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Sample records for synthesize nanoscale cobalt

  1. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesize nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2 O 4 ) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of ∼ 10 6 erg cm -3 can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure

  2. A novel method to synthesize cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanowires from cobalt (Co) nanobowls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Madhavi, S.; Ramanujan, R.V.

    2010-01-01

    A novel method suitable for the synthesis of the cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanowires at targeted regions is presented in this report. Cobalt (Co) nanobowls synthesized by colloidal crystal directed assembly were transformed into Co3O4 nanowires by a simple heat treatment process. Co nanobowls exhibited...

  3. Harnessing the extracellular bacterial production of nanoscale cobalt ferrite with exploitable magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Victoria S; Telling, Neil D; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A D; Pearce, Carolyn I; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E P; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2009-07-28

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe(2)O(4)) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of ∼10(6) erg cm(-3) can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies.

  4. Bio-inspired routes for synthesizing efficient nanoscale platinum electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jennifer N. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Wang, Joseph [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-08-31

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to use fundamental advances in bionanotechnology to design powerful platinum nanocrystal electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. The new economically-viable, environmentally-friendly, bottom-up biochemical synthetic strategy will produce platinum nanocrystals with tailored size, shape and crystal orientation, hence leading to a maximum electrochemical reactivity. There are five specific aims to the proposed bio-inspired strategy for synthesizing efficient electrocatalytic platinum nanocrystals: (1) isolate peptides that both selectively bind particular crystal faces of platinum and promote the nucleation and growth of particular nanocrystal morphologies, (2) pattern nanoscale 2-dimensional arrays of platinum nucleating peptides from DNA scaffolds, (3) investigate the combined use of substrate patterned peptides and soluble peptides on nanocrystal morphology and growth (4) synthesize platinum crystals on planar and large-area carbon electrode supports, and (5) perform detailed characterization of the electrocatalytic behavior as a function of catalyst size, shape and morphology. Project Description and Impact: This bio-inspired collaborative research effort will address key challenges in designing powerful electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications by employing nucleic acid scaffolds in combination with peptides to perform specific, environmentally-friendly, simultaneous bottom-up biochemical synthesis and patterned assembly of highly uniform and efficient platinum nanocrystal catalysts. Bulk synthesis of nanoparticles usually produces a range of sizes, accessible catalytic sites, crystal morphologies, and orientations, all of which lead to inconsistent catalytic activities. In contrast, biological systems routinely demonstrate exquisite control over inorganic syntheses at neutral pH and ambient temperature and pressures. Because the orientation and arrangement of the templating biomolecules can be precisely

  5. Liquid-phase syntheses of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkó, Katalin; Manek, Enikő; Meiszterics, Anikó; Havancsák, Károly; Vainio, Ulla; Peterlik, Herwig

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to synthesize cobalt-ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles using various liquid phase methods; sol-gel route, co-precipitation process, and microemulsion technique. The effects of experimental parameters on the particle size, size distribution, morphology, and chemical composition have been studied. The anions of precursors (chloride and nitrate), the solvents (water, n-propanol, ethanol, and benzyl alcohol), the precipitating agent (ammonia, sodium carbonate, and oxalic acid), the surfactants (polydimethylsiloxane, ethyl acetate, citric acid, cethyltrimethylammonium bromide, and sodium dodecil sulfate), their concentrations, and heat treatments were varied in the experiments. The smallest particles (around 40 nm) with narrow polydispersity and spherical shape could be achieved by a simple, fast sol-gel technique in the medium of propanol and ethyl acetate. The size characterization methods have also been investigated. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provide the comparison of methods. The SAXS data correspond with the sizes detected by SEM and differ from DLS data. The crystalline phases, morphology, and chemical composition of the particles with different shapes have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer.

  6. Polymer Films with Ion-Synthesized Cobalt and Iron Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The current paper presents an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of polymer samples implanted by iron and cobalt. The low-energy (40 keV) implantations were carried out into polyimide and polyethyleneterephthalate with fluences between 2.5x10e16-1.5x10e17 cm-2. The samples were...

  7. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than

  8. Nanoscale grain growth behaviour of CoAl intermetallic synthesized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Grain growth behaviour of the nanocrystalline CoAl intermetallic compound synthesized by mechanical alloying has been studied by isothermal annealing at different temperatures and durations. X-ray diffraction method was employed to investigate structural evolutions during mechanical alloying and annealing processes.

  9. A comparison study of polymer/cobalt ferrite nano-composites synthesized by mechanical alloying route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Rashidi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of different biopolymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG and polyvinylalcohol (PVA on synthesis and characterization of polymer/cobalt ferrite (CF nano-composites bymechanical alloying method has been systematically investigated. The structural, morphological andmagnetic properties changes during mechanical milling were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, fieldemission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques(VSM, respectively. The polymeric cobalt ferrite nano-composites were obtained by employing atwo-step procedure: the cobalt ferrite of 20 nm mean particle size was first synthesized by mechanicalalloying route and then was embedded in PEG or PVA biopolymer matrix by milling process. Theresults revealed that PEG melted due to the local temperature raise during milling. Despite thisphenomenon, cobalt ferrite nano-particles were entirely embedded in PEG matrix. It seems, PAV is anappropriate candidate for producing nano-composite samples due to its high melting point. InPVA/CF nano-composites, the mean crystallite size and milling induced strain decreased to 13 nm and0.48, respectively. Moreover, milling process resulted in well distribution of CF in PVA matrix eventhough the mean particle size of cobalt ferrite has not been significantly affecetd. FTIR resultconfirmed the attachment of PVA to the surface of nano-particles. Magnetic properties evaluationshowed that saturation magnetization and coercivity values decreased in nano-composite samplecomparing the pure cobalt ferrite.

  10. Influence of aging time of oleate precursor on the magnetic relaxation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by the thermal decomposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, Adriana P.; Polo-Corrales, Liliana; Chavez, Ermides; Cabarcas-Bolivar, Jari; Uwakweh, Oswald N.C.; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are of interest because of their room temperature coercivity and high magnetic anisotropy constant, which make them attractive in applications such as sensors based on the Brownian relaxation mechanism and probes to determine the mechanical properties of complex fluids at the nanoscale. These nanoparticles can be synthesized with a narrow size distribution by the thermal decomposition of an iron–cobalt oleate precursor in a high boiling point solvent. We studied the influence of aging time of the iron–cobalt oleate precursor on the structure, chemical composition, size, and magnetic relaxation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by the thermal decomposition method. The structure and thermal behavior of the iron–cobalt oleate was studied during the aging process. Infrared spectra indicated a shift in the coordination state of the oleate and iron/cobalt ions from bidentate to bridging coordination. Aging seemed to influence the thermal decomposition of the iron–cobalt oleate as determined from thermogravimmetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry, where shifts in the temperatures corresponding to decomposition events and a narrowing of the endotherms associated with these events were observed. Aging promoted formation of the spinel crystal structure, as determined from X-ray diffraction, and influenced the nanoparticle magnetic properties, resulting in an increase in blocking temperature and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Mossbauer spectra also indicated changes in the magnetic properties resulting from aging of the precursor oleate. Although all samples exhibited some degree of Brownian relaxation, as determined from complex susceptibility measurements in a liquid medium, aging of the iron–cobalt oleate precursor resulted in crossing of the in-phase χ′and out-of-phase χ″ components of the complex susceptibility at the frequency of the Brownian magnetic relaxation peak, as expected for nanoparticles

  11. Cobalt(II)-selective membrane electrode based on a recently synthesized benzo-substituted macrocyclic diamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsipur, M; Poursaberi, T; Rouhani, S; Niknam, K; Sharghi, H; Ganjali, M R

    2001-09-01

    A PVC-membrane electrode based on a recently synthesized 18-membered macrocyclic diamide is presented. The electrode reveals a Nernstian potentiometric response for Co2+ over a wide concentration range (2.0 x 10(-6)-1.0 x 10(-2) M). The electrode has a response time of about 10 s and can be used for at least 2 months without any divergence. The proposed sensor revealed very good selectivities for Co2+ over a wide variety of other metal ions, and could be used over a wide pH range (3.0-8.0). The detection limit of the sensor is 6.0 x 10(-7) M. It was successfully applied to the direct determination and potentiometric titration of cobalt ion.

  12. Composition tunable cobalt–nickel and cobalt–iron alloy nanoparticles below 10 nm synthesized using acetonated cobalt carbonyl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooneveld, Matti M.; Campos-Cuerva, Carlos; Pet, Jeroen; Meeldijk, Johannes D.; van Rijssel, Jos; Meijerink, Andries; Erne, Ben H.; de Groot, Frank M. F.

    A general organometallic route has been developed to synthesize CoxNi1-x and CoxFe1-x alloy nanoparticles with a fully tunable composition and a size of 4–10 nm with high yield. In contrast to previously reported synthesis methods using dicobalt octacarbonyl (Co2(CO)8), here the cobalt–cobalt bond

  13. Une alternative au cobalt pour la synthese de nanotubes de carbone monoparoi par plasma inductif thermique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Jean-Francois

    Les nanotubes de carbone de type monoparoi (C-SWNT) sont une classe recente de nanomateriaux qui ont fait leur apparition en 1991. L'interet qu'on leur accorde provient des nombreuses proprietes d'avant-plan qu'ils possedent. Leur resistance mecanique serait des plus rigide, tout comme ils peuvent conduire l'electricite et la chaleur d'une maniere inegalee. Non moins, les C-SWNT promettent de devenir une nouvelle classe de plateforme moleculaire, en servant de site d'attache pour des groupements reactifs. Les promesses de ce type particulier de nanomateriau sont nombreuses, la question aujourd'hui est de comment les realiser. La technologie de synthese par plasma inductif thermique se situe avantageusement pour la qualite de ses produits, sa productivite et les faibles couts d'operation. Par contre, des recherches recentes ont permis de mettre en lumiere des risques d'expositions reliees a l'utilisation du cobalt, comme catalyseur de synthese; son elimination ou bien son remplacement est devenu une preoccupation importante. Quatre recettes alternatives ont ete mises a l'essai afin de trouver une alternative plus securitaire a la recette de base; un melange catalytique ternaire, compose de nickel, de cobalt et d'oxyde d'yttrium. La premiere consiste essentiellement a remplacer la proportion massique de cobalt par du nickel, qui etait deja present dans la recette de base. Les trois options suivantes contiennent de nouveaux catalyseurs, en remplacement au Co, qui sont apparus dans plusieurs recherches scientifiques au courant des dernieres annees: le dioxyde de zircone (ZrO2), dioxyde de manganese (MnO2) et le molybdene (Mo). La methode utilisee consiste a vaporiser la matiere premiere, sous forme solide, dans un reacteur plasma a haute frequence (3 MHz) a paroi refroidi. Apres le passage dans le plasma, le systeme traverse une section dite de "croissance", isolee thermiquement a l'aide de graphite, afin de maintenir une certaine plage de temperature favorable a la

  14. Cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, John F.; Kimball, Bryn E.; Shedd, Kim B.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Cobalt is a silvery gray metal that has diverse uses based on certain key properties, including ferromagnetism, hardness and wear-resistance when alloyed with other metals, low thermal and electrical conductivity, high melting point, multiple valences, and production of intense blue colors when combined with silica. Cobalt is used mostly in cathodes in rechargeable batteries and in superalloys for turbine engines in jet aircraft. Annual global cobalt consumption was approximately 75,000 metric tons in 2011; China, Japan, and the United States (in order of consumption amount) were the top three cobalt-consuming countries. In 2011, approximately 109,000 metric tons of recoverable cobalt was produced in ores, concentrates, and intermediate products from cobalt, copper, nickel, platinum-group-element (PGE), and zinc operations. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (Congo [Kinshasa]) was the principal source of mined cobalt globally (55 percent). The United States produced a negligible amount of byproduct cobalt as an intermediate product from a PGE mining and refining operation in southeastern Montana; no U.S. production was from mines in which cobalt was the principal commodity. China was the leading refiner of cobalt, and much of its production came from cobalt ores, concentrates, and partially refined materials imported from Congo (Kinshasa).The mineralogy of cobalt deposits is diverse and includes both primary (hypogene) and secondary (supergene) phases. Principal terrestrial (land-based) deposit types, which represent most of world’s cobalt mine production, include primary magmatic Ni-Cu(-Co-PGE) sulfides, primary and secondary stratiform sediment-hosted Cu-Co sulfides and oxides, and secondary Ni-Co laterites. Seven additional terrestrial deposit types are described in this chapter. The total terrestrial cobalt resource (reserves plus other resources) plus past production, where available, is calculated to be 25.5 million metric tons. Additional resources of

  15. Synthesizing the Nanocrytalline Cobalt-Iron Coating Through The Electrodeposition Process With Different Time Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozlin Nik Masdek, Nik; Sorfian Hafiz Mansor, Mohd; Salleh, Zuraidah; Hyie, Koay Mei

    2018-03-01

    In the engineering world, electrodeposition or electroplating has become the most popular method of surface coating in improving corrosion behavior and mechanical properties of material. Therefore in this study, CoFe nanoparticle protective coating has been synthesized on the mild steel washer using electrodeposition method. The electrodeposition was conducted in the acidic environment with the pH value range from 1 to 2 with the controlled temperature of 50°C. The influence of deposition time (30, 60, 90 minutes) towards characteristic and properties such as particle size, surface morphology, corrosion behavior, and microhardness were studied in this investigation. Several results can be obtained by doing this experiment and testing. First, the surface morphology of Cobalt Iron (CoFe) on the electrodeposited mild steel washer are obtained. In addition, the microhardness of the mild steel washer due to the different deposition time are determined. Next, the observation on the difference in the grain size of CoFe that has been electrodeposited on the mild steel plate is made. Last but not least, the corrosion behavior was investigated. CoFe nanoparticles deposited for 30 minutes produced the smallest particle size and the highest microhardness of 86.17 and 236.84 HV respectively. The CoFe nanoparticles also exhibit the slowest corrosion rate at 30 minutes as compared to others. The crystalline size also increases when the time deposition is increased. The sample with 30 minute depositon time indicate the smallest crystalline size which is 15nm. The decrement of deposition time plays an important role in synthesizing CoFe nanoparticles with good corrosion resistance and microhardness. CoFe nanoparticles obtained at 30 minutes shows high corrosion resistance compared to others. In a nutshell, it was observed that the decrement of deposition time improved mechanical and corrosion properties of CoFe nanoparticles.

  16. Correlation between magnetic spin structure and the three-dimensional geometry in chemically synthesized nanoscale magnetite rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eltschka, M.; Klaui, M.; Rudiger, U

    2008-01-01

    The correlation between magnetic spin structure and geometry in nanoscale chemically synthesized Fe3O4 rings has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. We find primarily the flux closure vortex states but in rings with thickness variations, an effective stray field occurs. Using t....... The interaction between exchange coupled rings leads to antiparallel vortex states and extended onion states. (c) 2008 American Institute of Physics....

  17. Cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolyarova, I.A.; Bunakova, N.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    The neutron-activation method for determining cobalt in rocks, polymetallic and iron ores and rockforming minerals at 2x10 -6 -5x10 -3 % content is developed. Cobalt determination is based on the formation under the effect of thermal neutrons of nuclear reactor of the 60 Co radioactive isotope by the 59 Co (n, γ) 60 Co reaction with radiation energy of the most intensive line of 1333 keV. Cobalt can be determined by the scheme of the multicomponent analysis from the sample with other elements. Co is determined in the solution after separation of all determinable by the scheme elements. The 60 Co intensity is measured by the mUltichannel gamma-spectrometer with Ge(Li)-detector

  18. Soapnut extract mediated synthesis of nanoscale cobalt substituted NdFeB ferromagnetic materials and their characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, G. V. S. Jayapala; Prasad, T. N. V. K. V.; Shameer, Syed; Rao, M. Purnachandra

    2018-04-01

    Neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) permanent magnets have high energy product with suitable magnetic and physical properties for an array of applications including power generation and motors. However, synthetic routes of NdFeB permanent magnets involve critical procedures with high energy and needs scientific skills. Herein, we report on soapnut extract mediated synthesis of nanoscale cobalt substituted NdFeB (Co-NdFeB) permanent magnetic powders (Nd: 15%, Fe: 77.5%, B: 7.5% and Co with molar ratios: 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2). A 10 ml of 10% soapnut extract was added to 90 ml of respective chemical composition and heated to 60 °C for 30 min and aged for 24 h. The dried powder was sintered at 500 °C for 1 h. The characterization of the prepared nanoscale Co-NdFeB magnetic powders was done using the techniques such as Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS for size and zeta potential measurements), X-ray diffraction (XRD) for structural determination, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) for surface morphological and elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) for the identification of functional groups associated and hysteresis loop studies to quantify the magnetization. The results revealed that particles were in irregular and tubular shaped and highly stable (Zeta potential: -44.4 mV) with measured size NdFeB magnetic powders. Hysteresis studies signify the effect of an increase in Co concentration.

  19. Eco-friendly microbial route to synthesize cobalt nanoparticles using Bacillus thuringiensis against malaria and dengue vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimuthu, Sampath; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Kirthi, Arivarasan Vishnu; Santhoshkumar, Thirunavukkarasu; Jayaseelan, Chidambaram; Rajakumar, Govindasamy

    2013-12-01

    The developments of resistance and persistence to chemical insecticides and concerns about the non-target effects have prompted the development of eco-friendly mosquito control agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the larvicidal activities of synthesized cobalt nanoparticles (Co NPs) using bio control agent, Bacillus thuringiensis against malaria vector, Anopheles subpictus and dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). The synthesized Co NPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD analysis showed three distinct diffraction peaks at 27.03°, 31.00°, and 45.58° indexed to the planes 102, 122, and 024, respectively on the face-centered cubic cobalt acetate with an average size of 85.3 nm. FTIR spectra implicated role of the peak at 3,436 cm(-1) for O-H hydroxyl group, 2924 cm(-1) for methylene C-H stretch in the formation of Co NPs. FESEM analysis showed the topological and morphological appearance of NPs which were found to be spherical and oval in shape. TEM analysis showed polydispersed and clustered NPs with an average size of 84.81 nm. The maximum larvicidal mortality was observed in the cobalt acetate solution, B. thuringiensis formulation, and synthesized Co NPs against fourth instar larvae of A. subpictus and A. aegypti with LC50 values of 29.16, 8.12, 3.59 mg/L; 34.61, 6.94, and 2.87 mg/L; r (2) values of 0.986, 0.933, 0.942; 0.962, 0.957, and 0.922, respectively.

  20. In Vitro Biocompatibility of Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron Particles (NZVI) Synthesized using tea-polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A “green” protocol was used for the rapid generation of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles using tea polyphenols. The NZVI particles were subsequently examined for in vitro biocompatibility using the human keratinocyte cell (HaCaT) line as a skin exposure model. The cell...

  1. Enhanced photoluminescence from ordered arrays of cadmium sulfide nanotubes synthesized using nanoscale chemical reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Arthur

    2014-06-01

    We report enhanced room temperature photoluminescence from ordered arrays of few micrometers long cadmium sulfide nanotubes fabricated using 'nanoscale chemical reactors' of porous alumina by a unique two-chamber synthesis without using any surfactants. Photoluminescence from these nanotubes is -20 times larger than that of nanocrystalline cadmium sulfide particles prepared by bulk mixing of the same reactants. However, we rule out any quantum size effect as a source of enhanced photoluminescence from these intentionally un-passivated nanotubes. We identify sulfur deficiency in these nanotubes and directional orientation of these ordered nanotube arrays as the main reason for its superior photoluminescence as compared to agglomerated nanocrystallites of CdS prepared by bulk mixing.

  2. Influence of cobalt precursor and of its decomposition on the synthesis of cobalt nano-particles on silica for the optimization of the Fischer-Tropsch catalysts; Influence du precurseur de cobalt et de sa decomposition sur la synthese de nanoparticules de cobalt sur silice dans le cadre de l'optimisation des catalyseurs Fischer-Tropsch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girardon, J.S.; Khodakov, A.Y.; Constant-Griboval, A. [Universite des sciences et technologies de Lille, Lab. de catalyse de Lille, UMR 8010, 59 - Villeneuve D' Ascq (France)

    2004-07-01

    In order to synthesize Fischer-Tropsch catalysts more active and selective in heavy hydrocarbons, the understanding at the molecular level of the chemical processes which occur during synthesis is a strategic stake. This work is based in one hand on the use of different cobalt precursors (acetate (Ac) and nitrate (N)) and in another hand on the influence of the decomposition temperature of these precursors on the formation of cobalt nano-particles. An UV-visible study shows that the impregnated cobalt coming from the two types of precursors is in an octahedral environment before its decomposition. The XRD, UV-visible and XANES-EXAFS studies show, after decomposition in air (400 C, 5 hours), that the sample prepared from cobalt nitrate (N400) presents a Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase. This phase is not detected in the case of the cobalt acetate (Ac400). These observations are in agreement with the results of the catalytic tests which show that the solid N400 is eight times more than the solid Ac400. A softer decomposition at 170 C during 70 hours of the cobalt acetate (Ac170) has allowed to minimize the formation of cobalt silicate for Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and to increase of more than three times the catalytic activity. In the case of cobalt nitrate, the XRD analysis of the solids obtained after a softer decomposition (150 C and 100 C) has revealed a decrease of the size of the cobalt nano-particles. The catalytic conversion remains the same than with N400 but a better C{sub 5}{sup +} selectivity is observed. (O.M.)

  3. Aromatic carboxylate effect on dimensionality of three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ju-Wen; Gong, Chun-Hua; Hou, Li-Li; Tian, Ai-Xiang; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2013-01-01

    Three new metal-organic coordination polymers [Co(4-bbc) 2 (bbbm)] (1), [Co(3,5-pdc)(bbbm)]·2H 2 O (2) and [Co(1,4-ndc)(bbbm)] (3) (4-Hbbc=4-bromobenzoic acid, 3,5-H 2 pdc=3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 1,4-H 2 ndc=1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid and bbbm=1,1-(1,4-butanediyl)bis-1H-benzimidazole) were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Polymer 1 is a 1D chain formed by the bbbm ligands and Co II ions. Polymer 2 exhibits a 2D network with a (3·4·5)(3 2 ·4·5·6 2 ·7 4 ) topology. Polymer 3 possesses a 3D three-fold interpenetrating framework. The versatile structures of title polymers indicate that the aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of 1–3. Moreover, the thermal stability, electrochemical and luminescent properties of 1–3 were investigated. - graphical abstract: Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. The aromatic carboxylates play a key role in the dimensionality of three polymers. The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were obtained. • The aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of three polymers. • The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated

  4. Magnetic Properties of Iron-Cobalt Oxide Nanocomposites Synthesized in Polystyrene Resin Matrix*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishnava, P. P.; Senaratne, U.; Rodak, D.; Kroll, E.; Tsoi, G.; Naik, R.; Naik, V.; Wenger, L. E.; Tao, Qu; Boolchand, P.; Suryanarayanan, R.

    2004-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have potential applications in memory devices and medical technology. Magnetic iron-cobalt oxide nanoparticles were prepared by in situ precipitation in an ion exchange resin using the method of Ziolo et al^1. The ion exchange resin, consisting of sulfonated divinyl benzene cross linked polystyrene, was exposed to different iron and cobalt salt solutions: a) 4FeCl2 + CoCl2 b) 9FeCl2 + CoCl2 c) 4FeCl3 + CoCl2 d) 9FeCl3 + CoCl_2. The ions bound to the resin are then oxidized with hydrogen peroxide in an alkaline media with mild heat. The resulting nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fe^57 Mossbauer Spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. It was found that the oxide composition, particle size distribution, magnetic properties including blocking temperature and the amount of superparamagnetic phases are strongly influenced by the stoichiometry of the starting FeCl_2, FeCl_3, and CoCl2 solutions. Three major phases CoFe_2O_4, Fe_3O4 and γ-Fe_2O3 have been identified. The nanocomposites prepared using Fe^2+ and Co^2+ contain larger nanoparticles (10 nm) than those prepared by Fe^3+ and Co^2+ (3 nm) . The details of the structural characterization by XRD and TEM measurements and magnetic characteristics will be presented. *Research supported by NSF grant DGE 980720 ^1Ziolo et al, Science, 257, 5067 (1992).

  5. Recent progress and developments in lithium cobalt phosphate chemistry- Syntheses, polymorphism and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Jennifer; Nilges, Tom

    2018-04-01

    This review summarizes the development, investigation, and optimization of polymorphic lithium cobalt phosphate LiCoPO4. One of the three polymorphs known to date, olivine-type or Pnma-LiCoPO4, shows intriguing electrochemical properties as a high-voltage cathode material, which are of interest for next-generation lithium-ion batteries with higher energy density. Hence, scientists have developed optimization strategies to improve its performance for commercial applications. Herein, a number of procedures for the synthesis of Pnma-LiCoPO4 is presented, including thermodynamic as well as kinetically controlled approaches. The continuous improvement of its electrochemical performance is illustrated, which was realized by the development of solvothermal techniques that allow a precise particle size and morphology control. In the course of these investigations, two new polymorphs, Pna21-LiCoPO4 and Cmcm-LiCoPO4, have been discovered which show different physical and structural properties compared to Pnma-LiCoPO4. Despite their significantly poorer electrochemical performance, these polymorphs allow interesting insights into the variable structure chemistry of transition-metal phosphates, which canalizes in intriguing magnetic and thermal properties. The similarities and differences in the chemical and physical properties of Pnma-LiCoPO4, Pna21-LiCoPO4, and Cmcm-LiCoPO4 are discussed.

  6. Observation of magnetic anomalies in one-step solvothermally synthesized nickel-cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datt, Gopal; Sen Bishwas, Mousumi; Manivel Raja, M; Abhyankar, A C

    2016-03-07

    Magnetic anomalies corresponding to the Verwey transition and reorientation of anisotropic vacancies are observed at 151 K and 306 K, respectively, in NiCoFe2O4 nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by a modified-solvothermal method followed by annealing. Cationic disorder and spherical shape induced non-stoichiometry suppress the Verwey transition in the as-synthesized NPs. On the other hand, reorientation of anisotropic vacancies is quite robust. XRD and electron microscopy investigations confirm a single phase spinel structure and the surface morphology of the as-synthesized NPs changes from spherical to octahedral upon annealing. Rietveld analysis reveals that the Ni(2+) ions migrate from tetrahedral (A) to octahedral (B) sites upon annealing. The Mössbauer results show canted spins in both the NPs and the strength of superexchange is stronger in Co-O-Fe than Ni-O-Fe. Magnetic force images show that the as-synthesised NPs are single-domain whereas the annealed NPs are multi-domain octahedral particles. The FMR study reveals that both the NPs have a broad FMR line-width; and resonance properties are consistent with the random anisotropy model. The broad inhomogeneous FMR line-width, observation of the Verwey transition, tuning of the magnetic domain structure as well as the magnetic properties suggest that the NiCoFe2O4 ferrite NPs may be promising for future generation spintronics, magneto-electronics, and ultra-high-density recording media as well as for radar absorbing applications.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Nanoscale Cobalt Blue Pigment for Ceramic Inkjet Printing by Sol-Gel Self-Propagating Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Qi; Zhu, Haixiang; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Yanxiang; Zhu, Zhigang; Wu, Jianqing; Shih, Weiheng

    2017-01-01

    Cobalt blue pigments were prepared by self-propagating combustion followed by sol-gel method using aluminum nitrate and cobalt nitrate as the raw material. X ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fiber optic spectrometer and colorimetric analysis were used to investigate the effect of reaction temperature, metal ion concentration and dispersant upon the gel formation. The results show that the formation of gel network could be promoted by increasing the concentration of m...

  8. Inducing repetitive action potential firing in neurons via synthesized photoresponsive nanoscale cellular prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Siyuan; Madhukar, Anupam

    2013-02-01

    Recently we reported an analysis that examined the potential of synthesized photovoltaic functional abiotic nanosystems (PVFANs) to modulate membrane potential and activate action potential firing in neurons. Here we extend the analysis to delineate the requirements on the electronic energy levels and the attendant photophysical properties of the PVFANs to induce repetitive action potential under continuous light, a capability essential for the proposed potential application of PVFANs as retinal cellular prostheses to compensate for loss of photoreceptors. We find that repetitive action potential firing demands two basic characteristics in the electronic response of the PVFANs: an exponential dependence of the PVFAN excited state decay rate on the membrane potential and a three-state system such that, following photon absorption, the electron decay from the excited state to the ground state is via intermediate state(s) whose lifetime is comparable to the refractory time following an action potential. In this study, the potential of synthetic photovoltaic functional abiotic nanosystems (PVFANs) is examined under continuous light to modulate membrane potential and activate action potential firing in neurons with the proposed potential application of PVFANs as retinal cellular prostheses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of superparamagnetic and biocompatible properties of mesoporous silica coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized via microwave modified Pechini method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharibshahian, M. [Faculty of New Sciences and Technologies, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzaee, O., E-mail: O_mirzaee@semnan.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nourbakhsh, M.S. [Faculty of New Sciences and Technologies, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-01

    Cobalt ferrite nano particles were synthesized by Pechini sol-gel method and calcined at 700 °C in electrical and microwave furnace. The microwave calcined sample was coated with mesoporous silica by hydrothermal method. Characterization was performed by XRD, FESEM, TEM, VSM, BET and FTIR analysis. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay with 3T3 fibroblast cells. The XRD and FTIR results confirmed spinal formation in both cases and verified the formation of silica coating on the nanoparticles. For microwave calcination, The XRD and SEM results demonstrated smaller and flat adhesion forms of nanoparticles with the average size of 15 nm. The VSM results demonstrated nearly superparamagnetic nanoparticles with significant saturation magnetization equal to 64 emu/g. By coating, saturation magnetization was decreased to 36 emu/g. Moreover, the BET results confirmed the formation of mesoporous coating with the average pore diameters of 2.8 nm and average pore volume of 0.82 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}. Microwave calcined nanoparticles had the best structural and magnetic properties. - Highlights: • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized using the microwave modified Pechini method. • The Effect of calcination route and silica coating on NPs properties was studied. • The nearly superparamagnetic nanoparticles were achieved by microwave calcination. • MFC NPs had the best magnetic properties and MTT assay showed no toxicity for MFC-MSC NPs. • A useful scheme was designed to achieve biological superparamagnetic core/shell NPs.

  10. Formation of hollow nanocrystals through the nanoscale kirkendall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Yadong; Rioux, Robert M.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Hughes, Steven; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2004-03-11

    We demonstrate that hollow nanocrystals can be synthesized through a mechanism analogous to the Kirkendall Effect, in which pores form due to the difference in diffusion rates between two components in a diffusion couple. Cobalt nanocrystals are chosen as a primary example to show that their reaction in solution with oxygen, sulfur or selenium leads to the formation of hollow nanocrystals of the resulting oxide and chalcogenides. This process provides a general route to the synthesis of hollow nanostructures of large numbers of compounds. A simple extension of this process yields platinum-cobalt oxide yolk-shell nanostructures which may serve as nanoscale reactors in catalytic applications.

  11. High-throughput investigation of orientations effect on nanoscale magnetization reversal in cobalt ferrite thin films induced by electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanapal, Pravarthana; Guo, Shanshan; Wang, Baomin; Yang, Huali; Agarwal, Sandeep; Zhan, Qingfeng; Li, Run-Wei

    2017-10-01

    The magnetoelectric device concept which enables the non-volatile electric field control of magnetism needs to be investigated for the development of practical information storage devices. In this aspect, the emerging field of magneto-ionics based on the modulation of magnetism by field-driven ion migration is promising because it only requires a simple sample structure in the solid state and has good cyclability. However, the degree of ion migration within the magnetic structure is strongly dependent on the crystal orientations. Since the epitaxial films growing on the commercial single crystal substrates have limited orientations, the ability of magnetism modulated by field-driven ion migration cannot be optimized and understood by using these data. In this work, we utilized the high-throughput synthesis approach, namely, combinatorial substrate epitaxy, which utilizes a polycrystalline substrate. This provides a platform to develop and understand the degree of ionic migration in different orientations of the model system CoFe2O4 (CFO) films. The library of electric driven nanoscale magnetization reversal data of CFO with different orientations was obtained by applying the electric field in the same region of known CFO grain orientations. It was determined from the analysis that the [110] crystal direction exhibits the maximum nanoscale magnetization reversal ratio. This is mainly attributed to the ease Co2+ migration in the [110] direction under the electric field assisted by a Fe3+ and oxygen vacancies.

  12. Chemical Structure and Morphology of Magnetic Ultrafine Particles Synthesized from a Ternary Gaseous Mixture Involving Cobalt Tricarbonyl Nitrosyl

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morita, H.; Hattori, K.; Murafa, Nataliya; Šubrt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 3 (2015), s. 429-434 ISSN 0914-9244 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK178 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : gas phase photochemical reaction * magnetic ultrafine particle * cobalt tricarbonyl nitrosyl * iron pentacarbonyl Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.857, year: 2015

  13. The Effect of Catalyst Type on The Microstructure and Magnetic Properties of Synthesized Hard Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaima'a Jaber Kareem

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A sol-gel process prepared the nanoparticles of hard cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4. Cobalt nitrate hexahydrate (Co (NO32⋅6H2O, iron nitrate nonahydrate (Fe (NO33⋅9H2O with using two catalysis acid (citric acid and alkaline (hydroxide ammonium were used as precursor materials. Crystallization behavior of the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD. Nanoparticles phases can change from amorphous to spinel ferrite crystalline depending on the calcinated temperature at 600°C, with using citric acid as a catalysis without finding forgone phase, while using hydroxide ammonium was shown second phase (α-Fe2O3 with CoFe2O4. Crystallite size was measured by Scherrer’s formula about (25.327 nm and (27.119 nm respectively. Structural properties were investigated by FTIR, which was appeared main bond of (Fe-O, (Co-O, (C-O, and (H-O. Scanning electron microscopy (FE- SEM was shown the microstructure observation of cobalt ferrite and the particle size at the range about (28.77-42.97 nm. Magnetization measurements were carried out on a vibrating sample magenometer (VSM that exhibited hard spinel ferrite.

  14. Variation of intrinsic magnetic parameters of single domain Co-N interstitial nitrides synthesized via hexa-ammine cobalt nitrate route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ningthoujam, R.S.; Panda, R.N.; Gajbhiye, N.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Variation of intrinsic magnetic parameters of Co-N. ► Synthesis by hexa-ammine cobalt complex route. ► Tuning of coercivity by variation of size. - Abstract: We report the variation of Curie temperature (T c ) and coercivity (H c ) of the single domain Co-N interstitial materials synthesized via nitridation of the hexa-ammine Cobalt(III) nitrate complex at 673 K. Co-N materials crystallize in the fcc cubic structure with unit cell parameter, a = 3.552 Å. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks are broader indicating the materials to be nano-structured with crystallite sizes of 5–14 nm. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies confirm the nanocrystalline nature of the materials. TEM images show chain-like clusters indicating dipolar interactions between the particles. Magnetic studies focus on the existence of giant magnetic Co atoms in the Co-N lattice that are not influenced by the thermal relaxation. The values of the H c could be tuned with the dimension of the particles. The values of T c of the nitride materials are masked by the onset of the ferromagnetic to superparamagnetic transition at higher temperatures. Thermomagnetic studies show an increasing trend in the Curie temperature, T c , with decrease in particle dimension. This result has been explained qualitatively on the basis of ferromagnetic to superparamagnetic transition and finite size scaling effects.

  15. Variation of intrinsic magnetic parameters of single domain Co-N interstitial nitrides synthesized via hexa-ammine cobalt nitrate route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ningthoujam, R.S. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Panda, R.N., E-mail: rnp@bits-goa.ac.in [Chemistry Group, Birla Institute of Technology and Science-Pilani, Goa Campus, Zuari Nagar, Goa 403726 (India); Gajbhiye, N.S. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variation of intrinsic magnetic parameters of Co-N. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis by hexa-ammine cobalt complex route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tuning of coercivity by variation of size. - Abstract: We report the variation of Curie temperature (T{sub c}) and coercivity (H{sub c}) of the single domain Co-N interstitial materials synthesized via nitridation of the hexa-ammine Cobalt(III) nitrate complex at 673 K. Co-N materials crystallize in the fcc cubic structure with unit cell parameter, a = 3.552 Angstrom-Sign . The X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks are broader indicating the materials to be nano-structured with crystallite sizes of 5-14 nm. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies confirm the nanocrystalline nature of the materials. TEM images show chain-like clusters indicating dipolar interactions between the particles. Magnetic studies focus on the existence of giant magnetic Co atoms in the Co-N lattice that are not influenced by the thermal relaxation. The values of the H{sub c} could be tuned with the dimension of the particles. The values of T{sub c} of the nitride materials are masked by the onset of the ferromagnetic to superparamagnetic transition at higher temperatures. Thermomagnetic studies show an increasing trend in the Curie temperature, T{sub c}, with decrease in particle dimension. This result has been explained qualitatively on the basis of ferromagnetic to superparamagnetic transition and finite size scaling effects.

  16. Temperature dependent and applied field strength dependent magnetic study of cobalt nickel ferrite nano particles: Synthesized by an environmentally benign method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontu, Uday Bhasker; G, Narsinga Rao; Chou, F. C.; M, V. Ramana Reddy

    2018-04-01

    Spinel ferrites have come a long way in their versatile applications. The ever growing applications of these materials demand detailed study of material properties and environmental considerations in their synthesis. In this article, we report the effect of temperature and applied magnetic field strength on the magnetic behavior of the cobalt nickel ferrite nano powder samples. Basic structural properties of spinel ferrite nano particles, that are synthesized by an environmentally benign method of auto combustion, are characterized through XRD, TEM, RAMAN spectroscopy. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) is done to understand the nickel substitution effect on the optical properties of cobalt ferrite nano particles. Thermo magnetic studies using SQUID in the temperature range 5 K to 400 K and room temperature (300 K) VSM studies are performed on these samples. Fields of 0Oe (no applied field: ZF), 1 kOe (for ZFC and FC curves), 5 kOe (0.5 T), 50 kOe (5T) (for M-H loop study) are used to study the magnetic behavior of these nano particles. The XRD,TEM analysis suggest 40 nm crystallites that show changes in the cation distribution and phase changes in the spinel structure with nickel substitution. Raman micrographs support phase purity changes and cation redistributions with nickel substitution. Diffuse reflectance study on powder samples suggests two band gap values for nickel rich compounds. The Magnetic study of these sample nano particles show varied magnetic properties from that of hard magnetic, positive multi axial anisotropy and single-magnetic-domain structures at 5 K temperature to soft magnetic core shell like structures at 300 K temperature. Nickel substitution effect is non monotonous. Blocking temperature of all the samples is found to be higher than the values suggested in the literature.

  17. Syntheses, Crystal Structures and Thermal Behaviors of Two Supramolecular Salamo-Type Cobalt(II and Zinc(II Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the syntheses of two new complexes, [Co(L1(H2O2] (1 and [{Zn(L2(μ-OAcZn(n-PrOH}2] (2, from asymmetric halogen-substituted Salamo-type ligands H2L1 and H3L2, respectively. Investigation of the crystal structure of complex 1 reveals that the complex includes one Co(II ion, one (L12− unit and two coordinated water molecules. Complex 1 shows slightly distorted octahedral coordination geometry, forming an infinite 2D supramolecular structure by intermolecular hydrogen bond and π–π stacking interactions. Complex 2 contains four Zn(IIions, two completely deprotonated (L23− moieties, two coordinated μ-OAc− ions and n-propanol molecules. The Zn(II ions in complex 2 display slightly distorted trigonal bipyramidal or square pyramidal geometries.

