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Sample records for synthetase sequence evolution

  1. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L; Steitz, Thomas A; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-11-25

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNA(Pyl) have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate N(ε)-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNA(Pyl). Here, we examine an N(ε)-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids.

  2. Glutamine synthetase gene evolution: A good molecular clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesole, G.; Lanvave, C.; Saccone, C.; Bozzetti, M.P.; Preparata, G.

    1991-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase gene evolution in various animals, plants, and bacteria was evaluated by a general stationary Markov model. The evolutionary process proved to be unexpectedly regular even for a time span as long as that between the divergence of prokaryotes from eukaryotes. This enabled us to draw phylogenetic trees for species whose phylogeny cannot be easily reconstructed from the fossil record. The calculation of the times of divergence of the various organelle-specific enzymes led us to hypothesize that the pea and bean chloroplast genes for these enzymes originated from the duplication of nuclear genes as a result of the different metabolic needs of the various species. The data indicate that the duplication of plastid glutamine synthetase genes occurred long after the endosymbiotic events that produced the organelles themselves

  3. Genomic insights into the distribution, genetic diversity and evolution of polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Sivonen, Kaarina; Fewer, David P

    2015-12-01

    Polyketides and nonribosomal peptides are important secondary metabolites that exhibit enormous structural diversity, have many pharmaceutical applications, and include a number of clinically important drugs. These complex metabolites are most commonly synthesized on enzymatic assembly lines of polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Genome-mining studies making use of the recent explosion in the number of genome sequences have demonstrated unexpected enzymatic diversity and greatly expanded the known distribution of these enzyme systems across the three domains of life. The wealth of data now available suggests that genome-mining efforts will uncover new natural products, novel biosynthetic mechanisms, and shed light on the origin and evolution of these important enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Asparagine synthetase deficiency detected by whole exome sequencing causes congenital microcephaly, epileptic encephalopathy and psychomotor delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Salem, Salma; Gleeson, Joseph G; Al-Shamsi, Aisha M; Islam, Barira; Hertecant, Jozef; Ali, Bassam R; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2015-06-01

    Deficiency of Asparagine Synthetase (ASNSD, MIM 615574) is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder presenting with some brain abnormalities. Affected individuals have congenital microcephaly and progressive encephalopathy associated with severe intellectual disability and intractable seizures. The loss of function of the asparagine synthetase (ASNS, EC 6.3.5.4), particularly in the brain, is the major cause of this particular congenital microcephaly. In this study, we clinically evaluated an affected child from a consanguineous Emirati family presenting with congenital microcephaly and epileptic encephalopathy. In addition, whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel homozygous substitution mutation (c.1193A > C) in the ASNS gene. This mutation resulted in the substitution of highly conserved tyrosine residue by cysteine (p.Y398C). Molecular modeling analysis predicts hypomorphic and damaging effects of this mutation on the protein structure and altering its enzymatic activity. Therefore, we conclude that the loss of ASNS function is most likely the cause of this condition in the studied family. This report brings the number of reported families with this very rare disorder to five and the number of pathogenic mutations in the ASNS gene to four. This finding extends the ASNS pathogenic mutations spectrum and highlights the utility of whole-exome sequencing in elucidation the causes of rare recessive disorders that are heterogeneous and/or overlap with other conditions.

  5. Nucleotide sequence and developmental expression of Acanthamoeba S-adenosylmethionine synthetase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, K S; Henney, H R

    1997-03-20

    We have isolated and characterized a cDNA (cDNA1) from an Acanthamoeba cDNA library encoding the enzyme S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthetase (ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase; EC 2.5.1.6). The nucleotide sequence exhibits about 61-73% overall similarity to the corresponding gene of other organisms. The cDNA displays extreme codon bias with a preference for C or G in the third position. A putative initiation site and an ATP-binding site are identified. An amino acid content of 388 and a molecular mass of about 44,000 Daltons are deduced for the enzyme. Putative phosphorylation sites which might be involved in regulation of the enzyme are revealed. The cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), and the identity of the protein product confirmed by Western blotting analysis. Northern analyses of the expression of the Acanthamoeba SAM synthetase gene during development revealed a pronounced reduction in the level of transcripts as amoebae converted to cysts.

  6. Evolution of DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipu, Hamid Nawaz; Shabbir, Ambreen

    2015-03-01

    Sanger and coworkers introduced DNA sequencing in 1970s for the first time. It principally relied on termination of growing nucleotide chain when a dideoxythymidine triphosphate (ddTTP) was inserted in it. Detection of terminated sequences was done radiographically on Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (PAGE). Improvements that have evolved over time in original Sanger sequencing include replacement of radiography with fluorescence, use of separate fluorescent markers for each nucleotide, use of capillary electrophoresis instead of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then introduction of capillary array electrophoresis. However, this technique suffered from few inherent limitations like decreased sensitivity for low level mutant alleles, complexities in analyzing highly polymorphic regions like Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and high DNA concentrations required. Several Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies have been introduced by Roche, Illumina and other commercial manufacturers that tend to overcome Sanger sequencing limitations and have been reviewed. Introduction of NGS in clinical research and medical diagnostics is expected to change entire diagnostic approach. These include study of cancer variants, detection of minimal residual disease, exome sequencing, detection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and their disease association, epigenetic regulation of gene expression and sequencing of microorganisms genome.

  7. Nuclear glutamine synthetase evolution in Nicotiana: phylogenetics and the origins of allotetraploid and homoploid (diploid) hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, James J; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Andrew R; Knapp, Sandra; Chase, Mark W

    2010-04-01

    Interspecies relationships in Nicotiana (Solanaceae) are complex because 40 species are diploid (two sets of chromosomes) and 35 species are allotetraploid (four sets of chromosomes, two from each progenitor diploid species). We sequenced a fragment (containing four introns) of the nuclear gene 'chloroplast-expressed glutamine synthetase' (ncpGS) in 65 species of Nicotiana. Here we present the first phylogenetic analysis based on a low-copy nuclear gene for this well studied and important genus. Diploid species have a single-copy of ncpGS, and allotetraploids as expected have two homeologous copies, each derived from their progenitor diploid. Results were particularly useful for determining the paternal lineage of previously enigmatic taxa (for which our previous analyses had revealed only the maternal progenitors). In particular, we were able to shed light on the origins of the two oldest and largest allotetraploid sections, N. sects. Suaveolentes and Repandae. All homeologues have an intact reading frame and apparently similar rates of divergence, suggesting both remain functional. Difficulties in fitting certain diploid species into the sectional classification of Nicotiana on morphological grounds, coupled with discordance between the ncpGS data and previous trees (i.e. plastid, nuclear ribosomal DNA), indicate a number of homoploid (diploid) hybrids in the genus. We have evidence for Nicotiana glutinosa and Nicotiana linearis being of hybrid origin and patterns of intra-allelic recombination also indicate the possibility of reticulate origins for other diploid species. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular evolution of glutamine synthetase II: Phylogenetic evidence of a non-endosymbiotic gene transfer event early in plant evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tartar Aurélien

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine synthetase (GS is essential for ammonium assimilation and the biosynthesis of glutamine. The three GS gene families (GSI, GSII, and GSIII are represented in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. In this study, we examined the evolutionary relationship of GSII from eubacterial and eukaryotic lineages and present robust phylogenetic evidence that GSII was transferred from γ-Proteobacteria (Eubacteria to the Chloroplastida. Results GSII sequences were isolated from four species of green algae (Trebouxiophyceae, and additional green algal (Chlorophyceae and Prasinophytae and streptophyte (Charales, Desmidiales, Bryophyta, Marchantiophyta, Lycopodiophyta and Tracheophyta sequences were obtained from public databases. In Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses, eubacterial (GSIIB and eukaryotic (GSIIE GSII sequences formed distinct clades. Both GSIIB and GSIIE were found in chlorophytes and early-diverging streptophytes. The GSIIB enzymes from these groups formed a well-supported sister clade with the γ-Proteobacteria, providing evidence that GSIIB in the Chloroplastida arose by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses suggest that GSIIB and GSIIE coexisted for an extended period of time but it is unclear whether the proposed HGT happened prior to or after the divergence of the primary endosymbiotic lineages (the Archaeplastida. However, GSIIB genes have not been identified in glaucophytes or red algae, favoring the hypothesis that GSIIB was gained after the divergence of the primary endosymbiotic lineages. Duplicate copies of the GSIIB gene were present in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, and Physcomitrella patens. Both GSIIB proteins in C. reinhardtii and V. carteri f. nagariensis had N-terminal transit sequences, indicating they are targeted to the chloroplast or mitochondrion. In contrast, GSIIB proteins of P. patens lacked transit sequences, suggesting

  9. Evolution of the 2'-5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase family in eukaryotes and bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Karina Hansen; Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Reitamm, Tonu

    2009-01-01

    system. In view of these observations, we have pursued the idea that OAS genes could be present in other metazoans and in unicellular organisms as well. We have identified a number of OAS1 genes in annelids, mollusks, a cnidarian, chordates, and unicellular eukaryotes and also found a family of proteins......The 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) belongs to a nucleotidyl transferase family that includes poly(A) polymerases and CCA-adding enzymes. In mammals and birds, the OAS functions in the interferon system but it is also present in an active form in sponges, which are devoid of the interferon...

  10. The evolution of nanopore sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Yang, Qiuping; Wang, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    The “$1000 Genome” project has been drawing increasing attention since its launch a decade ago. Nanopore sequencing, the third-generation, is believed to be one of the most promising sequencing technologies to reach four gold standards set for the “$1000 Genome” while the second-generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a revolution in life sciences, particularly in genome sequencing-based personalized medicine. Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors. A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards. In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards. PMID:25610451

  11. The Evolution of Nanopore Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue eWang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The $1,000 Genome project has been drawing increasing attention since its launch a decade ago. Nanopore sequencing, the third-generation, is believed to be one of the most promising sequencing technologies to reach four gold standards set for the $1,000 Genome while the second-generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a revolution in life sciences, particularly in genome sequencing-based personalized medicine. Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET sensors. A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards. In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards.

  12. Human asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase: molecular cloning and the inference of the evolutionary history of Asx-tRNA synthetase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, K; Motegi, H; Yoshida, M; Noda, T

    1998-11-15

    We have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human cytoplasmic asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS). The N-terminal appended domain of 112 amino acid represents the signature sequence for the eukaryotic AsnRS and is absent from archaebacterial or eubacterial enzymes. The canonical ortholog for AsnRS is absent from most archaebacterial and some eubacterial genomes, indicating that in those organisms, formation of asparaginyl-tRNA is independent of the enzyme. The high degree of sequence conservation among asparaginyl- and aspartyl-tRNA synthetases (AsxRS) made it possible to infer the evolutionary paths of the two enzymes. The data show the neighbor relationship between AsnRS and eubacterial aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, and support the occurrence of AsnRS early in the course of evolution, which is in contrast to the proposed late occurrence of glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase.

  13. Universal sequence replication, reversible polymerization and early functional biopolymers: a model for the initiation of prebiotic sequence evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Imari Walker

    Full Text Available Many models for the origin of life have focused on understanding how evolution can drive the refinement of a preexisting enzyme, such as the evolution of efficient replicase activity. Here we present a model for what was, arguably, an even earlier stage of chemical evolution, when polymer sequence diversity was generated and sustained before, and during, the onset of functional selection. The model includes regular environmental cycles (e.g. hydration-dehydration cycles that drive polymers between times of replication and functional activity, which coincide with times of different monomer and polymer diffusivity. Template-directed replication of informational polymers, which takes place during the dehydration stage of each cycle, is considered to be sequence-independent. New sequences are generated by spontaneous polymer formation, and all sequences compete for a finite monomer resource that is recycled via reversible polymerization. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that this proposed prebiotic scenario provides a robust mechanism for the exploration of sequence space. Introduction of a polymer sequence with monomer synthetase activity illustrates that functional sequences can become established in a preexisting pool of otherwise non-functional sequences. Functional selection does not dominate system dynamics and sequence diversity remains high, permitting the emergence and spread of more than one functional sequence. It is also observed that polymers spontaneously form clusters in simulations where polymers diffuse more slowly than monomers, a feature that is reminiscent of a previous proposal that the earliest stages of life could have been defined by the collective evolution of a system-wide cooperation of polymer aggregates. Overall, the results presented demonstrate the merits of considering plausible prebiotic polymer chemistries and environments that would have allowed for the rapid turnover of monomer resources and for

  14. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, W.R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  15. Simulating efficiently the evolution of DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöniger, M; von Haeseler, A

    1995-02-01

    Two menu-driven FORTRAN programs are described that simulate the evolution of DNA sequences in accordance with a user-specified model. This general stochastic model allows for an arbitrary stationary nucleotide composition and any transition-transversion bias during the process of base substitution. In addition, the user may define any hypothetical model tree according to which a family of sequences evolves. The programs suggest the computationally most inexpensive approach to generate nucleotide substitutions. Either reproducible or non-repeatable simulations, depending on the method of initializing the pseudo-random number generator, can be performed. The corresponding options are offered by the interface menu.

  16. Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlinger, Marco; Rowan, Andrew J.; Horswell, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intratumor heterogeneity may foster tumor evolution and adaptation and hinder personalized-medicine strategies that depend on results from single tumor-biopsy samples.METHODSTo examine intratumor heterogeneity, we performed exome sequencing, chromosome aberration analysis, and ploidy ...

  17. Exploring the correlations between sequence evolution rate and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-15

    islands'. We suggest research directions that ... sequence evolution rate and are correlated with each other are important for several reasons. ... 2011). This included the acquisition of many traits used to define the respective orders.

  18. The evolution and utility of ribosomal ITS sequences in Bambusinae ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences are commonly used for phylogenetic reconstruction because they are highly reiterated as components of rDNA repeats, and hence are often subject to rapid homogenization through concerted evolution. Concerted evolution leads to intragenomic uniformity of repeats ...

  19. Exploring the correlations between sequence evolution rate and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 37; Issue 5. Exploring the correlations between sequence evolution rate and phenotypic divergence across the Mammalian tree provides insights into adaptive evolution. Jan Janecka Bhanu Chowdhary William Murphy. Articles Volume 37 Issue 5 November 2012 pp 897- ...

  20. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in shorebird populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenink, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis describes the global molecular population structure of two shorebird species, in particular of the dunlin, Calidris alpina, by means of comparative sequence analysis of the most variable part of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome. There are several reasons

  1. Sedimentary sequence evolution in a Foredeep basin: Eastern Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejarano, C.; Funes, D. [Corpoven S.A., Puerto La Cruz (Venezuela); Sarzalho, S.; Audemard, F.; Flores, G. [Caracas (Venezuela)

    1996-08-01

    Well log-seismic sequence stratigraphy analysis in the Eastern Venezuela Foreland Basin leads to study of the evolution of sedimentary sequences onto the Cretaceous-Paleocene passive margin. This basin comprises two different foredeep sub-basins: The Guarico subbasin to the west, older, and the Maturin sub-basin to the east, younger. A foredeep switching between these two sub-basins is observed at 12.5 m.y. Seismic interpretation and well log sections across the study area show sedimentary sequences with transgressive sands and coastal onlaps to the east-southeast for the Guarico sub-basin, as well as truncations below the switching sequence (12.5 m.y.), and the Maturin sub-basin shows apparent coastal onlaps to the west-northwest, as well as a marine onlap (deeper water) in the west, where it starts to establish. Sequence stratigraphy analysis of these sequences with well logs allowed the study of the evolution of stratigraphic section from Paleocene to middle Miocene (68.0-12.0 m.y.). On the basis of well log patterns, the sequences were divided in regressive-transgressive-regressive sedimentary cycles caused by changes in relative sea level. Facies distributions were analyzed and the sequences were divided into simple sequences or sub- sequences of a greater frequencies than third order depositional sequences.

  2. Three aspects of stellar evolution near the main sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, J.C.

    1979-05-01

    Three problems of stellar evolution are considered: the gap in the HR diagram of M67, the evolutionary status of RS CVn binaries and the solar neutrino problem. The physical basis of the Eggleton stellar evolution computer program is described. The program was used to calculate a grid of evolutionary tracks for models with masses between 0.7 and 1.29 solar masses. The more massive stars considered here have expanding convective cores during their main sequence evolution. The isochrone of the old galactic cluster M67 has a gap at the top of its main sequence because of the rapid evolution of stars at hydrogen exhaustion. RS CVn binaries present a complex collection of observational phenomena although they appear to be detached binaries. Their evolutionary status has remained controversial because of their high space density. Here it is shown that a post main sequence interpretation is satisfactory. Models of the Sun with metal poor interiors have been proposed in an attempt to resolve the solar neutrino problem. Here the evolution of two such models is calculated in detail, including a gradual contamination of the surface convection zone to produce the observed metal abundance, giving fully consistent models of the Sun as it is observed. (author)

  3. Exploring the correlations between sequence evolution rate and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sequence evolution behaves in a relatively consistent manner, leading to one of the fundamental paradigms in biology, the existence of a `molecular clock'. The molecular clock can be distilled to the concept of accumulation of substitutions, through time yielding a stable rate from which we can estimate lineage divergence.

  4. The ergot alkaloid gene cluster in Claviceps purpurea: extension of the cluster sequence and intra species evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarmann, Thomas; Machado, Caroline; Lübbe, Yvonne; Correia, Telmo; Schardl, Christopher L; Panaccione, Daniel G; Tudzynski, Paul

    2005-06-01

    The genomic region of Claviceps purpurea strain P1 containing the ergot alkaloid gene cluster [Tudzynski, P., Hölter, K., Correia, T., Arntz, C., Grammel, N., Keller, U., 1999. Evidence for an ergot alkaloid gene cluster in Claviceps purpurea. Mol. Gen. Genet. 261, 133-141] was explored by chromosome walking, and additional genes probably involved in the ergot alkaloid biosynthesis have been identified. The putative cluster sequence (extending over 68.5kb) contains 4 different nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes and several putative oxidases. Northern analysis showed that most of the genes were co-regulated (repressed by high phosphate), and identified probable flanking genes by lack of co-regulation. Comparison of the cluster sequences of strain P1, an ergotamine producer, with that of strain ECC93, an ergocristine producer, showed high conservation of most of the cluster genes, but significant variation in the NRPS modules, strongly suggesting that evolution of these chemical races of C. purpurea is determined by evolution of NRPS module specificity.

  5. Mutation of miRNA target sequences during human evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardner, Paul P; Vinther, Jeppe

    2008-01-01

    It has long-been hypothesized that changes in non-protein-coding genes and the regulatory sequences controlling expression could undergo positive selection. Here we identify 402 putative microRNA (miRNA) target sequences that have been mutated specifically in the human lineage and show that genes...... containing such deletions are more highly expressed than their mouse orthologs. Our findings indicate that some miRNA target mutations are fixed by positive selection and might have been involved in the evolution of human-specific traits....

  6. Understanding Cancer Genome and Its Evolution by Next Generation Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yong

    knowledge we previously know. There is very limited knowledge of East Asia lung cancer genome except enrichment of EGFR mutations and lack of KRAS mutations. We carried out integrated genomic, transcriptomic and methylomic analysis of 335 primary Chinese lung adenocarcinomas (LUAD) and 35 corresponding......Cancer will cause 13 million deaths by the year of 2030, ranking the second leading cause of death worldwide. Previous studies indicate that most of the cancers originate from cells that acquired somatic mutations and evolved as Darwin Theory. Ten biological insights of cancer have been summarized...... recently. Cutting-age technologies like next generation sequencing (NGS) enable exploring cancer genome and evolution much more efficiently. However, integrated cancer genome sequencing studies showed great inter-/intra-tumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and complex evolution patterns beyond the cancer biological...

  7. Structural Approaches to Sequence Evolution Molecules, Networks, Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bastolla, Ugo; Roman, H. Eduardo; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Structural requirements constrain the evolution of biological entities at all levels, from macromolecules to their networks, right up to populations of biological organisms. Classical models of molecular evolution, however, are focused at the level of the symbols - the biological sequence - rather than that of their resulting structure. Now recent advances in understanding the thermodynamics of macromolecules, the topological properties of gene networks, the organization and mutation capabilities of genomes, and the structure of populations make it possible to incorporate these key elements into a broader and deeply interdisciplinary view of molecular evolution. This book gives an account of such a new approach, through clear tutorial contributions by leading scientists specializing in the different fields involved.

  8. Sequence Evolution Under Constraints: Lessons Learned from Sudoku.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yucheng; Yang, Gongrong

    2016-10-01

    The complex structures of all proteins in nature are outcomes of a random walk driven by mutation and selection. Reconstructing the fitness landscape staging this process based on first-principle physical rules or experimental measurements is difficult. In this article we turn the popular Sudoku game into an artificial fitness landscape and use it as a model system to study sequence evolution under constraints. The Sudoku rules, which are human-mind friendly, intertwine a rugged landscape for sequences composed of digits, mimicking the functional constraints felt by a tightly folded protein. Simulated evolution reveals interesting properties of the valley-crossing dynamics on this complex landscape. It is found that (i) the mutation accumulation rate during valley-crossing is constant among different evolutionary pathways and depends on the ruggedness of the landscape; (ii) genetic drift and neutral networks play constructive roles during the process of searching for novel functions; and (iii) under strong selection, gene duplication can speed up the evolution by relaxing, but not completely liberating, the redundant copy from selective pressure. Insights gained from this prototype model may help us understand the evolution of real proteins.

  9. Biophysical and structural considerations for protein sequence evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grahnen Johan A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein sequence evolution is constrained by the biophysics of folding and function, causing interdependence between interacting sites in the sequence. However, current site-independent models of sequence evolutions do not take this into account. Recent attempts to integrate the influence of structure and biophysics into phylogenetic models via statistical/informational approaches have not resulted in expected improvements in model performance. This suggests that further innovations are needed for progress in this field. Results Here we develop a coarse-grained physics-based model of protein folding and binding function, and compare it to a popular informational model. We find that both models violate the assumption of the native sequence being close to a thermodynamic optimum, causing directional selection away from the native state. Sampling and simulation show that the physics-based model is more specific for fold-defining interactions that vary less among residue type. The informational model diffuses further in sequence space with fewer barriers and tends to provide less support for an invariant sites model, although amino acid substitutions are generally conservative. Both approaches produce sequences with natural features like dN/dS Conclusions Simple coarse-grained models of protein folding can describe some natural features of evolving proteins but are currently not accurate enough to use in evolutionary inference. This is partly due to improper packing of the hydrophobic core. We suggest possible improvements on the representation of structure, folding energy, and binding function, as regards both native and non-native conformations, and describe a large number of possible applications for such a model.

  10. Effects of mass loss on the evolution of massive stars. I. Main-sequence evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearborn, D.S.P.; Blake, J.B.; Hainebach, K.L.; Schramm, D.N.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of mass loss on the evolution and surface composition of massive stars during main-sequence evolution are examined. While some details of the evolutionary track depend on the formula used for the mass loss, the results appear most sensitive to the total mass removed during the main-sequence lifetime. It was found that low mass-loss rates have very little effect on the evolution of a star; the track is slightly subluminous, but the lifetime is almost unaffected. High rates of mass loss lead to a hot, high-luminosity stellar model with a helium core surrounded by a hydrogen-deficient (Xapprox.0.1) envelope. The main-sequence lifetime is extended by a factor of 2--3. These models may be identified with Wolf-Rayet stars. Between these mass-loss extremes are intermediate models which appear as OBN stars on the main sequence. The mass-loss rates required for significant observable effects range from 8 x 10 -7 to 10 -5 M/sub sun/ yr -1 , depending on the initial stellar mass. It is found that observationally consistent mass-loss rates for stars with M> or =30 M/sub sun/ may be sufficiently high that these stars lose mass on a time scale more rapidly than their main-sequence core evolution time. This result implies that the helium cores resulting from the main-sequence evolution of these massive stars may all be very similar to that of a star of Mapprox.30 M/sub sun/ regardless of the zero-age mass

  11. The Impact of Native State Switching on Protein Sequence Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharir-Ivry, Avital; Xia, Yu

    2017-06-01

    For proteins with a single well-defined native state, protein 3Dstructure is a major determinant of sequence evolution. On the other hand, many proteins adopt multiple, distinct native structures under different conditions ("conformational switches"), yet the impact of such native state switching on protein evolution is not fully understood. Here, we performed a proteome-wide analysis of how protein structure impacts sequence evolution for protein conformational switches in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using pooled analysis of sites with similar packing or burial. We observed a strong linear relationship between residue evolutionary rate and residue burial for conformational switches. In addition, we found that conformational switches evolve significantly and consistently more slowly than proteins with a single native state, even after controlling for degree of residue burial or packing. Next, we focused on proteins that switch conformations upon molecular binding. We found that interfacial residues in these conformational switches evolve more slowly than interfacial residues in proteins with a single native state, and that the bound conformation is a better predictor for residue evolutionary rate than the unbound conformation. Our findings suggest that for conformational switches, the necessity to encode multiple distinct native structures under different conditions imposes strong evolutionary constraints on the entire protein, rather than just a few key residues. Our results provide new insights into the structure-evolution relationship of protein conformational switches. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. The pig X and Y Chromosomes: structure, sequence, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Benjamin M; Sargent, Carole A; Churcher, Carol; Hunt, Toby; Herrero, Javier; Loveland, Jane E; Dunn, Matt; Louzada, Sandra; Fu, Beiyuan; Chow, William; Gilbert, James; Austin-Guest, Siobhan; Beal, Kathryn; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Cheng, William; Gordon, Daria; Grafham, Darren; Hardy, Matt; Harley, Jo; Hauser, Heidi; Howden, Philip; Howe, Kerstin; Lachani, Kim; Ellis, Peter J I; Kelly, Daniel; Kerry, Giselle; Kerwin, James; Ng, Bee Ling; Threadgold, Glen; Wileman, Thomas; Wood, Jonathan M D; Yang, Fengtang; Harrow, Jen; Affara, Nabeel A; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We have generated an improved assembly and gene annotation of the pig X Chromosome, and a first draft assembly of the pig Y Chromosome, by sequencing BAC and fosmid clones from Duroc animals and incorporating information from optical mapping and fiber-FISH. The X Chromosome carries 1033 annotated genes, 690 of which are protein coding. Gene order closely matches that found in primates (including humans) and carnivores (including cats and dogs), which is inferred to be ancestral. Nevertheless, several protein-coding genes present on the human X Chromosome were absent from the pig, and 38 pig-specific X-chromosomal genes were annotated, 22 of which were olfactory receptors. The pig Y-specific Chromosome sequence generated here comprises 30 megabases (Mb). A 15-Mb subset of this sequence was assembled, revealing two clusters of male-specific low copy number genes, separated by an ampliconic region including the HSFY gene family, which together make up most of the short arm. Both clusters contain palindromes with high sequence identity, presumably maintained by gene conversion. Many of the ancestral X-related genes previously reported in at least one mammalian Y Chromosome are represented either as active genes or partial sequences. This sequencing project has allowed us to identify genes--both single copy and amplified--on the pig Y Chromosome, to compare the pig X and Y Chromosomes for homologous sequences, and thereby to reveal mechanisms underlying pig X and Y Chromosome evolution. © 2016 Skinner et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlinger, Marco; Rowan, Andrew J.; Horswell, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intratumor heterogeneity may foster tumor evolution and adaptation and hinder personalized-medicine strategies that depend on results from single tumor-biopsy samples.METHODSTo examine intratumor heterogeneity, we performed exome sequencing, chromosome aberration analysis, and ploidy...... and 4EBP phosphorylation in vivo and constitutive activation of mTOR kinase activity in vitro. Mutational intratumor heterogeneity was seen for multiple tumor-suppressor genes converging on loss of function; SETD2, PTEN, and KDM5C underwent multiple distinct and spatially separated inactivating...... mutations within a single tumor, suggesting convergent phenotypic evolution. Gene-expression signatures of good and poor prognosis were detected in different regions of the same tumor. Allelic composition and ploidy profiling analysis revealed extensive intratumor heterogeneity, with 26 of 30 tumor samples...

  14. Sequence diversity and evolution of antimicrobial peptides in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Amparyup, Piti

    2015-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are evolutionarily ancient molecules that act as the key components in the invertebrate innate immunity against invading pathogens. Several AMPs have been identified and characterized in invertebrates, and found to display considerable diversity in their amino acid sequence, structure and biological activity. AMP genes appear to have rapidly evolved, which might have arisen from the co-evolutionary arms race between host and pathogens, and enabled organisms to survive in different microbial environments. Here, the sequence diversity of invertebrate AMPs (defensins, cecropins, crustins and anti-lipopolysaccharide factors) are presented to provide a better understanding of the evolution pattern of these peptides that play a major role in host defense mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie; Eriksson, Ulf Dennis; Møller, Inge Skrumsager

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the cytosolic enzyme glutamine synthetase 1 (GS1) has been investigated in numerous cases with the goal of improving crop nitrogen use efficiency. However, the outcome has generally been inconsistent. Here, we review possible reasons underlying the lack of success and conclude...

  16. Spectroscopic evolution of massive stars on the main sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, F.; Palacios, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The evolution of massive stars depends on several parameters, and the relation between different morphological types is not fully constrained. Aims: We aim to provide an observational view of evolutionary models in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, on the main sequence. This view should help compare observations and model predictions. Methods: We first computed evolutionary models with the code STAREVOL for initial masses between 15 and 100 M⊙. We subsequently calculated atmosphere models at specific points along the evolutionary tracks, using the code CMFGEN. Synthetic spectra obtained in this way were classified as if they were observational data: we assigned them a spectral type and a luminosity class. We tested our spectral classification by comparison to observed spectra of various stars with different spectral types. We also compared our results with empirical data of a large number of OB stars. Results: We obtain spectroscopic sequences along evolutionary tracks. In our computations, the earliest O stars (O2-3.5) appear only above 50 M⊙. For later spectral types, a similar mass limit exists, but is lower. A luminosity class V does not correspond to the entire main sequence. This only holds for the 15 M⊙ track. As mass increases, a larger portion of the main sequence is spent in luminosity class III. Above 50 M⊙, supergiants appear before the end of core-hydrogen burning. Dwarf stars (luminosity class V) do not occur on the zero-age main sequence above 80 M⊙. Consequently, the distribution of luminosity class V in the HR diagram is not a diagnostic of the length of the main sequence (above 15 M⊙) and cannot be used to constrain the size of the convective core. The distribution of dwarfs and giants in the HR diagram that results from our calculations agrees well with the location of stars analyzed by means of quantitative spectroscopy. For supergiants, there is a slight discrepancy in the sense that luminosity class I is observed slightly

  17. Clinical Sequencing Uncovers Origins and Evolution of Lassa Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kristian G; Shapiro, B Jesse; Matranga, Christian B; Sealfon, Rachel; Lin, Aaron E; Moses, Lina M; Folarin, Onikepe A; Goba, Augustine; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E; Momoh, Mambu; England, Eleina M; Winnicki, Sarah; Branco, Luis M; Gire, Stephen K; Phelan, Eric; Tariyal, Ridhi; Tewhey, Ryan; Omoniwa, Omowunmi; Fullah, Mohammed; Fonnie, Richard; Fonnie, Mbalu; Kanneh, Lansana; Jalloh, Simbirie; Gbakie, Michael; Saffa, Sidiki; Karbo, Kandeh; Gladden, Adrianne D; Qu, James; Stremlau, Matthew; Nekoui, Mahan; Finucane, Hilary K; Tabrizi, Shervin; Vitti, Joseph J; Birren, Bruce; Fitzgerald, Michael; McCowan, Caryn; Ireland, Andrea; Berlin, Aaron M; Bochicchio, James; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Lennon, Niall J; Ryan, Elizabeth M; Bjornson, Zach; Milner, Danny A; Lukens, Amanda K; Broodie, Nisha; Rowland, Megan; Heinrich, Megan; Akdag, Marjan; Schieffelin, John S; Levy, Danielle; Akpan, Henry; Bausch, Daniel G; Rubins, Kathleen; McCormick, Joseph B; Lander, Eric S; Günther, Stephan; Hensley, Lisa; Okogbenin, Sylvanus; Schaffner, Stephen F; Okokhere, Peter O; Khan, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Akpede, George O; Asogun, Danny A; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z; Happi, Christian T; Garry, Robert F; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2015-08-13

    The 2013-2015 West African epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) reminds us of how little is known about biosafety level 4 viruses. Like Ebola virus, Lassa virus (LASV) can cause hemorrhagic fever with high case fatality rates. We generated a genomic catalog of almost 200 LASV sequences from clinical and rodent reservoir samples. We show that whereas the 2013-2015 EVD epidemic is fueled by human-to-human transmissions, LASV infections mainly result from reservoir-to-human infections. We elucidated the spread of LASV across West Africa and show that this migration was accompanied by changes in LASV genome abundance, fatality rates, codon adaptation, and translational efficiency. By investigating intrahost evolution, we found that mutations accumulate in epitopes of viral surface proteins, suggesting selection for immune escape. This catalog will serve as a foundation for the development of vaccines and diagnostics. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chromosome Evolution in Connection with Repetitive Sequences and Epigenetics in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shu-Fen; Su, Ting; Cheng, Guang-Qian; Wang, Bing-Xiao; Li, Xu; Deng, Chuan-Liang; Gao, Wu-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Chromosome evolution is a fundamental aspect of evolutionary biology. The evolution of chromosome size, structure and shape, number, and the change in DNA composition suggest the high plasticity of nuclear genomes at the chromosomal level. Repetitive DNA sequences, which represent a conspicuous fraction of every eukaryotic genome, particularly in plants, are found to be tightly linked with plant chromosome evolution. Different classes of repetitive sequences have distinct distribution pattern...

  19. The intervening sequence of Coxiella burnetii: characterization and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Warrier

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The intervening sequence (IVS of Coxiella burnetii, the agent of Q fever, is a 428-nt selfish genetic element located in helix 45 of the precursor 23S rRNA. The IVS element, in turn, contains an ORF that encodes a hypothetical ribosomal S23 protein (S23p. Although S23p can be synthesized in vitro in the presence of an engineered E. coli promoter and ribosome binding site, results suggest that the protein is not synthesized in vivo. In spite of a high degree of IVS conservation among different strains of C. burnetii, the region immediately upstream of the S23p start codon is prone to change, and the S23p-encoding ORF is evidently undergoing reductive evolution. We determined that IVS excision from 23S rRNA was mediated by RNase III, and IVS RNA was rapidly degraded, thereafter. Levels of the resulting 23S rRNA fragments that flank the IVS, F1 (~1.2 kb and F2 (~1.7 kb, were quantified over C. burnetii’s logarithmic growth phase (1-5d. Results showed that 23S F1 quantities were consistently higher than those of F2 and 16S rRNA. The disparity between levels of the two 23S rRNA fragments following excision of IVS is an interesting phenomenon of unknown significance. Based upon phylogenetic analyses, IVS was acquired through horizontal transfer after C. burnetii’s divergence from an ancestral bacterium and has been subsequently maintained by vertical transfer. The widespread occurrence, maintenance and conservation of the IVS in C. burnetii imply that it plays an adaptive role or has a neutral effect on fitness.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Saccharomonospora sp. Strain LRS4.154, a Moderately Halophilic Actinobacterium with the Biotechnologically Relevant Polyketide Synthase and Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Carmona, Scarlett; Vera-Gargallo, Blanca; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Ventosa, Antonio; Sandoval-Trujillo, Horacio

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The draft genome sequence of Saccharomonospora sp. strain LRS4.154, a moderately halophilic actinobacterium, has been determined. The genome has 4,860,108 bp, a G+C content of 71.0%, and 4,525 open reading frames (ORFs). The clusters of PKS and NRPS genes, responsible for the biosynthesis of a large number of biomolecules, were identified in the genome. PMID:28546487

  1. The evolution and utility of ribosomal ITS sequences in Bambusinae ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-09

    Aug 9, 2012 ... both direct sequencing and cloning of PCR products were used for ITS analysis, with only one clone for ... ITS sequence was typically cloned to represent the mul- tiple copies of each plant ribosomal ...... Muir G. and Schlötterer C. 1999 Limitations to the phylogenetic use of ITS sequences in closely related ...

  2. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is important for photosynthetic efficiency and water use efficiency in potato as revealed by high-throughput sequencing QTL analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaminski, Kacper Piotr; Sørensen, Kirsten Kørup; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2015-01-01

    efficiency (WUE) of potato is important, but has been limited by technical difficulties in assessing the trait on individual plants and thus is poorly understood. In this study, a mapping population of potatoes has been robustly phenotyped, and considerable variation in WUE under well-watered conditions...... was observed. Two extreme WUE bulks of clones were identified and pools of genomic DNA from them as well as the parents were sequenced and mapped to reference potato genome. Following a novel data analysis approach, two highly resolved QTLs were found on chromosome 1 and 9. Interestingly, three genes encoding...

  3. Comparative genome sequencing of Drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene, and cis-element evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    years (Myr) since the pseudoobscura/melanogaster divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome-wide average, consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than random and nearby sequences......We have sequenced the genome of a second Drosophila species, Drosophila pseudoobscura, and compared this to the genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster, a primary model organism. Throughout evolution the vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same chromosome arm, but within each...... between the species-but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a pattern of repeat-mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high coadaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence...

  4. A genome-wide analysis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters and their peptides in a Planktothrix rubescens strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nederbragt Alexander J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria often produce several different oligopeptides, with unknown biological functions, by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS. Although some cyanobacterial NRPS gene cluster types are well described, the entire NRPS genomic content within a single cyanobacterial strain has never been investigated. Here we have combined a genome-wide analysis using massive parallel pyrosequencing ("454" and mass spectrometry screening of oligopeptides produced in the strain Planktothrix rubescens NIVA CYA 98 in order to identify all putative gene clusters for oligopeptides. Results Thirteen types of oligopeptides were uncovered by mass spectrometry (MS analyses. Microcystin, cyanopeptolin and aeruginosin synthetases, highly similar to already characterized NRPS, were present in the genome. Two novel NRPS gene clusters were associated with production of anabaenopeptins and microginins, respectively. Sequence-depth of the genome and real-time PCR data revealed three copies of the microginin gene cluster. Since NRPS gene cluster candidates for microviridin and oscillatorin synthesis could not be found, putative (gene encoded precursor peptide sequences to microviridin and oscillatorin were found in the genes mdnA and oscA, respectively. The genes flanking the microviridin and oscillatorin precursor genes encode putative modifying enzymes of the precursor oligopeptides. We therefore propose ribosomal pathways involving modifications and cyclisation for microviridin and oscillatorin. The microviridin, anabaenopeptin and cyanopeptolin gene clusters are situated in close proximity to each other, constituting an oligopeptide island. Conclusion Altogether seven nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS gene clusters and two gene clusters putatively encoding ribosomal oligopeptide biosynthetic pathways were revealed. Our results demonstrate that whole genome shotgun sequencing combined with MS-directed determination of oligopeptides successfully

  5. Cubozoan crystallins: evidence for convergent evolution of Pax regulatory sequences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozmik, Zbyněk; Swamynathan, S.K.; Růžičková, Jana; Jonášová, Kristýna; Pačes, Václav; Vlček, Čestmír; Piatigorsky, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2008), s. 52-61 ISSN 1520-541X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : evolution * gene * crystallin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.627, year: 2008

  6. The evolution and utility of ribosomal ITS sequences in Bambusinae ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-09

    Aug 9, 2012 ... both direct sequencing and cloning of PCR products were used for ITS analysis, with only one clone ... woody bamboos belonging to this subtribe. The recent availability of molecular data enabled tax- ..... Gigantochloa species occur mainly in Malaysia, and they can be distinguished upon flowering by the ...

  7. Phosphinothricin-tripeptide synthetases from Streptomyces viridochromogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, N; Schwartz, D; Wohlleben, W; Keller, U

    1998-02-10

    Phosphinothricyl-alanyl-alanine (Pt tripeptide (Ptt), bialaphos) is a metabolite produced by Streptomyces viridochromogenes and Streptomyces hygroscopicus. It contains the unique phosphinoamino acid phosphinothricin (Pt), which after cleavage from Ptt is active as an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase. We have isolated three enzymes that assemble the building block of the Ptt peptide backbone in a nonribosomal mechanism. The first enzyme, named Ptt-synthetase I (PTTS I), activates N-acetyldemethylphosphinothricin (AcDMPt) as adenylate and thioester. Pt is not activated. PTTS I can also activate N-acetylphosphinothricin (AcPt) or N-acetylglutamate as structural analogues of AcDMPT. Native PTTS I has an estimated size of 62 kDa whereas the denatured form displays a size of 76 kDa. Immunoblot analysis and determination of its N-terminal protein sequence revealed that PTTS I is identical with the gene product of phsA. The phsA gene was previously identified near the Pt-resistance gene pat in the Ptt biosynthesis gene cluster in S. viridochromogenes. Besides PTTS I, two alanine-activating enzymes (PTTS II/III) were partially purified from S. viridochromogenes with estimated native sizes of ca. 120 kDa (enzyme 1) and ca. 140 kDa (enzyme 2). Both enzymes bind alanine as a thioester via the corresponding adenylate. Level of PTTS II/III and product formation were correlated with each other in several different strains of S. viridochromogenes. These results indicate that Ptt is synthesized by three peptide synthetases, each activating one single amino acid. The data also confirm previous genetic data, which suggest that AcDMPt-Ala-Ala is the precursor of Ptt.

  8. The impact of the nucleosome code on protein-coding sequence evolution in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Warnecke

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Coding sequence evolution was once thought to be the result of selection on optimal protein function alone. Selection can, however, also act at the RNA level, for example, to facilitate rapid translation or ensure correct splicing. Here, we ask whether the way DNA works also imposes constraints on coding sequence evolution. We identify nucleosome positioning as a likely candidate to set up such a DNA-level selective regime and use high-resolution microarray data in yeast to compare the evolution of coding sequence bound to or free from nucleosomes. Controlling for gene expression and intra-gene location, we find a nucleosome-free "linker" sequence to evolve on average 5-6% slower at synonymous sites. A reduced rate of evolution in linker is especially evident at the 5' end of genes, where the effect extends to non-synonymous substitution rates. This is consistent with regular nucleosome architecture in this region being important in the context of gene expression control. As predicted, codons likely to generate a sequence unfavourable to nucleosome formation are enriched in linker sequence. Amino acid content is likewise skewed as a function of nucleosome occupancy. We conclude that selection operating on DNA to maintain correct positioning of nucleosomes impacts codon choice, amino acid choice, and synonymous and non-synonymous rates of evolution in coding sequence. The results support the exclusion model for nucleosome positioning and provide an alternative interpretation for runs of rare codons. As the intimate association of histones and DNA is a universal characteristic of genic sequence in eukaryotes, selection on coding sequence composition imposed by nucleosome positioning should be phylogenetically widespread.

  9. The exome sequencing identified the mutation in YARS2 encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase as a nuclear modifier for the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Peng, Yanyan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zengjun; Ji, Yanchun; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Minglian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Ye; Mo, Jun Qin; Huang, Taosheng; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disorder. Nuclear modifier genes are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. By using an exome sequencing approach, we identified a LHON susceptibility allele (c.572G>T, p.191Gly>Val) in YARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which interacts with m.11778G>A mutation to cause visual failure. We performed functional assays by using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from members of Chinese families (asymptomatic individuals carrying m.11778G>A mutation, or both m.11778G>A and heterozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations and symptomatic subjects harboring m.11778G>A and homozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations) and controls lacking these mutations. The 191Gly>Val mutation reduced the YARS2 protein level in the mutant cells. The aminoacylated efficiency and steady-state level of tRNA(Tyr) were markedly decreased in the cell lines derived from patients both carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The failure in tRNA(Tyr) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for polypeptides with high content of tyrosine codon such as ND4, ND5, ND6 and COX2 in cells lines carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The YARS2 p.191Gly>Val mutation worsened the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G>A mutation, especially reducing activities of complexes I and IV. The respiratory deficiency altered the efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mutated YARS2 aggravates mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with the m.11778G>A mutation, exceeding the threshold for the expression of blindness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and mutated nuclear-modifier YARS2. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press

  10. The evolution processes of DNA sequences, languages and carols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Jürgen; Henkel, Dorothea; Mika, Klaus

    2001-04-01

    The sequences of bases A, T, C and G of about 100 enolase, secA and cytochrome DNA were analyzed for attractive or repulsive interactions by the numbers T 1,T 2,T 3; r of nearest, next-nearest and third neighbor bases of the same kind and the concentration r=other bases/analyzed base. The area of possible T1, T2 values is limited by the linear borders T 2=2T 1-2, T 2=0 or T1=0 for clustering, attractive or repulsive interactions and the border T2=-2 T1+2(2- r) for a variation from repulsive to attractive interactions at r⩽2. Clustering is preferred by most bases in sequences of enolases and secA’ s. Major deviations with repulsive interactions of some bases are observed for archaea bacteria in secA and for highly developed animals and the human species in enolase sequences. The borders of the structure map for enthalpy stabilized structures with maximum interactions are approached in few cases. Most letters of the natural languages and some music notes are at the borders of the structure map.

  11. Phylogenetic evidence of HIV-1 sequence evolution in subjects with persistent low-level viraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Taiwo, Babafemi; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Eron, Joseph J; Bosch, Ronald J

    2015-01-01

    Persistent low-level viraemia (LLV) during the treatment of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is associated with emergent drug resistance mutation (DRM); however, insight into its driver is limited. The objectives were to study HIV-1 pol sequence evolution in subjects with persistent LLV and evaluate factors associated with sequence changes. HIV-1 pol sequences from 54 treatment-naive subjects undergoing first-line lopinavir/ritonavir- or efavirenz-containing ART were obtained at pre-ART and end of LLV. HIV-1 sequence evolution was evaluated using phylogenetic analysis and Hamming distance calculation. DRMs were interpreted based on the International AIDS Society-USA 2011 update. Subjects with new DRM during LLV had greater HIV-1 evolution across pol from the pre-ART to end of LLV compared with subjects without DRM. Evolution over non-DRM sites was similar between groups. Higher degree of genetic evolution was positively associated with higher HIV-1 RNA levels during LLV, both at DRM and non-DRM sites. The magnitude of LLV was the primary driver of evolution rate at DRM as well as non-DRM sites. Higher viral load was associated with DRM emergence in these subjects. These findings provide insights that may be applicable to the management of patients with persistent LLV during ART.

  12. PhyloSim - Monte Carlo simulation of sequence evolution in the R statistical computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Botond; Massingham, Tim; Jordan, Gregory E; Goldman, Nick

    2011-04-19

    The Monte Carlo simulation of sequence evolution is routinely used to assess the performance of phylogenetic inference methods and sequence alignment algorithms. Progress in the field of molecular evolution fuels the need for more realistic and hence more complex simulations, adapted to particular situations, yet current software makes unreasonable assumptions such as homogeneous substitution dynamics or a uniform distribution of indels across the simulated sequences. This calls for an extensible simulation framework written in a high-level functional language, offering new functionality and making it easy to incorporate further complexity. PhyloSim is an extensible framework for the Monte Carlo simulation of sequence evolution, written in R, using the Gillespie algorithm to integrate the actions of many concurrent processes such as substitutions, insertions and deletions. Uniquely among sequence simulation tools, PhyloSim can simulate arbitrarily complex patterns of rate variation and multiple indel processes, and allows for the incorporation of selective constraints on indel events. User-defined complex patterns of mutation and selection can be easily integrated into simulations, allowing PhyloSim to be adapted to specific needs. Close integration with R and the wide range of features implemented offer unmatched flexibility, making it possible to simulate sequence evolution under a wide range of realistic settings. We believe that PhyloSim will be useful to future studies involving simulated alignments.

  13. PhyloSim - Monte Carlo simulation of sequence evolution in the R statistical computing environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massingham Tim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Monte Carlo simulation of sequence evolution is routinely used to assess the performance of phylogenetic inference methods and sequence alignment algorithms. Progress in the field of molecular evolution fuels the need for more realistic and hence more complex simulations, adapted to particular situations, yet current software makes unreasonable assumptions such as homogeneous substitution dynamics or a uniform distribution of indels across the simulated sequences. This calls for an extensible simulation framework written in a high-level functional language, offering new functionality and making it easy to incorporate further complexity. Results PhyloSim is an extensible framework for the Monte Carlo simulation of sequence evolution, written in R, using the Gillespie algorithm to integrate the actions of many concurrent processes such as substitutions, insertions and deletions. Uniquely among sequence simulation tools, PhyloSim can simulate arbitrarily complex patterns of rate variation and multiple indel processes, and allows for the incorporation of selective constraints on indel events. User-defined complex patterns of mutation and selection can be easily integrated into simulations, allowing PhyloSim to be adapted to specific needs. Conclusions Close integration with R and the wide range of features implemented offer unmatched flexibility, making it possible to simulate sequence evolution under a wide range of realistic settings. We believe that PhyloSim will be useful to future studies involving simulated alignments.

  14. Organization and evolution of primate centromeric DNA from whole-genome shotgun sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Can; Ventura, Mario; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Rocchi, Mariano; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Eichler, Evan E

    2007-09-01

    The major DNA constituent of primate centromeres is alpha satellite DNA. As much as 2%-5% of sequence generated as part of primate genome sequencing projects consists of this material, which is fragmented or not assembled as part of published genome sequences due to its highly repetitive nature. Here, we develop computational methods to rapidly recover and categorize alpha-satellite sequences from previously uncharacterized whole-genome shotgun sequence data. We present an algorithm to computationally predict potential higher-order array structure based on paired-end sequence data and then experimentally validate its organization and distribution by experimental analyses. Using whole-genome shotgun data from the human, chimpanzee, and macaque genomes, we examine the phylogenetic relationship of these sequences and provide further support for a model for their evolution and mutation over the last 25 million years. Our results confirm fundamental differences in the dispersal and evolution of centromeric satellites in the Old World monkey and ape lineages of evolution.

  15. Organization and evolution of primate centromeric DNA from whole-genome shotgun sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Alkan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The major DNA constituent of primate centromeres is alpha satellite DNA. As much as 2%-5% of sequence generated as part of primate genome sequencing projects consists of this material, which is fragmented or not assembled as part of published genome sequences due to its highly repetitive nature. Here, we develop computational methods to rapidly recover and categorize alpha-satellite sequences from previously uncharacterized whole-genome shotgun sequence data. We present an algorithm to computationally predict potential higher-order array structure based on paired-end sequence data and then experimentally validate its organization and distribution by experimental analyses. Using whole-genome shotgun data from the human, chimpanzee, and macaque genomes, we examine the phylogenetic relationship of these sequences and provide further support for a model for their evolution and mutation over the last 25 million years. Our results confirm fundamental differences in the dispersal and evolution of centromeric satellites in the Old World monkey and ape lineages of evolution.

  16. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie

    fertilizer requirement. The enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) has been a major topic in plant nitrogen research for decades due to its central role in plant N metabolism. The cytosolic version of this enzyme (GS1) plays an important role in relation to primary N assimilation as well as in relation to N...

  17. Markovian and non-Markovian protein sequence evolution: aggregated Markov process models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiol, Carolin; Goldman, Nick

    2011-08-26

    Over the years, there have been claims that evolution proceeds according to systematically different processes over different timescales and that protein evolution behaves in a non-Markovian manner. On the other hand, Markov models are fundamental to many applications in evolutionary studies. Apparent non-Markovian or time-dependent behavior has been attributed to influence of the genetic code at short timescales and dominance of physicochemical properties of the amino acids at long timescales. However, any long time period is simply the accumulation of many short time periods, and it remains unclear why evolution should appear to act systematically differently across the range of timescales studied. We show that the observed time-dependent behavior can be explained qualitatively by modeling protein sequence evolution as an aggregated Markov process (AMP): a time-homogeneous Markovian substitution model observed only at the level of the amino acids encoded by the protein-coding DNA sequence. The study of AMPs sheds new light on the relationship between amino acid-level and codon-level models of sequence evolution, and our results suggest that protein evolution should be modeled at the codon level rather than using amino acid substitution models. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genome sequence of the brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Richard A.; Weinstock, George M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Scherer, Steven; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Worley, Kim C.; Burch, Paula E.; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Hines, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; DeRamo, Christine; Delgado, Oliver; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Miner, George; Morgan, Margaret; Hawes, Alicia; Gill, Rachel; Holt, Robert A.; Adams, Mark D.; Amanatides, Peter G.; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Barnstead, Mary; Chin, Soo; Evans, Cheryl A.; Ferriera, Steven; Fosler, Carl; Glodek, Anna; Gu, Zhiping; Jennings, Don; Kraft, Cheryl L.; Nguyen, Trixie; Pfannkoch, Cynthia M.; Sitter, Cynthia; Sutton, Granger G.; Venter, J. Craig; Woodage, Trevor; Smith, Douglas; Lee, Hong-Maei; Gustafson, Erik; Cahill, Patrick; Kana, Arnold; Doucette-Stamm, Lynn; Weinstock, Keith; Fechtel, Kim; Weiss, Robert B.; Dunn, Diane M.; Green, Eric D.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline; Bosdet, Ian; Fjell, Chris; Jones, Steven; Krzywinski, Martin; Mathewson, Carrie; Siddiqui, Asim; Wye, Natasja; McPherson, John; Zhao, Shaying; Fraser, Claire M.; Shetty, Jyoti; Shatsman, Sofiya; Geer, Keita; Chen, Yixin; Abramzon, Sofyia; Nierman, William C.; Havlak, Paul H.; Chen, Rui; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Ren, Yanru; Song, Xing-Zhi; Li, Bingshan; Liu, Yue; Qin, Xiang; Cawley, Simon; Cooney, A.J.; D' Souza, Lisa M.; Martin, Kirt; Wu, Jia Qian; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Jackson, Andrew R.; Kalafus, Kenneth J.; McLeod, Michael P.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Virk, Davinder; Volkov, Andrei; Wheeler, David A.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Tuzun, Eray; Birney, Ewan; Mongin, Emmanuel; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Woodwark, Cara; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Torrents, David; Alexandersson, Marina; Trask, Barbara J.; Young, Janet M.; et al.

    2004-02-02

    The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90 percent of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.

  19. Genome sequence analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon: insights into grass genome evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulman, Al

    2009-08-09

    Three subfamilies of grasses, the Erhardtoideae (rice), the Panicoideae (maize, sorghum, sugar cane and millet), and the Pooideae (wheat, barley and cool season forage grasses) provide the basis of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the complete genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be completely sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes reveals a precise sequence- based history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grass family and identifies nested insertions of whole chromosomes into centromeric regions as a predominant mechanism driving chromosome evolution in the grasses. The relatively compact genome of Brachypodium is maintained by a balance of retroelement replication and loss. The complete genome sequence of Brachypodium, coupled to its exceptional promise as a model system for grass research, will support the development of new energy and food crops

  20. Evolution of the Sun and Physical Processes at the Early Stage Before Main Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baturin, V. A.; Oreshina, A. V.; Ayukov, S. V.; Gorshkov, A. B.

    2017-05-01

    We consider basic conceptions about structure and evolution of stars, using our Sun and its possible pre-history in the focus of attention. The Sun is chosen because it is a star with well-studied internal structure, moderate mass, at the middle-age of its life on the Main Sequence (MS). Special attention is given to quasi-stationary evolution before Main Sequence. In comparison with MS, this early pre-Main Sequence (pMS) stage is characterized by faster change of structure parameters and higher luminosity, as well as by dominant role of gravitational sources of energy with respect to nuclear ones. During short time, about 50 Myr, a star undergoes some transformations of its structure: from fully convective to hybrid convective-radiative and finally to radiative-dominated, almost stationary star at the MS. One of the main questions of stellar evolution is if internal structure depends on previous states and if some traces of early evolution exist in later times. One can assume an existence of traces in the surface lithium abundance as well as in some accumulation of heavy elements in the core which occurs during pMS. Previous structure or evolution of a star or its mass change do not leave traces in the internal structure of the present-date Sun.

  1. The genome sequence of taurine cattle: A window to ruminant biology and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand the biology and evolution of ruminants, the cattle genome was sequenced to about sevenfold coverage. The cattle genome contains a minimum of 22,000 genes, with a core set of 14,345 orthologs shared among seven mammalian species of which 1217 are absent or undetected in noneutherian (ma...

  2. Comparative genome sequencing of drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene and cis-element evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Todd, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catherine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenee; Verduzco, Daniel; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2004-04-01

    The genome sequence of a second fruit fly, D. pseudoobscura, presents an opportunity for comparative analysis of a primary model organism D. melanogaster. The vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled leading to the identification of approximately 1300 syntenic blocks. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 35 My since divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome wide average consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than control sequences between the species but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a picture of repeat mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high co-adaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.

  3. Evolution of endogenous sequences of banana streak virus: what can we learn from banana (Musa sp.) evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayral, Philippe; Blondin, Laurence; Guidolin, Olivier; Carreel, Françoise; Hippolyte, Isabelle; Perrier, Xavier; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line

    2010-07-01

    Endogenous plant pararetroviruses (EPRVs) are viral sequences of the family Caulimoviridae integrated into the nuclear genome of numerous plant species. The ability of some endogenous sequences of Banana streak viruses (eBSVs) in the genome of banana (Musa sp.) to induce infections just like the virus itself was recently demonstrated (P. Gayral et al., J. Virol. 83:6697-6710, 2008). Although eBSVs probably arose from accidental events, infectious eBSVs constitute an extreme case of parasitism, as well as a newly described strategy for vertical virus transmission in plants. We investigated the early evolutionary stages of infectious eBSV for two distinct BSV species-GF (BSGFV) and Imové (BSImV)-through the study of their distribution, insertion polymorphism, and structure evolution among selected banana genotypes representative of the diversity of 60 wild Musa species and genotypes. To do so, the historical frame of host evolution was analyzed by inferring banana phylogeny from two chloroplast regions-matK and trnL-trnF-as well as from the nuclear genome, using 19 microsatellite loci. We demonstrated that both BSV species integrated recently in banana evolution, circa 640,000 years ago. The two infectious eBSVs were subjected to different selective pressures and showed distinct levels of rearrangement within their final structure. In addition, the molecular phylogenies of integrated and nonintegrated BSVs enabled us to establish the phylogenetic origins of eBSGFV and eBSImV.

  4. Synthetic biology for the directed evolution of protein biocatalysts: navigating sequence space intelligently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currin, Andrew; Swainston, Neil; Day, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of a protein affects both its structure and its function. Thus, the ability to modify the sequence, and hence the structure and activity, of individual proteins in a systematic way, opens up many opportunities, both scientifically and (as we focus on here) for exploitation in biocatalysis. Modern methods of synthetic biology, whereby increasingly large sequences of DNA can be synthesised de novo, allow an unprecedented ability to engineer proteins with novel functions. However, the number of possible proteins is far too large to test individually, so we need means for navigating the ‘search space’ of possible protein sequences efficiently and reliably in order to find desirable activities and other properties. Enzymologists distinguish binding (K d) and catalytic (k cat) steps. In a similar way, judicious strategies have blended design (for binding, specificity and active site modelling) with the more empirical methods of classical directed evolution (DE) for improving k cat (where natural evolution rarely seeks the highest values), especially with regard to residues distant from the active site and where the functional linkages underpinning enzyme dynamics are both unknown and hard to predict. Epistasis (where the ‘best’ amino acid at one site depends on that or those at others) is a notable feature of directed evolution. The aim of this review is to highlight some of the approaches that are being developed to allow us to use directed evolution to improve enzyme properties, often dramatically. We note that directed evolution differs in a number of ways from natural evolution, including in particular the available mechanisms and the likely selection pressures. Thus, we stress the opportunities afforded by techniques that enable one to map sequence to (structure and) activity in silico, as an effective means of modelling and exploring protein landscapes. Because known landscapes may be assessed and reasoned about as a whole

  5. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli. Properties of the purified enzyme and primary structure of the prs gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Harlow, Kenneth W.; King, Cheryl J.

    1986-01-01

    of ADP. The nucleotide sequence of the E. coli prs gene has been determined and the coding segment established. The deduced amino acid sequence of P-Rib-PP synthetase contained 314 amino acid residues and the molecular weight was calculated as 34,060. The initiation site of transcription was determined......Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (P-Rib-PP) synthetase of Escherichia coli has been purified to near homogeneity from a strain harboring the prs gene, encoding P-Rib-PP synthetase, on a multicopy plasmid. Analysis of the enzyme showed that it required inorganic phosphate for activity and for stability...

  6. Whole-genome duplication and molecular evolution in Cornus L. (Cornaceae - Insights from transcriptome sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yu

    Full Text Available The pattern and rate of genome evolution have profound consequences in organismal evolution. Whole-genome duplication (WGD, or polyploidy, has been recognized as an important evolutionary mechanism of plant diversification. However, in non-model plants the molecular signals of genome duplications have remained largely unexplored. High-throughput transcriptome data from next-generation sequencing have set the stage for novel investigations of genome evolution using new bioinformatic and methodological tools in a phylogenetic framework. Here we compare ten de novo-assembled transcriptomes representing the major lineages of the angiosperm genus Cornus (dogwood and relevant outgroups using a customized pipeline for analyses. Using three distinct approaches, molecular dating of orthologous genes, analyses of the distribution of synonymous substitutions between paralogous genes, and examination of substitution rates through time, we detected a shared WGD event in the late Cretaceous across all taxa sampled. The inferred doubling event coincides temporally with the paleoclimatic changes associated with the initial divergence of the genus into three major lineages. Analyses also showed an acceleration of rates of molecular evolution after WGD. The highest rates of molecular evolution were observed in the transcriptome of the herbaceous lineage, C. canadensis, a species commonly found at higher latitudes, including the Arctic. Our study demonstrates the value of transcriptome data for understanding genome evolution in closely related species. The results suggest dramatic increase in sea surface temperature in the late Cretaceous may have contributed to the evolution and diversification of flowering plants.

  7. Hepatocytes explanted in the spleen preferentially express carbamoylphosphate synthetase rather than glutamine synthetase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, W. H.; Been, W.; Charles, R.; Moorman, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    Urea cycle enzymes and glutamine synthetase are essential for NH3 detoxification and systemic pH homeostasis in mammals. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase, the first and flux-determining enzyme of the cycle, is found only in a large periportal compartment, and glutamine synthetase is found only in a

  8. Targeted sequencing of venom genes from cone snail genomes improves understanding of conotoxin molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Mark A; Mahardika, Gusti N

    2018-03-05

    To expand our capacity to discover venom sequences from the genomes of venomous organisms, we applied targeted sequencing techniques to selectively recover venom gene superfamilies and non-toxin loci from the genomes of 32 cone snail species (family, Conidae), a diverse group of marine gastropods that capture their prey using a cocktail of neurotoxic peptides (conotoxins). We were able to successfully recover conotoxin gene superfamilies across all species with high confidence (> 100X coverage) and used these data to provide new insights into conotoxin evolution. First, we found that conotoxin gene superfamilies are composed of 1-6 exons and are typically short in length (mean = ∼85bp). Second, we expanded our understanding of the following genetic features of conotoxin evolution: (a) positive selection, where exons coding the mature toxin region were often three times more divergent than their adjacent noncoding regions, (b) expression regulation, with comparisons to transcriptome data showing that cone snails only express a fraction of the genes available in their genome (24%-63%), and (c) extensive gene turnover, where Conidae species varied from 120-859 conotoxin gene copies. Finally, using comparative phylogenetic methods, we found that while diet specificity did not predict patterns of conotoxin evolution, dietary breadth was positively correlated with total conotoxin gene diversity. Overall, the targeted sequencing technique demonstrated here has the potential to radically increase the pace at which venom gene families are sequenced and studied, reshaping our ability to understand the impact of genetic changes on ecologically relevant phenotypes and subsequent diversification.

  9. Modeling the expected lifetime and evolution of a deme's principal genetic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian

    2014-03-01

    The principal genetic sequence (PGS) is the most common genetic sequence in a deme. The PGS changes over time because new genetic sequences are created by inversions, compete with the current PGS, and a small fraction become PGSs. A set of coupled difference equations provides a description of the evolution of the PGS distribution function in an ensemble of demes. Solving the set of equations produces the survival probability of a new genetic sequence and the expected lifetime of an existing PGS as a function of inversion size and rate, recombination rate, and deme size. Additionally, the PGS distribution function is used to explain the transition pathway from old to new PGSs. We compare these results to a cellular automaton based representation of a deme and the drosophila species, D. melanogaster and D. yakuba.

  10. Ultra-deep sequencing reveals the subclonal structure and genomic evolution of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Thomassen, Mads; Larsen, Martin Jakob

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), a subgroup of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), is primarily caused by alcohol consumption and tobacco use. Recent DNA sequencing studies suggests that HNSCC are very heterogeneous between patients; however the intra-patient subclonal...... structure remains unexplored due to lack of sampling multiple tumor biopsies from each patient. Materials and methods: To examine the clonal structure and describe the genomic cancer evolution we applied whole-exome sequencing combined with targeted ultra-deep targeted sequencing on biopsies from 5stage IV...... OSCC patients. From each patient, a series of biopsies were sampled from 3 distinct geographical sites in primary tumor and 1 lymph node metastasis. A whole blood sample was taken as the matched reference. Results and discussion: Our results demonstrate that ultra-deep sequencing gives a level...

  11. Non-divergence theory of evolution: sequence comparison of some proteins from snakes and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiya, N; Yagi, T

    1985-08-01

    A "non-divergence theory" is proposed for the mechanism of evolution. The theory is based on the observation that comparison of the amino acid sequences of related proteins in various organisms gives inconsistent results from one type of protein to another, and on the occurrence of significant gene transfer among living organisms. Special attention is focused on the sequence comparisons of short- and long-chain neurotoxins and phospholipases A2 from the venoms of proteroglyphous snakes and those of microbial ferredoxins, rubredoxins, and flavodoxins.

  12. Sequence and evolution of HLA-DR7- and -DRw53-associated. beta. -chain genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.A.T.; Wilkinson, D.; Bodmer, W.F.; Trowsdale, J.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones representing products of the DR7 and DRw53 ..beta..-chain genes were isolated from the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line MANN (DR7, DRw53, DQw2, DPw2). The DRw53..beta.. sequence was identical to a DRw53..beta.. sequence derived from cells with a DR4 haplotype. In contrast, the DR7..beta.. sequence was as unrelated to DR4..beta.. sequence as it was to other DR..beta..-related genes, except at the 3'-untranslated region. These results suggest that the DR7 and DR4 haplotypes may have been derived relatively recently from a common ancestral haplotype and that the DR4 and DR7 ..beta..-chain genes have undergone more rapid diversification in the ..beta..1 domains, most probably as a result of natural selection, than have the DRw53..beta..-chain genes. Short tracts of sequence within the DR7 and DRw53 ..beta..1 domains were shared with other DR..beta.. sequences, indicating that exchanges of genetic information between ..beta..1 domains of DR..beta..-related genes have played a part in their evolution. Serological analysis of mouse L-cell transfectants expressing surface HLA-DR7 molecules, confirmed by antibody binding and allelic sequence comparison, identified amino acid residues that may be critical to the binding of a monomorphic DR- and CP-specific monoclonal antibody.

