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Sample records for synthetic clay pore

  1. Investigating the pore-water chemistry effects on the volume change behaviour of Boom clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y. F.; Cui, Y. J.; Tang, A. M.; Nguyen, X. P.; Li, X. L.; Van Geet, M.

    The Essen site has been chosen as an alternative site for nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. The soil formation involved at this site is the same as at Mol site: Boom clay. However, owing to its geographical situation closer to the sea, Boom clay at Essen presents a pore water salinity 4-5 times higher than Boom clay at Mol. This study aims at studying the effects of pore water salinity on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay. Specific oedometer cells were used allowing “flushing” the pore water in soil specimen by synthetic pore water or distilled water. The synthetic pore water used was prepared with the chemistry as that for the site water: 5.037 g/L for core Ess83 and 5.578 g/L for core Ess96. Mechanical loading was then carried out on the soil specimen after flushing. The results show that water salinity effect on the liquid limit is negligible. The saturation or pore water replacement under the in situ effective stress of 2.4 MPa does not induce significant volume change. For Ess83, hydro-mechanical behaviour was found to be slightly influenced by the water salinity; on the contrary, no obvious effect was identified on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Ess96. This can be attributed to the higher smectite content in Ess83 than in Ess96.

  2. Pore-water chemistry effects on the compressibility behaviour of Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Y.F.; Cui, Y.J.; Tang, A.M.; Nguyen, X.P.; Li, X.L.; Maarten, V.G.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Boom clay is a thick deposit of over-consolidated marine clay, and belongs to the Oligocene series. Its hydraulic conductivity has been investigated since many years in Belgium within the site characterization program related to the performance assessment of potential geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in this formation. Recently, the work of Wemaere et al. (2008) shows a significant variability of the hydraulic conductivity of the Boom clay. Indeed, they performed measurements on soil cores taken from four distant boreholes at various depths. The vertical hydraulic conductivity was found to vary from 3 x 10 -12 to 10 x 10 -12 m/s. It is suspected that this variability would be partly related to the water chemistry effects. Indeed, De Craen et al. (2006) shows that the pore-water chemical composition of soil cores taken from the Essen site is significantly different from that at the Mol site. If the pore water chemistry has strong effect on the hydraulic conductivity, its effect on the mechanical behaviour needs to be investigated too. The aim of this paper is to verify whether there are significant effects of pore-water chemistry on the soil compressibility. This study would be helpful to transpose the knowledge obtained from the Mol site to other sites of Boom clay formation where the geochemical components are different from the former site, as the hydro-mechanical characteristics of Boom clay at the Mol site has been widely investigated since the last decades. Two soil cores were taken from the Essen site at a depth of 227 m (Ess83) and 240 m (Ess96). Based on the geochemical analysis presented by De Craen et al. (2006), synthetic water having similar chemical composition of the in-situ pore-water was prepared. The identification geotechnical characteristics of these cores are shown in Table 2. It can be observed that the clay content (particle size < 2 μm) is relatively high (more than 50

  3. Synthetic mullite fabrication from smectite clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, L.N. de; Kiminami, R.H.G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The technological importance of mullite is mostly due to its refractory properties. Mullite in native form is very rare, and therefore it may be necessary to produced it by synthetic means. Brazil has a large reserve of smectite clays. In this work the process to produce synthetic mullite from these clays by treatment with aluminum sulphate was studied. X-ray analyses has shown the presence of mullite crystals in treated smectite clays of several colours, sinterized at 1100 0 C. By sintering at 1300 0 C, pure mullite was obtained in some colours. (author) [pt

  4. Synthetic clay excels in 90Sr removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarneni, Sridhar; Kodama, Tatsuya; Paulus, William J.; Carlson, C.

    2000-01-01

    Tests with actual ground water from Hanford site, and fundamental studies of 2Na + →Sr 2+ exchange equilibria revealed that a synthetic clay is extremely selective for 90 Sr with a high capacity for uptake. Comparative studies with existing Sr selective ion exchangers clearly revealed that the present synthetic clay exhibited the best performance for 90 Sr removal from actual ground water collected from three different locations at Hanford. This novel Sr ion sieve is expected to be useful for the decontamination of the environment after accidental release and contamination with 90 Sr. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society

  5. Concerning a mechanism for removing clay particles of washing liquids from pores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badzhurak, R F

    1982-01-01

    Examined is a mechanism for removing the clay particles of washing liquids from a pore space. All the experiments are conducted in 1-% clay, water and polymer solutions (with a viscosity of 120 in accordance with SPV-5), made of clay powder of the Makharadz'ye deposit with a particle size of 40-60 mkm, sorted by a screen method. The polymer solutions were made on the basis of hypane, metas, polyacrylamide, KMTs-500, KhS-1 biopolymer, modified and clusterized by an alkaline (NaOH) of cornstarch. Studied is the process of removal of the solid phase from an ''ideal pore'', that is, a quartz capillary. It is demonstrated that the break away of the basic mass of the bentonite particles sedimented from the washing liquids on the quartz surface from the capillary and the formation by them of ''suspended flocules'' occurs at a water current speed in the pore equal to 2.5-4.0 times 10/sup -3/m/s. The carry away of the particles sedimented from the polymer solutions of metase, hypane, clusterized and modified starch, KMTs-500 and water occurs at a stream speed above 5.4 times 10/sup -3/m/s. The greatest speeds are required for the removal of clay particles more than 15 mkm in size from the pore space. The complete removal of these particles from the capillary is observed at a current speed above 40 times 10/sup -3/m/s.

  6. Adsorption and desorption of cadmium by synthetic and natural organo-clay complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.; Francis, C.W.; Oak Ridge National Lab., Tenn.

    1976-01-01

    Tracer levels of 109 Cd were used to study the adsorption and desorption of Cd by synthetic and natural organo-clay complexes. Synthetic organo-clay complexes were made by adsorbing humic acid extracted from soil to various forms of 3 ) 2 showed that Cd was adsorbed more tenaciously to the sesquioxides than organo-clay fractions

  7. Diffusion and electromigration in clay bricks influenced by differences in the pore system resulting from firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2012-01-01

    Ion transport in porous materials has been subject of study for several decades. However, the interaction between the pores and the overall pore system make it complicated to obtain a clear picture and predict diffusion and electromigration (transport induced by an applied electric field). Specific...... to the distance to the surface.The influence of the pore system on ion transport through the water saturated pore system of the bricks was supported by measurements for calculation of the electrical resistance and an increasing resistance was found for increasing brick firing temperatures. The effective diffusion...... the pore system to contribute to an overall understanding of ion transport in porous materials.The pore system in bricks are influenced by the firing degree, clay mixture composition and ion content. The present paper focuses on the pore system and effects from clay mixture composition and ion content were...

  8. Direct observations of the 3D pore network of a Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinet, J.C.; Talandier, J.; Davy, C.A.; Ghayaza, M.; Skoczylas, F.; Troadec, D.; Sardini, P.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Long term deep underground storage of radioactive nuclear waste is planned in the East of France within an argillaceous rock layer (the host rock), also called argillite, situated at ca. 450-500 m depth. Andra, the French national agency for nuclear waste management, is in charge of assessing the feasibility, the safety and the performance of this underground disposal. The drilling of storage tunnels generates an Excavated Damaged Zone (EDZ), where argillite is macro-cracked in various locations. This requires strengthening by different means, e.g. shotcrete or pre-fabricated concrete arches. It is also expected that underground water seepage will contribute to argillite sealing: mainly self-sealing, and sealing at the interface with concrete. Sealing phenomena include crystalline swelling of smectitic clay components of argillite and inter-particle swelling of clay minerals due to osmosis mechanisms. Small scale pores and mineral organisation of the COx clay-stone are widely acknowledged to control transfer properties of water, gas and varied solutes. In order to assess these properties, the COx small-scale structure has been imaged down to micrometric resolution by various means, including classical Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray computed microtomography and autoradiography. To go further into pore and mineral characterisation of COx clay-stone, the following investigations are currently under way: (i) acquiring/quantifying the 3D geometry of the pore network of undisturbed COx with a nano-metric resolution and (ii) imaging/quantifying the small-scale (mm-nm) structure of self-sealed volumes. The FIB (Focused Ion Beam) /SEM technique allows performing 3D observations of solid volumes of ca. a few microns, with a resolution of about ten nanometers, by acquiring and computing regularly spaced 2D SEM images. This technique provides quantification of the 3D spatial distribution mainly of macro- and meso-pores

  9. Change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiyouri N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The compressibility of engineered barrier clays is, to a large extent, controlled by microstructure change due to the presence of chemical ions in clay-water system. This paper aims to investigate the change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water. We use two pure clays (kaolinite and bentonite in the study. One-dimensional consolidation tests were performed on reconstituted samples, which are prepared with distilled water and three types of heavy metal solutions (Pb(NO32, Cu(NO32, Zn(NO32,. In order to better understand the impact of chemical pore fluid on microstructure of the two clays, following the consolidation test, scanning electron microscope (SEM observations and mercury intrusion pore size distribution measurements (MIP were conducted. Due to the measurement range of MIP, which is only allowed to measure the minimal pore size 20 Å, BET method by gas sorption, whose measurement pore size range is from 3.5 Å to 500 Å, is used to measure the micropore size distribution. By this method, specific surface area of the soils can be also determined. It can be employed to demonstrate the difference of creep performance between the soils. Furthermore, a series of batch equilibrium tests were conducted to better understand the physical-chemical interactions between the particles of soils and the heavy metal ions. With the further consideration of the interparticle electrical attractive and repulsive force, an attempt has been made to predict the creep behaviour by using the modified Gouy-Chapman double layer theory. The results of calculation were compared with that of tests. The comparison shows that the prediction of compressibility of the clays according to the modified double diffuse layer theory can be reasonably agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Development of eco-friendly porous fired clay bricks using pore-forming agents: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bories, Cecile; Borredon, Marie-Elisabeth; Vedrenne, Emeline; Vilarem, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Today, clay bricks are facing technological challenges and are uncompetitive compared to materials such as concrete. Their performance must be improved if they are to stand up to the competition. Increasing environmental concerns over the accumulation of unmanaged wastes from agricultural or industrial productions have made these good candidates for incorporation into building materials to improve their performance. This process leads to the formation of pores in the bricks, producing lightweight and sustainable building materials. This paper reviews the different pore-forming agents from renewable or mineral resources as described in the literature. It also presents the impact of pore-forming agents on the physical, mechanical and thermal properties of clay bricks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biogeochemical processes in a clay formation in situ experiment: Part E - Equilibrium controls on chemistry of pore water from the Opalinus Clay, Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, F.J., E-mail: fjpearson@gmail.com [Ground-Water Geochemistry, 5108 Trent Woods Dr., New Bern, NC 28562 (United States); Tournassat, Christophe; Gaucher, Eric C. [BRGM, B.P. 36009, 45060 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Equilibrium models of water-rock reactions in clay rocks are reviewed. > Analyses of pore waters of the Opalinus Clay from boreholes in the Mont Terri URL, Switzerland, are tabulated. > Results of modelling with various mineral controls are compared with the analyses. > Best agreement results with calcite, dolomite and siderite or daphnite saturation, Na-K-Ca-Mg exchange and/or kaolinite, illite, quartz and celestite saturation. > This approach allows calculation of the chemistry of pore water in clays too impermeable to yield water samples. - Abstract: The chemistry of pore water (particularly pH and ionic strength) is an important property of clay rocks being considered as host rocks for long-term storage of radioactive waste. Pore waters in clay-rich rocks generally cannot be sampled directly. Instead, their chemistry must be found using laboratory-measured properties of core samples and geochemical modelling. Many such measurements have been made on samples from the Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (URL). Several boreholes in that URL yielded water samples against which pore water models have been calibrated. Following a first synthesis report published in 2003, this paper presents the evolution of the modelling approaches developed within Mont Terri URL scientific programs through the last decade (1997-2009). Models are compared to the composition of waters sampled during dedicated borehole experiments. Reanalysis of the models, parameters and database enabled the principal shortcomings of the previous modelling efforts to be overcome. The inability to model the K concentrations correctly with the measured cation exchange properties was found to be due to the use of an inappropriate selectivity coefficient for Na-K exchange; the inability to reproduce the measured carbonate chemistry and pH of the pore waters using mineral-water reactions alone was corrected by considering clay mineral equilibria. Re

  12. Electrokinetic flows in cylindrical and slit capillaries in clays: from pore scale to sample scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obliger, Amael; Jardat, Marie; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Duvail, Magali; Bekri, Samir; Coelho, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Transport on the nanometer scale of clay interlayers and on the macroscopic sample scale can be well characterized experimentally, using either X-ray or neutron diffraction and diffusion on the one hand, and solute diffusion experiments on the other hand. Current imaging techniques do not allow to provide a direct picture of the pore network on the scale of several nanometers to several micrometers. The lack of knowledge of the pore network structure on intermediate scales requires to use numerical models of analog porous media. We attempt to describe the ionic transport in meso (diam. ∼ 10-50 nm) and macro-porosity (diam. > 50 nm) (due to the organization of clays particles) with a multi-scale approach provided by the Pore Network Model (PNM) that takes into consideration the topology of the media. Such an approach requires to know the transport coefficients of solvent and solutes in a throat connecting two pores, modelled as a capillary. The challenge in the case of clays, compared to the usual PNM methods, is to capture the effect of the surface charge of clay minerals on the transport of ions and water, under the effect of macroscopic pressure, salt concentration and electric potential gradients. Solvent and ionic transports are governed by the Stokes, the Nernst-Planck and the Poisson- Boltzmann equations. This set of equations can be solved analytically using the linearized form of the latter in order to get an approximation of the electro-osmotic speed and the ionic density profile. At variant with most previous works, we consider the case of a fixed surface charge instead of fixed surface potential. In addition to the Nernst-Einstein and chemical flows of solute, we calculated analytically the Poiseuille flow of solutes and the electro-osmotic flow of solvent and solutes. When the linearization is not possible, one must use numerical results for transport coefficients

  13. Analysis of pore pressure response of Callovo Oxfordian clay-stone to heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobmann, M.; Polster, M.; Li, S.; Schlegel, R.; Will, J.; Vymlatil, P.; Conil, N.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. One of the aims of the TED heater experiment at Bure is to perform a parameter identification of the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay. A detailed description of the heater experiment can be found in the paper presented by N. Conil, also at this meeting. Three artificial heat sources are used to simulate heat generating waste canisters and are placed in three parallel horizontal boreholes. The heating process is carried out by using three heating phases with different amounts of heat release. The thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) response of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone is monitored by a large number of temperature and pore water pressure sensors as well as extensometers installed in the heater boreholes as well as in a couple of observation boreholes. One possibility to identify the THM parameters of the clay-stone is to perform a series of forward simulations by adjusting the THM input parameters until the calculation results fit best to the measured values at the different sensor locations. Given the large number of sensors to consider, doing this fitting process manually is a long and laborious task. Thus, an automatic parameter identification process has been applied. Parameter identification In this paper we focus on the analysis of the pore water pressure response to drilling and heating. For the process of parameter identification, an automatic procedure was used by applying the software 'optiSLang' which allows for optimizing nonlinear tasks that include many parameters. The software is able to offer a sampling-based sensitivity analysis to identify important parameters, to quantify the individual influence on the calculation results, and to generate a so-called best design approximating the measurement results taken in situ as good as possible. optiSLang changes input parameters within given ranges automatically and autonomously starts new calculations by triggering the

  14. First assessment of the pore water composition of Rupel Clay in the Netherlands and the characterisation of its reactive solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behrends, T.; Veen, I. van der; Hoving, A.; Griffioen, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Rupel Clay member in the Netherlands largely corresponds to the Boom Formation in Belgium, and this marine, clay-rich deposit is a potential candidate to host radioactive waste disposal facilities. Prediction of the speciation of radionuclides in Rupel Clay pore water and their retardation by

  15. Dynamic mechanical properties and anisotropy of synthetic shales with different clay minerals under confining pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fei; Di, Bangrang; Wei, Jianxin; Ding, Pinbo; Shuai, Da

    2018-03-01

    The presence of clay minerals can alter the elastic behaviour of reservoir rocks significantly as the type of clay minerals, their volume and distribution, and their orientation control the shale's intrinsic anisotropic behaviours. Clay minerals are the most abundant materials in shale, and it has been proven extremely difficult to measure the elastic properties of natural shale by means of a single variable (in this case, the type of clay minerals), due to the influences of multiple factors, including water, TOC content and complex mineral compositions. We used quartz, clay (kaolinite, illite and smectite), carbonate and kerogen extract as the primary materials to construct synthetic shale with different clay minerals. Ultrasonic experiments were conducted to investigate the anisotropy of velocity and mechanical properties in dry synthetic and natural shale as a function of confining pressure. Velocities in synthetic shale are sensitive to the type of clay minerals, possibly due to the different structures of the clay minerals. The velocities increase with confining pressure and show higher rate of velocity increase at low pressures, and P-wave velocity is usually more sensitive than S-wave velocity to confining pressure according to our results. Similarly, the dynamic Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increase with applied pressure, and the results also reveal that E11 is always larger than E33 and ν31 is smaller than ν12. Velocity and mechanical anisotropy decrease with increasing stress, and are sensitive to stress and the type of clay minerals. However, the changes of mechanical anisotropy with applied stress are larger compared with the velocity anisotropy, indicating that mechanical properties are more sensitive to the change of rock properties.

  16. Boom clay pore water, home of a diverse microbial community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wouters, Katinka; Moors, Hugo; Leys, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Boom Clay pore water (BCPW) has been studied in the framework of geological disposal of nuclear waste for over two decades, thereby mainly addressing its geochemical properties. A reference composition for synthetic clay water has been derived earlier by modelling and spatial calibration efforts, mainly based on interstitial water sampled from different layers within the Boom clay. However, since microbial activity is found in a range of extreme circumstances, the possibility of microbes interacting with future radioactive waste in a host formation like Boom Clay, cannot be ignored. In this respect, BCPW was sampled from different Boom Clay layers using the Morpheus piezometer and subsequently analysed by a complementary set of microbiological and molecular techniques, in search for overall shared and abundant microorganisms. Similar to the previous characterization of the 'average' BCPW chemical composition, the primary aim of this microbiological study is to determine a representative BCPW microbial community which can be used in laboratory studies. Secondly, the in situ activity and the metabolic properties of members of this community were addressed, aiming to assess their survival and proliferation chances in repository conditions. In a first approach, total microbial DNA of the community was extracted from the BCPW samples. This molecular approach allows a broad insight in the total microbial ecology of the BCPW samples. By polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on the highly conserved 16S rRNA genes in this DNA pool and subsequent sequencing and bio-informatics analysis, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) could be assigned to the microbial community. The bacterial community was found to be quite diverse, with OTUs belonging to 8 different phyla (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chlorobi, Spirochetes, Chloroflexi and Deinococcus-Thermus). These results provide an overall view of the

  17. Boom clay pore water, home of a diverse microbial community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouters, Katinka; Moors, Hugo; Leys, Natalie [SCK.CEN, Environment, Health and Safety Institute, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Boom Clay pore water (BCPW) has been studied in the framework of geological disposal of nuclear waste for over two decades, thereby mainly addressing its geochemical properties. A reference composition for synthetic clay water has been derived earlier by modelling and spatial calibration efforts, mainly based on interstitial water sampled from different layers within the Boom clay. However, since microbial activity is found in a range of extreme circumstances, the possibility of microbes interacting with future radioactive waste in a host formation like Boom Clay, cannot be ignored. In this respect, BCPW was sampled from different Boom Clay layers using the Morpheus piezometer and subsequently analysed by a complementary set of microbiological and molecular techniques, in search for overall shared and abundant microorganisms. Similar to the previous characterization of the 'average' BCPW chemical composition, the primary aim of this microbiological study is to determine a representative BCPW microbial community which can be used in laboratory studies. Secondly, the in situ activity and the metabolic properties of members of this community were addressed, aiming to assess their survival and proliferation chances in repository conditions. In a first approach, total microbial DNA of the community was extracted from the BCPW samples. This molecular approach allows a broad insight in the total microbial ecology of the BCPW samples. By polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on the highly conserved 16S rRNA genes in this DNA pool and subsequent sequencing and bio-informatics analysis, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) could be assigned to the microbial community. The bacterial community was found to be quite diverse, with OTUs belonging to 8 different phyla (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chlorobi, Spirochetes, Chloroflexi and Deinococcus-Thermus). These results provide an overall view of the

  18. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C.; Vinsot, A.; Made, B.; Altmann, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  19. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C. [BRGM av. Claude Guillemin BP6009 45060 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Vinsot, A. [ANDRA Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground research Laboratory (URL), RD 960, 55290 Bure (France); Made, B.; Altmann, S. [ANDRA - Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  20. Pore-water evolution and solute-transport mechanisms in Opalinus Clay at Mont Terri and Mont Russelin (Canton Jura, Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurek, M. [Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Haller de, A. [Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-04-15

    Data pertinent to pore-water composition in Opalinus Clay in the Mont Terri and Mont Russelin anticlines have been collected over the last 20 years from long-term in situ pore-water sampling in dedicated boreholes, from laboratory analyses on drill cores and from the geochemical characteristics of vein infills. Together with independent knowledge on regional geology, an attempt is made here to constrain the geochemical evolution of the pore-waters. Following basin inversion and the establishment of continental conditions in the late Cretaceous, the Malm limestones acted as a fresh-water upper boundary leading to progressive out-diffusion of salinity from the originally marine pore-waters of the Jurassic low-permeability sequence. Model calculations suggest that at the end of the Palaeogene, pore-water salinity in Opalinus Clay was about half the original value. In the Chattian/Aquitanian, partial evaporation of sea-water occurred. It is postulated that brines diffused into the underlying sequence over a period of several Myr, resulting in an increase of salinity in Opalinus Clay to levels observed today. This hypothesis is further supported by the isotopic signatures of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr in current pore-waters. These are not simple binary mixtures of sea and meteoric water, but their Cl{sup -} and stable water-isotope signatures can be potentially explained by a component of partially evaporated sea-water. After the re-establishment of fresh-water conditions on the surface and the formation of the Jura Fold and Thrust Belt, erosion caused the activation of aquifers embedding the low-permeability sequence, leading to the curved profiles of various pore-water tracers that are observed today. Fluid flow triggered by deformation events during thrusting and folding of the anticlines occurred and is documented by infrequent vein infills in major fault structures. However, this flow was spatially focussed and of limited duration and so did not

  1. Origin of enhanced Brønsted acidity of NiF-modified synthetic mica-montmorillonite clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Chong; Pidko, Evgeny A.; Hensen, Emiel J.M.

    2018-01-01

    The Brønsted acidity of synthetic mica-montmorillonite (SMM) clay was studied by periodic DFT calculations. Different structural models were compared to determine the Brønsted acidity of protons of the SMM clay based on (i) isomorphous substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the tetrahedral silicate layer

  2. Origin of enhanced Brønsted acidity of NiF-modified synthetic mica-montmorillonite clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, C.; Pidko, E.A.; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2018-01-01

    The Brønsted acidity of synthetic mica-montmorillonite (SMM) clay was studied by periodic DFT calculations. Different structural models were compared to determine the Brønsted acidity of protons of the SMM clay based on (i) isomorphous substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the

  3. Surface modification of synthetic clay aimed at biomolecule adsorption: synthesis and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela de Mello Ferreira Guimarães

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the process for functionalization of laponite through the grafting of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS. Laponite is synthetic smectite clay with surface area of 350 m²/g. The samples, prior to and after functionalization, were characterized by chemical analyses, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, x ray diffraction (XRD, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry (MEV/EDS. Infrared spectroscopy and elemental analyses confirmed the presence of organic chains and thiol groups in the modified clay. The immobilized and available thiol group, measured according to the Volhard method, totaled 1.4 meq/g of clay, with approximately 90% accessible for Ag+ trapping. These results represent an improvement as compared to other works concerning the functionalization of smectite-type clays in which the effect produced by functional group blockage limits the access of species to less than 10% of the complexing sites.

  4. Cordierite containing ceramic membranes from smectetic clay using natural organic wastes as pore-forming agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Misrar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cordierite ceramic membranes were manufactured from natural clay, oxides and organic wastes as pore forming agents. Mixtures aforementioned materials with the pore-forming agents (up to 10 wt.% were investigated in the range 1000–1200 °C using thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, mercury porosimetry and filtration tests. Physical properties (density, water absorption and bending strength were correlated to the processing factors (pore-forming agent addition, firing temperature and soaking time. The results showed that cordierite together with spinel, diopside and clinoenstatite neoformed. SEM analysis revealed heterogeneous aspects. The results of the response surface methodology showed that the variations of physical properties versus processing parameters were well described by the used polynomial model. The addition of pore forming agent and temperature were the most influential factors. Filtration tests were performed on the best performing sample. The results allowed to testify that these membranes could be used in waste water treatment.

  5. Towards an assessment of colloid transport in undisturbed clay stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durce, D.; Landesman, C.; Grambow, B.; Giffaut, E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Colloids are known as a potentially important transport vector for sparingly soluble radionuclides in natural water environments. For assessing the mass transfer resistance of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock formation for colloid transport, a series of percolation experiments have been performed, using high pressure stainless steel advection cells of different diameters containing clay cores machined to about 50 μm of accuracy to the inner diameter of the cells. Synthetic clay pore water was pushed by a high pressure syringe pump across the clay core. In order to assess the cut-off size for colloid transport, molecules of different molecular weight were injected. C 14 labeled polymaleic acid (PMA) of sizes of 2 and 50 kDa were used. The effect of clay permeability, of water flow rate (injection pressure) and of ionic strength was studied. Low ionic strength experiments (I = 0.001) were realized by replacing the pore water by advective displacement with the required composition. Clay rock permeabilities were between 10 -12 and 10 -14 m/s. Hydrodynamic parameters were determined by HTO and 36 Cl injection. The results show already at 2 kDa and a permeability of 10 -12 m/s strong retention by partial filtration. The experimental results were modeled using simple chromatographic theory. (authors)

  6. Homogeneity vs. Heterogeneity of Porosity in Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemes, Susanne; Desbois, Guillaume; Urai, Janos L.; De Craen, Mieke; Honty, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Microstructural investigations on Boom Clay at nano- to micrometer scale, using BIB-SEM methods, result in porosity characterization for different mineral phases from direct observations on high resolution SE2-images of representative elementary areas (REAs). High quality, polished surfaces of cross-sections of ∼ 1 mm 2 size were produced on three different samples from the Mol-Dessel research site (Belgium). More than 33,000 pores were detected, manually segmented and analyzed with regard to their size, shape and orientation. Two main pore classes were defined: Small pores (< 500 nm (ED)) within the clay matrices of samples and =big' pores (> 500 nm (ED)) at the interfaces between clay and non-clay mineral (NCM) grains. Samples investigated show similar porosities regarding the first pore-class, but differences occur at the interfaces between clay matrix and NCM grains. These differences were interpreted to be due to differences in quantitative mineralogy (amount of non-clay mineral grains) and grain-size distributions between samples investigated. Visible porosities were measured as 15 to 17 % for samples investigated. Pore-size distributions of pores in clay are similar for all samples, showing log-normal distributions with peaks around 60 nm (ED) and more than 95 % of the pores being smaller than 500 nm (ED). Fitting pore-size distributions using power-laws with exponents between 1.56 and 1.7, assuming self-similarity of the pore space, thus pores smaller than the pore detection resolution following the same power-laws and using these power-laws for extrapolation of pore-size distributions below the limit of pore detection resolution, results in total estimated porosities between 20 and 30 %. These results are in good agreement with data known from Mercury Porosimetry investigations (35-40 % porosity) and water content porosity measurements (∼ 36 %) performed on Boom Clay. (authors)

  7. Evaluation of clay hybrid nanocomposites of different chain length as reinforcing agent for natural and synthetic rubbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yehia, A.A.; Akelah, A.M.; Rehab, A.; El-Sabbagh, S.H.; El Nashar, D.E.; Koriem, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → The modified organo-clay (MMT-ATBN) markedly reinforce natural and synthetic rubbers. → The reinforcing efficiency of the organo-clay is much higher than HAF carbon black. → The reinforcing efficiency of MMT modified with different alkylamines greatly depend on the chain length. → The good compatibility of modified organo-clay with NBR can be attributed to the chemical nature. -- Abstract: Polymer nanocomposites are one of the highly discussed research topics in recent time. It has been reported in the present paper the preparation and the properties of different nanoclays based on sodium montmorillonite (bentonite) and some organic amines of varying chain lengths (dodecylamine, hexadecylamine and octadecylamine) beside amine-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (ATBN). The hybrid clays have been characterized with the help of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Wide angle X-ray diffractions (WXRD), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). X-ray results showed that the intergallery distance of the clay is increased as a result of the intercalation of the amines and ATBN. The nanocomposite clays were incorporated in natural and synthetic rubbers (NR, SBR and NBR). The physico-mechanical properties are greatly improved with loading low concentrations of the nanocomposite clays compared with carbon black.

  8. Evaluation of natural clay Brasgel as adsorbent in removal of lead in synthetic waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, W.S.; Rodrigues, M.G.F.; Mota, M.F.; Patricio, A.C.L.; Silva, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    The smectite clays have high adsorption capacity and cation exchange. Due to its chemical and physical characteristics, they can be effectively used as adsorbent of pollutants (such as metal ions). The initial objective of this study was to characterize the clay Brasgel through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Spectrometry by Energy Dispersive (EDX) and nitrogen adsorption (BET method), seeking its use in removing lead (Pb 2+ ) from synthetic effluents. System was used in finite bath to assess the potential removal of lead (Pb 2+ ), following a 2 2 factorial experimental design with three center point experiments, taking as input variables: pH and initial concentrations of lead (Pb 2+ ). The clay has Brasgel clay in its composition that characterize it as a smectite clay. By having a large surface area, this clay showed great potential on the adsorption of metal ions. (author)

  9. Tracer sorption and macroscopic transport in clay nano-pores: a lattice-Boltzmann study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesque, Maximilien; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Duvail, Magali; Benichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphael; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Frenkel, Daan

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Agence Nationale pour la gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA) has been entrusted to find a safe solution for disposing of existing and future nuclear wastes. A prototype site has been considered for the waste disposal in a deep underground sedimentary geological formation. It is composed of clay minerals chosen, among other reasons, for their remarkable ability to limit radionuclide transport. Clay minerals are complex charged porous media characterized by heterogeneities at several length scales. They naturally occur as an assembly of few nano-meter-sized particles connected to form 10 to 100 nm interparticle pores containing water and ions. This intrinsically multi-scale structure, that gives the material its remarkable properties, makes the description of sorption and transport phenomena of transported ions particularly challenging. Experimental studies of water and ion transport through clays mostly consist in evaluating macroscopic effective transport coefficients like permeability or conductivity. They showed that the main transport mechanism is an effective diffusion that not only depends on particle charge but also on its chemical nature, or specificity. The goal of assessing the performance of clays as confinement barriers, particularly in the context of the geological disposal of nuclear waste, requires not only quantitative prediction of the retention and transport of species but also an understanding of the microscopic mechanisms underlying them. A successful approach has been to use numerical simulations via the Lattice-Boltzmann method (LB). It consists in making evolve populations describing the fluid at a level which is consistent with time and length-scales involved in transport properties, while still including a microscopic description of the phenomena. The transport of charged ions at the pore scale has recently been included in LB. In this method, the evolution of a tracer population is

  10. Preferred Orientation and Anisotropy of Clay minerals and Pores in Posidonia Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitpanyacharoen, W.; Chen, K.; Wenk, H.

    2010-12-01

    Shales compose a large part of sedimentary basins and form the seal and source rocks for hydrocarbon reservoirs. They are also of great interest in context of repositories for nuclear waste and carbon sequestration. A comprehensive study of shale properties is thus crucial for seismic prospecting, particularly due to high elastic anisotropy that is contributed by the alignment of constituent clay minerals during compaction and diagenesis. In this study, we quantitatively analyze composition, crystal preferred orientation (or texture), and the 3D porosity structure in four Posidonia shales from Germany using high energy synchrotron x-rays. We can infer texture information from x-ray diffraction images relying on the Rietveld method, as well as determine the 3D porosity structure from tomography images. We observed that quartz and calcite are dominating phases while illite-smectite, illite-mica and kaolinite are the major clay minerals. The texture strength of clays range from 4.22 to 6.12 m.r.d. A comparison of shallow Posidonia shales with deep shales from the North Sea, Saudi Arabia, and the Gulf of Mexico documents that P-wave anisotropy increases with increasing phyllosilicate content (mainly illite-smectite and kaolinite) and increasing burial. Low absorption features in microtomography images indicate porosity (including kerogen and fractures), which is estimated at 1 vol% and observed to be anisotropic, mainly organized parallel to bedding with little connectivity of flat pores in direction perpendicular to the bedding plane.

  11. Xenon-129 NMR study of the microporous structure of clays and pillared clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiao, C.; Carrado, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    129 Xe NMR studies have been carried out using xenon gas adsorbed in clays and pillared clays. Data from the measurements provide information on the pore structure of clays before and after pillaring. The results indicate that the effective pore diameter of montmorillonite increases, for example, from 5.4 Angstrom to 8.0 Angstrom after pillaring cheto-montmorillonite with aluminum polyoxohydroxy Keggin cations. The data are consistent with X-ray powder diffraction results, which show a corresponding increase in the interlamellar gallery height from 5.6 Angstrom to 8.4 Angstrom

  12. Effects of leachate concentration on the integrity of solidified clay liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qiang; Zhang, Qian

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of landfill leachate concentration on the degradation behaviour of solidified clay liners and to propose a viable mechanism for the observed degradation. The results indicated that the unconfined compressive strength of the solidified clay decreased significantly, while the hydraulic conductivity increased with the leachate concentration. The large pore proportion in the solidified clay increased and the sum of medium and micro pore proportions decreased, demonstrating that the effect on the solidified clay was evident after the degradation caused by exposure to landfill leachate. The unconfined compressive strength of the solidified clay decreased with increasing leachate concentration as the leachate changed the compact structure of the solidified clay, which are prone to deformation and fracture. The hydraulic conductivity and the large pore proportion of the solidified clay increased with the increase in leachate concentration. In contrast, the sum of medium and micro pore proportions showed an opposite trend in relation to leachate concentration, because the leachate gradually caused the medium and micro pores to form larger pores. Notably, higher leachate concentrations resulted in a much more distinctive variation in pore proportions. The hydraulic conductivity of the solidified clay was closely related to the size, distribution, and connection of pores. The proportion of the large pores showed a positive correlation with the increase of hydraulic conductivity, while the sum of the proportions of medium and micro pores showed a negative correlation.

  13. Developments in modelling of thermohydro-geomechanical behaviour of Boom clay and clay-based buffer materials (Volume 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, G.; Hueckel, T.; Peano, A.; Pellegrini, R.

    1991-01-01

    The results of two years of research on thermomechanics of clays performed within CEC contract Fl1W/0150 are described herein. Previous studies (research contracts with CEC/WAS/380.83.7 l) performed by ISMES have evidenced the need for an improved modelling of the volumetric response of natural clays. In a coupled approach, this leads to an improved prediction of pore-pressure development and dissipation. This is crucial for assessing conditions of a possible local thermal failure as verified in laboratory tests done at ISMES. The first part of the study lays the foundations of a comprehensive theoretical treatment of the interaction between water and soil skeleton. It consists in: (a) developing a framework for inclusion of water/soil particle thermally induced interaction into a thermodynamically consistent mixture theory approach (Section 2); (b) studying possible modelling approaches of considering the effective thermal expansion coefficient of pore water dependency on pore water status (Section 2); (c) testing artificial clays to assess pore water thermal expansion dependence on temperature in the presence of different amounts of active clay minerals and also Boom clay (Section 3); (d) performing a laboratory test campaign on Boom clay with special attention to the response in the overconsolidated domain (Section 4). 89 figs., 18 tabs., 102 refs

  14. Evaluation of the bleaching flux in clays containing hematite and different clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Junior, E.M.; Lusa, T.; Silva, T.M.; Medeiros, B.B.; Santos, G.R. dos; Morelli, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the addition of a synthetic flux in a clay mineral constituted by illite phase in the presence of iron oxide with the hematite, promotes color change of the firing products, making the reddish color firing into whiteness. This flow is constituted of a vitreous phase of the silicates family obtained by fusion/solidification of oxides and carbonates. Thus, the objective of this work was that of studying the interaction of the iron element in the final color mechanism of the different types of mineral crystal phase of the clays. In order to study the phenomenon, we obtained different compositions between the select clays and the synthetic flow, and characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and visual analysis. The results showed that the action of the synthetic flow as a modifying agent for color depends on the mineral crystal phase of the clays. The color firing modification does not occur in the clays content high levels of kaolinite mineral phase. (author)

  15. Thermal volume changes in clays and clay-stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, P.; Sulem, J.; Mohajerani, M.; Tang, A.M.; Monfared, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The disposal of high activity exothermic radioactive waste at great depth in clay host rocks will induce a temperature elevation that has been investigated in various underground research laboratories in Belgium, France and Switzerland through in-situ tests. Thermal effects are better known in clays (in particular Boom clay) than in clay-stone (e.g. Opalinus clay and Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone). In terms of volume changes, Figure 1 confirms the findings of Hueckel and Baldi (1990) that volume changes depend on the over-consolidation ratio (OCR) of the clay. In drained conditions, normally consolidated clays exhibit plastic contraction when heated, whereas over-consolidated clay exhibit elastic dilation. The nature of thermal volume changes in heated clays obviously has a significant effect on thermally induced pore pressures, when drainage is not instantaneous like what occurs in-situ. Compared to clays, the thermal volume change behaviour of clay-stones is less well known than that of clays. clay-stone are a priori suspected to behave like over-consolidated clays. In this paper, a comparison of recent results obtained in the laboratory on the drained thermal volume changes of clay-stones is presented and discussed. It is difficult to run drained mechanical tests in clay-stones like the Opalinus clay and the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone because of their quite low permeability (10 -12 - 10 -13 m/s). This also holds true for thermal tests. Due to the significant difference in thermal expansion coefficient between minerals and water, it is necessary to adopt very slow heating rate (0.5 - 1 C/h) to avoid any thermal pressurization. To do so, a new hollow cylinder apparatus (100 mm external diameter, 60 mm internal diameter) with lateral drainages reducing the drainage length to half the sample thickness (10 mm) has been developed (Monfared et al. 2011). The results of a drained cyclic thermal test carried out on

  16. Proceedings of the NEA Clay Club Workshop on Clay characterisation from nanoscopic to microscopic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    A wide spectrum of argillaceous media are being considered in Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) member countries as potential host rocks for the final, safe disposal of radioactive waste, and/or as major constituent of repository systems in which wastes will be emplaced. In this context, the NEA established the Working Group on the 'Characterisation, the Understanding and the Performance of Argillaceous Rocks as Repository Host Formations' in 1990, informally known as the 'Clay Club'. The Clay Club examines various argillaceous rocks that are being considered for the underground disposal of radioactive waste, ranging from soft clays to indurated shales. Very generally speaking, these clay rocks are composed of fine-grained minerals showing pore sizes from < 2 nm (micropores) up to > 50 nm (macro-pores). The water flow, solute transport and mechanical properties are largely determined by this microstructure, the spatial arrangement of the minerals and the chemical pore water composition. Examples include anion accessible ('geochemical') porosity and macroscopic membrane effects (chemical osmosis, hyper-filtration), geomechanical properties and the characteristics of two-phase flow properties (relevant for gas transport). At the current level of knowledge, there is a strong need to improve the nanoscale description of the phenomena observed at a more macroscopic scale. However, based on the scale of individual clay-minerals and pore sizes, for most of the imaging techniques this resolution is a clear challenge. The workshop, hosted by the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in the Akademiehotel Karlsruhe (Germany) from 6 to 8 September 2011, was intended to give, inter alia, a discussion platform on: - The current state-of-the-art of different spectro-microscopic methods - New developments addressing the above mentioned knowledge gaps in clays. - The perception of the interplay between geometry

  17. Gas transport and subsoil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berisso, Feto Esimo; Schjønning, Per; Keller, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Arrangements of elementary soil particles during soil deposition and subsequent biological and physical processes in long-term pedogenesis are expected to lead to anisotropy of the non-tilled subsoil pore system. Soil compaction by agricultural machinery is known to affect soil pore characteristics...... were sampled in vertical and horizontal directions from 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9 m depth (the two lower depths only in Sweden). In the laboratory, water retention, air permeability (ka) and gas diffusivity (Ds/D0) were determined. For the sandy clay loam, morphological characteristics of pores (effective......). In the sandy clay loam soil, dB and nB displayed significant anisotropy (FAcharacteristics because of its origin...

  18. Physico-chemical characterisation and sorption measurements of Cs, Sr, Ni, Eu, Th, Sn and Se on Opalinus clay from Mont Terri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauber, Matthias; Baeyens, Bart; Bradbury, Michael H.

    2000-12-01

    Opalinus Clay is currently under investigation as a potential host rock for the disposal of high level and long-lived intermediate radioactive waste. A throughout physico-chemical characterisation was carried out on a bore core sample from the underground rock laboratory Mont Terri (Canton Jura). The results of these investigations indicate that the major characteristics (mineralogy, cation exchange capacity, cation occupancies, selectivity coefficients, chloride and sulphate inventories) were very similar to a different core sample, previously used for pore water modelling studies. It was concluded that the pore water compositions derived in the earlier studies were reliable and could be used in this work. The organic matter which dissolved from the Opalinus Clay rock was not humic or fulvic acids and the concentration remaining in the liquid phase in the sorption experiments was < 0.5 ppm C. The organic matter is therefore considered to have little or no influence on the sorption behaviour of the studied radionuclides. Redox potential measurements of the Opalinus Clay/synthetic pore water system inside the glove boxes indicated anoxic conditions. The main focus of the experimental work presented here is on the sorption behaviour of Cs (I), Sr (II), Ni (II), Eu (III), Th (IV), Sn (IV) and Se (IV) on Opalinus Clay equilibrated with synthetic pore waters at pH 6.3 and 8. Sorption isotherms were measured for Cs, Ni, Eu, Th and Se. Single point data were measured for Sr and Sn. For all radionuclides studied the sorption kinetics were measured first. The times required to complete the sorption on the Opalinus Clay varied between one day for Th and one month for Ni and Se. Within the concentration ranges under study the uptake of Cs, Ni, Eu and Se on Opalinus Clay was non-linear, whereas for Th a linear sorption behaviour was observed. For Ni, Eu and Th the sorption increased with increasing pH. For Cs a pH independent sorption behaviour was observed. The concentration

  19. Law of nonlinear flow in saturated clays and radial consolidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It was derived that micro-scale amount level of average pore radius of clay changed from 0.01 to 0.1 micron by an equivalent concept of flow in porous media. There is good agreement between the derived results and test ones. Results of experiments show that flow in micro-scale pore of saturated clays follows law of nonlinear flow. Theoretical analyses demonstrate that an interaction of solid-liquid interfaces varies inversely with permeability or porous radius. The interaction is an important reason why nonlinear flow in saturated clays occurs. An exact mathematical model was presented for nonlinear flow in micro-scale pore of saturated clays. Dimension and physical meanings of parameters of it are definite. A new law of nonlinear flow in saturated clays was established. It can describe characteristics of flow curve of the whole process of the nonlinear flow from low hydraulic gradient to high one. Darcy law is a special case of the new law. A mathematical model was presented for consolidation of nonlinear flow in radius direction in saturated clays with constant rate based on the new law of nonlinear flow. Equations of average mass conservation and moving boundary, and formula of excess pore pressure distribution and average degree of consolidation for nonlinear flow in saturated clay were derived by using an idea of viscous boundary layer, a method of steady state in stead of transient state and a method of integral of an equation. Laws of excess pore pressure distribution and changes of average degree of consolidation with time were obtained. Results show that velocity of moving boundary decreases because of the nonlinear flow in saturated clay. The results can provide geology engineering and geotechnical engineering of saturated clay with new scientific bases. Calculations of average degree of consolidation of the Darcy flow are a special case of that of the nonlinear flow.

  20. The corrosion of zircaloy 2 in anaerobic synthetic cement pore solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansson, C.M.

    1984-12-01

    Measurements have been made of the corrosion rates of Zircaloy 2 tubes in anaerobic synthetic cement pore solution of pH 12.0-13.8. The samples were tested in the as-received condition by the polarization resistance technique using a Tafal constant of 52 mV/decade and, for all pH values, corrosion rates of 3.10 -5 A/m 2 (0.03 μm/yr) were determined. These corrosion currents are at the lower limit of the experimental detection range of the technique used. Some samples were then held at a low electrochemical potential, namely -1850 mV SCE, for several days but this treatment had only a minor effect on the behaviour of the Zircaloy: the value of corrosion rate was increased by a factor of 3 and the free potential was temporarily lowered but drifted towards more positive values after the applied potential was removed. Attempts were made to remove the passive film from the surface of the samples by electrochemical reduction. For practical, experimental reasons, this was not successful and, instead, the effect of removing the film by scratching the surface was investigated. At both the free potential and at applied cathodic potentials, an anodic current was detected immediately and the surface was scratched but, in all cases, the scratched area repassivated within a few seconds and the anodic corrosion current fell accordingly. Thus, it may be concluded that active corrosion of Zircaloy 2 in anaerobic concrete will not occur and, by comparison with measurements on steel, it is likely that the passive corrosion rates will be even lower in concrete than those measured in the synthetic pore solution. (Author)

  1. Modelling aqueous solubility of sodium chloride in clays at thermodynamic conditions of hydraulic fracturing by molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moučka, Filip; Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin

    2017-06-28

    To address the high salinity of flow-back water during hydraulic fracturing, we have studied the equilibrium partitioning of NaCl and water between the bulk phase and clay pores. In shale rocks, such a partitioning can occur between fractures with a bulk-like phase and clay pores. We use an advanced Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) technique based on fractional exchanges of dissolved ions and water molecules. We consider a typical shale gas reservoir condition of a temperature of 365 K and pressure of 275 bar, and we represent clay pores by pyrophyllite and Na-montmorillonite slits of a width ranging from about 7 to 28 Å, covering clay pores from dry clay to clay pores with a bulk-like layer in the middle of the pore. We employ the Joung-Cheatham model for ions, SPC/E model for water and CLAYFF for the clay pores. We first determine the chemical potentials for NaCl and water in the bulk phase using Osmotic Ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. The chemical potentials are then used in GCMC to simulate the adsorption of ions and water molecules in the clay pores, and in turn to predict the salt solubility in confined solutions. Besides the thermodynamic properties, we evaluate the structure and in-plane diffusion of the adsorbed fluids, and ion conductivities.

  2. Chemo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of unsaturated clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokni, N.; Olivella, S.; Alonso, E.E.; Romero, E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Understanding of the chemical effects on clays is essential for many problems ranging from pollution studies and waste-containment. Several studies examined the effect of changes in pore fluid composition on the mechanical and hydraulic properties. Volume changes (contraction/ expansion) have been measured on clay specimens upon exposure to salt solutions or permeation with organic liquids. Moreover, it was shown that permeation of clay with brine induces an increase of the shear strength. In addition, several models have been proposed to describe the chemo-mechanical behaviour of saturated clays under saturated conditions. A new chemo-hydro-mechanical model for unsaturated clays is under development. The chemo-mechanical effects are described within an elasto-plastic framework using the concept that chemical effects act on the plastic properties by increasing or decreasing the pre-consolidation stress. The model is based on the distinction within the material of a microstructural and a macro-structural levels. Chemical loading has a significant effect on the microstructure. The negative pressure associated with the capillary water plays its role in the interconnected macro pores. By adopting simple assumptions concerning the coupling between the two levels it is intended to reproduce the features of the behaviour of unsaturated clays when there is a change in pore fluid composition (increase or decrease of concentration). A yield surface which defines the set of yield pre-consolidation stress values, for each associated capillary suction and concentration of pore fluid should be defined. In addition, the behaviour of clays under unsaturated condition and the behaviour at full saturation under chemical loading represent two limiting cases of the framework. Studies on the compatibility of Boom Clay with large amounts of nitrate- bearing bituminized radioactive waste have recently raised a particular interest on the

  3. Self-sealing Faults in the Opalinus Clay - Evidence from Field Observations, Hydraulic Testing and Pore water Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautschi, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Swiss programme for high-level radioactive-waste, the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) is currently investigating the Jurassic (Aalenian) Opalinus Clay as a potential host formation (Nagra 1988, 1994). The Opalinus Clay consists of indurated dark grey micaceous Clay-stones (shales) that are subdivided into several litho-stratigraphic units. Some of them contain thin sandy lenses, limestone concretions or siderite nodules. The clay mineral content ranges from 40-80 weight per cent (9-29% illite, 3-10% chlorite, 6-20% kaolinite and 4-22% illite/smectite mixed layers in the ratio 70/30). Other minerals are quartz (15-30%), calcite (6-40%), siderite (2-3%), ankerite (0-3%), feldspars (1-7%), pyrite (1-3%) and organic carbon (<1%). The total water content ranges from 4-19% (Mazurek 1999, Nagra 2001). Faults are mainly represented by fault gouge and fault breccias, partly associated with minor veins of calcite. A key question in safety assessment is, whether these faults may represent preferential pathways for radionuclide transport. An extensive hydrogeological data base - part of which derives from strongly tectonized geological environments - suggests that advective transport through faults in the Opalinus Clay at depth > 200 m is insignificant. This conclusion is also supported by independent evidence from clay pore water hydrochemical and isotopic data. The lack of hydrochemical anomalies and the lack of extensive mineral veining suggest that there was also no significant paleo-flow through such faults. These observations can only be reconciled with a strong self-sealing capacity of the faults. Therefore it is concluded, that reactivated existing faults or newly induced fractures will not act as pathways for significant fluid flow at anytime due to self-healing processes. These conclusions are supported by results from laboratory hydro-frac and flow-through tests, and from field-tests in the Mont Terri underground

  4. Quantifying the effect of squirt flow dispersion from compliant clay porosity in clay bearing sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Compliant porosity in the form of cracks is known to cause significant attenuation and velocity dispersion through pore pressure gradients and consequent relaxation, dubbed squirt flow. Squirt flow from cracks vanish at high confining stress due to crack closing. Studies on clay bearing sandstones......-squirt flow on the bulk modulus of a clay bearing sandstone. The predicted magnitude of the clay-squirt effect on the bulk modulus is compared with experimental data. The clay-squirt effect is found to possibly account for a significant portion of the deviances from Gassmann fluid substitution in claybearing...... sandstones....

  5. HYDROXYETHYL METHACRYLATE BASED NANOCOMPOSITE HYDROGELS WITH TUNABLE PORE ARCHITECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Bat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA based hydrogels have found increasing number of applications in areas such as chromatographic separations, controlled drug release, biosensing, and membrane separations. In all these applications, the pore size and pore interconnectivity are crucial for successful application of these materials as they determine the rate of diffusion through the matrix. 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate is a water soluble monomer but its polymer, polyHEMA, is not soluble in water. Therefore, during polymerization of HEMA in aqueous media, a porous structure is obtained as a result of phase separation. Pore size and interconnectivity in these hydrogels is a function of several variables such as monomer concentration, cross-linker concentration, temperature etc. In this study, we investigated the effect of monomer concentration, graphene oxide addition or clay addition on hydrogel pore size, pore interconnectivity, water uptake, and thermal properties. PolyHEMA hydrogels have been prepared by redox initiated free radical polymerization of the monomer using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker. As a nanofiller, a synthetic hectorite Laponite® XLG and graphene oxide were used. Graphene oxide was prepared by the Tour Method. Pore morphology of the pristine HEMA based hydrogels and nanocomposite hydrogels were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The formed hydrogels were found to be highly elastic and flexible. A dramatic change in the pore structure and size was observed in the range between 22 to 24 wt/vol monomer at 0.5 % of cross-linker. In this range, the hydrogel morphology changes from typical cauliflower architecture to continuous hydrogel with dispersed water droplets forming the pores where the pores are submicron in size and show an interconnected structure. Such controlled pore structure is highly important when these hydrogels are used for solute diffusion or when there’s flow through monolithic hydrogels

  6. An update on synthetic dyes adsorption onto clay based minerals: A state-of-art review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngulube, T

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available of Environmental Management An update on synthetic dyes adsorption onto clay based minerals: A state- of-art review Tholiso Ngulube a,*, Jabulani Ray Gumbo b, Vhahangwele Masindi c,d, Arjun Maity e a Department of Ecology and Resources Management..., University of Venda, Private Bag X5050, Thohoyandou, 0950, Limpopo, South Africa b Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Venda, Private Bag X5050, Thohoyandou, 0950, Limpopo, South Africa c Council...

  7. Hydro-mechanical behaviour of two reference Belgian clay formations under non-isothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, A.; Romero, E.; Gens, A.; Li, X.L.

    2012-01-01

    dependency equivalent to that predicted by viscosity changes. Temperature control and high-stress equipment were specifically designed to explore compressibility features under different temperatures. Careful protocols were followed to avoid swelling of these deep clays at low stresses: samples were loaded to in situ stress, then placed in contact with synthetic water, and finally subjected to drained heating paths to reach target temperatures. Figure 3 displays loading/unloading results of BC and YC under saturated conditions at different temperatures (20 and 80 C). The post-yield compressibility displays similar values for both samples with no significant temperature sensitivity. The drained unloading paths for both clays involve strong swelling, finally attaining the initial void approximately. BC and YC samples display behaviour features typical of soils that undergo damage on loading. Figure 4 shows the evolution of the PSDs curves of Ypresian clay during drained loading and unloading. On loading, the larger pore mode is progressively reduced by inducing some shifting of the dominant pore mode towards lower values. On drained unloading towards state E, the PSD nearly coincides with the initial one, suggesting a reversible response. (authors)

  8. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of shale reservoir nanometer-sized pores in Member 1 of Shahejie Formation in JX area, Liaozhong sag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong; Zhang, Yu; Wen, Yiming

    2018-02-01

    The microscopic pore structure is the key of the shale reservoir study; however, traditional Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) methods cannot identify the irregular morphology caused by mechanical polishing. In this work, Scanning Electron Microscopy combined argon ion polishing technology was taken to study the characteristics of shale reservoir pores of Member 1 of Shahejie Formation (E3s1) located in JX1-1 area of Liaozhong Sag. The results show that pores between clay platelets, intraplatelet pores within clay aggregates and organic-matter pores are very rich in the area and with good pore connectivity, so these types of pores are of great significance for oil-gas exporation. Pores between clay platelets are formed by directional or semi-directional contact between edge and surface, edge and edge or surface and surface of laminated clay minerals, whose shapes are linear, mesh, and irregular with the size of 500 nm to 5 μm. The intraplatelet pores within clay aggregates are formed in the process of the transformation and compaction of clay minerals, whose shapes are usually linear with the width of 30 to 500 nm and the length of 2 to 50 μm. The organic-matter pores are from the process of the conversion from organic matters to the hydrocarbon under thermal evolution, whose shapes are gneissic, irregular, pitted and elliptical with the size of 100 nm to 2 μm. This study is of certain guiding significance to selecting target zones, evaluating resource potential and exploring & developing of shale gas in this region.

  10. Adsorption of hydrogen gas and redox processes in clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Mathilde; Leone, Laura; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Giffaut, Eric; Charlet, Laurent

    2012-03-20

    In order to assess the adsorption properties of hydrogen gas and reactivity of adsorbed hydrogen, we measured H(2)(g) adsorption on Na synthetic montmorillonite-type clays and Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clayrock using gas chromatography. Synthetic montmorillonites with increasing structural Fe(III) substitution (0 wt %, 3.2 wt %, and 6.4 wt % Fe) were used. Fe in the synthetic montmorillonites is principally present as structural Fe(III) ions. We studied the concomitant reduction of structural Fe(III) in the clays using (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry. The COx, which mainly contains smectite/illite and calcite minerals, is also studied together with the pure clay fraction of this clayrock. Experiments were performed with dry clay samples which were reacted with hydrogen gas at 90 and 120 °C for 30 to 45 days at a hydrogen partial pressure close to 0.45 bar. Results indicate that up to 0.11 wt % of hydrogen is adsorbed on the clays at 90 °C under 0.45 bar of relative pressure. (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry shows that up to 6% of the total structural Fe(III) initially present in these synthetic clays is reduced upon adsorption of hydrogen gas. No reduction is observed with the COx sample in the present experimental conditions.

  11. The application of small-angle neutron scattering to the study of mass transfer in clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, A.J.; Baston, A.H.; Bourke, P.J.; Jefferies, N.L.

    1990-01-01

    An extensive study using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been made of the pore structures in London Clay and in Ca-montmorillonite. Using SANS contrast variation techniques, the accessibilities of the pores to D 2 O by diffusion and permeation have been studied. Characterisation of the accessibility to different parts of the pore structure is intended to provide input data for models of radionuclide transport through clay geological barriers, and to improve interpretation of laboratory experiments that measure sorption of radionuclides on clays. (author)

  12. Pore system characteristics of the Permian transitional shale reservoir in the Lower Yangtze Region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taotao Cao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Permian shale, a set of transitional shale reservoir, is considered to be an important shale gas exploration target in the Lower Yangtze region. Due to little research conducted on the pore system characteristic and its controlling factors of the shale gas reservoir, SEM, FE-SEM, low-pressure N2 adsorption, and mercury intrusion tests were carried out on the Permian shales from the outcrop and HC well in the southern Anhui. The results show that the Permian shales mainly consist of organic matter, quartz, illite, calcite, and pyrite, of which pyrite occurs as framboids coexisting with organic matter and the organic matter is distributed in shales in stripped, interstitial, thin film and shell shapes. The basic pore types are inorganic mineral pore (intercrystalline pore, intergranular edge pore, intergranular pore, and interlayer pore in clay minerals and the organic pore and microfracture, of which organic pore and microfracture are the dominating pore types. In shale, organic pores are not developed at all in some organic grains but are well developed in others, which may be related to the types of and maceral compositions of kerogen. Under tectonic stress, shale rocks could develop mylonitization phenomenon exhibiting organic grains well blend with clay minerals, and produce a mass of microfractures and nanopores between organic matter grains and clay minerals. Mercury intrusion tests show that the shale is mainly composed of micropore and transition pore with high porosity, good pore connectivity and high efficiency of mercury withdraw, while the shale that mainly dominated by mesopore and macropore has a low porosity, poor pore connectivity, and low efficiency of the mercury withdraw. The volume percentage of mesopore and marcopore is increasing with the increase of quartz, and that of micropore and transition pore has a decreased tendency along with the increase of soluble organic matter (S1. Organic matter is the main contributor to

  13. Multistep triaxial strength tests: investigating strength parameters and pore pressure effects on Opalinus Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graesle, W.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The impact of natural variability between rock samples from a single formation is a common problem for the characterisation of THM properties of rocks. Data variation arising from heterogeneity between samples often obscures details of material behaviour. Besides efforts to reduce this statistical noise by careful selection of samples, there are essentially two approaches to overcome this problem: - To generate very large data sets for better statistics. - To avoid the impact of natural variability by yielding an extensive data set from a single sample. The multistep strength test follows the latter approach to characterise the mechanical behaviour of Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri and the possible impact of pore pressure effects. The concept of the multistep strength test comprises three test sections, each focused on the investigation of one mechanical characteristic of Opalinus Clay. Any section is composed of a series of strain controlled load cycles at various levels of confining pressure. 1) The linear elastic limit, i.e. the onset of nonlinearity in the stress-strain-relationship σ dev (ε 1 ) during strain-controlled triaxial loading, is determined in section 1. It defines a lower limit for the onset of damage. Avoiding sample damage is essential during this test section to ensure that all measurements reflect the behaviour of undisturbed material. Therefore, a rather strict and well detectable criterion for the onset of nonlinearity is required to enable a timely termination of any load phase. 2) Section 2 is focused on shear strength. Any load cycle is stopped as soon as peak stress is detected. As progressive damage of the sample is unavoidable during this process, it must be expected that only very few measured peak stresses approximately represent properties of the undamaged material. 3) Test section 3 is a conventional test of residual strength. Tests are carried out on cylindrical samples (100 mm

  14. Evaluation of the bleaching flux in clays containing hematite and different clay minerals; Avaliacao do fundente descolorante em argilas contendo hematita e diferentes argilominerais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Junior, E.M.; Lusa, T.; Silva, T.M.; Medeiros, B.B.; Santos, G.R. dos [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (DAMEC/UFTPR), Pato Branco, PR (Brazil); Morelli, M.R., E-mail: geocrisr@utfpr.edu.com, E-mail: morelli@power.ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DEMa/PPGCEM/UFSCar), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the addition of a synthetic flux in a clay mineral constituted by illite phase in the presence of iron oxide with the hematite, promotes color change of the firing products, making the reddish color firing into whiteness. This flow is constituted of a vitreous phase of the silicates family obtained by fusion/solidification of oxides and carbonates. Thus, the objective of this work was that of studying the interaction of the iron element in the final color mechanism of the different types of mineral crystal phase of the clays. In order to study the phenomenon, we obtained different compositions between the select clays and the synthetic flow, and characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and visual analysis. The results showed that the action of the synthetic flow as a modifying agent for color depends on the mineral crystal phase of the clays. The color firing modification does not occur in the clays content high levels of kaolinite mineral phase. (author)

  15. Squeezed Interstitial Water and Soil Properties in Pleistocene Blue Clays under Different Natural Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dolores Fidelibus

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies dating almost a century relate clay properties with the structure of the diffuse double layer (DDL, where the charged surfaces of clay crystal behave like an electric capacitor, whose dielectric is the interstitial fluid. The intensity of the inner electric field relates to the concentration and type of ions in the DDL. Other important implications of the model are less stressed: this part of the clay soil system, energetically speaking, is conservative. External contribution of energy, work of overburden or sun driven capillarity and long exposure to border low salinity waters can modify the concentration of pore-waters, thus affecting the DDL geometry, with electric field and energy storage variations. The study of clay soils coming from various natural geomorphological and hydrogeological contexts, determining a different salinity of interacting groundwater, shows how the clay interaction with freely circulating waters at the boundaries produces alterations in the native pore water salinity, and, at the nano-scale, variations of electric field and stored energy from external work. The swelling and the shrinkage of clay soil with their volumetric and geotechnical implications should be regarded as variations of the electrostatic and mechanical energy of the system. The study is based on tests on natural clay soil samples coming from a formation of stiff blue clays, widespread in southern Italy. Geotechnical identification and oedometer tests have been performed, and pore waters squeezed out from the specimens have been analyzed. Tested samples have similar grain size, clay fraction and plasticity; sorted according to the classified geomorphological/hydrogeological contexts, they highlight good correlations among dry density, mechanical work performed in selected stages of the oedometric test, swelling and non-swelling behaviour, and electrical conductivity of the squeezed pore waters. The work performed for swelling and non

  16. Determination of geochemical characters of insterstitial waters of pleistocene Italian clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanive, A.; Gragnani, R.; Mignuzzi, C.; Spat, G.