  18. Zr doping dependence of structural and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite synthesized by sol-gel based Pechini method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motavallian, Pourya; Abasht, Behzad; Abdollah-Pour, Hassan

    2018-04-01

    Nanocrystalline CoZrxFe2-xO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3 in a step of 0.05) powders were synthesized by Pechini sol-gel method. The dry gel was grinded and calcined at 700 °C in a static air atmosphere for 1 h. Some tests such as thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) combined with differential analysis (DTA), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) were carried out to investigate the thermal behaviour, structural bonds identification, crystallographic properties, morphology and magnetic properties of the obtained powders. X-ray diffraction revealed a single-phase cubic spinel structure for all samples, where the crystallite size decreases; the lattice parameter simultaneously increases with substitution of Zr. The results of FE-SEM showed that the particle size is in the 20-70 nm range. The magnetic properties such as saturation magnetization (Ms), remanent magnetization (Mr) and coercivity (Hc) were measured from the hysteresis loops. The greatest amount of saturation magnetization for CoZr0.05Fe1.95O4 sample was 67.9 emu·g-1.

  19. Solvent-induced synthesis of cobalt(II) coordination polymers based on a rigid ligand and flexible carboxylic acid ligands: syntheses, structures and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Chuanlei; Ju, Zemin; Zheng, Hegen

    2015-04-21

    Five new cobalt(ii) coordination architectures, {[Co(L)2(H2O)2]·2H2O·2NO3}n (), {[Co(L)(ppda)]·2H2O}n (), {[Co2(L)(ppda)2]2·H2O}n (), {[Co(L)(nba)]·5H2O}n (), and {[Co(L)(oba)]2·3H2O}n (), have been constructed from the rigid ligand L [L = 2,8-di(1H-imidazol-1-yl)dibenzofuran] and different flexible carboxylic acid ligands [H2ppda = 4,4'-(perfluoropropane-2,2-diyl)dibenzoic acid, H2nba = 4,4'-azanediyldibenzoic acid, and H2oba = 4,4'-oxydibenzoic acid]. Depending on the nature of the solvent systems, these five different coordination polymers were synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR, PXRD and elemental analysis. Compounds , and were obtained by a one-pot method, and then we utilized the solvent-induced effect to obtain almost pure crystals of , respectively. Compound is an infinite 1D chain which is formed by L ligands and Co atoms. Compound contains a [Co2(CO2)4] secondary building unit (SBU), and can be topologically represented as a 6-connected 2-fold interpenetrating pcu net with the point symbol of {4(12)·6(3)}. Compound can be characterized as a 4-connected sql tetragonal planar network with the point symbol of {4(4)·6(2)}. In compounds and , there is a 1D chain which is formed by flexible carboxylic acid ligands and Co atoms; then the 1D chain is linked by L ligands in the tilting direction, leading to the formation of a 2D layer. Furthermore, UV-vis, TGA and magnetic properties have been investigated in detail.

  20. Synthese, etude structurale et electrochimique des materiaux d'electrode positive d'oxydes mixtes lithium cobalt nickel oxide (0 /= 1) pour les batteries rechargeables au lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grincourt, Yves

    Depuis une dizaine d'annees, on observe un interet grandissant pour les batteries rechargeables au lithium de tension superieure a 4 volts. La commercialisation de ces batteries pour l'electronique grand marche tend de plus en plus a supplanter celle des accumulateurs Ni-Cd et Ni-MH, de tension nominate 1,2 V. Ces batteries au lithium font appel a des materiaux d'electrode positive (cathode a la decharge) du type oxydes mixtes de metaux de transition LiMnO 2, LiMn2O4, LiNiO2 ou LiCoO2. Si le compose LiCoO2 est relativement aise a synthetiser, il n'en demeure pas moins que le cobalt reste un metal plus couteux compare au nickel et au manganese. La synthese de LiNiO2, quart a elle, demeure un probleme du point de vue stoechiometrique. Un defaut de lithium (5 a 10% molaire) conduira a des proprietes electrochimiques mediocres de la batterie. Dans cette etude nous nous proposons donc de preparer par voie humide et par voie seche les materiaux d'electrode positive de la famille LiCoyNi1-yO2 aver (0 ≤ y ≤ 1) et d'etudier en detail l'influence du pourcentage de nickel et de cobalt sur les proprietes electrochimiques des oxydes mixtes Li-Ni-Co. Une des caracteristiques est la morphologie plus fine des poudres de materiaux, observes par microscopie electronique a balayage (MEB). Un traitement thermique a plus basse temperature (750°C) que pour LiCoO2 (850°C) ainsi qu'un leger exces de lithium dans la preparation, ont permis d'aboutir a un materiau de stoechiometrie quasi parfaite. Neanmoins, le role de pilfer joue par 2 a 4% de moles de Ni2+ presents sur les sites lithium, permet de conserver intacte la structure hexagonale de la maille entre deux cycles consecutifs. Afin de mieux comprendre l'influence du vieillissement dune demi-pile Li/LiMeO2 (Me = Ni, Co) a temperature ambiante, des etudes electrochimiques et d'impedance spectroscopique ont ete menees en parallele. Le vieillissement de la cellule s'accompagne seulement dune chute de son potentiel due a son auto

  1. Detection and Recovery of Palladium, Gold and Cobalt Metals from the Urban Mine Using Novel Sensors/Adsorbents Designated with Nanoscale Wagon-wheel-shaped Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, Sherif A; Shenashen, Mohamed A; Sakai, Masaru; Elshehy, Emad; Halada, Kohmei

    2015-12-06

    Developing low-cost, efficient processes for recovering and recycling palladium, gold and cobalt metals from urban mine remains a significant challenge in industrialized countries. Here, the development of optical mesosensors/adsorbents (MSAs) for efficient recognition and selective recovery of Pd(II), Au(III), and Co(II) from urban mine was achieved. A simple, general method for preparing MSAs based on using high-order mesoporous monolithic scaffolds was described. Hierarchical cubic Ia3d wagon-wheel-shaped MSAs were fabricated by anchoring chelating agents (colorants) into three-dimensional pores and micrometric particle surfaces of the mesoporous monolithic scaffolds. Findings show, for the first time, evidence of controlled optical recognition of Pd(II), Au(III), and Co(II) ions and a highly selective system for recovery of Pd(II) ions (up to ~95%) in ores and industrial wastes. Furthermore, the controlled assessment processes described herein involve evaluation of intrinsic properties (e.g., visual signal change, long-term stability, adsorption efficiency, extraordinary sensitivity, selectivity, and reusability); thus, expensive, sophisticated instruments are not required. Results show evidence that MSAs will attract worldwide attention as a promising technological means of recovering and recycling palladium, gold and cobalt metals.

  2. Bowl adamanzanes-bicyclic tetraamines: syntheses and crystal structures of complexes with cobalt(III) and chelating coordinated oxo-anions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broge, Louise; Søtofte, Inger; Jensen, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    Seven cobalt(III) complexes of the macrobicyclic tetraamine ligand [2(4).3(1)]adamanzane ([2(4).3(1)]adz) are reported along with the crystal structure of six of these complexes. The solid state and solution structures are discussed, and a detailed assignment of the NMR spectra of the sulfato com...

  3. Synthesis and characterisation of iron, cobalt and gallium complexes wit the redox-active amide ligand systems pyridinocarboxiamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide; Synthese und Charakterisierung von Eisen-, Cobalt- und Galliumkomplexen mit den redoxaktiven Amidligandsystemen Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, U.

    2001-07-01

    The interactions of the redox-active ligand systems piridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide with the metals iron, cobalt and gallium were investigated. It was found that metal complexes with ligands of the pyridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide type can be redox-active in the sense of a ligand-centered reaction. This may provide a better understanding of natural catalysis mechanisms and redox processes. [German] In dieser Arbeit wurde die Wechselwirkung der redoxaktiven Ligandsysteme Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid mit den Metallen Eisen, Cobalt und Gallium untersucht. Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass Metallkomplexe mit Liganden vom Typ Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid auch im Sinne einer ligandzentrierten Reaktion redoxaktiv sein koennen. Dies kann dazu beitragen, Katalysemechanismen und Redoxprozesse in der Natur besser zu verstehen. (orig.)

  4. Detection and Recovery of Palladium, Gold and Cobalt Metals from the Urban Mine Using Novel Sensors/Adsorbents Designated with Nanoscale Wagon-wheel-shaped Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, Sherif A.; Shenashen, Mohamed A.; Sakai, Masaru; Elshehy, Emad; Halada, Kohmei

    2015-01-01

    Developing low-cost, efficient processes for recovering and recycling palladium, gold and cobalt metals from urban mine remains a significant challenge in industrialized countries. Here, the development of optical mesosensors/adsorbents (MSAs) for efficient recognition and selective recovery of Pd(II), Au(III), and Co(II) from urban mine was achieved. A simple, general method for preparing MSAs based on using high-order mesoporous monolithic scaffolds was described. Hierarchical cubic Ia3d wagon-wheel-shaped MSAs were fabricated by anchoring chelating agents (colorants) into three-dimensional pores and micrometric particle surfaces of the mesoporous monolithic scaffolds. Findings show, for the first time, evidence of controlled optical recognition of Pd(II), Au(III), and Co(II) ions and a highly selective system for recovery of Pd(II) ions (up to ~95%) in ores and industrial wastes. Furthermore, the controlled assessment processes described herein involve evaluation of intrinsic properties (e.g., visual signal change, long-term stability, adsorption efficiency, extraordinary sensitivity, selectivity, and reusability); thus, expensive, sophisticated instruments are not required. Results show evidence that MSAs will attract worldwide attention as a promising technological means of recovering and recycling palladium, gold and cobaltmetals. PMID:26709467

  5. On the correlation between nanoscale structure and magnetic properties in ordered mesoporous cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quickel, Thomas E; Le, Van H; Brezesinski, Torsten; Tolbert, Sarah H

    2010-08-11

    In this work, we report the synthesis of periodic nanoporous cobalt ferrite (CFO) that exhibits tunable room temperature ferrimagnetism. The porous cubic CFO frameworks are fabricated by coassembly of inorganic precursors with a large amphiphilic diblock copolymer, referred to as KLE. The inverse spinel framework boasts an ordered open network of pores averaging 14 nm in diameter. The domain sizes of the crystallites are tunable from 6 to 15 nm, a control which comes at little cost to the ordering of the mesostructure. Increases in crystalline domain size directly correlate with increases in room temperature coercivity. In addition, these materials show a strong preference for out-of-plane oriented magnetization, which is unique in a thin film system. The preference is explained by in-plane tensile strain, combined with relaxation of the out-of-plane strain through flexing of the mesopores. It is envisioned that the pores of this ferrimagnet could facilitate the formation of a diverse range of exchange coupled composite materials.

  6. Nanoscale Cobalt-Manganese Oxide Catalyst Supported on Shape-Controlled Cerium Oxide: Effect of Nanointerface Configuration on Structural, Redox, and Catalytic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillary, Brendan; Sudarsanam, Putla; Amin, Mohamad Hassan; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2017-02-28

    Understanding the role of nanointerface structures in supported bimetallic nanoparticles is vital for the rational design of novel high-performance catalysts. This study reports the synthesis, characterization, and the catalytic application of Co-Mn oxide nanoparticles supported on CeO 2 nanocubes with the specific aim of investigating the effect of nanointerfaces in tuning structure-activity properties. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals the formation of different types of Co-Mn nanoalloys with a range of 6 ± 0.5 to 14 ± 0.5 nm on the surface of CeO 2 nanocubes, which are in the range of 15 ± 1.5 to 25 ± 1.5 nm. High concentration of Ce 3+ species are found in Co-Mn/CeO 2 (23.34%) compared with that in Mn/CeO 2 (21.41%), Co/CeO 2 (15.63%), and CeO 2 (11.06%), as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Nanoscale electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis in combination with XPS studies shows the transformation of Co 2+ to Co 3+ and simultaneously Mn 4+/3+ to Mn 2+ . The Co-Mn/CeO 2 catalyst exhibits the best performance in solvent-free oxidation of benzylamine (89.7% benzylamine conversion) compared with the Co/CeO 2 (29.2% benzylamine conversion) and Mn/CeO 2 (82.6% benzylamine conversion) catalysts for 3 h at 120 °C using air as the oxidant. Irrespective of the catalysts employed, a high selectivity toward the dibenzylimine product (97-98%) was found compared with the benzonitrile product (2-3%). The interplay of redox chemistry of Mn and Co at the nanointerface sites between Co-Mn nanoparticles and CeO 2 nanocubes as well as the abundant structural defects in cerium oxide plays a key role in the efficiency of the Co-Mn/CeO 2 catalyst for the aerobic oxidation of benzylamine.

  7. Synthesize and characterization of a novel anticorrosive cobalt ferrite nanoparticles dispersed in silica matrix (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2}) to improve the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharagozlou, M., E-mail: Gharagozlou@icrc.ac.ir [Department of Nanomaterials and Nanocoatings, Institute for Color Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ramezanzadeh, B., E-mail: Rramezanzadeh-bh@icrc.ac.ir [Department of Surface Coatings and Corrosion, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), PO 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baradaran, Z. [Department of Nanomaterials and Nanocoatings, Institute for Color Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-07-30

    Highlights: • An anticorrosive cobalt ferrite nanopigment dispersed in silica matrix was synthesized. • The nanopigment showed proper inhibition performance in solution study. • The nanopigment significantly improved the corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating. - Abstract: This study aimed at studying the effect of an anticorrosive nickel ferrite nanoparticle dispersed in silica matrix (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2}) on the corrosion protection properties of steel substrate. NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2} nanopigments were synthesized and then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Then, 1 wt.% of nanopigments was dispersed in an epoxy coating and the resultant nanocomposites were applied on the steel substrates. The corrosion inhibition effects of nanopigments were tested by an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and salt spray test. Results revealed that dispersing nickel ferrite nanoparticles in a silica matrix (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2}) resulted in the enhancement of the nanopigment dispersion in the epoxy coating matrix. Inclusion of 1 wt.% of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2} nanopigment into the epoxy coating enhanced its corrosion protection properties before and after scratching.

  8. Determination of cobalt ions at nano-level based on newly synthesized pendant armed macrocycle by polymeric membrane and coated graphite electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashok K; Singh, Prerna; Bhattacharjee, G

    2009-12-15

    Poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) based membranes of macrocycles 2,3,4:9,10,11-dipyridine-1,3,5,8,10,12-hexaazacyclotetradeca-2,9-diene (L(1)) and 2,3,4:9,10,11-dipyridine-1,5,8,12-tetramethylacrylate-1,3,5,8,10,12-hexaazacyclotetradeca-2,9-diene (L(2)) with NaTPB and KTpClPB as anion excluders and dibutylphthalate (DBP), benzyl acetate (BA), dioctylphthalate (DOP), o-nitrophenyloctyl ether (o-NPOE) and tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) as plasticizing solvent mediators were prepared and investigated as Co(2+) selective electrodes. The best performance was observed with the membranes having the composition L(2):PVC:TBP:NaTPB in the ratio of 6:39:53:2 (w/w; mg). The performance of the membrane based on L(2) was compared with polymeric membrane electrode (PME) and coated graphite electrode (CGE). The PME exhibits detection limit of 4.7x10(-8)M with a Nernstian slope of 29.7 mV decade(-1) of activity between pH 2.5 and 8.5 whereas CGE exhibits the detection limit of 6.8x10(-9)M with a Nernstian slope of 29.5 mV decade(-1) of activity between pH 2.0 and 9.0. The response time for PME and CGE was found to be 11 and 8s, respectively. The CGE has been found to work satisfactorily in partially non-aqueous media up to 35% (v/v) content of methanol, ethanol and 25% (v/v) content of acetonitrile and could be used for a period of 4 months. The CGE was successfully applied for the determination of Co(2+) in real and pharmaceutical samples and as an indicator electrode in potentiometric titration of cobalt ion.

  9. Evolution of Cobalt Oxide Nanostructures on Glass Substrate via Two Step Solution Route Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal, A. R.; Marquez, M. C.

    2017-06-01

    Controlling the morphology in the nanoscale has proven to be an effective way to drastically change the properties of materials. In this study, several morphologies of cobalt oxide (Co3O4) were synthesized by employing a two-step solution route. A Co3O4 seed layer was first deposited on the glass substrate via spin Coating using a Cobalt acetate precursor followed by chemical bath deposition of another Co3O4 layer using cobalt nitrate precursor. The effect of the seed layer and the deposition times on the morphology of the secondary Co3O4 nanostructures was verified by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Morphologies like nanoplatelets, nanorods, nanofibrils and porous nanowalls were observed in the SEM. Other characterization techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) were used to elucidate the formation of Co3O4. Furthermore, the surface of the seed layer was determined via atomic force microscope. It was found that the roughness of the seed layer ranges from ~0.3 to 3 nm depending on the concentration of the cobalt precursor used. Results showed that the morphology of Co3O4 can be easily modified using the two-step solution route technique. The alterations of the morphology of Co3O4 could lead to morphologies with unique properties and development of functional materials applicable in the field of energy and electronics.

  10. Cobalt-chitosan: Magnetic and biodegradable heterogeneous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A novel and biodegradable cobalt-chitosan as a magnetic heterogeneous catalyst was synthesized and characterized by XPS, FT-IR, EDX and TEM. Catalytic performance of cobalt- chitosan was tested by aerobic oxidation of alkyl arenes and alcohols. The results show that the catalyst exhibits excellent conversion for ...

  11. Cobalt-chitosan: Magnetic and biodegradable heterogeneous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A novel and biodegradable cobalt-chitosan as a magnetic heterogeneous catalyst was synthesized and characterized by XPS, FT-IR, EDX and TEM. Catalytic performance of cobalt- chitosan was tested by aerobic oxidation of alkyl arenes and alcohols. The results show that the catalyst exhibits excellent ...

  12. Syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties of cobalt(II) and nickel(II) coordination polymers based on a V-shaped ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Shuang [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5625 Renmin Street, Changchun 130022 (China); Yi, Fei-Yan [The School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Li, Guanghua [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis & Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Yu, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5625 Renmin Street, Changchun 130022 (China); Wang, Jing-yuan, E-mail: jywang@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 29 Zhongguancun East Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Dan, E-mail: liudan2007@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5625 Renmin Street, Changchun 130022 (China); Song, Shu-Yan [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5625 Renmin Street, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Two coordination polymers [Co{sub 2}(TA)(4,4′-bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·H{sub 2}O (1) and [Ni{sub 2}(TA)(4,4′-bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]·3H{sub 2}O (2) were prepared by hydrothermal reactions of MCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O (M = Co, Ni) with a V-shaped ligand TDPA (3,3′,4,4′-thiodiphthalic anhydride) and a I-shaped N-donor co-ligand (4,4′-bipy). They were characterized by elemental analyses, thermogravinetric analyses, and magnetic behavior. As is expected, TDPA hydrolyzes into the corresponding tetra-carboxylate acid H{sub 4}TA (3,3′,4,4′-thiodiphthalic acid) during the reactions. Co{sub 2} dimer and Ni mononuclear center are connected into two-dimensional (2D) layers by H{sub 4}TA and 4,4′-bipy bridge in 1 and 2, respectively. The most amazing feature is that 1 and 2 exhibit interesting spin-canting metamagnetism and weak ferromagnetic behavior, respectively, with the critical Néel temperature of T{sub N} =4 K for 1 and T{sub N} =13 K for 2, based on variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements. In low mono- or dinuclear metal system, such magnetic behaviors have rare been observed. Furthermore, complex 1 will be a potential metamagnet material. - Graphical abstract: Two Co(II) and Ni(II) coordination polymers were synthesized by hydrothermal reactions from a V-shape ligand (3,3′,4,4′-thiodiphthalic anhydride) and a I-shape ligand (4,4′-bipy), which were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, thermogravinetric analyses, and magnetic behavior, and exhibit interesting spin-canting metamagnetism and weak ferromagnetic behavior, respectively. - Highlights: • Two Co(II) and Ni(II) coordination polymers were successfully synthesized. • Co(II) coordination polymer shows an interesting spin-canting metamagnetism. • Ni(II) coordination polymer exhibits a weak ferromagnetic behavior.

  13. Composites comprising biologically-synthesized nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Seamus; Dias, Sampath; Blau, Werner; Wang, Jun; Oremland, Ronald S; Baesman, Shaun

    2013-04-30

    The present disclosure describes composite materials containing a polymer material and a nanoscale material dispersed in the polymer material. The nanoscale materials may be biologically synthesized, such as tellurium nanorods synthesized by Bacillus selenitireducens. Composite materials of the present disclosure may have optical limiting properties and find use in optical limiting devices.

  14. Comparison of supplemental cobalt form on fibre digestion and cobalamin concentrations in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobalt is essential for rumen microbial metabolism to synthesize methane, acetate and methionine. It also serves as a structural component of vitamin B12, which functions as a coenzyme in energy metabolism. A study was conducted to determine if cobalt form (cobalt carbonate vs cobalt glucoheptonate...

  15. Catalytic method for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, R.S.; Sansone, M.J.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

    A method for synthesizing hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen by contacting said gases with a slurry of a catalyst composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants.

  16. Spinel cobalt ferrite by complexometric synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham Duc Thang, P.D.T.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic fine particles of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) have been synthesized using complexometric method in which ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid C10H16N2O8 (EDTA) acts as a complexing agent. The crystallographic structure, microstructure and magnetic properties of the synthesized powder were

  17. Nanostructured cobalt phosphates as excellent biomimetic enzymes to sensitively detect superoxide anions released from living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min-Qiang; Ye, Cui; Bao, Shu-Juan; Xu, Mao-Wen; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Ling; Ma, Xiao-Qing; Guo, Jun; Li, Chang-Ming

    2017-01-15

    Monitoring superoxide anion radicals in living cells has been attracting much academic and industrial interest due to the dual roles of the radicals. Herein, we synthesized a novel nanostructured cobalt phosphate nanorods (Co 3 (PO 4 ) 2 NRs) with tunable pore structure using a simple and effective micro-emulsion method and explored their potential utilization in the electrochemical sensing of superoxide anions. As an analytical and sensing platform, the nanoscale biomimetic enzymes Co 3 (PO 4 ) 2 NRs exhibited excellent selectivity and sensitivity towards superoxide anion (O 2 •- ) with a low detection limit (2.25nM), wide linear range (5.76-5396nM), and long-term stability. Further, the nanoscale biomimetic enzyme could be efficiently applied in situ to electrochemically detect O 2 •- released from human malignant melanoma cells and normal keratinocyte, showing excellent real time quantitative detection capability. This material open up exciting opportunities for implementing biomimetic enzymes in nanoscale transition metal phosphates and designing enzyme-free biosensors with much higher sensitivity and durability in health and disease analysis than those of natural one. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nanoscale flexoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh D; Mao, Sheng; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Purohit, Prashant K; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-02-20

    Electromechanical effects are ubiquitous in biological and materials systems. Understanding the fundamentals of these coupling phenomena is critical to devising next-generation electromechanical transducers. Piezoelectricity has been studied in detail, in both the bulk and at mesoscopic scales. Recently, an increasing amount of attention has been paid to flexoelectricity: electrical polarization induced by a strain gradient. While piezoelectricity requires crystalline structures with no inversion symmetry, flexoelectricity does not carry this requirement, since the effect is caused by inhomogeneous strains. Flexoelectricity explains many interesting electromechanical behaviors in hard crystalline materials and underpins core mechanoelectric transduction phenomena in soft biomaterials. Most excitingly, flexoelectricity is a size-dependent effect which becomes more significant in nanoscale systems. With increasing interest in nanoscale and nano-bio hybrid materials, flexoelectricity will continue to gain prominence. This Review summarizes work in this area. First, methods to amplify or manipulate the flexoelectric effect to enhance material properties will be investigated, particularly at nanometer scales. Next, the nature and history of these effects in soft biomaterials will be explored. Finally, some theoretical interpretations for the effect will be presented. Overall, flexoelectricity represents an exciting phenomenon which is expected to become more considerable as materials continue to shrink. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Influence of Reduction Promoters on Stability of Cobalt/g-Alumina Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Burtron H. Davis

    2014-01-01

    This focused review article underscores how metal reduction promoters can impact deactivation phenomena associated with cobalt Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts. Promoters can exacerbate sintering if the additional cobalt metal clusters, formed as a result of the promoting effect, are in close proximity at the nanoscale to other cobalt particles on the surface. Recent efforts have shown that when promoters are used to facilitate the reduction of small crystallites with the aim of increasing...

  20. Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Polyvinyl Alcohol-Cobalt ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    7

    [14] has reported the electrical transport properties of polyvinyl alcohol- selenium nanocomposite ... of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles. Cobalt Ferrite nanoparticles are synthesized by wet chemical method using raw materials of ... constantly stirred using the magnetic stirrer until the pH level reached to 12. A specified amount.

  1. Cobalt nanoparticles as reusable catalysts for reduction of 4 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Facile reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol by sodium borohydride catalysed by cobalt nanopar- ticles (CoNPs) has been discussed. A simple approach has been made to synthesize highly active and ordered structures of CoNPs. The air-stable nanoparticles were prepared from cobalt sulphate using ...

  2. Comparison of different supplemental cobalt forms on fiber digestion and cobalamin levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobalt (Co) is essential for rumen microbial metabolism to synthesize methane, acetate and methionine. It also serves as a structural component of vitamin B*12, which functions as a coenzyme in energy metabolism. A study was conducted to determine if Co form (cobalt carbonate vs cobalt glucoheptona...

  3. Comparison of different supplemental cobalt forms on digestion and cobalamin levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobalt (Co) is essential for rumen microbial metabolism to synthesize methane, acetate and methionine. It also serves as a structural component of vitamin B12, which functions as a coenzyme in energy metabolism. A study was conducted to determine if Co form (cobalt carbonate vs cobalt glucoheptonat...

  4. Cobalt Doped SnO2 Thick Film Gas Sensors: Conductance and Gas Response Characteristics for LPG and CNG Gas

    OpenAIRE

    V. Kumar; S. K. Srivastava; Kiran Jain

    2009-01-01

    Cobalt doped thick films tin oxide sensors were studied for their LPG and CNG gas sensitivity. SnO2 powder was synthesized by precipitation technique and doped with cobalt sulphate (0 to 10 wt %) by impregnation technique. The sensing characteristics were found to depend on the cobalt concentration and operating temperature. Best performance for LPG and CNG detection was obtained for 3 wt % addition of cobalt sulphate. Cobalt doped SnO2 sensors showed a decrease in the optimum temperature for...

  5. Synthetic and mechanistic investigations of dioxygen activation on cobalt-Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    As described in Chapter 1, the cobalt(II) complex Bis[3-(salicylidenimino)-propyl]methylaminecobalt(II), [Co(salmdpt)] can bind dioxygen reversibly and forms a cobalt(III) superoxido complex during this process. One topic of the present work was the investigation of the dioxygen activation on cobalt complexes and the characterization of the dioxygen adduct complexes of the ligand saldptH2 and its derivatives. To synthesize the cobalt(III) superoxido complex of [Co(salmdpt)] different so...

  6. Adsorption Kinetics in Nanoscale Porous Coordination Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nune, Satish K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, Benard Peter; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Dang, Liem X.; Mei, Donghai; Karri, Naveen; Alvine, Kyle J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2015-10-07

    Nanoscale porous coordination polymers were synthesized using simple wet chemical method. The effect of various polymer surfactants on colloidal stability and shape selectivity was investigated. Our results suggest that the nanoparticles exhibited significantly improved adsorption kinetics compared to bulk crystals due to decreased diffusion path lengths and preferred crystal plane interaction.

  7. Tuning of magnetic parameters in cobalt-polystyrene nanocomposites by reduction cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Swapna S.; Sunny, Vijutha; Anantharaman, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores. A porous polymer network (polystyrene) was chosen as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The concentration of cobalt can be tuned in this technique by repeating the cycling process. Highlights: → Elementary cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized inside polystyrene by a novel process. → The self protection is achieved by the auto-shelling with the metal oxide. → The magnetisation and coercivity could be tuned by repeating the cycles. → Tuning of magnetic properties (both coercivity and magnetisation) could be achieved by the repetition of reduction cycles. → Synthesized nanocomposite can act as a catalyst for carbon nanotube synthesis. -- Abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores using CoSO 4 .7H 2 O and NaBH 4 . A porous polymer network (sulphonated polystyrene) was chosen, as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The concentration of cobalt can be tuned in this

  8. Sonochemical Synthesis of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha P. Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt ferrite being a hard magnetic material with high coercivity and moderate magnetization has found wide-spread applications. In this paper, we have reported the sonochemical synthesis of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles using metal acetate precursors. The ferrite synthesis occurs in three steps (hydrolysis of acetates, oxidation of hydroxides, and in situ microcalcination of metal oxides that are facilitated by physical and chemical effects of cavitation bubbles. The physical and magnetic properties of the ferrite nano-particles thus synthesized have been found to be comparable with those reported in the literature using other synthesis techniques.

  9. Self-supported porous Cobalt Oxide Nanowires with enhanced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Development of hybrid electrocatalysts with high activity and good stability is crucial for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) of water electrocatalysis. In this work, cobalt oxide (Co₃O₄) nanowires loaded on carbon fiber paper (CFP) were synthesized via hydrothermal method and annealing. The as-synthesized ...

  10. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugavel, T., E-mail: shanmugavelnano@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Paavai Engineering College, Namakkal -637018 (India); Raj, S. Gokul [Department of Physics, Vel Tech University, Avadi, Chennai - 600 062 (India); Rajarajan, G. [Department of Physics, Mahendra Engineering College, Mallasamudram -637503 (India); Kumar, G. Ramesh [Department of Physics, University College of Engineering, Anna University Chennai, Arni- 632317 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods.

  11. Dynamics at the nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoneham, A.M.; Gavartin, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    However fascinating structures may be at the nanoscale, time-dependent behaviour at the nanoscale has far greater importance. Some of the dynamics is random, with fluctuations controlling rate processes and making thermal ratchets possible. Some of the dynamics causes the transfer of energy, of signals, or of charge. Such transfers are especially efficiently controlled in biological systems. Other dynamical processes occur when we wish to control the nanoscale, e.g., to avoid local failures of gate dielectrics, or to manipulate structures by electronic excitation, to use spin manipulation in quantum information processing. Our prime purpose is to make clear the enormous range and variety of time-dependent nanoscale phenomena

  12. Nanoscale thermal probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Yue

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem.

  13. Cobalt sensitization and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P

    2012-01-01

    : This clinical review article presents clinical and scientific data on cobalt sensitization and dermatitis. It is concluded that cobalt despite being a strong sensitizer and a prevalent contact allergen to come up on patch testing should be regarded as a very complex metal to test with. Exposure...... data together with clinical data from metal workers heavily exposed to cobalt suggest that patch-test reactions are sometimes false positive and that patch testers should carefully evaluate their clinical relevance....

  14. The geobiochemistry of cobalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, E I

    1994-06-30

    In the crust of the Earth cobalt is present in a greater abundance than lead, molybdenum or cadmium. The concentration and distribution of cobalt is discussed in relation to major terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric systems. The processes which control or influence the transfer of this element in major ecosystems are evaluated in terms of bioavailability to plants, animals and man. The concept of geochemical provinces is considered in relation to the regional availability of cobalt and then its transfer along foodchains to man. Areas and environments which contain high or low concentrations of cobalt are considered in relation to the health of plants, animals and man; the special case of exposure to cobalt from the manufacturing industry is discussed. The association between cobalt and hard metal disease is noted. The use of various radionuclides of cobalt is considered as a means of tracing cobalt through complex ecosystems. The state of the art for measuring the concentration of cobalt is discussed with special reference to the quality of analytical data and the availability of suitable reference materials.

  15. Synthesis and structural characterization of polyaniline/cobalt chloride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asha, E-mail: arana5752@gmail.com [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences, Bhagat Phool Singh Mahilla Vishwavidyalaya, Khanpur Kalan, Sonipat-131305 (India); Goyal, Sneh Lata; Kishore, Nawal [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar-125001 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Polyaniline (PANI) and PANI /cobalt chloride composites were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline with CoCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O using ammonium peroxidisulphate as an oxidant. These composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD study reveals that both PANI and composites are amorphous. The XRD and SEM results confirm the presence of cobalt chloride in the composites.

  16. Mechanochemical Preparation of Cobalt Nanoparticles through a Novel Intramolecular Reaction in Cobalt(II Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Abolghasem Kahani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel solid state reaction involving a series of cobalt(II hydrazine-azides has been used to prepare metallic cobalt nanoparticles. The reactions of [Co(N2H4(N32], [Co(N2H42(N32], and [Co(N2H4(N3Cl]·H2O via NaOH, KOH as reactants were carried out in the solid state. These complexes undergo an intramolecular two-electron oxidation-reduction reaction at room temperature, producing metallic cobalt nanoparticles (Co1–Co6. The aforementioned complexes contain cobalt(II that is an oxidizing agent and also hydrazine ligand as a reducing agent. Other products produced include sodium azide and ammonia gas. The cobalt metal nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. The synthesized cobalt nanoparticles have similar morphologies; however, their particle size distributions are different.

  17. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Larrude

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs synthesized by spray pyrolysis were decorated with cobalt oxide nanoparticles using a simple synthesis route. This wet chemistry method yielded nanoparticles randomly anchored to the surface of the nanotubes by decomposition of cobalt nitrate hexahydrate diluted in acetone. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that dispersed particles were formed on the MWCNTs walls. The average size increased with the increasing concentration of cobalt nitrate in acetone in the precursor mixture. TEM images indicated that nanoparticles were strongly attached to the tube walls. The Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the MWCNT structure was slightly damaged after the nanoparticle growth.

  18. Nano cobalt oxides for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    KAUST Repository

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.

    2012-07-01

    Nano structured metal oxides including TiO 2, Co 3O 4 and Fe 3O 4 have been synthesized and evaluated for their photocatalytic activity for hydrogen generation. The photocatalytic activity of nano cobalt oxide was then compared with two other nano structured metal oxides namely TiO 2 and Fe 3O 4. The synthesized nano cobalt oxide was characterized thoroughly with respect to EDX and TEM. The yield of hydrogen was observed to be 900, 2000 and 8275 mmol h -1 g -1 of photocatalyst for TiO 2, Co 3O 4 and Fe 3O 4 respectively under visible light. It was observed that the hydrogen yield in case of nano cobalt oxide was more than twice to that of TiO 2 and the hydrogen yield of nano Fe 3O 4 was nearly four times as compared to nano Co 3O 4. The influence of various operating parameters in hydrogen generation by nano cobalt oxide was then studied in detail. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis of Highly Stable Cobalt Nanomaterial Using Gallic Acid and Its Application in Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Naz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the room temperature (25–30°C green synthesis of cobalt nanomaterial (CoNM in an aqueous medium using gallic acid as a reducing and stabilizing agent. pH 9.5 was found to favour the formation of well dispersed flower shaped CoNM. The optimization of various parameters in preparation of nanoscale was studied. The AFM, SEM, EDX, and XRD characterization studies provide detailed information about synthesized CoNM which were of 4–9 nm in dimensions. The highly stable CoNM were used to study their catalytic activity for removal of azo dyes by selecting methyl orange as a model compound. The results revealed that 0.4 mg of CoNM has shown 100% removal of dye from 50 μM aqueous solution of methyl orange. The synthesized CoNM can be easily recovered and recycled several times without decrease in their efficiency.

  20. Modulation of synthetic parameters of cobalt nanoparticles: TEM, EDS, spectral and thermal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Kumar, Avdhesh

    2012-12-01

    The study focuses on the modulation of synthetic parameters in order to influence the size, structure, composition and arrangement of nanoparticles of cobalt. Cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized by ethanolic solution of benzildiethylenetriamine in cobalt nitrate solution at 60 °C with stirring and refluxing leads to nanoparticles of cobalt. The morphology and structure of the synthesized nanoparticles of cobalt were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), QELS Data and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR). Crystalline size was 20 nm determined from the sharp peak at 2θ = 25 °C from the powder XRD. TEM images of cobalt nanoparticles without reducing agent having the diameter 20 nm with spherical shape and black color.

  1. Nickel cobalt oxide hollow nanosponges as advanced electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Wen, Dan; Leubner, Susanne; Oschatz, Martin; Liu, Wei; Holzschuh, Matthias; Simón, Frank M.; Kaskel, Stefan; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A class of novel nickel cobalt oxide hollow nanosponges were synthesized through a sodium borohydride reduction strategy. Due to their porous and hollow nanostructures, and synergetic effects between their components, the optimized nickel cobalt oxide nanosponges exhibited excellent catalytic activity towards oxygen evolution reaction.

  2. Directed magnetic field induced assembly of high magnetic moment cobalt nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Madhavi, S.; Ramanujan, R.V.

    2010-01-01

    A directed magnetic field induced assembly technique was employed to align two phase (h.c.p. + f.c.c.) cobalt nanoparticles in a mechanically robust long wire morphology. Co nanoparticles with an average size of 4.3 nm and saturation magnetization comparable to bulk cobalt were synthesized...

  3. Electrodeposition of Cobalt Nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sungbok; Hong, Kimin

    2013-01-01

    We developed an electroplating process of cobalt nanowires of which line-widths were between 70 and 200 nm. The plating electrolyte was made of CoSO 4 and an organic additive, dimethyldithiocarbamic acid ester sodium salt (DAESA). DAESA in plating electrolytes had an accelerating effect and reduced the surface roughness of plated cobalt thin films. We obtained void-free cobalt nanowires when the plating current density was 6.25 mA/cm 2 and DAESA concentration was 1 mL/L

  4. Phosphine modified cobalt hydroformylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rensburg, H. van; Tooze, R.P.; Foster, D.F. [Sasol Technology UK, St. Andrews (United Kingdom); Janse van Rensburg, W. [Sasol Technology, Sasolburg (South Africa)

    2006-07-01

    An ongoing challenge in phosphine modified cobalt hydroformylation is the fundamental understanding of the electronic and steric properties of phosphine ligands that influence the selectivity and activity of the catalytic reaction. A series of acyclic and cyclic phosphines have been prepared and tested in phosphine modified cobalt hydroformylation of 1-octene. Molecular modelling on a series of phospholanes showed some interesting theoretical and experimental correlations. We also evaluated the use of N-heterocyclic carbenes as an alternative for phosphines in modified cobalt hydroformylation. (orig.)

  5. Spintronics in nanoscale devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hedin, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    By exploiting the novel properties of quantum dots and nanoscale Aharonov-Bohm rings together with the electronic and magnetic properties of various semiconductor materials and graphene, researchers have conducted numerous theoretical and computational modeling studies and experimental tests that show promising behavior for spintronics applications. Spin polarization and spin-filtering capabilities and the ability to manipulate the electron spin state through external magnetic or electric fields have demonstrated the promise of workable nanoscale devices for computing and memory applications.

  6. Electrocatalytic performance evaluation of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt oxide thin films for oxygen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, P. T.; Lokhande, A. C.; Pawar, B. S.; Gang, M. G.; Jo, Eunjin; Go, Changsik; Suryawanshi, M. P.; Pawar, S. M.; Kim, Jin Hyeok

    2018-01-01

    The development of an inexpensive, stable, and highly active electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is essential for the practical application of water splitting. Herein, we have synthesized an electrodeposited cobalt hydroxide on nickel foam and subsequently annealed in an air atmosphere at 400 °C for 2 h. In-depth characterization of all the films using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron emission spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) techniques, which reveals major changes for their structural, morphological, compositional and electrochemical properties, respectively. The cobalt hydroxide nanosheet film shows high catalytic activity with 290 mV overpotential at 10 mA cm-2 and 91 mV dec-1 Tafel slope and robust stability (24 h) for OER in 1 M KOH electrolyte compared to cobalt oxide (340 mV). The better OER activity of cobalt hydroxide in comparison to cobalt oxide originated from high active sites, enhanced surface, and charge transport capability.