  13. Centromere and telomere sequence alterations reflect the rapid genome evolution within the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Trung D; Cao, Hieu X; Jovtchev, Gabriele; Neumann, Pavel; Novák, Petr; Fojtová, Miloslava; Vu, Giang T H; Macas, Jiří; Fajkus, Jiří; Schubert, Ingo; Fuchs, Joerg

    2015-12-01

    Linear chromosomes of eukaryotic organisms invariably possess centromeres and telomeres to ensure proper chromosome segregation during nuclear divisions and to protect the chromosome ends from deterioration and fusion, respectively. While centromeric sequences may differ between species, with arrays of tandemly repeated sequences and retrotransposons being the most abundant sequence types in plant centromeres, telomeric sequences are usually highly conserved among plants and other organisms. The genome size of the carnivorous genus Genlisea (Lentibulariaceae) is highly variable. Here we study evolutionary sequence plasticity of these chromosomal domains at an intrageneric level. We show that Genlisea nigrocaulis (1C = 86 Mbp; 2n = 40) and G. hispidula (1C = 1550 Mbp; 2n = 40) differ as to their DNA composition at centromeres and telomeres. G. nigrocaulis and its close relative G. pygmaea revealed mainly 161 bp tandem repeats, while G. hispidula and its close relative G. subglabra displayed a combination of four retroelements at centromeric positions. G. nigrocaulis and G. pygmaea chromosome ends are characterized by the Arabidopsis-type telomeric repeats (TTTAGGG); G. hispidula and G. subglabra instead revealed two intermingled sequence variants (TTCAGG and TTTCAGG). These differences in centromeric and, surprisingly, also in telomeric DNA sequences, uncovered between groups with on average a > 9-fold genome size difference, emphasize the fast genome evolution within this genus. Such intrageneric evolutionary alteration of telomeric repeats with cytosine in the guanine-rich strand, not yet known for plants, might impact the epigenetic telomere chromatin modification. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Both Maintenance and Avoidance of RNA-Binding Protein Interactions Constrain Coding Sequence Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savisaar, Rosina; Hurst, Laurence D

    2017-05-01

    While the principal force directing coding sequence (CDS) evolution is selection on protein function, to ensure correct gene expression CDSs must also maintain interactions with RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Understanding how our genes are shaped by these RNA-level pressures is necessary for diagnostics and for improving transgenes. However, the evolutionary impact of the need to maintain RBP interactions remains unresolved. Are coding sequences constrained by the need to specify RBP binding motifs? If so, what proportion of mutations are affected? Might sequence evolution also be constrained by the need not to specify motifs that might attract unwanted binding, for instance because it would interfere with exon definition? Here, we have scanned human CDSs for motifs that have been experimentally determined to be recognized by RBPs. We observe two sets of motifs-those that are enriched over nucleotide-controlled null and those that are depleted. Importantly, the depleted set is enriched for motifs recognized by non-CDS binding RBPs. Supporting the functional relevance of our observations, we find that motifs that are more enriched are also slower-evolving. The net effect of this selection to preserve is a reduction in the over-all rate of synonymous evolution of 2-3% in both primates and rodents. Stronger motif depletion, on the other hand, is associated with stronger selection against motif gain in evolution. The challenge faced by our CDSs is therefore not only one of attracting the right RBPs but also of avoiding the wrong ones, all while also evolving under selection pressures related to protein structure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. The Genome Sequence of Taurine Cattle: A Window to Ruminant Biology and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Elsik, Christine G.; Tellam, Ross L.; Worley, Kim C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Abatepaulo, Antonio R. R.; Abbey, Colette A.; Adelson, David L.; Aerts, Jan; Ahola, Virpi; Alexander, Lee; Alioto, Tyler; Almeida, Iassudara G.; Amadio, Ariel F.; Anatriello, Elen; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2009-01-01

    To understand the biology and evolution of ruminants, the cattle genome was sequenced to about sevenfold coverage. The cattle genome contains a minimum of 22,000 genes, with a core set of 14,345 orthologs shared among seven mammalian species of which 1217 are absent or undetected in noneutherian (marsupial or monotreme) genomes. Cattle-specific evolutionary breakpoint regions in chromosomes have a higher density of segmental duplications, enrichment of repetitive elements, and species-specifi...

  16. New perspectives on glutamine synthetase in grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarbreck, Stéphanie M; Defoin-Platel, M; Hindle, M; Saqi, M; Habash, Dimah Z

    2011-02-01

    Members of the glutamine synthetase (GS) gene family have now been characterized in many crop species such as wheat, rice, and maize. Studies have shown that cytosolic GS isoforms are involved in nitrogen remobilization during leaf senescence and emphasized a role in seed production particularly in small grain crop species. Data from the sequencing of genomes for model crops and expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries from non-model species have strengthened the idea that the cytosolic GS genes are organized in three functionally and phylogenetically conserved subfamilies. Using a bioinformatic approach, the considerable publicly available information on high throughput gene expression was mined to search for genes having patterns of expression similar to GS. Interesting new hypotheses have emerged from searching for co-expressed genes across multiple unfiltered experimental data sets in rice. This approach should inform new experimental designs and studies to explore the regulation of the GS gene family further. It is expected that understanding the regulation of GS under varied climatic conditions will emerge as an important new area considering the results from recent studies that have shown nitrogen assimilation to be critical to plant acclimation to high CO(2) concentrations.

  17. Ultra-deep sequencing reveals the subclonal structure and genomic evolution of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Thomassen, Mads; Larsen, Martin Jakob

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), a subgroup of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), is primarily caused by alcohol consumption and tobacco use. Recent DNA sequencing studies suggests that HNSCC are very heterogeneous between patients; however the intra-patient subclonal...... structure remains unexplored due to lack of sampling multiple tumor biopsies from each patient. Materials and methods: To examine the clonal structure and describe the genomic cancer evolution we applied whole-exome sequencing combined with targeted ultra-deep targeted sequencing on biopsies from 5stage IV...... of unprecedented high resolution enabling clear detection of subclonal structure and observation of otherwise undetectable mutations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that OSCC show a high degree of inter-patient heterogeneity but a low degree of intra-patient/tumor heterogeneity. However, some OSCC cancers contain...

  18. On Statistical Modeling of Sequencing Noise in High Depth Data to Assess Tumor Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadan, Raul; Bhanot, Gyan; Marsilio, Sonia; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Pasqualucci, Laura; Khiabanian, Hossein

    2017-12-01

    One cause of cancer mortality is tumor evolution to therapy-resistant disease. First line therapy often targets the dominant clone, and drug resistance can emerge from preexisting clones that gain fitness through therapy-induced natural selection. Such mutations may be identified using targeted sequencing assays by analysis of noise in high-depth data. Here, we develop a comprehensive, unbiased model for sequencing error background. We find that noise in sufficiently deep DNA sequencing data can be approximated by aggregating negative binomial distributions. Mutations with frequencies above noise may have prognostic value. We evaluate our model with simulated exponentially expanded populations as well as data from cell line and patient sample dilution experiments, demonstrating its utility in prognosticating tumor progression. Our results may have the potential to identify significant mutations that can cause recurrence. These results are relevant in the pretreatment clinical setting to determine appropriate therapy and prepare for potential recurrence pretreatment.

  19. Accelerated Evolution of Conserved Noncoding Sequences in theHuman Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prambhakar, Shyam; Noonan, James P.; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, EdwardM.

    2006-07-06

    Genomic comparisons between human and distant, non-primatemammals are commonly used to identify cis-regulatory elements based onconstrained sequence evolution. However, these methods fail to detect"cryptic" functional elements, which are too weakly conserved amongmammals to distinguish from nonfunctional DNA. To address this problem,we explored the potential of deep intra-primate sequence comparisons. Wesequenced the orthologs of 558 kb of human genomic sequence, coveringmultiple loci involved in cholesterol homeostasis, in 6 nonhumanprimates. Our analysis identified 6 noncoding DNA elements displayingsignificant conservation among primates, but undetectable in more distantcomparisons. In vitro and in vivo tests revealed that at least three ofthese 6 elements have regulatory function. Notably, the mouse orthologsof these three functional human sequences had regulatory activity despitetheir lack of significant sequence conservation, indicating that they arecryptic ancestral cis-regulatory elements. These regulatory elementscould still be detected in a smaller set of three primate speciesincluding human, rhesus and marmoset. Since the human and rhesus genomesequences are already available, and the marmoset genome is activelybeing sequenced, the primate-specific conservation analysis describedhere can be applied in the near future on a whole-genome scale, tocomplement the annotation provided by more distant speciescomparisons.

  20. Physical studies of adenylosuccinate synthetase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    To determine the chemical mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by adenylosuccinate synthetase, positional isotope exchange studies were performed. Positional isotope exchange from the β-γ bridge to the β nonbridge position of [γ- 18 O]GTP was followed using 31 P NMR. The positional isotope exchange was found to occur in the presence of either IMP or IMP and succinate. The exchange did not occur in the presence of asparate. These results support a reaction mechanism which involves formation of a 6-phosphoryl-IMP intermediate with subsequent attack by aspartate to form adenylosuccinate as originally proposed by Lieberman in 1956. In order to resolve the NMR resonances for positional isotope exchange, it was necessary to find a chelator which would limit exchange broadening. trans-1,2-Diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid was found to be a suitable chelator at neutral and acidic pH. Studies of adenylosuccinate synthetase from Escherichia coli have been limited by the low concentrations of enzyme present in the cell and the difficulty in purifying the enzyme to homogeneity. Overproduction of the enzyme by cloning the purA gene into a runaway replication plasmid allowed the cells to produce a much higher concentration of enzyme. A new purification scheme is reported that takes advantage of the overproduced enzyme. Yields of 75 mg of homogeneous enzyme have been obtained from 76 g of E. coli cell paste

  1. Conservation of Tubulin-Binding Sequences in TRPV1 throughout Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Puspendu; Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Goswami, Chandan

    2012-01-01

    Background Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid sub type 1 (TRPV1), commonly known as capsaicin receptor can detect multiple stimuli ranging from noxious compounds, low pH, temperature as well as electromagnetic wave at different ranges. In addition, this receptor is involved in multiple physiological and sensory processes. Therefore, functions of TRPV1 have direct influences on adaptation and further evolution also. Availability of various eukaryotic genomic sequences in public domain facilitates us in studying the molecular evolution of TRPV1 protein and the respective conservation of certain domains, motifs and interacting regions that are functionally important. Methodology and Principal Findings Using statistical and bioinformatics tools, our analysis reveals that TRPV1 has evolved about ∼420 million years ago (MYA). Our analysis reveals that specific regions, domains and motifs of TRPV1 has gone through different selection pressure and thus have different levels of conservation. We found that among all, TRP box is the most conserved and thus have functional significance. Our results also indicate that the tubulin binding sequences (TBS) have evolutionary significance as these stretch sequences are more conserved than many other essential regions of TRPV1. The overall distribution of positively charged residues within the TBS motifs is conserved throughout evolution. In silico analysis reveals that the TBS-1 and TBS-2 of TRPV1 can form helical structures and may play important role in TRPV1 function. Conclusions and Significance Our analysis identifies the regions of TRPV1, which are important for structure – function relationship. This analysis indicates that tubulin binding sequence-1 (TBS-1) near the TRP-box forms a potential helix and the tubulin interactions with TRPV1 via TBS-1 have evolutionary significance. This interaction may be required for the proper channel function and regulation and may also have significance in the context of Taxol

  2. Seventeen new complete mtDNA sequences reveal extensive mitochondrial genome evolution within the Demospongiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Wang

    Full Text Available Two major transitions in animal evolution--the origins of multicellularity and bilaterality--correlate with major changes in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA organization. Demosponges, the largest class in the phylum Porifera, underwent only the first of these transitions and their mitochondrial genomes display a peculiar combination of ancestral and animal-specific features. To get an insight into the evolution of mitochondrial genomes within the Demospongiae, we determined 17 new mtDNA sequences from this group and analyzing them with five previously published sequences. Our analysis revealed that all demosponge mtDNAs are 16- to 25-kbp circular molecules, containing 13-15 protein genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 2-27 tRNA genes. All but four pairs of sampled genomes had unique gene orders, with the number of shared gene boundaries ranging from 1 to 41. Although most demosponge species displayed low rates of mitochondrial sequence evolution, a significant acceleration in evolutionary rates occurred in the G1 group (orders Dendroceratida, Dictyoceratida, and Verticillitida. Large variation in mtDNA organization was also observed within the G0 group (order Homosclerophorida including gene rearrangements, loss of tRNA genes, and the presence of two introns in Plakortis angulospiculatus. While introns are rare in modern-day demosponge mtDNA, we inferred that at least one intron was present in cox1 of the common ancestor of all demosponges. Our study uncovered an extensive mitochondrial genomic diversity within the Demospongiae. Although all sampled mitochondrial genomes retained some ancestral features, including a minimally modified genetic code, conserved structures of tRNA genes, and presence of multiple non-coding regions, they vary considerably in their size, gene content, gene order, and the rates of sequence evolution. Some of the changes in demosponge mtDNA, such as the loss of tRNA genes and the appearance of hairpin-containing repetitive elements

  3. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH 2 from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and [ 125 I]-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the [ 125 I]antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10 9 platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency

  4. Focal plane AIT sequence: evolution from HRG-Spot 5 to Pleiades HR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, Roland; Pranyies, Pascal; Toubhans, Isabelle

    2017-11-01

    Optical and geometrical image qualities of Focal Planes, for "push-broom" high resolution remote sensing satellites, require the implementation of specific means and methods for the AIT sequence. Indeed the geometric performances of the focal plane mainly axial focusing and transverse registration, are duly obtained on the basis of adjustment, setting and measurement of optical and CCD components with an accuracy of a few microns. Since the end of the 1970s, EADS-SODERN has developed a series of detection units for earth observation instruments like SPOT and Helios. And EADS-SODERN is now responsible for the development of the Pleiades High Resolution Focal Plane assembly. This paper presents the AIT sequences. We introduce all the efforts, innovative solutions and improvements made on the assembly facilities to match the technical evolutions and breakthrough of the Pleiades HR FP concept in comparison with the previous High Resolution Geometric SPOT 5 Focal Plane. The main evolution drivers are the implementation of strip filters and the realization of 400 mm continuous retinas. For Pleiades HR AIT sequence, three specific integration and measuring benches, corresponding with the different assembly stages, are used: a 3-D non-contact measurement machine for the assembly of detection module, a 3-D measurement machine for mirror integration on the main Focal Plane SiC structure, and a 3-D geometric coordinates control bench to focus detection module lines and to ensure they are well registered together.

  5. Valyl-tRNA synthetase gene of Escherichia coli K12: Molecular genetic characterization and homology within a family of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, J.D. III.

    1988-01-01

    This work reports the subcloning and characterization of the molecular elements necessary for the expression of the Escherichia coli valS gene encoding valyl-tRNA synthetase. The valS gene was subcloned from plasmid pLC26-22 by genetic complementation of a valS ts strain. The DNA region encoding the valS structural gene was determined by in vitro coupled transcription-translation assays. Cells transformed with a plasmid containing a full length copy of the valS gene enhanced in vivo valyl-tRNA synthetase specific activity twelve-fold. DNA sequences flanking the valS structural gene are presented. The transcription initiation sites of the valS gene were determined, in vivo and in vitro, by S1 nuclease protection studies, primer-extension analysis and both [α- 32 P]labeled and [γ- 32 P]end-labeled in vitro transcription assays. The DNA sequence of the valS gene of Escherichia coli has been determined. Significant similarity at the primary sequence level was detected between valyl-tRNA synthetase of E. coli and other known branched-chain aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. An extended open reading frame (ORF) encoded on the DNA strand opposite the valS structural gene is described

  6. Evolutionary divergence of chloroplast FAD synthetase proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arilla-Luna Sonia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flavin adenine dinucleotide synthetases (FADSs - a group of bifunctional enzymes that carry out the dual functions of riboflavin phosphorylation to produce flavin mononucleotide (FMN and its subsequent adenylation to generate FAD in most prokaryotes - were studied in plants in terms of sequence, structure and evolutionary history. Results Using a variety of bioinformatics methods we have found that FADS enzymes localized to the chloroplasts, which we term as plant-like FADS proteins, are distributed across a variety of green plant lineages and constitute a divergent protein family clearly of cyanobacterial origin. The C-terminal module of these enzymes does not contain the typical riboflavin kinase active site sequence, while the N-terminal module is broadly conserved. These results agree with a previous work reported by Sandoval et al. in 2008. Furthermore, our observations and preliminary experimental results indicate that the C-terminus of plant-like FADS proteins may contain a catalytic activity, but different to that of their prokaryotic counterparts. In fact, homology models predict that plant-specific conserved residues constitute a distinct active site in the C-terminus. Conclusions A structure-based sequence alignment and an in-depth evolutionary survey of FADS proteins, thought to be crucial in plant metabolism, are reported, which will be essential for the correct annotation of plant genomes and further structural and functional studies. This work is a contribution to our understanding of the evolutionary history of plant-like FADS enzymes, which constitute a new family of FADS proteins whose C-terminal module might be involved in a distinct catalytic activity.

  7. Recalibrating Equus evolution using the genome sequence of an early Middle Pleistocene horse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Zhang, Guojie

    2013-01-01

    The rich fossil record of equids has made them a model for evolutionary processes. Here we present a 1.12-times coverage draft genome from a horse bone recovered from permafrost dated to approximately 560-780 thousand years before present (kyr bp). Our data represent the oldest full genome sequence...... and olfaction throughout horse evolution. Finally, we identify 29 genomic regions among horse breeds that deviate from neutrality and show low levels of genetic variation compared to the Przewalski's horse. Such regions could correspond to loci selected early during domestication....

  8. Genomic architecture and evolution of clear cell renal cell carcinomas defined by multiregion sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Ignacio; Fisher, Rosalie; McGranahan, Nicholas; Matthews, Nicholas; Santos, Claudio R; Martinez, Pierre; Phillimore, Benjamin; Begum, Sharmin; Rabinowitz, Adam; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Gulati, Sakshi; Bates, Paul A; Stamp, Gordon; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Hazell, Steven; Futreal, P Andrew; Stewart, Aengus; Swanton, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal carcinomas (ccRCCs) can display intratumor heterogeneity (ITH). We applied multiregion exome sequencing (M-seq) to resolve the genetic architecture and evolutionary histories of ten ccRCCs. Ultra-deep sequencing identified ITH in all cases. We found that 73–75% of identified ccRCC driver aberrations were subclonal, confounding estimates of driver mutation prevalence. ITH increased with the number of biopsies analyzed, without evidence of saturation in most tumors. Chromosome 3p loss and VHL aberrations were the only ubiquitous events. The proportion of C>T transitions at CpG sites increased during tumor progression. M-seq permits the temporal resolution of ccRCC evolution and refines mutational signatures occurring during tumor development. PMID:24487277

  9. Analysis of Complete Nucleotide Sequences of 12 Gossypium Chloroplast Genomes: Origin and Evolution of Allotetraploids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Xiong, Guanjun; Li, Pengbo; He, Fei; Huang, Yi; Wang, Kunbo; Li, Zhaohu; Hua, Jinping

    2012-01-01

    Background Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is a model system for the analysis of polyploidization. Although ascertaining the donor species of allotetraploid cotton has been intensively studied, sequence comparison of Gossypium chloroplast genomes is still of interest to understand the mechanisms underlining the evolution of Gossypium allotetraploids, while it is generally accepted that the parents were A- and D-genome containing species. Here we performed a comparative analysis of 13 Gossypium chloroplast genomes, twelve of which are presented here for the first time. Methodology/Principal Findings The size of 12 chloroplast genomes under study varied from 159,959 bp to 160,433 bp. The chromosomes were highly similar having >98% sequence identity. They encoded the same set of 112 unique genes which occurred in a uniform order with only slightly different boundary junctions. Divergence due to indels as well as substitutions was examined separately for genome, coding and noncoding sequences. The genome divergence was estimated as 0.374% to 0.583% between allotetraploid species and A-genome, and 0.159% to 0.454% within allotetraploids. Forty protein-coding genes were completely identical at the protein level, and 20 intergenic sequences were completely conserved. The 9 allotetraploids shared 5 insertions and 9 deletions in whole genome, and 7-bp substitutions in protein-coding genes. The phylogenetic tree confirmed a close relationship between allotetraploids and the ancestor of A-genome, and the allotetraploids were divided into four separate groups. Progenitor allotetraploid cotton originated 0.43–0.68 million years ago (MYA). Conclusion Despite high degree of conservation between the Gossypium chloroplast genomes, sequence variations among species could still be detected. Gossypium chloroplast genomes preferred for 5-bp indels and 1–3-bp indels are mainly attributed to the SSR polymorphisms. This study supports that the common ancestor of diploid A-genome species in

  10. Rapid evolution of the env gene leader sequence in cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joseph; Biek, Roman; Litster, Annette; Willett, Brian J.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Analysing the evolution of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) at the intra-host level is important in order to address whether the diversity and composition of viral quasispecies affect disease progression. We examined the intra-host diversity and the evolutionary rates of the entire env and structural fragments of the env sequences obtained from sequential blood samples in 43 naturally infected domestic cats that displayed different clinical outcomes. We observed in the majority of cats that FIV env showed very low levels of intra-host diversity. We estimated that env evolved at a rate of 1.16×10−3 substitutions per site per year and demonstrated that recombinant sequences evolved faster than non-recombinant sequences. It was evident that the V3–V5 fragment of FIV env displayed higher evolutionary rates in healthy cats than in those with terminal illness. Our study provided the first evidence that the leader sequence of env, rather than the V3–V5 sequence, had the highest intra-host diversity and the highest evolutionary rate of all env fragments, consistent with this region being under a strong selective pressure for genetic variation. Overall, FIV env displayed relatively low intra-host diversity and evolved slowly in naturally infected cats. The maximum evolutionary rate was observed in the leader sequence of env. Although genetic stability is not necessarily a prerequisite for clinical stability, the higher genetic stability of FIV compared with human immunodeficiency virus might explain why many naturally infected cats do not progress rapidly to AIDS. PMID:25535323

  11. De novo gene evolution of antifreeze glycoproteins in codfishes revealed by whole genome sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalsrud, Helle Tessand; Tørresen, Ole Kristian; Hongrø Solbakken, Monica; Salzburger, Walter; Hanel, Reinhold; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Jentoft, Sissel

    2017-12-05

    New genes can arise through duplication of a pre-existing gene or de novo from non-coding DNA, providing raw material for evolution of new functions in response to a changing environment. A prime example is the independent evolution of antifreeze glycoprotein genes (afgps) in the Arctic codfishes and Antarctic notothenioids to prevent freezing. However, the highly repetitive nature of these genes complicates studies of their organization. In notothenioids, afgps evolved from an extant gene, yet the evolutionary origin of afgps in codfishes is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that afgps in codfishes have evolved de novo from non-coding DNA 13-18 Ma, coinciding with the cooling of the Northern Hemisphere. Using whole-genome sequence data from several codfishes and notothenioids, we find higher copy number of afgp in species exposed to more severe freezing suggesting a gene dosage effect. Notably, antifreeze function is lost in one lineage of codfishes analogous to the afgp losses in non-Antarctic notothenioids. This indicates that selection can eliminate the antifreeze function when freezing is no longer imminent. Additionally, we show that evolution of afgp-assisting antifreeze potentiating protein genes (afpps) in notothenioids coincides with origin and lineage-specific losses of afgp. The origin of afgps in codfishes is one of the first examples of an essential gene born from non-coding DNA in a non-model species. Our study underlines the power of comparative genomics to uncover past molecular signatures of genome evolution, and further highlights the impact of de novo gene origin in response to a changing selection regime. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase superactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... purines available. In people with the more severe form of PRS superactivity , PRPS1 gene mutations change single protein building blocks ( amino acids ) in the PRPP synthetase 1 enzyme, resulting in ...

  13. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg and Evolution Analysis within the Malvales Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Zhan, Di-Feng; Jia, Xian; Mei, Wen-Li; Dai, Hao-Fu; Chen, Xiong-Ting; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg is an important medicinal woody plant producing agarwood, which is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. High-throughput sequencing of chloroplast (cp) genomes enhanced the understanding about evolutionary relationships within plant families. In this study, we determined the complete cp genome sequences for A. sinensis. The size of the A. sinensis cp genome was 159,565 bp. This genome included a large single-copy region of 87,482 bp, a small single-copy region of 19,857 bp, and a pair of inverted repeats (IRa and IRb) of 26,113 bp each. The GC content of the genome was 37.11%. The A. sinensis cp genome encoded 113 functional genes, including 82 protein-coding genes, 27 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Seven genes were duplicated in the protein-coding genes, whereas 11 genes were duplicated in the RNA genes. A total of 45 polymorphic simple-sequence repeat loci and 60 pairs of large repeats were identified. Most simple-sequence repeats were located in the noncoding sections of the large single-copy/small single-copy region and exhibited high A/T content. Moreover, 33 pairs of large repeat sequences were located in the protein-coding genes, whereas 27 pairs were located in the intergenic regions. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome bias ended with A/T on the basis of codon usage. The distribution of codon usage in A. sinensis cp genome was most similar to that in the Gonystylus bancanus cp genome. Comparative results of 82 protein-coding genes from 29 species of cp genomes demonstrated that A. sinensis was a sister species to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome presented the highest sequence similarity of >90% with the G. bancanus cp genome by using CGView Comparison Tool. This finding strongly supports the placement of A. sinensis as a sister to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. The complete A. sinensis cp genome information will be highly beneficial for further studies on this traditional medicinal

  14. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Aquilaria sinensis (Lour. Gilg and the Evolution Analysis within the Malvalesorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquilaria sinensis (Lour. Gilg is an important medicinal woody plant producing agarwood, which is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. High-throughput sequencing of chloroplast (cp genomes enhanced the understanding about evolutionary relationships within plant families. In this study, we determined the complete cp genome sequences for A. sinensis. The size of the A.sinensis cp genome was 159,565 bp. This genome included a large single-copy region of 87,482 bp, a small single-copy region of 19,857 bp, and a pair of inverted repeats (IRa and IRb of 26,113 bp each. The GC content of the genome was 37.11%. The A.sinensis cp genome encoded 113 functional genes, including 82 protein-coding genes, 27 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Seven genes were duplicated in the protein-coding genes, whereas 11 genes were duplicated in the RNA genes. A total of 45 polymorphic simple-sequence repeat loci and 60 pairs of large repeats were identified. Most simple-sequence repeats were located in the noncoding sections of the large single-copy/small single-copy region and exhibited high A/T content. Moreover, 33 pairs of large repeat sequences were located in the protein-coding genes, whereas 27 pairs were located in the intergenic regions. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome bias ended with A/T on the basis of codon usage. The distribution of codon usage in A.sinensis cp genome was most similar to that in the Gonystylus bancanus cp genome. Comparative results of 82 protein-coding genes from 29 species of cp genomes demonstrated that A.sinensis was a sister species to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. Aquilaria sinensis cp genome presented the highest sequence similarity of >90% with the G. bancanus cp genome by using CGView Comparison Tool. This finding strongly supports the placement of A.sinensis as a sister to G. bancanus within the Malvales order. The complete A.sinensis cp genome information will be highly beneficial for further studies on this traditional

  15. Impacts of WIMP dark matter upon stellar evolution: main-sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Pat; Edsjo, Joakim

    2008-01-01

    The presence of large amounts of WIMP dark matter in stellar cores has been shown to have significant effects upon models of stellar evolution. We present a series of detailed grids of WIMP-influenced stellar models for main sequence stars, computed using the DarkStars code. We describe the changes in stellar structure and main sequence evolution which occur for masses ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 solar masses and metallicities from Z = 0.0003-0.02, as a function of the rate of energy injection by WIMPs. We then go on to show what rates of energy injection can be obtained using realistic orbital parameters for stars near supermassive black holes, including detailed considerations of dark matter halo velocity and density profiles. Capture and annihilation rates are strongly boosted when stars follow elliptical rather than circular orbits, causing WIMP annihilation to provide up to 100 times the energy of hydrogen fusion in stars at the Galactic centre.

  16. Computer-aided analyses of transport protein sequences: gleaning evidence concerning function, structure, biogenesis, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saier, M H

    1994-03-01

    Three-dimensional structures have been elucidated for very few integral membrane proteins. Computer methods can be used as guides for estimation of solute transport protein structure, function, biogenesis, and evolution. In this paper the application of currently available computer programs to over a dozen distinct families of transport proteins is reviewed. The reliability of sequence-based topological and localization analyses and the importance of sequence and residue conservation to structure and function are evaluated. Evidence concerning the nature and frequency of occurrence of domain shuffling, splicing, fusion, deletion, and duplication during evolution of specific transport protein families is also evaluated. Channel proteins are proposed to be functionally related to carriers. It is argued that energy coupling to transport was a late occurrence, superimposed on preexisting mechanisms of solute facilitation. It is shown that several transport protein families have evolved independently of each other, employing different routes, at different times in evolutionary history, to give topologically similar transmembrane protein complexes. The possible significance of this apparent topological convergence is discussed.

  17. Evolution and metabolic significance of the urea cycle in photosynthetic diatoms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Allen, A. E.; Dupont, Ch. L.; Oborník, Miroslav; Horák, Aleš; Nunes-Nesi, A.; McCrow, J. P.; Zheng, H.; Johnson, D. A.; Hu, H.; Fernie, A. R.; Bowler, Ch.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 473, č. 7346 (2011), s. 203-209 ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/1423 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : CARBAMOYL-PHOSPHATE SYNTHETASE * PHAEODACTYLUM-TRICORNUTUM * MAXIMUM-LIKELIHOOD * PHYLOGENETIC RECONSTRUCTION * MOLECULAR EVOLUTION * SEQUENCE ALIGNMENT * DIVERGENCE TIMES * MARINE DIATOMS * MIXED MODELS * TREE Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 36.280, year: 2011

  18. Tandem heterocyclization domains in a nonribosomal peptide synthetase essential for siderophore biosynthesis in Vibrio anguillarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lorenzo, M.; Stork, M.; Naka, H.; Tolmasky, M.E.; Crosa, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Anguibactin, the siderophore produced by Vibrio anguillarum 775, is synthesized via a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) mechanism. Most of the genes required for anguibactin biosynthesis are harbored by the pJM1 plasmid. Complete sequencing of this plasmid identified an orf encoding a 108 kDa

  19. Biased Gene Conversion and GC-Content Evolution in the Coding Sequences of Reptiles and Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuet, Emeric; Ballenghien, Marion; Romiguier, Jonathan; Galtier, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian and avian genomes are characterized by a substantial spatial heterogeneity of GC-content, which is often interpreted as reflecting the effect of local GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), a meiotic repair bias that favors G and C over A and T alleles in high-recombining genomic regions. Surprisingly, the first fully sequenced nonavian sauropsid (i.e., reptile), the green anole Anolis carolinensis, revealed a highly homogeneous genomic GC-content landscape, suggesting the possibility that gBGC might not be at work in this lineage. Here, we analyze GC-content evolution at third-codon positions (GC3) in 44 vertebrates species, including eight newly sequenced transcriptomes, with a specific focus on nonavian sauropsids. We report that reptiles, including the green anole, have a genome-wide distribution of GC3 similar to that of mammals and birds, and we infer a strong GC3-heterogeneity to be already present in the tetrapod ancestor. We further show that the dynamic of coding sequence GC-content is largely governed by karyotypic features in vertebrates, notably in the green anole, in agreement with the gBGC hypothesis. The discrepancy between third-codon positions and noncoding DNA regarding GC-content dynamics in the green anole could not be explained by the activity of transposable elements or selection on codon usage. This analysis highlights the unique value of third-codon positions as an insertion/deletion-free marker of nucleotide substitution biases that ultimately affect the evolution of proteins. PMID:25527834

  20. Holocentric chromosome evolution in kissing bugs (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae): diversification of repeated sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Sebastián; Lorite, Pedro; Vela, Jesús; Mora, Pablo; Palomeque, Teresa; Thi, Khoa Pham; Panzera, Francisco

    2017-09-06

    The analysis of the chromosomal and genome evolution in organisms with holocentric chromosomes is restricted by the lack of primary constriction or centromere. An interesting group is the hemipteran subfamily Triatominae, vectors of Chagas disease, which affects around 6 to 7 million people worldwide. This group exhibits extensive variability in the number and chromosomal location of repeated sequences such as heterochromatin and ribosomal genes. This paper tries to reveal the significant differences of the repeated sequences among Triatoma species through the use of genomic DNA probes. We analysed the chromosomal distribution and evolution of repeated sequences in Triatoma species by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) using genomic DNA probes from two North American Triatoma species. These genomic probes were hybridized both on their own chromosomes and on other Triatoma species from North and South America, with different amounts and chromosome location of C-heterochromatin. The results were compared with those previously described using South American Triatoma genomic probes. We observed two chromosomal hybridization patterns: (i) very intense hybridization signals concentrated on specific chromosomal regions or particular chromosomes; and (ii) lower intensity hybridization signals dispersed along all chromosomes. Self-GISH on T. rubrofasciata and T. dimidiata chromosomes presented strong hybridization signals on all C-heterochromatin regions. However, when we perform genomic cross-hybridizations, only strong signals are detected on the Y chromosome, leaving the C-heterochromatic autosomal regions unmarked. We confirm that repeated DNA of the Y chromosome is shared among Triatoma species and probably represents an ancestral character of the Triatomini tribe. On the contrary, autosomal heterochromatic regions are constituted by species-specific DNA repeats, most probably satDNA families, suggesting that Triatoma speciation involved the amplification of diverse

  1. Bio++: a set of C++ libraries for sequence analysis, phylogenetics, molecular evolution and population genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galtier Nicolas

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large number of bioinformatics applications in the fields of bio-sequence analysis, molecular evolution and population genetics typically share input/ouput methods, data storage requirements and data analysis algorithms. Such common features may be conveniently bundled into re-usable libraries, which enable the rapid development of new methods and robust applications. Results We present Bio++, a set of Object Oriented libraries written in C++. Available components include classes for data storage and handling (nucleotide/amino-acid/codon sequences, trees, distance matrices, population genetics datasets, various input/output formats, basic sequence manipulation (concatenation, transcription, translation, etc., phylogenetic analysis (maximum parsimony, markov models, distance methods, likelihood computation and maximization, population genetics/genomics (diversity statistics, neutrality tests, various multi-locus analyses and various algorithms for numerical calculus. Conclusion Implementation of methods aims at being both efficient and user-friendly. A special concern was given to the library design to enable easy extension and new methods development. We defined a general hierarchy of classes that allow the developer to implement its own algorithms while remaining compatible with the rest of the libraries. Bio++ source code is distributed free of charge under the CeCILL general public licence from its website http://kimura.univ-montp2.fr/BioPP.

  2. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Bacillus subtilis. Cloning, characterization and chromosomal mapping of the prs gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Dan; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1987-01-01

    The gene (prs) encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase has been cloned from a library of Bacillus subtilis DNA by complementation of an Escherichia coli prs mutation. Flanking DNA sequences were pruned away by restriction endonuclease and exonuclease BAL 31 digestions, resulting...

  3. When contemporary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases invent their cognate amino acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Hervé; Becker, Hubert Dominique; Reinbolt, Joseph; Kern, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Faithful protein synthesis relies on a family of essential enzymes called aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, assembled in a piecewise fashion. Analysis of the completed archaeal genomes reveals that all archaea that possess asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) also display a second ORF encoding an AsnRS truncated from its anticodon binding-domain (AsnRS2). We show herein that Pyrococcus abyssi AsnRS2, in contrast to AsnRS, does not sustain asparaginyl-tRNAAsn synthesis but is instead capable of converting aspartic acid into asparagine. Functional analysis and complementation of an Escherichia coli asparagine auxotrophic strain show that AsnRS2 constitutes the archaeal homologue of the bacterial ammonia-dependent asparagine synthetase A (AS-A), therefore named archaeal asparagine synthetase A (AS-AR). Primary sequence- and 3D-based phylogeny shows that an archaeal AspRS ancestor originated AS-AR, which was subsequently transferred into bacteria by lateral gene transfer in which it underwent structural changes producing AS-A. This study provides evidence that a contemporary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase can be recruited to sustain amino acid metabolism. PMID:12874385

  4. Glutamine Synthetase: Localization Dictates Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Castegna

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase (GS is the adenosine triphosphate (ATP-dependent enzyme that catalyses the synthesis of glutamine by condensing ammonium to glutamate. In the circulatory system, glutamine carries ammonia from muscle and brain to the kidney and liver. In brain reduction of GS activity has been suggested as a mechanism mediating neurotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders. In cancer, the delicate balance between glutamine synthesis and catabolism is a critical event. In vitro evidence, confirmed in vivo in some cases, suggests that reduced GS activity in cancer cells associates with a more invasive and aggressive phenotype. However, GS is known to be highly expressed in cells of the tumor microenvironment, such as fibroblasts, adipocytes and immune cells, and their ability to synthesize glutamine is responsible for the acquisition of protumoral phenotypes. This has opened a new window into the complex scenario of the tumor microenvironment, in which the balance of glutamine consumption versus glutamine synthesis influences cellular function. Since GS expression responds to glutamine starvation, a lower glutamine synthesizing power due to the absence of GS in cancer cells might apply a metabolic pressure on stromal cells. This event might push stroma towards a GS-high/protumoral phenotype. When referred to stromal cells, GS expression might acquire a ‘bad’ significance to the point that GS inhibition might be considered a conceivable strategy against cancer metastasis.

  5. Focused Evolution of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Revealed by Structures and Deep Sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xueling; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Baoshan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wang, Charlene; Chen, Xuejun; Longo, Nancy S.; Louder, Mark; McKee, Krisha; O’Dell, Sijy; Perfetto, Stephen; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Shi, Wei; Wu, Lan; Yang, Yongping; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Zhongjia; Zhang, Zhenhai; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Simek, Melissa; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Connors, Mark; Mullikin, James C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Roederer, Mario; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R. (Tumaini); (NIH); (Duke); (Kilimanjaro Repro.); (IAVI)

    2013-03-04

    Antibody VRC01 is a human immunoglobulin that neutralizes about 90% of HIV-1 isolates. To understand how such broadly neutralizing antibodies develop, we used x-ray crystallography and 454 pyrosequencing to characterize additional VRC01-like antibodies from HIV-1-infected individuals. Crystal structures revealed a convergent mode of binding for diverse antibodies to the same CD4-binding-site epitope. A functional genomics analysis of expressed heavy and light chains revealed common pathways of antibody-heavy chain maturation, confined to the IGHV1-2*02 lineage, involving dozens of somatic changes, and capable of pairing with different light chains. Broadly neutralizing HIV-1 immunity associated with VRC01-like antibodies thus involves the evolution of antibodies to a highly affinity-matured state required to recognize an invariant viral structure, with lineages defined from thousands of sequences providing a genetic roadmap of their development.

  6. Glutamine versus ammonia utilization in the NAD synthetase family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica De Ingeniis

    Full Text Available NAD is a ubiquitous and essential metabolic redox cofactor which also functions as a substrate in certain regulatory pathways. The last step of NAD synthesis is the ATP-dependent amidation of deamido-NAD by NAD synthetase (NADS. Members of the NADS family are present in nearly all species across the three kingdoms of Life. In eukaryotic NADS, the core synthetase domain is fused with a nitrilase-like glutaminase domain supplying ammonia for the reaction. This two-domain NADS arrangement enabling the utilization of glutamine as nitrogen donor is also present in various bacterial lineages. However, many other bacterial members of NADS family do not contain a glutaminase domain, and they can utilize only ammonia (but not glutamine in vitro. A single-domain NADS is also characteristic for nearly all Archaea, and its dependence on ammonia was demonstrated here for the representative enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschi. However, a question about the actual in vivo nitrogen donor for single-domain members of the NADS family remained open: Is it glutamine hydrolyzed by a committed (but yet unknown glutaminase subunit, as in most ATP-dependent amidotransferases, or free ammonia as in glutamine synthetase? Here we addressed this dilemma by combining evolutionary analysis of the NADS family with experimental characterization of two representative bacterial systems: a two-subunit NADS from Thermus thermophilus and a single-domain NADS from Salmonella typhimurium providing evidence that ammonia (and not glutamine is the physiological substrate of a typical single-domain NADS. The latter represents the most likely ancestral form of NADS. The ability to utilize glutamine appears to have evolved via recruitment of a glutaminase subunit followed by domain fusion in an early branch of Bacteria. Further evolution of the NADS family included lineage-specific loss of one of the two alternative forms and horizontal gene transfer events. Lastly, we identified NADS

  7. Evolution of green plants as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, H; Lim, B L; Osawa, S

    1985-02-01

    We have constructed a phylogenic tree for green plants by comparing 5S rRNA sequences. The tree suggests that the emergence of most of the uni- and multicellular green algae such as Chlamydomonas, Spirogyra, Ulva, and Chlorella occurred in the early stage of green plant evolution. The branching point of Nitella is a little earlier than that of land plants and much later than that of the above green algae, supporting the view that Nitella-like green algae may be the direct precursor to land plants. The Bryophyta and the Pteridophyta separated from each other after emergence of the Spermatophyta. The result is consistent with the view that the Bryophyta evolved from ferns by degeneration. In the Pteridophyta, Psilotum (whisk fern) separated first, and a little later Lycopodium (club moss) separated from the ancestor common to Equisetum (horsetail) and Dryopteris (fern). This order is in accordance with the classical view. During the Spermatophyta evolution, the gymnosperms (Cycas, Ginkgo, and Metasequoia have been studied here) and the angiosperms (flowering plants) separated, and this was followed by the separation of Metasequoia and Cycas (cycad)/Ginkgo (maidenhair tree) on one branch and various flowering plants on the other.

  8. Gene expression, cellular localisation and function of glutamine synthetase isozymes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, Stéphanie M.; Møller, Anders Laurell Blom; Dionisio, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    We present the first cloning and study of glutamine synthetase (GS) genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Based on sequence analysis, phylogenetic studies and mapping data, ten GS sequences were classified into four sub-families: GS2 (a, b and c), GS1 (a, b and c), GSr (1 and 2) and GSe (1 and 2...

  9. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. III. Exon sequences confirm most dendrograms based on protein sequences: calmodulin dendrograms show significant lack of parallelism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, S.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    In the first report in this series we presented dendrograms based on 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand family. In the second we used sequences from 228 proteins, containing 835 domains, and showed that eight of the 29 subfamilies are congruent and that the EF-hand domains of the remaining 21 subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories. In this study we have computed dendrograms within and among the EF-hand subfamilies using the encoding DNA sequences. In most instances the dendrograms based on protein and on DNA sequences are very similar. Significant differences between protein and DNA trees for calmodulin remain unexplained. In our fourth report we evaluate the sequences and the distribution of introns within the EF-hand family and conclude that exon shuffling did not play a significant role in its evolution.

  10. Phosphinothricin tripeptide synthetases in Streptomyces viridochromogenes Tü494.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Dirk; Grammel, Nicolas; Heinzelmann, Eva; Keller, Ullrich; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2005-11-01

    The tripeptide backbone of phosphinothricin (PT) tripeptide (PTT), a compound with herbicidal activity from Streptomyces viridochromogenes, is assembled by three stand-alone peptide synthetase modules. The enzyme PhsA (66 kDa) recruits the PT-precursor N-acetyl-demethylphosphinothricin (N-Ac-DMPT), whereas the two alanine residues of PTT are assembled by the enzymes PhsB and PhsC (129 and 119 kDa, respectively). During or after assembly, the N-Ac-DMPT residue in the peptide is converted to PT by methylation and deacetylation. Both phsB and phsC appear to be cotranscribed together with two other genes from a single promoter and they are located at a distance of 20 kb from the gene phsA, encoding PhsA, in the PTT biosynthesis gene cluster of S. viridochromogenes. PhsB and PhsC represent single nonribosomal peptide synthetase elongation modules lacking a thioesterase domain. Gene inactivations, genetic complementations, determinations of substrate specificity of the heterologously produced proteins, and comparison of PhsC sequence with the amino terminus of the alanine-activating nonribosomal peptide synthetase PTTSII from S. viridochromogenes confirmed the role of the two genes in the bialanylation of Ac-DMPT. The lack of an integral thioesterase domain in the PTT assembly system points to product release possibly involving two type II thioesterase genes (the1 and the2) located in the PTT gene cluster alone or in conjunction with an as yet unknown mechanism of product release.

  11. Metamorphic evolution of the Lesser Himalayan Crystalline Sequence, Siyom Valley, NE Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandini, P.; Thakur, S. S.

    2011-03-01

    The paper reports classical Barrovian inverted metamorphism in the Lesser Himalayan Crystalline Sequence, Siyom Valley, NE Himalaya. The sequence is thrust-bounded and constitutes a part of the western limb of the Siang antiform. Six metamorphic zones are delineated with increasing grade from biotite zone through garnet-, staurolite-, kyanite-, sillimanite- to sillimanite-K-feldspar zone with increasing structural level. Granulite-facies pelitic assemblages, marked by the occurrence of garnet + cordierite occur in the sillimanite-K-feldspar zone. Three phases of folding, F 1, F 2 and F 3 and two generations of planar structures, S 1 and S 2 are recognised. Peak metamorphic mineral growths are dominantly syn-F 2. Metamorphic isograds and boundary thrusts of the sequence are co-folded around the Siang antiform by F 3 deformation. Garnet shows prograde growth zoning in lower grade rocks and retrograde diffusion zoning in higher grade rocks. Pelites of the sillimanite-K-feldspar zone show textural evidence of decompression such as corona of cordierite around kyanite. Breakdown reactions of muscovite and biotite in this zone are attributed to decompression. Geothermobarometric calculations show gradual increase of temperature from garnet zone to sillimanite-K-feldspar zone, whereas pressure increases sharply from garnet zone to staurolite zone and remains nearly constant thereafter. Peak metamorphism reached temperature of >750 °C and pressure of ˜10 kbar in the sillimanite-K-feldspar zone. P-T estimates, decompression reactions and pseudosection topologies suggest a clockwise path with steep decompression for the evolution of the sillimanite-K-feldspar zone in the Siyom Valley.

  12. Single-virion sequencing of lamivudine-treated HBV populations reveal population evolution dynamics and demographic history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan O; Aw, Pauline P K; de Sessions, Paola Florez; Hong, Shuzhen; See, Lee Xian; Hong, Lewis Z; Wilm, Andreas; Li, Chen Hao; Hue, Stephane; Lim, Seng Gee; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Burkholder, William F; Hibberd, Martin

    2017-10-27

    Viral populations are complex, dynamic, and fast evolving. The evolution of groups of closely related viruses in a competitive environment is termed quasispecies. To fully understand the role that quasispecies play in viral evolution, characterizing the trajectories of viral genotypes in an evolving population is the key. In particular, long-range haplotype information for thousands of individual viruses is critical; yet generating this information is non-trivial. Popular deep sequencing methods generate relatively short reads that do not preserve linkage information, while third generation sequencing methods have higher error rates that make detection of low frequency mutations a bioinformatics challenge. Here we applied BAsE-Seq, an Illumina-based single-virion sequencing technology, to eight samples from four chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients - once before antiviral treatment and once after viral rebound due to resistance. With single-virion sequencing, we obtained 248-8796 single-virion sequences per sample, which allowed us to find evidence for both hard and soft selective sweeps. We were able to reconstruct population demographic history that was independently verified by clinically collected data. We further verified four of the samples independently through PacBio SMRT and Illumina Pooled deep sequencing. Overall, we showed that single-virion sequencing yields insight into viral evolution and population dynamics in an efficient and high throughput manner. We believe that single-virion sequencing is widely applicable to the study of viral evolution in the context of drug resistance and host adaptation, allows differentiation between soft or hard selective sweeps, and may be useful in the reconstruction of intra-host viral population demographic history.

  13. EVOLUTION OF GROUP GALAXIES FROM THE FIRST RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, I. H. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Yee, H. K. C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Hsieh, B. C. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Gladders, M., E-mail: tli@astro.swin.edu.au, E-mail: hyee@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: bchsieh@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: gladders@oddjob.uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-04-20

    We study the evolution of the red-galaxy fraction (f{sub red}) in 905 galaxy groups with 0.15 {<=} z < 0.52. The galaxy groups are identified by the 'probability friends-of-friends' algorithm from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1) photometric-redshift sample. There is a high degree of uniformity in the properties of the red sequence of the group galaxies, indicating that the luminous red-sequence galaxies in the groups are already in place by z {approx} 0.5 and that they have a formation epoch of z {approx}> 2. In general, groups at lower redshifts exhibit larger f{sub red} than those at higher redshifts, showing a group Butcher-Oemler effect. We investigate the evolution of f{sub red} by examining its dependence on four parameters, one of which can be classified as intrinsic and three of which can be classified as environmental: galaxy stellar mass (M{sub *}), total group stellar mass (M{sub *,grp}, a proxy for group halo mass), normalized group-centric radius (r{sub grp}), and local galaxy density ({Sigma}{sub 5}). We find that M{sub *} is the dominant parameter such that there is a strong correlation between f{sub red} and galaxy stellar mass. Furthermore, the dependence of f{sub red} on the environmental parameters is also a strong function of M{sub *}. Massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) show little dependence of f{sub red} on r{sub grp}, M{sub *,grp}, and {Sigma}{sub 5} over the redshift range. The dependence of f{sub red} on these parameters is primarily seen for galaxies with lower masses, especially for M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 10.6} M{sub Sun }. We observe an apparent 'group down-sizing' effect, in that galaxies in lower-mass halos, after controlling for galaxy stellar mass, have lower f{sub red}. We find a dependence of f{sub red} on both r{sub grp} and {Sigma}{sub 5} after the other parameters are controlled. At a fixed r{sub grp}, there is a significant dependence of f{sub red} on {Sigma}{sub 5

  14. X-ray emission regimes and rotation sequences in M 35 . An updated model of stellar activity evolution on the main sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondoin, P.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Late-type stars in young open clusters show two kinds of dependence of their X-ray emission on rotation. They also tend to group into two main sub-populations that lie on narrow sequences in diagrams where their rotation periods are plotted against their (B - V) colour indices. A correlation between these two regimes of X-ray emission and the rotation sequences has been recently observed in the M 34 open cluster. Sun-like M 34 stars also show a drop of their X-ray to bolometric luminosity ratio by about one order of magnitude at a Rossby number of about 0.3. Aims: The present study looks for similar connections between X-ray activity and rotation in an other open cluster. The aim is to consolidate a model of X-ray activity evolution on the main sequence and to provide observational constraints on dynamo processes in the interiors of late-type stars. Methods: The paper compares XMM-Newton measurements of X-ray stellar emission in M 35 with X-ray luminosity distributions derived from rotation period measurements assuming either an X-ray regime transition at a critical Rossby number or a correlation between X-ray emission regimes and rotation sequences. Results: This second hypothesis could account for the low number of M 35 stars detected in X-rays. A model of X-ray activity evolution is proposed based on the correlation. One major output is that the transition from saturated to non-saturated X-ray emission occurs at Rossby numbers between about 0.13 and 0.4 for each star depending on its mass and initial period of rotation on the ZAMS. This prediction agrees with observations of stellar X-ray emission in M 34. It explains the large range of X-ray luminosities observed among Sun-like stars in young open clusters. Conclusions: I conclude that the correlation between X-ray emission regimes and rotation sequences could be a fundamental property of the early evolution of stellar magnetic activity on the main sequence. I argue that the angular momentum

  15. Genomic diversity and evolution of Mycobacterium ulcerans revealed by next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Qi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium ulcerans is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, the third most common mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy. It is an emerging infectious disease that afflicts mainly children and youths in West Africa. Little is known about the evolution and transmission mode of M. ulcerans, partially due to the lack of known genetic polymorphisms among isolates, limiting the application of genetic epidemiology. To systematically profile single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, we sequenced the genomes of three M. ulcerans strains using 454 and Solexa technologies. Comparison with the reference genome of the Ghanaian classical lineage isolate Agy99 revealed 26,564 SNPs in a Japanese strain representing the ancestral lineage. Only 173 SNPs were found when comparing Agy99 with two other Ghanaian isolates, which belong to the two other types previously distinguished in Ghana by variable number tandem repeat typing. We further analyzed a collection of Ghanaian strains using the SNPs discovered. With 68 SNP loci, we were able to differentiate 54 strains into 13 distinct SNP haplotypes. The average SNP nucleotide diversity was low (average 0.06-0.09 across 68 SNP loci, and 96% of the SNP locus pairs were in complete linkage disequilibrium. We estimated that the divergence of the M. ulcerans Ghanaian clade from the Japanese strain occurred 394 to 529 thousand years ago. The Ghanaian subtypes diverged about 1000 to 3000 years ago, or even much more recently, because we found evidence that they evolved significantly faster than average. Our results offer significant insight into the evolution of M. ulcerans and provide a comprehensive report on genetic diversity within a highly clonal M. ulcerans population from a Buruli ulcer endemic region, which can facilitate further epidemiological studies of this pathogen through the development of high-resolution tools.

  16. Expression Divergence Is Correlated with Sequence Evolution but Not Positive Selection in Conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, Kathryn A; Yeaman, Sam; Nurkowski, Kristin A; Rieseberg, Loren H; Aitken, Sally N

    2016-06-01

    The evolutionary and genomic determinants of sequence evolution in conifers are poorly understood, and previous studies have found only limited evidence for positive selection. Using RNAseq data, we compared gene expression profiles to patterns of divergence and polymorphism in 44 seedlings of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and 39 seedlings of interior spruce (Picea glauca × engelmannii) to elucidate the evolutionary forces that shape their genomes and their plastic responses to abiotic stress. We found that rapidly diverging genes tend to have greater expression divergence, lower expression levels, reduced levels of synonymous site diversity, and longer proteins than slowly diverging genes. Similar patterns were identified for the untranslated regions, but with some exceptions. We found evidence that genes with low expression levels had a larger fraction of nearly neutral sites, suggesting a primary role for negative selection in determining the association between evolutionary rate and expression level. There was limited evidence for differences in the rate of positive selection among genes with divergent versus conserved expression profiles and some evidence supporting relaxed selection in genes diverging in expression between the species. Finally, we identified a small number of genes that showed evidence of site-specific positive selection using divergence data alone. However, estimates of the proportion of sites fixed by positive selection (α) were in the range of other plant species with large effective population sizes suggesting relatively high rates of adaptive divergence among conifers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Whole-genome sequencing reveals the mechanisms for evolution of streptomycin resistance in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuxin; Gao, Jiayuan; Wang, Bini; Huo, Dongxue; Wang, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Jiachao; Shao, Yuyu

    2018-04-01

    In this research, we investigated the evolution of streptomycin resistance in Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC14917, which was passaged in medium containing a gradually increasing concentration of streptomycin. After 25 d, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of L. plantarum ATCC14917 had reached 131,072 µg/mL, which was 8,192-fold higher than the MIC of the original parent isolate. The highly resistant L. plantarum ATCC14917 isolate was then passaged in antibiotic-free medium to determine the stability of resistance. The MIC value of the L. plantarum ATCC14917 isolate decreased to 2,048 µg/mL after 35 d but remained constant thereafter, indicating that resistance was irreversible even in the absence of selection pressure. Whole-genome sequencing of parent isolates, control isolates, and isolates following passage was used to study the resistance mechanism of L. plantarum ATCC14917 to streptomycin and adaptation in the presence and absence of selection pressure. Five mutated genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms and structural variants) were verified in highly resistant L. plantarum ATCC14917 isolates, which were related to ribosomal protein S12, LPXTG-motif cell wall anchor domain protein, LrgA family protein, Ser/Thr phosphatase family protein, and a hypothetical protein that may correlate with resistance to streptomycin. After passage in streptomycin-free medium, only the mutant gene encoding ribosomal protein S12 remained; the other 4 mutant genes had reverted to the wild type as found in the parent isolate. Although the MIC value of L. plantarum ATCC14917 was reduced in the absence of selection pressure, it remained 128-fold higher than the MIC value of the parent isolate, indicating that ribosomal protein S12 may play an important role in streptomycin resistance. Using the mobile elements database, we demonstrated that streptomycin resistance-related genes in L. plantarum ATCC14917 were not located on mobile elements. This research offers a way of

  18. Perspective on sequence evolution of microsatellite locus (CCGn in Rv0050 gene from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ruiliang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mycobacterial genome is inclined to polymerase slippage and a high mutation rate in microsatellite regions due to high GC content and absence of a mismatch repair system. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying microsatellite variation have not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated mutation events in the hyper-variable trinucleotide microsatellite locus MML0050 located in the Rv0050 gene of W-Beijing and non-W-Beijing Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in order to gain insight into the genomic structure and activity of repeated regions. Results Size analysis indicated the presence of five alleles that differed in length by three base pairs. Moreover, nucleotide gains occurred more frequently than loses in this trinucleotide microsatellite. Mutation frequency was not completely related with the total length, though the relative frequency in the longest allele was remarkably higher than that in the shortest. Sequence analysis was able to detect seven alleles and revealed that point mutations enhanced the level of locus variation. Introduction of an interruptive motif correlated with the total allele length and genetic lineage, rather than the length of the longest stretch of perfect repeats. Finally, the level of locus variation was drastically different between the two genetic lineages. Conclusion The Rv0050 locus encodes the bifunctional penicillin-binding protein ponA1 and is essential to mycobacterial survival. Our investigations of this particularly dynamic genomic region provide insights into the overall mode of microsatellite evolution. Specifically, replication slippage was implicated in the mutational process of this microsatellite and a sequence-based genetic analysis was necessary to determine that point mutation events acted to maintain microsatellite size integrity while providing genomic diversity.

  19. Combined stellar structure and atmosphere models for massive stars. II. Spectral evolution on the main sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaerer, D.; de Koter, A.; Schmutz, W.; Maeder, A.

    1996-08-01

    In Schaerer et al. (1995, Paper I) we have presented the first ``combined stellar structure and atmosphere models'' (CoStar) for massive stars, which consistently treat the entire mass loosing star from the center out to the outer region of the stellar wind. The models use up-to-date input physics and state-of-the-art techniques to model both the stellar interior and the spherically expanding non-LTE atmosphere. The atmosphere models include line blanketing for all elements from hydrogen to zinc. The present publication covers the spectral evolution corresponding to the main sequence interior evolution discussed in Paper I. The CoStar results presented in this paper comprise: (a) flux distributions, from the EUV to the far IR, and the ionizing fluxes in the hydrogen and helium continua, (b) absolute optical and infrared UBVRIJHKLMN photometric magnitudes and UV colors, (c) detailed line blanketed UV spectra, and (d) non-LTE hydrogen and helium line spectra in the optical and IR, including theoretical K band spectra. These results may, e.g., be used for population synthesis models intended to study the massive star content in young starforming regions. We compare our results with other predictions from LTE and non-LTE plane parallel models and point out the improvements and the importance of using adequate atmosphere models including stellar winds for massive stars. Particular emphasis is given to comparisons of the UV spectral evolution with observations, including continuum indices and several metal line signatures of P-Cygni lines and broad absorption features. Good agreement is found for most UV features. In particular, we are able to reproduce the strong observed Fe III 1920A feature in late O and early B giants and supergiants. This feature is found to depend sensitively on temperature and may be used to derive effective temperatures for these stars. We also derive a simple formula to determine mass loss rates from the equivalent width of hydrogen

  20. The glycyl-tRNA synthetase of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagar, E A; Giese, M J; Yasin, B; Pang, M

    1995-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases specifically charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. A prototype for the most complex aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is the four-subunit glycyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli, encoded by two open reading frames. We examined the glycyl-tRNA synthetase gene from Chlamydia trachomatis, a genetically isolated bacterium, and identified only a single open reading frame for the chlamydial homolog (glyQS). This is the first report of a prokaryotic glycyl-tRNA synthetase encoded by a single gene. PMID:7665503

  1. Growth factors regulate glutamine synthetase activity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Khaled

    2012-07-10

    Jul 10, 2012 ... affected by growth medium, carbon source, nitrogen source and sodium chloride. LB supplemented with 7% glycerol ... Abbreviations: GS, Glutamine synthetase; MSM, minimal salt medium; NB, nutrient broth medium; NF, ... glutamate and ammonia, which in turn, cells are supplied with ammonia, and their ...

  2. Pleiotropy constrains the evolution of protein but not regulatory sequences in a transcription regulatory network influencing complex social behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria eMolodtsova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly apparent that genes and networks that influence complex behaviour are evolutionary conserved, which is paradoxical considering that behaviour is labile over evolutionary timescales. How does adaptive change in behaviour arise if behaviour is controlled by conserved, pleiotropic, and likely evolutionary constrained genes? Pleiotropy and connectedness are known to constrain the general rate of protein evolution, prompting some to suggest that the evolution of complex traits, including behaviour, is fuelled by regulatory sequence evolution. However, we seldom have data on the strength of selection on mutations in coding and regulatory sequences, and this hinders our ability to study how pleiotropy influences coding and regulatory sequence evolution. Here we use population genomics to estimate the strength of selection on coding and regulatory mutations for a transcriptional regulatory network that influences complex behaviour of honey bees. We found that replacement mutations in highly connected transcription factors and target genes experience significantly stronger negative selection relative to weakly connected transcription factors and targets. Adaptively evolving proteins were significantly more likely to reside at the periphery of the regulatory network, while proteins with signs of negative selection were near the core of the network. Interestingly, connectedness and network structure had minimal influence on the strength of selection on putative regulatory sequences for both transcription factors and their targets. Our study indicates that adaptive evolution of complex behaviour can arise because of positive selection on protein-coding mutations in peripheral genes, and on regulatory sequence mutations in both transcription factors and their targets throughout the network.

  3. Genome sequence of an Australian kangaroo, Macropus eugenii, provides insight into the evolution of mammalian reproduction and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background We present the genome sequence of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii, which is a member of the kangaroo family and the first representative of the iconic hopping mammals that symbolize Australia to be sequenced. The tammar has many unusual biological characteristics, including the longest period of embryonic diapause of any mammal, extremely synchronized seasonal breeding and prolonged and sophisticated lactation within a well-defined pouch. Like other marsupials, it gives birth to highly altricial young, and has a small number of very large chromosomes, making it a valuable model for genomics, reproduction and development. Results The genome has been sequenced to 2 × coverage using Sanger sequencing, enhanced with additional next generation sequencing and the integration of extensive physical and linkage maps to build the genome assembly. We also sequenced the tammar transcriptome across many tissues and developmental time points. Our analyses of these data shed light on mammalian reproduction, development and genome evolution: there is innovation in reproductive and lactational genes, rapid evolution of germ cell genes, and incomplete, locus-specific X inactivation. We also observe novel retrotransposons and a highly rearranged major histocompatibility complex, with many class I genes located outside the complex. Novel microRNAs in the tammar HOX clusters uncover new potential mammalian HOX regulatory elements. Conclusions Analyses of these resources enhance our understanding of marsupial gene evolution, identify marsupial-specific conserved non-coding elements and critical genes across a range of biological systems, including reproduction, development and immunity, and provide new insight into marsupial and mammalian biology and genome evolution. PMID:21854559

  4. Diversity, Distribution, and Evolution of Tomato Viruses in China Uncovered by Small RNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenxi; Sun, Xuepeng; Taylor, Angela; Jiao, Chen; Xu, Yimin; Cai, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoli; Ge, Chenhui; Pan, Guanghui; Wang, Quanxi; Fei, Zhangjun; Wang, Quanhua

    2017-06-01

    Tomato is a major vegetable crop that has tremendous popularity. However, viral disease is still a major factor limiting tomato production. Here, we report the tomato virome identified through sequencing small RNAs of 170 field-grown samples collected in China. A total of 22 viruses were identified, including both well-documented and newly detected viruses. The tomato viral community is dominated by a few species, and they exhibit polymorphisms and recombination in the genomes with cold spots and hot spots. Most samples were coinfected by multiple viruses, and the majority of identified viruses are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Evolutionary analysis of one of the most dominant tomato viruses, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), predicts its origin and the time back to its most recent common ancestor. The broadly sampled data have enabled us to identify several unreported viruses in tomato, including a completely new virus, which has a genome of ∼13.4 kb and groups with aphid-transmitted viruses in the genus Cytorhabdovirus Although both DNA and RNA viruses can trigger the biogenesis of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs), we show that features such as length distribution, paired distance, and base selection bias of vsiRNA sequences reflect different plant Dicer-like proteins and Argonautes involved in vsiRNA biogenesis. Collectively, this study offers insights into host-virus interaction in tomato and provides valuable information to facilitate the management of viral diseases. IMPORTANCE Tomato is an important source of micronutrients in the human diet and is extensively consumed around the world. Virus is among the major constraints on tomato production. Categorizing virus species that are capable of infecting tomato and understanding their diversity and evolution are challenging due to difficulties in detecting such fast-evolving biological entities. Here, we report the landscape of the tomato virome in China, the leading country in

  5. Evolution Models of Helium White Dwarf–Main-sequence Star Merger Remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xianfei; Bi, Shaolan; Hall, Philip D.; Jeffery, C. Simon

    2017-01-01

    It is predicted that orbital decay by gravitational-wave radiation and tidal interaction will cause some close binary stars to merge within a Hubble time. The merger of a helium-core white dwarf with a main-sequence (MS) star can produce a red giant branch star that has a low-mass hydrogen envelope when helium is ignited and thus become a hot subdwarf. Because detailed calculations have not been made, we compute post-merger models with a stellar evolution code. We find the evolutionary paths available to merger remnants and find the pre-merger conditions that lead to the formation of hot subdwarfs. We find that some such mergers result in the formation of stars with intermediate helium-rich surfaces. These stars later develop helium-poor surfaces owing to diffusion. Combining our results with a model population and comparing to observed stars, we find that some observed intermediate helium-rich hot subdwarfs can be explained as the remnants of the mergers of helium-core white dwarfs with low-mass MS stars.

  6. System risk evolution analysis and risk critical event identification based on event sequence diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Pengcheng; Hu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    During system operation, the environmental, operational and usage conditions are time-varying, which causes the fluctuations of the system state variables (SSVs). These fluctuations change the accidents’ probabilities and then result in the system risk evolution (SRE). This inherent relation makes it feasible to realize risk control by monitoring the SSVs in real time, herein, the quantitative analysis of SRE is essential. Besides, some events in the process of SRE are critical to system risk, because they act like the “demarcative points” of safety and accident, and this characteristic makes each of them a key point of risk control. Therefore, analysis of SRE and identification of risk critical events (RCEs) are remarkably meaningful to ensure the system to operate safely. In this context, an event sequence diagram (ESD) based method of SRE analysis and the related Monte Carlo solution are presented; RCE and risk sensitive variable (RSV) are defined, and the corresponding identification methods are also proposed. Finally, the proposed approaches are exemplified with an accident scenario of an aircraft getting into the icing region

  7. Evolution Models of Helium White Dwarf–Main-sequence Star Merger Remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xianfei; Bi, Shaolan [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875 (China); Hall, Philip D.; Jeffery, C. Simon, E-mail: zxf@bnu.edu.cn [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-01

    It is predicted that orbital decay by gravitational-wave radiation and tidal interaction will cause some close binary stars to merge within a Hubble time. The merger of a helium-core white dwarf with a main-sequence (MS) star can produce a red giant branch star that has a low-mass hydrogen envelope when helium is ignited and thus become a hot subdwarf. Because detailed calculations have not been made, we compute post-merger models with a stellar evolution code. We find the evolutionary paths available to merger remnants and find the pre-merger conditions that lead to the formation of hot subdwarfs. We find that some such mergers result in the formation of stars with intermediate helium-rich surfaces. These stars later develop helium-poor surfaces owing to diffusion. Combining our results with a model population and comparing to observed stars, we find that some observed intermediate helium-rich hot subdwarfs can be explained as the remnants of the mergers of helium-core white dwarfs with low-mass MS stars.

  8. Regulation of Angiogenesis by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Mirando

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their canonical roles in translation the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs have developed secondary functions over the course of evolution. Many of these activities are associated with cellular survival and nutritional stress responses essential for homeostatic processes in higher eukaryotes. In particular, six ARSs and one associated factor have documented functions in angiogenesis. However, despite their connection to this process, the ARSs are mechanistically distinct and exhibit a range of positive or negative effects on aspects of endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and survival. This variability is achieved through the appearance of appended domains and interplay with inflammatory pathways not found in prokaryotic systems. Complete knowledge of the non-canonical functions of ARSs is necessary to understand the mechanisms underlying the physiological regulation of angiogenesis.