    1985-01-01

    The geochemical characters of clay formations and of their pore water are fundamental with regards to the mobility of the radionuclides as well as to the corrosion processes on enginered barriers. Experimental researches have been carried out in different types of clay, which represent Italian formations, for the characterization of pore water. A squeezer system, which reaches 1500 Kg/cm 2 in pressure, and an analytical micro-scale methodology, for the determination of dissolved constituents in pore water, were set up. The extracted pore water ranges from 60% to 85% in relation to consolidation state of clay. The chemical composition of the extracted fluid has been checked during the squeezing. During this step the observed variations were smaller than those between the different specimens of the same sample. The comparison between the results obtained by squeezing and by a multiple washing technique, using increasing water/sediment ratios, shows that the last one does not give reliable results on the chemical composition of pore water. This is due to the presence of easily weatherable minerals and to the exchange processes between the clayey minerals and the solution. Nevertheless both these techniques have supplied complementary information about geochemical processes in water-rock interaction. The salinity of pore water ranges from 0.45 g/l to 24.5 g/l and the chemism always shows a high content of calcium-magnesium sulfate, or sodium chloride or calcium-magnesium-sulfate with sodium chloride. The correlation between geochemical composition of pore water and mineralogical composition of clay is not significant

  17. Influence of the clay content and drying of successive no solvents change in the morphology of polyamide 6 / clay membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, C.H.; Ferreira, R.S.B.; Bezerra, E.B.; Leite, A.M.D.; Araujo, E.D.; Lira, H.L.

    2014-01-01

    Membranes of polyamide 6/clay nanocomposites with different contents (1 and 3%) of Brazilian bentonite clay using the technique of phase inversion was obtained. The nanocomposites were obtained in a co-rotating twin screw extruder, by the melt intercalation method and were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), which showed possibly an exfoliated and / or partially exfoliated structure was obtained. The membranes were dried at room temperature and also by successive exchange of non-solvents, to prevent collapse the pores using ethanol and n-hexane as a non-solvent. From the photomicrographs of top surface by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed to morphology change in the membranes from the presence of different clay contents as well as drying the same by successive exchange of non-solvents, obtaining membranes with larger amount of pores uniformly distributed. (author)

  18. Processes of cation migration in clay-rocks: Final Scientific Report of the CatClay European Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmann, S.; Aertsens, M.; Appelo, T.; Bruggeman, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Glaus, M.; Jacquier, P.; Kupcik, T.; Maes, N.; Montoya, V.; Rabung, T.; Robinet, J.-C.; Savoye, S.; Schaefer, T.; Tournassat, C.; Van Laer, L.; Van Loon, L.

    2015-07-01

    illite and clay rocks, even though some assumptions made have to be verified. In parallel, actual 3D geometrical pore size distributions of compacted illite, and in less extent, clay rock samples, were successfully determined by combining TEM and FIB-nt analyses on materials maintained in a water-like saturation state by means of an extensive impregnation step. Based on this spatial distribution of pores, first numerical diffusion experiments were carried at the pore scale through virtual illite, enabling a better understanding of how transfer pathways are organized in the porous media. Finally, the EC CatClay project allowed a better understanding of the migration of strongly sorbing tracers through low permeability 'clay rock' formations, increasing confidence in our capacity to demonstrate that the models used to predict radionuclide migration through these rocks are scientifically sound. (authors)

  19. The influence of clay minerals on acoustic properties of sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Olav

    1997-12-31

    This thesis aims to provide better understanding of the relationship between the acoustic properties and the petrophysical/mineralogical properties in sand-prone rock. It emphasizes the influence of clay minerals. The author develops a method to deposit clay minerals/mineral aggregates in pore space of a rigid rock framework. Kaolinite aggregates were flushed into porous permeable Bentheimer sandstone to evaluate the effect of pore filling minerals on porosity, permeability and acoustic properties. The compressional velocity was hardly affected by the clay content and it was found that the effect of minor quantities of pore filling minerals may be acoustically modelled as an ideal suspension, where the pore fluid bulk modulus is modified by the bulk modulus of the clay minerals. The influence of clays on acoustic velocities in petroleum reservoir rocks was investigated through ultrasonic measurements of compressional- and shear-waves on core material from reservoir and non-reservoir units on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The measured velocities decrease as the porosity increases, but are not strongly dependent on the clay content. The measured velocities are less dependent on the petrophysical and lithological properties than indicated by previous authors and published mathematical models, and stiffness reduction factors are introduced in two of the models to better match the data. Velocities are estimated along the wellbores based on non-sonic well logs and reflect well the actual sonic log well measurements. In some wells the compressional velocity cannot be modelled correctly by the models suggested. Very high compressional wave anisotropy was measured in the dry samples at atmospheric conditions. As the samples were saturated, the anisotropy was reduced to a maximum of about 30% and decreases further upon pressurization. Reservoir rocks retrieved from 2500 m are more stress dependent than those retrieved from less than 200 m depth. 168 refs., 117 figs., 24

  20. Hydraulic and mechanical behavior of landfill clay liner containing SSA in contact with leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Lu, Haijun; Liu, Junzhu; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiong

    2018-05-01

    Sewage sludge ash (SSA) produced by municipal sludge can be used as a modified additive for clay liner, and improves the working performance of landfill clay liner in contact with leachate. Under the action of landfill leachate, the permeability, shear strength, phase composition, and pore structure of the modified clay are investigated through the flexible wall permeability test, triaxial shear test, thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis, and low-temperature nitrogen adsorption test, respectively. The hydraulic conductivity of the modified clay containing 0-5% SSA is in the range of 3.94 × 10 -8 -1.16 × 10 -7  cm/s, and the pollutant concentration of the sample without SSA was higher than others. The shear strength of the modified clay is more than that of the traditional clay liner, the cohesion rate of modified clay increases from 32.5 to 199.91 kPa, and the internal friction angle decreases from 32.5° to 15.6°. Furthermore, the weight loss rates of the samples are 15.69%, 17.92%, 18.06%, and 20.68%, respectively, when the SSA content increases from 0% to 5%. The total pore volume and average pore diameter of the modified clay decrease with the increase in the SSA content, respectively. However, the specific area of the modified clay increases with the increase in the SSA content.

  1. Effects of biochar on hydraulic conductivity of compacted kaolin clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, James Tsz Fung; Chen, Zhongkui; Wong, Annie Yan Yan; Ng, Charles Wang Wai; Wong, Ming Hung

    2018-03-01

    Compacted clay is widely used as capillary barriers in landfill final cover system. Recently, biochar amended clay (BAC) has been proposed as a sustainable alternative cover material. However, the effects of biochar on saturated hydraulic conductivity (k sat ) of clay with high degree of compaction is not yet understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of biochar on k sat of compacted kaolin clay. Soil specimens were prepared by amending kaolin clay with biochar derived from peanut-shell at 0, 5 and 20% (w/w). The k sat of soil specimens was measured using a flexible water permeameter. The effects of biochar on the microstructure of the compacted clay was also investigated using MIP. Adding 5% and 20% of biochar increased the k sat of compacted kaolin clay from 1.2 × 10 -9 to 2.1 × 10 -9 and 1.3 × 10 -8 ms -1 , respectively. The increase in k sat of clay was due to the shift in pore size distribution of compacted biochar-amended clay (BAC). MIP results revealed that adding 20% of biochar shifted the dominant pore diameter of clay from 0.01-0.1 μm (meso- and macropores) to 0.1-4 μm (macropores). Results reported in this communication revealed that biochar application increased the k sat of compacted clay, and the increment was positively correlated to the biochar percentage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Utilization of crushed clay brick in cellular concrete production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Aliabdo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research program is to study the effect of using crushed clay brick as an alternative aggregate in aerated concrete. Two series of mixtures were designed to investigate the physico-mechanical properties and micro-structural analysis of autoclave aerated concrete and foamed concrete, respectively. In each series, natural sand was replaced with crushed clay brick aggregate. In both series results showed a significant reduction in unit weight, thermal conductivity and sound attenuation coefficient while porosity has increased. Improvement on compressive strength of autoclave aerated concrete was observed at a percentage of 25% and 50% replacement, while in foamed concrete compressive strength gradually decreased by increasing crushed clay brick aggregate content. A comparatively uniform distribution of pore in case of foamed concrete with natural sand was observed by scanning electron microscope, while the pores were connected mostly and irregularly for mixes containing a percentage higher than 25% clay brick aggregate.

  3. Geotechnical characterization of boom clay in relation to the disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horseman, S.T.; Winter, M.G.; Enwistle, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the results of a laboratory study on the geotechnical properties of the Tertiary Boom clay. Tests were performed on 'undisturbed' samples of clay taken from a location 247 m below surface at the SCK/CEN experimental site at Mol in Belgium. In geotechnical terms, the Boom clay (at depth) may be described as a hard, high-plasticity, overconsolidated clay. Test methods have included (a) the one-dimensional consolidation test with consolidation stresses up to 32 MPa, (b) the one dimensional swelling pressure test, (c) the isotropically-consolidated, undrained (CIU) triaxial test with pore pressure measurement, and (d) the unconsolidated undrained (UU) triaxial test. All triaxial tests were load-controlled. Limited test results are presented on pore pressure responses during heating under undrained conditions and on the effect of elevated temperature (80 O C) on deformability and strength. It is found that significantly large excess pore pressures (circa 1 MPa under in situ stress conditions) may be developed during heating from ambient laboratory temperature to 80 O C. The effect is due, at least in part, to the expansion of the pore fluid

  4. On the thermal behaviour of Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, P.; Cui Yu Jun; Sultan, N.

    2004-01-01

    When temperature is increased, the various phenomena that occur in a saturated natural potential host clay for nuclear waste disposal (Boom clay from SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium) were experimentally investigated in a temperature controlled high stress triaxial cell. Firstly, the pore pressure build-up due to the difference in thermal dilation of both water and minerals was investigated through thermal consolidation tests. Interesting information was obtained about the dissipation of thermally induced pore pressure in Boom clay, based on the standard Terzaghi consolidation theory. Secondly, the volume change behaviour in drained conditions (i.e. under a very slow temperature increase) confirmed that the clay overconsolidation ratio (OCR) controlled the nature of the volume changes. Whereas overconsolidated soils use to dilate as any material when temperature is elevated, normally consolidated soils present a decrease in volume, which is less common. The principles of a coupled thermo-elasto-plastic model that was specifically developed to model this particular behaviour are finally presented. Obviously, it appears necessary to account in detail for these thermal phenomena in order to properly understand the response of the geological barrier in the near field once nuclear waste has been stored. (orig.)

  5. Synthesis of titania modified silica-pillared clay (SPC) with highly ordered interlayered mesoporous structure for removing toxic metal ion Cr(VI) from aqueous state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Huihui; Zhu, Kongnan; Li, Baoshan; Yao, Chao; Kong, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clays synthesized through post synthetic route was utilized as adsorbers for the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions under different temperatures and initial concentrations. The starting mesostructured silica-pillared clay is assembled by intragallery ammonia-catalyzed hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane using cationic surfactant as gallery template, and subsequently, the formed interlayered pore walls were decorated with nano-sized TiO 2 particle through organic titanium functionalization process. The kind of structural transformation has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), elemental analysis (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Such results indicate that most of the grafted titanium species was combined with Si–OH on the surface of gallery pores. By changing the concentration of organic titanium source during synthesis, the porous structure system is effected. Under suitable conditions, these materials exhibit high adsorption capacity and efficiency. Qualitative estimates of the thermodynamic parameters showed that the overall adsorption process is spontaneous (ΔG° 0). The adsorption isotherms of Cr(VI) on titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clay were best fitted by Redlich–Peterson models. Detail results of thermodynamics and kinetics are also presented.

  6. Synthesis of titania modified silica-pillared clay (SPC) with highly ordered interlayered mesoporous structure for removing toxic metal ion Cr(VI) from aqueous state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Huihui, E-mail: maohuihui_beijing@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Catalytic Materials and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu Province 213164 (China); Zhu, Kongnan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Catalytic Materials and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu Province 213164 (China); Li, Baoshan, E-mail: bsli@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Yao, Chao; Kong, Yong [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Catalytic Materials and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu Province 213164 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clays synthesized through post synthetic route was utilized as adsorbers for the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions under different temperatures and initial concentrations. The starting mesostructured silica-pillared clay is assembled by intragallery ammonia-catalyzed hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane using cationic surfactant as gallery template, and subsequently, the formed interlayered pore walls were decorated with nano-sized TiO{sub 2} particle through organic titanium functionalization process. The kind of structural transformation has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), elemental analysis (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Such results indicate that most of the grafted titanium species was combined with Si–OH on the surface of gallery pores. By changing the concentration of organic titanium source during synthesis, the porous structure system is effected. Under suitable conditions, these materials exhibit high adsorption capacity and efficiency. Qualitative estimates of the thermodynamic parameters showed that the overall adsorption process is spontaneous (ΔG° < 0) and endothermic (ΔH° > 0). The adsorption isotherms of Cr(VI) on titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clay were best fitted by Redlich–Peterson models. Detail results of thermodynamics and kinetics are also presented.

  7. Se of polymers to control clay swelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slobod, R L; Beiswanger, J P.G.

    1968-01-01

    The injection of water to displace oil is one of the main methods used to increase oil recovery. High injection rates are generally desired, and in some cases the flood will not be economic unless high rates are maintained. The presence of clays which swell in the presence of water offers a complication to the problem of maintaining adequate injectivity. In the course of this study it was observed that certain polymers, when present in dilute concentrations in the water, had the ability to reduce the response of these clays to fresh water. Two polymers, one an anionic and the other nonionic, were found to be very effective in controlling the clays present in Berea cores. Successful control of clay swelling was obtained by use of solutions containing as little as 1.0 ppM of polymer, but at this low concentration appreciable volumes of treating solution were required. These results suggest that some minimum amount of polymer must be adsorbed to prevent clay swelling. In Berea sandstone this minimum amount appeared to be of the order of 0.03 mg per cc of pore space. A series of tests made using 10.0 ppM polymer showed that the polymer could be made through the porous system in which 0.066 per mg of polymer was adsorbed per cc of pore space.

  8. Aluminium - Cobalt-Pillared Clay for Dye Filtration Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, A.; Widiarsih

    2018-04-01

    The manufacture of membrane support from cobalt aluminium pillared clay has been conducted. This research was conducted by mixing a clay suspension with pillared solution prepared from the mixture of Co(NO3)2.6H2O and AlCl3.6H2O. The molar ratio between Al and Co was 75:25 and the ratio of [OH-]/[metal] was 2. The clay suspension was stirred for 24 hours at room temperature, filtered and dried. The dried clay was then calcined at 200°C, 300°C and 400°C with a ramp rate of 2°C/min. Aluminium-cobalt-pillared clay was then characterized by XRD and GSA and moulded become a membrane support for subsequent tests on dye filtration. The XRD analysis showed that basal spacing (d 001) value of aluminium cobalt was 19.49 Å, which was higher than the natural clay of 15.08Å however, the basal spacing decreased with increasing calcination temperature. The result of the GSA analysis showed that the pore diameter of the aluminium cobalt pillared clay membrane was almost the same as that of natural clay that were 34.5Å and 34.2Å, respectively. Nevertheless, the pillared clay has a more uniform pore size distribution. The results of methylene blue filtration measurements demonstrated that the membrane filter support could well which shown by a clear filtrate at all concentrations tested. The value of rejection and flux decreased with the increasing concentration of methylene blue. The values of dye rejection and water flux reached 99.89% and 5. 80 x 10-6 kg min-1, respectively but they decreased with increasing concentration of methylene blue. The results of this study indicates that the aluminium-pillared clay cobalt could be used as membrane materials especially for ultrafiltration.

  9. Investigations of excavated clay-stone as backfill/seal material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang

    2012-01-01

    certain densities between 1.56 g/cm 3 for pure MX80 and 2.02 g/cm 3 for pure COX powder under load of 30 MPa. Generally, the seals to be constructed in boreholes, drifts and shafts must have certain swelling capacity for sealing of possibly remaining gaps within the seals and the seal/rock interfaces and for supporting the surrounding rock against damage propagation. Low hydraulic conductivities are also required for the seals against fluid transport. Figure 2 illustrates the swelling pressures measured on two compacted COX+MX80 mixtures and the related water permeabilities. It is obvious that drying led to a rapid drop of the pre-applied stress down to zero and wetting contrarily gave a stress rising up to 4.0-4.7 MPa in humid environment and even higher up to 6.0 MPa when contacting with synthetic pore water. Among the tested mixtures, the maximum swelling pressure of 9.5 MPa was observed on the compacted COX/MX80-mixture with a ratio of 50/50 and with coarse-grains of a size up to 10 mm. This suggests that the mixtures can be optimized with adequate amount of expansive bentonite filling the macro-pores between large clay-stone grains. The water permeability values of 10 -19 - 10 -20 m 2 obtained on the compacted clay-stone-bentonite mixtures are very close to that of the intact clay rock. Thermal properties of compacted crushed clay-stone were determined as function of porosity and water saturation. While the specific heat capacity was measured on average at 900 Jkg -1 K -1 , the thermal conductivity increases with water saturation from 0.8 Wm -1 K -1 at dry conditions to 1.6 Wm -1 K -1 at saturated conditions. The thermal properties of compacted clay-stone backfill are comparable with those of compacted bentonite. These preliminary results promote us to continue the investigations on the excavated clay-stone and clay-stone-bentonite mixtures for design of the engineered barrier system with regard to the specific functional requirements, for development of constitutive

  10. Comparative analysis of histopathologic effects of synthetic meshes based on material, weight, and pore size in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, Sean B; Saberski, Ean R; Kreutzer, Donald L; Novitsky, Yuri W

    2012-08-01

    While synthetic prosthetics have essentially become mandatory for hernia repair, mesh-induced chronic inflammation and scarring can lead to chronic pain and limited mobility. Mesh propensity to induce such adverse effects is likely related to the prosthetic's material, weight, and/or pore size. We aimed to compare histopathologic responses to various synthetic meshes after short- and long-term implantations in mice. Samples of macroporous polyester (Parietex [PX]), heavyweight microporous polypropylene (Trelex[TX]), midweight microporous polypropylene (ProLite[PL]), lightweight macroporous polypropylene (Ultrapro[UP]), and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (DualMesh[DM]) were implanted subcutaneously in mice. Four and 12 wk post-implantation, meshes were assessed for inflammation, foreign body reaction (FBR), and fibrosis. All meshes induced varying levels of inflammatory responses. PX induced the greatest inflammatory response and marked FBR. DM induced moderate FBR and a strong fibrotic response with mesh encapsulation at 12 wk. UP and PL had the lowest FBR, however, UP induced a significant chronic inflammatory response. Although inflammation decreased slightly for TX, marked FBR was present throughout the study. Of the three polypropylene meshes, fibrosis was greatest for TX and slightly reduced for PL and UP. For UP and PL, there was limited fibrosis within each mesh pore. Polyester mesh induced the greatest FBR and lasting chronic inflammatory response. Likewise, marked fibrosis and encapsulation was seen surrounding ePTFE. Heavier polypropylene meshes displayed greater early and persistent fibrosis; the reduced-weight polypropylene meshes were associated with the least amount of fibrosis. Mesh pore size was inversely proportional to bridging fibrosis. Moreover, reduced-weight polypropylene meshes demonstrated the smallest FBR throughout the study. Overall, we demonstrated that macroporous, reduced-weight polypropylene mesh exhibited the highest degree of

  11. Thermal Transmittance of Porous Hollow Clay Brick by Guarded Hot Box Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonsoo

    2018-03-01

    The thermal property of a porous hollow clay brick was determined by measuring the thermal transmittance of the wall made of porous hollow clay bricks. Prior to the production of porous hollow clay bricks, nonporous and porous tiny clay bricks were prepared to determine the physico-mechanical properties by modifying the amount of wood flour and firing temperature. The bricks were produced by uniaxial pressing and then fired in an electric furnace. Their physico-mechanical properties were measured by water absorption, apparent porosity, bulk density, and compressive strength. The porous tiny clay bricks were produced with three types of wood flour: coarse wood flour (1-0.36 mm), medium-sized wood flour (0.36-0.15 mm), and fine wood flour (cement bricks. The two walls had a thermal transmittance of 1.42 and 2.72 W\\cdot m^{-2}\\cdot K^{-1}, respectively. The difference in thermal transmittance was due to the pores created with fine wood flour (< 0.08 mm) as a pore-forming agent.

  12. Water diffusion in clays with added organic surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda-Pinon, J; Mendoza-Lopez, M L; Manzano-RamIrez, A; Perez-Robles, J F; Vega-Duran, J T

    2007-01-01

    Tensoactive agents may decrease water absorption in clay products like adobes. They modify the characteristics of the surface of clay particles. Characterization of water diffusion through the pores of modified clays is important to apply appropriate surface modifiers and to improve their performance. We established a simple model for water diffusion in test samples of defined dimensions to estimate real physical parameters and their effect on water absorption. Adsorption mechanisms are examined based on experimental results. The fitting of the experimental data to the model provides a deep understanding of water adsorption in chemically modified clays. A better agreement between the model and the experimental data is achieved for complex molecules

  13. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The meeting covers all topics concerning natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay material based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties). The works presented deal with: examples of broad research programs (national or international) on the role of natural and artificial clay barriers for radionuclide confinement; clay-based repository concepts: repository designs, including technological and safety issues related to the use of clay for nuclear waste confinement; geology and clay characterisation: mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in rock clay, fracturing, self sealing processes, role of organic matter and microbiological processes; geochemistry: pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry; mass transfer: water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space geometry, water, solute and gas transfer processes, colloid mediated transport, large scale movements, long-term diffusion; alteration processes: oxidation effects, hydration-dehydration processes, response to thermal stress, iron-clay interactions, alkaline perturbation; geomechanics: thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of clay, rheological models, EDZ characterisation and evolution, coupled behaviour and models (HM, THM, THMC). A particular interest is given to potential contributions coming from fields of activities other than radioactive waste management, which take advantage of the confinement properties of the clay barrier (oil and gas industries, gas geological storage, CO 2 geological sequestration, chemical waste isolation

  14. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The meeting covers all topics concerning natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay material based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties). The works presented deal with: examples of broad research programs (national or international) on the role of natural and artificial clay barriers for radionuclide confinement; clay-based repository concepts: repository designs, including technological and safety issues related to the use of clay for nuclear waste confinement; geology and clay characterisation: mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in rock clay, fracturing, self sealing processes, role of organic matter and microbiological processes; geochemistry: pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry; mass transfer: water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space geometry, water, solute and gas transfer processes, colloid mediated transport, large scale movements, long-term diffusion; alteration processes: oxidation effects, hydration-dehydration processes, response to thermal stress, iron-clay interactions, alkaline perturbation; geomechanics: thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of clay, rheological models, EDZ characterisation and evolution, coupled behaviour and models (HM, THM, THMC). A particular interest is given to potential contributions coming from fields of activities other than radioactive waste management, which take advantage of the confinement properties of the clay barrier (oil and gas industries, gas geological storage, CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, chemical waste isolation

  15. An Evaluation of Models of Bentonite Pore Water Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Watson, Claire; Wilson, James (Quintessa Ltd, Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)); Arthur, Randy (Monitor Scientific LLC, Denver, CO (United States))

    2010-01-15

    The determination of a bentonite pore water composition and understanding its evolution of with time underpins many radioactive waste disposal issues, such as buffer erosion, canister corrosion, and radionuclide solubility, sorption, and diffusion, inter alia. The usual approach to modelling clay pore fluids is based primarily around assumed chemical equilibrium between Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ aqueous species and ion exchange sites on montmorillonite, but also includes protonation- deprotonation of clay edge surface sites, and dissolution-precipitation of the trace mineral constituents, calcite and gypsum. An essential feature of this modelling approach is that clay hydrolysis reactions (i.e. dissolution of the aluminosilicate octahedral and tetrahedral sheets of montmorillonite) are ignored. A consequence of the omission of clay hydrolysis reactions from bentonite pore fluid models is that montmorillonite is preserved indefinitely in the near-field system, even over million-year timescales. Here, we investigate the applicability of an alternative clay pore fluid model, one that incorporates clay hydrolysis reactions as an integral component and test it against well-characterised laboratory experimental data, where key geochemical parameters, Eh and pH, have been measured directly in compacted bentonite. Simulations have been conducted using a range of computer codes to test the applicability of this alternative model. Thermodynamic data for MX-80 smectite used in the calculations were estimated using two different methods. Simulations of 'end-point' pH measurements in batch bentonite-water slurry experiments showed different pH values according to the complexity of the system studied. The most complete system investigated revealed pH values were a strong function of partial pressure of carbon dioxide, with pH increasing with decreasing PCO{sub 2} (log PCO{sub 2} values ranging from -3.5 to -7.5 bars produced pH values ranging from 7.9 to 9.6). A second

  16. Applying squeezing technique to clay-rocks: lessons learned from ten years experiments at Mont Terri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A. M.; Melon, A.; Sanchez-Ledesma, D.M.; Tournassat, C.; Gaucher, E.; Astudillo, J.; Vinsot, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Argillaceous formations of low permeability are considered in several countries as potential host rocks for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes (HLRW). In order to determine their suitability for waste disposal, evaluations of the hydro-geochemistry and transport mechanisms from such geologic formations to the biosphere must be undertaken. The migration of radionuclides through the geosphere will occur predominantly in the aqueous phase, and hence the pore water chemistry plays an important role in determining ion diffusion characteristics in argillaceous formations. Consequently, a great effort has been made to characterise the pore water chemistry in clay-rocks formations. In the last 10 years various techniques were developed for determining pore water composition of clay-rocks including both direct and indirect methods: 1) In situ pore water sampling (water and gas) from sealed boreholes (Pearson et al., 2003; Vinsot et al. 2008); 2) Laboratory pore water sampling from unaltered core samples by the squeezing technique at high pressures (Fernandez et al., 2009); and 3) Characterization of the water chemistry by geochemical modelling (Gaucher et al. 2009). Pore water chemistry in clay-rocks and extraction techniques were documented and reviewed in different studies (Sacchi et al., 2001). Recovering pristine pore water from low permeable and low water content systems is very difficult and sometimes impossible. Besides, uncertainties are associated to each method used for the pore water characterization. In this paper, a review about the high pressure squeezing technique applied to indurate clay-rocks was performed. For this purpose, the experimental work on Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri Research Laboratory during the last ten years was evaluated. A complete discussion was made about different issues such as: a) why is necessary to obtain the pore water by squeezing in the context of radioactive waste

  17. Evaluation of natural clay Brasgel as adsorbent in removal of lead in synthetic waste water; Avaliacao da argila Brasgel natural como adsorvente na remocao de chumbo de efluentes sinteticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, W.S.; Rodrigues, M.G.F.; Mota, M.F.; Patricio, A.C.L.; Silva, M.M., E-mail: wsl_20@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (LABNOV/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Desenvolvimento de Novos Materiais

    2012-07-01

    The smectite clays have high adsorption capacity and cation exchange. Due to its chemical and physical characteristics, they can be effectively used as adsorbent of pollutants (such as metal ions). The initial objective of this study was to characterize the clay Brasgel through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Spectrometry by Energy Dispersive (EDX) and nitrogen adsorption (BET method), seeking its use in removing lead (Pb{sup 2+}) from synthetic effluents. System was used in finite bath to assess the potential removal of lead (Pb{sup 2+}), following a 2{sup 2} factorial experimental design with three center point experiments, taking as input variables: pH and initial concentrations of lead (Pb{sup 2+}). The clay has Brasgel clay in its composition that characterize it as a smectite clay. By having a large surface area, this clay showed great potential on the adsorption of metal ions. (author)

  18. X-ray Tomography and Impregnation Methods to Analyze Pore Space Hetrerogeneities at the Hydrated State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pret, D.; Ferrage, E.; Tertre, E.; Robinet, J.C.; Faurel, M.; Hubert, F.; Pelletier, M.; Bihannic, I.

    2013-01-01

    For clay based materials, the investigation of both mineral skeleton and pore space organization as well as water distribution remains a key and challenging task. Such information is however required in order to fully understand and model their macroscopic hydro-mechanical or transport properties. In particular, as far as swelling clay minerals are involved, even pure clay materials are well known to represent spatially heterogeneous, anisotropic and deformable media from the nanometre to the centimetre scale. Probing their organization over such extremely large scale range requires the combination of different techniques providing quantitative results that can be used to feed global balances of water and pore distributions. Bulk physical measurements have been used for decades for analyzing clay systems at the dry state or for hydrated states under free macroscopic swelling conditions of samples. These approaches need to be associated to reveal the complexity of the pore space network. Indeed, all probes exhibit contrasted accessibilities and provide data on the basis of simple geometrical models either about pore or neck/throat size for a given size range. The main interest of imaging techniques is their ability to reveal the spatial heterogeneities of organization as well as the real morphology of pores. Still, they are poorly documented in literature as preparation procedures and extraction of quantitative data are not straightforward for clay materials. Clay organization is highly reactive and is, for example, a function of the resin/water removal technique used during embedding process, the content/composition of pore water or the pressure applied. Imaging techniques based on electron beam generally requires vacuum conditions around the sample and imply its impregnation by a resin. It is then generally difficult to assess the hydration state corresponding to the organization observed. Coupling different techniques is thus only possible when similar

  19. Organo-clay/anthracite filtration for oil removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moazed, H.; Viragahavan, T.

    1999-01-01

    An advantage of organo-clay compared to other sorbents is that it can selectively remove organic pollutants from contaminated waters. An investigation was conducted to determine the potential of an organo-clay/anthracite mixture as a filter media for the removal of oil from synthetic and real oily waters. Also included in the study were column filtration studies using synthetic and real waste waters to determine the sorptive capacity of the material. In general, oil removal efficiencies in a 300 mm organo-clay/anthracite bed decreased with an increase in flow rates. Results of eight hour studies indicated that the depth of an organo-clay/anthracite bed has a direct effect on oil removal efficiency. The Thomas equation provides a reasonable fit of the data based on breakthrough studies. The model can be used to determine the parameters needed to design full-scale filtration columns. The uptake of oil by an organo-clay/anthracite mixture is well described by an equation including time such as the Weber or Moris model. The maximum solid-phase concentration of the solute values obtained from the Thomas equation were comparable to the values found by a mass balance approach. 12 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Polyacrylamide sorption opportunity on interlayer and external pore surfaces of contaminant barrier clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyang, Hilary I; Bae, Sunyoung

    2005-01-01

    Physico-chemical interactions among polymer molecules in aqueous solution and clay mineralogical/textural characteristics influence the sorption of polymer molecules on clay barrier minerals. Amendment of potentially unstable barrier clays with aqueous polymers can improve barrier material resistance to environmental stresses during service. In this research, the ability of molecular coils of polyacrylamide (PAM) to overlap in solution and to enter interlayer space in Na-montmorillonite (specific surface=31.82+/-0.22 m2 g(-1)) and kaolinite (specific surface=18+/-2 m2 g(-1)) were analyzed theoretically and experimentally, using solution viscosity measurements, and X-ray diffractometry. Experimental data on two theoretical indices: relative size ratio (RSR); and molecular availability (Ma) that are formulated to scale polymer molecular sorption on clay interlayer, indicate that the sorption of PAM A (Mw=4000000) and PAM B (Mw=7000000) does not produce any significant change in the d-spacing of both clay minerals. Although the negative Ma values of -3.51 g l(-1) for PAM A and -3.88 g l(-1) for PAM B indicate high levels of entanglement of polymer molecular coils in solution, sorption data confirm that the entangled coils are still able to sorb onto Na-montmorillonite highly and kaolinite to a lesser extent.

  1. Pore Structure and Fractal Characteristics of Niutitang Shale from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaodong Xi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A suite of shale samples from the Lower Cambrian Niutitang Formation in northwestern Hunan Province, China, were investigated to better understand the pore structure and fractal characteristics of marine shale. Organic geochemistry, mineralogy by X-ray diffraction, porosity, permeability, mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption and methane adsorption experiments were conducted for each sample. Fractal dimension D was obtained from the nitrogen adsorption data using the fractal Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH model. The relationships between total organic carbon (TOC content, mineral compositions, pore structure parameters and fractal dimension are discussed, along with the contributions of fractal dimension to shale gas reservoir evaluation. Analysis of the results showed that Niutitang shale samples featured high TOC content (2.51% on average, high thermal maturity (3.0% on average, low permeability and complex pore structures, which are highly fractal. TOC content and mineral compositions are two major factors affecting pore structure but they have different impacts on the fractal dimension. Shale samples with higher TOC content had a larger specific surface area (SSA, pore volume (PV and fractal dimension, which enhanced the heterogeneity of the pore structure. Quartz content had a relatively weak influence on shale pore structure, whereas SSA, PV and fractal dimension decreased with increasing clay mineral content. Shale with a higher clay content weakened pore structure heterogeneity. The permeability and Langmuir volume of methane adsorption were affected by fractal dimension. Shale samples with higher fractal dimension had higher adsorption capacity but lower permeability, which is favorable for shale gas adsorption but adverse to shale gas seepage and diffusion.

  2. Geochemical porosity values obtained in core samples from different clay-rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Argillaceous formations of low permeability are considered in many countries as potential host rocks for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes (HLRW). In order to determine their suitability for waste disposal, evaluations of the hydro-geochemistry and transport mechanisms from such geologic formations to the biosphere must be undertaken. One of the key questions about radionuclide diffusion and retention is to know the chemistry and chemical reactions and sorption processes that will occur in the rock and their effects on radionuclide mobility. In this context, the knowledge of the pore water chemistry is essential for performance assessment purposes. This information allows to establish a reliable model for the main water-rock interactions, which control the physico-chemical parameters and the chemistry of the major elements of the system. An important issue in order to model the pore water chemistry in clayey media is to determine the respective volume accessible to cations and anions, i.e, the amount of water actually available for chemical reactions/solute transport. This amount is usually referred as accessible porosity or geochemical porosity. By using the anion inventories, i.e. the anion content obtained from aqueous leaching, and assuming that all Cl - , Br - and SO4 2- leached in the aqueous extracts originates from pore water, the concentration of a conservative ion can be converted into the real pore water concentration if the accessible porosity is known. In this work, the accessible porosity or geochemical porosity has been determined in core samples belonging to four different formations: Boom Clay from Hades URL (Belgium, BE), Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri (Switzerland, CH), and Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from Bure URL (France, FR). The geochemical or chloride porosity was defined as the ratio between the pore water volume containing Cl-bearing pore water and the total volume of a sample

  3. The connectivity of pore space in mudstones: insights from high-pressure Wood's metal injection, BIB-SEM imaging, and mercury intrusion porosimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, J.; Hemes, S.; Houben, M.; Desbois, G.; Radi, Z.; Urai, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Study of the pore space in mudstones by mercury intrusion porosimetry is a common but indirect technique and it is not clear which part of the pore space is actually filled with mercury. We studied samples from the Opalinus Clay, Boom Clay, Haynesville Shale, and Bossier Shale Formations using

  4. The nature of strong Brønsted acidity of Ni-SMM clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yue, C.; Liu, C.; Mezari, B.; Brückner, A.; Pidko, E.A.; Rigutto, M.S.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the high Brønsted acidity of Ni-SMM (Ni-substituted synthetic mica-montmorillonite; beidellite structure) clays was investigated. Ni-SMM clays with varying F content, SMM with F and Ni-SMM without F in the structure were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Ni-SMM clays with

  5. The petrography of the Jurassic core from the Harwell research site. Part 1: Kimmeridge Clay, Corallian Beds and Oxford Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.

    1983-06-01

    Detailed examination by mineralogical and petrological techniques has enabled a detailed characterisation of the lithologies of the Oxford Clay, Corallian Beds and the Kimmeridge Clay beneath the Harwell Research Site. Information obtained has revealed the nature of the bulk mineralogy, pore-types, pore-surface mineralogy and post-depositional alteration of the rocks. Diagenesis has played an important part in determining the mineralogy, porosity and fabric of the rocks and has had the greatest variation of effects in the Corallian Beds, determining the phases now in contact with groundwater. It is these authigenic phases that are of key interest in assessing the behaviour of radionuclides which may be released into the local groundwater systems. The importance of the different pore-types characterised during this investigation and of the mineral phases lining these potential pathways for groundwater movement are discussed in detail at the end of this report. Diagenesis has reduced primary porosity in many of the Corallian rocks by calcite precipitation. In such rocks where a cohesive cement is present, groundwater flow must occur along large-scale fractures and more slowly along intercrystalline grain-boundary cracks. (author)

  6. Impact of pore-pressure cycling on bentonite in constant volume experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, C.C.; Harrington, J.F.; Cuss, R.J.; Sellin, P.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The SKB safety case for a KBS-3 repository highlights the potential importance of future successive glaciation events on repository functions. One particular uncertainty is the likely affect of elevated pore-water pressures on barrier safety functions. Over the repository lifetime such changes in pore-water pressure are likely to be cyclic in nature, as successive glacial episodes lead to loading and unloading of the engineered barrier. For a clay-water system with the pore-water in thermodynamic equilibrium with an external reservoir of water at pressure, p w , the total stress acting on the surrounding vessel can be expressed as: (1) σ = Π + αp w where Π is the swelling pressure and α is a proportionality constant. We present results from a series of laboratory experiments designed to investigate this relationship, in the context of glacial loading. Blocks of pre-compacted Mx80 bentonite were manufactured by Clay Technology AB (Lund, Sweden), by rapidly compacting bentonite granules in a mould under a one dimensionally applied stress (Johannesson et al., 1995). The blocks were then sub-sampled and cylindrical specimens prepared for testing (120 mm in length and 60 mm in diameter). The experiments were conducted using a specially designed constant volume cell, which allows the evolution of the total stresses acting on the surrounding vessel to be monitored during clay swelling (at three radial and two axial locations). A high precision syringe pump was used to maintain a constant applied pore pressure within the bentonite, while the rate of hydraulic inflow, and consequent stress development, were monitored to determine the point at which hydraulic equilibrium was reached. During the tests each sample was subjected to an incremental series of constant pore-pressure steps, with all samples experiencing at least one loading and unloading cycle. The resulting average total stress data yield alpha values in the

  7. Microbial analyses of clay and water from different samples from the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory (RL), Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M.H.; Barsotti, V.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Hamon, C.J.; Neble, S.; Shippers, A.; Le Marrec, C.; Vinsot, A.; Schwyn, B.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Exploration of deep subsurface microbial life has increased for very diverse motives. One of them is that these environments are potential host rocks for radioactive waste repositories and that microorganisms may influence geochemical conditions around such sites and migration properties of radionuclides. The pore water Chemistry experiment (PC) was conducted at the Mont Terri-RL to measure in situ the pH, Eh, and other geochemical parameters within the pore water of the Opalinus Clay formation. The borehole for PC was drilled with N 2 under clean but not aseptic conditions, filled immediately with synthetic pore water, which was circulated and monitored for five years. Soon after initiation of PC it was evident that microbial activity affected the borehole water geochemistry. Microbial analyses, including molecular biology and culturing methods, were performed repeatedly during PC (2003-2006), with detailed analysis of water and over-core clay upon termination in 2007. Results indicated the presence of heterotrophic aerobes and anaerobes, nitrate-reducers, iron-reducers, sulphate-reducers and Archaea, which together with geochemical data suggested a reducing environment with sulphate reduction in the water and adjacent clay. A black precipitate containing pyrite and a strong H 2 S smell confirmed the occurrence of sulphate reduction. Specific species identified (> 98% similarity) in PC water included Pseudomonas stutzeri, Bacillus licheniformis, and Desulfosporosinus sp., with similar and additional species (e.g., Trichococcus sp.; Koccuria sp.) in the clay. The origin of these (mostly anaerobic) species cannot be determined with certainty. Some species likely resulted from contamination, but others could be revived species indigenous in the Opalinus Clay. The microbial processes that occurred in PC are not representative of the processes in the undisturbed formation but illustrate the potential for microbial

  8. The challenge of multi-parameter hydrochemical, gas-physical, and isotopic analyses of in-situ clay pore water and samples from in-situ clay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichinger, L.; Lorenz, G.D.; Eichinger, F.; Wechner, S.; Voropaev, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Within the research framework of natural clay rocks used as barriers for radioactive waste confinement comprehensive analyses are mandatory to determine the chemical and isotopic composition of natural pore water and therein dissolved gases as well as samples from distinct in-situ and lab experiments. Based on the natural conditions pore waters from low permeable argillaceous rocks can be sampled only in small amounts over long time periods. Often those samples are primarily influenced by processes of the exploration and exploitation such as the contamination by drilling fluid and disinfection fluid or cement-water interactions. Sophisticated equipment for circulation experiments allows the sampling of gas and water in the original state in steel and peek cells. The challenge though is to optimise the lab equipment and measurement techniques in a way that the physical-chemical conditions of the water can be analysed in the original state. The development of special micro measuring cells enables the analyses of physical parameters like redox potential under very slow through-flow conditions. Additional analyses can follow subsequently without wasting any drop of the precious pore water. The gas composition is measured in equilibrated gas phases above water phases after emptying a defined volume by inert gas or through manual pressure. The analytical challenge is to obtain an extensive set of parameters which is considered representative for the in-situ conditions using only a few millilitres of water. The parameter analysis includes the determination of the composition of the water, the isotopic compositions of the water and the dissolved constituents as well as their gas concentrations and isotopic signatures. So far the smallest sample volume needed for an analysis of a full set of parameters including the gas composition was 9 ml of water. Obviously, the analysis requires a highly sophisticated infrastructure and

  9. Deposition of Suspended Clay to Open and Sand-Filled Framework Gravel Beds in a Laboratory Flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooneyham, Christian; Strom, Kyle

    2018-01-01

    Pulses of fine sediment composed of sand, silt, and clay can be introduced to gravel bed rivers through runoff from burn-impacted hillslopes, landslides, bank failure, or the introduction of reservoir sediment as a result of sluicing or dam decommissioning. Here we present a study aimed at quantifying exchange between suspensions of clay and gravel beds. The questions that motivate the work are: how do bed roughness and pore space characteristics, shear velocity (u∗), and initial concentration (C0) affect clay deposition on or within gravel beds? Where does deposition within these beds occur, and can deposited clay be resuspended while the gravel is immobile? We examine these questions in a laboratory flume using acrylic, open-framework gravel, and armored sand-gravel beds under conditions of varying u∗ and C0. Deposition of clay occurred to all beds (even with Rouse numbers ˜ 0.01). We attribute deposition under full suspension conditions to be an outcome of localized protected zones where clay can settle and available pore space in the bed. For smooth wall cases, protection came from the viscous wall region and the development of bed forms; for the rough beds, protection came from separation zones and low-velocity pore spaces. Bed porosity was the strongest influencer of nondimensional deposition rate; deposition increased with porosity. Deposition was inversely related to u∗ for the acrylic bed runs; no influence of u∗ was found for the porous bed runs. Increases in discharge resulted in resuspension of clay from acrylic beds; no resuspension was observed in the porous bed runs.

  10. Analytical Expressions for Thermo-Osmotic Permeability of Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalvès, J.; Ji Yu, C.; Matray, J.-M.; Tremosa, J.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a new formulation for the thermo-osmotic permeability of natural pore solutions containing monovalent and divalent cations is proposed. The mathematical formulation proposed here is based on the theoretical framework supporting thermo-osmosis which relies on water structure alteration in the pore space of surface-charged materials caused by solid-fluid electrochemical interactions. The ionic content balancing the surface charge of clay minerals causes a disruption in the hydrogen bond network when more structured water is present at the clay surface. Analytical expressions based on our heuristic model are proposed and compared to the available data for NaCl solutions. It is shown that the introduction of divalent cations reduces the thermo-osmotic permeability by one third compared to the monovalent case. The analytical expressions provided here can be used to advantage for safety calculations in deep underground nuclear waste repositories.

  11. Electroosmotic pore transport in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uitto, Olivia D; White, Henry S

    2003-04-01

    To determine the pathways and origin of electroosmotic flow in human skin. Iontophoretic transport of acetaminophen in full thickness human cadaver skin was visualized and quantified by scanning electrochemical microscopy. Electroosmotic flow in the shunt pathways of full thickness skin was compared to flow in the pores of excised stratum corneum and a synthetic membrane pore. The penetration of rhodamine 6G into pore structures was investigated by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Electroosmotic transport is observed in shunt pathways in full thickness human skin (e.g., hair follicles and sweat glands), but not in pore openings of freestanding stratum corneum. Absolute values of the diffusive and iontophoretic pore fluxes of acetaminophen in full thickness human skin are also reported. Rhodamine 6G is observed to penetrate to significant depths (approximately 200 microm) along pore pathways. Iontophoresis in human cadaver skin induces localized electroosmotic flow along pore shunt paths. Electroosmotic forces arise from the passage of current through negatively charged mesoor nanoscale pores (e.g., gap functions) within cellular regions that define the pore structure beneath the stratum corneum.

  12. Clay with Desiccation Cracks is an Advection Dominated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Sher, Y.; Ronen, Z.; Dahan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy clay sediments are regarded "safe" from the hydrological point of view due to their low hydraulic conductivities. However, the formation of desiccation cracks in dispersive clays may dramatically change their bulk hydraulic properties. The impact of desiccation cracks on water percolation, dissolved salts and contaminants transport and redox related reactions (microbial ammonium oxidation and denitrification) were investigated in 6 -12 m clay layer near a diary farm waste lagoon. The study implemented unique vadose-zone monitoring systems that enable in-situ measurements of the temporal variation of the sediment's water content along with frequent sampling of the sediment's pore water along the entire vadose zone (> 30 m). Results from four years of continuous measurements showed quick rises in sediment water content following rain events and temporal wastewater overflows. The percolation pattern indicated dominance of preferential flow through a desiccation-cracks network crossing the entire clay sediment layer. High water-propagation velocities (0.4 - 23.6 m h-1) were observed, indicating that the desiccation-crack network remains open and serves as a preferential flow pathway year-round, even at high sediment water content (~0.50 m3 m-3). The rapid percolation bypassed the most bio-geo-active parts of the soil, transporting even highly sorptive contaminants (testosterone and estrogen) in to the deep sections of the vadose zone, accelerating the underlying groundwater contamination. The ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the vadose zone and the high number of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria (~108 gene copies gdry-sediemt-1, each) found in the sediment indicated that the entire vadose zone is aerated even at high water content conditions (~0.55 m3 m-3). The dissolved salts concentration in the pore-water and the δ2H-H2O and δ18O-H2O values of the pore-water substantially increased with depth (becoming less depleted) in the clay sediment

  13. Pore formation and occurrence in the organic-rich shales of the Triassic Chang-7 Member, Yanchang Formation, Ordos Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Er

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shale-reservoir appraisal depends greatly on its pore characteristics (e.g., diameter, geometry, connectivity. Using a new pore-classification scheme based on the matrix type and occurrence state, four types of pores are identified in the organic-rich shales of the Triassic Chang-7 Member: intergranular, intragranular, organic pore, and microfracture. The intergranular pores are subdivided into primary pores between clastic grains, clay-mineral aggregates, and secondary dissolution pores between clastic grains or clay-mineral aggregates based on their origins, respectively. The intragranular pores are subdivided into secondary dissolved pores in feldspars, intra-clay-mineral aggregates and inter-pyrite. Organic pores include primarily microfractures in the organic matter and isolated organic pores. Microfracture is mainly developed along sandy and muddy laminations. Analysis by integration of data from pore imaging, low-temperature liquid nitrogen absorption, relationships between pore geometry and mineral components and between TOC and maturity of organic matter indicates that depositional environment, diagenesis, and thermal evolution of organic matter controlled the formation and preservation of pores. Organic-rich shales deposited in a deep and semi-deep lake environment contains thinly bedded turbidite sandstones, which are characterized by high content of clastic particles and thus favor the development of primary intergranular and intragranular pores, as well as microfractures along sandy laminations. During the early diagenesis process, precipitation of pyrite favors the development of inter-pyrite pores. However, compaction reduced the diameter and bulk pore volume. Organic pore has been greatly reduced under compaction. Dissolution led to formation of both inter and intra-feldspar pores, which has improved reservoir quality to some extent. Organic pore started to develop after shale maturity reaches a threshold (RO = 0

  14. CATSIUS CLAY PROJECT: Calculation and testing of behaviour of unsaturated clay as barrier in radioactive waste repositories: stage 3: validation exercises at a large in situ scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, E. E.; Alcoverro, J.

    1999-01-01

    Stage 3 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at a Large in situ Scale includes two Benchmarks: Benchmark 3.1: In situ Hydration of Boom Clay Pellets (BACCHUS 2) and Benchmark 3.2: FEBEX Mock-up Test. The BACCHUS 2 in situ test was performed in the HADES underground laboratory (Mol, Belgium) to demonstrate and optimize an installation procedure for a clay based material and to study its hydration process. After drilling a vertical shaft (540 mm in diameter, 3.0 m in length) in the host Boom clay, a central filter (90 mm in diameter) was placed, the remaining space was filled with a mixture of clay pellets and clay powder and the assembly was sealed at the upper end by a resin plug (0.20 m in thickness) over which concrete was poured. The test was instrumented so that it could be used as a validation experiment. Total stress, pore water pressure and water content measurements were performed both in the backfill material and in the surrounding clay massif. Once the installation was complete, the natural hydration of the backfill material began (day 0). To accelerate the hydration process, on day 516 water was injected through the central filter. On day 624, after the saturation of the backfill was reached, the hydraulic circuit was closed and the undrained response of the system backfill-host clay was monitored until an overall steady state was reached. Partners were asked to provide predictions for the evolution of the pore water pressure and total pressure of various points where appropriate sensors are installed. This benchmark addresses the Hydro-Mechanical response of an unsaturated low density clay barrier under natural and artificial hydration. (Author)

  15. CATSIUS CLAY PROJECT: Calculation and testing of behaviour of unsaturated clay as barrier in radioactive waste repositories: stage 3: validation exercises at a large in situ scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, E E; Alcoverro, J

    1999-07-01

    Stage 3 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at a Large in situ Scale includes two Benchmarks: Benchmark 3.1: In situ Hydration of Boom Clay Pellets (BACCHUS 2) and Benchmark 3.2: FEBEX Mock-up Test. The BACCHUS 2 in situ test was performed in the HADES underground laboratory (Mol, Belgium) to demonstrate and optimize an installation procedure for a clay based material and to study its hydration process. After drilling a vertical shaft (540 mm in diameter, 3.0 m in length) in the host Boom clay, a central filter (90 mm in diameter) was placed, the remaining space was filled with a mixture of clay pellets and clay powder and the assembly was sealed at the upper end by a resin plug (0.20 m in thickness) over which concrete was poured. The test was instrumented so that it could be used as a validation experiment. Total stress, pore water pressure and water content measurements were performed both in the backfill material and in the surrounding clay massif. Once the installation was complete, the natural hydration of the backfill material began (day 0). To accelerate the hydration process, on day 516 water was injected through the central filter. On day 624, after the saturation of the backfill was reached, the hydraulic circuit was closed and the undrained response of the system backfill-host clay was monitored until an overall steady state was reached. Partners were asked to provide predictions for the evolution of the pore water pressure and total pressure of various points where appropriate sensors are installed. This benchmark addresses the Hydro-Mechanical response of an unsaturated low density clay barrier under natural and artificial hydration. (Author)

  16. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degueldre, Claude, E-mail: c.degueldre@lancaster.ac.uk [Engineering Department, University of Lancaster, LA1 4YW Lancaster (United Kingdom); ChiAM & Institute of Environment, University of Geneva, 1211 Genève 4, Swizerland (Switzerland); Earlier, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Cloet, Veerle [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  17. Polyamide 6/clay membranes: effect of precipitation bath in morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Rodholfo da S.B.; Pereira, Caio H. do O; Leite, Amanda M.D.; Araujo, Edcleide M.; Lira, Helio L.

    2015-01-01

    Polyamide 6 membranes and their nanocomposites with 5% clay were obtained by the phase inversion method and the precipitation was made in distilled water bath and also in the mixture of solvent and distilled water. The nanocomposites were characterized by XRD and membranes by SEM. By XRD analysis, it was found that the obtained nanocomposite presents a structure probably exfoliated and / or partially exfoliated, it was also possible to observe the presence of two characteristic peaks (α and γ) of the polyamide 6 phases. In the SEM micrographs it was seen that the presence of clay promote alterations in morphology, size and distribution of pores. The presence of acid in the precipitation bath leads to a significant decrease in the filter layer, but also an increase in the quantity of pore size. (author)

  18. Lithological and hydrological influences on ground-water composition in a heterogeneous carbonate-clay aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, S.J.; Herman, J.S.; Jones, B.F.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of clay units on ground-water composition was investigated in a heterogeneous carbonate aquifer system of Miocene age in southwest Florida, known as the Intermediate aquifer system. Regionally, the ground water is recharged inland, flows laterally and to greater depths in the aquifer systems, and is discharged vertically upward at the saltwater interface along the coast. A depth profile of water composition was obtained by sampling ground water from discrete intervals within the permeable carbonate units during coring and by squeezing pore water from a core of the less-permeable clay layers. A normative salt analysis of solute compositions in the water indicated a marine origin for both types of water and an evolutionary pathway for the clay water that involves clay diagenesis. The chemical composition of the ground water in the carbonate bedrock is significantly different from that of the pore water in the clay layers. Dissolution of clays and opaline silica results in high silica concentrations relative to water in other parts of the Intermediate aquifer system. Water enriched in chloride relative to the overlying and underlying ground water recharges the aquifer inland where the confining clay layer is absent, and it dissolves carbonate and silicate minerals and reacts with clays along its flow path, eventually reaching this coastal site and resulting in the high chloride and silica concentrations observed in the middle part of the Intermediate aquifer system. Reaction-path modeling suggests that the recharging surficial water mixes with sulfate-rich water upwelling from the Upper Floridan aquifer, and carbonate mineral dissolution and precipitation, weathering and exchange reactions, clay mineral diagenesis, clay and silica dissolution, organic carbon oxidation, and iron and sulfate reduction result in the observed water compositions.A study was conducted to clarify the influence of clay units on ground-water composition in a heterogeneous

  19. Permeability changes induced by microfissure closure and opening in tectonized materials. Effect on slope pore pressure regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Maria; Vaunat, Jean; Pedone, Giuseppe; Cotecchia, Federica; Sollecito, Francesca; Casini, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    Tectonized clays are complex materials characterized by several levels of structures that may evolve during load and wetting/drying processes. Some microstructural patterns, as microfissures, have a particular influence on the value of permeability which is one of the main factors controlling pore pressure regime in slopes. In this work, the pore pressure regime measured in a real slope of tectonized clay in Southern Italy is analyzed by a numerical model that considers changes in permeability induced by microfissure closure and opening during the wetting and drying processes resulting from climatic actions. Permeability model accounts for the changes in Pore Size Distribution observed by Microscopy Intrusion Porosimetry. MIP tests are performed on representative samples of ground in initial conditions ("in situ" conditions) and final conditions (deformed sample after applying a wetting path that aims to reproduce the saturation of the soil under heavy rains). The resulting measurements allow for the characterization at microstructural level of the soil, identifying the distribution of dominant families pores in the sample and its evolution under external actions. Moreover, comparison of pore size density functions allows defining a microstructural parameter that depends on void ratio and degree of saturation and controls the variation of permeability. Model has been implemented in a thermo-hydro-mechanical code provided with a special boundary condition for climatic actions. Tool is used to analyze pore pressure measurements obtained in the tectonized clay slope. Results are analyzed at the light of the effect that permeability changes during wetting and drying have on the pore pressure regime.

  20. Ventilation test at Mont Terri. Geoelectric monitoring of the opalinus clay desaturation. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieczorek, Klaus; Zhang, Chun-Liang; Rothfuchs, Tilmann

    2008-04-01

    Between December 2001 and May 2004, a ventilation experiment (VE) was performed in the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (URL) and co-financed by the Commission of the European Communities. The objective was to investigate the desaturation of consolidated clay formations in consequence of the ventilation of underground openings of a repository in such a formation. The results of the geoelectric measurements performed in the second phase of the Mont Terri ventilation test can be summarized as follows: Geoelectric tomography has been found suitable for monitoring ventilation-induced saturation changes in the Opalinus clay. During ventilation with dry air a desaturation down to below 50% could be detected in both desaturation cycles. The desaturated zone extends less than 0.5 m into the rock around the microtunnel. During the second resaturation phase, ventilation with humid air led to quick resaturation at the tunnel surface, while resaturation of the rock mass took months. The still ongoing third resaturation phase seems to imply that resaturation of the rock mass may take years with no air circulation in the tunnel. The laboratory investigations on the Opalinus clay included the determination of water retention capacity, swelling pressure, free swelling/shrinking strains induced by moisture changes, and response of normal and large hollow clay samples to the ventilation of the central boreholes at different air humidity values. The Opalinus clay has a high water absorption capacity. The amount of water uptake in unconstraint conditions is much higher than the water content in the naturally confined state, indicating that the pore water in the natural clay rock is predominantly bound on clay minerals. The swelling pressure induced by wetting with vapour is very close to the major lithostatic stress at the sampling location. Water uptake from vapour causes a large free expansion of up to 12% over 8 months and even a breakdown along bedding planes. Release of

  1. Studies in Finishing Effects of Clay Mineral in Polymers and Synthetic Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faheem Uddin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of clay mineral in modifying the properties of polymeric material is improved in application. The current interest in modifying the polymeric materials, particularly polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, and nylon using clay mineral for improved flame retardancy, thermal stability, peak heat release rate, fracture, and strength properties generated significant research literature. This paper aims to review some of the important recent modification achieved in the performance of polymeric materials using organoclay mineral. Degradation of clay mineral-polymer (nm composite is discussed with appropriate known examples. Clay mineral (nm loading of 5 wt.% to 7 wt.% that was significantly smaller than the percent loading of conventional fillers in polymeric materials introduced significant improvement in terms of thermal and physical stability. An attempt is made to emphasize flammability and thermal stability and to indicate the areas that are relatively little explored in modification of fiber-forming polymers to enhance further research interest.

  2. Pulse heating tests on two reference Belgian clay formations. Laboratory experiments and numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, A.; Romero, E.; Vaunat, J.; Gens, A.; Li, X.L.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Two deep clay formations are being investigated in Belgium in connection with the design of a repository for 'High-Level Radioactive Waste': Boom clay at Mol (located between 160 and 270 m depths), considered the reference host formation, and Ypresian clay at Kallo (located between 300 and 450 m depths) as an alternative one. Thermal impact may play an important role on the behaviour of these low-permeability clayey formations. In this context, heating pulse tests on intact borehole samples retrieved in vertical and horizontal directions were carried out on both clays using an axisymmetric heating cell. Heating tests under nearly constant volume conditions and different target temperatures (maximum 85 C) were performed under controlled hydraulic boundary conditions. Attention is focused on the time evolution of temperature and pore water pressure changes during heating and cooling paths -i.e., pore pressure build-up during quasi-undrained heating and later dissipation to the applied hydraulic boundary conditions-. The finite element program CODE-BRIGHT was used to determine thermal parameters by back-analysis and to simulate the experimental results. Table 1 summarises the main properties of these clays. The experimental programme was carried out on a fully-instrumented cell (sample 75 mm diameter and 100 mm high) with a controlled-power heater housed inside the cell. Two miniature pore water pressure transducers located at different heights of the lateral wall of the cell and three thermocouples were used to monitor the sample response. The cell has top and bottom valves to control hydraulic conditions. The protocol of the tests included three main phases: hydration, heating and cooling. Throughout the heating and cooling phases, the bottom drainage was maintained open at a constant water pressure using an automatic pressure/volume controller, while the upper valve was kept closed. Figures 1a and 1c show the time

  3. Thermal Behaviour of clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassoni, E.

    1985-01-01

    The programme carried out by ENEA to model the thermal-hydraulic-mechanical behaviour of the clay formations and to measure, in situ and in laboratory, the thermal properties of these rocks, is presented. An in situ heating experiment has been carried out in an open clay quarry in the area of Monterotondo, near Rome. The main goal of the experiment was to know the temperature field and the thermal effects caused by the high level radioactive waste disposed of in a clayey geological formation. The conclusions are as follows: - the thermal conduction codes are sufficiently accurate to forecast the temperature increases caused in the clay by the dissipation of the heat generated by high level radioactive waste; - the thermal conductivity deduced by means of the ''curve fitting'' method ranges from 0.015 to 0.017 W.cm -1 . 0 C -1 - the temperature variation associated with the transport of clay interstitial water caused by temperature gradient is negligible. A laboratory automated method has been designed to measure the thermal conductivity and diffusivity in clay samples. A review of experimental data concerning thermomechanical effects in rocks as well as results of thermal experiments performed at ISMES on clays are presented. Negative thermal dilation has been found both in the elastic and plastic range under constant stress. Thermoplastic deformation appears ten times greater than the thermoelastic one. A mathematical model is proposed in order to simulate the above and other effects that encompass thermal-elastic-plastic-pore water pressure response of clays at high temperature and effective pressure with undrained and transient drainage conditions. Implementation of the two versions into a finite element computer code is described

  4. Synthesis of malachite@clay nanocomposite for rapid scavenging of cationic and anionic dyes from synthetic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Varsha; Sillanpää, Mika

    2017-01-01

    Synthesis of malachite@clay nanocomposite was successfully carried out for the removal of cationic (Methylene Blue, MB) and anionic dyes (Congo Red, CR) from synthetic wastewater. Nanocomposite was characterized by TEM, SEM, FT-IR, EDS analysis and zeta potential. TEM analysis indicated that the particle diameter of nanocomposite was in the range of 14 to 23nm. Various important parameters viz. contact time, concentration of dyes, nanocomposite dosage, temperature and solution pH were optimized to achieve maximum adsorption capacity. In the case of MB, removal decreased from 99.82% to 93.67% while for CR, removal decreased from 88.55% to 75.69% on increasing dye concentration from 100 to 450mg/L. pH study confirmed the higher removal of CR in acidic range while MB removal was higher in alkaline range. Kinetic study revealed the applicability of pseudo-second-order model for the adsorption of both dyes. Negative values of ΔG 0 for both systems suggested the feasibility of dye removal and support for spontaneous adsorption of CR and MB on nanocomposite. Nanocomposite showed 277.77 and 238.09mg/g Langmuir adsorption capacity for MB and CR respectively. Desorption of dyes from the dye loaded nanocomposite was easily carried out with acetone. The results indicate that the prepared malachite@clay nanocomposite is an efficient adsorbent with high adsorption capacity for the aforementioned dyes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Study of the Properties of Bentonites for their use in Clay Geo synthetic Barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiro Lopez, A.; Mateo Sanz, B.; Garcia Cidoncha, H.; Blanco Fernandez, M.