  7. Synthesis of cobalt boride nanoparticles using radio frequency thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapitan, Jr. Lorico DS.; Ying Ying Chen; Seesoek Choe; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Nano size cobalt boride particles were synthesized from vapor phase using a 30 kw-4 MHz radio frequency (RF) thermal plasma. Cobalt and boron powder mixtures used as precursors in different composition and feed rate were evaporated immediately in the high temperature plasma and cobalt boride nanoparticles were produced through the quenching process. The x-ray diffractometry (XRD) patterns of cobalt boride nanoparticles prepared from the feed powder ratio of 1:2 and 1:3 for Co: B showed peaks that are associated with the Co 2 B and CoB crystal phases of cobalt boride. The XRD analysis revealed that increasing the powder feed rate results in a higher mass fraction and a larger crystalline diameter of cobalt boride nanoparticles. The images obtained by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) revealed that cobalt boride nanoparticles have a spherical morphology. The crystallite size of the particles estimated with XRD was found to be 18-22 nm. (author)

  8. Mixed alumina and cobalt containing plasma electrolytic oxide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yar-Mukhamedova, G. Sh; Ved', M. V.; Karakurkchi, A. V.; Sakhnenko, N. D.

    2017-06-01

    Principles of plasma electrolytic oxidation of the AL25 aluminum alloy in diphosphate alkali solutions containing cobalt(2+) cations are discussed. It has been established that a variation in the concentration of the electrolyte components provides the formation of mixed-oxide coatings consisting of the basic matrix materials and the cobalt oxides of different content. An increase in the cobalt oxide content in the coating is achieved by the variation in electrolysis current density as well as the treatment time due to both the electrochemical and thermo-chemical reactions at substrate surface and in spark region. Current density intervals that provide micro-globular surface formation and uniform cobalt distribution in the coating are determined. The composition and morphology of the surface causes high catalytic properties of synthesized materials, which confirmed the results of testing in model reaction CO and benzene oxidation as well as fuel combustion for various modes of engine operation.

  9. Preparation and characterization of a novel bioactive bone cement: glass based nanoscale hydroxyapatite bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Zhou, Nai; Huang, Wenhai; Wang, Deping; Zhang, Liying; Li, Haifeng

    2004-12-01

    A novel type of glass-based nanoscale hydorxypatite (HAP) bioactive bone cement (designed as GBNHAPC) was synthesized by adding nanoscale hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystalline (20-40 nm), into the self-setting glass-based bone cement (GBC). The inhibition rate of nanoscale HAP and micron HAP on osteosarcoma U2-OS cells was examined. The effects of nanoscale HAP on the crystal phase, microstructure and compressive strength of GBNHAPC were studied respectively. It was concluded that nanoscale HAP could inhibit the cell proliferation, while micron HAP could not, and that nanoscale HAP could be dispersed in the cement evenly and the morphology did not change significantly after a longer immersion time. XRD and FTIR results show nanoscale HAP did not affect the setting reaction of the cement. Furthermore, GBNHAPC had a higher compressive strength (92 MPa) than GBC. It was believed that GBNHAPC might be a desirable biomaterial that could not only fill bone defects but also inhibit cancer cell growth.

  10. Competitive Adsorption-Assisted Formation of One-Dimensional Cobalt Nanochains with High CO Hydrogenation Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xin [State; Ren, Zhibo [State; Institute; Zhu, Xiaolin [State; Zhang, Qinwei [State; Mei, Donghai [Institute; Chen, Biaohua [State

    2017-10-31

    In the present work, cobalt nanochains have been successfully synthesized by a novel co assisted self-assembling formation strategy. A dramatic morphology transformation from cobalt nanoparticles to nanochains are observed when co molecules were introduced into the synthetic system. DFT calculations further confirm that competitive co-adsorbed co and oleylamine over the cobalt nanoparticles facilitates the formation of cobalt nanochains, which show higher co hydrogenation performance. The present work provides a new strategic and promising method for controllable synthesis of catalyst nanomaterials with the preferred surface structure and morphology.

  11. Comparative study of synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanotechnology is an emerging field in science and technology, which can be applied to synthesize new materials at the nanoscale level. The present investigation aimed at comparing the synthesis, characterization andin vitro anticancer efficacy of synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles using leaves extract of Bauhinia ...

  12. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    . Conclusions: This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future....... Microstructural characterization was made using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results: Cobalt release was found in 4 (1.1%) of 354 items. All these had a dark appearance. SEM/EDS was performed on the four dark appearing items which showed tin-cobalt plating on these...

  13. Nanoscale grain growth behaviour of CoAl intermetallic synthesized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    initial grain size and the grain-growth exponent, respec- tively. K is a constant that satisfies the following equation. (Kambara et al 2000; Thein et al 2006; Ren et al 2008):. 0 exp. ,. Q. K K. RT. −. ⎛. ⎞. = ⎜. ⎟. ⎝. ⎠. (2) where Q is the activation energy required for grain growth and K0, R and T are constant, gas constant and.

  14. Nanoscale grain growth behaviour of CoAl intermetallic synthesized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Lee J, Zhou F, Chung K H, Kim N J and Lavernia E J 2001. Metall. Mater. Trans. 32 3109. Liu F, Yang G, Wang H, Chen Z and Zhou Y 2006 Thermo- chim. Acta 443 212. Liu K W and Mucklich F 2001 Acta Mater. 49 395. Mousavi T, Karimzadeh F and Abbasi M H 2008 Mater. Sci. Eng. 487 46. Nakamura R and Iijima Y 2005 ...

  15. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jianhua (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Russell, Scott (California State University, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA); Morishetti, Kiran (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  16. Wrought cobalt- base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarstrom, D. L.

    1993-08-01

    Wrought cobalt-base superalloys are used extensively in gas turbine engines because of their excellent high-temperature creep and fatigue strengths and resistance to hot corrosion attack. In addition, the unique character of the oxide scales that form on some of the alloys provides outstanding resistance to high-temperature sliding wear. This article provides a review of the evolutionary development of wrought cobalt-base alloys in terms of alloy design and physical metallurgy. The topics include solid-so-lution strengthening, carbide precipitation characteristics, and attempts to introduce age hardening. The use of PHACOMP to enhance thermal stability characteristics and the incorporation of rare-earth ele-ments to improve oxidation resistance is also reviewed and discussed. The further development of cobalt-base superalloys has been severely hampered by past political events, which have accentuated the strategic vulnerability of cobalt as a base or as an alloying element. Consequently, alternative alloys have been developed that use little or no cobalt. One such alternative, Haynes® 230TMalloy, is discussed briefly.

  17. Synthesis of Samarium Cobalt Nanoblades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darren M. Steele

    2010-08-25

    As new portable particle acceleration technologies become feasible the need for small high performance permanent magnets becomes critical. With particle accelerating cavities of a few microns, the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) candidate demands magnets of comparable size. To address this need, samarium cobalt (SmCo) nanoblades were attempted to be synthesized using the polyol process. Since it is preferable to have blades of 1-2 {micro}m in length, key parameters affecting size and morphology including method of stirring, reaction temperature, reaction time and addition of hydroxide were examined. Nanoparticles consisting of 70-200 nm spherical clusters with a 3-5 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating were synthesized at 285 C and found to be ferromagnetic. Nanoblades of 25nm in length were observed at the surface of the nanoclusters and appeared to suggest agglomeration was occurring even with PVP employed. Morphology and size were characterized using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis was conducted to determine composition but no supportive evidence for any particular SmCo phase has yet been observed.

  18. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    This thesis is concerned with fundamental research into electronic and magnetic interaction on the nanoscale. From small metallic and magnetic islands and layers to single atoms. The research revolves around magnetic interaction probed through the spectroscopic capabilities of the scanning....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...... coverage the silver preferably nucleates on top of the bilayer high cobalt islands compared to directly on the Cu(111) substrate. Furthermore, the silver forms a combination of a reconstruction and a Moire pattern which is investigated with low-energy electron diraction and spectroscopic STM mapping at 6...

  19. The structural evolution and diffusion during the chemical transformation from cobalt to cobalt phosphide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, Don-Hyung

    2011-01-01

    We report the structural evolution and the diffusion processes which occur during the phase transformation of nanoparticles (NPs), ε-Co to Co 2P to CoP, from a reaction with tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) investigations were used to elucidate the changes in the local structure of cobalt atoms which occur as the chemical transformation progresses. The lack of long-range order, spread in interatomic distances, and overall increase in mean-square disorder compared with bulk structure reveal the decrease in the NP\\'s structural order compared with bulk structure, which contributes to their deviation from bulk-like behavior. Results from EXAFS show both the Co2P and CoP phases contain excess Co. Results from EXAFS, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the inward diffusion of phosphorus is more favorable at the beginning of the transformation from ε-Co to Co2P by forming an amorphous Co-P shell, while retaining a crystalline cobalt core. When the major phase of the sample turns to Co 2P, the diffusion processes reverse and cobalt atom out-diffusion is favored, leaving a hollow void, characteristic of the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. For the transformation from Co2P to CoP theory predicts an outward diffusion of cobalt while the anion lattice remains intact. In real samples, however, the Co-rich nanoparticles continue Kirkendall hollowing. Knowledge about the transformation method and structural properties provides a means to tailor the synthesis and composition of the NPs to facilitate their use in applications. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. The Idaho cobalt belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookstrom, Arthur A.

    2013-01-01

    The Idaho cobalt belt (ICB) is a northwest-trending belt of cobalt (Co) +/- copper (Cu)-bearing deposits and prospects in the Salmon River Mountains of east-central Idaho, U.S.A. The ICB is about 55 km long and 10 km long in its central part, which contains multiple strata-bound ore zones in the Blackbird mine area. The Black Pine and Iron Creek Co-Cu prospects are southeast of Blackbird, and the Tinkers Pride, Bonanza Copper, Elk Creek, and Salmon Canyon Copper prospects are northwest of Blackbird.

  1. Cobalt/Fullerene Spinterfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Spintronics is a multidisciplinary research field and it explores phenomena that interlink the spin and charge degrees of freedom. The thesis focuses on spin-polarized electronic transports in cobalt (Co) and fullerene (C60) based vertical spintronic devices. It starts with a review about

  2. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) complexes of N, N' – bis(benzoin)ethylenediiminato have been prepared and characterized by infrared, elemental analysis, conductivity measurements and solubility. The potentiometric, and elemental analyses studies of the complexes revealed 1:1 ...

  3. Cobalt (III) complexes as novel matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiyoun [Sungshin Women' s Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    We have synthesized a series of novel MMP-9 inhibitors containing cobalt(III) complexes. The synthesized cobalt(III) complexes are effective as enzyme inhibitors and the attachment of a biphenyl group enhanced the efficiency of enzyme inhibition up to 6-fold. When compared to the reported non-hydroxamate MMP inhibitors, the synthesized complexes showed comparable in vitro potency. The enzyme assay showed that the cobalt(III) complex can disrupt the zinc binding active site of MMP-9 and is proposed to work via a ligand exchange mechanism. Since histidine residues are essential for the catalytic activity of a large percentage of enzymes and zinc finger proteins, these cobalt(III) complexes can serve as a prototype inhibitor towards various zinc containing enzymes and proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc binding endopeptidases that play crucial roles in various physiological processes and diseases such as embryogenic growth, angiogenesis, arthritis, skin ulceration, liver fibrosis and tumor metastasis. Because of their implications in a wide range of diseases, MMPs are considered as intriguing drug targets. The majority of MMP inhibitors are organic small molecules containing a hydroxamate functionality for the zinc binding group. This hydroxamate group binds to a zinc(II) center in a bidentate fashion and creates a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry.

  4. Photocatalytic degradation of congo red using copper substituted cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirankumar, V. S.; Hardik, B.; Sumathi, S.

    2017-11-01

    Co1-xCuxFe2O4 nanoparticles with x = 0 and 0.5 were synthesized through the combustion method. The as-made materials are face centered-cubic close-packed spinel structures. The characterization techniques such as powder XRD, FTIR, UV-DRS and SEM studies collectively verified that the formed products are cobalt ferrite and copper substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. In addition, the mean crystalline size, lattice parameter and band gap energy of nanoparticles are calculated. The photocatalytic activity of the obtained Co1-xCuxFe2O4 spinel nanoparticles is evaluated by monitoring the degradation of congo red under visible light irradiation.

  5. High density nonmagnetic cobalt in thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Banu, Nasrin; Singh, Surendra; Basu, Saibal; Roy, Anupam; Movva, Hema C. P.; Dev, B. N.

    2017-01-01

    Recently high density (HD) nonmagnetic (NM) cobalt has been discovered in a cobalt thin film, grown on Si(111). This cobalt film had a natural cobalt oxide at the top. The oxide layer forms when the film is taken out of the electron-beam deposition chamber and exposed to air. Thin HD NM cobalt layers were found near the cobalt/silicon and the cobalt-oxide/cobalt interfaces, while the thicker mid-depth region of the film was hcp cobalt with normal density and normal magnetic moment. If an ultr...

  6. Nanoscale Vacuum Channel Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Woo; Moon, Dong-Il; Meyyappan, M

    2017-04-12

    Vacuum tubes that sparked the electronics era had given way to semiconductor transistors. Despite their faster operation and better immunity to noise and radiation compared to the transistors, the vacuum device technology became extinct due to the high power consumption, integration difficulties, and short lifetime of the vacuum tubes. We combine the best of vacuum tubes and modern silicon nanofabrication technology here. The surround gate nanoscale vacuum channel transistor consists of sharp source and drain electrodes separated by sub-50 nm vacuum channel with a source to gate distance of 10 nm. This transistor performs at a low voltage (3 microamperes). The nanoscale vacuum channel transistor can be a possible alternative to semiconductor transistors beyond Moore's law.

  7. Ellipsometry at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Hingerl, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    This book presents and introduces ellipsometry in nanoscience and nanotechnology making a bridge between the classical and nanoscale optical behaviour of materials. It delineates the role of the non-destructive and non-invasive optical diagnostics of ellipsometry in improving science and technology of nanomaterials and related processes by illustrating its exploitation, ranging from fundamental studies of the physics and chemistry of nanostructures to the ultimate goal of turnkey manufacturing control. This book is written for a broad readership: materials scientists, researchers, engineers, as well as students and nanotechnology operators who want to deepen their knowledge about both basics and applications of ellipsometry to nanoscale phenomena. It starts as a general introduction for people curious to enter the fields of ellipsometry and polarimetry applied to nanomaterials and progresses to articles by experts on specific fields that span from plasmonics, optics, to semiconductors and flexible electronics...

  8. Nanoscale Organic Hybrid Electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Nugent, Jennifer L.

    2010-08-20

    Nanoscale organic hybrid electrolytes are composed of organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructures, each with a metal oxide or metallic nanoparticle core densely grafted with an ion-conducting polyethylene glycol corona - doped with lithium salt. These materials form novel solvent-free hybrid electrolytes that are particle-rich, soft glasses at room temperature; yet manifest high ionic conductivity and good electrochemical stability above 5V. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Metal-carbon C/Co nanocomposites based on activated pyrolyzed polyacrylonitrile and cobalt particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, M. N.; Vasilev, A. A.; Muratov, D. G.; Zemtsov, L. M.; Karpacheva, G. P.

    2017-09-01

    A new way of synthesizing metal-carbon nanocomposites via simultaneous pyrolysis and the chemical activation of a precursor based on polyacrylonitrile and cobalt carbonate under IR radiation is proposed. Structural characteristics of samples synthesized both without alkali and in the activation process are compared. The effect the metal has on the structure of the carbon and the size of its specific surface area is shown. The specific surface area of the sample synthesized with the simultaneous formation of the carbon matrix, its activation, and the reduction of the metal is 1232 m2/g. Cobalt nanoparticles are found to have cubic face-centered and hexagonal close-packed lattices.

  10. Nanoscale thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, David G.; Ford, Wayne K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Merlin, Roberto; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime—experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  11. A Systematic Review of Systemic Cobaltism After Wear or Corrosion of Chrome-Cobalt Hip Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Bradford D; Steck, Thomas; Woelber, Erik; Tower, Stephen S

    2015-06-12

    We sought to synthesize data on systemic arthroprosthetic cobaltism, a recently described syndrome that results from wear or corrosion of chrome-cobalt hip components. We conducted a systematic literature review to identify all reported cases of systemic arthroprosthetic cobaltism. To assess the epidemiologic link between blood cobalt levels (B[Co]), we developed a symptom scoring tool that evaluated 9 different symptom categories and a category of medical utilization. We identified 25 patients reported between 2001 and 2014 with a substantial increase in case reports over the past 3 years. Symptoms were diverse and involved the hip (84%), cardiovascular system (60%), audiovestibular system (52%), peripheral motor-sensory system (48%), thyroid (48%), psychological functioning (32%), visual system (32%), and the hematological, oncological, or immune system (20%). The mean latency from implantation to presentation or revision was 41 months (range, 9-99 months). The mean B[Co] was 324 μg/L and 4 patients had levels less than 20 μg/L. The B[Co] but not blood chromium level was highly associated with a quantitative measure of overall symptom severity (r, 0.81; P chrome-cobalt hip implants, may involve a large number of organ systems, and may occur with relatively low B[Co]. There is an urgent need to better define the overall scope of the problem and to develop screening and management strategies.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

  12. Elicitation threshold of cobalt chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise A; Johansen, Jeanne D; Voelund, Aage

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cobalt is a strong skin sensitizer (grade 5 of 5 in the guinea-pig maximization test) that is used in various industrial and consumer applications. To prevent sensitization to cobalt and elicitation of allergic cobalt dermatitis, information about the elicitation threshold level...... of cobalt is important. OBJECTIVE: To identify the dermatitis elicitation threshold levels in cobalt-allergic individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Published patch test dose-response studies were reviewed to determine the elicitation dose (ED) levels in dermatitis patients with a previous positive patch test...... reaction to cobalt. A logistic dose-response model was applied to data collected from the published literature to estimate ED values. The 95% confidence interval (CI) for the ratio of mean doses that can elicit a reaction in 10% (ED(10)) of a population was calculated with Fieller's method. RESULTS...

  13. Electrocatalytic behaviour of surface confined pentanethio cobalt (II) binuclear phthalocyanines towards the oxidation of 4-chlorophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, Zainab O.; Louzada, Marcel; Mashazi, Philani; Nyokong, Tebello; Khene, Samson

    2017-12-01

    Cobalt binuclear phthalocyanine (CoBiPc) bearing pentanethio substituents at the peripheral positions were synthesized. The immobilization of the synthesized cobalt phthalocyanines on gold electrode was achieved using self-assembled monolayer method (SAM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Kelvin Probe (KP) techniques were used to characterise the formation of monomeric and binuclear phthalocyanine SAMs on the gold surface. The phthalocyanine SAMs on gold electrodes were investigated for electrocatalytic oxidation of 4-chlorophenol. The electrocatalytic properties of tetra- and octa- pentanethio substituted cobalt binuclear phthalocyanine (CoBiPc) are compared with their tetra- and octa-pentanethio substituted phthalocyanine (CoPc). The SAMs modified gold electrode surfaces showed a peak current enhancement and stability and reduction in electrocatalytic potentials compared to the bare or unmodified electrodes towards the detection of the 4-chlorophenol. The SAMs of cobalt binuclear phthalocyanines exhibited more enhanced electrocatalytic properties in terms of stability, detection peak current and reduction of the electrocatalytic over potential.

  14. Nanoscale Architectures for Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus

    2009-03-01

    In my group, we have developed a number of different potential architecture systems for gaining insights into energy storage and photovoltaics. In one manifestation of our efforts, generating a heterojunction comprising nanotubes and nanocrystals, externally bound and connected, has been significant. The unique, innovative, and important aspect of this particular nanoscale architecture is that it takes advantage of the tunability, in terms of size, shape, and chemistry, of nanotubes and nanocrystals, to create a sharp junction interface, whose properties are inherently manipulable, tailorable, and hence, predictable. For example, the electrical resistance of nanotube-nanoparticle networks is dependent on the nanoscale junctions that exist between these constituent nanomaterials as well as on microscale and macroscale connectivity. Thus, rational design of these nanomaterials is critical to a fundamental understanding of charge transport in single molecules and the determination of their conductance. Results on these systems can therefore be used to increase understanding of intrinsic factors affecting carrier mobility, such as electronic structure, carrier trapping, and delocalization. In a second manifestation, three-dimensional, dendritic micron- scale spheres of alkali metal hydrogen titanate 1D nanostructures (i.e.: nanowires and nanotubes) have been generated using a modified hydrothermal technique in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and an alkali metal hydroxide solution. Sea-urchin-like assemblies of these 1D nanostructures have been transformed into their hydrogen titanate analogues by neutralization as well as into their corresponding semiconducting, anatase titania nanostructured counterparts through a moderate high-temperature annealing dehydration process without destroying the 3D hierarchical structural motif. The as-prepared hollow spheres of titanate and titania 1D nanostructures have overall diameters, ranging from 0.8 μm to 1.2 μm, while the

  15. Thermal stability of nanoscale metallic multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, A.S., E-mail: sofia.ramos@dem.uc.pt [CEMUC, Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Universidade de Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A.J.; Vieira, M.T. [CEMUC, Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Universidade de Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Morgiel, J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, Reymonta 25, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Safran, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-11-28

    Metallic nanolayered thin films/foils, in particular Ni/Al multilayers, have been used to promote joining. The objective of this work is to evaluate the thermal stability of nanoscale metallic multilayers with potential for joining applications. Multilayers thin films with low (Ti/Al and Ni/Ti), medium (Ni/Al) and high (Pd/Al) enthalpies of exothermic reaction were prepared by dual cathode magnetron sputtering. Their thermal stability was studied by: i) differential scanning calorimetry combined with X-ray diffraction (XRD), ii) in-situ XRD using cobalt radiation, and iii) in-situ transmission electron microscopy. It was possible to detect traces of intermetallic or amorphous phases in the as-deposited short period (bilayer thickness) multilayers, except for the Ti/Al films where no reaction products that might be formed during deposition were identified. For short periods (below 20 nm) the equilibrium phases are directly achieved upon annealing, whereas for higher periods intermediate trialuminide phases are present for Ti/Al and Ni/Al multilayers. The formation of B2-NiTi from Ni/Ti multilayers occurs without the formation of intermediate phases. On the contrary, for the Pd–Al system the formation of intermediate phases was never avoided. The viability of nanoscale multilayers as “filler” materials for joining macro or microparts/devices was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Me1 and Me2 (Me—metal) alternated nanolayers deposited by magnetron sputtering • Reactive Me1/Me2 multilayer thin films with nanometric modulation period • By heat treatment the films always evolve to the equilibrium intermetallic phase. • For some Me1–Me2 systems and periods, the formation of intermediate phases occurs. • Me1/Me2 multilayer thin films can be used as filler materials to enhance joining.

  16. An Efficient and Recyclable Nanoparticle-Supported Cobalt Catalyst for Quinoxaline Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rajabi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The syntheses of quinoxalines derived from 1,2-diamine and 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds under mild reaction conditions was carried out using a nanoparticle-supported cobalt catalyst. The supported nanocatalyst exhibited excellent activity and stability and it could be reused for at least ten times without any loss of activity. No cobalt contamination could be detected in the products by AAS measurements, pointing to the excellent activity and stability of the Co nanomaterial.

  17. Tailoring the magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Vega, A. Estrada; Garza-Navarro, M. A.; Durán-Guerrero, J. G.; Moreno Cortez, I. E.; Lucio-Porto, R.; González-González, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, we report on the tuning of magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters. The cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters were synthesized from a two-step approach that consists of the synthesis of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in organic media, followed by their dispersion into aqueous dissolution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. These emulsions were prepared at three different concentrations of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in order to control the size and clustering density of the nanoparticles in the nanoclusters. The synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and their related techniques, such as bright-field and Z-contrast imaging, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry; as well as static magnetic measures. The experimental evidence indicates that the size, morphology, and nanoparticles clustering density in the nanoclusters is highly dependent of the cobalt-ferrite:CTAB molar ratio that is used in their synthesis. In addition, due to the clustering of the nanoparticles into the nanoclusters, their magnetic moments are blocked to relax cooperatively. Hence, the magnetic response of the nanoclusters can be tailored by controlling the size and nanoparticles clustering density.

  18. Tailoring the magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, A. Estrada de la; Garza-Navarro, M. A., E-mail: marco.garzanr@uanl.edu.mx; Durán-Guerrero, J. G.; Moreno Cortez, I. E.; Lucio-Porto, R.; González-González, V. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica (Mexico)

    2016-01-15

    In this contribution, we report on the tuning of magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters. The cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters were synthesized from a two-step approach that consists of the synthesis of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in organic media, followed by their dispersion into aqueous dissolution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. These emulsions were prepared at three different concentrations of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in order to control the size and clustering density of the nanoparticles in the nanoclusters. The synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and their related techniques, such as bright-field and Z-contrast imaging, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry; as well as static magnetic measures. The experimental evidence indicates that the size, morphology, and nanoparticles clustering density in the nanoclusters is highly dependent of the cobalt-ferrite:CTAB molar ratio that is used in their synthesis. In addition, due to the clustering of the nanoparticles into the nanoclusters, their magnetic moments are blocked to relax cooperatively. Hence, the magnetic response of the nanoclusters can be tailored by controlling the size and nanoparticles clustering density.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of cobalt-manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, J. [Laboratorio de Magnetismo y Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455-0153 (United States); Arias, N.P. [Laboratorio de Materiales Nanoestructurados y Funcionales, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Electronica y Computacion, Facultad de Ingenieria y Arquitectura, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Giraldo, O. [Laboratorio de Materiales Nanoestructurados y Funcionales, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Rosales-Rivera, A., E-mail: arosalesr@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Magnetismo y Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia)

    2012-08-15

    Cobalt doped/un-doped manganese oxides materials were synthesized at various doping rates by soft chemical reactions, oxidation-reduction method, which allows generating a metal-mixed oxide. The synthesized materials were characterized using several techniques including chemical analysis, X-rays diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The chemical analysis confirmed the presence of cobalt in the samples. XRD patterns reveal mainly a spinel-like structure and SEM micrographs exhibited morphology with fine aggregate of particles. TGA profiles showed weight loss due to loss of water in a first step, followed by a loss of oxygen from the lattice associated with partial reduction of Mn{sup 4+} to Mn{sup 3+}. VSM was used to measure the magnetization as a function of the applied magnetic field at temperatures T=50 and 300 K. Different magnetic behaviors were observed when cobalt percentage changed in the samples. These behaviors are considered to be related to the size of the particles and composition of the materials. Higher coercive field and lesser magnetization were observed for the sample with higher cobalt content.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of cobalt-manganese oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia, J.; Arias, N.P.; Giraldo, O.; Rosales-Rivera, A.

    2012-01-01

    Cobalt doped/un-doped manganese oxides materials were synthesized at various doping rates by soft chemical reactions, oxidation-reduction method, which allows generating a metal-mixed oxide. The synthesized materials were characterized using several techniques including chemical analysis, X-rays diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The chemical analysis confirmed the presence of cobalt in the samples. XRD patterns reveal mainly a spinel-like structure and SEM micrographs exhibited morphology with fine aggregate of particles. TGA profiles showed weight loss due to loss of water in a first step, followed by a loss of oxygen from the lattice associated with partial reduction of Mn 4+ to Mn 3+ . VSM was used to measure the magnetization as a function of the applied magnetic field at temperatures T=50 and 300 K. Different magnetic behaviors were observed when cobalt percentage changed in the samples. These behaviors are considered to be related to the size of the particles and composition of the materials. Higher coercive field and lesser magnetization were observed for the sample with higher cobalt content.

  1. Flexoelectricity in Nanoscale Ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalan, Gustau

    2012-02-01

    All ferroelectrics are piezoelectric and thus have an intrinsic coupling between polarization and strain. There exists an additional electromechanical coupling, however, between polarization and strain gradients. Strain gradients are intrinsically vectorial fields and, therefore, they can in principle be used to modify both the orientation and the sign of the polarization, thanks to the coupling known as flexoelectricity. Flexoelectricity is possible even in paraelectric materials, but is generally stronger in ferroelectrics on account of their high permittivity (the flexoelectric coefficient is proportional to the dielectric constant). Moreover, strain gradients can be large at the nanoscale due to the smallness of the relaxation length and, accordingly, strong flexoelectric effects can be expected in nanoscale ferroelectrics. In this talk we will present two recent results that highlight the above features. In the first part, I will show how polarization tilting can be achieved in a nominally tetragonal ferroelectric (PbTiO3) thanks to the internal flexoelectric fields generated in nano-twinned epitaxial thin films. Flexoelectricity thus offers a purely physical means of achieving rotated polarizations, which are thought to be useful for enhanced piezoelectricity. In the second part, we will show how the large strain gradients generated by pushing the sharp tip of an atomic force microscope against the surface of a thin ferroelectric film can be used to actively switch its polarity by 180^o. This enables a new concept for ``multiferroic'' memory operation in which the memory bits are written mechanically and read electrically.

  2. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  3. Magnetic Cobalt and Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles in Hyperbranched Polyester Polyol Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Medvedeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of cobalt (Co and its oxides based nanoparticles were synthesized by using hyperbranched polyester polyol Boltorn H20 as a platform and sodium borohydride as a reducing agent. UV, FT-IR, XRD, NTA, and TEM methods were employed to obtain physicochemical characteristics of the products. The average diameter of Co nanoparticles was approximately 8.2±3.4 nm. Their magnetic properties, including hysteresis loop, field-cooled, and zero field-cooled curves were investigated. The nanoparticles exhibit superparamagnetism at room temperature, accompanied by magnetic hysteresis below the blocking temperature.

  4. Gold-supported two-dimensional cobalt oxyhydroxide (CoOOH) and multilayer cobalt oxide islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fester, Jakob; Walton, Alexander; Li, Zheshen

    2017-01-01

    morphology consisting of hydroxylated trilayer islands is identical to an exfoliated sheet of the [small beta]-CoOOH which is proposed to be the active phase of the cobalt oxide oxygen evolution reaction catalyst present in the electrochemical environment, and we note that this synthesized structure thus......In the present study, we investigate the facile conversion of Co-O bilayer islands on a Au(111) surface into preferentially O-Co-O trilayers in an oxygen atmosphere and O-Co-O-Co-O multilayers at elevated temperature. We characterize and compare the island morphologies with scanning tunneling...

  5. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale.

  6. Manipulation of morphology and magnetic properties in cobalt nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglin Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ferromagnetic metallic Cobalt nanowires are synthesized by the reduction of carboxylate salts of Co in 1, 2-butanediol using a solvothermal chemical process. In this process, the size and shape of the nanocrystals can be controlled via reaction parameters such as surfactant ratio, precursor concentration, and the temperature ramp. Synthesized Co nanocrystals exhibit the hexagonally close-packed phase favored the growth of anisotropic particles and the (002 crystalline direction is along the long axis of the nanowires. By varying the catalyst concentration in proper range, the effect of synthetic parameters on controlling Co nanoparticles with different length of 50 - 700 nm was systematically studied. Magnetic measurements and TEM images of the Cobalt nanowires indicate that the coercivity of the Co nanowires depends substantially on the morphology. The obtained highest coercivity of 8.4 kOe can be attributed to their small mean diameter and high crystallinity of nanowires for 200 - 300 nm.

  7. Nickel, cobalt, and their alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive guide to the compositions, properties, processing, performance, and applications of nickel, cobalt, and their alloys. It includes all of the essential information contained in the ASM Handbook series, as well as new or updated coverage in many areas in the nickel, cobalt, and related industries.

  8. Protective Agent-Free Synthesis of Colloidal Cobalt Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balela, M. D. L.; Lockman, Z.; Azizan, A.; Matsubara, E.; Amorsolo, A. V. Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Spherical colloidal cobalt (Co) nanoparticles of about 2-7 nm were synthesized by hydrazine reduction in ethylene glycol at 80 deg. C. The mean diameter of the Co nanoparticles was varied to some extent by changing the pH, temperature, Co(II) chloride hexahydrate concentration, and amount of hydrazine. The Co particle size was reduced by decreasing Co(II) chloride concentration and increasing amount of hydrazine.

  9. A Nanoscale Tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Elba

    2008-10-01

    Experimentalists constantly seek to overcome technical limitations. This is especially true in the world of biophysics, where the drive to study molecular targets such as ion channels, a type of membrane transport protein, has resulted in methodological breakthroughs that have merited the Nobel Prize (Hodgkin and Huxley, 1963; Neher and Sakmann, 1991). In this presentation I will explain how nanoscale phenomena that are essential for sensory perception underlie the ability of dancers, gymnasts, and musicians to excel at their artistic endeavors. I will describe how our investigations of sensory mechanotransduction and the quest for improved signal amplification inspired a scientific journey that has culminated in an exciting new line of collaborative NIH-funded research with nanomaterials (quantum dots). I will conclude with a general discussion of how training in physics offers an ideal foundation for interdisciplinary research in health related fields, such as those that deal with neuroscience and disorders of the nervous system.

  10. Continuous removal of radioactive cobalt from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    More than 99% of radioactive cobalt can be removed from water by precipitation as cobalt(III) hydroxide. The process is continuous and uses either sodium hypochlorite or oxygen and calcium sulfite to oxidize the cobalt. Carbonate and phosphate interfere with cobalt removal, but the process has potential for other applications such as thallium removal and sewage treatment. (author)

  11. Nanoscale Confinement and Fluorescence Effects of Bacterial Light Harvesting Complex LH2 in Mesoporous Silicas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikemoto, Hideki; Tubasum, Sumera; Pullerits, Tonu

    2013-01-01

    Many key chemical and biochemical reactions, particularly in living cells, take place in confined space at the mesoscopic scale. Towards understanding of physicochemical nature of biomacromolecules confined in nanoscale space, in this work we have elucidated fluorescent effects of a light...... harvesting complex LH2 in nanoscale chemical environments. Mesoporous silicas (SBA-15 family) with different shapes and pore sizes were synthesized and used to create nanoscale biomimetic environments for molecular confinement of LH2. A combination of UV-vis absorption, wide-field fluorescence microscopy...

  12. Synthesis and characterization of graphene quantum dots/cobalt ferrite nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Shilpa; Sathishkumar, M.; Kothurkar, Nikhil K.; Senthilkumar, R.

    2018-02-01

    A facile method has been developed for the synthesis of a graphene quantum dots/cobalt ferrite nanocomposite. Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were synthesized by a simple bottom-up method using citric acid, followed by the co-precipitation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles on the graphene quantum dots. The morphology, structural analysis, optical properties, magnetic properties were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) measurements. The synthesized nanocomposite showed good fluorescence and superparamagnetic properties, which are important for biomedical applications.

  13. Nanoscale friction and wear maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Nikhil S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-04-28

    Friction and wear are part and parcel of all walks of life, and for interfaces that are in close or near contact, tribology and mechanics are supremely important. They can critically influence the efficient functioning of devices and components. Nanoscale friction force follows a complex nonlinear dependence on multiple, often interdependent, interfacial and material properties. Various studies indicate that nanoscale devices may behave in ways that cannot be predicted from their larger counterparts. Nanoscale friction and wear mapping can help identify some 'sweet spots' that would give ultralow friction and near-zero wear. Mapping nanoscale friction and wear as a function of operating conditions and interface properties is a valuable tool and has the potential to impact the very way in which we design and select materials for nanotechnology applications.

  14. Homogeneous Precipitation Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs of cobalt ferrite have been synthesized via a homogeneous precipitation route using hexamethylenetetramine (HMT as the precipitant. The particle size, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the synthesized particles were investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The NPs are of cubic inverse spinel structure and nearly spherical shape. With the increase of oxidation time from 30 to 180 minutes in the reaction solution at 90∘C, the average particle size increases from ~30 nm to ~45 nm. The as-synthesized NPs ~30 nm in size show higher Ms (61.5 emu/g and moderate Hc (945 Oe and Mr/Ms (0.45 value compared with the materials synthesized by coprecipitation method using NaOH as precipitate at high pH value.

  15. Nanoscale technology in biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Greco, Ralph S; Smith, R Lane

    2004-01-01

    Reviewing recent accomplishments in the field of nanobiology Nanoscale Technology in Biological Systems introduces the application of nanoscale matrices to human biology. It focuses on the applications of nanotechnology fabrication to biomedical devices and discusses new physical methods for cell isolation and manipulation and intracellular communication at the molecular level. It also explores the application of nanobiology to cardiovascular diseases, oncology, transplantation, and a range of related disciplines. This book build a strong background in nanotechnology and nanobiology ideal for

  16. Nanoscale waveguiding methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chia-Jean

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWhile 32 nm lithography technology is on the horizon for integrated circuit (IC fabrication, matching the pace for miniaturization with optics has been hampered by the diffraction limit. However, development of nanoscale components and guiding methods is burgeoning through advances in fabrication techniques and materials processing. As waveguiding presents the fundamental issue and cornerstone for ultra-high density photonic ICs, we examine the current state of methods in the field. Namely, plasmonic, metal slot and negative dielectric based waveguides as well as a few sub-micrometer techniques such as nanoribbons, high-index contrast and photonic crystals waveguides are investigated in terms of construction, transmission, and limitations. Furthermore, we discuss in detail quantum dot (QD arrays as a gain-enabled and flexible means to transmit energy through straight paths and sharp bends. Modeling, fabrication and test results are provided and show that the QD waveguide may be effective as an alternate means to transfer light on sub-diffraction dimensions.

  17. Electrocatalytic Activity of Electropolymerized Cobalt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... KEYWORDS. Electrocatalysis, 6-mercaptopurine, 2-mercaptobenzimidazole, cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine, electropolymeric film. 1. Introduction ... have been used to prepare polymeric film modified electrodes; among them ... ultrasonicated thoroughly in 50.0 % nitric acid, ethanol and distilled water ...

  18. Cobalt: for strength and color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.; Kropschot, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt is a shiny, gray, brittle metal that is best known for creating an intense blue color in glass and paints. It is frequently used in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries and to create alloys that maintain their strength at high temperatures. It is also one of the essential trace elements (or "micronutrients") that humans and many other living creatures require for good health. Cobalt is an important component in many aerospace, defense, and medical applications and is a key element in many clean energy technologies. The name cobalt comes from the German word kobold, meaning goblin. It was given this name by medieval miners who believed that troublesome goblins replaced the valuable metals in their ore with a substance that emitted poisonous fumes when smelted. The Swedish chemist Georg Brandt isolated metallic cobalt-the first new metal to be discovered since ancient times-in about 1735 and identified some of its valuable properties.

  19. Influence of Reduction Promoters on Stability of Cobalt/g-Alumina Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Jacobs

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This focused review article underscores how metal reduction promoters can impact deactivation phenomena associated with cobalt Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts. Promoters can exacerbate sintering if the additional cobalt metal clusters, formed as a result of the promoting effect, are in close proximity at the nanoscale to other cobalt particles on the surface. Recent efforts have shown that when promoters are used to facilitate the reduction of small crystallites with the aim of increasing surface Co0 site densities (e.g., in research catalysts, ultra-small crystallites (e.g., <2–4.4 nm formed are more susceptible to oxidation at high conversion relative to larger ones. The choice of promoter is important, as certain metals (e.g., Au that promote cobalt oxide reduction can separate from cobalt during oxidation-reduction (regeneration cycles. Finally, some elements have been identified to promote reduction but either poison the surface of Co0 (e.g., Cu, or produce excessive light gas selectivity (e.g., Cu and Pd, or Au at high loading. Computational studies indicate that certain promoters may inhibit polymeric C formation by hindering C-C coupling.