  9. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli. Properties of the purified enzyme and primary structure of the prs gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Harlow, Kenneth W.; King, Cheryl J.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (P-Rib-PP) synthetase of Escherichia coli has been purified to near homogeneity from a strain harboring the prs gene, encoding P-Rib-PP synthetase, on a multicopy plasmid. Analysis of the enzyme showed that it required inorganic phosphate for activity and for stability...... the UAA translation stop codon, within a Thy-rich region following an inverted repeat sequence, indicative of an rho-independent transcription terminator....

  10. Characterization of the Escherichia coli prsA1-encoded mutant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase identifies a divalent cation-nucleotide binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, Stanley G.; Harlow, Kenneth W.; Switzer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    by chemical determination of the amino acid sequence of a tryptic peptide derived from the purified mutant enzyme. The mutation lies at the N-terminal end of a 16 residue sequence that is highly conserved in E. coli, Bacillus subtilis, and rat PRPP synthetases and has the following consensus sequence......The prsA1 allele, specifying a mutant Escherichia coli phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase, has been cloned. The mutation was shown by nucleotide sequence analysis to result from substitution of Asp-128 (GAT) in the wild type by Ala (GCT) in prsA1. This alteration was confirmed...

  11. Combining protein sequence, structure, and dynamics: A novel approach for functional evolution analysis of PAS domain superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zheng; Zhou, Hongyu; Tao, Peng

    2018-02-01

    PAS domains are widespread in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryota, and play important roles in various functions. In this study, we aim to explore functional evolutionary relationship among proteins in the PAS domain superfamily in view of the sequence-structure-dynamics-function relationship. We collected protein sequences and crystal structure data from RCSB Protein Data Bank of the PAS domain superfamily belonging to three biological functions (nucleotide binding, photoreceptor activity, and transferase activity). Protein sequences were aligned and then used to select sequence-conserved residues and build phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional structure alignment was also applied to obtain structure-conserved residues. The protein dynamics were analyzed using elastic network model (ENM) and validated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The result showed that the proteins with same function could be grouped by sequence similarity, and proteins in different functional groups displayed statistically significant difference in their vibrational patterns. Interestingly, in all three functional groups, conserved amino acid residues identified by sequence and structure conservation analysis generally have a lower fluctuation than other residues. In addition, the fluctuation of conserved residues in each biological function group was strongly correlated with the corresponding biological function. This research suggested a direct connection in which the protein sequences were related to various functions through structural dynamics. This is a new attempt to delineate functional evolution of proteins using the integrated information of sequence, structure, and dynamics. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  12. Evolutive and regressive soil sequences for characterization of soils in laurel forest (Tenerife, Canary Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Asterio Guerra-García

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil degradation processes have achieved the recognition of a global environmental problem in recent years. It has been suggested by various international forums and organizations that in order to adequately establish methods to combat land degradation, it is necessary to evaluate this degradation locally and at a detailed scale. The evaluation of soil degradation of natural ecosystems at a detailed scale requires the definition of standards to which to compare this degradation. To define these standards and properly handle the processes that give rise to variations in soil quality and degradation, it is necessary to establish in some detail the pedogenic processes that have or have not taken place in a particular area and which lead to the formation of a mature soil. A mature soil should be considered as standard in these situations and, therefore, a non-degraded soil. This paper presents the possible evolutive and regressive sequences of soil, and provides some examples of using this methodology to evaluate the degradation of the same in the Monteverde of the island of Tenerife. It also presents some physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of climacic mature soils, degraded soils and low quality soils, and examines their similarities and differences in this bioclimatic environment and on different parent materials. Thus it is observed that the main processes of degradation in these areas are related to plant cover modifications that lead to the decreasing protection of the soil surface, which results in the long term, in the onset of degradation processes such as water erosion, biological degradation, loss of andic properties, compaction and sealing and crusting surface, loss of water retention capacity, illuviation, etc. Climacic soils that can be found in areas of steep lava flows are Leptosols, while gently sloping areas are Cambisols and Andosols. On pyroclastic materials there are vitric Andosols and andic Andosols according to

  13. Rapid sequencing of the bamboo mitochondrial genome using Illumina technology and parallel episodic evolution of organelle genomes in grasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Fei Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Compared to their counterparts in animals, the mitochondrial (mt genomes of angiosperms exhibit a number of unique features. However, unravelling their evolution is hindered by the few completed genomes, of which are essentially Sanger sequenced. While next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized chloroplast genome sequencing, they are just beginning to be applied to angiosperm mt genomes. Chloroplast genomes of grasses (Poaceae have undergone episodic evolution and the evolutionary rate was suggested to be correlated between chloroplast and mt genomes in Poaceae. It is interesting to investigate whether correlated rate change also occurred in grass mt genomes as expected under lineage effects. A time-calibrated phylogenetic tree is needed to examine rate change. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined a largely completed mt genome from a bamboo, Ferrocalamus rimosivaginus (Poaceae, through Illumina sequencing of total DNA. With combination of de novo and reference-guided assembly, 39.5-fold coverage Illumina reads were finally assembled into scaffolds totalling 432,839 bp. The assembled genome contains nearly the same genes as the completed mt genomes in Poaceae. For examining evolutionary rate in grass mt genomes, we reconstructed a phylogenetic tree including 22 taxa based on 31 mt genes. The topology of the well-resolved tree was almost identical to that inferred from chloroplast genome with only minor difference. The inconsistency possibly derived from long branch attraction in mtDNA tree. By calculating absolute substitution rates, we found significant rate change (∼4-fold in mt genome before and after the diversification of Poaceae both in synonymous and nonsynonymous terms. Furthermore, the rate change was correlated with that of chloroplast genomes in grasses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our result demonstrates that it is a rapid and efficient approach to obtain angiosperm mt genome sequences using

  14. Evolution and strengthening of the Calabrian Regional Seismic Network during the Pollino sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; Gervasi, Anna; Guerra, Ignazio

    2013-04-01

    In the last three years the Calabria-Lucania border area is affected by an intense seismic activity generated by the activation of geological structures which be seat of clusters of microearthquakes, with energy release sufficient to be felt and to generate alarm and bother. Besides to the historical memory of the inhabitants of Mormanno (the town most affected of macroseismic effects) there are some historical documents that indicate the occurrence of a similar seismic crisis in 1888. A more recent seismic sequence, the first monitored by seismic instruments, occurred in 1973-1974. In the last case, the activity started in early 2010 and is still ongoing. The two shocks of ML = 4.3 and 5.0 and the the very long time duration differs this crisis from the previous ones. Given this background, in 1981 was installed at Mormanno a seismic station (MMN) belonging to Regional Seismic Network of the University of Calabria (RSRC), now also a station of the Italian National Seismic Network of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica Vulcanolgia (INSN-INGV). This seismic station made it possible to follow the evolution of seismicity in this area and in particular the progressive increase in seismic activity started in 2010. Since 2010, some 3D stand-alone, was installed by the University of Calabria. Further stations of INGV were installed in November 2011 after a sharp increase of the energy release and subsequently by the INGV and the GeoForschungsZentrum (Potsdam) after the main shock of the whole sequence. Seismic networks are powerful tools for understanding active tectonic processes in a monitored seismically active region. However, the optimal monitoring of a seismic region requires the assessment of the seismic network capabilities to identify seismogenic areas that are not adequately covered and to quantify measures that will allow the network improvement. In this paper we examine in detail the evolution and the strengthening of the RSRC in the last years analyzing the

  15. Phylogenetic relationships and evolution in Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae) based on matK sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltis, D E; Tago-Nakazawa, M; Xiang, Q Y; Kawano, S; Murata, J; Wakabayashi, M; Hibsch-Jetter, C

    2001-05-01

    Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae) consists of 57 species widely distributed in temperate and arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere, with two species restricted to the southern part of South America. Species relationships within the genus are highly problematic. The genus has traditionally been divided into two groups, sometimes recognized as sections (Oppositifolia and Alternifolia), based on leaf arrangement, or, alternatively, into 17 series. Based on morphological features, Hara suggested that the genus originated in South America and then subsequently migrated to the Northern Hemisphere. We conducted phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences of the chloroplast gene matK for species of Chrysosplenium to elucidate relationships, test Hara's biogeographic hypothesis for the genus, and examine chromosomal and gynoecial diversification. These analyses revealed that both sections Oppositifolia and Alternifolia are monophyletic and form two large sister clades. Hence, leaf arrangement is a good indicator of relationships within this genus. Hara's series Pilosa and Macrostemon are each also monophyletic; however, series Oppositifolia, Alternifolia, and Nepalensia are clearly not monophyletic. MacClade reconstructions suggest that the genus arose in Eastern Asia, rather than in South America, with several independent migration events from Asia to the New World. In one well-defined subclade, species from eastern and western North America form a discrete clade, with Old World species as their sister group, suggesting that the eastern and western North American taxa diverged following migration to that continent. The South American species forms a clade with species from eastern Asia; this disjunction may be the result of ancient long-distance dispersal. Character mapping demonstrated that gynoecial diversification is dynamic, with reversals from inferior to half-inferior ovaries, as well as to ovaries that appear superior. Chromosomal evolution also appears to be labile

  16. THE QUADRUPLE PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE SYSTEM LkCa 3: IMPLICATIONS FOR STELLAR EVOLUTION MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Guillermo; Latham, David W.; Ruíz-Rodríguez, Dary; Prato, L.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Badenas, Mariona; Schaefer, G. H.; Mathieu, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery that the pre-main-sequence (PMS) object LkCa 3 in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region is a hierarchical quadruple system of M stars. It was previously known to be a close (∼0.''5) visual pair, with one component being a moderately eccentric 12.94 day single-lined spectroscopic binary. A re-analysis of archival optical spectra complemented by new near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy shows both visual components to be double lined; the second one has a period of 4.06 days and a circular orbit. In addition to the orbital elements, we determine optical and NIR flux ratios, effective temperatures, and projected rotational velocities for all four stars. Using existing photometric monitoring observations of the system that had previously revealed the rotational period of the primary in the longer-period binary, we also detect the rotational signal of the primary in the 4.06 day binary, which is synchronized with the orbital motion. With only the assumption of coevality, a comparison of all of these constraints with current stellar evolution models from the Dartmouth series points to an age of 1.4 Myr and a distance of 133 pc, consistent with previous estimates for the region and suggesting that the system is on the near side of the Taurus complex. Similar comparisons of the properties of LkCa 3 and the well-known quadruple PMS system GG Tau with the widely used models from the Lyon series for a mixing length parameter of α ML = 1.0 strongly favor the Dartmouth models

  17. Interactions of chromatin context, binding site sequence content, and sequence evolution in stress-induced p53 occupancy and transactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular stresses activate the tumor suppressor p53 protein leading to selective binding to DNA response elements (REs and gene transactivation from a large pool of potential p53 REs (p53REs. To elucidate how p53RE sequences and local chromatin context interact to affect p53 binding and gene transactivation, we mapped genome-wide binding localizations of p53 and H3K4me3 in untreated and doxorubicin (DXR-treated human lymphoblastoid cells. We examined the relationships among p53 occupancy, gene expression, H3K4me3, chromatin accessibility (DNase 1 hypersensitivity, DHS, ENCODE chromatin states, p53RE sequence, and evolutionary conservation. We observed that the inducible expression of p53-regulated genes was associated with the steady-state chromatin status of the cell. Most highly inducible p53-regulated genes were suppressed at baseline and marked by repressive histone modifications or displayed CTCF binding. Comparison of p53RE sequences residing in different chromatin contexts demonstrated that weaker p53REs resided in open promoters, while stronger p53REs were located within enhancers and repressed chromatin. p53 occupancy was strongly correlated with similarity of the target DNA sequences to the p53RE consensus, but surprisingly, inversely correlated with pre-existing nucleosome accessibility (DHS and evolutionary conservation at the p53RE. Occupancy by p53 of REs that overlapped transposable element (TE repeats was significantly higher (p<10-7 and correlated with stronger p53RE sequences (p<10-110 relative to nonTE-associated p53REs, particularly for MLT1H, LTR10B, and Mer61 TEs. However, binding at these elements was generally not associated with transactivation of adjacent genes. Occupied p53REs located in L2-like TEs were unique in displaying highly negative PhyloP scores (predicted fast-evolving and being associated with altered H3K4me3 and DHS levels. These results underscore the systematic interaction between chromatin status and p53

  18. The subclonal structure and genomic evolution of oral squamous cell carcinoma revealed by ultra-deep sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Thomassen, Mads; Larsen, Martin J

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that head and neck squamous cell carcinomas are very heterogeneous between patients; however the subclonal structure remains unexplored mainly due to studies using only a single biopsy per patient. To deconvolutethe clonal structure and describe the genomic cancer evolution......, we applied whole-exome sequencing combined with ultra-deep targeted sequencing on oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC). From each patient, a set of biopsies was sampled from distinct geographical sites in primary tumor and lymph node metastasis.We demonstrate that the included OSCCs show a high...

  19. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yu Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method.

  20. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Yu; Meng, Xiang-Bing; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method. PMID:24696649

  1. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intra-Host Evolution (LASSIE Identifies Immune-Selected HIV Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hraber

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Within-host genetic sequencing from samples collected over time provides a dynamic view of how viruses evade host immunity. Immune-driven mutations might stimulate neutralization breadth by selecting antibodies adapted to cycles of immune escape that generate within-subject epitope diversity. Comprehensive identification of immune-escape mutations is experimentally and computationally challenging. With current technology, many more viral sequences can readily be obtained than can be tested for binding and neutralization, making down-selection necessary. Typically, this is done manually, by picking variants that represent different time-points and branches on a phylogenetic tree. Such strategies are likely to miss many relevant mutations and combinations of mutations, and to be redundant for other mutations. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intrahost Evolution (LASSIE uses transmitted founder loss to identify virus “hot-spots” under putative immune selection and chooses sequences that represent recurrent mutations in selected sites. LASSIE favors earliest sequences in which mutations arise. With well-characterized longitudinal Env sequences, we confirmed selected sites were concentrated in antibody contacts and selected sequences represented diverse antigenic phenotypes. Practical applications include rapidly identifying immune targets under selective pressure within a subject, selecting minimal sets of reagents for immunological assays that characterize evolving antibody responses, and for immunogens in polyvalent “cocktail” vaccines.

  2. Quick guide to polyketide synthase and nonribosomal synthetase genes in Fusarium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen T.; Sørensen, Jens L.; Giese, Henriette

    2012-01-01

    for future polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptides synthetases (NRPSs) nomenclature assignment and classification. Sequence similarities of the adenylation and ketosynthase domain sequences were used to group the identified NRPS and PKS genes. We present the current state of knowledge of PKS......Fusarium species produce a plethora of bioactive polyketides and nonribosomal peptides that give rise to health problems in animals and may have drug development potential. Using the genome sequences for Fusarium graminearum, F. oxysporum, F. solani and F. verticillioides we developed a framework...

  3. Phylogeny and character evolution of the coprinoid mushroom genus Parasola as inferred from LSU and ITS nr DNA sequence data

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, L.G.; Kocsubé, S.; Papp, T.; Vágvölgyi, C.

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships, species concepts and morphological evolution of the coprinoid mushroom genus Parasola were studied. A combined dataset of nuclear ribosomal ITS and LSU sequences was used to infer phylogenetic relationships of Parasola species and several outgroup taxa. Clades recovered in the phylogenetic analyses corresponded well to morphologically discernable species, although in the case of P. leiocephala, P. lilatincta and P. plicatilis amended concepts proved necessary. Para...

  4. POST-MAIN SEQUENCE EVOLUTION OF ICY MINOR PLANETS: IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER RETENTION AND WHITE DWARF POLLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malamud, Uri; Perets, Hagai B., E-mail: uri.mal@tx.technion.ac.il, E-mail: hperets@physics.technion.ac.il [Department of Physics, Technion (Israel)

    2016-12-01

    Most observations of polluted white dwarf atmospheres are consistent with accretion of water-depleted planetary material. Among tens of known cases, merely two involve accretion of objects that contain a considerable mass fraction of water. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relative scarcity of these detections. Based on a new and highly detailed model, we evaluate the retention of water inside icy minor planets during the high-luminosity stellar evolution that follows the main sequence. Our model fully considers the thermal, physical, and chemical evolution of icy bodies, following their internal differentiation as well as water depletion, from the moment of their birth and through all stellar evolution phases preceding the formation of the white dwarf. We also account for different initial compositions and formation times. Our results differ from previous studies, which have either underestimated or overestimated water retention. We show that water can survive in a variety of circumstances and in great quantities, and therefore other possibilities are discussed in order to explain the infrequency of water detection. We predict that the sequence of accretion is such that water accretes earlier, and more rapidly, than the rest of the silicate disk, considerably reducing the chance of its detection in H-dominated atmospheres. In He-dominated atmospheres, the scarcity of water detections could be observationally biased. It implies that the accreted material is typically intrinsically dry, which may be the result of the inside-out depopulation sequence of minor planets.

  5. Parameters of proteome evolution from histograms of amino-acid sequence identities of paralogous proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Koon-Kiu

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of the full repertoire of proteins encoded in a given genome is mostly driven by gene duplications, deletions, and sequence modifications of existing proteins. Indirect information about relative rates and other intrinsic parameters of these three basic processes is contained in the proteome-wide distribution of sequence identities of pairs of paralogous proteins. Results We introduce a simple mathematical framework based on a stochastic birth-and-death model that allows one to extract some of this information and apply it to the set of all pairs of paralogous proteins in H. pylori, E. coli, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, and H. sapiens. It was found that the histogram of sequence identities p generated by an all-to-all alignment of all protein sequences encoded in a genome is well fitted with a power-law form ~ p-γ with the value of the exponent γ around 4 for the majority of organisms used in this study. This implies that the intra-protein variability of substitution rates is best described by the Gamma-distribution with the exponent α ≈ 0.33. Different features of the shape of such histograms allow us to quantify the ratio between the genome-wide average deletion/duplication rates and the amino-acid substitution rate. Conclusion We separately measure the short-term ("raw" duplication and deletion rates rdup∗ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacPC6xNi=xH8viVGI8Gi=hEeeu0xXdbba9frFj0xb9qqpG0dXdb9aspeI8k8fiI+fsY=rqGqVepae9pg0db9vqaiVgFr0xfr=xfr=xc9adbaqaaeGacaGaaiaabeqaaeqabiWaaaGcbaGaemOCai3aa0baaSqaaiabbsgaKjabbwha1jabbchaWbqaaiabgEHiQaaaaaa@3283@, rdel∗ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacPC6xNi=xH8viVGI8Gi=hEeeu0xXdbba9frFj0xb9qqpG0dXdb9aspeI8k8fiI+fsY=rqGqVepae9pg0db9vqaiVgFr0xfr=xfr=xc9adbaqaaeGacaGaaiaabeqaaeqabiWaaaGcbaGaemOCai3aa0baaSqaaiabbsga

  6. Recent Acceleration of Plastid Sequence and Structural Evolution Coincides with Extreme Mitochondrial Divergence in the Angiosperm Genus Silene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Daniel B.; Alverson, Andrew J.; Wu, Martin; Palmer, Jeffrey D.; Taylor, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    The angiosperm genus Silene exhibits some of the most extreme and rapid divergence ever identified in mitochondrial genome architecture and nucleotide substitution rates. These patterns have been considered mitochondrial specific based on the absence of correlated changes in the small number of available nuclear and plastid gene sequences. To better assess the relationship between mitochondrial and plastid evolution, we sequenced the plastid genomes from four Silene species with fully sequenced mitochondrial genomes. We found that two species with fast-evolving mitochondrial genomes, S. noctiflora and S. conica, also exhibit accelerated rates of sequence and structural evolution in their plastid genomes. The nature of these changes, however, is markedly different from those in the mitochondrial genome. For example, in contrast to the mitochondrial pattern, which appears to be genome wide and mutationally driven, the plastid substitution rate accelerations are restricted to a subset of genes and preferentially affect nonsynonymous sites, indicating that altered selection pressures are acting on specific plastid-encoded functions in these species. Indeed, some plastid genes in S. noctiflora and S. conica show strong evidence of positive selection. In contrast, two species with more slowly evolving mitochondrial genomes, S. latifolia and S. vulgaris, have correspondingly low rates of nucleotide substitution in plastid genes as well as a plastid genome structure that has remained essentially unchanged since the origin of angiosperms. These results raise the possibility that common evolutionary forces could be shaping the extreme but distinct patterns of divergence in both organelle genomes within this genus. PMID:22247429

  7. Distribution and evolution of repeated sequences in genomes of Triatominae (Hemiptera-Reduviidae inferred from genomic in situ hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pita

    Full Text Available The subfamily Triatominae, vectors of Chagas disease, comprises 140 species characterized by a highly homogeneous chromosome number. We analyzed the chromosomal distribution and evolution of repeated sequences in Triatominae genomes by Genomic in situ Hybridization using Triatoma delpontei and Triatoma infestans genomic DNAs as probes. Hybridizations were performed on their own chromosomes and on nine species included in six genera from the two main tribes: Triatomini and Rhodniini. Genomic probes clearly generate two different hybridization patterns, dispersed or accumulated in specific regions or chromosomes. The three used probes generate the same hybridization pattern in each species. However, these patterns are species-specific. In closely related species, the probes strongly hybridized in the autosomal heterochromatic regions, resembling C-banding and DAPI patterns. However, in more distant species these co-localizations are not observed. The heterochromatic Y chromosome is constituted by highly repeated sequences, which is conserved among 10 species of Triatomini tribe suggesting be an ancestral character for this group. However, the Y chromosome in Rhodniini tribe is markedly different, supporting the early evolutionary dichotomy between both tribes. In some species, sex chromosomes and autosomes shared repeated sequences, suggesting meiotic chromatin exchanges among these heterologous chromosomes. Our GISH analyses enabled us to acquire not only reliable information about autosomal repeated sequences distribution but also an insight into sex chromosome evolution in Triatominae. Furthermore, the differentiation obtained by GISH might be a valuable marker to establish phylogenetic relationships and to test the controversial origin of the Triatominae subfamily.

  8. Evolution of R5 and X4 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag sequences in vivo: evidence for recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rij, Ronald P. van; Worobey, Michael; Visser, Janny A.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is in general established by CCR5-utilizing (R5) virus variants, which persist throughout the course of infection. R5 HIV-1 variants evolve into CXCR4-utilizing (X4) HIV-1 variants in approximately half of the infected individuals. We have previously observed an ongoing genetic evolution with a continuous divergence of envelope gp120 sequences of coexisting R5 and X4 virus variants over time. Here, we studied evolution of gag p17 sequences in two patients who developed X4 variants in the course of infection. In contrast to the envelope gp120 sequences, gag p17 sequences of R5 and X4 virus populations intermingled in phylogenetic trees and did not diverge from each other over time. Statistical evaluation using the Shimodaira-Hasegawa test indicated that the different genomic regions evolved along different topologies, supporting the hypothesis of recombination. Therefore, our data imply that recombination between R5 and X4 HIV-1 variants occurs in vivo

  9. Distribution and evolution of repeated sequences in genomes of Triatominae (Hemiptera-Reduviidae) inferred from genomic in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Sebastian; Panzera, Francisco; Sánchez, Antonio; Panzera, Yanina; Palomeque, Teresa; Lorite, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The subfamily Triatominae, vectors of Chagas disease, comprises 140 species characterized by a highly homogeneous chromosome number. We analyzed the chromosomal distribution and evolution of repeated sequences in Triatominae genomes by Genomic in situ Hybridization using Triatoma delpontei and Triatoma infestans genomic DNAs as probes. Hybridizations were performed on their own chromosomes and on nine species included in six genera from the two main tribes: Triatomini and Rhodniini. Genomic probes clearly generate two different hybridization patterns, dispersed or accumulated in specific regions or chromosomes. The three used probes generate the same hybridization pattern in each species. However, these patterns are species-specific. In closely related species, the probes strongly hybridized in the autosomal heterochromatic regions, resembling C-banding and DAPI patterns. However, in more distant species these co-localizations are not observed. The heterochromatic Y chromosome is constituted by highly repeated sequences, which is conserved among 10 species of Triatomini tribe suggesting be an ancestral character for this group. However, the Y chromosome in Rhodniini tribe is markedly different, supporting the early evolutionary dichotomy between both tribes. In some species, sex chromosomes and autosomes shared repeated sequences, suggesting meiotic chromatin exchanges among these heterologous chromosomes. Our GISH analyses enabled us to acquire not only reliable information about autosomal repeated sequences distribution but also an insight into sex chromosome evolution in Triatominae. Furthermore, the differentiation obtained by GISH might be a valuable marker to establish phylogenetic relationships and to test the controversial origin of the Triatominae subfamily.

  10. The Subclonal Structure and Genomic Evolution of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Revealed by Ultra-deep Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Thomassen, Mads; Larsen, Martin Jakob

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), a subgroup of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), is primarily caused by alcohol consumption and tobacco use. Recent DNA sequencing studies suggests that HNSCC are very heterogeneous between patients; however the intra-patient subclonal...... structure remains unexplored due to lack of sampling multiple tumor biopsies from each patient. Materials and methods: To examine the clonal structure and describe the genomic cancer evolution we applied whole-exome sequencing combined with targeted ultra-deep targeted sequencing on biopsies from 5stage IV...... of unprecedented high resolution enabling clear detection of subclonal structure and observation of otherwise undetectable mutations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that OSCC show a high degree of inter-patient heterogeneity but a low degree of intra-patient/tumor heterogeneity. However, some OSCC cancers contain...

  11. alpha-Crystallin A sequences of Alligator mississippiensis and the lizard Tupinambis teguixin: molecular evolution and reptilian phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, W W; Zweers, A; Versteeg, M; Dessauer, H C; Goodman, M

    1985-11-01

    The amino acid sequences of the eye lens protein alpha-crystallin A from many mammalian and avian species, two frog species, and a dogfish have provided detailed information about the molecular evolution of this protein and allowed some useful inferences about phylogenetic relationships among these species. We now have isolated and sequenced the alpha-crystallins of the American alligator and the common tegu lizard. The reptilian alpha A chains appear to have evolved as slowly as those of other vertebrates, i.e., at two to three amino acid replacements per 100 residues in 100 Myr. The lack of charged replacements and the general types and distribution of replacements also are similar to those in other vertebrate alpha A chains. Maximum-parsimony analyses of the total data set of 67 vertebrate alpha A sequences support the monophyletic origin of alligator, tegu, and birds and favor the grouping of crocodilians and birds as surviving sister groups in the subclass Archosauria.

  12. Empirical tests of pre-main-sequence stellar evolution models with eclipsing binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassun, Keivan G.; Feiden, Gregory A.; Torres, Guillermo

    2014-06-01

    We examine the performance of standard pre-main-sequence (PMS) stellar evolution models against the accurately measured properties of a benchmark sample of 26 PMS stars in 13 eclipsing binary (EB) systems having masses 0.04-4.0 M⊙ and nominal ages ≈1-20 Myr. We provide a definitive compilation of all fundamental properties for the EBs, with a careful and consistent reassessment of observational uncertainties. We also provide a definitive compilation of the various PMS model sets, including physical ingredients and limits of applicability. No set of model isochrones is able to successfully reproduce all of the measured properties of all of the EBs. In the H-R diagram, the masses inferred for the individual stars by the models are accurate to better than 10% at ≳1 M⊙, but below 1 M⊙ they are discrepant by 50-100%. Adjusting the observed radii and temperatures using empirical relations for the effects of magnetic activity helps to resolve the discrepancies in a few cases, but fails as a general solution. We find evidence that the failure of the models to match the data is linked to the triples in the EB sample; at least half of the EBs possess tertiary companions. Excluding the triples, the models reproduce the stellar masses to better than ∼10% in the H-R diagram, down to 0.5 M⊙, below which the current sample is fully contaminated by tertiaries. We consider several mechanisms by which a tertiary might cause changes in the EB properties and thus corrupt the agreement with stellar model predictions. We show that the energies of the tertiary orbits are comparable to that needed to potentially explain the scatter in the EB properties through injection of heat, perhaps involving tidal interaction. It seems from the evidence at hand that this mechanism, however it operates in detail, has more influence on the surface properties of the stars than on their internal structure, as the lithium abundances are broadly in good agreement with model predictions. The

  13. Stratigraphic framework and evolution of the Cretaceous continental sequences of the Bauru, Sanfranciscana, and Parecis basins, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batezelli, Alessandro; Ladeira, Francisco Sergio Bernardes

    2016-01-01

    With the breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana, the South American Plate has undergone an intense process of tectonic restructuring that led to the genesis of the interior basins that encompassed continental sedimentary sequences. The Brazilian Bauru, Sanfranciscana and Parecis basins during Late Cretaceous have had their evolution linked to this process of structuring and therefore have very similar sedimentary characteristics. The purpose of this study is to establish a detailed understanding of alluvial sedimentary processes and architecture within a stratigraphic sequence framework using the concept of the stratigraphic base level or the ratio between the accommodation space and sediment supply. The integration of the stratigraphic and facies data contributed to defining the stratigraphic architecture of the Bauru, Sanfranciscana and Parecis Basins, supporting a model for continental sequences that depicts qualitative changes in the sedimentation rate (S) and accommodation space (A) that occurred during the Cretaceous. This study discusses the origin of the unconformity surfaces (K-0, K-1 and K-1A) that separate Sequences 1, 2A and 2B and the sedimentary characteristics of the Bauru, Sanfranciscana and Parecis Basins from the Aptian to the Maastrichtian, comparing the results with other Cretaceous Brazilian basins. The lower Cretaceous Sequence 1 (Caiuá and Areado groups) is interpreted as a low-accommodation systems tract compound by fluvial and aeolian systems. The upper Cretaceous lacustrine, braided river-dominated alluvial fan and aeolian systems display characteristics of the evolution from high-to low-accommodation systems tracts (Sequences 2A and 2B). Unconformity K-0 is related to the origin of the Bauru Basin itself in the Early Cretaceous. In Sanfranciscana and Parecis basins, the unconformity K-0 marks the contact between aeolian deposits from Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous alluvial systems (Sequences 1 and 2). Unconformity K-1, which was

  14. Transformation of Bacillus Subtilis with cloned thymidylate synthetases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Edward M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Biology and Biophysics

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carries two genes, thyA and thyB, each encoding different protein products, with thymidylate synthetase (TSase) activity. Either of these genes alone is sufficient for thymidine independence in B. subtilis. In addition there exist two B. subtilis temperate bacteriophages which upon infection of thymine requiring auxotrophs results in conversion of the organism to thymine independence. Chimeric plasmids selected for Thy+ transforming activity in E. coli were constructed and then used as a source of defined highly enriched DNA with which to transform competent B. subtilis. These plasmids were studied for their: (1) abiility to transform B. subtilis to thymine independence; (2) site of integration within the B. subtilis chromosome upon transformation; (3) phenotype of Thy+ plasmid generated transformants; and (4) nucleotide sequence homology among the cloned DNA fragments conferring thymine independence. Plasmids containing the two bacteriophage thy genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyA, whereas the plasmids containing the cloned B. subtilis chromosomal genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyB. Utilizing similar technology, the ability of an entirely foreign hybred bacterial plasmiid to transform B. subtilis was examined. In this case the gene from E. coli encoding thymidylate synthetase was cloned in the plasmid pBR322. The resulting chimeric plasmid was effective in transforming both E. coli and B. subtilis to thymine prototrophy. Uncloned linear E. coli chromosomal DNA was unable to transform thymine requiring strains of B. subtilis to thymine independence. Although the Thy/sup +/ transformants of E. coli contained plasmid DNA, the Thy+ transformants derived from the transformation of B. subtilis did not contain detectable extrachromosomal DNA. Instead the DNA from the chimeric plasmid was integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis. (ERB)

  15. Common peptides study of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Gottlieb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs constitute an essential enzyme super-family, providing fidelity of the translation process of mRNA to proteins in living cells. They are common to all kingdoms and are of utmost importance to all organisms. It is thus of great interest to understand the evolutionary relationships among them and underline signature motifs defining their common domains. RESULTS: We utilized the Common Peptides (CPs framework, based on extracted deterministic motifs from all aaRSs, to study family-specific properties. We identified novel aaRS-class related signatures that may supplement the current classification methods and provide a basis for identifying functional regions specific to each aaRS class. We exploited the space spanned by the CPs in order to identify similarities between aaRS families that are not observed using sequence alignment methods, identifying different inter-aaRS associations across different kingdom of life. We explored the evolutionary history of the aaRS families and evolutionary origins of the mitochondrial aaRSs. Lastly, we showed that prevalent CPs significantly overlap known catalytic and binding sites, suggesting that they have meaningful functional roles, as well as identifying a motif shared between aaRSs and a the Biotin-[acetyl-CoA carboxylase] synthetase (birA enzyme overlapping binding sites in both families. CONCLUSIONS: The study presents the multitude of ways to exploit the CP framework in order to extract meaningful patterns from the aaRS super-family. Specific CPs, discovered in this study, may play important roles in the functionality of these enzymes. We explored the evolutionary patterns in each aaRS family and tracked remote evolutionary links between these families.

  16. Evolution of biological sequences implies an extreme value distribution of type I for both global and local pairwise alignment scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maréchal Eric

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Confidence in pairwise alignments of biological sequences, obtained by various methods such as Blast or Smith-Waterman, is critical for automatic analyses of genomic data. Two statistical models have been proposed. In the asymptotic limit of long sequences, the Karlin-Altschul model is based on the computation of a P-value, assuming that the number of high scoring matching regions above a threshold is Poisson distributed. Alternatively, the Lipman-Pearson model is based on the computation of a Z-value from a random score distribution obtained by a Monte-Carlo simulation. Z-values allow the deduction of an upper bound of the P-value (1/Z-value2 following the TULIP theorem. Simulations of Z-value distribution is known to fit with a Gumbel law. This remarkable property was not demonstrated and had no obvious biological support. Results We built a model of evolution of sequences based on aging, as meant in Reliability Theory, using the fact that the amount of information shared between an initial sequence and the sequences in its lineage (i.e., mutual information in Information Theory is a decreasing function of time. This quantity is simply measured by a sequence alignment score. In systems aging, the failure rate is related to the systems longevity. The system can be a machine with structured components, or a living entity or population. "Reliability" refers to the ability to operate properly according to a standard. Here, the "reliability" of a sequence refers to the ability to conserve a sufficient functional level at the folded and maturated protein level (positive selection pressure. Homologous sequences were considered as systems 1 having a high redundancy of information reflected by the magnitude of their alignment scores, 2 which components are the amino acids that can independently be damaged by random DNA mutations. From these assumptions, we deduced that information shared at each amino acid position evolved with a

  17. Molecular phylogeny, population genetics, and evolution of heterocystous cyanobacteria using nifH gene sequences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Singh, P.; Singh, S. S.; Elster, Josef; Mishra, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 250, č. 3 (2013), s. 751-764 ISSN 0033-183X Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : evolution * heterocystous cyanobacteria * nifH gene Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.171, year: 2013

  18. Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibbs, Richard A; Weinstock, George M; Metzker, Michael L

    2004-01-01

    The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over...

  19. Expressed sequence tags as a tool for phylogenetic analysis of placental mammal evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Kullberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We investigate the usefulness of expressed sequence tags, ESTs, for establishing divergences within the tree of placental mammals. This is done on the example of the established relationships among primates (human, lagomorphs (rabbit, rodents (rat and mouse, artiodactyls (cow, carnivorans (dog and proboscideans (elephant. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have produced 2000 ESTs (1.2 mega bases from a marsupial mouse and characterized the data for their use in phylogenetic analysis. The sequences were used to identify putative orthologous sequences from whole genome projects. Although most ESTs stem from single sequence reads, the frequency of potential sequencing errors was found to be lower than allelic variation. Most of the sequences represented slowly evolving housekeeping-type genes, with an average amino acid distance of 6.6% between human and mouse. Positive Darwinian selection was identified at only a few single sites. Phylogenetic analyses of the EST data yielded trees that were consistent with those established from whole genome projects. CONCLUSIONS: The general quality of EST sequences and the general absence of positive selection in these sequences make ESTs an attractive tool for phylogenetic analysis. The EST approach allows, at reasonable costs, a fast extension of data sampling from species outside the genome projects.

  20. Evolution of Tandem Repeat Satellite Sequences in Two Closely Related Caenorhabditis Species. Diminution of Satellites in Hermaphrodites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, Juan A; Messeguer, Xavier

    2017-11-28

    The availability of the genome sequence of the unisexual (male-female) Caenorhabditis nigoni offers an opportunity to compare its non-coding features with the related hermaphroditic species Caenorhabditis briggsae ; to understand the evolutionary dynamics of their tandem repeat sequences (satellites), as a result of evolution from the unisexual ancestor. We take advantage of the previously developed SATFIND program to build satellite families defined by a consensus sequence. The relative number of satellites (satellites/Mb) in C. nigoni is 24.6% larger than in C. briggsae . Some satellites in C. nigoni have developed from a proto-repeat present in the ancestor species and are conserved as an isolated sequence in C. briggsae . We also identify unique satellites which occur only once and joint satellite families with a related sequence in both species. Some of these families are only found in C. nigoni , which indicates a recent appearance; they contain conserved adjacent 5' and 3' regions, which may favor transposition. Our results show that the number, length and turnover of satellites are restricted in the hermaphrodite C. briggsae when compared with the unisexual C. nigoni . We hypothesize that this results from differences in unequal recombination during meiotic chromosome pairing, which limits satellite turnover in hermaphrodites.

  1. THE RISE AND FALL OF PASSIVE DISK GALAXIES: MORPHOLOGICAL EVOLUTION ALONG THE RED SEQUENCE REVEALED BY COSMOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, Kevin; Hopkins, Philip; Ma, Chung-Pei; Scarlata, Claudia; Capak, Peter; Carollo, C. M.; Oesch, Pascal; Ellis, Richard S.; Salvato, Mara; Scoville, Nick; Drory, Niv; Leauthaud, Alexie; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Murray, Norman; Ilbert, Olivier; Pozzetti, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    The increasing abundance of passive 'red-sequence' galaxies since z ∼ 1-2 is mirrored by a coincident rise in the number of galaxies with spheroidal morphologies. In this paper, however, we show in detail, that, the correspondence between galaxy morphology and color is not perfect, providing insight into the physical origin of this evolution. Using the COSMOS survey, we study a significant population of red-sequence galaxies with disk-like morphologies. These passive disks typically have Sa-Sb morphological types with large bulges, but they are not confined to dense environments. They represent nearly one-half of all red-sequence galaxies and dominate at lower masses (∼ 10 M sun ) where they are increasingly disk-dominated. As a function of time, the abundance of passive disks with M * ∼ 11 M sun increases, but not as fast as red-sequence spheroidals in the same mass range. At higher mass, the passive disk population has declined since z ∼ 1, likely because they transform into spheroidals. Based on these trends, we estimate that as much as 60% of galaxies transitioning onto the red sequence evolve through a passive disk phase. The origin of passive disks therefore has broad implications for our understanding of how star formation shuts down. Because passive disks tend to be more bulge-dominated than their star-forming counterparts, a simple fading of blue disks does not fully explain their origin. We explore the strengths and weaknesses of several more sophisticated explanations, including environmental effects, internal stabilization, and disk regrowth during gas-rich mergers. While previous work has sought to explain color and morphological transformations with a single process, these observations open the way to new insight by highlighting the fact that galaxy evolution may actually proceed through several separate stages.

  2. Effect of accretion on the pre-main-sequence evolution of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Elbakyan, Vardan; Hosokawa, Takashi; Sakurai, Yuya; Guedel, Manuel; Yorke, Harold

    2017-09-01

    Aims: The pre-main-sequence evolution of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs is studied numerically starting from the formation of a protostellar or proto-brown dwarf seed and taking into account the mass accretion onto the central object during the initial several Myr of evolution. Methods: The stellar evolution was computed using the STELLAR evolution code with recent modifications. The mass accretion rates were taken from numerical hydrodynamics models by computing the circumstellar disk evolution starting from the gravitational collapse of prestellar cloud cores of various mass and angular momentum. The resulting stellar evolution tracks were compared with the isochrones and isomasses calculated using non-accreting models. Results: We find that mass accretion in the initial several Myr of protostellar evolution can have a strong effect on the subsequent evolution of young stars and brown dwarfs. The disagreement between accreting and non-accreting models in terms of the total stellar luminosity L∗, stellar radius R∗, and effective temperature Teff depends on the thermal efficiency of accretion, that is, on the fraction of accretion energy that is absorbed by the central object. The largest mismatch is found for the cold accretion case, in which essentially all accretion energy is radiated away. The relative deviations in L∗ and R∗ in this case can reach 50% for objects 1.0 Myr old, and they remain notable even for objects 10 Myr old. In the hot and hybrid accretion cases, in which a constant fraction of accretion energy is absorbed, the disagreement between accreting and non-accreting models becomes less pronounced, but still remains notable for objects 1.0 Myr old. These disagreements may lead to an incorrect age estimate for objects of (sub-)solar mass when using the isochrones that are based on non-accreting models, as has also been noted previously. We find that objects with strong luminosity bursts exhibit notable excursions in the L∗-Teff diagram

  3. Comparable contributions of structural-functional constraints and expression level to the rate of protein sequence evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins show a broad range of evolutionary rates. Understanding the factors that are responsible for the characteristic rate of evolution of a given protein arguably is one of the major goals of evolutionary biology. A long-standing general assumption used to be that the evolution rate is, primarily, determined by the specific functional constraints that affect the given protein. These constrains were traditionally thought to depend both on the specific features of the protein's structure and its biological role. The advent of systems biology brought about new types of data, such as expression level and protein-protein interactions, and unexpectedly, a variety of correlations between protein evolution rate and these variables have been observed. The strongest connections by far were repeatedly seen between protein sequence evolution rate and the expression level of the respective gene. It has been hypothesized that this link is due to the selection for the robustness of the protein structure to mistranslation-induced misfolding that is particularly important for highly expressed proteins and is the dominant determinant of the sequence evolution rate. Results This work is an attempt to assess the relative contributions of protein domain structure and function, on the one hand, and expression level on the other hand, to the rate of sequence evolution. To this end, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the effect of the fusion of a pair of domains in multidomain proteins on the difference in the domain-specific evolutionary rates. The mistranslation-induced misfolding hypothesis would predict that, within multidomain proteins, fused domains, on average, should evolve at substantially closer rates than the same domains in different proteins because, within a mutlidomain protein, all domains are translated at the same rate. We performed a comprehensive comparison of the evolutionary rates of mammalian and plant protein domains

  4. Toward a better knowledge of the molecular evolution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase by comparison of partial cDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrig, H H; Heute, V; Kluge, M

    1998-01-01

    To get deeper insight into the evolution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase we have identified PEPC fragments (about 1,100 bp) of another 12 plants species not yet investigated in this context. The selected plants include one Chlorophyta, two Bryophyta, four Pteridophyta, and five Spermatophyta species. The obtained phylogenetic trees on PEPC isoforms are the most complete ones up to now available. Independent of their manner of construction, the resulting dendrograms are very similar and fully consistent with the main topology as it is postulated for the evolution of the higher terrestrial plants. We found a distinct clustering of the PEPC sequences of the prokaryotes, the algae, and the spermatophytes. PEPC isoforms of the archegoniates are located in the phylogenetic trees between the algae and spermatophytes. Our results strengthen the view that the PEPC is a very useful molecular marker with which to visualize phylogenetic trends both on the metabolic and organismic levels.

  5. BAC-end sequences analysis provides first insights into coffee (Coffea canephora P.) genome composition and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereeper, Alexis; Guyot, Romain; Tranchant-Dubreuil, Christine; Anthony, François; Argout, Xavier; de Bellis, Fabien; Combes, Marie-Christine; Gavory, Frederick; de Kochko, Alexandre; Kudrna, Dave; Leroy, Thierry; Poulain, Julie; Rondeau, Myriam; Song, Xiang; Wing, Rod; Lashermes, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Coffee is one of the world's most important agricultural commodities. Coffee belongs to the Rubiaceae family in the euasterid I clade of dicotyledonous plants, to which the Solanaceae family also belongs. Two bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries of a homozygous doubled haploid plant of Coffea canephora were constructed using two enzymes, HindIII and BstYI. A total of 134,827 high quality BAC-end sequences (BESs) were generated from the 73,728 clones of the two libraries, and 131,412 BESs were conserved for further analysis after elimination of chloroplast and mitochondrial sequences. This corresponded to almost 13 % of the estimated size of the C. canephora genome. 6.7 % of BESs contained simple sequence repeats, the most abundant (47.8 %) being mononucleotide motifs. These sequences allow the development of numerous useful marker sites. Potential transposable elements (TEs) represented 11.9 % of the full length BESs. A difference was observed between the BstYI and HindIII libraries (14.9 vs. 8.8 %). Analysis of BESs against known coding sequences of TEs indicated that 11.9 % of the genome corresponded to known repeat sequences, like for other flowering plants. The number of genes in the coffee genome was estimated at 41,973 which is probably overestimated. Comparative genome mapping revealed that microsynteny was higher between coffee and grapevine than between coffee and tomato or Arabidopsis. BESs constitute valuable resources for the first genome wide survey of coffee and provide new insights into the composition and evolution of the coffee genome.

  6. Sequence of Stages in the Microstructure Evolution in Copper under Mild Reciprocating Tribological Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Christian; Liu, Zhilong; Strassberger, Luis; Gumbsch, Peter

    2016-06-22

    Tailoring the surface properties of a material for low friction and little wear has long been a goal of tribological research. Since the microstructure of the material under the contact strongly influences tribological performance, the ability to control this microstructure is thereby of key importance. However, there is a significant lack of knowledge about the elementary mechanisms of microstructure evolution under tribological load. To cover different stages of this microstructure evolution, high-purity copper was investigated after increasing numbers of sliding cycles of a sapphire sphere in reciprocating motion. Scanning electron and focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy were applied to monitor the microstructure changes. A thin tribologically deformed layer which grew from tens of nanometers to several micrometers with increasing number of cycles was observed in cross-sections. By analyzing dislocation structures and local orientation changes in the cross-sectional areas, dislocation activity, the occurrence of a distinct dislocation trace line, and the emergence of new subgrain boundaries could be observed at different depths. These results strongly suggest that dislocation self-organization is a key elementary mechanism for the microstructure evolution under a tribological load. The distinct elementary processes at different stages of sliding identified here will be essential for the future modeling of the microstructure evolution in tribological contacts.

  7. Nucleotide sequences of immunoglobulin eta genes of chimpanzee and orangutan: DNA molecular clock and hominoid evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakoyama, Y.; Hong, K.J.; Byun, S.M.; Hisajima, H.; Ueda, S.; Yaoita, Y.; Hayashida, H.; Miyata, T.; Honjo, T.

    1987-02-01

    To determine the phylogenetic relationships among hominoids and the dates of their divergence, the complete nucleotide sequences of the constant region of the immunoglobulin eta-chain (C/sub eta1/) genes from chimpanzee and orangutan have been determined. These sequences were compared with the human eta-chain constant-region sequence. A molecular clock (silent molecular clock), measured by the degree of sequence divergence at the synonymous (silent) positions of protein-encoding regions, was introduced for the present study. From the comparison of nucleotide sequences of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin and ..beta..- and delta-globulin genes between humans and Old World monkeys, the silent molecular clock was calibrated: the mean evolutionary rate of silent substitution was determined to be 1.56 x 10/sup -9/ substitutions per site per year. Using the silent molecular clock, the mean divergence dates of chimpanzee and orangutan from the human lineage were estimated as 6.4 +/- 2.6 million years and 17.3 +/- 4.5 million years, respectively. It was also shown that the evolutionary rate of primate genes is considerably slower than those of other mammalian genes.

  8. Induction of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III and glutamine synthetase mRNA during confinement stress in gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, H; Kahatapitiya, N; Kingsley, K; Salo, W L; Anderson, P M; Wang, Y S; Walsh, P J

    2000-01-01

    Gulf toadfish (Opsanus &bgr;) rapidly switch to excretion of urea as their main nitrogenous waste product under several laboratory conditions, including confinement to small volumes of water. Prior evidence suggested that the activities of two key enzymes of urea synthesis exhibited potentially different modes of upregulation during this switch, with carbamoyl phosphate synthethase III (CPSase III) activated allosterically by N-acetylglutamate, and glutamine synthetase (GSase) activated by increases in the concentration of protein. The present study was undertaken to examine additional aspects of the regulation of these enzymes. The sequence for O. beta CPSase III cDNA was obtained, and it was found to be similar to that of other piscine CPSases. The sequence also allowed us to develop riboprobes for CPSase III mRNA analysis using ribonuclease protection assays (RPAs). CPSase III mRNA was expressed in liver, muscle, kidney and intestine, in agreement with prior enzymatic measurements. Levels of CPSase III mRNA increased five- to tenfold (relative to beta-actin mRNA) in liver (but not muscle) following 48 h of confinement stress. Measured by western analysis using an antibody to chicken GSase, confined O. beta GSase protein concentrations increased eightfold over control levels, in agreement with prior and present measurements of increases in GSase activity. Furthermore, RPAs of GSase mRNA levels demonstrated an increase of fivefold during confinement.

  9. Illuminating the evolution of equids and rodents with next-generation sequencing of ancient specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouatt, Julia Thidamarth Vilstrup

    The sequencing of ancient DNA provides perspectives on the genetic history of past populations and extinct species. However, ancient DNA research presents specific limitations mostly due to DNA survival, damage and contamination. Yet with stringent laboratory procedures, the sensitivity of target...... enrichment methods and the massive throughput and latest advances within DNA sequencing, the field of ancient DNA has flourished in later years. Those advances have even enabled the sequencing of complete genomes from the past, moving the field into genomic sciences. In this thesis we have used these latest...... ial genomes of extant and extinct taxa, and dated major radiation events within Equidae. We have also revealed the phylogenetic origins of hutias, a group of capromyid rodents from the West Indies using museum specimens and a museomic approach, and at the other end of the spectrum, characterized...

  10. Large Scale Sequencing of Dothideomycetes Provides Insights into Genome Evolution and Adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haridas, Sajeet; Crous, Pedro; Binder, Manfred; Spatafora, Joseph; Grigoriev, Igor

    2015-03-16

    Dothideomycetes is the largest and most diverse class of ascomycete fungi with 23 orders 110 families, 1300 genera and over 19,000 known species. We present comparative analysis of 70 Dothideomycete genomes including over 50 that we sequenced and are as yet unpublished. This extensive sampling has almost quadrupled the previous study of 18 species and uncovered a 10 fold range of genome sizes. We were able to clarify the phylogenetic positions of several species whose origins were unclear in previous morphological and sequence comparison studies. We analyzed selected gene families including proteases, transporters and small secreted proteins and show that major differences in gene content is influenced by speciation.

  11. The Cenozoic geological evolution of the Central and Northern North Sea based on seismic sequence stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordt, Henrik

    1996-03-01

    This thesis represents scientific results from seismic sequence stratigraphic investigations. These investigations and results are integrated into an ongoing mineralogical study of the Cenozoic deposits. the main results from this mineralogical study are presented and discussed. The seismic investigations have provided boundary conditions for a forward modelling study of the Cenozoic depositional history. Results from the forward modelling are presented as they emphasise the influence of tectonics on sequence development. The tectonic motions described were important for the formation of the large oil and gas fields in the North Sea.

  12. An Iranian genomic sequence of Beet mosaic virus provides insights into diversity and evolution of the world population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Musa; Gibbs, Adrian J; Hosseini, Ahmad; Hosseini, Samin

    2018-04-01

    Beet mosaic virus (BtMV), the only Potyvirus known to infect sugar beet, occurs worldwide in beet crops. The full genome sequencing of a BtMV isolate from Iran (Ir-VRU), enabled us to better understand the evolutionary history of this virus. Selection analysis suggested that BtMV evolution is mainly under negative selection but its strength varies in different proteins with the multifunctional proteins under strongest selection. Recombination has played a major role in the evolution of the BtMVs; only the Ir-VRU and USA isolates show no evidence of recombination. The ML phylogenies of BtMVs from coat protein and full sequences were completely congruent. The primary divergence of the BtMV phylogeny is into USA and Eurasian lineages, and the latter then divides to form a cluster only found in Iran, and a sister cluster that includes all the European and Chinese isolates. A simple patristic dating method estimated that the primary divergence of the BtMV population was only 360 (range 260-490) years ago, suggesting an emergence during the development of sugar beet as a crop over the past three centuries rather than with the use of leaf beet as a vegetable for at least 2000 years.

  13. Age, distance, and geochemical evolution within a monogenetic volcanic field: Analyzing patterns in the Auckland Volcanic Field eruption sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvec, Nicolas Le; Bebbington, Mark S.; Lindsay, Jan M.; McGee, Lucy E.

    2013-09-01

    The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) is a young active monogenetic basaltic field, which contains ˜50 volcanoes scattered across the Auckland metropolitan area. Understanding the temporal, spatial, and chemical evolution of the AVF during the last c.a. 250 ka is crucial in order to forecast a future eruption. Recent studies have provided new age constraints and potential temporal sequences of the past eruptions within the AVF. We use this information to study how the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers evolves with time, and how the chemical composition of the erupted magmas evolves with time and space. We seek to develop a methodology which compares successive eruptions to describe the link between geochemical and spatiotemporal evolution of volcanic centers within a monogenetic volcanic field. This methodology is tested with the present day data of the AVF. The Poisson nearest neighbor analysis shows that the spatial behavior of the field has been constant overtime, with the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers fitting the Poisson model within the significance levels. The results of the meta-analysis show the existence of correlations between the chemical composition of the erupted magmas and distance, volume, and time. The apparent randomness of the spatiotemporal evolution of the volcanic centers observed at the surface is probably influenced by the activity of the source. The methodology developed in this study can be used to identify possible relationships between composition trends and volume, time and/or distance to the behavior of the source, for successive eruptions of the AVF.

  14. The evolution of soybean mosaic virus: An updated analysis by obtaining 18 new genomic sequences of Chinese strains/isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guang-Can; Shao, Zhu-Qing; Ma, Fang-Fang; Wu, Ping; Wu, Xiao-Yi; Xie, Zhong-Yun; Yu, De-Yue; Cheng, Hao; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Jiang, Zhen-Feng; Chen, Qing-Shan; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2015-10-02

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is widely recognized as a highly damaging pathogen of soybean, and various strains/isolates have been reported to date. However, the pathogenic differences and phylogenetic relationships of these SMV strains/isolates have not been extensively studied. In the present work, by first obtaining 18 new genomic sequences of Chinese SMV strains/isolates and further compiling these with available data, we have explored the evolution of SMV from multiple aspects. First, as in other potyviruses, recombination has occurred frequently during SMV evolution, and a total of 32 independent events were detected. Second, using a maximum-likelihood method and removing recombinant fragments, a phylogeny covering 83 SMV sequences sampled from all over the world was reconstructed and the results showed four separate SMV clades, with clade I and II recovered for the first time. Third, the population structure analysis of SMV revealed significant genetic differentiations between China and two other countries (Korea and U.S.A.). Fourth, certain SMV-encoded genes, such as P1, HC-Pro and P3, exhibited higher non-synonymous substitution rate (dN) than synonymous substitution rate (dS), indicating that positive selection has influenced these genes. Finally, four Chinese SMV strains/isolates were selected for inoculation of both USA and Chinese differential soybean cultivars, and their pathogenic phenotypes were significantly different from that of the American strains. Overall, these findings have further broadened our understanding on SMV evolution, which would assist researchers to better deal with this harmful virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tracking the evolution of sex chromosome systems in Melanoplinae grasshoppers through chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio M; Castillo, Elio R; Martí, Dardo A; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C

    2013-08-09

    The accumulation of repetitive DNA during sex chromosome differentiation is a common feature of many eukaryotes and becomes more evident after recombination has been restricted or abolished. The accumulated repetitive sequences include multigene families, microsatellites, satellite DNAs and mobile elements, all of which are important for the structural remodeling of heterochromatin. In grasshoppers, derived sex chromosome systems, such as neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀, are frequently observed in the Melanoplinae subfamily. However, no studies concerning the evolution of sex chromosomes in Melanoplinae have addressed the role of the repetitive DNA sequences. To further investigate the evolution of sex chromosomes in grasshoppers, we used classical cytogenetic and FISH analyses to examine the repetitive DNA sequences in six phylogenetically related Melanoplinae species with X0♂/XX♀, neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀ sex chromosome systems. Our data indicate a non-spreading of heterochromatic blocks and pool of repetitive DNAs (C0t-1 DNA) in the sex chromosomes; however, the spreading of multigene families among the neo-sex chromosomes of Eurotettix and Dichromatos was remarkable, particularly for 5S rDNA. In autosomes, FISH mapping of multigene families revealed distinct patterns of chromosomal organization at the intra- and intergenomic levels. These results suggest a common origin and subsequent differential accumulation of repetitive DNAs in the sex chromosomes of Dichromatos and an independent origin of the sex chromosomes of the neo-XY and neo-X1X2Y systems. Our data indicate a possible role for repetitive DNAs in the diversification of sex chromosome systems in grasshoppers.

  16. Divergent evolution and purifying selection of the flaA gene sequences in Aeromonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorén J Gaspar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial flagellum is the most important organelle of motility in bacteria and plays a key role in many bacterial lifestyles, including virulence. The flagellum also provides a paradigm of how hierarchical gene regulation, intricate protein-protein interactions and controlled protein secretion can result in the assembly of a complex multi-protein structure tightly orchestrated in time and space. As if to stress its importance, plants and animals produce receptors specifically dedicated to the recognition of flagella. Aside from motility, the flagellum also moonlights as an adhesion and has been adapted by humans as a tool for peptide display. Flagellar sequence variation constitutes a marker with widespread potential uses for studies of population genetics and phylogeny of bacterial species. Results We sequenced the complete flagellin gene (flaA in 18 different species and subspecies of Aeromonas. Sequences ranged in size from 870 (A. allosaccharophila to 921 nucleotides (A. popoffii. The multiple alignment displayed 924 sites, 66 of which presented alignment gaps. The phylogenetic tree revealed the existence of two groups of species exhibiting different FlaA flagellins (FlaA1 and FlaA2. Maximum likelihood models of codon substitution were used to analyze flaA sequences. Likelihood ratio tests suggested a low variation in selective pressure among lineages, with an ω ratio of less than 1 indicating the presence of purifying selection in almost all cases. Only one site under potential diversifying selection was identified (isoleucine in position 179. However, 17 amino acid positions were inferred as sites that are likely to be under positive selection using the branch-site model. Ancestral reconstruction revealed that these 17 amino acids were among the amino acid changes detected in the ancestral sequence. Conclusion The models applied to our set of sequences allowed us to determine the possible evolutionary pathway

  17. Biodiversity Meets Neuroscience: From the Sequencing Ship (Ship-Seq) to Deciphering Parallel Evolution of Neural Systems in Omic's Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Leonid L

    2015-12-01

    The origins of neural systems and centralized brains are one of the major transitions in evolution. These events might occur more than once over 570-600 million years. The convergent evolution of neural circuits is evident from a diversity of unique adaptive strategies implemented by ctenophores, cnidarians, acoels, molluscs, and basal deuterostomes. But, further integration of biodiversity research and neuroscience is required to decipher critical events leading to development of complex integrative and cognitive functions. Here, we outline reference species and interdisciplinary approaches in reconstructing the evolution of nervous systems. In the "omic" era, it is now possible to establish fully functional genomics laboratories aboard of oceanic ships and perform sequencing and real-time analyses of data at any oceanic location (named here as Ship-Seq). In doing so, fragile, rare, cryptic, and planktonic organisms, or even entire marine ecosystems, are becoming accessible directly to experimental and physiological analyses by modern analytical tools. Thus, we are now in a position to take full advantages from countless "experiments" Nature performed for us in the course of 3.5 billion years of biological evolution. Together with progress in computational and comparative genomics, evolutionary neuroscience, proteomic and developmental biology, a new surprising picture is emerging that reveals many ways of how nervous systems evolved. As a result, this symposium provides a unique opportunity to revisit old questions about the origins of biological complexity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Rapid genome-wide evolution in Brassica rapa populations following drought revealed by sequencing of ancestral and descendant gene pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Steven J; Kane, Nolan C; O'Hara, Niamh B; Tittes, Silas; Rest, Joshua S

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that evolution can occur rapidly in response to selection. Recent advances in sequencing suggest the possibility of documenting genetic changes as they occur in populations, thus uncovering the genetic basis of evolution, particularly if samples are available from both before and after selection. Here, we had a unique opportunity to directly assess genetic changes in natural populations following an evolutionary response to a fluctuation in climate. We analysed genome-wide differences between ancestors and descendants of natural populations of Brassica rapa plants from two locations that rapidly evolved changes in multiple phenotypic traits, including flowering time, following a multiyear late-season drought in California. These ancestor-descendant comparisons revealed evolutionary shifts in allele frequencies in many genes. Some genes showing evolutionary shifts have functions related to drought stress and flowering time, consistent with an adaptive response to selection. Loci differentiated between ancestors and descendants (FST outliers) were generally different from those showing signatures of selection based on site frequency spectrum analysis (Tajima's D), indicating that the loci that evolved in response to the recent drought and those under historical selection were generally distinct. Very few genes showed similar evolutionary responses between two geographically distinct populations, suggesting independent genetic trajectories of evolution yielding parallel phenotypic changes. The results show that selection can result in rapid genome-wide evolutionary shifts in allele frequencies in natural populations, and highlight the usefulness of combining resurrection experiments in natural populations with genomics for studying the genetic basis of adaptive evolution. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Insights into the evolution of mitochondrial genome size from complete sequences of Citrullus lanatus and Cucurbita pepo (Cucurbitaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, Andrew J; Wei, XiaoXin; Rice, Danny W; Stern, David B; Barry, Kerrie; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2010-06-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of seed plants are unusually large and vary in size by at least an order of magnitude. Much of this variation occurs within a single family, the Cucurbitaceae, whose genomes range from an estimated 390 to 2,900 kb in size. We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of Citrullus lanatus (watermelon: 379,236 nt) and Cucurbita pepo (zucchini: 982,833 nt)--the two smallest characterized cucurbit mitochondrial genomes--and determined their RNA editing content. The relatively compact Citrullus mitochondrial genome actually contains more and longer genes and introns, longer segmental duplications, and more discernibly nuclear-derived DNA. The large size of the Cucurbita mitochondrial genome reflects the accumulation of unprecedented amounts of both chloroplast sequences (>113 kb) and short repeated sequences (>370 kb). A low mutation rate has been hypothesized to underlie increases in both genome size and RNA editing frequency in plant mitochondria. However, despite its much larger genome, Cucurbita has a significantly higher synonymous substitution rate (and presumably mutation rate) than Citrullus but comparable levels of RNA editing. The evolution of mutation rate, genome size, and RNA editing are apparently decoupled in Cucurbitaceae, reflecting either simple stochastic variation or governance by different factors.

  20. First Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence from a Box Jellyfish Reveals a Highly Fragmented Linear Architecture and Insights into Telomere Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David Roy; Kayal, Ehsan; Yanagihara, Angel A.; Collins, Allen G.; Pirro, Stacy; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Animal mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) are typically single circular chromosomes, with the exception of those from medusozoan cnidarians (jellyfish and hydroids), which are linear and sometimes fragmented. Most medusozoans have linear monomeric or linear bipartite mitochondrial genomes, but preliminary data have suggested that box jellyfish (cubozoans) have mtDNAs that consist of many linear chromosomes. Here, we present the complete mtDNA sequence from the winged box jellyfish Alatina moseri (the first from a cubozoan). This genome contains unprecedented levels of fragmentation: 18 unique genes distributed over eight 2.9- to 4.6-kb linear chromosomes. The telomeres are identical within and between chromosomes, and recombination between subtelomeric sequences has led to many genes initiating or terminating with sequences from other genes (the most extreme case being 150 nt of a ribosomal RNA containing the 5′ end of nad2), providing evidence for a gene conversion–based model of telomere evolution. The silent-site nucleotide variation within the A. moseri mtDNA is among the highest observed from a eukaryotic genome and may be associated with elevated rates of recombination. PMID:22117085

  1. The Role of Next-Generation Sequencing in Sarcomas: Evolution From Light Microscope to Molecular Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisberg, Roman; Roszik, Jason; Conley, Anthony; Patel, Shreyaskumar R; Subbiah, Vivek

    2017-10-13

    Sarcomas are rare, heterogeneous group of soft tissue and bone tumors. Precise diagnosis of specific subtypes is challenging using conventional methods. Herein, we review the role of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology that is used for rapid sequencing of DNA and RNA. Recent sarcoma specific studies recommend that molecular genetic testing should be added at diagnosis for appropriate clinical management in addition to diagnosis by expert pathologists. NGS has already been used to identify potentially actionable mutations, copy number alterations, and gene fusions. Rationally, choosing a drug based on an individual patient profile aka: "precision oncology" has been so far limited to few case reports in sarcomas. As we improve our ability to deliver personalized medicine using all modalities including conventional therapy, more patients may eventually benefit. As the cost and capacity of NGS outpace Moore's law, so does the probability of success.

  2. Antipeptide antibodies that can distinguish specific subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; Henry, R. L.; Takemoto, L. J.; Guikema, J. A.; Wong, P. P.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root nodules are very similar. However, there are small regions within the sequences that are significantly different between the two polypeptides. The sequences between amino acids 2 and 9 and between 264 and 274 are examples. Three peptides (gamma 2-9, gamma 264-274, and beta 264-274) corresponding to these sequences were synthesized. Antibodies against these peptides were raised in rabbits and purified with corresponding peptide-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bean nodule proteins demonstrated that the anti-beta 264-274 antibodies reacted specifically with the beta polypeptide and the anti-gamma 264-274 and anti-gamma 2-9 antibodies reacted specifically with the gamma polypeptide of the native and denatured glutamine synthetase. These results showed the feasibility of using synthetic peptides in developing antibodies that are capable of distinguishing proteins with similar primary structures.

  3. Late Neogene Sequence Stratigraphic Evolution of the Foz do Amazonas Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorini, Christian; Haq, Bilal U.; Tadeu dos Reis, Antonio; Guizan Silva, Cleverson; Cruz, Alberto; Soares, Emilson; Grangeon, Didier

    2014-05-01

    The margin of the Foz do Amazonas Basin saw a shift from predominantly carbonate to siliciclastic sedimentation in the early late Miocene. By this time the Amazon shelf had also been incised by a canyon that allowed direct influx of sediment to the basin floor, thus confirming that the paleo-Amazon fan had already initiated by that time (9.5-8.3Ma). Above this interval, during a prolonged lowstand, Messinian third-order sequences are preserved only in the incised-valley fills of the canyon with no equivalent strata on the shelf. Third and fourth-order sequences younger than Messinian are preserved on the shelf after sea-level rise above the shelf by early Pliocene. Sequences younger than 3.8 Ma often show fourth-order cyclicity with average duration of 400 kyr (larger scale eccentricity cycles) often preserved in high sedimentation rate areas of river deltas. Mass wasting and transportation of slope sediments to the basin began to play an important role in sediment dispersal at least as far back as mid Pliocene, after rapid progradation had produced steeper slopes 23 more prone to failure.

  4. Chromosome-scale comparative sequence analysis unravels molecular mechanisms of genome evolution between two wheat cultivars

    KAUST Repository

    Thind, Anupriya Kaur

    2018-02-08

    Background: Recent improvements in DNA sequencing and genome scaffolding have paved the way to generate high-quality de novo assemblies of pseudomolecules representing complete chromosomes of wheat and its wild relatives. These assemblies form the basis to compare the evolutionary dynamics of wheat genomes on a megabase-scale. Results: Here, we provide a comparative sequence analysis of the 700-megabase chromosome 2D between two bread wheat genotypes, the old landrace Chinese Spring and the elite Swiss spring wheat line CH Campala Lr22a. There was a high degree of sequence conservation between the two chromosomes. Analysis of large structural variations revealed four large insertions/deletions (InDels) of >100 kb. Based on the molecular signatures at the breakpoints, unequal crossing over and double-strand break repair were identified as the evolutionary mechanisms that caused these InDels. Three of the large InDels affected copy number of NLRs, a gene family involved in plant immunity. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density revealed three haploblocks of 8 Mb, 9 Mb and 48 Mb with a 35-fold increased SNP density compared to the rest of the chromosome. Conclusions: This comparative analysis of two high-quality chromosome assemblies enabled a comprehensive assessment of large structural variations. The insight obtained from this analysis will form the basis of future wheat pan-genome studies.