    2014-01-01

    Bentonites used for the production of clay geo synthetic barriers need to meet some properties so that they can be a waterproofing system. among the bentonites used in industry, sodium bentonite has the lowest permeability due to its high water absorption capacity in the inter-laminar space, causing it to swell and form a barrier to water flow. this paper provides the study of the properties of four bentonite to evaluate their quality the study of the properties of four bentonite to evaluate their quality. For this study, the main properties have been tested: water absorption, swelling index, fluid loss, cation exchange capacity and montmorillonite content. In order to optimize the procedure for the characterization of bentonites, correlations between different tests have been done, to identify the most suitable ones. Finally, a compatibility test has been carried out to study the performance of bentonites in water containing a high amount of sales, because in this case, an ion exchange between the interlayer sodium ions of bentonite and cations dissolved in the water can take, resulting in a decrease swell of the bentonite. (Author)

  6. Non disturbing characterization and quantification of natural organic matter (NOM) contained in clay rock pore water by mass spectrometry using electro-spray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huclier-Markai, S.; Landesman, C.; Grambow, B.; Rogniaux, H.; Monteau, F.; Vinsot, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Callovo-Oxfordian formation (COx) rock may contain up to 1% w/w of organic Carbon. Most of the Organic Matter (OM) is attached to the mineral particles whereas a small portion is present as Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) in the pore water. In environmental studies, Natural Organic Matter (NOM) plays a key role on the bioavailability and the toxicity of metallic compounds. It is necessary to know the structure of any organic substance in order to assess which chemical and biological reactions occur under environmentally relevant conditions. The 150 Myears solid-bound organic matter of the COx (kerogen) has been already investigated in several studies and originates from a mixture of marine and terrestrial sources. In addition to this, the CCl 4 soluble organic fraction (bitumen) has been already characterized by liquid and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. It allows proportion and distribution of biological markers to be determined as polar compounds with aromatic and saturated hydrocarbons. DOM was extracted from a crushed clay rock of the COx formation with a high rock/water ratio of about 1500 g/L. Part of the OM from the COx is known to be sensitive to air oxidation which can significantly modify the nature of the bitumen by an overall shift towards lower molecular weight compounds. Therefore, the characteristics of the DOM must be determined in in-situ like conditions if one wants to assess the mobility of DOM in the clay pore space and to evaluate the mobility of heavy metals/ radionuclides. Due to their high binding capacity with metal ions and their colloidal sizes in natural waters, these macromolecules, through complexation reactions, might either enhance the mobility of trace elements, or reduce their migration rates by sorption processes in relation with their size and that of the porous medium. Consequently, the characterization of DOM in anoxic pore water samples from the COx

  7. Influence of clay on the adsorption of heavy metals like copper and cadmium on chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Nagan; Latha, Srinivasan; Sudha, Persu N; Renganathan, N Gopalan

    2013-02-01

    The influence of clay on the adsorption of heavy metals like copper and cadmium on chitosan from simulated industrial wastewater is evaluated. Chitosan-clay blend with ratio of (1:1), (1:2), and (2:1) have been prepared, and these were used as membranes to remove copper and cadmium ions from synthetic industrial wastewater. The chemical parameters for quantities of adsorption of heavy metal contamination have been done, and the kinetics of adsorption has also been carried out. Clay provides enough absorbable sites to overcome mass transfer limitations. The number of absorbable sites for cadmium is more compared to copper, and thus the rate of recovery of cadmium is faster than copper, and the percentage removal of cadmium is more than copper at all times on clay over nylon 6. This difference indicates the influence of clay in the adsorption of heavy metals in comparison to synthetic polymer nylon 6. Rate constant for first-order kinetics of adsorption, k (1), for copper and cadmium is less than that of clay, which clearly indicates that clay, which is a natural polymer, is more kinetically favored compared to synthetic polymer. The difference in the intraparticle diffusion in both the natural and synthetic polymer is not much, and it suggests that the particle diffusion mechanism is the same in both cases. Copper and cadmium recovery is parallel at all times. The percentage of removal of copper increased with an increase in pH from 3 to 5. In the case of cadmium containing wastewater, the maximum removal of metal occurred at pH 5. The uptake amount of Cu(2+) ions on chitosan increased rapidly with increasing the contact time from 0 to 360 min and then reaches equilibrium after 360 min, and the equilibrium constant for copper and cadmium ions are more or less the same for the adsorption reaction. There are more adsorption sites for cadmium in the presence of clay and mass transfer limitation is avoided without resorting to rotation, which is the highlight of the

  8. The nature of porosity in organic-rich mudstones of the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation, North Sea, offshore United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Neil S.; Hackley, Paul C.; Lowers, Heather; Hill, Ronald J.; Egenhoff, Sven O.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Blum, Alex E.

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of organic-rich mudstones from wells that penetrated the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation, offshore United Kingdom, were performed to evaluate the nature of both organic and inorganic rock constituents and their relation to porosity in this world-class source rock. The formation is at varying levels of thermal maturity, ranging from immature in the shallowest core samples to mature in the deepest core samples. The intent of this study was to evaluate porosity as a function of both organic macerals and thermal maturity. At least four distinct types of organic macerals were observed in petrographic and SEM analyses and they all were present across the study area. The macerals include, in decreasing abundance: 1) bituminite admixed with clays; 2) elongate lamellar masses (alginite or bituminite) with small quartz, feldspar, and clay entrained within it; 3) terrestrial (vitrinite, fusinite, semifusinite) grains; and 4) Tasmanites microfossils. Although pores in all maceral types were observed on ion-milled surfaces of all samples, the pores (largely nanopores with some micropores) vary as a function of maceral type. Importantly, pores in the macerals do not vary systematically as a function of thermal maturity, insofar as organic pores are of similar size and shape in both the immature and mature Kimmeridge rocks. If any organic pores developed during the generation of hydrocarbons, they were apparently not preserved, possibly because of the highly ductile nature of much of the rock constituents of Kimmeridge mudstones (clays and organic material). Inorganic pores (largely micropores with some nanopores) have been observed in all Kimmeridge mudstones. These pores, particularly interparticle (i.e., between clay platelets), and intraparticle (i.e., in framboidal pyrite, in partially dissolved detrital K-feldspar, and in both detrital and authigenic dolomite) are noteworthy because they compose much of the observable porosity in the shales in both

  9. Influence of clay content on wave-induced liquefaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    of measurements were carried out: (1) pore-water pressure measurements across the soil depth and (2) water-surface elevation measurements. These measurements were synchronized with video recordings of the liquefaction process from the side. The ranges of the various quantities in the experiments were wave height...... of silt and clay was not liquefied. Sand may become prone to liquefaction with the introduction of clay, contrary to the general perception that this type of sediment is normally liquefaction-resistant under waves. For instance, sand with d50 50:4 mmwas liquefied with CC510:8%, whereas sand with d50 50...

  10. Fractal Characteristics of Pores in Taiyuan Formation Shale from Hedong Coal Field, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kunjie; Zeng, Fangui; Cai, Jianchao; Sheng, Guanglong; Xia, Peng; Zhang, Kun

    For the purpose of investigating the fractal characteristics of pores in Taiyuan formation shale, a series of qualitative and quantitative experiments were conducted on 17 shale samples from well HD-1 in Hedong coal field of North China. The results of geochemical experiments show that Total organic carbon (TOC) varies from 0.67% to 5.32% and the organic matters are in the high mature or over mature stage. The shale samples consist mainly of clay minerals and quartz with minor pyrite and carbonates. The FE-SEM images indicate that three types of pores, organic-related pores, inorganic-related pores and micro-fractures related pores, are developed well, and a certain number of intragranular pores are found inside quartz and carbonates formed by acid liquid corrosion. The pore size distributions (PSDs) broadly range from several to hundreds nanometers, but most pores are smaller than 10nm. As the result of different adsorption features at relative pressure (0-0.5) and (0.5-1) on the N2 adsorption isotherm, two fractal dimensions D1 and D2 were obtained with the Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) model. D1 and D2 vary from 2.4227 to 2.6219 and from 2.6049 to 2.7877, respectively. Both TOC and brittle minerals have positive effect on D1 and D2, whereas clay minerals, have a negative influence on them. The fractal dimensions are also influenced by the pore structure parameters, such as the specific surface area, BJH pore volume, etc. Shale samples with higher D1 could provide more adsorption sites leading to a greater methane adsorption capacity, whereas shale samples with higher D2 have little influence on methane adsorption capacity.

  11. Preparation of Synthetic Zeolites from Myanmar Clay Mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phyu Phyu Win

    2004-04-01

    Faujasite type zeolite X was successfully synthesized from Myanmar clay mineral kaolinite, by treating with sodium hydroxide at 820 C followed by dissolution in water and hydrothermal treatment. It was found that the solution of fused clay powder can be crystallized at 90C under ambient pressure to synthesize faujasite type zeolite X. The effects of aging time and the amount of water on the formation of the product phase and Si/ Al ratios of the resulting products were investigated. Most of the Si and Al components in kaolinite might be dissolved into an alkaline solution and reacted to form ring-like structures. Then it was effectively transformed into zeolite materials. The maximum relative crystallinity of faujasite zeolite obtained was found to be 100%. Zeolite P was found to be a competitive phase present in some resulting products during hydrothermal treatment. The cation exchange capacity of kaolinite is very low, but increased after a proper treatment. It was found that the prepared faujasite type zeolite X, zeolite P and hydrogen zeolite (HZ) can reduce the hardness, the alkalinity, the total dissolved solid and the dissolved iron of raw water in the batch wise operation of water treatment. Therefore, it can be used as the cation exchanged resin for water treatment

  12. Investigation of activated Al-pillared clay efficiency in vegetable oil purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomić Gizela A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents a contribution to the applicability of natural clays and their derivates as adsorbents in the process of purification of vegetable oil. Investigation of textural properties of raw and purified clay samples reveals that during acid activation and Al-pillaring, BET and micropore surface area increases significantly. However, bleaching capacity of clay and its derivates is not determined by using sample surface area, but rather sample total pore volume. Surface area, especially micropore surface area contributes to removal of smaller molecules. This was confirmed by successful elimination of moisture and volatile materials by samples with an appropriate micropore structure. Used samples of clay and its derivates do not significantly influence acid and peroxide values of raw sunflower oil during its treatment.

  13. A desk study of surface diffusion and mass transport in clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.J.

    1988-09-01

    The concept of a geological barrier to radionuclide migration from theoretical radioactive waste repositories has drawn attention to the physico-chemical properties of clays, which are traditionally regarded as retarding media. This report addresses the different mechanisms of transport of radionuclides through clay and in particular focuses on the surface diffusion movement of sorbed cations. The relative contributory importance of the different transport mechanisms is governed by the pore size distributions and interconnections within the clay fabric. Surface diffusion data in the literature have been from experiments using compacted montmorillonite and biotite gneiss. A possible programme of laboratory work is outlined, based on diffusion experiments, which describes the way of measuring the effect of surface diffusion more accurately in clays, mudstones and shales. (author)

  14. Uncertainties in pore water chemistry of compacted bentonite from Rokle deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervinka, R.; Vejsadu, J.; Vokal, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The composition of compacted bentonite pore water influences a number of important processes occurring in a deep geological repository (DGR), e.g. corrosion of waste package materials, solubility of radionuclides, or diffusion and sorption of radionuclides. Its determination is not straightforward, because it is difficult to obtain (e.g. squeeze) the pore water from compacted bentonite without changing its properties. It is therefore necessary to combine experimentally obtained parameters and geochemical modelling to approach it compositions. This article describes the results achieved in investigation the composition of pore water of compacted Ca-Mg bentonite from Czech deposits, proposed in Czech DGR concept. Ca-Mg bentonite from the largest operating deposit Rokle (Tertiary neo-volcanic area, NW Bohemia) represents complex mixture of (Ca,Mg)-Fe-rich montmorillonite, micas, kaolinite and other mineral admixtures (mainly Ca, Mg, Fe carbonates, feldspars and iron oxides). For experimental investigations the homogenized and grind raw bentonite material obtained directly from the deposit and commercial product (partly Na-activated) from supplier were used. Geochemical characterization of Rokle bentonite included mineralogical composition analyzed by Xray diffraction, cation exchange capacity determined using Cu-trien method, surface complexation parameters determined by acid-base titrations and 'geochemical' porosity derived from diffusion experiments with tracers ( 3 H and 36 Cl). Soluble salts inventory was calculated on the base of results from aqueous extracts of bentonite in deionized water at different solid to liquid ratios (from 18.6 to 125 g/l) and high pressure squeezing of water saturated bentonite at different solid to liquid ratios (from 1:1 to 4:1 w/w). The geochemical model contained cation exchange in the interlayer space and protonization and de-protonization of surface hydroxyl groups on clay

  15. The CEC benchmark interclay on rheological models for clays results of pilot phase (January-June 1989) about the boom clay at Mol (B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Come, B.

    1990-01-01

    A pilot phase of a benchmark exercise for rheological models for boom clay, called interclay, was launched by the CEC in January 1989. The purpose of the benchmark is to compare predictions of calculations made about well-defined rock-mechanical problems, similar to real cases at the Mol facilities, using existing data from laboratory tests on samples. Basically, two approaches were to be compared: one considering clay as an elasto-visco-plastic medium (rock-mechanics approach), and one isolating the role of pore-pressure dissipation (soil-mechanics approach)

  16. Catalysts for synthetic liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, L.A.; Turney, T.W.

    1987-12-01

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysts have been designed, characterized and tested for the selective production of hydrocarbons suitable as synthetic liquid transport fuels from synthesis gas (i.e., by the reduction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen). It was found that hydrocarbons in the middle distillate range, or suitable for conversion to that range, could be produced over several of the new catalyst systems. The various catalysts examined included: (1) synthetic cobalt clays, mainly cobalt chlorites; (2) cobalt hydrotalcites; (3) ruthenium metal supported on rare earth oxides of high surface area; and (4) a novel promoted cobalt catalyst. Active and selective catalysts have been obtained, in each category. With the exception of the clays, reproducibility of catalyst performance has been good. Catalysts in groups 2 and 4 have exhibited very high activity, with long lifetimes and easy regeneration.

  17. Clay Characterization as Engineered Barrier to Contaminants Migration: Thermal, Hydraulic and Mechanical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bru, A.; Casero, D.

    2001-01-01

    In this work we characterize the structure of a clay, concretely bentonite. Our main aim is to stress the important role that plays the heterogeneity of the medium structure in transport processes. Randomness of pore sizes produces an anomalous transport of contaminants. We analyze mercuric porosimetry data with simulations finding that pore size distribution has a power-law behaviour. (Author) 6 refs

  18. Study of the chemo-hydro-mechanical behavior of stiff clays in the context of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Xuan Phu

    2013-01-01

    The present research aims to understand the chemo-hydro-mechanical behavior of stiff clays through two geological formations, the Boom Clay and the Ypresian clays which are considered as possible host formations for the radioactive wastes disposal in Belgium. The volume change behavior was studied in both intact and reconstituted states, and under different conditions: under K0 and isotropic loading, under loading/unloading loops. The results show that the volume change behavior is governed by the competition between the physico-chemical effect and the mechanical effect, characterized by a threshold stress which corresponds to the swelling stress in terms of structure changes. A constitutive law was developed to capture this aspect. The permeability was determined, compared with the results in literature and correlated with the parameters as void ratio. The permeability variation with depth shows the important role of macro-pores in fluids' transfer. The volume change behavior and permeability of intact Boom Clay and Ypresian clays are also influenced by pore water chemical composition changes which modify the diffuse double layer and give rise to the aggregation of clay particles. The elastic parameters, yield curve and failure envelope of Boom Clay and Ypresian clays were identified. A conceptual elasto-plastic model was developed, accounting for the swelling effects and the competition between the physico-chemical effect and the mechanical effect. (author)

  19. Polyethersulfone/clay membranes and its water permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalho, Thamyres Cardoso de; Medeiros, Vanessa da Nobrega; Araujo, Edcleide Maria de; Lira, Helio Lucena; Leite, Amanda Melissa Damiao

    2017-01-01

    Membranes can be considered polymeric or inorganic films that function as a semipermeable barrier to filtration on a molecular scale, separating two phases and restricting, totally or partially, the transportation of one or more chemical species (solute) present in the solution. Therefore, the aim of this work is to produce polyethersulfone membranes (PES) and polyethersulfone/clay by phase inversion technique and evaluate the presence of clay in obtaining membranes for wastewater treatment. The used solvent was dimethylformamide (DMF) and clays were Brasgel PA (MMT) and Cloisite Na (CL Na) in the proportion of 3 to 5% (wt.). By Xray diffraction (XRD), the membranes with 3% of MMT and CL Na clays apparently had partially exfoliated structures. For the composition with 5% of CL Na a small peak was observed, which indicates that this is possibly an intercalated structure or microcomposite. By scanning electron microscopy (SEM), visualizes that the pure surface of the pure PES membrane a structure apparently without pores was observed in the used magnification and without roughness surface when compared to membranes with clay. The measurements of contact angle indicated that the inclusion of clay altered the wetting ability of the membranes. The flow with distilled water for all membranes started high and over time reached a stabilization level. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence and the content of clay altered the morphology of the membrane, contributing to an increase in water flow. (author)

  20. Hydrogen solubility in pore water of partially saturated argillites: Application to Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock in the context of a nuclear waste geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassin, A.; Dymitrowska, M.; Azaroual, M.

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear waste geological disposals, large amounts of hydrogen (H 2 ) are expected to be produced by different (bio-)geochemical processes. Depending on the pressure generated by such a process, H 2 could be produced as a gas phase and displace the neighbouring pore water. As a consequence, a water-unsaturated zone could be created around the waste and possibly affect the physical and physic-chemical properties of the disposal and the excavation disturbed zone around it. The present study is the first part of an ongoing research program aimed at evaluating the possible chemical evolution of the pore water-minerals-gas system in such a context. The goal of this study was to evaluate, in terms of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, the geochemical disturbance of the pore water due to variations in hydrogen pressure, temperature and relative humidity. No heterogeneous reactions involving mineral phases of the clay-rock or reactive surface sites were taken into account in the thermodynamic analysis. In the case sulphate reduction reaction is allowed, geochemical modelling results indicate that the main disturbance is the increase in pH (from around 7 up to more than 10) and an important decrease in the redox potential (Eh) related to hydrogen dissolution. This occurs from relatively low H 2 partial pressures (∼1 bar and above). Then, temperature and relative humidity (expressed in terms of capillary pressure) further displace the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, namely the pH and the aqueous speciation as well as saturation indices of mineral phases. Finally, the results suggest that the generation of hydrogen, combined with an increase in temperature (between 30 deg. C and 80 deg. C) and a decrease in relative humidity (from 100% to 30%), should increase the chemical reactivity of the pore water-rock-gas system. (authors)

  1. Physical capture and release of drug molecules, water and cations by a smectite clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho dos Santos, Éverton

    -fluorohectorite (LiFh, Li1.2(Mg4.8Li1.2)Si8O20F4), a synthetic clay mineral from the smectite family, have been experimentally analyzed. By means of X-rays powder diffraction (XRD), using both an in-house instrument and synchrotron radiation, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric Analysis coupled to an Infrared......-analysis and inelastic neutron scattering data we established that the drug presence into the interlayer space of Fh is weakening the water-clay interactions. Furthermore, CIPRO’s release from Fh in synthetic gastric acid juice (SGA) as a function of time and temperature was also carefully followed. Our studies showed...... and toxicological tests, we demonstrated that the effectiveness and toxicity of pure CIPRO is unaffected in the clay-drug complex. To conclude, the high drug adsorption capacity as well as the slow and gradual release from CIPRO when intercalated in Fh adds this synthetic smectite to the list of promising drug...

  2. Fabrication and performance of all-solid-state chloride sensors in synthetic concrete pore solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaojian; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Yingzi; Deng, Hongwei

    2010-01-01

    One type of all-solid-state chloride sensor was fabricated using a MnO(2) electrode and a Ag/AgCl electrode. The potentiometric response of the sensor to chloride in synthetic concrete pore solutions was systematically studied, and the polarization performance was also evaluated. The results show a good linear relationship between the potential reading of the sensor and the logarithm of chloride activity (concentration ranges from 0.05 to 5.0 M), and the potential value remains stable with increasing immersion time. The existence of K(+), Ca(2+), Na(+) and SO(4) (2-) ions have little influence on the potentiometric response of the sensor to chloride, but the pH has a significant influence on the potential value of the sensor at low chloride concentration. The potential reading of the sensor increases linearly with the solution temperature over the range from 5 to 45 °C. Meanwhile, an excellent polarization behavior is proven by galvanostatic and potentiodynamic tests. All of the results reveal that the developed sensor has a great potential for monitoring chloride ions in concrete environments.

  3. Fabrication and Performance of All-Solid-State Chloride Sensors in Synthetic Concrete Pore Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Deng

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available One type of all-solid-state chloride sensor was fabricated using a MnO2 electrode and a Ag/AgCl electrode. The potentiometric response of the sensor to chloride in synthetic concrete pore solutions was systematically studied, and the polarization performance was also evaluated. The results show a good linear relationship between the potential reading of the sensor and the logarithm of chloride activity (concentration ranges from 0.05 to 5.0 M, and the potential value remains stable with increasing immersion time. The existence of K+, Ca2+, Na+ and SO42− ions have little influence on the potentiometric response of the sensor to chloride, but the pH has a significant influence on the potential value of the sensor at low chloride concentration. The potential reading of the sensor increases linearly with the solution temperature over the range from 5 to 45 °C. Meanwhile, an excellent polarization behavior is proven by galvanostatic and potentiodynamic tests. All of the results reveal that the developed sensor has a great potential for monitoring chloride ions in concrete environments.

  4. New membranes made of sintered clay application to crossflow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The new mineral membranes made of sintered clay are performed and characterized in terms of porosity, hydraulic resistance, pore diameter and mechanical resistance. It is shown that these membranes can be used as microfiltration membrane. The variations of the filtrate flux as a function of time are measured during the ...

  5. In situ analysis of microbial reduction of a nitrate plume in Opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleyen, N.; Smets, S.; Valcke, E.; Albrecht, A.; De Canniere, P.; Schwyn, B.; Wittebroodt, C.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In several countries, such as Belgium, France and Switzerland, clay formations are foreseen as the host rock for geological disposal of bituminized low-level and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive waste. Suitable clay formations exhibit favorable hydro-mechanical and geochemical characteristics, which are expected to retard the migration of leached radionuclides. Along with radionuclides, certain classes of bituminized radioactive waste may also contain high concentrations of NaNO 3 , dispersed into the hydrophobic bitumen matrix used to stabilize the waste. During and after saturation of the disposal gallery, this bituminized waste will start to take up water due to osmosis, resulting in the leaching of significant amounts of NaNO 3 and soluble organic bitumen degradation products (BDP) into the clay pore water. This nitrate plume could cause several geochemical and biochemical processes in the clay surrounding the waste disposal gallery, potentially affecting the barrier function of the host rock. To study these processes, an in situ experiment in the Opalinus Clay, named the Bitumen-Nitrate-Clay interaction (BN) experiment, is being performed at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory (CH). The experiment consists of a vertical borehole rigged with a downhole equipment containing three packed-off intervals, each lined with a cylindrical sintered stainless steel filter screen to allow contact with the surrounding clay. Prior to the start of the tests, the intervals were injected with an artificial Opalinus Clay pore water, containing all major ions at pore water concentrations at Mont Terri, but no organic matter, and were equilibrated with the surrounding clay for ∼8 months. To ensure a continuous water flow during the tests, each interval is connected to a stainless steel water circulation unit, equipped with water sampling containers, circulation pumps and flow meters. In addition, to continuously monitor the

  6. The Ypresian clays as alternative host rock for radioactive waste disposal in Belgium. A transferability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Baelen, Herve; Wouters, Laurent; Brassinnes, Stephane; Van Geet, Maarten; Vandenberghe, Noel

    2012-01-01

    -layer phases, but less kaolinite. The smectites in the Ypresian clays partly originate from weathered volcanic ash layers, re-mobilised and deposited into the basin during the early Eocene, but there are indications as well for the direct sedimentation of ash layers within the basin, which subsequently transformed into authigenic smectite. Scanning electron microscopy images reveal that the compaction fabric of the Ypresian clays is, at least in a number of samples, less pronounced than for Boom Clay. An additional difference is possibly the presence of a bi-modal pore size distribution, the larger pore size population being absent in undisturbed Boom Clay. Nevertheless the total porosity measured in both host rocks is comparable, but decreases with depth in the case of the Ypresian clays. From a mechanical point of view, Ypresian clays seem to behave less stiff and appears to be more sensitive to failure. Concerning the thermal properties, contrasting results have been obtained. In a first research effort, the thermal conductivity was smaller than for Boom Clay; more recently, however, a higher conductivity than for Boom Clay was obtained, illustrating the sensitivity of thermal-conductivity measurements to the experimental conditions. The measured hydraulic conductivity covers a comparable range to Boom Clay, but displays larger vertical variations. The diffusion accessible porosity and apparent diffusion coefficient obtained on clay cores are in the same order, but a decrease with depth has been observed for the Ypresian clays. Analysis of the pore water chemistry indicates that it is of the NaCl-type and can be categorised as brackish to salty. Especially in the upper part of the Ypresian clays, the results show a very high vertical variation, which does probably not reflect the natural variability, but reflects the difficulties of obtaining a representative pore water by squeezing. The same safety concept as the one developed on Boom Clay can be envisaged, but some

  7. Syncrude`s highway berm: part 3 of 5 - Soil parameters (pore pressure parameters and settlement from inundation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, R.; Fong, V.; Ashton, C.; Strueby, B. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Difficulties in predicting pore fluid pressures in the fills composing the highway berm were discussed. The pore water pressures in the in-situ clay foundation units were expected to be very sensitive to water content. Over 200 piezometer tips were installed into fill and in situ soil units, and results of the measurements were reported. The in situ basal foundation clays and sands were found to have a similar pore pressure ratio of typically less than 0.25. Fill pore fluid pressure ratios determined in the field varied according to density when loose fills were compared to very dense fills. To illustrate, when the fill was 86% to 91% of maximum Standard Proctor Density, the pore pressure ratio value was not dependent on fluid content. When the fill was densely compacted to 98% Standard Proctor Density, the pore pressure ratio was largely dependent on the fluid content as it related to the optimum fluid content determined from Standard Proctor testing. Significant first-time wetting settlement was observed to occur with fills at initial densities of around 90% of maximum Standard Proctor dry density. Settlements for fills placed initially above 97% Standard Proctor Density generally had inundation settlements of less than 0.3% of fill thickness predicted from laboratory testing. 4 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Micromechanics of non-active clays in saturated state and DEM modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagano Arianna Gea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a conceptual micromechanical model for 1-D compression behaviour of non-active clays in saturated state. An experimental investigation was carried out on kaolin clay samples saturated with fluids of different pH and dielectric permittivity. The effect of pore fluid characteristics on one-dimensional compressibility behaviour of kaolin was investigated. A three dimensional Discrete Element Method (DEM was implemented in order to simulate the response of saturated kaolin observed during the experiments. A complex contact model was introduced, considering both the mechanical and physico-chemical microscopic interactions between clay particles. A simple analysis with spherical particles only was performed as a preliminary step in the DEM study in the elastic regime.

  9. Coupled transport and chemistry in clay stone studied by advective displacement: experiments and model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landesman, C.; Grambow, B.; Bailly, C.; Ribet, S.; Perrigaud, K.; Baty, V.; Giffaut, E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication entered in this record. For assessing the mass transfer resistance of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock formation in case of implementing a nuclear waste repository, various strongly coupled processes need to be understood and quantified both in near and far field: multi-species diffusion/advection, mineral/pore water interaction, interaction with the waste matrix and engineered barrier material, radionuclide retention, colloid transport, pore water chemistry evolution etc. To study many of these processes in their interrelationship simultaneously, a series of high pressure stainless steel advection cell was designed and clay cores from different locations of different calcite and clay contents were machined to fit the inner diameter of the cells with a precision of 50 μm. After assembling, simulated oxygen free clay pore water with bromine tracer was pushed by a High Pressure pump through the reactor by a pressure of up 100 bars at temperatures between 20 and 90 deg. C and the out-flowing water was collected, protected from air and analyzed by ICP-MS, COT meter and ion chromatography in regular time intervals. The water flow rate was between 0.02 and 1.2 mL/ d, corresponding to a clay rock permeabilities between 10 -12 and 10 -14 m/s at 25 deg. C. Permeabilities increase with temperature as expected due to reduction of viscosity of water. The experiments last up to 2 years. The first drops of out flowing allow estimating the initial pore water composition. This is particular useful to assess mobile natural organic matter contents, Se concentrations and temperature effect on clay water composition. Results show that only very small organic molecules are mobile. Temperature had only little effect on water composition. After few months both tritiated (HTO) water and 36 Cl were added and from the evolution of the activities in the out flowing water dispersion coefficients and accessible

  10. Clay, Water, and Salt: Controls on the Permeability of Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, Ian C; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B

    2017-09-19

    theory of colloidal interactions that accurately predicts clay swelling in a narrow range of conditions (low salinity, low compaction, Na + counterion). An important feature of clay swelling that is not predicted by these models is the coexistence, in most conditions of aqueous chemistry and dry bulk density, of two types of pores between parallel smectite particles: mesopores with a pore width of >3 nm that are controlled by long-range interactions (the osmotic swelling regime) and nanopores with a pore width <1 nm that are controlled by short-range interactions (the crystalline swelling regime). Nanogeochemical characterization and simulation techniques, including coarse-grained and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, hold significant promise for the development of advanced constitutive relations that predict this coexistence and its dependence on aqueous chemistry.

  11. ATLAS IV in situ heating test in Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Guangjing; Li, Xiangling; Verstricht, Jan; Sillen, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The small scale in-situ ATLAS (Admissible Thermal Loading for Argillaceous Storage) tests are performed to assess the hydro-mechanical effects of a thermal transient on the host Boom clay at the HADES underground research facility in Mol, Belgium. The initial test set-up, consisting of a heater borehole and two observation boreholes, was installed in 1991-1992. The first test (later named 'ATLAS I') was then performed from July 1993 to June 1996; during this time, the heater dissipated a constant power of 900 W. During the second phase ('ATLAS II'), the heating power was doubled (1800 W) and maintained constant from June 1996 to May 1997. This was followed by shutdown and natural cooling starting from June 1997 on. To broaden the THM characterization of the Boom clay at a larger scale and at different temperature levels, the test set-up was extended in 2006 by drilling two additional instrumented boreholes (AT97E and AT98E). The heater was switched on again from April 2007 to April 2008 with a stepwise power increase, followed by an instantaneous shutdown. This phase is called 'ATLAS III'. The above tests have provided a large set of good quality and well documented data on temperature, pore water pressure and total stress; these data allowed to make several interesting observations regarding the thermal anisotropy and THM coupling in the Boom clay. The straightforward geometry and well defined boundary conditions of the tests facilitate the comparison between measurement and numerical modeling studies. Based on the three dimensional coupled THM modeling of the ATLAS III test, the good agreement between measurement and numerical modeling of temperature and pore water pressure yields a set of THM parameters and confirms the thermo-mechanical anisotropy of the Boom clay. To get a better insight in the anisotropic THM behavior of the Boom clay, a new upward instrumented borehole was drilled above the ATLAS heater at

  12. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  13. Estimation of bitumen and clay content in fine tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta Cabrera, S.C.; Bryan, J.; Kantzas, A.

    2007-01-01

    Fine tailings are the components of tailings ponds and the by-product of the oil sand extraction process, consisting mostly of water with small amounts of bitumen, sand, silts and clays. Because of the large volumes of tailings, an important environmental and production process issue involves the reduction of the remaining bitumen in the tailings stream. This paper presented the results of a study that used low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in order to estimate the bitumen, clay and water content of synthetic tailings samples. NMR is a non-destructive technique that is utilized to determine compositions of oil and brine emulsions and the viscosity of heavy oil and bitumen as well as in reservoir characterization, measuring properties such as permeability, porosity, mobile and immobile fluids, and fluid saturations. The study prepared and tested numerous samples with variable water, bitumen, sand and clay concentrations in the NMR tool under ambient conditions. Two qualities of water and bitumen were used to prepare the synthetic samples. Each type of water and bitumen was analyzed as a single substance and in a mixture with the typical solids found in tailings composition. These included kaolinite, illite, sodium montmorillonite and sand. These synthetic samples were analyzed using different mixing configurations, as a function of time and in two different NMR tools. It was concluded that NMR is a potential application for on-line determination of tailings streams composition. 18 refs., 3 tabs., 17 figs

  14. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F

    2007-11-15

    Clay minerals are aluminium phyllosilicates, mostly products of the chemical alteration and mechanical breakdown of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Their physical and chemical properties can be directly related to their layered, fine-grained (large surface area) structure. These properties such as large water retention, low hydraulic conductivity, heat resistance and ionic exchange capacities, make clays ideal for many different applications, e.g. as sealing material for the underground disposal of radioactive waste. The long-term disposal of radioactive waste in an underground geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept. In the barrier of highly compacted clay, water is intercalated and confined between the clay layers. The narrow pores are responsible that under natural hydraulic gradients, molecular diffusion through water is the dominant transport mechanism for released radionuclides. The properties of water at the water-clay interface differ from that of bulk water. Therefore, a good and deep understanding of the water structure and dynamics in compacted clay systems is fundamental. This knowledge is the base for the progressing research about transport of pollutants through the compacted clays and argillaceous rock of radioactive waste barriers. This study focusses on four different types of pure clays, two of them charged, namely montmorillonite and illite (both in a Na and Ca form), and two uncharged, namely kaolinite and pyrophyllite. Their structural differences result in a significantly different behaviour in contact with water. In case of montmorillonite, water is located in between particles and in the interlayer space. In illite, water is found only in between particles, because the interlayer surfaces are tightly linked by potassium cations. The layers of kaolinite and pyrophyllite are uncharged and, consequently, water is located only in between particles. The clay powders were compacted to reach a high bulk dry density of about 1.9 g

  15. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F.

    2007-11-01

    Clay minerals are aluminium phyllosilicates, mostly products of the chemical alteration and mechanical breakdown of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Their physical and chemical properties can be directly related to their layered, fine-grained (large surface area) structure. These properties such as large water retention, low hydraulic conductivity, heat resistance and ionic exchange capacities, make clays ideal for many different applications, e.g. as sealing material for the underground disposal of radioactive waste. The long-term disposal of radioactive waste in an underground geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept. In the barrier of highly compacted clay, water is intercalated and confined between the clay layers. The narrow pores are responsible that under natural hydraulic gradients, molecular diffusion through water is the dominant transport mechanism for released radionuclides. The properties of water at the water-clay interface differ from that of bulk water. Therefore, a good and deep understanding of the water structure and dynamics in compacted clay systems is fundamental. This knowledge is the base for the progressing research about transport of pollutants through the compacted clays and argillaceous rock of radioactive waste barriers. This study focusses on four different types of pure clays, two of them charged, namely montmorillonite and illite (both in a Na and Ca form), and two uncharged, namely kaolinite and pyrophyllite. Their structural differences result in a significantly different behaviour in contact with water. In case of montmorillonite, water is located in between particles and in the interlayer space. In illite, water is found only in between particles, because the interlayer surfaces are tightly linked by potassium cations. The layers of kaolinite and pyrophyllite are uncharged and, consequently, water is located only in between particles. The clay powders were compacted to reach a high bulk dry density of about 1.9 g

  16. Hydroxyapatite clay for gap filling and adequate bone ingrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, M; Terayama, K; Ito, M; Takei, T; Kitagawa, E

    1995-03-01

    In uncemented total hip arthroplasty, a complete filling of the gap between femoral prosthesis and the host bone is difficult and defects would remain, because the anatomy of the reamed intramedullary canal cannot fit the prosthesis. Therefore, it seems practical to fill the gap with a clay containing hydroxyapatite (HA), which has an osteoconductive character. The clay (HA clay) is made by mixing HA granules (size 0.1 mm or more) having a homogeneous pore distribution and a porosity of 35-48 vol%, and a viscous substance such as a saline solution of sodium alginate (SSSA). In the first experiment, the ratio of HA granules and sodium alginate in SSSA is set for the same handling properties of HA clay and polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (standard viscosity) before hardening. As a result, the ratio is set for 55 wt% of HA in the clay and 12.5 wt% of sodium alginate in SSSA (i.e., HA:sodium alginate:saline solution = 9.8:1:7). In the second study, the gap between the femoral stem and bone model is completely filled with HA clay. However, the gap is not filled only with HA granules or HA granules mixed with saline solution. In the third animal experiment, using an unloaded model, histology shows that HA clay has an osteoconductive property bridging the gap between the implant and the cortical bone without any adverse reaction. HA clay is considered a useful biomaterial to fill the gap with adequate bone ingrowth.

  17. Cryo-FIB-SEM and MIP study of porosity and pore size distribution of bentonite and kaolin at different moisture contents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; Winter, D.A.M. de; Post, J.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Drury, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Clays often constitute the main component of poultices used for salt extraction from porous materials in conservation intervention. Knowledge of the evolution in porosity and pore size of clay based poultices, due to shrinkage during drying, is of crucial importance for the selection of the most

  18. Characterization of the porosity in Boom (Mol site, Belgium) and Opalinus (Mont Terri, Switzerland) clays - about the benefit of using ion beam milling tools and CRYO-SEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbois, G.; Houben, M.E.; Sholokhova, Y.; Urai, J.L.; Kukla, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. clay-stones form seals for hydrocarbon accumulations, aquitards and chemical barriers. The sealing capacity is controlled either by the rock microstructure or by chemical interactions between minerals and the permeating fluid. A detailed knowledge about the sealing characteristics is of particular interest in the storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and radioactive waste in geologic formations. A key factor to understanding the sealing by clay-stones is a detailed understanding of the morphology of the pore space. The morphology of porosity has a strong effect on many mechanical and transport properties of clay-stones. Though the bulk expression of these properties are relatively well known for a number of clay-stones, the relation between nanostructures and macro-properties are poorly studied for a complete understanding of the fluid-rock interactions. There is a considerable body of literature on the characterization of porosity in clay-stones using many different techniques (metal injection porosimetry; magnetic susceptibility measurement; SEM; TEM; neutron scattering; NMR spectroscopy, CT scanner; ESEM...). However, the pore space characterization has been mostly indirect until now. To investigate directly the meso-porosity (from mm to about ten nm in pore size) in clay-stones, SEM imaging is certainly the most direct approach but, in one hand, it is limited by the poor quality of the investigated surfaces (mainly broken or mechanically polished surfaces including the decoration of porosity by colored resin embedment), which make observation difficult, and the interpretation of the microstructures complicated; and on the other hand, most of conventional methods require dried samples in which the natural structure of pores could be damaged due to the desiccation and dehydration of the clay minerals. Some recently developed alternatives are able to solve these problems of sample preparation suitable for SEM

  19. Microporous membranes from polyamide 6/national clay nanocomposites - Part 2: microstructural and permeability evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Amanda M.D.; Araujo, Edcleide M.; Lira, Helio de L.; Paz, Rene Anisio da; Medeiros, Vanessa da Nobrega

    2014-01-01

    Organic/inorganic hybrid membranes of polyamide 6 and mineral clay containing layers of silicate were prepared and compared to those of the pure polymer. Use was made of an as-received sodium clay from industry and another organophilized with ammonium quaternary salts (Dodigen and Cetremide). The salts make the clays surface hydrophobic and improve their incorporation into the polymer matrix in the molten state. Membranes were prepared with these nanocomposites using the immersion-precipitation technique with formic acid as a solvent, and precipitation in a water bath as non-solvent. The acid concentration in the solution containing the polymer and the hybrids was varied to study its influence in morphology and permeability of the membranes. An asymmetric morphology consisting of a filter skin and a porous support was observed, with pores both on the surface and in the cross section being affected by the different salts. This asymmetric morphology was also affected significantly by the acid concentration, with thicker filter skins for higher concentrations. The acid concentration affected the pores size and their distribution. The clay particles probably acted as a barrier to the flow. The permeating flux for the two acid concentrations varied as a function of the distinct morphologies. (author)

  20. Nanometer-Scale Pore Characteristics of Lacustrine Shale, Songliao Basin, NE China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    Full Text Available In shale, liquid hydrocarbons are accumulated mainly in nanometer-scale pores or fractures, so the pore types and PSDs (pore size distributions play a major role in the shale oil occurrence (free or absorbed state, amount of oil, and flow features. The pore types and PSDs of marine shale have been well studied; however, research on lacustrine shale is rare, especially for shale in the oil generation window, although lacustrine shale is deposited widely around the world. To investigate the relationship between nanometer-scale pores and oil occurrence in the lacustrine shale, 10 lacustrine shale core samples from Songliao Basin, NE China were analyzed. Analyses of these samples included geochemical measurements, SEM (scanning electron microscope observations, low pressure CO2 and N2 adsorption, and high-pressure mercury injection experiments. Analysis results indicate that: (1 Pore types in the lacustrine shale include inter-matrix pores, intergranular pores, organic matter pores, and dissolution pores, and these pores are dominated by mesopores and micropores; (2 There is no apparent correlation between pore volumes and clay content, however, a weak negative correlation is present between total pore volume and carbonate content; (3 Pores in lacustrine shale are well developed when the organic matter maturity (Ro is >1.0% and the pore volume is positively correlated with the TOC (total organic carbon content. The statistical results suggest that oil in lacustrine shale mainly occurs in pores with diameters larger than 40 nm. However, more research is needed to determine whether this minimum pore diameter for oil occurrence in lacustrine shale is widely applicable.

  1. Hydro-mechanical aspects: glacial loading/erosion - the opalinus clay study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschall, P.; Kupfer, T.; Kuhlmann, U.

    2004-01-01

    In Nagra's high level waste programme the future geological evolution of the investigation area in the Zurcher Weinland (NE Switzerland) is considered over a time period of around 1 Ma. Uplift, erosion and climatic changes were identified as processes that may affect the long-term performance of a repository for spent fuel (SF), vitrified high-level waste (HLW) and long-lived intermediate-level waste (ILW). The possible impact of those long-term processes on the barrier function of the host rock formation (Opalinus Clay) comprises: (i) the change of the vertical hydraulic gradient caused by changing recharge/discharge conditions in the regional aquifer systems; (ii) permeability enhancement of the host rock formation due to the uplift process; and (iii) expulsion of contaminated pore water from the disposal area as a result of repeated glacial loading. Due to the fact that the discharge level of the regional aquifer systems is defined by the Rhine valley and the regional recharge areas are characterised by moderate elevations (typically 2 are not expected within the next several million years. Hence, the topography of NE Switzerland together with the favourable hydraulic properties of the host rock formation prevent efficiently the vertical exchange of groundwater between the regional aquifer systems. Even on geological time scales of millions of years the expected vertical pore water flow through the host rock formation is in the order of 10 -14 m/s and lower. At present, the Opalinus Clay forms a perfect hydraulic barrier. The process of ongoing uplift, however, may give rise to embrittlement of the rock, entailed by permeability enhancement. Evidence for permeability enhancement of Opalinus Clay in shallow depth was observed by Hekel (1994). On the other hand, regional studies confirmed the low permeability of the Opalinus Clay formation in greater depth even when fractured (Gautschi, 2001; Marschall et al., 2003). Such evidence, together with conceptual

  2. Investigating the swelling pressure of compacted crushed-Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, C. S.; Tang, A. M.; Cui, Y. J.; Delage, P.; Schroeder, C.; De Laure, E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the swelling pressure of heavily compacted crushed Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone at a dry unit mass ρ d =2.0 Mg/m 3 using four different methods: constant-volume, swell-reload, zero-swell and adjusted constant-volume method. Results show that the swelling pressure varies in the range of 1-5 MPa and depends significantly on the test method. From the constant-volume tests, it is observed that the swelling behavior during wetting is a function of the suction and depends on both the hydration paths and wetting conditions (e.g. vapor-wetting or liquid-wetting). The swelling pressure decreases significantly with saturation time. To identify the microstructure changes of specimens before and after wetting, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tests were performed. It is observed that, after wetting, the large inter-aggregate pores observed in the as-compacted specimen are no longer apparent; the whole pattern is characterized by a general swell of hydrated clay particles, rendering the soil more homogenous. Results from MIP indicated that wetting caused a significant reduction of the entrance diameter of the dominant inter-aggregate pores from 2.1 to 0.5μm whereas intra-aggregate pores were not significantly influenced. (authors)

  3. Influence of the clay content and drying of successive no solvents change in the morphology of polyamide 6 / clay membranes; Influencia do teor de argila e da secagem por troca sucessiva de nao solventes na morfologia das membranas de poliamida 6 / argila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, C.H.; Ferreira, R.S.B.; Bezerra, E.B.; Leite, A.M.D.; Araujo, E.D.; Lira, H.L., E-mail: caio.henrique7@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Membranes of polyamide 6/clay nanocomposites with different contents (1 and 3%) of Brazilian bentonite clay using the technique of phase inversion was obtained. The nanocomposites were obtained in a co-rotating twin screw extruder, by the melt intercalation method and were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), which showed possibly an exfoliated and / or partially exfoliated structure was obtained. The membranes were dried at room temperature and also by successive exchange of non-solvents, to prevent collapse the pores using ethanol and n-hexane as a non-solvent. From the photomicrographs of top surface by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed to morphology change in the membranes from the presence of different clay contents as well as drying the same by successive exchange of non-solvents, obtaining membranes with larger amount of pores uniformly distributed. (author)

  4. Characterization of bentonite pore structure by combining chloride porosity and SAXS measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The total water porosity, chloride porosity and the microstructure were studied in compacted samples prepared from MX-80 and Deponit bentonites equilibrated through filter plates with 0.1 M NaCl solution for 12.5 months. The dry densities of the samples varied approximately from 0.7 to 1.55 g/cm 3 . XRD and SAXS (Small Angle X-ray Scattering) were used to study the microstructure of the bentonites. It was obvious that the chloride porosity was lower than the water porosity in both clays, which indicates the exclusion caused by the negatively charged montmorillonite surfaces. In the XRD and SAXS measurements the measured basal spaces represented by the diffraction peaks were smaller than the theoretical ones assuming a homogenous microstructure. This indicates that there was a substantial amount of water also in the pores, which were not represented by the peaks. This could explain the difference between the measured chloride porosity and the modelling curve obtained with the Donnan model. By combining the information from the SAXS measurements and the chloride exclusion measurements, it was possible to evaluate the volumes of the soft and dense fractions and the pore sizes in each fraction for MX-80. The chloride porosity was mostly caused by the pores in the soft clay where the pore size is larger. The volume of the soft fraction decreased and its density increased with increasing density of the sample. (authors)

  5. Characterization of Zeolite in Zeolite-Geopolymer Hybrid Bulk Materials Derived from Kaolinitic Clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayami Takeda

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Zeolite-geopolymer hybrid materials have been formed when kaolin was used as a starting material. Their characteristics are of interest because they can have a wide pore size distribution with micro- and meso-pores due to the zeolite and geopolymer, respectively. In this study, Zeolite-geopolymer hybrid bulk materials were fabricated using four kinds of kaolinitic clays (a halloysite and three kinds of kaolinite. The kaolinitic clays were first calcined at 700 °C for 3 h to transform into the amorphous aluminosilicate phases. Alkali-activation treatment of the metakaolin yielded bulk materials with different amounts and types of zeolite and different compressive strength. This study investigated the effects of the initial kaolinitic clays on the amount and types of zeolite in the resultant geopolymers as well as the strength of the bulk materials. The kaolinitic clays and their metakaolin were characterized by XRD analysis, chemical composition, crystallite size, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR analysis, and specific surface area measurements. The correlation between the amount of zeolite formed and the compressive strength of the resultant hybrid bulk materials, previously reported by other researchers was not positively observed. In the studied systems, the effects of Si/Al and crystalline size were observed. When the atomic ratio of Si/Al in the starting kaolinitic clays increased, the compressive strength of the hybrid bulk materials increased. The crystallite size of the zeolite in the hybrid bulk materials increased with decreasing compressive strength of the hybrid bulk materials.

  6. Interaction of polymer with discotic clay particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvray, L.; Lal, J.

    1999-01-01

    Normally synthetic well defined monodisperse discotic laponite clays are known to form a gel phase at mass concentrations as low as a few percent in distilled water. Hydrosoluble polymer polyethylene oxide was added to this intriguing clay system, it was observed that it either prevents gelation or slows it down extremely depending on the polymer weight, concentration or the laponite concentration. Small Angle Neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study these systems because only by isotopic labeling can the structure of the adsorbed polymer layers be determined. The contrast variation technique is specifically used to determine separately the different partial structure factors of the clay and polymer. In this way the signal of the adsorbed chains is separated from the signal of the free chains in the dilute regime. Attempts have also been made to characterize the structure in the concentrated regime of laponite with polymer

  7. Comparative study of illite clay and illite-based geopolymer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperberga, I; Sedmale, G; Zeila, K; Ulme, D; Stinkulis, G

    2011-01-01

    Quaternary (Q-clay) clayey deposits are one of the dominating parts of mineral raw materials of the sedimentary cover at present area of Latvia. These clays can be characterised by illite content up to 75-80 %. Two ways for use of illite clays were studied: conventional and geopolymers method. Purpose of the second mentioned method was showing the influence of alkali (KOH) on the transformation of Q-clay/illite structure. Obtained products were investigated by IR-spectroscopy, DTA and XRD, pore size distribution was determined as well. Some ceramic properties and compressive strength were determined and compared. IR-spectrum showed the effect of alkali on the transformation of Q-clay/illite structure in three main absorption bands: 3620-3415 cm -1 which is related to the vibrational modes of adsorbed water between SiO 4 and AlO 6 layers; new stronger absorption bands at 1635 cm -1 and 1435 cm -1 indicate on the appearance of vibrations in Q-KOH and are related to the K-O-Si bonds; the most essential changes are vibrations at 850 cm -1 showing the changes in the coordination number of Al from 6 to 4 for Q-KOH. Investigations of the bulk density in dependence on temperature showed the small increase of bulk density for Q-clay while - the relatively remarkable decrease for Q-clay/KOH. Mentioned values correlate with the compressive strength of Q-clay and Q-KOH products.

  8. Rheological properties of sodium smectite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boergesson, L.; Hoekmark, H.; Karnland, O.

    1988-12-01

    The rheological properties of Na-smectite Mx-80 have been investigated by various laboratory tests. The investigations include determination of the hydraulic conductivity, the undrained stress-strain-strength properties, the creep properties, the compression and swelling properties in drained and undrained conditions and the undrained thermomechanical properties. Measurements have been made at different densities, clay/sand mixtures and pore water compositions. The influence of temperature, rate of strain and testing technique has also been considered. The investigation has led to a supply of basic data for the material models which will be used at performance calculations. The results have also increased the general understanding of the function of smectitic clay as buffer material. The microstructural behaviour has been considered at the validation of the different test results and the validity of the effective stress theory has been discussed. Comparisons with the properties of Ca-smectite have also been made. (orig.)

  9. Clay nanoparticles effects on performance and morphology of poly(vinylidene fluoride membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. D. Morihama

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a comparison between neat poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF membrane and composite (PVDF-Nanoclay and PVDF-PVP-Nanoclay membranes is presented. All membranes were synthesized by the phase inversion process, using 18% PVDF, n-methylpyrrolidone as solvent and water as the non-solvent. Demineralized water cross-flow permeation tests were conducted to evaluate the membranes performance. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images of the membranes surface and cross-section and water contact angle measurements were used to estimate additives effects on membranes morphology. The results indicate that dopant addition affected membrane permeate flux and morphology. The 4% nanoclay composite membrane resulted in the highest ultrapure water permeability (0.9130 m³.m-2.h-1.MPa-1, lower hydraulic resistance (3.27´10+12.m-1, lower contact angle (87.1º and highest surface porosity (0.95%. Furthermore, it was verified that the membrane surface porosity increased with increasing clay nanoparticles concentrations. It was observed that the morphology of the membranes with clay nanoparticle addition is characterized by a thin surface layer, with macro-pores, a thin bottom layer, which has a sponge-like structure with micro-pores and a thick intermediate layer, with finger-like pores and macro-pores. It was also verified that the introduction of PVP promotes a denser morphology compared with membranes without it. Based on the SEM surface and cross-sectional images and permeability tests, it became evident that the internal pore morphology plays an important role in membrane performance, because the higher the frequency and extent of the finger-like pores in the intermediate layer the higher is the membrane permeability. These preliminary results indicated that the use of nanoclay as an additive for membrane casting is a promising procedure for improving membrane performance for water and wastewater treatment.

  10. Genotoxicity of clays with potential use in biopolymers for food packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Mortensen, Alicja; Hadrup, Niels

    Genotoxicity of clays with potential use in biopolymers for food packaging Plastics produced from biopolymers are of commercial interest as they are manufactured from renewable resources such as agricultural crop wastes and have the potential to meet environmental and health requirements. Biopoly......Genotoxicity of clays with potential use in biopolymers for food packaging Plastics produced from biopolymers are of commercial interest as they are manufactured from renewable resources such as agricultural crop wastes and have the potential to meet environmental and health requirements...... in crude suspensions (suspended in cell culture medium) and crude suspensions filtrated through a 0.2 µm pore size filter in order to investigate the potential effect of “nanoparticles” only. The two clays showed noticeable differences in genotoxicity; both crude and filtered suspensions of Cloisite...

  11. Spectroscopic characterization of schiff base-copper complexes immobilized in smectite clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M. Dias

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, the immobilization of some Schiff base-copper(II complexes in smectite clays is described as a strategy for the heterogenization of homogeneous catalysts. The obtained materials were characterized by spectroscopic techniques, mostly UV/Vis, EPR, XANES and luminescence spectroscopy. SWy-2 and synthetic Laponite clays were used for the immobilization of two different complexes that have previously shown catalytic activity in the dismutation of superoxide radicals, and disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide. The obtained results indicated the occurrence of an intriguing intramolecular redox process involving copper and the imine ligand at the surface of the clays. These studies are supported by computational calculations.

  12. The absorption of Mn-54 onto some kinds of clay in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Minh Khoa; Le Van So

    2000-01-01

    The absorption of radioactive Mn-54 from aqueous solutions by natural treated clay of Dilinh region has been investigated. The effect of many factors such as time, pH, carrier concentration... were studied. It was found that the uptake is maximum in neutral or slightly alkaline solutions. The experimental results show that natural clay is suited for the moval of radioactive Mn-54. These types of clay may be considered superior to synthetic exchangers for the removal of Mn-54 if the availability and price of the former are taken into account. (author)

  13. Induced polarization of clay-sand mixtures: experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okay, G.; Leroy, P.; Tournassat, C.; Ghorbani, A.; Jougnot, D.; Cosenza, P.; Camerlynck, C.; Cabrera, J.; Florsch, N.; Revil, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Frequency-domain induced polarization (IP) measurements consist of imposing an alternative sinusoidal electrical current (AC) at a given frequency and measuring the resulting electrical potential difference between two other non-polarizing electrodes. The magnitude of the conductivity and the phase lag between the current and the difference of potential can be expressed into a complex conductivity with the in-phase representing electro-migration and a quadrature conductivity representing the reversible storage of electrical charges (capacitive effect) of the porous material. Induced polarization has become an increasingly popular geophysical method for hydrogeological and environmental applications. These applications include for instance the characterization of clay materials used as permeability barriers in landfills or to contain various types of contaminants including radioactive wastes. The goal of our study is to get a better understanding of the influence of the clay content, clay mineralogy, and pore water salinity upon complex conductivity measurements of saturated clay-sand mixtures in the frequency range ∼1 mHz-12 kHz. The complex conductivity of saturated unconsolidated sand-clay mixtures was experimentally investigated using two types of clay minerals, kaolinite and smectite in the frequency range 1.4 mHz - 12 kHz. Four different types of samples were used, two containing mainly kaolinite (80% of the mass, the remaining containing 15% of smectite and 5% of illite/muscovite; 95% of kaolinite and 5% of illite/muscovite), and the two others containing mainly Na-smectite or Na-Ca-smectite (95% of the mass; bentonite). The experiments were performed with various clay contents (1, 5, 20, and 100% in volume of the sand-clay mixture) and salinities (distilled water, 0.1 g/L, 1 g/L, and 10 g/L NaCl solution). In total, 44 saturated clay or clay-sand mixtures were prepared. Induced polarization measurements

  14. Excess pore water pressure induced in the foundation of a tailings dyke at Muskeg River Mine, Fort McMurray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshraghian, A.; Martens, S. [Klohn Crippen Berger Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed the effect of staged construction on the generation and dissipation of excess pore water pressure within the foundation clayey units of the External Tailings Facility dyke. Data were compiled from piezometers installed within the dyke foundation and used to estimate the dissipation parameters for the clayey units for a selected area of the foundation. Spatial and temporal variations in the pore water pressure generation parameters were explained. Understanding the process by which excess pore water pressure is generated and dissipates is critical to optimizing dyke design and performance. Piezometric data was shown to be useful in improving estimates of the construction-induced pore water pressure and dissipation rates within the clay layers in the foundation during dyke construction. In staged construction, a controlled rate of load application is used to increase foundation stability. Excess pore water pressure dissipates after each application, so the most critical stability condition happens after each load. Slow loading allows dissipation, whereas previous load pressure remains during fast loading. The dyke design must account for the rate of loading and the rate of pore pressure dissipation. Controlling the rate of loading and the rate of stress-induced excess pore water pressure generation is important to dyke stability during construction. Effective stress-strength parameters for the foundation require predictions of the pore water pressure induced during staged construction. It was found that both direct and indirect loading generates excess pore water pressure in the foundation clays. 2 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs.

  15. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  16. Linking particle and pore-size distribution parameters to soil gas transport properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    , respectively) and the Campbell water retention parameter b were used to characterize particle and pore size distributions, respectively. Campbell b yielded a wide interval (4.6–26.2) and was highly correlated with α, β, and volumetric clay content. Both Dp/Do and ka followed simple power-law functions (PLFs......) of air-filled porosity (εa). The PLF tortuosity–connectivity factors (X*) for Dp/Do and ka were both highly correlated with all basic soil characteristics, in the order of volumetric clay content = Campbell b > gravimetric clay content > α > β. The PLF water blockage factors (H) for Dp/Do and ka were...... also well (but relatively more weakly) correlated with the basic soil characteristics, again with the best correlations to volumetric clay content and b. As a first attempt at developing a simple Dp/Do model useful at the field scale, we extended the classical Buckingham Dp/Do model (εa2) by a scaling...

  17. Basic science of new aerogels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Feasibility of making monolithic composite aerogels containing silica and natural clay minerals, synthetic clay minerals or zeolites has been demonstrated, using two different processes; up to 30 wt% of the mineral phase has been successfully added. Addition of natural and synthetic clay minerals or zeolites to silica aerosols was shown to retard densification. Composite silica aerogels showed significant surface area still present after sintering at 800 or 1000 C. For most samples, 1 wt% of the second phase is equally effective in retarding densification as 10 wt%. Composite aerogels, in general, had lower hardness values than pure silica. Hardness values were inversely proportional to aerogel pore radius.

  18. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: permeant cations chaperoned by anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-28

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  19. Microbiological analysis of the in situ bitumen-nitrate-Opalinus clay interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moors, Hugo; Boven, Patrick; Leys, Natalie; Geissler, Andrea; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Microscopy, molecular biology methods, ATP-measurements, and cultivation based techniques of the initial pore water samples, proved the presence and activity of bacteria. Analysis of the 16 S rDNA sequences obtained from the initial interval solutions, i.e. artificial pore water used to fill the intervals and which have been in contact with the surrounding clay for more than six months, indicates similar bacterial communities in all three solutions of the test intervals with the dominant population being Proteobacteria (81.5 - 94.9 %) and Firmicutes (3.4 - 11.1%). Actinobacteria (1.7 and 7.4%) have only been detected in the initial pore water of two intervals. The first results of the Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Amplification (RISA) analysis, using universal bacterial primers for 16 S rDNA968-983 and 23 S rDNA115-130, demonstrate that in both injection tests, i.e. nitrate (interval 1) or nitrate and acetate (interval 2), a strong shift in bacterial communities was induced. Just before the start of these injection tests the pore waters of the two intervals were strongly predominated by different Clostridial species most of them related to Desulfosporosinus species. In addition, smaller populations of Bacteroidetes and Beta- proteobacteria were found as well. Twenty-four hours later, a rapid and strong proliferation of Bacteroidetes, in interval 1, and of Alphaproteobacteria, in intervals 1 and 2, occurred. Specific for interval 1, a stimulation of Beta- and Deltaproteobacteria and a complete masking of the Clostridial groups had occurred. In contrast, in interval 2, Gammaproteobacteria were stimulated and some Clostridia continued to persist. This shift may be due to bacterial contamination of the exchanged interval solutions and/or the drastic change of carbon- and/or electron acceptor source

  20. Microbiological analysis of the in situ bitumen-nitrate-Opalinus clay interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moors, Hugo; Boven, Patrick; Leys, Natalie [SCK.CEN, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, Laboratory for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Boeretang 200, B-2400 MOL (Belgium); Geissler, Andrea; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf, Institute of Radiochemistry, Biogeochemistry, Bautzner Landstr. 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Microscopy, molecular biology methods, ATP-measurements, and cultivation based techniques of the initial pore water samples, proved the presence and activity of bacteria. Analysis of the {sup 16}S rDNA sequences obtained from the initial interval solutions, i.e. artificial pore water used to fill the intervals and which have been in contact with the surrounding clay for more than six months, indicates similar bacterial communities in all three solutions of the test intervals with the dominant population being Proteobacteria (81.5 - 94.9 %) and Firmicutes (3.4 - 11.1%). Actinobacteria (1.7 and 7.4%) have only been detected in the initial pore water of two intervals. The first results of the Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Amplification (RISA) analysis, using universal bacterial primers for {sup 16}S rDNA968-983 and {sup 23}S rDNA115-130, demonstrate that in both injection tests, i.e. nitrate (interval 1) or nitrate and acetate (interval 2), a strong shift in bacterial communities was induced. Just before the start of these injection tests the pore waters of the two intervals were strongly predominated by different Clostridial species most of them related to Desulfosporosinus species. In addition, smaller populations of Bacteroidetes and Beta- proteobacteria were found as well. Twenty-four hours later, a rapid and strong proliferation of Bacteroidetes, in interval 1, and of Alphaproteobacteria, in intervals 1 and 2, occurred. Specific for interval 1, a stimulation of Beta- and Deltaproteobacteria and a complete masking of the Clostridial groups had occurred. In contrast, in interval 2, Gammaproteobacteria were stimulated and some Clostridia continued to persist. This shift may be due to bacterial contamination of the exchanged interval solutions and/or the drastic change of carbon- and/or electron acceptor source.

  1. Clay mineral facies and lateritization in basalts of the southeastern Parana Basin, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.T.G. de; Formoso, M.L.L.; Trescases, J.J.; Meunier, A.

