavily vacant diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Jafari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   Motivated by the idea of impurity band superconductivity in heavily Boron doped diamond, we investigate the doping of various elements into diamond to address the question, which impurity band can offer a better DOS at the Fermi level. Surprisingly, we find that the vacancy does the best job in producing the largest DOS at the Fermi surface. To investigate the effect of disorder in Anderson localization of the resulting impurity band, we use a simple tight-binding model. Our preliminary study based on the kernel polynomial method shows that the impurity band is already localized at the concentration of 10-3. Around the vacancy concentration of 0.006 the whole spectrum of diamond becomes localized and quantum percolation takes place. Therefore to achieve conducting bands at concentrations on the scale of 5-10 percent, one needs to introduce correlations such as hopping among the vacancies .

  15. Effect of pressure on electrical resistance of WSe single crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The results of electrical resistance measurements under pressure on single crystals of. WSe2 are reported. Measurements up to 8.5 GPa are carried out using Bridgman anvil set up and beyond it using diamond anvil cell (DAC) up to a pressure of 27 GPa. There is no clear indication of any phase transition till the ...

  16. Diamond semiconductor technology for RF device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, Yasar; Esame, Onur; Tekin, Ibrahim; Kang, Weng P.; Davidson, Jimmy L.

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of diamond electronics from the RF perspective. Our aim was to find and present the potential, limitations and current status of diamond semiconductor devices as well as to investigate its suitability for RF device applications. While doing this, we briefly analysed the physics and chemistry of CVD diamond process for a better understanding of the reasons for the technological challenges of diamond material. This leads to Figure of Merit definitions which forms the basis for a technology choice in an RF device/system (such as transceiver or receiver) structure. Based on our literature survey, we concluded that, despite the technological challenges and few mentioned examples, diamond can seriously be considered as a base material for RF electronics, especially RF power circuits, where the important parameters are high speed, high power density, efficient thermal management and low signal loss in high power/frequencies. Simulation and experimental results are highly regarded for the surface acoustic wave (SAW) and field emission (FE) devices which already occupies space in the RF market and are likely to replace their conventional counterparts. Field effect transistors (FETs) are the most promising active devices and extremely high power densities are extracted (up to 30 W/mm). By the surface channel FET approach 81 GHz operation is developed. Bipolar devices are also promising if the deep doping problem can be solved for operation at room temperature. Pressure, thermal, chemical and acceleration sensors have already been demonstrated using micromachining/MEMS approach, but need more experimental results to better exploit thermal, physical/chemical and electronic properties of diamond.

  17. Progress of Diamond-like Carbon Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Qing-yun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon(DLC films had many unique and outstanding properties such as high thermal conductivity, high hardness, excellent chemical inertness, low friction coefficients and wear coefficients. The properties and combinations were very promising for heat sink, micro-electromechanical devices, radiation hardening, biomedical devices, automotive industry and other technical applications, more research and a lot of attention were attracted in recent years. The research progress of diamond-like films and the nucleation mechanism of film were summarized, and application prospect of DLC films were demonstrated. The aim of this paper is to provide insights on the research trend of DLC films and the industry applications.

  18. Growth of diamond layers on diamond and cBN seeds using iron carbide under high pressure and high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Li Xun; Hao Zhao Yin; LiuPeng; Li Musen; Zou Guang Tian; Cheng Shu Yu; Cheng Kai Jia

    2002-01-01

    Iron carbide without any graphite was studied under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT); diamond layers were obtained both on diamond and on cubic boron nitride seeds at 5.5 GPa and 1700-1750 K. The results showed that transition-metal carbide was the main intermediate in the course of the transformation from graphite to diamond under HPHT.

  19. [From synthetic biology to synthetic humankind].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouvel, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an historical survey of the expression "synthetic biology" in order to identify its main philosophical components. The result of the analysis is then used to investigate the meaning of the notion of "synthetic man". It is shown that both notions share a common philosophical background that can be summed up by the short but meaningful assertion: "biology is technology". The analysis allows us to distinguish two notions that are often confused in transhumanist literature: the notion of synthetic man and the notion of renewed man. The consequences of this crucial distinction are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Synthetic Cathinones ("Bath Salts")

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cathinones? Behavioral therapy can be used to treat addiction to synthetic cathinones. Examples include: cognitive-behavioral therapy contingency management, or motivational incentives—providing rewards to ...