  5. The Iquique 2014 sequence: understanding its nucleation and propagation from the seismicity evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuenzalida, A.; Rietbrock, A.; Woollam, J.; Tavera, H.; Ruiz, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Northern Chile and Southern Peru region is well known for its high seismic hazard due to the lack of recent major ruptures along long segments of the subduction interface. For this reason the 2014 Iquique Mw 8.1 earthquake that occurred in the Northern Chile seismic gap was expected and high quality seismic and geodetic networks were operating at the time of the event recording the precursory phase of a mega-thrust event with unprecedented detail. In this study we used seismic data collected during the 2014 Iquique sequence to generate a detailed earthquake catalogue. This catalogue consists of more than 15,000 events identified in Northern Chile during the period between 1/3/14 and 31/5/14 and provides full coverage of the immediate foreshock sequence, the main-shock and early after-shock series. The initial catalogue was obtained by automatic data processing and only selecting events with at least two associate S phases to improve the reliability of initial locations. Subsequently, this subset of events was automatically processed again using an optimized STA/LTA triggering algorithm for both P and S-waves and constraining the detection times by estimated arrival times at each station calculated for the preliminary locations. Finally, all events were relocated using a recently developed 1D velocity model and associated station corrections. For events Mw 4 or larger that occurred between the 15/3/14 and 10/04/14, we estimated it regional moment tensor by full-waveform inversion. Our results confirm the seismic activation of the upper plate during the foreshock sequence, as well highlight a crustal activity on the fore-arc during the aftershock series. The seismicity distribution was compared to the previous inter-seismic coupling studies obtained in the region, in which we observe interplay between high and low coupling areas, which are correlated to the seismicity rate. The spatial distribution of the seismicity and the complexities on the mechanisms observed

  6. Stoichiometry and composition of an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex from rat liver.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, D L; Yang, D C

    1981-01-01

    The particulate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of rat liver were copurified about 1000-fold with more than 20% yields for individual synthetase activities. Measurements of aminoacylation activities showed that lysyl-, arginyl-, leucyl-, isoleucyl-, and methionyl-tRNA synthetases in the purified complex cosedimented at 18 S. The molecular weight of the synthetase complex is about one million, as estimated by gel filtration. The stoichiometry of the synthetase in the complex was determined by activ...

  7. Genomic fossils reveal adaptation of non-autonomous pararetroviruses driven by concerted evolution of noncoding regulatory sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sunlu; Zheng, Huizhen; Kishima, Yuji

    2017-06-01

    The interplay of different virus species in a host cell after infection can affect the adaptation of each virus. Endogenous viral elements, such as endogenous pararetroviruses (PRVs), have arisen from vertical inheritance of viral sequences integrated into host germline genomes. As viral genomic fossils, these sequences can thus serve as valuable paleogenomic data to study the long-term evolutionary dynamics of virus-virus interactions, but they have rarely been applied for this purpose. All extant PRVs have been considered autonomous species in their parasitic life cycle in host cells. Here, we provide evidence for multiple non-autonomous PRV species with structural defects in viral activity that have frequently infected ancient grass hosts and adapted through interplay between viruses. Our paleogenomic analyses using endogenous PRVs in grass genomes revealed that these non-autonomous PRV species have participated in interplay with autonomous PRVs in a possible commensal partnership, or, alternatively, with one another in a possible mutualistic partnership. These partnerships, which have been established by the sharing of noncoding regulatory sequences (NRSs) in intergenic regions between two partner viruses, have been further maintained and altered by the sequence homogenization of NRSs between partners. Strikingly, we found that frequent region-specific recombination, rather than mutation selection, is the main causative mechanism of NRS homogenization. Our results, obtained from ancient DNA records of viruses, suggest that adaptation of PRVs has occurred by concerted evolution of NRSs between different virus species in the same host. Our findings further imply that evaluation of within-host NRS interactions within and between populations of viral pathogens may be important.

  8. Dynamic evolution of pathogenicity revealed by sequencing and comparative genomics of 19 Pseudomonas syringae isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Baltrus

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Closely related pathogens may differ dramatically in host range, but the molecular, genetic, and evolutionary basis for these differences remains unclear. In many Gram- negative bacteria, including the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, type III effectors (TTEs are essential for pathogenicity, instrumental in structuring host range, and exhibit wide diversity between strains. To capture the dynamic nature of virulence gene repertoires across P. syringae, we screened 11 diverse strains for novel TTE families and coupled this nearly saturating screen with the sequencing and assembly of 14 phylogenetically diverse isolates from a broad collection of diseased host plants. TTE repertoires vary dramatically in size and content across all P. syringae clades; surprisingly few TTEs are conserved and present in all strains. Those that are likely provide basal requirements for pathogenicity. We demonstrate that functional divergence within one conserved locus, hopM1, leads to dramatic differences in pathogenicity, and we demonstrate that phylogenetics-informed mutagenesis can be used to identify functionally critical residues of TTEs. The dynamism of the TTE repertoire is mirrored by diversity in pathways affecting the synthesis of secreted phytotoxins, highlighting the likely role of both types of virulence factors in determination of host range. We used these 14 draft genome sequences, plus five additional genome sequences previously reported, to identify the core genome for P. syringae and we compared this core to that of two closely related non-pathogenic pseudomonad species. These data revealed the recent acquisition of a 1 Mb megaplasmid by a sub-clade of cucumber pathogens. This megaplasmid encodes a type IV secretion system and a diverse set of unknown proteins, which dramatically increases both the genomic content of these strains and the pan-genome of the species.

  9. Dynamic evolution of pathogenicity revealed by sequencing and comparative genomics of 19 Pseudomonas syringae isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrus, David A; Nishimura, Marc T; Romanchuk, Artur; Chang, Jeff H; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Cherkis, Karen; Roach, Jeff; Grant, Sarah R; Jones, Corbin D; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2011-07-01

    Closely related pathogens may differ dramatically in host range, but the molecular, genetic, and evolutionary basis for these differences remains unclear. In many Gram- negative bacteria, including the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, type III effectors (TTEs) are essential for pathogenicity, instrumental in structuring host range, and exhibit wide diversity between strains. To capture the dynamic nature of virulence gene repertoires across P. syringae, we screened 11 diverse strains for novel TTE families and coupled this nearly saturating screen with the sequencing and assembly of 14 phylogenetically diverse isolates from a broad collection of diseased host plants. TTE repertoires vary dramatically in size and content across all P. syringae clades; surprisingly few TTEs are conserved and present in all strains. Those that are likely provide basal requirements for pathogenicity. We demonstrate that functional divergence within one conserved locus, hopM1, leads to dramatic differences in pathogenicity, and we demonstrate that phylogenetics-informed mutagenesis can be used to identify functionally critical residues of TTEs. The dynamism of the TTE repertoire is mirrored by diversity in pathways affecting the synthesis of secreted phytotoxins, highlighting the likely role of both types of virulence factors in determination of host range. We used these 14 draft genome sequences, plus five additional genome sequences previously reported, to identify the core genome for P. syringae and we compared this core to that of two closely related non-pathogenic pseudomonad species. These data revealed the recent acquisition of a 1 Mb megaplasmid by a sub-clade of cucumber pathogens. This megaplasmid encodes a type IV secretion system and a diverse set of unknown proteins, which dramatically increases both the genomic content of these strains and the pan-genome of the species. © 2011 Baltrus et al.

  10. Evolution of the RH gene family in vertebrates revealed by brown hagfish (Eptatretus atami) genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akinori; Komata, Hidero; Iwashita, Shogo; Seto, Shotaro; Ikeya, Hironobu; Tabata, Mitsutoshi; Kitano, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    In vertebrates, there are four major genes in the RH (Rhesus) gene family, RH, RHAG, RHBG, and RHCG. These genes are thought to have been formed by the two rounds of whole-genome duplication (2R-WGD) in the common ancestor of all vertebrates. In our previous work, where we analyzed details of the gene duplications process of this gene family, three nucleotide sequences belonging to this family were identified in Far Eastern brook lamprey (Lethenteron reissneri), and the phylogenetic positions of the genes were determined. Lampreys, along with hagfishes, are cyclostomata (jawless fishes), which is a sister group of gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates). Although those results suggested that one gene was orthologous to the gnathostome RHCG genes, we did not identify clear orthologues for other genes. In this study, therefore, we identified three novel cDNA sequences that belong to the RH gene family using de novo transcriptome analysis of another cyclostome: the brown hagfish (Eptatretus atami). We also determined the nucleotide sequences for the RHBG and RHCG genes in a red stingray (Dasyatis akajei), which belongs to the cartilaginous fishes. The phylogenetic tree showed that two brown hagfish genes, which were probably duplicated in the cyclostome lineage, formed a cluster with the gnathostome RHAG genes, whereas another brown hagfish gene formed a cluster with the gnathostome RHCG genes. We estimated that the RH genes had a higher evolutionary rate than the RHAG, RHBG, and RHCG genes. Interestingly, in the RHBG genes, only the bird lineage showed a higher rate of nonsynonymous substitutions. It is likely that this higher rate was caused by a state of relaxed functional constraints rather than positive selection nor by pseudogenization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cylindrospermopsin and saxitoxin synthetase genes in Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii strains from Brazilian freshwater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Hoff-Risseti

    Full Text Available The Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii population from Brazilian freshwater is known to produce saxitoxin derivatives (STX, while cylindrospermopsin (CYN, which is commonly detected in isolates from Australia and Asia continents, has thus far not been detected in South American strains. However, during the investigation for the presence of cyrA, cyrB, cyrC and cyrJ CYN synthetase genes in the genomes of four laboratory-cultured C. raciborskii Brazilian strains, the almost complete cyrA gene sequences were obtained for all strains, while cyrB and cyrC gene fragments were observed in two strains. These nucleotide sequences were translated into amino acids, and the predicted protein functions and domains confirmed their identity as CYN synthetase genes. Attempts to PCR amplify cyrJ gene fragments from the four strains were unsuccessful. Phylogenetic analysis grouped the nucleotide sequences together with their homologues found in known CYN synthetase clusters of C. raciborskii strains with high bootstrap support. In addition, fragments of sxtA, sxtB and sxtI genes involved in STX production were also obtained. Extensive LC-MS analyses were unable to detect CYN in the cultured strains, whereas the production of STX and its analogues was confirmed in CENA302, CENA305 and T3. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the presence of cyr genes in South American strains of C. raciborskii and the presence of sxt and cyr genes in a single C. raciborskii strain. This discovery suggests a shift in the type of cyanotoxin production over time of South American strains of C. raciborskii and contributes to the reconstruction of the evolutionary history and diversification of cyanobacterial toxins.

  12. Evolution of Mexican Bursera (Burseraceae) inferred from ITS, ETS, and 5S nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Judith X

    2003-02-01

    I reconstructed a phylogeny of 66 species and varieties of Bursera and 9 outgroup species using sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS), the 5S non-transcribed region (5S-NTS), and the external transcribed region (ETS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA. This study extends a previously proposed parsimony-based phylogenetic study that used the ITS sequences of 57 Bursera species and five outgroups. Parsimony and maximum likelihood methods were used to infer the phylogeny in this new study. Analyses of the combined data sets largely confirmed the phylogenetic relationships proposed by the previous molecular study but generated a considerably more robust topology. The new phylogenies corroborate the monophyly of the genus, and its division into the two monophyletic subgenera or sections, Bursera and Bullockia. The current analyses also identify four main groups of species in section Bursera, and two in section Bullockia, confirming some of the previously proposed groups based on fruit, flower, and leaf morphology. One previously problematic species B. sarcopoda, which has sometimes been placed in Commiphora, is shown to belong in Bursera. Another controversial species, Commiphora leptophloeos, which was thought to belong to Bursera, falls within Commiphora.

  13. Insights from the Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium lepraemurium: Massive Gene Decay and Reductive Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Benjak

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium lepraemurium is the causative agent of murine leprosy, a chronic, granulomatous disease similar to human leprosy. Due to the similar clinical manifestations of human and murine leprosy and the difficulty of growing both bacilli axenically, Mycobacterium leprae and M. lepraemurium were once thought to be closely related, although it was later suggested that M. lepraemurium might be related to Mycobacterium avium. In this study, the complete genome of M. lepraemurium was sequenced using a combination of PacBio and Illumina sequencing. Phylogenomic analyses confirmed that M. lepraemurium is a distinct species within the M. avium complex (MAC. The M. lepraemurium genome is 4.05 Mb in length, which is considerably smaller than other MAC genomes, and it comprises 2,682 functional genes and 1,139 pseudogenes, which indicates that M. lepraemurium has undergone genome reduction. An error-prone repair homologue of the DNA polymerase III α-subunit was found to be nonfunctional in M. lepraemurium, which might contribute to pseudogene formation due to the accumulation of mutations in nonessential genes. M. lepraemurium has retained the functionality of several genes thought to influence virulence among members of the MAC.

  14. Molecular phylogeny and evolution of Scomber (Teleostei: Scombridae) based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiao; Gao, Tianxiang; Miao, Zhenqing; Yanagimoto, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the genus Scomber was conducted based on mitochondrial (COI, Cyt b and control region) and nuclear (5S rDNA) DNA sequence data in multigene perspective. A variety of phylogenetic analytic methods were used to clarify the current taxonomic Classification and to assess phylogenetic relationships and the evolutionary history of this genus. The present study produced a well-resolved phylogeny that strongly supported the monophyly of Scomber. We confirmed that S. japonicus and S. colias were genetically distinct. Although morphologically and ecologically similar to S. colias, the molecular data showed that S. japonicus has a greater molecular affinity with S. australasicus, which conflicts with the traditional taxonomy. This phylogenetic pattern was corroborated by the mtDNA data, but incompletely by the nuclear DNA data. Phylogenetic concordance between the mitochondrial and nuclear DNA regions for the basal nodes Supports an Atlantic origin for Scomber. The present-day geographic ranges of the species were compared with the resultant molecular phylogeny derived from partition Bayesian analyses of the combined data sets to evaluate possible dispersal routes of the genus. The present-day geographic distribution of Scomber species might be best ascribed to multiple dispersal events. In addition, our results suggest that phylogenies derived from multiple genes and long sequences exhibited improved phylogenetic resolution, from which we conclude that the phylogenetic reconstruction is a reliable representation of the evolutionary history of Scomber.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyperammonemia, type I Genetics Education Materials for School Success (GEMSS) Orphanet: Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 1 deficiency Patient ... for Links Data Files & API Site Map Subscribe Customer Support USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & ...

  16. Comparative analysis of secreted protein evolution using expressed sequence tags from four poplar leaf rusts (Melampsora spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanguay Philippe

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obligate biotrophs such as rust fungi are believed to establish long-term relationships by modulating plant defenses through a plethora of effector proteins, whose most recognizable feature is the presence of a signal peptide for secretion. Since the phenotypes of these effectors extend to host cells, their genes are expected to be under accelerated evolution stimulated by host-pathogen coevolutionary arms races. Recently, whole genome sequence data has allowed the prediction of secretomes, facilitating the identification of putative effectors. Results We generated cDNA libraries from four poplar leaf rust pathogens (Melampsora spp. and used computational approaches to identify and annotate putative secreted proteins with the aim of uncovering new knowledge about the nature and evolution of the rust secretome. While more than half of the predicted secretome members encoded lineage-specific proteins, similarities with experimentally characterized fungal effectors were also identified. A SAGE analysis indicated a strong stage-specific regulation of transcripts encoding secreted proteins. The average sequence identity of putative secreted proteins to their closest orthologs in the wheat stem rust Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici was dramatically reduced compared with non-secreted ones. A comparative genomics approach based on homologous gene groups unravelled positive selection in putative members of the secretome. Conclusion We uncovered robust evidence that different evolutionary constraints are acting on the rust secretome when compared to the rest of the genome. These results are consistent with the view that these genes are more likely to exhibit an effector activity and be involved in coevolutionary arms races with host factors.

  17. Comparative analysis of secreted protein evolution using expressed sequence tags from four poplar leaf rusts (Melampsora spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, David L; Feau, Nicolas; Tanguay, Philippe; Hamelin, Richard C

    2010-07-08

    Obligate biotrophs such as rust fungi are believed to establish long-term relationships by modulating plant defenses through a plethora of effector proteins, whose most recognizable feature is the presence of a signal peptide for secretion. Since the phenotypes of these effectors extend to host cells, their genes are expected to be under accelerated evolution stimulated by host-pathogen coevolutionary arms races. Recently, whole genome sequence data has allowed the prediction of secretomes, facilitating the identification of putative effectors. We generated cDNA libraries from four poplar leaf rust pathogens (Melampsora spp.) and used computational approaches to identify and annotate putative secreted proteins with the aim of uncovering new knowledge about the nature and evolution of the rust secretome. While more than half of the predicted secretome members encoded lineage-specific proteins, similarities with experimentally characterized fungal effectors were also identified. A SAGE analysis indicated a strong stage-specific regulation of transcripts encoding secreted proteins. The average sequence identity of putative secreted proteins to their closest orthologs in the wheat stem rust Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici was dramatically reduced compared with non-secreted ones. A comparative genomics approach based on homologous gene groups unravelled positive selection in putative members of the secretome. We uncovered robust evidence that different evolutionary constraints are acting on the rust secretome when compared to the rest of the genome. These results are consistent with the view that these genes are more likely to exhibit an effector activity and be involved in coevolutionary arms races with host factors.

  18. Discovery Strategies of Bioactive Compounds Synthesized by Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and Type-I Polyketide Synthases Derived from Marine Microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoutzias, Grigoris D; Chaliotis, Anargyros; Mossialos, Dimitris

    2016-04-16

    Considering that 70% of our planet's surface is covered by oceans, it is likely that undiscovered biodiversity is still enormous. A large portion of marine biodiversity consists of microbiomes. They are very attractive targets of bioprospecting because they are able to produce a vast repertoire of secondary metabolites in order to adapt in diverse environments. In many cases secondary metabolites of pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest such as nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs) are synthesized by multimodular enzymes named nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSes) and type-I polyketide synthases (PKSes-I), respectively. Novel findings regarding the mechanisms underlying NRPS and PKS evolution demonstrate how microorganisms could leverage their metabolic potential. Moreover, these findings could facilitate synthetic biology approaches leading to novel bioactive compounds. Ongoing advances in bioinformatics and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are driving the discovery of NRPs and PKs derived from marine microbiomes mainly through two strategies: genome-mining and metagenomics. Microbial genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and this vast quantity of biological information can be analyzed through genome mining in order to identify gene clusters encoding NRPSes and PKSes of interest. On the other hand, metagenomics is a fast-growing research field which directly studies microbial genomes and their products present in marine environments using culture-independent approaches. The aim of this review is to examine recent developments regarding discovery strategies of bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and type-I PKS derived from marine microbiomes and to highlight the vast diversity of NRPSes and PKSes present in marine environments by giving examples of recently discovered bioactive compounds.

  19. Discovery Strategies of Bioactive Compounds Synthesized by Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and Type-I Polyketide Synthases Derived from Marine Microbiomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoris D. Amoutzias

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering that 70% of our planet’s surface is covered by oceans, it is likely that undiscovered biodiversity is still enormous. A large portion of marine biodiversity consists of microbiomes. They are very attractive targets of bioprospecting because they are able to produce a vast repertoire of secondary metabolites in order to adapt in diverse environments. In many cases secondary metabolites of pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest such as nonribosomal peptides (NRPs and polyketides (PKs are synthesized by multimodular enzymes named nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSes and type-I polyketide synthases (PKSes-I, respectively. Novel findings regarding the mechanisms underlying NRPS and PKS evolution demonstrate how microorganisms could leverage their metabolic potential. Moreover, these findings could facilitate synthetic biology approaches leading to novel bioactive compounds. Ongoing advances in bioinformatics and next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies are driving the discovery of NRPs and PKs derived from marine microbiomes mainly through two strategies: genome-mining and metagenomics. Microbial genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and this vast quantity of biological information can be analyzed through genome mining in order to identify gene clusters encoding NRPSes and PKSes of interest. On the other hand, metagenomics is a fast-growing research field which directly studies microbial genomes and their products present in marine environments using culture-independent approaches. The aim of this review is to examine recent developments regarding discovery strategies of bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and type-I PKS derived from marine microbiomes and to highlight the vast diversity of NRPSes and PKSes present in marine environments by giving examples of recently discovered bioactive compounds.

  20. Whole Genome Sequencing of the Asian Arowana (Scleropages formosus) Provides Insights into the Evolution of Ray-Finned Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Christopher M; Tan, Mun Hua; Croft, Larry J; Hammer, Michael P; Gan, Han Ming

    2015-10-06

    The Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus) is of commercial importance, conservation concern, and is a representative of one of the oldest lineages of ray-finned fish, the Osteoglossomorpha. To add to genomic knowledge of this species and the evolution of teleosts, the genome of a Malaysian specimen of arowana was sequenced. A draft genome is presented consisting of 42,110 scaffolds with a total size of 708 Mb (2.85% gaps) representing 93.95% of core eukaryotic genes. Using a k-mer-based method, a genome size of 900 Mb was also estimated. We present an update on the phylogenomics of fishes based on a total of 27 species (23 fish species and 4 tetrapods) using 177 orthologous proteins (71,360 amino acid sites), which supports established relationships except that arowana is placed as the sister lineage to all teleost clades (Bayesian posterior probability 1.00, bootstrap replicate 93%), that evolved after the teleost genome duplication event rather than the eels (Elopomorpha). Evolutionary rates are highly heterogeneous across the tree with fishes represented by both slowly and rapidly evolving lineages. A total of 94 putative pigment genes were identified, providing the impetus for development of molecular markers associated with the spectacular colored phenotypes found within this species. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. Molecular systematics and evolution of the "Apollo" butterflies of the genus Parnassius (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoto, Keiichi; Katoh, Toru; Chichvarkhin, Anton; Yagi, Takashi

    2004-02-04

    Sequences of 777 bp of mtDNA-ND5 locus were determined in order to shed light on the molecular systematics and evolution of the "Apollo" butterflies. Examined were nearly all of about 50 species of the genus Parnassius, together with seven species of the allied genera in the subfamily Parnassiinae (Papilionidae). The NJ and the MP phylogenetic trees show that the "Apollos" constitute a monophyletic group, comprising a number of cluster groups probably reflecting a relatively rapid radiation in evolution. The clusters of species-groups denoted I-VIII correspond to those species-groups recognized on the basis of morphological characters. Our findings will also help understand the biological relationships among several species or subspecies on which the classical taxonomy is in dispute. The unexpected finding is that among the samples of allied genera compared, Hypermnestra helios appears to be the most closely related to the "Apollos", despite morphological and behavioral dissimilarity. Furthermore, in contrast to the previous higher taxonomy, Archon apollinus which is classified in the tribe Parnassiini was found genetically closer to the tribe Zerynthiini, raising a taxonomic controversy.

  2. Inferring the evolution of the major histocompatibility complex of wild pigs and peccaries using hybridisation DNA capture-based sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Carol; Moroldo, Marco; Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Mach, Núria; Marthey, Sylvain; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Wahlberg, Per; Chong, Amanda Y; Estellé, Jordi; Ho, Simon Y W; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Gongora, Jaime

    2017-12-18

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a key genomic model region for understanding the evolution of gene families and the co-evolution between host and pathogen. To date, MHC studies have mostly focused on species from major vertebrate lineages. The evolution of MHC classical (Ia) and non-classical (Ib) genes in pigs has attracted interest because of their antigen presentation roles as part of the adaptive immune system. The pig family Suidae comprises over 18 extant species (mostly wild), but only the domestic pig has been extensively sequenced and annotated. To address this, we used a DNA-capture approach, with probes designed from the domestic pig genome, to generate MHC data for 11 wild species of pigs and their closest living family, Tayassuidae. The approach showed good efficiency for wild pigs (~80% reads mapped, ~87× coverage), compared to tayassuids (~12% reads mapped, ~4× coverage). We retrieved 145 MHC loci across both families. Phylogenetic analyses show that the class Ia and Ib genes underwent multiple duplications and diversifications before suids and tayassuids diverged from their common ancestor. The histocompatibility genes mostly form orthologous groups and there is genetic differentiation for most of these genes between Eurasian and sub-Saharan African wild pigs. Tests of selection showed that the peptide-binding region of class Ib genes was under positive selection. These findings contribute to better understanding of the evolutionary history of the MHC, specifically, the class I genes, and provide useful data for investigating the immune response of wild populations against pathogens.

  3. Kinetic Basis for the Conjugation of Auxin by a GH3 Family Indole-acetic Acid-Amido Synthetase*

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qingfeng; Westfall, Corey S.; Hicks, Leslie M.; Wang, Shiping; Jez, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    The GH3 family of acyl-acid-amido synthetases catalyze the ATP-dependent formation of amino acid conjugates to modulate levels of active plant hormones, including auxins and jasmonates. Initial biochemical studies of various GH3s show that these enzymes group into three families based on sequence relationships and acyl-acid substrate preference (I, jasmonate-conjugating; II, auxin- and salicylic acid-conjugating; III, benzoate-conjugating); however, little is known about the kinetic and chemi...

  4. Evolution and comparative genomics of subcellular specializations: EST sequencing of Torpedo electric organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian, Javad; Berry, Deborah L; Sanjari, Salar; Razvi, Mohammed; Brown, Kristy; Hathout, Yetrib; Vertes, Akos; Dadgar, Sherry; Hoffman, Eric P

    2011-03-01

    Uncharacterized open reading frames (ORFs) in human genomic sequence often show a high degree of evolutionary conservation, yet have little or no tissue EST or protein data suggestive of protein product function. The encoded proteins may have highly restricted expression in specialized cells, subcellular specializations, and/or narrow windows during development. One such highly specialized and minute subcellular compartment is the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), where motorneurons contact muscle fibers. The electric Torpedo ray has evolved to expand the NMJ structure to the size of a large organ (electroplax organ), and we hypothesized that Torpedo electroplax proteins would be candidates for human ESTs expressed at the human NMJ. A total of 9719 primary electroplax cDNA clones were sequenced. We identified 44 human ORFs showing high (>63%) amino acid identity to Torpedo electroplax transcripts with enrichment for mRNA splicing motifs (SH2 and pre-mRNA splicing domains), an observation potentially important for the strict nuclear domains maintained by myonuclei underlying the NMJ. We generated antibodies against two uncharacterized human genes (C19orf29 [Drosophila cactin] and C15orf24) and showed that these were indeed expressed at the murine NMJ. Cactin, a member of the Rel transcription factor family in Drosophila, localized to the postsynaptic cytosol of the NMJ and nuclear membrane. C15orf24 protein localized to the murine postsynaptic sarcolemma. We show a novel approach towards identifying proteins expressed at a subcellular specialization using evolutionary diversity of organ function and cross-species mapping. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sequence and expression variations suggest an adaptive role for the DA1-like gene family in the evolution of soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Man; Gu, Yongzhe; He, Lingli; Chen, Qingshan; He, Chaoying

    2015-05-15

    The DA1 gene family is plant-specific and Arabidopsis DA1 regulates seed and organ size, but the functions in soybeans are unknown. The cultivated soybean (Glycine max) is believed to be domesticated from the annual wild soybeans (Glycine soja). To evaluate whether DA1-like genes were involved in the evolution of soybeans, we compared variation at both sequence and expression levels of DA1-like genes from G. max (GmaDA1) and G. soja (GsoDA1). Sequence identities were extremely high between the orthologous pairs between soybeans, while the paralogous copies in a soybean species showed a relatively high divergence. Moreover, the expression variation of DA1-like paralogous genes in soybean was much greater than the orthologous gene pairs between the wild and cultivated soybeans during development and challenging abiotic stresses such as salinity. We further found that overexpressing GsoDA1 genes did not affect seed size. Nevertheless, overexpressing them reduced transgenic Arabidopsis seed germination sensitivity to salt stress. Moreover, most of these genes could improve salt tolerance of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, corroborated by a detection of expression variation of several key genes in the salt-tolerance pathways. Our work suggested that expression diversification of DA1-like genes is functionally associated with adaptive radiation of soybeans, reinforcing that the plant-specific DA1 gene family might have contributed to the successful adaption to complex environments and radiation of the plants.

  6. Evolution of Envelope Sequences of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Cellular Reservoirs in the Setting of Potent Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Frost, Simon D. W.; Leigh-Brown, Andrew J.; Ignacio, Caroline C.; Kee, Kristin; Perelson, Alan S.; Spina, Celsa A.; Havlir, Diane V.; Hezareh, Marjan; Looney, David J.; Richman, Douglas D.; Wong, Joseph K.

    1999-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients treated with potent antiretroviral therapy, the persistence of latently infected cells may reflect the long decay half-life of this cellular reservoir or ongoing viral replication at low levels with continuous replenishment of the population or both. To address these possibilities, sequences encompassing the C2 and V3 domains of HIV-1 env were analyzed from virus present in baseline plasma and from viral isolates obtained after 2 years of suppressive therapy in six patients. The presence of sequence changes consistent with evolution was demonstrated for three subjects and correlated with less complete suppression of viral replication, as indicated by the rapidity of the initial virus load decline or the intermittent reappearance of even low levels of detectable viremia. Together, these results provide evidence for ongoing replication. In the remaining three patients, virus recovered after 2 years of therapy was either genotypically contemporary with or ancestral to virus present in plasma 2 years before, indicating that virus recovery had indeed resulted from activation of latently infected cells. PMID:10516049

  7. Reconstructing the evolution of agarics from nuclear gene sequences and basidiospore ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnica, Sigisfredo; Weiss, Michael; Walther, Grit; Oberwinkler, Franz

    2007-09-01

    Traditional classifications of agaric fungi involve gross morphology of their fruit bodies and meiospore print-colour. However, the phylogeny of these fungi and the evolution of their morphological and ecological traits are poorly understood. Phylogenetic analyses have already demonstrated that characters used in traditional classifications of basidiomycetes may be heavily affected by homoplasy, and that non-gilled taxa evolved within the agarics several times. By integrating molecular phylogenetic analyses including domains D1-D3 and D7-D8 of nucLSU rDNA and domains A-C of the RPB1 gene with morphological and chemical data from representative species of 88 genera, we were able to resolve higher groups of agarics. We found that the species with thick-walled and pigmented basidiospores constitute a derived group, and hypothesize that this specific combination of characters represents an evolutionary advantage by increasing the tolerance of the basidiospores to dehydration and solar radiation and so opened up new ecological niches, e.g. the colonization of dung substrates by enabling basidiospores to survive gut passages through herbivores. Our results confirm the validity of basidiospore morphology as a phylogenetic marker in the agarics.

  8. Genetic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Pullorum based on characterization and evolution of CRISPR sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaolei; Hu, Yachen; Xu, Yaohui; Yin, Kequan; Li, Yang; Chen, Yun; Xia, Jie; Xu, Lijuan; Liu, Zijian; Geng, Shizhong; Li, Qiuchun; Jiao, Xinan; Chen, Xiang; Pan, Zhiming

    2017-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Pullorum (S. Pullorum) is the cause of pullorum disease, characterized by white diarrhea, which leads to high mortality in poultry. In this study, we aimed to assess the genetic diversity of 655 S. Pullorum strains from 1962 to 2015 in China, Europe, and South America. A sequence typing scheme based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) was used to reveal the genetic relationships among these strains in this study. Overall, a total of 20 Pullorum sequence types (PSTs) of CRISPR were identified in the 655 isolates with PST7 (74%, 486/655) and PST3 (13%, 86/655) to be the most two frequent PSTs belonging to two different lineages, which confirmed the genetic conservation of S. Pullorum strains isolated from six provinces and two direct-controlled municipalities (Beijing and Shanghai) in China. However, the identification of seven new PSTs distributed in strains isolated since 2001 implied that genetic variation continues to develop in S. Pullorum. Interestingly, the whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism typing (WGST) of 96 strains out of the 655 isolates divided them into four lineages based on SNP analysis of core genomic sequence and exhibit good correspondence with the CRISPR subtyping method. Notably, 22 out of 26 isolates from Europe and South America were distributed in five distinctive PSTs (with no Chinese strains). Additionally, CRISPR data of spacers and their arrangement exhibit subtle but distinct specificity between different strains, and the dynamic adaptive nature of CRISPR loci provides critical insights into the evolution of S. Pullorum as the bacteria are influenced by their environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Phylogenetic reconstruction of Bantu kinship challenges Main Sequence Theory of human social evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opie, Christopher; Shultz, Susanne; Atkinson, Quentin D; Currie, Thomas; Mace, Ruth

    2014-12-09

    Kinship provides the fundamental structure of human society: descent determines the inheritance pattern between generations, whereas residence rules govern the location a couple moves to after they marry. In turn, descent and residence patterns determine other key relationships such as alliance, trade, and marriage partners. Hunter-gatherer kinship patterns are viewed as flexible, whereas agricultural societies are thought to have developed much more stable kinship patterns as they expanded during the Holocene. Among the Bantu farmers of sub-Saharan Africa, the ancestral kinship patterns present at the beginning of the expansion are hotly contested, with some arguing for matrilineal and matrilocal patterns, whereas others maintain that any kind of lineality or sex-biased dispersal only emerged much later. Here, we use Bayesian phylogenetic methods to uncover the history of Bantu kinship patterns and trace the interplay between descent and residence systems. The results suggest a number of switches in both descent and residence patterns as Bantu farming spread, but that the first Bantu populations were patrilocal with patrilineal descent. Across the phylogeny, a change in descent triggered a switch away from patrifocal kinship, whereas a change in residence triggered a switch back from matrifocal kinship. These results challenge "Main Sequence Theory," which maintains that changes in residence rules precede change in other social structures. We also indicate the trajectory of kinship change, shedding new light on how this fundamental structure of society developed as farming spread across the globe during the Neolithic.

  10. Phylogeny and evolution of Digitulati ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) inferred from mitochondrial ND5 gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhi-Hui; Imura, Yûki; Okamoto, Munehiro; Kim, Choong-Gon; Zhou, Hong-Zhang; Paik, Jong-Cheol; Osawa, Syozo

    2004-01-01

    Genealogical trees have been constructed using mitochondrial ND5 gene sequences of 87 specimens consisting of 32 species which have been believed to belong to the division Digitulati (one of the lineages of the subtribe Carabina) of the world. There have been recognized six lineages, which are well separated from each other. Each lineage contains the following genus: (1) the lineage A: Ohomopterus from Japan; (2) the lineage B: Isiocarabus from eastern Eurasian Continent; (3) the lineage C: Carabus from China which are further subdivided into three sublineages; (4) the lineage D: Carabus from USA; (5) the lineage E: Carabus from the Eurasian Continent, Japan and North America; and (6) the lineage F: Eucarabus from the Eurasian Continent. Additionally, the genus Acrocarabus which had been treated as a constituent of the division Archicarabomorphi has been recognized to be the 7th lineage of the division Digitulati from the ND5 genealogical analysis as well as morphology. These lineages are assumed to have radiated within a short period and are largely linked to their geographic distribution.

  11. Recognition of Escherichia coli valine transfer RNA by its cognate synthetase: A fluorine-19 NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Wenchy; Horowitz, J.

    1991-01-01

    Interactions of 5-fluorouracil-substituted Escherichia coli tRNA Val with its cognate synthetase have been investigated by fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance. Valyl-tRNA synthetase (VRS) (EC 6.1.1.9), purified to homogeneity from an overproducing strain of E. coli, differs somewhat from VRS previously isolated from E. coli K12. Its amino acid composition and N-terminal sequence agree well with results derived from the sequence of the VRS gene. Apparent K M and V max values of the purified VRS are the same for both normal and 5-fluorouracil (FUra)-substituted tRNA Val . Binding of VRS to (FUra)tRNA Val induces structural perturbations that are reflected in selective changes in the 19 F NMR spectrum of the tRNA. Addition of increasing amounts of VRS results in a gradual loss of intensity at resonances corresponding to FU34, FU7, and FU67, with FU34, at the wobble position of the anticodon, being affected most. At higher VRS/tRNA ratios, a broadening and shifting of FU12 and of FU4 and/or FU8 occur. These results indicate that VRS interacts with tRNA Val along the entire inside of the L-shape molecule, from the acceptor stem to the anticodon. Valyl-tRNA synthetase also causes a splitting of resonances FU55 and FU64 in the T-loop and stem of tRNA Val , suggesting conformational changes in this part of the molecule. No 19 F NMR evidence was found for formation of the Michael adduct between VRS and FU8 of 5-fluorouracil-substituted tRNA Val that has been proposed as a common intermediate in the aminoacylation reaction

  12. Myocardial tagging by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance: evolution of techniques--pulse sequences, analysis algorithms, and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim El-Sayed H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR tagging has been established as an essential technique for measuring regional myocardial function. It allows quantification of local intramyocardial motion measures, e.g. strain and strain rate. The invention of CMR tagging came in the late eighties, where the technique allowed for the first time for visualizing transmural myocardial movement without having to implant physical markers. This new idea opened the door for a series of developments and improvements that continue up to the present time. Different tagging techniques are currently available that are more extensive, improved, and sophisticated than they were twenty years ago. Each of these techniques has different versions for improved resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, scan time, anatomical coverage, three-dimensional capability, and image quality. The tagging techniques covered in this article can be broadly divided into two main categories: 1 Basic techniques, which include magnetization saturation, spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM, delay alternating with nutations for tailored excitation (DANTE, and complementary SPAMM (CSPAMM; and 2 Advanced techniques, which include harmonic phase (HARP, displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE, and strain encoding (SENC. Although most of these techniques were developed by separate groups and evolved from different backgrounds, they are in fact closely related to each other, and they can be interpreted from more than one perspective. Some of these techniques even followed parallel paths of developments, as illustrated in the article. As each technique has its own advantages, some efforts have been made to combine different techniques together for improved image quality or composite information acquisition. In this review, different developments in pulse sequences and related image processing techniques are described along with the necessities that led to their invention

  13. The effect of the multi-pass non-circular drawing sequence on mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Wan; Baek, Hyun Moo; Hwang, Sun Kwang; Son, Il-Heon; Bae, Chul Min; Im, Yong-Taek

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A multi-pass non-circular drawing sequence is proposed to make high-strength wires. • The sequence was designed and applied for a low-carbon steel wire up to the 10th pass. • Many LAGBs and small grain size of the wire produced by the sequence were obtained. • High plastic deformation was imposed on the wire, resulting in grain refinement. • The sequence made fine-grained wires with improved UTS, ductility and fatigue life. - Abstract: In this study, the multi-pass non-circular drawing sequence was investigated for manufacturing high-strength wires with better ductility in a simple continuous way without adding additional alloys and heat treatment considering the effect of microstructure evolution and die geometry of the sequence on the mechanical properties of low-carbon steel during the process. For this purpose, the non-circular drawing sequence was designed and applied up to the 10th pass at room temperature. Mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of the specimen processed by the sequence were investigated by tension, Vickers micro-hardness, electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD), and fatigue tests compared with those for the conventional wire-drawing process. From the EBSD results, the higher low angle grain boundaries length per unit area and smaller average grain size of the specimen processed by the non-circular drawing sequence were obtained than those of the specimen processed by the wire-drawing process for the 8th pass. These results indicated that more plastic deformation was imposed in the material by the non-circular drawing sequence, resulting in grain refinement of the deformed specimen compared to the wire-drawing process. It is demonstrated that the multi-pass non-circular drawing sequence could be beneficial in producing fine-grained wires with improved ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and fatigue property by simply changing drawing dies geometry of the conventional wire-drawing process

  14. Sequence evolution of the hypervariable region in the putative envelope region E2/NS1 of hepatitis C virus is correlated with specific humoral immune responses.

    OpenAIRE

    van Doorn, L J; Capriles, I; Maertens, G; DeLeys, R; Murray, K; Kos, T; Schellekens, H; Quint, W

    1995-01-01

    Sequence evolution of the hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) in the N terminus of E2/NS1 of hepatitis C virus (HCV) was studied retrospectively in six chimpanzees inoculated with the same genotype 1b strain, containing a unique predominant HVR1 sequence. Immediately after inoculation, all animals contained the same HVR predominant sequence. Two animals developed an acute self-limiting infection. Anti-HVR1 immunoglobulin G (IgG) was produced 40 to 60 days after inoculation and rapidly disappeared a...

  15. Gleaning unexpected fruits from hard-won synthetases: probing principles of permissivity in non-canonical amino acid-tRNA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Richard B; Karplus, P Andrew; Mehl, Ryan A

    2014-08-18

    The site-specific incorporation of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins is an important tool for understanding biological function. Traditionally, each new ncAA targeted for incorporation requires a resource-consuming process of generating new ncAA aminoacyl tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pairs. However, the discovery that some tRNA synthetases are "permissive", in that they can incorporate multiple ncAAs, means that it is no longer always necessary to develop a new synthetase for each newly desired ncAA. Developing a better understanding of what factors make ncAA synthetases more permissive would increase the utility of this new approach. Here, we characterized two synthetases selected for the same ncAA that have markedly different "permissivity profiles." Remarkably, the more permissive synthetase incorporated an ncAA for which we had not been able to generate a synthetase through de novo selection methods. Crystal structures revealed that the two synthetases recognize their parent ncAA through a conserved core of interactions, with the more permissive synthetase displaying a greater degree of flexibility in its interaction geometries. We also observed that intraprotein interactions not directly involved in ncAA binding can play a crucial role in synthetase permissivity and suggest that optimization of such interactions might provide an avenue to engineering synthetases with enhanced permissivity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Dihydrofolate synthetase and folylpolyglutamate synthetase: direct evidence for intervention of acyl phosphate intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, R.V.; Shane, B.; McGuire, J.J.; Coward, J.K.

    1988-12-13

    The transfer of /sup 17/O and/or /sup 18/O from (COOH-/sup 17/O or -/sup 18/O) enriched substrates to inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/) has been demonstrated for two enzyme-catalyzed reactions involved in folate biosynthesis and glutamylation. COOH-/sup 18/O-labeled folate, methotrexate, and dihydropteroate, in addition to (/sup 17/O)-glutamate, were synthesized and used as substrates for folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) isolated from Escherichia coli, hog liver, and rat liver and for dihydrofolate synthetase (DHFS) isolated from E. coli. P/sub i/ was purified from the reaction mixtures and converted to trimethyl phosphate (TMP), which was then analyzed for /sup 17/O and /sup 18/O enrichment by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and/or mass spectroscopy. In the reactions catalyzed by the E. coli enzymes, both NMR and quantitative mass spectral analyses established that transfer of the oxygen isotope from the substrate /sup 18/O-enriched carboxyl group to P/sub i/ occurred, thereby providing strong evidence for an acyl phosphate intermediate in both the FPGS- and DHFS-catalyzed reactions. Similar oxygen-transfer experiments were carried out by use of two mammalian enzymes. The small amounts of P/sub i/ obtained from reactions catalyzed by these less abundant FPGS proteins precluded the use of NMR techniques. However, mass spectral analysis of the TMP derived from the mammalian FPGS-catalyzed reactions showed clearly that /sup 18/O transfer had occurred.

  17. SCREENING OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND GENES CODING POLYKETIDE SYNTHETASE AND NONRIBOSOMAL PEPTIDE SYNTHETASE OF ACTINOMYCETE ISOLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Kovácsová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe antimicrobial activity using agar plate diffusion method and screening genes coding polyketide synthetase (PKS-I and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS from actinomycetes. A total of 105 actinomycete strains were isolated from arable soil. Antimicrobial activity was demonstrated at 54 strains against at least 1 of total 12 indicator organisms. Antifungal properties were recorded more often than antibacterial properties. The presence of PKS-I and NRPS genes were founded at 61 of total 105 strains. The number of strains with mentioned biosynthetic enzyme gene fragments matching the anticipated length were 19 (18% and 50 (47% respectively. Overall, five actinomycete strains carried all the biosynthetical genes, yet no antimicrobial activity was found against any of tested pathogens. On the other hand, twenty-one strains showed antimicrobial activity even though we were not able to amplify any of the PKS or NRPS genes from them. Combination of the two methods showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of actinomycetes isolated from arable soil, which indicate that actinomycetes are valuable reservoirs of novel bioactive compounds.

  18. Molecular evolution and phylogenetic utility of Wolbachia ftsZ and wsp gene sequences with special reference to the origin of male-killing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulenburg, van de J.H.G.; Hurst, G.D.D.; Huigens, T.M.E.; Meer, van M.M.M.; Jiggins, F.M.; Majerus, M.E.N.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed assessment of the evolution and phylogenetic utility of two genes, ftsZ and wsp, was used to investigate the origin of male-killing Wolbachia, previously isolated from the ladybird Adalia bipunctata and the butterfly Acraea encedon. The analysis included almost all available sequences of

  19. Comparative analysis of function and interaction of transcription factors in nematodes: Extensive conservation of orthology coupled to rapid sequence evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Rama S

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much of the morphological diversity in eukaryotes results from differential regulation of gene expression in which transcription factors (TFs play a central role. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an established model organism for the study of the roles of TFs in controlling the spatiotemporal pattern of gene expression. Using the fully sequenced genomes of three Caenorhabditid nematode species as well as genome information from additional more distantly related organisms (fruit fly, mouse, and human we sought to identify orthologous TFs and characterized their patterns of evolution. Results We identified 988 TF genes in C. elegans, and inferred corresponding sets in C. briggsae and C. remanei, containing 995 and 1093 TF genes, respectively. Analysis of the three gene sets revealed 652 3-way reciprocal 'best hit' orthologs (nematode TF set, approximately half of which are zinc finger (ZF-C2H2 and ZF-C4/NHR types and HOX family members. Examination of the TF genes in C. elegans and C. briggsae identified the presence of significant tandem clustering on chromosome V, the majority of which belong to ZF-C4/NHR family. We also found evidence for lineage-specific duplications and rapid evolution of many of the TF genes in the two species. A search of the TFs conserved among nematodes in Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus and Homo sapiens revealed 150 reciprocal orthologs, many of which are associated with important biological processes and human diseases. Finally, a comparison of the sequence, gene interactions and function indicates that nematode TFs conserved across phyla exhibit significantly more interactions and are enriched in genes with annotated mutant phenotypes compared to those that lack orthologs in other species. Conclusion Our study represents the first comprehensive genome-wide analysis of TFs across three nematode species and other organisms. The findings indicate substantial conservation of transcription

  20. Whole genome sequencing reveals complex evolution patterns of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains in patients.

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    Matthias Merker

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant (MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC strains represent a major threat for tuberculosis (TB control. Treatment of MDR-TB patients is long and less effective, resulting in a significant number of treatment failures. The development of further resistances leads to extensively drug-resistant (XDR variants. However, data on the individual reasons for treatment failure, e.g. an induced mutational burst, and on the evolution of bacteria in the patient are only sparsely available. To address this question, we investigated the intra-patient evolution of serial MTBC isolates obtained from three MDR-TB patients undergoing longitudinal treatment, finally leading to XDR-TB. Sequential isolates displayed identical IS6110 fingerprint patterns, suggesting the absence of exogenous re-infection. We utilized whole genome sequencing (WGS to screen for variations in three isolates from Patient A and four isolates from Patient B and C, respectively. Acquired polymorphisms were subsequently validated in up to 15 serial isolates by Sanger sequencing. We determined eight (Patient A and nine (Patient B polymorphisms, which occurred in a stepwise manner during the course of the therapy and were linked to resistance or a potential compensatory mechanism. For both patients, our analysis revealed the long-term co-existence of clonal subpopulations that displayed different drug resistance allele combinations. Out of these, the most resistant clone was fixed in the population. In contrast, baseline and follow-up isolates of Patient C were distinguished each by eleven unique polymorphisms, indicating an exogenous re-infection with an XDR strain not detected by IS6110 RFLP typing. Our study demonstrates that intra-patient microevolution of MDR-MTBC strains under longitudinal treatment is more complex than previously anticipated. However, a mutator phenotype was not detected. The presence of different subpopulations might confound phenotypic and

  1. Functional continuity: did field-induced oriented aperiodic constraints at Life's origin aid its sequence-based evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra-Delmotte, G.; Mitra, A. N.

    2014-04-01

    A non-biological analog undergoing Darwinian-like evolution could have enhanced the probability of many crucial independent bottom-up emergent steps, engendered within its premises, and smoothen the inanimate-animate transition. Now, the higher-level environment-mutable DNA sequences influence the lower-level pattern of oriented templates (enzymes, lipid membranes, RNA) in the organized cell matrix and hence their associated substrate-dynamics; note how templates are akin to local fields, kinetically constraining reactant orientations. Since the lowerlevel is likely the more primitive of the two (rather than Cairns-Smith's "readily available" rigid clay crystal sequence-based replicators as a memory-like basis for slowly mutating predecessor-patterns enroute to complex RNA-based Darwinian evolution), a gradual thermodynamic-to-kinetic transition in an isotropic medium, is proposed as driven by some order-parameter --via "available" field-responsive dipolar colloid networks, as apart from bio-organics, mineral colloids also can display liquid crystal (LC) phases (see [1]). An access to solid-like orientational order in a fluid matrix suggests how aperiodic patterns can be influenced and sustained (a la homeostasis) via external inhomogeneous fields (e.g. magnetic rocks); this renders these cooperative networks with potential as confining host-media, whose environment-sensitivity can not only influence their sterically-coupled guest-substrates but also their network properties (the latter can enable 'functions' like spontaneous transport under non-equilibrium suggesting a natural basis for their selection by the environment). In turn LC systems could have been preceded by even simpler anisotropic fluid hosts, viz., external field-induced mineral magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) aggregates. Indeed, the capacity of an MNP to couple its magnetic and rotational d.o.f.s suggests how an environment-sensitive field-influenced network of interacting dipolar colloids close to

  2. Genome sequencing of the extinct Eurasian wild aurochs, Bos primigenius, illuminates the phylogeography and evolution of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Stephen D E; Magee, David A; McGettigan, Paul A; Teasdale, Matthew D; Edwards, Ceiridwen J; Lohan, Amanda J; Murphy, Alison; Braud, Martin; Donoghue, Mark T; Liu, Yuan; Chamberlain, Andrew T; Rue-Albrecht, Kévin; Schroeder, Steven; Spillane, Charles; Tai, Shuaishuai; Bradley, Daniel G; Sonstegard, Tad S; Loftus, Brendan J; MacHugh, David E

    2015-10-26

    Domestication of the now-extinct wild aurochs, Bos primigenius, gave rise to the two major domestic extant cattle taxa, B. taurus and B. indicus. While previous genetic studies have shed some light on the evolutionary relationships between European aurochs and modern cattle, important questions remain unanswered, including the phylogenetic status of aurochs, whether gene flow from aurochs into early domestic populations occurred, and which genomic regions were subject to selection processes during and after domestication. Here, we address these questions using whole-genome sequencing data generated from an approximately 6,750-year-old British aurochs bone and genome sequence data from 81 additional cattle plus genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism data from a diverse panel of 1,225 modern animals. Phylogenomic analyses place the aurochs as a distinct outgroup to the domestic B. taurus lineage, supporting the predominant Near Eastern origin of European cattle. Conversely, traditional British and Irish breeds share more genetic variants with this aurochs specimen than other European populations, supporting localized gene flow from aurochs into the ancestors of modern British and Irish cattle, perhaps through purposeful restocking by early herders in Britain. Finally, the functions of genes showing evidence for positive selection in B. taurus are enriched for neurobiology, growth, metabolism and immunobiology, suggesting that these biological processes have been important in the domestication of cattle. This work provides important new information regarding the origins and functional evolution of modern cattle, revealing that the interface between early European domestic populations and wild aurochs was significantly more complex than previously thought.

  3. Parallel ClickSeq and Nanopore sequencing elucidates the rapid evolution of defective-interfering RNAs in Flock House virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Jaworski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Defective-Interfering RNAs (DI-RNAs have long been known to play an important role in virus replication and transmission. DI-RNAs emerge during virus passaging in both cell-culture and their hosts as a result of non-homologous RNA recombination. However, the principles of DI-RNA emergence and their subsequent evolution have remained elusive. Using a combination of long- and short-read Next-Generation Sequencing, we have characterized the formation of DI-RNAs during serial passaging of Flock House virus (FHV in cell-culture over a period of 30 days in order to elucidate the pathways and potential mechanisms of DI-RNA emergence and evolution. For short-read RNAseq, we employed 'ClickSeq' due to its ability to sensitively and confidently detect RNA recombination events with nucleotide resolution. In parallel, we used the Oxford Nanopore Technologies's (ONT MinION to resolve full-length defective and wild-type viral genomes. Together, these accurately resolve both rare and common RNA recombination events, determine the correlation between recombination events, and quantifies the relative abundance of different DI-RNAs throughout passaging. We observe the formation of a diverse pool of defective RNAs at each stage of viral passaging. However, many of these 'intermediate' species, while present in early stages of passaging, do not accumulate. After approximately 9 days of passaging we observe the rapid accumulation of DI-RNAs with a correlated reduction in specific infectivity and with the Nanopore data find that DI-RNAs are characterized by multiple RNA recombination events. This suggests that intermediate DI-RNA species are not competitive and that multiple recombination events interact epistatically to confer 'mature' DI-RNAs with their selective advantage allowing for their rapid accumulation. Alternatively, it is possible that mature DI-RNA species are generated in a single event involving multiple RNA rearrangements. These insights have

  4. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cánovas Francisco M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1 and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2. Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types.

  5. Evolution of Sequence Type 4821 Clonal Complex Meningococcal Strains in China from Prequinolone to Quinolone Era, 1972–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qinglan; Mustapha, Mustapha M.; Chen, Mingliang; Qu, Di; Zhang, Xi; Harrison, Lee H.

    2018-01-01

    The expansion of hypervirulent sequence type 4821 clonal complex (CC4821) lineage Neisseria meningitidis bacteria has led to a shift in meningococcal disease epidemiology in China, from serogroup A (MenA) to MenC. Knowledge of the evolution and genetic origin of the emergent MenC strains is limited. In this study, we subjected 76 CC4821 isolates collected across China during 1972–1977 and 2005–2013 to phylogenetic analysis, traditional genotyping, or both. We show that successive recombination events within genes encoding surface antigens and acquisition of quinolone resistance mutations possibly played a role in the emergence of CC4821 as an epidemic clone in China. MenC and MenB CC4821 strains have spread across China and have been detected in several countries in different continents. Capsular switches involving serogroups B and C occurred among epidemic strains, raising concerns regarding possible increases in MenB disease, given that vaccines in use in China do not protect against MenB. PMID:29553310

  6. Inferences from protein and nucleic acid sequences - Early molecular evolution, divergence of kingdoms and rates of change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Barker, W. C.; Mclaughlin, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Description of new sensitive, objective methods for establishing the probable common ancestry of very distantly related sequences and the quantitative evolutionary change which has taken place. These methods are applied to four families of proteins and nucleic acids and evolutionary trees will be derived where possible. Of the three families containing duplications of genetic material, two are nucleic acids: transfer RNA and 5S ribosomal RNA. Both of these structures are functional in the synthesis of coded proteins, and prototypes must have been present in the cell at the inception of the fundamental coding process that all living things share. There are many types of tRNA which recognize the various nucleotide triplets and the 20 amino acids. These types are thought to have arisen as a result of many gene duplications. Relationships among these types are discussed. The 5S ribosomal RNA, presently functional in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, is very likely descended from an early form incorporating almost a complete duplication of genetic material. The amount of evolution in the various lines can again be compared. The other two families containing duplications are proteins; ferredoxin and cytochrome c.

  7. Chromosome Mapping of Repetitive Sequences in Rachycentron canadum (Perciformes: Rachycentridae): Implications for Karyotypic Evolution and Perspectives for Biotechnological Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobina, Uedson Pereira; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Souza, Luiz Gustavo Rodrigues; Calado, Leonardo Luiz; Tavares, Manoel; Manzella, João; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2011-01-01

    The cobia, Rachycentron canadum, a species of marine fish, has been increasingly used in aquaculture worldwide. It is the only member of the family Rachycentridae (Perciformes) showing wide geographic distribution and phylogenetic patterns still not fully understood. In this study, the species was cytogenetically analyzed by different methodologies, including Ag-NOR and chromomycin A3 (CMA3)/DAPI staining, C-banding, early replication banding (RGB), and in situ fluorescent hybridization with probes for 18S and 5S ribosomal genes and for telomeric sequences (TTAGGG)n. The results obtained allow a detailed chromosomal characterization of the Atlantic population. The chromosome diversification found in the karyotype of the cobia is apparently related to pericentric inversions, the main mechanism associated to the karyotypic evolution of Perciformes. The differential heterochromatin replication patterns found were in part associated to functional genes. Despite maintaining conservative chromosomal characteristics in relation to the basal pattern established for Perciformes, some chromosome pairs in the analyzed population exhibit markers that may be important for cytotaxonomic, population, and biodiversity studies as well as for monitoring the species in question. PMID:21541243

  8. Structural and Sequence Similarities of Hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum A Protein to Human Homolog Suggest Early Evolution and Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva Barve

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA is a protein that binds to damaged DNA, verifies presence of a lesion, and recruits other proteins of the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway to the site. Though its homologs from yeast, Drosophila, humans, and so forth are well studied, XPA has not so far been reported from protozoa and lower animal phyla. Hydra is a fresh-water cnidarian with a remarkable capacity for regeneration and apparent lack of organismal ageing. Cnidarians are among the first metazoa with a defined body axis, tissue grade organisation, and nervous system. We report here for the first time presence of XPA gene in hydra. Putative protein sequence of hydra XPA contains nuclear localization signal and bears the zinc-finger motif. It contains two conserved Pfam domains and various characterized features of XPA proteins like regions for binding to excision repair cross-complementing protein-1 (ERCC1 and replication protein A 70 kDa subunit (RPA70 proteins. Hydra XPA shows a high degree of similarity with vertebrate homologs and clusters with deuterostomes in phylogenetic analysis. Homology modelling corroborates the very close similarity between hydra and human XPA. The protein thus most likely functions in hydra in the same manner as in other animals, indicating that it arose early in evolution and has been conserved across animal phyla.

  9. Structural and sequence similarities of hydra xeroderma pigmentosum A protein to human homolog suggest early evolution and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barve, Apurva; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Ghaskadbi, Surendra

    2013-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) is a protein that binds to damaged DNA, verifies presence of a lesion, and recruits other proteins of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway to the site. Though its homologs from yeast, Drosophila, humans, and so forth are well studied, XPA has not so far been reported from protozoa and lower animal phyla. Hydra is a fresh-water cnidarian with a remarkable capacity for regeneration and apparent lack of organismal ageing. Cnidarians are among the first metazoa with a defined body axis, tissue grade organisation, and nervous system. We report here for the first time presence of XPA gene in hydra. Putative protein sequence of hydra XPA contains nuclear localization signal and bears the zinc-finger motif. It contains two conserved Pfam domains and various characterized features of XPA proteins like regions for binding to excision repair cross-complementing protein-1 (ERCC1) and replication protein A 70 kDa subunit (RPA70) proteins. Hydra XPA shows a high degree of similarity with vertebrate homologs and clusters with deuterostomes in phylogenetic analysis. Homology modelling corroborates the very close similarity between hydra and human XPA. The protein thus most likely functions in hydra in the same manner as in other animals, indicating that it arose early in evolution and has been conserved across animal phyla.

  10. Chromosome Mapping of Repetitive Sequences in Rachycentron canadum (Perciformes: Rachycentridae: Implications for Karyotypic Evolution and Perspectives for Biotechnological Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uedson Pereira Jacobina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cobia, Rachycentron canadum, a species of marine fish, has been increasingly used in aquaculture worldwide. It is the only member of the family Rachycentridae (Perciformes showing wide geographic distribution and phylogenetic patterns still not fully understood. In this study, the species was cytogenetically analyzed by different methodologies, including Ag-NOR and chromomycin A3 (CMA3/DAPI staining, C-banding, early replication banding (RGB, and in situ fluorescent hybridization with probes for 18S and 5S ribosomal genes and for telomeric sequences (TTAGGGn. The results obtained allow a detailed chromosomal characterization of the Atlantic population. The chromosome diversification found in the karyotype of the cobia is apparently related to pericentric inversions, the main mechanism associated to the karyotypic evolution of Perciformes. The differential heterochromatin replication patterns found were in part associated to functional genes. Despite maintaining conservative chromosomal characteristics in relation to the basal pattern established for Perciformes, some chromosome pairs in the analyzed population exhibit markers that may be important for cytotaxonomic, population, and biodiversity studies as well as for monitoring the species in question.

  11. Rates and patterns of mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in fringilline finches (fringilla spp.) and the greenfinch (Carduelis chloris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, H D; Baker, A J

    1998-06-01

    Rates and patterns of evolution in partial sequences of five mitochondrial genes (cytochrome b, ATPase 6, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5, tRNA(Glu), and the control region) were compared among taxa in the passerine bird genera Fringilla and Carduelis. Rates of divergence do not vary significantly among genes, even in comparisons with the control region. Rate variation among lineages is significant only for the control region and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5, and patterns of variation are consistent with the expectations of neutral theory. Base composition is biased in all genes but is stationary among lineages, and there is evidence for directional mutation pressure only in the control region. Despite these similarities, patterns of substitution differ among genes, consistent with alternative regimes of selective constraint. Rates of nonsynonymous substitution are higher in NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 than in other protein-coding genes, and transitions exist in elevated proportions relative to transversions. Transitions appear to accumulate linearly with time in tRNA(Glu), and despite exhibiting the highest overall rate of divergence among species, there are no transversional changes in this gene. Finally, for resolving phylogenetic relationships among Fringilla taxa, the combined protein-coding data are broadly similar to those of the control region in terms of phylogenetic informativeness and statistical support.

  12. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  13. Regions involved in fengycin synthetases enzyme complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chieh Cheng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fengycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic synthesized nonribosomally by five fengycin synthetases. These enzymes are linked in a specific order to form the complex. This study investigates how these enzymes interact in the complex and analyzes the regions in the enzymes that are critical to the interactions. Methods: Deletions were generated in the fengycin synthetases. The interaction of these mutant proteins with their partner enzymes in the complex was analyzed in vitro by a glutathione S-transferase (GST or nickel pulldown assay. Results: The communication-mediating donor (COM-D domains of the fengycin synthetases, when fused to GST, specifically pulled down their downstream partner enzymes in the GST-pulldown assays. The communication-mediating acceptor (COM-A domains were required for binding between two partner enzymes, although the domains alone did not confer specificity of the binding to their upstream partner enzymes. This study found that the COM-A domain, the condensation domain, and a portion of the adenylation domain in fengycin synthetase B (FenB were required for specific binding to fengycin synthetase A (FenA. Conclusion: The interaction between the COM-D and COM-A domains in two partner enzymes is critical for nonribosomal peptide synthesis. The COM-A domain alone is insufficient for interacting with its upstream partner enzyme in the enzyme complex with specificity; a region that contains COM-A, condensation, and a portion of adenylation domains in the downstream partner enzyme is required. Keywords: communication-mediating donor and acceptor domain, fengycin synthetase, protein-protein interaction

  14. Full-Length Venom Protein cDNA Sequences from Venom-Derived mRNA: Exploring Compositional Variation and Adaptive Multigene Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modahl, Cassandra M; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-06-01

    access to cDNA sequences in the absence of living specimens, even from commercial venom sources, to evaluate important regional differences in venom composition and to study snake venom protein evolution.

  15. Reconstructing SALMFamide Neuropeptide Precursor Evolution in the Phylum Echinodermata: Ophiuroid and Crinoid Sequence Data Provide New Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, Maurice R.; Semmens, Dean C.; Blowes, Liisa M.; Levine, Judith; Lowe, Christopher J.; Arnone, Maria I.; Clark, Melody S.

    2015-01-01

    The SALMFamides are a family of neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants in echinoderms. Analysis of genome/transcriptome sequence data from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinoidea), the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea), and the starfish Patiria miniata (Asteroidea) reveals that in each species there are two types of SALMFamide precursor: an L-type precursor comprising peptides with a C-terminal LxFamide-type motif and an F-type precursor solely or largely comprising peptides with a C-terminal FxFamide-type motif. Here, we have identified transcripts encoding SALMFamide precursors in the brittle star Ophionotus victoriae (Ophiuroidea) and the feather star Antedon mediterranea (Crinoidea). We have also identified SALMFamide precursors in other species belonging to each of the five echinoderm classes. As in S. purpuratus, A. japonicus, and P. miniata, in O. victoriae there is one L-type precursor and one F-type precursor. However, in A. mediterranea only a single SALMFamide precursor was found, comprising two peptides with a LxFamide-type motif, one with a FxFamide-type motif, five with a FxLamide-type motif, and four with a LxLamide-type motif. As crinoids are basal to the Echinozoa (Holothuroidea + Echinoidea) and Asterozoa (Asteroidea + Ophiuroidea) in echinoderm phylogeny, one model of SALMFamide precursor evolution would be that ancestrally there was a single SALMFamide gene encoding a variety of SALMFamides (as in crinoids), which duplicated in a common ancestor of the Echinozoa and Asterozoa and then specialized to encode L-type SALMFamides or F-type SALMFamides. Alternatively, a second SALMFamide precursor may remain to be discovered or may have been lost in crinoids. Further insights will be obtained if SALMFamide receptors are identified, which would provide a molecular basis for experimental analysis of the functional significance of the “cocktails” of SALMFamides that exist in echinoderms. PMID:25699014

  16. Reconstructing SALMFamide neuropeptide precursor evolution in the phylum Echinodermata: ophiuroid and crinoid sequence data provide new insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice R Elphick

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The SALMFamides are a family of neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants in echinoderms. Analysis of genome/transcriptome sequence data from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinoidea, the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea and the starfish Patiria miniata (Asteroidea reveals that in each species there are two types of SALMFamide precursor: an L-type precursor comprising peptides with a C-terminal LxFamide-type motif and an F-type precursor solely or largely comprising peptides with a C-terminal FxFamide-type motif. Here we have identified transcripts encoding SALMFamide precursors in the brittle star Ophionotus victoriae (Ophiuroidea and the feather star Antedon mediterranea (Crinoidea. We have also identified SALMFamide precursors in other species belonging to each of the five echinoderm classes. As in S. purpuratus, A. japonicus and P. miniata, in O. victoriae there is one L-type precursor and one F-type precursor. However, in A. mediterranea only a single SALMFamide precursor was found, comprising two peptides with a LxFamide-type motif, one with a FxFamide-type motif, five with a FxLamide-type motif and four with a LxLamide-type motif. As crinoids are basal to the Echinozoa (Holothuroidea + Echinoidea and Asterozoa (Asteroidea + Ophiuroidea in echinoderm phylogeny, one model of SALMFamide precursor evolution would be that ancestrally there was a single SALMFamide gene encoding a variety of SALMFamides (as in crinoids, which duplicated in a common ancestor of the Echinozoa and Asterozoa and then specialised to encode L-type SALMFamides or F-type SALMFamides. Alternatively, a second SALMFamide precursor may remain to be discovered or may have been lost in crinoids. Further insights will be obtained if SALMFamide receptors are identified, which would provide a molecular basis for experimental analysis of the functional significance of the cocktails of SALMFamides that exist in echinoderms.