    1998-01-01

    Seventeen samples from two lateritic profiles, each with five facies, were studied. These profiles occur on the old planation surface of the plateau basalts of the southern part of ParanáBasin, Brazil. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, Mössbauer spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra were used to obtain information about the nature and chemical composition of each weathering facies. In addition, scanning electron microscopy and analyses of clay minerals were performed to detect microcrystalline environmental changes. Both profiles have two major parts: a loose red-clay latosol separated from an underlying mottled clay and an alterite facies; a stone line may or may not be present between the latosol and the underlying units. In both profiles the latosol consists principally of kaolinite, hematite and goethite. Two alterite facies, shaped by differential weathering, are also present in the lower profile: a halloysite–nontronite clayey matrix with a well developed fissure system occurs in the argillaceous alterite and a network of Al–goethite aggregates is typical of the highly porous cortex of the boulder alterite that is found in the stone line and below it. Gibbsite has crystallized in the large pores of porphyritic boulder alterite but is absent in the small pores of the subaphyric boulder alterite. Clay minerals observed in fissures include halloysite associated with goethite and manganese oxides. The basalt has hydrothermal green-clays (mixed layers and trioctahedral smectites) that formed between primary plagioclase, pyroxene and Ti–magnetite crystals while fresh corestones of the boulder alterite have cryptocrystalline iron-rich material. The study of these profiles shows one principal evolutionary trend for clay minerals. This trend is from smectite and mixed layers that form green clays in altered bedrock at the base of the profile to an intermediate association of nontronite and halloysite in the argillaceous

  2. Raman spectroscopy of adsorbed water in clays: first attempt at band assignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligny, Dominique de; Guillaud, Emmanuel [Institut Lumiere Matiere, CNRS, Universite Lyon 1, 12 rue Ada Byron, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Gailhanou, Helene; Blanc, Philippe [BRGM, Service D3E, 3 avenue Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France)

    2013-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be a useful tool to determine water content within clays, or even in highly saturated solutions. The following assignment is proposed for the OH region of SAz-2: the two large bands at 3260 and 3475 cm{sup -1} are assigned to water in pores, the first one to water molecules coordinated to the interlayer cations, and the second one to structural Al-OH groups The band at 3600 cm{sup -1} is therefore more likely related to adsorbed water on the clay surface. Simple intensity ratios of these different bands give good estimates of water content. (authors)

  3. Modified montmorillonite clay microparticles for stable oil-in-seawater emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jiannan; Worthen, Andrew J; Foster, Lynn M; Chen, Yunshen; Cornell, Kevin A; Bryant, Steven L; Truskett, Thomas M; Bielawski, Christopher W; Johnston, Keith P

    2014-07-23

    Environmentally benign clay particles are of great interest for the stabilization of Pickering emulsions. Dodecane-in-synthetic seawater (SSW) emulsions formed with montmorillonite (MMT) clay microparticles modified with bis(2-hydroxyethyl)oleylamine were stable against coalescence, even at clay concentrations down to 0.1% w/v. Remarkably, as little as 0.001% w/v surfactant lowered the hydrophilicity of the clay to a sufficient level for stabilization of oil-in-SSW emulsions. The favorable effect of SSW on droplet size reduction and emulsion stability enhancement is hypothesized to be due to reduced electrostatic repulsion between adsorbed clay particles and a consequent increase in the continuous phase (an aqueous clay suspension) viscosity. Water/oil (W/O) emulsions were inverted to O/W either by decreasing the mass ratio of surfactant-to-clay (transitional inversion) or by increasing the water volume fraction (catastrophic inversion). For both types of emulsions, coalescence was minimal and the sedimentation or creaming was highly correlated with the droplet size. For catastrophic inversions, the droplet size of the emulsions was smaller in the case of the preferred curvature. Suspensions of concentrated clay in oil dispersions in the presence of surfactant were stable against settling. The mass transfer pathways during emulsification of oil containing the clay particles were analyzed on the droplet size/stability phase diagrams to provide insight for the design of dispersant systems for remediating surface and subsurface oceanic oil spills.

  4. Water Retention Curves of Opalinus Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, M. V.; Romero, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    The water retention curve of Opalinus clay samples was determined under different conditions: total and matric suction, stress or no-stress conditions, wetting and drying paths. Through the fitting of these results to the van Genuchten expression the P parameter, related to the air entry value (AEV), was obtained. The AEV is the suction value above which air is able to enter the pores of the sample, and consequently, above which 2-phase flow can take place in the soil pore structure. The samples used in this research came from two different boreholes, BHT-1 and BHG-D1, but the behaviour of them did not depend on their location, what was probably due to the fact that both were drilled in the shay facies of the Opalinus clay. There was not a distinct difference between the results obtained under total or matric suctions. In the drying paths, both the water contents and the degrees of saturation tended to be higher when total suction was applied, however the reverse trend was observed for the water contents reached in wetting paths. As well, no clear difference was observed in the water retention curves obtained in odometers under matric and total suctions, what points to the osmotic component of suction in Opalinus clay not being significant. Overall, the water contents were lower and the degrees of saturation higher when suction was applied under vertical stress, what would indicate that the water retention capacity was lower under 8 MPa vertical stress than under free volume conditions. This vertical stress value is slightly higher than the maximum in situ stress. Also, the samples showed hysteresis according to the expected behaviour, i.e. the water contents for a given suction were higher during a drying path than during a wetting path. The P values obtained were between 6 and 34 MPa, and tended to be higher for the samples tested under stress, in drying paths and when total suction was used. The air entry value calculated from the mercury intrusion porosimetry

  5. Water Retention Curves of Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Romero, F. J.

    2012-11-01

    The water retention curve of Opalinus clay samples was determined under different conditions: total and matric suction, stress or no-stress conditions, wetting and drying paths. Through the fitting of these results to the van Genuchten expression the P parameter, related to the air entry value (AEV), was obtained. The AEV is the suction value above which air is able to enter the pores of the sample, and consequently, above which 2-phase flow can take place in the soil pore structure. The samples used in this research came from two different boreholes, BHT-1 and BHG-D1, but the behaviour of them did not depend on their location, what was probably due to the fact that both were drilled in the shay facies of the Opalinus clay. There was not a distinct difference between the results obtained under total or matric suctions. In the drying paths, both the water contents and the degrees of saturation tended to be higher when total suction was applied, however the reverse trend was observed for the water contents reached in wetting paths. As well, no clear difference was observed in the water retention curves obtained in odometers under matric and total suctions, what points to the osmotic component of suction in Opalinus clay not being significant. Overall, the water contents were lower and the degrees of saturation higher when suction was applied under vertical stress, what would indicate that the water retention capacity was lower under 8 MPa vertical stress than under free volume conditions. This vertical stress value is slightly higher than the maximum in situ stress. Also, the samples showed hysteresis according to the expected behaviour, i.e. the water contents for a given suction were higher during a drying path than during a wetting path. The P values obtained were between 6 and 34 MPa, and tended to be higher for the samples tested under stress, in drying paths and when total suction was used. The air entry value calculated from the mercury intrusion porosimetry

  6. Study of the influence of agricultural waste on the porosity of clay brick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelouah Nasser

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the influence of two organic residues on the porosity of clay bricks. The insulation capacity of the brick increases with increasing the porosity. Combustible organic additions are often used to form pores. The formation of the more homogenous porous structure is favourably impacted by using the crushed rough olive stones containing oil. Plasticity, bulk density and mechanical properties were studied. The additions of organic residues have proved successful to form pores while maintaining the mechanical properties in the limits of the Algerian norms.

  7. Pore-scale uncertainty quantification with multilevel Monte Carlo

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo

    2014-01-06

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of pore-scale transport processes in porous media have recently gained large popularity. However the geometrical details of the pore structures can be known only in a very low number of samples and the detailed flow computations can be carried out only on a limited number of cases. The explicit introduction of randomness in the geometry and in other setup parameters can be crucial for the optimization of pore-scale investigations for random homogenization. Since there are no generic ways to parametrize the randomness in the porescale structures, Monte Carlo techniques are the most accessible to compute statistics. We propose a multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) technique to reduce the computational cost of estimating quantities of interest within a prescribed accuracy constraint. Random samples of pore geometries with a hierarchy of geometrical complexities and grid refinements, are synthetically generated and used to propagate the uncertainties in the flow simulations and compute statistics of macro-scale effective parameters.

  8. Characterisation of gas transport properties of the Opalinus clay, a potential host rock formation for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschall, P.; Horseman, S.; Gimmi, T.

    2005-01-01

    The Opalinus Clay in Northern Switzerland has been identified as a potential host rock formation for the disposal of radioactive waste. Comprehensive understanding of gas transport processes through this low-permeability formation forms a key issue in the assessment of repository performance. Field investigations and laboratory experiments suggest an intrinsic permeability of the Opalinus Clay in the order of 10 -20 to 10 -21 m 2 and a moderate anisotropy ratio ≤ 10. Porosity depends on clay content and burial depth; values of ∼ 0.12 are reported for the region of interest. Porosimetry indicates that about 10-30% of voids can be classed as macro-pores, corresponding to an equivalent pore radius > 25 nm. The determined entry pressures are in the range of 0.4-10 MPa and exhibit a marked dependence on intrinsic permeability. Both in situ gas tests and gas permeameter tests on drill-cores demonstrate that gas transport through the rock is accompanied by pore water displacement, suggesting that classical flow concepts of immiscible displacement in porous media can be applied when the gas entry pressure (i.e. capillary threshold pressure) is less than the minimum principal stress acting within the rock. Essentially, the pore space accessible to gas flow is restricted to the network of connected macro-pores, which implies a very low degree of desaturation of the rock during the gas imbibition process. At elevated gas pressures (i.e. when gas pressure approaches the level of total stress that acts on the rock body), evidence was seen for dilatancy controlled gas transport mechanisms. Further field experiments were aimed at creating extended tensile fractures with high fracture transmissivity (hydro- or gas-fractures). The test results lead to the conclusion that gas fracturing can be largely ruled out as a risk for post-closure repository performance. (authors)

  9. Presence and evolution of natural organic matter in the boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Geet, M.; Deniau, I.; Largeau, C.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, A.; Dierckx, A.

    2004-01-01

    Because of its very low hydraulic conductivity, reducing conditions, slightly alkaline pH, high specific surface, high cation exchange capacity and high plasticity, the Boom Clay is studied as a reference host formation for the deep disposal of high-level long-lived radioactive waste (NIRAS/ONDRAF, 1989). However, Boom Clay also contains up to 5% wt. of organic matter (OM). As radionuclides can form complexes with this organic matter, a detailed characterisation and knowledge of the evolution of the organic matter is necessary. An overview of the characteristics of the organic matter present in Boom Clay is given by Van Geet et al., (2003). The solid phase OM can be up to 5%. The dissolved OM fraction is around 200 mg C per liter of Boom Clay pore water. Both kinds of OM will be discussed. Concerning the solid phase OM the focus will be on the past evolution and its possible future evolution due to a thermal stress. For the dissolved OM, the focus will be on its origin. (author)

  10. The Relationship between Elastic Properties and Shear Fabric in Clay-Rich Fault Gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenigsberg, A.; Saffer, D. M.; Riviere, J.; Ryan, K. L.; Marone, C.

    2016-12-01

    The low mechanical strength of major crustal faults remains a fundamental problem in geophysics and earthquake mechanics. Although both clay abundance and shear fabric are known as key controls on the frictional weakening of faults, the detailed links between fabric, elastic properties, composition, and fault strength remain poorly understood. This gap in information is in part because data are lacking to fully characterize the evolution of gouge microstructures and elastic properties during shearing. Here, we use seismic wave propagation to probe gouge ultrasonic and elastic properties, as a proxy for the development of shear fabrics. We report on a suite of direct shear experiments that include ultrasonic wave transmission to monitor compressional and shear wave velocities (Vp, Vs), during progressive shear of synthetic, clay-rich fault gouge. In order to better understand when and how clay grain alignment and nano-coatings begin to dominate the affect of shear fabric and local gouge density on elastic properties and shear strength, we studied a suite of synthetic gouges composed of Ca-montmorillonite and quartz ranging from 0-100% clay. Our laboratory experiments document friction coefficients (μ) ranging from 0.21 for gouges composed of 100% smectite to 0.62 for 100% quartz, with μ decreasing as clay content increases. We find that Vp and Vs increases as shear progresses and porosity decreases. Ongoing analyses of ultrasonic waves will assess variations of Vp, Vs, and elastic moduli throughout shear and as a function of gouge composition. We anticipate that these variations will be linked to formation of fabric elements observed via microstructural analysis, and will be indicative of whether quartz or clay is dominating how the fabrics form. Finally, we expect that clay content will be the dominant factor controlling shear fabric evolution and, consequently, the key control on the evolution of elastic properties with shear.

  11. The effect of clay amendment on substrate properties and growth of woody plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Meisl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the effect of two clay products differing in particle size distribution on properties of growing substrate and on growth of containerized woody plants in substrates amended with these clay products. Fine and coarse clay were added to a peat substrate, each at two rates. The peat substrate without clay was used as a control. The substrates were tested in experiments with two woody ornamentals (Thuja occidentalis ’Smaragd’ and Prunus cistena. Chemical and physical properties of the substrates were measured according to European Standards before planting. Proportion of water categories differing in availability to the plants were calculated from retention curves measured on the sand box. Properties of substrates in containers with and without plants were evaluated in the same way at the end of the culture. Clay addition changed chemical and physical properties of the tested substrates in terms: available nutrients content, particle density, bulk density, total pore volume, easy available water, water buffering capacity, air capacity, and shrinkage. The effect of fine clay was much stronger. In comparison with the clear effect of clay addition on the substrate chemical and physical properties, the effect on the growth and quality of model woody plants was not so explicit.

  12. A Study of Clay-Epoxy Nanocomposites Consisting of Unmodified Clay and Organo Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Edward

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Clay-epoxy nanocomposites were synthesized from DGEBA resin and montmorillonite clay with an in-situ polymerization. One type of untreated clay and two types of organo clay were used to produce the nanocompsoites. The aims of this study were to examine the nanocomposite structure using different tools and to compare the results between the unmodified clay and modified clays as nanofillers. Although diffractogram in reflection mode did not show any apparent peak of both types of materials, the transmitted XRD (X-Ray Difraction graphs, DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter analysis and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope images revealed that the modified clay-epoxy and unmodified clay-epoxy provides different results. Interestingly, the micrographs showed that some of the modified clay layers possessed non-exfoliated layers in the modified clay-epoxy nanocomposites. Clay aggregates and a hackle pattern were found from E-SEM images for both types of nanocomposite materials. It is shown that different tools should be used to determine the nanocomposite structure.

  13. Microbiologically mediated processes in a repository sited in a clay host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwyn, B.; Leupin, O. X.; Bagnoud, A.; Bernier-Latmani, R.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Because of their favourable retention properties for radionuclides, clay-rich sediments are being considered in Switzerland as host rocks for the geological disposal of high, intermediate- and low-level radioactive waste. Compacted bentonite is foreseen as backfill material in the high level waste repository whereas for intermediate- and low-level waste the near field will mainly consist of cementitious material. The evolution of both types of repositories, which includes re-saturation, heat generation (only high level waste), near field degradation, gas production and radionuclide release may be impacted by microbial activity and vice versa. In this respect questions arise such as: - Are microorganisms present in a repository and its host rock? - Under which condition are microorganisms active in and around a repository? - In which processes are microorganisms involved? Various in situ experiments in a wide range of geological environments have evidenced the presence of microorganisms. Whether the microorganisms found in these in situ experiments are indigenous or introduced by drilling or/and excavation activities is still controversial. However, recent findings suggest the presence of indigenous microorganisms in Opalinus Clay. To conclusively answer the question about the origin of microorganisms, an international investigation programme has been launched to probe rock samples from the Underground Rock Laboratory at Mont Terri. So far, no metabolic activity has been observed in undisturbed clay rocks. Such activity may have ceased during diagenetic compaction of the sediment as suggested by the pore water composition measured in the Callovian-Oxfordian clayey formation of Bure (France). For the safety case of a repository the origin of microorganisms is of minor importance compared to the understanding of the conditions under which they might be metabolically active. Pore size distribution and connectivity can

  14. Nano-biocomposites based on synthetic aliphatic polyesters and nanoclay

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ojijo, Vincent O

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an overview of the recent developments in the preparation, characterisation, properties, crystallisation behaviour, and melt rheology of clay-containing composites of biodegradable synthetic aliphatic polyesters such as poly...

  15. A minimalistic microbial food web in an excavated deep subsurface clay rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F; Diomidis, Nikitas; Leupin, Olivier X; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-01-01

    Clay rocks are being considered for radioactive waste disposal, but relatively little is known about the impact of microbes on the long-term safety of geological repositories. Thus, a more complete understanding of microbial community structure and function in these environments would provide further detail for the evaluation of the safety of geological disposal of radioactive waste in clay rocks. It would also provide a unique glimpse into a poorly studied deep subsurface microbial ecosystem. Previous studies concluded that microorganisms were present in pristine Opalinus Clay, but inactive. In this work, we describe the microbial community and assess the metabolic activities taking place within borehole water. Metagenomic sequencing and genome-binning of a porewater sample containing suspended clay particles revealed a remarkably simple heterotrophic microbial community, fueled by sedimentary organic carbon, mainly composed of two organisms: a Pseudomonas sp. fermenting bacterium growing on organic macromolecules and releasing organic acids and H2, and a sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae able to oxidize organic molecules to CO(2). In Opalinus Clay, this microbial system likely thrives where pore space allows it. In a repository, this may occur where the clay rock has been locally damaged by excavation or in engineered backfills. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Repository tunnel construction in deep clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, B.G.; Mair, R.J.; Taylor, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    One of the objects of the Hades project at Mol, Belgium has been to evaluate the feasibility of construction of a deep repository in the Boom clay formation at depth of approximately 225 metres. The main objective of the present project was to analyse and interpret the detailed geotechnical measurements made around the Hades trial shaft and tunnel excavations and evaluate the safety of radioactive waste disposal in a repository facility in deep clay formations. Plasticity calculations and finite element analyses were used which gave results consistent with the in-situ measurements. It was shown that effective stress analysis could successfully predict the observed field behaviour. Correct modelling of the small-strain stiffness of the Boom clay was essential if reasonable predictions of the pore pressure response due to construction are to be made. The calculations undertaken indicated that, even in the long term, the pressures on the test drift tunnel lining are likely to be significantly lower than the overburden pressure. Larger long-term tunnel lining pressures are predicted for impermeable linings. A series of laboratory stress path tests was undertaken to determine the strength and stiffness characteristics of the Boom clay. The tests were conducted at appropriate effective stress levels on high-quality samples retrieved during construction of the test drift. The apparatus developed for the testing is described and the results discussed. The development of a self boring retracting pressure-meter is described. This novel in-situ testing device was specifically designed to determine from direct measurements the convergence/confinement curve relevant to tunnelling in clay formations. 44 refs., 60 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Imaging techniques in clay sciences: a key tool to go a step further

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinet, J.C.; Michau, N.; Schaefer, T.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clay-rocks and clay based materials are greatly considered in nuclear waste geological repository due to their multiple favourable properties (low permeability, low diffusion coefficients, high retention capacity for radionuclides, swelling...). In this context, the study of clays and clay rocks covers a large variety of scientific disciplines such as geology, mineralogy, geomechanics, geochemistry or hydrodynamics. These disciplines are linked together by a common issue which is the understanding and the predicting of clay and clay-rock behaviors and properties under various thermal-hydrological-mechanical- chemical (THMC) conditions. Linking the fundamental forces to macroscopic (from millimeter to several meters) behaviors and properties is nevertheless not straightforward for porous media such as clay-rocks and clay based materials. Currently, it remains a key challenge for the scientific community. Imaging techniques offer solutions to face up this challenge by characterizing the internal microstructure of material and rocks at different levels of resolution. Due to the reactivity of clay minerals with water (swelling, mechanical deformation) or with repository components (mineral transformations at iron, copper or concrete interfaces) and the multi-scale distribution of pore and mineral sizes, classically ranged from nano-meter to millimeter, imaging clay based materials and clay-rocks itself is unanimously recognized as a challenging task. In the 80's, despite several constraints and limits, the microstructure of clays had been intensively imaged using conventional 2D imaging techniques such as optical microscopy, X-ray radiography, scanning electron microscopy or transmission electron microscopy [1]. The images acquired using these techniques have given us a pictorial frame of reference of the internal structures of clay rocks and clay based materials at various resolution levels. They have also highlighted

  18. Pore structure and function of synthetic nanopores with fixed charges: tip shape and rectification properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RamIrez, Patricio [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, E-46022 Valencia (Spain); Apel, Pavel Yu [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie street 6, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Cervera, Javier; Mafe, Salvador [Departament de Fisica de la Terra i Termodinamica, Universitat de Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)], E-mail: patraho@fis.upv.es

    2008-08-06

    We present a complete theoretical study of the relationship between the structure (tip shape and dimensions) and function (selectivity and rectification) of asymmetric nanopores on the basis of previous experimental studies. The theoretical model uses a continuum approach based on the Nernst-Planck equations. According to our results, the nanopore transport properties, such as current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, conductance, rectification ratio, and selectivity, are dictated mainly by the shape of the pore tip (we have distinguished bullet-like, conical, trumpet-like, and hybrid shapes) and the concentration of pore surface charges. As a consequence, the nanopore performance in practical applications will depend not only on the base and tip openings but also on the pore shape. In particular, we show that the pore opening dimensions estimated from the pore conductance can be very different, depending on the pore shape assumed. The results obtained can also be of practical relevance for the design of nanopores, nanopipettes, and nanoelectrodes, where the electrical interactions between the charges attached to the nanostructure and the mobile charges confined in the reduced volume of the inside solution dictate the device performance in practical applications. Because single tracks are the elementary building blocks for nanoporous membranes, the understanding and control of their individual properties should also be crucial in protein separation, water desalination, and bio-molecule detection using arrays of identical nanopores.

  19. Pore structure and function of synthetic nanopores with fixed charges: tip shape and rectification properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RamIrez, Patricio; Apel, Pavel Yu; Cervera, Javier; Mafe, Salvador

    2008-01-01

    We present a complete theoretical study of the relationship between the structure (tip shape and dimensions) and function (selectivity and rectification) of asymmetric nanopores on the basis of previous experimental studies. The theoretical model uses a continuum approach based on the Nernst-Planck equations. According to our results, the nanopore transport properties, such as current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, conductance, rectification ratio, and selectivity, are dictated mainly by the shape of the pore tip (we have distinguished bullet-like, conical, trumpet-like, and hybrid shapes) and the concentration of pore surface charges. As a consequence, the nanopore performance in practical applications will depend not only on the base and tip openings but also on the pore shape. In particular, we show that the pore opening dimensions estimated from the pore conductance can be very different, depending on the pore shape assumed. The results obtained can also be of practical relevance for the design of nanopores, nanopipettes, and nanoelectrodes, where the electrical interactions between the charges attached to the nanostructure and the mobile charges confined in the reduced volume of the inside solution dictate the device performance in practical applications. Because single tracks are the elementary building blocks for nanoporous membranes, the understanding and control of their individual properties should also be crucial in protein separation, water desalination, and bio-molecule detection using arrays of identical nanopores

  20. Pore structure and function of synthetic nanopores with fixed charges: tip shape and rectification properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Patricio; Apel, Pavel Yu; Cervera, Javier; Mafé, Salvador

    2008-08-06

    We present a complete theoretical study of the relationship between the structure (tip shape and dimensions) and function (selectivity and rectification) of asymmetric nanopores on the basis of previous experimental studies. The theoretical model uses a continuum approach based on the Nernst-Planck equations. According to our results, the nanopore transport properties, such as current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, conductance, rectification ratio, and selectivity, are dictated mainly by the shape of the pore tip (we have distinguished bullet-like, conical, trumpet-like, and hybrid shapes) and the concentration of pore surface charges. As a consequence, the nanopore performance in practical applications will depend not only on the base and tip openings but also on the pore shape. In particular, we show that the pore opening dimensions estimated from the pore conductance can be very different, depending on the pore shape assumed. The results obtained can also be of practical relevance for the design of nanopores, nanopipettes, and nanoelectrodes, where the electrical interactions between the charges attached to the nanostructure and the mobile charges confined in the reduced volume of the inside solution dictate the device performance in practical applications. Because single tracks are the elementary building blocks for nanoporous membranes, the understanding and control of their individual properties should also be crucial in protein separation, water desalination, and bio-molecule detection using arrays of identical nanopores.

  1. Study on rich alumina alkali-activated slag clay minerals cementitious materials for immobilization of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuxiang; Qian Guangren; Yi Facheng; Shi Rongming; Fu Yibei; Li Lihua; Zhang Jun

    1999-01-01

    The composition and some properties of its pastes of rich alumina alkali-activated slag clay minerals (RAAASCM) cementitious materials for immobilization of radioactive waste are studied. Experimental results show that heat activated kaolinite, Xingjiang zeolite, modified attapulgite clay are better constituents of RAAASCM. RAAASCM cementitious materials pastes exhibit high strength, low porosity, fewer harmful pore, and high resistance to sulphate corrosion as well as gamma irradiation. The Sr 2+ , Cs + leaching portion of the simulated radioactive waste forms based on RAAASCM, is low

  2. Geotechnical aspects of tunnel construction in deep clay formations for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Moor, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    The significant factors affecting the construction of tunnels in deep clay formations for radioactive waste disposal were outlined. Two aspects of tunneling were discussed; the feasibility of tunnel construction and changes in pore water pressure that might occur with time. Some results of model tunnel tests and analyses were presented. (U.K.)

  3. Hydrophobic Modification of Layered Clays and Compatibility for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Jen Lin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the intercalation and exfoliation of layered clays with polymeric intercalating agents involving poly(oxypropylene-amines and the particular uses for epoxy nanocomposites are reviewed. For intercalation, counter-ionic exchange reactions of clays including cationic layered silicates and anionic Al-Mg layered double hydroxide (LDH with polymeric organic ions afforded organoclays led to spatial interlayer expansion from 12 to 92 Å (X-ray diffraction as well as hydrophobic property. The inorganic clays of layered structure could be modified by the poly(oxypropyleneamine-salts as the intercalating agents with molecular weights ranging from 230 to 5,000 g/mol. Furthermore, natural montmorillonite (MMT clay could be exfoliated into thin layer silicate platelets (ca. 1 nm thickness in one step by using polymeric types of exfoliating agents. Different lateral dimensions of MMT, synthetic fluorinated Mica and LDH clays had been cured into epoxy nanocomposites. The hydrophobic amine-salt modification resulting in high spacing of layered or exfoliation of individual clay platelets is the most important factor for gaining significant improvements of properties. In particular, these modified clays were reported to gain significant improvements such as reduced coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE, enhanced thermal stability, and hardness. The utilization of these layered clays for initiating the epoxy self-polymerization was also reported to have a unique compatibility between clay and organic resin matrix. However, the matrix domain lacks of covalently bonded crosslink and leads to the isolation of powder material. It is generally concluded that the hydrophobic expansion of the clay inter-gallery spacing is the crucial step for enhancing the compatibility and the ultimate preparation of the advanced epoxy materials.

  4. Hydrophobic Modification of Layered Clays and Compatibility for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiang-Jen; Chan, Ying-Nan; Lan, Yi-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on the intercalation and exfoliation of layered clays with polymeric intercalating agents involving poly(oxypropylene)-amines and the particular uses for epoxy nanocomposites are reviewed. For intercalation, counter-ionic exchange reactions of clays including cationic layered silicates and anionic Al-Mg layered double hydroxide (LDH) with polymeric organic ions afforded organoclays led to spatial interlayer expansion from 12 to 92 Å (X-ray diffraction) as well as hydrophobic property. The inorganic clays of layered structure could be modified by the poly(oxypropylene)amine-salts as the intercalating agents with molecular weights ranging from 230 to 5,000 g/mol. Furthermore, natural montmorillonite (MMT) clay could be exfoliated into thin layer silicate platelets (ca. 1 nm thickness) in one step by using polymeric types of exfoliating agents. Different lateral dimensions of MMT, synthetic fluorinated Mica and LDH clays had been cured into epoxy nanocomposites. The hydrophobic amine-salt modification resulting in high spacing of layered or exfoliation of individual clay platelets is the most important factor for gaining significant improvements of properties. In particular, these modified clays were reported to gain significant improvements such as reduced coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), enhanced thermal stability, and hardness. The utilization of these layered clays for initiating the epoxy self-polymerization was also reported to have a unique compatibility between clay and organic resin matrix. However, the matrix domain lacks of covalently bonded crosslink and leads to the isolation of powder material. It is generally concluded that the hydrophobic expansion of the clay inter-gallery spacing is the crucial step for enhancing the compatibility and the ultimate preparation of the advanced epoxy materials.

  5. Experimental study of water sorption and clays swelling by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and digital image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes-Hernandez, G.

    2002-10-01

    This work deals with the study of water sorption and clays swelling (MX80 bentonite and Paris basin argilites). A new approach by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) coupled to digital image analysis is proposed to estimate the swelling with time and the relative humidity. The ESEM is a new generation tool, not much used in the clays domain, which allows to study hydrated materials in different conditions of relative humidity. In this work, it is shown that qualitative and quantitative information about clays swelling at the aggregate scale can be obtained. The study of the kinetics allows to identify three swelling steps which are described by a first order kinetic model. The study of water sorption by raw bentonite and the exchange of different cation (Na + , Li + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ ) has permitted to analyze the cation influence on the swelling potential. The adsorption kinetics, described by a second order model, depends directly on the relative humidity, on the mass of the sample and on the compensating cation. The study of the texture of the compacted MX80 bentonite in dry and humid conditions has permitted to observe the morphological evolution of the porous network (macro-porosity) during the hydration/dehydration. From different analytical approaches, a diminution of the macro-pores and/or meso-pores size and the opening of inter-aggregate pores is observed when the apparent density increases. The study of the influence of the instantaneous water condensation/evaporation on the argilites shows that the sensitiveness to water increases when the proportion of clay increases. In particular, it is characterized by a cracking partially reversible or irreversible after several condensation/evaporation cycles. (J.S.)

  6. Pore design of pelletised VOX/ZrO2-SO4/Sepiolite composite catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Due-Hansen, Johannes; Yates, M.

    2010-01-01

    The NH3-SCR activities of a series of extruded and calcined VOX/ZrO2-SO4 - sepiolite catalysts were determined. The pore structures were heavily influenced by the clay content with macropore sizes ranging from 50 to >1000 nm. Mechanical strength and SCR activity measurements suggested that 25% w/....../w sepiolite is the optimal catalyst composition....

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Acid and Alkaline Treated Kaolin Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaolin was refluxed with HNO3, HCl, H3PO4, CH3COOH, and NaOH of 3M concentration at 110 °C for 4 hours followed by calcination at 550 °C for 2 hours. The physico-chemical characteristics of resulted leached kaolinite clay were studied by XRF, XRD, FTIR, TGA, DTA, SEM and N2 adsorption techniques. XRF and FTIR study indicate that acid treatment under reflux conditions lead to the removal of the octahedral Al3+ cations along with other impurities. XRD of acid treated clay shows that, the peak intensity was found to decrease. Extent of leaching of Al3+ ions is different for different acid/base treatment. The acid treatment increased the Si/Al ratio, surface area and pore volume of the clay. Thus, the treated kaolin clay can be used as promising adsorbent and catalyst supports. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 1st March 2013; Revised: 9th April 2013; Accepted: 19th April 2013[How to Cite: Kumar, S., Panda, A. K., Singh, R.K. (2013. Preparation and Characterization of Acids and Alkali Treated Kaolin Clay. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 8 (1: 61-69. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4530.61-69][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4530.61-69] |View in  |

  8. Pyrolysis of attapulgite clay blended with yak dung enhances pasture growth and soil health: Characterization and initial field trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khalid; Joseph, Stephen D; Li, Fei; Bai, Yanfu; Shang, Zhanhuan; Rawal, Aditya; Hook, James M; Munroe, Paul R; Donne, Scott; Taherymoosavi, Sara; Mitchell, David R G; Pace, Ben; Mohammed, Mohanad; Horvat, Joseph; Marjo, Christopher E; Wagner, Avital; Wang, Yanlong; Ye, Jun; Long, Rui-Jun

    2017-12-31

    Recent studies have shown that the pyrolysis of biomass combined with clay can result in both lower cost and increase in plant yields. One of the major sources of nutrients for pasture growth, as well as fuel and building materials in Tibet is yak dung. This paper reports on the initial field testing in a pasture setting in Tibet using yak dung, biochar, and attapulgite clay/yak dung biochars produced at ratios of 10/90 and 50/50 clay to dung. We found that the treatment with attapulgite clay/yak dung (50/50) biochar resulted in the highest pasture yields and grass nutrition quality. We also measured the properties and yields of mixtures of clay/yak dung biochar used in the field trials produced at 400°C and 500°C to help determine a possible optimum final pyrolysis temperature and dung/clay ratio. It was observed that increasing clay content increased carbon stability, overall biochar yield, pore size, carboxyl and ketone/aldehyde functional groups, hematite and ferrous/ferric sulphate/thiosulphate concentration, surface area and magnetic moment. Decreasing clay content resulted in higher pH, CEC, N content and an enhanced ability to accept and donate electrons. The resulting properties were a complex function of both processing temperature and the percentage of clay for the biochars processed at both 400°C and 500°C. It is possible that the increase in yield and nutrient uptake in the field trial is related to the higher concentration of C/O functional groups, higher surface area and pore volume and higher content of Fe/O/S nanoparticles of multiple oxidation state in the 50/50 clay/dung. These properties have been found to significantly increase the abundance of beneficial microorganisms and hence improve the nutrient cycling and availability in soil. Further field trials are required to determine the optimum pyrolysis production conditions and application rate on the abundance of beneficial microorganisms, yields and nutrient quality. Copyright © 2017

  9. Measurement of gas permeability through geo-synthetic clay liners; Mesure de la permeabilite au gaz a travers des geosynthetiques bentonitiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouazza, A.; Vangpaisal, T. [Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2000-07-01

    While much research has been performed to investigate the ability of GCLs to limit flow through minimization of the saturated hydraulic conductivity, very little is known about their capabilities to control gas flux and therefore reducing gas migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding landfills. The aim of this study was to assess gas flow through GCLs with a simple and reliable testing procedure. A gas permeameter was developed to study gas flow through partially saturated geo-synthetic clay liners (GCLs). Measurements of the differential pressure across the GCL sample at varying flow rates were used to calculate gas permeability at different moisture contents. For the range of water content studied (65% < {omega} < 128%) a decrease of around 4 orders of magnitude in the GCL permeability has been observed. This suggests that the GCL degree of hydration during the design life of a waste containment facility is an important issue to address in the design process of a lining or cover system using a GCL. (authors)

  10. Treatment and characterization of clays (Brasgel and Green Bentonite) for use in zinc removal tests of synthetic effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patricio, A.C.L.; Silva, M.M. da; Lima, W.S.; Laborde, H.M.; Rodrigues, M.G.F.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to synthesize two organophilic clays starting from the green Bentonite clay and Brasgel in their natural forms and to evaluate the potential in the process of zinc removal of wastewater through a finite bath system. After the treatment process, the clays in the natural and organophilic form were characterized by the techniques of X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Infrared Spectroscopy (IR), in addition, organophilic clays obtained were submitted to the swelling of Foster, aiming to analyze their behavior in certain organic solvents. The analysis of the efficiency of organophilic clays in the Zn"+"2 removal process was performed in solutions based on a factorial design 2"2 + 3 replicates in the central point, having as analysis variables the pH of the solution (3.0 to 5.0) and the initial concentration of zinc ranging from 10 to 50 ppm

  11. Atomic force microscopy analysis of synthetic membranes applied in release studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olejnik, Anna, E-mail: annamar@amu.edu.pl; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We compare eight synthetic membranes by atomic force microscopy. • We predict the behavior of membranes in the release experiments. • The polymeric synthetic membranes varied in shape and size. • We detect substructures in pores of cellulose esters and nylon membranes. • Substructures limit the release rate of active compound. - Abstract: Synthetic membranes are commonly used in drug release studies and are applied mostly in quality control. They contain pores through which the drug can be diffused directly into the receptor fluid. Investigation of synthetic membranes permits determination of their structure and characterization of their properties. We suggest that the preliminary characterization of the membranes can be relevant to the interpretation of the release results. The aim of this study was to compare eight synthetic membranes by using atomic force microscopy in order to predict and understand their behavior in the release experiments. The results proved that polytetrafluoroethylene membrane was not suitable for the release study of tetrapeptide due to its hydrophobic nature, thickness and the specific structure with high trapezoid shaped blocks. The additional substructures in pores of mixed cellulose esters and nylon membranes detected by AFM influenced the diffusion rate of the active compound. These findings indicate that the selection of the membrane for the release studies should be performed cautiously by taking into consideration the membrane properties and by analyzing them prior the experiment.

  12. Atomic force microscopy analysis of synthetic membranes applied in release studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olejnik, Anna; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We compare eight synthetic membranes by atomic force microscopy. • We predict the behavior of membranes in the release experiments. • The polymeric synthetic membranes varied in shape and size. • We detect substructures in pores of cellulose esters and nylon membranes. • Substructures limit the release rate of active compound. - Abstract: Synthetic membranes are commonly used in drug release studies and are applied mostly in quality control. They contain pores through which the drug can be diffused directly into the receptor fluid. Investigation of synthetic membranes permits determination of their structure and characterization of their properties. We suggest that the preliminary characterization of the membranes can be relevant to the interpretation of the release results. The aim of this study was to compare eight synthetic membranes by using atomic force microscopy in order to predict and understand their behavior in the release experiments. The results proved that polytetrafluoroethylene membrane was not suitable for the release study of tetrapeptide due to its hydrophobic nature, thickness and the specific structure with high trapezoid shaped blocks. The additional substructures in pores of mixed cellulose esters and nylon membranes detected by AFM influenced the diffusion rate of the active compound. These findings indicate that the selection of the membrane for the release studies should be performed cautiously by taking into consideration the membrane properties and by analyzing them prior the experiment.

  13. Influence of Clay Content, Mineralogy and Fabric On Radar Frequency Response of Aquifer Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, L. J.; Handley, K.

    High frequency electromagnetic methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) and time domain reflectometry (TDR) are widely employed to measure water saturation in the vadose zone and water filled porosity in the saturated zone. However, previous work has shown that radar frequency dielectric properties are strongly influenced by clay as well as by water content. They have also shown that that the dielectric response of clay minerals is strongly frequency dependent, and that even a small proportion of clay such as that present in many sandstone aquifers can have a large effect at typi- cal GPR frequencies (around 100MHz). Hence accurate water content/porosity deter- mination requires clay type and content to be taken into account. Reported here are dielectric measurements on clay-sand mixtures, aimed at investigating the influence of clay mineralogy, particle shape, and the geometrical arrangement of the mixture constituents on GPR and TDR response. Dielectric permittivity (at 50-1000MHz) was measured for mixtures of Ottawa Sand and various clay minerals or clay size quartz rock flour, using a specially constructed dielectric cell. Both homogeneous and layered mixtures were tested. The influence of pore water salinity, clay type, and particle arrangement on the dielectric response is interpreted in terms of dielectric dispersion mechanisms. The appropriateness of var- ious dielectric mixing rules such as the Complex Refractive Index Method (CRIM) for determination of water content or porosity from field GPR and TDR data are dis- cussed.

  14. Anisotropy of the Subsoil Pore System As Affected by High Mechanical Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berisso, Feto Esimo; Schjønning, Per; Keller, Thomas

    and horizontally at 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9 m depths (the two lower depths only in Sweden) in two treatments (compacted and control). Water retention, air permeability (ka) and gas diffusivity (Ds/Do) were determined in the laboratory. We defined an anisotropy factor (AF) as the ratio of a certain soil property...... measured in the horizontal direction to the same property measured in vertical direction. For both soils and both treatments, ka at -100 hPa was higher in vertical direction than in horizontal direction (AF ....12 – 0.34 in the sandy loam soil and clay soil, respectively. AF was closer to 1 for the compacted treatments for both soils. We applied Ball’s tube model for the pore system and calculated the number of soil pores in a given soil cross-sectional area and the tube-equivalent pore diameter. Vertical cores...

  15. Adsorption of polar aromatic hydrocarbons on synthetic calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lene; Grahl-Madsen, Laila; Grøn, Christian

    1996-01-01

    The wettability of hydrocarbon reservoirs depends on how and to what extent the organic compounds are adsorbed onto the surfaces of calcite, quartz and clay. A model system of synthetic call cite, cyclohexane and the three probe molecules: benzoic acid, benzyl alcohol and benzylamine, have been...

  16. In situ geochemical properties of clays subject to thermal loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.A.

    1980-01-01

    Compositional variation and geochemical environment in an argillaceous unit are a function of age, depth of burial and mode of origin. This paper considers the variation limits likely to be encountered in potential repository host rocks and examines the significance of factors such as porosity, pore-fluid pressure, total fluid content, and major and accessory mineral component behaviors in controlling the geochemical environment in the neighbourhood of a thermally active waste canister. Particular attention is paid to the use of Eh-pH diagrams in assessing corrosion environments and nuclide speciation. The paper outlines the variables which must be considered when endeavouring to interpret such plots (e.g. temperature, concentration, concurrent reactions and probabilities) and uses the behavior of various iron minerals found in clay deposits under specific conditions to illustrate the complexities. The overall thermal stability of various clay and accessory minerals is discussed and extended to attempt to predict behavior under deep repository conditions, using available data on the diagenetic characteristics of clay-rich sediments. The physical behavior of fluids in plastic clays is considered and methods evaluated for deriving induced geochemical conditions in a thermally active repository. The latter section is particularly related to canister corrosion studies, in situ experiments, and waste dissolution parameters

  17. Large scale structures in liquid crystal/clay colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S.; Klein, Susanne; Leach, Edward; Pizzey, Claire; Richardson, Robert M.

    2005-04-01

    Suspensions of three different clays in K15, a thermotropic liquid crystal, have been studied by optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering. The three clays were claytone AF, a surface treated natural montmorillonite, laponite RD, a synthetic hectorite, and mined sepiolite. The claytone and laponite were sterically stabilized whereas sepiolite formed a relatively stable suspension in K15 without any surface treatment. Micrographs of the different suspensions revealed that all three suspensions contained large scale structures. The nature of these aggregates was investigated using small angle x-ray scattering. For the clays with sheet-like particles, claytone and laponite, the flocs contain a mixture of stacked and single platelets. The basal spacing in the stacks was independent of particle concentration in the suspension and the phase of the solvent. The number of platelets in the stack and their percentage in the suspension varied with concentration and the aspect ratio of the platelets. The lath shaped sepiolite did not show any tendency to organize into ordered structures. Here the aggregates are networks of randomly oriented single rods.

  18. Large scale structures in liquid crystal/clay colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duijneveldt, Jeroen S van; Klein, Susanne; Leach, Edward; Pizzey, Claire; Richardson, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Suspensions of three different clays in K15, a thermotropic liquid crystal, have been studied by optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering. The three clays were claytone AF, a surface treated natural montmorillonite, laponite RD, a synthetic hectorite, and mined sepiolite. The claytone and laponite were sterically stabilized whereas sepiolite formed a relatively stable suspension in K15 without any surface treatment. Micrographs of the different suspensions revealed that all three suspensions contained large scale structures. The nature of these aggregates was investigated using small angle x-ray scattering. For the clays with sheet-like particles, claytone and laponite, the flocs contain a mixture of stacked and single platelets. The basal spacing in the stacks was independent of particle concentration in the suspension and the phase of the solvent. The number of platelets in the stack and their percentage in the suspension varied with concentration and the aspect ratio of the platelets. The lath shaped sepiolite did not show any tendency to organize into ordered structures. Here the aggregates are networks of randomly oriented single rods

  19. Thermal activation and characterization of clay aiming their use as sorbent in fixed bed columns to remove cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.M. da; Rodrigues, M.G.F.; Silva, M.L.P.; Kleinübing, S.J.; Silva, M.G.C.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we studied the removal of cadmium in a synthetic wastewater using clay of Pernambuco - Brazil, in systems of fixed bed column. Clay was thermally activated at 500 °C. The materials were characterized using X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption (BET method). For tests in fixed bed column, we applied a factorial design 2"2 and found that increasing the flow adversely affects the process of removing cadmium concentration while acting positively. The studies showed these materials as promising for the removal of Cd"2"+ ions in synthetic wastewater containing low levels of this metal. (author)

  20. Visualizing and Quantifying Bioaccessible Pores in Field-Aged Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Clay Soils Using Synchrotron-based X-ray Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W.; Kim, J.; Zhu, N.; McBeth, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial hydrocarbon degradation is environmentally significant and applicable to contaminated site remediation practices only when hydrocarbons (substrates) are physically bioaccessible to bacteria in soil matrices. Powerful X-rays are produced by synchrotron radiation, allowing for bioaccessible pores in soil (larger than 4 microns), where bacteria can be accommodated, colonize and remain active, can be visualized at a much higher resolution. This study visualized and quantified such bioaccessible pores in intact field-aged, oil-contaminated unsaturated soil fractions, and examined the relationship between the abundance of bioaccessible pores and hydrocarbon biodegradation. Using synchrotron-based X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) at the Canadian Light Source, a large dataset of soil particle characteristics, such as pore volumes, surface areas, number of pores and pore size distribution, was generated. Duplicate samples of five different soil fractions with different soil aggregate sizes and water contents (13, 18 and 25%) were examined. The method for calculating the number and distribution of bioaccessible pores using CT images was validated using the known porosity of Ottawa sand. This study indicated that the distribution of bioaccessible pore sizes in soil fractions are very closely related to microbial enhancement. A follow-up aerobic biodegradation experiment for the soils at 17 °C (average site temperature) over 90 days confirmed that a notable decrease in hydrocarbon concentrations occurred in soils fractions with abundant bioaccessible pores and with a larger number of pores between 10 and 100 μm. The hydrocarbon degradation in bioactive soil fractions was extended to relatively high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons (C16-C34). This study provides quantitative information about how internal soil pore characteristics can influence bioremediation performance.

  1. Effect of temperature on the containment properties of argillaceous rocks: The case study of Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoye, S.; Goutelard, F.; Beaucaire, C.; Charles, Y.; Fayette, A.; Herbette, M.; Larabi, Y.; Coelho, D.

    2011-01-01

    Heat generated by high level radioactive wastes could alter the performance of a clay repository. It was intended to investigate the effect of such a thermal period on the diffusive properties of Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones. Thus, through-diffusion experiments with HTO, 36 Cl, 22 Na and 137 Cs were performed before, during and after stages of heating at 80 degrees C that lasted for up to one year. A special attention was paid to limit the occurrence of any chemical disturbance. Therefore (i) the temperature was raised to 80 degrees C, then progressively brought back to 21 degrees C, thanks to three intermediate temperature stages, and (ii) specific synthetic solutions were used for each temperature, chemistry of which being close to the equilibrium state, especially with respect to the carbonate and sulphate minerals. It was found that experiments carried out at 80 degrees C showed a clear increase of the effective diffusion coefficient values for the four tracers with respect to those obtained at 21 degrees C (by a factor of 3 for HTO and 36 Cl, 5 for 22 Na and 2 for 137 Cs). On the other hand, the porosity and rock capacity values did not exhibit any significant discrepancy between 21 degrees C and 80 degrees C, indicating no observable damage of both the pore conducing network and the sorption properties of clay minerals. The Stokes-Einstein relationship, based on the temperature dependency of the viscosity of bulk water, could be used to describe the temperature dependence of the diffusion of HTO and 36 Cl but failed to describe the diffusive evolution of the two sorbing cations, 22 Na and 137 Cs. Furthermore, experiments performed after the thermal period led to diffusive properties well matching those obtained before heating. All these results suggest that at the lab scale the heating of rock samples would not alter the clay-stone containment properties. (authors)

  2. Geotechnical variability of permafrozen glaciomarine clays in Sdr. Strømfjord in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels Nielsen; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Belmonte, Louise Josefine

    2014-01-01

    -going in the area at Strømfjordshavn. The C14 datings of marine shells collected on the marine clay terraces at level 300kPa. Clay minerals were weathered causing moderate to high activity and plasticity despite the formation age of only 7000 years. (b) The "River Bank Erosion Cut" 2 km east of the Airport Terminal...... level with Upper Marine Limit (UML) varying from +120 to +140m at the West Coast to +40 at Kangerlussuaq. This retreat is well documented through C14-dating in the local area near to Kangerlussuaq Airport related to Fjord Stages F2 (+60m/8300 y BC) and F3 (+40m/8100 y BC) and Mt. Keglen stage (+40m/7200....... We studied a frozen marine clay deposit at +35 m with stratified ice layers under sandy gravel top layer. During laboratory analysis using fall cone testing a thawed clay sample was found to be quick (St>700) due to dilution of pore water salts. Multidisciplinary approach was necessary for this study....

  3. Interaction and transport of actinides in natural clay rock with consideration of humic substances and clay organics. Characterization and quantification of the influence of clay organics on the interaction and diffusion of uranium and americium in the clay. Joint project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, Gert; Schmeide, Katja; Joseph, Claudia; Sachs, Susanne; Steudtner, Robin; Raditzky, Bianca; Guenther, Alix

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this project was the study of basic interaction processes in the systems actinide - clay organics - aquifer and actinide - natural clay - clay organics - aquifer. Thus, complexation, redox, sorption and diffusion studies were performed. To evaluate the influence of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur containing functional groups of humic acid (HA) on the complexation of actinides in comparison to carboxylic groups, the Am(III) and U(VI) complexation by model ligands was studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TRLFS. The results show that Am(III) is mainly coordinated via carboxylic groups, however, probably stabilized by nitrogen groups. The U(VI) complexation is dominated by carboxylic groups, whereas nitrogen and sulfur containing groups play a minor role. Phosphorus containing groups may contribute to the U(VI) complexation by HA, however, due to their low concentration in HA they play only a subordinate role compared to carboxylic groups. Applying synthetic HA with varying sulfur contents (0 to 6.9 wt.%), the role of sulfur functionalities of HA for the U(VI) complexation and Np(V) reduction was studied. The results have shown that sulfur functionalities can be involved in U(VI) humate complexation and act as redox-active sites in HA for the Np(V) reduction. However, due to the low content of sulfur in natural HA, its influence is less pronounced. In the presence of carbonate, the U(VI) complexation by HA was studied in the alkaline pH range by means of cryo-TRLFS (-120 C) and ATR FT-IR spectroscopy. The formation of the ternary UO 2 (CO 3 ) 2 HA(II) 4- complex was detected. The complex formation constant was determined with log β 0.1 M = 24.57 ± 0.17. For aqueous U(VI) citrate and oxalate species, luminescence emission properties were determined by cryo-TRLFS and used to determine stability constants. The existing data base could be validated. The U(VI) complexation by lactate, studied in the temperature range 7 to 65 C, was found to be endothermic

  4. Interaction and transport of actinides in natural clay rock with consideration of humic substances and clay organics. Characterization and quantification of the influence of clay organics on the interaction and diffusion of uranium and americium in the clay. Joint project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhard, Gert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (Germany). Inst. of Radiochemistry; Schmeide, Katja; Joseph, Claudia; Sachs, Susanne; Steudtner, Robin; Raditzky, Bianca; Guenther, Alix

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this project was the study of basic interaction processes in the systems actinide - clay organics - aquifer and actinide - natural clay - clay organics - aquifer. Thus, complexation, redox, sorption and diffusion studies were performed. To evaluate the influence of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur containing functional groups of humic acid (HA) on the complexation of actinides in comparison to carboxylic groups, the Am(III) and U(VI) complexation by model ligands was studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TRLFS. The results show that Am(III) is mainly coordinated via carboxylic groups, however, probably stabilized by nitrogen groups. The U(VI) complexation is dominated by carboxylic groups, whereas nitrogen and sulfur containing groups play a minor role. Phosphorus containing groups may contribute to the U(VI) complexation by HA, however, due to their low concentration in HA they play only a subordinate role compared to carboxylic groups. Applying synthetic HA with varying sulfur contents (0 to 6.9 wt.%), the role of sulfur functionalities of HA for the U(VI) complexation and Np(V) reduction was studied. The results have shown that sulfur functionalities can be involved in U(VI) humate complexation and act as redox-active sites in HA for the Np(V) reduction. However, due to the low content of sulfur in natural HA, its influence is less pronounced. In the presence of carbonate, the U(VI) complexation by HA was studied in the alkaline pH range by means of cryo-TRLFS (-120 C) and ATR FT-IR spectroscopy. The formation of the ternary UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}HA(II){sup 4-} complex was detected. The complex formation constant was determined with log {beta}{sub 0.1} M = 24.57 {+-} 0.17. For aqueous U(VI) citrate and oxalate species, luminescence emission properties were determined by cryo-TRLFS and used to determine stability constants. The existing data base could be validated. The U(VI) complexation by lactate, studied in the temperature range 7 to 65 C

  5. Behavior of clay materials under ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, Maxime

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this PhD thesis is to study and understand, by proposing reaction mechanisms, the behavior under irradiation of various clay materials. The systems of interest were first synthetic talc, which is the prototype of a non-swelling material. Under irradiation by accelerated electrons, the production of dihydrogen in this system, due solely to surface hydroxyl groups, is of the same order of magnitude as the one obtained in liquid water. This yield is divided by 30 in the case of natural talc from Luzenac, thus highlighting the importance of the impurities as scavengers of the precursors of dihydrogen. Synthetic smectites, which are swelling materials, were then studied. The results evidence the radiolysis of water confined in the interlayer space, leading to H 2 yields which may be two to three times higher than those measured in water. Moreover, they are similar for montmorillonite and saponite, evidencing that the charge location plays only a minor role. Finally, the study of double layered hydroxides or anionic clays shows that, in this case, the nature of the anion in the inter lamellar space controls the reactivity. Parallel to these measurements, electron paramagnetic spectroscopy experiments have enabled proposing reaction mechanisms. Finally, all these results are of interest in the context of the disposal of radioactive waste. (author) [fr

  6. Impact of pore-water freshening on clays and the compressibility of hydrate-bearing reservoirs during production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Junbong [U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA; Cao, Shuang [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA; Waite, William [U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA; Jung, Jongwon [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-si, Chungbuk, South Korea

    2017-06-25

    Gas production efficiency from natural hydrate-bearing sediments depends in part on geotechnical properties of fine-grained materials, which are ubiquitous even in sandy hydrate-bearing sediments. The responses of fine-grained material to pore fluid chemistry changes due to freshening during hydrate dissociation could alter critical sediment characteristics during gas production activities. We investigate the electrical sensitivity of fine grains to pore fluid freshening and the implications of freshening on sediment compression and recompression parameters.

  7. Revealing Soil Structure and Functional Macroporosity along a Clay Gradient Using X-ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Arthur, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    clay content, respectively) at a field site in Lerbjerg, Denmark. The water-holding capacity of soils markedly increased with increasing soil clay content, while significantly higher air permeability was observed for the L1 to L3 soils than for the L4 to L6 soils. Higher air permeability values......The influence of clay content in soil-pore structure development and the relative importance of macroporosity in governing convective fluid flow are two key challenges toward better understanding and quantifying soil ecosystem functions. In this study, soil physical measurements (soil-water...... retention and air permeability) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning were combined and used from two scales on intact soil columns (100 and 580 cm3). The columns were sampled along a natural clay gradient at six locations (L1, L2, L3, L4, L5 and L6 with 0.11, 0.16, 0.21, 0.32, 0.38 and 0.46 kg kg−1...

  8. Sorption of Cesium on smectite-rich clays from the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic) and their mixtures with sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejsada, J; Jelínek, E; Randa, Z; Hradil, D; Prikryl, R

    2005-01-01

    Sorption is an important process for the transport of radionuclides through backfill materials in a radioactive waste underground repository. Within this study, sorption of Cs on selected Czech clay materials and their mixtures with sand was investigated by batch tests. The experiments were performed under oxic conditions at 25 degrees C. Synthetic groundwater as a liquid phase and unconditioned clays (as they were provided by their producer) were used to reach the natural conditions as close as possible. Distribution ratios (Rds) of Cs for all selected clays rise with increase of the clay fraction in clay/sand mixtures in agreement with previous works studying sorption behaviour of such mixtures. The rise of Rds is from 10(2) cm3 g(-1) for mixtures with 80% of sand to 10(3) cm3 g(-1) for pure clays. There are significant differences between natural and technologically modified clays.

  9. Evaluation of mesopores and characterization of clays of the State of Puebla, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, M.A.; Velasco, J.A.; Rojas, F.; Lara, V.H.; Salgado, M.A.; Tamariz, V.

    2003-01-01

    The crystalline properties of natural clays are related to the different crystallographic phases that are present in the structure of these substrates. Clays from the zone of Tehuacan, in the state of Puebla, Mexico, have been studied by means of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Atomic Absorption (AA), and N 2 Adsorption at 76 K. XRD analysis indicates the presence in the clay adsorbents of montmorillonite, quartz and, in some cases, of calcium carbonate. The textural properties of these porous materials of natural origin have been evaluated through the BET equation, the Langmuir equation, the single point BET method and the Gurvitsch Rule. The meso porosity that is present in each substrate has been measured via the methods of Kelvin, Barret, Jovner, and Halenda (BJH), and Kruk, Jaroniec, and Sayari as well as by the so-called differential curves of t-plots. The N 2 adsorption isotherms at 76 K that were measured on our clay adsorbents indicate that the adsorption process is carried out through a multilayer formation mechanism. The sorption hysteresis loops confirm characteristic aspects of this type of clay materials. Plots of the adsorbed volume versus the statistical thickness (t-plots) of N 2 layers adsorbed on the clay surface were also evaluated. The latter curves comprise three zones of behavior; each zone representing a different filling mechanism of the pore space. (Author)

  10. Structural Characterization of Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites Prepared by Co-Precipitation Using EPR Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Kielmann

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNCs containing either a rubber or an acrylate polymer were prepared by drying or co-precipitating polymer latex and nanolayered clay (synthetic and natural suspensions. The interface between the polymer and the clay nanoparticles was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR techniques by selectively addressing spin probes either to the surfactant layer (labeled stearic acid or the clay surface (labeled catamine. Continuous-wave (CW EPR studies of the surfactant dynamics allow to define a transition temperature T* which was tentatively assigned to the order-disorder transition of the surfactant layer. CW EPR studies of PCNC showed that completely exfoliated nanoparticles coexist with agglomerates. HYSCORE spectroscopy in PCNCs showed couplings within the probe −assigned with DFT computations− and couplings with nuclei of the environment, 1H and 23Na for the surfactant layer probe, and 29Si, 7Li, 19F and 23Na for the clay surface probe. Analysis of these couplings indicates that the integrity of the surfactant layer is conserved and that there are sizeable ionic regions containing sodium ions directly beyond the surfactant layer. Simulations of the very weak couplings demonstrated that the HYSCORE spectra are sensitive to the composition of the clay and whether or not clay platelets stack.

  11. Quantitative mineralogy and preliminary pore-water chemistry of candidate buffer and backfill materials for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigley, R.M.

    1984-07-01

    The quantitative mineralogy of seven candidate buffer and backfill materials for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault is presented. Two of the materials were coarse grained: one a blended very pure silica sand, and the other a crushed plagioclase-rich granite or granodiorite. Five materials were fine-grained soils containing abundant clay minerals. Of these, three were fairly pure, Cretaceous, ash-derived bentonites that contained up to 3 percent of soluble sulphates; one was a freshwater glacial clay containing 59 percent interlayered smectite-illite; and one was a crushed Paleozoic shale containing abundant illite and chlorite. The adsorbed cation regimes and the pore-water chemistry of the clays are discussed

  12. Study of adsorption of zinc in clay smectite type Bofe in system of finite bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, R.S.; Mota, J.D.; Lima, W.S.; Rodrigues, M.G.F.

    2012-01-01

    Clays are demonstrably excellent adsorbents, both for their physical and chemical characteristics and the wide coverage and low cost. Among the various groups of clay minerals, the smectite are noted for having large surface areas. The initial objective of this study was to characterize the clay Bofe through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Spectrometry by Energy Dispersive (EDX) and nitrogen adsorption (BET). To evaluate the adsorption of metal ions zinc (synthetic sewage), we used a system in finite bath, following a factorial design 2 2 , taking as input variables: pH and initial concentrations of zinc (Zn2 +) and output variables: percentage removal and removal capacity. The characterization results showed that Bofe clay belongs to the family of smectite and therefore has great potential for adsorption. (author)

  13. Water retention, gas transport, and pore network complexity during short-term regeneration of soil structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2013-01-01

    mm sieved) samples of varying clay mineralogy (illite, kaolinite, and smectite) amended with organic material (7.5 t ha–1). Also, the newly-formed structure was compared with that of sieved repacked (SR) and natural intact samples. Assessment and comparison of structure complexity and organization....... The proportion of pores > 100 1m increased in order: smectite

  14. Obtenção de membranas microporosas a partir de manocompósitos de poliamida 6/argila nacional. Parte 1: influência da presença da argila na morfologia das membranas Obtaining microporous membranes from nylon 6/national clay nanocomposites. Part 1: influence of clay on the membranes morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M. D. Leite

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Membranas poliméricas foram produzidas a partir de nanocompósitos de poliamida 6 e argila constituída de silicatos em camadas, utilizando a técnica de imersão-precipitação. A argila foi modificada organicamente com os sais quaternários de amônio, Dodigen e Cetremide. Foram obtidos nanocompósitos de poliamida 6 com argila sem tratamento (MMT e com argila tratada (OMMT. Os nanocompósitos obtidos foram avaliados por DRX e MET, apresentando estrutura com predominância de lamelas de argila esfoliadas na matriz polimérica. As membranas produzidas pelo método de inversão de fases foram caracterizadas por DRX e MEV. A difração de raios X das membranas confirmou os resultados para os nanocompósitos anteriormente preparados. A superfície da matriz observada por MEV apresentou poros irregulares. Já para as membranas com os nanocompósitos observou-se maior quantidade e melhor distribuição dos poros, indicando que a presença da argila alterou a morfologia da membrana. As fotomicrografias das seções transversais dessas membranas mostraram uma estrutura morfológica assimétrica, constituída de uma pele, onde os poros são muito pequenos ou inexistentes, e uma camada porosa com poros de tamanho e distribuição uniformes.Polymeric membranes were produced from nylon 6 nanocomposites and a clay using the immersion-precipitation technique. The clay was organically modified by using a quaternary ammonium salt, Dodigen. Nanocomposites were obtained from nylon 6 with untreated clay (MMT and treated clay (OMMT. The nanocomposites were studied by XRD and TEM. The morphological structure consisted of an exfoliated and partially exfoliated clay layers in the polymeric matrix. The membranes were produced by phase inversion method and characterized by XRD and SEM. The X-ray diffraction of the membranes confirmed the results for the nanocomposites. The SEM image of the membrane top surface showed irregular pores. As for the membranes with the

  15. Transport and leaching of technetium and uranium from spent UO2 fuel in compacted bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramebaeck, H.; Albinsson, Y.; Skaalberg, M.; Eklund, U.B.; Kjellberg, L.; Werme, L.