  20. In situ and post reaction cobalt-incorporation into aminopropyl-modified periodic mesoporous organosilica materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alufelwi M. Tshavhungwe

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Bifunctional periodic mesoporous organosilica materials with and without cobalt ion incorporation were synthesized by co-condensation of 1,2-bistrimethoxysilylethane (BTME with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. Cobalt was incorporated onto APTS-modified ethylene-bridged silica materials by in situ and by incipient wetness addition methods. The periodicity of the new materials is indicated by the presence of low angle diffraction peaks found in the XRD profiles (pore size ca. 40 nm. The surface area, pore volume and pore diameter of the new ethylene-bridged silica materials decreased with increasing loading of APTS as well as after cobalt incorporation. Thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy show that the surfactant is removed by solvent extraction. Cobalt ion incorporation is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

  1. Discovery of a cobalt complex with high MEK1 binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyue; Zhou, Tongliang; Liu, Hui; Xu, Fengrong; Niu, Yan; Wang, Chao; Liang, Lei; Xu, Ping

    2017-05-15

    A series of Schiff base ligands (L 1 -L 5 ) and their cobalt(II) complexes (1-5) were designed and synthesized for MEK1 binding experiment. The biological evaluation results showed that Bis(N,N'-disalicylidene)-3,4-phenylenediamine-cobalt(II) 1 and Bis(N,N'-disalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexanediamine-cobalt(II) 2 are much more effective than the parent Schiff bases (L 1 and L 2 ). Importantly, 2 exhibited MEK1 binding affinity with IC 50 71nM, which is so far the best result for metal complexes and more potent than U0126 (7.02μM) and AZD6244 (2.20μM). Docking study was used to elucidate the binding modes of complex 2 with MEK1. Thus cobalt(II) complex 2 may be further developed as a novel MEK1 inhibitor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. hermo-Physical and Mechanical Properties of Unsaturated Polyester /Cobalt Ferrite Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamees Salam Faiq

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Unsaturated polyester was used as a matrix which was filled with different percentages of cobalt ferrite using hand lay-up method. Cobalt ferrite was synthesized using solid state ceramic method with reagent of CoO and Fe2O3. Mechanical properties such tensile strength, Young's modulus and shore D hardness of the composite have been studied. All these properties have increased by 10% with increasing cobalt ferrite contents. Also the thermal properties such thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity are highly increased as the ferrite content increased, while the thermal diffusivity increased by 22 %. On the other hand dielectric strength of composite has been measured which increased by 50% by increasing the cobalt ferrite content.

  3. Cobalt Doped SnO2 Thick Film Gas Sensors: Conductance and Gas Response Characteristics for LPG and CNG Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kumar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt doped thick films tin oxide sensors were studied for their LPG and CNG gas sensitivity. SnO2 powder was synthesized by precipitation technique and doped with cobalt sulphate (0 to 10 wt % by impregnation technique. The sensing characteristics were found to depend on the cobalt concentration and operating temperature. Best performance for LPG and CNG detection was obtained for 3 wt % addition of cobalt sulphate. Cobalt doped SnO2 sensors showed a decrease in the optimum temperature for CNG detection from 450°C to 350°C. The transient response characteristics were determined at different temperatures and doping concentrations to understand the effect of doping on the rate kinetics. A correlation was established between response time, sensor response and the intergranular potential barriers.

  4. Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride photocatalysts with high activity for hydrogen evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Wen; Li, Kui; Yu, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Wei-De, E-mail: zhangwd@scut.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride (Co−CN) was synthesized by one-step thermal polycondensation using cobalt phthalocyanine and melamine as precursors. The obtained photocatalysts display high and stable activity for photocatalytic generation of hydrogen through water splitting. - Highlights: • Cobalt-doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} photocatalysts were prepared. • High and stable visible light photocatalytic activity for H{sub 2} evolution. • Efficient separation and transfer of photo-induced electron-hole pairs. - Abstract: Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride (Co−CN) was synthesized by one-step thermal polycondensation using cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) and melamine as precursors. The π-π interaction between melamine and CoPc promotes cobalt doping into the framework of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The prepared samples were carefully characterized and the results demonstrated that Co-doped graphitic carbon nitride inhibited the crystal growth of graphitic carbon nitride (CN), leading to larger specific surface area (33.1 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and abundant Co-N{sub x} active sites, narrower band gap energy and more efficient separation of photogenerated electrons and holes. 0.46% Co−CN exhibited higher hydrogen evolution rate (28.0 μmol h{sup −1}) under visible light irradiation, which is about 3.0 times of that over the pure CN and about 2.2 times of that over cobalt-doped CN using CoCl{sub 2} ∙ 6H{sub 2}O as a cobalt source. This study provides a valuable strategy to modify CN with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

  5. COBALT SALTS PRODUCTION BY USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila V. Dyakova

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the extracting cobalt salts by using mixtures on the basis of tertiary amine from multicomponent solutions from the process of hydrochloride leaching of cobalt concentrate. The optimal composition for the extraction mixture, the relationship between the cobalt distribution coefficients and modifier’s nature and concentration, and the saltingout agent type have been determined. A hydrochloride extraction technology of cobalt concentrate yielding a purified concentrated cobalt solution for the production of pure cobalt salts has been developed and introduced at Severonikel combine.

  6. Annual reports in inorganic and general syntheses 1972

    CERN Document Server

    Niedenzu, Kurt

    1973-01-01

    Annual Reports in Inorganic and General Syntheses-1972 presents an organized annual summary of synthetic developments in inorganic chemistry and its related areas. The book discusses alkali and alkaline earth elements, alloys, silver, gold, zinc, cadmium, mercury, boron, aluminum, gallium, indium, thallium, yttrium, scandium, lanthanides, actinides, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, Group V and VI transition elements, manganese, technetium, rhenium, iron, cobalt, nickel, ruthenium, osmium, rhodium, and iridium. The text also describes the chemistry of palladium, platinum, silicon, germanium, tin,

  7. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamza, A V

    2008-04-07

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The NSCL is delivering on its mission providing Laboratory programs with scientific solutions through the use of nanoscale synthesis and characterization. While this annual report summarizes 2007 activities, we have focused on nanoporous materials, advanced high strength, nanostructured metals, novel 3-dimensional lithography and characterization at the nanoscale for the past 3 years. In these three years we have synthesized the first monolithic nanoporous metal foams with less than 10% relative density; we have produced ultrasmooth nanocrystalline diamond inertial confinement fusion capsules; we have synthesized 3-dimensional graded density structures from full density to 5% relative density using nanolithography; and we have established ultrasmall angle x-ray scattering as a non-destructive tool to determine the structure on the sub 300nm scale. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and to train personnel for Lab programs. The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory. Andrew Detor from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sutapa Ghosal from the University of California, Irvine, Xiang Ying Wang from Shanghai Institute of Technology, and Arne Wittstock from University of Bremen joined the NSCL this year. The NSCL is pursuing four science and technology themes: nanoporous materials, advanced nanocrystalline materials, novel three-dimensional nanofabrication technologies, and nondestructive characterization at the mesoscale. The NSCL is also pursuing building new facilities for science and technology such as nanorobotics and atomic layer deposition.

  8. Effect of the Polymeric Stabilizer in the Aqueous Phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalyzed by Colloidal Cobalt Nanocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Delgado

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of small and well defined cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized by the chemical reduction of cobalt salts in water using NaBH4 as a reducing agent and using various polymeric stabilizers. The obtained nanocatalysts of similar mean diameters (ca. 2.6 nm were fully characterized and tested in the aqueous phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (AFTS. Interestingly, the nature and structure of the stabilizers used during the synthesis of the CoNPs affected the reduction degree of cobalt and the B-doping of these NPs and consequently, influenced the performance of these nanocatalysts in AFTS.

  9. Influence of Cobalt on the Adhesion Strength of Polycrystalline Diamond Coatings on WC-Co Hard Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnik, S. A.; Gaidaichuk, A. V.; Okhotnikov, V. V.

    2018-02-01

    The influence of cobalt on the phase composition and adhesion strength of polycrystalline diamond coatings has been studied using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray microanalysis. The coatings have been deposited on WC-Co hard alloy substrates in glow discharge plasma. It has been found that the catalytic amorphization of carbon only takes place during the direct synthesis of the diamond coating, when the cobalt vapor pressure over the substrate is high and the cobalt-related degradation of the synthesized diamond is absent.

  10. AN ELECTROPLATING METHOD OF FORMING PLATINGS OF NICKEL, COBALT, NICKEL ALLOYS OR COBALT ALLOYS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    An electroplating method of forming platings of nickel, cobalt, nickel alloys or cobalt alloys with reduced stresses in an electrodepositing bath of the type: Watt's bath, chloride bath or a combination thereof, by employing pulse plating with periodic reverse pulse and a sulfonated naphthalene...... additive. This method makes it possible to deposit nickel, cobalt, nickel or cobalt platings without internal stresses....

  11. Sensing at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    The merits of nanostructures in sensing may seem obvious, yet playing these attributes to their maximum advantage can be a work of genius. As fast as sensing technology is improving, expectations are growing, with demands for cheaper devices with higher sensitivities and an ever increasing range of functionalities and compatibilities. At the same time tough scientific challenges like low power operation, noise and low selectivity are keeping researchers busy. This special issue on sensing at the nanoscale with guest editor Christofer Hierold from ETH Zurich features some of the latest developments in sensing research pushing at the limits of current capabilities. Cheap and easy fabrication is a top priority. Among the most popular nanomaterials in sensing are ZnO nanowires and in this issue Dario Zappa and colleagues at Brescia University in Italy simplify an already cheap and efficient synthesis method, demonstrating ZnO nanowire fabrication directly onto silicon substrates [1]. Meanwhile Nicolae Barson and colleagues in Germany point out the advantages of flame spray pyrolysis fabrication in a topical review [2] and, maximizing on existing resources, researchers in Denmark and Taiwan report cantilever sensing using a US20 commercial DVD-ROM optical pickup unit as the readout source [3]. The sensor is designed to detect physiological concentrations of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, a protein associated with inflammation due to HIV, cancer and other infectious diseases. With their extreme properties carbon nanostructures feature prominently in the issue, including the demonstration of a versatile and flexible carbon nanotube strain sensor [4] and a graphene charge sensor with sensitivities of the order of 1.3 × 10-3 e Hz-1/2 [5]. The issue of patterning for sensing devices is also tackled by researchers in the US who demonstrate a novel approach for multicomponent pattering metal/metal oxide nanoparticles on graphene [6]. Changes in electrical

  12. Influence of the temperature in the electrochemical synthesis of cobalt ferrites nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazario, E. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, UAM, C/Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Morales, M.P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Galindo, R. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, UAM, C/Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Herrasti, P., E-mail: pilar.herrasti@uam.es [Departamento de Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, UAM, C/Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Menendez, N. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, UAM, C/Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by new electrochemical method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature affects to percentage of inclusion of Co and diameter of the synthesized nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At 80 Degree-Sign C and current densities of 50/25 mA cm{sup -2} applied to Fe and Co, respectively, a stoichiometric CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with 40 nm of diameter were obtained. - Abstract: A new electrochemical method to synthesize cobalt ferrite nanoparticles has been developed. Magnetic measurement, Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, inductive coupled plasma spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were carried out to characterize the cobalt ferrites synthesized at different temperatures between 25 Degree-Sign C and 80 Degree-Sign C. These techniques confirm the efficiency of the electrochemical method. At room temperature a mixture of different compounds was obtained with a particle diameter around 20 nm, while at 80 Degree-Sign C the synthesis of cobalt ferrite leads to a stoichiometric spinel, with a crystallite size of 40 nm measured by Scherrer equation. The temperature was defined as an important parameter to obtain stoichiometric ferrites and different diameters.

  13. Cobalt and Nickel Complexes Bearing 2-(2-pyridyl-Benzimidazole: Synthesis and Ethylene Oligomerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Long Du

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of cobalt and nickel complexes MLX2 (M=Co or Ni, X=Cl bearing 2-(2-pyridylbenzimidazole ligands were synthesized. Treatment of the complexes with methylaluminoxane (MAO leads to active catalysts for ethylene oligomerization. The oligomers were olefins from C2 to C6.

  14. Cobalt and Nickel Complexes Bearing 2-(2-pyridyl)-Benzimidazole: Synthesis and Ethylene Oligomerization

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Jian-Long; Li-Jun-Li

    2005-01-01

    A series of cobalt and nickel complexes MLX2 (M=Co or Ni, X=Cl) bearing 2-(2-pyridyl)benzimidazole ligands were synthesized. Treatment of the complexes with methylaluminoxane (MAO) leads to active catalysts for ethylene oligomerization. The oligomers were olefins from C2 to C6.

  15. Nanoscale phase change memory materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Marissa A; Jeyasingh, Rakesh Gnana David; Wong, H-S Philip; Milliron, Delia J

    2012-08-07

    Phase change memory materials store information through their reversible transitions between crystalline and amorphous states. For typical metal chalcogenide compounds, their phase transition properties directly impact critical memory characteristics and the manipulation of these is a major focus in the field. Here, we discuss recent work that explores the tuning of such properties by scaling the materials to nanoscale dimensions, including fabrication and synthetic strategies used to produce nanoscale phase change memory materials. The trends that emerge are relevant to understanding how such memory technologies will function as they scale to ever smaller dimensions and also suggest new approaches to designing materials for phase change applications. Finally, the challenges and opportunities raised by integrating nanoscale phase change materials into switching devices are discussed.

  16. Study on hydrothermal synthesis dynamics of nanoscale xonotlite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F.; Chen, S.; Lin, Q.; Wang, X. D.; Cao, J. X.

    2018-01-01

    The xonotlite crystals were synthesized via the hydrothermal synthesis manner from CaO and SiO2 as the raw materials with their Si/Ca molar ratio of 1.0. Hydrothermal synthesis dynamics of nanoscale xonotlite fibers was explored by masterly measuring the electrical conductivities and the calcium concentrations of product slurries synthesized at various reaction temperature in this paper. The results indicated that the calculated values of the products’ quality at various reaction temperatures were consistent with the measured values. Based on chemical reaction kinetic, using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, spline interpolation and least-squares fitting method, the dynamic relationship of xonotlite fibers synthesized via hydrothermal synthesis process is of -{dc}A/{dt}={kc}A4/5.

  17. Phosphorus introduction mechanism in electrodeposited cobalt films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtchenko, Jean-Francois

    1973-01-01

    The cathodic reduction of hypophosphite, phosphite and phosphate ions was studied using chrono-potentiometry and voltammetry. Then cobalt was deposited at constant current from a bath containing one of these three compounds. The current, while giving an electrodeposition of cobalt, also enhances at the same time a chemical deposition of cobalt. It is shown that high coercive forces in cobalt films are much more related to this chemical deposition than to the simple fact that the films contain some phosphorus. (author) [fr

  18. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  19. Transport of cobalt-60 industrial radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunstadt, Peter; Gibson, Wayne

    This paper will deal with safety aspects of the handling of Cobalt-60, the most widely used industrial radio-isotope. Cobalt-60 is a man-made radioisotope of Cobalt-59, a naturally occurring non radioactive element, that is made to order for radiation therapy and a wide range of industrial processing applications including sterilization of medical disposables, food irradiation, etc.

  20. Cobalt-containing alloys and their ability to release cobalt and cause dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julander, Anneli; Hindsén, Monica; Skare, Lizbet; Lidén, Carola

    2009-03-01

    Cobalt, nickel, and chromium are important skin sensitizers. However, knowledge about cobalt exposure and causes of cobalt sensitization is limited. To study release of cobalt, nickel, and chromium from some cobalt-containing hard metal alloys and to test reactivity to the materials in cobalt-sensitized patients. Discs suitable for patch testing were made of some hard metal alloys. Cobalt, nickel, and chromium release from the materials was determined by immersion in artificial sweat (2 min, 1 hr, 1 day, and 1 week). Patch test reactivity to the discs and to serial dilutions of cobalt and nickel was assessed in previously patch-tested dermatitis patients (19 cobalt positive and 18 cobalt-negative controls). All discs released cobalt, nickel, and chromium. Some discs released large amounts of cobalt (highest concentration: 290 microg/cm(2)/week). Seven discs elicited three or more positive test reactions. The concentration of released cobalt was high enough to elicit allergic contact dermatitis in cobalt-sensitized patients. As the materials in the discs are used in wear parts of hard metal tools, individuals with contact allergy to cobalt may develop hand eczema when handling such materials.

  1. Supported, Alkali-Promoted Cobalt Oxide Catalysts for NOx Removal from Coal Combustion Flue Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris D. Argyle

    2005-12-31

    A series of cobalt oxide catalysts supported on alumina ({gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were synthesized with varying contents of cobalt and of added alkali metals, including lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium. Unsupported cobalt oxide catalysts and several cobalt oxide catalysts supported ceria (CeO{sub 2}) with varying contents of cobalt with added potassium were also prepared. The catalysts were characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy and were examined for NO{sub x} decomposition activity. The CoO{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and particularly the CoO{sub x}/CeO{sub 2} catalysts show N{sub 2}O decomposition activity, but none of the catalysts (unsupported Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} or those supported on ceria or alumina) displayed significant, sustained NO decomposition activity. For the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported catalysts, N{sub 2}O decomposition activity was observed over a range of reaction temperatures beginning about 723 K, but significant (>50%) conversions of N{sub 2}O were observed only for reaction temperatures >900 K, which are too high for practical commercial use. However, the CeO{sub 2}-supported catalysts display N{sub 2}O decomposition rates similar to the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported catalysts at much lower reaction temperatures, with activity beginning at {approx}573 K. Conversions of >90% were achieved at 773 K for the best catalysts. Catalytic rates per cobalt atom increased with decreasing cobalt content, which corresponds to increasing edge energies obtained from the UV-visible spectra. The decrease in edge energies suggests that the size and dimensionality of the cobalt oxide surface domains increase with increasing cobalt oxide content. The rate data normalized per mass of catalyst that shows the activity of the CeO{sub 2}-supported catalysts increases with increasing cobalt oxide content. The combination of these data suggest that supported cobalt oxide species similar to bulk Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} are inherently more active than

  2. Nanoscale Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaoye

    Continuous downscaling in microelectronics has pushed conventional CMOS technology to its physical limits, while Moore's Law has correctly predicted the trend for decades, each step forward is accompanied with unprecedented technological difficulties and near-exponential increase in cost. At the same time, however, demands for low-power, low-cost and high-speed devices have never diminished, instead, even more stringent requirements have been imposed on device performances. It is therefore crucial to explore alternative materials and device architectures in order to alleviate the pressure caused by downscaling. To this end, we investigated two different approaches: (1) InSb nanowire based field effect transistors (NWFETs) and (2) single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) -- peptide nucleic acid (PNA) --SWCNT conjugate. Two types of InSb nanowires were synthesized by template-assisted electrochemistry and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) respectively. In both cases, NWFETs were fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL) and crystallinity was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns. For electrochemistry nanowire, ambipolar conduction was observed with strong p-type conduction, the effect of thermal annealing on the conductivity was analyzed, a NWFET model that took into consideration the underlapped region in top-gated NWFET was proposed. Hole mobility in the channel was calculated to be 292.84 cm2V-1s -1 with a density of 1.5x1017/cm3. For CVD nanowire, the diameter was below 40nm with an average of 20nm. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process was speculated to be the mechanism responsible for nanowire growth. The efficient gate control was manifested by high ION/I OFF ratio which was on the order of 106 and a small inverse subthreshold slope (functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes to synthesize the conjugate and characterized its electrical properties. Negative differential resistance (NDR) was observed

  3. Cobalt production in RAPS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, P.D.; Purandare, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    At present in RAPS-1 radioisotope Co 60 is produced by irradiating Co 59 in the adjusters which perform the function of regulation of reactivity, power and xenon override. But the manrem expenditure of the crew handling the charge and discharge of the adjusters is going to be prohibitively high. It is therefore proposed to irradiate Co 59 in the fuel channel positions. The physics optimisation study for such irradiation is presented. The burnup penalty and loss of power are estimated to produce the required quantity of Co 60 after optimising the number of cobalt pencils in a bundle and the positions of the cobalt producing channels in the reactor core. (author)

  4. Synthesis of cobalt alloy through smelting method and its characterization as prosthesis bone implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aminatun,, E-mail: ami-sofijan@yahoo.co.id; Putri, N.S Efinda, E-mail: ami-sofijan@yahoo.co.id; Indriani, Arista, E-mail: ami-sofijan@yahoo.co.id; Himawati, Umi, E-mail: ami-sofijan@yahoo.co.id; Hikmawati, Dyah, E-mail: ami-sofijan@yahoo.co.id; Suhariningsih, E-mail: ami-sofijan@yahoo.co.id [Department of physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Airlangga University (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    Cobalt-based alloys are widely used as total hip and knee replacements because of their excellent properties, such as corrosion resistance, fatigue strength and biocompatibility. In this work, cobalt alloys with variation of Cr (28.5; 30; 31.5; 33, and 34.5% wt) have been synthesized by smelting method began with the process of compaction, followed by smelting process using Tri Arc Melting Furnace at 200A. Continued by homogenization process at recrystallization temperature (1250° C) for 3 hours to allow the atoms diffuses and transform into γ phase. The next process is rolling process which is accompanied by heating at 1200° C for ± 15 minutes and followed by quenching. This process is repeated until the obtained thickness of ± 1 mm. The evaluated material properties included microstructure, surface morphology, and hardness value. It was shown that microstructure of cobalt alloys with variation of Cr is dominant by γ phase, thus making the entire cobalt alloys have high hardness. It was also shown from the surface morphology of entire cobalt alloys sample indicated the whole process of synthesis that had good solubility were at flat surface area. Hardness value test showed all of cobalt alloys sample had high hardness, just variation of 33% Cr be in the range of ASTMF75, it were 345,24 VHN which is potential to be applied as an implant prosthesis.

  5. Nanoscale organic ferroelectric resistive switches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khikhlovskyi, V.; Wang, R.; Breemen, A.J.J.M. van; Gelinck, G.H.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Kemerink, M.

    2014-01-01

    Organic ferroelectric resistive switches function by grace of nanoscale phase separation in a blend of a semiconducting and a ferroelectric polymer that is sandwiched between metallic electrodes. In this work, various scanning probe techniques are combined with numerical modeling to unravel their

  6. Cobalt(II) and Cobalt(III) Coordination Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nicholas C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment which illustrates the formation of tris(phenanthroline)cobalt complexes in the 2+ and 3+ oxidation states, the effect of coordination on reactions of the ligand, and the use of a ligand displacement reaction in recovering the transformed ligand. Uses IR, UV-VIS, conductivity, and NMR. (MVL)

  7. Bioinspired, functional nanoscale materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, In-Kook

    Functional nanomaterials in nature exhibit many unique functions and optical and mechanical properties. Examples of this include the dry adhesion of a gecko's foot, the reduced drag on a shark's skin, the high strength and toughness of nacre, and the superhydrophobic self-cleaning of a lotus leaf. This dissertation is devoted to creating unique and enhanced properties by mimicking such functional materials. We have developed a novel self-pumping membrane, which does not require an applied voltage. The self-pumping membrane harvests chemical energy from a surrounding fluid and uses it for accelerated mass transport across the membrane. A device such as this has promising applications in implantable or remotely operating autonomous devices and membrane-based purification systems. Reproducible and highly active surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates were developed using a bottom-up self-assembly technology. With their high sensitivity and good reproducibility, the developed nanostructures (gold nanoparticle and nanohole arrays) as SERS substrates are very promising for applications such as ultra-sensitive detectors for chemicals and reproducible sensors for chemical and biological molecules. Binary colloidal crystals were created using a simple, fast, and scalable spin-coating technology. Although further investigation of the procedure is needed to improve the ordering of particles in the individual layers, the developed assembly technology has a promising outlook in applications such as optical integrated circuits and high-speed optical computing. Inorganic-organic nanocomposites were realized by assembling synthesized gibbsite nanoplatelets using the electrophoretic deposition and infiltration of a monomer followed by polymerization. Via surface modifications of gibbsite nanoplatelets, nanocomposites were further reinforced with covalent linkages between the inorganic platelets and organic matrix.

  8. Coordination compounds of cobalt and cadmium with isobutyric acid amide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsivadze, A.Yu.; Ivanova, I.S.; Solovkina, O.A.

    1983-01-01

    Coordination compounds of cobalt and cadmium with isobutyric acid amide (IBAA) of Co(NCS) 2 x(IBAA) 2 (H 2 O) 2 , CoCl 2 (IBAA) 4 , CoI 2 (IBAA) 8 (H 2 O) 2 , CdI 2 (IBAA) 2 composition have been synthesized and characterized. Their infrared absorption spectra (200-400 cm -1 ), electron reflection spectra (200-750 nm) were studied. It is shown that in all compounds there are IBAA molecUles coordinated through an oxygen atom. Thiocyanogroups are coordinated throUgh nitrogen atoms

  9. Carbon Nanomaterials from Carbon Monoxide Using Nickel and Cobalt Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liszka, B.; Krzton, A.; Pawlyta, M.

    2010-01-01

    Two catalysts, nickel and cobalt, supported on MgO were used for carbon nanomaterials deposition by CO disproportionation. The syntheses were performed at 795 and 900 K in the hydrogen atmosphere. The resulting products were investigated using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Although in the literature carbon nanofibres are expected to form: in the hydrogen presence, we obtained carbon nanotubes, which were multiwall and twisted with the outer diameter of 10-120 nm and the tube length up to 10 μm. (authors)

  10. [Synthesis and spectral properties of tailed sercine tetraphenylporphyrin cobalt complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Chun-lin; Zhou, Chun-qiong; Zhou, Yu; He, Zhi-ke; Yuan, Liang-jie

    2004-04-01

    A new tailed sercine tetraphenylporphinatozinc, 5-(p-butoxyphenyl-10,15,20-trichlorophenyl)porphine and cobalt complex (Co[Ser-TPP]) was synthesized and characterized by elementary analysis, UV, IR, 1HNMR and Raman spectra. The electronic absorption spectra of axial coordination reactions of Co[Ser-TPP] with pyridine, 4-methylpyridine, 4-aminopyridine, 4,4-bipyridine, imidazole, 1-methylimidazole and 2-methylimidazole were inverstigated. The results showed that the changes of electronic absorption spectra of Co[Ser-TPP] could be attributed to the axial coordination reactions of Co[Ser-TPP] with pyridine and imidazole series.

  11. Synthesis and microwave absorbing properties of Cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. Y.; Li, Y. S.

    2018-01-01

    Cobalt ferrite power CoFe2O4 was synthesized through the chemical co-precipitation method. The structure, morphology and microwave absorbing properties were studied by changing raw materials, annealing temperature and experimental steps. The measurements of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron micrograph suggest that annealed CoFe2O4 sample is still a spinel structure. Moreover, the crystalline and grain sizes become large with the enhancement of annealing temperature. The measurements of microwave absorbing properties show that the reflection loss decreases continuously, and the wavelength of maximum absorption loss shift to short-wave limit as the sample thickness increases.

  12. Electrocatalytic Activity of Electropolymerized Cobalt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... The electrocatalytic activity of electropolymerized cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine (poly-CoTAPc) film modified on the glassy carbon electrode ... nation of these sulphhydryl compounds in human metabolism is essential for .... adduct product was formed by the coordination axially between. Co(II)TAPc and ...

  13. The cobalt-60 container scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jigang, A.; Liye, Z.; Yisi, L.; Haifeng, W.; Zhifang, W.; Liqiang, W.; Yuanshi, Z.; Xincheng, X.; Furong, L.; Baozeng, G.; Chunfa, S.

    1997-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) has successfully designed and constructed a container (cargo) scanner, which uses cobalt-60 of 100-300 Ci as radiation source. The following performances of the Cobalt-60 container scanner have been achieved at INET: a) IQI (Image Quality Indicator) - 2.5% behind 100 mm of steel; b) CI (Contrast Indicator) - 0.7% behind 100 mm of steel; c) SP (Steel Penetration) - 240 mm of steel; d) Maximum Dose per Scanning - 0.02mGy; e) Throughput - twenty 40-foot containers per hour. These performances are equal or similar to those of the accelerator scanners. Besides these nice enough inspection properties, the Cobalt-60 scanner possesses many other special features which are better than accelerator scanners: a) cheap price - it will be only or two tenths of the accelerator scanner's; b) low radiation intensity - the radiation protection problem is much easier to solve and a lot of money can be saved on the radiation shielding building; c) much smaller area for installation and operation; d) simple operation and convenient maintenance; e) high reliability and stability. The Cobalt-60 container (or cargo) scanner is satisfied for boundary customs, seaports, airports and railway stations etc. Because of the nice special features said above, it is more suitable to be applied widely. Its high properties and low price will make it have much better application prospects

  14. Cobalt 60 commercial irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, G.

    1985-01-01

    The advantage of using cobalt 60 for ionizing treatment is that it has excellent penetration. Gamma plants are also very efficient, in as much as there is very little mechanical or electrical equipment in a gamma irradiation facility. The average efficiency of a gamma plant is usually around 95% of all available processing time

  15. Characterization of feline serum-cobalt binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, Amy N; Barger, Anne M; MacNeill, Amy L; Mitchell, Mark M; Solter, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress inhibits albumin's ability to complex with cobalt. Feline serum-cobalt binding has not been described. The objective was to develop a cobalt binding test for use with feline serum, and correlate the results with other biochemical and cellular constituents in blood, and with clinical diseases of cats. A colorimetric test of cobalt binding, based on the oxidation-reduction reaction of Co(+2) and dithiothreitol, was developed using feline serum. The test was used to measure cobalt binding in stored serum from 176 cats presented to the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital for a variety of disease conditions. Time-matched hematology and biochemical data, and clinical information, were obtained from the medical record of each cat and correlated with the serum-cobalt binding results. Serial dilution of feline serum with phosphate-buffered saline resulted in a highly linear decrease in serum-cobalt binding (r(2)  = .9984). Serum-cobalt binding of the clinical samples also correlated with albumin concentrations in a stepwise linear regression model (r(2)  = .425), and both cobalt binding and albumin were significantly decreased in cases of inflammation. Albumin and cobalt binding also shared significant correlations with several erythron variables, and serum concentration of total calcium and bilirubin. The correlation of cobalt binding measured by a colorimetric test with albumin concentration in the clinical samples and with serum dilution is consistent with feline albumin-cobalt complex formation. Hypoalbuminemia is the likely cause of reduced serum-cobalt binding in inflammation and the correlations observed between cobalt binding and other variables. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  16. Cobalt Oxide on N-Doped Carbon for 1-Butene Oligomerization to Produce Linear Octenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Dongting [Department; Xu, Zhuoran [Department; Chada, Joseph P. [Department; Carrero, Carlos A. [Department; Rosenfeld, Devon C. [The Dow Chemical Company, 2301 N. Brazosport Boulevard, Freeport, Texas 77541-3257, United States; Rogers, Jessica L. [The Dow Chemical Company, 2301 N. Brazosport Boulevard, Freeport, Texas 77541-3257, United States; Hermans, Ive [Department; Huber, George W. [Department

    2017-10-02

    Cobalt oxide supported on N-doped carbon catalysts were investigated for 1-butene oligomerization. The materials were synthesized by treating activated carbon with nitric acid and subsequently with NH3 at 200, 400, 600, and 800 °C, followed by impregnation with cobalt. The 1-butene oligomerization selectivity increased with ammonia treatment temperature of the carbon support. The oligomerization selectivity of cobalt oxide on N-doped carbon synthesized at 800 °C (800A-CoOx/N-C) is 2.6 times higher than previously reported cobalt oxide on N-doped carbon synthesized with NH4OH (2A-CoOx/N-C). Over 70% of the butene dimers were linear C8 olefins for all catalysts. The oligomerization selectivity increased with 1-butene conversion. The catalysts were characterized by elemental analysis, N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nitrogen content of the catalysts increases with ammonia treatment temperature as confirmed by elemental analysis. The surface content of pyridinic nitrogen with a binding energy of 398.4 ± 0.1 eV increased with ammonia treatment temperature as evidenced by deconvolution of N 1s XPS spectra.

  17. Synthesis, Structural and Spectroscopic Characterization, and Reactivities of Mononuclear Cobalt(III)-Peroxo Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jaeheung; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Kang, Hye Yeon; Lee, Jung Yoon; Kubo, Minoru; Ogura, Takashi; Solomon, Edward I.; Nam, Wonwoo

    2010-01-01

    Metal-dioxygen adducts are key intermediates detected in the catalytic cycles of dioxygen activation by metalloenzymes and biomimetic compounds. In this study, mononuclear cobalt(III)- peroxo complexes bearing tetraazamacrocyclic ligands, [Co(12-TMC)(O2)]+ and [Co(13-TMC)(O2)]+, were synthesized by reacting [Co(12-TMC)(CH3CN)]2+ and [Co(13-TMC)(CH3CN)]2+, respectively, with H2O2 in the presence of triethylamine. The mononuclear cobalt(III)-peroxo intermediates were isolated and characterized ...

  18. New mixed valence defect dicubane cobalt(II)/cobalt(III) complex: Synthesis, crystal structure, photoluminescence and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, Mustafa Burak; Gungor, Elif; Kara, Hulya; Baisch, Ulrich; Acar, Yasemin

    2018-02-01

    A new defect dicubane cobalt(II)/cobalt(III), [(CoII2CoIII2L42(H2O)(CH3COO)(CH3COOH]. 4H2O complex (1) where H2L = [1-(3-hydroxypropyliminomethyl)naphthalene-2-ol], has been synthesized and characterized by element analysis, FT-IR, solid UV-Vis spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystal structure determination shows a cationic tetrameric arrangement consisting of a defect dicubane core with two missing vertexes. Each cobalt ion has a distorted octahedral geometry with six coordinate ordered CoII and CoIII ions. The solid state photoluminescence properties of complex (1) and its ligand H2L have been investigated under UV light at 349 nm in the visible region. H2L exhibits blue emission while complex (1) shows red emission at room temperature. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements on the complex (1) in the range 2-300 K indicate an antiferromagnetic interaction.

  19. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery: has the use of cobalt replaced nickel following regulatory intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten S; Menné, Torkil; Lidén, Carola; Julander, Anneli; Møller, Per; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2010-08-01

    Before the introduction of the EU Nickel Directive, concern was raised that manufacturers of jewellery might turn from the use of nickel to cobalt following the regulatory intervention on nickel exposure. The aim was to study 354 consumer items using the cobalt spot test. Cobalt release was assessed to obtain a risk estimate of cobalt allergy and dermatitis in consumers who would wear the jewellery. The cobalt spot test was used to assess cobalt release from all items. Microstructural characterization was made using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Cobalt release was found in 4 (1.1%) of 354 items. All these had a dark appearance. SEM/EDS was performed on the four dark appearing items which showed tin-cobalt plating on these. This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future. Industries may not be fully aware of the potential cobalt allergy problem.

  20. Nanoscale strontium titanate photocatalysts for overall water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Troy K; Browning, Nigel D; Osterloh, Frank E

    2012-08-28

    SrTiO(3) (STO) is a large band gap (3.2 eV) semiconductor that catalyzes the overall water splitting reaction under UV light irradiation in the presence of a NiO cocatalyst. As we show here, the reactivity persists in nanoscale particles of the material, although the process is less effective at the nanoscale. To reach these conclusions, Bulk STO, 30 ± 5 nm STO, and 6.5 ± 1 nm STO were synthesized by three different methods, their crystal structures verified with XRD and their morphology observed with HRTEM before and after NiO deposition. In connection with NiO, all samples split water into stoichiometric mixtures of H(2) and O(2), but the activity is decreasing from 28 μmol H(2) g(-1) h(-1) (bulk STO), to 19.4 μmol H(2) g(-1) h(-1) (30 nm STO), and 3.0 μmol H(2) g(-1) h(-1) (6.5 nm STO). The reasons for this decrease are an increase of the water oxidation overpotential for the smaller particles and reduced light absorption due to a quantum size effect. Overall, these findings establish the first nanoscale titanate photocatalyst for overall water splitting.

  1. Field Effect Transistor in Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    significant alteration in transport behaviour of these molecular junctions. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Theory , Nanoscale, Field Effect Transistor (FET), Devices...Density Functional Theory (DFT), Non-equilibrium Green Function 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES     13...Keep in mind the amount of funding you received relative to the amount of effort you put into the report. References: 1. J. R. Heath and M

  2. Technological Convergence from the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, William

    A series of scientific conferences and book-length publications predict that nanoscience will have its greatest impact through the convergence of four fields where research progress and engineering applications are expected to be especially significant. These are the so-called NBIC fields of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and new technologies based on cognitive science. This chapter is a first sociological reconnaissance of the convergenist movement in science and technology, based on the unity of nature at the nanoscale.

  3. Investigation of Structural, Morphological, Magnetic Properties and Biomedical applications of Cu2+ Substituted Uncoated Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Margabandhu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present work, Cu2+ substituted cobalt ferrite (Co1-xCuxFe2O4, x = 0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 magnetic nanopowders were synthesized via chemical co-precipitation method. The prepared powders were investigated by various characterization methods such as X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD, scanning electron microscope analysis (SEM, vibrating sample magnetometer analysis (VSM and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis (FTIR. The XRD analysis reveals that the synthesized nanopowders possess single phase centred cubic spinel structure. The average crystallite size of the particles ranging from 27-49 nm was calculated by using Debye-scherrer formula. Magnetic properties of the synthesized magnetic nanoparticles are studied by using VSM. The VSM results shows the magnetic properties such as coercivity, magnetic retentivity decreases with increase in copper substitution whereas the saturation magnetization shows increment and decrement in accordance with Cu2+ substitution in cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. SEM analysis reveals the morphology of synthesized magnetic nanoparticles. FTIR spectra of Cu2+ substituted cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles were recorded in the frequency range 4000-400cm-1. The spectrum shows the presence of water adsorption and metal oxygen bonds. The adhesion nature of Cu2+ substituted cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles with bacteria in reviewed results indicates that the synthesized nanoparticles could be used in biotechnology and biomedical applications.

  4. New cobalt-mediated radical polymerization (CMRP of methyl methacrylate initiated by two single-component dinuclear β-diketone cobalt (II catalysts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Bao

    Full Text Available Two dinuclear cobalt complexes based on bis-diketonate ligands (ligand 1: 3,3'-(1,3-phenylenebis(1-phenylpropane-1,3-dione; ligand 2: 3,3'-(1,4-phenylenebis(1-phenylpropane-1,3-dione were successfully synthesized. The two neutral catalysts all showed satisfactory activities in the cobalt-mediated radical polymerization (CMRP of methyl methacrylate (MMA with the common initiator of azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN. The resulting polymerizations have all of the characteristics of a living polymerization and displayed linear semilogarithmic kinetic plots, a linear correlation between the number-average molecular weight and the monomer conversion, and low polydispersities. Mono- or dicomponent low polydispersity polymers could be obtained by using the two dinuclear catalysts under proper reaction conditions. All these improvements facilitate the implementation of the acrylate CMRP and open the door to the scale-up of the syntheses and applications of the multicomponent low polydispersity polymers.

  5. Ferric and cobaltous hydroacid complexes for forward osmosis (FO) processes

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Qingchun

    2014-07-01

    Cupric and ferric hydroacid complexes have proven their advantages as draw solutes in forward osmosis in terms of high water fluxes, negligible reverse solute fluxes and easy recovery (Ge and Chung, 2013. Hydroacid complexes: A new class of draw solutes to promote forward osmosis (FO) processes. Chemical Communications 49, 8471-8473.). In this study, cobaltous hydroacid complexes were explored as draw solutes and compared with the ferric hydroacid complex to study the factors influencing their FO performance. The solutions of the cobaltous complexes produce high osmotic pressures due to the presence of abundant hydrophilic groups. These solutes are able to dissociate and form a multi-charged anion and Na+ cations in water. In addition, these complexes have expanded structures which lead to negligible reverse solute fluxes and provide relatively easy approaches in regeneration. These characteristics make the newly synthesized cobaltous complexes appropriate as draw solutes. The FO performance of the cobaltous and ferric-citric acid (Fe-CA) complexes were evaluated respectively through cellulose acetate membranes, thin-film composite membranes fabricated on polyethersulfone supports (referred as TFC-PES), and polybenzimidazole and PES dual-layer (referred as PBI/PES) hollow fiber membranes. Under the conditions of DI water as the feed and facing the support layer of TFC-PES FO membranes (PRO mode), draw solutions at 2.0M produced relatively high water fluxes of 39-48 LMH (Lm-2hr-1) with negligible reverse solute fluxes. A water flux of 17.4 LMH was achieved when model seawater of 3.5wt.% NaCl replaced DI water as the feed and 2.0M Fe-CA as the draw solution under the same conditions. The performance of these hydroacid complexes surpasses those of the synthetic draw solutes developed in recent years. This observation, along with the relatively easy regeneration, makes these complexes very promising as a novel class of draw solutes. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Design of a nanoscale silicon laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, S. L.; Simpson, J. T.; Withrow, S. P.; White, C. W.; Norris, P. M.