  17. Convergent Evolution of Hemoglobin Function in High-Altitude Andean Waterfowl Involves Limited Parallelism at the Molecular Sequence Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekhar Natarajan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental question in evolutionary genetics concerns the extent to which adaptive phenotypic convergence is attributable to convergent or parallel changes at the molecular sequence level. Here we report a comparative analysis of hemoglobin (Hb function in eight phylogenetically replicated pairs of high- and low-altitude waterfowl taxa to test for convergence in the oxygenation properties of Hb, and to assess the extent to which convergence in biochemical phenotype is attributable to repeated amino acid replacements. Functional experiments on native Hb variants and protein engineering experiments based on site-directed mutagenesis revealed the phenotypic effects of specific amino acid replacements that were responsible for convergent increases in Hb-O2 affinity in multiple high-altitude taxa. In six of the eight taxon pairs, high-altitude taxa evolved derived increases in Hb-O2 affinity that were caused by a combination of unique replacements, parallel replacements (involving identical-by-state variants with independent mutational origins in different lineages, and collateral replacements (involving shared, identical-by-descent variants derived via introgressive hybridization. In genome scans of nucleotide differentiation involving high- and low-altitude populations of three separate species, function-altering amino acid polymorphisms in the globin genes emerged as highly significant outliers, providing independent evidence for adaptive divergence in Hb function. The experimental results demonstrate that convergent changes in protein function can occur through multiple historical paths, and can involve multiple possible mutations. Most cases of convergence in Hb function did not involve parallel substitutions and most parallel substitutions did not affect Hb-O2 affinity, indicating that the repeatability of phenotypic evolution does not require parallelism at the molecular level.

  18. Mutations in the glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase gene cause early-onset epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodera, Hirofumi; Osaka, Hitoshi; Iai, Mizue; Aida, Noriko; Yamashita, Akio; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-02-01

    Aminoacylation is the process of attaching amino acids to their cognate tRNA, and thus is essential for the translation of mRNA into protein. This direct interaction of tRNA with amino acids is catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified compound heterozygous mutations [c.169T>C (p.Tyr57His) and c.1485dup (p.Lys496*)] in QARS, which encodes glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase, in two siblings with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (EOEE). Recessive mutations in QARS, including the loss-of-function missense mutation p.Tyr57His, have been reported to cause intractable seizures with progressive microcephaly. The p.Lys496* mutation is novel and causes truncation of the QARS protein, leading to a deletion of part of the catalytic domain and the entire anticodon-binding domain. Transient expression of the p.Lys496* mutant in neuroblastoma 2A cells revealed diminished and aberrantly aggregated expression, indicating the loss-of-function nature of this mutant. Together with the previous report, our data suggest that abnormal aminoacylation is one of the underlying pathologies of EOEE.

  19. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling by modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing in Brassica rapa suggests that epigenetic modifications play a key role in polyploid genome evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xun; Ge, Xianhong; Wang, Jing; Tan, Chen; King, Graham J.; Liu, Kede

    2015-01-01

    Brassica rapa includes some of the most important vegetables worldwide as well as oilseed crops. The complete annotated genome sequence confirmed its paleohexaploid origins and provides opportunities for exploring the detailed process of polyploid genome evolution. We generated a genome-wide DNA methylation profile for B. rapa using a modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) method. This sampling represented 2.24% of all CG loci (2.5 × 105), 2.16% CHG (2.7 × 105), and 1.68%...

  20. Fusion of the subunits α and β of succinyl-CoA synthetase as a phylogenetic marker for Pezizomycotina fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M. Koire

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene fusions, yielding the formation of multidomain proteins, are evolutionary events that can be utilized as phylogenetic markers. Here we describe a fusion gene comprising the α and β subunits of succinyl-coA synthetase, an enzyme of the TCA cycle, in Pezizomycotina fungi. This fusion is present in all Pezizomycotina with complete genome sequences and absent from all other organisms. Phylogenetic analysis of the α and β subunits of succinyl-CoA synthetase suggests that both subunits were duplicated and retained in Pezizomycotina while one copy was lost from other fungi. One of the duplicated copies was then fused in Pezizomycotina. Our results suggest that the fusion of the α and β subunits of succinyl-CoA synthetase can be used as a molecular marker for membership in the Pezizomycotina subphylum. If a species has the fusion it can be reliably classified as Pezizomycotina, while the absence of the fusion is suggestive that the species is not a member of this subphylum.

  1. The tryptophan synthetase gene TRP1 of Nodulisporium sp.: molecular characterization and its relation to nodulisporic acid A production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, C; Peekhaus, N; Lu, P; Sangari, R; Zhang, A; Masurekar, P; An, Z

    2008-06-01

    Nodulisporic acid A (NAA), an insecticidal indole diterpene, is produced by the fungus Nodulisporium sp. Since indole-3-glycerolphosphate is the precursor of the indole moiety of NAA, it is suggested that the activity of tryptophan synthetase may play a role in NAA biosynthesis. To investigate this hypothesis, the tryptophan synthetase gene TRP1 of Nodulisporium sp. was cloned and characterized. The gene consists of three introns of 146, 68, and 57 bp. The four exons encode a protein of 712 amino acids, the sequence of which is highly homologous to that of other fungal tryptophan synthetase proteins. The transcription initiation site was mapped 66 bp upstream to the ATG, and the polyA tail attachment site is 169 bp downstream to the translation stop codon. Replacement of the N-terminal half of the gene with a hygromycin selection marker yielded mutants with the tryptophan auxotroph/hygromycin-resistance (trp(-)/hyr) phenotype. The TRP1 mutants required a high concentration of tryptophan supplement in solid medium (10 mM) to sustain minimal growth and failed to produce NAA in the production medium (FFL-CAM) supplemented with high concentrations of tryptophan.

  2. Binding of Divalent Magnesium by Escherichia coli Phosphoribosyl Diphosphate Synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of the substrates MgATP and ribose 5-phosphate as well as Mg2+ to the enzyme 5-phospho-d-ribosyl a-1-diphosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli has been analyzed. By use of the competive inhibitors of ATP and ribose 5-phosphate binding, a,ß-methylene ATP and (+)-1-a,2-a...

  3. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases: Identifying the cryptic gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-19

    Jan 19, 2017 ... Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) present in bacteria and fungi are the major multi-modular enzyme complexes which synthesize secondary metabolites like the pharmacologically impor- tant antibiotics and siderophores. Each of the multiple modules of an ...

  4. Heterogeneous distribution of glutamine synthetase during rat liver development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaasbeek Janzen, J. W.; Gebhardt, R.; ten Voorde, G. H.; Lamers, W. H.; Charles, R.; Moorman, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    Two days before birth, immunohistochemical detection of glutamine synthetase already reveals a heterogeneous distribution pattern related to the vascular architecture of the liver. Only a small number of hepatocytes in the vicinity of the efferent venules show relatively high staining intensity.

  5. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases: Identifying the cryptic gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) present in bacteria and fungi are themajor multi-modular enzyme complexes which synthesize secondary metabolites like the pharmacologically importantantibiotics and siderophores. Each of the multiple modules of an NRPS activates a ...

  6. Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency in Murine Astrocytes Results in Neonatal Death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Youji; Hakvoort, Theodorus B. M.; Vermeulen, Jacqueline L. M.; Labruyère, Wilhelmina T.; de Waart, D. Rudi; van der Hel, W. Saskia; Ruijter, Jan M.; Uylings, Harry B. M.; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a key enzyme in the "glutamine-glutamate cycle" between astrocytes and neurons, but its function in vivo was thus far tested only pharmacologically. Crossing GS(fl/lacZ) or GS(fl/f)l mice with hGFAP-Cre mice resulted in prenatal excision of the GS(fl) allele in

  7. Restoration Of Glutamine Synthetase Activity, Nitric Oxide Levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Propolis has been proposed to be protective on neurodegenerative disorders. To understand the neuroprotective effects of honeybee propolis, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, nitric oxide (NO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) were studied in different brain ...

  8. Isolation of an acetyl-CoA synthetase gene (ZbACS2) from Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Cardoso, Helena; Sousa, Maria João; Steensma, H Yde; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília

    2004-03-01

    A gene homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae ACS genes, coding for acetyl-CoA synthetase, has been cloned from the yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307, by using reverse genetic approaches. A probe obtained by PCR amplification from Z. bailii DNA, using primers derived from two conserved regions of yeast ACS proteins, RIGAIHSVVF (ScAcs1p; 210-219) and RVDDVVNVSG (ScAcs1p; 574-583), was used for screening a Z. bailii genomic library. Nine clones with partially overlapping inserts were isolated. The sequenced DNA fragment contains a complete ORF of 2027 bp (ZbACS2) and the deduced polypeptide shares significant homologies with the products of ACS2 genes from S. cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis (81% and 82% identity and 84% and 89% similarity, respectively). Phylogenetic analysis shows that the sequence of Zbacs2 is more closely related to the sequences from Acs2 than to those from Acs1 proteins. Moreover, this analysis revealed that the gene duplication producing Acs1 and Acs2 proteins has occurred in the common ancestor of S. cerevisiae, K. lactis, Candida albicans, C. glabrata and Debaryomyces hansenii lineages. Additionally, the cloned gene allowed growth of S. cerevisiae Scacs2 null mutant, in medium containing glucose as the only carbon and energy source, indicating that it encodes a functional acetyl-CoA synthetase. Also, S. cerevisiae cells expressing ZbACS2 have a shorter lag time, in medium containing glucose (2%, w/v) plus acetic acid (0.1-0.35%, v/v). No differences in cell response to acetic acid stress were detected both by specific growth and death rates. The mode of regulation of ZbACS2 appears to be different from ScACS2 and KlACS2, being subject to repression by a glucose pulse in acetic acid-grown cells. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  10. High-Throughput Sequencing of the Expressed Torafugu (Takifugu rubripes) Antibody Sequences Distinguishes IgM and IgT Repertoires and Reveals Evidence of Convergent Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xi; Sun, Jianqiang; Tan, Engkong; Shimizu, Kentaro; Reza, Md Shaheed; Watabe, Shugo; Asakawa, Shuichi

    2018-01-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) or antibody diversity arises from somatic recombination of immunoglobulin (Ig) gene segments and is concentrated within the Ig heavy (H) chain complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR-H3). We performed high-throughput sequencing of the expressed antibody heavy-chain repertoire from adult torafugu. We found that torafugu use between 70 and 82% of all possible V (variable), D (diversity), and J (joining) gene segment combinations and that they share a similar frequency distribution of these VDJ combinations. The CDR-H3 sequence repertoire observed in individuals is biased with the preferential use of a small number of VDJ, dominated by sequences containing inserted nucleotides. We uncovered the common CDR-H3 amino-acid (aa) sequences shared by individuals. Common CDR-H3 sequences feature highly convergent nucleic-acid recombination compared with private ones. Finally, we observed differences in repertoires between IgM and IgT, including the unequal usage frequencies of V gene segment and the biased number of nucleotide insertion/deletion at VDJ junction regions that leads to distinct distributions of CDR-H3 lengths.

  11. High-Throughput Sequencing of the Expressed Torafugu (Takifugu rubripes Antibody Sequences Distinguishes IgM and IgT Repertoires and Reveals Evidence of Convergent Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Fu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available B-cell antigen receptor (BCR or antibody diversity arises from somatic recombination of immunoglobulin (Ig gene segments and is concentrated within the Ig heavy (H chain complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR-H3. We performed high-throughput sequencing of the expressed antibody heavy-chain repertoire from adult torafugu. We found that torafugu use between 70 and 82% of all possible V (variable, D (diversity, and J (joining gene segment combinations and that they share a similar frequency distribution of these VDJ combinations. The CDR-H3 sequence repertoire observed in individuals is biased with the preferential use of a small number of VDJ, dominated by sequences containing inserted nucleotides. We uncovered the common CDR-H3 amino-acid (aa sequences shared by individuals. Common CDR-H3 sequences feature highly convergent nucleic-acid recombination compared with private ones. Finally, we observed differences in repertoires between IgM and IgT, including the unequal usage frequencies of V gene segment and the biased number of nucleotide insertion/deletion at VDJ junction regions that leads to distinct distributions of CDR-H3 lengths.

  12. Characterization of shale gas enrichment in the Wufeng Formation–Longmaxi Formation in the Sichuan Basin of China and evaluation of its geological construction–transformation evolution sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang He

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Shale gas in Upper Ordovician Wufeng Formation–Lower Silurian Longmaxi Formation in the Sichuan Basin is one of the key strata being explored and developed in China, where shale gas reservoirs have been found in Fuling, Weiyuan, Changning and Zhaotong. Characteristics of shale gas enrichment in the formation shown by detailed profiling and analysis are summarized as “high, handsome and rich”. “High” mainly refers to the high quality of original materials for the formation of shale with excellent key parameters, including the good type and high abundance of organic matters, high content of brittle minerals and moderate thermal evolution. “Handsome” means late and weak deformation, favorable deformation mode and structure, and appropriate uplift and current burial depth. “Rich” includes high gas content, high formation pressure coefficient, good reservoir property, favorable reservoir scale transformation and high initial and final output, with relative ease of development and obvious economic benefit. For shale gas enrichment and high yield, it is important that the combination of shale was deposited and formed in excellent conditions (geological construction, and then underwent appropriate tectonic deformation, uplift, and erosion (geological transformation. Evaluation based on geological construction (evolution sequence from formation to the reservoir includes sequence stratigraphy and sediment, hydrocarbon generation and formation of reservoir pores. Based on geological transformation (evolution sequence from the reservoir to preservation, the strata should be evaluated for structural deformation, the formation of reservoir fracture and preservation of shale gas. The evaluation of the “construction - transformation” sequence is to cover the whole process of shale gas formation and preservation. This way, both positive and negative effects of the formation-transformation sequence on shale gas are assessed. The evaluation

  13. Formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene diversity in the guts of higher termites with different diets and lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottesen, Elizabeth A; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we examine gene diversity for formyl-tetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS), a key enzyme in homoacetogenesis, recovered from the gut microbiota of six species of higher termites. The "higher" termites (family Termitidae), which represent the majority of extant termite species and genera, engage in a broader diversity of feeding and nesting styles than the "lower" termites. Previous studies of termite gut homoacetogenesis have focused on wood-feeding lower termites, from which the preponderance of FTHFS sequences recovered were related to those from acetogenic treponemes. While sequences belonging to this group were present in the guts of all six higher termites examined, treponeme-like FTHFS sequences represented the majority of recovered sequences in only two species (a wood-feeding Nasutitermes sp. and a palm-feeding Microcerotermes sp.). The remaining four termite species analyzed (a Gnathamitermes sp. and two Amitermes spp. that were recovered from subterranean nests with indeterminate feeding strategies and a litter-feeding Rhynchotermes sp.) yielded novel FTHFS clades not observed in lower termites. These termites yielded two distinct clusters of probable purinolytic Firmicutes and a large group of potential homoacetogens related to sequences previously recovered from the guts of omnivorous cockroaches. These findings suggest that the gut environments of different higher termite species may select for different groups of homoacetogens, with some species hosting treponeme-dominated homoacetogen populations similar to those of wood-feeding, lower termites while others host Firmicutes-dominated communities more similar to those of omnivorous cockroaches.

  14. Evolutionary relationships of the carbamoylphosphate synthetase genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoff, M. J.; Jonker, A.; Beintema, J. J.; Lamers, W. H.

    1995-01-01

    Carbamoylphosphate is a common intermediate in the metabolic pathways leading to the biosynthesis of arginine and pyrimidines. The amino acid sequences of all available proteins that catalyze the formation of carbamoylphosphate were retrieved from Genbank and aligned to estimate their mutual

  15. Evolutionary relationships of the carbamoylphosphate synthetase genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vandenHoff, MJB; Jonker, A; Beintema, JJ; Lamers, WH

    1995-01-01

    Carbamoylphosphate is a common intermediate in the metabolic pathways leading to the biosynthesis of arginine and pyrimidines, The amino acid sequences of all available proteins that catalyze the formation of carbamoylphosphate were retrieved from Genbank and aligned to estimate their mutual

  16. Distinctive properties and expression profiles of glutamine synthetase from a plant symbiotic fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanini, Barbara; Betti, Marco; Márquez, Antonio J; Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola; Ottonello, Simone

    2003-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences reported in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank(R)/EBI Nucleotide Sequence Databases with accession numbers AF462037 (glutamine synthetase) and AF462032 (glutamate synthase). Nitrogen retrieval and assimilation by symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi is thought to play a central role in the mutualistic interaction between these organisms and their plant hosts. Here we report on the molecular characterization of the key N-assimilation enzyme glutamine synthetase from the mycorrhizal ascomycete Tuber borchii (TbGS). TbGS displayed a strong positive co-operativity ( n =1.7+/-0.29) and an unusually high S(0.5) value (54+/-16 mM; S(0.5) is the substrate concentration value at which v =(1/2) V (max)) for glutamate, and a correspondingly low sensitivity towards inhibition by the glutamate analogue herbicide phosphinothricin. The TbGS mRNA, which is encoded by a single-copy gene in the Tuber genome, was up-regulated in N-starved mycelia and returned to basal levels upon resupplementation of various forms of N, the most effective of which was nitrate. Both responses were accompanied by parallel variations of TbGS protein amount and glutamine synthetase activity, thus indicating that TbGS levels are primarily controlled at the pre-translational level. As revealed by a comparative analysis of the TbGS mRNA and of the mRNAs for the metabolically related enzymes glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamate synthase, TbGS is not only the sole messenger that positively responds to N starvation, but also the most abundant under N-limiting conditions. A similar, but even more discriminating expression pattern, with practically undetectable glutamate dehydrogenase mRNA levels, was observed in fruitbodies. The TbGS mRNA was also found to be expressed in symbiosis-engaged hyphae, with distinctively higher hybridization signals in hyphae that were penetrating among and within root cells. PMID:12683951

  17. Population-Sequencing as a Biomarker of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei Evolution through Microbial Forensic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Jakupciak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale genomics projects are identifying biomarkers to detect human disease. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are two closely related select agents that cause melioidosis and glanders. Accurate characterization of metagenomic samples is dependent on accurate measurements of genetic variation between isolates with resolution down to strain level. Often single biomarker sensitivity is augmented by use of multiple or panels of biomarkers. In parallel with single biomarker validation, advances in DNA sequencing enable analysis of entire genomes in a single run: population-sequencing. Potentially, direct sequencing could be used to analyze an entire genome to serve as the biomarker for genome identification. However, genome variation and population diversity complicate use of direct sequencing, as well as differences caused by sample preparation protocols including sequencing artifacts and mistakes. As part of a Department of Homeland Security program in bacterial forensics, we examined how to implement whole genome sequencing (WGS analysis as a judicially defensible forensic method for attributing microbial sample relatedness; and also to determine the strengths and limitations of whole genome sequence analysis in a forensics context. Herein, we demonstrate use of sequencing to provide genetic characterization of populations: direct sequencing of populations.

  18. Genomic, Biochemical, and Modeling Analyses of Asparagine Synthetases from Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Asparagine synthetase activity in cereals has become an important issue with the discovery that free asparagine concentration determines the potential for formation of acrylamide, a probably carcinogenic processing contaminant, in baked cereal products. Asparagine synthetase catalyses the ATP-dependent transfer of the amino group of glutamine to a molecule of aspartate to generate glutamate and asparagine. Here, asparagine synthetase-encoding polymerase chain reaction (PCR products were amplified from wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Spark cDNA. The encoded proteins were assigned the names TaASN1, TaASN2, and TaASN3 on the basis of comparisons with other wheat and cereal asparagine synthetases. Although very similar to each other they differed slightly in size, with molecular masses of 65.49, 65.06, and 66.24 kDa, respectively. Chromosomal positions and scaffold references were established for TaASN1, TaASN2, and TaASN3, and a fourth, more recently identified gene, TaASN4. TaASN1, TaASN2, and TaASN4 were all found to be single copy genes, located on chromosomes 5, 3, and 4, respectively, of each genome (A, B, and D, although variety Chinese Spring lacked a TaASN2 gene in the B genome. Two copies of TaASN3 were found on chromosome 1 of each genome, and these were given the names TaASN3.1 and TaASN3.2. The TaASN1, TaASN2, and TaASN3 PCR products were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli (TaASN4 was not investigated in this part of the study. Western blot analysis identified two monoclonal antibodies that recognized the three proteins, but did not distinguish between them, despite being raised to epitopes SKKPRMIEVAAP and GGSNKPGVMNTV in the variable C-terminal regions of the proteins. The heterologously expressed TaASN1 and TaASN2 proteins were found to be active asparagine synthetases, producing asparagine and glutamate from glutamine and aspartate. The asparagine synthetase reaction was modeled using SNOOPY® software and information from

  19. Importance of purine and pyrimidine content of local nucleotide sequences (six bases long) for evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, H

    1991-10-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolves rapidly, and random base change is thought to act as a major factor in this evolution. However, segments of the viral genome differ in their variability: there is the highly variable env gene, particularly hypervariable regions located within env, and, in contrast, the conservative gag and pol genes. Computer analysis of the nucleotide sequences of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates reveals that base substitution in this virus is nonrandom and affected by local nucleotide sequences. Certain local sequences 6 base pairs long are excessively frequent in the hypervariable regions. These sequences exhibit base-substitution hotspots at specific positions in their 6 bases. The hotspots tend to be nonsilent letters of codons in the hypervariable regions--thus leading to marked amino acid substitutions there. Conversely, in the conservative gag and pol genes the hotspots tend to be silent letters because of a difference in codon frame from the hypervariable regions. Furthermore, base substitutions in the local sequences that frequently appear in the conservative genes occurred at a low level, even within the variable env. Thus, despite the high variability of this virus, the conservative genes and their products could be conserved. These may be some of the strategies evolved in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to allow for positive-selection pressures, such as the host immune system, and negative-selection pressures on the conservative gene products.

  20. Evolution of the alternative AQP2 gene: Acquisition of a novel protein-coding sequence in dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Takushi; Suzuki, Miwa; Takayama, Asuka

    2018-01-01

    Taxon-specific de novo protein-coding sequences are thought to be important for taxon-specific environmental adaptation. A recent study revealed that bottlenose dolphins acquired a novel isoform of aquaporin 2 generated by alternative splicing (alternative AQP2), which helps dolphins to live in hyperosmotic seawater. The AQP2 gene consists of four exons, but the alternative AQP2 gene lacks the fourth exon and instead has a longer third exon that includes the original third exon and a part of the original third intron. Here, we show that the latter half of the third exon of the alternative AQP2 arose from a non-protein-coding sequence. Intact ORF of this de novo sequence is shared not by all cetaceans, but only by delphinoids. However, this sequence is conservative in all modern cetaceans, implying that this de novo sequence potentially plays important roles for marine adaptation in cetaceans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Rare Cause of Neonatal Hemolytic Anemia: Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu Ustkoyuncu, Pembe; Mutlu, Fatma Türkan; Kiraz, Aslihan; Tag Balkis, Zuhal; Yel, Sibel

    2018-01-01

    Isolated hemolysis or hemolytic anemia and 5-oxoprolinuria are 2 distinct medical conditions in the clinical spectrum associated with glutathione synthetase deficiency. A 1-day-old female baby presented with anemia and respiratory distress. Her hemoglobin level was 9.5 g/dL and the total serum bilirubin level was 5.6 mg/dL. Metabolic acidosis was detected in her blood gas analysis. Metabolic acidosis recurred despite treatment and further investigation was required. Her 5-oxoproline level was 3815 mmol/mol creatinine in urine organic acid analysis, and a homozygous mutation [p.R125H (c.374G>A)] was found in the glutathione synthetase gene. GSD has been observed in very few patients and is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of hemolytic anemia in newborns.

  2. A stochastic modeling of isotope exchange reactions in glutamine synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmiruk, N. V.; Boronovskiy, S. E.; Nartsissov, Ya R.

    2017-11-01

    The model presented in this work allows simulation of isotopic exchange reactions at chemical equilibrium catalyzed by a glutamine synthetase. To simulate the functioning of the enzyme the algorithm based on the stochastic approach was applied. The dependence of exchange rates for 14C and 32P on metabolite concentration was estimated. The simulation results confirmed the hypothesis of the ascertained validity for preferred order random binding mechanism. Corresponding values of K0.5 were also obtained.

  3. Biodiversity Meets Neuroscience: From the Sequencing Ship (Ship-Seq) to Deciphering Parallel Evolution of Neural Systems in Omic’s Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Leonid L.

    2015-01-01

    The origins of neural systems and centralized brains are one of the major transitions in evolution. These events might occur more than once over 570–600 million years. The convergent evolution of neural circuits is evident from a diversity of unique adaptive strategies implemented by ctenophores, cnidarians, acoels, molluscs, and basal deuterostomes. But, further integration of biodiversity research and neuroscience is required to decipher critical events leading to development of complex integrative and cognitive functions. Here, we outline reference species and interdisciplinary approaches in reconstructing the evolution of nervous systems. In the “omic” era, it is now possible to establish fully functional genomics laboratories aboard of oceanic ships and perform sequencing and real-time analyses of data at any oceanic location (named here as Ship-Seq). In doing so, fragile, rare, cryptic, and planktonic organisms, or even entire marine ecosystems, are becoming accessible directly to experimental and physiological analyses by modern analytical tools. Thus, we are now in a position to take full advantages from countless “experiments” Nature performed for us in the course of 3.5 billion years of biological evolution. Together with progress in computational and comparative genomics, evolutionary neuroscience, proteomic and developmental biology, a new surprising picture is emerging that reveals many ways of how nervous systems evolved. As a result, this symposium provides a unique opportunity to revisit old questions about the origins of biological complexity. PMID:26163680

  4. The evolution of surface magnetic fields in young solar-type stars II: the early main sequence (250-650 Myr)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, C. P.; Bouvier, J.; Petit, P.; Lèbre, A.; Amard, L.; Palacios, A.; Morin, J.; Donati, J.-F.; Vidotto, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    There is a large change in surface rotation rates of sun-like stars on the pre-main sequence and early main sequence. Since these stars have dynamo-driven magnetic fields, this implies a strong evolution of their magnetic properties over this time period. The spin-down of these stars is controlled by interactions between stellar and magnetic fields, thus magnetic evolution in turn plays an important role in rotational evolution. We present here the second part of a study investigating the evolution of large-scale surface magnetic fields in this critical time period. We observed stars in open clusters and stellar associations with known ages between 120 and 650 Myr, and used spectropolarimetry and Zeeman Doppler Imaging to characterize their large-scale magnetic field strength and geometry. We report 15 stars with magnetic detections here. These stars have masses from 0.8 to 0.95 M⊙, rotation periods from 0.326 to 10.6 d, and we find large-scale magnetic field strengths from 8.5 to 195 G with a wide range of geometries. We find a clear trend towards decreasing magnetic field strength with age, and a power law decrease in magnetic field strength with Rossby number. There is some tentative evidence for saturation of the large-scale magnetic field strength at Rossby numbers below 0.1, although the saturation point is not yet well defined. Comparing to younger classical T Tauri stars, we support the hypothesis that differences in internal structure produce large differences in observed magnetic fields, however for weak-lined T Tauri stars this is less clear.

  5. Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase: the first crystallization of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnefond, Luc; Frugier, Magali; Touzé, Elodie; Lorber, Bernard; Florentz, Catherine; Giegé, Richard, E-mail: r.giege@ibmc.u-strasbg.fr; Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Sauter, Claude [Département ‘Machineries Traductionnelles’, Architecture et Réactivité de l’ARN, Université Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, CNRS, IBMC, 15 Rue René Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France)

    2007-04-01

    Crystals of human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase lacking the C-terminal S4-like domain diffract to 2.7 Å resolution and are suitable for structure determination. Human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and a truncated version with its C-terminal S4-like domain deleted were purified and crystallized. Only the truncated version, which is active in tyrosine activation and Escherichia coli tRNA{sup Tyr} charging, yielded crystals suitable for structure determination. These tetragonal crystals, belonging to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, were obtained in the presence of PEG 4000 as a crystallizing agent and diffracted X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution. Complete data sets could be collected and led to structure solution by molecular replacement.

  6. Variation in the genomic locations and sequence conservation of STAR elements among staphylococcal species provides insight into DNA repeat evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Joanne; Blades, Matthew; Arafat, Yasrab; Malik, Salman A; Bayliss, Christopher D; Morrissey, Julie A

    2012-09-28

    Staphylococcus aureus Repeat (STAR) elements are a type of interspersed intergenic direct repeat. In this study the conservation and variation in these elements was explored by bioinformatic analyses of published staphylococcal genome sequences and through sequencing of specific STAR element loci from a large set of S. aureus isolates. Using bioinformatic analyses, we found that the STAR elements were located in different genomic loci within each staphylococcal species. There was no correlation between the number of STAR elements in each genome and the evolutionary relatedness of staphylococcal species, however higher levels of repeats were observed in both S. aureus and S. lugdunensis compared to other staphylococcal species. Unexpectedly, sequencing of the internal spacer sequences of individual repeat elements from multiple isolates showed conservation at the sequence level within deep evolutionary lineages of S. aureus. Whilst individual STAR element loci were demonstrated to expand and contract, the sequences associated with each locus were stable and distinct from one another. The high degree of lineage and locus-specific conservation of these intergenic repeat regions suggests that STAR elements are maintained due to selective or molecular forces with some of these elements having an important role in cell physiology. The high prevalence in two of the more virulent staphylococcal species is indicative of a potential role for STAR elements in pathogenesis.

  7. Variation in the genomic locations and sequence conservation of STAR elements among staphylococcal species provides insight into DNA repeat evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purves Joanne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus Repeat (STAR elements are a type of interspersed intergenic direct repeat. In this study the conservation and variation in these elements was explored by bioinformatic analyses of published staphylococcal genome sequences and through sequencing of specific STAR element loci from a large set of S. aureus isolates. Results Using bioinformatic analyses, we found that the STAR elements were located in different genomic loci within each staphylococcal species. There was no correlation between the number of STAR elements in each genome and the evolutionary relatedness of staphylococcal species, however higher levels of repeats were observed in both S. aureus and S. lugdunensis compared to other staphylococcal species. Unexpectedly, sequencing of the internal spacer sequences of individual repeat elements from multiple isolates showed conservation at the sequence level within deep evolutionary lineages of S. aureus. Whilst individual STAR element loci were demonstrated to expand and contract, the sequences associated with each locus were stable and distinct from one another. Conclusions The high degree of lineage and locus-specific conservation of these intergenic repeat regions suggests that STAR elements are maintained due to selective or molecular forces with some of these elements having an important role in cell physiology. The high prevalence in two of the more virulent staphylococcal species is indicative of a potential role for STAR elements in pathogenesis.

  8. The investigation of genetic diversity and evolution of Daweishan Mini chicken based on the complete mitochondrial (mt)DNA D-loop region sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiao-Xu; Tang, Xiu-Jun; Lu, Jun-Xian; Fan, Yan-Feng; Chen, Da-Wei; Tang, Meng-Jun; Gu, Rong; Gao, Yu-Shi

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the genetic diversity and origin of Daweishan Mini chickens using mtDNA sequence polymorphism. Blood samples from 30 Daweishan Mini chickens were collected. The complete D-loop was PCR amplified, sequenced and compared with the DNA data of five Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus) subspecies. Eighteen variable sites that defined six haplotypes were observed. The six haplotypes were clustered into four clades (A, B, D and E), of which clade A and B were dominant. Clades Aand B were clustered with G.g. spadiceus, indicating these two clades may have originated from this subspecies. These results show there is diversity in the middle of the mtDNA D-loop, and indicate there are multiple maternal origins for Daweishan Mini chickens. It appears that G.g. spadiceus contributed more to the evolution of the Daweishan Mini chickens breed than the other four subspecies tested here.

  9. VDJ-Seq: Deep Sequencing Analysis of Rearranged Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene to Reveal Clonal Evolution Patterns of B Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanwen; Nie, Kui; Redmond, David; Melnick, Ari M; Tam, Wayne; Elemento, Olivier

    2015-12-28

    Understanding tumor clonality is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis and disease progression. In addition, understanding the clonal composition changes that occur within a tumor in response to certain micro-environment or treatments may lead to the design of more sophisticated and effective approaches to eradicate tumor cells. However, tracking tumor clonal sub-populations has been challenging due to the lack of distinguishable markers. To address this problem, a VDJ-seq protocol was created to trace the clonal evolution patterns of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) relapse by exploiting VDJ recombination and somatic hypermutation (SHM), two unique features of B cell lymphomas. In this protocol, Next-Generation sequencing (NGS) libraries with indexing potential were constructed from amplified rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) VDJ region from pairs of primary diagnosis and relapse DLBCL samples. On average more than half million VDJ sequences per sample were obtained after sequencing, which contain both VDJ rearrangement and SHM information. In addition, customized bioinformatics pipelines were developed to fully utilize sequence information for the characterization of IgH-VDJ repertoire within these samples. Furthermore, the pipeline allows the reconstruction and comparison of the clonal architecture of individual tumors, which enables the examination of the clonal heterogeneity within the diagnosis tumors and deduction of clonal evolution patterns between diagnosis and relapse tumor pairs. When applying this analysis to several diagnosis-relapse pairs, we uncovered key evidence that multiple distinctive tumor evolutionary patterns could lead to DLBCL relapse. Additionally, this approach can be expanded into other clinical aspects, such as identification of minimal residual disease, monitoring relapse progress and treatment response, and investigation of immune repertoires in non-lymphoma contexts.

  10. Complete plastome sequences of Equisetum arvense and Isoetes flaccida: implications for phylogeny and plastid genome evolution of early land plant lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandoli Dina F

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite considerable progress in our understanding of land plant phylogeny, several nodes in the green tree of life remain poorly resolved. Furthermore, the bulk of currently available data come from only a subset of major land plant clades. Here we examine early land plant evolution using complete plastome sequences including two previously unexamined and phylogenetically critical lineages. To better understand the evolution of land plants and their plastomes, we examined aligned nucleotide sequences, indels, gene and nucleotide composition, inversions, and gene order at the boundaries of the inverted repeats. Results We present the plastome sequences of Equisetum arvense, a horsetail, and of Isoetes flaccida, a heterosporous lycophyte. Phylogenetic analysis of aligned nucleotides from 49 plastome genes from 43 taxa supported monophyly for the following clades: embryophytes (land plants, lycophytes, monilophytes (leptosporangiate ferns + Angiopteris evecta + Psilotum nudum + Equisetum arvense, and seed plants. Resolution among the four monilophyte lineages remained moderate, although nucleotide analyses suggested that P. nudum and E. arvense form a clade sister to A. evecta + leptosporangiate ferns. Results from phylogenetic analyses of nucleotides were consistent with the distribution of plastome gene rearrangements and with analysis of sequence gaps resulting from insertions and deletions (indels. We found one new indel and an inversion of a block of genes that unites the monilophytes. Conclusions Monophyly of monilophytes has been disputed on the basis of morphological and fossil evidence. In the context of a broad sampling of land plant data we find several new pieces of evidence for monilophyte monophyly. Results from this study demonstrate resolution among the four monilophytes lineages, albeit with moderate support; we posit a clade consisting of Equisetaceae and Psilotaceae that is sister to the "true ferns

  11. The reported human NADsyn2 is ammonia-dependent NAD synthetase from a pseudomonad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieganowski, Pawel; Brenner, Charles

    2003-08-29

    Nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) synthetases catalyze the last step in NAD+ metabolism in the de novo, import, and salvage pathways that originate from tryptophan (or aspartic acid), nicotinic acid, and nicotinamide, respectively, and converge on nicotinic acid mononucleotide. NAD+ synthetase converts nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide to NAD+ via an adenylylated intermediate. All of the known eukaryotic NAD+ synthetases are glutamine-dependent, hydrolyzing glutamine to glutamic acid to provide the attacking ammonia. In the prokaryotic world, some NAD+ synthetases are glutamine-dependent, whereas others can only use ammonia. Earlier, we noted a perfect correlation between presence of a domain related to nitrilase and glutamine dependence and then proved in the accompanying paper (Bieganowski, P., Pace, H. C., and Brenner, C. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 33049-33055) that the nitrilase-related domain is an essential, obligate intramolecular, thiol-dependent glutamine amidotransferase in the yeast NAD+ synthetase, Qns1. Independently, human NAD+ synthetase was cloned and shown to depend on Cys-175 for glutamine-dependent but not ammonia-dependent NAD+ synthetase activity. Additionally, it was claimed that a 275 amino acid open reading frame putatively amplified from human glioma cell line LN229 encodes a human ammonia-dependent NAD+ synthetase and this was speculated largely to mediate NAD+ synthesis in human muscle tissues. Here we establish that the so-called NADsyn2 is simply ammonia-dependent NAD+ synthetase from Pseudomonas, which is encoded on an operon with nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase and, in some Pseudomonads, with nicotinamidase.

  12. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction and evolution of an Upper Cretaceous lacustrine-fluvial-deltaic sequence in the Parecis Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubert, Rogerio R.; Mizusaki, Ana Maria Pimentel; Martinelli, Agustín G.; Urban, Camile

    2017-12-01

    The Cretaceous in the Brazilian Platform records events of magmatism, tectonism and sedimentation coupled to the Gondwana breakup. Some of these events are registered as sedimentary sequences in interior basins, such as in the Cretaceous sequence of the Alto Xingu Sub-basin, Parecis Basin, Central Brazil. This article proposes the faciologic characterization and paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the Cretaceous sequence of the eastern portion of the Parecis Basin and its relation with some reactivated structures as, for instance, the Serra Formosa Arch. Based on both data from outcrops and core drillings a paleoenvironmental and evolutionary reconstruction of the sequence is herein presented. The base of the studied section is characterized by chemical and low energy clastic sedimentation of Lake Bottom and Shoreline, in a context of fast initial subsidence and low sedimentation rate. As the subsidence process decreased, a deltaic progradation became dominant with deposition in a prodelta environment, followed by a deltaic front and deltaic plain interbedded with fluvial plain, and aeolian deposition completing the sequence. The inferred Coniacian-Santonian age is based on vertebrate (fishes and notosuchians) and ostracod fossils with regional chrono-correlates in the Adamantina (Bauru Group), Capacete (Sanfranciscana Basin), and Bajo de la Carpa (Neuquén Group, in Argentina) formations. The formation of a Coniacian depocenter in the Alto Xingu Sub-basin is associated to the Turonian-Coniacian reactivation event in the Peruvian Orogenic Phase of the Andean Orogeny, with the transference of stresses to interplate setting, reactivating Proterozoic structures of the basement.

  13. Effects of GSH1 and GSH2 Gene Mutation on Glutathione Synthetases Activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Jia, Haiyan; Zhang, Longmei; Wang, Haiyan; Tang, Hui; Zhang, Liping

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, three mutants from wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae HBU2.558, called U2.558, UN2.558, and UNA2.558, were screened by UV, sodium nitrite, Atmospheric and room temperature plasma, respectively. Glutathione production of the three mutants increased by 41.86, 72.09 and 56.76%, respectively. We detected the activity of glutathione synthetases and found that its activity was improved. Amino acid sequences of three mutant colonies were compared with HBU2.558. Four mutants: Leu51→Pro51 (L51P), Glu62→Val62 (E62V), Ala332→Glu332 (A332E) and Ser653→Gly653 (S653G) were found in the analysis of γ-glutamylcysteine ligase. L51 is located adjacently to the two active sites of GCL/E/Mg 2+ /ADP complex in the overall GCL structure. L51P mutant spread distortion on the β-sheet due to the fact that the φ was changed from -50.4° to -40.2°. A mutant Leu54→Pro54 (L54P) was found in the analysis of glutathione synthetase, and L54 was an amino acid located between an α-helix and a β-sheet. The results confirm that introduction of proline located at the middle of the β-sheet or at the N- or C-terminal between α-helix and β-sheet or, i.e., L51P and L54P, changed the φ, rigidity, hydrophobicity and conformational entropy, thus increased protein stability and improved the enzyme activity.

  14. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a hyperthermophilic adenylosuccinate synthetase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoying; Akasaka, Ryogo; Takemoto, Chie; Morita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Machiko; Terada, Takaho; Shirozu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Chen, Shilin; Si, Shuyi; Xie, Yong

    2011-01-01

    A hyperthermophilic adenylosuccinate synthetase from P. horikoshii OT3, which is 90–120 amino acids shorter than those from the vast majority of organisms, was expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Adenylosuccinate synthetase (AdSS) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step in the conversion of inosine monophosphate (IMP) to adenosine monophosphate (AMP) in the purine-biosynthetic pathway. Although AdSS from the vast majority of organisms is 430–457 amino acids in length, AdSS sequences isolated from thermophilic archaea are 90–120 amino acids shorter. In this study, crystallographic studies of a short AdSS sequence from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 (PhAdSS) were performed in order to reveal the unusual structure of AdSS from thermophilic archaea. Crystals of PhAdSS were obtained by the microbatch-under-oil method and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.50 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the trigonal space group P3 2 12, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.2, c = 107.9 Å. There was one molecule per asymmetric unit, giving a Matthews coefficient of 2.17 Å 3 Da −1 and an approximate solvent content of 43%. In contrast, the results of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analytical ultracentrifugation showed that the recombinant PhAdSS formed a dimer in solution

  15. Novel arenavirus sequences in Hylomyscus sp. and Mus (Nannomys setulosus from Côte d'Ivoire: implications for evolution of arenaviruses in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Coulibaly-N'Golo

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify new arenaviruses and gather insights in the evolution of arenaviruses in Africa. During 2003 through 2005, 1,228 small mammals representing 14 different genera were trapped in 9 villages in south, east, and middle west of Côte d'Ivoire. Specimens were screened by pan-Old World arenavirus RT-PCRs targeting S and L RNA segments as well as immunofluorescence assay. Sequences of two novel tentative species of the family Arenaviridae, Menekre and Gbagroube virus, were detected in Hylomyscus sp. and Mus (Nannomys setulosus, respectively. Arenavirus infection of Mus (Nannomys setulosus was also demonstrated by serological testing. Lassa virus was not found, although 60% of the captured animals were Mastomys natalensis. Complete S RNA and partial L RNA sequences of the novel viruses were recovered from the rodent specimens and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Gbagroube virus is a closely related sister taxon of Lassa virus, while Menekre virus clusters with the Ippy/Mobala/Mopeia virus complex. Reconstruction of possible virus-host co-phylogeny scenarios suggests that, within the African continent, signatures of co-evolution might have been obliterated by multiple host-switching events.

  16. Genome-wide DNA Methylation Profiling by Modified Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing in Brassica rapa Suggests that Epigenetic Modifications Play a Key Role in Polyploid Genome Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun eChen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Brassica rapa includes some of the most important vegetables worldwide as well as oilseed crops. The complete annotated genome sequence confirmed its paleohexaploid origins and provides opportunities for exploring the detailed process of polyploid genome evolution. We generated a genome-wide DNA methylation profile for B. rapa using a modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS method. This sampling represented 2.24% of all CG loci (2.5 x 105, 2.16% CHG (2.7 x 105 and 1.68% CHH loci (1.05 x 105 (where H = A, T or C. Our sampling of DNA methylation in B. rapa indicated that 52.4% of CG sites were present as 5mCG, with 31.8% of CHG and 8.3% of CHH. It was found that genic regions of single copy genes had significantly higher methylation compared to those of two or three copy genes. Differences in degree of genic DNA methylation were observed in a hierarchical relationship corresponding to the relative age of the three ancestral subgenomes, primarily accounted by single-copy genes. RNA-seq analysis revealed that overall the level of transcription was negatively correlated with mean gene methylation content and depended on copy number or associated with the different subgenomes. These results provide new insights into the role epigenetic variation plays in polyploid genome evolution, and suggest an alternative mechanism for duplicate gene loss.

  17. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling by modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing in Brassica rapa suggests that epigenetic modifications play a key role in polyploid genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xun; Ge, Xianhong; Wang, Jing; Tan, Chen; King, Graham J; Liu, Kede

    2015-01-01

    Brassica rapa includes some of the most important vegetables worldwide as well as oilseed crops. The complete annotated genome sequence confirmed its paleohexaploid origins and provides opportunities for exploring the detailed process of polyploid genome evolution. We generated a genome-wide DNA methylation profile for B. rapa using a modified reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) method. This sampling represented 2.24% of all CG loci (2.5 × 10(5)), 2.16% CHG (2.7 × 10(5)), and 1.68% CHH loci (1.05 × 10(5)) (where H = A, T, or C). Our sampling of DNA methylation in B. rapa indicated that 52.4% of CG sites were present as (5m)CG, with 31.8% of CHG and 8.3% of CHH. It was found that genic regions of single copy genes had significantly higher methylation compared to those of two or three copy genes. Differences in degree of genic DNA methylation were observed in a hierarchical relationship corresponding to the relative age of the three ancestral subgenomes, primarily accounted by single-copy genes. RNA-seq analysis revealed that overall the level of transcription was negatively correlated with mean gene methylation content and depended on copy number or was associated with the different subgenomes. These results provide new insights into the role epigenetic variation plays in polyploid genome evolution, and suggest an alternative mechanism for duplicate gene loss.

  18. Time-Sampled Population Sequencing Reveals the Interplay of Selection and Genetic Drift in Experimental Evolution ofPotato Virus Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutnjak, Denis; Elena, Santiago F; Ravnikar, Maja

    2017-08-15

    RNA viruses are one of the fastest-evolving biological entities. Within their hosts, they exist as genetically diverse populations (i.e., viral mutant swarms), which are sculpted by different evolutionary mechanisms, such as mutation, natural selection, and genetic drift, and also the interactions between genetic variants within the mutant swarms. To elucidate the mechanisms that modulate the population diversity of an important plant-pathogenic virus, we performed evolution experiments with Potato virus Y (PVY) in potato genotypes that differ in their defense response against the virus. Using deep sequencing of small RNAs, we followed the temporal dynamics of standing and newly generated variations in the evolving viral lineages. A time-sampled approach allowed us to (i) reconstruct theoretical haplotypes in the starting population by using clustering of single nucleotide polymorphisms' trajectories and (ii) use quantitative population genetics approaches to estimate the contribution of selection and genetic drift, and their interplay, to the evolution of the virus. We detected imprints of strong selective sweeps and narrow genetic bottlenecks, followed by the shift in frequency of selected haplotypes. Comparison of patterns of viral evolution in differently susceptible host genotypes indicated possible diversifying evolution of PVY in the less-susceptible host (efficient in the accumulation of salicylic acid). IMPORTANCE High diversity of within-host populations of RNA viruses is an important aspect of their biology, since they represent a reservoir of genetic variants, which can enable quick adaptation of viruses to a changing environment. This study focuses on an important plant virus, Potato virus Y , and describes, at high resolution, temporal changes in the structure of viral populations within different potato genotypes. A novel and easy-to-implement computational approach was established to cluster single nucleotide polymorphisms into viral haplotypes from

  19. The SAURON project : XV. Modes of star formation in early-type galaxies and the evolution of the red sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapiro, Kristen L.; Falcon-Barroso, Jesus; van de Ven, Glenn; de Zeeuw, P. Tim; Sarzi, Marc; Bacon, Roland; Bolatto, Alberto; Cappellari, Michele; Croton, Darren; Davies, Roger L.; Emsellem, Eric; Fakhouri, Onsi; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Peletier, Reynier F.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; van der Wolk, Guido

    We combine SAURON integral field data of a representative sample of local early-type, red sequence galaxies with Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera imaging in order to investigate the presence of trace star formation in these systems. With the Spitzer data, we identify galaxies hosting low-level star

  20. The SAURON project - XV. Modes of star formation in early-type galaxies and the evolution of the red sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapiro, Kristen L.; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; van de Ven, Glenn; de Zeeuw, P. Tim; Sarzi, Marc; Bacon, Roland; Bolatto, Alberto; Cappellari, Michele; Croton, Darren; Davies, Roger L.; Emsellem, Eric; Fakhouri, Onsi; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Peletier, Reynier F.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; van der Wolk, Guido

    We combine SAURON integral field data of a representative sample of local early-type, red sequence galaxies with Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera imaging in order to investigate the presence of trace star formation in these systems. With the Spitzer data, we identify galaxies hosting low-level star

  1. Genome sequence of the Asian Tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, reveals insights into its biology, genetics, and evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chena, X.G.; Jiang, X.; Gu, J.; Xu, M.; Wu, Y.; Deng, Y.; Zhang, C.; Bonizzoni, M.; Dermauw, W.; Vontas, J.; Armbruster, P.; Huang, X.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, H.; He, W.; Peng, H.; Liu, Y.; Wu, K.; Chen, J.; Lirakis, M.; Topalis, P.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Hall, B.A.; Thorpe, C.; Mueller, R.L.; Sun, C.; Waterhouse, R.M.; Yan, G.; Tu, Z.J.; Fang, X.; James, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a highly successful invasive species that transmits a number of human viral diseases, including dengue and Chikungunya fevers. This species has a large genome with significant population-based size variation. The complete genome sequence was determined

  2. An ITS phylogeny of Leccinum and an analysis of the evolution of minisatellite-like sequences within ITS1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, den H.C.; Gravendeel, B.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2004-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of the European species of Leccinum (Boletales, Boletaceae) were investigated by maximum parsimony, Bayesian and likelihood analyses of nrITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and 28S sequences. The separate gene trees inferred were largely concordant, and their combined analysis indicates that

  3. Genotyping-by-sequencing provides the first well-resolved phylogeny for coffee (Coffea) and insights into the evolution of caffeine content in its species: GBS coffee phylogeny and the evolution of caffeine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon, Perla; Grover, Corrinne E; Davis, Aaron P; Rakotomalala, Jean-Jacques; Raharimalala, Nathalie E; Albert, Victor A; Sreenath, Hosahalli L; Stoffelen, Piet; Mitchell, Sharon E; Couturon, Emmanuel; Hamon, Serge; de Kochko, Alexandre; Crouzillat, Dominique; Rigoreau, Michel; Sumirat, Ucu; Akaffou, Sélastique; Guyot, Romain

    2017-04-01

    A comprehensive and meaningful phylogenetic hypothesis for the commercially important coffee genus (Coffea) has long been a key objective for coffee researchers. For molecular studies, progress has been limited by low levels of sequence divergence, leading to insufficient topological resolution and statistical support in phylogenetic trees, particularly for the major lineages and for the numerous species occurring in Madagascar. We report here the first almost fully resolved, broadly sampled phylogenetic hypothesis for coffee, the result of combining genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) technology with a newly developed, lab-based workflow to integrate short read next-generation sequencing for low numbers of additional samples. Biogeographic patterns indicate either Africa or Asia (or possibly the Arabian Peninsula) as the most likely ancestral locality for the origin of the coffee genus, with independent radiations across Africa, Asia, and the Western Indian Ocean Islands (including Madagascar and Mauritius). The evolution of caffeine, an important trait for commerce and society, was evaluated in light of our phylogeny. High and consistent caffeine content is found only in species from the equatorial, fully humid environments of West and Central Africa, possibly as an adaptive response to increased levels of pest predation. Moderate caffeine production, however, evolved at least one additional time recently (between 2 and 4Mya) in a Madagascan lineage, which suggests that either the biosynthetic pathway was already in place during the early evolutionary history of coffee, or that caffeine synthesis within the genus is subject to convergent evolution, as is also the case for caffeine synthesis in coffee versus tea and chocolate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Biocontrol Strain Bacillus velezensis CC09

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Xunchao; Kang, Xingxing; Xi, Huan; Liu, Changhong; Xue, Yarong

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus velezensis is a heterotypic synonym of B. methylotrophicus, B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum, and Bacillus oryzicola, and has been used to control plant fungal diseases. In order to fully understand the genetic basis of antimicrobial capacities, we did a complete genome sequencing of the endophytic B.?velezensis strain CC09. Genes tightly associated with biocontrol ability, including nonribosomal peptide synthetases, polyketide synthetases, iron acquisition, colonization, and vo...

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Biocontrol Strain Bacillus velezensis CC09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xunchao; Kang, Xingxing; Xi, Huan; Liu, Changhong; Xue, Yarong

    2016-09-29

    Bacillus velezensis is a heterotypic synonym of B. methylotrophicus, B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum, and Bacillus oryzicola, and has been used to control plant fungal diseases. In order to fully understand the genetic basis of antimicrobial capacities, we did a complete genome sequencing of the endophytic B. velezensis strain CC09. Genes tightly associated with biocontrol ability, including nonribosomal peptide synthetases, polyketide synthetases, iron acquisition, colonization, and volatile organic compound synthesis were identified in the genome. Copyright © 2016 Cai et al.

  6. EFFECT OF METALLICITY ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE HABITABLE ZONE FROM THE PRE-MAIN SEQUENCE TO THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND THE SEARCH FOR LIFE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danchi, William C.; Lopez, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    During the course of stellar evolution, the location and width of the habitable zone changes as the luminosity and radius of the star evolves. The duration of habitability for a planet located at a given distance from a star is greatly affected by the characteristics of the host star. A quantification of these effects can be used observationally in the search for life around nearby stars. The longer the duration of habitability, the more likely it is that life has evolved. The preparation of observational techniques aimed at detecting life would benefit from the scientific requirements deduced from the evolution of the habitable zone. We present a study of the evolution of the habitable zone around stars of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 M ☉ for metallicities ranging from Z = 0.0001 to Z = 0.070. We also consider the evolution of the habitable zone from the pre-main sequence until the asymptotic giant branch is reached. We find that metallicity strongly affects the duration of the habitable zone for a planet as well as the distance from the host star where the duration is maximized. For a 1.0 M ☉ star with near solar metallicity, Z = 0.017, the duration of the habitable zone is >10 Gyr at distances 1.2-2.0 AU from the star, whereas the duration is >20 Gyr for high-metallicity stars (Z = 0.070) at distances of 0.7-1.8 AU, and ∼4 Gyr at distances of 1.8-3.3 AU for low-metallicity stars (Z = 0.0001). Corresponding results have been obtained for stars of 1.5 and 2.0 solar masses.

  7. High Throughput Sequencing Analysis of the Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene from Flow-Sorted B Cell Sub-Populations Define the Dynamics of Follicular Lymphoma Clonal Evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Carlotti

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of evolution of Follicular Lymphoma (FL clones during disease progression is important for monitoring and targeting this tumor effectively. Genetic profiling of serial FL biopsies and examples of FL transmission following bone marrow transplant suggest that this disease may evolve by divergent evolution from a common ancestor cell. However where this ancestor cell resides and how it evolves is still unclear. The analysis of the pattern of somatic hypermutation of the immunoglobulin gene (Ig is traditionally used for tracking the physiological clonal evolution of B cells within the germinal center and allows to discriminate those cells that have just entered the germinal center and display features of ancestor cells from those B cells that keep re-circulating across different lymphoid organs. Here we investigated the pattern of somatic hypermutation of the heavy chain of the immunoglobulin gene (IgH-VH in 4 flow-sorted B cells subpopulations belonging to different stages of differentiation, from sequential lymph node biopsies of cases displaying diverse patterns of evolution, using the GS-FLX Titanium sequencing platform. We observed an unexpectedly high level of clonality, with hundreds of distinct tumor subclones in the different subpopulations from the same sample, the majority detected at a frequency <10-2. By using a lineage trees analysis we observed in all our FL and t-FL cases that the oligoclonal FL population was trapped in a narrow intermediate stage of maturation that maintains the capacity to undergo SHM, but was unable to further differentiate. The presence of such a complex architecture highlights challenges currently encountered in finding a cure for this disease.

  8. The Triassic-Liassic volcanic sequence and rift evolution in the Saharan Atlas basins (Algeria). Eastward vanishing of the Central Atlantic magmatic province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meddah, A.; Bertrand, H.; Seddiki, A.; Tabeliouna, M.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the Triassic-Liassic sequence in ten diapirs from the Saharan Atlas (Algeria). Based on detailed mapping, two episodes are identified. The first one consists of a volcano-sedimentary sequence in which three volcanic units were identified (lower, intermediate and upper units). They are interlayered and sometimes imbricated with siliciclastic to evaporitic levels which record syn-sedimentary tectonics. This sequence was deposited in a lagoonal-continental environment and is assigned to the Triassic magmatic rifting stage. The second episode, lacking lava flows (post magmatic rifting stage), consists of carbonate levels deposited in a lagoonal to marine environment during the Rhaetian-Hettangian. The volcanic units consist of several thin basaltic flows, each 0.5 to 1m thick, with a total thickness of 10–15m. The basalts are low-Ti continental tholeiites, displaying enrichment in large ion lithophile elements and light rare earth elements [(La/Yb)n= 2.5-6] with a negative Nb anomaly. Upwards decrease of light-rare-earth-elements enrichment (e.g. La/Yb) is modelled through increasing melting rate of a spinel-bearing lherzolite source from the lower (6–10wt.%) to the upper (15–20wt.%) unit. The lava flows from the Saharan Atlas share the same geochemical characteristics and evolution as those from the Moroccan Atlas assigned to the Central Atlantic magmatic province. They represent the easternmost witness of this large igneous province so far known.

  9. The Triassic-Liassic volcanic sequence and rift evolution in the Saharan Atlas basins (Algeria). Eastward vanishing of the Central Atlantic magmatic province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meddah, A.; Bertrand, H.; Seddiki, A.; Tabeliouna, M.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the Triassic-Liassic sequence in ten diapirs from the Saharan Atlas (Algeria). Based on detailed mapping, two episodes are identified. The first one consists of a volcano-sedimentary sequence in which three volcanic units were identified (lower, intermediate and upper units). They are interlayered and sometimes imbricated with siliciclastic to evaporitic levels which record syn-sedimentary tectonics. This sequence was deposited in a lagoonal-continental environment and is assigned to the Triassic magmatic rifting stage. The second episode, lacking lava flows (post magmatic rifting stage), consists of carbonate levels deposited in a lagoonal to marine environment during the Rhaetian-Hettangian. The volcanic units consist of several thin basaltic flows, each 0.5 to 1m thick, with a total thickness of 10–15m. The basalts are low-Ti continental tholeiites, displaying enrichment in large ion lithophile elements and light rare earth elements [(La/Yb)n= 2.5-6] with a negative Nb anomaly. Upwards decrease of light-rare-earth-elements enrichment (e.g. La/Yb) is modelled through increasing melting rate of a spinel-bearing lherzolite source from the lower (6–10wt.%) to the upper (15–20wt.%) unit. The lava flows from the Saharan Atlas share the same geochemical characteristics and evolution as those from the Moroccan Atlas assigned to the Central Atlantic magmatic province. They represent the easternmost witness of this large igneous province so far known.

  10. Mutations in QARS, Encoding Glutaminyl-tRNA Synthetase, Cause Progressive Microcephaly, Cerebral-Cerebellar Atrophy, and Intractable Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaochang; Ling, Jiqiang; Barcia, Giulia; Jing, Lili; Wu, Jiang; Barry, Brenda J.; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Hill, R. Sean; Weimer, Jill M.; Stein, Quinn; Poduri, Annapurna; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Ville, Dorothée; Dulac, Olivier; Yu, Tim W.; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Servattalab, Sarah; Rodriguez, Jacqueline; Boddaert, Nathalie; Munnich, Arnold; Colleaux, Laurence; Zon, Leonard I.; Söll, Dieter; Walsh, Christopher A.; Nabbout, Rima

    2014-01-01

    Progressive microcephaly is a heterogeneous condition with causes including mutations in genes encoding regulators of neuronal survival. Here, we report the identification of mutations in QARS (encoding glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase [QARS]) as the causative variants in two unrelated families affected by progressive microcephaly, severe seizures in infancy, atrophy of the cerebral cortex and cerebellar vermis, and mild atrophy of the cerebellar hemispheres. Whole-exome sequencing of individuals from each family independently identified compound-heterozygous mutations in QARS as the only candidate causative variants. QARS was highly expressed in the developing fetal human cerebral cortex in many cell types. The four QARS mutations altered highly conserved amino acids, and the aminoacylation activity of QARS was significantly impaired in mutant cell lines. Variants p.Gly45Val and p.Tyr57His were located in the N-terminal domain required for QARS interaction with proteins in the multisynthetase complex and potentially with glutamine tRNA, and recombinant QARS proteins bearing either substitution showed an over 10-fold reduction in aminoacylation activity. Conversely, variants p.Arg403Trp and p.Arg515Trp, each occurring in a different family, were located in the catalytic core and completely disrupted QARS aminoacylation activity in vitro. Furthermore, p.Arg403Trp and p.Arg515Trp rendered QARS less soluble, and p.Arg403Trp disrupted QARS-RARS (arginyl-tRNA synthetase 1) interaction. In zebrafish, homozygous qars loss of function caused decreased brain and eye size and extensive cell death in the brain. Our results highlight the importance of QARS during brain development and that epilepsy due to impairment of QARS activity is unusually severe in comparison to other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase disorders. PMID:24656866

  11. Use of genomics to identify bacterial undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthetase: cloning, expression, and characterization of the essential uppS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, C M; Takács, B; Fountoulakis, M; Stieger, M; Keck, W

    1999-01-01

    The prenyltransferase undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthetase (di-trans,poly-cis-decaprenylcistransferase; EC 2.5.1.31) was purified from the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli by TSK-DEAE, ceramic hydroxyapatite, TSK-ether, Superdex 200, and heparin-Actigel chromatography. The protein was labeled with the photolabile analogue of the farnesyl pyrophosphate analogue (E, E)-[1-3H]-(2-diazo-3-trifluoropropionyloxy)geranyl diphosphate and was detected on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel as a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 29 kDa. This protein band was cut out from the gel, trypsin digested, and subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometric analysis. Comparison of the experimental data with computer-simulated trypsin digest data for all E. coli proteins yielded a single match with a protein of unassigned function (SWISS-PROT Q47675; YAES_ECOLI). Sequences with strong similarity indicative of homology to this protein were identified in 25 bacterial species, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in Caenorhabditis elegans. The homologous genes (uppS) were cloned from E. coli, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, expressed in E. coli as amino-terminal His-tagged fusion proteins, and purified over a Ni2+ affinity column. An untagged version of the E. coli uppS gene was also cloned and expressed, and the protein purified in two chromatographic steps. We were able to detect Upp synthetase activity for all purified enzymes. Further, biochemical characterization revealed no differences between the recombinant untagged E. coli Upp synthetase and the three His-tagged fusion proteins. All enzymes were absolutely Triton X-100 and MgCl2 dependent. With the use of a regulatable gene disruption system, we demonstrated that uppS is essential for growth in S. pneumoniae R6.

  12. Increased hepatic glycogen synthetase and decreased phosphorylase in trained rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Saugmann, P; Richter, Erik

    1979-01-01

    Rats were either physically trained by a 12 wk swimming program or were freely eating or weight matched, sedentary controls. Trained rats had a higher relative liver weight and total hepatic glycogen synthetase (EC 2.4.1.11) activity and a lower phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1) activity than the other...... groups of rats. These changes may partly explain the demonstrated training-induced increase in glucose tolerance. None of the findings could be ascribed to differences in foold intake or body weight....

  13. Phosphorylation and Acetylation of Acyl-CoA Synthetase- I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frahm, Jennifer L; Li, Lei O; Grevengoed, Trisha J

    2011-01-01

    Long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) contributes 50 to 90% of total ACSL activity in liver, adipose tissue, and heart and appears to direct the use of long chain fatty acids for energy. Although the functional importance of ACSL1 is becoming clear, little is understood about its post...... and acetylated amino acids by mass spectrometry. We then compared these results to the post-translational modifications observed in vivo in liver and brown adipose tissue after mice were fasted or exposed to a cold environment. We identified universal N-terminal acetylation, 15 acetylated lysines, and 25...

  14. Seismic - Wireline logs sequence stratigraphic analyses and geologic evolution for the Upper Cretaceous succession of Abu Gharadig basin, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhan, Mohammad Abdelfattah

    2017-05-01

    The Upper Cretaceous megasequence in the northern part of the Egyptian Western Desert has been classified into four 2nd order depositional sequences. These sequences started with the Cenomanian SQ-I topped by the Turonian - Santonian SQ-II. However, both SQ-III and SQ-IV represent the Campanian- Maastrichtian time span. The interpreted 2nd order SQ-I and SQ-II have been further subdivided into six smaller 3rd order sequences (SQ-1 to SQ-6). The depositional history started during the Early Cenomanian times, characterized by wide marine invasion enabled the deposition of the shallow marine Bahariya Formation (SQ-1). The Upper Cenomanian times, witnessed a rapid subsidence, simultaneously with new marine transgressive phase. This is resulted in the deposition of SQ-2, consuming the entire sediments of the Abu Roash G Member. During the Turonian - Coniacian times the northern parts of Egypt showed successive oscillating transgressive - regressive marine cycles led to equivocal sedimentary bodies of the Turonian-Coniacian Abu Roash Formation (SQ-3, SQ-4, and SQ-5). During the Santonian age, the northern parts of Egypt were subjected to tectonic crustal shortening, producing large scale folds. As a result, a new tectonically-overprinted marine depositional cycle started and marked by rapid phase of basin subsidence. This was accompanied by a deep marine invasion covered most of the northern parts of Egyptian lands, depositing the lower parts of the Khoman- B (SQ-6) under transgressive depositional conditions. By the end of Santonian cycle, the upper parts of the Khoman Formation B Member was deposited during a gradual, and slow relative sea level drop ending the deposition of SQ-6. At the beginning of the Campanian - Maastrichtian times, a new widespread sea-level rise associated with basin subsidence. Accordingly, two successive depositional cycles were thus initiated, forming SQ-III and SQ-VI sequences separated by unconformity type-2 boundary (SB-8).

  15. Explaining the luminosity spread in young clusters: proto and pre-main sequence stellar evolution in a molecular cloud environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sigurd S.; Haugbølle, Troels

    2018-02-01

    Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams of star-forming regions show a large luminosity spread. This is incompatible with well-defined isochrones based on classic non-accreting protostellar evolution models. Protostars do not evolve in isolation of their environment, but grow through accretion of gas. In addition, while an age can be defined for a star-forming region, the ages of individual stars in the region will vary. We show how the combined effect of a protostellar age spread, a consequence of sustained star formation in the molecular cloud, and time-varying protostellar accretion for individual protostars can explain the observed luminosity spread. We use a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation including a sub-scale sink particle model of a star-forming region to follow the accretion process of each star. The accretion profiles are used to compute stellar evolution models for each star, incorporating a model of how the accretion energy is distributed to the disc, radiated away at the accretion shock, or incorporated into the outer layers of the protostar. Using a modelled cluster age of 5 Myr, we naturally reproduce the luminosity spread and find good agreement with observations of the Collinder 69 cluster, and the Orion Nebular Cluster. It is shown how stars in binary and multiple systems can be externally forced creating recurrent episodic accretion events. We find that in a realistic global molecular cloud model massive stars build up mass over relatively long time-scales. This leads to an important conceptual change compared to the classic picture of non-accreting stellar evolution segmented into low-mass Hayashi tracks and high-mass Henyey tracks.

  16. All 37 Mitochondrial Genes of Aphid Aphis craccivora Obtained from Transcriptome Sequencing: Implications for the Evolution of Aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nan; Zhang, Hao; Li, Hu; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-01-01

    The availability of mitochondrial genome data for Aphididae, one of the economically important insect pest families, in public databases is limited. The advent of next generation sequencing technology provides the potential to generate mitochondrial genome data for many species timely and cost-effectively. In this report, we used transcriptome sequencing technology to determine all the 37 mitochondrial genes of the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora. This method avoids the necessity of finding suitable primers for long PCRs or primer-walking amplicons, and is proved to be effective in obtaining the whole set of mitochondrial gene data for insects with difficulty in sequencing mitochondrial genome by PCR-based strategies. Phylogenetic analyses of aphid mitochondrial genome data show clustering based on tribe level, and strongly support the monophyly of the family Aphididae. Within the monophyletic Aphidini, three samples from Aphis grouped together. In another major clade of Aphididae, Pterocomma pilosum was recovered as a potential sister-group of Cavariella salicicola, as part of Macrosiphini.