    2000-01-01

    The transport properties of Tc and U in compacted bentonite clay and the leaching behaviour of these elements from spent nuclear fuel in the same system were investigated. Pieces of spent UO 2 fuel were embedded in bentonite clay (ρ d =2100 kg/m 3 ). A low saline synthetic groundwater was used as the aqueous phase. After certain experimental times, the bentonite clay was cut into 0.1 mm thick slices, which were analysed for their content of Tc and U. Measurements were made using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Tc analysis comprised chemical separation. The analysis of U was done by means of detecting 236 U, since the natural content of U in bentonite clay made it impossible to distinguish between U originating from the fuel and the clay. The influence of different additives mixed into the clay was studied. The results showed an influence on both transport and leaching behaviour when metallic Fe was mixed into the clay. This indicates that Tc and U are reduced to their lower oxidation states as a result of this additive

  16. Preparation of Natural and Synthetic Porous Biodegradable ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Preparation of Natural and Synthetic Porous Biodegradable Scaffolds for Infected Wounds. Characterised for their physical properties, pore size and release kinetics. Release kinetics of bioactive molecules (antibiotics) in a controlled fashion. Release pattern of the ...

  17. Shearing of saturated clays in rock joints at high confining pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Mao, N.

    1979-01-01

    Saturated clays are sheared between rock joints at various pore water pressures and at confining pressures up to 3 kb (300 Mpa). Sliding on these joints is stable. For a given clay, the shear stress required to initiate sliding increases linearly with the effective normal stress across the sliding surface, with a slope of 0.08 +- 0.01 for joints filled with saturated montmorillonite, 0.12 +- 0.01 with saturated chlorite, 0.15 +- 0.01 with saturated kaolinite, and 0.22 +- 0.02 with saturated silty illite. Thus at high confining pressures the shear stress required to initiate sliding on joints filled with saturated clays are very much smaller than that required to initiate sliding on clean rock joints or on joints filled with dry gouge materials. In the crust, saturation of gouge materials along active faults would greatly lower the frictional resistance to faulting and would stabilize fault movement. Different fault behaviors such as stable creep along some faults and intermittent but sudden slip along others may reflect in part different degrees of saturation of fault zones at depth

  18. The synthesis and application of pillared clays prepared from charge reduced montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engwall, Erik Edwin

    The synthesis of pillared interlayered clays (PILCs) makes use of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of clay minerals to prop their structures open with large hydroxy-metal cations. Homo-ionic Ca-Montmorillonite with a CEC of 83.9 meq/100 g has been partially exchanged with varied amounts of Li+ and heated to 200°C for 24 hours. These have been used to produce Zr and Al PILCs making use of ethanol/water synthesis solutions to overcome the hydrophobic nature of the clay. For the Zr-PILC system, the d(001) spacings determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD) were relatively constant at 19.0--20.1 A with respect to changing the unpillared CEC. The Zr-PILCs had type I isotherms for argon at 87 K and for benzene, p-xylene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene adsorption at 30°C. Several Al-PILC synthesis procedures were evaluated and all produced materials whose adsorption capacity decreased with decreasing unpillared CEC. This reduction in adsorption capacity with unpillared CEC could be partially overcome by the combined use of ethanol/water pillaring solutions with ethanol/water washing. Previously unreported d(001) values in the range of 26.8 to 29.8 A were observed in Al-PILCs and were often bimodal with the expected values of about 18 A. These larger d(001) values were most prevalent at lower CEC values, if pillaring conditions favored the formation of polymeric species other than the Keggin cation. A new micropore size distribution model was developed to better understand PILC pore structure. The new model was compared to the Horvath and Kawazoe (1983) model (HK) and the Cheng and Yang (1994) model (CY) using argon adsorption at 87 K on Zr and Al-PILCs. The interlayer spacings determined by XRD for the test PILCs were 9.5 and 8.5 A for Zr and Al-PILCs respectively. Pore sizes predicted by the new model were 7.5 and 7.3 A for Zr and Al-PILCs respectively. The new model consistently predicts values that are closer to the interlayer spacing than either the HK or CY models. The new

  19. Effects of coal and wheat husk additives on the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of clay bricks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.; Iqbal, Y.; Muhammad, R.

    2017-07-01

    The use of by-products as additives in brick industry is gaining increased research attention due to their effective role in decreasing the total energy needs of industrial furnaces. In addition, these additives leave pores upon burning, causing a decrease in thermal conductivity and affect the mechanical properties of bricks as well. In the present study, various proportions of coal and wheat husk were used as additives in the initial ingredients of clay bricks. Microstructure, thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal diffusivity, water absorption, shrinkage, compressive strength and bulk density of fired clay bricks with and without additives were investigated. Clay bricks containing 5–15wt.% additives were found to be within the permissible limits for most of the recommended standard specifications. (Author)

  20. Reducing the Influence of Soil Moisture on the Estimation of Clay from Hyperspectral Data: A Case Study Using Simulated PRISMA Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Castaldi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture hampers the estimation of soil variables such as clay content from remote and proximal sensing data, reducing the strength of the relevant spectral absorption features. In the present study, two different strategies have been evaluated for their ability to minimize the influence of soil moisture on clay estimation by using soil spectra acquired in a laboratory and by simulating satellite hyperspectral data. Simulated satellite data were obtained according to the spectral characteristics of the forthcoming hyperspectral imager on board of the Italian PRISMA satellite mission. The soil datasets were split into four groups according to the water content. For each soil moisture level a prediction model was applied, using either spectral indices or partial least squares regression (PLSR. Prediction models were either specifically developed for the soil moisture level or calibrated using synthetically dry soil spectra, generated from wet soil data. Synthetically dry spectra were obtained using a new technique based on the effects caused by soil moisture on the optical spectrum from 400 to 2400 nm. The estimation of soil clay content, when using different prediction models according to soil moisture, was slightly more accurate as compared to the use of synthetically dry soil spectra, both employing clay indices and PLSR models. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that the a priori knowledge of the soil moisture class can reduce the error of clay estimation when using hyperspectral remote sensing data, such as those that will be provided by the PRISMA satellite mission in the near future.

  1. Electrochemically enhanced reduction of hexavalent chromium in contaminated clay: Kinetics, energy consumption, and application of pulse current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tian Ran; Pamukcu, Sibel; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    the dependency of reaction rate on energy consumption. A modified electrophoresis cell with platinum wires as working electrodes was used to run experiments. Results showed that the reduction rate of Cr(VI) was significantly increased by application of current with the pseudo-first-order rate constant kpse from......,Fe)(OH)3] precipitates. XRD analysis suggested that the [(Cr,Fe)(OH)3] formed at the clay surface and grew into the pore fluid. SEM-EDX results indicated that the overall Fe(III):Cr(III) ratio of the precipitates was approximately 1.26:1. Application of pulse current decreased the non-productive energy......Electrochemically enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in clay medium is a technique based on inputting extra energy into the clay to drive the favorable redox reaction. In this study, the reducing reagent Fe(II) was transported into Cr(VI) spiked kaolinite clay by direct current to investigate...

  2. Use of swelling clays to reduce permeability and its potential application to nuclear waste repository sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, D.E.; Morrow, C.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The injection of swelling-clay slurries into joints or faults at a deep-burial nuclear waste disposal site may result in signficant permeability reductions for the effective containment of radioactive wastes. In an experiment conducted to illustrate the permeability change accompanying clay swelling, a coarse stone with interconnected pore spaces was injected with a clay-electrolyte slurry, modelling the pressure-grouting of a fractured repository rock. Subsequently, solutions with lower electroylte concentrations were driven through the clay-filled stone, corresponding to migration of lower salinity ground-waters through the clay-grouted fracture. The initial injection procedure reduced the permeability of the stone from 1--10 darcies to 700 nanodarcies; the changes in solution composition decreased permeability by more than 2 additional orders of magnitude to 3 nanodarcies. For application at a nuclear waste repository, the electrolyte concentration of the injected clay slurry should be made higher than that of the ground-water in the host rock. Subesquent interaction of the ground-water with the clays would initiate swelling and create the additional, post-injection permeability reductions that may be important in preventing the escape of buried radioactive wastes. The measured permeability of the clay filling is considerably lower than that of cement tested for borehole plugging. Clays also have the advantage over cement and chemical grouts in that they are geologically stable at relatively low temperatures and have a high capacity for radionuclide adsorption

  3. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has through years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R 466). It states natural clay deposits may be used for membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system may contain at least 95% of all leachate created throughout...... ion transport as well as diffusion.Clay prospection for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island Lolland. The natural clay contains 60 to 75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium-type. The clay material...... has been evaluated using standardised methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15 to 0.3m thick clay membrane have been tested...

  4. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has throughout the years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R4669. It states that natural clay deposits may be used as membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system contains at least 95% of all leachate created...... into account advective ion transport as well as diffusion. Clay prospecting for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island of Lolland. The natural clay contains 60-75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium......-type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...

  5. Thermal hardening of saturated clays. Application to underground storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, Jean-Marc

    1994-01-01

    Saturated clays submitted to constant mechanical loading and slow temperature increase frequently undergo irreversible contractions. This phenomena is described here by means of a change of plastic limits induced by temperature only, called thermal hardening. Constitutive laws adapted to this kind of plastic behaviour can be formulated within a general framework that satisfies thermodynamical principles. It shows that this coupling results from the presence of a latent heat during the isothermal hardening of plastic limits. A thermomechanical extension of Cam Clay model is then proposed and used in the analysis of laboratory thermomechanical tests performed on clay materials. Making use of tests already published, we show the adequacy of the concept of thermal hardening for clay behaviour. Some clay from deep geological formation considered for the disposal of radioactive waste exhibit thermal hardening in laboratory tests. The consequences for the underground storage facilities during the thermal loading created by the waste are investigated by means of in situ tests as well as numerical computation. The measurement around a heating probe buried in the clay mass demonstrate the significance of thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings. An accurate understanding of in situ measurements is achieved by means of numerical modeling in which the interaction between the various loading of the tests (excavation, pore pressure seepage, and heating) is carefully taken into account. Thermal hardening of the clay appears to be of little influence in these in situ tests. On the other hand, the magnitude of thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings observed in situ are higher than might have been expected from laboratory tests. A more accurate prediction is obtained if one takes into account the more stiffer behaviour of clays when they are subjected to small deformations. (authors)

  6. The effects of waste leachates on the hydraulic conductivity of natural clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, F

    1989-01-01

    Sanitary land filling remains a viable alternative for disposal of the ever increasing volumes of municipal solid waste. Current landfill design practice requires the presence of a clay barrier (liner) that may consist of either a natural stratum or compacted clay borrow. The liner acts as a hydraulic barrier to control the flux of contaminants from the waste into the adjacent groundwater. In order to do this clay liners are required to have low hydraulic conductivity, k (typically 10{sup {minus}8} cm/s) that shall not increase during exposure to waste leachate. This thesis reports the assessment of compatibility between natural clays from Sarnia, Ontario, and various leachates ranging from municipal solid waste leachate to concentrated organic solvents. The studies were performed using specially designed fixed-ring permeameters that allowed controlling confining effective stresses, volume changes in the soil specimen and chemistry of the influent and effluent permeants. The Sarnia clays appeared to be compatible with domestic waste leachate, showing slight reductions in k. Extensive retardation of potassium from the leachate required long testing periods (up to twelve pore volumes) before the soils were deemed to be in chemical equilibrium. Concentrated, water-soluble organics (ethanol and dioxane) increased the hydraulic conductivity of compacted clays by 100 to 1,000-fold, thus destroying their effectiveness as liners. Water-compacted clays appeared remarkably resistant to penetration by concentrated hydrophobic solvents such as cyclohexane. Large hydraulic gradients (up to {approximately}900) were required to produce breakthrough along compaction induced fractures. However, alcohols and surfactants can facilitate the entry of hydrophobic liquids into the double layers causing large increased in k.

  7. Study of the behavior of aggregate of calcined clay for use in permeable pavements for the city of Manaus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.S.; Vilela, P.A.T.; Araujo, V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Research on the production of ceramic aggregates and their use in paving in the country began in the 80’s in the search for an alternative material that could replace the pebble or crushed stone, studied the clay, considered an abundant mineral resource by virtue of being the predominant soil in this region and which were made synthetic calcinated clay aggregates (ASAC), for their application in permeable paving concrete motivated by the lack of permeable areas. The study consists of the characterization of materials for manufacture of concrete slabs permeable and the assessment of the effects of synthetic aggregate on its properties in fresh and hardened state. The ceramic bodies were subjected to tests of X-ray diffraction, determination of chemical composition and plasticity. The results indicate that the use of synthetic clusters is a viable alternative for the production of porous concrete. (author)

  8. Response surface method as a tool for heavy clay firing process optimization: Roofing tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Arsenović

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Heavy clay samples collected in close vicinity of Toplička Mala Plana, Serbia, were surveyed to examine their possible use in heavy clay industry. The representative raw material, which contained the lowest content of clay minerals and the highest content of carbonates, was enriched with two more plastic clays. Chemical and mineralogical composition, as well as particle size distribution, were determined to distinct the samples. The samples in the form of tiles, hollow blocks and cubes were prepared following the usual practice in ceramic laboratories. The effect of process parameters, such as temperature (850–950 °C and concentration of the added clays (both in the range of 0–10 wt.%, were investigated in terms of compressive strength, water absorption, firing shrinkage, weight loss during firing and volume mass of cubes. The optimal conditions were determined by the response surface method, coupled with the fuzzy synthetic evaluation algorithm, using membership trapezoidal function, and showed that these materials can be used for roofing tiles production.

  9. Stochastic modeling of filtrate alkalinity in water filtration devices: Transport through micro/nano porous clay based ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay and plant materials such as wood are the raw materials used in manufacture of ceramic water filtration devices around the world. A step by step manufacturing procedure which includes initial mixing, molding and sintering is used. The manufactured ceramic filters have numerous pores which help i...

  10. An experimental study of the effects of adsorbing and non-adsorbing gases on friction and permeability evolution in clay-rich fault gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisabeth, H. P.; Zoback, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the flow of fluids through fractures in clay-rich rocks is fundamental to a number of geoengineering enterprises, including development of unconventional hydrocarbon resources, nuclear waste storage and geological carbon sequestration. High clay content tends to make rocks plastic, low-porosity and anisotropic. In addition, some gasses adsorb to clay mineral surfaces, resulting in swelling and concomitant changes in physical properties. These complexities can lead to coupled behaviors that render prediction of fluid behavior in the subsurface difficult. We present the results of a suite of triaxial experiments on binary mixtures of quartz and illite grains to separate and quantify the effects of hydrostatic pressure, differential stress, clay content and gas chemistry on the evolution of mechanical and hydraulic characteristics of the gouge material during deformation. Tests are run on saw-cut samples prepared with gouge at 20 MPa confining pressure, 10 MPa pore pressure and at room temperature. Argon or carbon dioxide is used as pore fluid. Sample permeability, stress and strain are monitored continuously during hydrostatic and axial deformation. We find that pressure and shearing both lead to reductions in permeability. Adsorbing gas leads to swelling and promotes permeability reduction, but appears to have no effect on frictional properties. These results indicate that the seal integrity of clay-rich caprocks may not be compromised by shear deformation, and that depletion and shear deformation of unconventional reservoirs is expected to result in production declines.

  11. Enhancement of insulating properties of brick clay by renewable agricultural wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Bánhidi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of agricultural wastes (byproducts in various segments of brick and tile industry is increasing continuously. These additives, which are previously mixed into the raw or compound clay, start to ignite during the firing process, providing extra thermal energy inside the product and decreasing the required external energy need. Besides this effect, the combustion of additives increases the porosity of the final product resulting in enhanced thermal insulation properties. In this paper the effect of some common agricultural wastes (sawdust, rice-peel and seed-shell on the thermal properties of brick clay products was investigated. The brick samples were prepared from the mixture of the yellow and gray clay in the ratio of 4:1, water content was between 15.57-16.67 wt.% and the pore-forming additives in concentrations 0, 4 and 7 wt.%. To measure the steady state thermal conductivity of the clay mixtures, samples with dimensions of 300×300×50 mm were prepared. Drying and firing were performed using the industrial partner’s standard procedures. Precise thermal conductivity data was measured, using a RAPID‑K type static thermal conductivity instrument. The results showed that increasing the quantity of agricultural byproducts in the clay mixture significantly decreases the thermal conductivity of the final products, while only a minor reduction in the mechanical strength was observed. It was found that the most efficient byproduct additive was the sunflower seed‑shell. With the addition of only 7 wt.% seed‑shell to the basic clay the thermal conductivity decreased from 0,27 W/m·K to 0,17 W/m·K (i.e. ~36%.

  12. An investigation into the effects of pore connectivity on T2 NMR relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghomeshi, Shahin; Kryuchkov, Sergey; Kantzas, Apostolos

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique used to characterize fluids and flow in porous media. The NMR relaxation curves are closely related to pore geometry, and the inversion of the NMR relaxometry data is known to give useful information with regards to pore size distribution (PSD) through the relative amplitudes of the fluids stored in the small and large pores. While this information is crucial, the main challenge for the successful use of the NMR measurements is the proper interpretation of the measured signals. Natural porous media patterns consist of complex pore structures with many interconnected or "coupled" regions, as well as isolated pores. This connectivity along the throats changes the relaxation distribution and in order to properly interpret this data, a thorough understanding of the effects of pore connectivity on the NMR relaxation distribution is warranted. In this paper we address two main points. The first pertains to the fact that there is a discrepancy between the relaxation distribution obtained from experiments, and the ones obtained from solving the mathematical models of diffusion process in the digitized images of the pore space. There are several reasons that may attribute to this such as the lack of a proper incorporation of surface roughness into the model. However, here we are more interested in the effects of pore connectivity and to understand why the typical NMR relaxation distribution obtained from experiments are wider, while the numerical simulations predict that a wider NMR relaxation distribution may indicate poor connectivity. Secondly, by not taking into account the pore coupling effects, from our experience in interpreting the data, we tend to underestimate the pore volume of small pores and overestimate the amplitudes in the large pores. The role of pore coupling becomes even more prominent in rocks with small pore sizes such as for example in shales, clay in sandstones, and in the microstructures of

  13. Clay Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  14. Caracterização da argila bentonítica para utilização na remoção de chumbo de efluentes sintéticos Characterization of smectite clays for application in the removal of lead from synthetic effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. F. Rodrigues

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como principal objetivo caracterizar argilas esmectíticas chocolate de Boa-Vista, Estado da Paraíba (Brasil na sua forma natural e após tratamento químico, visando a sua utilização na remoção de Pb2+ de efluentes sintéticos. Os métodos de caracterização utilizados foram fluorescência de raios X, difração de raios X, microscopia eletrônica de varredura e espectroscopia de raios X por energia dispersiva. Neste trabalho foi estabelecido o procedimento para remoção de Pb2+ a partir de um efluente inorgânico sintético, utilizando argila natural. Para avaliar a influência dos principais parâmetros, como pH, tratamento e granulometria da argila sobre a remoção do Pb2+, foi utilizado o planejamento fatorial e os melhores resultados obtidos foram: pH 4,5, granulometria entre 35 e 48 mesh, e argila natural.The main objective of this paper is to characterize the Chocolate smectite clays of Boa-Vista, State of Paraíba (Brazil, in their natural form, and after chemical treatment for their application in the removal of Pb2+ from synthetic effluents. The following methods were used: X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In is work the procedures for Pb2+ removal from a synthetic inorganic effluent using a natural clay were established. To evaluate the influence of the main parameters, such as pH, clay treatment and granulometry, on Pb2+ removal, factorial planning was used and the best results obtained were pH 4.5, granulometry in the range of 35 to 48 mesh and natural clay.

  15. Pore solution chemistry of simulated low-level liquid waste incorporated in cement grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-12-01

    Expressed pore solutions from simulated low level liquid waste cement grouts cured at room temperature, 50 degree C and 90 degree C for various duration were analyzed by standard chemical methods and ion chromatography. The solid portions of the grouts were formulated with portland cement, fly ash, slag, and attapulgite clay in the ratios of 3:3:3:1. Two different solutions simulating off-gas condensates expected from vitrification of Hanford low level tank wastes were made. One is highly alkaline and contains the species Na + , P0 4 3- , N0 2 - , NO 3 - and OH - . The other is carbonated and contains the species, Na + , PO 4 3- , NO 2 - , NO 3 - , and CO 3 2- . In both cases phosphate rapidly disappeared from the pore solution, leaving behind sodium in the form of hydroxide. The carbonates were also removed from the pore solution to form calcium carbonate and possibly calcium monocarboaluminate. These reactions resulted in the increase of hydroxide ion concentration in the early period. Subsequently there was a significant reduction OH - and Na + ion concentrations. In contrast high concentration of N0 2 - and N0 3 - were retained in the pore solution indefinitely

  16. The effect of firing temperature on the irreversible expansion, water absorption and pore structure of a brick body during freeze-thaw cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikuláš ŠVEDA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the monitoring of brick body in the process of volumetric freezing and thawing. The samples were fired at temperatures of 900, 1000 and 1060 °C. Attention is focused on monitoring of the irreversible expansion, water absorption and pore structure of a brick body. We found that in all cases the endpoints take place continuously, where the amount firing temperature plays a crucial role. The greatest influence of freeze/thaw cycles on the change of the pore structure was also observed at the lowest temperature. The change of the pore system during the freeze-thaw cycles occurs in such a way, that the pore volume of small pores further decreases and conversely, the pore volume of large pores increases. The knowledge gained can be used not only in the production of new but also in predicting the remaining durability of older clay roofing tiles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.4.2741

  17. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  18. Organically modified clay removes oil from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alther, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    When bentonite or other clays and zeolite are modified with quaternary amines, they become organophilic. Such modified bentonites are used to remove mechanically emulsified oil and grease, and other sparingly soluble organics. Types of oil found in water can include fats, lubricants, cutting fluids, heavy hydrocarbons such as tars, grease, crude oil, diesel oils; and light hydrocarbons such as kerosene, jet fuel, and gasoline. If the organoclay is granulated, it is placed into a liquid phase carbon filter vessel to remove FOGs (Free Oil and Grease) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. In this application the clay is mixed with anthrazite to prevent early plugging of the filter by oil or grease droplets. In batch systems a powdered organoclay is employed. Organoclay removes mechanically emulsified oil and grease at 5--7 times the rate of activated carbon, or 50% of its dry weight. Oil and grease and other large sparingly soluble chlorinated hydrocarbons and NOMs (Natural Organic Matter) blind the pores of activated carbon (and ion-exchange resins), reducing its effectiveness significantly. It is therefore economically advantageous for the end user to prepolish the water before it enters carbon vessels. Operating costs can often be reduced by 50% or more

  19. Influence of clay mineralogy on clay based ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radzali Othman; Tuan Besar Tuan Sarif; Zainal Arifin Ahmad; Ahmad Fauzi Mohd Noor; Abu Bakar Aramjat

    1996-01-01

    Clay-based ceramic products can either be produced directly from a suitable clay source without the need further addition or such products can be produced from a ceramic body formulated by additions of other raw materials such as feldspar and silica sand. In either case, the mineralogical make-up of the clay component plays a dominating role in the fabrication and properties of the ceramic product. This study was sparked off by a peculiar result observed in one of five local ball clay samples that were used to reformulate a ceramic body. Initial characterisation tests conducted on the clays indicated that these clays can be classified as kaolinitic. However, one of these clays produced a ceramic body that is distinctively different in terms of whiteness, smoothness and density as compared to the other four clays. Careful re-examination of other characterisation data, such as particle size distribution and chemical analysis, failed to offer any plausible explanation. Consequently, the mineralogical analysis by x-ray diffraction was repeated by paying meticulous attention to specimen preparation. Diffraction data for the clay with anomalous behaviour indicated the presence of a ∼ 10A peak that diminished when the same specimen was re-tested after heating in an oven at 12O degree C whilst the other four clays only exhibit the characteristic kaolinite (Al sub 2 O sub 3. 2SiO sub 2. 2H sub 2 0) and muscovite peaks at ∼ 7A and ∼ 10A before and after heat treatment. This suggests the presence of the mineral halloysite (A1 sub 2 0 sub 3. 2SiO sub 2.4H sub 2 0) in that particular clay. This difference in mineralogy can be attributed to account for the variations in physical properties of the final product. Consequently, this paper reviews in general the precautionary measures that must be adhered to during any mineralogical investigation of clay minerals or clay-based materials. The common pitfalls during specimen preparation, machine settings and interpretation of

  20. Potential assessment of Sergipe and Alagoas clays in aggregates production for use in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, H.A.; Santos, C.P.; Oliveira, R.M.P.B.; Jesus, E. de; Macedo, Z.S.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to characterize technologically three clays employed by ceramic industries in Sergipe state, Brazil. Its potential use for the production of calcined synthetic aggregate to substitute gravel in concrete production was evaluated. The characterization of the clays included particle size and plasticity analysis, X-ray diffraction, differential and thermogravimetric analyses, dilatometry, X-ray fluorescence, organic matter content, cation exchange capacity, specific area, and scanning electron microscopy. Ceramic bodies were uniaxially pressed under 30 MPa, into rectangular and cylindrical shapes. Ceramic bodies of individual clays and also ceramic formulations were fired and subsequently characterized to determine their water absorption, apparent density, compressive strength, and grain morphology. It was observed that, after firing at 1120 deg C, two formulations presented strength, water absorption and specific mass comparable to those of gravel used in concrete. (author)

  1. In situ heating test in Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone: measurement and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conil, N.; Armand, G.; De La Vaissiere, R.; Morel, J.; Garitte, B.; Jobmann, M.; Jellouli, M.; Filippi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. To study the thermo -hydro-mechanical effects of the early thermal phase on the clay host rock of a deep repository, Andra has performed a new in-situ heating test called TED experiment. This experiment is the second one being carried out in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory The aim of the TED experiment is to measure the evolution of the temperature; deformation and pore pressure fields around several heaters and to back-analyse the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of the rock. The TED experiment was also designed to estimate the overpressure generated by heat in the zero flux plan between several heaters and to study the evolution of the damaged zone due to heat. Analysis of the experimental results will help in calibrating numerical models which will be applied to the disposal cell cases. The test set-up consists of three boreholes containing the heaters and twenty one instrumented observation boreholes. Each heater is 4 m long and may generate a power of 1500 W. The distance between each heater is about 2.6 m, which is close to the ratio of the disposal cell geometry concept. The surrounding boreholes were strategically located to follow the anisotropic THM behavior of the clay-stone. There are twelve pore pressure measurement boreholes (a total of eighteen piezometers), nine temperature measurement boreholes (108 temperature sensors) and 2 strain measurement boreholes. In order to optimize the inverse problem analysis, special attention has been paid to the reduction of uncertainties regarding the sensors location in the boreholes. Possible sensors location errors were indeed found to be a problematic issue for analysis and parameter determination in the previous thermal experiment ([1]). The central heater was activated on January 25, 2010 starting with a relatively low heating power of 150 W, then the heating power was increased to 300 W and finally to 600 W. Each step was about four

  2. Tests for the characterization of bentonite used in the manufacture of clay geo synthetic barriers (GBR-C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiro, A.; Mateo, B.; Garcia, H.; Llorente, S.

    2011-01-01

    Bentonites are clays essentially composed of the smectite minerals. they are used in the manufacture of Clay Geosynthetic Barriers )GBR-C) which are low-permeability geosynthetic materials, forming part of the lining technologies and construction waterproofing systems. This article shows a series of testing to evaluate the quality of the bentonite for such use. Correlation between different testing has also been established in order to identify the most suitable ones for their characterization. (Author) 8 refs.

  3. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement - 4. International meeting. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    proposed within the Strategic Research Agenda, elaborated through the Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform (IGD-TP). The conference offers a particular opportunity to present the more recent developments and main outputs of research carried out within the framework of national and international cooperative experiments and dedicated European projects. Contributions coming from fields other than radioactive waste disposal; like geological storage of natural gas, sequestration of CO 2 , energy storage in underground, chemical waste isolation, etc., also taking advantage of the properties of the clay material, were encouraged. This conference covers all topics concerning the natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay-based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties) and monitoring. General strategy for clay based repository concepts Examples of research programmes (national or international) concerning the role of natural and engineered clay barriers for radioactive waste confinement including repository designs, safety assessment, full-scale demonstrations and implementations (e.g. heater tests). Geology and clay characterisation Clay mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in clay rock, fracturing, self-sealing processes, role of organic matters and microbiological processes, micro and nano characterisation of clay minerals and argillaceous rocks. Geochemistry Pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry. Mass transfer Water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space

  4. Diffusion in the pore water of compacted crushed salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluegge, Judith; Herr, Sebastian; Lauke, Thomas; Meleshyn, Artur; Miehe, Ruediger; Ruebel, Andre

    2016-07-15

    Diffusion of dissolved radionuclides in the pore water of compacted crushed salt in the long-term is the most relevant process for the release of radionuclides from a dedicated repository for high-level waste in a salt formation as has been shown in latest safety assessments and research projects /BUH 16/. So far, diffusion coefficients for free water have been applied for the diffusion in pore water in models for long-term safety assessments. This conservative assumption was used, because data on the diffusion coefficient of dissolved substances in crushed salt have been missing. Furthermore, the diffusion coefficient in the pore water was assumed to be constant and independent from the degree of compaction of the crushed salt. The work presented in this report was intended to contribute to fill this gap of knowledge about how the diffusion of radionuclides takes place in the compacted backfill of a repository in salt. For the first time, the pore diffusion coefficient as well as its dependence on the porosity of the crushed salt was determined experimentally by means of through-diffusion experiments using caesium as tracer. The results achieved in this project suggest that the diffusion in compacted crushed salt is not fully comparable to that in a homogeneous, temporally stable porous medium like sand or clay. The results obtained from four diffusion experiments show a remarkably different behaviour and all yield unique concentration versus time plots which includes highly temporal variable tracer fluxes with even full interruptions of the flux for longer periods of time. This effect cannot be explained by assuming a tracer transport by diffusion in a temporarily invariant pore space and / or under temporally invariant experimental conditions. From our point of view, a restructuring of the pore space seems to lead to closed areas of pore water in the sample which may open up again after some time, leading to a variable pore space and hence variable diffusive

  5. Chlordecone retention in the fractal structure of volcanic clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woignier, Thierry; Clostre, Florence; Macarie, Hervé; Jannoyer, Magalie

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Allophanic soils are highly polluted but less contaminant for cultivated vegetables. ► SAXS and TEM show the fractal structure of allophane aggregates at the nanoscale. ► Allophane aggregates play the role of a labyrinth which fixes and traps chlordecone. ► Allophane physical properties contribute to chlordecone retention in andosols. - Abstract: Chlordecone (CHLD), a soil and foodstuff pollutant, as well as an environmentally persistent organochlorine insecticide, was used intensively in banana fields. The chlordecone uptake of three crops was measured for two types of polluted soils: allophanic and non-allophanic. The uptake is lower for allophanic soils even if their chlordecone content is higher than with non-allophanic soils. The fractal structure of the allophane aggregates was characterized at the nanoscale by small angle X-rays scattering, pore size distribution and transmission electron microscopy. We showed that clay microstructures should be an important physico-chemical factor governing the fate of chlordecone in the environment. Allophanic clays result in two counterintuitive findings: higher contaminant trappings yet lower contaminant availability. We propose that this specific, tortuous structure, along with its associated low accessibility, partly explains the low availability of chlordecone confined in allophanic soils. Capsule The fractal and tortuous microstructure of allophane clay favours the chlordecone retention in soils and disfavours the crop uptake.

  6. Polyethersulfone/clay membranes and its water permeability; Membranas de polietersulfona/argila e sua permeabilidade a agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalho, Thamyres Cardoso de; Medeiros, Vanessa da Nobrega; Araujo, Edcleide Maria de; Lira, Helio Lucena, E-mail: thamyrescc@gmail.com, E-mail: vanismedeiros@gmail.com, E-mail: edcleide.araujo@ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: helio.lira@ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEMa/CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais; Leite, Amanda Melissa Damiao, E-mail: amanda.leite@ect.ufrn.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (ECT/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Escola de Ciencia e Tecnologia

    2017-04-15

    Membranes can be considered polymeric or inorganic films that function as a semipermeable barrier to filtration on a molecular scale, separating two phases and restricting, totally or partially, the transportation of one or more chemical species (solute) present in the solution. Therefore, the aim of this work is to produce polyethersulfone membranes (PES) and polyethersulfone/clay by phase inversion technique and evaluate the presence of clay in obtaining membranes for wastewater treatment. The used solvent was dimethylformamide (DMF) and clays were Brasgel PA (MMT) and Cloisite Na (CL Na) in the proportion of 3 to 5% (wt.). By Xray diffraction (XRD), the membranes with 3% of MMT and CL Na clays apparently had partially exfoliated structures. For the composition with 5% of CL Na a small peak was observed, which indicates that this is possibly an intercalated structure or microcomposite. By scanning electron microscopy (SEM), visualizes that the pure surface of the pure PES membrane a structure apparently without pores was observed in the used magnification and without roughness surface when compared to membranes with clay. The measurements of contact angle indicated that the inclusion of clay altered the wetting ability of the membranes. The flow with distilled water for all membranes started high and over time reached a stabilization level. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence and the content of clay altered the morphology of the membrane, contributing to an increase in water flow. (author)

  7. Synthetic opal as a template for nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul A.; Heales, Lindsey; Barber, Richard L.; Turney, Terence W.

    2001-04-01

    Synthetic opal has been used as a template for making 3D inverse opals of silica, titania and silicone rubber. The materials are mesoporous with connected pores and channels and have better opalescence than the opal templates they replace. Thin films of synthetic opal have been grown onto glass substrates by spin coating and these have also been used as templates for making thin films of inverse opal and as masks for depositing metal nanodots. This method produced hexagonally patterned 50 nm gold dots on a flat graphite substrate.

  8. The Strength Behaviour of Lime Stabilized Organic Clay Soil Modified by Catalyst Additeives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khitam Abdulhussein Saeed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The organic clay soil can be found in many large size reclaimed lands. These soils present enormously high settlement potential and low strength that needs to be improved by means of effective ground improvement techniques. One of the low cost techniques is to modify the soil with lime in-situ to make it suitable for construction and allow it to increase in strength by pozzolanic reactions between lime and clay minerals. Lime is known to be an effective stabilization material for clayey soil. Nevertheless, its effectiveness may be less with organic clay due to low effective strength properties. Thus, this study concerns the addition of catalyst i.e. zeolite which may improve the performance of lime stabilization to accelerate lime-organic clay reactions. The unconfined compressive test (UCT is conducted on remoulded samples (38mm x 80mm for 0, 7, 14 , 28, and 90 days of curing period. The addition of synthetic zeolite in lime-organic stabilized soil has increased the soil strength by 185% at 90 days curing period at the design mix of organic clay + 10% lime +10% zeolite. The higher value of UCS indicates that zeolite is an effective catalyst to enhance lime stabilization.

  9. Concentrated aqueous sodium chloride solution in clays at thermodynamic conditions of hydraulic fracturing: Insight from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin

    2018-06-01

    To address a high salinity of flow-back water during hydraulic fracturing, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and study the thermodynamics, structure, and diffusion of concentrated aqueous salt solution in clay nanopores. The concentrated solution results from the dissolution of a cubic NaCl nanocrystal, immersed in an aqueous NaCl solution of varying salt concentration and confined in clay pores of a width comparable to the crystal size. The size of the nanocrystal equals to about 18 Å which is above a critical nucleus size. We consider a typical shale gas reservoir condition of 365 K and 275 bar, and we represent the clay pores as pyrophyllite and Na-montmorillonite (Na-MMT) slits. We employ the Extended Simple Point Charge (SPC/E) model for water, Joung-Cheatham model for ions, and CLAYFF for the slit walls. We impose the pressure in the normal direction and the resulting slit width varies from about 20 to 25 Å when the salt concentration in the surrounding solution increased from zero to an oversaturated value. By varying the salt concentration, we observe two scenarios. First, the crystal dissolves and its dissolution time increases with increasing salt concentration. We describe the dissolution process in terms of the number of ions in the crystal, and the crystal size and shape. Second, when the salt concentration reaches a system solubility limit, the crystal grows and attains a new equilibrium size; the crystal comes into equilibrium with the surrounding saturated solution. After crystal dissolution, we carry out canonical MD simulations for the concentrated solution. We evaluate the hydration energy, density profiles, orientation distributions, hydrogen-bond network, radial distribution functions, and in-plane diffusion of water and ions to provide insight into the microscopic behaviour of the concentrated aqueous sodium chloride solution in interlayer galleries of the slightly hydrophobic pyrophyllite and hydrophilic Na-MMT pores.

  10. Influence of natural mobile organic matter on europium retention on Bure clay rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu-Do, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Bure clay rock (CR) was chosen as host rock for the French high and intermediate level long lived radioactive waste repository. This choice is mostly explained by the retention ability of the Callovo-Oxfordian rock (COx). Bure clay rock contains natural organic matter (OM) that could have an influence on radionuclide retention. The aim of this work is to assess the influence of natural mobile OM on the retention of Eu on clay rock. Eu was chosen as a chemical model for trivalent actinides contained in vitrified waste. Three organic molecules were studied: suberic, sorbic and tiglic acids, small organic acids identified in COx pore water. All the experiments were carried out in an environment recreating COx water (pH=7.5; I=0.1 mol/L; PCO 2 =10 -2 bar).Clay rock sample characterization showed that the sample used in this work was similar to those previously extracted from the area of interest and that it was necessary to maintain pH at 7.5 to avoid altering the clay rock. The Eu-OM system study indicated that organic acids had no influence on Eu speciation in COx water. The Eu-CR system experimental study confirmed that retention implied sorption on CR (C(Eu)≤6.10 -6 mol/L) and precipitation in COx water (C(Eu)≥6.10 -6 mol/L). Distribution coefficient Rd (quantifying sorption) was estimated at 170 ± 30 L/g. This high value is consistent with literature values obtained on clay rocks. The ternary Eu-OM-CR system study showed a slight increase of sorption in the presence of organic matter. This synergistic effect is very satisfactory in terms of storage security: the presence of small organic acids in clay rock does not question retention properties with respect to europium and trivalent actinides. (author)

  11. Numerical analysis of thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in the clay based material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xuerui

    2016-10-06

    Clay formations are investigated worldwide as potential host rock for the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Usually bentonite is preferred as the buffer and backfill material in the disposal system. In the disposal of HLW, heat emission is one of the most important issues as it can generate a series of complex thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in the surrounding materials and thus change the material properties. In the context of safety assessment, it is important to understand the thermally induced THM interactions and the associated change in material properties. In this work, the thermally induced coupled THM behaviours in the clay host rock and in the bentonite buffer as well as the corresponding coupling effects among the relevant material properties are numerically analysed. A coupled non-isothermal Richards flow mechanical model and a non-isothermal multiphase flow model were developed based on the scientific computer codes OpenGeoSys (OGS). Heat transfer in the porous media is governed by thermal conduction and advective flow of the pore fluids. Within the hydraulic processes, evaporation, vapour diffusion, and the unsaturated flow field are considered. Darcy's law is used to describe the advective flux of gas and liquid phases. The relative permeability of each phase is considered. The elastic deformation process is modelled by the generalized Hooke's law complemented with additional strain caused by swelling/shrinkage behaviour and by temperature change. In this study, special attention has been paid to the analysis of the thermally induced changes in material properties. The strong mechanical and hydraulic anisotropic properties of clay rock are described by a transversely isotropic mechanical model and by a transversely isotropic permeability tensor, respectively. The thermal anisotropy is described by adoption of the bedding-orientation-dependent thermal conductivity. The dependency of the thermal

  12. Numerical analysis of thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in the clay based material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xuerui

    2016-01-01

    Clay formations are investigated worldwide as potential host rock for the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Usually bentonite is preferred as the buffer and backfill material in the disposal system. In the disposal of HLW, heat emission is one of the most important issues as it can generate a series of complex thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in the surrounding materials and thus change the material properties. In the context of safety assessment, it is important to understand the thermally induced THM interactions and the associated change in material properties. In this work, the thermally induced coupled THM behaviours in the clay host rock and in the bentonite buffer as well as the corresponding coupling effects among the relevant material properties are numerically analysed. A coupled non-isothermal Richards flow mechanical model and a non-isothermal multiphase flow model were developed based on the scientific computer codes OpenGeoSys (OGS). Heat transfer in the porous media is governed by thermal conduction and advective flow of the pore fluids. Within the hydraulic processes, evaporation, vapour diffusion, and the unsaturated flow field are considered. Darcy's law is used to describe the advective flux of gas and liquid phases. The relative permeability of each phase is considered. The elastic deformation process is modelled by the generalized Hooke's law complemented with additional strain caused by swelling/shrinkage behaviour and by temperature change. In this study, special attention has been paid to the analysis of the thermally induced changes in material properties. The strong mechanical and hydraulic anisotropic properties of clay rock are described by a transversely isotropic mechanical model and by a transversely isotropic permeability tensor, respectively. The thermal anisotropy is described by adoption of the bedding-orientation-dependent thermal conductivity. The dependency of the thermal

  13. Study of heat and hydraulic diffusions in clays under thermal loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djeran, I.

    1993-01-01

    This study is a cost-sharing research programme on radioactive waste disposal and radioactive waste management. The thermal conductivity of clays is the fundamental parameter which governs the thermal diffusion and the pore pressure of the rock mass under thermal loading. Experiments have been undertaken in a reduced model, respecting representative boundary conditions. They show that the thermal conductivity depends on temperature in an unfavourable sense to the decrease of heat. On the other hand, the outflow of pore water, from the source to the exterior, has a low amplitude. A single model of porous medium allows the observations and illustrates the effects of the variation of conductivity on the behaviour of rock mass. Finally, thanks to the numerical formulations specially developed, we examine the incident of the particularities of proposed models on the thermohydromechanical behaviour of geometrically simple structures subjected to a given thermal loading

  14. PROCESSING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF TUBULAR CERAMIC SUPPORT FOR MICROFILTRATION MEMBRANE PREPARED FROM PYROPHYLLITE CLAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedallah Talidi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Tubular macroporous support for ceramic microfiltration membranes were prepared by extrusion followed by sintering of the low cost pyrophyllite clay. Clay powders mixed with some organic additives can be extruded to form a porous tubular support. The average pore size of the membrane is observed to increase from 5 µm to 10.8 µm when sintering temperature increase from 900 °C to 1200 °C. However, with the increase in temperature from 900 °C to 1200 °C, the support porosity is reduced from 47% to 30% and flexural strength is increased from 4 MPa to 17 MPa. The fabricated macro-porous supports are expected to have potential applications in the pre-treatment and also can be used like support for membranes of ultra-filtration.

  15. Modelling Aqueous Solubility of Sodium Chloride in Clays at Thermodynamic Conditions of Hydraulic Fracturing by Molecular Simulations.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moučka, Filip; Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, JUL 7 (2017), s. 16586-16599 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-12291S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 640979 - ShaleXenvironmenT Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : molecular simulation * Monte Carlo (GCMC) technique * clay pores Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  16. Reactive transport modelling of a heating and radiation experiment in the Boom clay (Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montenegro, L.; Samper, J.; Delgado, J.

    2003-01-01

    Most countries around the world consider Deep Geological Repositories (DGR) as the most safe option for the final disposal of high level radioactive waste (HLW). DGR is based on adopting a system of multiple barriers between the HLW and the biosphere. Underground laboratories provide information about the behaviour of these barriers at real conditions. Here we present a reactive transport model for the CERBERUS experiment performed at the HADES underground laboratory at Mol (Belgium) in order to characterize the thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H) and geochemical (G) behaviour of the Boon clay. This experiment is unique because it addresses the combined effect of heat and radiation produced by the storage of HLW in a DGR. Reactive transport models which are solved with CORE, are used to perform quantitative predictions of Boom clay thermo-hydro-geochemical (THG) behaviour. Numerical results indicate that heat and radiation cause a slight oxidation near of the radioactive source, pyrite dissolution, a pH decrease and slight changes in the pore water chemical composition of the Boom clay. (Author) 33 refs

  17. Modeling Air Permeability in Variably Saturated Soil from Two Natural Clay Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda T K K; Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per

    2013-01-01

    measurements from two Danish arable fields, each located on natural clay gradients, this study presents a pore tortuosity–disconnectivity analysis to characterize the soil–gas phase. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of soil–moisture condition, clay content, and other potential......Understanding soil–gas phase properties and processes is important for finding solutions to critical environmental problems such as greenhouse gas emissions and transport of gaseous-phase contaminants in soils. Soil–air permeability, ka (μm2), is the key parameter governing advective gas movement...... in soil and is controlled by soil physical characteristics representing soil texture and structure. Models predicting ka as a function of air-filled porosity (ɛ) often use a reference-point measurement, for example, ka,1000 at ɛ1000 (where the measurement is done at a suction of –1000 cm H2O). Using ka...

  18. Preparation and characterization of sol-gel derived 4%La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic membrane on clay-based supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersoy, B. [Afyon Kocatepe Univ., Mining Engineering Dept., AFYON (Turkey); Gunay, V. [TUBITAK-MRC, MCTRI, Gebze-KOCAELI (Turkey)

    2004-07-01

    In this work, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane layer (4 wt% La{sub 2}O{sub 3}+96% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was coated on the clay based porous support by using the sol-gel coating. The coating solution was prepared by using boehmite (AlOOH), La-nitrate (La{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.6H{sub 2}O), PVA, distilled water and HNO{sub 3}. The thickness of the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane layer was between 5-7 {mu}m. Two unprocessed clay samples which were supplied from Kutahya and Balikesir regions, were used to produce supports for the membranes. Porosities of the supports were varied from 25 to 40% depending on sintering temperatures. Mean pore diameter of the supports were between 0.01-1{mu}m. The mean pore diameter of 4wt%La{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane layer was around 11 nm and total pore area was 113 m{sup 2} / g at 1000 C for 1 hour. (orig.)

  19. Remeasurement of thorium-230 in the pore water of Lacnor tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snodgrass, W.J.; Hart, D.R.

    1990-02-01

    A resampling of the Lacnor tailings management area was undertaken under a comprehensive quality assurance programme to establish levels of thorium 230 in pore water. A quality assurance programme was established for field sampling, sample handling and transport, and laboratory procedures and reporting. The external audit was used to evaluate analytical bias (on synthetic and field samples) and precision (by comparison of duplicate-duplicate results). Accuracy was assessed using synthetic samples. The external audit indicates that thorium 230 measurements by the main laboratory are not significantly different from the interlaboratory average within standard statistical limits. The results of the audit are based on measurement of environmental samples and known synthetic samples. This shows that present and previous measurements of thorium 230 varying from 0,1 to 150 Bq/L are valid data. A qualitative interpretation of the controls on thorium 230 geochemistry is provided in terms of control by thorium 232 and thorium dioxide(c) solid phase. Generic dose estimates for consumption of water containing thorium 230 are made but require refinement ot account for the actual pH of the drinking water and the degree of dilution of the pore water. The results of this project indicate that the performance of the laboratory that will conduct future thorium 230 measurements can be assessed satisfactorily with a smaller scale external laboratory assurance programme. The programme should include replicate samples sent to each laboratory and interlaboratory comparison on samples having high and low values of thorium 230

  20. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  1. Mobility of U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm from spent nuclear fuel into bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramebaeck, H.; Skaalberg, M.; Eklund, U.B.; Kjellberg, L.; Werme, L.

    1998-01-01

    The mobility of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium from spent nuclear fuel (UO 2 ) into compacted bentonite was studied. Pieces of spent BWR UO 2 fuel was embedded in a compacted bentonite clay/low saline synthetic groundwater system. After a contact time of six years the bentonite was sliced into 0.1 mm thick slices and analysed for its content of actinides. Radiometric as well as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used for the analysis. The influence on the mobility by the addition of metallic iron, metallic copper and vivianite (Fe(II)-mineral) to the bentonite clay was investigated. The results show a low mobility of actinides in bentonite clay. Except for uranium the mobility of the other actinides could, after six years of diffusion time, only be detected less than 1 mm from the spent fuel. (orig.)

  2. The adsorption of Cu(II) on sodium bentonite in a synthetic saline groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, S.R.; King, F.

    1994-10-01

    The adsorption of Cu(II) on Na-bentonite has been studied under conditions that simulate those expected in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault located deep underground in the Canadian Shield. Adsorption isotherms have been determined for loose and compacted clay (compacted clay dry density 1.2 g.cm -3 ) over a wide range of copper concentrations (1 x 10 -6 mol.dm -3 to 1.0 mol.dm -3 ) at temperatures of 25 degrees C, 50 degrees C and 95 degrees C. Studies were carried out in a Na + - /Ca 2+ -based chloride solution ([Cl - ] = 0.97 mol.dm -3 ), with a clay-to-solution ratio of 1.6 g:360 cm 3 . For loose clays, the adsorption behaviour follows a Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorbate surface coverage increases with temperature, and exceeds the cation exchange capacity for Cu 2+ at temperatures of 50 degrees C and 95 degrees C. For compacted clays, the data follow a Freundlich-type isotherm, and exhibit no apparent temperature dependence. At a given pore-water copper concentration, the extent of adsorption on compacted clay is less than on loose clay. The difference between the behaviour of loose and compacted clays is explained in terms of the inaccessibility of some of the adsorption sites in compacted media. The significance of the results for calculating the corrosion rate of copper nuclear fuel waste containers is discussed. The adsorption results are used to analyze the shape and temperature dependence of copper concentration profiles observed in diffusion and corrosion experiments. 1 ref., 12 figs. 6 tabs., 1 appendix

  3. Modelling of clay diagenesis using a combined approach of crystalchemistry and thermochemistry: a case study in the smectite illitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloni, Claudio; Previde Massara, Elisabetta; Di Paola, Eleonora; Ortenzi, Andrea; Gherardi, Fabrizio; Blanc, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Diagenetic transformations occurring in clayey and arenaceous sediments is investigated in a number of hydrocarbon reservoirs with an integrated approach that combines mineralogical analysis, crystalchemistry, estimation of thermochemical parameters of clay minerals, and geochemical modelling. Because of the extremely variable crystalchemistry of clays, especially in the smectite - illite compositional range, the estimation of thermochemical parameters of site-specific clay-rich rocks is crucial to investigate water-rock equilibria and to predict mineralogical evolutionary patterns at the clay-sandstone interface. The task of estimating the thermochemical properties of clay minerals and predicting diagenetic reactions in natural reservoirs is accomplished through the implementation of an informatized, procedure (IP) that consists of: (i) laboratory analysis of smectite, illite and mixed layers (I/S) for the determination of their textural characteristics and chemical composition; (ii) estimation of the thermodynamic and structural parameters (enthalpy, entropy, and free energy of formation, thermal capacity, molar volume, molar weight) with a MS Excel tool (XLS) specifically developed at the French Bureau of Geological and Mining Researches (BRGM); (iii) usage of the SUPCRT (Johnson et al., 1992) software package (thereinafter, SSP) to derive log K values to be incorporated in thermodynamic databases of the standard geochemical codes; (iv) check of the consistency of the stability domains calculated with these log K values with relevant predominance diagrams; (v) final application of geochemical and reactive transport models to investigate the reactive mechanisms under different thermal conditions (40-150°C). All the simulations consider pore waters having roughly the same chemical composition of reservoir pore waters, and are performed with The Geochemist Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2015), PHREEQC (Parkhurst, 1999) and TOUGHREACT (Xu, 2006). The overall

  4. Modification of Clays by Sol-Gel Reaction and Their Use in the Ethylene In Situ Polymerization for Obtaining Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Moncada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanocomposites formation by in situ polymerization used a metallocene catalyst (butyl-2-cyclopentadienyl zirconium 2-chlorines and a hectorite synthetic clay type which is discussed. This research was carried out in two phases. The first phase consisted of mixing the components of the metallocenic polymerization reaction (metallocene-methylaluminoxane-ethylene with clay in a reactor. In the second phase, the metallocenic catalytic system was supported by clay particles and then a polymerization reaction was made. In this second phase, the clay particles were modified using a sol-gel reaction with different pH values: pH = 3, pH = 8, and pH = 12. The results were compared in terms of the catalytic activity in the different systems (phase 1 and phase 2 and the nanoparticle morphology of nanocomposites generated in this study.

  5. Reactive transport modeling of interaction processes between clay stone and cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windt, L. de; van der Lee, J.; Pellegrini, D.

    2001-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes in clayey formations may require the use of large amounts of concrete and cement. The chemical interactions between these industrial materials and the host rock are modeled with the reactive transport code HYTEC for time scales and a geometry representative of disposal projects. The pH evolution, a key parameter in element mobility, is studied more specifically. It depends on several interdependent processes: i) diffusion of highly alkaline cement pore solution, ii) strong buffering related to important mineral transformations both in the cement and in the clay, and iii) cation exchange processes, beyond the zone of intense mineral transformations. In addition, precipitation of secondary minerals may lead to a partial or complete clogging of the pore space, almost stopping the propagation of the high pH plume. In a second step, preliminary results on the migration of strontium and uranium in these strongly coupled systems are presented as an example of transport parameter derivation. (authors)

  6. Synthetic chloride-selective carbon nanotubes examined by using molecular and stochastic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2010-09-22

    Synthetic channels, such as nanotubes, offer the possibility of ion-selective nanoscale pores which can broadly mimic the functions of various biological ion channels, and may one day be used as antimicrobial agents, or for treatment of cystic fibrosis. We have designed a carbon nanotube that is selectively permeable to anions. The virtual nanotubes are constructed from a hexagonal array of carbon atoms (graphene) rolled up to form a tubular structure, with an effective radius of 4.53 Å and length of 34 Å. The pore ends are terminated with polar carbonyl groups. The nanotube thus formed is embedded in a lipid bilayer and a reservoir containing ionic solutions is added at each end of the pore. The conductance properties of these synthetic channels are then examined with molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations. Profiles of the potential of mean force at 0 mM reveal that a cation moving across the pore encounters an insurmountable free energy barrier of ∼25 kT in height. In contrast, for anions, there are two energy wells of ∼12 kT near each end of the tube, separated by a central free energy barrier of 4 kT. The conductance of the pore, with symmetrical 500 mM solutions in the reservoirs, is 72 pS at 100 mV. The current saturates with an increasing ionic concentration, obeying a Michaelis-Menten relationship. The pore is normally occupied by two ions, and the rate-limiting step in conduction is the time taken for the resident ion near the exit gate to move out of the energy well. Copyright © 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clay Characterization as Engineered Barrier to Contaminants Migration: Thermal, Hydraulic and Mechanical Properties; Caracterizacion de la Arcilla como Barrera de Ingenieria para la Migracion de Contaminantes: Propiedades Termicas, Hidraulicas y Mecanicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bru, A.; Casero, D. [CIEMAT: Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    In this work we characterize the structure of a clay, concretely bentonite. Our main aim is to stress the important role that plays the heterogeneity of the medium structure in transport processes. Randomness of pore sizes produces an anomalous transport of contaminants. We analyze mercuric porosimetry data with simulations finding that pore size distribution has a power-law behaviour. (Author) 6 refs.

  8. Use of clays as liners in solar ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Gerardo [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Anahuac Mexico Norte, Huixquilucan, Edo. de Mexico 52786 (Mexico); Almanza, Rafael [Instituto de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2009-06-15

    An alternative to synthetic materials for use in solar pond liners is to select clayey soils as hydraulic barriers. This option reduces the cost of construction and the risk of contamination of subsoil and groundwater by hot brines. This paper deals with the physical, chemical and hydraulic properties of different soils tested mainly as compacted clay liners. The underdeveloped nations have the option to use this type of liner, but before doing so several tests are recommended, including those for soil and water composition, permeability, plasticity and X-ray diffraction analysis. In this investigation the following samples are analyzed: native clayey soils with illite, montmorillonite and halloysite, treated and non-treated bentonites in powder and granulated form, a mixture of zeolite and sodium bentonite, and industrial minerals composed largely of halloysite, kaolinite and attapulgite selected clays. Neutral salt aqueous solutions (NaCl and KCl) at different concentrations and under temperature gradients were used for compatibility testing conducted on these specimens. Experiment setup and particular testing procedures are also discussed. (author)

  9. Clay filter-aid in ultrafiltration (UF) of humic acid solution

    KAUST Repository

    Pontié , M.; Thekkedath, A.; Kecili, K.; Dach, H.; De Nardi, F.; Castaing, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Fouling studies with three different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) (100. kDa, 30. kDa and 10. kDa) membranes in regenerated cellulose were carried out in the presence of Acros humic acids (HA) at pH 3.0, 6.7 and 9.5. It was shown that the tighter membranes were less fouled compared with the higher MWCO membranes. 100. kDa membrane showed the highest degree of fouling. The role of pH showed that the highest degree of fouling happened at a neutral pH (pH 6.7) and the lowest degree of fouling happened at a basic pH (pH 9.5).Effectiveness of a novel pre-treatment method was applied to the 100kDa membrane. We added in the HA solution clay particles, homemade synthetized from natural bentonite and denoted Mont-CTAB. We observed a gain in productivity of 25%. 2D-fractal dimension parameter decreased under 1.5, showing a de-organization of the cake due to clay particles in/on the cake and a specific resistance of 4.4×10 11m/kg was obtained in presence of clays versus 3.6×10 14m/kg with HA alone. Finally the development of clay assisted ultrafiltration process changes the cake morphology limiting fouling impact and it is hope that for long term experiments, formation of a gel-layer should be limited. © 2012 Elsevier B.V..

  10. Clay filter-aid in ultrafiltration (UF) of humic acid solution

    KAUST Repository

    Pontié, M.

    2012-04-01

    Fouling studies with three different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) (100. kDa, 30. kDa and 10. kDa) membranes in regenerated cellulose were carried out in the presence of Acros humic acids (HA) at pH 3.0, 6.7 and 9.5. It was shown that the tighter membranes were less fouled compared with the higher MWCO membranes. 100. kDa membrane showed the highest degree of fouling. The role of pH showed that the highest degree of fouling happened at a neutral pH (pH 6.7) and the lowest degree of fouling happened at a basic pH (pH 9.5).Effectiveness of a novel pre-treatment method was applied to the 100kDa membrane. We added in the HA solution clay particles, homemade synthetized from natural bentonite and denoted Mont-CTAB. We observed a gain in productivity of 25%. 2D-fractal dimension parameter decreased under 1.5, showing a de-organization of the cake due to clay particles in/on the cake and a specific resistance of 4.4×10 11m/kg was obtained in presence of clays versus 3.6×10 14m/kg with HA alone. Finally the development of clay assisted ultrafiltration process changes the cake morphology limiting fouling impact and it is hope that for long term experiments, formation of a gel-layer should be limited. © 2012 Elsevier B.V..

  11. Automatic facial pore analysis system using multi-scale pore detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J Y; Kim, S W; Lee, S H; Choi, J E; Ko, S J

    2017-08-01

    As facial pore widening and its treatments have become common concerns in the beauty care field, the necessity for an objective pore-analyzing system has been increased. Conventional apparatuses lack in usability requiring strong light sources and a cumbersome photographing process, and they often yield unsatisfactory analysis results. This study was conducted to develop an image processing technique for automatic facial pore analysis. The proposed method detects facial pores using multi-scale detection and optimal scale selection scheme and then extracts pore-related features such as total area, average size, depth, and the number of pores. Facial photographs of 50 subjects were graded by two expert dermatologists, and correlation analyses between the features and clinical grading were conducted. We also compared our analysis result with those of conventional pore-analyzing devices. The number of large pores and the average pore size were highly correlated with the severity of pore enlargement. In comparison with the conventional devices, the proposed analysis system achieved better performance showing stronger correlation with the clinical grading. The proposed system is highly accurate and reliable for measuring the severity of skin pore enlargement. It can be suitably used for objective assessment of the pore tightening treatments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. New aluminium-rich alkali slag matrix with clay minerals for immobilizing simulated radioactive Sr and Cs waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Guangren; Sun, Darren Delai; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2001-01-01

    A new aluminium-rich alkali-activated slag matrix (M-AAS) with clay absorbents has been developed for immobilization of simulated radioactive Sr or Cs waste by introducing metakaolin, natural zeolite and NaOH-treated attapulgite clay minerals into alkali-activated slag matrix (AAS). The results revealed that the additions of metakaolin and clay absorbents into the cementitious matrixes would greatly enhance the distribution ratio, R d , of selective adsorption whether the matrix was OPC matrix or AAS matrix. The new immobilizing matrix M-AAS not only exhibited the strongest selective adsorption for both Sr and Cs ions, but also was characterized by lower porosity and small pore diameter so that it exhibited the lowest leaching rate. Hydration product analyses also demonstrated that (Na+Al)-substituted C-S-H(I) and self-generated zeolite were major hydration products in the M-AAS matrix, which provided this new immobilizing matrix with better selective adsorption on Sr and Cs and lower leaching rate

  13. Technetium migration in Boom Clay - Assessing the role of colloid-facilitated transport in a deep clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggeman, C.; Martens, E.; Maes, N.; Jacops, E.; Van Gompel, M.; Van Ravestyn, L.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The role of colloids - mainly dissolved natural organic matter (NOM, 50-150 mg/l) - in the transport of radionuclides in the Boom Clay formation (Mol, Belgium), has long since been a matter of (heavy) debate. For more than 20 years, batch experiments with Boom Clay suspensions showed a pronounced influence of the dissolved organic carbon concentration on the aqueous concentrations of different radionuclides like Tc, Np, Am and U. Moreover, small fractions of these radionuclides were also observed to elute almost un-retarded out of confined clay cores in percolation experiments. In the past years, a new conceptual model for the speciation of the long-lived fission product Technetium- 99 ( 99 Tc) under Boom Clay conditions has been drafted. In brief, the stable oxidation state of 99 Tc in these conditions is +IV, and, therefore, Tc solution concentrations are limited by the solubility of TcO 2 .nH 2 O(s). However, during reduction of TcVII (in the TcO 4 - form) to TcIV, precursor TcO 2 .nH 2 O colloids are formed, which are stabilised by the dissolved organic matter present in Boom Clay interstitial pore water, and in supernatants of Boom Clay batch suspensions. Moreover, this stabilisation process occurs in such a systematic way, that (conditional) interaction constants could be established, and the behaviour was described as a 'hydrophobic sorption', or, more accurately, a 'colloid-colloid' interaction. This conceptual model was implemented into PHREEQC geochemical and Hydrus transport code to come to a reactive transport model that was used to simulate both the outflow and the tracer profile in several long-term running percolation experiments (both in lab and under in situ conditions). To account for slow dissociation kinetics of Tc from the NOM colloid, a first-order kinetic rate equation was also added to the model. In order to describe the migration of colloidal particles (NOM), an

  14. Capillary pressure controlled methane hydrate and ice growth-melting patterns in porous media : synthetic silica versus natural sandstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R.; Tohidi, B.; Webber, B. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Centre for Gas Research, Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Although naturally-occurring gas hydrates (or clathrate hydrates) in marine sediments can pose a hazard to deepwater hydrocarbon production operations, they represent a potential strategic energy reserve. Gas hydrates can also provide a means for deep ocean carbon dioxide disposal through sequestration/storage. They have long-term importance with respect to ocean margin stability, methane release, and global climate change. However, fundamental knowledge is still lacking regarding the mechanisms of hydrate growth, accumulation and distribution within the subsurface. Marine sediments which host gas hydrates are commonly fine-grained silts, muds, and clays with narrow mean pore diameters, leading to speculation that capillary phenomena could play a significant role in controlling hydrate distribution in the seafloor, and may be partly responsible for discrepancies between observed and predicted hydrate stability zone thicknesses. A close relationship between hydrate inhibition and pore size has been confirmed through previous laboratory studies. Clathrate stability has been significantly reduced in narrow pores. However, the focus of investigations has generally been hydrate dissociation conditions in porous media, with capillary controls on the equally important process of hydrate growth being largely overlooked. This paper presented the results of an experimental investigation into methane hydrate growth and dissociation equilibria in natural medium grained sandstone. The study also compared data with that previously measured for mesoporous silica glasses. The paper discussed solid-liquid phase behaviour in confined geometries including hysteresis in porous media. It also discussed the experimental equipment and method. It was concluded that, as for synthetic silicas, hydrate growth and dissociation in the sandstone were characterised by a measurable hysteresis between opposing transitions, notably hydrate (or ice) formation occurring at temperatures lower than

  15. Porous Carbon with Willow-Leaf-Shaped Pores for High-Performance Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanhong; Zhang, Linlin; Schon, Tyler B; Li, Huanhuan; Fan, Chaoying; Li, Xiaoying; Wang, Haifeng; Wu, Xinglong; Xie, Haiming; Sun, Haizhu; Seferos, Dwight S; Zhang, Jingping

    2017-12-13

    A novel kind of biomass-derived, high-oxygen-containing carbon material doped with nitrogen that has willow-leaf-shaped pores was synthesized. The obtained carbon material has an exotic hierarchical pore structure composed of bowl-shaped macropores, willow-leaf-shaped pores, and an abundance of micropores. This unique hierarchical porous structure provides an effective combination of high current densities and high capacitance because of a pseudocapacitive component that is afforded by the introduction of nitrogen and oxygen dopants. Our synthetic optimization allows further improvements in the performance of this hierarchical porous carbon (HPC) material by providing a high degree of control over the graphitization degree, specific surface area, and pore volume. As a result, a large specific surface area (1093 m 2 g -1 ) and pore volume (0.8379 cm 3 g -1 ) are obtained for HPC-650, which affords fast ion transport because of its short ion-diffusion pathways. HPC-650 exhibits a high specific capacitance of 312 F g -1 at 1 A g -1 , retaining 76.5% of its capacitance at 20 A g -1 . Moreover, it delivers an energy density of 50.2 W h kg -1 at a power density of 1.19 kW kg -1 , which is sufficient to power a yellow-light-emitting diode and operate a commercial scientific calculator.