    The recent observation of optical gain from silicon nanocrystals embedded in SiO2 opens an opportunity to develop a nanoscale silicon-based laser. However, the challenge remains to design and develop a laser architecture using CMOS-compatible materials. In this paper we present two designs for a waveguide laser in which silicon nanocrystals embedded in SiO2 are used as the optical gain media. One design employs a SiO2 membrane containing encapsulated Si nanocrystals. Preliminary calculations given here show that a highly resonant laser cavity can be produced in a SiO2 membrane using sub-wavelength structures. This photonic crystal architecture, used to guide and contain the light, can be combined with a gain medium of optically active Si nanocrystals synthesized in the SiO2 membrane using ion implantation/thermal annealing to produce a Si-based laser. The laser cavity dimensions can be matched to the near-infrared wavelengths where optical gain has been observed from Si nanocrystals. The second design utilizes silicon nanocrystals embedded in a distributed-feedback laser cavity fabricated in SiO2. Lasing action over a broad wavelength range centered at 770 nm should be possible in both of these configurations.

  7. Polytypic transformations during the thermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, Thimmasandra Narayan

    2010-01-01

    The isothermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature leads to the formation of Co 3 O 4 . The phase evolution during the decomposition process was monitored using powder X-ray diffraction. The transformation of cobalt hydroxide to cobalt oxide occurs via three phase mixture while cobalt hydroxynitrate to cobalt oxide occurs through a two phase mixture. The nature of the sample and its preparation method controls the decomposition mechanism. The comparison of topotactical relationship between the precursors to the decomposed product has been reported in relation to polytypism. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal thermal decomposition studies of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature show the metastable phase formed prior to Co 3 O 4 phase.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of iron-cobalt (FeCo) alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsopoulos, Sotiris; Barfod, Rasmus; Eriksen, Kim Michael

    2017-01-01

    Iron-cobalt nanocrystaline bimetallic alloys supported on carbon microparticles were synthesized and characterized. The preparation methods involved the use of iron and cobalt chloride or acetate precursor salts in water and direct co-precipitation or wet impregnation techniques. The size...... of the alloy nanoparticles differed depending on the preparation method. When the wet impregnation technique of acetate precursor salts of Fe and Co were used for the synthesis, the size of FeCo alloy nanoparticles was approximately 13 nm. FeCo alloy nanoparticles were characterized by crystallography (XRD...... and mechanically stable for prolonged periods of time. AFM analysis showed that the FeCo nanoparticles were formed on the surface of the carrier. The results of this study suggest that using these easy and inexpensive synthetic methods iron-cobalt nanoparticles can be formed on carbon microparticles support...

  9. Magnetic properties of mesoporous cobalt-silica-alumina ternary mixed oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Nabanita [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Seikh, Md. Motin [Department of Chemistry, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan, West Bengal (India); Bhaumik, Asim, E-mail: msab@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Mesoporous cobalt-silica-alumina mixed oxides with variable cobalt content have been synthesized through slow evaporation method by using Pluronic F127 non-ionic surfactant as template. N{sub 2} sorption analysis of the template-free mixed oxide samples revealed that these mesoporous materials have high BET surface areas together with large mesopores. Powder XRD, TEM, EDS, FT IR and EPR spectroscopic analysis have been employed to understand the nature of the mesophases, bonding and composition of the materials. Low temperature magnetic measurements of these mixed oxide materials show the presence of ferromagnetic correlation at elevated temperature though at low temperature paramagnetic to ferrimagnetic transition is observed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mesoporous cobalt-silica-alumina ternary mixed oxides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High surface area and mesoporosity in magnetic materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferromagnetic correlation at elevated temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low temperature paramagnetic to ferrimagnetic transition.

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of sea urchin-like nickel and cobalt selenides nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xiaohe [Department of Inorganic Materials, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China) and School of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)]. E-mail: liuxh@mail.csu.edu.cn; Zhang Ning [Department of Inorganic Materials, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Yi Ran [Department of Inorganic Materials, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Qiu Guanzhou [Department of Inorganic Materials, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Yan Aiguo [Department of Inorganic Materials, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Wu Hongyi [Department of Inorganic Materials, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Meng Dapeng [Department of Inorganic Materials, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Tang, Motang [School of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2007-05-25

    Sea urchin-like nanorod-based nickel and cobalt selenides nanocrystals have been selective synthesized via a hydrothermal reduction route in which hydrated nickel chloride and hydrated cobalt chloride were employed to supply Ni and Co source and aqueous hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}.H{sub 2}O) was used as reducing agent. The composition, morphology, and structure of final products could be easily controlled by adjusting the molar ratios of reactants and process parameters such as hydrothermal time. The morphology and phase structure of the final products have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The probable formation mechanism of the sea urchin-like nanorod-based nickel and cobalt selenides nanocrystals was discussed on the basis of the experimental results.

  11. Quantum dot nanoscale heterostructures for solar energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinsky, Rachel S; Ding, Qi; Faber, Matthew S; Wright, John C; Jin, Song

    2013-04-07

    Quantum dot nanoscale semiconductor heterostructures (QDHs) are a class of materials potentially useful for integration into solar energy conversion devices. However, realizing the potential of these heterostructured systems requires the ability to identify and synthesize heterostructures with suitably designed materials, controlled size and morphology of each component, and structural control over their shared interface. In this review, we will present the case for the utility and advantages of chemically synthesized QDHs for solar energy conversion, beginning with an overview of various methods of heterostructured material synthesis and a survey of heretofore reported materials systems. The fundamental charge transfer properties of the resulting materials combinations and their basic design principles will be outlined. Finally, we will discuss representative solar photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical devices employing QDHs (including quantum dot sensitized solar cells, or QDSSCs) and examine how QDH synthesis and design impacts their performance.

  12. Recovery of Cobalt as Cobalt Oxalate from Cobalt Tailings Using Moderately Thermophilic Bioleaching Technology and Selective Sequential Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guobao Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt is a very important metal which is widely applied in various critical areas, however, it is difficult to recover cobalt from minerals since there is a lack of independent cobalt deposits in nature. This work is to provide a complete process to recover cobalt from cobalt tailings using the moderately thermophilic bioleaching technology and selective sequential extraction. It is found that 96.51% Co and 26.32% Cu were extracted after bioleaching for four days at 10% pulp density. The mean compositions of the leach solutions contain 0.98 g·L−1 of Co, 6.52 g·L−1 of Cu, and 24.57 g·L−1 of Fe (III. The copper ion was then recovered by a solvent extraction process and the ferric ions were selectively removed by applying a goethite deironization process. The technological conditions of the above purification procedures were deliberately discussed. Over 98.6% of copper and 99.9% of ferric ions were eliminated from the leaching liquor. Cobalt was finally produced as cobalt oxalate and its overall recovery during the whole process was greater than 95%. The present bioleaching process of cobalt is worth using for reference to deal with low-grade cobalt ores.

  13. Nanolithography using nanoscale ridge apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang

    There is a continuous effort to develop techniques for nanoscale feature definition below the diffraction limit. Nanolithography has been a key technique because of its precision and cost effective. A sub-wavelength hole in an opaque screen can be used to provide a small light source with the optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit in the near field. However, a nanometer-sized hole in circular or square shapes is plagued by low transmission and poor contrast. This drawback limits the nanoscale apertures from being employed in nanolithography applications. Ridge apertures in C, H and bowtie shapes, on the other hand, have been numerically and experimentally demonstrated to show the ability of achieving both enhanced light transmission and sub-wavelength optical resolution down to nanometer domain benefiting from the existence of waveguide propagation mode confined in the gap between the ridges. In this report, the detailed field distributions in contact nanolithography are analyzed using finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. It was found that the high imaging contrast, which is necessary for successful lithography, is achieved close to the mask exit plane and decays quickly with the increase of the distance from the mask exit plane. Simulations are also performed for comparable regular shaped apertures and different shape bowtie apertures. Design rules are proposed to optimize the bowtie aperture for producing a sub-wavelength, high transmission field with high imaging contrast. High resolution contact nanolithography was carried on a home constructed lithography setup. It has been experimentally demonstrated that nanoscale bowtie and C apertures can be used for contact lithography to achieve nanometer scale resolution due to its intrinsic advantages of achieving enhanced optical transmission and concentrating light far beyond the diffraction limit. It also has shown the advantages of bowtie and C apertures over conventional apertures in both

  14. Cobalt toxicity in anaerobic granular sludge: influence of chemical speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartacek, J.; Fermoso, F.G.; Baldo-Urrutia, A.M.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of cobalt speciation on the toxicity of cobalt to methylotrophic methanogenesis in anaerobic granular sludge was investigated. The cobalt speciation was studied with three different media that contained varying concentrations of complexing ligands [carbonates, phosphates and

  15. Mineral resource of the month: cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2009-01-01

    Cobalt is a metal used in numerous commercial, industrial and military applications. On a global basis, the leading use of cobalt is in rechargeable lithium-ion, nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride battery electrodes. Cobalt use has grown rapidly since the early 1990s, with the development of new battery technologies and an increase in demand for portable electronics such as cell phones, laptop computers and cordless power tools.

  16. Derivative spectrophotometry of cobalt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    The method of derivative spectrophotometry is briefly described, and derivative absorption spectra are presented for samarium, cobalt, and commercial Sm-Co alloys. It is shown that the use of derivative spectrophotometry not only improves the accuracy and selectivity of element determinations but also simplifies the analysis of alloys. Results of a statistical evaluation of the metrological characteristics of the analytical procedure described here are presented. 8 references

  17. Cobalt release from implants and consumer items and characteristics of cobalt sensitized patients with dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menne, Torkil; Liden, Carola

    2012-01-01

    -containing dental alloys and revised hip implant components.Results. Six of eight dental alloys and 10 of 98 revised hip implant components released cobalt in the cobalt spot test, whereas none of 50 mobile phones gave positive reactions. The clinical relevance of positive cobalt test reactions was difficult...

  18. EFTF cobalt test assembly results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlins, J.A.; Wootan, D.W.; Carter, L.L.; Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    A cobalt test assembly containing yttrium hydride pins for neutron moderation was irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility during Cycle 9A for 137.7 equivalent full power days at a power level fo 291 MW. The 36 test pins consisted of a batch of 32 pins containing cobalt metal to produce Co-60, and a set of 4 pins with europium oxide to produce Gd-153, a radioisotope used in detection of the bone disease Osteoporosis. Post-irradiation examination of the cobalt pins determined the Co-60 produced with an accuracy of about 5 %. The measured Co-60 spatially distributed concentrations were within 20 % of the calculated concentrations. The assembly average Co-60 measured activity was 4 % less than the calculated value. The europium oxide pins were gamma scanned for the europium isotopes Eu-152 and Eu-154 to an absolute accuracy of about 10 %. The measured europium radioisotpe anc Gd-153 concentrations were within 20 % of calculated values. In conclusion, the hydride assembly performed well and is an excellent vehicle for many Fast Flux Test Facility isotope production applications. The results also demonstrate that the calculational methods developed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company are very accurate. (author)

  19. Spectrophotometric determination of cobalt with phenanthrenequinone monoxime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trikha, K C; Katyal, M; Singh, R P

    1967-08-01

    Phenanthrenequinone monoxime reacts with cobalt to form a yellow-orange insoluble 1:3 (cobalt:ligand) complex which is extractable into chloroform in the pH range 4.45-8.0. The determination of cobalt is carried out at 470 mmu. Beer's law is obeyed over the concentration range 0-3.0 ppm of cobalt. The sensitivity is 0-00336 mug of Co/cm(2) for 0.001 absorbance. The effect of a number of foreign ions has been studied.

  20. Cobalt accumulation and circulation by blackgum trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.A.

    1975-01-01

    Blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica Marsh.) trees accumulate far greater concentrations of cobalt in mature foliage than do other species on the same site (363 ppM in ash of blackgum, compared with about 3 ppM by mockernut hickory and about 1 ppM by red maple, tulip tree, and white oak). Cobalt concentrations in dormant woody tissues of blackgum also significantly exceed those in the other four species. Inoculation of six blackgums with 60 Co revealed that cobalt remains mobile in the trees for at least 3 years. Foliar concentrations of stable cobalt increase uniformly until senescence. In late August, foliage accounts for only 9 percent of total tree weight but 57 percent of total tree cobalt. Losses of cobalt from trees occur almost entirely by leaf abscission, and the loss rates of weight and cobalt from decomposing litter are similar. Retention of cobalt in the biologically active soil layers perpetuates zones of cobalt concentration created by this species in woodlands

  1. Identification of catalytic sites in cobalt-nitrogen-carbon materials for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitolo, Andrea; Ranjbar-Sahraie, Nastaran; Mineva, Tzonka; Li, Jingkun; Jia, Qingying; Stamatin, Serban; Harrington, George F; Lyth, Stephen Mathew; Krtil, Petr; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; Fonda, Emiliano; Jaouen, Frédéric

    2017-10-16

    Single-atom catalysts with full utilization of metal centers can bridge the gap between molecular and solid-state catalysis. Metal-nitrogen-carbon materials prepared via pyrolysis are promising single-atom catalysts but often also comprise metallic particles. Here, we pyrolytically synthesize a Co-N-C material only comprising atomically dispersed cobalt ions and identify with X-ray absorption spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility measurements and density functional theory the structure and electronic state of three porphyrinic moieties, CoN 4 C 12 , CoN 3 C 10,porp and CoN 2 C 5 . The O 2 electro-reduction and operando X-ray absorption response are measured in acidic medium on Co-N-C and compared to those of a Fe-N-C catalyst prepared similarly. We show that cobalt moieties are unmodified from 0.0 to 1.0 V versus a reversible hydrogen electrode, while Fe-based moieties experience structural and electronic-state changes. On the basis of density functional theory analysis and established relationships between redox potential and O 2 -adsorption strength, we conclude that cobalt-based moieties bind O 2 too weakly for efficient O 2 reduction.Nitrogen-doped carbon materials with atomically dispersed iron or cobalt are promising for catalytic use. Here, the authors show that cobalt moieties have a higher redox potential, bind oxygen more weakly and are less active toward oxygen reduction than their iron counterpart, despite similar coordination.

  2. Preparation and characterization of the cobalt ferrite nano-particles by reverse coprecipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huixia, Feng, E-mail: fenghx66@163.com; Baiyi, Chen; Deyi, Zhang; Jianqiang, Zhang; Lin, Tan

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, cobalt ferrite nano-particles were rapidly prepared using a reverse coprecipitation method. The effects of pH value, aging time, aging temperature and calcination temperature were studied by VSM, XRD and TEM. The results presented that the conditions to obtain the cobalt ferrite nano-particles with a perfect cubic spinel ferrite type structure are the pH value of 12.00, aging time of 60 min, aging temperature of 92 °C and calcination temperature of 800 °C. The crystallite size of cobalt ferrite increased with increasing the aging and calcination temperature. The saturation magnetization of cobalt ferrite increased with increasing the aging and calcination temperature. The VSM analysis demonstrated that the optimum sample has a high saturation magnetization and proper coercivity, 72.95 emu/g and 717 Oe, respectively. Furthermore, the particle size estimated from the TEM was seen to be larger than that observed from the XRD analysis. - Highlights: • Cobalt ferrite nano-particles were synthesized by reverse precipitation method. • The synthesis conditions were investigated in detail. • The optimum sample presents high saturation magnetization and proper coercivity. • The optimum sample was approximately spherical shape.

  3. Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride photocatalysts with high activity for hydrogen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Wen; Li, Kui; Yu, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Wei-De

    2017-01-01

    Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride (Cosbnd CN) was synthesized by one-step thermal polycondensation using cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) and melamine as precursors. The π-π interaction between melamine and CoPc promotes cobalt doping into the framework of g-C3N4. The prepared samples were carefully characterized and the results demonstrated that Co-doped graphitic carbon nitride inhibited the crystal growth of graphitic carbon nitride (CN), leading to larger specific surface area (33.1 m2 g-1) and abundant Co-Nx active sites, narrower band gap energy and more efficient separation of photogenerated electrons and holes. 0.46% Cosbnd CN exhibited higher hydrogen evolution rate (28.0 μmol h-1) under visible light irradiation, which is about 3.0 times of that over the pure CN and about 2.2 times of that over cobalt-doped CN using CoCl2 • 6H2O as a cobalt source. This study provides a valuable strategy to modify CN with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

  4. Surface Chemistry in Nanoscale Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biener, Jürgen; Wittstock, Arne; Baumann, Theodore F.; Weissmüller, Jörg; Bäumer, Marcus; Hamza, Alex V.

    2009-01-01

    Although surfaces or, more precisely, the surface atomic and electronic structure, determine the way materials interact with their environment, the influence of surface chemistry on the bulk of the material is generally considered to be small. However, in the case of high surface area materials such as nanoporous solids, surface properties can start to dominate the overall material behavior. This allows one to create new materials with physical and chemical properties that are no longer determined by the bulk material, but by their nanoscale architectures. Here, we discuss several examples, ranging from nanoporous gold to surface engineered carbon aerogels that demonstrate the tuneability of nanoporous solids for sustainable energy applications.

  5. Surface Chemistry in Nanoscale Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex V. Hamza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although surfaces or, more precisely, the surface atomic and electronic structure, determine the way materials interact with their environment, the influence of surface chemistry on the bulk of the material is generally considered to be small. However, in the case of high surface area materials such as nanoporous solids, surface properties can start to dominate the overall material behavior. This allows one to create new materials with physical and chemical properties that are no longer determined by the bulk material, but by their nanoscale architectures. Here, we discuss several examples, ranging from nanoporous gold to surface engineered carbon aerogels that demonstrate the tuneability of nanoporous solids for sustainable energy applications.

  6. Cobalt and Nickel Complexes Bearing 2,6-Bis(imino)phenoxy Ligands:Synthesis and Ethylene Oligomerization Study

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Jian-Long; Li, Li-Jun

    2006-01-01

    A series of new cobalt and nickel complexes MLX2 (M = Co or Ni, X = Cl) bearing 2,6-bis(imino)phenoxy ligands have been synthesized. Treatment of the complexes with methylaluminoxane (MAO) leads to active catalysts for ethylene oligomerization. The oligomers are olefins from C4 to C6.

  7. Cobalt and Nickel Complexes Bearing 2,6-Bis(iminophenoxy Ligands:Synthesis and Ethylene Oligomerization Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Long Du

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of new cobalt and nickel complexes MLX2 (M = Co or Ni, X = Cl bearing 2,6-bis(iminophenoxy ligands have been synthesized. Treatment of the complexes with methylaluminoxane (MAO leads to active catalysts for ethylene oligomerization. The oligomers are olefins from C4 to C6.

  8. Black and green pigments based on chromium-cobalt spinels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliziario, Sayonara A., E-mail: sayonaraea@iq.unesp.br [Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Andrade, Jeferson M. de [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Lima, Severino J.G. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, CT, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Paskocimas, Carlos A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, CT, Natal, RN (Brazil); Soledade, Luiz E.B. [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Hammer, P.; Longo, E. [Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Souza, Antonio G.; Santos, Ieda M.G. [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Co(Co{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x})O{sub 4} powders with different chromium concentrations (x = 0, 0.25 and 1) were prepared by the polymeric precursor method. {yields} Co(CoCr)O{sub 4} and Co(Co{sub 1.75}Cr{sub 0.25})O{sub 4} displayed a dark color and CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} was green. {yields} The colors were related to the different oxidation states of Cr and Co. {yields} Cobalt enrichment result in an increasing presence of Co(III) and a decrease amount of Cr(VI). - Abstract: Chromium and cobalt oxides are widely used in the manufacture of industrial pigments. In this work, the Co(Co{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x})O{sub 4} powders with different chromium concentrations (x = 0, 0.25 and 1) were synthesized by the polymeric precursor method, heat treatment between 600 and 1000 deg. C. These powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, colorimetry, UV-vis absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Even with the addition of chromium, the XRD patterns revealed that all powders crystallize in a single spinel cubic structure. The spinels with higher cobalt amount, Co(CoCr)O{sub 4} and Co(Co{sub 1.75}Cr{sub 0.25})O{sub 4}, displayed a dark color, without the Co{sup 3+} reduction observed in Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} between 900 and 950 deg. C. The spinel with higher chromium amount, CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, was green. The colors were directly related to the occupation of tetrahedral and octahedral sites by the chromophores, as well as to the different oxidation states of chromium and cobalt. The different optical band gap values estimated from UV-vis spectra suggested the existence of intermediary energy levels within the band gap. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed an increasing presence of Co(III) and a decreasing amount of Cr(VI) with cobalt enrichment.

  9. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  10. Nanoscale alterations of corneocytes indicate skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franz, J; Beutel, M; Gevers, K

    2016-01-01

    , we extended the phenotypic perspective down to the nanoscale. METHODS: Corneocyte samples were obtained non-invasively by a standard tape stripping procedure from 21 indviduals. Scanning electron (SEM) and atomic force microcopy (AFM) were used to record nanoscale topography. Circular nano...

  11. Cobalt removal from wastewater using pine sawdust

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    StudentLab

    2012-05-15

    May 15, 2012 ... was evaluated as an adsorbent in the treatment of wastewater containing cobalt ions. A two-level three ... showed adsorption capabilities for cobalt, and hence it could be an option in the quest to use waste to treat wastewater. ... using the Rushton turbine impellers for 30 min, and then separated by vacuum ...

  12. Cobalt 60 availability for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the steady and significant growth in the application of radiation processing to industrial sterilization has been seen. The principal application of this technology is the sterilization of disposable medical products, food irradiation, the irradiation of personal care goods and so on. At present, more than 70 million curies of cobalt-60 supplied by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. have been used for gamma processing in these applications. This is estimated to be more than 80 % of the total cobalt-60 in service in the world. Commercial food irradiation has an exciting future, and as to the impact of food irradiation on the availability of cobalt-60 over the next ten years, two principal factors must be examined, namely, the anticipated demand for cobalt-60 in all radiation processing applications, and the supply of cobalt-60 to reliably meet the expected demand. As for the cobalt-60 in service today, 90 % is used for the sterilization of disposable medical products, 5 % for food irradiation, and 5 % for other application. The demand for up to 30 million curies of cobalt-60 is expected over the next 10 years. Today, it is estimated that over 150,000 tons of spices, fruit and fish are irradiated. The potential cobalt-60 production could exceed 110 million curies per year. Gamma processing application will demand nearly 50 million curies in 1990. (Kako, I.)

  13. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddie L. Chang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal ion complexes are playing an increasing role in the development of antimicrobials. We review here the antimicrobial properties of cobalt coordination complexes in oxidation state 3+. In addition to reviewing the cobalt complexes containing polydentate donor ligands, we also focus on the antimicrobial activity of the homoleptic [Co(NH36]3+ ion.

  14. Cobalt-chitosan: Magnetic and biodegradable heterogeneous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cobalt-chitosan: Magnetic and biodegradable catalyst. 1931. Table 3. Effects of the solvent, temperature and base on oxidation of phenylethyl alcohol using cobalt-chitosan.a. Entry. Solvent. Temperature. Base. Yield (%) b. 1. DMF. 100. K2CO3. 60. 2. DMF. 100. KOH. 60. 3. CH3CN. 80. K2CO3. 65. 4. H2O reflux. KOH. 10. 5.

  15. Cobalt Derivatives as Promising Therapeutic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffern, Marie C.; Yamamoto, Natsuho; Holbrook, Robert J.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic complexes are versatile platforms for the development of potent and selective pharmaceutical agents. Cobalt possesses a diverse array of properties that can be manipulated to yield promising drug candidates. Investigations into the mechanism of cobalt therapeutic agents can provide valuable insight into the physicochemical properties that can be harnessed for drug development. This review presents examples of bioactive cobalt complexes with special attention to their mechanisms of action. Specifically, cobalt complexes that elicit biological effects through protein inhibition, modification of drug activity, and bioreductive activation are discussed. Insights gained from these examples reveal features of cobalt that can be rationally tuned to produce therapeutics with high specificity and improved efficacy for the biomolecule or pathway of interest. PMID:23270779

  16. Cobalt sorption onto Savannah River Plant soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffner, S.L.

    1985-06-01

    A laboratory study of cobalt-60 sorption was conducted using Savannah River Plant soil and groundwater from the low-level waste burial ground. Systematic variation of soil and water composition indicates that cobalt sorption is most strongly a function of pH. Over a pH range of 2 to 9, the distribution coefficient ranged from 2 to more than 10,000 mL/g. Changes in clay content and in K + , Ca 2+ , or Mg 2+ concentrations influence cobalt sorption indirectly through the slight pH changes which result. The ions Na + , Cl - , and NO 3 - have no effect on cobalt sorption. Ferrous ion, added to groundwater to simulate the condition of water at the bottom of the waste trenches, accounts for part of the decrease in cobalt sorption observed with trench waters. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Solvothermal synthesis of cobalt ferrite hollow spheres with chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, Sarah; Suarez, Jorge; Gonzalez, Gema

    2017-09-01

    Cobalt ferrite hollow spheres with chitosan (CoFe 2 O 4 /CS) were synthesized by two different approaches using the solvothermal method. The first approach involves in-situ incorporation of FeCl 3 :6H 2 O and CoNO 3 :6H 2 O in the solvothermal reaction (M1) and in second approach already prepared CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles (NPs) using the thermal decomposition method was placed in the solvothermal reaction to form the hollow spheres (M2). Structural identification of the samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analyses (DSC-TGA) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The magnetic properties were evaluated using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The presence of chitosan on the hollow sphere was confirmed by FTIR. The XRD analyses proved that the synthesized samples were cobalt ferrite with spinel structure. The structure of the surface and the average particle size of the spheres were observed by SEM and TEM showing the nano scale of the CoFe 2 O 4 component. Structural characterization demonstrating that chitosan does not affect the crystallinity, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of the CoFe 2 O 4 /CS. This work demonstrates that the CoFe 2 O 4 /CS prepared using the as synthesized CoFe 2 O 4 NPs have better structural and magnetic properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A tetrahedrally coordinated cobalt(II) aminophosphonate containing one-dimensional channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmill, William R.; Smith, Mark D.; Reisner, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    A tetrahedrally coordinated cobalt(II) phosphonate, Co(O 3 PCH 2 CH 2 NH 2 ), has been synthesized using hydrothermal techniques. X-ray diffraction indicates that this material is a three-dimensional open framework with rings aligned along a single axis forming infinite one-dimensional channels. The framework decomposes just above 400 deg. C. Magnetic susceptibility data are consistent with weak antiferromagnetic ordering at low temperatures

  19. Tailoring the magnetic properties and magnetorheological behavior of spinel nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite by varying annealing temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Sedlačík, Michal; Pavlínek, Vladimír; Peer, Petra; Filip, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles of spinel nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite were synthesized via the sol-gel method and subsequent annealing. The influence of the annealing temperature on the structure, magnetic properties, and magnetorheological effect was investigated. The finite crystallite size of the particles, determined by X-ray diffraction and the particle size observed via transmission electron microscopy, increased with the annealing temperature. The magnetic properties observed via a vibrating...

  20. Structure of cobalt sulfate tetrahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellersohn, T.

    1992-01-01

    Cobalt(II) sulfate tetrahydrate-d 8 , CoSO 4 -4D 2 O, mineralogical name aplowite, monoclinic, P2 1 /n a = 5.952 (1), b = 13.576 (2), c = 7.908 (1) A. The title compound belongs to the rozenite group of minerals. The characteristic structural units are [Co 2 (SO 4 ) 2 (D 2 O) 8 ] heteropolyhedral clusters which are linked by hydrogen bonds of medium strength. One of the water molecules is very asymmetrically bonded, with one H (D) atom being involved in a long bifurcated hydrogen bond. (orig.)

  1. Alternative chemical-based synthesis routes and characterization of nano-scale particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocchi, E.A. [Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, DCMM-PUC-RIO, R. Margues de S. Vicente 225, C.P 3890-Gavea, 22451-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Motta, M.S. [Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, DCMM-PUC-RIO, R. Margues de S. Vicente 225, C.P 3890-Gavea, 22451-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Solorzano, I.G. [Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, DCMM-PUC-RIO, R. Margues de S. Vicente 225, C.P 3890-Gavea, 22451-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)]. E-mail: guilsol@dcmm.puc-rio.br; Jena, P.K. [Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, DCMM-PUC-RIO, R. Margues de S. Vicente 225, C.P 3890-Gavea, 22451-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Moura, F.J. [Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, DCMM-PUC-RIO, R. Margues de S. Vicente 225, C.P 3890-Gavea, 22451-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2004-09-25

    Different nano-scale particles have been synthesized by alternative routes: nitrates dehydratation and oxide, or co-formed oxides, reduction by hydrogen. Chemical-based synthesis routes are described and thermodynamics studies and kinetics data are presented to support the feasibility for obtaining single-phase oxides and co-formed two-phase oxides. In addition, the reduction reaction has been applied to successfully produce metal/ceramic nanocomposites. Structural characterization has been carried out by means of X-ray diffraction and, more extensively, transmission electron microscopy operating in conventional diffraction contrast mode (CTEM) and high-resolution mode (HRTEM). Nano-scale size distribution of oxide particles is well demonstrated together with their defect-free structure in the lower range, around 20 nm, size. Structural features related to the synthesized nano-composites are also presented.

  2. Alternative chemical-based synthesis routes and characterization of nano-scale particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocchi, E.A.; Motta, M.S.; Solorzano, I.G.; Jena, P.K.; Moura, F.J.

    2004-01-01

    Different nano-scale particles have been synthesized by alternative routes: nitrates dehydratation and oxide, or co-formed oxides, reduction by hydrogen. Chemical-based synthesis routes are described and thermodynamics studies and kinetics data are presented to support the feasibility for obtaining single-phase oxides and co-formed two-phase oxides. In addition, the reduction reaction has been applied to successfully produce metal/ceramic nanocomposites. Structural characterization has been carried out by means of X-ray diffraction and, more extensively, transmission electron microscopy operating in conventional diffraction contrast mode (CTEM) and high-resolution mode (HRTEM). Nano-scale size distribution of oxide particles is well demonstrated together with their defect-free structure in the lower range, around 20 nm, size. Structural features related to the synthesized nano-composites are also presented

  3. Syntheses of the B(8)-hydroxy- and B((8),(8)')-dihydroxy-derivatives of the bis(1,2-dicarbollido)-3-cobalt(1-)ate ion by its reductive acetoxylation and hydroxylation: molecular structure of [8,8'-mu-CH3C(O) (2) (1,2-C2B9H10) (2) -3-Co] (0) zwitterion determined by X-ray diffraction analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plešek, Jaromír; Grüner, Bohumír; Báča, Jiří; Fusek, Jiří; Císařová, I.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 649, č. 2 (2002), s. 181-190 ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/99/1096; GA ČR GA203/99/M037 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : bis(1,2-dicarbollido)-3- cobalt (1-)ate ion * carbaboranes * metallacarboranes Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.901, year: 2002

  4. Designing Nanoscale Precipitates in Novel Cobalt-based Superalloys to Improve Creep Resistance and Operating Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunand, David C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Seidman, David N. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Wolverton, Christopher [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Saal, James E. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Bocchini, Peter J. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Sauza, Daniel J. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2014-10-01

    High-temperature structural alloys for aerospace and energy applications have long been dominated by Ni-base superalloys, whose strength and creep resistance can be attributed to microstructures consisting of a large volume fraction of ordered (L12) γ'-precipitates embedded in a disordered’(f.c.c.) γ-matrix. These alloys exhibit excellent mechanical behavior and thermal stability, but after decades of incremental improvement are nearing the theoretical limit of their operating temperatures. Conventional Co-base superalloys are solid-solution or carbide strengthened; although they see industrial use, these alloys are restricted to lower-stress applications because the absence of an ordered intermetallic phase places an upper limit on their mechanical performance. In 2006, a γ+γ' microstructure with ordered precipitates analogous to (L12) Ni3Al was first identified in the Co-Al-W ternary system, allowing, for the first time, the development of Co-base alloys with the potential to meet or even exceed the elevated-temperature performance of their Ni-base counterparts. The potential design space for these alloys is complex: the most advanced Ni-base superalloys may contain as many as 8-10 minor alloying additions, each with a specified purpose such as raising the γ' solvus temperature or improving creep strength. Our work has focused on assessing the effects of alloying additions on microstructure and mechanical behavior of γ'-strengthened Co-base alloys in an effort to lay the foundations for understanding this emerging alloy system. Investigation of the size, morphology, and composition of γ' and other relevant phases is investigated utilizing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 3-D picosecond ultraviolet local electrode atom probe tomography (APT). Microhardness, compressive yield stress at ambient and elevated temperatures, and compressive high-temperature creep measurements are employed to extract mechanical behavior. First-principle calculations have been employed to predict the stability of Co3(Al0.5,W0.5) as well as to estimate important physical parameters, such as the anti-phase boundary (APB) energy, in this system. Additionally, 2D dislocation dynamics modeling has been employed to predict the effect of γ' precipitate size and volume fraction on the critical resolved shear stress of model Ni-base superalloy systems (for which experimental data are readily available in the archival literature) as well as for the case of model Co-base superalloys. Investigations of the ternary Co-Al-W system were carried out to establish baseline values for the composition, size, morphology, and volume fraction of the strengthening γ' precipitates with respect to aging time and temperature. The addition of grain-boundary strengtheners B and Zr were investigated and found to improve creep strength compared to ternary Co-Al-W, which suffers from brittle grain boundaries. Incorporation of Ni to extend the γ+γ' two-phase field coupled with systematic replacement of Ti for Al and W was shown to raise the γ' volume fraction and solvus temperature, while reducing the bulk alloy density by enabling a reduction in W content. Ti additions also promoted dramatic improvements in both room temperature flow stress as well as the magnitude of the anomalous flow behavior leading to substantial strength increases in the range 650 – 800 °C.

  5. Nanoscale cryptography: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, Massoud; Shi, Weidong; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    While most of the electronics industry is dependent on the ever-decreasing size of lithographic transistors, this scaling cannot continue indefinitely. To improve the performance of the integrated circuits, new emerging and paradigms are needed. In recent years, nanoelectronics has become one of the most important and exciting forefront in science and engineering. It shows a great promise for providing us in the near future with many breakthroughs that change the direction of technological advances in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we discuss the contribution that nanotechnology may offer to the evolution of cryptographic hardware and embedded systems and demonstrate how nanoscale devices can be used for constructing security primitives. Using a custom set of design automation tools, it is demonstrated that relative to a conventional 45-nm CMOS system, performance gains can be obtained up to two orders of magnitude reduction in area and up to 50 % improvement in speed.

  6. Nanoscale biophysics of the cell

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Macroscopic cellular structures and functions are generally investigated using biological and biochemical approaches. But these methods are no longer adequate when one needs to penetrate deep into the small-scale structures and understand their functions. The cell is found to hold various physical structures, molecular machines, and processes that require physical and mathematical approaches to understand and indeed manipulate them. Disorders in general cellular compartments, perturbations in single molecular structures, drug distribution therein, and target specific drug-binding, etc. are mostly physical phenomena. This book will show how biophysics has revolutionized our way of addressing the science and technology of nanoscale structures of cells, and also describes the potential for manipulating the events that occur in them.

  7. Ion Discrimination by Nanoscale Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempe, Susan; Rogers, David

    2013-03-01

    Proteins that form membrane-spanning channels excel at discriminating between molecules on the basis of subtle structural and chemical differences. For example, some channels distinguish between water and ions; others between Na+ (sodium) and K+ (potassium) despite identical charges and only sub-Angstrom differences in size. If we could understand these structure/function relationships, we could potentially harness biological design principles in robust nanoscale devices that mimic biological function for efficient separations. Using ab initio molecular simulations, we have interrogated the link between channel structure and selective transport, both in cellular channels and polymer membranes. Our results emphasize the surprisingly important role of the environment that surrounds ion-binding sites, as well as the coordination chemistry of the binding site for raising or lowering the free energy barrier to transport in both systems. Support for Sandia Laboratory Research & Development Program is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Nickel acts as an adjuvant during cobalt sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menne; Nielsen, Morten Milek; Vennegaard, Marie T.

    2015-01-01

    Metal allergy is the most frequent form of contact allergy with nickel and cobalt being the main culprits. Typically, exposure comes from metal-alloys where nickel and cobalt co-exist. Importantly, very little is known about how co-exposure to nickel and cobalt affects the immune system. We...... investigated these effects by using a recently developed mouse model. Mice were epicutaneously sensitized with i) nickel alone, ii) nickel in the presence of cobalt, iii) cobalt alone, or iv) cobalt in the presence of nickel, and then followed by challenge with either nickel or cobalt alone. We found...... that sensitization with nickel alone induced more local inflammation than cobalt alone as measured by increased ear-swelling. Furthermore, the presence of nickel during sensitization to cobalt led to a stronger challenge response to cobalt as seen by increased ear-swelling and increased B and T cell responses...

  9. The effect of cobalt substitution on magnetic hardening of magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozaffari, M., E-mail: mozafari@sci.ui.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadadian, Y. [Physics Department, Razi University, Taghebostan, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aftabi, A. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj 66177-15175 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Oveisy Moakhar, M. [Physics Department, Razi University, Taghebostan, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    In this work cobalt-substituted magnetite (Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, x=0, 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75) nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation method and their structural and magnetic properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction was carried out and the results show that all of the samples have single phase spinel structure. Microstructure of the samples was studied using a field emission scanning electron microscope and the results show that particle sizes of the prepared nanoparticles were uniform and in the 50–55 nm range. Room temperature magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were measured by an alternating gradient force magnetometer and the results revealed that substituting cobalt for iron in magnetite structure, changes the magnetite from a soft magnetic material to a hard one. So that coercivity changes from 0 (a superparamagnetic state) to 337 Oe (a hard magnetic material), which is a remarkable change. Curie temperatures of the samples were determined by recording their susceptibility-temperature (χ–T) curves and the results show that by increasing cobalt content, Curie temperature of the samples also increases. Also χ–T curves of the samples were recorded from above Curie temperature to room temperature (first cooling), while the curves in the second heating and second cooling have the same behaviour as the first cooling curve. The results depict that all samples have different behaviour in the first cooling and in the first heating processes. This shows remarkable changes of the cation distribution in the course of first heating. - Highlights: • It is possible to get Co substituted magnetite nanoparticles by coprecipitation method. • Prepared nanoparticles have different cation distribution in comparison with that of bulk counterparts. • Co substitution increases coercivity of the magnetite.

  10. Establishing efficient cobalt based catalytic sites for oxygen evolution on a Ta3N5 photocatalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Nurlaela, Ela

    2015-08-05

    In a photocatalytic suspension system with a powder semiconductor, the interface between the photocatalyst semiconductor and catalyst should be constructed to minimize resistance for charge transfer of excited carriers. This study demonstrates an in-depth understanding of pretreatment effects on the photocatalytic O2 evolution reaction (OER) activity of visible-light-responsive Ta3N5 decorated with CoOx nanoparticles. The CoOx/Ta3N5 sample was synthesized by impregnation followed by sequential heat treat-ments under NH3 flow and air flow at various temperatures. Various characterization techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and X-ray photoelectron spec-troscopy (XPS), were used to clarify the state and role of cobalt. No improvement in photocatalytic activity for OER over the bare Ta3N5 was observed for the as-impregnated CoOx/Ta3N5, likely because of insufficient contact between CoOx and Ta3N5. When the sample was treated in NH3 at high temperature, a substantial improvement in the photocatalytic activity was observed. After NH3 treatment at 700 °C, the Co0-CoOx core-shell agglomerated cobalt structure was identified by XAS and STEM. No metallic cobalt species was evident after the photocatalytic OER, indicating that the metallic cobalt itself is not essential for the reaction. Accordingly, mild oxidation (200 °C) of the NH3-treated CoOx/Ta3N5 sample enhanced photocatalytic OER activity. Oxidation at higher temperatures drastically eliminated the photocatalytic activity, most likely because of unfavorable Ta3N5 oxidation. These results suggest that the intimate contact between cobalt species and Ta3N5 facilitated at high temperature is beneficial to enhancing hole transport and that the cobalt oxide provides electrocatalytic sites for OER.