  17. All 37 Mitochondrial Genes of Aphid Aphis craccivora Obtained from Transcriptome Sequencing: Implications for the Evolution of Aphids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Song

    Full Text Available The availability of mitochondrial genome data for Aphididae, one of the economically important insect pest families, in public databases is limited. The advent of next generation sequencing technology provides the potential to generate mitochondrial genome data for many species timely and cost-effectively. In this report, we used transcriptome sequencing technology to determine all the 37 mitochondrial genes of the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora. This method avoids the necessity of finding suitable primers for long PCRs or primer-walking amplicons, and is proved to be effective in obtaining the whole set of mitochondrial gene data for insects with difficulty in sequencing mitochondrial genome by PCR-based strategies. Phylogenetic analyses of aphid mitochondrial genome data show clustering based on tribe level, and strongly support the monophyly of the family Aphididae. Within the monophyletic Aphidini, three samples from Aphis grouped together. In another major clade of Aphididae, Pterocomma pilosum was recovered as a potential sister-group of Cavariella salicicola, as part of Macrosiphini.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution and phylogeny of the Atlantic Alcidae, including the extinct great auk (Pinguinus impennis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moum, Truls; Arnason, Ulfur; Arnason, Einar

    2002-09-01

    The Atlantic auk assemblage includes four extant species, razorbill (Alca torda), dovekie (Alle alle), common murre (Uria aalge), and thick-billed murre (U. lomvia), and one recently extinct species, the flightless great auk (Pinguinus impennis). To determine the phylogenetic relationships among the species, a contiguous 4.2-kb region of the mitochondrial genome from the extant species was amplified using PCR. This region included one ribosomal RNA gene, four transfer RNA genes, two protein-coding genes, the control region, and intergenic spacers. Sets of PCR primers for amplifying the same region from great auk were designed from sequences of the extant species. The authenticity of the great auk sequence was ascertained by alternative amplifications, cloning, and separate analyses in an independent laboratory. Phylogenetic analyses of the entire assemblage, made possible by the great auk sequence, fully resolved the phylogenetic relationships and split it into two primary lineages, Uria versus Alle, Alca, and Pinguinus. A sister group relationship was identified between Alca and Pinguinus to the exclusion of ALLE: Phylogenetically, the flightless great auk originated late relative to other divergences within the assemblage. This suggests that three highly divergent species in terms of adaptive specializations, Alca, Alle, and Pinguinus, evolved from a single lineage in the Atlantic Ocean, in a process similar to the initial adaptive radiation of alcids in the Pacific Ocean.

  19. Sequence, structure and function relationships in flaviviruses as assessed by evolutive aspects of its conserved non-structural protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Néli José; Lima Afonso, Marcelo Querino; Pedersolli, Natan Gonçalves; de Oliveira, Lucas Carrijo; Andrade, Dhiego Souto; Bleicher, Lucas

    2017-10-28

    Flaviviruses are responsible for serious diseases such as dengue, yellow fever, and zika fever. Their genomes encode a polyprotein which, after cleavage, results in three structural and seven non-structural proteins. Homologous proteins can be studied by conservation and coevolution analysis as detected in multiple sequence alignments, usually reporting positions which are strictly necessary for the structure and/or function of all members in a protein family or which are involved in a specific sub-class feature requiring the coevolution of residue sets. This study provides a complete conservation and coevolution analysis on all flaviviruses non-structural proteins, with results mapped on all well-annotated available sequences. A literature review on the residues found in the analysis enabled us to compile available information on their roles and distribution among different flaviviruses. Also, we provide the mapping of conserved and coevolved residues for all sequences currently in SwissProt as a supplementary material, so that particularities in different viruses can be easily analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA; Anderson, John Christopher [San Diego, CA; Chin, Jason W [San Diego, CA; Liu, David R [Lexington, MA; Magliery, Thomas J [North Haven, CT; Meggers, Eric L [Philadelphia, PA; Mehl, Ryan Aaron [San Diego, CA; Pastrnak, Miro [San Diego, CA; Santoro, Stephen William [San Diego, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2011-09-06

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  1. The early history of tRNA recognition by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    2006-10-04

    Oct 4, 2006 ... of these enzymes for correct genetic code expression as well as early structural data and related enzymology will be reviewed. Despite structural diversity, all synthetases follow a two-step mechanism for tRNA aminoacylation. Specificity, however, is not absolute since synthetases were shown to catalyze ...

  2. [The anti-synthetase syndrome: muscle disease and multisystem disorder at the same time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengstman, G.J.D.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2003-01-01

    In three women, aged 60, 45 and 38 years, who presented with exertional dyspnoea (due to lung fibrosis) and Raynaud's phenomenon, dermatomyopathy and Raynaud's phenomenon, and symmetrical arthralgia and myalgia, respectively, the anti-synthetase syndrome was diagnosed. The anti-synthetase syndrome

  3. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA; Anderson, John Christopher [San Diego, CA; Chin, Jason [Cambridge, GB; Liu, David R [Lexington, MA; Magliery, Thomas J [North Haven, CT; Meggers, Eric L [Philadelphia, PA; Mehl, Ryan Aaron [Lancaster, PA; Pastrnak, Miro [San Diego, CA; Santoro, Steven William [Cambridge, MA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2008-04-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  4. A Model of Proteostatic Energy Cost and Its Use in Analysis of Proteome Trends and Sequence Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2014-01-01

    . The proteostatic selection pressure is stronger at low metabolic rates (i.e. scarce environments) and in hot habitats, explaining proteome adaptations towards rough environments as a question of energy. The model may also explain several trade-offs observed in protein evolution and suggests how protein properties......, temperature, resource availability, and turnover rates in one simple framework. We then explore the ansatz that the chemical energy remaining after proteostatic maintenance is available for reproduction (or cell division) and thus, proportional to organism fitness. Selection for lower proteostatic costs...

  5. The genome sequence of Pseudoplusia includens single nucleopolyhedrovirus and an analysis of p26 gene evolution in the baculoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craveiro, Saluana R; Inglis, Peter W; Togawa, Roberto C; Grynberg, Priscila; Melo, Fernando L; Ribeiro, Zilda Maria A; Ribeiro, Bergmann M; Báo, Sônia N; Castro, Maria Elita B

    2015-02-25

    Pseudoplusia includens single nucleopolyhedrovirus (PsinSNPV-IE) is a baculovirus recently identified in our laboratory, with high pathogenicity to the soybean looper, Chrysodeixis includens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) (Walker, 1858). In Brazil, the C. includens caterpillar is an emerging pest and has caused significant losses in soybean and cotton crops. The PsinSNPV genome was determined and the phylogeny of the p26 gene within the family Baculoviridae was investigated. The complete genome of PsinSNPV was sequenced (Roche 454 GS FLX - Titanium platform), annotated and compared with other Alphabaculoviruses, displaying a genome apparently different from other baculoviruses so far sequenced. The circular double-stranded DNA genome is 139,132 bp in length, with a GC content of 39.3 % and contains 141 open reading frames (ORFs). PsinSNPV possesses the 37 conserved baculovirus core genes, 102 genes found in other baculoviruses and 2 unique ORFs. Two baculovirus repeat ORFs (bro) homologs, bro-a (Psin33) and bro-b (Psin69), were identified and compared with Chrysodeixis chalcites nucleopolyhedrovirus (ChchNPV) and Trichoplusia ni single nucleopolyhedrovirus (TnSNPV) bro genes and showed high similarity, suggesting that these genes may be derived from an ancestor common to these viruses. The homologous repeats (hrs) are absent from the PsinSNPV genome, which is also the case in ChchNPV and TnSNPV. Two p26 gene homologs (p26a and p26b) were found in the PsinSNPV genome. P26 is thought to be required for optimal virion occlusion in the occlusion bodies (OBs), but its function is not well characterized. The P26 phylogenetic tree suggests that this gene was obtained from three independent acquisition events within the Baculoviridae family. The presence of a signal peptide only in the PsinSNPV p26a/ORF-20 homolog indicates distinct function between the two P26 proteins. PsinSNPV has a genomic sequence apparently different from other baculoviruses sequenced so far. The complete

  6. High-throughput sequencing of transposable element insertions suggests adaptive evolution of the invasive Asian tiger mosquito towards temperate environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubert, Clement; Henri, Helene; Minard, Guillaume; Valiente Moro, Claire; Mavingui, Patrick; Vieira, Cristina; Boulesteix, Matthieu

    2017-08-01

    Invasive species represent unique opportunities to evaluate the role of local adaptation during colonization of new environments. Among these species, the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a threatening vector of several human viral diseases, including dengue and chikungunya, and raises concerns about the Zika fever. Its broad presence in both temperate and tropical environments has been considered the reflection of great "ecological plasticity." However, no study has been conducted to assess the role of adaptive evolution in the ecological success of Ae. albopictus at the molecular level. In the present study, we performed a genomic scan to search for potential signatures of selection leading to local adaptation in one-hundred-forty field-collected mosquitoes from native populations of Vietnam and temperate invasive populations of Europe. High-throughput genotyping of transposable element insertions led to the discovery of more than 120,000 polymorphic loci, which, in their great majority, revealed a virtual absence of structure between the biogeographic areas. Nevertheless, 92 outlier loci showed a high level of differentiation between temperate and tropical populations. The majority of these loci segregate at high insertion frequencies among European populations, indicating that this pattern could have been caused by recent adaptive evolution events in temperate areas. An analysis of the overlapping and neighbouring genes highlighted several candidates, including diapause, lipid and juvenile hormone pathways. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. DNA spontaneous mutation and its role in the evolution of GC-content: assessing the impact of the genetic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-03-28

    The structure of DNA is not constantly at its equilibrium point but evolves with time. It is generally accepted that evolution induces a decrease of the guanine-cytosine (GC) content and a concomitant increase of the adenine-thymine (AT) ratio through a biased GC → AT mutation process. Unfortunately, the mechanism behind this natural alteration of the stored genetic information is not fully understood. Here, we use a hybrid QM:QM' approach to assess the link between one of the sources of the spontaneous mutation, the so-called G*C* rare tautomers that arise from a double proton exchange between the bases, and the evolution of the GC-content. Our simulations indicate that the G*C* mutation is mainly accumulated in GC-rich regions rather than being randomly spread, and consequently the GC → AT error tends to locate in coding fragments. That specific preference is indirectly induced by the base pairs containing the mutated point, as they tune the structure of the first hydration-shell that solvates the reactive base pair undergoing tautomerisation. The reorganisation of the explicit water molecules eventually modifies the energy barriers as well as the stability of the genetic error during the process.

  8. A Topical Trajectory on Survival: an Analysis of Link-Making in a Sequence of Lessons on Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocksén, Miranda; Olander, Clas

    2017-04-01

    This study explores the concept of link-making in relation to communicative strategies applied in the teaching and studying of biological evolution. The analysis focused on video recordings of 11 lessons on biological evolution conducted in a Swedish 9th grade class of students aged 15 years. It reveals how the teacher and students connected classroom conversations, the frequency of references to conversations in whole-class settings, and the development of a theme focusing on species survival and extinction. Detailed examples from the data illustrate how this theme developed from its initiation during the first lesson, through discussion and clarification, to its wrapping up during the last lesson. They further illustrate how students made sense of what the teacher said and wrote, and how the teacher postponed issues, explained and developed topics, provided opportunities for link-making, organised the class, motivated students, and checked their understanding. The study's methodological approach offers a way of including several time dimensions within research. Based on our findings, we conclude that the excerpts examined here did succeed in building `islands of coherence' in the co-construction of curricular content. Moreover, the topical trajectory in relation to species survival provided opportunities for constructing a `scientific story' in the classroom.

  9. Complete sequences of organelle genomes from the medicinal plant Rhazya stricta (Apocynaceae) and contrasting patterns of mitochondrial genome evolution across asterids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongjun; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Sabir, Jamal S M; Mutwakil, Mohammed H Z; Baeshen, Mohammed N; Sabir, Meshaal J; Baeshen, Nabih A; Jansen, Robert K

    2014-05-28

    Rhazya stricta is native to arid regions in South Asia and the Middle East and is used extensively in folk medicine to treat a wide range of diseases. In addition to generating genomic resources for this medicinally important plant, analyses of the complete plastid and mitochondrial genomes and a nuclear transcriptome from Rhazya provide insights into inter-compartmental transfers between genomes and the patterns of evolution among eight asterid mitochondrial genomes. The 154,841 bp plastid genome is highly conserved with gene content and order identical to the ancestral organization of angiosperms. The 548,608 bp mitochondrial genome exhibits a number of phenomena including the presence of recombinogenic repeats that generate a multipartite organization, transferred DNA from the plastid and nuclear genomes, and bidirectional DNA transfers between the mitochondrion and the nucleus. The mitochondrial genes sdh3 and rps14 have been transferred to the nucleus and have acquired targeting presequences. In the case of rps14, two copies are present in the nucleus; only one has a mitochondrial targeting presequence and may be functional. Phylogenetic analyses of both nuclear and mitochondrial copies of rps14 across angiosperms suggests Rhazya has experienced a single transfer of this gene to the nucleus, followed by a duplication event. Furthermore, the phylogenetic distribution of gene losses and the high level of sequence divergence in targeting presequences suggest multiple, independent transfers of both sdh3 and rps14 across asterids. Comparative analyses of mitochondrial genomes of eight sequenced asterids indicates a complicated evolutionary history in this large angiosperm clade with considerable diversity in genome organization and size, repeat, gene and intron content, and amount of foreign DNA from the plastid and nuclear genomes. Organelle genomes of Rhazya stricta provide valuable information for improving the understanding of mitochondrial genome evolution

  10. A case of severe glutathione synthetase deficiency with novel GSS mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Xia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione synthetase deficiency (GSSD is a rare inborn error of glutathione metabolism with autosomal recessive inheritance. The severe form of the disease is characterized by acute metabolic acidosis, usually present in the neonatal period with hemolytic anemia and progressive encephalopathy. A case of a male newborn infant who had severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap, hemolytic anemia, and hyperbilirubinemia is reported. A high level of 5-oxoproline was detected in his urine and a diagnosis of generalized GSSD was made. DNA sequence analysis revealed the infant to be compound heterozygous with two mutations, c.738dupG in exon 8 of GSS gene resulting in p.S247fs and a repetitive sequence in exon 3 of GSS gene. Treatment after diagnosis of GSSD included supplementation with antioxidants and oral sodium hydrogen bicarbonate. However, he maintained a variable degree of metabolic acidosis and succumbed shortly after his parents requested discontinuation of therapy because of dismal prognosis and medical futility when he was 18 days old.

  11. A case of severe glutathione synthetase deficiency with novel GSS mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, H.; Ye, J.; Wang, L.; Zhu, J.; He, Z.

    2018-01-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency (GSSD) is a rare inborn error of glutathione metabolism with autosomal recessive inheritance. The severe form of the disease is characterized by acute metabolic acidosis, usually present in the neonatal period with hemolytic anemia and progressive encephalopathy. A case of a male newborn infant who had severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap, hemolytic anemia, and hyperbilirubinemia is reported. A high level of 5-oxoproline was detected in his urine and a diagnosis of generalized GSSD was made. DNA sequence analysis revealed the infant to be compound heterozygous with two mutations, c.738dupG in exon 8 of GSS gene resulting in p.S247fs and a repetitive sequence in exon 3 of GSS gene. Treatment after diagnosis of GSSD included supplementation with antioxidants and oral sodium hydrogen bicarbonate. However, he maintained a variable degree of metabolic acidosis and succumbed shortly after his parents requested discontinuation of therapy because of dismal prognosis and medical futility when he was 18 days old. PMID:29340523

  12. Pristinamycin I biosynthesis in Streptomyces pristinaespiralis: molecular characterization of the first two structural peptide synthetase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Crécy-Lagard, V; Blanc, V; Gil, P; Naudin, L; Lorenzon, S; Famechon, A; Bamas-Jacques, N; Crouzet, J; Thibaut, D

    1997-01-01

    Two genes involved in the biosynthesis of the depsipeptide antibiotics pristinamycins I (PI) produced by Streptomyces pristinaespiralis were cloned and sequenced. The 1.7-kb snbA gene encodes a 3-hydroxypicolinic acid:AMP ligase, and the 7.7-kb snbC gene encodes PI synthetase 2, responsible for incorporating L-threonine and L-aminobutyric acid in the PI macrocycle. snbA and snbC, which encode the two first structural enzymes of PI synthesis, are not contiguous. Both genes are located in PI-specific transcriptional units, as disruption of one gene or the other led to PI-deficient strains producing normal levels of the polyunsaturated macrolactone antibiotic pristinamycin II, also produced by S. pristinaespiralis. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that the SnbA protein is a member of the adenylate-forming enzyme superfamily and that the SnbC protein contains two amino acid-incorporating modules and a C-terminal epimerization domain. A model for the initiation of PI synthesis analogous to the established model of initiation of fatty acid synthesis is proposed. PMID:9006024

  13. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of the threadfin cichlid (Petrochromis trewavasae and the blunthead cichlid (Tropheus moorii and patterns of mitochondrial genome evolution in cichlid fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Fischer

    Full Text Available The cichlid fishes of the East African Great Lakes represent a model especially suited to study adaptive radiation and speciation. With several African cichlid genome projects being in progress, a promising set of closely related genomes is emerging, which is expected to serve as a valuable data base to solve questions on genotype-phenotype relations. The mitochondrial (mt genomes presented here are the first results of the assembly and annotation process for two closely related but eco-morphologically highly distinct Lake Tanganyika cichlids, Petrochromis trewavasae and Tropheus moorii. The genomic sequences comprise 16,588 bp (P. trewavasae and 16,590 bp (T. moorii, and exhibit the typical mitochondrial structure, with 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and a non-coding control region. Analyses confirmed that the two species are very closely related with an overall sequence similarity of 96%. We analyzed the newly generated sequences in the phylogenetic context of 21 published labroid fish mitochondrial genomes. Consistent with other vertebrates, the D-loop region was found to evolve faster than protein-coding genes, which in turn are followed by the rRNAs; the tRNAs vary greatly in the rate of sequence evolution, but on average evolve the slowest. Within the group of coding genes, ND6 evolves most rapidly. Codon usage is similar among examined cichlid tribes and labroid families; although a slight shift in usage patterns down the gene tree could be observed. Despite having a clearly different nucleotide composition, ND6 showed a similar codon usage. C-terminal ends of Cox1 exhibit variations, where the varying number of amino acids is related to the structure of the obtained phylogenetic tree. This variation may be of functional relevance for Cox1 synthesis.

  14. Replacement of the folC gene, encoding folylpolyglutamate synthetase-dihydrofolate synthetase in Escherichia coli, with genes mutagenized in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, C; Bognar, A L

    1992-03-01

    The folylpolyglutamate synthetase-dihydrofolate synthetase gene (folC) in Escherichia coli was deleted from the bacterial chromosome and replaced by a selectable Kmr marker. The deletion strain required a complementing gene expressing folylpolyglutamate synthetase encoded on a plasmid for viability, indicating that folC is an essential gene in E. coli. The complementing folC gene was cloned into the vector pPM103 (pSC101, temperature sensitive for replication), which segregated spontaneously at 42 degrees C in the absence of selection. This complementing plasmid was replaced in the folC deletion strain by compatible pUC plasmids containing folC genes with mutations generated in vitro, producing strains which express only mutant folylpolyglutamate synthetase. Mutant folC genes expressing insufficient enzyme activity could not complement the chromosomal deletion, resulting in retention of the pPM103 plasmid. Some mutant genes expressing low levels of enzyme activity replaced the complementing plasmid, but the strains produced were auxotrophic for products of folate-dependent pathways. The folylpolyglutamate synthetase gene from Lactobacillus casei, which may lack dihydrofolate synthetase activity, replaced the complementing plasmid, but the strain was auxotrophic for all folate end products.

  15. Genetic Diversity and Phylogenetic Evolution of Tibetan Sheep Based on mtDNA D-Loop Sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbin Liu

    Full Text Available The molecular and population genetic evidence of the phylogenetic status of the Tibetan sheep (Ovis aries is not well understood, and little is known about this species' genetic diversity. This knowledge gap is partly due to the difficulty of sample collection. This is the first work to address this question. Here, the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship of 636 individual Tibetan sheep from fifteen populations were assessed using 642 complete sequences of the mitochondrial DNA D-loop. Samples were collected from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau area in China, and reference data were obtained from the six reference breed sequences available in GenBank. The length of the sequences varied considerably, between 1031 and 1259 bp. The haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity were 0.992±0.010 and 0.019±0.001, respectively. The average number of nucleotide differences was 19.635. The mean nucleotide composition of the 350 haplotypes was 32.961% A, 29.708% T, 22.892% C, 14.439% G, 62.669% A+T, and 37.331% G+C. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all four previously defined haplogroups (A, B, C, and D were found in the 636 individuals of the fifteen Tibetan sheep populations but that only the D haplogroup was found in Linzhou sheep. Further, the clustering analysis divided the fifteen Tibetan sheep populations into at least two clusters. The estimation of the demographic parameters from the mismatch analyses showed that haplogroups A, B, and C had at least one demographic expansion in Tibetan sheep. These results contribute to the knowledge of Tibetan sheep populations and will help inform future conservation programs about the Tibetan sheep native to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

  16. The Genome Sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the Role of Genome Evolution in Cold-adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Michelle A.; Lauro, Federico M.; Williams, Timothy J.; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S.; De Francisci, David; Chong, Kevin W.Y.; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H.; De Maere, Matthew Z.; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michelle; Lapidus, Alla; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five tiered Evidence Rating system that ranked annotations from Evidence Rating (ER) 1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis COG genes are over-represented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are over-represented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two over-represented COG categories appear to have been acquired from {var_epsilon}- and {delta}-proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they play an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have

  17. Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency pre and post newborn screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraka R. Donti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiency. The typical presentation described in the medical literature is of neonatal onset within hours to weeks of birth with emesis, hypotonia, lethargy, seizures, metabolic ketolactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, developmental delay, skin rash and alopecia. The condition is screened for by newborn screening (NBS tandem mass spectroscopy by elevated hydroxypentanoylcarnitine on dried blood spots. Urine organic acid profile may demonstrate elevated lactic, 3-OH isovaleric, 3-OH propionic, 3-MCC, methylcitric acids, and tiglylglycine consistent with loss of function of the above carboxylases. Here we describe a cohort of patients, 2 diagnosed pre-NBS and 3 post-NBS with broad differences in initial presentation and phenotype. In addition, prior to the advent of NBS, there are isolated reports of late-onset holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the medical literature, which describe patients diagnosed between 1 and 8 years of life, however to our knowledge there are no reports of late-onset HCLS being missed by NBS. Also we report two cases, each with novel pathogenic variants HCLS, diagnosed at age 3 years and 21 months respectively. The first patient had a normal newborn screen whilst the second had an abnormal newborn screen but was misdiagnosed as 3-methylcrotonylcarboxylase (3-MCC deficiency and subsequently lost to follow-up until they presented again with severe metabolic acidosis.

  18. Purification and properties of the dihydrofolate synthetase from Serratia indica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masamichi; Iwai, Kazuo

    1976-01-01

    The dihydrofolate synthetase (EC6.3.2.12) responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of dihydrofolic acid from dihydropteroic acid and L-glutamic acid was purified about 130-fold from extracts of Serratia indica IFO 3759 by ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography, Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, and DEAE-cellulose column chromatography. The enzyme preparation obtained was shown to be homogeneous by DEAE-cellulose column chromatography and ultracentrifugal analysis. The sedimentation coefficient of this enzyme was 3.9 S, and the molecular weight was determined to be about 47,000 by Sephadex G-100. The optimum pH for the reaction was 9.0. The enzymatic reaction required dihydropteroate, L-glutamate and ATP as substrates, and Mg 2+ and K + as cofactors. γ-L-Glutamyl-L-glutamic acid cannot replace L-glutamic acid as the substrate. Neither pteroic acid nor tetrahydropteroic acid can be used as the substrate. ATP was partially replaced by ITP or GTP. The enzyme reaction was inhibited by the addition of ADP, but not by AMP. One mole of dihydrofolate, 1 mole of ADP and 1 mole of orthophosphate were produced from each 1 mole of dihydropteroic acid, L-glutamic acid, and ATP. These results suggest that the systematic name for the dihydrofolate synthetase is 7,8-dihydropteroate: L-glutamate ligase (ADP). (auth.)

  19. Sequence Classification: 521551 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|51473447|ref|YP_067204.1| Alanine:alanine... ligase (ADP-forming).; Alanylalanine synthetase.; D-Ala-D-Ala synthetase.; D-alanine--D-alanine ligase; D-alanyl-D-alanine... synthetase.; D-alanylalanine synthetase. || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/51473447 ...

  20. Defense mechanisms against herbivory in Picea: sequence evolution and expression regulation of gene family members in the phenylpropanoid pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porth Ilga

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In trees, a substantial amount of carbon is directed towards production of phenolics for development and defense. This metabolic pathway is also a major factor in resistance to insect pathogens in spruce. In such gene families, environmental stimuli may have an important effect on the evolutionary fate of duplicated genes, and different expression patterns may indicate functional diversification. Results Gene families in spruce (Picea have expanded to superfamilies, including O-methyltransferases, cytochrome-P450, and dirigents/classIII-peroxidases. Neo-functionalization of superfamily members from different clades is reflected in expression diversification. Genetical genomics can provide new insights into the genetic basis and evolution of insect resistance in plants. Adopting this approach, we merged genotype data (252 SNPs in a segregating pedigree, gene expression levels (for 428 phenylpropanoid-related genes and measures of susceptibility to Pissodes stobi, using a partial-diallel crossing-design with white spruce (Picea glauca. Thirty-eight expressed phenylpropanoid-related genes co-segregated with weevil susceptibility, indicating either causative or reactive effects of these genes to weevil resistance. We identified eight regulatory genomic regions with extensive overlap of quantitative trait loci from susceptibility and growth phenotypes (pQTLs and expression QTL (eQTL hotspots. In particular, SNPs within two different CCoAOMT loci regulate phenotypic variation from a common set of 24 genes and three resistance traits. Conclusions Pest resistance was associated with individual candidate genes as well as with trans-regulatory hotspots along the spruce genome. Our results showed that specific genes within the phenylpropanoid pathway have been duplicated and diversified in the conifer in a process fundamentally different from short-lived angiosperm species. These findings add to the information about the role of the

  1. High-resolution comparative mapping among man, cattle and mouse suggests a role for repeat sequences in mammalian genome evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe François

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative mapping provides new insights into the evolutionary history of genomes. In particular, recent studies in mammals have suggested a role for segmental duplication in genome evolution. In some species such as Drosophila or maize, transposable elements (TEs have been shown to be involved in chromosomal rearrangements. In this work, we have explored the presence of interspersed repeats in regions of chromosomal rearrangements, using an updated high-resolution integrated comparative map among cattle, man and mouse. Results The bovine, human and mouse comparative autosomal map has been constructed using data from bovine genetic and physical maps and from FISH-mapping studies. We confirm most previous results but also reveal some discrepancies. A total of 211 conserved segments have been identified between cattle and man, of which 33 are new segments and 72 correspond to extended, previously known segments. The resulting map covers 91% and 90% of the human and bovine genomes, respectively. Analysis of breakpoint regions revealed a high density of species-specific interspersed repeats in the human and mouse genomes. Conclusion Analysis of the breakpoint regions has revealed specific repeat density patterns, suggesting that TEs may have played a significant role in chromosome evolution and genome plasticity. However, we cannot rule out that repeats and breakpoints accumulate independently in the few same regions where modifications are better tolerated. Likewise, we cannot ascertain whether increased TE density is the cause or the consequence of chromosome rearrangements. Nevertheless, the identification of high density repeat clusters combined with a well-documented repeat phylogeny should highlight probable breakpoints, and permit their precise dating. Combining new statistical models taking the present information into account should help reconstruct ancestral karyotypes.

  2. Genome sequence of the Asian Tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, reveals insights into its biology, genetics, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Guang; Jiang, Xuanting; Gu, Jinbao; Xu, Meng; Wu, Yang; Deng, Yuhua; Zhang, Chi; Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Dermauw, Wannes; Vontas, John; Armbruster, Peter; Huang, Xin; Yang, Yulan; Zhang, Hao; He, Weiming; Peng, Hongjuan; Liu, Yongfeng; Wu, Kun; Chen, Jiahua; Lirakis, Manolis; Topalis, Pantelis; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Hall, Andrew Brantley; Jiang, Xiaofang; Thorpe, Chevon; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge; Sun, Cheng; Waterhouse, Robert Michael; Yan, Guiyun; Tu, Zhijian Jake; Fang, Xiaodong; James, Anthony A

    2015-11-03

    The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a highly successful invasive species that transmits a number of human viral diseases, including dengue and Chikungunya fevers. This species has a large genome with significant population-based size variation. The complete genome sequence was determined for the Foshan strain, an established laboratory colony derived from wild mosquitoes from southeastern China, a region within the historical range of the origin of the species. The genome comprises 1,967 Mb, the largest mosquito genome sequenced to date, and its size results principally from an abundance of repetitive DNA classes. In addition, expansions of the numbers of members in gene families involved in insecticide-resistance mechanisms, diapause, sex determination, immunity, and olfaction also contribute to the larger size. Portions of integrated flavivirus-like genomes support a shared evolutionary history of association of these viruses with their vector. The large genome repertory may contribute to the adaptability and success of Ae. albopictus as an invasive species.

  3. Population Structure and Evolution of Non-O1/Non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by Multilocus Sequence Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Connie; Leung, Queenie; Ahsan, Sunjukta; Reeves, Peter R.; Nair, G. Balakrish; Lan, Ruiting

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic non-O1/non-O139 Vibrio cholerae strains can cause sporadic outbreaks of cholera worldwide. In this study, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of seven housekeeping genes was applied to 55 non-O1/non-O139 isolates from clinical and environmental sources. Data from five published O1 isolates and 17 genomes were also included, giving a total of 77 isolates available for analysis. There were 66 sequence types (STs), with the majority being unique, and only three clonal complexes. The V. cholerae strains can be divided into four subpopulations with evidence of recombination among the subpopulations. Subpopulations I and III contained predominantly clinical strains. PCR screening for virulence factors including Vibrio pathogenicity island (VPI), cholera toxin prophage (CTXΦ), type III secretion system (T3SS), and enterotoxin genes (rtxA and sto/stn) showed that combinations of these factors were present in the clinical isolates with 85.7% having rtxA, 51.4% T3SS, 31.4% VPI, 31.4% sto/stn (NAG-ST) and 11.4% CTXΦ. These factors were also present in environmental isolates but at a lower frequency. Five strains previously mis-identified as V. cholerae serogroups O114 to O117 were also analysed and formed a separate population with V. mimicus. The MLST scheme developed in this study provides a framework to identify sporadic cholera isolates by genetic identity. PMID:23776471

  4. AFLP and DNA sequence variation in an Andean domesticate, pepino (Solanum muricatum, Solanaceae): implications for evolution and domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanca, José M; Prohens, Jaime; Anderson, Gregory J; Zuriaga, Elena; Cañizares, Joaquín; Nuez, Fernando

    2007-07-01

    The pepino (Solanum muricatum) is a vegetatively propagated, domesticated native of the Andes, where it grows with wild relatives. We used AFLPs and a 1-kb sequence of the 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase gene to study variation of 27 accessions of S. muricatum and 35 collections of 10 species of wild relatives (Solanum section Basarthrum). A total of 298 AFLP fragments and 29 DNA sequence haplotypes were detected. Cluster and principal coordinate analyses and other genetic parameters estimated from both types of markers, show that S. muricatum is closely related to the species from one of the series (Caripensia) of section Basarthrum and that >90% of the variation of the cultigen is also represented in that series. Pepino is highly diverse, either because it is not monophyletic or it has been subjected to regular introgression with wild species, or both. Although a continuous distribution of the genetic variation occurred within the cultivated species, three genetic clusters were recognized. Cluster 1 is mostly centered in Ecuador, cluster 2 in Ecuador and Peru, and cluster 3 in Colombia and Ecuador. Cluster 3 also includes all modern cultivars studied. These results and other evidence suggest that northern Ecuador/southern Colombia is the main center of pepino diversity and the center of origin. The high genetic variation of this cultigen indicates that domestication does not always produce a genetic bottleneck.

  5. A Markov chain Monte Carlo Expectation Maximization Algorithm for Statistical Analysis of DNA Sequence Evolution with Neighbor-Dependent Substitution Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Asger

    2008-01-01

    -dimensional integrals required in the EM algorithm are estimated using MCMC sampling. The MCMC sampler requires simulation of sample paths from a continuous time Markov process, conditional on the beginning and ending states and the paths of the neighboring sites. An exact path sampling algorithm is developed......The evolution of DNA sequences can be described by discrete state continuous time Markov processes on a phylogenetic tree. We consider neighbor-dependent evolutionary models where the instantaneous rate of substitution at a site depends on the states of the neighboring sites. Neighbor......-dependent substitution models are analytically intractable and must be analyzed using either approximate or simulation-based methods. We describe statistical inference of neighbor-dependent models using a Markov chain Monte Carlo expectation maximization (MCMC-EM) algorithm. In the MCMC-EM algorithm, the high...

  6. Evolution of electric communication signals in the South American ghost knifefishes (Gymnotiformes: Apteronotidae): A phylogenetic comparative study using a sequence-based phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam R.; Proffitt, Melissa R.; Ho, Winnie W.; Mullaney, Claire B.; Maldonado-Ocampo, Javier A.; Lovejoy, Nathan R.; Alves-Gomes, José A.; Smith, G. Troy

    2018-01-01

    The electric communication signals of weakly electric ghost knifefishes (Gymnotiformes: Apteronotidae) provide a valuable model system for understanding the evolution and physiology of behavior. Apteronotids produce continuous wave-type electric organ discharges (EODs) that are used for electrolocation and communication. The frequency and waveform of EODs, as well as the structure of transient EOD modulations (chirps), vary substantially across species. Understanding how these signals have evolved, however, has been hampered by the lack of a well-supported phylogeny for this family. We constructed a molecular phylogeny for the Apteronotidae by using sequence data from three genes (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, recombination activating gene 2, and cytochrome oxidase B) in 32 species representing 13 apteronotid genera. This phylogeny and an extensive database of apteronotid signals allowed us to examine signal evolution by using ancestral state reconstruction (ASR) and phylogenetic generalized least squares (PGLS) models. Our molecular phylogeny largely agrees with another recent sequence-based phylogeny and identified five robust apteronotid clades: (i) Sternarchorhamphus + Orthosternarchus, (ii) Adontosternarchus, (iii) Apteronotus + Parapteronotus, (iv) Sternarchorhynchus, and (v) a large clade including Porotergus, ‘Apteronotus’, Compsaraia, Sternarchogiton, Sternarchella, and Magosternarchus. We analyzed novel chirp recordings from two apteronotid species (Orthosternarchus tamandua and Sternarchorhynchus mormyrus), and combined data from these species with that from previously recorded species in our phylogenetic analyses. Some signal parameters in O. tamandua were plesiomorphic (e.g., low frequency EODs and chirps with little frequency modulation that nevertheless interrupt the EOD), suggesting that ultra-high frequency EODs and ‘‘big” chirps evolved after apteronotids diverged from other gymnotiforms. In contrast to previous studies, our PGLS

  7. A WHEP Domain Regulates the Dynamic Structure and Activity of Caenorhabditis elegans Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Yao; Chien, Chin-I; Chang, Chia-Pei; Lin, Bo-Chun; Wang, Chien-Chia

    2016-08-05

    WHEP domains exist in certain eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and play roles in tRNA or protein binding. We present evidence herein that cytoplasmic and mitochondrial forms of Caenorhabditis elegans glycyl-tRNA synthetase (CeGlyRS) are encoded by the same gene (CeGRS1) through alternative initiation of translation. The cytoplasmic form possessed an N-terminal WHEP domain, whereas its mitochondrial isoform possessed an extra N-terminal sequence consisting of an mitochondrial targeting signal and an appended domain. Cross-species complementation assays showed that CeGRS1 effectively rescued the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial defects of a yeast GRS1 knock-out strain. Although both forms of CeGlyRS efficiently charged the cytoplasmic tRNAs(Gly) of C. elegans, the mitochondrial form was much more efficient than its cytoplasmic counterpart in charging the mitochondrial tRNA(Gly) isoacceptor, which carries a defective TψC hairpin. Despite the WHEP domain per se lacking tRNA binding activity, deletion of this domain reduced the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. Most interestingly, the deletion mutant possessed a higher thermal stability and a somewhat lower structural flexibility. Our study suggests a role for the WHEP domain as a regulator of the dynamic structure and activity of the enzyme. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Provides Insight into the Evolution and Genetic Composition of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenberg, Kurt R; Desjardins, Christopher A; Zalutskaya, Aksana; Slodovnikova, Vervara; Oler, Andrew J; Quiñones, Mariam; Abeel, Thomas; Chapman, Sinead B; Tartakovsky, Michael; Gabrielian, Andrei; Hoffner, Sven; Skrahin, Aliaksandr; Birren, Bruce W; Rosenthal, Alexander; Skrahina, Alena; Earl, Ashlee M

    2017-02-01

    The emergence and spread of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (DR-TB) are critical global health issues. Eastern Europe has some of the highest incidences of DR-TB, particularly multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB. To better understand the genetic composition and evolution of MDR- and XDR-TB in the region, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 138 M. tuberculosis isolates from 97 patients sampled between 2010 and 2013 in Minsk, Belarus. MDR and XDR-TB isolates were significantly more likely to belong to the Beijing lineage than to the Euro-American lineage, and known resistance-conferring loci accounted for the majority of phenotypic resistance to first- and second-line drugs in MDR and XDR-TB. Using a phylogenomic approach, we estimated that the majority of MDR-TB was due to the recent transmission of already-resistant M. tuberculosis strains rather than repeated de novo evolution of resistance within patients, while XDR-TB was acquired through both routes. Longitudinal sampling of M. tuberculosis from 34 patients with treatment failure showed that most strains persisted genetically unchanged during treatment or acquired resistance to fluoroquinolones. HIV+ patients were significantly more likely to have multiple infections over time than HIV- patients, highlighting a specific need for careful infection control in these patients. These data provide a better understanding of the genomic composition, transmission, and evolution of MDR- and XDR-TB in Belarus and will enable improved diagnostics, treatment protocols, and prognostic decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Wollenberg et al.

  9. New insights into flavivirus evolution, taxonomy and biogeographic history, extended by analysis of canonical and alternative coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Moureau

    Full Text Available To generate the most diverse phylogenetic dataset for the flaviviruses to date, we determined the genomic sequences and phylogenetic relationships of 14 flaviviruses, of which 10 are primarily associated with Culex spp. mosquitoes. We analyze these data, in conjunction with a comprehensive collection of flavivirus genomes, to characterize flavivirus evolutionary and biogeographic history in unprecedented detail and breadth. Based on the presumed introduction of yellow fever virus into the Americas via the transatlantic slave trade, we extrapolated a timescale for a relevant subset of flaviviruses whose evolutionary history, shows that different Culex-spp. associated flaviviruses have been introduced from the Old World to the New World on at least five separate occasions, with 2 different sets of factors likely to have contributed to the dispersal of the different viruses. We also discuss the significance of programmed ribosomal frameshifting in a central region of the polyprotein open reading frame in some mosquito-associated flaviviruses.

  10. The Whole Genome Sequence of Sphingobium chlorophenolicum L-1: Insights into the Evolution of the Pentachlorophenol Degradation Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copley, Shelley D. [University of Colorado; Rokicki, Joseph [University of Colorado; Turner, Pernilla [University of Colorado; Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Sphingobium chlorophenolicum Strain L-1 can mineralize the toxic pesticide pentachlorophenol (PCP). We have sequenced the genome of S. chlorophenolicum Strain L-1. The genome consists of a primary chromosome that encodes most of the genes for core processes, a secondary chromosome that encodes primarily genes that appear to be involved in environmental adaptation, and a small plasmid. The genes responsible for degradation of PCP are found on chromosome 2. We have compared the genomes of S. chlorophenolicum Strain L-1 and Sphingobium japonicum, a closely related Sphingomonad that degrades lindane. Our analysis suggests that the genes encoding the first three enzymes in the PCP degradation pathway were acquired via two different horizontal gene transfer events, and the genes encoding the final two enzymes in the pathway were acquired from the most recent common ancestor of these two bacteria.

  11. Sequence-tagged high-density genetic maps of Zoysia japonica provide insights into genome evolution in Chloridoideae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Singh, Ratnesh; Genovesi, Anthony D; Wai, Ching Man; Huang, Xiaoen; Chandra, Ambika; Yu, Qingyi

    2015-06-01

    Zoysiagrass (Zoysia spp.), belonging to the genus Zoysia in the subfamily Chloridoideae, is widely used in domestic lawns, sports fields and as forage. We constructed high-density genetic maps of Zoysia japonica using a restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq) approach and an F1 mapping population derived from a cross between 'Carrizo' and 'El Toro'. Two linkage maps were constructed, one for each of the parents. A map consisting of 2408 RAD markers distributed on 21 linkage groups was constructed for 'Carrizo'. Another map with 1230 RAD markers mapped on 20 linkage groups was constructed for 'El Toro'. The average distance between adjacent markers of the two maps was at 0.56 and 1.4 cM, respectively. Comparative genomics analysis was carried out among zoysiagrass, rice and sorghum genomes and a highly conserved collinearity in the gene order was observed among the three genomes. Chromosome collinearity was disrupted at centromeric regions for each chromosome pair between zoysiagrass and sorghum genomes. However, no obvious synteny gaps were observed across the centromeric regions between zoysiagrass and rice genomes. Two homologous chromosomes for each of the 10 sorghum chromosomes were found in the zoysiagrass genome, indicating an allotetraploid origin for zoysiagrass. The reduction of the basic chromosome number from 12 to 10 in chloridoids and panicoids took place via independent single-step nested chromosome fusion events after the two subfamilies diverged from a common ancestor. The genetic maps will assist in genome sequence assembly, targeted gene isolation and comparative genomic analyses among grasses. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Mining for Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Polyketide Synthase Genes Revealed a High Level of Diversity in the Sphagnum Bog Metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christina A; Oberauner-Wappis, Lisa; Peyman, Armin; Amos, Gregory C A; Wellington, Elizabeth M H; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Sphagnum bog ecosystems are among the oldest vegetation forms harboring a specific microbial community and are known to produce an exceptionally wide variety of bioactive substances. Although the Sphagnum metagenome shows a rich secondary metabolism, the genes have not yet been explored. To analyze nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), the diversity of NRPS and PKS genes in Sphagnum-associated metagenomes was investigated by in silico data mining and sequence-based screening (PCR amplification of 9,500 fosmid clones). The in silico Illumina-based metagenomic approach resulted in the identification of 279 NRPSs and 346 PKSs, as well as 40 PKS-NRPS hybrid gene sequences. The occurrence of NRPS sequences was strongly dominated by the members of the Protebacteria phylum, especially by species of the Burkholderia genus, while PKS sequences were mainly affiliated with Actinobacteria. Thirteen novel NRPS-related sequences were identified by PCR amplification screening, displaying amino acid identities of 48% to 91% to annotated sequences of members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Some of the identified metagenomic clones showed the closest similarity to peptide synthases from Burkholderia or Lysobacter, which are emerging bacterial sources of as-yet-undescribed bioactive metabolites. This report highlights the role of the extreme natural ecosystems as a promising source for detection of secondary compounds and enzymes, serving as a source for biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Long-Range Structural Effects of a Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease-Causing Mutation in Human Glycyl-TRNA Synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, W.; Nangle, L.A.; Zhang, W.; Schimmel, P.; Yang, X.-L.

    2009-06-04

    Functional expansion of specific tRNA synthetases in higher organisms is well documented. These additional functions may explain why dominant mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, the most common heritable disease of the peripheral nervous system. At least 10 disease-causing mutant alleles of GlyRS have been annotated. These mutations scatter broadly across the primary sequence and have no apparent unifying connection. Here we report the structure of wild type and a CMT-causing mutant (G526R) of homodimeric human GlyRS. The mutation is at the site for synthesis of glycyl-adenylate, but the rest of the two structures are closely similar. Significantly, the mutant form diffracts to a higher resolution and has a greater dimer interface. The extra dimer interactions are located {approx}30 {angstrom} away from the G526R mutation. Direct experiments confirm the tighter dimer interaction of the G526R protein. The results suggest the possible importance of subtle, long-range structural effects of CMT-causing mutations at the dimer interface. From analysis of a third crystal, an appended motif, found in higher eukaryote GlyRSs, seems not to have a role in these long-range effects.

  14. Orbitally-driven evolution of Lake Turkana (Turkana Depression, Kenya, EARS) between 1.95 and 1.72 Ma: A sequence stratigraphy perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutz, Alexis; Schuster, Mathieu; Boës, Xavier; Rubino, Jean-Loup

    2017-01-01

    Lakes act as major archives for continental paleoenvironments, particularly when the evolution of lake levels over time serves as a guide for understanding regional paleohydrology and paleoclimate. In this paper, two sections from the Nachukui Formation (Turkana Depression, East African Rift System) provide a complete record of lake level variability and then paleohydrology for Lake Turkana between 1.95 and 1.72 Ma. This period corresponds to a key time during which important human evolutionary and technological innovations have occurred in East Africa and in the Turkana area. Based on sedimentary facies and sequence analyses on coastal deposits, one long-term regressive-transgressive cycle is identified between 1.95 and 1.72 Ma. Superimposed on this trend, five higher-frequency cycles of lake level change are identified between 1.87 and 1.76 Ma. Origins of these periodicities are attributed to orbital forcings. The extents of bathymetry change and shoreline migration during these periods are explored, suggesting that the period between 1.87 and 1.76 Ma was relatively dry and that climate experienced a relatively low variability. This finding differs strongly from most of the previous paleoenvironmental investigations in the region that argue high climate variability during a relatively wet period. This work emphasizes the importance of using sequence stratigraphy for analyzing lacustrine deposits.

  15. Whole-genome sequencing of multiple myeloma from diagnosis to plasma cell leukemia reveals genomic initiating events, evolution, and clonal tides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Jan B; Shi, Chang-Xin; Tembe, Waibhav; Christoforides, Alexis; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Sinari, Shripad; Middha, Sumit; Asmann, Yan; Schmidt, Jessica; Braggio, Esteban; Keats, Jonathan J; Fonseca, Rafael; Bergsagel, P Leif; Craig, David W; Carpten, John D; Stewart, A Keith

    2012-08-02

    The longitudinal evolution of a myeloma genome from diagnosis to plasma cell leukemia has not previously been reported. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 4 purified tumor samples and patient germline DNA drawn over a 5-year period in a t(4;14) multiple myeloma patient. Tumor samples were acquired at diagnosis, first relapse, second relapse, and end-stage secondary plasma cell leukemia (sPCL). In addition to the t(4;14), all tumor time points also shared 10 common single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) on WGS comprising shared initiating events. Interestingly, we observed genomic sequence variants that waxed and waned with time in progressive tumors, suggesting the presence of multiple independent, yet related, clones at diagnosis that rose and fell in dominance. Five newly acquired SNVs, including truncating mutations of RB1 and ZKSCAN3, were observed only in the final sPCL sample suggesting leukemic transformation events. This longitudinal WGS characterization of the natural history of a high-risk myeloma patient demonstrated tumor heterogeneity at diagnosis with shifting dominance of tumor clones over time and has also identified potential mutations contributing to myelomagenesis as well as transformation from myeloma to overt extramedullary disease such as sPCL.

  16. Experimental evolution, genetic analysis and genome re-sequencing reveal the mutation conferring artemisinin resistance in an isogenic lineage of malaria parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Hunt, Paul

    2010-09-16

    Background: Classical and quantitative linkage analyses of genetic crosses have traditionally been used to map genes of interest, such as those conferring chloroquine or quinine resistance in malaria parasites. Next-generation sequencing technologies now present the possibility of determining genome-wide genetic variation at single base-pair resolution. Here, we combine in vivo experimental evolution, a rapid genetic strategy and whole genome re-sequencing to identify the precise genetic basis of artemisinin resistance in a lineage of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi. Such genetic markers will further the investigation of resistance and its control in natural infections of the human malaria, P. falciparum.Results: A lineage of isogenic in vivo drug-selected mutant P. chabaudi parasites was investigated. By measuring the artemisinin responses of these clones, the appearance of an in vivo artemisinin resistance phenotype within the lineage was defined. The underlying genetic locus was mapped to a region of chromosome 2 by Linkage Group Selection in two different genetic crosses. Whole-genome deep coverage short-read re-sequencing (IlluminaSolexa) defined the point mutations, insertions, deletions and copy-number variations arising in the lineage. Eight point mutations arise within the mutant lineage, only one of which appears on chromosome 2. This missense mutation arises contemporaneously with artemisinin resistance and maps to a gene encoding a de-ubiquitinating enzyme.Conclusions: This integrated approach facilitates the rapid identification of mutations conferring selectable phenotypes, without prior knowledge of biological and molecular mechanisms. For malaria, this model can identify candidate genes before resistant parasites are commonly observed in natural human malaria populations. 2010 Hunt et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  17. Experimental evolution, genetic analysis and genome re-sequencing reveal the mutation conferring artemisinin resistance in an isogenic lineage of malaria parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunt Paul

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical and quantitative linkage analyses of genetic crosses have traditionally been used to map genes of interest, such as those conferring chloroquine or quinine resistance in malaria parasites. Next-generation sequencing technologies now present the possibility of determining genome-wide genetic variation at single base-pair resolution. Here, we combine in vivo experimental evolution, a rapid genetic strategy and whole genome re-sequencing to identify the precise genetic basis of artemisinin resistance in a lineage of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi. Such genetic markers will further the investigation of resistance and its control in natural infections of the human malaria, P. falciparum. Results A lineage of isogenic in vivo drug-selected mutant P. chabaudi parasites was investigated. By measuring the artemisinin responses of these clones, the appearance of an in vivo artemisinin resistance phenotype within the lineage was defined. The underlying genetic locus was mapped to a region of chromosome 2 by Linkage Group Selection in two different genetic crosses. Whole-genome deep coverage short-read re-sequencing (Illumina® Solexa defined the point mutations, insertions, deletions and copy-number variations arising in the lineage. Eight point mutations arise within the mutant lineage, only one of which appears on chromosome 2. This missense mutation arises contemporaneously with artemisinin resistance and maps to a gene encoding a de-ubiquitinating enzyme. Conclusions This integrated approach facilitates the rapid identification of mutations conferring selectable phenotypes, without prior knowledge of biological and molecular mechanisms. For malaria, this model can identify candidate genes before resistant parasites are commonly observed in natural human malaria populations.

  18. Affinity labeling of Escherichia coli phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase at the binding site for tRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hountondji, C.; Schmitter, J.M.; Beauvallet, C.; Blanquet, S.

    1987-01-01

    Periodate-oxidized tRNA/sup Phe/ (tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/) behaves as a specific affinity label of tetrameric Escherichia coli phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS). Reaction of the α 2 β 2 enzyme with tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/ results in the loss of tRNA/sup Phe/ aminoacylation activity with covalent attachment of 2 mol of tRNA dialdehyde/mol of enzyme, in agreement with the stoichiometry of tRNA binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the PheRS-[ 14 C]tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/ covalent complex indicates that the large (α, M/sub r/ 87K) subunit of the enzyme interacts with the 3'-adenosine of tRNA/sub ox//sup Phe/. The [ 14 C]tRNA-labeled chymotryptic peptides of PheRS were purified by both gel filtration and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The radioactivity was almost equally distributed among three peptides: Met-Lys[Ado]-Phe, Ala-Asp-Lys[Ado]-Leu, and Lys-Ile-Lys[Ado]-Ala. These sequences correspond to residues 1-3, 59-62, and 104-107, respectively, in the N-terminal region of the 795 amino acid sequence of the α subunit. It is noticeable that the labeled peptide Ala-Asp-Lys-Leu is adjacent to residues 63-66 (Arg-Val-Thr-Lys). The latter sequence was just predicted to resemble the proposed consensus tRNA CCA binding region Lys-Met-Ser-Lys-Ser, as deduced from previous affinity labeling studies on E. coli methionyl- and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases

  19. Antenatal and postnatal radiologic diagnosis of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandaralage, Sahan P.S.; Farnaghi, Soheil; Dulhunty, Joel M.; Kothari, Alka

    2016-01-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency results in impaired activation of enzymes implicated in glucose, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. Antenatal imaging and postnatal imaging are useful in making the diagnosis. Untreated holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is fatal, while antenatal and postnatal biotin supplementation is associated with good clinical outcomes. Although biochemical assays are required for definitive diagnosis, certain radiologic features assist in the diagnosis of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency. To review evidence regarding radiologic diagnostic features of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the antenatal and postnatal period. A systematic review of all published cases of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency identified by a search of Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Science. A total of 75 patients with holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency were identified from the systematic review, which screened 687 manuscripts. Most patients with imaging (19/22, 86%) had abnormal findings, the most common being subependymal cysts, ventriculomegaly and intraventricular hemorrhage. Although the radiologic features of subependymal cysts, ventriculomegaly, intraventricular hemorrhage and intrauterine growth restriction may be found in the setting of other pathologies, these findings should prompt consideration of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in at-risk children. (orig.)

  20. Antenatal and postnatal radiologic diagnosis of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandaralage, Sahan P.S. [Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service, Southport, Queensland (Australia); Griffith University, School of Medicine, Southport, Queensland (Australia); Farnaghi, Soheil [Caboolture Hospital, Caboolture, Queensland (Australia); Dulhunty, Joel M.; Kothari, Alka [Redcliffe Hospital, Redcliffe, Queensland (Australia); The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Herston, Queensland (Australia)

    2016-03-15

    Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency results in impaired activation of enzymes implicated in glucose, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. Antenatal imaging and postnatal imaging are useful in making the diagnosis. Untreated holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is fatal, while antenatal and postnatal biotin supplementation is associated with good clinical outcomes. Although biochemical assays are required for definitive diagnosis, certain radiologic features assist in the diagnosis of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency. To review evidence regarding radiologic diagnostic features of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the antenatal and postnatal period. A systematic review of all published cases of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency identified by a search of Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Science. A total of 75 patients with holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency were identified from the systematic review, which screened 687 manuscripts. Most patients with imaging (19/22, 86%) had abnormal findings, the most common being subependymal cysts, ventriculomegaly and intraventricular hemorrhage. Although the radiologic features of subependymal cysts, ventriculomegaly, intraventricular hemorrhage and intrauterine growth restriction may be found in the setting of other pathologies, these findings should prompt consideration of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in at-risk children. (orig.)

  1. Detection and analysis of methicillin-resistant human-adapted sequence type 398 allows insight into community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Wang, Yanan; Le, Katherine Y; Liu, Qian; Shang, Jun; Dai, Yingxin; Meng, Hongwei; Wang, Xing; Li, Tianming; Gao, Qianqian; Qin, Juanxiu; Lu, Huiying; Otto, Michael; Li, Min

    2018-01-29

    Severe infections with highly virulent community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) are a global problem. However, the molecular events defining the evolution of CA-MRSA are still poorly understood. MRSA of sequence type (ST) 398 is known to frequently infect livestock, while ST398 isolates infecting humans are commonly methicillin-susceptible or represent MRSA originating from livestock-associated (LA)-MRSA. We used whole genome sequencing of newly detected CA-MRSA ST398 isolates, in comparison to geographically matched LA-MRSA and methicillin-sensitive ST398, to determine their evolutionary history. Furthermore, we used phenotypic analyses including animal infection models to gain insight into the evolution of virulence in these CA-MRSA isolates. Finally, we determined methicillin resistance and expression of the methicillin resistance-conferring gene mecA and its penicillin-binding protein product, PBP2a, in a large series of CA-MRSA strains of divergent STs. We report several cases of severe and fatal infections due to ST398 CA-MRSA. The responsible isolates showed the typical genetic characteristics reported for human-adapted methicillin-sensitive ST398. Whole genome sequencing demonstrated that they evolved from human-adapted, methicillin-susceptible clones on several different occasions. Importantly, the isolates had not undergone consistent genetic alterations or changes in virulence as compared to their methicillin-susceptible predecessors. Finally, we observed dramatically and consistently lower methicillin resistance and expression of the resistance gene mecA, as compared to hospital-associated MRSA strains, in a diverse selection of CA-MRSA strains. Our study presents evidence for the development of highly virulent human-adapted ST398 CA-MRSA isolates from methicillin-susceptible predecessors. Notably, our investigation indicates that, in contrast to widespread notions, the development of CA-MRSA is not necessarily

  2. Seryl-tRNA Synthetases in Translation and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Močibob

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For a long time seryl-tRNA synthetases (SerRSs stood as an archetypal, canonical aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS, exhibiting only basic tRNA aminoacylation activity and with no moonlighting functions beyond protein biosynthesis. The picture has changed substantially in recent years after the discovery that SerRSs play an important role in antibiotic production and resistance and act as a regulatory factor in vascular development, as well as after the discovery of mitochondrial morphogenesis factor homologous to SerRS in insects. In this review we summarize the recent research results from our laboratory, which advance the understanding of seryl-tRNA synthetases and further paint the dynamic picture of unexpected SerRS activities. SerRS from archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus was shown to interact with the large ribosomal subunit and it was postulated to contribute to a more efficient translation by the"tRNA channeling" hypothesis. Discovery of the atypical SerRS in a small number of methanogenic archaea led to the discovery of a new family of enzymes in numerous bacteria - amino acid:[carrier protein] ligases (aa:CP ligases. These SerRS homologues resigned tRNA aminoacylation activity, and instead adopted carrier proteins as the acceptors of activated amino acids. The crystal structure of the aa:CP ligase complex with the carrier protein revealed that the interactions between two macromolecules are incomparable to tRNA binding by the aaRS and consequently represent a true evolutionary invention. Kinetic investigations of SerRSs and the accuracy of amino acid selection revealed that SerRSs possess pre-transfer proofreading activity, challenging the widely accepted presumption that hydrolytic proofreading activity must reside in an additional, separate editing domain, not present in SerRSs. Finally, the plant tRNA serylation system is discussed, which is particularly interesting due to the fact that protein biosynthesis takes place

  3. Maintainance of specificity, information, and thermostability in thermophilic Bacillus sp. glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedler, F C; Hoffmann, F M; Kenney, R; Carfi, J

    1976-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase has been purified to homogeneity from B. subtilis (37 degrees) B. stearothermophilus (55 degrees), and B. caldolyticus (75 degrees). Those characteristics compared include size (6.0 +/- 0.3 X 10(5) daltons), quaternary structure (12 SU) amino acid content, substrate Km's and specificity for structural analogs, metal ion activation, number and kind of separate feedback modifier sites, and the complexity of modifier-substrate and modifier-modifier site interactions. Although the 37 degrees and 55 degrees systems are quite similar, the 75 degrees system shows important alterations in substrate specificity and modes of modifier action. Whereas at 37 degrees and 55 degrees AMP inhibits synergistically with amino acids (glycine, glutamine, histidine), the 75 degrees enzyme is inhibited directly by the products ADP, (which assumes the role of AMP) and glutamine, plus other ligands. Ligand binding domains are compared and found to be very different. Thermostabilization occurs by (a) protection by bound L-glutamate, (b) protein aggregation, (c) trends in the content of total polar residues, total Asx + Flx residues, the average hydrophobicity, and (d) disulfide bond cross-linking. Such studies provide insights to molecular evolution occurring with changes in environmental stress.

  4. Structural characterization of antibiotic self-immunity tRNA synthetase in plant tumour biocontrol agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Shaileja; Palencia, Andrés; Virus, Cornelia; Schulwitz, Sarah; Temple, Brenda R; Cusack, Stephen; Reader, John

    2016-10-07

    Antibiotic-producing microbes evolved self-resistance mechanisms to avoid suicide. The biocontrol Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 secretes the Trojan Horse antibiotic agrocin 84 that is selectively transported into the plant pathogen A. tumefaciens and processed into the toxin TM84. We previously showed that TM84 employs a unique tRNA-dependent mechanism to inhibit leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), while the TM84-producer prevents self-poisoning by expressing a resistant LeuRS AgnB2. We now identify a mechanism by which the antibiotic-producing microbe resists its own toxin. Using a combination of structural, biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that AgnB2 evolved structural changes so as to resist the antibiotic by eliminating the tRNA-dependence of TM84 binding. Mutagenesis of key resistance determinants results in mutants adopting an antibiotic-sensitive phenotype. This study illuminates the evolution of resistance in self-immunity genes and provides mechanistic insights into a fascinating tRNA-dependent antibiotic with applications for the development of anti-infectives and the prevention of biocontrol emasculation.

  5. Allostery of 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthetase in Clostridium: another conserved generic characteristic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R A; Twarog, R

    1972-09-01

    Enzymological studies were done to characterize the allosteric control of 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthetase in three species of Clostridium. Allosteric control was identified as feedback inhibition by phenylalanine and was qualitatively similar for the DAHP synthetases of C. butyricum, C. acetobutylicum, and C. tetanomorphum. Quantitative differences in the enzymology and kinetics of allosteric control distinguished C. tetanomorphum from C. butyricum and C. acetobutylicum. Crude extracts contained apparent proteolytic activity which could be fractionated from DAHP synthetase. The proteolytic activity was more labile than DAHP synthetase in extracts and was progressively inactivated by serial freeze-thaw treatments. Protease activity was at least partially inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl-fluoride. The method of comparative allostery of DAHP synthetase distinguishes the genera Bacillus and Clostridium, each having a strongly conserved pattern of regulation for DAHP synthetase. The data reinforce previous conclusions that allosteric control patterns governing the activity of DAHP synthetase are stable, reliable generic characteristics.

  6. A model of proteostatic energy cost and its use in analysis of proteome trends and sequence evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper P Kepp

    Full Text Available A model of proteome-associated chemical energetic costs of cells is derived from protein-turnover kinetics and protein folding. Minimization of the proteostatic maintenance cost can explain a range of trends of proteomes and combines both protein function, stability, size, proteostatic cost, temperature, resource availability, and turnover rates in one simple framework. We then explore the ansatz that the chemical energy remaining after proteostatic maintenance is available for reproduction (or cell division and thus, proportional to organism fitness. Selection for lower proteostatic costs is then shown to be significant vs. typical effective population sizes of yeast. The model explains and quantifies evolutionary conservation of highly abundant proteins as arising both from functional mutations and from changes in other properties such as stability, cost, or turnover rates. We show that typical hypomorphic mutations can be selected against due to increased cost of compensatory protein expression (both in the mutated gene and in related genes, i.e. epistasis rather than compromised function itself, although this compensation depends on the protein's importance. Such mutations exhibit larger selective disadvantage in abundant, large, synthetically costly, and/or short-lived proteins. Selection against increased turnover costs of less stable proteins rather than misfolding toxicity per se can explain equilibrium protein stability distributions, in agreement with recent findings in E. coli. The proteostatic selection pressure is stronger at low metabolic rates (i.e. scarce environments and in hot habitats, explaining proteome adaptations towards rough environments as a question of energy. The model may also explain several trade-offs observed in protein evolution and suggests how protein properties can coevolve to maintain low proteostatic cost.

  7. Short-term sequence evolution and vertical inheritance of the Naegleria twin-ribozyme group I intron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Jonckheere Johan F

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribosomal DNA of several species of the free-living Naegleria amoeba harbors an optional group I intron within the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. The intron (Nae.S516 has a complex organization of two ribozyme domains (NaGIR1 and NaGIR2 and a homing endonuclease gene (NaHEG. NaGIR2 is responsible for intron excision, exon ligation, and full-length intron RNA circularization, reactions typical for nuclear group I intron ribozymes. NaGIR1, however, is essential for NaHEG expression by generating the 5' end of the homing endonuclease messenger RNA. Interestingly, this unusual class of ribozyme adds a lariat-cap at the mRNA. Results To elucidate the evolutionary history of the Nae.S516 twin-ribozyme introns we have analyzed 13 natural variants present in distinct Naegleria isolates. Structural variabilities were noted within both the ribozyme domains and provide strong comparative support to the intron secondary structure. One of the introns, present in N. martinezi NG872, contains hallmarks of a degenerated NaHEG. Phylogenetic analyses performed on separate data sets representing NaGIR1, NaGIR2, NaHEG, and ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 ribosomal DNA are consistent with an overall vertical inheritance pattern of the intron within the Naegleria genus. Conclusion The Nae.S516 twin-ribozyme intron was gained early in the Naegleria evolution with subsequent vertical inheritance. The intron was lost in the majority of isolates (70%, leaving a widespread but scattered distribution pattern. Why the apparent asexual Naegleria amoebae harbors active intron homing endonucleases, dependent on sexual reproduction for its function, remains a puzzle.

  8. Novel parvoviruses in reptiles and genome sequence of a lizard parvovirus shed light on Dependoparvovirus genus evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pénzes, Judit J; Pham, Hanh T; Benkö, Mária; Tijssen, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Here, we report the detection and partial genome characterization of two novel reptilian parvoviruses derived from a short-tailed pygmy chameleon (Rampholeon brevicaudatus) and a corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) along with the complete genome analysis of the first lizard parvovirus, obtained from four bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps). Both homology searches and phylogenetic tree reconstructions demonstrated that all are members of the genus Dependoparvovirus. Even though most dependoparvoviruses replicate efficiently only in co-infections with large DNA viruses, no such agents could be detected in one of the bearded dragon samples, hence the possibility of autonomous replication was explored. The alternative ORF encoding the full assembly activating protein (AAP), typical for the genus, could be obtained from reptilian parvoviruses for the first time, with a structure that appears to be more ancient than that of avian and mammalian parvoviruses. All three viruses were found to harbour short introns as previously observed for snake adeno-associated virus, shorter than that of any non-reptilian dependoparvovirus. According to the phylogenetic calculations based on full non-structural protein (Rep) and AAP sequences, the monophyletic cluster of reptilian parvoviruses seems to be the most basal out of all lineages of genus Dependoparvovirus. The suspected ability for autonomous replication, results of phylogenetic tree reconstruction, intron lengths and the structure of the AAP suggested that a single Squamata origin instead of the earlier assumed diapsid (common avian-reptilian) origin is more likely for the genus Dependoparvovirus of the family Parvoviridae.

  9. Next Generation Sequencing of Chromosome-Specific Libraries Sheds Light on Genome Evolution in Paleotetraploid Sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyushkova, Daria A; Makunin, Alexey I; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Romanenko, Svetlana A; Druzhkova, Anna S; Biltueva, Larisa B; Serdyukova, Natalya A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Trifonov, Vladimir A

    2017-11-10

    Several whole genome duplication (WGD) events followed by rediploidization took place in the evolutionary history of vertebrates. Acipenserids represent a convenient model group for investigation of the consequences of WGD as their representatives underwent additional WGD events in different lineages resulting in ploidy level variation between species, and these processes are still ongoing. Earlier, we obtained a set of sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus) chromosome-specific libraries by microdissection and revealed that they painted two or four pairs of whole sterlet chromosomes, as well as additional chromosomal regions, depending on rediploidization status and chromosomal rearrangements after genome duplication. In this study, we employed next generation sequencing to estimate the content of libraries derived from different paralogous chromosomes of sterlet. For this purpose, we aligned the obtained reads to the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) reference genome to reveal syntenic regions between these two species having diverged 360 Mya. We also showed that the approach is effective for synteny prediction at various evolutionary distances and allows one to clearly distinguish paralogous chromosomes in polyploid genomes. We postulated that after the acipenserid-specific WGD sterlet karyotype underwent multiple interchromosomal rearrangements, but different chromosomes were involved in this process unequally.