  16. Quantifying the clay content with borehole depth and impact on reservoir flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarath Kumar, Aaraellu D.; Chattopadhyay, Pallavi B.

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on the application of reservoir well log data and 3D transient numerical model for proper optimization of flow dynamics and hydrocarbon potential. Fluid flow through porous media depends on clay content that controls porosity, permeability and pore pressure. The pressure dependence of permeability is more pronounced in tight formations. Therefore, preliminary clay concentration analysis and geo-mechanical characterizations have been done by using wells logs. The assumption of a constant permeability for a reservoir is inappropriate and therefore the study deals with impact of permeability variation for pressure-sensitive formation. The study started with obtaining field data from available well logs. Then, the mathematical models are developed to understand the efficient extraction of oil in terms of reservoir architecture, porosity and permeability. The fluid flow simulations have been done using COMSOL Multiphysics Software by choosing time dependent subsurface flow module that is governed by Darcy's law. This study suggests that the reservoir should not be treated as a single homogeneous structure with unique porosity and permeability. The reservoir parameters change with varying clay content and it should be considered for effective planning and extraction of oil. There is an optimum drawdown for maximum production with varying permeability in a reservoir.

  17. Geochemical of clay formations : study of Spanish clay REFERENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turrero, M. J.; Pena, J.

    2003-01-01

    Clay rocks are investigated in different international research programs in order to assess its feasibility for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes. This is because different sepcific aspects: they have low hydraulic conductivity (10''-11-10''-15 m/s), a high sorption capacity, self-sealing capacity of facults and discontinuities and mechanical resistance. Several research programs on clay formations are aimed to study the chemistry of the groundwater and the water-rock reactions that control it: e. g. Boom Clay (Mol, Belgium), Oxford Clay /Harwell, United Kingdom), Toarcian Clay (Tournemire, France), Palfris formation (Wellenberg, Switzerland), Opalinus Clay (Bure, France). Based on these studies, considerable progress in the development of techniques for hydrologic, geochemical and hydrogeochemical characterization of mudstones has been accomplished (e. g. Beaufais et al. 1994, De Windt el al. 1998. Thury and Bossart 1999, Sacchi and Michelot 2000) with important advances in the knowledge of geochemical process in these materials (e. g. Reeder et al. 1993, Baeyens and Brandbury 1994, Beaucaire et al. 2000, Pearson et al., 2003).Furtermore, geochemical modeling is commonly used to simulate the evolution of water chemistry and to understand quantitatively the processes controlling the groundwater chemistry (e. g. Pearson et al. 1998, Tempel and Harrison 2000, Arcos et al., 2001). The work presented here is part of a research program funded by Enresa in the context of its R and D program. It is focused on the characterization of a clay formation (reference Argillaceous Formation, RAF) located within the Duero Basin (north-centralSpain). The characterisation of th ephysical properties,, fluid composition, mineralogy, water-rock reaction processes, geochemical modelling and sorption properties of the clays from the mentioned wells is the main purpose of this work. (Author)

  18. The effective stress concept in saturated sand-clay buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, J.; Oswell, J.M.; Gray, M.N.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed on mixtures of sand and bentonite, to investigate whether the behavior of the mixture can be expressed in terms of effective stresses, defined as the tensor difference between externally applied total stresses and pore water pressures measured outside the cell. Within acceptable bounds of experimental error, the tests show that effective stress can be used to describe consolidation and shear behaviour. However, because part of the effective stress in the clay is derived from net interparticle repulsive (unit) forces seated in diffuse double layers around aggregations of bentonite particles, the applicability of the concept has at this stage been restricted to conditions of constant volume (or possibly constant straining rate), constant chemistry, and constant temperature

  19. Predicting Soil-Water Characteristics from Volumetric Contents of Pore-Size Analogue Particle Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus

    *-model) for the SWC, derived from readily available soil properties such as texture and bulk density. A total of 46 soils from different horizons at 15 locations across Denmark were used for models evaluation. The Xw-model predicts the volumetric water content as a function of volumetric fines content (organic matter...... and clay). It performed reasonably well for the dry-end (above a pF value of 2.0; pF = log(|Ψ|), where Ψ is the matric potential in cm), but did not do as well closer to saturated conditions. The Xw*-model gives the volumetric water content as a function of volumetric content of particle size fractions...... (organic matter, clay, silt, fine and coarse sand), variably included in the model depending on the pF value. The volumetric content of a particular soil particle size fraction was included in the model if it was assumed to contribute to the pore size fraction still occupied with water at the given p...

  20. Performance of the Opalinus Clay under thermal loading: experimental results from Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gens, A. [Universitat Politència de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany); Gaus, I. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); and others

    2017-04-15

    The paper presents an overview of the behaviour of Opalinus Clay under thermal loading as observed in three in situ heating tests performed in the Mont Terri rock laboratory: HE-B, HE-D and HE-E. The three tests are summarily described; they encompass a broad range of test layouts and experimental conditions. Afterwards, the following topics are examined: determination of thermal conductivity, thermally-induced pore pressure generation and thermally-induced mechanical effects. The mechanisms underlying pore pressure generation and dissipation are discussed in detail and the relationship between rock damage and thermal loading is examined using an additional in situ test: SE-H. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the various thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) interactions identified in the heating tests. (authors)

  1. On the role of anisotropy in the perturbation of Boom Clay by a deep disposal repository for high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillen, X.; Li, X.L.; Van Marcke, P.; Chen, G.; Bastiaens, W.

    2010-01-01

    and in-situ experiments in the clay formation. In particular variations of the volumetric deformations in the massif can be evidenced by the strong hydro-mechanical coupling observed during the construction of the Connecting Gallery. The pore water potential perturbation is clearly anisotropic. In the short term, the extent of the hydraulic perturbation is larger in the vertical direction and is mainly caused by the instantaneous (dilatant) deformation of the clay upon excavation. In the long term, drainage to the (open) gallery becomes the dominant process and the horizontal profile eventually passes below the vertical one, as the horizontal hydraulic conductivity is larger than the vertical one. The convergence of the clay during an excavation also appears to be anisotropic as the vertical convergence is smaller than the horizontal one. Around the excavated galleries a fracture pattern consisting of two conjugated fracture planes is observed. A similar behaviour is observed around boreholes and has also been reproduced recently with small scale hollow cylinder triaxial tests. Simple models of the excavation of a gallery and of the ATLAS III heater experiment, which explicitly represent Boom Clay as a transverse isotropic material, are shown to capture essential features of the damaged zone around the gallery and the pore pressure perturbations induced by mechanical or thermal loading. Such models also facilitate the formulation of hypotheses about possible links between the structure of the EDZ and the hydraulic conductivity measurements. (authors)

  2. Anisotropic Behaviour of Opalinus Clay Through Consolidated and Drained Triaxial Testing in Saturated Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, Valentina; Ferrari, Alessio; Laloui, Lyesse

    2018-05-01

    This paper investigates the anisotropic hydro-mechanical behaviour of Opalinus Clay shale, the host material currently being considered for the construction of a nuclear waste repository in Switzerland. Consolidated and drained triaxial tests on Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri URL have been conducted in order to derive information on its strength and stiffness properties. Opalinus Clay specimens were tested both parallel to bedding (P-specimens) and perpendicular to bedding (S-specimens). The considered effective confining stress range (from 2 to 12 MPa) has been selected in order to reproduce possible in situ stress conditions for the repository. In this work, particular attention has been paid to the experimental procedure in order to ensure consolidated conditions and avoid generation of unwanted excess pore water pressure during drained shearing. The Skempton B parameter has been determined for all the tested specimens in order to ensure saturation. Both single-stage and multistage triaxial testing procedures were adopted in the experimental campaign. The results of the triaxial tests highlight an anisotropic elastic response of Opalinus Clay: S-specimens present a more compliant behaviour than P-specimens. The values of the Young modulus are found to increase with the increase in mean effective stress. The analysis of the peak and ultimate shear strength results reveals that the material behaves in a similar manner regardless of the considered direction of loading (P and S directions) with respect to the bedding orientation. Peak and ultimate failure envelopes for Opalinus Clay were derived for the investigated stress range.

  3. Emulsions treatment of oil / water using clay vermiculite hydrofobized; Tratamento de emulsoes oleo/agua utilizando a argila vermiculita hidrofobizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, V.C.; Batista, T.S.; Ramos, I.B.M.; Alves, J.J.N.; Sousa, B.V., E-mail: valdetecampossilva@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the oil removal capacity in synthetic emulsions using clay vermiculite expanded and hydrophobized. Removing and oil adsorption capacity were evaluated from the finite bath assays using the factorial design 2², and the model definition that describes the process by adsorption isotherm. The diffraction patterns confirm that the process of expansion and hydrophobic at 700 ° C increases the spacing between clay layers of vermiculite, as well as the infrared spectrum presents characteristic band of the hydrophobing process. From the isotherms it found that the correlation coefficients showed that the Langmuir, Freundlich, Langmuir sigmoidal Hill Sigmoidal well describe the adsorption behavior of vermiculite clay. However, the experimental data were best fitted to the Hill sigmoid model.(author)

  4. To Investigate the Absorption, Dynamic Contact Angle and Printability Effects of Synthetic Zeolite Pigments in an Inkjet Receptive Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalindre, Swaraj Sunil

    Ink absorption performance in inkjet receptive coatings containing synthetic zeolite pigments was studied. Coating pigment pore and particle size distribution are the key parameters that influence in modifying media surface properties, thus affecting the rate of ink penetration and drying time (Scholkopf, et al. 2004). The primary objective of this study was: (1) to investigate the synthetic zeolite pigment effects on inkjet ink absorption, dynamic contact angle and printability, and (2) to evaluate these novel synthetic zeolite pigments in replacing the fumed silica pigments in conventional inkjet receptive coatings. In this research study, single pigment coating formulations (in equal P:B ratio) were prepared using microporous synthetic zeolite pigments (5A, Organophilic and 13X) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) binder. The laboratory-coated samples were characterized for absorption, air permeance, roughness, drying time, wettability and print fidelity. Based on the rheological data, it was found that the synthetic zeolite formulated coatings depicted a Newtonian flow behavior at low shear; while the industry accepted fumed silica based coatings displayed a characteristically high pseudoplastic flow behavior. Our coated samples generated using microporous synthetic zeolite pigments produced low absorption, reduced wettability and accelerated ink drying characteristics. These characteristics were caused due to the synthetic zeolite pigments, which resulted in relatively closed surface structure coated samples. The research suggested that no single selected synthetic zeolite coating performed better than the conventional fumed silica based coatings. Experimental data also showed that there was no apparent relationship between synthetic zeolite pigment pore sizes and inkjet ink absorption. For future research, above coated samples should be evaluated for pore size distribution using Mercury Porosimeter, which quantifies surface porosity of coated samples. This presented

  5. Concrete-Opalinus clay interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenni, A.; Maeder, U.; Lerouge, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Schwyn, B.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Designs for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste foresee cementitious materials as structural elements, backfill or waste matrix. Therefore, studies of interactions between cement and all other materials involved are important. Interactions are mostly driven by chemical gradients in pore water and might lead to mineralogical alterations in the barrier system, which in turn influence properties like swelling pressure, permeability, or specific retention in case of clay materials. Existing laboratory and in-situ studies using clay-stone revealed significant alteration in both cement and clay-stone. Phase dissolution, precipitation, and carbonation, were found to cause an overall porosity increase in the cement with a possible decrease close to the interface, and clogging in the clay-stone [2]. Most of the work was done on cement pastes rather than concretes to avoid analytical complications caused by aggregates, and the scale of investigation was chosen in the range of centimetres rather than micrometers. The Cement-Clay Interaction (CI) experiment at the Mont Terri Underground Laboratory (St. Ursanne, Switzerland) aims at replicating some of the processes at interfaces to be expected.For this purpose, two vertical cylindrical boreholes (384 mm diameter, up to 10 m length) in Opalinus Clay (OPA) were filled with layers of three different concretes and bentonite. The concrete formulations are based on common aggregate content and grain size distributions, combined with three different cements: Portland cement (OPC), ESDRED cement especially designed for repository applications (40% of cement substituted with silica fume), and low alkali cement (LAC, containing slag and nano-silica).In this study, we present a characterisation of the three concrete-OPA interfaces after two years of alteration and deduce possible mechanisms. Backscattered electron (BE) imaging and energy dispersive spectrum (EDX) element mapping

  6. The Influence of Syndepositional Macropores on the Hydraulic Integrity of Thick Alluvial Clay Aquitards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timms, Wendy A.; Acworth, R. Ian; Crane, Richard A.; Arns, Christoph H.; Arns, Ji-Youn; McGeeney, Dayna E.; Rau, Gabriel C.; Cuthbert, Mark O.

    2018-04-01

    Clay-rich deposits are commonly assumed to be aquitards which act as natural hydraulic barriers due to their low hydraulic connectivity. Postdepositional weathering processes are known to increase the permeability of aquitards in the near surface but not impact on deeper parts of relatively thick formations. However, syndepositional processes affecting the hydraulic properties of aquitards have previously received little attention in the literature. Here, we analyze a 31 m deep sediment core recovered from an inland clay-rich sedimentary sequence using a combination of techniques including particle size distribution and microscopy, centrifuge dye tracer testing and micro X-ray CT imaging. Subaerial deposition of soils within these fine grained alluvial deposits has led to the preservation of considerable macropores (root channels or animal burrows). Connected pores and macropores thus account for vertical hydraulic conductivity (K) of 4.2×10-9 m/s (geometric mean of 13 samples) throughout the thick aquitard, compared to a matrix K that is likely sediment was deposited must be considered when aquitards are investigated as potential natural hydraulic barriers and illustrate the value of combining multiple investigation techniques for characterizing clay-rich deposits.

  7. Penelitian pengaruh variasi china clay dan naphthenic oil terhadap perpanjangan tetap dan tegangan putus kompon karet untuk lis pintu almari es

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Buchori

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to know the influence of filer china clay naphthenic oil to the physical properties of permanent set and tensile strength rubber compound for refrigerator gasket. It makes from natural rubber ( pale crepe and synthetic rubber (SBR 1502 as raw material with addition of ingredients such as : softener, activator, filler, antioxidant, accelerator, coloring and vulcanizing agent. It should be carried out using base formula by varying china clay : 30; 40 ; and 50 parts and naphthenic oil : 5,0 ; 7,5 and 10 parts for 9 compound then should be tested their physical properties permanent set and tensile strength. The result of the test statistically prove that china clay and naphthenic oil influence the physical properties for permanent set by china clay 30 parts and naphthenic oil 5 parts, the value 1,24%, for tensile strength by china clay 50 parts and naphthenic oil 5 parts, the value 102,6081 Kg/Cm2.

  8. A preliminary study on titanium-clay interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersin, P.; Grolimund, D.; Kumpulainen, S.; Brendle, J.; Snellman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Posiva and SKB are developing a horizontal disposal design alternative, termed KBS-3H. In this design alternative, modules of a Cu-waste canister surrounded by bentonite blocks is placed in a perforated steel cylinder, a so-called supercontainer (SC), before emplacement in the deposition drifts. The current design for the SC is based on carbon steel. But because corrosion will lead to high hydrogen levels and iron-clay interactions, alternative materials are also being considered. A promising alternative are Ti alloys which display high strength and are known to behave as chemically inert materials under variety of conditions. Also for the Ti alloys, both the corrosion rate and interaction behaviour with other components in the drift needs to be known. In particular, it needs to be demonstrated that corrosion-derived Ti has no significant detrimental effects on the bentonite buffer which is one main barrier within the KBS-3H concept. Unfortunately, the benign inert behaviour of Ti makes it difficult to perform meaningful experiments. Hence, it is not surprising that so far, very little research work on this topic has been carried out and experience is very limited. A preliminary batch-type investigation has been launched to shed more light on Ti-clay interaction processes and on the Ti species resulting from these interactions. A series of experiments including purified MX-80 bentonite or synthetic 'Ti-free' montmorillonite were mixed with metallic Ti nano-powder or foil in 0.1 M NaCl solutions at different pH and temperature conditions. After several months, solid and solute samples from the first set of tests were analyzed by wet chemistry and spectroscopic methods. Ti speciation was analyzed with XAS combined with XRF as elemental mapping tool. A further series of tests will be analyzed in the near future. In addition to reacted samples, a number of reference and starting materials (e.g. MX-80, Rokle

  9. An Image-based Micro-continuum Pore-scale Model for Gas Transport in Organic-rich Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, B.; Tchelepi, H.

    2017-12-01

    Gas production from unconventional source rocks, such as ultra-tight shales, has increased significantly over the past decade. However, due to the extremely small pores ( 1-100 nm) and the strong material heterogeneity, gas flow in shale is still not well understood and poses challenges for predictive field-scale simulations. In recent years, digital rock analysis has been applied to understand shale gas transport at the pore-scale. An issue with rock images (e.g. FIB-SEM, nano-/micro-CT images) is the so-called "cutoff length", i.e., pores and heterogeneities below the resolution cannot be resolved, which leads to two length scales (resolved features and unresolved sub-resolution features) that are challenging for flow simulations. Here we develop a micro-continuum model, modified from the classic Darcy-Brinkman-Stokes framework, that can naturally couple the resolved pores and the unresolved nano-porous regions. In the resolved pores, gas flow is modeled with Stokes equation. In the unresolved regions where the pore sizes are below the image resolution, we develop an apparent permeability model considering non-Darcy flow at the nanoscale including slip flow, Knudsen diffusion, adsorption/desorption, surface diffusion, and real gas effect. The end result is a micro-continuum pore-scale model that can simulate gas transport in 3D reconstructed shale images. The model has been implemented in the open-source simulation platform OpenFOAM. In this paper, we present case studies to demonstrate the applicability of the model, where we use 3D segmented FIB-SEM and nano-CT shale images that include four material constituents: organic matter, clay, granular mineral, and pore. In addition to the pore structure and the distribution of the material constituents, we populate the model with experimental measurements (e.g. size distribution of the sub-resolution pores from nitrogen adsorption) and parameters from the literature and identify the relative importance of different

  10. Comprehensive review of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, M. Uma; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-11-01

    Human activity inevitably produces waste materials that must be managed. Some waste can be reused. However many wastes that cannot be used beneficially must be disposed of ensuring environmental safety. One of the common methods of disposal is landfilling. The most common problems of the landfill site are environmental degradation and groundwater contamination caused by leachate produced during the decomposition process of organic material and rainfall. Liner in a landfill is an important component which prevent leachate migration and prevent groundwater contamination. Earthen liners have been widely used to contain waste materials in landfill. Liners and covers for municipal and hazardous waste containment facilities are often constructed with the use of fine-grained, low plasticity soils. Because of low permeability geosynthetic clay liners and compacted clay liners are the main materials used in waste disposal landfills. This paper summaries the important geotechnical characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity, liquid limit and free swell index of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on research findings. This paper also compares geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on certain criteria such as thickness, availability of materials, vulnerability to damage etc.

  11. Modelling of the thermomechanical behaviour of saturated clays: application to the radioactive wastes disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahbaoui, A.

    1995-01-01

    During the waste disposal of containers, the clay barriers of backfill and the confining medium, which is essentially composed of clay, are submitted to heavy thermal stresses which induce volume change and can result in material failure. The clay, composed of solid skeleton, adsorbed water, and free water, is submitted to physico-chemical interactions which influence its thermomechanical behaviour, itself quits different from granular media such as sand. The principal factor responsible for this response is the effect of temperature on the clays water. Thus, the loss of special structure of adsorbed water and the increase in thickness of the diffused double-layer provoke microstructural rearrangement mechanisms of particles. Those mechanisms are strongly correlated with the mechanical state of material. When it is highly over-consolidated, an irreversible swelling occurs during thermal cycle, accompanied by a breaking up of the particles and a permanent expansion of meso-pores. The greater the OCR, the more important the thermal swelling. When the material is normally consolidated, the particles settle during heating under the external stress, which results in a denser rearrangement of the material. With a slight over-consolidated material, all the intermediate stages between the above mechanisms can be reached. However, cooling produces only a weak reversible compression characterising the thermal contraction of the components. Those microscopic phenomena have been used to elaborate a macroscopic thermomechanical model based on the Cam-Clay and the Hujeux Models. The model formulation includes a thermal softening, on one hand, by the reduction of the mechanical yield surface f c and the translation of the thermal yield surface f T (PTL), and, on the other hand, an irreversible thermal expansive volumetric strain. This approach of the problem was tested along various thermomechanical paths and especially on the laboratory tests, on the expansive and non expansive

  12. Time evolution of the Clay Barrier Chemistry in a HLW deep geological disposal in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font, I.; Miguel, M. J.; Juncosa, R.

    2000-01-01

    The main goal of a high level waste geological disposal is to guarantee the waste isolation from the biosphere, locking them away into very deep geological formations. The best way to assure the isolation is by means of a multiple barrier system. These barriers, in a serial disposition, should assure the confinement function of the disposal system. Two kinds of barriers are considered: natural barriers (geological formations) and engineered barriers (waste form, container and backfilling and sealing materials). Bentonite is selected as backfilling and sealing materials for HLW disposal into granite formations, due to its very low permeability and its ability to fill the remaining spaces. bentonite has also other interesting properties, such as, the radionuclide retention capacity by sorption processes. Once the clay barrier has been placed, the saturation process starts. The granite groundwater fills up the voids of the bentonite and because of the chemical interactions, the groundwater chemical composition varies. Near field processes, such as canister corrosion, waste leaching and radionuclide release, strongly depends on the water chemical composition. Bentonite pore water composition is such a very important feature of the disposal system and its determination and its evolution have great relevance in the HLW deep geological disposal performance assessment. The process used for the determination of the clay barrier pore water chemistry temporal evolution, and its influence on the performance assessment, are presented in this paper. (Author)

  13. Self-Assembling Organic Nanopores as Synthetic Transmembrane Channels with Tunable Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaoxi

    A long-standing goal in the area of supramolecular self-assembly involves the development of synthetic ion/water channels capable of mimicking the mass-transport characteristics of biological channels and pores. Few examples of artificial transmembrane channels with large lumen, high conductivity and selectivity are known. A review of pronounced biological transmembrane protein channels and some representative synthetic models have been provided in Chapter 1, followed by our discovery and initial investigation of shape-persistent oligoamide and phenylene ethynylene macrocycles as synthetic ion/water channels. In Chapter 2, the systematic structural modification of oligoamide macrocycles 1, the so-called first-generation of these shape-persistent macrocycles, has led to third-generation macrocycles 3. The third generation was found to exhibit unprecedented, strong intermolecular association in both the solid state and solution via multiple techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, and 1H NMR. Fluorescence spectroscopy paired with dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that macrocycles 3 can assemble into a singly dispersed nanotubular structure in solution. The resultant self-assembling pores consisting of 3 were examined by HPTS-LUVs assays and BLM studies (Chapter 3) and found to form cation-selective (PK+/PCl- = 69:1) transmembrane ion channels with large conductance (200 ˜ 2000 pS for alkali cations) and high stability with open times reaching to 103 seconds. Tuning the aggregation state of macrocycles by choosing an appropriate polar solvent mixture (i.e., 3:1, THF:DMF, v/v) and concentration led to the formation of ion channels with well-defined square top behavior. A parallel study using DLS to examine the size of aggregates was used in conjunction with channel activity assays (LUVs/BLM) to reveal the effects of the aggregation state on channel activity. Empirical evidence now clearly indicates that a preassembled state, perhaps that of a

  14. Geomechanical behaviour of Opalinus Clay at multiple scales: results from Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, F.; Wild, K.M.; Loew, S. [Institute of Geology, Engineering Geology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Yong, S. [Knight Piesold Ltd, Vancouver (Canada); Thoeny, R. [Grundwasserschutz und Entsorgung, AF-Consult Switzerland AG, Baden (Switzerland); Frank, E. [Sektion Geologie (GEOL), Eidgenössisches Nuklear-Sicherheitsinspektorat (ENSI), Brugg (Switzerland)

    2017-04-15

    The paper represents a summary about our research projects conducted between 2003 and 2015 related to the mechanical behaviour of Opalinus Clay at Mont Terri. The research summarized covers a series of laboratory and field tests that address the brittle failure behaviour of Opalinus Clay, its undrained and effective strength, the dependency of petro-physical and mechanical properties on total suction, hydro-mechanically coupled phenomena and the development of a damage zone around excavations. On the laboratory scale, even simple laboratory tests are difficult to interpret and uncertainties remain regarding the representativeness of the results. We show that suction may develop rapidly after core extraction and substantially modifies the strength, stiffness, and petro-physical properties of Opalinus Clay. Consolidated undrained tests performed on fully saturated specimens revealed a relatively small true cohesion and confirmed the strong hydro-mechanically coupled behaviour of this material. Strong hydro-mechanically coupled processes may explain the stability of cores and tunnel excavations in the short term. Pore-pressure effects may cause effective stress states that favour stability in the short term but may cause longer-term deformations and damage as the pore-pressure dissipates. In-situ observations show that macroscopic fracturing is strongly influenced by bedding planes and faults planes. In tunnel sections where opening or shearing along bedding planes or faults planes is kinematically free, the induced fracture type is strongly dependent on the fault plane frequency and orientation. A transition from extensional macroscopic failure to shearing can be observed with increasing fault plane frequency. In zones around the excavation where bedding plane shearing/shearing along tectonic fault planes is kinematically restrained, primary extensional type fractures develop. In addition, heterogeneities such as single tectonic fault planes or fault zones

  15. Morphology modification of polyethersulfone membrane from montmorillonite clay presence; Modificacao da morfologia de membrana de polietersulfona a partir da presenca de argila montmorilonita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, R.S.B.; Oliveira, S.S.L.; Leite, A.M.D.; Araujo, E.M.; Lira, H.L., E-mail: edcleide.araujo@dema.ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEMa/CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais; Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (ECT/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologia

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work is to produce hollow fiber membranes of polyethersulfone from the formation of hybrids with montmorillonite national clay (3 and 5% Brasgel PA), with the intention of modifying the morphology and improving the flow properties of the PES membrane. Initially, flat membranes were produced for characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and contact angle. By XRD it was evident that membrane production and clay influenced the crystallinity of the polymer. The measurement of the contact angle indicated that the incorporation of clay promoted a change in membrane hydrophilicity, being more evident for with the 3% of MMT. By means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) it was evidenced that the clay modified the morphology of the membrane, having a better distribution of the pores and the 'fingers'. The flow measurements showed that the membrane containing 3% of MMT had a higher permeability to distilled water, indicating its potential for the treatment of liquid effluents. (author)

  16. Reducing CO2 Emissions in the Production of Porous Fired Clay Bricksks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikuláš ŠVEDA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A plan to reduce CO2 emissions is a priority these days. Brick industry contributes to the increase of these emissions mainly through the use of combustible pore-forming agents such as sawdust, cellulose, and coal sludge. These agents are used to improve the thermal insulation properties of brick products, and the suppliers regularly increase the prices of these agents based on their high consumption. Therefore, in an effort to reduce raw material expenses and CO2 emissions, brick manufacturers are looking for new possibilities while maintaining the quality of their products. This article discusses the possibility of using industrially manufactured product Vuppor as an additive as a replacement for combustible pore-forming agents. The presence of this additive in the fired clay body increases the proportion of pores, especially with a size range between 0.1 and 5 µm, having a positive impact on the reduction of its thermal conductivity. With a 0.5 wt.% dose of Vuppor additive, the brick production costs and thermal conductivity can be reduced by 20 % and 12 %, respectively, while also achieving reductions in CO2 emissions over 60 %. Consequently, the combustible pore-forming agents can be used in a more environmentally friendly manner, for example in the furniture industry, the biogas production, and the like.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.2.15103

  17. Clay dispersibility and soil friability – testing the soil clay-to-carbon saturation concept

    OpenAIRE

    Schjønning, P.; de Jonge, L.W.; Munkholm, L.J.; Moldrup, P.; Christensen, B.T.; Olesen, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled three years in a field varying in clay content (~100 to ~220 g kg-1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay ...

  18. Pore volume is most highly correlated with the visual assessment of skin pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S J; Shin, M K; Back, J H; Koh, J S

    2014-11-01

    Many studies have been focused on evaluating assessment techniques for facial pores amid growing attention on skin care. Ubiquitous techniques used to assess the size of facial pores include visual assessment, cross-section images of the skin surface, and profilometric analysis of silicone replica of the facial skin. In addition, there are indirect assessment methods, including observation of pores based on confocal laser scanning microscopy and the analysis of sebum secretion and skin elasticity. The aim of this study was to identify parameters useful in estimating pore of surface in normal skin. The severity of pores on the cheek area by frontal optical images was divided on a 0-6 scale with '0' being faint and small pore and '6' being obvious and large pore. After the photos of the frontal cheek of 32 women aged between 35 and 49 were taken, the size of their pores was measured on a 0-6 scale; and the correlation between visual grading of pore and various evaluations (pore volume by 3-D image, pore area and number by Optical Image Analyzer) contributing to pore severity investigated using direct, objective, and noninvasive evaluations. The visual score revealed that the size of pores was graded on a 1-6 scale. Visual grading of pore was highly correlated with pore volume measured from 3-D images and pore area measured from 2-D optical images in the order (P pore was also slightly correlated with the number of pores in size of over 0.04 mm(2) (P pore score and pore volume can be explained by 3-D structural characteristics of pores. It is concluded that pore volume and area serve as useful parameters in estimating pore of skin surface. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Penelitian pengaruh variasi China clay dan napthenoc oil terhadap kekerasan dan ketahanan sobek kompon karet untuk lis pintu almari es

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Brataningsih Puji Lestari

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to know influence of naphthenic oil and filler china clay to the physical properties of hardness and tear resistant rubber compound for refrigerator gasket. It makes from natural rubber (pale crepe and synthetic rubber (SBR 1502 as material with addition ingredients are china clay, stearic, guanidine, naphthenic oil, paraffin wax, coumarone resin, zink okside, stearic acid, guanidine, sulfonamide, ASOP, titan diokside, brown factice and sulphur. Rubber compound for refrigerator gasket, formed to slab by hydraulic press at 150C and 150 kg/cm2. Than tasted hardness and tear resistant. The result of this research indicated naphthenic oil and filler china clay variation are high significant to hardness and tear resistant properties of rubber compound for refrigerator gasket.

  20. The current-voltage relation of a pore and its asymptotic behavior in a Nernst-Planck model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Birlea

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A model for current-voltage nonlinearity and asymmetry is a good starting point for explaining the electrical behavior of the nanopores in synthetic or biological membranes. Using a Nernst-Planck model, we found three behaviors for the current density in a membrane's pore as a function of voltage: a quasi-ohmic, slow rising linear current at low voltages, a nonlinear current at intermediate voltages, and a non-ohmic, fast rising linear current at large voltages. The slope of the quasi-ohmic current depends mainly on the height of energy barrier inside the pore, w, through an exponential term, ew. The magnitude of the non-ohmic linear current is controlled by the potential energy gradient at the pore entrance, w/r. The current-voltage relation is asymmetric if the ion's potential energy inside the pore has an asymmetric triangular profile. The model has only two assumed parameters, the energy barrier height, w, and the relative size of the entrance region of the pore, r, which is a useful feature for fitting and interpreting experimental data.

  1. Comparative study of methods to estimate hydraulic parameters in the hydraulically undisturbed Opalinus Clay (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.; Matray, J.-M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses, (France); Yu, C.; Gonçalvès, J. [Aix Marseille Université UMR 6635 CEREGE Technopôle Environnement Arbois-Méditerranée Aix-en-Provence, Cedex 4 (France); and others

    2017-04-15

    The deep borehole (DB) experiment gave the opportunity to acquire hydraulic parameters in a hydraulically undisturbed zone of the Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland). Three methods were used to estimate hydraulic conductivity and specific storage values of the Opalinus Clay formation and its bounding formations through the 248 m deep borehole BDB-1: application of a Poiseuille-type law involving petrophysical measurements, spectral analysis of pressure time series and in situ hydraulic tests. The hydraulic conductivity range in the Opalinus Clay given by the first method is 2 × 10{sup -14}-6 × 10{sup -13} m s{sup -1} for a cementation factor ranging between 2 and 3. These results show low vertical variability whereas in situ hydraulic tests suggest higher values up to 7 × 10{sup -12} m s{sup -1}. Core analysis provides economical estimates of the homogeneous matrix hydraulic properties but do not account for heterogeneities at larger scale such as potential tectonic conductive features. Specific storage values obtained by spectral analysis are consistent and in the order of 10{sup -6} m{sup -1}, while formulations using phase shift and gain between pore pressure signals were found to be inappropriate to evaluate hydraulic conductivity in the Opalinus Clay. The values obtained are globally in good agreement with the ones obtained previously at the rock laboratory. (authors)

  2. Application of a Multi-Scale form of Terzaghi’s Effective Stress Principle for Unsaturated Expansive Clays to Simulate Hydro-Mechanical Behavior During Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainka Julia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed multi-scale form of Terzaghi’s effective stress principle for unsaturated swelling clays that was rigorously derived by periodic homogenization starting from micro- and nano-mechanical analyses is applied to numerically simulate one-dimensional swelling pressure tests of compacted bentonites during hydration. The total macroscopic stress captures the coupling between disjoining forces at the nanoscopic scale of clay platelets and capillary effects at the microscopic scale of clay aggregates over the entire water content range. The numerical results allow to draw conclusions on the water transfer mechanism between inter- and intra-aggregate pores during hydration and consequently on the evolution of the external swelling pressure resulting from the competition between capillary and disjoining forces. In addition, such application highlights the abilities and the limits of the electrical double-layer theory to compute the disjoining pressure in the nano-pores. For large platelet distances, in the range of osmotic swelling, the nature of the disjoining pressure is electro-chemical and can be computed from Poisson-Boltzmann theory. Conversely, at small distances, in the crystalline swelling, a solvation component has to be added to account for the molecular nature of the solvent. As a first improvement of the nano-scale description the solvent is treated as a hard sphere fluid using Density Functional Theory.

  3. Characterization and quantification by mass spectrometry of mobile organic matter from clay rock: influence of the origin and of the sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huclier-Markai, S.; Landesman, C.; Montavon, G.; Grambow, B.; Monteau, F.; Fernandez, A.M.; Vinsot, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In environmental studies, Natural Organic Matter (NOM) plays a key role on the bioavailability and the toxicity of metallic compounds. If one wants to evaluate the mobility of heavy metals / radionuclides, which is in natura in most of the cases dependant on their interactions with NOM. One part of the organic inventory in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation (COx) exists as small dissolved compounds in the pore water but the weak content and the weak porosity of the formation (∼ 8 % of water in weight) make the complexation study with metal ions difficult. One part of the organic matter attached to the sediment (∼ 1 % in weight) can be mobilized in a synthetic pore water 1 and can be considered as similar to in situ pore water dissolved organic matter (DOM) regarding its size distribution. The collection of clay pore water has been done through percolation experiment, a unique and original experimental process developed to get pore water from a core sample,that have been described previously. From these experiments, it was shown that mobile organic matter concentration could reach 0.01 mol C/L by application of a pressure gradient up to 100 bars. Since part of the OM from the COx is known to be sensitive to air oxidation, the characterization and quantification of DOM were then performed under anoxic conditions (about - 170 mV vs Standard Hydrogen Electrode SHE). In addition, the chemical composition of NOM contained in the pore water from the argillite clay rock has been determined in in-situ like conditions by ESI-MS and APCI-MS, which are suitable techniques to identify the chemical composition of NOM contained in the COx pore water available from boreholes. Mostly low molecular weight molecules were identified, of whom structural features observed were mainly acidic compounds, fatty acids as well as aldehydes and amino acids. Fulvic and Humic Acids have such low concentrations in the COx formation, leading to a

  4. Pore Pressure Distribution and Flank Instability in Hydrothermally Altered Stratovolcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J. L.; Taron, J.; Hurwitz, S.; Reid, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Field and geophysical investigations of stratovolcanoes with long-lived hydrothermal systems commonly reveal that initially permeable regions (such as brecciated layers of pyroclastic material) can become both altered and water-bearing. Hydrothermal alteration in these regions, including clay formation, can turn them into low-permeability barriers to fluid flow, which could increase pore fluid pressures resulting in flank slope instability. We examined elevated pore pressure conditions using numerical models of hydrothermal flow in stratovolcanoes, informed by geophysical data about internal structures and deposits. Idealized radially symmetric meshes were developed based on cross-sectional profiles and alteration/permeability structures of Cascade Range stratovolcanoes. We used the OpenGeoSys model to simulate variably saturated conditions in volcanoes heated only by regional heat fluxes, as well as 650°C intrusions at two km depth below the surface. Meteoric recharge was estimated from precipitation rates in the Cascade Range. Preliminary results indicate zones of elevated pore pressures form: 1) where slopes are underlain by continuous low-permeability altered layers, or 2) when the edifice has an altered core with saturated, less permeable limbs. The first scenario might control shallow collapses on the slopes above the altered layers. The second could promote deeper flank collapses that are initially limited to the summit and upper slopes, but could progress to the core of an edifice. In both scenarios, pore pressures can be further elevated by shallow intrusions, or evolve over longer time scales under forcing from regional heat flux. Geometries without confining low-permeability layers do not show these pressure effects. Our initial scenarios use radially symmetric models, but we are also simulating hydrothermal flow under real 3D geometries with asymmetric subsurface structures (Mount Adams). Simulation results will be used to inform 3D slope

  5. Adsorption of hydrogen sulfide gas on several synthetic zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, T; Ise, Y; Boki, K; Tanada, S

    1974-07-01

    Ten kinds of synthetic zeolites were tested to determine the most suitable adsorbent for H/sub 2/S gas removal by a dry process. Specific surface area with argon gas and H/sub 2/S gas, surface pH, and thermodynamic data of adsorbents were measured. The amounts of H/sub 2/S gas adsorbed on synthetic zeolite adsorbents were affected in terms of the pore sizes of the adsorbents rather than the surface pH and the thermodynamic factors. The adsorbents No. 3, No. 7, and No. 8 showed higher adsorption of H/sub 2/S than the other adsorbents and were the most suitable for practical purposes.

  6. Hydro-mechanical characterisation of Vendian clay from Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, A.M.; Cui, Y.J.; Hong, P.Y.; Li, X.L.; Rumynin, V.G.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of the Belgian-Russian bilateral program for developing a repository concept for L/ILW disposal, with a long experience in studies on disposal in clays, SCK.CEN has been charged to assist LSK RADON in assessing disposal possibilities at the LSK RADON site. In the present work, the hydro-mechanical characterisation of Kotlin clay taken from the LSK RADON site is investigated using laboratory tests. Three drilled cores taken from the site of LSK RADON were provided for testing: - RUS-B1-23.1-MCH from 23.1-m depth; - RUS-B1-78.4-MCH from 78.4-m depth; - RUS-B1-126.6 M CH: from 126.6-m depth. The depth of the samples was measured from the surface. The surface elevation was about 24 m above the sea level and the depth of the ground water table from the surface was around 3.5 m. It is shown that the sample taken from 23.1 m depth was close to the limit between the Lomonosov aquifer stratum (Cambrian Sand) and the first Kotlin confining layer (Vendian clay, Vkt1). The sample taken from 78.4 m depth corresponds to the middle of the Vkt1. The third sample taken from 126.6 m depth corresponds to the bottom part of the Vkt1. Visual observations and particles size distribution analysis showed that the studied soil corresponds to a stiff clay. However, the sample from 23.1 m depth has lower fine grain content and, that from 126.6 m depth is similar to a clayey rock. Drained triaxial compression tests at various confining pressures (p' 0 ) under controlled strain condition were performed on Core No. 2 (middle of Vkt1). The Young's modulus determined from these tests ranges from 140 to 260 MPa. Failure was obtained at an axial strain (ε a ) of about 2% and the shear stress (q) decreases drastically after the failure. The peak shear strength obtained varied from 2.06 to 3.82 MPa. Regarding the volumetric behaviour upon shearing, the soil volume decreases firstly by 1.2% (contractant) and then increases

  7. Textile properties of synthetic prolapse mesh in response to uniaxial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, William R.; Moalli, Pamela A.; Abramowitch, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although synthetic mesh is associated with superior anatomic outcomes for the repair of pelvic organ prolapse, the benefits of mesh have been questioned because of the relatively high complication rates. To date, the mechanisms that result in such complications are poorly understood, yet the textile characteristics of mesh products are believed to play an important role. Interestingly, the pore diameter of synthetic mesh has been shown to impact the host response after hernia repair greatly, and such findings have served as design criteria for prolapse meshes, with larger pores viewed as more favorable. Although pore size and porosity are well-characterized before implantation, the changes in these textile properties after implantation are unclear; the application of mechanical forces has the potential to greatly alter pore geometries in vivo. Understanding the impact of mechanical loading on the textile properties of mesh is essential for the development of more effective devices for prolapse repair. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine the effect of tensile loading and pore orientation on mesh porosity and pore dimensions. STUDY DESIGN In this study, the porosity and pore diameter of 4 currently available prolapse meshes were examined in response to uniaxial tensile loads of 0.1, 5, and 10 N while mimicking clinical loading conditions. The textile properties were compared with those observed for the unloaded mesh. Meshes included Gynemesh PS (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ), UltraPro (Artisyn; Ethicon), Restorelle (Coloplast, Minneapolis, MN), and Alyte Y-mesh (Bard, Covington, GA). In addition to the various pore geometries, 3 orientations of Restorelle (0-, 5-, 45-degree offset) and 2 orientations of UltraPro (0-, 90-degree offset) were examined. RESULTS In response to uniaxial loading, both porosity and pore diameter dramatically decreased for most mesh products. The application of 5 N led to reductions in porosity for nearly all groups

  8. Multiscale Micromechanical Modeling of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites and the Effective Clay Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Nuo; Boyce, Mary C.; Parks, David M.; Manovitch, Oleg; Rutledge, Gregory C.; Lee, Hojun; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2003-03-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites have been observed to exhibit enhanced mechanical properties at low weight fractions (Wp) of clay. Continuum-based composite modeling reveals that the enhanced properties are strongly dependent on particular features of the second-phase ¡°particles¡+/-; in particular, the particle volume fraction (fp), the particle aspect ratio (L/t), and the ratio of particle mechanical properties to those of the matrix. However, these important aspects of as-processed nanoclay composites have yet to be consistently and accurately defined. A multiscale modeling strategy was developed to account for the hierarchical morphology of the nanocomposite: at a lengthscale of thousands of microns, the structure is one of high aspect ratio particles within a matrix; at the lengthscale of microns, the clay particle structure is either (a) exfoliated clay sheets of nanometer level thickness or (b) stacks of parallel clay sheets separated from one another by interlayer galleries of nanometer level height. Here, quantitative structural parameters extracted from XRD patterns and TEM micrographs are used to determine geometric features of the as-processed clay ¡°particles¡+/-, including L/t and the ratio of fp to Wp. These geometric features, together with estimates of silicate lamina stiffness obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, provide a basis for modeling effective mechanical properties of the clay particle. The structure-based predictions of the macroscopic elastic modulus of the nanocomposite as a function of clay weight fraction are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The adopted methodology offers promise for study of related properties in polymer/clay nanocomposites.

  9. Clay intercalation and influence on crystallinity of EVA-based clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, D.S.; Prasad, R.; Gupta, R.K.; Bhattacharya, S.N.

    2005-01-01

    Various polymer clay nanocomposites (PCNs) were prepared from ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) with 9, 18 and 28% vinyl acetate (VA) content filled with different wt.% (2.5, 5 and 7.5) of a Montmorillonite-based organo-modified clay (Cloisite[reg] C15A and C30B). The PCNs were prepared using melt blending techniques. Morphological information regarding intercalation and exfoliation were determined by using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). WAXS and TEM confirmed that increasing the VA content was necessary to achieve greater clay-polymer interaction as seen from the comparatively higher intercalation of clay platelets with 28% VA. The effect of addition of clay on the development and the modification of crystalline morphology in EVA matrix was also studied using WAXS and temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC). Results are presented showing that the addition of clay platelets does not increase the matrix crystallinity but the morphology was significantly modified such that there was an increase in the 'rigid' amorphous phase. Mechanical properties were also evaluated against the respective morphological information for each specimen and there are indications that the level of clay-polymer interaction plays a significant role in such morphological modification, and in such a way that affects the final PCN mechanical properties which has wide and significant applications in the packaging industries

  10. The relevance of polymeric synthetic membranes in topical formulation assessment and drug diffusion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shiow-Fern; Rouse, Jennifer J; Sanderson, Francis D; Eccleston, Gillian M

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic membranes are composed of thin sheets of polymeric macromolecules that can control the passage of components through them. Generally, synthetic membranes used in drug diffusion studies have one of two functions: skin simulation or quality control. Synthetic membranes for skin simulation, such as the silicone-based membranes polydimethylsiloxane and Carbosil, are generally hydrophobic and rate limiting, imitating the stratum corneum. In contrast, synthetic membranes for quality control, such as cellulose esters and polysulfone, are required to act as a support rather than a barrier. These synthetic membranes also often contain pores; hence, they are called porous membranes. The significance of Franz diffusion studies and synthetic membranes in quality control studies involves an understanding of the fundamentals of synthetic membranes. This article provides a general overview of synthetic membranes, including a brief background of the history and the common applications of synthetic membranes. This review then explores the types of synthetic membranes, the transport mechanisms across them, and their relevance in choosing a synthetic membrane in Franz diffusion cell studies for formulation assessment purposes.

  11. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability-Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled 3 yr in a field varying in clay content (∼100 to ∼220 g kg−1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay dispersibility was measured after end-over-end shaking of field-moist soil and 1- to 2-mm sized aggregates either air......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...

  12. SBR Brazilian organophilic/clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Thiago R.; Valenzuela-Diaz, Francisco R.; Morales, Ana Rita; Paiva, Lucilene B.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is the obtaining of SBR composites using a Brazilian raw bentonite and the same bentonite treated with an organic salt. The clays were characterized by XRD. The clay addition in the composites was 10 pcr. The composites were characterized by XRD and had measured theirs tension strength (TS). The composite with Brazilian treated clay showed TS 233% higher than a composite with no clay, 133% higher than a composite with Cloisite 30B organophilic clay and 17% lower than a composite with Cloisite 20 A organophilic clay. XRD and TS data evidence that the composite with Brazilian treated clay is an intercalated nanocomposite. (author)

  13. Atrazine biodegradation modulated by clays and clay/humic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besse-Hoggan, Pascale; Alekseeva, Tatiana; Sancelme, Martine; Delort, Anne-Marie; Forano, Claude

    2009-01-01

    The fate of pesticides in the environment is strongly related to the soil sorption processes that control not only their transfer but also their bioavailability. Cationic (Ca-bentonite) and anionic (Layered Double Hydroxide) clays behave towards the ionisable pesticide atrazine (AT) sorption with opposite tendencies: a noticeable sorption capacity for the first whereas the highly hydrophilic LDH showed no interactions with AT. These clays were modified with different humic acid (HA) contents. HA sorbed on the clay surface and increased AT interactions. The sorption effect on AT biodegradation and on its metabolite formation was studied with Pseudomonas sp. ADP. The biodegradation rate was greatly modulated by the material's sorption capacity and was clearly limited by the desorption rate. More surprisingly, it increased dramatically with LDH. Adsorption of bacterial cells on clay particles facilitates the degradation of non-sorbed chemical, and should be considered for predicting pesticide fate in the environment. - The biodegradation rate of atrazine was greatly modulated by adsorption of the pesticide and also bacterial cells on clay particles.

  14. Influence of Polymer-Clay Interfacial Interactions on the Ignition Time of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zope, Indraneel S; Dasari, Aravind; Yu, Zhong-Zhen

    2017-08-11

    Metal ions present on smectite clay (montmorillonite) platelets have preferential reactivity towards peroxy/alkoxy groups during polyamide 6 (PA6) thermal decomposition. This changes the decomposition pathway and negatively affects the ignition response of PA6. To restrict these interfacial interactions, high-temperature-resistant polymers such as polyetherimide (PEI) and polyimide (PI) were used to coat clay layers. PEI was deposited on clay by solution-precipitation, whereas PI was deposited through a solution-imidization-precipitation technique before melt blending with PA6. The absence of polymer-clay interfacial interactions has resulted in a similar time-to-ignition of PA6/PEI-clay (133 s) and PA6/PI-clay (139 s) composites as neat PA6 (140 s). On the contrary, PA6 with conventional ammonium-based surfactant modified clay has showed a huge drop in time-to-ignition (81 s), as expected. The experimental evidences provided herein reveal the role of the catalytic activity of clay during the early stages of polymer decomposition.

  15. Synthetic flux as a whitening agent for ceramic tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues dos Santos, Geocris, E-mail: geocris.rodrigues@gmail.com [INNOVARE Inteligência Em Cerâmica, 13566-420 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento De Engenharia Dos Materiais, Universidade Federal De São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Salvetti, Alfredo Roque [Departamento De Física, Universidade Federal De Mato Grosso Do Sul (Brazil); Cabrelon, Marcelo Dezena [INNOVARE Inteligência Em Cerâmica, 13566-420 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento De Engenharia Dos Materiais, Universidade Federal De São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Morelli, Márcio Raymundo [Departamento De Engenharia Dos Materiais, Universidade Federal De São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • The synthetic flux acts as a whitening agent of firing color in raw material ceramics. • The raw material ceramics have high levels of the iron oxides and red color. • The different process obtained red color clays with hematite and illite phases. • The whiteness ceramic obtained herein can be used in a porcelain tile industry. - Abstract: A synthetic flux is proposed as a whitening agent of firing color in tile ceramic paste during the sinterization process, thus turning the red firing color into whiteness. By using this mechanism in the ceramic substrates, the stoneware tiles can be manufactured using low cost clays with high levels of iron oxides. This method proved to be an economical as well as commercial strategy for the ceramic tile industries because, in Brazil, the deposits have iron compounds as mineral component (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in most of the raw materials. Therefore, several compositions of tile ceramic paste make use of natural raw materials, and a synthetic flux in order to understand how the interaction of the iron element, in the mechanism of firing color ceramic, occurs in this system. The bodies obtained were fired at 1100 °C for 5 min in air atmosphere to promote the color change. After the heating, the samples were submitted to X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analyses. The results showed that the change of firing color occurs because the iron element, which is initially in the crystal structure of the hematite phase, is transformed into a new crystal (clinopyroxenes phase) formed during the firing, so as to make the final firing color lighter.

  16. Pore-scale investigation on the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in heterogeneous soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Todd-Brown, Katherine E.; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2016-11-15

    The relationship between microbial respiration rate and soil moisture content is an important property for understanding and predicting soil organic carbon degradation, CO2 production and emission, and their subsequent effects on climate change. This paper reports a pore-scale modeling study to investigate the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in soils and to evaluate various factors that affect this response. X-ray computed tomography was used to derive soil pore structures, which were then used for pore-scale model investigation. The pore-scale results were then averaged to calculate the effective respiration rates as a function of water content in soils. The calculated effective respiration rate first increases and then decreases with increasing soil water content, showing a maximum respiration rate at water saturation degree of 0.75 that is consistent with field and laboratory observations. The relationship between the respiration rate and moisture content is affected by various factors, including pore-scale organic carbon bioavailability, the rate of oxygen delivery, soil pore structure and physical heterogeneity, soil clay content, and microbial drought resistivity. Simulations also illustrates that a larger fraction of CO2 produced from microbial respiration can be accumulated inside soil cores under higher saturation conditions, implying that CO2 flux measured on the top of soil cores may underestimate or overestimate true soil respiration rates under dynamic moisture conditions. Overall, this study provides mechanistic insights into the soil respiration response to the change in moisture conditions, and reveals a complex relationship between heterotrophic microbial respiration rate and moisture content in soils that is affected by various hydrological, geochemical, and biophysical factors.

  17. Effects of temperature and thermally-induced microstructure change on hydraulic conductivity of Boom Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.Z. Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Boom Clay is one of the potential host rocks for deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive nuclear waste in Belgium. In order to investigate the mechanism of hydraulic conductivity variation under complex thermo-mechanical coupling conditions and to better understand the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM coupling behaviour of Boom Clay, a series of permeability tests using temperature-controlled triaxial cell has been carried out on the Boom Clay samples taken from Belgian underground research laboratory (URL HADES. Due to its sedimentary nature, Boom Clay presents across-anisotropy with respect to its sub-horizontal bedding plane. Direct measurements of the vertical (Kv and horizontal (Kh hydraulic conductivities show that the hydraulic conductivity at 80 °C is about 2.4 times larger than that at room temperature (23 °C, and the hydraulic conductivity variation with temperature is basically reversible during heating–cooling cycle. The anisotropic property of Boom Clay is studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM tests, which highlight the transversely isotropic characteristics of intact Boom Clay. It is shown that the sub-horizontal bedding feature accounts for the horizontal permeability higher than the vertical one. The measured increment in hydraulic conductivity with temperature is lower than the calculated one when merely considering the changes in water kinematic viscosity and density with temperature. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR tests have also been carried out to investigate the impact of microstructure variation on the THM properties of clay. The results show that heating under unconstrained boundary condition will produce larger size of pores and weaken the microstructure. The discrepancy between the hydraulic conductivity experimentally measured and predicted (considering water viscosity and density changes with temperature can be attributed to the microstructural weakening effect on the thermal volume change

  18. Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in the Presence of Silica Sand and Bentonite Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Saw V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in a porous media containing silica sand of different sizes and bentonite clay were studied in the presence of synthetic seawater with 3.55 wt% salinity. The phase equilibrium of methane hydrate under different experimental conditions was investigated. The effects of the particle size of silica sand as well as a mixture of bentonite clay and silica sand on methane hydrate formation and its dissociation were studied. The kinetics of hydrate formation was studied under different subcooling conditions to observe its effects on the induction time of hydrate formation. The amount of methane gas encapsulated in hydrate was computed using a real gas equation. The Clausius-Clapeyron equation is used to estimate the enthalpy of hydrate dissociation with measured phase equilibrium data.

  19. The impact of hazardous waste leachate on performance of clay liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavat, Nasim; Nalbantoglu, Zalihe

    2013-02-01

    Penetration of hazardous liquids through waste containment barriers exerts contamination and considerable alterations in geotechnical properties of clay liners. In general, these changes are attributed to the variation of the dielectric constant and the chemistry of the pore fluids which cause changes in soil structure. In the present study, a series of laboratory tests were performed on natural and contaminated clay soil permeated with different hazardous liquids: ethylene glycol and toluene which are generally found in petroleum-contaminated sites, possessing intermediate and low dielectric constants. Toluene was used in its pure form and ethylene glycol was used at various percentages of 0, 20, 40 and 60% by the volume of distilled water. In addition, natural sea water was also utilized as an inorganic fluid for permeation and salinization of the clay soil. The overall test results indicated that plasticity, sedimentation time, unconfined compressive strength, swell and compressibility generally decreased with increasing organic fluid/water concentration, while a slight increase in the permeability values was observed. Pure toluene resulted in diminution of plasticity and considerable flocculation of the particles which caused the soil to become granular. Sea water also caused particle flocculation and reduction in plasticity, swell potential and unconfined compressive strength, although it was noted that compressibility properties remained unchanged compared to distilled water. Finally, the correlation between the electrical resistivity and plasticity index values suggested that the electrical resistivity measurements can be used as a detecting technique for subsurface soil and waste barrier contamination.

  20. Pore water pressures and slope stability: a joint geophysical and geotechnical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrone, Angela; Lapenna, Vincenzo; Vassallo, Roberto; Maio, Caterina Di

    2008-01-01

    Slope stability is influenced by many factors, among which are subsoil structure and pore water pressure distribution. This paper presents a multi-disciplinary approach for the determination of these two factors and for the construction of a reliable model of the subsoil for the slope stability analysis. The case of a clay slope located in the Southern Apennines (Italy) is presented and discussed. Geophysical imaging (2D electrical resistivity tomography—ERT), in situ geotechnical monitoring (measurements of pore pressures and horizontal displacements) and laboratory geotechnical tests (for the determination of index, hydraulic and mechanical properties of soils) have been carried out. The comparison and the integration between ERT images and direct observations of the material extracted from boreholes have allowed us to reconstruct the subsoil stratigraphy with continuity. Thus, a reliable 2D model of the subsoil has been obtained, with well-defined boundaries on which it has been possible to apply appropriate hydraulic conditions. This geotechnical model has been used for studying the pore water pressure distribution and for analysing how the hydraulic boundary conditions—among which rain events—influence the slope stability. Our findings demonstrate the powerful skill of the ERT, if integrated with borehole data, to generate an accurate subsoil model. It is also evident that geophysical imaging can be a source of ambiguity and misjudgement if interpreted without a comparison with geotechnical data

  1. Phosphonium modified clay/polyimide nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceylan, Hatice; Çakmakçi, Emrah; Beyler-Çiǧil, Asli; Kahraman, Memet Vezir

    2014-01-01

    In this study, octyltriphenylphosphonium bromide [OTPP-Br] was prepared from the reaction of triphenylphosphine and 1 -bromooctane. The modification of clay was done by ion exchange reaction using OTPP-Br in water medium. Poly(amic acid) was prepared from the reaction of 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-Oxydianiline (ODA). Polyimide(PI)/clay hybrids were prepared by blending of poly(amic acid) and organically modified clay as a type of layered clays. The morphology of the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structures of polyimide and Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were characterized by FTIR. SEM and FTIR results showed that the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were successfully prepared. Thermal properties of the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  2. Clay mineralogy and magnetic susceptibility of Oxisols in geomorphic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies analyzing the variability of clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility provide data for the delineation of site-specific management areas since many of their attributes are important to agronomy and the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variability of clay minerals, magnetic susceptibility, adsorbed phosphorus and physical attributes in Oxisols of sandstones in different geomorphic surfaces. For that purpose, soil samples were collected every 25 m along a transect located within the area where the geomorphic surfaces were identified and mapped. The transect occupied the central portion of 500 ha, where it was also sampled for density purposes with one sample per six hectares. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0.0-0.2 m. The results of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility analyses were subjected to statistical and geostatistical analyses. The nature of the clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility was dependent on the variation of the soil parent material. High values of magnetic susceptibility were associated with the presence of maghemite and magnetite of coarse size. The spatial variability of crystallinity and the content of Fe oxides, as well as magnetic susceptibility, were dependent on the age of the geomorphic surfaces. The youngest surface had greater spatial variability of these attributes. The iron (goethite and hematite and aluminum (gibbsite oxides in the youngest geomorphic surface influenced the low values of soil density and high values of total pore volume, micropores and P adsorption. The characterization of the spatial variability of Fe oxides and susceptibility allowed for the delineation of homogeneous areas.

  3. Seasonal Effects on the Relationships Between Soil Water Content, Pore Water Pressure and Shear Strength and Their Implications for Slope Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    A soil's shear resistance is mainly dependent upon the magnitude of effective stress. For small to medium height slopes (up to 10m) in clay soils the total stress acting along potential failure planes will be low, therefore the magnitude of effective stress (and hence soil shear strength) will be dominated by the pore-water pressure. The stability of slopes on this scale through periods of increased precipitation is improved by the generation of negative pore pressures (soil suctions) during preceding, warmer, drier periods. These negative pore water pressures increase the effective stress within the soil and cause a corresponding increase in shearing resistance. The relationships between soil water content and pore water pressure (soil water retention curves) are known to be hysteretic, but for the purposes of the majority of slope stability assessments in partially saturated clay soils, these are assumed to be consistent with time. Similarly, the relationship between shear strength and water content is assumed to be consistent over time. This research presents a laboratory study in which specimens of compacted Glacial Till (typical of engineered slopes within the UK) were subjected to repeated cycles of wetting and drying to simulate seasonal cycles. At predetermined water contents, measurements of soil suction were made using tensiometer and dewpoint potentiometer methods. The undrained shear strength of the specimens was then measured using triaxial strength testing equipment. Results indicate that repeated wetting and drying cycles caused a change in the soil water retention behaviour. A reduction in undrained shear strength at corresponding water contents along the wetting and drying paths was also observed. The mechanism for the change in the relationship is believed to be a deterioration in the soil physical structure due to shrink/swell induced micro-cracking. The non-stationarity of these relationships has implications for slope stability assessment.

  4. Mud-filtrate correction of sonic logs by fluid substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne

    structures. Making reliable discoveries in challenging conditions requires an increasing level of detail in seismic interpretation. Advanced seismic processing as Amplitude-Versus-Offset (AVO) analysis, have become commonplace in seismic interpretation. These techniques involves comparison with synthetic...... of wetting phase saturation, and the clay content. When the water saturation is at the irreducible water saturation or higher only the effect of clay on the elastic velocities have a differential effect on the elastic velocities. Mixed saturations are fluid substituted using effective fluid moduli formulated...... as a set of bounds by Mavko and Mukerji (1998). Ultrasonic velocity data from the literature shows that these bounds applies most accurately to sandstones with a simple pore-space, as reflected in a high permeability and low clay fraction....