  11. Explaining Synthesized Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBaalen, Jeffrey; Robinson, Peter; Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, Thomas; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Motivated by NASA's need for high-assurance software, NASA Ames' Amphion project has developed a generic program generation system based on deductive synthesis. Amphion has a number of advantages, such as the ability to develop a new synthesis system simply by writing a declarative domain theory. However, as a practical matter, the validation of the domain theory for such a system is problematic because the link between generated programs and the domain theory is complex. As a result, when generated programs do not behave as expected, it is difficult to isolate the cause, whether it be an incorrect problem specification or an error in the domain theory. This paper describes a tool we are developing that provides formal traceability between specifications and generated code for deductive synthesis systems. It is based on extensive instrumentation of the refutation-based theorem prover used to synthesize programs. It takes augmented proof structures and abstracts them to provide explanations of the relation between a specification, a domain theory, and synthesized code. In generating these explanations, the tool exploits the structure of Amphion domain theories, so the end user is not confronted with the intricacies of raw proof traces. This tool is crucial for the validation of domain theories as well as being important in everyday use of the code synthesis system. It plays an important role in validation because when generated programs exhibit incorrect behavior, it provides the links that can be traced to identify errors in specifications or domain theory. It plays an important role in the everyday use of the synthesis system by explaining to users what parts of a specification or of the domain theory contribute to what pieces of a generated program. Comments are inserted into the synthesized code that document these explanations.

  12. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, J.; Norton, J.L.; Malkoske, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments. The major application is in the health care industry where irradiators are used to sterilize single use medical products. These irradiators are designed and built by MDS Nordion and are used by manufacturers of surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes and other medical products. The irradiator is a large shielded room with a storage pool for the cobalt-60 sources. The medical products are circulated through the shielded room and exposed to the cobalt-60 sources. This treatment sterilizes the medical products which can then be shipped to hospitals for immediate use. Other applications for this irradiation technology include sanitisation of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials and food irradiation. The cobalt-60 sources are manufactured by MDS Nordion in their Cobalt Operations Facility in Kanata. More than 75,000 cobalt-60 sources for use in irradiators have been manufactured by MDS Nordion. The cobalt-60 sources are double encapsulated in stainless steel capsules, seal welded and helium leak tested. Each source may contain up to 14,000 curies. These sources are shipped to over 170 industrial irradiators around the world. This paper will focus on the MDS Nordion proprietary technology used to produce the cobalt-60 isotope in CANDU reactors. Almost 55 years ago MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada developed the process for manufacturing cobalt-60 at the Chalk River Labs, in Ontario, Canada. A cobalt-59 target was introduced into a research reactor where the cobalt-59 atom absorbed one neutron to become cobalt-60. Once the cobalt-60 material was removed from the research reactor it was encapsulated in stainless steel and seal welded using a Tungsten Inert Gas weld. The first cobalt-60 sources manufactured using material from the Chalk River Labs were used in cancer

  13. A new three-dimensional cobalt phosphate: Co 5(OH 2) 4(HPO 4) 2(PO 4) 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhangang; Tian, Aixiang; Peng, Jun; Zhai, Xueliang

    2006-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) cobalt phosphate: Co 5(OH 2) 4(HPO 4) 2(PO 4) 2 ( 1), has been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and magnetic techniques. The title compound is a template free cobalt phosphate. Compound 1 exhibits a complex net architecture based on edge- and corner-sharing of CoO 6 and PO 4 polyhedra. The magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated that the title compound obeys Curie-Weiss behavior down to a temperature of 17 K at which an antiferromagnetic phase transition occurs.

  14. Exploration of Cocatalyst Effects on a Bimetallic Cobalt Catalyst System: Enhanced Activity and Enantioselectivity in Epoxide Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Widger, Peter C. B.

    2011-07-26

    Organic ionic compounds were synthesized and investigated as cocatalysts with a bimetallic cobalt complex for enantioselective epoxide polymerization. The identities of both the cation and the anion were systematically varied, and the subsequent reactivity was studied. The nature of the ionic cocatalyst dramatically impacted the rate and enantioselectivity of the catalyst system. The ionic cocatalyst [P(N=P(N(CH2)4)3) 4 +][tBuCO2 -] in combination with a bimetallic cobalt complex produced a catalyst system that exhibited the greatest activity and selectivity for a variety of monosubstituted epoxides. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Cobalt and sulfur co-doped nano-size TiO2 for photodegradation of various dyes and phenol

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiqa, Asima

    2015-11-01

    Various compositions of cobalt and sulfur co-doped titania nano-photocatalyst are synthesized via sol–gel method. A number of techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman, N2 sorption, electron microscopy are used to examine composition, crystalline phase, morphology, distribution of dopants, surface area and optical properties of synthesized materials. The synthesized materials consisted of quasispherical nanoparticles of anatase phase exhibiting a high surface area and homogeneous distribution of dopants. Cobalt and sulfur co-doped titania demonstrated remarkable structural and optical properties leading to an efficient photocatalytic activity for degradation of dyes and phenol under visible light irradiations. Moreover, the effect of dye concentration, catalyst dose and pH on photodegradation behavior of environmental pollutants and recyclability of the catalyst is also examined to optimize the activity of nano-photocatalyst and gain a better understanding of the process.

  16. Neodymium cobalt oxide as a chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, I. A.; Rahman, Mohammed M.; Khan, Sher Bahadar

    2018-03-01

    Chemical sensing and electrical transport properties of neodymium coblate, NdCoO3, was investigated in this work. It was prepared by using co-precipitation method. Pure neodymium chloride and cobalt chloride were mixing in the presence of sodium hydroxide and the obtained co-precipitated powder was calcined at 850 and 1000 °C. The synthesized composites, as-grown (NdCoO3-I), calcined at 850 °C (NdCoO3-II), and calcined at 1000 °C (NdCoO3-III) were studied in details in terms of their morphological and structural properties. The X-ray analysis confirmed that the synthesized products are well crystalline possessing single phase orthorhombic crystal system of space group Pbnm(62). The crystallite size of NdCoO3-I, NdCoO3-II, and NdCoO3-III is 22, 111, and 338 nm, respectively which reflect that crystallite size is increasing with increase in firing temperature. The DC resistivity was measured as a function of temperature in the temperature range from room temperature up to 200 °C. All NdCoO3 are semiconductor in this range of temperature but showed different activation energy which strongly depends on the crystallite size of the products. The activation energy decreased with increase in crystallite size, 0.798, 0.414 and 0.371 eV for NdCoO3-I, NdCoO3-II, and NdCoO3-III, respectively. Thus resistivity increases with increase in crystallite size of NdCoO3. All NdCoO3 products were tested as chemical sensor for acetone by electrochemical approaches and showed excellent sensitivity. Among the NdCoO3 samples, NdCoO3-III showed the highest sensitivity (3.4722 μAcm-2 mM-1) compared to other compositions and gradually decreased to 3.2407 μAcm-2 mM-1 with decreasing the crystallite size of NdCoO3-II. It is also observed that the sensitivity drastically decreased to 0.76253 μAcm-2 mM-1 in the case of NdCoO3-I. It is introduced an efficient route for the detection of environmental unsafe chemicals by electrochemical approach for the safety of healthcare and environmental

  17. Magnetic and Structural Investigations of Nanocrystalline Cobalt-Ferrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sharifi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt ferrite is an important magnetic material due to their large magneto-crystalline anisotropy, high cohercivity, moderate saturation magnetization and chemical stability.In this study, cobalt ferrites Nanoparticles have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and a new microemulsion route. We examined the cation occupancy in the spinel structure based on the “Rietveld with energies” method. The Xray measurements revealed the production of a broad single ferrite cubic phase with the average particle sizes of about 12 nm and 7nm, for co-precipitation and micro-emulsion methods, respectively. The FTIR measurements between 400 and 4000 cm-1 confirmed the intrinsic cation vibrations of the spinelstructure for the two methods. Furthermore, the Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM was carried out at room temperature to study the structural and magnetic properties. The results revealed that by changing the method from co-precipitation to the reverse micelle the material exhibits a softer magnetic behavior in such a way that both saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease from 58 to 29 emu/g and from 286 to 25 Oe, respectively.

  18. Cobalt-doped nanohydroxyapatite: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tank, Kashmira P., E-mail: kashmira_physics@yahoo.co.in [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India); Chudasama, Kiran S.; Thaker, Vrinda S. [Saurashtra University, Bioscience Department (India); Joshi, Mihir J., E-mail: mshilp24@rediffmail.com [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India)

    2013-05-15

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}; HAP) is a major mineral component of the calcified tissues, and it has various applications in medicine and dentistry. In the present investigation, cobalt-doped hydroxyapatite (Co-HAP) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-mediated approach and characterized by different techniques. The EDAX was carried out to estimate the amount of doping in Co-HAP. The transmission electron microscopy result suggested the transformation of morphology from needle shaped to spherical type on increasing the doping concentration. The powder XRD study indicated the formation of a new phase of brushite for higher concentration of cobalt. The average particle size and strain were calculated using Williamson-Hall analysis. The average particle size was found to be 30-60 nm. The FTIR study confirmed the presence of various functional groups in the samples. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against four organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella flexneri as Gram negative as well as Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus as Gram positive. The hemolytic test result suggested that all samples were non-hemolytic. The photoluminescence study was carried out to identify its possible applicability as a fluorescent probe.

  19. Chromium Substituted Cobalt Ferrites by Glycine-Nitrates Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Gingasu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromium substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe2–xCrxO4, 0 ≤ x ≤ 2 were synthesized through solution combustion method using glycine as fuel, named glycine-nitrates process (GNP. As evidenced by X-ray diffraction data (XRD, single cubic spinel phase was formed for all CoFe2–xCrxO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 2 series. The cubic lattice parameter (a decreases with increasing chromium content. Room temperature 57Fe Mössbauer spectra revealed the Fe3+ and Cr3+ site occupancy, the local hyperfine magnetic fields and the substitution of Fe3+ by Cr3+ in the lattice. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed a refinement of particle size with the increase of Cr3+ content. Magnetic measurements from 5 K to 120 K have shown a dropping in the saturation magnetization as the chromium content increases. This behaviour has been explained in terms of substitution of Fe3+ by Cr3+ in the cubic lattice of cobalt ferrite.

  20. Bismuth onion thin film in situ grown on silicon wafer synthesized through a hydrothermal approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yue; Liu Hong; Liu Jin; Hu Chenguo; Wang Jiyang

    2010-01-01

    Bismuth onion structured nanospheres with the same structure as carbon onions have been synthesized and observed. The nanospheres were synthesized through a hydrothermal method using bismuth hydroxide and silicon wafer as reactants. By controlling the heating temperature, heating time, and the pressure, nanoscale bismuth spheres can be in situ synthesized on silicon wafer, and forms a bismuth onion film on the substrate. The electronic property of the films was investigated. A formation mechanism of the formation of bismuth onions and the onion film has been proposed on the basis of experimental observations.

  1. Widely tunable THz synthesizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.; Eliet, S.; Guinet, M.; Cuisset, A.; Bocquet, R.; Yasui, T.; Rovera, D.

    2011-09-01

    The generation of cw-THz radiation by photomixing is particularly suited to the high resolution spectroscopy of gases; nevertheless, until recently, it has suffered from a lack of frequency metrology. Frequency combs are a powerful tool that can transfer microwave frequency standards to optical frequencies and a single comb has permitted accurate (10-8) THz frequency synthesis with a limited tuning range. A THz synthesizer composed of three extended cavity laser diodes phase locked to a frequency comb has been constructed and its utility for high resolution gas phase spectroscopy demonstrated. The third laser diode allows a larger tuning range of up to 300 MHz to be achieved without the need for large frequency excursions, while the frequency comb provides a versatile link to be established from any traceable microwave frequency standard. The use of a single frequency comb as a reference for all of the cw-lasers eliminates the dependency of synthesized frequency on the carrier envelope offset frequency. This greatly simplifies the frequency comb stabilization requirements and leads to a reduced instrument complexity.

  2. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkoske, G.R.; Norton, J.L. [MDS Nordion, Kanata, Ontario (Canada); Slack, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments, but are primarily used to sterilize single-use medical products including; surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes, and cotton swabs. Other applications include sanitization of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials, and food irradiation. The technology for producing the cobalt-60 isotope was developed by MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) almost 55 years ago using research reactors at the AECL Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, Canada. The first cobalt-60 source produced for medical applications was manufactured by MDS Nordion and used in cancer therapy. The benefits of cobalt-60 as applied to medical product manufacturing, were quickly realized and the demand for this radioisotope quickly grew. The same technology for producing cobalt-60 in research reactors was then designed and packaged such that it could be conveniently transferred to a utility/power reactor. In the early 1970's, in co-operation with Ontario Power Generation (formerly Ontario Hydro), bulk cobalt-60 production for industrial irradiation applications was initiated in the four Pickering A CANDU reactors. As the demand and acceptance of sterilization of medical products grew, MDS Nordion expanded its bulk supply by installing the proprietary Canadian technology for producing cobalt-60 in additional CANDU reactors. CANDU is unique among the power reactors of the world, being heavy water moderated and fuelled with natural uranium. They are also designed and supplied with stainless steel adjusters, the primary function of which is to shape the neutron flux to optimize reactor power and fuel bum-up, and to provide excess reactivity needed to overcome xenon-135 poisoning following a reduction of power. The reactor is designed to develop full power output with all of the adjuster

  3. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.; Norton, J.L.; Slack, J.

    2002-01-01

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments, but are primarily used to sterilize single-use medical products including; surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes, and cotton swabs. Other applications include sanitization of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials, and food irradiation. The technology for producing the cobalt-60 isotope was developed by MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) almost 55 years ago using research reactors at the AECL Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, Canada. The first cobalt-60 source produced for medical applications was manufactured by MDS Nordion and used in cancer therapy. The benefits of cobalt-60 as applied to medical product manufacturing, were quickly realized and the demand for this radioisotope quickly grew. The same technology for producing cobalt-60 in research reactors was then designed and packaged such that it could be conveniently transferred to a utility/power reactor. In the early 1970's, in co-operation with Ontario Power Generation (formerly Ontario Hydro), bulk cobalt-60 production for industrial irradiation applications was initiated in the four Pickering A CANDU reactors. As the demand and acceptance of sterilization of medical products grew, MDS Nordion expanded its bulk supply by installing the proprietary Canadian technology for producing cobalt-60 in additional CANDU reactors. CANDU is unique among the power reactors of the world, being heavy water moderated and fuelled with natural uranium. They are also designed and supplied with stainless steel adjusters, the primary function of which is to shape the neutron flux to optimize reactor power and fuel bum-up, and to provide excess reactivity needed to overcome xenon-135 poisoning following a reduction of power. The reactor is designed to develop full power output with all of the adjuster

  4. PREFACE: Nanoscale science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    optical throughput of the probe and scanning position accuracy. Prato showed a method to characterize force sensitivity of piezoelectric transducers and we've implemented a test system for off line characterization of probes. Recent improvements in aperture SNOM were also illustrated in this talk by some biological applications. H Stadler showed the development of a new instrumentation, combining optical and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) multimodal characterization, specifically designed for SPM based life science research and full integration with optical microscopy. The prerequisites and design of such equipment besides newer application examples in this area were discussed. Stadler also overviewed work on improving quantitative mechanical characterization on the nanoscale. This included hardware like SPM control electronics and probe development as theoretical aspects and software for data evaluation. Comparative field emission studies of as-produced CNTs vis á vis commercially obtained SWCNT were presented by A Tiberia. Carbon nanotubes synthesized at INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati in the nanotechnology group of S Bellucci by DC thermal plasma process were analyzed by electron microscope and studied for their field emission properties. These carbon nanotubes were deposited on a tungsten wire, which acted as the cathode. Care was taken to ensure complete covering of the wire. The emission studies were performed in a stainless steel chamber under a dynamic vacuum in the range of 10-8 Torr. The field emitted current was detected using a phosphorous coated ITO (indium tin oxide) glass plate. The phosphorous coat also helped in imaging the tips of the nanotubes. This was crucial in accurately estimating the emitting area and thus the field enhancement factor. The I-V curves for the field emission were recorded for various distances between the electrodes. Similar studies were performed for commercially obtained single walled carbon nanotubes and the results

  5. Towards Nanoscale Biomedical Devices in Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parracino, A.; Gajula, G.P.; di Gennaro, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Medical interest in nanotechnology originates from a belief that nanoscale therapeutic devices can be constructed and directed towards its target inside the human body. Such nanodevices can be engineered by coupling superparamagnetic nanoparticle to biomedically active proteins. We hereby report ...

  6. Nanoscale Vacuum Electronics: Back to the Future?

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This CIF project developed nanoscale vacuum devices for potential radiation-immune electronics ideal for space applications. Vacuum is superior to any semiconductor...

  7. Development of Nanoscale Ceramics for Advanced Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Leffler; Joseph Helble

    1999-09-30

    Bulk structures of unstabilized ZrO{sub 2-x}, with x in the range of 0 {<=} x {<=} 0.44, at ambient pressure have been found to exist in three different structures. (monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic.). At ambient temperature and elevated pressures above 3.5 GPa, unstabilized zirconia at these same compositions is found as a fourth phase, the orthorhombic phase. Work done in this project has demonstrated that nanoscale zirconia particles containing the orthorhombic phase in addition to amorphous material can be produced through solgel methods. Extensive characterization of this material including recent high temperature x-ray diffraction work has indicated that the structure of the synthesized zirconia appears to be linked to the oxygen vacancy population in the material, and that water appears to be a critical factor in determining the type of material formed during synthesis. These results suggest that surface energy alone is not the controlling factor in determining crystal phase.

  8. Coordination compounds of cobalt and cadmium with isobutyric acid amide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsivadze, A.Yu.; Ivanova, I.S.; Solovkina, O.A. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Obshchej i Neorganicheskoj Khimii)

    1983-06-01

    Coordination compounds of cobalt and cadmium with isobutyric acid amide (IBAA) of Co(NCS)/sub 2/x(IBAA)/sub 2/(H/sub 2/O)/sub 2/, CoCl/sub 2/(IBAA)/sub 4/, CoI/sub 2/(IBAA)/sub 8/(H/sub 2/O)/sub 2/, CdI/sub 2/(IBAA)/sub 2/ composition have been synthesized and characterized. Their infrared absorption spectra (200-400 cm/sup -1/), electron reflection spectra (200-750 nm) were studied. It is shown that in all compounds there are IBAA molecUles coordinated through an oxygen atom. Thiocyanogroups are coordinated through nitrogen atoms.

  9. Preparation of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeska da Rocha Caffarena

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured magnetic materials have great interest because of their applications in high-density magnetic information storage and for magnetic sensors. The electrodeposition of materials into porous alumina arrays is a suitable technique to produce nanomaterials, since highly ordered uniform nanomaterials can be obtained simply and cheaply. In this work, template-assisted Co nanowire arrays were prepared by electrodeposition into nanometer-sized pores of an alumite film using a two-electrode electrochemical cell. The Co nanowires were electrodeposited from a solution of 400 g/L of CoSO4.7H2O and 40 g/L of H3BO3. The morphology of the samples was investigated by means of TEM and AFM. The structural characteristic of the samples was examined using XRD, EDX and FTIR, which confirm the cobalt nanowire formation.

  10. Porous oxides synthesized by the combustion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugo L, V.

    2005-01-01

    The result of this work, seeks to be a contribution for the treatment of radioactive wastes, with base to the sorption properties that present those porous oxides, synthesized by a method that allows to increase the sorption capacity. The main objective of the present investigation has been the modification of the structural characteristics of the oxides of Fe, Mg and Zn to increase its capacity of sorption of 60 Co in particular. It was studied the effect of the synthesis method by combustion in the inorganic oxides; the obtained solids were characterized using the following techniques: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), semiquantitative elementary analysis by Dispersive energy spectroscopy (EDS) and determination of surface area by the Brunauner-Emmett-Teller method (BET). Also was carried out batch type experiments for the sorption of Co 2+ , with the purpose of studying the sorption capacity of each one of the prepared oxides. In accordance with that previously exposed, the working plan that was carried out in this investigation is summarized in the following stages: 1. Preparation of inorganic oxides by two different methods, studying the effect of the temperature in the synthesis process. 2. Characterization of the inorganic oxides by XRD, by means of which those were chosen the solids with better properties. 3. Characterization of the inorganic oxides by SEM and EDS where it was studied the morphology of the synthesized materials and the semiquantitative elemental composition. 4. Realization of a sorption experiment type Batch with non radioactive Co 2+ to simulate the sorption of 60 Co and determination of the sorption capacity by means of neutron activation of the non radioactive cobalt. 5. Determination of the surface area by the (BET) technique of the inorganic oxides with better sorption properties. (Author)

  11. Magnetic Properties of Molecular and Nanoscale Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Krupskaya, Yulia

    2011-01-01

    The idea of miniaturizing devices down to the nanoscale where quantum ffeffects become relevant demands a detailed understanding of the interplay between classical and quantum properties. Therefore, characterization of newly produced nanoscale materials is a very important part of the research in this fifield. Studying structural and magnetic properties of nano- and molecular magnets and the interplay between these properties reveals new interesting effects and suggests ways to control and op...

  12. High-performance planar nanoscale dielectric capacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Ciraci, S.; Özçelik, V. Ongun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model for planar nanoscale dielectric capacitor consisting of a single layer, insulating hexagonal boron nitride (BN) stripe placed between two metallic graphene stripes, all forming commensurately a single atomic plane. First-principles density functional calculations on these nanoscale capacitors for different levels of charging and different widths of graphene - BN stripes mark high gravimetric capacitance values, which are comparable to those of supercapacitors made from othe...

  13. Method for synthesizing HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Raymond R.; Coon, Clifford L.; Harrar, Jackson E.; Pearson, Richard K.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for electrochemically synthesizing N.sub.2 O.sub.5 cludes oxidizing a solution of N.sub.2 O.sub.4 /HNO.sub.3 at an anode, while maintaining a controlled potential between the N.sub.2 O.sub.4 /HNO.sub.3 solution and the anode. A potential of about 1.35 to 2.0 V vs. SCE is preferred, while a potential of about 1.80 V vs. SCE is most preferred. Thereafter, the N.sub.2 O.sub.5 is reacted with either 1.5-diacetyl-3,7-dinitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (DADN) or 1,3,5,7-tetraacetyl-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (TAT) to form cyclotetramethylenetetraamine (HMX).

  14. Intracellular Siderophore Detection in an Egyptian, Cobalt-Treated F. solani Isolate Using SEM-EDX with Reference to its Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrag, Rasha M

    2017-07-06

    An Egyptian, plant pathogenic Fusarium solani isolate was grown on cobalt concentrations of 0, 50, 200, 500, 800, and 1000 ppm. The isolate survived concentrations up to 800 ppm, however failed to grow at 1000 ppm. Morphology and elemental analysis of the isolate under the investigated Co concentrations were studied using Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). The isolate reserved its morphology up to a concentration of 200 ppm. Morphological distortions were dramatic at 500 and 800 ppm. EDX detected Co uptake through the hyphae, microconidia, macroconidia, and chlamydospores. Iron, calcium, and potassium were also detected. EDX results showed a linear relationship between Co% and Fe% up to a concentration of 500 ppm reflecting the possible ability of the isolate to synthesize intracellular siderophores storing iron and their release from the vacuoles. The participation of such siderophores in conferring tolerance against cobalt is discussed. At 800 ppm, the % of Fe was greatly reduced with an accompanying increase in morphological distortions and absence of microconidia. Increasing the implicated cobalt concentrations resulted in increasing the percentages of the chelated cobalt reflecting the possible implication of the cell wall as well as extracellular siderophores in the uptake of cobalt. The current results recommend the absence of cobalt in any control regime taken to combat the investigated F. solani isolate and highlights the accomplishment of biochemical, ultrastructural, and molecular studies on such isolate to approve the production of siderophores and the role of cell wall in cobalt uptake.

  15. Cobalt-60 control in Ontario Hydro reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of specifying reduced Cobalt-59 in the primary heat transport circuit materials of construction on the radiation fields developed around the primary circuit. An eight-fold reduction in steam generator radiation fields due to Cobalt-60 has been observed for two identical sets of reactors, one with and one without Cobalt-59 control. The comparison is between eight reactors at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS). Units 5 to 8 (PNGS-B) are identical to Units 1 to 4 (PNGS-A) except that PNGS-B has reduced impurity Cobalt-59 in the alloys of construction and a reduced use of stellite. The effects of chemistry control are also discussed

  16. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J M; Coker, V S; Moise, S; Wincott, P L; Vaughan, D J; Tuna, F; Arenholz, E; van der Laan, G; Pattrick, R A D; Lloyd, J R; Telling, N D

    2013-06-06

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 -xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt-iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe(2+) site with Co(2+), with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites.

  17. Controllable synthesis of hierarchical nickel cobalt sulfide with enhanced electrochemical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Jinjin; Han, Jiaxi; Diao, Guiqiang; Liu, Jiwen; Xie, Zhuopeng; Cheng, Gao; Sun, Ming; Yu, Lin

    2018-03-01

    The composition of nickel cobalt sulfide has great influence on its electrochemical performance. Herein, the nickel cobalt sulfide with different composition and mixed phase were synthesized by one-step solvothermal method through changing the molar ratio of Ni to Co in the reaction system. The electrochemical measurements showed that the nickel cobalt sulfide with a theoretical molar ratio of Ni/Co to be 1.5:1.5 (NCS-2) demonstrates the superior pseudocapacitive performance with a high specific capacitance (6.47 F cm-2 at 10 mA cm-2) and a favorable Coulombic efficiency (∼99%). Whereas, when applied as the catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction in 1 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, the nickel cobalt sulfide with a theoretical molar ratio of Ni/Co is 1:2 (NCS-1) displays better catalytic activity, and it requires a relatively lower overpotential of 282 mV to deliver the current density of 10 mA cm-2.

  18. Transport properties of cobalt at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radharkishna, P.; Nielsen, Mourits

    1965-01-01

    Measurements are made of electrical resistivity, absolute thermoelectric power, and thermal conductivity of polycrystalline cobalt between 1.2 and 6 K; results are discussed on basis of inter-electronic scattering.......Measurements are made of electrical resistivity, absolute thermoelectric power, and thermal conductivity of polycrystalline cobalt between 1.2 and 6 K; results are discussed on basis of inter-electronic scattering....

  19. Molecular Photovoltaics in Nanoscale Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Pakoulev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the intrinsic charge transport in organic photovoltaic (PVC devices and field-effect transistors (SAM-OFETs fabricated by vapor phase molecular self-assembly (VP-SAM method. The dynamics of charge transport are determined and used to clarify a transport mechanism. The 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic diphenylimide (NTCDI SAM devices provide a useful tool to study the fundamentals of polaronic transport at organic surfaces and to discuss the performance of organic photovoltaic devices in nanoscale. Time-resolved photovoltaic studies allow us to separate the charge annihilation kinetics in the conductive NTCDI channel from the overall charge kinetic in a SAM-OFET device. It has been demonstrated that tuning of the type of conductivity in NTCDI SAM-OFET devices is possible by changing Si substrate doping. Our study of the polaron charge transfer in organic materials proposes that a cation-radical exchange (redox mechanism is the major transport mechanism in the studied SAM-PVC devices. The role and contribution of the transport through delocalized states of redox active surface molecular aggregates of NTCDI are exposed and investigated. This example of technological development is used to highlight the significance of future technological development of nanotechnologies and to appreciate a structure-property paradigm in organic nanostructures.

  20. Molecular photovoltaics in nanoscale dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtman, Vladimir; Zelichonok, Alexander; Pakoulev, Andrei V

    2011-01-05

    This review focuses on the intrinsic charge transport in organic photovoltaic (PVC) devices and field-effect transistors (SAM-OFETs) fabricated by vapor phase molecular self-assembly (VP-SAM) method. The dynamics of charge transport are determined and used to clarify a transport mechanism. The 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic diphenylimide (NTCDI) SAM devices provide a useful tool to study the fundamentals of polaronic transport at organic surfaces and to discuss the performance of organic photovoltaic devices in nanoscale. Time-resolved photovoltaic studies allow us to separate the charge annihilation kinetics in the conductive NTCDI channel from the overall charge kinetic in a SAM-OFET device. It has been demonstrated that tuning of the type of conductivity in NTCDI SAM-OFET devices is possible by changing Si substrate doping. Our study of the polaron charge transfer in organic materials proposes that a cation-radical exchange (redox) mechanism is the major transport mechanism in the studied SAM-PVC devices. The role and contribution of the transport through delocalized states of redox active surface molecular aggregates of NTCDI are exposed and investigated. This example of technological development is used to highlight the significance of future technological development of nanotechnologies and to appreciate a structure-property paradigm in organic nanostructures.

  1. [Are the cobalt hip prosthesis dangerous?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistretta, Virginie; Kurth, William; Charlier, Corinne

    The placement of a hip prosthesis is one of the most common orthopedic surgical procedures. Some implants contain metal and are therefore capable of releasing metal particles like cobalt in patients who wear metal prostheses. Cobalt can be responsible of local toxicity (including metallosis, hypersensitivity reaction, and benign tumor) or systemic toxicity (including cardiomyopathy, polycythemia, hypothyroidism, and neurological disorders). To monitor potential toxicity of metal hip prostheses, an annual monitoring of patients implanted is recommended and includes clinical examination, radiological examination and blood cobalt determination. The cobalt concentration in blood allows to estimate the risk of toxicity and to evaluate the performance of the implant. The currently recommended threshold value is equal to 7 µg of cobalt per liter of blood. Our study, conducted on 251 patients over a period of 4 years, has shown that the cobalt concentration average was 2.51 µg/l in blood, with 51 patients having a cobaltemia higher than the threshold of 7 µg/l. © 2016 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  2. 40 CFR 415.650 - Applicability; description of the cobalt salts production subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cobalt salts production subcategory. 415.650 Section 415.650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Cobalt Salts Production Subcategory § 415.650 Applicability; description of the cobalt... cobalt salts. ...

  3. Nickel acts as an adjuvant during cobalt sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Nielsen, Morten Milek; Vennegaard, Marie T; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Geisler, Carsten; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2015-03-01

    Metal allergy is the most frequent form of contact allergy with nickel and cobalt being the main culprits. Typically, exposure comes from metal-alloys where nickel and cobalt co-exist. Importantly, very little is known about how co-exposure to nickel and cobalt affects the immune system. We investigated these effects by using a recently developed mouse model. Mice were epicutaneously sensitized with i) nickel alone, ii) nickel in the presence of cobalt, iii) cobalt alone, or iv) cobalt in the presence of nickel, and then followed by challenge with either nickel or cobalt alone. We found that sensitization with nickel alone induced more local inflammation than cobalt alone as measured by increased ear-swelling. Furthermore, the presence of nickel during sensitization to cobalt led to a stronger challenge response to cobalt as seen by increased ear-swelling and increased B and T cell responses in the draining lymph nodes compared to mice sensitized with cobalt alone. In contrast, the presence of cobalt during nickel sensitization only induced an increased CD8(+) T cell proliferation during challenge to nickel. Thus, the presence of nickel during cobalt sensitization potentiated the challenge response against cobalt more than the presence of cobalt during sensitization to nickel affected the challenge response against nickel. Taken together, our study demonstrates that sensitization with a mixture of nickel and cobalt leads to an increased immune response to both nickel and cobalt, especially to cobalt, and furthermore that the adjuvant effect appears to correlate with the inflammatory properties of the allergen. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Tuning of Heat Transfer Rate of Cobalt Manganese Ferrite Based Magnetic Fluids in Varying Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margabandhu MARIMUTHU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic fluids are the colloidal solutions containing suspended magnetic nanoparticles in carrier fluids. The present work analyzed the heat transfer characteristics of de-ionized water and transformer oil (base fluids based cobalt manganese ferrite (Co1-xMnxFe2O4 coated with oleic acid synthesized via co-precipitation technique magnetic fluids in  varying magnetic field. Experimental investigations were carried out to analyze the heat transfer property of synthesized magnetic fluids (MNF in varying magnetic field applied in perpendicular direction to the thermal gradient of magnetic fluids. The experimental results indicate that the magnetic fluids show enhancement in heat transfer rate than carrier fluids in absence of magnetic field and it shows decrement in heat transfer rate in presence of varying magnetic field. Thus, the results reveal that the heat transfer characteristics of cobalt manganese ferrite based magnetic fluids was tunable by controlling the direction and influence of magnetic field strength. This tunable heat transfer property of cobalt manganese ferrite based magnetic fluids could be applicable in heat transport phenomena of transformers and in microelectronic devices.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.3.16662

  5. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery: has the use of cobalt replaced nickel following regulatory intervention?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten S; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    Before the introduction of the EU Nickel Directive, concern was raised that manufacturers of jewellery might turn from the use of nickel to cobalt following the regulatory intervention on nickel exposure.......Before the introduction of the EU Nickel Directive, concern was raised that manufacturers of jewellery might turn from the use of nickel to cobalt following the regulatory intervention on nickel exposure....

  6. Synthesis of new cobalt aluminophosphate framework by opening a cobalt methylphosphonate layered material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zaarour, M.; Pérez, O.; Boullay, P.; Martens, J.; Mihailova, B.; Karaghiosoff, K.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Mintova, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 34 (2017), s. 5100-5105 ISSN 1466-8033 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : cobalt aluminophosphate * cobalt methylphosphonate * layered materials * crystallic structure * X-ray diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.474, year: 2016

  7. Nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics key processes and characterization issues, and nanoscale effects

    CERN Document Server

    Alguero, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the key issues in processing and characterization of nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics, and provides a comprehensive description of their properties, with an emphasis in differentiating size effects of extrinsic ones like boundary or interface effects. Recently described nanoscale novel phenomena are also addressed. Organized into three parts it addresses key issues in processing (nanostructuring), characterization (of the nanostructured materials) and nanoscale effects. Taking full advantage of the synergies between nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics, it covers materials nanostructured at all levels, from ceramic technologies like ferroelectric nanopowders, bulk nanostructured ceramics and thick films, and magnetoelectric nanocomposites, to thin films, either polycrystalline layer heterostructures or epitaxial systems, and to nanoscale free standing objects with specific geometries, such as nanowires and tubes at different levels of development. The book is developed from t...

  8. A new three-dimensional cobalt phosphate: Co5(OH2)4(HPO4)2(PO4)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Zhangang; Tian Aixiang; Peng Jun; Zhai Xueliang

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) cobalt phosphate: Co 5 (OH 2 ) 4 (HPO 4 ) 2 (PO 4 ) 2 (1), has been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and magnetic techniques. The title compound is a template free cobalt phosphate. Compound 1 exhibits a complex net architecture based on edge- and corner-sharing of CoO 6 and PO 4 polyhedra. The magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated that the title compound obeys Curie-Weiss behavior down to a temperature of 17 K at which an antiferromagnetic phase transition occurs. - Graphical abstract: A 3D cobalt phosphate with a neutral framework: Co 5 (OH 2 ) 4 (HPO 4 ) 2 (PO 4 ) 2 (1), has been synthesized and characterized. Compound 1 exhibits a complex net architecture based on edge- and corner-sharing of CoO 6 and PO 4 polyhedra. Its magnetic property was researched

  9. Biological responses of isolated macrophages to cobalt metal and tungsten carbide-cobalt powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lison, D; Lauwerys, R

    1991-10-01

    A previous study from this laboratory, using morphological and biochemical (LDH release) parameters, has shown that tungsten carbide-cobalt dust exhibits a greater cytotoxicity toward isolated macrophages than cobalt metal powder alone. The present study extends this comparison by examining additional biological parameters. Glucose uptake and superoxide anion production by isolated macrophages were significantly more depressed by the tungsten carbide-cobalt mixture (WC-Co) than by cobalt alone (Co) while pure tungsten carbide (WC) had no effect or even stimulated the cells. For glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and cell-associated plasminogen activator (PA) activities, no difference between Co and WC-Co dusts was observed. These observations add further evidence to our previous findings regarding the different biological reactivity of cobalt metal alone or mixed with tungsten carbide.

  10. Attosecond physics at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappina, M F; Pérez-Hernández, J A; Landsman, A S; Okell, W A; Zherebtsov, S; Förg, B; Schötz, J; Seiffert, L; Fennel, T; Shaaran, T; Zimmermann, T; Chacón, A; Guichard, R; Zaïr, A; Tisch, J W G; Marangos, J P; Witting, T; Braun, A; Maier, S A; Roso, L; Krüger, M; Hommelhoff, P; Kling, M F; Krausz, F; Lewenstein, M

    2017-05-01

    Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds (1 attosecond  =  1 as  =  10 -18 s), which is comparable with the optical field. For comparison, the revolution of an electron on a 1s orbital of a hydrogen atom is  ∼152 as. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this report on progress we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metallic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spatially inhomogeneous laser induced fields at a nanometer scale modify the laser-driven electron dynamics. Consequently, this has important impact on pivotal processes such as above-threshold ionization and high-order harmonic generation. The deep understanding of the coupled dynamics between these spatially inhomogeneous fields and matter configures a promising way to new avenues of research and applications. Thanks to the maturity that attosecond physics has reached, together with the tremendous advance in material engineering and manipulation techniques, the age of atto-nanophysics has begun, but it is in the initial stage. We present thus some of the open questions, challenges and prospects for experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions, as well as experiments aimed at characterizing the

  11. Structural and magnetic properties of cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion method for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Kaliyamoorthy; Rajan Babu, Dhanakotti; Kavya Bai, Mane Prabhu; Supriya, Ravi; Vidya, Radhakrishnan; Madeswaran, Saminathan; Anandan, Pandurangan; Arivanandhan, Mukannan; Hayakawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by solution combustion technique. The structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were also investigated. The average crystallite size of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) magnetic nanoparticle was calculated using Scherrer equation, and it was found to be 16±5 nm. The particle size was measured by transmission electron microscope. This value was found to match with the crystallite size calculated by Scherrer equation corresponding to the prominent intensity peak (311) of X-ray diffraction. The high-resolution transmission electron microscope image shows clear lattice fringes and high crystallinity of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles exhibited the saturation magnetization value of 47 emu/g and coercivity of 947 Oe. The anti-microbial activity of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles showed better results as an anti-bacterial agent. The affinity constant was determined for the nanoparticles, and the cytotoxicity studies were conducted for the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles at different concentrations and the results are discussed. PMID:26491320

  12. Structural and magnetic properties of cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion method for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan K

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Kaliyamoorthy Venkatesan,1 Dhanakotti Rajan Babu,1 Mane Prabhu Kavya Bai,2 Ravi Supriya,2 Radhakrishnan Vidya,2 Saminathan Madeswaran,1 Pandurangan Anandan,3 Mukannan Arivanandhan,3 Yasuhiro Hayakawa3 1School of Advanced Sciences, 2School of Bio Sciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India; 3Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu, Japan Abstract: Cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by solution combustion technique. The structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were also investigated. The average crystallite size of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticle was calculated using Scherrer equation, and it was found to be 16±5 nm. The particle size was measured by transmission electron microscope. This value was found to match with the crystallite size calculated by Scherrer equation corresponding to the prominent intensity peak (311 of X-ray diffraction. The high-resolution transmission electron microscope image shows clear lattice fringes and high crystallinity of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles exhibited the saturation magnetization value of 47 emu/g and coercivity of 947 Oe. The anti-microbial activity of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles showed better results as an anti-bacterial agent. The affinity constant was determined for the nanoparticles, and the cytotoxicity studies were conducted for the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles at different concentrations and the results are discussed. Keywords: cytotoxicity, HR-TEM, magnetic nanoparticles, VSM 

  13. Investigations of cations distributions and morphology of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandekar, Kamlesh V., E-mail: chandekar.kamlex@gmail.com; Kant, K. Mohan [Dept. of Applied Physics, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology, Nagpur, - 440010 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation method and structural properties was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) at room temperature. X-ray diffraction data was used to determine lattice parameter, X-ray density, distributions of cations among tetrahedral and octahedral sites, site radii, ionic radii and bond length of inverse spinel cobalt ferrite. XRD analysis revealed crystallinity and high intense peak correspond to cubic inverse spinel structure with average crystalline size measured by X-ray line profile fitting was found to be 13nm for most intense peak (311). The surface morphology and microstructural feature was investigated by TEM analysis which revealed that particle size varying from 12-22 nm with selected electron diffraction pattern (SAED).