  10. Post-main-sequence Evolution of Icy Minor Planets. II. Water Retention and White Dwarf Pollution around Massive Progenitor Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malamud, Uri; Perets, Hagai B., E-mail: uri.mal@tx.technion.ac.il, E-mail: hperets@physics.technion.ac.il [Department of Physics, Technion (Israel)

    2017-06-10

    Most studies suggest that the pollution of white dwarf (WD) atmospheres arises from the accretion of minor planets, but the exact properties of polluting material, and in particular the evidence for water in some cases, are not yet understood. Here we study the water retention of small icy bodies in exo-solar planetary systems, as their respective host stars evolve through and off the main sequence and eventually become WDs. We explore, for the first time, a wide range of star masses and metallicities. We find that the mass of the WD progenitor star is of crucial importance for the retention of water, while its metallicity is relatively unimportant. We predict that minor planets around lower-mass WD progenitors would generally retain more water and would do so at closer distances from the WD than compared with high-mass progenitors. The dependence of water retention on progenitor mass and other parameters has direct implications for the origin of observed WD pollution, and we discuss how our results and predictions might be tested in the future as more observations of WDs with long cooling ages become available.

  11. Insertion sequence element single nucleotide polymorphism typing provides insights into the population structure and evolution of Mycobacterium ulcerans across Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandelannoote, Koen; Jordaens, Kurt; Bomans, Pieter; Leirs, Herwig; Durnez, Lies; Affolabi, Dissou; Sopoh, Ghislain; Aguiar, Julia; Phanzu, Delphin Mavinga; Kibadi, Kapay; Eyangoh, Sara; Manou, Louis Bayonne; Phillips, Richard Odame; Adjei, Ohene; Ablordey, Anthony; Rigouts, Leen; Portaels, Françoise; Eddyani, Miriam; de Jong, Bouke C

    2014-02-01

    Buruli ulcer is an indolent, slowly progressing necrotizing disease of the skin caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. In the present study, we applied a redesigned technique to a vast panel of M. ulcerans disease isolates and clinical samples originating from multiple African disease foci in order to (i) gain fundamental insights into the population structure and evolutionary history of the pathogen and (ii) disentangle the phylogeographic relationships within the genetically conserved cluster of African M. ulcerans. Our analyses identified 23 different African insertion sequence element single nucleotide polymorphism (ISE-SNP) types that dominate in different areas where Buruli ulcer is endemic. These ISE-SNP types appear to be the initial stages of clonal diversification from a common, possibly ancestral ISE-SNP type. ISE-SNP types were found unevenly distributed over the greater West African hydrological drainage basins. Our findings suggest that geographical barriers bordering the basins to some extent prevented bacterial gene flow between basins and that this resulted in independent focal transmission clusters associated with the hydrological drainage areas. Different phylogenetic methods yielded two well-supported sister clades within the African ISE-SNP types. The ISE-SNP types from the "pan-African clade" were found to be widespread throughout Africa, while the ISE-SNP types of the "Gabonese/Cameroonian clade" were much rarer and found in a more restricted area, which suggested that the latter clade evolved more recently. Additionally, the Gabonese/Cameroonian clade was found to form a strongly supported monophyletic group with Papua New Guinean ISE-SNP type 8, which is unrelated to other Southeast Asian ISE-SNP types.

  12. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W; Riley, Robert; Nagy, Laszlo G; Koehler, Gage; Ransdell, Anthony S; Younus, Hina; Chow, Julianna; Chiniquy, Jennifer; Lipzen, Anna; Tritt, Andrew; Sun, Hui; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Ohm, Robin A; Kües, Ursula; Blanchette, Robert A; Grigoriev, Igor V; Minto, Robert E; Hibbett, David S

    2015-03-01

    Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. Here, we present the genome sequences of the white-rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown-rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. C. torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot and brown-rot fungi, but at the same time they show characteristics of decay that resembles soft rot. Both species cause weak wood decay and degrade all wood components but leave the middle lamella intact. Their gene content related to lignin degradation is reduced, similar to brown-rot fungi, but both have maintained a rich array of genes related to carbohydrate degradation, similar to white-rot fungi. These characteristics appear to have evolved from white-rot ancestors with stronger ligninolytic ability. F. hepatica shows characteristics of brown rot both in terms of wood decay genes found in its genome and the decay that it causes. However, genes related to cellulose degradation are still present, which is a plesiomorphic characteristic shared with its white-rot ancestors. Four wood degradation-related genes, homologs of which are frequently lost in brown-rot fungi, show signs of pseudogenization in the genome of F. hepatica. These results suggest that transition toward a brown-rot lifestyle could be an ongoing process in F. hepatica. Our results reinforce the idea that wood decay mechanisms are more diverse than initially thought and that the dichotomous separation of wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina into white rot and brown rot should be revisited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W.; Riley, Robert; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Koehler, Gage; Ransdell, Anthony S.; Younus, Hina; Chow, Julianna; Chiniquy, Jennifer; Lipzen, Anna; Tritt, Andrew; Sun, Hui; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Ohm, Robin A.; Kües, Ursula; Blanchette, Robert A.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Minto, Robert E.; Hibbett, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. Here, we present the genome sequences of the white rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. Cylindrobasidium torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot and brown-rot fungi, but at the same time they show characteristics of decay that resembles soft rot. Both species cause weak wood decay and degrade all wood components but leave the middle lamella intact. Their gene content related to lignin degradation is reduced, similar to brown-rot fungi, but both have maintained a rich array of genes related to carbohydrate degradation, similar to white-rot fungi. These characteristics appear to have evolved from white-rot ancestors with stronger ligninolytic ability. Fistulina hepatica shows characteristics of brown rot both in terms of wood decay genes found in its genome and the decay that it causes. However, genes related to cellulose degradation are still present, which is a plesiomorphic characteristic shared with its white-rot ancestors. Four wood degradation-related genes, homologs of which are frequently lost in brown-rot fungi, show signs of pseudogenization in the genome of F. hepatica. These results suggest that transition towards a brown rot lifestyle could be an ongoing process in F. hepatica. Our results reinforce the idea that wood decay mechanisms are more diverse than initially thought and that the dichotomous separation of wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina into white rot and brown rot should be revisited. PMID:25683379

  14. Streptogramin B biosynthesis in Streptomyces pristinaespiralis and Streptomyces virginiae: molecular characterization of the last structural peptide synthetase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Crécy-Lagard, V; Saurin, W; Thibaut, D; Gil, P; Naudin, L; Crouzet, J; Blanc, V

    1997-01-01

    Streptomyces pristinaespiralis and S. virginiae both produce closely related hexadepsipeptide antibiotics of the streptogramin B family. Pristinamycins I and virginiamycins S differ only in the fifth incorporated precursor, di(mono)methylated amine and phenylalanine, respectively. By using degenerate oligonucleotide probes derived from internal sequences of the purified S. pristinaespiralis SnbD and SnbE proteins, the genes from two streptogramin B producers, S. pristinaespiralis and S. virginiae, encoding the peptide synthetase involved in the activation and incorporation of the last four precursors (proline, 4-dimethylparaaminophenylalanine [for pristinamycin I(A)] or phenylalanine [for virginiamycin S], pipecolic acid, and phenylglycine) were cloned. Analysis of the sequence revealed that SnbD and SnbE are encoded by a unique snbDE gene. SnbDE (4,849 amino acids [aa]) contains four amino acid activation domains, four condensation domains, an N-methylation domain, and a C-terminal thioesterase domain. Comparison of the sequences of 55 amino acid-activating modules from different origins confirmed that these sequences contain enough information for the performance of legitimate predictions of their substrate specificity. Partial sequencing (1,993 aa) of the SnbDE protein of S. virginiae allowed comparison of the proline and aromatic acid activation domains of the two species and the identification of coupled frameshift mutations. PMID:9303382

  15. Formyltetrahydrofolate Synthetase Gene Diversity in the Guts of Higher Termites with Different Diets and Lifestyles ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottesen, Elizabeth A.; Leadbetter, Jared R.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examine gene diversity for formyl-tetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS), a key enzyme in homoacetogenesis, recovered from the gut microbiota of six species of higher termites. The “higher” termites (family Termitidae), which represent the majority of extant termite species and genera, engage in a broader diversity of feeding and nesting styles than the “lower” termites. Previous studies of termite gut homoacetogenesis have focused on wood-feeding lower termites, from which the preponderance of FTHFS sequences recovered were related to those from acetogenic treponemes. While sequences belonging to this group were present in the guts of all six higher termites examined, treponeme-like FTHFS sequences represented the majority of recovered sequences in only two species (a wood-feeding Nasutitermes sp. and a palm-feeding Microcerotermes sp.). The remaining four termite species analyzed (a Gnathamitermes sp. and two Amitermes spp. that were recovered from subterranean nests with indeterminate feeding strategies and a litter-feeding Rhynchotermes sp.) yielded novel FTHFS clades not observed in lower termites. These termites yielded two distinct clusters of probable purinolytic Firmicutes and a large group of potential homoacetogens related to sequences previously recovered from the guts of omnivorous cockroaches. These findings suggest that the gut environments of different higher termite species may select for different groups of homoacetogens, with some species hosting treponeme-dominated homoacetogen populations similar to those of wood-feeding, lower termites while others host Firmicutes-dominated communities more similar to those of omnivorous cockroaches. PMID:21441328

  16. Biochemical and mutational analysis of glutamine synthetase type III from the rumen anaerobe Ruminococcus albus 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Kensey R; Kocherginskaya, Svetlana A; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O

    2005-11-01

    Two different genes encoding glutamine synthetase type I (GSI) and GSIII were identified in the genome sequence of R. albus 8. The identity of the GSIII protein was confirmed by the presence of its associated conserved motifs. The glnN gene, encoding the GSIII, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells. The recombinant protein was purified and subjected to biochemical and physical analyses. Subunit organization suggested a protein present in solution as both monomers and oligomers. Kinetic studies using the forward and the gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT) assays were carried out. Mutations that changed conserved glutamic acid residues to alanine in the four GSIII motifs resulted in drastic decreases in GS activity using both assays, except for an E380A mutation, which rather resulted in an increase in activity in the forward assay compared to the wild-type protein. Reduced GSIII activity was also exhibited by mutating, individually, two lysines (K308 and K318) located in the putative nucleotide-binding site to alanine. Most importantly, the presence of mRNA transcripts of the glnN gene in R. albus 8 cells grown under ammonia limiting conditions, whereas little or no transcript was detected in cells grown under ammonia sufficient conditions, suggested an important role for the GSIII in the nitrogen metabolism of R. albus 8. Furthermore, the mutational studies on the conserved GSIII motifs demonstrated, for the first time, their importance in the structure and/or function of a GSIII protein.

  17. Conformational changes involving ammonia tunnel formation and allosteric control in GMP synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Justin C; Gudihal, Ravidra; Burgner, John W; Pedley, Anthony M; Zwierko, Alexander T; Davisson, V Jo; Linger, Rebecca S

    2014-03-01

    GMP synthetase is the glutamine amidotransferase that catalyzes the final step in the guanylate branch of de novo purine biosynthesis. Conformational changes are required to efficiently couple distal active sites in the protein; however, the nature of these changes has remained elusive. Structural information derived from both limited proteolysis and sedimentation velocity experiments support the hypothesis of nucleotide-induced loop- and domain-closure in the protein. These results were combined with information from sequence conservation and precedents from other glutamine amidotransferases to develop the first structural model of GMPS in a closed, active state. In analyzing this Catalytic model, an interdomain salt bridge was identified residing in the same location as seen in other triad glutamine amidotransferases. Using mutagenesis and kinetic analysis, the salt bridge between H186 and E383 was shown to function as a connection between the two active sites. Mutations at these residues uncoupled the two half-reactions of the enzyme. The chemical events of nucleotide binding initiate a series of conformational changes that culminate in the establishment of a tunnel for ammonia as well as an activated glutaminase catalytic site. The results of this study provide a clearer understanding of the allostery of GMPS, where, for the first time, key substrate binding and interdomain contacts are modeled and analyzed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Holocarboxylase Synthetase: A Moonlighting Transcriptional Coregulator of Gene Expression and a Cytosolic Regulator of Biotin Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Del-Río, Alfonso; Valadez-Graham, Viviana; Gravel, Roy A

    2017-08-21

    The vitamin biotin is an essential nutrient for the metabolism and survival of all organisms owing to its function as a cofactor of enzymes collectively known as biotin-dependent carboxylases. These enzymes use covalently attached biotin as a vector to transfer a carboxyl group between donor and acceptor molecules during carboxylation reactions. In human cells, biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze key reactions in gluconeogenesis, fatty acid synthesis, and amino acid catabolism. Biotin is attached to apocarboxylases by a biotin ligase: holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) in mammalian cells and BirA in microbes. Despite their evolutionary distance, these proteins share structural and sequence similarities, underscoring their importance across all life forms. However, beyond its role in metabolism, HCS participates in the regulation of biotin utilization and acts as a nuclear transcriptional coregulator of gene expression. In this review, we discuss the function of HCS and biotin in metabolism and human disease, a putative role for the enzyme in histone biotinylation, and its participation as a nuclear factor in chromatin dynamics. We suggest that HCS be classified as a moonlighting protein, with two biotin-dependent cytosolic metabolic roles and a distinct biotin-independent nuclear coregulatory function.

  19. Detection of polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase biosynthetic genes from antimicrobial coral-associated actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Dong, Jun-De; Yang, Jian; Luo, Xiong-Ming; Zhang, Si

    2014-10-01

    The diversity and properties of actinobacteria, predominant residents in coral holobionts, have been rarely documented. In this study, we aimed to explore the species diversity, antimicrobial activities and biosynthetic potential of culturable actinomycetes within the tissues of the scleractinian corals Porites lutea, Galaxea fascicularis and Acropora millepora from the South China Sea. A total of 70 strains representing 13 families and 15 genera of actinobacteria were isolated. The antimicrobial activity and biosynthetic potential of fifteen representative filamentous actinomycetes were estimated. Crude fermentation extracts of 6 strains exhibited comparable or greater activities against Vibrio alginolyticus than ciprofloxacin. Seven of the 15 actinomycetes strains possess type I polyketide synthases (PKS-I) and/or nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) genes. Nine tested strains possess type II polyketide synthases (PKS-II). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that these PKS and NRPS gene screening positive strains belong to genera Nocardiopsis, Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Amycolatopsis and Prauserella. One PKS-I and four NRPS fragments showed actinomycetes to produce bioactive molecules.

  20. Insights into substrate promiscuity of human seryl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Kaitlyn M; Puppala, Anupama K; Lee, Jonathan W; Lee, Hyun; Simonović, Miljan

    2017-11-01

    Seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) attaches L-serine to the cognate serine tRNA (tRNA Ser ) and the noncognate selenocysteine tRNA (tRNA Sec ). The latter activity initiates the anabolic cycle of selenocysteine (Sec), proper decoding of an in-frame Sec UGA codon, and synthesis of selenoproteins across all domains of life. While the accuracy of SerRS is important for overall proteome integrity, it is its substrate promiscuity that is vital for the integrity of the selenoproteome. This raises a question as to what elements in the two tRNA species, harboring different anticodon sequences and adopting distinct folds, facilitate aminoacylation by a common aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. We sought to answer this question by analyzing the ability of human cytosolic SerRS to bind and act on tRNA Ser , tRNA Sec , and 10 mutant and chimeric constructs in which elements of tRNA Ser were transposed onto tRNA Sec We show that human SerRS only subtly prefers tRNA Ser to tRNA Sec , and that discrimination occurs at the level of the serylation reaction. Surprisingly, the tRNA mutants predicted to adopt either the 7/5 or 8/5 fold are poor SerRS substrates. In contrast, shortening of the acceptor arm of tRNA Sec by a single base pair yields an improved SerRS substrate that adopts an 8/4 fold. We suggest that an optimal tertiary arrangement of structural elements within tRNA Sec and tRNA Ser dictate their utility for serylation. We also speculate that the extended acceptor-TΨC arm of tRNA Sec evolved as a compromise for productive binding to SerRS while remaining the major recognition element for other enzymes involved in Sec and selenoprotein synthesis. © 2017 Holman et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Evidence that the mitochondrial leucyl tRNA synthetase (LARS2) gene represents a novel type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    hart, Leen M; Hansen, Torben; Rietveld, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that a mutation in the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene is associated with type 2 diabetes. One of the consequences of this mutation is a reduced aminoacylation of tRNA(Leu(UUR)). In this study, we have examined whether variants in the leucyl tRNA synthetase...... gene (LARS2), involved in aminoacylation of tRNA(Leu(UUR)), associate with type 2 diabetes. Direct sequencing of LARS2 cDNA from 25 type 2 diabetic subjects revealed eight single nucleotide polymorphisms. Two of the variants were examined in 7,836 subjects from four independent populations...... no significant differences in clinical variables between carriers and noncarriers. In this study, we provide evidence that the LARS2 gene may represent a novel type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene. The mechanism by which the H324Q variant enhances type 2 diabetes risk needs to be further established...

  2. Adaptive sequence evolution in a color gene involved in the formation of the characteristic egg-dummies of male haplochromine cichlid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braasch Ingo

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exceptionally diverse species flocks of cichlid fishes in East Africa are prime examples of parallel adaptive radiations. About 80% of East Africa's more than 1 800 endemic cichlid species, and all species of the flocks of Lakes Victoria and Malawi, belong to a particularly rapidly evolving lineage, the haplochromines. One characteristic feature of the haplochromines is their possession of egg-dummies on the males' anal fins. These egg-spots mimic real eggs and play an important role in the mating system of these maternal mouthbrooding fish. Results Here, we show that the egg-spots of haplochromines are made up of yellow pigment cells, xanthophores, and that a gene coding for a type III receptor tyrosine kinase, colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor a (csf1ra, is expressed in egg-spot tissue. Molecular evolutionary analyses reveal that the extracellular ligand-binding and receptor-interacting domain of csf1ra underwent adaptive sequence evolution in the ancestral lineage of the haplochromines, coinciding with the emergence of egg-dummies. We also find that csf1ra is expressed in the egg-dummies of a distantly related cichlid species, the ectodine cichlid Ophthalmotilapia ventralis, in which markings with similar functions evolved on the pelvic fin in convergence to those of the haplochromines. Conclusion We conclude that modifications of existing signal transduction mechanisms might have evolved in the haplochromine lineage in association with the origination of anal fin egg-dummies. That positive selection has acted during the evolution of a color gene that seems to be involved in the morphogenesis of a sexually selected trait, the egg-dummies, highlights the importance of further investigations of the comparative genomic basis of the phenotypic diversification of cichlid fishes.

  3. Evolution of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis over four decades revealed by whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keira A Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The largest global outbreak of extensively drug-resistant (XDR tuberculosis (TB was identified in Tugela Ferry, KwaZulu-Natal (KZN, South Africa in 2005. The antecedents and timing of the emergence of drug resistance in this fatal epidemic XDR outbreak are unknown, and it is unclear whether drug resistance in this region continues to be driven by clonal spread or by the development of de novo resistance. A whole genome sequencing and drug susceptibility testing (DST was performed on 337 clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb collected in KZN from 2008 to 2013, in addition to three historical isolates, one of which was isolated during the Tugela Ferry outbreak. Using a variety of whole genome comparative approaches, 11 drug-resistant clones of M.tb circulating from 2008 to 2013 were identified, including a 50-member clone of XDR M.tb that was highly related to the Tugela Ferry XDR outbreak strain. It was calculated that the evolutionary trajectory from first-line drug resistance to XDR in this clone spanned more than four decades and began at the start of the antibiotic era. It was also observed that frequent de novo evolution of MDR and XDR was present, with 56 and 9 independent evolutions, respectively. Thus, ongoing amplification of drug-resistance in KwaZulu-Natal is driven by both clonal spread and de novo acquisition of resistance. In drug-resistant TB, isoniazid resistance was overwhelmingly the initial resistance mutation to be acquired, which would not be detected by current rapid molecular diagnostics that assess only rifampicin resistance.

  4. Studies towards the synthesis of ATP analogs as potential glutamine synthetase inhibitors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salisu, S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In research directed at the development of adenine triphosphate (ATP) analogs as potential glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitors, adenine and allopurinol derivatives have been synthesized either as novel ATP analogs or as scaffolds...

  5. Amino acid environment determines expression of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in embryonic rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, W. H.; van Roon, M.; Mooren, P. G.; de Graaf, A.; Charles, R.

    1985-01-01

    A completely defined medium (EHM-1), which reflects the amino acid composition of fetal rat serum and contains albumin as the sole proteinaceous compound, allows the accumulation of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the presence of dexamethasone, dibutyryl cyclic

  6. Kinetic basis for the conjugation of auxin by a GH3 family indole-acetic acid-amido synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingfeng; Westfall, Corey S; Hicks, Leslie M; Wang, Shiping; Jez, Joseph M

    2010-09-24

    The GH3 family of acyl-acid-amido synthetases catalyze the ATP-dependent formation of amino acid conjugates to modulate levels of active plant hormones, including auxins and jasmonates. Initial biochemical studies of various GH3s show that these enzymes group into three families based on sequence relationships and acyl-acid substrate preference (I, jasmonate-conjugating; II, auxin- and salicylic acid-conjugating; III, benzoate-conjugating); however, little is known about the kinetic and chemical mechanisms of these enzymes. Here we use GH3-8 from Oryza sativa (rice; OsGH3-8), which functions as an indole-acetic acid (IAA)-amido synthetase, for detailed mechanistic studies. Steady-state kinetic analysis shows that the OsGH3-8 requires either Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) for maximal activity and is specific for aspartate but accepts asparagine as a substrate with a 45-fold decrease in catalytic efficiency and accepts other auxin analogs, including phenyl-acetic acid, indole butyric acid, and naphthalene-acetic acid, as acyl-acid substrates with 1.4-9-fold reductions in k(cat)/K(m) relative to IAA. Initial velocity and product inhibition studies indicate that the enzyme uses a Bi Uni Uni Bi Ping Pong reaction sequence. In the first half-reaction, ATP binds first followed by IAA. Next, formation of an adenylated IAA intermediate results in release of pyrophosphate. The second half-reaction begins with binding of aspartate, which reacts with the adenylated intermediate to release IAA-Asp and AMP. Formation of a catalytically competent adenylated-IAA reaction intermediate was confirmed by mass spectrometry. These mechanistic studies provide insight on the reaction catalyzed by the GH3 family of enzymes to modulate plant hormone action.

  7. REPRESSION BY ADENINE OF THE FORMYLTETRAHYDROFOLATE SYNTHETASE IN AN ANTIFOLIC-RESISTANT MUTANT OF STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALBRECHT, A M; HUTCHISON, D J

    1964-04-01

    Albrecht, Alberta M. (Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, New York, N.Y.), and Dorris J. Hutchison. Repression by adenine of the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase in an antifolic-resistant mutant of Streptococcus faecalis. J. Bacteriol. 87:792-798. 1964.-In an amethopterin-resistant mutant of Streptococcus faecalis ATCC 8043 under cultivation conditions requiring purine synthesis de novo, both the dihydrofolate reductase and the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase were formed as constant fractions of the total protein synthesized during the exponential phase of growth. When excess adenine was added to the medium, the rate of formation of the synthetase was markedly decreased, i.e., repressed. Under these latter conditions, the synthesis of the reductase proceeded at a rate equal to that observed in the absence of adenine. The repressibility of the synthetase by adenine was demonstrated also by the decrease in rate of synthetase formation upon the addition of adenine to a culture actively synthesizing this enzyme. Guanine and hypoxanthine, like adenine, also repressed the synthetase; exogenous xanthine was less effective. Neither of the pyrimidines, thymine and uracil, at approximately 1 mug/ml, interfered with synthesis of the two enzymes.

  8. Gain-Of-Function Mutational Activation of Human TRNA Synthetase Procytokine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X.L.; Kapoor, M.; Otero, F.J.; Slike, B.M.; Tsuruta, H.; Frausto, R.; Bates, A.; Ewalt, K.L.; Cheresh, D.A.; Schimmel, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Disease-causing mutations occur in genes for aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. That some mutations are dominant suggests a gain of function. Native tRNA synthetases, such as tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, catalyze aminoacylation and are also procytokines that are activated by natural fragmentation. In principle, however, gain-of-function phenotypes could arise from mutational activation of synthetase procytokines. From crystal structure analysis, we hypothesized that a steric block of a critical Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif in full-length TyrRS suppresses the cytokine activity of a natural fragment. To test this hypothesis, we attempted to uncover ELR in the procytokine by mutating a conserved tyrosine (Y341) that tethers ELR. Site-specific proteolytic cleavage and small-angle X-ray scattering established subtle opening of the structure by the mutation. Strikingly, four different assays demonstrated mutational activation of cytokine functions. The results prove the possibilities for constitutive gain-of-function mutations in tRNA synthetases.

  9. Direct whole-genome deep-sequencing of human respiratory syncytial virus A and B from Vietnamese children identifies distinct patterns of inter- and intra-host evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilm, Andreas; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Lam, Ha Minh; Sim, Shuzhen; Sukumaran, Rashmi; Tran, Anh Tuan; Nguyen, Bach Hue; Tran, Thi Thu Loan; Tran, Quynh Huong; Vo, Quoc Bao; Dac, Nguyen Anh Tran; Trinh, Hong Nhien; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hai; Binh, Bao Tinh Le; Le, Khanh; Nguyen, Minh Tien; Thai, Quang Tung; Vo, Thanh Vu; Ngo, Ngoc Quang Minh; Dang, Thi Kim Huyen; Cao, Ngoc Huong; Tran, Thu Van; Ho, Lu Viet; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno; Chen, Swaine; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Bryant, Juliet E.; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children < 2 years of age. Little is known about RSV intra-host genetic diversity over the course of infection or about the immune pressures that drive RSV molecular evolution. We performed whole-genome deep-sequencing on 53 RSV-positive samples (37 RSV subgroup A and 16 RSV subgroup B) collected from the upper airways of hospitalized children in southern Vietnam over two consecutive seasons. RSV A NA1 and RSV B BA9 were the predominant genotypes found in our samples, consistent with other reports on global RSV circulation during the same period. For both RSV A and B, the M gene was the most conserved, confirming its potential as a target for novel therapeutics. The G gene was the most variable and was the only gene under detectable positive selection. Further, positively selected sites in G were found in close proximity to and in some cases overlapped with predicted glycosylation motifs, suggesting that selection on amino acid glycosylation may drive viral genetic diversity. We further identified hotspots and coldspots of intra-host genetic diversity in the RSV genome, some of which may highlight previously unknown regions of functional importance. PMID:26407694

  10. Theoretical studies of massive stars. I - Evolution of a 15-solar-mass star from the zero-age main sequence to neon ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endal, A. S.

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of a star with mass 15 times that of the sun from the zero-age main sequence to neon ignition has been computed by the Henyey method. The hydrogen-rich envelope and all shell sources were explicitly included in the models. An algorithm has been developed for approximating the results of carbon burning, including the branching ratio for the C-12 + C-12 reaction and taking some secondary reactions into account. Penetration of the convective envelope into the core is found to be unimportant during the stages covered by the models. Energy transfer from the carbon-burning shell to the core by degenerate electron conduction becomes important after the core carbon-burning stage. Neon ignition will occur in a semidegenerate core and will lead to a mild 'flash.' Detailed numerical results are given in an appendix. Continuation of the calculations into later stages and variations with the total mass of the star will be discussed in later papers.

  11. Whole genome sequence analysis of the first Australian OXA-48-producing outbreak-associated Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates: the resistome and in vivo evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn A Espedido

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequencing was used to characterize the resistome of intensive care unit (ICU outbreak-associated carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates. Importantly, and of particular concern, the carbapenem-hydrolyzing β-lactamase gene bla(OXA-48 and the extended-spectrum β-lactamase gene bla(CTX-M-14, were identified on a single broad host-range conjugative plasmid. This represents the first report of bla(OXA-48 in Australia and highlights the importance of resistance gene surveillance, as such plasmids can silently spread amongst enterobacterial populations and have the potential to drastically limit treatment options. Furthermore, the in vivo evolution of these isolates was also examined after 18 months of intra-abdominal carriage in a patient that transited through the ICU during the outbreak period. Reflecting the clonality of K. pneumoniae, only 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were accumulated during this time-period and many of these were associated with genes involved in tolerance/resistance to antibiotics, metals or organic solvents, and transcriptional regulation. Collectively, these SNPs are likely to be associated with changes in virulence (at least to some extent that have refined the in vivo colonization capacity of the original outbreak isolate.

  12. Solid-state dewetting of single- and bilayer Au-W thin films: Unraveling the role of individual layer thickness, stacking sequence and oxidation on morphology evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Herz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembly of ultrathin Au, W, and Au-W bilayer thin films is investigated using a rapid thermal annealing technique in an inert ambient. The solid-state dewetting of Au films is briefly revisited in order to emphasize the role of initial film thickness. W films deposited onto SiO2 evolve into needle-like nanocrystals rather than forming particle-like agglomerates upon annealing at elevated temperatures. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that such nanocrystals actually consist of tungsten (VI oxide (WO3 which is related to an anisotropic oxide crystal growth out of the thin film. The evolution of W films is highly sensitive to the presence of any residual oxygen. Combination of both the dewetting of Au and the oxide crystal growth of WO3 is realized by using various bilayer film configurations of the immiscible Au and W. At low temperature, Au dewetting is initiated while oxide crystal growth is still suppressed. Depending on the stacking sequence of the Au-W bilayer thin film, W acts either as a substrate or as a passivation layer for the dewetting of Au. Being the ground layer, W changes the wettability of Au which clearly modifies its initial state for the dewetting. Being the top layer, W prevents Au from dewetting regardless of Au film thickness. Moreover, regular pattern formation of Au-WO3 nanoparticles is observed at high temperature demonstrating how bilayer thin film dewetting can create unique nanostructure arrangements.

  13. Evidence for positive selection acting on microcystin synthetase adenylation domains in three cyanobacterial genera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhiainen Leo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria produce a wealth of secondary metabolites, including the group of small cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxins that constitutes the microcystin family. The enzyme complex that directs the biosynthesis of microcystin is encoded in a single large gene cluster (mcy. mcy genes have a widespread distribution among cyanobacteria and are likely to have an ancient origin. The notable diversity within some of the Mcy modules is generated through various recombination events including horizontal gene transfer. Results A comparative analysis of the adenylation domains from the first module of McyB (McyB1 and McyC in the microcystin synthetase complex was performed on a large number of microcystin-producing strains from the Anabaena, Microcystis and Planktothrix genera. We found no decisive evidence for recombination between strains from different genera. However, we detected frequent recombination events in the mcyB and mcyC genes between strains within the same genus. Frequent interdomain recombination events were also observed between mcyB and mcyC sequences in Anabaena and Microcystis. Recombination and mutation rate ratios suggest that the diversification of mcyB and mcyC genes is driven by recombination events as well as point mutations in all three genera. Sequence analysis suggests that generally the adenylation domains of the first domain of McyB and McyC are under purifying selection. However, we found clear evidence for positive selection acting on a number of amino acid residues within these adenylation domains. These include residues important for active site selectivity of the adenylation domain, strongly suggesting selection for novel microcystin variants. Conclusion We provide the first clear evidence for positive selection acting on amino acid residues involved directly in the recognition and activation of amino acids incorporated into microcystin, indicating that the microcystin complement of a given strain may

  14. Stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar Evolution, Second Edition covers the significant advances in the understanding of birth, life, and death of stars.This book is divided into nine chapters and begins with a description of the characteristics of stars according to their brightness, distance, size, mass, age, and chemical composition. The next chapters deal with the families, structure, and birth of stars. These topics are followed by discussions of the chemical composition and the evolution of main-sequence stars. A chapter focuses on the unique features of the sun as a star, including its evolution, magnetic fields, act

  15. Characterization of FdmV as an Amide Synthetase for Fredericamycin A Biosynthesis in Streptomyces griseus ATCC 43944*

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yihua; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Ju, Jianhua; Lin, Shuangjun; Rajski, Scott R.; Shen, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Fredericamycin (FDM) A is a pentadecaketide natural product that features an amide linkage. Analysis of the fdm cluster from Streptomyces griseus ATCC 43944, however, failed to reveal genes encoding the types of amide synthetases commonly seen in natural product biosynthesis. Here, we report in vivo and in vitro characterizations of FdmV, an asparagine synthetase (AS) B-like protein, as an amide synthetase that catalyzes the amide bond formation in FDM A biosynthesis. This is supported by the...

  16. Predicted class-I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase-like proteins in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Lakshminarayan M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies point to a great diversity of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis systems with major roles in amino acid and co-factor biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and post-translational modifications of proteins by peptide tags. The least studied of these systems are those utilizing tRNAs or aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AAtRS in non-ribosomal peptide ligation. Results Here we describe novel examples of AAtRS related proteins that are likely to be involved in the synthesis of widely distributed peptide-derived metabolites. Using sensitive sequence profile methods we show that the cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs are members of the HUP class of Rossmannoid domains and are likely to be highly derived versions of the class-I AAtRS catalytic domains. We also identify the first eukaryotic CDPSs in fungi and in animals; they might be involved in immune response in the latter organisms. We also identify a paralogous version of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase, which is widespread in bacteria, and present evidence using contextual information that it might function independently of protein synthesis as a peptide ligase in the formation of a peptide- derived secondary metabolite. This metabolite is likely to be heavily modified through multiple reactions catalyzed by a metal-binding cupin domain and a lysine N6 monooxygenase that are strictly associated with this paralogous methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MtRS. We further identify an analogous system wherein the MtRS has been replaced by more typical peptide ligases with the ATP-grasp or modular condensation-domains. Conclusions The prevalence of these predicted biosynthetic pathways in phylogenetically distant, pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria suggests that metabolites synthesized by them might participate in interactions with the host. More generally, these findings point to a complete spectrum of recruitment of AAtRS to various non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways, ranging from the

  17. In situ autoradiographic detection of folylpolyglutamate synthetase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sussman, D.J.; Milman, G.; Osborne, C.; Shane, B.

    1986-01-01

    The enzyme folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) catalyzes the conversion of folate (pteroylmonoglutamate) to the polyglutamate forms (pteroylpolyglutamates) that are required for folate retention by mammalian cells. A rapid in situ autoradiographic assay for FPGS was developed which is based on the folate cofactor requirement of thymidylate synthase. Chinese hamster AUX B1 mutant cells lack FPGS activity and are unable to accumulate folate. As a result, the conversion of [6- 3 H]deoxyuridine to thymidine via the thymidylate synthase reaction is impaired in AUX B1 cells and no detectable label is incorporated into DNA. In contrast, FPGS in wild-type Chinese hamster CHO cells causes folate retention and enables the incorporation of [6- 3 H]deoxyuridine into DNA. Incorporation may be detected by autoradiography of monolayer cultures or of colonies replica plated onto polyester discs. Introduction of Escherichia coli FPGS into AUX B1 cells restores the activity of the thymidylate synthase pathway and demonstrates that the E. coli FPGS enzyme can provide pteroylpolyglutamates which functions in mammalian cells

  18. Nitric oxide synthetase and Helicobacter pylori in patients undergoing appendicectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to determine whether Helicobacter pylori forms part of the normal microenvironment of the appendix, whether it plays a role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis, and whether it is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) in appendicular macrophages. METHODS: Serology for H. pylori was performed on 51 consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendicectomy. Appendix samples were tested for urease activity, cultured and stained for H. pylori, graded according to the degree of inflammatory infiltrate, and probed immunohistochemically for iNOS expression. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 21 (range 7-51) years. Seventeen patients (33 per cent) were seropositive for H. pylori but no evidence of H. pylori was found in any appendix specimen. However, an enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in seropositive patients (P < 0.04) and the expression of macrophage iNOS in the mucosa of normal and inflamed appendix specimens was increased (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: H. pylori does not colonize the appendix and is unlikely to be a pathogenic stimulus for appendicitis. Priming effects on mucosal immunology downstream from the foregut may occur after infection with H. pylori.

  19. Chitin synthetase in encysting Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba invadens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.; Gillin, F.D.

    1987-01-01

    Giardia lamblia (Gl) and Entamoeba invadens (Ei) are protozoan parasites with two morphologic stages in their life cycles. Motile trophozoites colonize the intestine of humans and reptiles respectively. Water resistant cysts, which can survive outside the host, transmit infection. In vitro cyst formation of Ei from trophozoites has been reported, and the authors have recently induced in vitro encystation of Gl. Although the cyst walls of both parasites contain chitin, it synthesis by encysting trophozoites has not been reported. The authors now show that encystation conditions greatly increase chitin synthetase (CS) specific activity (incorporation of 3 H GlcNAc from UDP-GlcNAc into TCA-or alcohol-precipitable material). Extracts of encysting Gl incorporated 3.6 nmol/mg protein in 5 hr compared to < 0.005 in controls. Extracts of encysting Fi incorporated 4.8 n mol/mg protein, compared to 1.7 in the control. CS activity of both parasites requires preformed chitin. The Gl enzyme requires a reducing agent, is inhibited by digitonin and the CS inhibitors, polyoxin D and Nikkomycin, but not by tunicamycin. The product is digested by chitinase. Ei enzyme does not require a reducing agent and is stimulated by 1 mg/ml digitonin, but inhibited by higher concentrations. These studies demonstrate CS enzymes which may play important roles in encystation of Gl and Ei

  20. Chitin synthetase in encysting Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba invadens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.; Gillin, F.D.

    1987-05-01

    Giardia lamblia (Gl) and Entamoeba invadens (Ei) are protozoan parasites with two morphologic stages in their life cycles. Motile trophozoites colonize the intestine of humans and reptiles respectively. Water resistant cysts, which can survive outside the host, transmit infection. In vitro cyst formation of Ei from trophozoites has been reported, and the authors have recently induced in vitro encystation of Gl. Although the cyst walls of both parasites contain chitin, it synthesis by encysting trophozoites has not been reported. The authors now show that encystation conditions greatly increase chitin synthetase (CS) specific activity (incorporation of /sup 3/H GlcNAc from UDP-GlcNAc into TCA-or alcohol-precipitable material). Extracts of encysting Gl incorporated 3.6 nmol/mg protein in 5 hr compared to < 0.005 in controls. Extracts of encysting Fi incorporated 4.8 n mol/mg protein, compared to 1.7 in the control. CS activity of both parasites requires preformed chitin. The Gl enzyme requires a reducing agent, is inhibited by digitonin and the CS inhibitors, polyoxin D and Nikkomycin, but not by tunicamycin. The product is digested by chitinase. Ei enzyme does not require a reducing agent and is stimulated by 1 mg/ml digitonin, but inhibited by higher concentrations. These studies demonstrate CS enzymes which may play important roles in encystation of Gl and Ei.

  1. Essential nontranslational functions of tRNA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Nontranslational functions of vertebrate aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), which catalyze the production of aminoacyl-tRNAs for protein synthesis, have recently been discovered. Although these new functions were thought to be 'moonlighting activities', many are as critical for cellular homeostasis as their activity in translation. New roles have been associated with their cytoplasmic forms as well as with nuclear and secreted extracellular forms that affect pathways for cardiovascular development and the immune response and mTOR, IFN-γ and p53 signaling. The associations of aaRSs with autoimmune disorders, cancers and neurological disorders further highlight nontranslational functions of these proteins. New architecture elaborations of the aaRSs accompany their functional expansion in higher organisms and have been associated with the nontranslational functions for several aaRSs. Although a general understanding of how these functions developed is limited, the expropriation of aaRSs for essential nontranslational functions may have been initiated by co-opting the amino acid-binding site for another purpose.

  2. Essential Non-Translational Functions of tRNA Synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Nontranslational functions of vertebrate aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), which catalyze the production of aminoacyl-tRNAs for protein synthesis, have recently been discovered. While these new functions were thought to be ‘moonlighting activities’, many are as critical for cellular homeostasis as the activity in translation. New roles have been associated with cytoplasmic forms as well as with nuclear and secreted extracellular forms that impact pathways for cardiovascular development, the immune response, and mTOR, IFN-γ and p53 signaling. The associations of aaRSs with autoimmune disorders, cancers and neurological disorders further highlight nontranslational functions of these proteins. Novel architecture elaborations of the aaRSs accompany their functional expansion in higher organisms and have been associated with the nontranslational functions for several aaRSs. While a general understanding of how these functions developed is limited, the expropriation of aaRSs for essential nontranslational functions may have been initiated by co-opting the amino acid binding site for another purpose. PMID:23416400

  3. The gene encoding human glutathione synthetase (GSS) maps to the long arm of chromosome 20 at band 11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.C.; Vaska, V.L.; Ford, J.H. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville (Australia)] [and others

    1995-12-10

    Two forms of glutathione synthetase deficiency have been described. While one form is mild, causing hemolytic anemia, the other more severe form causes 5-oxoprolinuria with secondary neurological involvement. Despite the existence of two deficiency phenotypes, Southern blots hybridized with a glutathione synthetase cDNA suggest that there is a single glutathione synthetase gene in the human genome. Analysis of somatic cell hybrids showed the human glutathione synthetase gene (GSS) to be located on chromosome 20, and this assignment has been refined to subband 20q11.2 using in situ hybridization. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  4. The predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus aspartyl-tRNA synthetase recognizes tRNAAsn as a substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Alperstein

    Full Text Available The predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus preys on other Gram-negative bacteria and was predicted to be an asparagine auxotroph. However, despite encoding asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase and glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase, B. bacteriovorus also contains the amidotransferase GatCAB. Deinococcus radiodurans, and Thermus thermophilus also encode both of these aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with GatCAB. Both also code for a second aspartyl-tRNA synthetase and use the additional aspartyl-tRNA synthetase with GatCAB to synthesize asparagine on tRNAAsn. Unlike those two bacteria, B. bacteriovorus encodes only one aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. Here we demonstrate the lone B. bacteriovorus aspartyl-tRNA synthetase catalyzes aspartyl-tRNAAsn formation that GatCAB can then amidate to asparaginyl-tRNAAsn. This non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase with GatCAB thus provides B. bacteriovorus a second route for Asn-tRNAAsn formation with the asparagine synthesized in a tRNA-dependent manner. Thus, in contrast to a previous prediction, B. bacteriovorus codes for a biosynthetic route for asparagine. Analysis of bacterial genomes suggests a significant number of other bacteria may also code for both routes for Asn-tRNAAsn synthesis with only a limited number encoding a second aspartyl-tRNA synthetase.

  5. Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Theron

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase is a ubiquitous central enzyme in nitrogen metabolism that is controlled by up to four regulatory mechanisms, including adenylylation of some or all of the twelve subunits by adenylyl transferase. It is considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of tuberculosis, being essential for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and is found extracellularly only in the pathogenic Mycobacterium strains. Human glutamine synthetase is not regulated by the adenylylation mechanism, so the adenylylated form of bacterial glutamine synthetase is of particular interest. Previously published reports show that, when M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase is expressed in Escherichia coli, the E. coli adenylyl transferase does not optimally adenylylate the M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase. Here, we demonstrate the production of soluble adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase in E. coli by the co-expression of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase and M. tuberculosis adenylyl transferase. The differential inhibition of adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase and deadenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase by ATP based scaffold inhibitors are reported. Compounds selected on the basis of their enzyme inhibition were also shown to inhibit M. tuberculosis in the BACTEC 460TB™ assay as well as the intracellular inhibition of M. tuberculosis in a mouse bone-marrow derived macrophage assay.

  6. Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, A; Roth, R L; Hoppe, H; Parkinson, C; van der Westhuyzen, C W; Stoychev, S; Wiid, I; Pietersen, R D; Baker, B; Kenyon, C P

    2017-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is a ubiquitous central enzyme in nitrogen metabolism that is controlled by up to four regulatory mechanisms, including adenylylation of some or all of the twelve subunits by adenylyl transferase. It is considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of tuberculosis, being essential for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and is found extracellularly only in the pathogenic Mycobacterium strains. Human glutamine synthetase is not regulated by the adenylylation mechanism, so the adenylylated form of bacterial glutamine synthetase is of particular interest. Previously published reports show that, when M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase is expressed in Escherichia coli, the E. coli adenylyl transferase does not optimally adenylylate the M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase. Here, we demonstrate the production of soluble adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase in E. coli by the co-expression of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase and M. tuberculosis adenylyl transferase. The differential inhibition of adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase and deadenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase by ATP based scaffold inhibitors are reported. Compounds selected on the basis of their enzyme inhibition were also shown to inhibit M. tuberculosis in the BACTEC 460TB™ assay as well as the intracellular inhibition of M. tuberculosis in a mouse bone-marrow derived macrophage assay.

  7. Differential expression of argininosuccinate synthetase in serous and non‐serous ovarian carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Dong‐Joo; Walts, Ann E; Beach, Jessica A; Lester, Jenny; Bomalaski, John S; Walsh, Christine S; Ruprecht Wiedemeyer, W; Karlan, Beth Y

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The current standard of care for epithelial ovarian cancer does not discriminate between different histologic subtypes (serous, clear cell, endometrioid and mucinous) despite the knowledge that ovarian carcinoma subtypes do not respond uniformly to conventional platinum/taxane‐based chemotherapy. Exploiting addictions and vulnerabilities in cancers with distinguishable molecular features presents an opportunity to develop individualized therapies that may be more effective than the current ‘one size fits all' approach. One such opportunity is arginine depletion therapy with pegylated arginine deiminase, which has shown promise in several cancer types that exhibit low levels of argininosuccinate synthetase including hepatocellular and prostate carcinoma and melanoma. Based on the high levels of argininosuccinate synthetase previously observed in ovarian cancers, these tumours have been considered unlikely candidates for arginine depletion therapy. However, argininosuccinate synthetase levels have not been evaluated in the individual histologic subtypes of ovarian carcinoma. The current study is the first to examine the expression of argininosuccinate synthetase at the mRNA and protein levels in large cohorts of primary and recurrent ovarian carcinomas and ovarian cancer cell lines. We show that the normal fallopian tube fimbria and the majority of primary high‐grade and low‐grade serous ovarian carcinomas express high levels of argininosuccinate synthetase, which tend to further increase in recurrent tumours. In contrast to the serous subtype, non‐serous ovarian carcinoma subtypes (clear cell, endometrioid and mucinous) frequently lack detectable argininosuccinate synthetase expression. The in vitro sensitivity of ovarian cancer cell lines to arginine depletion with pegylated arginine deiminase was inversely correlated with argininosuccinate synthetase expression. Our data suggest that the majority of serous ovarian carcinomas are not susceptible

  8. Dual Organellar Targeting of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in Diatoms and Cryptophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gile, Gillian H; Moog, Daniel; Slamovits, Claudio H; Maier, Uwe-G; Archibald, John M

    2015-05-20

    The internal compartmentation of eukaryotic cells not only allows separation of biochemical processes but it also creates the requirement for systems that can selectively transport proteins across the membrane boundaries. Although most proteins function in a single subcellular compartment, many are able to enter two or more compartments, a phenomenon known as dual or multiple targeting. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), which catalyze the ligation of tRNAs to their cognate amino acids, are particularly prone to functioning in multiple subcellular compartments. They are essential for translation, so they are required in every compartment where translation takes place. In diatoms, there are three such compartments, the plastid, the mitochondrion, and the cytosol. In cryptophytes, translation also takes place in the periplastid compartment (PPC), which is the reduced cytoplasm of the plastid's red algal ancestor and which retains a reduced red algal nucleus. We searched the organelle and nuclear genomes of the cryptophyte Guillardia theta and the diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana for aaRS genes and found an insufficient number of genes to provide each compartment with a complete set of aaRSs. We therefore inferred, with support from localization predictions, that many aaRSs are dual targeted. We tested four of the predicted dual targeted aaRSs with green fluorescent protein fusion localizations in P. tricornutum and found evidence for dual targeting to the mitochondrion and plastid in P. tricornutum and G. theta, and indications for dual targeting to the PPC and cytosol in G. theta. This is the first report of dual targeting in diatoms or cryptophytes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  9. Coupling channel evolution monitoring and RFID tracking in a large, wandering, gravel-bed river: Insights into sediment routing on geomorphic continuity through a riffle-pool sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, Margot; Dufour, Simon; Provansal, Mireille; Couvert, Bernard; de Linares, Matthieu

    2015-02-01

    Bedload transport and bedform mobility in large gravel-bed rivers are not easily monitored, especially during floods. Large reaches present difficulties in bed access during flows for flow measurements. Because of these logistical issues, the current knowledge about bedload transport processes and bedform mobility lacks field-based information, while this missing information would precisely match river management needs. The lack of information linking channel evolution and particle displacements is even more striking in wandering reaches. The Durance River is a large, wandering, gravel-bed river (catchment area: 14,280 km2; mean width: 240 m), located in the southern French Alps and highly impacted by flow diversion and gravel mining. In order to improve current understanding of the link between sediment transport processes and river bed morphodynamics, we set up a sediment particle survey in the channel using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and topographic surveys (GPS RTK and scour chains) for a 4-year recurrence interval flood. By combining topographic changes before and after a flood, intraflood erosion/deposition patterns from scour chains, differential routing of tracer particles, and spatial distribution of bed shear stress through a complex reach, this paper aims to define the critical shear stress for significant sediment mobility in this setting. Gravel tracking highlights displacement patterns in agreement with bar downstream migration and transport of particles across the riffle within this single flood event. Because no velocity measurements were possible during flood, a TELEMAC three-dimensional model helped interpret particle displacements by estimating spatial distribution of shear stresses and flow directions at peak flow. Although RFID tracking in a large, wandering, gravel-bed river does have some technical limitations (burial, recovery process time-consuming), it provides useful information on sediment routing through a riffle

  10. Role of 4-Hydroxybutyrate-CoA Synthetase in the CO2 Fixation Cycle in Thermoacidophilic Archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, AS; Han, YJ; Bennett, RK; Adams, MWW; Kelly, RM

    2013-02-08

    Metallosphaera sedula is an extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon that grows heterotrophically on peptides and chemolithoautotrophically on hydrogen, sulfur, or reduced metals as energy sources. During autotrophic growth, carbon dioxide is incorporated into cellular carbon via the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle (3HP/4HB). To date, all of the steps in the pathway have been connected to enzymes encoded in specific genes, except for the one responsible for ligation of coenzyme A (CoA) to 4HB. Although several candidates for this step have been identified through bioinformatic analysis of the M. sedula genome, none have been shown to catalyze this biotransformation. In this report, transcriptomic analysis of cells grown under strict H-2-CO2 autotrophy was consistent with the involvement of Msed_0406 and Msed_0394. Recombinant versions of these enzymes catalyzed the ligation of CoA to 4HB, with similar affinities for 4HB (K-m values of 1.9 and 1.5 mM for Msed_0406 and Msed_0394, respectively) but with different rates (1.69 and 0.22 mu mol x min(-1) x mg(-1) for Msed_0406 and Msed_0394, respectively). Neither Msed_0406 nor Msed_0394 have close homologs in other Sulfolobales, although low sequence similarity is not unusual for acyl-adenylate-forming enzymes. The capacity of these two enzymes to use 4HB as a substrate may have arisen from simple modifications to acyl-adenylate-forming enzymes. For example, a single amino acid substitution (W424G) in the active site of the acetate/propionate synthetase (Msed_1353), an enzyme that is highly conserved among the Sulfolobales, changed its substrate specificity to include 4HB. The identification of the 4-HB CoA synthetase now completes the set of enzymes comprising the 3HP/4HB cycle.

  11. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A., E-mail: merritt@u.washington.edu [Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa, (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  12. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine

  13. Phytohormonal regulation of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase by gibberellic acid in wheat aleurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, M; Satpathy, M; Sachar, R C

    1992-11-17

    Gibberellic acid (GA3) brought about a 3-fold stimulation of AdoMet synthetase activity in wheat aleurones. At the qualitative level, three isozymes of AdoMet synthetase were observed by DE-52 chromatography in GA3-treated wheat aleurones. In contrast, the control wheat aleurones showed a single isozyme. Thus the phytohormone (GA3, 1 microM) induced two additional isozymes of AdoMet synthetase in wheat aleurones. The activity of all the three isozymes in GA3-treated aleurones was considerably decreased by the simultaneous presence of abscisic acid (ABA, 10 microM). Cycloheximide (20 micrograms/ml) also significantly lowered the levels of the three isozymes of AdoMet synthetase in Ga3-treated aleurones, thereby suggesting the requirement of de-novo protein synthesis for the complete induction of isozymes. However, wheat aleurones excised from embryonated wheat seeds, did not require the application of GA3 for the induction of two additional isozymes of AdoMet synthetase. Apparently, the transport of GA3 from the embryo to aleurones induced two new isozymes of AdoMet synthetase. Three isozymes of AdoMet synthetase were also observed in wheat embryos excised from germinated wheat grains, without exogenous application of GA3. The molecular weight of all the three isozymes of AdoMet synthetase in wheat system is 181,000. The molecular weight of the subunit of the enzyme is 84,000. The dimeric nature of AdoMet synthetase was established by SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified enzyme. In-vitro hybridization of two flanking isozymic peaks I and III by NaCl-freeze-thaw method resulted in the appearance of an additional middle activity peak (isozyme II). However, no additional isozymic peaks were generated when isozymic peaks I and III were individually given a freeze-thaw treatment. Thus the flanking isozymic peaks I and III represent homodimers that differed in their net charge. In contrast, the middle isozymic activity peak II, when subjected to NaCl-freeze-thaw treatments

  14. Identification of autoantibodies to tyrosil-tRNA synthetase in heart disfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryabenko D. V.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the levels of specific autoantibodies against tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and its individual modules in the blood serum of people with heart failure caused by dilated cardiomyopathy, myocarditis and ischemic heart disease compared with healthy donors. Methods. Recombinant proteins were obtained using bacterial strains transformed with appropriate plasmid vectors and were purified by chromatography on Ni-NTA-agarose. The levels of specific autoantibodies were investigated by ELISA. Results. The increased levels of autoantibodies specific to tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, its N-terminal catalytic module and non-catalytic C-module, were found in the blood serum of patients, compared with healthy donors. Conclusions. The results obtained demonstrate the possible role of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase in adaptive changes of the myocardium in response to stress factors.

  15. Inhibition of Dihydropteroate Synthetase from Escherichia coli by Sulfones and Sulfonamides

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Jerry L.; Maren, Thomas H.

    1973-01-01

    The inhibitory action of various diphenylsulfones and sulfonamides on dihydropteroate synthetase partially purified from Escherichia coli was examined. 4,4′-Diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS; I50 = 2 × 10−5 M) and the monosubstituted derivatives 4-amino-4′-formamidodiphenylsulfone (I50 = 5.8 × 10−5 M) and 4-amino-4′-acetamidodiphenylsulfone (I50 = 5.2 × 10−5 M) were effective inhibitors of dihydropteroate synthetase activity. Disubstitution of the arylamine groups of DDS (4,4′-diformamidodiphenylsulfone and 4,4′-diacetamidodiphenylsulfone) resulted in complete loss of inhibitory activity. Both DDS (KI = 5.9 × 10−6 M) and sulfadiazine (KI = 2.5 × 10−6 M) were found to be competitive inhibitors of dihydropteroate synthetase. These findings are discussed in regard to the Bell and Roblin theory of structure-activity relationships for p-aminobenzoic acid antagonists. PMID:4597736

  16. [Methionine sulfoximine and phosphinothricin--glutamine synthetase inhibitors and activators and their herbicidal activity (A review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstigneeva, Z G; Solov'eva, N A; Sidel'nikova, L I

    2003-01-01

    Derivatives of methionine sulfoximine (MSO) and phosphinothrycin (PPT), which are analogues of glutamate, exhibit selective herbicidal activity. This effect is accounted for by impairments of nitrogen metabolism, resulting from inhibition of its key enzyme in plants, glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2). Inhibition of the enzyme causes ammoniac nitrogen to accumulate and terminates the synthesis of glutamine. Changes in the content of these two metabolites (excess ammonium and glutamine deficiency) act in a concert to cause plant death. However, low concentrations of MSO, PPT, and their metabolites produce an opposite effect: glutamine synthetase is activated, with concomitant stimulation of plant growth and productivity. The mechanisms whereby MSO and PPT affect glutamine synthetase activity are discussed in the context of nitrogen metabolism in plants.

  17. Diet- and hormone-induced reversal of the carbamoylphosphate synthetase mRNA gradient in the rat liver lobulus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moorman, A. F.; de Boer, P. A.; Charles, R.; Lamers, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    A hybridocytochemical analysis of adult liver from normal control and from hormonally and dietary-treated rats was carried out, using radioactively-labelled probes for the mRNAs of glutamine synthetase (GS), carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). In line

  18. Continuous recording of long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity using fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Erland J.F.; Nystrøm, Birthe T.

    2001-01-01

    acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes......acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes...

  19. Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes pesL and pes1 Are Essential for Fumigaclavine C Production in Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Gallagher, Lorna; Schrettl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The identity of metabolites encoded by the majority of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, remains outstanding. We found that the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthetases PesL and Pes1 were essential for fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, the end produc...

  20. Large Sequence Polymorphisms of the Euro-American lineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a phylogenetic reconstruction and evidence for convergent evolution in the DR locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindi, Laura; Lari, Nicoletta; Garzelli, Carlo

    2012-10-01

    The Euro-American lineage of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex consists of 10 sublineages, each defined by a deletion of a large genomic region (RD, region of difference); by spoligotyping, that probes the polymorphism of the Direct Repeat (DR) locus, the Euro-American strains are classified into 5 lineages (T, Haarlem, LAM, S and X) and 34 sublineages, but the relationships between the RD-defined sublineages and the spoligotype groupings are largely unclear. By testing a global sample of 158 Euro-American strains, mutually exclusive deletions of RD115, RD122, RD174, RD182, RD183, RD193, RD219, RD726 or RD761 were found in 122 strains; deletion of RD724, typical of strains from Central Africa, was not found. The RD-defined sublineages, tested for katG463/gyrA95 polymorphism, belonged to Principal Genotypic Group (PGG) 2, with the exception of RD219 sublineage belonging to PGG3; the 36 strains with no deletion were of either PGG2 or 3. Based on these polymorphisms, a phylogenetic reconstruction of the Euro-American lineage, that integrates the previously reported phylogeny, is proposed. Although certain deletions were found to be associated to certain spoligotype lineages (i.e., deletion RD115 to T and LAM, RD174 to LAM, RD182 to Haarlem, RD219 to T), our analysis indicates a general lack of concordance between RD-defined sublineages and spoligotype groupings. Moreover, of the 42 spoligotypes detected among the study strains, sixteen were shared by strains belonging to different RD sublineages. IS6110-RFLP analysis of strains sharing spoligotypes confirmed a poor genetic relatedness between strains of different RD sublineages. These findings provide evidence for the occurrence of a high degree of homoplasy in the DR locus leading to convergent evolution to identical spoligotypes. The incongruence between Large Sequence Polymorphism and spoligotype polymorphism argues against the use of spoligotyping for establishing phylogenetic relationships within the Euro

  1. Sequence Evolution and Expression of the Androgen Receptor and Other Pathway-Related Genes in a Unisexual Fish, the Amazon Molly, Poecilia formosa, and Its Bisexual Ancestors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Zhu

    Full Text Available The all-female Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa originated from a single hybridization of two bisexual ancestors, Atlantic molly (Poecilia mexicana and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna. As a gynogenetic species, the Amazon molly needs to copulate with a heterospecific male, but the genetic information of the sperm-donor does not contribute to the next generation, as the sperm only acts as the trigger for the diploid eggs' embryogenesis. Here, we study the sequence evolution and gene expression of the duplicated genes coding for androgen receptors (ars and other pathway-related genes, i.e., the estrogen receptors (ers and cytochrome P450, family19, subfamily A, aromatase genes (cyp19as, in the Amazon molly, in comparison to its bisexual ancestors. Mollies possess-as most other teleost fish-two copies of the ar, er, and cyp19a genes, i.e., arα/arβ, erα/erβ1, and cyp19a1 (also referred as cyp19a1a/cyp19a2 (also referred to as cyp19a1b, respectively. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs among the ancestral bisexual species were generally predicted not to alter protein function. Some derived substitutions in the P. mexicana and one in P. formosa are predicted to impact protein function. We also describe the gene expression pattern of the ars and pathway-related genes in various tissues (i.e., brain, gill, and ovary and provide SNP markers for allele specific expression research. As a general tendency, the levels of gene expression were lowest in gill and highest in ovarian tissues, while expression levels in the brain were intermediate in most cases. Expression levels in P. formosa were conserved where expression did not differ between the two bisexual ancestors. In those cases where gene expression levels significantly differed between the bisexual species, P. formosa expression was always comparable to the higher expression level among the two ancestors. Interestingly, erβ1 was expressed neither in brain nor in gill in the

  2. The influence of prenatal X-irradiation on the activity of SRNA-aminoacyl synthetases in the developing rabbit brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wender, M.; Zgorzalewicz, B.

    1976-01-01

    The activities of sRNA-aminoacyl synthetases were investigated in the cerebral white and grey matter of rabbits subjected during their prenatal life to a single x-ray dose of 150 rad. The results of investigations have shown that ionizing radiation acting during intrauterine development of the experimental animal brings about a distinct depression of all sRNA-aminoacyl synthetase activities in the newborn irradiated litter. During the postnatal development of these animals the activities of some of the synthetases further decreased and even at adulthood, where they are normally very low, their activities were below the control values. The activities of some other synthetases, after the initial depression, showed no further decrease and at adulthood had values comparable to controls. The results indicate clearly that prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation also affects the steps of protein biosynthesis which depend on the activity of sRNA-aminoacyl synthetases. (author)

  3. Characterization of a Salmonella typhimurium mutant defective in phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochimsen, Bjarne; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Garber, Bruce B.

    1985-01-01

    -utilizing mutants. Strain GP122 had roughly 15% of the PRPP synthetase activity and 25% of the PRPP pool of its parent strain. The mutant exhibited many of the predicted consequences of a decreased PRPP pool and a defective PRPP synthetase enzyme, including: poor growth on purine bases; decreased accumulation of 5......-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (the substrate of the blocked purE reaction) under conditions of purine starvation; excretion of anthranilic acid when grown in medium lacking tryptophan; increased resistance to inhibition by 5-fluorouracil; derepressed levels of aspartate transcarbamylase and orotate...

  4. An archaeal tRNA-synthetase complex that enhances aminoacylation under extreme conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Hausmann, Corinne D

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play an integral role in protein synthesis, functioning to attach the correct amino acid with its cognate tRNA molecule. AaRSs are known to associate into higher-order multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complexes (MSC) involved in archaeal and eukaryotic translatio...... of a complex between MtSerRS and MtArgRS provides a means by which methanogenic archaea can optimize an early step in translation under a wide range of extreme environmental conditions....

  5. Entamoeba lysyl-tRNA synthetase contains a cytokine-like domain with chemokine activity towards human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Castro de Moura

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunological pressure encountered by protozoan parasites drives the selection of strategies to modulate or avoid the immune responses of their hosts. Here we show that the parasite Entamoeba histolytica has evolved a chemokine that mimics the sequence, structure, and function of the human cytokine HsEMAPII (Homo sapiens endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II. This Entamoeba EMAPII-like polypeptide (EELP is translated as a domain attached to two different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS that are overexpressed when parasites are exposed to inflammatory signals. EELP is dispensable for the tRNA aminoacylation activity of the enzymes that harbor it, and it is cleaved from them by Entamoeba proteases to generate a standalone cytokine. Isolated EELP acts as a chemoattractant for human cells, but its cell specificity is different from that of HsEMAPII. We show that cell specificity differences between HsEMAPII and EELP can be swapped by site directed mutagenesis of only two residues in the cytokines' signal sequence. Thus, Entamoeba has evolved a functional mimic of an aaRS-associated human cytokine with modified cell specificity.

  6. Putative Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Cytochrome P450 Genes Responsible for Tentoxin Biosynthesis in Alternaria alternata ZJ33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You-Hai; Han, Wen-Jin; Gui, Xi-Wu; Wei, Tao; Tang, Shuang-Yan; Jin, Jian-Ming

    2016-08-02

    Tentoxin, a cyclic tetrapeptide produced by several Alternaria species, inhibits the F₁-ATPase activity of chloroplasts, resulting in chlorosis in sensitive plants. In this study, we report two clustered genes, encoding a putative non-ribosome peptide synthetase (NRPS) TES and a cytochrome P450 protein TES1, that are required for tentoxin biosynthesis in Alternaria alternata strain ZJ33, which was isolated from blighted leaves of Eupatorium adenophorum. Using a pair of primers designed according to the consensus sequences of the adenylation domain of NRPSs, two fragments containing putative adenylation domains were amplified from A. alternata ZJ33, and subsequent PCR analyses demonstrated that these fragments belonged to the same NRPS coding sequence. With no introns, TES consists of a single 15,486 base pair open reading frame encoding a predicted 5161 amino acid protein. Meanwhile, the TES1 gene is predicted to contain five introns and encode a 506 amino acid protein. The TES protein is predicted to be comprised of four peptide synthase modules with two additional N-methylation domains, and the number and arrangement of the modules in TES were consistent with the number and arrangement of the amino acid residues of tentoxin, respectively. Notably, both TES and TES1 null mutants generated via homologous recombination failed to produce tentoxin. This study provides the first evidence concerning the biosynthesis of tentoxin in A. alternata.

  7. Entamoeba lysyl-tRNA Synthetase Contains a Cytokine-Like Domain with Chemokine Activity towards Human Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung Min; Kim, Sunghoon; Celada, Antonio; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2011-01-01

    Immunological pressure encountered by protozoan parasites drives the selection of strategies to modulate or avoid the immune responses of their hosts. Here we show that the parasite Entamoeba histolytica has evolved a chemokine that mimics the sequence, structure, and function of the human cytokine HsEMAPII (Homo sapiens endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II). This Entamoeba EMAPII-like polypeptide (EELP) is translated as a domain attached to two different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) that are overexpressed when parasites are exposed to inflammatory signals. EELP is dispensable for the tRNA aminoacylation activity of the enzymes that harbor it, and it is cleaved from them by Entamoeba proteases to generate a standalone cytokine. Isolated EELP acts as a chemoattractant for human cells, but its cell specificity is different from that of HsEMAPII. We show that cell specificity differences between HsEMAPII and EELP can be swapped by site directed mutagenesis of only two residues in the cytokines' signal sequence. Thus, Entamoeba has evolved a functional mimic of an aaRS-associated human cytokine with modified cell specificity. PMID:22140588

  8. Molecular Evolution of Aromatic Polyketides and Comparative Sequence Analysis of Polyketide Ketosynthase and 16S Ribosomal DNA Genes from Various Streptomyces Species

    OpenAIRE

    Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko; Halo, Laura; Munukka, Eveliina; Hakala, Juha; Mäntsälä, Pekka; Ylihonko, Kristiina

    2002-01-01

    A 613-bp fragment of an essential ketosynthase gene from the biosynthetic pathway of aromatic polyketide antibiotics was sequenced from 99 actinomycetes isolated from soil. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolates clustered into clades that correspond to the various classes of aromatic polyketides. Additionally, sequencing of a 120-bp fragment from the γ-variable region of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and subsequent comparative sequence analysis revealed incongruity between the ketosynthase...