  5. Fabric and Geotechnical behavior of the volcanic clays of Xalapa, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, O.

    2009-01-01

    The City of Xalapa is nailed in the Eastern part of the Axis Mexican Neovolcanico and is laid the foundations, in its majority, clays of volcanic origin of the Quaternary. These ashes have a peculiar behavior when the micro climate around them varies, as shown in previous slides of the slope and embankments. On the other hand, these clays problems for their identification, as these soils are rich in halloysite and to a lesser extent by allophones. To understand the microstructure in natural state of the clay one studies the characteristics physical-chemistries of his components by the method of ionic chromatography and the chemical isolated particle composition is analysed with an transmission electron microscope (TEM) with a connected detector of dispersion of X-ray energy. On the other hand, the mineralogical composition is obtained from X-ray diffractometer of dust in argillaceous fraction. The morphology of particles is identified by means of the TEM. Limits liquid associated with the specific surface of particles, this last one determined by adsorption of N 2 . The fabric of the clay in natural and artificial state (with different methods from compaction) in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) is compared. In accordance with the above-mentioned, it is studied the levels of the fabric, the morphology of the pores and the type of connections of the particles. In order to verify the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of the soil depend on the fabric of this artificial and natural samples prepared and geotechnical behavior is characterized to observe its answer and to compare it. Also it is observed as it influences the fabric in the deformation of this one under constant suction. The residual strength is investigated carefully and it is compared with that of the peak. (Author) 35 refs

  6. Effect of clay structure and type of organomodifier on the thermal properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) based nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papageorgiou, George Z.; Karandrea, Eva; Giliopoulos, Dimitrios; Papageorgiou, Dimitrios G.; Ladavos, Athanasios; Katerinopoulou, Aikaterini; Achilias, Dimitris S.; Triantafyllidis, Konstantinos S.; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Poly(ethylene terephthalate) nanocomposites were prepared using 4 different clay types. • Nanomer I30E clay was exfoliated into PET, as it was found from XRD. • The intercalation of Kunipia-CTAB resulted in less pronounced effect on PET crystallization. • The immobilized amorphous fraction, activation energy and nucleation activity were calculated. • Nanomer I30E clay facilitated the crystallization process. - Abstract: In the current investigation, nanocomposites of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) with different types of organo-clays were produced using the melt mixing technique. Two types of commercial inorganic clays (Laponite-synthetic hectorite and Kunipia-montmorillonite) were studied after cation-exchange with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) while two commercial organo-modified montmorillonite clays (Nanomer I.30E modified with primary octadecylammonium ions and Cloisite 10A modified with quaternary dimethyl benzyl hydrogenated-tallow ammonium ions) were also investigated. The structure of the nanocomposites was studied by X-ray diffraction measurements. A detailed crystallization analysis was carried out by means of both isothermal and non-isothermal (melt and cold) measurements. All data were analyzed using the simple Avrami equation along with advanced isoconversional methods. The nucleation activity of the filler was investigated in every case. Lauritzen–Hoffman analysis was employed to isothermal data to estimate the nucleation parameters. From all these measurements it was found that the organo-clay I.30E induces the higher crystallization rates and lower activation energy and is more effective regarding the PET crystallization compared to the other types of organo-clays. The I.30E organo-clay nanocomposite exhibited also the higher immobilized amorphous fraction and the higher nucleation parameter K g in the Lauritzen–Hoffman analysis. This is due to its better dispersion and exfoliation

  7. Effect of clay structure and type of organomodifier on the thermal properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) based nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papageorgiou, George Z.; Karandrea, Eva; Giliopoulos, Dimitrios [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTH), GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papageorgiou, Dimitrios G. [Solid State Physics Department, School of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki AUTH, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Ladavos, Athanasios; Katerinopoulou, Aikaterini [University of Patras, Agrinio 30100 (Greece); Achilias, Dimitris S.; Triantafyllidis, Konstantinos S. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTH), GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Bikiaris, Dimitrios N., E-mail: dbic@chem.auth.gr [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTH), GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-01-20

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Poly(ethylene terephthalate) nanocomposites were prepared using 4 different clay types. • Nanomer I30E clay was exfoliated into PET, as it was found from XRD. • The intercalation of Kunipia-CTAB resulted in less pronounced effect on PET crystallization. • The immobilized amorphous fraction, activation energy and nucleation activity were calculated. • Nanomer I30E clay facilitated the crystallization process. - Abstract: In the current investigation, nanocomposites of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) with different types of organo-clays were produced using the melt mixing technique. Two types of commercial inorganic clays (Laponite-synthetic hectorite and Kunipia-montmorillonite) were studied after cation-exchange with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) while two commercial organo-modified montmorillonite clays (Nanomer I.30E modified with primary octadecylammonium ions and Cloisite 10A modified with quaternary dimethyl benzyl hydrogenated-tallow ammonium ions) were also investigated. The structure of the nanocomposites was studied by X-ray diffraction measurements. A detailed crystallization analysis was carried out by means of both isothermal and non-isothermal (melt and cold) measurements. All data were analyzed using the simple Avrami equation along with advanced isoconversional methods. The nucleation activity of the filler was investigated in every case. Lauritzen–Hoffman analysis was employed to isothermal data to estimate the nucleation parameters. From all these measurements it was found that the organo-clay I.30E induces the higher crystallization rates and lower activation energy and is more effective regarding the PET crystallization compared to the other types of organo-clays. The I.30E organo-clay nanocomposite exhibited also the higher immobilized amorphous fraction and the higher nucleation parameter K{sub g} in the Lauritzen–Hoffman analysis. This is due to its better dispersion and

  8. Simplified modeling of HM behavior of swelling clays for nuclear waste disposal buffers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoxha, Dashnor; Belayachi, Naima; Do, Duc-Phi; Poutrel, Adrien; Wendling, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The swelling clays are extensively studied these last decades in relation with many industrial applications: foundations in civil engineering, sealing of waste disposals., etc. Especially in the case of waste disposals buffers the swelling pressure and its kinetics are of great importance. In the research programme of ANDRA (French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency), a mixing of bentonite MX80 with 30% of sands has been chosen as a buffering material. The modelling of behaviour of this material has been object of several works and several sophisticated models have been proposed. However as the practice of nuclear waste disposals proves, the needs for robust and simple models, able to describe the most important features of buffers, are yet to be meet by engineers and researches. This paper aims at a simplified model for the buffers behaviour based upon an extension of previous works and laboratory results. As discussed and proposed by many authors modeling of swelling clays behavior needs to consider both crystalline and osmotic swelling. While molecular dynamics could be used to understand the relation between the structure of clay minerals and its swelling properties a multiscale approach counting for chemical and hydro-mechanical couplings in various scale is revealed to give insights on the mechanisms governing clayey soil swelling. However in many industrial application large scale problems would be considered for which macroscopic and robust models should be used. From macroscopic point of view, basically two alternative approaches are used: effective stress approach and so called independent stress state variables. For an isotropic material, the volumetric strain of unsaturated media predicted by BBM model, could be written as a function of: the mean stress of applied mechanical stress, the air pressure, the suction (or pore pressure where the media is fully saturated), the drained bulk

  9. Common clay and shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  10. Effects of modified Clay on the morphology and thermal stability of PMMA/clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Yen; Lin, Mei-Ju; Chuang, Yi-Chen; Chou, Po-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    The potential to improve the mechanical, thermal, and optical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/clay nanocomposites prepared with clay containing an organic modifier was investigated. Pristine sodium montmorillonite clay was modified using cocoamphodipropionate, which absorbs UVB in the 280–320 nm range, via ion exchange to enhance the compatibility between the clay platelets and the methyl methacrylate polymer matrix. PMMA/clay nanocomposites were synthesized via in situ free-radical polymerization. Three types of clay with various cation-exchange capacities (CEC) were used as inorganic layered materials in these organic–inorganic hybrid nanocomposites: CL42, CL120, and CL88 with CEC values of 116, 168, and 200 meq/100 g of clay, respectively. We characterized the effects of the organoclay dispersion on UV resistance, effectiveness as an O 2 gas barrier, thermal stability, and mechanical properties of PMMA/clay nanocomposites. Gas permeability analysis demonstrated the excellent gas barrier properties of the nanocomposites, consistent with the intercalated or exfoliated morphologies observed. The optical properties were assessed using UV–Visible spectroscopy, which revealed that these materials have good optical clarity, UV resistance, and scratch resistance. The effect of the dispersion capability of organoclay on the thermal properties of PMMA/clay nanocomposites was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry; these analyses revealed excellent thermal stability of some of the modified clay nanocomposites. - Highlights: ► We control the dispersion morphology by protonation of K2 into the clay. ► The CL120 and CL88, with the higher CEC, are more random intercalated by K2. ► We report these materials have good optical clarity, and UV resistance

  11. Effect of the pore water composition on the diffusive anion transport in argillaceous, low permeability sedimentary rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigger, Cornelia; Van Loon, Luc R

    2018-06-01

    The effect of the pore water composition on the diffusive anion transport was studied for two different argillaceous, low permeability sedimentary rocks, Opalinus Clay (OPA) and Helvetic Marl (HM). The samples were saturated with different solutions with varying molar concentration and different main cations in the solution: NaCl based pore solutions and CaCl 2 based pore solutions. The total porosity was measured by through-diffusion experiments with the neutral tracer HTO. Experiments performed in NaCl solutions resulted in a porosity of 0.12 for OPA and 0.03 for HM, and are consistent with results of the experiments in CaCl 2 solutions. The total porosity was independent of the molar concentration, in contrast to the measured anion porosity, which increased with increasing molar concentration. It could further be observed that the pore solution based on the bivalent cation calcium shielded the negative surface charge stronger than the monovalent cation sodium, resulting in a larger measureable anion-accessible porosity in the case of CaCl 2 solutions. The data was modelled based on an adapted Donnan approach of Birgersson and Karnland (2009). The model had to be adjusted with a permanent free, uncharged porosity, as well as with structural information on the permanent anion exclusion because of so-called bottleneck pores. Both parameters can only be evaluated from experiments. Nevertheless, taking these two adaptions into account, the effect of varying pore water compositions on the anion-accessible porosity of the investigated argillaceous rocks could be satisfactorily described. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of the pore water composition on the diffusive anion transport in argillaceous, low permeability sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigger, Cornelia; Van Loon, Luc R.

    2018-06-01

    The effect of the pore water composition on the diffusive anion transport was studied for two different argillaceous, low permeability sedimentary rocks, Opalinus Clay (OPA) and Helvetic Marl (HM). The samples were saturated with different solutions with varying molar concentration and different main cations in the solution: NaCl based pore solutions and CaCl2 based pore solutions. The total porosity was measured by through-diffusion experiments with the neutral tracer HTO. Experiments performed in NaCl solutions resulted in a porosity of 0.12 for OPA and 0.03 for HM, and are consistent with results of the experiments in CaCl2 solutions. The total porosity was independent of the molar concentration, in contrast to the measured anion porosity, which increased with increasing molar concentration. It could further be observed that the pore solution based on the bivalent cation calcium shielded the negative surface charge stronger than the monovalent cation sodium, resulting in a larger measureable anion-accessible porosity in the case of CaCl2 solutions. The data was modelled based on an adapted Donnan approach of Birgersson and Karnland (2009). The model had to be adjusted with a permanent free, uncharged porosity, as well as with structural information on the permanent anion exclusion because of so-called bottleneck pores. Both parameters can only be evaluated from experiments. Nevertheless, taking these two adaptions into account, the effect of varying pore water compositions on the anion-accessible porosity of the investigated argillaceous rocks could be satisfactorily described.

  13. Porous Chromatographic Materials as Substrates for Preparing Synthetic Nuclear Explosion Debris Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, Scott D.; Liezers, Martin; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Garcia, Ben J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Carman, April J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated several porous chromatographic materials as synthetic substrates for preparing surrogate nuclear explosion debris particles. The resulting synthetic debris materials are of interest for use in developing analytical methods. Eighteen metals, including some of forensic interest, were loaded onto materials by immersing them in metal solutions (556 mg/L of each metal) to fill the pores, applying gentle heat (110°C) to drive off water, and then treating them at high temperatures (up to 800°C) in air to form less soluble metal species. High-boiling-point metals were uniformly loaded on spherical controlled-pore glass to emulate early fallout, whereas low-boiling-point metals were loaded on core-shell silica to represent coated particles formed later in the nuclear fallout-formation process. Analytical studies were applied to characterize solubility, material balance, and formation of recalcitrant species. Dissolution experiments indicated loading was 1.5 to 3 times higher than expected from the pore volume alone, a result attributed to surface coating. Analysis of load solutions before and after filling the material pores revealed that most metals were passively loaded; that is, solutions filled the pores without active metal discrimination. However, niobium and tin concentrations were lower in solutions after pore filling, and were found in elevated concentrations in the final products, indicating some metals were selectively loaded. High-temperature treatments caused reduced solubility of several metal species, and loss of some metals (rhenium and tellurium) because volatile species were formed. Sample preparation reproducibility was high (the inter-batch relative standard deviation was 7.8%, and the intra-batch relative standard deviation was 0.84%) indicating that this material is suitable for use as a working standard for analytical methods development. We anticipate future standardized radionuclide-loaded materials will find use in

  14. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  15. Clay nanoparticles for regenerative medicine and biomaterial design: A review of clay bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Mohamed; Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dawson, Jonathan I

    2018-03-01

    Clay nanoparticles, composites and hydrogels are emerging as a new class of biomaterial with exciting potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Clay particles have been extensively explored in polymeric nanocomposites for self-assembly and enhanced mechanical properties as well as for their potential as drug delivery modifiers. In recent years, a cluster of studies have explored cellular interactions with clay nanoparticles alone or in combination with polymeric matrices. These pioneering studies have suggested new and unforeseen utility for certain clays as bioactive additives able to enhance cellular functions including adhesion, proliferation and differentiation, most notably for osteogenesis. This review examines the recent literature describing the potential effects of clay-based nanomaterials on cell function and examines the potential role of key clay physicochemical properties in influencing such interactions and their exciting possibilities for regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of the permeability of microporous membranes polyamide 6 / clay bentonite for water-oil separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, P.S.S.; Medeiros, K.M.; Araujo, E.M.; Lira, H.L.

    2014-01-01

    The petroleum refining industries have faced major problems in relation to the treatment of their effluents before disposal into the environment. Among the conventional technologies treatment of these effluents, the process of oil-water separation by means of membranes has been extensively used, for having enormous potentiality. Therefore, in this study, hybrid membranes of polyamide 6/ bentonite clay were produced by the technique of phase inversion and by precipitation of the solution from the nanocomposites obtained by melt intercalation. The clay was organically modified with the quaternary ammonium salt (Cetremide®). The nanocomposites were obtained from (PA6) with untreated (AST) and treated clay (ACT), which were subsequently characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Already membranes were characterized by XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and flow measurements. From the XRD results, it was observed an exfoliated and/or partially exfoliated structure for the nanocomposites and for the membranes. From SEM images it was observed that the presence of AST and ACT clays in the polymeric matrix caused changes in membrane morphology and pore formation. The flow with distilled water in the membranes showed a decrease initially and then followed by stability. All membranes tested in the process of separating emulsions of oil in water, particularly those of nanocomposites obtained a significant reduction of oil concentration in the permeate, thus showing that these membranes have a great potential to be applied to the water-oil separation. (author)

  17. Thixotropic Properties of Latvian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Lakevičs, Vitālijs; Stepanova, Valentīna; Ruplis, Augusts

    2015-01-01

    This research studies Latvia originated Devon (Tūja, Skaņkalne), quaternary (Ceplīši), Jurassic, (Strēļi) and Triassic (Vadakste) deposit clays as well as Lithuania originated Triassic (Akmene) deposit clays. Thixotropic properties of clay were researched by measuring relative viscosity of clay in water suspensions. Relative viscosity is measured with a hopper method. It was detected that, when concentration of suspension is increased, clay suspension’s viscosity also increases. It happens un...

  18. Irreversible deformation and its incidence on the hydraulic properties of clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celerier, B.; Raynaud, S.; Ghoreychi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Natural fluid overpressures occurring in fine grained sediments can be released by two different mechanisms: large scale natural hydro-fracturing or smaller scale damages associated with dilatancy that enhance permeability. This second mechanism is discussed. An experimental work is currently under way to define the conditions under which dilatancy sufficiently enhances permeability to release overpressures without requiring large fractures. Re-moulded clays are first consolidated to high pressures (20 MPa) in an oedometric cell. They are then loaded in a triaxial apparatus where a stress path leading to dilatancy is applied, and the permeability is monitored by measuring fluid flows. The evolution of the pore space is further analysed by X-ray tomography and microstructural observations. (author)

  19. Biological and geochemical processes involved during denitrification in Callovo-Oxfordian clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollivier, P.; Parmentier, M.; Joulian, C.; Pauwels, H.; Albrecht, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The clay-rich Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) formation has been selected for the disposal of medium and high level, long-lived radioactive waste. After waste cell closure and degradation of package some intermediate-level waste will release nitrate. The latter is likely to diffuse into the surrounding environment (engineered barriers and geological host formation) and interact with a variety compounds present in the barrier components and the rocks. These interactions may result in modification of chemical conditions and impact storage conditions and radionuclide retention. Our work is focused on the understanding of the fate of nitrates released during and after degradation of waste package. We developed a coupled approach considering both geochemical and biological processes of nitrate reduction to simulate reactions occurring at the interface of the engineered barrier and the clay-rich COx formation. Laboratory experiments have been carried out in order to acquire data on kinetics of denitrification coupled with a molecular approach using enzymatic and metabolic activities as a tool for an accurate estimation of biomass. Denitrification has been monitored in a synthetic solution comparable to COx pore water supplemented with acetate and nitrate and amended with a heterotrophic denitrifying strain, Pseudomonas mandelii. Several conditions are applied considering different acetate/nitrate ratios in the presence or absence of COx clay. Before the beginning of experiments, the headspace is flushed with N 2 gas to remove oxygen from flasks. Acetylene is used to stop denitrification reaction after the production of N 2 O gas and thus avoid the formation of N 2 gas. Two successive redox reactions are thus expected to occur in experiments. Samples are regularly collected to analyze physical and chemical parameters as well as biological parameters. Biomass is estimated and monitored using both optical microscopy and

  20. Modified clay minerals efficiency against chemical and biological warfare agents for civil human protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachá, Daniela; Rosenbergová, Kateřina; Slabotínský, Jiří; Kutláková, Kateřina Mamulová; Studentová, Soňa; Martynková, Gražyna Simha

    2014-04-30

    Sorption efficiencies of modified montmorillonite and vermiculite of their mono ionic Na and organic HDTMA and HDP forms were studied against chemical and biological warfare agents such as yperite and selected bacterial strains. Yperite interactions with modified clay minerals were observed through its capture in low-density polyethylene foil-modified clay composites by measuring yperite gas permeation with using chemical indication and gas chromatography methods. The antibacterial activities of synthetized organoclays were tested against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species in minimum inhibitory concentration tests. The obtained results showed a positive influence of modified clay minerals on the significant yperite breakthrough-time increase. The most effective material was the polyethylene-Na form montmorillonite, while the polyethylene-Na form vermiculite showed the lowest efficiency. With increasing organic cations loading in the interlayer space the montmorillonite efficiency decreased, and in the case of vermiculite an opposite effect was observed. Generally the modified montmorillonites were more effective than modified vermiculites. The HDP cations seem to be more effective compare to the HDTMA. The antibacterial activity tests confirmed efficiency of all organically modified clay minerals against Gram-positive bacteria. The confirmation of antibacterial activity against Y. pestis, plague bacteria, is the most interesting result of this part of the study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. TIG Dressing Effects on Weld Pores and Pore Cracking of Titanium Weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jun Yi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Weld pores redistribution, the effectiveness of using tungsten inert gas (TIG dressing to remove weld pores, and changes in the mechanical properties due to the TIG dressing of Ti-3Al-2.5V weldments were studied. Moreover, weld cracks due to pores were investigated. The results show that weld pores less than 300 μm in size are redistributed or removed via remelting due to TIG dressing. Regardless of the temperature condition, TIG dressing welding showed ductility, and there was a loss of 7% tensile strength of the weldments. Additionally, it was considered that porosity redistribution by TIG dressing was due to fluid flow during the remelting of the weld pool. Weld cracks in titanium weldment create branch cracks around pores that propagate via the intragranular fracture, and oxygen is dispersed around the pores. It is suggested that the pore locations around the LBZ (local brittle zone and stress concentration due to the pores have significant effects on crack initiation and propagation.

  2. Clay minerals behaviour in thin sandy clay-rich lacustrine turbidites (Lake Hazar, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ouahabi, Meriam; Hubert-Ferrari, Aurelia; Lamair, Laura; Hage, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    Turbidites have been extensively studied in many different areas using cores or outcrop, which represent only an integrated snapshot of a dynamic evolving flow. Laboratory experiments provide the missing relationships between the flow characteristics and their deposits. In particular, flume experiments emphasize that the presence of clay plays a key role in turbidity current dynamics. Clay fraction, in small amount, provides cohesive strength to sediment mixtures and can damp turbulence. However, the degree of flocculation is dependent on factors such as the amount and size of clay particles, the surface of clay particles, chemistry and pH conditions in which the clay particles are dispersed. The present study focuses on thin clayey sand turbidites found in Lake Hazar (Turkey) occurring in stacked thin beds. Depositional processes and sources have been previously studied and three types were deciphered, including laminar flows dominated by cohesion, transitional, and turbulence flow regimes (Hage et al., in revision). For the purpose of determine the clay behavior in the three flow regimes, clay mineralogical, geochemical measurements on the cores allow characterising the turbidites. SEM observations provide further information regarding the morphology of clay minerals and other clasts. The study is particularly relevant given the highly alkaline and saline water of the Hazar Lake. Clay minerals in Hazar Lake sediments include kaolinite (1:1-type), illite and chlorite (2:1-type). Hazar lake water is alkaline having pH around 9.3, in such alkaline environment, a cation-exchange reaction takes place. Furthermore, in saline water (16‰), salts can act as a shield and decrease the repulsive forces between clay particle surfaces. So, pH and salt content jointly impact the behaviour of clays differently. Since the Al-faces of clay structures have a negative charge in basic solutions. At high pH, all kaolinite surfaces become negative-charged, and then kaolinite

  3. Hydration of swelling clay and bacteria interaction. An experimental in situ reaction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, J.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on the physical-chemical behaviour of swelling di-octahedral clays (smectites) and their interaction with aqueous solutions and bacteria (Shewanella putrefaciens). Experimental results are presented for compacted clays, hydrated under confined volume conditions, using a new type of reaction-cell (the 'wet-cell' of Warr and Hoffman, 2004) that was designed for in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement. For comparison, dispersed clay systems were studied using standard batch solutions subjected to varying degrees of agitation. The combination of time-dependent in situ XRD measurements with gravimetric measurements and calculated diffraction patterns using the CALCMIX software (Plancon and Drits, 1999) allowed to successful quantification of the dynamics of water uptake and storage. This analytical procedure combined with published water vapour adsorption data enabled determination of the abundance of structured water layers, developed in the interlayer space, and the amount of water contained in different storage sites (interlayers, surfaces and pore spaces). Qualitative information on surface area and textural organization was also estimated based on calculated changes in the average particle thickness and the organization of water layer structures (ordering). Abiotic smectite hydration experiments, using a range of natural and industrial bentonites (SWy-2, IBECO, MX80, TIXOTON), focused on defining the role of the interlayer cation, variable clay packing densities and the ionic strength of the infiltrating solution. The rate of smectite hydration, as expected, was seen to be highly dependent on the type of interlayer cation (enhanced for Ca as opposed to Na) and the ionic strength of solution (enhanced uptake rates with saline solutions, particularly as they infiltrate Na-smectite). A range of dynamic changes in micro textural state occurred as a function of packing density. These changes explain the differences in hydration behaviour observed

  4. Fe(0)-clays interactions at 90°C under anoxic conditions: a comparative study between clay fraction of Callovo-Oxfordian and other purified clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, C.; Pelletier, M.; Villieras, F.; Barres, O.; Galmiche, M.; Ghanbaja, J.; Kohler, A.; Michau, N.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste it is of prime importance to understand the interactions between the saturated clay formation and steel containers. This can be achieved through an in-depth analysis of iron-clay interactions. Previous studies on the subject investigated the influence of solid/liquid ratio, iron/clay ratio, temperature and reaction time. The aim of the present study is to explain Callovo-Oxfordian-Fe(0) interactions by determining the role of each mineral phases present in the Callovo-Oxfordian (clay minerals, quartz, carbonates and pyrite) on the mechanisms of interaction between metal iron and clay particles. In that context, it is especially important to understand in detail the influence of clay nature and to obtain some insight about the relationships between interaction mechanisms at the molecular scale and crystallographic properties (particle size, TO or TOT layers, amount of edge faces...). The influence of the combination of different clays and the addition of other minerals must also be studied. In a first step, the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from the Andra's underground research laboratory was purified to extract the clay fraction (illite, illite-smectite, kaolinite and chlorite). Batch experiments were carried out in anoxic conditions at 90 deg. C in the presence of background electrolyte (NaCl 0.02 M.L -1 , CaCl 2 0.04 M.L -1 ) for durations of one, three or nine months in the presence of metallic iron powder. Experiments without iron were used as control. The iron/clay ratio was fixed at 1/3 with a solid/liquid ratio of 1/20. The above mentioned experiments were also carried out in parallel on other purified clays: two smectites (Georgia bentonite and SWy2 from the Clay Minerals Society), one illite (illite du Puy) and one kaolinite (KGa2, from the Clay Minerals society). At the end of the experiments, solid and liquid phases were

  5. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsen, A; Grobet, P; Keung, M; Leeman, H; Schoonheydt, R; Toufar, H [eds.

    1995-08-20

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY `95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately.

  6. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsen, A.; Grobet, P.; Keung, M.; Leeman, H.; Schoonheydt, R.; Toufar, H.

    1995-01-01

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY '95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately

  7. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrou, Gnanli; Brumaud, Coralie; Habert, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  8. Intercalation and retention of carbon dioxide in a smectite clay promoted by interlayer cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, L; Fossum, J O; Rozynek, Z; Hemmen, H; Rustenberg, K; Sobas, P A; Kalantzopoulos, G N; Knudsen, K D; Janek, M; Plivelic, T S; da Silva, G J

    2015-03-05

    A good material for CO2 capture should possess some specific properties: (i) a large effective surface area with good adsorption capacity, (ii) selectivity for CO2, (iii) regeneration capacity with minimum energy input, allowing reutilization of the material for CO2 adsorption, and (iv) low cost and high environmental friendliness. Smectite clays are layered nanoporous materials that may be good candidates in this context. Here we report experiments which show that gaseous CO2 intercalates into the interlayer nano-space of smectite clay (synthetic fluorohectorite) at conditions close to ambient. The rate of intercalation, as well as the retention ability of CO2 was found to be strongly dependent on the type of the interlayer cation, which in the present case is Li(+), Na(+) or Ni(2+). Interestingly, we observe that the smectite Li-fluorohectorite is able to retain CO2 up to a temperature of 35°C at ambient pressure, and that the captured CO2 can be released by heating above this temperature. Our estimates indicate that smectite clays, even with the standard cations analyzed here, can capture an amount of CO2 comparable to other materials studied in this context.

  9. Microporous membranes from polyamide 6/national clay nanocomposites - Part 2: microstructural and permeability evaluation; Obtencao de membranas microporosas a partir de nanocompositos de polimida 6/argila nacional - Parte 2: avaliacao microestrutural e de permeabilidade das membranas obtidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Amanda M.D.; Araujo, Edcleide M.; Lira, Helio de L.; Paz, Rene Anisio da; Medeiros, Vanessa da Nobrega, E-mail: amandamelissa.lins@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2014-06-01

    Organic/inorganic hybrid membranes of polyamide 6 and mineral clay containing layers of silicate were prepared and compared to those of the pure polymer. Use was made of an as-received sodium clay from industry and another organophilized with ammonium quaternary salts (Dodigen and Cetremide). The salts make the clays surface hydrophobic and improve their incorporation into the polymer matrix in the molten state. Membranes were prepared with these nanocomposites using the immersion-precipitation technique with formic acid as a solvent, and precipitation in a water bath as non-solvent. The acid concentration in the solution containing the polymer and the hybrids was varied to study its influence in morphology and permeability of the membranes. An asymmetric morphology consisting of a filter skin and a porous support was observed, with pores both on the surface and in the cross section being affected by the different salts. This asymmetric morphology was also affected significantly by the acid concentration, with thicker filter skins for higher concentrations. The acid concentration affected the pores size and their distribution. The clay particles probably acted as a barrier to the flow. The permeating flux for the two acid concentrations varied as a function of the distinct morphologies. (author)

  10. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landrou Gnanli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  11. A multi-technique characterization of cronstedtite synthetized by iron-clay interaction in a step by step cooling procedure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pignatelli, I.; Mugnaioli, E.; Hybler, Jiří; Mosser-Ruck, R.; Cathelineau, M.; Michau, N.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 4 (2013), s. 277-289 ISSN 0009-8604 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : cronstedtite * MDO polytypes * radioactive waste storage * experimental iron-clay interaction Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.398, year: 2013

  12. Synthesis of templated carbons starting from clay and clay-derived zeolites for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available 57 58 59 60 For Peer Review 1 Synthesis of templated carbons starting from clay and clay-derived zeolites for hydrogen storage applications N. M. Musyoka1*, J. Ren1, H. W. Langmi1, D. E. C. Rogers1, B. C. North1, M. Mathe1 and D. Bessarabov2... clear (filtered) extract of cloisite clay, SNC for zeolite from unfiltered cloisite clay extract and SBC for zeolite from unfiltered South African bentonite clay extract. Furfuryl alcohol (Sigma Aldrich, C5H6O2, 98%) and Ethylene gas were used...

  13. Migration of uranium in the presence of clay colloids in a sandy aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Cointe, P.; Grambow, B.; Piscitelli, A.; Montavon, G.; Van der Lee, J.; Giffaut, E.; Schneider, V.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In France, low and medium level radioactive waste of short period (nuclides with a half-life less than 31 years and an activity ranging from 100 to 1,000,000 Bq/g) is stored in concrete constructions on a surface site in Soulaines-Dhuys (Aube). The site was chosen for its simple geology: it entirely lays on an aquifer formation, the Upper Aptian sands, above a Lower Aptian impermeable clay formation. The site is surrounded by the Noues d'Amance stream, which serves as the single outlet of the groundwater on the site. The objective of this study is to improve knowledge of radionuclides migration in the aquifer formation to improve safety, using U(VI) as an example and focusing on colloids, capable of transporting U(VI) on long distances. The sediment is composed of two main phases: quartz and clay minerals (glauconite, with a small fraction of kaolinite and smectite), with relative amounts of 91 and 6% in weight, respectively. The aquifer water contains clay colloids, invisible to the eye though observed with SEM and TEM in a non disturbed sample. No signal was measured with usual light diffusion techniques and Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4). Only the Laser Induced Breakdown Detection (LIBD) technique could characterize the size (between 30 and 70 nm) and the concentration (around 10 ppb) of the clay colloids. Batch experiments were carried out to define U(VI)-Quartz and U(VI)-Clay interactions, with U(VI) concentration, pH and pCO 2 being the studied variables. The data were modelled with the Chess geochemistry code developed at the Paris School of Mines and compared to literature. Davis applied model for U(VI)-Quartz interaction and Bradbury and Baeyens applied model for U(VI)-Illite interaction adequately describe the experimental data. To know if clay colloids can move freely in the groundwater, pore size was measured using X-ray microtomography. Nanoparticles tracing was done with

  14. Migration of uranium in the presence of clay colloids in a sandy aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Cointe, P. [Laboratoire SUBATECH, UMR 6457 Ecole des Mines/CNRS/Universite, 4 rue A. Kastler, BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Centre de Geosciences, Ecole des Mines de Paris, 35 rue St-Honore, 77305 Fontainebleau Cedex (France); ANDRA 1/7 rue Jean Monnet - 92298 Chatenay Malabry Cedex (France); Grambow, B.; Piscitelli, A.; Montavon, G. [Laboratoire SUBATECH, UMR 6457 Ecole des Mines/CNRS/Universite, 4 rue A. Kastler, BP 20722, 44307 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Van der Lee, J. [EDF R ete D, Site des Renardieres, Route de Sens - Ecuelles, 77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Giffaut, E.; Schneider, V. [ANDRA 1/7 rue Jean Monnet - 92298 Chatenay Malabry Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In France, low and medium level radioactive waste of short period (nuclides with a half-life less than 31 years and an activity ranging from 100 to 1,000,000 Bq/g) is stored in concrete constructions on a surface site in Soulaines-Dhuys (Aube). The site was chosen for its simple geology: it entirely lays on an aquifer formation, the Upper Aptian sands, above a Lower Aptian impermeable clay formation. The site is surrounded by the Noues d'Amance stream, which serves as the single outlet of the groundwater on the site. The objective of this study is to improve knowledge of radionuclides migration in the aquifer formation to improve safety, using U(VI) as an example and focusing on colloids, capable of transporting U(VI) on long distances. The sediment is composed of two main phases: quartz and clay minerals (glauconite, with a small fraction of kaolinite and smectite), with relative amounts of 91 and 6% in weight, respectively. The aquifer water contains clay colloids, invisible to the eye though observed with SEM and TEM in a non disturbed sample. No signal was measured with usual light diffusion techniques and Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4). Only the Laser Induced Breakdown Detection (LIBD) technique could characterize the size (between 30 and 70 nm) and the concentration (around 10 ppb) of the clay colloids. Batch experiments were carried out to define U(VI)-Quartz and U(VI)-Clay interactions, with U(VI) concentration, pH and pCO{sub 2} being the studied variables. The data were modelled with the Chess geochemistry code developed at the Paris School of Mines and compared to literature. Davis applied model for U(VI)-Quartz interaction and Bradbury and Baeyens applied model for U(VI)-Illite interaction adequately describe the experimental data. To know if clay colloids can move freely in the groundwater, pore size was measured using X-ray microtomography. Nanoparticles tracing was done with

  15. Corrosion of non-irradiated UAl{sub x}-Al fuel in the presence of clay pore solution. A quantitative XRD secondary phase analysis applying the DDM method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Andreas [Halle-Wittenberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Mineralogy and Geochemistry; RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Crystallography; Klinkenberg, Martina; Curtius, Hildegard [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Energy and Climate Research, IEK-6 Nuclear Waste Management

    2017-04-01

    Corrosion experiments with non-irradiated metallic UAl{sub x}-Al research reactor fuel elements were carried out in autoclaves to identify and quantify the corrosion products. Such compounds, considering the long-term safety assessment of final repositories, can interact with the released inventory and this constitutes a sink for radionuclide migration in formation waters. Therefore, the metallic fuel sample was subjected to clay pore solution to investigate its process of disintegration by analyzing the resulting products and the remnants, i.e. the secondary phases. Due to the fast corrosion rate a full sample disintegration was observed within the experimental period of 1 year at 90 C. The obtained solids were subdivided into different grain size fractions and prepared for analysis. The elemental analysis of the suspension showed that, uranium and aluminum are concentrated in the solids, whereas iron was mainly dissolved. Non-ambient X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with the derivative difference minimization (DDM) method was applied for the qualitative and quantitative phase analysis (QPA) of the secondary phases. Gypsum and hemihydrate (bassanite), residues of non-corroded nuclear fuel, hematite, and goethite were identified. The quantitative phase analysis showed that goethite is the major crystalline phase. The amorphous content exceeded 80 wt% and hosted the uranium. All other compounds were present to a minor content. The obtained results by XRD were well supported by complementary scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis.

  16. The structure of actinide ions exchanged into native and modified zeolites and clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, S. R.; Soderholm, L.; Giaquinta, D. M.

    2000-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the structure and valence of thorium (Th 4+ ) and uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) cations exchanged into two classes of microporous aluminosilicate minerals: zeolites and smectite clays. XAS is also employed to examine the fate of the exchanged cations after modification of the mineral surface using self-assembled organic films and/or exposure to hydrothermal conditions. These treatments serve as models for the forces that ultimately determine the chemical fate of the actinide cations in the environment. The speciation of the cations depends on the pore size of the aluminosilicate, which is fixed for the zeolites and variable for the smectites

  17. Research of Deformation of Clay Soil Mixtures Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Romas Girkontas; Tadas Tamošiūnas; Andrius Savickas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to determine clay soils and clay soils mixtures deformations during drying. Experiments consisted from: a) clay and clay mixtures bridges (height ~ 0,30 m, span ~ 1,00 m); b) tiles of clay and clay, sand and straw (height, length, wide); c) cylinders of clay; clay and straw; clay, straw and sand (diameter; height). According to the findings recommendations for clay and clay mixtures drying technology application were presented. During the experiment clay bridge bear...

  18. Mechanisms behind injecting the combination of nano-clay particles and polymer solution for enhanced oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili Nezhad, Seyyed Shahram; Cheraghian, Goshtasp

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory investigations and field applications have proved injection of polymer solution to be an effective means to improve oil recovery for reservoirs of medium oil viscosity. The incremental oil produced in this case is the result of an increase in areal and vertical sweep efficiencies. Biopolymers and synthetic polymers are the major categories used in the petroleum industry for specific reasons. Biopolymers like xanthan are limited in their application as they are more susceptible to biodegradation. Synthetic polymers like Hydrolyzed PolyAcrylaMide (HPAM) have a much wider application as they are less susceptible to biodegradation. Furthermore, development of nanotechnology has successfully provided technical and economical viable alternatives for present materials. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of combining clay nanoparticles with polymer solution on oil recovery. This paper includes a history match of both one-dimensional and two-dimensional polymer floods using a three-dimensional numerical model for fluid flow and mass transport. Results indicated that the amount of polymer adsorption decreased when clay nanoparticles were added to the PolyAcrylaMide solution; however, mobility ratio improvement is believed to be the main contributor for the proposed method in order to enhance much oil recovery compared to xanthan flood and HPAM flood.

  19. Raw material of the Corumbatai formation at the region of ceramic pole of Santa Gertrudes - Sao Paulo, Brazil, with natural characteristics for fabrication of expanded clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, M.M.T.; Zanardo, A.; Rocha, R.R.; Roveri, C.D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper refers to the study of the bases material of the Corumbatai Formation (Parana Basin) from a clay mine, which presents limits for its use in ceramic tiles in dry grinding process due to its hardness and, especially, the high content of organic matter in relation to the clay overlaid. The characterization of the raw material and the product was accomplished by organic carbon analysis, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and test-firing. Firing conditions were determined to get expanded clay, using fast firing static kiln and a continuous roller kiln, both from laboratory equipment, getting samples with variable density up to the limit of expansion, with density that can reach values lower than 0,5g.cm -3 because of the formation of closed pores and an external vitreous foil which provide a high mechanical resistance to the particles. (author)

  20. Nearfield behaviour of clay barriers and their interaction with concrete Task 3 characterization of radioactive waste forms a series of final reports (1985-89) No 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atabek, R.; Beziat, A.; Coulon, H.; Dardaine, M.; Eglem, A.; Farcy, C.; Fontan, N.; Gatabin, C.; Gegout, P.; Lajudie, A.; Landoas, O.; Lechelle, J.; Plas, F.; Raynal, J.; Revertegat, E.; Debrabant, P.; Proust, D.

    1991-01-01

    In order to guarantee the safety of waste underground disposal, engineered barriers will be implemented as backfill materials in galleries and access shafts and as buffer materials between the host medium and the waste packages. One of the first requirements for engineered barriers is to minimize water and chemical species transfer. The materials being considered are essentially swelling clays, in particular calcium smectite clays coming from french deposits and hydraulic binders, more specially a ternary cement (named C.L.C.). A vitrified waste disposal in granite is taken as the most constraining scenario as far as engineered barrier is concerned. The clay buffer material is placed between the packages and the host rock. The main properties which are determined are directly related to the engineered barrier requirements: thermal conductivity, hydraulic conductivity, swelling pressure and swelling capacity. Moreover results are obtained on temperature effect on clay microstructure and properties in both cases: without and with water intake. The concrete durability with regard to clay pore water attack is evaluated taking into account previous results obtained to ensure low-level radioactive waste disposal safety. 23 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs

  1. Lattice density functional theory investigation of pore shape effects. I. Adsorption in single nonperiodic pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanoski, A P; van Swol, Frank

    2002-10-01

    A fully explicit in three dimensions lattice density functional theory is used to investigate adsorption in single nonperiodic pores. The effect of varying pore shape from the slits and cylinders that are normally simulated was our primary interest. A secondary concern was the results for pores with very large diameters. The shapes investigated were square pores with or without surface roughness, cylinders, right triangle pores, and trapezoidal pores. It was found that pores with very similar shape factors gave similar results but that the introduction of acute angled corners or very large side ratio lengths in rectangular pores gave results that were significantly different. Further, a rectangular pore going towards the limit of infinite side ratio does not approach the results of a slit pore. In all of these cases, the importance of features that are present for only a small portion of the pore is demonstrated.

  2. HDPE/clay hybrids: the effect of clay modified with poly(diphenyl siloxanes) on thermal and rheological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monasterio, Fernanda E.; Carrera, Maria C.; Erdmann, Eleonora; Destefanis, Hugo A., E-mail: ferelenakq@gmail.co [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Inst. de Investigaciones para la Industria Quimica; Pita, Victor J.R.R.; Dias, Marcos L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Profa. Eloisa Mano

    2009-07-01

    Poly(diphenyl siloxanes) (PDPhS) were synthesized in presence of organophilic clay in order to modify its nano structure. Two silane monomers were used: dimethoxydiphenylsilane and dichlorodiphenylsilane. The following characterizations were performed for all clays: XRD, FTIR and TGA/DTG. These siloxane-modified clays were more hydrophobic and had enhanced thermal stability. Solvent extraction was carried out in the siloxane-modified clays and the PDPhS soluble fraction analyzed according the molecular weight via GPC. The presence of free and grafted oligomers on clay surface was identified. The modified clays were added to HDPE by melt processing to obtain HDPE/clay hybrids which exhibited marked differences in the rheological behavior when compared with neat HDPE. (author)

  3. HDPE/clay hybrids: the effect of clay modified with poly(diphenyl siloxanes) on thermal and rheological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monasterio, Fernanda E.; Carrera, Maria C.; Erdmann, Eleonora; Destefanis, Hugo A.; Pita, Victor J.R.R.; Dias, Marcos L.

    2009-01-01

    Poly(diphenyl siloxanes) (PDPhS) were synthesized in presence of organophilic clay in order to modify its nano structure. Two silane monomers were used: dimethoxydiphenylsilane and dichlorodiphenylsilane. The following characterizations were performed for all clays: XRD, FTIR and TGA/DTG. These siloxane-modified clays were more hydrophobic and had enhanced thermal stability. Solvent extraction was carried out in the siloxane-modified clays and the PDPhS soluble fraction analyzed according the molecular weight via GPC. The presence of free and grafted oligomers on clay surface was identified. The modified clays were added to HDPE by melt processing to obtain HDPE/clay hybrids which exhibited marked differences in the rheological behavior when compared with neat HDPE. (author)

  4. Crystallite size distribution of clay minerals from selected Serbian clay deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The BWA (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique for the measurement of the mean crystallite thickness and thickness distributions of phyllosilicates was applied to a set of kaolin and bentonite minerals. Six samples of kaolinitic clays, one sample of halloysite, and five bentonite samples from selected Serbian deposits were analyzed. These clays are of sedimentary volcano-sedimentary (diagenetic, and hydrothermal origin. Two different types of shape of thickness distribution were found - lognormal, typical for bentonite and halloysite, and polymodal, typical for kaolinite. The mean crystallite thickness (T BWA seams to be influenced by the genetic type of the clay sample.

  5. Aspects of clay/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oscarson, D.W.; Dixon, D.A.; Onofrei, M.

    1997-01-01

    In the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste management, both clay-based materials and concrete are proposed for use as barriers, seals or supporting structures. The main concern when clays and concrete are in proximity is the generation of a high-pH environment by concrete since clay minerals are relatively unstable at high pH. Here we examine the OH - -generating capacity of two high-performance concretes when in contact with several solutions. We also investigate various aspects of claylconcrete interactions. They are: (1) the alkalimetric titration of clay suspensions, (2) the effect of Ca(OH) 2 (portlandite) on the swelling and hydraulic properties of compacted bentonite, and (3) the influence of cement grout on a backfill clay retrieved from the 900-d Buffer/Container Experiment at the Underground Research Laboratory of AECL. The results indicate that although high-performance concretes establish significantly lower poresolution pH (9 to 10) than does ordinary portland cement, the pH is still somewhat higher than that of clay/groundwater systems of about pH 8. Hence, even if high-performance concrete is used in a disposal vault, the potential still exists for clay minerals to alter over long periods of time if in contact with this concrete. The data show, however, that clays have a substantial buffering capacity, and clay-based barriers can thus neutralize much of the OH - potentially released from concrete in a vault. Moreover, even after reacting for 120 d at 85 o C with up to 5 wt.% Ca(OH) 2 , compacted bentonite (dry density = 1.2 Mg/m 3 ) retains much of its swelling capacity and has a permeability low enough (hydraulic conductivity ≤ 10 -11 m/s) to ensure that molecular diffusion will be the main transport mechanism through compacted clay-based barriers. Furthermore, according to X-ray diffractometry, the clay mineral component of backfill was not altered by contact with a cement grout for 900 d in the Buffer/Container Experiment

  6. Physical Properties of Latvian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgelāne, I; Stepanova, V; Ločs, J; Mālers, J; Bērziņa-Cimdiņa, L

    2012-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of clays mostly depends on its mineral and chemical composition, particle size and pH value. The mutual influence of these parameters is complex. Illite is the most abundant clay mineral in Latvia and usually used in building materials and pottery. The viscosity and plasticity of Latvian clays from several deposits were investigated and correlated with mineral composition, particle size and pH value. Fractionated and crude clay samples were used. The p...

  7. Characterisation of gas transport properties of the Opalinus clay, a potential host rock formation for radioactive waste disposal; Caracterisation des proprietes des argiles d'Opalinus (roche d'accueil potentielle pour un stockage de dechets radioactifs) relatives au transport des gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschall, P. [Nagra - National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Wettingen (Switzerland); Horseman, S. [British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth (United Kingdom); Gimmi, T. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    The Opalinus Clay in Northern Switzerland has been identified as a potential host rock formation for the disposal of radioactive waste. Comprehensive understanding of gas transport processes through this low-permeability formation forms a key issue in the assessment of repository performance. Field investigations and laboratory experiments suggest an intrinsic permeability of the Opalinus Clay in the order of 10{sup -20} to 10{sup -21} m{sup 2} and a moderate anisotropy ratio {<=} 10. Porosity depends on clay content and burial depth; values of {approx} 0.12 are reported for the region of interest. Porosimetry indicates that about 10-30% of voids can be classed as macro-pores, corresponding to an equivalent pore radius > 25 nm. The determined entry pressures are in the range of 0.4-10 MPa and exhibit a marked dependence on intrinsic permeability. Both in situ gas tests and gas permeameter tests on drill-cores demonstrate that gas transport through the rock is accompanied by pore water displacement, suggesting that classical flow concepts of immiscible displacement in porous media can be applied when the gas entry pressure (i.e. capillary threshold pressure) is less than the minimum principal stress acting within the rock. Essentially, the pore space accessible to gas flow is restricted to the network of connected macro-pores, which implies a very low degree of desaturation of the rock during the gas imbibition process. At elevated gas pressures (i.e. when gas pressure approaches the level of total stress that acts on the rock body), evidence was seen for dilatancy controlled gas transport mechanisms. Further field experiments were aimed at creating extended tensile fractures with high fracture transmissivity (hydro- or gas-fractures). The test results lead to the conclusion that gas fracturing can be largely ruled out as a risk for post-closure repository performance. (authors)

  8. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  9. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  10. Effects of Different Types of Clays and Maleic Anhydride Modified Polystyrene on Polystyrene/Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mehrabzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer/clay nanocomposites are considered as a new subject of research in Iran and the world. Addition of a minimum amount of clay (2-5wt% can improve the mechanical properties, enhance barrier properties and reduce flammability dramatically. Polystyrene (PS exhibits high strength, high modulus and excellent dimensional stability, but it has poor ductility, elongation, and flexural modulus. By incorporating clay into polystyrene these properties can be improved. In this study preparation of polystyrene/clay nanocomposite, effects of different types of clays (Cloisite 10A andNanomer I.30TC and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene on mechanical properties of the prepared polystyrene/clay nanocomposites were evaluated. Samples were prepared by a twin screw extruder. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques were employed to evaluate the extent of intercalation and exfoliation of silicate layers in the nanocomposites. Mechanical tests show that by addition of clay and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene the flexural modulus (~30% and elongation-at-break (~40% of prepared nanocomposites have been improved. XRD and TEM results show that nanocomposite have an intercalated structure with ability to change to further exfoliation structure.

  11. Multiscale pore networks and their effect on deformation and transport property alteration associated with hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Hugh; Hayman, Nicholas; Jiang, Han; Tian, Xiao; Jiang, Chunbi

    2017-04-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that, during a hydraulic fracture stimulation, the permeability of the unfractured matrix far from the main, induced tensile fracture increases by one to two orders of magnitude. This permeability enhancement is associated with pervasive shear failure in a large region surrounding the main induced fracture. We have performed low-pressure gas sorption, mercury intrusion, and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements along with high-resolution scanning electron microscope imaging on several preserved and unpreserved shale samples from North American basins before and after inducing failure in confined compressive strength tests. We have observed that the pore structure in intact samples exhibits multiscale behavior, with sub-micron-scale pores in organic matter connected in isolated, micron-scale clusters which themselves are connected to each other through a network of microcracks. The organic-hosted pore networks are poorly connected due to a significant number of dead-end pores within the organic matter. Following shear failure, we often observe an increase in pore volume in the sub-micron range, which appears to be related to the formation of microcracks that propagate along grain boundaries and other planes of mechanical strength contrast. This is consistent with other experimental and field evidence. In some cases these microcracks cross or terminate in organic matter, intersecting the organic-hosted pores. The induced microcrack networks typically have low connectivity and do not appreciably increase the connectivity of the overall pore network. However, in other cases the shear deformation results in an overall pore volume decrease; samples which exhibit this behavior tend to have more clay minerals. Our interpretation of these phenomena is as follows. As organic matter is converted to hydrocarbons, organic-hosted pores develop, and the hydrocarbons contained in these pores are overpressured. The disconnected nature of these

  12. Thixotropic Properties of Latvian Illite Containing Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Lakevičs, Vitālijs; Stepanova, Valentīna; Niedra, Santa; Dušenkova, Inga; Ruplis, Augusts

    2015-01-01

    Thixotropic properties of Latvian Devonian and Quaternary clays were studied. Dynamic viscosity of the water clay suspensions were measured with a rotating viscometer. Influence of concentration, pH and modifiers on the thixotropic clay properties was analyzed. It was found that Latvian clays have thixotropic properties. Stability of clay suspensions is described with the thixotropy hysteresis loop. Increasing the speed of the viscometer rotation, dynamic viscosity of the clay suspension decr...

  13. Stable silicon isotope signatures of marine pore waters - Biogenic opal dissolution versus authigenic clay mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Claudia; Doering, Kristin; Wallmann, Klaus; Scholz, Florian; Sommer, Stefan; Grasse, Patricia; Geilert, Sonja; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved silicon isotope compositions have been analysed for the first time in pore waters (δ30SiPW) of three short sediment cores from the Peruvian margin upwelling region with distinctly different biogenic opal content in order to investigate silicon isotope fractionation behaviour during early diagenetic turnover of biogenic opal in marine sediments. The δ30SiPW varies between +1.1‰ and +1.9‰ with the highest values occurring in the uppermost part close to the sediment-water interface. These values are of the same order or higher than the δ30Si of the biogenic opal extracted from the same sediments (+0.3‰ to +1.2‰) and of the overlying bottom waters (+1.1‰ to +1.5‰). Together with dissolved silicic acid concentrations well below biogenic opal saturation, our collective observations are consistent with the formation of authigenic alumino-silicates from the dissolving biogenic opal. Using a numerical transport-reaction model we find that approximately 24% of the dissolving biogenic opal is re-precipitated in the sediments in the form of these authigenic phases at a relatively low precipitation rate of 56 μmol Si cm-2 yr-1. The fractionation factor between the precipitates and the pore waters is estimated at -2.0‰. Dissolved and solid cation concentrations further indicate that off Peru, where biogenic opal concentrations in the sediments are high, the availability of reactive terrigenous material is the limiting factor for the formation of authigenic alumino-silicate phases.

  14. Clay exfoliation and polymer/clay aerogels by supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona eLongo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 treatments of a montmorillonite (MMT intercalated with ammonium cations bearing two long hydrocarbon tails (organo-modified MMT, OMMT led to OMMT exfoliation, with loss of the long-range order in the packing of the hydrocarbon tails and maintenance of the long-range order in the clay layers. The intercalated and the derived exfoliated OMMT have been deeply characterized, mainly by X-ray diffraction analyses. Monolithic composite aerogels, with large amounts of both intercalated and exfoliated OMMT and including the nanoporous-crystalline δ form of syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS, have been prepared, by scCO2 extractions of s-PS-based gels. Also for high OMMT content, the gel and aerogel preparation procedures occur without re-aggregation of the exfoliated clay, which is instead observed for other kinds of polymer processing. Aerogels with the exfoliated OMMT have more even dispersion of the clay layers, higher elastic modulus and larger surface area than aerogels with the intercalated OMMT. Extremely light materials with relevant transport properties could be prepared. Moreover, s-PS-based aerogels with exfoliated OMMT could be helpful for the handling of exfoliated clay minerals.

  15. In situ determination of anisotropic permeability of clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, H.; Soennke, J.; Morel, J.; Krug, S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clay stone has, due to its tectonic evolution of the formation, hydraulically and mechanically transversal isotropic behaviour. Argillite bedding or layering structure has been observed in the underground laboratories Mont Terri in Switzerland and Meuse/Haute-Marne at Bure site in France. To characterise the hydraulic properties of the clay formation, single and double packer systems have been applied based on the packer test theory. However, this kind of packer type cannot distinguish the difference between the properties parallel to the bedding and perpendicular to the bedding. The previous investigations using single packer system in boreholes parallel and perpendicular to bedding show quite different pressure decrease rates. The measured pressure development serves for the determination of the hydraulic parameters, which however may also be influenced by pore water pressure in partially or fully saturated medium, like clay stone. In order to filter out this influence, the measurements should be made at the same location in the same borehole. Therefore a 'slot packer' system has been developed to measure hydraulic properties in dependency of bedding direction. An intensive test program has been carried out in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory to judge the feasibility of the new packer system for the hydraulic anisotropy characterisation before the packer will be applied in the French Underground Laboratory Meuse/Haute-Marne. One important issue of the test program is to get the feeling of the packer handling and technical features. Three campaigns in 2007 and four campaigns in 2008 have been carried out. Seven boreholes with length from 3 to 10 metres have been drilled for the test purpose. The long boreholes with a length of ten metres are originally planned for intensive testing in the undisturbed zone, the short holes for the near-field characterisation. The disturbed zone around an underground opening

  16. Fault creep and stress drops in saturated silt-clay gouge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombolakis, E.G.; Hepburn, J.C.; Roy, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of physicochemical processes in saturated silt-clay gouge indicates that this type of fault zone material can account for for the following phenomena: (1) the nonlinear mechanical behavior indicated by certain geophysical measurements along the San Andreas fault zone, (2) the low stress drops associated with earthquakes to several kilometers' depth, and (3) the recurrence of creep-induced instabilities at shallow depths along fault zones. A rheological model is described for a gouge consisting of colloidal size clay platelets with absorbed water, brittle silt size particles, and 'free' pore water. Recurrence of shallow earthquakes or accelerated creep is explained in the model by thixotropic hardening of the colloidal phase following shear deformation, i.e., by electrochemical reorientation of clay platelets from a dispersed structure to a face-to-edge type of structure during a quiescent period. The silt phase must support part of the effective mean stress for thixotropic hardening to occur at several kilometers' depth. The peak shear strength of the gouge in this case is expressed in functional form by S/sub p/=f[kappaP/sub e/+sigma-bar/sub c/ tan psi/sub e/; sigma-bar/sub s/ tan psi/sub s/], where kappa, P/sub e/, and psi/sub e/ are Hvorslev parameters; sigma-bar/sub c/ is the effective stress in the colloidal phase, acting normal to the shear zone; sigma-bar/sub s/ is the effective stress in the silt phase, acting normal to the shear zone; and psi/sub s/ is the 'friction angle' of the silt phase. The peak shear strength is time dependent owing to viscous type contacts between absorbed water layers surrounding the colloidal platelets. The time-dependent nature of S/sub p/ may be responsible for certain nonlinear behavior noted in fault zones and for the small stress drops associated with earthquakes occurring at several kilometers' depth

  17. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Port-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (2+ solubility.

  18. Viscosity and Plasticity of Latvian Illite Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgelāne, I; Vecstaudža, J; Stepanova, V; Mālers, J; Bērziņa-Cimdiņa, L

    2012-01-01

    Due to viscosity and plasticity, clays and clay minerals are used in civil engineering, pottery and also in cosmetics and medicine as thickening agents and emulsion and suspension stabilizers. The rheological properties of clay suspensions are complex. Mostly it is an interaction between mineral composition, clay particle size and pH value and also depends on clay minerals. Clay-water suspension is non-Newtonian fluid showing thixotropic and pseudoplastic properties. Results showed that plast...

  19. Toward highly stable electrocatalysts via nanoparticle pore confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Carolina; Meier, Josef C; Peinecke, Volker; Bongard, Hans; Katsounaros, Ioannis; Topalov, Angel A; Lu, Anhui; Mayrhofer, Karl J J; Schüth, Ferdi

    2012-12-19

    The durability of electrode materials is a limiting parameter for many electrochemical energy conversion systems. In particular, electrocatalysts for the essential oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) present some of the most challenging instability issues shortening their practical lifetime. Here, we report a mesostructured graphitic carbon support, Hollow Graphitic Spheres (HGS) with a specific surface area exceeding 1000 m(2) g(-1) and precisely controlled pore structure, that was specifically developed to overcome the long-term catalyst degradation, while still sustaining high activity. The synthetic pathway leads to platinum nanoparticles of approximately 3 to 4 nm size encapsulated in the HGS pore structure that are stable at 850 °C and, more importantly, during simulated accelerated electrochemical aging. Moreover, the high stability of the cathode electrocatalyst is also retained in a fully assembled polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Identical location scanning and scanning transmission electron microscopy (IL-SEM and IL-STEM) conclusively proved that during electrochemical cycling the encapsulation significantly suppresses detachment and agglomeration of Pt nanoparticles, two of the major degradation mechanisms in fuel cell catalysts of this particle size. Thus, beyond providing an improved electrocatalyst, this study describes the blueprint for targeted improvement of fuel cell catalysts by design of the carbon support.

  20. Clay Portrait Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  1. Clay matrix voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdicakis, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In many countries, it is planned that the long life highly radioactive nuclear spent fuel will be stored in deep argillaceous rocks. The sites selected for this purpose are anoxic and satisfy several recommendations as mechanical stability, low permeability and low redox potential. Pyrite (FeS 2 ), iron(II) carbonate, iron(II) bearing clays and organic matter that are present in very small amounts (about 1% w:w) in soils play a major role in their reactivity and are considered today as responsible for the low redox potential values of these sites. In this communication, we describe an electrochemical technique derived from 'Salt matrix voltammetry' and allowing the almost in-situ voltammetric characterization of air-sensitive samples of soils after the only addition of the minimum humidity required for electrolytic conduction. Figure 1 shows the principle of the developed technique. It consists in the entrapment of the clay sample between a graphite working electrode and a silver counter/quasi-reference electrode. The sample was previously humidified by passing a water saturated inert gas through the electrochemical cell. The technique leads to well-defined voltammetric responses of the electro-active components of the clays. Figure 2 shows a typical voltammogram relative to a Callovo-Oxfordian argillite sample from Bure, the French place planned for the underground nuclear waste disposal. During the direct scan, one can clearly distinguish the anodic voltammetric signals for the oxidation of the iron (II) species associated with the clay and the oxidation of pyrite. The reverse scan displays a small cathodic signal for the reduction of iron (III) associated with the clay that demonstrates that the majority of the previously oxidized iron (II) species were transformed into iron (III) oxides reducible at lower potentials. When a second voltammetric cycle is performed, one can notice that the signal for iron (II

  2. Multi scale experimental study of water and ionic transport in porous charged media: clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadene, A.

    2005-10-01

    Clays are porous media of industrial interest. Due to their retention capacities and low permeability to water, they are the principal candidate for the conception of engineered barriers radioactive waste disposal. The main interest of this study is the experimental determination of the cationic and water dynamics in montmorillonite and fluoro-hectorite at low water contents This latter synthetic smectite has been used as a model clay to help the interpretation of the results issued from the first natural one. After a summary on the clayey system, this work reports the many experimental techniques (Atomic Force Microscopy, Photo-Correlation Spectroscopy, Micro-calorimetry, Powder Diffraction) used during the preliminary study concerning structural characterisation of the samples. The study of the sodic form of smectites with the use of a combination of quasi-elastic neutron scattering techniques (Time of Flight and Spin Echo) succeeded to water diffusion coefficients but also to a discernment of the limits of such techniques. Experiments with montmorillonite samples are in agreement with the simulations, so tending to a validation of the models. Experimental data obtained from synthetic hectorites will be in the near future compared to simulations In the last part, this work shows the application of Broad Band Dielectric Spectroscopy for the investigation of ionic dynamic in these porous media. Many models have been developed for the interpretation of the experimental raw data obtained with this technique. (author)

  3. Pore Structure and Diagenetic Controls on Relative Permeability: Implications for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO2 Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, J.; Dewers, T. A.; Heath, J. E.; Cather, M.; Mozley, P.