  14. Synthesis and butadiene polymerization behaviors of cationic cobalt-based catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of cationic cobalt-based compounds bearing different neutral N-bearing ligands (1,10-phenanthroline, bipyridine, benzimidazole, terpyridine and anionic ligands (trifluoromethanesulfonate, methanesulfonate were synthesized and the simple compound, Co(Phen2Cl2, was also prepared as a reference compound. All the compounds were characterized along with infrared spectra analysis and some of them were further confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallographic analysis. Upon activation with ethylaluminum sesquichloride, these cationic cobalt(II compounds showed high catalytic activities for butadiene polymerization. The detailed investigations were carried out to disclose the influence of various polymerization conditions, sterical and electronic parameters of the ligands on their performing activities of the compounds.

  15. Preparation of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts from cobalt/iron hydrotalcites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, B.H.; Boff, J.J.; Zarochak, M.F. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Compounds with the (hydrotalcites) have properties that make them attractive as precursors for Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. A series of single-phase hydrotalcites with cobalt/iron atom ratios ranging from 75/25 to 25/75 has been synthesized. Mixed cobalt/iron oxides have been prepared from these hydrotalcites by controlled thermal decomposition. Thermal decomposition at temperatures below 600 {degrees}C typically produced a single-phase mixed metal oxide with a spinel structure. The BET surface areas of the spinal samples have been found to be as high as about 150 m{sup 2}/g. Appropriate reducing pretreatments have been developed for several of these spinels and their activity, selectivity, and activity and selectivity maintenance have been examined at 13 MPa in a fixed-bed microreactor.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Cobalt doped Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles by Chemical Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugazhvadivu, K. S.; Ramachandran, K.; Tamilarasan, K.

    Cobalt doped α-Mn2O3 nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical route. The structural properties were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. The SEM image shows that the nanoclusters having spherical geometry. The optical properties were analyzed by ultraviolet - visible (UV-Vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. UV-Vis spectra illustrates that Co doped Mn2O3 nanosystem acquire blue shift from bulk value (2.5 eV). The chemical composition and purity of the samples were examined using energy dispersive analysis of X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). Magnetic properties were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Guoy's method. The high magnetic moment of 3.5 μB shows the enhancement in magnetic transition temperature (Tc) of Mn2O3 nanosystem due to the incorporation of cobalt ions.

  17. Cobalt-doped carbon xerogel with different initial pH values toward oxygen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitri, Azim; Loh, Kee Shyuan; Puspasari, Ifa; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2017-12-01

    In this study, cobalt-doped carbon xerogel (Co-CX) was synthesized via sol-gel polymerization resorcinol-formaldehyde, catalyzed with cobalt nitrate, followed by drying and carbonization process under nitrogen gas flow. The effect of initial pH value (5.5, 6.5 and 7.5) and the type of carbon precursors on the morphology of Co-CX have been investigated with Field Emission-Transmission Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The catalytic activity of Co-CX for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M KOH has been studied by using a rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) technique. FESEM revealed that Co doping promotes the formation of more pores. While the conditions allow obtaining xerogel with higher porosity at pH 7.5. The RRDE result display that Co-CX exhibited good catalytic activity tends to favor two electrons pathway.

  18. Nanoscale hierarchical optical interactions for secure information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tate Naoya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing demand for novel physical security that can differentiate between real and false specific artifact that have been added to bank bills, certifications, and other vouchers. The most simple and effective method for improving the security level is to scale down the elemental structures so that they cannot be duplicated by attackers. While there is a paradox that the achieved fabrication resolution by a defender can also be realized by an attacker, further improvement in security is possible by the functional fusion of artifact metrics and nanophotonics. The fundamental advantages of this concept are the high-level clone resistance and individuality of nanoscale artifacts, which are based on the super-resolution fabrication and nanoscale hierarchical structure of optical near-field interactions, respectively. In this paper, the basis for the fabrication of nanoscale artifacts by utilizing random phenomena is described, and a quantitative evaluation of the security level is presented. An experimental demonstration using a nano-/macro-hierarchical hologram is presented to demonstrate the fundamental procedure for retrieving nanoscale features as hidden information. Finally, the concept and a simple demonstration of non-scanning probe microscopy are described as a practical application of the retrieval and authentication of nanoscale artifact metrics.

  19. Crystallization of high-strength nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharopoulos, A; Chen, X; Wilson, R M; Hill, R; Cattell, M J

    2013-11-01

    Fine-grained, high strength, translucent leucite dental glass-ceramics are synthesized via controlled crystallization of finely milled glass powders. The objectives of this study were to utilize high speed planetary milling of an aluminosilicate glass for controlled surface crystallization of nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics and to test the biaxial flexural strength. An aluminosilicate glass was synthesized, attritor or planetary milled and heat-treated. Glasses and glass-ceramics were characterized using particle size analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Experimental (fine and nanoscale) and commercial (Ceramco-3, IPS Empress Esthetic) leucite glass-ceramics were tested using the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) test. Gaussian and Weibull statistics were applied. Experimental planetary milled glass-ceramics showed an increased leucite crystal number and nano-scale median crystal sizes (0.048-0.055 μm(2)) as a result of glass particle size reduction and heat treatments. Experimental materials had significantly (p0.05) strength difference. All other groups' mean BFS and characteristic strengths were found to be significantly different (pceramics with high flexural strength. These materials may help to reduce problems associated with brittle fracture of all-ceramic restorations and give reduced enamel wear. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Peroxidase-like activity of nanocrystalline cobalt selenide and its application for uric acid detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang QQ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quan-Quan Zhuang,1 Zhi-Hang Lin,1 Yan-Cheng Jiang,1 Hao-Hua Deng,2 Shao-Bin He,1,3 Li-Ting Su,4 Xiao-Qiong Shi,2 Wei Chen2 1Department of Pharmacy, Affiliated Quanzhou First Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Quanzhou, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, 3Department of Pharmacy, Quanzhou Infectious Disease Hospital, 4Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, Quanzhou Medical College, Quanzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Dendrite-like cobalt selenide nanostructures were synthesized from cobalt and selenium powder precursors by a solvothermal method in anhydrous ethylenediamine. The as-prepared nanocrystalline cobalt selenide was found to possess peroxidase-like activity that could catalyze the reaction of peroxidase substrates in the presence of H2O2. A spectrophotometric method for uric acid (UA determination was developed based on the nanocrystalline cobalt selenide-catalyzed coupling reaction between N-ethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl-3-methylaniline sodium salt and 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP in the presence of H2O2. Under optimum conditions, the absorbance was proportional to the concentration of UA over the range of 2.0–40 µM with a detection limit of 0.5 µM. The applicability of the proposed method has been validated by determination of UA in human serum samples with satisfactory results. Keywords: enzyme mimics, cobalt selenide, peroxidase-like activity, uric acid, human serum

  1. Comparative supercapacitive properties of asymmetry two electrode coin type supercapacitor cells made from MWCNTs/cobalt oxide and MWCNTs/iron oxide nanocomposite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adekunle, AS

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Supercapacitive properties of synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles (MO) vis a vis iron oxides (Fe(sub2)O(sub3)) and cobalt oxide (Co(sub3)O(sub4)) nanoparticles integrated with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in a two-electrode coin cell type...

  2. IN SITU AND POST REACTION COBALT-INCORPORATION INTO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bridged silica materials decreased with increasing loading of APTS as well as after cobalt incorporation. Thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy show that the surfactant is removed by solvent extraction. Cobalt ion incorporation is ...

  3. Characteristics of Polyaniline Cobalt Supported Catalysts for Epoxidation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Grzegorz; Pielichowski, Jan; Grzesik, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    A study of polyaniline (PANI) doping with various cobalt compounds, that is, cobalt(II) chloride, cobalt(II) acetate, and cobalt(II) salen, is presented. The catalysts were prepared by depositing cobalt compounds onto the polymer surface. PANI powders containing cobalt ions were obtained by one- or two-step method suspending PANI in the following acetonitrile/acetic acid solution or acetonitrile and then acetic acid solution. Moreover different ratios of Co(II) : PANI were studied. Catalysts obtained with both methods and at all ratios were investigated using various techniques including AAS and XPS spectroscopy. The optimum conditions for preparation of PANI/Co catalysts were established. Catalytic activity of polyaniline cobalt(II) supported catalysts was tested in dec-1-ene epoxidation with molecular oxygen at room temperature. The relationship between the amount of cobalt species, measured with both AAS and XPS techniques, and the activity of PANI-Co catalysts has been established. PMID:24701183

  4. Cobalt: A vital element in the aircraft engine industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Recent trends in the United States consumption of cobalt indicate that superalloys for aircraft engine manufacture require increasing amounts of this strategic element. Superalloys consume a lion's share of total U.S. cobalt usage which was about 16 million pounds in 1980. In excess of 90 percent of the cobalt used in this country was imported, principally from the African countries of Zaire and Zambia. Early studies on the roles of cobalt as an alloying element in high temperature alloys concentrated on the simple Ni-Cr and Nimonic alloy series. The role of cobalt in current complex nickel base superalloys is not well defined and indeed, the need for the high concentration of cobalt in widely used nickel base superalloys is not firmly established. The current cobalt situation is reviewed as it applies to superalloys and the opportunities for research to reduce the consumption of cobalt in the aircraft engine industry are described.

  5. Characteristics of Polyaniline Cobalt Supported Catalysts for Epoxidation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Kowalski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of polyaniline (PANI doping with various cobalt compounds, that is, cobalt(II chloride, cobalt(II acetate, and cobalt(II salen, is presented. The catalysts were prepared by depositing cobalt compounds onto the polymer surface. PANI powders containing cobalt ions were obtained by one- or two-step method suspending PANI in the following acetonitrile/acetic acid solution or acetonitrile and then acetic acid solution. Moreover different ratios of Co(II : PANI were studied. Catalysts obtained with both methods and at all ratios were investigated using various techniques including AAS and XPS spectroscopy. The optimum conditions for preparation of PANI/Co catalysts were established. Catalytic activity of polyaniline cobalt(II supported catalysts was tested in dec-1-ene epoxidation with molecular oxygen at room temperature. The relationship between the amount of cobalt species, measured with both AAS and XPS techniques, and the activity of PANI-Co catalysts has been established.

  6. Highly selective and active CO2 reduction electrocatalysts based on cobalt phthalocyanine/carbon nanotube hybrid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Wu, Zishan; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Liewu; Li, Yanyan; Xu, Haomin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zisheng; Liang, Yongye; Wang, Hailiang

    2017-03-01

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide with renewable energy is a sustainable way of producing carbon-neutral fuels. However, developing active, selective and stable electrocatalysts is challenging and entails material structure design and tailoring across a range of length scales. Here we report a cobalt-phthalocyanine-based high-performance carbon dioxide reduction electrocatalyst material developed with a combined nanoscale and molecular approach. On the nanoscale, cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecules are uniformly anchored on carbon nanotubes to afford substantially increased current density, improved selectivity for carbon monoxide, and enhanced durability. On the molecular level, the catalytic performance is further enhanced by introducing cyano groups to the CoPc molecule. The resulting hybrid catalyst exhibits >95% Faradaic efficiency for carbon monoxide production in a wide potential range and extraordinary catalytic activity with a current density of 15.0 mA cm-2 and a turnover frequency of 4.1 s-1 at the overpotential of 0.52 V in a near-neutral aqueous solution.

  7. Highly selective and active CO2 reduction electrocatalysts based on cobalt phthalocyanine/carbon nanotube hybrid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Wu, Zishan; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Liewu; Li, Yanyan; Xu, Haomin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zisheng; Liang, Yongye; Wang, Hailiang

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide with renewable energy is a sustainable way of producing carbon-neutral fuels. However, developing active, selective and stable electrocatalysts is challenging and entails material structure design and tailoring across a range of length scales. Here we report a cobalt-phthalocyanine-based high-performance carbon dioxide reduction electrocatalyst material developed with a combined nanoscale and molecular approach. On the nanoscale, cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecules are uniformly anchored on carbon nanotubes to afford substantially increased current density, improved selectivity for carbon monoxide, and enhanced durability. On the molecular level, the catalytic performance is further enhanced by introducing cyano groups to the CoPc molecule. The resulting hybrid catalyst exhibits >95% Faradaic efficiency for carbon monoxide production in a wide potential range and extraordinary catalytic activity with a current density of 15.0 mA cm−2 and a turnover frequency of 4.1 s−1 at the overpotential of 0.52 V in a near-neutral aqueous solution. PMID:28272403

  8. Highly selective and active CO2reduction electrocatalysts based on cobalt phthalocyanine/carbon nanotube hybrid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Wu, Zishan; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Liewu; Li, Yanyan; Xu, Haomin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zisheng; Liang, Yongye; Wang, Hailiang

    2017-03-08

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide with renewable energy is a sustainable way of producing carbon-neutral fuels. However, developing active, selective and stable electrocatalysts is challenging and entails material structure design and tailoring across a range of length scales. Here we report a cobalt-phthalocyanine-based high-performance carbon dioxide reduction electrocatalyst material developed with a combined nanoscale and molecular approach. On the nanoscale, cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecules are uniformly anchored on carbon nanotubes to afford substantially increased current density, improved selectivity for carbon monoxide, and enhanced durability. On the molecular level, the catalytic performance is further enhanced by introducing cyano groups to the CoPc molecule. The resulting hybrid catalyst exhibits >95% Faradaic efficiency for carbon monoxide production in a wide potential range and extraordinary catalytic activity with a current density of 15.0 mA cm -2 and a turnover frequency of 4.1 s -1 at the overpotential of 0.52 V in a near-neutral aqueous solution.

  9. Association between cobalt allergy and dermatitis caused by leather articles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cobalt is a strong skin sensitizer and a prevalent contact allergen. Recent studies have recognized exposure to leather articles as a potential cause of cobalt allergy. OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between contact allergy to cobalt and a history of dermatitis resulting from....... CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests a positive association between cobalt allergy and a history of dermatitis caused by non-occupational exposure to leather articles....

  10. Manipulating radicals: Using cobalt to steer radical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chirilă, A.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes research aimed at understanding and exploiting metallo-radical reactivity and explores reactions mediated by square planar, low-spin cobalt(II) complexes. A primary goal was to uncover novel reactivity of discrete cobalt(III)-bound carbene radicals generated upon reaction of the cobalt(II) catalysts with carbene precursors. Another important goal was to replace cobalt(II)-porphyrin catalysts with cheaper and easier to prepare metallo-radical analogues. Therefore the cata...

  11. The physiological effect of cobalt on watermelon cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Naihua; Jin Yafang; Sun Yaochen; Huang Yiming

    1993-01-01

    Cobalt has essential physiological action on both animals and plants. For the latter it can raise plant's nitrogen-fixing ability and saccharine content. Spray of cobalt mixed with other nutritive elements can improve the germinatit of seeds and the yield of fruit. For specifying the nutritive function of cobalt upon watermelon, isotope 60 Co was mixed into a complex leaf nutritive aqua and the regularity of transferring and absorbing cobalt in the watermelon's body was investigated

  12. Relaxation resistance of heat resisting alloys with cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzdyka, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    Relaxation resistance of refractory nickel-chromium alloys containing 5 to 14 % cobalt is under study. The tests involve the use of circular samples at 800 deg to 850 deg C. It is shown that an alloy containing 14% cobalt possesses the best relaxation resistance exceeding that of nickel-chromium alloys without any cobalt by a factor of 1.5 to 2. The relaxation resistance of an alloy with 5% cobalt can be increased by hardening at repeated loading

  13. Cobalt, nickel and cadmium coordination compounds with phenylacetylhydrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machkhoshvili, R.I.; Metreveli, D.P.; Mitaishvili, G.Sh.; Shchelokov, R.N.

    1985-03-01

    In the process of interaction of aqueous-ethanol solutions of chlorides, sulphates, nitrates, thiocyanates of cobalt, nickel, cadmium and phenylacetylhydrazine in neutral or low-acid medium coordination compounds: (M(EAG)/sub 3/)X/sub 2/ (M=Co, Ni; X=Cl, 1/2SO/sub 4/, NO/sub 3/), Cd(FAG)/sub 2/X/sub 2/ (X = Cl, 1/2SO/sub 4/, NCS), Ni(EAG)/sub 2/(NCS)/sub 2/, where FAG C/sub 6/H/sub 5/CH/sub 2/xCONHNH/sub 2/, have been synthesized. In the reactions of aqueous-ethanol solutions of (Co(NH/sub 3/)/sub 5/Cl)Cl/sub 2/ and phenylacetylhydrazine the complex Co(C/sub 6/H/sub 5/CH/sub 2/CONNH/sub 2/)/sub 3/ is prepared. Certain physicochemical properties and IR absorption spectra of the coordination compounds synthesized are studied.

  14. Spinel versus layered structures for lithium cobalt oxide synthesized at 400-degrees-c

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gummow, RJ

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available Rietveld refinements of X-ray data of LiCoO2 prepared at 400-degrees-C and a chemically-delithiated product Li0.5CoO2 using space group symmetries R3mBAR and Fd3m are reported. Refinements in both R3mBAR (layered-type structure) and Fd3m (spinel...

  15. Synthesis, structural, and spectroscopic characterization and reactivities of mononuclear cobalt(III)-peroxo complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaeheung; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Kang, Hye Yeon; Lee, Jung Yoon; Kubo, Minoru; Ogura, Takashi; Solomon, Edward I; Nam, Wonwoo

    2010-12-01

    Metal-dioxygen adducts are key intermediates detected in the catalytic cycles of dioxygen activation by metalloenzymes and biomimetic compounds. In this study, mononuclear cobalt(III)-peroxo complexes bearing tetraazamacrocyclic ligands, [Co(12-TMC)(O(2))](+) and [Co(13-TMC)(O(2))](+), were synthesized by reacting [Co(12-TMC)(CH(3)CN)](2+) and [Co(13-TMC)(CH(3)CN)](2+), respectively, with H(2)O(2) in the presence of triethylamine. The mononuclear cobalt(III)-peroxo intermediates were isolated and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques and X-ray crystallography, and the structural and spectroscopic characterization demonstrated unambiguously that the peroxo ligand is bound in a side-on η(2) fashion. The O-O bond stretching frequency of [Co(12-TMC)(O(2))](+) and [Co(13-TMC)(O(2))](+) was determined to be 902 cm(-1) by resonance Raman spectroscopy. The structural properties of the CoO(2) core in both complexes are nearly identical; the O-O bond distances of [Co(12-TMC)(O(2))](+) and [Co(13-TMC)(O(2))](+) were 1.4389(17) Å and 1.438(6) Å, respectively. The cobalt(III)-peroxo complexes showed reactivities in the oxidation of aldehydes and O(2)-transfer reactions. In the aldehyde oxidation reactions, the nucleophilic reactivity of the cobalt-peroxo complexes was significantly dependent on the ring size of the macrocyclic ligands, with the reactivity of [Co(13-TMC)(O(2))](+) > [Co(12-TMC)(O(2))](+). In the O(2)-transfer reactions, the cobalt(III)-peroxo complexes transferred the bound peroxo group to a manganese(II) complex, affording the corresponding cobalt(II) and manganese(III)-peroxo complexes. The reactivity of the cobalt-peroxo complexes in O(2)-transfer was also significantly dependent on the ring size of tetraazamacrocycles, and the reactivity order in the O(2)-transfer reactions was the same as that observed in the aldehyde oxidation reactions.

  16. Atomic nanoscale technology in the nuclear industry

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Taeho

    2011-01-01

    Developments at the nanoscale are leading to new possibilities and challenges for nuclear applications in areas ranging from medicine to international commerce to atomic power production/waste treatment. Progress in nanotech is helping the nuclear industry slash the cost of energy production. It also continues to improve application reliability and safety measures, which remain a critical concern, especially since the reactor disasters in Japan. Exploring the new wide-ranging landscape of nuclear function, Atomic Nanoscale Technology in the Nuclear Industry details the breakthroughs in nanosca

  17. Nanoscale phase-change materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qinghui; Wang, Yuxi; Zhu, Jia

    2017-06-01

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) that can reversibly transit between crystalline and amorphous phases have been widely used for data-storage and other functional devices. As PCMs scale down to nanoscale, the properties and transition procedures can vary, bringing both challenges and opportunities in scalability. This article describes the physical structures, properties and applications of nanoscale phase-change materials and devices. The limitations and performance of scaling properties in phase-change materials and the recent progress and challenges in phase-change devices are presented. At the end, some emerging applications related to phase-change materials are also introduced.

  18. Nanoscale phase-change materials and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Qinghui; Wang, Yuxi; Zhu, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) that can reversibly transit between crystalline and amorphous phases have been widely used for data-storage and other functional devices. As PCMs scale down to nanoscale, the properties and transition procedures can vary, bringing both challenges and opportunities in scalability. This article describes the physical structures, properties and applications of nanoscale phase-change materials and devices. The limitations and performance of scaling properties in phase-change materials and the recent progress and challenges in phase-change devices are presented. At the end, some emerging applications related to phase-change materials are also introduced. (topical review)

  19. Palladium-cobalt particles as oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav [East Setauket, NY; Huang, Tao [Manorville, NY

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates to palladium-cobalt particles useful as oxygen-reducing electrocatalysts. The invention also relates to oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells containing these palladium-cobalt particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for the production of electrical energy by using the palladium-cobalt particles of the invention.

  20. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining a...

  1. Feasibility Study for Cobalt Bundle Loading to CANDU Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Donghwan; Kim, Youngae; Kim, Sungmin

    2016-01-01

    CANDU units are generally used to produce cobalt-60 at Bruce and Point Lepreau in Canada and Embalse in Argentina. China has started production of cobalt-60 using its CANDU 6 Qinshan Phase III nuclear power plant in 2009. For cobalt-60 production, the reactor’s full complement of stainless steel adjusters is replaced with neutronically equivalent cobalt-59 adjusters, which are essentially invisible to reactor operation. With its very high neutron flux and optimized fuel burn-up, the CANDU has a very high cobalt-60 production rate in a relatively short time. This makes CANDU an excellent vehicle for bulk cobalt-60 production. Several studies have been performed to produce cobalt-60 using adjuster rod at Wolsong nuclear power plant. This study proposed new concept for producing cobalt-60 and performed the feasibility study. Bundle typed cobalt loading concept is proposed and evaluated the feasibility to fuel management without physics and system design change. The requirement to load cobalt bundle to the core was considered and several channels are nominated. The production of cobalt-60 source is very depend on the flux level and burnup directly. But the neutron absorption characteristic of cobalt bundle is too high, so optimizing design study is needed in the future

  2. Assessment of cobalt levels in wastewater, soil and vegetable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Cobalt concentrations in this study were higher than maximum contaminant levels set by Standard. Organizations such as WHO and FAO in wastewater while below their limits in vegetables. Key words: Cobalt level, Kubanni River, soil, vegetable, wastewater. INTRODUCTION. Cobalt is beneficial to human because it is part ...

  3. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. M.; Coker, V. S.; Moise, S.; Wincott, P. L.; Vaughan, D. J.; Tuna, F.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Lloyd, J. R.; Telling, N. D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 −xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt–iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe2+ site with Co2+, with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814

  4. Perfluorinated cobalt phthalocyanine effectively catalyzes water electrooxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Morlanes, Natalia Sanchez

    2014-12-08

    Efficient electrocatalysis of water oxidation under mild conditions at neutral pH was achieved by a fluorinated cobalt phthalocyanine immobilized on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) surfaces with an onset potential at 1.7 V vs. RHE. Spectroscopic, electrochemical, and inhibition studies indicate that phthalocyanine molecular species are the operational active sites. Neither free cobalt ions nor heterogeneous cobalt oxide particles or films were observed. During long-term controlled-potential electrolysis at 2 V vs. RHE (phosphate buffer, pH 7), electrocatalytic water oxidation was sustained for at least 8 h (TON ≈ 1.0 × 105), producing about 4 μmol O2 h-1 cm-2 with a turnover frequency (TOF) of about 3.6 s-1 and no measurable catalyst degradation.

  5. Solubility of cobalt in primary circuit solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, I.; Joyer, F.

    1992-01-01

    The solubility of cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2 O 4 ) was measured in PWR primary circuit conditions, in the temperature range 250-350 deg C, and the results were compared with the ones obtained on magnetite and nickel ferrite. As in the former cases, it was found that, in the prevailing primary circuit conditions, the solubility of the cobalt ferrite was minimum at temperatures around 300 deg C, for cobalt as well as for iron. The equilibrium iron concentration is significantly lower than in the case of magnetite. The results are discussed in relation with the POTHY code, based only on thermodynamic laws and data, used for the prediction of the primary circuit chemistry

  6. Radioactive cobalt removal from Salem liquid radwaste with cobalt selective media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maza R.; Wilson, J.A.; Hetherington, R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports results of benchtop tests using ion exchange material to selectively remove radioactive cobalt from high conductivity liquid radwaste at the Salem Nuclear Generating Station. The purpose of this test program is to reduce the number of curies in liquid releases without increasing the solid waste volume. These tests have identified two cobalt selective materials that together remove radioactive cobalt more effectively than the single component currently used. All test materials were preconditioned by conversion to the divalent calcium or sulfate form to simulate chemically exhausted media

  7. Radiation induced ligand loss from cobalt complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funston, A. M.; McFadyen, W.D.; Tregloan, P.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Due to the rapid nature of ligand dissociation from cobalt(II) complexes the study of the rate of ligand dissociation necessitates the use of a technique such as pulse radiolysis. This allows the rapid reduction of the corresponding cobalt(III) complex by a reducing radical, such as the aquated electron, to form the cobalt(II) complex. However, to date, no systematic study of either the mechanism of reduction or the influence of the electronic structure on the rate of ligand dissociation has been carried out. In order to understand these processes more fully the mechanism of reduction of a range of related cobalt(III) complexes by the aquated electron and the subsequent rate of ligand dissociation from the resulting cobalt(II) complexes is being investigated. It has been found that a number of processes are observed following the initial rapid reaction of the cobalt(III) complex with the aquated electron. Ultimately ligand loss is observed. Depending upon the complex, the initial processes observed may include the formation of coordinated radicals and electron transfer within the complex. For complexes containing aromatic ligands such as 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine the formation of a coordinated radical is observed as the initial reduction step. The kinetics of ligand dissociation of these complexes has been determined. The loss of monodentate ligands is fast and has been indistinguishable from the reduction processes when aromatic ligands are also present in the complex. However, for diamine chelates and diimine chelates spectra of the transient species can be resolved

  8. Cobalt-free nickel-base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Michio; Harada, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    Cobalt-free nickel-base cast superalloys have been developed. Cobalt is considered to be a beneficial element to strengthen the alloys but should be eliminated in alloys to be used for direct cycle helium turbine driven by helium gas from HTGR (high temp. gas reactor). The elimination of cobalt is required to avoid the formation of radioactive 60 Co from the debris or scales of the alloys. Cobalt-free alloys are also desirable from another viewpoint, i.e. recently the shortage of the element has become a serious problem in industry. Cobalt-free Mar-M200 type alloys modified by the additions of 0.15 - 0.2 wt% B and 1 - 1.5 wt% Hf were found to have a creep rupture strength superior or comparable to that of the original Mar-M200 alloy bearing cobalt. The ductility in tensile test at 800 0 C, as cast or after prolonged heating at 900 0 C (the tensile test was done without removing the surface layer affected by the heating), was also improved by the additions of 0.15 - 0.2% B and 1 - 1.5% Hf. The morphology of grain boundaries became intricated by the additions of 0.15 - 0.2% B and 1 - 1.5% Hf, to such a degree that one can hardly distinguish grain boundaries by microscopes. The change in the grain boundary morphology was considered, as suggested previously by one of the authors (M.Y.), to be the reason for the improvements in the creep rupture strength and tensile ductility. (author)

  9. Using mathematical models to understand the effect of nanoscale roughness on protein adsorption for improving medical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan B

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Batur Ercan,1 Dongwoo Khang,2 Joseph Carpenter,3 Thomas J Webster1 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2School of Materials Science and Engineering and Center for PRC and RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, South Korea; 3School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Surface roughness and energy significantly influence protein adsorption on to biomaterials, which, in turn, controls select cellular adhesion to determine the success and longevity of an implant. To understand these relationships at a fundamental level, a model was originally proposed by Khang et al to correlate nanoscale surface properties (specifically, nanoscale roughness and energy to protein adsorption, which explained the greater cellular responses on nanostructured surfaces commonly reported in the literature today. To test this model for different surfaces from what was previously used to develop that model, in this study we synthesized highly ordered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid surfaces of identical chemistry but altered nanoscale surface roughness and energy using poly(dimethylsiloxane molds of polystyrene beads. Fibronectin and collagen type IV adsorption studies showed a linear adsorption behavior as the surface nanoroughness increased. This supported the general trends observed by Khang et al. However, when fitting such data to the mathematical model established by Khang et al, a strong correlation did not result. Thus, this study demonstrated that the equation proposed by Khang et al to predict protein adsorption should be modified to accommodate for additional nanoscale surface property contributions (ie, surface charge to make the model more accurate. In summary, results from this study provided an important step in developing future mathematical models that can correlate surface properties (such as nanoscale roughness and surface energy to initial protein adsorption events important to

  10. Copper nanofiber-networked cobalt oxide composites for high performance Li-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim Hee-Sang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We prepared a composite electrode structure consisting of copper nanofiber-networked cobalt oxide (CuNFs@CoO x . The copper nanofibers (CuNFs were fabricated on a substrate with formation of a network structure, which may have potential for improving electron percolation and retarding film deformation during the discharging/charging process over the electroactive cobalt oxide. Compared to bare CoO x thin-film (CoO x TF electrodes, the CuNFs@CoO x electrodes exhibited a significant enhancement of rate performance by at least six-fold at an input current density of 3C-rate. Such enhanced Li-ion storage performance may be associated with modified electrode structure at the nanoscale, improved charge transfer, and facile stress relaxation from the embedded CuNF network. Consequently, the CuNFs@CoO x composite structure demonstrated here can be used as a promising high-performance electrode for Li-ion batteries.

  11. Preface: Friction at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusc, Claudio; Smith, Roger; Urbakh, Michael; Vanossi, Andrea

    2008-09-01

    Interfacial friction is one of the oldest problems in physics and chemistry, and certainly one of the most important from a practical point of view. Everyday operations on a broad range of scales, from nanometer and up, depend upon the smooth and satisfactory functioning of countless tribological systems. Friction imposes serious constraints and limitations on the performance and lifetime of micro-machines and, undoubtedly, will impose even more severe constraints on the emerging technology of nano-machines. Standard lubrication techniques used for large objects are expected to be less effective in the nano-world. Novel methods for control and manipulation are therefore needed. What has been missing is a molecular level understanding of processes occurring between and close to interacting surfaces to help understand, and later manipulate friction. Friction is intimately related to both adhesion and wear, and all three require an understanding of highly non-equilibrium processes occurring at the molecular level to determine what happens at the macroscopic level. Due to its practical importance and the relevance to basic scientific questions there has been major increase in activity in the study of interfacial friction on the microscopic level during the last decade. Intriguing structural and dynamical features have been observed experimentally. These observations have motivated theoretical efforts, both numerical and analytical. This special issue focusses primarily on discussion of microscopic mechanisms of friction and adhesion at the nanoscale level. The contributions cover many important aspects of frictional behaviour, including the origin of stick-slip motion, the dependence of measured forces on the material properties, effects of thermal fluctuations, surface roughness and instabilities in boundary lubricants on both static and kinetic friction. An important problem that has been raised in this issue, and which has still to be resolved, concerns the

  12. Metal- versus Ligand-Centered Oxidations in Phenolato-Vanadium and -Cobalt Complexes: Characterization of Phenoxyl-Cobalt(III) Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Achim; Adam, Britta; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Hildenbrand, Knut; Schnepf, Robert; Hildebrandt, Peter; Bill, Eckhard; Wieghardt, Karl

    1997-08-13

    The coordination chemistry of the pendent-arm macrocycles 1,4,7-tris(3,5-dimethyl-2-hydroxybenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, L(Me)H(3), 1,4,7-tris(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, L(Bu)H(3), 1,4,7-tris(3-tert-butyl-5-methoxy-2-hydroxybenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, L(OCH)()3H(3), and Tolman's ligand 1,4-diisopropyl-7-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, L(Pr)H, with vanadium and cobalt(III) has been studied. The following complexes containing a fac-N(3)O(3) donor set have been synthesized: [L(Me)V(III)] (1), [L(Me)V(IV)]PF(6) (2), [(L(Me)H)V(V)(O)]PF(6) (3), [L(Bu)V(IV)]PF(6) (4), [L(OCH)()3V(IV)]PF(6) (5), [L(Me)Co(III)] (6), [L(Bu)Co(III)] (7), [L(OCH)()3Co(III)] (8). In addition, two complexes containing the L(Pr)Co(III) fragment have been prepared: [L(Pr)Co(III)(acac)](ClO(4)) (9) and [L(Pr)Co(III)(Cl(4)cat)].CH(3)CN (10), where acac(-) represents the ligand pentane-2,4-dionate and Cl(4)cat(2)(-) is tetrachlorocatecholate. Complexes 9 and 10 have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography: 9 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P&onemacr; with a = 9.493(1) Å, b = 9.760(1) Å, c = 18.979(2) Å, alpha = 88.57(1) degrees, beta = 78.60(1) degrees, gamma = 79.24(1) degrees, V = 1693.3(3) Å(3), and Z = 2; 10 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n with a = 10.184(2) Å, b = 24.860(5) Å, c = 14.872(3) Å, beta = 97.95(3) degrees, V = 3729(1) Å(3), and Z = 4. Electrochemically, complexes 2, 4, and 5 can be reversibly oxidized by one electron, yielding vanadium(V), and one-electron-reduced, affording vanadium(III) species; 3 can be reduced to [L(Me)HV(IV)(O)]. These redox processes are shown to be metal-centered. In contrast, the cyclic voltammograms of 7 and 8 display three reversible one-electron oxidations. For the monocations [7](*)(+) and [8](*)(+), EPR and UV-vis spectroscopies reveal that these are phenoxyl-cobalt(III) species. Thus, the redox processes are ligand

  13. EXAFS Determination of the Structure of Cobalt in Carbon-Supported Cobalt and Cobalt-Molybdenum Sulfide Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Bouwens, S.M.A.M.; Veen, J.A.R. van; Beer, V.H.J. de; Prins, R.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the cobalt present in carbon-supported Co and Co-Mo sulfide catalysts was studied by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Co K-edge and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thiophene hydrodesulfurization activities were used to measure the catalytic properties of

  14. Effect of cobalt on the primary productivity of Spirulina platensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R.M.; Panigrahi, S.; Azeez, P.A.

    1987-10-01

    Cobalt, a micronutrient for biological organisms, is a metal of wide use. Main sources of Co to the environment are combustion of fossil fuels, smelters, cobalt processing facilities, sewage and industrial wastes. Atomic power plants and nuclear weapon detonations form an important source of radioisotopes of this metal to the environment. Cobalt has been included in the 14 toxic trace elements of critical importance from the point of view of environmental pollution and health hazards. Cobalt deficiency leads to diseases like stunted growth. At toxic level, Co inhibits heme biosynthesis and enzyme activities. The present study reports the effect of cobalt on biomass productivity of blue-green alga Spirulina platensis.

  15. Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I.

    2012-01-01

    The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

  16. Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I.

    2012-06-01

    The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

  17. Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the origin and physical effects of “dynamic structural disorder” (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale

  18. Enhanced nanoscale friction on fluorinated graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sangku; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, Jeong Young

    2012-12-12

    Atomically thin graphene is an ideal model system for studying nanoscale friction due to its intrinsic two-dimensional (2D) anisotropy. Furthermore, modulating its tribological properties could be an important milestone for graphene-based micro- and nanomechanical devices. Here, we report unexpectedly enhanced nanoscale friction on chemically modified graphene and a relevant theoretical analysis associated with flexural phonons. Ultrahigh vacuum friction force microscopy measurements show that nanoscale friction on the graphene surface increases by a factor of 6 after fluorination of the surface, while the adhesion force is slightly reduced. Density functional theory calculations show that the out-of-plane bending stiffness of graphene increases up to 4-fold after fluorination. Thus, the less compliant F-graphene exhibits more friction. This indicates that the mechanics of tip-to-graphene nanoscale friction would be characteristically different from that of conventional solid-on-solid contact and would be dominated by the out-of-plane bending stiffness of the chemically modified graphene. We propose that damping via flexural phonons could be a main source for frictional energy dissipation in 2D systems such as graphene.

  19. Nanoscale science and nanotechnology education in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nanoscale science and nanotechnology is a rapidly growing and multidisciplinary field with its footing in chemistry, physics, molecular biology and engineering. It has led to breakthroughs in energy, environmental science, agriculture, biotechnology and several others. it is also capable of making a positive and significant ...

  20. Anomalous freezing behavior of nanoscale liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangler, E. J.; Kumar, P. B. S.; Laradji, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the finite size of one-component liposomes on their phase behavior is investigated via simulations of an implicit-solvent model of self-assembled lipid bilayers. We found that the high curvature of nanoscale liposomes has a significant effect on their freezing behavior. While...

  1. Bio-Conjugates for Nanoscale Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Klaus

    Bio-conjugates for Nanoscale Applications is the title of this thesis, which covers three different projects in chemical bio-conjugation research, namely synthesis and applications of: Lipidated fluorescent peptides, carbohydrate oxime-azide linkers and N-aryl O-R2 oxyamine derivatives. Lipidated...

  2. Selective nanoscale growth of lattice mismatched materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Chang; Brueck, Steven R. J.

    2017-06-20

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods of forming high-quality semiconductor devices using lattice-mismatched materials. In one embodiment, a composite film including one or more substantially-single-particle-thick nanoparticle layers can be deposited over a substrate as a nanoscale selective growth mask for epitaxially growing lattice-mismatched materials over the substrate.

  3. Nanoscale thermal transport: Theoretical method and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yu-Jia; Liu, Yue-Yang; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2018-03-01

    With the size reduction of nanoscale electronic devices, the heat generated by the unit area in integrated circuits will be increasing exponentially, and consequently the thermal management in these devices is a very important issue. In addition, the heat generated by the electronic devices mostly diffuses to the air in the form of waste heat, which makes the thermoelectric energy conversion also an important issue for nowadays. In recent years, the thermal transport properties in nanoscale systems have attracted increasing attention in both experiments and theoretical calculations. In this review, we will discuss various theoretical simulation methods for investigating thermal transport properties and take a glance at several interesting thermal transport phenomena in nanoscale systems. Our emphasizes will lie on the advantage and limitation of calculational method, and the application of nanoscale thermal transport and thermoelectric property. Project supported by the Nation Key Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2017YFB0701602) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11674092).

  4. Force modulation for enhanced nanoscale electrical sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, W.W.; Sebastian, A.; Abelmann, Leon; Despont, M.; Pozidis, H.