  9. SEQUENCE AND ANALYSIS OF THE GENETIC-LOCUS RESPONSIBLE FOR SURFACTIN SYNTHESIS IN BACILLUS-SUBTILIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COSMINA, P; RODRIGUEZ, F; DEFERRA, F; GRANDI, G; PEREGO, M; VENEMA, G; VANSINDEREN, D

    The chromosomal region of Bacillus subtilis comprising the entire srfA operon, sfp and about four kilobases in between have been completely sequenced and functionally characterized. The srfA gene codes for three large subunits of surfactin synthetase, 402, 401 and 144 kDa, respectively, arranged in

  10. High levels of asparagine synthetase in hypocotyls of pine seedlings suggest a role of the enzyme in re-allocation of seed-stored nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, Rafael A; de la Torre, Fernando; Cánovas, Francisco M; Cantón, Francisco R

    2006-06-01

    A pine asparagine synthetase gene expressed in developing seedlings has been identified by cloning its cDNA (PsAS1) from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). Genomic DNA analysis with PsAS1 probes and a sequence-based phylogenetic tree are consistent with the possibility of more than one gene encoding asparagine synthetase in pine. However, the parallel patterns of free asparagine content and PsAS1 products indicate that the protein encoded by this gene is mainly responsible for the accumulation of this amino acid during germination and early seedling development. The temporal and spatial patterns of PsAS1 expression together with the spatial distribution of asparagine content suggest that, early after germination, part of the nitrogen mobilized from the megagametophyte is diverted toward the hypocotyl to produce high levels of asparagine as a reservoir of nitrogen to meet later specific demands of development. Furthermore, the transcript and protein analyses in seedlings germinated and growth for extended periods under continuous light or dark suggest that the spatial expression pattern of PsAS1 is largely determined by a developmental program. Therefore, our results suggest that the spatial and temporal control of PsAS1 expression determines the re-allocation of an important amount of seed-stored nitrogen during pine germination.

  11. Reconstruction of putative DNA virus from endogenous rice tungro bacilliform virus-like sequences in the rice genome: implications for integration and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishima Yuji

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant genomes contain various kinds of repetitive sequences such as transposable elements, microsatellites, tandem repeats and virus-like sequences. Most of them, with the exception of virus-like sequences, do not allow us to trace their origins nor to follow the process of their integration into the host genome. Recent discoveries of virus-like sequences in plant genomes led us to set the objective of elucidating the origin of the repetitive sequences. Endogenous rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV-like sequences (ERTBVs have been found throughout the rice genome. Here, we reconstructed putative virus structures from RTBV-like sequences in the rice genome and characterized to understand evolutionary implication, integration manner and involvements of endogenous virus segments in the corresponding disease response. Results We have collected ERTBVs from the rice genomes. They contain rearranged structures and no intact ORFs. The identified ERTBV segments were shown to be phylogenetically divided into three clusters. For each phylogenetic cluster, we were able to make a consensus alignment for a circular virus-like structure carrying two complete ORFs. Comparisons of DNA and amino acid sequences suggested the closely relationship between ERTBV and RTBV. The Oryza AA-genome species vary in the ERTBV copy number. The species carrying low-copy-number of ERTBV segments have been reported to be extremely susceptible to RTBV. The DNA methylation state of the ERTBV sequences was correlated with their copy number in the genome. Conclusions These ERTBV segments are unlikely to have functional potential as a virus. However, these sequences facilitate to establish putative virus that provided information underlying virus integration and evolutionary relationship with existing virus. Comparison of ERTBV among the Oryza AA-genome species allowed us to speculate a possible role of endogenous virus segments against its related disease.

  12. Association of IDDM and attenuated response of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase to yellow fever vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnevie-Nielsen, V; Larsen, M L; Frifelt, J J

    1989-01-01

    Basal and yellow fever vaccination-induced 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (2',5'A) activity was determined in blood mononuclear cells (peripheral blood lymphocytes [PBLs]) from insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and matched control subjects. The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine...

  13. Regulation of Amidase Formation in Mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO Lacking Glutamine Synthetase Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Herst, Patricia M.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The formation of amidase was studied in mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO lacking glutamine synthetase activity. It appeared that catabolite repression of amidase synthesis by succinate was partially relieved when cellular growth was limited by glutamine. Under these conditions, a correlation

  14. Computational discovery of specificity-conferring sites in non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Michael; Søndergaard, Dan Ariel; Tofting-Olesen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: By using a class of large modular enzymes known as Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases (NRPS), bacteria and fungi are capable of synthesizing a large variety of secondary metabolites, many of which are bioactive and have potential, pharmaceutical applications as e.g.~antibiotics. There ...

  15. Purification and properties of phosphoribosyl-diphosphate synthetase from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnvig, Kirsten; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Switzer, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl-diphosphate (PPRibP) synthetase from Bacillus subtiliis has been purified to near homogeneity from an Escherichia coli Δprs strain bearing the cloned B. subtilis prs gene, encoding PPRibP synthentase, on a plasmid. The Mr of the subunit (34,000) and its amino-terminal amino acid se...

  16. Regulation of the spatiotemporal pattern of expression of the glutamine synthetase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie-Venema, H.; Hakvoort, T. B.; van Hemert, F. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase, the enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of glutamate and ammonia into glutamine, is expressed in a tissue-specific and developmentally controlled manner. The first part of this review focuses on its spatiotemporal pattern of expression, the factors that regulate

  17. Nitrogen metabolism in actinorhizal nodules of Alnus glutinosa: expression of glutamine synthetase and acetylornithine transaminase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guan, C.; Ribeiro, A.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Jing, Y.; Kammen, van A.; Bisseling, T.; Pawlowski, K.

    1996-01-01

    Two nodule cDNA clones representing genes involved in Alnus glutinosa nitrogen metabolism were analysed. ag11 encoded glutamine synthetase (GS), the enzyme responsible for ammonium assimilation, while ag118 encoded acetylornithine transaminase (AOTA), an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of

  18. Primer Dependent and Independent Forms of Soluble Starch Synthetase from Developing Barley Endosperms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreis, M.

    1980-01-01

    The activity of soluble starch synthetase (ADP-glucose: agr-1,4-glucan agr-4-glucosyltransferase) in the non-purified extract from 16 day-old Bomi barley endosperms (Hordeum vulgare L.) was low and the reaction was non-linear when plotted against protein concentration. Starch synthetase was purif......The activity of soluble starch synthetase (ADP-glucose: agr-1,4-glucan agr-4-glucosyltransferase) in the non-purified extract from 16 day-old Bomi barley endosperms (Hordeum vulgare L.) was low and the reaction was non-linear when plotted against protein concentration. Starch synthetase...... was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and DEAE-cellulose chromatography and separated into four fractions. In the absence of an added carbohydrate primer two of the four fractions catalized the synthesis of a methanol-precipitable agr-glucan when high concentrations of sodium citrate and bovine serum...... albumim were added. The rate of agr-glucan synthesis by the unprimed reaction was higher than for the primed reaction. The four enzyme fractions were active with ADP-Glc, but not with UDP-Glc, both in the primed and in the unprimed reaction....

  19. Orthogonal use of a human tRNA synthetase active site to achieve multi-functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Quansheng; Kapoor, Mili; Guo, Min; Belani, Rajesh; Xu, Xiaoling; Kiosses, William B.; Hanan, Melanie; Park, Chulho; Armour, Eva; Do, Minh-Ha; Nangle, Leslie A.; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2011-01-01

    Protein multi-functionality is an emerging explanation for the complexity of higher organisms. In this regard, while aminoacyl tRNA synthetases catalyze amino acid activation for protein synthesis, some also act in pathways for inflammation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. How multiple functions evolved and their relationship to the active site is not clear. Here structural modeling analysis, mutagenesis, and cell-based functional studies show that the potent angiostatic, natural fragment of human TrpRS associates via Trp side chains that protrude from the cognate cellular receptor VE-cadherin. Modeling indicates that (I prefer the way it was because the conclusion was reached not only by modeling, but more so by experimental studies.)VE-cadherin Trp side chains fit into the Trp-specific active site of the synthetase. Thus, specific side chains of the receptor mimic (?) amino acid substrates and expand the functionality of the active site of the synthetase. We propose that orthogonal use of the same active site may be a general way to develop multi-functionality of human tRNA synthetases and other proteins. PMID:20010843

  20. Synthesis, accumulation and turnover of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cultures of embryonic rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roon, M. A.; Charles, R.; Lamers, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroid, thyroid hormones and cyclic AMP can induce the synthesis of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cultures of hepatocytes as soon as these cells differentiate from the embryonic foregut. The low levels of both enzymes that can accumulate in such

  1. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Chaudhry, Farrukh A.; Verlander, Jill W.; Weiner, I. David

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4 (+) with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of

  2. Glutamine Synthetase in Muscle Is Required for Glutamine Production during Fasting and Extrahepatic Ammonia Detoxification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Youji; Hakvoort, Theodorus B. M.; Köhler, S. Eleonore; Vermeulen, Jacqueline L. M.; de Waart, D. Rudi; de Theije, Chiel; ten Have, Gabrie A. M.; van Eijk, Hans M. H.; Kunne, Cindy; Labruyere, Wilhelmina T.; Houten, Sander M.; Sokolovic, Milka; Ruijter, Jan M.; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2010-01-01

    The main endogenous source of glutamine is de novo synthesis in striated muscle via the enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS). The mice in which GS is selectively but completely eliminated from striated muscle with the Cre-loxP strategy (GS-KO/M mice) are, nevertheless, healthy and fertile. Compared with

  3. Expression pattern of glutamine synthetase marks transition from collecting into conducting hepatic veins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, W. H.; Vermeulen, J. L.; Hakvoort, T. B.; Moorman, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    The expression of glutamine synthetase (GS) is confined to a rim of hepatocytes surrounding the efferent hepatic veins in all mammalian species investigated. In rat liver, a two- to three-cell thick layer of GS-positive (GS(+)) hepatocytes uniformly surrounds the two to four terminal branching

  4. Isolation and characterization of the rat glutamine synthetase-encoding gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Zande, L.; Labruyère, W. T.; Arnberg, A. C.; Wilson, R. H.; van den Bogaert, A. J.; Das, A. T.; van Oorschot, D. A.; Frijters, C.; Charles, R.; Moorman, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    From a rat genomic library in phage lambda Charon4A, a complete glutamine synthetase-encoding gene was isolated. The gene is 9.5-10 kb long, consists of seven exons, and codes for two mRNA species of 1375 nucleotides (nt) and 2787 nt, respectively. For both mRNAs, full-length cDNAs containing a

  5. Changes in Activities of Glutamine Synthetase during Grain Filling and Their Relation to Rice Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-xun JIN

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Four japonica rice varieties differed in cooking and eating qualities were used in a pot experiment to study the relationship between the activities of glutamine synthetase during grain filling and rice quality. The activities of glutamine synthetase gradually increased and then declined as a single peak curve in the course of grain filling. The 15th day after heading was a turning point, before which the enzymatic activities in the inferior rice varieties with high protein content were higher than those in the superior rice varietie with low protein content, and after which it was converse. The activity of glutamine synthetase in grain was correlated with the taste meter value, peak viscosity and breakdown negatively at the early stage of grain filling whereas positively at the middle and late stages. Moreover, it was correlated with the protein content of rice grain and setback positively at the early stage and negatively at the middle and late stages. The correlation degree varied with the course of grain filling. From 15 days to 20 days after heading was a critical stage, in which the direction of correlation between the activity of glutamine synthetase and taste meter value and RVA properties of rice changed.

  6. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli, Identification of a mutant enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Nygaard, Per

    1982-01-01

    , stimulated the mutant enzyme. The activity of PRib-PP synthetase in crude extract was higher in the mutant than in the parent. When starved for purines an accumulation of PRib-PP was observed in the parent strain, while the pool decreased in the mutant. During pyrimidine starvation derepression of PRib...

  7. Characterization of a Salmonella typhimurium mutant defective in phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochimsen, Bjarne U.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Garber, Bruce B.

    1985-01-01

    This study describes the isolation and characterization of a mutant (strain GP122) of Salmonella typhimurium with a partial deficiency of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase activity. This strain was isolated in a purE deoD gpt purine auxotroph by a procedure designed to select guanosine...

  8. Computational Insights into the High-Fidelity Catalysis of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelnga, Mohamed M.

    Obtaining insights into the catalytic function of enzymes is an important area of research due to their widespread applications in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. Among these enzymes, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are known for their remarkable fidelity in catalyzing the aminoacylation reactions of tRNA in protein biosynthesis. Despite the exceptional execution of this critical function, mechanistic details of the reactions catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases remain elusive demonstrating the obvious need to explore their remarkable chemistry. During the PhD studies reported in this thesis the mechanism of aminoacylation, pre?transfer editing and post?transfer editing catalyzed by different aaRS have been established using multi-scale computational enzymology. In the first two chapters a detailed information about aaRS and the addressed questions was given in addition to an overview of the used computational methodology currently used to investigate the enzymatic mechanisms. The aminoacylation mechanism of threonine by Threonyl-tRNA synthetases, glutamine by Glutaminyl-tRNA synthetases and glutamate by Glutamyl-tRNA synthetases have been clearly unveiled in chapter 3 and 4. Also, valuable information regarding the role of cofactors and active site residues has been obtained. While investigating the post-transfer editing mechanisms, which proceed in a remote and distinct active site, two different scenarios were experimentally suggested for two types of threonyl-tRNA synthetase species to correct the misacylation of the structurally related serine. We explored these two mechanisms as in chapters 5 and 6. Moreover, the synthetic site in which the aminoacylation reaction is catalyzed, is also responsible for a second type of proofreading reaction called pre-transfer editing mechanism. In chapter 7, this latter mechanism has been elucidated for both Seryl-tRNA synthetases and Isoleucyl-tRNA synthetases against their non-cognate substrates

  9. A Conserved Proline Triplet in Val-tRNA Synthetase and the Origin of Elongation Factor P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata L. Starosta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial ribosomes stall on polyproline stretches and require the elongation factor P (EF-P to relieve the arrest. Yet it remains unclear why evolution has favored the development of EF-P rather than selecting against the occurrence of polyproline stretches in proteins. We have discovered that only a single polyproline stretch is invariant across all domains of life, namely a proline triplet in ValS, the tRNA synthetase, that charges tRNAVal with valine. Here, we show that expression of ValS in vivo and in vitro requires EF-P and demonstrate that the proline triplet located in the active site of ValS is important for efficient charging of tRNAVal with valine and preventing formation of mischarged Thr-tRNAVal as well as efficient growth of E. coli in vivo. We suggest that the critical role of the proline triplet for ValS activity may explain why bacterial cells coevolved the EF-P rescue system.

  10. Evolutionary Limitation and Opportunities for Developing tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors with 5-Binding-Mode Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Fang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs as building blocks for translation. Each of the aaRS families plays a pivotal role in protein biosynthesis and is indispensable for cell growth and survival. In addition, aaRSs in higher species have evolved important non-translational functions. These translational and non-translational functions of aaRS are attractive for developing antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic agents and for treating other human diseases. The interplay between amino acids, tRNA, ATP, EF-Tu and non-canonical binding partners, had shaped each family with distinct pattern of key sites for regulation, with characters varying among species across the path of evolution. These sporadic variations in the aaRSs offer great opportunity to target these essential enzymes for therapy. Up to this day, growing numbers of aaRS inhibitors have been discovered and developed. Here, we summarize the latest developments and structural studies of aaRS inhibitors, and classify them with distinct binding modes into five categories.

  11. Equilibria and partitioning of complexes in the S-adenosylmethionine synthetase reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markham, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase) catalyzes a reaction in which the [enzyme-ATP-methionine] complex reacts to form an intermediate [enzyme-AdoMet-PPPi] complex: hydrolysis of PPPi yields an [enzyme-AdoMet-PPi-Pi] complex from which AdoMet is the last product to dissociate. Analysis of reaction mixtures which were quenched with acid during turnover of E. coli AdoMet synthetase with saturating substrates containing [α - 32 P]ATP showed that PPPi is present in an amount corresponding to 45% of the total enzyme active sites, reflecting the portion of enzyme present in an [enzyme-AdoMet-PPPi] complex. Similar experiments in which excess pyrophosphatase was included (to hydrolyze PPi as it was released from AdoMet synthetase), showed that enzyme-bound PPi is present in an amount corresponding to 22% of the total AdoMet synthetase. The enzyme not present in complexes with PPPi or PPi is probably distributed between the [enzyme-ATP-methionine] and the [enzyme-AdoMet] complexes. AdoMet synthetase forms enzyme-bound 32 PPPi from added 32 PPi and Pi; the equilibrium constant [enzyme-AdoMet-PPi-Pi]/[enzyme-AdoMet-PPPi] is 2.0, greatly displaced from the equilibrium for hydrolysis of free PPPi. Since the ratio of enzyme-bound PPi to PPPi is 0.5 during the steady state, the PPPi hydrolysis step is not at equilibrium during turnover. Formation of [ 32 P]ATP from the [enzyme-AdoMet- 32 PPPi] complex was not detected

  12. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara (SSRL); (Maryland)

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  13. Hox gene sequences from the geophilomorph centipede Pachymerium ferrugineum (C. L. Koch, 1835) (Chilopoda: Geophilomorpha: Geophilidae): implications for the evolution of the Hox class genes of arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianello, Alberto; Ronco, Monica; Burato, Paola A; Minelli, Alessandro

    2002-01-01

    Here we report on a partial screen for Hox gene sequences from the geophilomorph centipede Pachymerium ferrugineum, resulting in 11 different sequences. All of these sequences could be homologized to specific Drosophila genes, yielding two representatives for the Dfd class and one each for the remaining classes. Phylogenetic analysis of these data with a broad sample of arthropod/onychophoran homologous sequences confirmed these results and provided further support for the monophyly of the Hox3/zen class. Conversely, the phylogenetic status of ftz-type genes remains uncertain. Our results complement the previous partial findings for two other centipedes (the scolopendromorph Ethmostigmus rubripes and the lithobiomorph Lithobius forficatus) and confirm the expectation that in myriapods, too, all Hox genes classes are present. This suggests that even the Chilopoda, with uniform trunk segments, have the same number of Hox genes as the more tagmatized Insecta.

  14. A systematic computational analysis of biosynthetic gene cluster evolution: lessons for engineering biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnix H Medema

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial secondary metabolites are widely used as antibiotics, anticancer drugs, insecticides and food additives. Attempts to engineer their biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs to produce unnatural metabolites with improved properties are often frustrated by the unpredictability and complexity of the enzymes that synthesize these molecules, suggesting that genetic changes within BGCs are limited by specific constraints. Here, by performing a systematic computational analysis of BGC evolution, we derive evidence for three findings that shed light on the ways in which, despite these constraints, nature successfully invents new molecules: 1 BGCs for complex molecules often evolve through the successive merger of smaller sub-clusters, which function as independent evolutionary entities. 2 An important subset of polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases evolve by concerted evolution, which generates sets of sequence-homogenized domains that may hold promise for engineering efforts since they exhibit a high degree of functional interoperability, 3 Individual BGC families evolve in distinct ways, suggesting that design strategies should take into account family-specific functional constraints. These findings suggest novel strategies for using synthetic biology to rationally engineer biosynthetic pathways.

  15. Giardia fatty acyl-CoA synthetases as potential drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengguang eGuo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Giardiasis caused by Giardia intestinalis (syn. G. lamblia, G. duodenalis is one of the leading causes of diarrheal parasitic diseases worldwide. Although limited drugs to treat giardiasis are available, there are concerns regarding toxicity in some patients and the emerging drug resistance. By data-mining genome sequences, we observed that G. intestinalis is incapable of synthesizing fatty acids de novo. However, this parasite has five long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetases (GiACS1 to GiACS5 to activate fatty acids scavenged from the host. ACS is an essential enzyme because fatty acids need to be activated to form acyl-CoA thioesters before they can enter subsequent metabolism. In the present study, we performed experiments to explore whether some GiACS enzymes could serve as drug targets in Giardia. Based on the high-throughput datasets and protein modeling analyses, we initially studied the GiACS1 and GiACS2, because genes encoding these two enzymes were found to be more consistently expressed in varied parasite life cycle stages and when interacting with host cells based on previously reported transcriptome data. These two proteins were cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins. Biochemical analysis revealed that both had apparent substrate preference towards palmitic acid (C16:0 and myristic acid (C14:0, and allosteric or Michaelis-Menten kinetics on palmitic acid or ATP. The ACS inhibitor triacsin C inhibited the activity of both enzymes (IC50 = 1.56 µM, Ki = 0.18 µM for GiACS1 and IC50 = 2.28 µM, Ki = 0.23 µM for GiACS2, respectively and the growth of G. intestinalis in vitro (IC50 = 0.8 µM. As expected from giardial evolutionary characteristics, both GiACSs displayed differences in overall folding structure as compared with their human counterparts. These observations support the notion that some of the GiACS enzymes may be explored as drug targets in this parasite.

  16. In search of evidence of deep fluid discharges and pore pressure evolution in the crust to explain the seismicity style of the Umbria-Marche 1997-1998 seismic sequence (Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Quattrocchi

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting soon after the first main-shocks of the long seismic sequence which has occurred along the Umbria-Marche boundary since September 1997, fluid geochemistry surveying was accomplished (around 200 samples over the epicentre area as a whole, collecting information on hydrological variations too. The collected experimental data allowed to discuss the spatial and temporal evolution of the circulating fluids, either in the chemistry or in the dynamic paths, during the different stages of the seismic sequence. All the geo-structural, seismological and fluid geochemistry information gathered in this sector of the Central Apennines are discussed together in an attempt to speculate about the possible role and evolution of pore-pressure at depth up to surface within the seismogenic process recalling the "Fault Valve Activity Model", the "Coseismic Strain Model", the "frictional heating-frictional stress coupling model" and the "Dilatancy Model". This overview may also explain the geochemical and hydrological experimentally observed anomalies, in occurrence of the seismic sequence. The seismic style of the long sequence is revised in terms of pore-pressure regime down to seismogenic depth (2-10 km, within the poly-phase Evaporite Triassic Basement (ETB and the Paleozoic Crystalline Basement (PCB, corresponding to the horizons of transient dehydration reactions: process triggered and enhanced during the seismogenic process, involving further fluid overpressure, and consequently further seismicity (chain effect. All the recalled processes and models may explain fluid remobilization and over-pressuring in the upper crust starting soon after the main-shocks, along relict low angle planes (close Apennine and anti-Apennine fault segments, rendering the Umbria-Marche boundary a "transiently weakened frictional instability zone", for a period spanning more than one year.

  17. Diversity of formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase genes in the rumens of roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) and sika deer (Cervus nippon) fed different diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Henderson, Gemma; Yang, Yahan; Li, Guangyu

    2017-01-01

    Reductive acetogenesis by homoacetogens represents an alternative pathway to methanogenesis to remove metabolic hydrogen during rumen fermentation. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of homoacetogen in the rumens of pasture-fed roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) and sika deer (Cervus nippon) fed either oak-leaf-based (tannin-rich, 100 mg/kg dried matter), corn-stover-based, or corn-silage-based diets, by using formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS) gene sequences as a marker. The diversity and richness of FTHFS sequences was lowest in animals fed oak leaf, indicating that tannin-containing plants may affect rumen homoacetogen diversity. FTHFS amino acid sequences in the rumen of roe deer significantly differed from those of sika deer. The phylogenetic analyses showed that 44.8% of sequences in pasture-fed roe deer, and 72.1%, 81.1%, and 37.5% of sequences in sika deer fed oak-leaf-, corn-stover-, and corn-silage-based diets, respectively, may represent novel bacteria that have not yet been cultured. These results demonstrate that the rumens of roe deer and sika deer harbor potentially novel homoacetogens and that diet may influence homoacetogen community structure.

  18. The evolution of massive stars and their spectra. I. A non-rotating 60 M⊙ star from the zero-age main sequence to the pre-supernova stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Jose H.; Meynet, Georges; Ekström, Sylvia; Georgy, Cyril

    2014-04-01

    For the first time, the interior and spectroscopic evolution of a massive star is analyzed from the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) to the pre-supernova (SN) stage. For this purpose, we combined stellar evolution models using the Geneva code and stellar atmospheric/wind models using CMFGEN. With our approach, we were able to produce observables, such as a synthetic high-resolution spectrum and photometry, thereby aiding the comparison between evolution models and observed data. Here we analyze the evolution of a non-rotating 60 M⊙ star and its spectrum throughout its lifetime. Interestingly, the star has a supergiant appearance (luminosity class I) even at the ZAMS. We find the following evolutionary sequence of spectral types: O3 I (at the ZAMS), O4 I (middle of the H-core burning phase), B supergiant (BSG), B hypergiant (BHG), hot luminous blue variable (LBV; end of H-core burning), cool LBV (H-shell burning through the beginning of the He-core burning phase), rapid evolution through late WN and early WN, early WC (middle of He-core burning), and WO (end of He-core burning until core collapse). We find the following spectroscopic phase lifetimes: 3.22 × 106 yr for the O-type, 0.34 × 105 yr (BSG), 0.79 × 105 yr (BHG), 2.35 × 105 yr (LBV), 1.05 × 105 yr (WN), 2.57 × 105 yr (WC), and 3.80 × 104 yr (WO). Compared to previous studies, we find a much longer (shorter) duration for the early WN (late WN) phase, as well as a long-lived LBV phase. We show that LBVs arise naturally in single-star evolution models at the end of the MS when the mass-loss rate increases as a consequence of crossing the bistability limit. We discuss the evolution of the spectra, magnitudes, colors, and ionizing flux across the star's lifetime, and the way they are related to the evolution of the interior. We find that the absolute magnitude of the star typically changes by ~6 mag in optical filters across the evolution, with the star becoming significantly fainter in optical filters at

  19. Analysis of the overdispersed clock in the short-term evolution of hepatitis C virus: Using the E1/E2 gene sequences to infer infection dates in a single source outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Borys; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Jiménez, Nuria; Bracho, María Alma; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Moya, Andrés; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2006-06-01

    The assumption of a molecular clock for dating events from sequence information is often frustrated by the presence of heterogeneity among evolutionary rates due, among other factors, to positively selected sites. In this work, our goal is to explore methods to estimate infection dates from sequence analysis. One such method, based on site stripping for clock detection, was proposed to unravel the clocklike molecular evolution in sequences showing high variability of evolutionary rates and in the presence of positive selection. Other alternatives imply accommodating heterogeneity in evolutionary rates at various levels, without eliminating any information from the data. Here we present the analysis of a data set of hepatitis C virus (HCV) sequences from 24 patients infected by a single individual with known dates of infection. We first used a simple criterion of relative substitution rate for site removal prior to a regression analysis. Time was regressed on maximum likelihood pairwise evolutionary distances between the sequences sampled from the source individual and infected patients. We show that it is indeed the fastest evolving sites that disturb the molecular clock and that these sites correspond to positively selected codons. The high computational efficiency of the regression analysis allowed us to compare the site-stripping scheme with random removal of sites. We demonstrate that removing the fast-evolving sites significantly increases the accuracy of estimation of infection times based on a single substitution rate. However, the time-of-infection estimations improved substantially when a more sophisticated and computationally demanding Bayesian method was used. This method was used with the same data set but keeping all the sequence positions in the analysis. Consequently, despite the distortion introduced by positive selection on evolutionary rates, it is possible to obtain quite accurate estimates of infection dates, a result of especial relevance for

  20. The complete genomic sequence of pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV and its implications for our understanding of evolution dynamics in the genus polerovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviv Dombrovsky

    Full Text Available We determined the complete sequence and organization of the genome of a putative member of the genus Polerovirus tentatively named Pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV. PYLCV has a wider host range than Tobacco vein-distorting virus (TVDV and has a close serological relationship with Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV (both poleroviruses. The extracted viral RNA was subjected to SOLiD next-generation sequence analysis and used as a template for reverse transcription synthesis, which was followed by PCR amplification. The ssRNA genome of PYLCV includes 6,028 nucleotides encoding six open reading frames (ORFs, which is typical of the genus Polerovirus. Comparisons of the deduced amino acid sequences of the PYLCV ORFs 2-4 and ORF5, indicate that there are high levels of similarity between these sequences to ORFs 2-4 of TVDV (84-93% and to ORF5 of CABYV (87%. Both PYLCV and Pepper vein yellowing virus (PeVYV contain sequences that point to a common ancestral polerovirus. The recombination breakpoint which is located at CABYV ORF3, which encodes the viral coat protein (CP, may explain the CABYV-like sequences found in the genomes of the pepper infecting viruses PYLCV and PeVYV. Two additional regions unique to PYLCV (PY1 and PY2 were identified between nucleotides 4,962 and 5,061 (ORF 5 and between positions 5,866 and 6,028 in the 3' NCR. Sequence analysis of the pepper-infecting PeVYV revealed three unique regions (Pe1-Pe3 with no similarity to other members of the genus Polerovirus. Genomic analyses of PYLCV and PeVYV suggest that the speciation of these viruses occurred through putative recombination event(s between poleroviruses co-infecting a common host(s, resulting in the emergence of PYLCV, a novel pathogen with a wider host range.

  1. The Cytoplasmic Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase of the Malaria Parasite is a Dual-Stage Target for Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Jonathan D.; Pepper, Lauren R.; Cortese, Joseph F.; Estiu, Guillermina; Galinsky, Kevin; Zuzarte-Luis, Vanessa; Derbyshire, Emily R.; Ribacke, Ulf; Lukens, Amanda K.; Santos, Sofia A.; Patel, Vishal; Clish, Clary B.; Sullivan, William J.; Zhou, Huihao; Bopp, Selina E.; Schimmel, Paul; Lindquist, Susan; Clardy, Jon; Mota, Maria M.; Keller, Tracy L.; Whitman, Malcolm; Wiest, Olaf; Wirth, Dyann F.; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance is a major limitation of current antimalarials. The discovery of new druggable targets and pathways including those that are critical for multiple life cycle stages of the malaria parasite is a major goal for the development of the next-generation of antimalarial drugs. Using an integrated chemogenomics approach that combined drug-resistance selection, whole genome sequencing and an orthogonal yeast model, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic prolyl-tRNA synthetase (PfcPRS) of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is a biochemical and functional target of febrifugine and its synthetic derivatives such as halofuginone. Febrifugine is the active principle of a traditional Chinese herbal remedy for malaria. We show that treatment with febrifugine derivatives activated the amino acid starvation response in both P. falciparum and a transgenic yeast strain expressing PfcPRS. We further demonstrate in the P. berghei mouse model of malaria that halofuginol, a new halofuginone analog that we developed, is highly active against both liver and asexual blood stages of the malaria parasite. Halofuginol, unlike halofuginone and febrifugine, is well tolerated at efficacious doses, and represents a promising lead for the development of dual-stage next generation antimalarials. PMID:25995223

  2. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetases expressed at high levels in developing seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose A; Venegas Calerón, Mónica; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Garcés, Rafael; Mullen, Robert; Gidda, Satinder K; Salas, Joaquín J

    2014-03-01

    Long chain fatty acid synthetases (LACSs) activate the fatty acid chains produced by plastidial de novo biosynthesis to generate acyl-CoA derivatives, important intermediates in lipid metabolism. Oilseeds, like sunflower, accumulate high levels of triacylglycerols (TAGs) in their seeds to nourish the embryo during germination. This requires that sunflower seed endosperm supports very active glycerolipid synthesis during development. Sunflower seed plastids produce large amounts of fatty acids, which must be activated through the action of LACSs, in order to be incorporated into TAGs. We cloned two different LACS genes from developing sunflower endosperm, HaLACS1 and HaLACS2, which displayed sequence homology with Arabidopsis LACS9 and LACS8 genes, respectively. These genes were expressed at high levels in developing seeds and exhibited distinct subcellular distributions. We generated constructs in which these proteins were fused to green fluorescent protein and performed transient expression experiments in tobacco cells. The HaLACS1 protein associated with the external envelope of tobacco chloroplasts, whereas HaLACS2 was strongly bound to the endoplasmic reticulum. Finally, both proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and recovered as active enzymes in the bacterial membranes. Both enzymes displayed similar substrate specificities, with a very high preference for oleic acid and weaker activity toward stearic acid. On the basis of our findings, we discuss the role of these enzymes in sunflower oil synthesis. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  3. Direct whole-genome deep-sequencing of human respiratory syncytial virus A and B from Vietnamese children identifies distinct patterns of inter- and intra-host evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do, Lien Anh Ha; Wilm, Andreas; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Lam, Ha Minh; Sim, Shuzhen; Sukumaran, Rashmi; Tran, Anh Tuan; Nguyen, Bach Hue; Tran, Thi Thu Loan; Tran, Quynh Huong; Vo, Quoc Bao; Tran Dac, Nguyen Anh; Trinh, Hong Nhien; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hai; Le Binh, Bao Tinh; Le, Khanh; Nguyen, Minh Tien; Thai, Quang Tung; Vo, Thanh Vu; Ngo, Ngoc Quang Minh; Dang, Thi Kim Huyen; Cao, Ngoc Huong; Tran, Thu Van; Ho, Lu Viet; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno; Chen, Swaine; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Bryant, Juliet E.; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children under two years of age. Little is known about RSV intra-host genetic diversity over the course of infection, or about the immune pressures that drive RSV molecular evolution. We performed

  4. Activation of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase by single-stranded and double-stranded RNA aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, R; Norby, P L; Martensen, P M

    1998-01-01

    A number of small RNA molecules that are high affinity ligands for the 46-kDa form of human 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase have been identified by the SELEX method. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicates that these RNAs bind to the enzyme with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range....... Competition experiments indicate that the binding site for the small RNAs on the 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase molecule at least partially overlaps that for the synthetic double-stranded RNA, poly(I).poly(C). Several of the RNAs function as potent activators of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase in vitro......-stranded RNA, can also be activated by RNA ligands with little secondary structure. Since 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase possesses no homology to other known RNA-binding proteins, the development of small specific ligands by SELEX should facilitate studies of RNA-protein interactions and may reveal novel...

  5. Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, Anjo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available studies indicating an alternative mechanism via the cytochrome cytochrome bc1 complex impacting on the homeostasis of ATP synthesis [39]. The inhibition of glutamine synthetase may also impact the ATP homeostasis as the resultant accumulation of α...

  6. Stellar evolution. VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iben, I., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Evolution of low mass Population I stars from main sequence to red giant branch in Hertzsprung- Russell diagram, through energy generation phases of p-p chain reactions /dominating over C-N cycle reactions/ and hydrogen burning

  7. Concerted evolution rapidly eliminates sequence variation in rDNA coding regions but not in intergenic spacers in Nicotiana tabacum allotetraploid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunerová Bedřichová, Jana; Renny-Byfield, S.; Matyášek, Roman; Leitch, A.; Kovařík, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 303, č. 8 (2017), s. 1043-1060 ISSN 0378-2697 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-11642S; GA ČR(CZ) GC16-02149J Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Concerted evolution * Immunomodulation * Neutrophils Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 1.239, year: 2016

  8. Compositions of orthogonal lysyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J Christopher [San Francisco, CA; Wu, Ning [Brookline, MA; Santoro, Stephen [Cambridge, MA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA

    2009-08-18

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal lysyl-tRNAs, orthogonal lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of lysyl-tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate homoglutamines into proteins are provided in response to a four base codon. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with homoglutamines using these orthogonal pairs.

  9. Genetic analysis of loop sequences in the let-7 gene family reveal a relationship between loop evolution and multiple isomiRs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingming Liang

    Full Text Available While mature miRNAs have been widely studied, the terminal loop sequences are rarely examined despite regulating both primary and mature miRNA functions. Herein, we attempted to understand the evolutionary pattern of loop sequences by analyzing loops in the let-7 gene family. Compared to the stable miRNA length distributions seen in most metazoans, higher metazoan species exhibit a longer length distribution. Examination of these loop sequence length distributions, in addition to phylogenetic tree construction, implicated loop sequences as the main evolutionary drivers in miRNA genes. Moreover, loops from relevant clustered miRNA gene families showed varying length distributions and higher levels of nucleotide divergence, even between homologous pre-miRNA loops. Furthermore, we found that specific nucleotides were dominantly distributed in the 5' and 3' terminal loop ends, which may contribute to the relatively precise cleavage that leads to a stable isomiR expression profile. Overall, this study provides further insight into miRNA processing and maturation and further enriches our understanding of miRNA biogenesis.

  10. Boom-Bust Turnovers of Megabase-Sized Centromeric DNA in Solanum Species: Rapid Evolution of DNA Sequences Associated with Centromeres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, H.Q.; Koblížková, Andrea; Wang, K.; Gong, Z.Y.; Oliveira, L.; Torres, G.A.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, W.; Novák, Petr; Buell, C.R.; Macas, Jiří; Jiang, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2014), s. 1436-1447 ISSN 1040-4651 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Alpha-satellite DNA * repetitive sequences * rice centromeres Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.338, year: 2014

  11. Conserved sequences of sperm-activating peptide and its receptor throughout evolution, despite speciation in the sea star Asterias amurensis and closely related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakachi, Mia; Hoshi, Motonori; Matsumoto, Midori; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2008-08-01

    The asteroidal sperm-activating peptides (asterosaps) from the egg jelly bind to their sperm receptor, a membrane-bound guanylate cyclase, on the tail to activate sperm in sea stars. Asterosaps are produced as single peptides and then cleaved into shorter peptides. Sperm activation is followed by the acrosome reaction, which is subfamily specific. In order to investigate the molecular details of the asterosap-receptor interaction, corresponding cDNAs have been cloned, sequenced and analysed from the Asteriinae subfamily including Asterias amurensis, A. rubens, A. forbesi and Aphelasterias japonica, as well as Distolasterias nipon from the Coscinasteriinae subfamily. Averages of 29% and 86% identity were found from the deduced amino acid sequences in asterosap and its receptor extracellular domains, respectively, across all species examined. The phylogenic tree topology for asterosap and its receptor was similar to that of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I. In spite of a certain homology, the amino acid sequences exhibited speciation. Conservation was found in the asterosap residues involved in disulphide bonding and proteinase-cleaving sites. Conversely, similarities were detected between potential asterosap-binding sites and the structure of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor. Although the sperm-activating peptide and its receptor share certain common sequences, they may serve as barriers that ensure speciation in the sea star A. amurensis and closely related species.

  12. Evolution of multi-drug resistant HCV clones from pre-existing resistant-associated variants during direct-acting antiviral therapy determined by third-generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Haruhiko; Ueda, Yoshihide; Inuzuka, Tadashi; Yamashita, Yukitaka; Osaki, Yukio; Nasu, Akihiro; Umeda, Makoto; Takemura, Ryo; Seno, Hiroshi; Sekine, Akihiro; Marusawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Resistance-associated variant (RAV) is one of the most significant clinical challenges in treating HCV-infected patients with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). We investigated the viral dynamics in patients receiving DAAs using third-generation sequencing technology. Among 283 patients with genotype-1b HCV receiving daclatasvir + asunaprevir (DCV/ASV), 32 (11.3%) failed to achieve sustained virological response (SVR). Conventional ultra-deep sequencing of HCV genome was performed in 104 patients (32 non-SVR, 72 SVR), and detected representative RAVs in all non-SVR patients at baseline, including Y93H in 28 (87.5%). Long contiguous sequences spanning NS3 to NS5A regions of each viral clone in 12 sera from 6 representative non-SVR patients were determined by third-generation sequencing, and showed the concurrent presence of several synonymous mutations linked to resistance-associated substitutions in a subpopulation of pre-existing RAVs and dominant isolates at treatment failure. Phylogenetic analyses revealed close genetic distances between pre-existing RAVs and dominant RAVs at treatment failure. In addition, multiple drug-resistant mutations developed on pre-existing RAVs after DCV/ASV in all non-SVR cases. In conclusion, multi-drug resistant viral clones at treatment failure certainly originated from a subpopulation of pre-existing RAVs in HCV-infected patients. Those RAVs were selected for and became dominant with the acquisition of multiple resistance-associated substitutions under DAA treatment pressure.

  13. Morphological character evolution of Amorphophallus (Araceae) based on a combined phylogenetic analysis of trnL, rbcL, and LEAFY second intron sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedayu, A.; Eurlings, M.C.M.; Gravendeel, B.; Hetterscheid, W.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Sequences of three different genes in 69 taxa of Amorphophallus were combined to reconstruct the molecular phylogeny of this species-rich Aroid genus. The data set was analyzed by three different methods, Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian analysis, producing slightly different tree

  14. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals dynamic evolution of the elastin gene that has involved purifying selection and lineage-specific insertions/deletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Eric D

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elastin gene (ELN is implicated as a factor in both supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS and Williams Beuren Syndrome (WBS, two diseases involving pronounced complications in mental or physical development. Although the complete spectrum of functional roles of the processed gene product remains to be established, these roles are inferred to be analogous in human and mouse. This view is supported by genomic sequence comparison, in which there are no large-scale differences in the ~1.8 Mb sequence block encompassing the common region deleted in WBS, with the exception of an overall reversed physical orientation between human and mouse. Results Conserved synteny around ELN does not translate to a high level of conservation in the gene itself. In fact, ELN orthologs in mammals show more sequence divergence than expected for a gene with a critical role in development. The pattern of divergence is non-conventional due to an unusually high ratio of gaps to substitutions. Specifically, multi-sequence alignments of eight mammalian sequences reveal numerous non-aligning regions caused by species-specific insertions and deletions, in spite of the fact that the vast majority of aligning sites appear to be conserved and undergoing purifying selection. Conclusions The pattern of lineage-specific, in-frame insertions/deletions in the coding exons of ELN orthologous genes is unusual and has led to unique features of the gene in each lineage. These differences may indicate that the gene has a slightly different functional mechanism in mammalian lineages, or that the corresponding regions are functionally inert. Identified regions that undergo purifying selection reflect a functional importance associated with evolutionary pressure to retain those features.

  15. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirando, Adam C; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K; Ebert, Alicia M; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S

    2015-08-14

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans.

  16. Infection-specific phosphorylation of glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase induces antiviral immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Young; Lee, Hyun-Cheol; Kim, Hyun-Kwan; Jang, Song Yee; Park, Seong-Jun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jong Hwan; Hwang, Jungwon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Arif, Abul; Kim, Seon-Young; Choi, Young-Ki; Lee, Cheolju; Lee, Chul-Ho; Jung, Jae U; Fox, Paul L; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Myung Hee

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian cytoplasmic multi-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC) is a depot system that regulates non-translational cellular functions. Here we found that the MSC component glutamyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase (EPRS) switched its function following viral infection and exhibited potent antiviral activity. Infection-specific phosphorylation of EPRS at Ser990 induced its dissociation from the MSC, after which it was guided to the antiviral signaling pathway, where it interacted with PCBP2, a negative regulator of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) that is critical for antiviral immunity. This interaction blocked PCBP2-mediated ubiquitination of MAVS and ultimately suppressed viral replication. EPRS-haploid (Eprs+/−) mice showed enhanced viremia and inflammation and delayed viral clearance. This stimulus-inducible activation of MAVS by EPRS suggests an unexpected role for the MSC as a regulator of immune responses to viral infection. PMID:27595231

  17. Plasmodium falciparum mitochondria import tRNAs along with an active phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arvind; Sharma, Amit

    2015-02-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum protein translation enzymes aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are an emergent family of drug targets. The aaRS ensemble catalyses transfer of amino acids to cognate tRNAs, thus providing charged tRNAs for ribosomal consumption. P. falciparum proteome expression relies on a total of 36 aaRSs for the three translationally independent compartments of cytoplasm, apicoplast and mitochondria. In the present study, we show that, of this set of 36, a single genomic copy of mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (mFRS) is targeted to the parasite mitochondria, and that the mFRS gene is exclusive to malaria parasites within the apicomplexan phyla. Our protein cellular localization studies based on immunofluorescence data show that, along with mFRS, P. falciparum harbours two more phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (FRS) assemblies that are localized to its apicoplast and cytoplasm. The 'extra' mFRS is found in mitochondria of all asexual blood stage parasites and is competent in aminoacylation. We show further that the parasite mitochondria import tRNAs from the cytoplasmic tRNA pool. Hence drug targeting of FRSs presents a unique opportunity to potentially stall protein production in all three parasite translational compartments.

  18. Chromosomal distribution of interstitial telomeric sequences as signs of evolution through chromosome fusion in six species of the giant water bugs (Hemiptera, Belostoma)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chirino, M. G.; Dalíková, Martina; Marec, František; Bressa, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 14 (2017), s. 5227-5235 ISSN 2045-7758 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-13713S Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA17-17211S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : chromosomal fusion * interstitial telomeric repeats * karyotype evolution Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 2.440, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.3098/full

  19. Sequence architecture of the Palaeocene Transitional Facies and Response to Tectonic Evolution and Sea Level Change in the Lishui Depression, East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Lishui Depression (LD) is a polycyclic rift basin located in the southwestern of the East China Sea Shelf Basin. From bottom to top, the Palaeocene strata sequentially comprise the Yueguifeng (YGF), Lingfeng (LF) and Mingyuefeng Formations (MYF). The YGF clastic deposits were produced by a continental lacustrine. The LF and MYF were a set of coal-bearing strata formed by marine transgressive-regressive cycles. The Palaeocene depositional cycle is divided into two second-order sequences, namely SQII1 (YGF, 66.5-60Ma) and SQII2 (LF and MYF, 60-53Ma), which can be interpreted as the initial rifting sequence and the strong rifting sequence respectively that controlled by episodic tectonic subsidence, namely Yandang and Oujiang movements. The SQII1 includes only one third-order sequence, namely SQIII1, which is constituted by lake transgressive systems tract (LTST) and lake regressive systems tract (LRST). The SQII2 can be subdivided into four third-order sequences, namely SQIII2 (Lower LF, 60-57Ma), SQIII3 (Upper LF, 57-55Ma), SQIII4 (Lower MYF, 55-54.5Ma) and SQIII5 (Upper MYF, 54.5-53Ma). In the SQIII2 period, LD suffered massive transgression and the sustained high relative sea level led to the only development of transgressive systems tract (TST) and highstand systems tract (HST). In the SQIII3 period, the relative sea level declined and simultaneously two sets of incised valley were recognized on the seismic reflection with no lowstand fan developed. So the SQIII3 is considered to be composed of basin margin systems tract (BMST, similar to the shelf margin systems tract), TST and HST. Early SQIII4 (55Ma ), the relative sea level started global rapid declining and the LST of LD developed a completed system of prograding wedge, incised valley and basin floor fan. While the TST developed a retrograding marine sediments and the HST was characterized by a typical foreset parasequences. In SQIII5 period, the global sea level continuously rose and the sedimentary

  20. Animal evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus

    , and even whole genomes, has brought a new stability to the field. The book brings together the information from these varied fields, and demonstrates that it is indeed now possible to build a phylogenetic tree from a combination of both morphology and gene sequences. This thoroughly revised third edition......This book provides a comprehensive analysis of evolution in the animal kingdom. It reviews the classical, morphological information from structure and embryology, as well as the new data gained from studies using immune stainings of nerves and muscles and blastomere markings, which makes...

  1. First-order and subsidiary faults controlling the time-space evolution of the Central Italy 2016 seismic sequence - a multi-source data detailed 3D reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavecchia, Giusy; de nardis, Rita; Ferrarini, Federica; Cirillo, Daniele; Brozzetti, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    The Central Italy 2016 seismic sequence, with its three major events (24 August, Mw 6.0/6.2; 26 October Mw5.9/6.0; 30 October Mw6.5/6.6), activated a well-known active west-dipping extensional fault alignment of central Italy (Vettore-Gorzano faults, VEGO). Soon after the first event, based on geological, interferometric and at that moment available seismological data, a preliminary 3D fault model of VEGO was built. Such a model is here updated and improved at the light of a large amount of relocated earthquake data (time interval 24 August to 30 November 2016, 0.1≤ML ≤6.5, Chiaraluce at al., submitted to SRL) plus additional geological information. The 3D modeling was done using the software package MOVE from the Midland Valley. All the available data were taken into consideration (surface traces, fault-slip data, primary co-seismic surface fractures, geological maps and cross-sections, hypocentral locations and focal mechanisms of both background seismicity and seismic sequences). The VEGO geometric configuration did not substantially changed with respect to the previous model, but some additional structures involved in the sequence were reconstructed. In particular, four additional faults are well evident: a NE-dipping normal fault (dip-angle 50˚ ) antithetic to Vettore Fault, located at depths between 1 and 5 km; a WNW dipping plane (dip-angle 30˚ ) located at depth between 1 and 4 km within the Vettore footwall volume; this structure represents a splay of the late Miocene Sibillini thrust, which is evidently cross-cut and dislocated by the Vettore normal fault; a SW-dipping normal fault representing an unknown northward prosecution of the VEGO alignment, where since 26 October a relevant seismic activity was released; an unknown east-dipping low-angle detachment, where VEGO detaches at a depth of about 10-11 km. An uninterrupted microseismic activity has illuminated such a detachment not only during the overall sequence, but also in the previous months

  2. Using regional moment tensors to constrain the kinematics and stress evolution of the 2010–2013 Canterbury earthquake sequence, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Matthew W.; Herrmann, Robert B.; Benz, Harley M.; Furlong, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    On September 3, 2010, a MW 7.0 (U.S. Geological Survey moment magnitude) earthquake ruptured across the Canterbury Plains in South Island, New Zealand. Since then, New Zealand GNS Science has recorded over 10,000 aftershocks ML 2.0 and larger, including three destructive ~ MW 6.0 earthquakes near Christchurch. We treat the Canterbury earthquake sequence as an intraplate earthquake sequence, and compare its kinematics to an Andersonian model for fault slip in a uniform stress field. We determined moment magnitudes and double couple solutions for 150 earthquakes having MW 3.7 and larger through the use of a waveform inversion technique using data from broadband seismic stations on South Island, New Zealand. The majority (126) of these double couple solutions have strike-slip focal mechanisms, with right-lateral slip on ENE fault planes or equivalently left-lateral slip on SSE fault planes. The remaining focal mechanisms indicate reverse faulting, except for two normal faulting events. The strike-slip segments have compatible orientations for slip in a stress field with a horizontal σ1 oriented ~ N115°E, and horizontal σ3. The preference for right lateral strike-slip earthquakes suggests that these structures are inherited from previous stages of deformation. Reverse slip is interpreted to have occurred on previously existing structures in regions with an absence of existing structures optimally oriented for strike-slip deformation. Despite the variations in slip direction and faulting style, most aftershocks had nearly the same P-axis orientation, consistent with the regional σ1. There is no evidence for significant changes in these stress orientations throughout the Canterbury earthquake sequence.

  3. Assessment of adaptive evolution between wheat and rice as deduced from full-length common wheat cDNA sequence data and expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashizaki Yoshihide

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wheat is an allopolyploid plant that harbors a huge, complex genome. Therefore, accumulation of expressed sequence tags (ESTs for wheat is becoming particularly important for functional genomics and molecular breeding. We prepared a comprehensive collection of ESTs from the various tissues that develop during the wheat life cycle and from tissues subjected to stress. We also examined their expression profiles in silico. As full-length cDNAs are indispensable to certify the collected ESTs and annotate the genes in the wheat genome, we performed a systematic survey and sequencing of the full-length cDNA clones. This sequence information is a valuable genetic resource for functional genomics and will enable carrying out comparative genomics in cereals. Results As part of the functional genomics and development of genomic wheat resources, we have generated a collection of full-length cDNAs from common wheat. By grouping the ESTs of recombinant clones randomly selected from the full-length cDNA library, we were able to sequence 6,162 independent clones with high accuracy. About 10% of the clones were wheat-unique genes, without any counterparts within the DNA database. Wheat clones that showed high homology to those of rice were selected in order to investigate their expression patterns in various tissues throughout the wheat life cycle and in response to abiotic-stress treatments. To assess the variability of genes that have evolved differently in wheat and rice, we calculated the substitution rate (Ka/Ks of the counterparts in wheat and rice. Genes that were preferentially expressed in certain tissues or treatments had higher Ka/Ks values than those in other tissues and treatments, which suggests that the genes with the higher variability expressed in these tissues is under adaptive selection. Conclusion We have generated a high-quality full-length cDNA resource for common wheat, which is essential for continuation of the

  4. Origin and evolution of Petrocosmea (Gesneriaceae) inferred from both DNA sequence and novel findings in morphology with a test of morphology-based hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhi-Jing; Lu, Yuan-Xue; Li, Chao-Qun; Dong, Yang; Smith, James F; Wang, Yin-Zheng

    2015-07-03

    Petrocosmea Oliver (Gesneriaceae) currently comprises 38 species with four non-nominate varieties, nearly all of which have been described solely from herbarium specimens. However, the dried specimens have obscured the full range of extremely diverse morphological variation that exists in the genus and has resulted in a poor subgeneric classification system that does not reflect the evolutionary history of this group. It is important to develop innovative methods to find new morphological traits and reexamine and reevaluate the traditionally used morphological data based on new hypothesis. In addition, Petrocosmea is a mid-sized genus but exhibits extreme diverse floral variants. This makes the genus of particular interest in addressing the question whether there are any key factors that is specifically associated with their evolution and diversification. Here we present the first phylogenetic analyses of the genus based on dense taxonomic sampling and multiple genes combined with a comprehensive morphological investigation. Maximum-parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of molecular data from two nuclear DNA and six cpDNA regions support the monophyly of Petrocosmea and recover five major clades within the genus, which is strongly corroborated by the reconstruction of ancestral states for twelve new morphological characters directly observed from living material. Ancestral area reconstruction shows that its most common ancestor was likely located east and southeast of the Himalaya-Tibetan plateau. The origin of Petrocosmea from a potentially Raphiocarpus-like ancestor might have involved a series of morphological modifications from caulescent to acaulescent habit as well as from a tetrandrous flower with a long corolla-tube to a diandrous flower with a short corolla-tube, also evident in the vestigial caulescent habit and transitional floral form in clade A that is sister to the remainder of the genus. Among the five clades in Petrocosmea, the

  5. Phylogenetic Trees From Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryvkin, Paul; Wang, Li-San

    In this chapter, we review important concepts and approaches for phylogeny reconstruction from sequence data.We first cover some basic definitions and properties of phylogenetics, and briefly explain how scientists model sequence evolution and measure sequence divergence. We then discuss three major approaches for phylogenetic reconstruction: distance-based phylogenetic reconstruction, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood. In the third part of the chapter, we review how multiple phylogenies are compared by consensus methods and how to assess confidence using bootstrapping. At the end of the chapter are two sections that list popular software packages and additional reading.

  6. Universal distribution of mutational effects on protein stability, uncoupling of protein robustness from sequence evolution and distinct evolutionary modes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Guilhem; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2015-05-01

    Robustness to destabilizing effects of mutations is thought of as a key factor of protein evolution. The connections between two measures of robustness, the relative core size and the computationally estimated effect of mutations on protein stability (ΔΔG), protein abundance and the selection pressure on protein-coding genes (dN/dS) were analyzed for the organisms with a large number of available protein structures including four eukaryotes, two bacteria and one archaeon. The distribution of the effects of mutations in the core on protein stability is universal and indistinguishable in eukaryotes and bacteria, centered at slightly destabilizing amino acid replacements, and with a heavy tail of more strongly destabilizing replacements. The distribution of mutational effects in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus gammatolerans is significantly shifted toward strongly destabilizing replacements which is indicative of stronger constraints that are imposed on proteins in hyperthermophiles. The median effect of mutations is strongly, positively correlated with the relative core size, in evidence of the congruence between the two measures of protein robustness. However, both measures show only limited correlations to the expression level and selection pressure on protein-coding genes. Thus, the degree of robustness reflected in the universal distribution of mutational effects appears to be a fundamental, ancient feature of globular protein folds whereas the observed variations are largely neutral and uncoupled from short term protein evolution. A weak anticorrelation between protein core size and selection pressure is observed only for surface residues in prokaryotes but a stronger anticorrelation is observed for all residues in eukaryotic proteins. This substantial difference between proteins of prokaryotes and eukaryotes is likely to stem from the demonstrable higher compactness of prokaryotic proteins.

  7. Sphene and zircon in the Highland Range volcanic sequence (Miocene, southern Nevada, USA): Elemental partitioning, phase relations, and influence on evolution of silicic magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombini, L.L.; Miller, C.F.; Gualda, G.A.R.; Wooden, J.L.; Miller, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Sphene is prominent in Miocene plutonic rocks ranging from diorite to granite in southern Nevada, USA, but it is restricted to rhyolites in coeval volcanic sequences. In the Highland Range volcanic sequence, sphene appears as a phenocryst only in the most evolved rocks (72-77 mass% SiO2; matrix glass 77-78 mass% SiO2). Zr-in-sphene temperatures of crystallization are mostly restricted to 715 and 755??C, in contrast to zircon (710-920??C, Ti-in-zircon thermometry). Sphene rim/glass Kds for rare earth elements are extremely high (La 120, Sm 1200, Gd 1300, Lu 240). Rare earth elements, especially the middle REE (MREE), decrease from centers to rims of sphene phenocrysts along with Zr, demonstrating the effect of progressive sphene fractionation. Whole rocks and glasses have MREE-depleted, U-shaped REE patterns as a consequence of sphene fractionation. Within the co-genetic, sphene-rich Searchlight pluton, only evolved leucogranites show comparable MREE depletion. These results indicate that sphene saturation in intruded and extruded magmas occurred only in highly evolved melts: abundant sphene in less silicic plutonic rocks represents a late-stage 'bloom' in fractionated interstitial melt. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Gamma-Glutamylpolyamine Synthetase GlnA3 Is Involved in the First Step of Polyamine Degradation Pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor M145

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bera

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces coelicolor M145 was shown to be able to grow in the presence of high concentrations of polyamines, such as putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, or spermine, as a sole nitrogen source. However, hardly anything is known about polyamine utilization and its regulation in streptomycetes. In this study, we demonstrated that only one of the three proteins annotated as glutamine synthetase-like protein, GlnA3 (SCO6962, was involved in the catabolism of polyamines. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the expression of glnA3 was strongly induced by exogenous polyamines and repressed in the presence of ammonium. The ΔglnA3 mutant was shown to be unable to grow on defined Evans agar supplemented with putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, and spermine as sole nitrogen source. HPLC analysis demonstrated that the ΔglnA3 mutant accumulated polyamines intracellularly, but was unable to degrade them. In a rich complex medium supplemented with a mixture of the four different polyamines, the ΔglnA3 mutant grew poorly showing abnormal mycelium morphology and decreased life span in comparison to the parental strain. These observations indicated that the accumulation of polyamines was toxic for the cell. An in silico analysis of the GlnA3 protein model suggested that it might act as a gamma-glutamylpolyamine synthetase catalyzing the first step of polyamine degradation. GlnA3-catalyzed glutamylation of putrescine was confirmed in an enzymatic in vitro assay and the GlnA3 reaction product, gamma-glutamylputrescine, was detected by HPLC/ESI-MS. In this work, the first step of polyamine utilization in S. coelicolor has been elucidated and the putative polyamine utilization pathway has been deduced based on the sequence similarity and transcriptional analysis of homologous genes expressed in the presence of polyamines.

  9. Localization of two human autoantigen genes by PCR screening and in situ hybridization-glycyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 7p15 and Alanyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 16q22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R.C.; Pai, S.I.; Liu, P. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Ge, Q.; Targoff, I.N. [Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aminoacyl-RS) catalyze the attachment of an amino acid to its cognate tRNA. Five of 20 human aminoacyl-RS (histidyl-RS, threonyl-RS, isoleucyl-RS, glycyl-RS, and alanyl-RS) have been identified as targets of autoantibodies in the autoimmune disease polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM; 9). A sixth autoantigenic amino-acyl-RS, lysyl-RS, was recently reported. The genes for histidyl-RS and threonyl-RS have been assigned to chromosome 5, as have the genes for leucyl-RS and arginyl-RS. Six other aminoacyl-RS (glutamyl-prolyl-RS, valyl-RS, cysteinyl-RS, methionyl-RS, tryptophanyl-RS, and asparaginyl-RS) were assigned to chromosomes 1, 6, 11, 12, 14, and 18, respectively. The reason for a preponderance of aminoacyl-RS genes on chromosome 5 is unknown, but it has been suggested that regulatory relatedness might be a factor. Recently the entire or partial cDNA sequences for two autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS genes, glycyl-RS (gene symbol GARS; 4) and alanyl-RS (gene symbol AARS; 1), were reported. To understand further the genesis of autoimmune responses to aminoacyl-RS and to determine whether genes for autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS colocalize to chromosome 5, we have determined the chromosomal site of the GARS and AARS genes by PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrid panels and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Complete chloroplast genome sequences of Drimys, Liriodendron, andPiper: Implications for the phylogeny of magnoliids and the evolution ofGC content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhengqiu, C.; Penaflor, C.; Kuehl, J.V.; Leebens-Mack, J.; Carlson, J.; dePamphilis, C.W.; Boore, J.L.; Jansen, R.K.

    2006-06-01

    The magnoliids represent the largest basal angiosperm clade with four orders, 19 families and 8,500 species. Although several recent angiosperm molecular phylogenies have supported the monophyly of magnoliids and suggested relationships among the orders, the limited number of genes examined resulted in only weak support, and these issues remain controversial. Furthermore, considerable incongruence has resulted in phylogenies supporting three different sets of relationships among magnoliids and the two large angiosperm clades, monocots and eudicots. This is one of the most important remaining issues concerning relationships among basal angiosperms. We sequenced the chloroplast genomes of three magnoliids, Drimys (Canellales), Liriodendron (Magnoliales), and Piper (Piperales), and used these data in combination with 32 other completed angiosperm chloroplast genomes to assess phylogenetic relationships among magnoliids. The Drimys and Piper chloroplast genomes are nearly identical in size at 160,606 and 160,624 bp, respectively. The genomes include a pair of inverted repeats of 26,649 bp (Drimys) and 27,039 (Piper), separated by a small single copy region of 18,621 (Drimys) and 18,878 (Piper) and a large single copy region of 88,685 bp (Drimys) and 87,666 bp (Piper). The gene order of both taxa is nearly identical to many other unrearranged angiosperm chloroplast genomes, including Calycanthus, the other published magnoliid genome. Comparisons of angiosperm chloroplast genomes indicate that GC content is not uniformly distributed across the genome. Overall GC content ranges from 34-39%, and coding regions have a substantially higher GC content than non-coding regions (both intergenic spacers and introns). Among protein-coding genes, GC content varies by codon position with 1st codon > 2nd codon > 3rd codon, and it varies by functional group with photosynthetic genes having the highest percentage and NADH genes the lowest. Across the genome, GC content is highest in

  11. Karyotypic evolution and organization of the highly repetitive DNA sequences in the Japanese shrew-moles, Dymecodon pilirostris and Urotrichus talpoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, A; Yoshimura, A; Kuro-o, M; Obara, Y

    2005-01-01

    The karyological relationship and organization of highly repetitive DNA sequences in Japanese shrew-moles were studied by zoo-blot hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). When the genomic DNA of the eastern race of Urotrichus talpoides was digested with PstI, three fragments of highly repetitive DNA sequences, approximately 0.7, 0.9, and 1.4 kb in length, were observed as distinct bands. The results of FISH in the eastern race of U. talpoides using these three fragments separately as probes showed that the 0.7-kb PstI fragment was distributed in the centromeric regions of most chromosomes, and that the 0.9- and 1.4-kb fragments were predominantly located in the C-heterochromatin region of chromosome 13p. Although the western race of U. talpoides also had three PstI fragments, 0.9- and 1.4-kb PstI fragments were more ambiguous than those of the eastern race. The PstI- digested genomic DNA in Dymecodonpilirostris produced only a faint 0.9-kb band, and its signal patterns obtained by zoo-blot hybridization were clearly different from those of U. talpoides. The 0.7-kb fragment of U. talpoides hybridized strongly with the 0.9-kb fragment of D. pilirostris. In a FISH analysis, the 0.9-kb fragment of D. pilirostris hybridized with highly repetitive DNA in the centromeric regions of most chromosomes from both D. pilirostris and U. talpoides. Zoo-blot hybridization and FISH analyses suggest that the 0.9- and 1.4-kb PstI fragments were generated specifically in the genome of U. talpoides after the common ancestor differentiated into two extant shrew-mole species. A difference in the length of the centromeric elements between U. talpoides and D. pilirostris might be observed due to certain modifications of the repeating unit.

  12. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Pelargonium xhortorum: Or ganization and evolution of the largest and most highlyrearranged chloroplast genome of land plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumley, Timothy W.; Palmer, Jeffrey D.; Mower, Jeffrey P.; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Calie, Patrick J.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen,Robert K.

    2006-01-20

    The chloroplast genome of Pelargonium e hortorum has beencompletely sequenced. It maps as a circular molecule of 217,942 bp, andis both the largest and most rearranged land plant chloroplast genome yetsequenced. It features two copies of a greatly expanded inverted repeat(IR) of 75,741 bp each, and consequently diminished single copy regionsof 59,710 bp and 6,750 bp. It also contains two different associations ofrepeated elements that contribute about 10 percent to the overall sizeand account for the majority of repeats found in the genome. Theyrepresent hotspots for rearrangements and gene duplications and include alarge number of pseudogenes. We propose simple models that account forthe major rearrangements with a minimum of eight IR boundary changes and12 inversions in addition to a several insertions of duplicated sequence.The major processes at work (duplication, IR expansion, and inversion)have disrupted at least one and possibly two or three transcriptionaloperons, and the genes involved in these disruptions form the core of thetwo major repeat associations. Despite the vast increase in size andcomplexity of the genome, the gene content is similar to that of otherangiosperms, with the exceptions of a large number of pseudogenes as partof the repeat associations, the recognition of two open reading frames(ORF56 and ORF42) in the trnA intron with similarities to previouslyidentified mitochondrial products (ACRS and pvs-trnA), the loss of accDand trnT-GGU, and in particular, the lack of a recognizably functionalrpoA. One or all of three similar open reading frames may possibly encodethe latter, however.

  13. Modular evolution of TnGBSs, a new family of integrative and conjugative elements associating insertion sequence transposition, plasmid replication, and conjugation for their spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérillot, Romain; Da Cunha, Violette; Sauvage, Elisabeth; Bouchier, Christiane; Glaser, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) have a major impact on gene flow and genome dynamics in bacteria. The ICEs TnGBS1 and TnGBS2, first identified in Streptococcus agalactiae, use a DDE transposase, unlike most characterized ICEs, which depend on a phage-like integrase for their mobility. Here we identified 56 additional TnGBS-related ICEs by systematic genome analysis. Interestingly, all except one are inserted in streptococcal genomes. Sequence comparison of the proteins conserved among these ICEs defined two subtypes related to TnGBS1 or TnGBS2. We showed that both types encode different conjugation modules: a type IV secretion system, a VirD4 coupling protein, and a relaxase and its cognate oriT site, shared with distinct lineages of conjugative elements of Firmicutes. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that TnGBSs evolved from two conjugative elements of different origins by the successive recruitment of a transposition module derived from insertion sequences (ISs). Furthermore, TnGBSs share replication modules with different plasmids. Mutational analyses and conjugation experiments showed that TnGBS1 and TnGBS2 combine replication and transposition upstream promoters for their transfer and stabilization. Despite an evolutionarily successful horizontal dissemination within the genus Streptococcus, these ICEs have a restricted host range. However, we reveal that for TnGBS1 and TnGBS2, this host restriction is not due to a transfer incompatibility linked to the conjugation machineries but most likely to their ability for transient maintenance through replication after their transfer.

  14. Stage-dependent expression and up-regulation of trypanothione synthetase in amphotericin B resistant Leishmania donovani.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Equbal

    Full Text Available Kinetoplastids differ from other organisms in their ability to conjugate glutathione and spermidine to form trypanothione which is involved in maintaining redox homeostasis and removal of toxic metabolites. It is also involved in drug resistance, antioxidant mechanism, and defense against cellular oxidants. Trypanothione synthetase (TryS of thiol metabolic pathway is the sole enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of trypanothione in Leishmania donovani. In this study, TryS gene of L. donovani (LdTryS was cloned, expressed, and fusion protein purified with affinity column chromatography. The purified protein showed optimum enzymatic activity at pH 8.0-8.5. The TryS amino acids sequences alignment showed that all amino acids involved in catalytic and ligands binding of L. major are conserved in L. dono