    2016-12-01

    Multiphase flow in clay-bearing sandstones of the Morrow Sandstone governs the efficiency of CO2 storage and enhanced oil recovery at the Farnsworth Unit, Texas. This formation is the target for enhanced oil recovery and injection of one million metric ton of anthropogenically-sourced CO2. The sandstone hosts eight major flow units that exhibit distinct microstructural characteristics due to diagenesis, including: "clean" macro-porosity; quartz overgrowths constricting some pores; ghost grains; intergranular porosity filled by microporous authigenic clay; and feldspar dissolution. We examine the microstructural controls on macroscale (core scale) relative permeability and capillary pressure behavior through: X-ray computed tomography, Robomet.3d, and focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy imaging of the pore structure of the major flow units of the Morrow Sandstone; relative permeability and capillary pressure in the laboratory using CO2, brine, and oil at reservoir pressure and effective stress conditions. The combined data sets inform links between patterns of diagenesis and multiphase flow. These data support multiphase reservoir simulation and performance assessment by the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP). Funding for this project is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory through the SWP under Award No. DE-FC26-05NT42591. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  5. Surface modification of montmorillonite on surface Acid-base characteristics of clay and thermal stability of epoxy/clay nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Seo, Dong-Il; Lee, Jae-Rock

    2002-07-01

    In this work, the effect of surface treatments on smectitic clay was investigated in surface energetics and thermal behaviors of epoxy/clay nanocomposites. The pH values, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were used to analyze the effect of cation exchange on clay surface and the exfoliation phenomenon of clay interlayer. The surface energetics of clay and thermal properties of epoxy/clay nanocomposites were investigated in contact angles and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. From the experimental results, the surface modification of clay by dodecylammonium chloride led to the increases in both distance between silicate layers of about 8 A and surface acid values, as well as in the electron acceptor component (gamma(+)(s)) of surface free energy, resulting in improved interfacial adhesion between basic (or electron donor) epoxy resins and acidic (electron acceptor) clay interlayers. Also, the thermal stability of nanocomposites was highly superior to pure epoxy resin due to the presence of the well-dispersed clay nanolayer, which has a barrier property in a composite system.

  6. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain...

  7. Preliminary analysis of construction of the test drift in boom clay at Mol using plasticity solutions and finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, R.J.; Taylor, R.N.; Higgins, K.G.; Potts, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Analyses have been undertaken on an advancing tunnel heading at great depth in a clay formation corresponding to the test drift construction at Mol. Belgium. Simplifying assumptions enable plasticity solutions to be used to model the behaviour of a tunnel heading in a linear elastic-perfectly plastic soil. Finite element analysis with the same soil model has been undertaken of the test drift construction, assuming axisymmetric conditions. The results are compared with the plasticity solutions and with the measurements of lining stresses, soil movements and pore pressures by SCK/CEN. Good agreement is obtained between the plasticity solutions and finite element analysis. The measured immediate build-up of stress on the linings is well-predicted and reasonable agreement is obtained between predicted and measured soil movements. The measured pore-pressure changes are poorly predicted by the analyses

  8. Study of the Properties of Bentonites for their use in Clay Geo synthetic Barriers; Estudio de la propiedades de las bentonitas para su utilizacion en barreras geosinteticas arcillosas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiro Lopez, A.; Mateo Sanz, B.; Garcia Cidoncha, H.; Blanco Fernandez, M.

    2014-02-01

    Bentonites used for the production of clay geo synthetic barriers need to meet some properties so that they can be a waterproofing system. among the bentonites used in industry, sodium bentonite has the lowest permeability due to its high water absorption capacity in the inter-laminar space, causing it to swell and form a barrier to water flow. this paper provides the study of the properties of four bentonite to evaluate their quality the study of the properties of four bentonite to evaluate their quality. For this study, the main properties have been tested: water absorption, swelling index, fluid loss, cation exchange capacity and montmorillonite content. In order to optimize the procedure for the characterization of bentonites, correlations between different tests have been done, to identify the most suitable ones. Finally, a compatibility test has been carried out to study the performance of bentonites in water containing a high amount of sales, because in this case, an ion exchange between the interlayer sodium ions of bentonite and cations dissolved in the water can take, resulting in a decrease swell of the bentonite. (Author)

  9. Potential of polyaniline modified clay nanocomposite as a selective decontamination adsorbent for Pb(II) ions from contaminated waters; kinetics and thermodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piri, Somayeh; Zanjani, Zahra Alikhani; Piri, Farideh; Zamani, Abbasali; Yaftian, Mohamadreza; Davari, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays significant attention is to nanocomposite compounds in water cleaning. In this article the synthesis and characterization of conductive polyaniline/clay (PANI/clay) as a hybrid nanocomposite with extended chain conformation and its application for water purification are presented. Clay samples were obtained from the central plain of Abhar region, Abhar, Zanjan Province, Iran. Clay was dried and sieved before used as adsorbent. The conductive polyaniline was inflicted into the layers of clay to fabricate a hybrid material. The structural properties of the fabricated nanocomposite are studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The elimination process of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions from synthetics aqueous phase on the surface of PANI/clay as adsorbent were evaluated in batch experiments. Flame atomic absorption instrument spectrophotometer was used for determination of the studied ions concentration. Consequence change of the pH and initial metal amount in aqueous solution, the procedure time and the used adsorbent dose as the effective parameters on the removal efficiency was investigated. Surface characterization was exhibited that the clay layers were flaked in the hybrid nanocomposite. The results show that what happen when a nanocomposite polyaniline chain is inserted between the clay layers. The adsorption of ions confirmed a pH dependency procedure and a maximum removal value was seen at pH 5.0. The adsorption isotherm and the kinetics of the adsorption processes were described by Temkin model and pseudo-second-order equation. Time of procedure, pH and initial ion amount have a severe effect on adsorption efficiency of PANI/clay. By using suggested synthesise method, nano-composite as the adsorbent simply will be prepared. The prepared PANI/clay showed excellent adsorption capability for decontamination of Pb ions from contaminated water. Both of suggested synthesise and

  10. Pore REconstruction and Segmentation (PORES) method for improved porosity quantification of nanoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Eyndhoven, G., E-mail: geert.vaneyndhoven@uantwerpen.be [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Kurttepeli, M. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Van Oers, C.J.; Cool, P. [Laboratory of Adsorption and Catalysis, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Bals, S. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Batenburg, K.J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Science Park 123, NL-1090 GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mathematical Institute, Universiteit Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 1, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Sijbers, J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2015-01-15

    Electron tomography is currently a versatile tool to investigate the connection between the structure and properties of nanomaterials. However, a quantitative interpretation of electron tomography results is still far from straightforward. Especially accurate quantification of pore-space is hampered by artifacts introduced in all steps of the processing chain, i.e., acquisition, reconstruction, segmentation and quantification. Furthermore, most common approaches require subjective manual user input. In this paper, the PORES algorithm “POre REconstruction and Segmentation” is introduced; it is a tailor-made, integral approach, for the reconstruction, segmentation, and quantification of porous nanomaterials. The PORES processing chain starts by calculating a reconstruction with a nanoporous-specific reconstruction algorithm: the Simultaneous Update of Pore Pixels by iterative REconstruction and Simple Segmentation algorithm (SUPPRESS). It classifies the interior region to the pores during reconstruction, while reconstructing the remaining region by reducing the error with respect to the acquired electron microscopy data. The SUPPRESS reconstruction can be directly plugged into the remaining processing chain of the PORES algorithm, resulting in accurate individual pore quantification and full sample pore statistics. The proposed approach was extensively validated on both simulated and experimental data, indicating its ability to generate accurate statistics of nanoporous materials. - Highlights: • An electron tomography reconstruction/segmentation method for nanoporous materials. • The method exploits the porous nature of the scanned material. • Validated extensively on both simulation and real data experiments. • Results in increased image resolution and improved porosity quantification.

  11. Water retention properties of Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Min; Delage, Pierre; Tang, Anh Minh; GATMIRI, Behrouz

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Many investigations were carried out on the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone that has been selected by the French radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) as a potential host rock for high level radioactive waste disposal at great depth. Various authors demonstrated the significant water sensitivity of clay-stones. Some cracks generated by desaturation have been observed in the Tournemire URL (France) excavated in clay-stone. By carrying out some ESEM (environmental scanning electron microscope) observations on COx clay-stone samples submitted to cyclic changes in relative humidity, Montes et al. (2004) evidenced the water sensitivity of the clay fraction, with significant successive openings and closures of cracks and pores. Hysteresis effects have been observed in the water retention curve, in the ultrasonic velocity evolution and in the strain changes induced by hydration cycles on COx samples submitted to controlled relative humidities by Pham et al., (2007). Better knowledge of the mechanism of desaturation of the clay-stone is necessary to further understand the changes in hydro-mechanical properties of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) that becomes significantly de-saturated all around the galleries because of ventilation. In this framework, a detailed study of the water retention properties of the COx clay-stone was carried out i) to complete existing observations with respect to volume changes under suction cycles and ii) to determine the main drying and wetting curves so as to better investigate hysteresis effects in the water retention curve.. Particular attention was paid to the characterization of the initial state in the laboratory (where samples are provided unsaturated due to the combined effect of coring, storage and transportation) and to the volume changes and changes in degree of saturation along the main wetting and drying paths. The determination of the water retention properties was

  12. Mineral acquisition from clay by budongo forest chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay

  13. Evaluation of kaolinite clays of Moa for the production of cement based clinker-calcined clay-limestone (LC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S. Almenares-Reyes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Clay materials from two outcrops of the Moa region were analyzed to determine their potential use as supplementary cementitious material in the production of ternary cements based on limestone-calcined clay. The clays were characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy (EAA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis (ATG. These methods revealed high aluminum in clays, moderate kaolinite content, a disordered structure and the presence of impurities. The solubility of aluminum and silicon in alkali and the compressive strength of LC3 systems is proportional to their content in clay, being higher for the one with higher kaolinite content and greater structural disorder (outcrop D1, although the clay of both outcrops may constitute supplementary cementitious materials in the production of ternary cements based clinker-calcined clay-limestone. The suitable thermal activation range for both clays is between 650 ° C and 850 ° C.

  14. Thermal activation and characterization of clay aiming their use as sorbent in fixed bed columns to remove cadmium; Ativacao termica e caracterizacao da argila visando sua utilizacao como adsorvente em colunas de leito fixo para a remocao de cadmio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.M. da; Rodrigues, M.G.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Silva, M.L.P. [Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Arido (UFERSA), RN (Brazil); Kleinübing, S.J.; Silva, M.G.C., E-mail: marciliomaximo@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this work we studied the removal of cadmium in a synthetic wastewater using clay of Pernambuco - Brazil, in systems of fixed bed column. Clay was thermally activated at 500 °C. The materials were characterized using X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption (BET method). For tests in fixed bed column, we applied a factorial design 2{sup 2} and found that increasing the flow adversely affects the process of removing cadmium concentration while acting positively. The studies showed these materials as promising for the removal of Cd{sup 2+} ions in synthetic wastewater containing low levels of this metal. (author)

  15. The Effect of the Pore Entrance on Particle Motion in Slit Pores: Implications for Ultrathin Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavari, Armin; Baltus, Ruth

    2017-08-10

    Membrane rejection models generally neglect the effect of the pore entrance on intrapore particle transport. However, entrance effects are expected to be particularly important with ultrathin membranes, where membrane thickness is typically comparable to pore size. In this work, a 2D model was developed to simulate particle motion for spherical particles moving at small Re and infinite Pe from the reservoir outside the pore into a slit pore. Using a finite element method, particles were tracked as they accelerated across the pore entrance until they reached a steady velocity in the pore. The axial position in the pore where particle motion becomes steady is defined as the particle entrance length (PEL). PELs were found to be comparable to the fluid entrance length, larger than the pore size and larger than the thickness typical of many ultrathin membranes. Results also show that, in the absence of particle diffusion, hydrodynamic particle-membrane interactions at the pore mouth result in particle "funneling" in the pore, yielding cross-pore particle concentration profiles focused at the pore centerline. The implications of these phenomena on rejection from ultrathin membranes are examined.

  16. Geochemistry and mineralogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plecas, I.; Dimovic, S.; Orta, M.M.; Alba, M.D.; Alvero, R.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Chain, P.; Escudero, A.; Naranjo, M.; Pavon, E.; Trillo, J.M.; Vejsada, J.; Vokal, A.; Zadvernyuk, H.P.; Fedorenko, Y.G.; Zlobenko, B.P.; Koromyslichenko, T.I.; Battaglia, S.; Cervelli, M.; Millot, R.; Girard, J.P.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Alonso, U.; Muurinen, A.; Carlsson, T.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Escudero, A.; Gonzalez-Carrascosa, T.; Hurtado, S.; Pavon, E.; Villa, M.; Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A.C.M.; Marques Fernandes, M.; Rabung, Th.; Dahn, R.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.; Breynaert, E.; Maes, A.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, I.A.; Vancluysen, J.; Credoz, A.; Bildstein, O.; Jullien, M.; Raynal, J.; Petronin, J.C.; Trotignon, L.; Pokrovsky, O.; Jacquier, P.; Beaucaire, C.; Vuillaume, A.L.; Wittebroodt, Ch.; Ly, J.; Page, J.; Savoye, S.; Pitsch, H.; Jacques, D.; Wang, L.; Galunin, E.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Vidal, M.; Grandia, F.; Domenech, C.; Arcos, D.; Duro, L.; Bruno, J.; Andre, L.; Pauwels, H.; Azaroual, M.; Albrecht, A.; Romero, M.A.; Aerts, S.; Boven, P.; Van Geet, M.; Boever, P. de; Alonso, U.; Albarran, N.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Truche, L.; Berger, G.; Guillaume, D.; Jacquot, E.; Tournassat, Ch.; Lerouge, C.; Brendle, J.; Greneche, J.M.; Touzelet, St.; Blanc, Ph.; Gaucher, E.C.; Thoenen, T.; Klinkenberg, M.; Kaufhold, S.; Dohrmann, R.; Siegesmund, S.; Liu, D.J.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N.; Weber, T.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Bildstein, O.; Combarieu, G. de; Frugier, P.; Menut, D

    2007-07-01

    Na- and Ca- Montmorillonite; the effect of temperature on the proton charge of Montmorillonite; the transformation of organic matter in the presence of smectite: fate of lanthanides during polymerization reactions; a surface complexation modelling using multi-components approach: sorption of selenium on argilite; the in-situ characterization of the Callovo- Oxfordian pore water composition; the natural organic matter fractionation on mineral surfaces: a spectroscopic approach; an examination of clay minerals-organic matter interactions at submicron-scale during confined pyrolysis of a simplified system Volclay bentonite -type II kerogen; the sorption of Np(v), U(vi) and Cs onto bentonite and clayey soils; the PHREEQC / traces coupling tool within the ALLIANCEs platform; is pore water close to the surfaces of a clay rock enriched in heavy water isotopes as compared to free pore water?; the ageing effect on the chemical and isotopic (Sr and Ar) characteristics of cored Mont Terri Opalinus Clays; the effect of concentration of the couples of Cation (Cu{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}) on the natural selectivity phenomena in the case of Na-Montmorillonite: qualitative XRD analysis; and a qualitative study of synthetic Na- Hectorite saturated by heavy metals cations.

  17. Influence of herbicide structure, clay acidity, and humic acid coating on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiping; Gan, Jianying; Yates, Scott R

    2002-07-03

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption decreased in the order metolachlor > acetochlor > alachlor > propachlor on Ca(2+)- or Mg(2+)-saturated clays and in the order metolachlor > alachlor > acetachlor > propachlor on Al(3+)- or Fe(3+)-saturated clays. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in bonding. For the same herbicide, adsorption of alachlor, acetachlor, and metolachlor on clay followed the order Ca(2+) approximately Mg(2+) < Al(3+) < or = Fe(3+), which coincided with the increasing acidity of homoionic clays. Adsorption of propachlor, however, showed an opposite dependence, suggesting a different governing interaction. In clay and humic acid mixtures, herbicide adsorption was less than that expected from independent additive adsorption by the individual constituents, and the deviation was dependent on the clay-to-humic acid ratio, with the greatest deviation consistently occurring at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio.

  18. Clay shale as host rock. A geomechanical contribution about Opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lempp, Christof; Menezes, Flora; Sachwitz, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The Opalinuston is a prominent rock representing the type of organic clay shales or clay stones within the sequence of Triassic and Jurassic marine sediments in Southern Germany. The rock forms a homogenous unit some ten meters thick. The degree of consolidation of this type of pelitic rock depends mainly on the former load conditions, but is also dependent on the long-term weathering and even on the present exposition. The geomechanical parameters such as shear strength, tensional strength and permeability vary with the state of consolidation and become important when the use is discussed of such rocks for radioactive waste disposal. A tunneling project at the northern escarpment of the Swabian Alb (Southwest Germany) within the Opalinus clay offered the rare opportunity to obtain fresh unweathered rock samples in greater amounts compared to fresh drilling cores from which geomechanical investigations are usually undertaken. Consequently, the results of geomechanical laboratory testings are presented in order to compare here the results of multistep triaxial compression tests, of hydraulic fracturing laboratory tests and of some other tests for rock characterization with the corresponding results of Opalinus clay sites in Switzerland that were investigated by the Swiss Nagra Company for host rock characterization. After a discussion of the relevant state of fresh Opalinus clay, especially of suction pressure conditions and saturation state, the results of triaxial shear tests are presented. Increasing shear deformation at increasing pressure and unchanged water saturation do not result in a significant strength reduction of the Opalinus clay. The rock shows increasing cohesion and stiffness, if multiple loading has repeatedly reached the failure point. Thus there is no increased permeability with continued shearing. Only at the beginning of the shearing process is a temporarily increased permeability to be expected due to dilatation processes. An increased

  19. Determination of gas diffusion coefficients in undisturbed Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacops, E.; Volckaert, G.; Maes, N.; Govaerts, J.; Weetjens, E.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Belgian agency for radioactive waste and enriched fissile materials Ondraf/Niras presently considers Boom Clay as a potential host formation for the disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste. The production of gas is unavoidable within a geological repository. Gas is produced by different mechanisms: anaerobic corrosion of metals in waste and packaging, radiolysis of water and organic materials in the waste and engineered barriers and microbial degradation of various organic wastes. Corrosion and radiolysis yield mainly hydrogen while microbial degradation leads to methane and carbon dioxide. The gas generated in the near field of a geological repository will dissolve in the pore water and is transported away from the repository by diffusion as dissolved species. If the gas generation rate is larger than the diffusive flux, the pore water will become over-saturated and a free gas phase will form. Initially, isolated gas bubbles will accumulate until a continuous gas phase is formed. As gas pressure continues to increase, discrete gas pathways may be formed by tensile fractures within the rock fabric. Consequently, this entire process may locally and at least temporarily alter the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the engineered barriers and the clay and, perhaps, their performance. Therefore it is important to assess whether or not gas production rates might exceed the diffusive gas flux. The currently available gas diffusion parameters (D eff : effective diffusion coefficient) for hydrogen in Boom Clay, obtained from the MEGAS project, and re-evaluated after lead to an estimated D eff between 1.9 10 -12 and 1.5 10 -10 m 2 /s. Sensitivity calculations showed that this uncertainty on the diffusion coefficient, combined with that on the gas source term, made it impossible to exclude the formation of a free gas phase. To reduce the uncertainty, an experimental method was developed to determine

  20. Mineralogy and geotechnical characteristics of some pottery clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujib Olamide ADEAGBO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties of soils, which are tremendously influenced by the active clay minerals in soil, are of great importance in geotechnical engineering. This paper investigates the clay-sized particles of the Igbara-Odo pottery clay, and compares results obtained with available data on the bulk sample, to determine their correlation and underline the dependence of the geotechnical properties of the bulk clay material on the clay-sized particles. The bulk clay sample consists of 52% sand-size particles, 21% silt and 27% clay. Analysis of the clay-sized particles and the bulk materials shows: specific gravity of 2.07 and 2.66, liquid limit of 91.0% and 33.0%, plastic limit of 27.5% and 14.3%, plasticity index of 63.5% and 18.7% and a linear shrinkage of 7.9% and 5.4%, for both clay-sized particles and bulk clay respectively. The activity value of the clay material (0.64 suggests the presence of Kaolinite and Ilite; and these were confirmed with X-Ray diffraction on the bulk sample and clay-sized particles. X-Ray diffraction patterns shows distinctive peaks which highlight the dominance of Kaolinite (with 8 peaks in the pottery clay sample for both clay-sized particles and bulk material; while traces of other clay minerals like Illite and Halloysite and rock minerals like Mica, Feldspar and Chrysotile were also found. These results suggest that the clay possesses high viability in the manufacturing of ceramics, refractory bricks, paper, fertilizer and paint. The clay material can be used as a subgrade in road construction, since it possesses low swelling characteristics.

  1. Computational optimization of synthetic water channels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, David Michael; Rempe, Susan L. B.

    2012-12-01

    Membranes for liquid and gas separations and ion transport are critical to water purification, osmotic energy generation, fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, and catalysis. Often these membranes lack pore uniformity and robustness under operating conditions, which can lead to a decrease in performance. The lack of uniformity means that many pores are non-functional. Traditional membranes overcome these limitations by using thick membrane materials that impede transport and selectivity, which results in decreased performance and increased operating costs. For example, limitations in membrane performance demand high applied pressures to deionize water using reverse osmosis. In contrast, cellular membranes combine high flux and selective transport using membrane-bound protein channels operating at small pressure differences. Pore size and chemistry in the cellular channels is defined uniformly and with sub-nanometer precision through protein folding. The thickness of these cellular membranes is limited to that of the cellular membrane bilayer, about 4 nm thick, which enhances transport. Pores in the cellular membranes are robust under operating conditions in the body. Recent efforts to mimic cellular water channels for efficient water deionization produced a significant advance in membrane function. The novel biomimetic design achieved a 10-fold increase in membrane permeability to water flow compared to commercial membranes and still maintained high salt rejection. Despite this success, there is a lack of understanding about why this membrane performs so well. To address this lack of knowledge, we used highperformance computing to interrogate the structural and chemical environments experienced by water and electrolytes in the newly created biomimetic membranes. We also compared the solvation environments between the biomimetic membrane and cellular water channels. These results will help inform future efforts to optimize and tune the performance of synthetic

  2. In situ pore-pressure evolution during dynamic CPT measurements in soft sediments of the western Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Annedore; Stegmann, Sylvia; Mörz, Tobias; Lange, Matthias; Wever, Thomas; Kopf, Achim

    2008-08-01

    We present in situ strength and pore-pressure measurements from 57 dynamic cone penetration tests in sediments of Mecklenburg ( n = 51), Eckernförde ( n = 2) and Gelting ( n = 4) bays, western Baltic Sea, characterised by thick mud layers and partially free microbial gas resulting from the degradation of organic material. In Mecklenburg and Eckernförde bays, sediment sampling by nine gravity cores served sedimentological characterisation, analyses of geotechnical properties, and laboratory shear tests. At selected localities, high-resolution echo-sounder profiles were acquired. Our aim was to deploy a dynamic cone penetrometer (CPT) to infer sediment shear strength and cohesion of the sea bottom as a function of fluid saturation. The results show very variable changes in pore pressure and sediment strength during the CPT deployments. The majority of the CPT measurements ( n = 54) show initially negative pore-pressure values during penetration, and a delayed response towards positive pressures thereafter. This so-called type B pore-pressure signal was recorded in all three bays, and is typically found in soft muds with high water contents and undrained shear strengths of 1.6-6.4 kPa. The type B signal is further affected by displacement of sediment and fluid upon penetration of the lance, skin effects during dynamic profiling, enhanced consolidation and strength of individual horizons, the presence of free gas, and a dilatory response of the sediment. In Mecklenburg Bay, the remaining small number of CPT measurements ( n = 3) show a well-defined peak in both pore pressure and cone resistance during penetration, i.e. an initial marked increase which is followed by exponential pore-pressure decay during dissipation. This so-called type A pore-pressure signal is associated with normally consolidated mud, with indurated clay layers showing significantly higher undrained shear strength (up to 19 kPa). In Eckernförde and Gelting bays pore-pressure response type B is

  3. Pore Space investigation in natural and artificial materials: POSINAM (FP7-MC-IAPP) project (15.10.2009-14.10.2013)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parneix, J.C.; Bouchet, A.; Mazurier, A.; Ramirez, S.; Rassineux, F.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Ikonen, J.; Sammaljaervi, J.; Helariutta, K.; Sardini, P.; Bonifait, T.; Hellmuth, K.H.; Pret, D.; Gallier, J.; Shroff Rama, M.

    2012-01-01

    . The fulfillment of IAPP POSINAM project includes the building of a technical platform which is now ready to be used in Poitiers University site (France). Application of radioprotection rules is needed for a proper use of radioactive resin. Contamination testing measurements are actually performed for the preparation of ASN licensing documents. A radiation safety course was given by HYRL members to ERM and HYDRASA's employees end users. Exchange of knowledge from ERM/HYDRASA to HYRL was also achieved during POSINAM project by delivering course on petrography and image analysis. scientific and technical/technological goals: To set-up polymerization by heating and determine its effect on materials. To assess the organization of resin in interlayer pore space for swelling clay, to determine the structural changes of the pore space when replacing water by polymer in interlayer space and micropores. To develop innovative and specific software for porosity imagery analyses. To normalize the methodology of saturation, polymerization and autoradiography according to quality standards needed for industrial application. To organize the development of the methodology to improve various application possibilities such as developing the pre-handling techniques for brittle and swelling clays; to introduce different markers in resin. To standardize the software used in the quantitative pore space analysis to reach similar results from one site to another. To build a platform in Poitiers for industrial use of the method where the radio labeled material as well as hazardous organic liquids can be handled, e.g. taking into account radioprotection and chemical risk. To develop in-situ and laboratory testing procedures and study their differences; to study the differences in the information provided by 14 C-PMMA method using 'digital autoradiography' or an old fashioned film autoradiography. The potential impacts are the scientific and economic development of a group able answering to the

  4. Wave liquefaction in soils with clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (in silt-clay and sand-clay mixtures) on liquefaction beneath progressive waves. The experiments showed that the influence of clay content is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction is increa...

  5. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter [Danish Polymer Centre, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Søltofts Plads, Building 229, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Wolff, Anders, E-mail: anders.wolff@nanotech.dtu.dk [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2016-04-01

    with different polymers, making it suitable for engineering various large scale organs/tissues. - Highlights: • Fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore architecture • The method combines both sacrificial 3D printing and practice leaching process. • Synthetic silicone elastomer and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) scaffolds were fabricated. • Dual-pore scaffold can support high cell viability, distribution and functionality. • The scaffold fabrication method can be scaled up to the size of real organs.

  6. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto; Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter; Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders

    2016-01-01

    with different polymers, making it suitable for engineering various large scale organs/tissues. - Highlights: • Fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore architecture • The method combines both sacrificial 3D printing and practice leaching process. • Synthetic silicone elastomer and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) scaffolds were fabricated. • Dual-pore scaffold can support high cell viability, distribution and functionality. • The scaffold fabrication method can be scaled up to the size of real organs.

  7. Characterization of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz N, C.; Olguin, M.T.; Solache R, M.; Alarcon H, T.; Aguilar E, A.

    2002-01-01

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  8. Leaching of Heavy Metals Using SPLP Method from Fired Clay Brick Incorporating with Sewage Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Salim, Nurul Salhana Abdul; Amira Sarani, Noor; Aqma Izurin Rahmat, Nur

    2017-05-01

    Sewage sludge is a by-product generate from wastewater treatment process. The sewage sludge contains significant trace metal such as Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb which are toxic to the environment. Sewage sludge is disposed of by landfilling method. However, this option not suitable because of land restriction and environmental control regulations imposed. Therefore, sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plant was incorporated into fired clay brick to produce good quality of brick as well as reducing heavy metals from sludge itself. Sewage sludge with 0%, 1%, 5%, 10% and 20% of were incorporated into fired clay bricks and fired at 1050°C temperature with heating rates of 1°C/min. The brick sample then crushed and sieved through 9.5 mm sieve for Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP). From the results, incorporation up to 20% of sewage sludge has leached less heavy metals and compliance with USEPA standard.

  9. Predictive modelling of an excavation test in indurated clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garitte, B.; Vaunat, J.; Gens, A.; Vietor, T.

    2010-01-01

    constitutive laws that describe the various phenomena under consideration. The density of the solid and the density of the water are dependent on the total mean pressure and the water pressure, respectively and the advective water flux is described by an anisotropic Darcy's law. Finally, the mechanical behaviour is modelled using an anisotropic linear elastic constitutive law that relates the medium deformation with the effective stress (σ'=σ-b.p w , where σ is total stress, b is the Biot coefficient and p w the water pressure). The simulated pore water pressure evolution is presented for two points at 1 m from the niche wall, in a transversal section at 16.5 m from the gallery centre (points B1 and B2) for 4 different computations. B1 lies in the direction of the major stress and B2 in the direction of the minor stress. F an is a 'full' anisotropic computation, considering anisotropy of stress, stiffness and permeability (E 1 = 1.33*E 2 = 4000 MPa). ISO is an isotropic simulation. In E an and in S an , all properties are considered isotropic except the mechanical constitutive law (E1 = 2*E2 = 6000 MPa) and the stress state, respectively. Long before the arrival of the gallery, ISO and S an do not predict significant pore water pressure changes in contrast to the computations that consider an anisotropic constitutive model. The changes are strongest in the case of F an and are consistent with observations in similar tests performed in Callovo-Oxfordian Clay. After the passage of the shaft, pore water pressure keeps increasing in the minor stress direction whereas it decreases in the major stress direction. A future stage of modelling must incorporate the reduction of stiffness and the increase in permeability cause by rock damage. The result will likely be a lower magnitude of the pore water pressure increments and an acceleration of drainage processes

  10. Thermo-hydraulic behaviour of Boom Clay using a heating cell. experimental and numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, A.; Romero, E.; Vaunat, J.; Gens, A.; Li, X.L.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Boom clay is the subject of extensive research in Belgium dealing with all phenomena that may possibly affect the performance of this geological formation as potential radioactive waste repository. Specifically, thermal loads may play an important role on this low-permeability clay. There are a number of laboratory results concerning the saturated hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay under different temperatures and recent studies on this area are described in Le (2008). Nevertheless, information on clay hydro-mechanical response on heating and cooling paths under small-scale laboratory conditions is less known. To this aim, non-isothermal tests on intact borehole samples were carried out using an axisymmetric heating cell described in Munoz et al. (2009). Heating and cooling paths under nearly constant volume and different target temperatures (maximum 85 deg. C) were performed under controlled hydraulic boundary conditions. The paper presents results of an exhaustive experimental programme performed on a fully-instrumented cell (sample 75 mm in diameter and 100 mm high) with a controlled-power heater installed along the axis of the sample. Different transducers were monitoring the sample response: two miniature pore water pressure transducers located at different heights of the lateral wall of the cell, three thermocouples (two at equivalent locations in relation to the pressure transducers and one near the heater), and top and lateral strain gauges attached to reduced thickness sections of the walls. The cell has top and bottom valves to apply the hydraulic conditions. The protocol of the tests presented three important phases: hydration, heating and cooling. Throughout the heating and cooling phases, the bottom drainage was maintained open at a constant water pressure of 1 MPa using an automatic pressure/volume controller, while the upper valve was kept closed. This back-pressure was important since it

  11. Study of the behavior of aggregate of calcined clay for use in permeable pavements for the city of Manaus; Estudo do comportamento de agregado sintetico de argila calcinada para uso em pavimentos permeaveis para a cidade de Manaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, M.S.; Vilela, P.A.T.; Araujo, V.S., E-mail: oliveirasmichelle@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Amazonas (UEAM), AM (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Research on the production of ceramic aggregates and their use in paving in the country began in the 80’s in the search for an alternative material that could replace the pebble or crushed stone, studied the clay, considered an abundant mineral resource by virtue of being the predominant soil in this region and which were made synthetic calcinated clay aggregates (ASAC), for their application in permeable paving concrete motivated by the lack of permeable areas. The study consists of the characterization of materials for manufacture of concrete slabs permeable and the assessment of the effects of synthetic aggregate on its properties in fresh and hardened state. The ceramic bodies were subjected to tests of X-ray diffraction, determination of chemical composition and plasticity. The results indicate that the use of synthetic clusters is a viable alternative for the production of porous concrete. (author)

  12. Clays and Clay Minerals and their environmental application in Food Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Cuéllar Antequera, Jorge; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Cutillas Díez, Raul

    2013-04-01

    The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and prevention of the health. References

  13. In situ chemical osmosis experiment in the Boom Clay at the Mol underground research laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavito, A. M.; De Cannière, P.; Kooi, H.

    Studies on the compatibility of Boom Clay with large amounts of nitrate- bearing bituminized radioactive waste have recently raised a particular interest for osmosis-induced effects in this reference formation in Belgium. Indeed, water flow and solute transport may be associated with several types of driving forces, or gradients (chemical, electrical, thermal), in addition to the hydraulic forces, resulting in the so-called coupled flows. Fluid flow caused by driving forces different than hydraulic gradients is referred to as osmosis. Chemical osmosis, the water flow induced by a chemical gradient across a semi-permeable membrane, can generate pressure increase. The question thus arises if there is a risk to create high pore pressures that could damage the near-field of medium-level waste (MLW) galleries, if osmotically driven water flows towards the galleries are produced by the release of large amounts of NaNO 3 (750 t) in the formation. To what extent a low-permeability clay formation such as the Boom Clay acts as an osmotic membrane is thus a key issue to assess the relevance of osmosis phenomena for the disposal of medium-level waste. An in situ osmosis experiment has been conducted at the H ADES underground research laboratory to determine the osmotic efficiency of Boom Clay at the field scale. A recently developed chemical osmosis flow continuum model has been used to design the osmosis experiment, and to interpret the water pressure measurements. Experimental data could be reproduced quite accurately by the model, and the inferred parameter values are consistent with independent determinations for Boom Clay. A rapid water pressure increase (but limited to about a 2 m water column) was observed after 12 h in the filter containing the more saline water. Then, the osmotically induced water pressure slowly decays on several months. So, the experimental results obtained in situ confirm the occurrence of non-hydraulic flow phenomena (chemical osmosis) in a low

  14. Experimental research of ZrO{sub 2}/BCP/PCL scaffold with complex pore pattern for bone tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Min Woo; Shin, Hae Ri; Kim, Jong Young [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Recently, synthetic biopolymers and bioceramics such as poly (-caprolactone)(PCL), hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate, biphasic calcium phosphate(BCP), and zirconia have been used as substrates to generate various tissues or organs in tissue engineering. Thus, the purpose of this study was the characterization of ZrO{sub 2}/BCP/PCL(ZBP) scaffold for bone tissue regeneration. Based on the result of single-line test, blended 3D ZBP scaffolds with fully interconnected pores and new complex pore pattern of -type and staggered-type were successfully fabricated using a polymer deposition system. Furthermore, the effect of ZBP scaffold on mechanical property was analyzed. In addition, in vitro cell interaction of ZBP scaffold on MG63 cells was evaluated using a cell counting kit-8(CCK-8) assay.

  15. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Reynolds

    Full Text Available Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  16. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W; English, Christopher J; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  17. Influence of carbonate micro-fabrics on the failure strength of Callovo-Oxfordian clay stones and Opalinus Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinkenberg, M.; Dohrmann, R.; Kaufhold, S.; Siegesmund, S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The potential use of clay stones as host rock for radioactive waste disposal is currently investigated. For this application, hydraulic conductivity, swelling properties, water uptake, rheological and mechanical properties are of great importance. The Opalinus Clay (Mont-Terri, Switzerland) and the Callovo- Oxfordian clay stone (France) are the most frequently studied clay stones. One goal is to develop a numerical model being able to predict the mechanical behaviour of clay stones under repository-like conditions. Experimental investigations reveal that Opalinus Clay and Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone behave different with respect to the dependence of mechanical strength on the carbonate content. The failure strength of Opalinus Clay decreases with increasing carbonate content, whereas it increases with increasing carbonate content when Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone is considered. To supply proper data and enable reliable model assumptions, the use of suitable experimental techniques for the description of the microstructure is indispensable. After mechanical testing, samples were taken perpendicular to the bedding and polished sections were prepared. The micro-fabrics were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image analysis. Backscattered electron (BSE) images were used for the image analysis because carbonates can be extracted by grey level analysis. The image analysis of the extracted particles provides the following parameters: area, longest and shortest axis of an ellipse (surrounding the particle), perimeter, the angle to horizontal (longest axis), and the aspect ratio (longest axis/shortest axis). Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone shows a homogenous distribution of fine-grained carbonates and dovetail connection of calcium carbonate with the clayey matrix. In contrast Opalinus Clay shows large elongated carbonate grains (high aspect ratios) of shell fragments. Cracks are mostly related to these

  18. Pore-Scale Investigation on Stress-Dependent Characteristics of Granular Packs and Their Impact on Multiphase Fluid Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrealba, V.; Karpyn, Z.; Yoon, H.; Hart, D. B.; Klise, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    The pore-scale dynamics that govern multiphase flow under variable stress conditions are not well understood. This lack of fundamental understanding limits our ability to quantitatively predict multiphase flow and fluid distributions in natural geologic systems. In this research, we focus on pore-scale, single and multiphase flow properties that impact displacement mechanisms and residual trapping of non-wetting phase under varying stress conditions. X-ray micro-tomography is used to image pore structures and distribution of wetting and non-wetting fluids in water-wet synthetic granular packs, under dynamic load. Micro-tomography images are also used to determine structural features such as medial axis, surface area, and pore body and throat distribution; while the corresponding transport properties are determined from Lattice-Boltzmann simulations performed on lattice replicas of the imaged specimens. Results are used to investigate how inter-granular deformation mechanisms affect fluid displacement and residual trapping at the pore-scale. This will improve our understanding of the dynamic interaction of mechanical deformation and fluid flow during enhanced oil recovery and geologic CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Evaluation of mesopores and characterization of clays of the State of Puebla, Mexico; Evaluacion de materiales mesoporosos y caracterizacion de las arcillas en el Estado de Puebla, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, M.A.; Velasco, J.A. [Departamento de Investigaci en Zeolitas, Instituto de Ciencias de la Universidad Autonoma de Puebla. Edif. 76, Complejo de Ciencias, C. U., San Manuel, Puebla 72570 Puebla (Mexico); Rojas, F.; Lara, V.H. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa. Apartado Postal 55-434, M ico, D.F. (Mexico); Salgado, M.A. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Tamariz, V. [Posgrado de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto de Ciencias de la Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The crystalline properties of natural clays are related to the different crystallographic phases that are present in the structure of these substrates. Clays from the zone of Tehuacan, in the state of Puebla, Mexico, have been studied by means of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Atomic Absorption (AA), and N{sub 2} Adsorption at 76 K. XRD analysis indicates the presence in the clay adsorbents of montmorillonite, quartz and, in some cases, of calcium carbonate. The textural properties of these porous materials of natural origin have been evaluated through the BET equation, the Langmuir equation, the single point BET method and the Gurvitsch Rule. The meso porosity that is present in each substrate has been measured via the methods of Kelvin, Barret, Jovner, and Halenda (BJH), and Kruk, Jaroniec, and Sayari as well as by the so-called differential curves of t-plots. The N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms at 76 K that were measured on our clay adsorbents indicate that the adsorption process is carried out through a multilayer formation mechanism. The sorption hysteresis loops confirm characteristic aspects of this type of clay materials. Plots of the adsorbed volume versus the statistical thickness (t-plots) of N{sub 2} layers adsorbed on the clay surface were also evaluated. The latter curves comprise three zones of behavior; each zone representing a different filling mechanism of the pore space. (Author)

  20. Preparation of nanocomposites polyurethane water bone with clay montmorillonite sodica and organophilic clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Claudia P.; Delpech, Marcia C.; Coutinho, Fernanda M.B.; Mello, Ivana L.

    2009-01-01

    Nanocomposites based on water bone polyurethane (NWPU's) were synthesized based on poli(propylene glycol), dimethylolpropionic acid (DMPA), isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and hydrazine (HYD), as chain extender. Two kinds of clays were employed: hydrophilic and organophilic. The nanocomposites were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and the mechanical properties were evaluated. The FTIR results showed the presence of specific groups of clay and the XRD suggested that occurred their intercalation/exfoliation through polyurethane matrix. The mechanical resistance of the systems showed significant increase when compared to water dispersions synthesized without clay. (author)

  1. The Effects of High Salinity Groundwater on the Performance of Clay Barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David

    2005-08-01

    Potential changes in groundwater chemistry during the operational or post-closure periods of the Swedish repository for spent fuel could affect the performance of both the bentonite buffer and repository backfill. For example, the up-coning of saline groundwater could lead to decreased swelling pressures in both the bentonite buffer and tunnel backfills, and could also induce 'piping'. SKB is considering these issues as part of its 'SR-Can' safety assessment. This report reviews evidence for the behaviour of swelling clays in groundwaters of varying salinity with special relevance to the SKB programme. Smectite clays can absorb water into clay inter-layers with the most important parameters being: the surface density of charge of the clay; the charge and solvation behaviour of the inter-layer ions; and the electrolyte concentration or activity of water. Two categories of swelling are generally observed: innercrystalline swelling caused by the hydration of the exchangeable cations in the dry clay; and osmotic swelling, resulting from concentration gradients in ion concentrations between clay surfaces and pore water. Several models exist to interpret and predict the swelling behaviour of clays. SKB currently prefer an interpretation of clay swelling pressure where clay particles are viewed as 'macro-ions' and the entire clay-water system can be considered as a 'polyelectrolyte'. SKB use the term 'Donnan exclusion' to estimate the amount of introduced ions into the clay and hence the amount of reduced swelling pressure due to contact with a saline solution. Donnan exclusion is the process whereby the migration of anions through the narrow aqueous film surrounding clay platelets is restricted due to the repulsion by the negative charge of the clay platelets. SKB's experimental work shows that: There is an exponential relation between swelling pressure and mean basal interlamellar spacing of the clay. Ions from the external electrolyte solution enter the clay volume

  2. The Effects of High Salinity Groundwater on the Performance of Clay Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David [Quintessa Ltd., Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    Potential changes in groundwater chemistry during the operational or post-closure periods of the Swedish repository for spent fuel could affect the performance of both the bentonite buffer and repository backfill. For example, the up-coning of saline groundwater could lead to decreased swelling pressures in both the bentonite buffer and tunnel backfills, and could also induce 'piping'. SKB is considering these issues as part of its 'SR-Can' safety assessment. This report reviews evidence for the behaviour of swelling clays in groundwaters of varying salinity with special relevance to the SKB programme. Smectite clays can absorb water into clay inter-layers with the most important parameters being: the surface density of charge of the clay; the charge and solvation behaviour of the inter-layer ions; and the electrolyte concentration or activity of water. Two categories of swelling are generally observed: innercrystalline swelling caused by the hydration of the exchangeable cations in the dry clay; and osmotic swelling, resulting from concentration gradients in ion concentrations between clay surfaces and pore water. Several models exist to interpret and predict the swelling behaviour of clays. SKB currently prefer an interpretation of clay swelling pressure where clay particles are viewed as 'macro-ions' and the entire clay-water system can be considered as a 'polyelectrolyte'. SKB use the term 'Donnan exclusion' to estimate the amount of introduced ions into the clay and hence the amount of reduced swelling pressure due to contact with a saline solution. Donnan exclusion is the process whereby the migration of anions through the narrow aqueous film surrounding clay platelets is restricted due to the repulsion by the negative charge of the clay platelets. SKB's experimental work shows that: There is an exponential relation between swelling pressure and mean basal interlamellar spacing of the clay. Ions from the

  3. Speciation of neptunium after diffusion in Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, Tobias; Amayri, Samer; Drebert, Jakob; Froehlich, Daniel R.; Grolimund, Daniel; Rosemann, Jonathan [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry; Kaplan, Ugras [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland). Swiss Light Source

    2015-07-01

    that the reduction of Np occured near the surface. In our recent long-term diffusion experiment using 8 μM Np(V) in OPA pore water (pH 7.6), we were able to map the speciation of Np along a 2 mm long diffusion path parallel to the bedding of the clay. These μ-XANES measurements showed that mobile Np(V) is immobilized in Opalinus Clay as Np(IV) by progressive reduction along its diffusion path, further consolidating the suitability of argillaceous rocks with regard to the long-term storage of Np.

  4. Active pore space utilization in nanoporous carbon-based supercapacitors: Effects of conductivity and pore accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredych, Mykola; Koscinski, Mikolaj; Sliwinska-Bartkowiak, Malgorzata; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2012-12-01

    Composites of commercial graphene and nanoporous sodium-salt-polymer-derived carbons were prepared with 5 or 20 weight% graphene. The materials were characterized using the adsorption of nitrogen, SEM/EDX, thermal analysis, Raman spectroscopy and potentiometric titration. The samples' conductivity was also measured. The performance of the carbon composites in energy storage was linked to their porosity and electronic conductivity. The small pores (<0.7) were found as very active for double layer capacitance. It was demonstrated that when double layer capacitance is a predominant mechanism of charge storage, the degree of the pore space utilization for that storage can be increased by increasing the conductivity of the carbons. That active pore space utilization is defined as gravimetric capacitance per unit pore volume in pores smaller than 0.7 nm. Its magnitude is affected by conductivity of the carbon materials. The functional groups, besides pseudocapacitive contribution, increased the wettability and thus the degree of the pore space utilization. Graphene phase, owing to its conductivity, also took part in an insitu increase of the small pore accessibility and thus the capacitance of the composites via enhancing an electron transfer to small pores and thus imposing the reduction of groups blocking the pores for electrolyte ions.

  5. Crude oil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons removal via clay-microbe-oil interactions: Effect of acid activated clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Fialips, Claire I

    2017-07-01

    Acid treatment of clay minerals is known to modify their properties such as increase their surface area and surface acidity, making them suitable as catalysts in many chemical processes. However, the role of these surface properties during biodegradation processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is only known for mild acid (0.5 M Hydrochloric acid) treated clays. Four different clay minerals were used for this study: a montmorillonite, a saponite, a palygorskite and a kaolinite. They were treated with 3 M hydrochloric acid to produce acid activated clay minerals. The role of the acid activated montmorillonite, saponite, palygorskite and kaolinite in comparison with the unmodified clay minerals in the removal of PAHs during biodegradation was investigated in microcosm experiments. The microcosm experiments contained micro-organisms, oil, and clays in aqueous medium with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community predominantly composed of Alcanivorax spp. Obtained results indicated that acid activated clays and unmodified kaolinite did not enhance the biodegradation of the PAHs whereas unmodified montmorillonite, palygorskite and saponite enhanced their biodegradation. In addition, unmodified palygorskite adsorbed the PAHs significantly due to its unique channel structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. From clay bricks to deep underground storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    This booklet issued by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste NAGRA takes a look at the use of clay strata for the storage of radioactive wastes in deep-lying repositories. First of all, a geological foray is made concerning the history of the use of clay and its multifarious uses. The characteristics of clay and its composition are examined and its formation in the geological past is explained. In particular Opalinus clay is looked at and the structures to be found are discussed. The clay's various properties and industrial uses are examined and its sealing properties are examined. Also, Bentonite clay is mentioned and work done by Nagra and co-researchers is noted

  7. Microstructure and Thermal Properties of Polypropylene/Clay Nanocomposites with TiCl4/MgCl2/Clay Compound Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP/clay nanocomposites were synthesized by in situ intercalative polymerization with TiCl4/MgCl2/clay compound catalyst. Microstructure and thermal properties of PP/clay nanocomposites were studied in detail. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectra indicated that PP/clay nanocomposites were successfully prepared. Both wide-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM examination proved that clay layers are homogeneously distributed in PP matrix. XRD patterns also showed that the α phase was the dominate crystal phase of PP in the nanocomposites. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA examinations confirmed that thermal stability of PP/clay nanocomposites was markedly superior to pure PP. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC scans showed that the melt temperature and the crystallinity of nanocomposites were slightly lower than those of pure PP due to crystals imperfections.

  8. Pore water pressure response to small and large openings in argillaceous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garitte, B.; Gens, A.; Vaunat, J.; Armand, G.; Conil, N.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the last decade an important amount of piezometers have been installed in the Bure Underground Rock Laboratory (URL) in the vicinity of ongoing works involving gallery excavations and drilling of boreholes and alveoles both in the major and minor stress directions. Relatively far field piezometers (placed one to four diameters from the excavation wall) showed a qualitatively consistent response at different scales. Here, we investigate whether the pore water pressure response around openings of different scales may be up-scaled. An attempt is made to find a common set of parameters that explains quantitatively the rock response at the different scales. The mechanisms underlying the pore water pressure response around an underground opening are twofold. The first class of mechanisms is usually associated with nearly undrained behaviour and the related pore water pressure changes are induced by the stress redistribution triggered by the creation of the tunnel opening causing a reorientation of the principal stresses and influenced by the initial stress anisotropy. These pore water pressure changes are closely linked to the mechanical constitutive law of the rock and to the damage zone around the opening. The second class of mechanisms is related to the drainage of excess pore water pressure relative to a state governed by the atmospheric water pressure condition prescribed at gallery wall and the water flow law, usually Darcy's. Strong anisotropy effects on the hydraulic response of Callovo-Oxfordian Clay can be observed with reference to Figure 1 that shows the pore pressure response to the drilling of a 150 mm-diameter borehole performed to install a heater for the TER thermal experiment. The borehole is aligned with the major horizontal principal stress. Therefore, in principle, the stress state should be approximately isotropic in a cross section of the borehole. As a matter of fact, however, a degree of

  9. Hydrochemical characterisation of the opalinus clay in the test interval of the BDI-B1 borehole and on site pH, Eh, Fe(II) and alkalinity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A.M.; Turrero, M.J.; Yllera, A.; Melon, A.M.; Sanchez, M.D.; Pena, J.; Garralon, A.; Rivas, P. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Dpt. of Energy Environmental Impact, Madrid (Spain); Hernan, P. [ENRESA, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Clay formations are considered as a feasible option for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In order to determine their suitability for this purpose, the evaluation of the hydro-geochemistry and transport mechanisms must be undertaken. In this sense, a general understanding of the basic physical and chemical processes that govern the solute transport together with a detailed site-characterization programme is required. To reach this goal, a number of activities have been developed in the Opalinus Clay formation at the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (URL) at Switzerland. In the context of some experiments (WS-C, WS-D, WS-E, GM Task, DI, etc.), the Opalinus Clay formation has been comprehensively characterized to develop a conceptual, thermodynamic and transport model of solutes. The framework of these works is the need to know the mechanism of the possible migration of radionuclides and the pore water chemistry, as essential data for the performance assessment of such argillaceous systems. (authors)

  10. Pore Fluid Evolution Influenced by Volcanic Activities and Related Diagenetic Processes in a Rift Basin: Evidence from the Paleogene Medium-Deep Reservoirs of Huanghekou Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongheng Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic activities exert a significant influence on pore fluid property and related diagenetic processes that substantially controlled reservoirs quality. Analysis of Paleogene medium-deep sandstones on the Huanghekou Sag provides insight into relating the diagenetic processes to pore fluid property evolution influenced by volcanic activities. Three distinct types of pore fluids were identified on the basis of an integrated and systematic analysis including core and thin section observation, XRD, SEM, CL, and trace element. Alkaline aqueous medium environment occurred in E2s1+2 where volcanic activities have insignificant influence on pore fluids, evidenced by typical alkaline diagenetic events such as K-feldspar albitization, quartz dissolution, feldspar dissolution, and carbonate cementation. During the deposition of E3d3, influx of terrestrial freshwater and alteration of ferromagnesian-rich pore water result in the formation of mixing aqueous medium environment through volcanic eruption dormancy causing zeolite dissolution, clay mineral transformation, and K-feldspar albitization. Ferromagnesian-rich aqueous medium environment developed resulting from the intensive hydrolysis of the unstable ferromagnesian minerals formed due to intense volcanic activities during E3d1+2 and corresponding predominant diagenetic processes were characterized by the precipitation and dissolution of low-silica zeolites. Therefore, the differential properties of pore fluids caused various diagenetic processes controlling reservoir quality.

  11. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichiak, Jessica; Tellez, Hernesto; Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  12. Impact of the electron donor on in situ microbial nitrate reduction in Opalinus Clay: results from the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleyen, N.; Smets, S. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Small, J. [National Nuclear Laboratory NLL, Warrington (United Kingdom); and others

    2017-04-15

    At the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland), an in situ experiment is being carried out to examine the fate of nitrate leaching from nitrate-containing bituminized radioactive waste, in a clay host rock for geological disposal. Such a release of nitrate may cause a geochemical perturbation of the clay, possibly affecting some of the favorable characteristics of the host rock. In this in situ experiment, combined transport and reactivity of nitrate is studied inside anoxic and water-saturated chambers in a borehole in the Opalinus Clay. Continuous circulation of the solution from the borehole to the surface equipment allows a regular sampling and online monitoring of its chemical composition. In this paper, in situ microbial nitrate reduction in the Opalinus Clay is discussed, in the presence or absence of additional electron donors relevant for the disposal concept and likely to be released from nitrate-containing bituminized radioactive waste: acetate (simulating bitumen degradation products) and H{sub 2} (originating from radiolysis and corrosion in the repository). The results of these tests indicate that - in case microorganisms would be active in the repository or the surrounding clay - microbial nitrate reduction can occur using electron donors naturally present in the clay (e.g. pyrite, dissolved organic matter). Nevertheless, non-reactive transport of nitrate in the clay is expected to be the main process. In contrast, when easily oxidizable electron donors would be available (e.g. acetate and H{sub 2}), the microbial activity will be strongly stimulated. Both in the presence of H{sub 2} and acetate, nitrite and nitrogenous gases are predominantly produced, although some ammonium can also be formed when H{sub 2} is present. The reduction of nitrate in the clay could have an impact on the redox conditions in the pore-water and might also lead to a gas-related perturbation of the host rock, depending on the electron donor used during denitrification

  13. Pore-Confined Carriers and Biomolecules in Mesoporous Silica for Biomimetic Separation and Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shanshan

    Selectively permeable biological membranes composed of lipophilic barriers inspire the design of biomimetic carrier-mediated membranes for aqueous solute separation. This work imparts selective permeability to lipid-filled pores of silica thin film composite membranes using carrier molecules that reside in the lipophilic self-assemblies. The lipids confined inside the pores of silica are proven to be a more effective barrier than bilayers formed on the porous surface through vesicle fusion, which is critical for quantifying the function of an immobilized carrier. The ability of a lipophilic carrier embedded in the lipid bilayer to reversibly bind the target solute and transport it through the membrane is demonstrated. Through the functionalization of the silica surface with enzymes, enzymatic catalysis and biomimetic separations can be combined on this nanostructured composite platform. The successful development of biomimetic nanocomposite membrane can provide for efficient dilute aqueous solute upgrading or separations using engineered carrier/catalyst/support systems. While the carrier-mediated biomimetic membranes hold great potential, fully understanding of the transport processes in composite synthetic membranes is essential for improve the membrane performance. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique is demonstrated to be a useful tool for characterizing the thin film pore accessibility. Furthermore, the effect of lipid bilayer preparation methods on the silica thin film (in the form of pore enveloping, pore filling) on ion transport is explored, as a lipid bilayer with high electrically insulation is essential for detecting activity of proteins or biomimetic carriers in the bilayer. This study provides insights for making better barriers on mesoporous support for carrier-mediated membrane separation process. Porous silica nanoparticles (pSNPs) with pore sizes appropriate for biomolecule loading are potential for encapsulating dsRNA within the

  14. Simultaneous sorption of As, B, Cr, Mo and Se from coal fly ash leachates by Al(sup3+)-pillared bentonite clay: implication for the construction of activated geo-synthetic clay liner

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available successfully removed oxyanion species from generated coal FA leachates. This study shows that Al(sup3+)-modified bentonite clay is an effective adsorbent for oxyanion species in coal FA leachates and could be applied as a reactive barrier in coal FA retention...

  15. Feasibility of using overburden clays for sealing purposes and laboratory testing of the clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, J. (Vyzkumny Ustav pro Hnede Uhli, Most (Czechoslovakia))

    1992-03-01

    Studies properties of overburden clay from North Bohemian surface coal mines for use as sealants of industrial and household waste that will be dumped at Czechoslovak surface mine sites. Basic requirements of sealing layers are optimum compressibility and impermeability by suitable compacting. Laboratory soil mechanical tests of different clay samples were carried out using the Proctor standard tests (PCS) and the Norwegian Geonor A/S - m 45 instrument. Laboratory tests were used to select the best available clay types with optimum density and moisture content. Experimental results of laboratory tests are provided.

  16. Sorption of radionuclides by tertiary clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.F.; Czurda, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    The sorption capacity of different clay types for some metals (Co, Cs, Sr and Zn), occurring as common radionuclides in radioactive waste deposits, had been analysed by a static (batch technique) and a dynamic method (percolation tests, in which the driving force is a hydraulic gradient). Sorption capacity generally increased with an increasing pH of solution. A decrease of sorption capacity had been observed in the order Zn > Cs ≥ Co > Sr for the batch and Cs > Zn > Sr > Co for the percolation tests. Clay marls showed a distinctly higher sorption respectively retention capacity as pure clays. Sorption capacity depends on solution parameters like type and concentration of radionuclide, pH, salt concentration, etc., and on rock parameters like mineral content (e.g. swelling clay minerals and carbonates), organic material, rock pH, micro fabric, etc. A third parameter of great influence is the contact time between clay and solution. The adsorption isotherms reflect two different adsorption mechanisms: a very rapid adsorption (a few minutes) on the external surfaces of clay minerals and a slow adsorption process (weeks and longer), due to the diffusion of metal ions into the interlayer space of clay minerals. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  17. Organophilization and characterization of commercial bentonite clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, B.B. da; Lima, J.C.C.; Alves, A.M.; Araujo, E.M.; Melo, T.J.A. de

    2012-01-01

    Bentonite clay is a plastic changes resulting from volcanic ash, consisting mostly of montmorillonite. The state of Paraiba is a major source of bentonite clay from Brazil, where the main oil fields are located in Boa Vista and represents the largest national production of raw and beneficiated bentonite. Aimed at the commercial value of this type of clay and its high applicability in the polls, this article aims to make a comparison between two kinds of clay, a national (Brasgel) and other imported (Cloisite) from organophilization of two commercial bentonite, ionic surfactant with Praepagem WB, and characterize them by XRD, FTIR and TG / DTG. We observe that despite getting inferior properties, the clay presents national values very similar to those presented by imported clay. (author)

  18. Silt-clay aggregates on Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greeley, R.

    1979-01-01

    Viking observations suggest abundant silt and clay particles on Mars. It is proposed that some of these particles agglomerate to form sand size aggregates that are redeposited as sandlike features such as drifts and dunes. Although the binding for the aggregates could include salt cementation or other mechanisms, electrostatic bonding is considered to be a primary force holding the aggregates together. Various laboratory experiments conducted since the 19th century, and as reported here for simulated Martian conditions, show that both the magnitude and sign of electrical charges on windblown particles are functions of particle velocity, shape and composition, atmospheric pressure, atmospheric composition, and other factors. Electrical charges have been measured for saltating particles in the wind tunnel and in the field, on the surfaces of sand dunes, and within dust clouds on earth. Similar, and perhaps even greater, charges are proposed to occur on Mars, which could form aggregates of silt and clay size particles. Electrification is proposed to occur within Martian dust clouds, generating silt-clay aggregates which would settle to the surface where they may be deposited in the form of sandlike structures. By analog, silt-clay dunes are known in many parts of the earth where silt-clay aggregated were transported by saltation and deposited as 'sand.' In these structures the binding forces were later destroyed, and the particles reassumed the physical properties of silt and clay, but the sandlike bedding structure within the 'dunes' was preserved. The bedding observed in drifts at the Viking landing site is suggested to result from a similar process involving silt-clay aggregates on Mars

  19. A three-scale model for ionic solute transport in swelling clays incorporating ion-ion correlation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tien Dung; Moyne, Christian; Murad, Marcio A.

    2015-01-01

    A new three-scale model is proposed to describe the movement of ionic species of different valences in swelling clays characterized by three separate length scales (nano, micro, and macro) and two levels of porosity (nano- and micropores). At the finest (nano) scale the medium is treated as charged clay particles saturated by aqueous electrolyte solution containing monovalent and divalent ions forming the electrical double layer. A new constitutive law is constructed for the disjoining pressure based on the numerical resolution of non-local problem at the nanoscale which, in contrast to the Poisson-Boltzmann theory for point charge ions, is capable of capturing the short-range interactions between the ions due to their finite size. At the intermediate scale (microscale), the two-phase homogenized particle/electrolyte solution system is represented by swollen clay clusters (or aggregates) with the nanoscale disjoining pressure incorporated in a modified form of Terzaghi's effective principle. At the macroscale, the electro-chemical-mechanical couplings within clay clusters is homogenized with the ion transport in the bulk fluid lying in the micro pores. The resultant macroscopic picture is governed by a three-scale model wherein ion transport takes place in the bulk solution strongly coupled with the mechanics of the clay clusters which play the role of sources/sinks of mass to the bulk fluid associated with ion adsorption/desorption in the electrical double layer at the nanoscale. Within the context of the quasi-steady version of the multiscale model, wherein the electrolyte solution in the nanopores is assumed at instantaneous thermodynamic equilibrium with the bulk fluid in the micropores, we build-up numerically the ion-adsorption isotherms along with the constitutive law of the retardation coefficients of monovalent and divalent ions. In addition, the constitutive law for the macroscopic swelling pressure is reconstructed numerically showing patterns of

  20. What Makes a Natural Clay Antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (clay minerals in the bactericidal process is to buffer the aqueous pH and oxidation state to conditions that promote Fe2+ solubility. Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe2+. Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe2+ overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe3+ and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals. PMID:21413758

  1. Mineralogical and chemical characterization of various bentonite and smectite-rich clay materials Part A: Comparison and development of mineralogical characterization methods Part B: Mineralogical and chemical characterization of clay materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpulainen, S.; Kiviranta, L.

    2010-06-01

    Mineralogy is an essential issue in understanding thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) behavior of bentonite materials. Mineralogy affects, among others, chemical composition of pore water, susceptibility for erosion, and transport of radionuclides. Consequently, mineralogy affects the designs of the buffer and backfill components. The objective of this work was to implement and develop mineralogical and chemical methods for characterization of reference clays considered for use as buffer and backfill materials in nuclear waste disposal. In this work, different methods were tested, compared, developed, and best available techniques selected. An additional aim was to characterize reference materials that are used in various nuclear waste disposal supporting studies, e.g., the SKB's alternative buffer material (ABM) experiment. Materials studied included three Wyoming-bentonites, two bentonites from Milos, four bentonites from Kutch district, and two Friedland clays. Minerals were identified using x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and polarizing microscopy. Mineralogical composition was estimated using Rietveld-analysis. Chemical methods were used to support and validate mineralogical interpretation. Total chemical composition was determined from decomposed samples using spectrometry (ICP-AES) and combustion (Leco-S, Leco-C). Ferric and ferrous iron species were distinguished titrimetrically and the amount of soluble sulphate was determined using ion chromatography. In addition, cation exchange capacity and original exchangeable cations were determined. Chemical composition of fine (<2 μ m) fractions and poorly crystalline Fe-, Al- and Si-phases determined by selective extractions were used in structural calculations of smectite. XRD is a basic method for all mineralogical characterization, but it is insensitive for detecting trace minerals and variations in the structural chemical composition of clay minerals. Polarizing

  2. Natural gas extraction and artificial gas injection experiments in Opalinus Clay, Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinsot, A.; Lundy, M. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Déchets Radioactifs ANDRA, Meuse Haute-Marne Center, Bure (France); Appelo, C.A.J. [Dr C.A.J. Appelo, Hydrochemical Consultant, Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2017-04-15

    Two experiments have been installed at Mont Terri in 2004 and 2009 that allowed gas circulation within a borehole at a pressure between 1 and 2 bar. These experiments made it possible to observe the natural gases that were initially dissolved in pore