    2011-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy employing conductive probes is a powerful tool for the investigation and modification of electrical properties at the nanoscale. Application areas include semiconductor metrology, probe-based data storage and materials research. Conductive probes can also be used to emulate

  5. Nanoscale temperature sensing using the Seebeck effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F. L.; Flipse, J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the effect of Joule heating on the electron temperature in metallic nanoscale devices and compare the results with a diffusive 3D finite element model. The temperature is probed using four thermocouples located at different distances from the heater. A good quantitative

  6. Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I. [National Metrology Laboratory SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), Lot PT 4803, Bandar Baru Salak Tinggi, 43900 Sepang (Malaysia)

    2012-06-29

    The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

  7. Micelles Based on Biodegradable Poly(L-glutamic acid)-b-Polylactide with Paramagnetic Gd Ions Chelated to the Shell Layer as a Potential Nanoscale MRI-Visible Delivery System

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guodong; Zhang, Rui; Wen, Xiaoxia; Li, Li; Li, Chun

    2007-01-01

    There is much interest in the development of nanoscale drug delivery system with MRI visibility to optimize the delivery efficiency and therapeutic efficacy under image guidance. Here we report on the successful fabrication of nanoscale micelles based on biodegradable poly(L-glutamic acid)-b-polylactide (PG-b-PLA) block copolymer with paramagnetic Gd3+ ions chelated to their shell. (PG-b-PLA) was synthesized by sequential polymerization reactions: anionic polymerization of L-lactide followed ...

  8. Toxicity and bioactivity of cobalt nanoparticles on the monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-ke; Ye, Jun; Han, Qing-lin; Tao, Ran; Liu, Fan; Wang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    To explore the toxicity and biological activity of cobalt nanoparticles on the osteoclasts. Analyze the relationship between cobalt nanoparticles and osteolysis. Monocyte-macrophages (RAW 264.7) was cultured in vitro, osteoclast-like cells were induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). After RAW 264.7 was induced for 24 h, Methyl Thiazolium Tetrazolium (MTT) biological toxicity test of osteoclast-like cell was preceded using Cobalt nanoparticles (set 4 concentrations: 10, 20, 50, 100 μM) and cobalt chloride (set 4 concentrations: 10, 20, 50, 100 μM) at 2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 h respectively. The relative expression of mRNA of CA II and Cat K after RAW 264.7 induction was determined by Q-PCR. mRNA relative expression of CA II, Cat K were reduced at multiple concentrations both cobalt nanoparticles and cobalt chloride, and was time and concentration dependent, cobalt nanoparticles are more significant than cobalt chloride group. But when the cobalt nanoparticles concentration is in 10-50 μM, the mRNA relative expression of CA II, Cat K increased. Cobalt nanoparticles have biological toxicity. At multiple concentrations, the differentiation and proliferation of osteoclasts was inhibited, but when the concentration of cobalt nanoparticles is in 10-50 μM, it has been strengthened. © 2015 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. OXYGEN-1S AND COBALT-2P X-RAY ABSORPTION OF COBALT OXIDES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEGROOT, FMF; ABBATE, M; VANELP, J; SAWATZKY, GA; MA, YJ; CHEN, CT; SETTE, F

    1993-01-01

    The oxygen ls and cobalt 2p x-ray absorption spectra of CoO, Li-doped CoO and LiCoO2 have been measured with 0.1 eV resolution. The cobalt 2p spectra are analysed with a ligand-field multiplet model and the inclusion of charge-transfer effects is discussed. The oxygen ls spectra are interpreted as

  10. Nanoscale hotspots due to nonequilibrium thermal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Sanjiv; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experimental and modeling efforts have been directed towards the issue of temperature localization and hotspot formation in the vicinity of nanoscale heat generating devices. The nonequilibrium transport conditions which develop around these nanoscale devices results in elevated temperatures near the heat source which can not be predicted by continuum diffusion theory. Efforts to determine the severity of this temperature localization phenomena in silicon devices near and above room temperature are of technological importance to the development of microelectronics and other nanotechnologies. In this work, we have developed a new modeling tool in order to explore the magnitude of the additional thermal resistance which forms around nanoscale hotspots from temperatures of 100-1000K. The models are based on a two fluid approximation in which thermal energy is transferred between ''stationary'' optical phonons and fast propagating acoustic phonon modes. The results of the model have shown excellent agreement with experimental results of localized hotspots in silicon at lower temperatures. The model predicts that the effect of added thermal resistance due to the nonequilibrium phonon distribution is greatest at lower temperatures, but is maintained out to temperatures of 1000K. The resistance predicted by the numerical code can be easily integrated with continuum models in order to predict the temperature distribution around nanoscale heat sources with improved accuracy. Additional research efforts also focused on the measurements of the thermal resistance of silicon thin films at higher temperatures, with a focus on polycrystalline silicon. This work was intended to provide much needed experimental data on the thermal transport properties for micro and nanoscale devices built with this material. Initial experiments have shown that the exposure of polycrystalline silicon to high temperatures may induce recrystallization and radically increase the thermal

  11. Cobalt reduction of NSSS valve hardfacings for ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joo Hak; Lee, Sang Sub

    1994-07-01

    This report informs NSSS designer that replacement of materials is one of the major means of ALARA implementation, and describes that NSSS valves with high-cobalt hardfacing are significant contributors to post-shutdown radiation fields caused by activation of cobalt-59 to cobalt-60. Generic procedures for implementing cobalt reduction programs for valves are presented. Discussions are presented of the general and specific design requirements for valve hardfacing in nuclear service. The nuclear safety issues involved with changing valve hardfacing materials are discussed. The common methods used to deposit hardfacing materials are described together with an explanation of the wear measurements. Wear resistance, corrosion resistance, friction coefficient, and mechanical properties of candidate hardfacing alloys are given. World-wide nuclear utility experience with cobalt-free hardfacing alloys is described. The use of low-cobalt or cobalt-free alloys in other nuclear plant components is described. 17 figs., 38 tabs., 18 refs. (Author)

  12. Electrochemical C-H Amination by Cobalt Catalysis in a Renewable Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauermann, Nicolas; Mei, Ruhuai; Ackermann, Lutz

    2018-03-06

    Syntheses of substituted anilines primarily rely on palladium-catalyzed coupling chemistry with prefunctionalized aryl electrophiles. While oxidative aminations have emerged as powerful alternatives, they largely produce undesired metal-containing by-products in stoichiometric quantities. In contrast, described herein is the unprecedented electrochemical C-H amination by cobalt-catalyzed C-H activation. The environmentally benign electrocatalysis avoids stoichiometric metal oxidants, can be conducted under ambient air, and employs a biomass-derived, renewable solvent for sustainable aminations in an atom- and step-economical manner with H 2 as the sole byproduct. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Synthesis of ferrofluids based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Influence of reaction time on structural, morphological and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirabadizadeh, Ahmad; Salighe, Zohre; Sarhaddi, Reza, E-mail: reza.sarhaddi@birjand.ac.ir; Lotfollahi, Zahra

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Ferrofluids based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation method. • The crystallite and particle size of cobalt ferrite can be controlled effectively by reaction time. • The ferrofluids have lower values of saturation magnetization and coercivity as compared to nanoparticles. • By increasing the size of nanoparticles, the narrower and sharper spikes of ferrofluids are formed. - Abstract: In this work, for first time the ferrofluids based on the cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation method at different reaction times (0.5–6.5 h). Crystal structure, morphology and magnetic properties of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and the ferrofluids based on the nanoparticles were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The XRD patterns of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles synthesized at different reaction times indicated that all samples are single phase in accordance with inverse cubic spinel structure with space group Fd-3m, and no impurity phase was observed. By increasing the reaction time to 3.5 h, the lattice parameter and the average crystallites size increased and then afterwards decreased by increasing the reaction time. The microscopic studies indicated the formation of nanosized particles with nearly spherical in shape, whereas the average particle size for all samples is found to be less than 50 nm. The results of VSM also showed that the saturation magnetization and coercivity field of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and the ferrofluids were influenced by reaction time, whereas the ferrofluids have lower values of magnetic parameters than that of nanoparticles.

  14. Engineering Nanoscale Multiferroic Composites for Memory Applications with Atomic Layer Deposition of Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Diana

    This work focuses on the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) for lead zirconate titanate, Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O 3 (PZT). Leveraging the surface-reaction controlled process based on alternating self-limiting surface reactions, PZT can be synthesized not only with elemental precision to realize the desired composition (Zr/Ti = 52/48) but also with outstanding conformality. The latter enables the integration of PZT with a ferromagnetic phase to realize multiferroism (MF) and magnetoelectric (ME) effect. Since PZT is one of the best known ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials due the large displacements of the Pb ions at the morphotropic phase boundary, PZT based MF composites could lead to stronger ME coupling through strain coupling at the interface. Specifically, ALD PZT thin films were synthesized by using beta-diketonate metalorganic precursors Pb(TMHD)2, Zr(TMHD)4, and Ti(O.i-Pr) 2(TMHD)2 and H2O. The number of local cycles and global cycles were regulated to achieve the desired stoichiometry and thickness, respectively. ALD of PZT was studied to obtain (100) textured PZT on Pt (111) oriented platinized silicon substrates. In order to attain a highly oriented PZT thin film, a (100) textured PbTiO3 seed layer was required because PZT orientation is governed by nucleation. MF nanocomposites were engineered using ALD PZT thin films to achieve controlled complex nanoscale structures, enabling porosity to be studied as a new additional parameter for nanocomposite architectures to enhance ME effect. Specifically, 3--6 nm-thick ALD PZT thin films were deposited to uniformly coat the walls of mesoporous cobalt ferrite (CFO) template. The PZT/CFO nanocomposites were electrically poled ex-situ and the change in magnetic moment was measured. The inverse magnetoelectric coupling coefficient, a, was determined to be 85.6 Oe-cm/mV. The in-plane results show no significant change in magnetization (1--4%) as a function of electric field, which was expected due to the effect

  15. Cobalt (II) supported on ethylenediamine-functionalized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ethylenediamine-functionalized nanocellulose complexed with cobalt(II) was found to be a highly efficient heterogeneous catalyst for the room temperature aerobic oxidation of various types of primary and secondary benzylic alcohols into their corresponding aldehydes and ketones, respectively. The catalyst showed no ...

  16. Water Adsorption on Free Cobalt Cluster Cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiawi, Denis M.; Bakker, Joost M.; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Jamshidi, Zahra; Visscher, Lucas; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Cationic cobalt clusters complexed with water Con+–H2O (n = 6–20) are produced through laser ablation and investigated via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IR-MPD) spectroscopy in the 200–1700 cm–1 spectral range. All spectra exhibit a resonance close to the 1595 cm–1 frequency of the free

  17. Water adsorption on free cobalt cluster cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiawi, D.M.; Bakker, J.M.; Oomens, J.; Buma, W.J.; Jamshidi, Z.; Visscher, L.; Waters, L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Cationic cobalt clusters complexed with water Con+-​H2O (n = 6-​20) are produced through laser ablation and investigated via IR multiple photon dissocn. (IR-​MPD) spectroscopy in the 200-​1700 cm-​1 spectral range. All spectra exhibit a resonance close to the 1595 cm-​1 frequency of the free water

  18. Induced ferromagnetism and magnetoelectric coupling in ion-beam synthesized BiFeO3-CoFe2O4 nanocomposite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarresi, H.; Lazenka, V.; Menéndez, E.; Lorenz, M.; Bisht, M.; Volodin, A.; Van Haesendonck, C.; Grundmann, M.; Van Bael, M. J.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.

    2016-08-01

    Ferrimagnetic CoFe2O4 (cobalt ferrite) is formed within an epitaxial BiFeO3 (bismuth ferrite) thin film matrix by Co channeled ion implantation and subsequent annealing. The presence of nanoscale CoFe2O4 crystals in the matrix is confirmed by x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The significantly increased magnetic moment and the low-temperature coercive field of the composite system evidence the formation of ferrimagnetic cobalt ferrite and its nanoscale character, respectively. The results demonstrate that ion beam synthesis is an appropriate method to controllably transform a planar system into a granular one, increasing the interface area between cobalt ferrite and bismuth ferrite. The ferroelectric nature of the BiFeO3-CoFe2O4 composite is confirmed by several scanning probe microscopy techniques. At room temperature, the composite exhibits a magnetoelectric voltage coefficient of α ME  =  17.5 V (cm · Oe)-1, while a single-phase BiFeO3 thin film shows a α ME value of 4.2 V (cm · Oe)-1. The high magnetoelectric voltage coefficient is interpreted to be the result of the interfacial interaction between the ferrimagnetic CoFe2O4 nanocrystallites and the multiferroic BiFeO3 matrix.

  19. SYNTHESES, SPECTROSCOPIC AND MAGNETIC PROPERTIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    SYNTHESES, SPECTROSCOPIC AND MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF. POLYSTYRENE-ANCHORED COORDINATION COMPOUNDS OF. THIAZOLIDINONE. Dinesh Kumar1, Amit Kumar2* and Durga Dass3. 1Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra 136119, Haryana,. India. 2Department of ...

  20. Fully automated parallel oligonucleotide synthesizer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebl, M.; Burger, Ch.; Ellman, B.; Heiner, D.; Ibrahim, G.; Jones, A.; Nibbe, M.; Thompson, J.; Mudra, Petr; Pokorný, Vít; Poncar, Pavel; Ženíšek, Karel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 8 (2001), s. 1299-1314 ISSN 0010-0765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : automated oligonucleotide synthesizer Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.778, year: 2001

  1. Effect of cobalt doping on structural, optical and redox properties cerium oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Anees A.; Labis, J.; Alam, M.; Ramay, Shahid M.; Ahmad, N.; Mahmood, Asif

    2016-03-01

    Cobalt-doped ceria nanoparticles were synthesized using the polyol method under co-precipitation hydrolysis. The structural, morphological, optical and redox properties were observed to investigate the influence of different concentration of cobalt ion doping on the prepared CeO2 nanomaterials in terms of X-ray diffraction, field-emission transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, UV/vis absorption spectroscopy and temperature program reduction techniques. The optical band gap energy was calculated from the optical absorption spectra for doped ceria nanoparticles, which have been found to be 2.68, 2.77, and 2.82 eV for the 2, 4, and 7 mol% Co ion-doped CeO2 nanoparticles, respectively. As observed, the band gap energies increases as the doping Co ion concentrations increased, which could be due to significant increased oxygen vacancies with Co doping. The synergistic interaction between Co and CeO2 was the main factor responsible for high catalytic activity of cobalt-doped CeO2 model catalysts.

  2. Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties of nickel substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Effect of nickel concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninad B. Velhal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nickel substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with composition Co1−xNixFe2O4 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 1.0 was synthesized using simple, low temperature auto combustion method. The X-ray diffraction patterns reveal the formation of cubic phase spinel structure. The crystallite size varies from 30-44 nm with the nickel content. Porous and agglomerated morphology of the bulk sample was displayed in the scanning electron microscopy. Micro Raman spectroscopy reveals continuous shift of Eg and Eg(2 stokes line up to 0.8 Ni substitution. The dispersion behavior of the dielectric constant with frequency and the semicircle nature of the impedance spectra show the cobalt nickel ferrite to have high resistance. The ferromagnetic nature is observed in all the samples, however, the maximum saturation magnetization was achieved by the 0.4 Ni substituted cobalt ferrite, which is up to the 92.87 emu/gm at 30K.

  3. Department of Energy Nanoscale Science Research Centers: Approach to Nanomaterial ES&H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-05-12

    The following non-mandatory guidance is intended for the Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) funded by the Basic Energy Sciences program office under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. It describes practices thought appropriate to the management of environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concerns associated with laboratory-scale operations involving the design, synthesis, or characterization of engineered nanomaterials, In general, it is intended to apply to precursors, intermediates, and wastes used during, or resulting from synthesizing such nanomaterials. In general, it is not intended to apply to materials for which an occupational exposure limit has been established.

  4. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Leah J.; Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Maine Center for Environmental Toxicology and Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Zheng, Tongzhang [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Wise, John Pierce, E-mail: John.Wise@usm.maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Maine Center for Environmental Toxicology and Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity. - Highlights: • Particulate and soluble cobalt are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung cells. • Soluble cobalt induces more cytotoxicity compared to particulate cobalt. • Soluble and particulate cobalt induce similar levels of genotoxicity. • Particle-cell contact is required for particulate cobalt-induced toxicity.

  5. Understanding the mechanisms of cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoqi; Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Scott, Brian L; Hanson, Susan K

    2013-06-12

    Cobalt(II) alkyl complexes of aliphatic PNP pincer ligands have been synthesized and characterized. The cationic cobalt(II) alkyl complex [(PNHP(Cy))Co(CH2SiMe3)]BAr(F)4 (4) (PNHP(Cy) = bis[(2-dicyclohexylphosphino)ethyl]amine) is an active precatalyst for the hydrogenation of olefins and ketones and the acceptorless dehydrogenation of alcohols. To elucidate the possible involvement of the N-H group on the pincer ligand in the catalysis via a metal-ligand cooperative interaction, the reactivities of 4 and [(PNMeP(Cy))Co(CH2SiMe3)]BAr(F)4 (7) were compared. Complex 7 was found to be an active precatalyst for the hydrogenation of olefins. In contrast, no catalytic activity was observed using 7 as a precatalyst for the hydrogenation of acetophenone under mild conditions. For the acceptorless dehydrogenation of 1-phenylethanol, complex 7 displayed similar activity to complex 4, affording acetophenone in high yield. When the acceptorless dehydrogenation of 1-phenylethanol with precatalyst 4 was monitored by NMR spectroscopy, the formation of the cobalt(III) acetylphenyl hydride complex [(PNHP(Cy))Co(III)(κ(2)-O,C-C6H4C(O)CH3)(H)]BAr(F)4 (13) was detected. Isolated complex 13 was found to be an effective catalyst for the acceptorless dehydrogenation of alcohols, implicating 13 as a catalyst resting state during the alcohol dehydrogenation reaction. Complex 13 catalyzed the hydrogenation of styrene but showed no catalytic activity for the room temperature hydrogenation of acetophenone. These results support the involvement of metal-ligand cooperativity in the room temperature hydrogenation of ketones but not the hydrogenation of olefins or the acceptorless dehydrogenation of alcohols. Mechanisms consistent with these observations are presented for the cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of olefins and ketones and the acceptorless dehydrogenation of alcohols.

  6. Single cobalt sites in mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix for selective catalytic hydrogenation of nitroarenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiaohui

    2017-11-20

    A supported cobalt catalyst with atomically dispersed Co-Nx sites (3.5 wt% Co) in a mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix (named Co@mesoNC) is synthesized by hydrolysis of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) in a Zn/Co bimetallic zeolitic imidazolate framework (BIMZIF(Co,Zn)), followed by high-temperature pyrolysis and SiO2 leaching. A combination of TEM, XRD XPS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies confirm the absence of cobalt nanoparticles and indicate that these highly dispersed cobalt species are present in the form of Co-Nx. The exclusive formation of Co-Nx sites in the carbon matrix is attributed to the presence of a large amount of Zn and N in the BIMZIF precursor together with the presence of SiO2 in the pore space of this framework, extending the initial spatial distance between cobalt atoms and thereby impeding their agglomeration. The presence of SiO2 during high-temperature pyrolysis is proven crucial to create mesoporosity and a high BET area and pore volume in the N-doped carbon support (1780 m2 g−1, 1.54 cm3 g−1). This heterogeneous Co@mesoNC catalyst displays high activity and selectivity (>99%) for the selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline at mild conditions (0.5–3 MPa, 343–383 K). When more challenging substrates (functionalized nitroarenes) are hydrogenated, the catalyst Co@mesoNC displays an excellent chemoselectivity to the corresponding substituted anilines.The presence of mesoporosity improves mass transport of reactants and/or products and the accessibility of the active Co-Nx sites, and greatly reduces deactivation due to fouling.

  7. Hybrid, Nanoscale Phospholipid/Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liedberg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles, in which the polymeric membrane is blended with phospholipids, display interesting self-assembly behavior, incorporating the robustness and chemical versatility of polymersomes with the softness and biocompatibility of liposomes. Such structures can be conveniently characterized by preparing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs via electroformation. Here, we are interested in exploring the self-assembly and properties of the analogous nanoscale hybrid vesicles (ca. 100 nm in diameter of the same composition prepared by film-hydration and extrusion. We show that the self-assembly and content-release behavior of nanoscale polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide (PB-PEO/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles can be tuned by the mixing ratio of the amphiphiles. In brief, these hybrids may provide alternative tools for drug delivery purposes and molecular imaging/sensing applications and clearly open up new avenues for further investigation.

  8. Anomalous electrical conductivity of nanoscale colloidal suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Suman; Padhy, Sourav

    2008-10-28

    The electrical conductivity of colloidal suspensions containing nanoscale conducting particles is nontrivially related to the particle volume fraction and the electrical double layer thickness. Classical electrochemical models, however, tend to grossly overpredict the pertinent effective electrical conductivity values, as compared to those obtained under experimental conditions. We attempt to address this discrepancy by appealing to the complex interconnection between the aggregation kinetics of the nanoscale particles and the electrodynamics within the double layer. In particular, we model the consequent alterations in the effective electrophoretic mobility values of the suspension by addressing the fundamentals of agglomeration-deagglomeration mechanisms through the pertinent variations in the effective particulate dimensions, solid fractions, as well as the equivalent suspension viscosity. The consequent alterations in the electrical conductivity values provide a substantially improved prediction of the corresponding experimental findings and explain the apparent anomalous behavior predicted by the classical theoretical postulates.

  9. Scanning nanoscale multiprobes for conductivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Peter; Hansen, Torben Mikael; Kuhn, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    We report fabrication and measurements with two- and four-point probes with nanoscale dimensions, for high spatial resolution conductivity measurements on surfaces and thin films. By combination of conventional microfabrication and additive three-dimensional nanolithography, we have obtained...... electrode spacings down to 200 nm. At the tips of four silicon oxide microcantilevers, narrow carbon tips are grown in converging directions and subsequently coated with a conducting layer. The probe is placed in contact with a conducting surface, whereby the electrode resistance can be determined....... The nanoelectrodes withstand considerable contact force before breaking. The probe offers a unique possibility to position the voltage sensors, as well as the source and drain electrodes in areas of nanoscale dimensions. ©2000 American Institute of Physics....

  10. Structure sensitivity and nanoscale effects in electrocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, Marc T. M.

    2011-05-01

    This review discusses the role of the detailed nanoscale structure of catalytic surfaces on the activity of various electrocatalytic reactions of importance for fuel cells, hydrogen production, and other environmentally important catalytic reactions, such as carbon monoxide oxidation, methanol and ethanol oxidation, ammonia oxidation, nitric oxide reduction, hydrogen evolution, and oxygen reduction. Specifically, results and insights obtained from surface-science single-crystal-based model experiments are linked to experiments on well-defined shape-controlled nanoparticles. A classification of structure sensitive effects in electrocatalysis is suggested, based both on empirical grounds and on quantum-chemical viz. thermochemical considerations. The mutual relation between the two classification schemes is also discussed. The review underscores the relevance of single-crystal modeling of nanoscale effects in catalysis, and points to the special role of two kinds of active sites for electrocatalysis on nanoparticulate surfaces: (i) steps and defects in (111) terraces or facets, and (ii) long-range (100) terraces or facets.

  11. Development of Hydrotalcite Based Cobalt Catalyst by Hydrothermal and Co-precipitation Method for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faizan Shareef

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of a synthesis method for cobalt catalyst supported on hydrotalcite material for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The hydrotalcite supported cobalt (HT-Co catalysts were synthesized by co-precipitation and hydrothermal method. The prepared catalysts were characterized by using various techniques like BET (Brunauer–Emmett–Teller, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy, TGA (Thermal Gravimetric Analysis, XRD (X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Fixed bed micro reactor was used to test the catalytic activity of prepared catalysts. The catalytic testing results demonstrated the performance of hydrotalcite based cobalt catalyst in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with high selectivity for liquid products. The effect of synthesis method on the activity and selectivity of catalyst was also discussed. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 3rd November 2016; Revised: 26th February 2017; Accepted: 9th March 2017; Available online: 27th October 2017; Published regularly: December 2017 How to Cite: Sharif, M.S., Arslan, M., Iqbal, N., Ahmad, N., Noor, T. (2017. Development of Hydrotalcite Based Cobalt Catalyst by Hydrothermal and Co-precipitation Method for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12(3: 357-363 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.3.762.357-363

  12. 3 D Porous Nickel-Cobalt Nitrides Supported on Nickel Foam as Efficient Electrocatalysts for Overall Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yueqing; Zhang, Baohua; Pan, Wei; Ma, Houyi; Zhang, Jintao

    2017-08-30

    Exploring highly efficient and durable bifunctional electrocatalysts from earth-abundant low-cost transition metals is central to obtaining clean hydrogen energy through large-scale electrolytic water splitting. Porous nickel-cobalt nitride nanosheets on macroporous Ni foam (NF) are synthesized through facile electrodeposition followed by a one-step annealing process in a NH 3 atmosphere. The transformation from a metal hydroxide into a metal nitride could efficiently enhance the electrocatalytic performance for both the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Interestingly, the incorporation of nickel further boosts the catalytic activity of cobalt nitride. When used as bifunctional electrocatalysts, the obtained nickel-cobalt nitride electrocatalyst shows good stability and superior catalytic performance toward both HER and OER with low overpotentials of 0.29 and 0.18 V, respectively, to achieve a current density of 10 mA cm -2 . The good electrocatalytic performance was also evidenced by the fabrication of an electrolyzer for overall water splitting, which exhibits a high gas generation rate for hydrogen and oxygen with excellent stability during prolonged alkaline water electrolysis. The present work provides an efficient approach to prepare a 3 D interconnected porous nickel-cobalt nitride network with exposed inner active sites for overall water splitting. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. From surface to intracellular non-invasive nanoscale study of living cells impairments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewald, Dr. Maxime [University of Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon, France.; Tetard, Laurene [ORNL; Elie-Caille, Dr. Cecile [Institut FEMTO-ST UMR CNRS 6174, University Franche-Comté, 25044 Besancon, France; Nicod, Laurence [University of Franche-Comte, Laboratoire de Biologie Cellulaire; Passian, Ali [ORNL; Bourillot, Dr. Eric [University of Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon, France.; Lesniewska, Prof. Eric [University of Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon, France.

    2014-01-01

    Among the enduring challenges in nanoscience, subsurface characterization of live cells holds major stakes. Developments in nanometrology for soft matter thriving on the sensitivity and high resolution benefits of atomic force microscopy have enabled detection of subsurface structures at the nanoscale (1,2,3). However, measurements in liquid environments remain complex (4,5,6,7), in particular in the subsurface domain. Here we introduce liquid-Mode Synthesizing Atomic Force Microscopy (l-MSAFM) to study both the inner structures and the chemically induced intracellular impairments of living cells. Specifically, we visualize the intracellular stress effects of glyphosate on living keratinocytes skin cells. This new approach for living cell nanoscale imaging, l-MSAFM, in their physiological environment or in presence of a chemical stress agent confirmed the loss of inner structures induced by glyphosate. The ability to monitor the cell's inner response to external stimuli, non-destructively and in real time, has the potential to unveil critical nanoscale mechanisms of life science.

  14. From surface to intracellular non-invasive nanoscale study of living cells impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, M.; Tetard, L.; Elie-Caille, C.; Nicod, L.; Passian, A.; Bourillot, E.; Lesniewska, E.

    2014-07-01

    Among the enduring challenges in nanoscience, subsurface characterization of living cells holds major stakes. Developments in nanometrology for soft matter thriving on the sensitivity and high resolution benefits of atomic force microscopy have enabled detection of subsurface structures at the nanoscale. However, measurements in liquid environments remain complex, in particular in the subsurface domain. Here we introduce liquid-mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (l-MSAFM) to study both the inner structures and the chemically induced intracellular impairments of living cells. Specifically, we visualize the intracellular stress effects of glyphosate on living keratinocytes skin cells. This new approach, l-MSAFM, for nanoscale imaging of living cell in their physiological environment or in presence of a chemical stress agent could resolve the loss of inner structures induced by glyphosate, the main component of a well-known pesticide (RoundUp™). This firsthand ability to monitor the cell’s inner response to external stimuli non-destructively and in liquid, has the potential to unveil critical nanoscale mechanisms of life science.

  15. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Bradley R [Brentwood, CA; Talley, Chad E [Brentwood, CA

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  16. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-01-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ∼1 nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and

  17. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  18. Fourth International Conference on Nanoscale Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, Bekir; Advances in Nanoscale Magnetism

    2009-01-01

    The book aims to provide an overview of recent progress in the understanding of magnetic properties in nanoscale through recent results of various theoretical and experimental investigations. The papers describe a wide range of physical aspects, together with theoretical and experimental methods. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in magnetism and magnetic materials science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students.

  19. Infochemistry Information Processing at the Nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Szacilowski, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Infochemistry: Information Processing at the Nanoscale, defines a new field of science, and describes the processes, systems and devices at the interface between chemistry and information sciences. The book is devoted to the application of molecular species and nanostructures to advanced information processing. It includes the design and synthesis of suitable materials and nanostructures, their characterization, and finally applications of molecular species and nanostructures for information storage and processing purposes. Divided into twelve chapters; the first three chapters serve as an int

  20. DOE - BES Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beecher, Cathy Jo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-14

    These are slides from a powerpoint shown to guests during tours of Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It shows the five DOE-BES nanoscale science research centers (NSRCs), which are located at different national laboratories throughout the country. Then it goes into detail specifically about the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at LANL, including statistics on its user community and CINT's New Mexico industrial users.

  1. Nanoscale structure dynamics within electrocatalytic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Bentley, Cameron Luke; Kang, Minkyung; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical interfaces used for sensing, (electro)catalysis, and energy storage are usually nanostructured to expose particular surface sites, but probing the intrinsic activity of these sites is often beyond current experimental capability. Herein, it is demonstrated how a simple meniscus imaging probe of just 30 nm in size can be deployed for direct electrochemical and topographical imaging of electrocatalytic materials at the nanoscale. Spatially resolved topographical and electrochemi...

  2. Static electric field enhancement in nanoscale structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.lepetit@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Lemoine, Didier, E-mail: didier.lemoine@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5589, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Márquez-Mijares, Maykel, E-mail: mmarquez@instec.cu [Université de Toulouse, UPS, Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5589, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias Aplicadas, Avenida Salvador Allende 1110, Quinta de los Molinos, La Habana (Cuba)

    2016-08-28

    We study the effect of local atomic- and nano-scale protrusions on field emission and, in particular, on the local field enhancement which plays a key role as known from the Fowler-Nordheim model of electronic emission. We study atomic size defects which consist of right angle steps forming an infinite length staircase on a tungsten surface. This structure is embedded in a 1 GV/m ambient electrostatic field. We perform calculations based upon density functional theory in order to characterize the total and induced electronic densities as well as the local electrostatic fields taking into account the detailed atomic structure of the metal. We show how the results must be processed to become comparable with those of a simple homogeneous tungsten sheet electrostatic model. We also describe an innovative procedure to extrapolate our results to nanoscale defects of larger sizes, which relies on the microscopic findings to guide, tune, and improve the homogeneous metal model, thus gaining predictive power. Furthermore, we evidence analytical power laws for the field enhancement characterization. The main physics-wise outcome of this analysis is that limited field enhancement is to be expected from atomic- and nano-scale defects.

  3. Nanoscale-Agglomerate-Mediated Heterogeneous Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyeongyun; Wu, Alex; Kim, Moon-Kyung; Saigusa, Kosuke; Liu, Aihua; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2017-12-13

    Water vapor condensation on hydrophobic surfaces has received much attention due to its ability to rapidly shed water droplets and enhance heat transfer, anti-icing, water harvesting, energy harvesting, and self-cleaning performance. However, the mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces remains poorly understood and is attributed to defects in the hydrophobic coating exposing the high surface energy substrate. Here, we observe the formation of high surface energy nanoscale agglomerates on hydrophobic coatings after condensation/evaporation cycles in ambient conditions. To investigate the deposition dynamics, we studied the nanoscale agglomerates as a function of condensation/evaporation cycles via optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), microgoniometric contact angle measurements, nucleation statistics, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The FESEM and EDS results indicated that the nanoscale agglomerates stem from absorption of sulfuric acid based aerosol particles inside the droplet and adsorption of volatile organic compounds such as methanethiol (CH 3 SH), dimethyl disulfide (CH 3 SSCH), and dimethyl trisulfide (CH 3 SSSCH 3 ) on the liquid-vapor interface during water vapor condensation, which act as preferential sites for heterogeneous nucleation after evaporation. The insights gained from this study elucidate fundamental aspects governing the behavior of both short- and long-term heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces, suggest previously unexplored microfabrication and air purification techniques, and present insights into the challenges facing the development of durable dropwise condensing surfaces.

  4. Geometric rectification for nanoscale vibrational energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos-Marún, Raúl A.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we present a mechanism that, based on quantum-mechanical principles, allows one to recover kinetic energy at the nanoscale. Our premise is that very small mechanical excitations, such as those arising from sound waves propagating through a nanoscale system or similar phenomena, can be quite generally converted into useful electrical work by applying the same principles behind conventional adiabatic quantum pumping. The proposal is potentially useful for nanoscale vibrational energy harvesting where it can have several advantages. The most important one is that it avoids the use of classical rectification mechanisms as it is based on what we call geometric rectification. We show that this geometric rectification results from applying appropriate but quite general initial conditions to damped harmonic systems coupled to electronic reservoirs. We analyze an analytically solvable example consisting of a wire suspended over permanent charges where we find the condition for maximizing the pumped charge. We also studied the effects of coupling the system to a capacitor including the effect of current-induced forces and analyzing the steady-state voltage of operation. Finally, we show how quantum effects can be used to boost the performance of the proposed device.

  5. Nanoscale piezoelectric vibration energy harvester design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foruzande, Hamid Reza; Hajnayeb, Ali; Yaghootian, Amin

    2017-09-01

    Development of new nanoscale devices has increased the demand for new types of small-scale energy resources such as ambient vibrations energy harvesters. Among the vibration energy harvesters, piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs) can be easily miniaturized and fabricated in micro and nano scales. This change in the dimensions of a PEH leads to a change in its governing equations of motion, and consequently, the predicted harvested energy comparing to a macroscale PEH. In this research, effects of small scale dimensions on the nonlinear vibration and harvested voltage of a nanoscale PEH is studied. The PEH is modeled as a cantilever piezoelectric bimorph nanobeam with a tip mass, using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory in conjunction with Hamilton's principle. A harmonic base excitation is applied as a model of the ambient vibrations. The nonlocal elasticity theory is used to consider the size effects in the developed model. The derived equations of motion are discretized using the assumed-modes method and solved using the method of multiple scales. Sensitivity analysis for the effect of different parameters of the system in addition to size effects is conducted. The results show the significance of nonlocal elasticity theory in the prediction of system dynamic nonlinear behavior. It is also observed that neglecting the size effects results in lower estimates of the PEH vibration amplitudes. The results pave the way for designing new nanoscale sensors in addition to PEHs.

  6. Nanoscale Electrochemical Sensing and Processing in Microreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odijk, Mathieu; van den Berg, Albert

    2018-03-08

    In this review, we summarize recent advances in nanoscale electrochemistry, including the use of nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials, and nanowires. Exciting developments are reported for nanoscale redox cycling devices, which can chemically amplify signal readout. We also discuss promising high-frequency techniques such as nanocapacitive CMOS sensor arrays or heterodyning. In addition, we review electrochemical microreactors for use in (drug) synthesis, biocatalysis, water treatment, or to electrochemically degrade urea for use in a portable artificial kidney. Electrochemical microreactors are also used in combination with mass spectrometry, e.g., to study the mimicry of drug metabolism or to allow electrochemical protein digestion. The review concludes with an outlook on future perspectives in both nanoscale electrochemical sensing and electrochemical microreactors. For sensors, we see a future in wearables and the Internet of things. In microreactors, a future goal is to monitor the electrochemical conversions more precisely or ultimately in situ by combining other spectroscopic techniques. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry Volume 11 is June 12, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  7. The effect of the central donor in bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt catalysts for the selective cis-1,4-polymerisation of butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariou, Renan; Chirinos, Juan J; Gibson, Vernon C; Jacobsen, Grant; Tomov, Atanas K; Britovsek, George J P; White, Andrew J P

    2010-10-14

    A series of bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) dichloride complexes containing a range of different central donors has been synthesized and characterized. The nature of the central donor affects the binding of the ligand to the cobalt centre and determines the coordination geometry of the metal complexes. All complexes have been shown to catalyse the polymerization of butadiene, in combination with MAO as the co-catalyst, to give cis-1,4-polybutadiene with high selectivity. The nature of the central donor has a marked influence on the polymerization activity of the catalysts, but does not affect the polymer microstructure. The addition of PPh(3) generally increases the polymerization activity of these cobalt catalysts and results in predominantly (60-70%) 1,2-vinyl-polybutadiene.

  8. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts: influence of cobalt dispersion and titanium oxides promotion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azib, H.

    1996-04-10

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of Sol-Gel preparation parameters which occur in silica supported cobalt catalysts synthesis. These catalysts are particularly used for the waxes production in natural gas processing. The solids have been characterized by several techniques: transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), programmed temperature reduction (TPR), infrared spectroscopy (IR), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), Magnetism, thermodesorption of H{sub 2} (TPD). The results indicate that the control of the cobalt dispersion and oxide phases nature is possible by modifying Sol-Gel parameters. The catalytic tests in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were conducted on a pilot unit under pressure (20 atm) and suggested that turnover rates were independent of Co crystallite size, Co phases in the solids (Co deg., cobalt silicate) and titanium oxide promotion. On the other methane, the C{sub 3}{sup +} hydrocarbon selectivity is increased with increasing crystallite size. Inversely, the methane production is favoured by very small crystallites, cobalt silicate increase and titanium addition. However, the latter, used as a cobalt promoter, has a benefic effect on the active phase stability during the synthesis. (author). 149 refs., 102 figs., 71 tabs.

  9. Radiation and thermal effects on cobalt retention by Mexican aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila-Rangel, J.I. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico 11801, D. F. (Mexico); Unidad Academica Centro Regional de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cipres 10, Frac. La Penuela, Zacatecas, Zacatecas 98068 (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100 Col. Centro C. P. 50000, Toluca, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Solache-Rios, M. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico 11801, D. F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: msr@nuclear.inin.mx; Nunez-Monreal, J.E. [Unidad Academica de Ciencias Quimicas, Programa de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Km. 0.5 Carr. a Cd. Cuauhtemoc., Guadalupe, Zacatecas 98600 (Mexico)

    2007-05-15

    Thermal and radiation effects on the leaching of cobalt from two cobalt exchanged zeolites and one clay were determined. The cobalt exchanged aluminosilicates were heated at different temperatures (500, 700, 900 and 1100 deg. C), and the materials were then treated with NaCl (1 and 5 M) and HNO{sub 3} (0.001 and 1 M) solutions to determine the leaching behavior of cobalt from the materials. Cobalt showed greater stability when the materials were heated at the highest temperature. The unheated samples and those heated at 1100 deg. C were gamma irradiated, and it was found that cobalt leaching from gamma irradiated aluminosilicates was higher than that for non-irradiated materials.

  10. A spot test for detection of cobalt release – early experience and findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P.; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is often difficult to establish clinical relevance of metal exposure in cobalt-allergic patients. Dermatologists and patients may incorrectly assume that many metallic items release cobalt at levels that may cause cobalt dermatitis. Cobalt-allergic patients may be unaware...... also be used as a gel test if combined with an agar preparation. We found no false-positive reactions when testing metals and alloys known not to contain cobalt. However, one cobalt-containing alloy, which elicited cobalt dermatitis in cobalt-allergic patients, was negative upon cobalt gel testing....... Conclusions: The cobalt test detects amounts of cobalt release that approximate the elicitation concentration seen in cobalt-allergic patients. It may serve as a useful tool in dermatology offices and workplaces....

  11. Effect of Crystallographic Texture on Magnetic Characteristics of Cobalt Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cobalt nanowires with controlled diameters have been synthesized using electrochemical deposition in etched ion-track polycarbonate membranes. Structural characterization of these nanowires with diameter 70, 90, 120 nm and length 30 μm was performed by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction techniques. The as-prepared wires show uniform diameter along the whole length and X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that [002] texture of these wires become more pronounced as diameter is reduced. Magnetic characterization of the nanowires shows a clear difference of squareness and coercivity between parallel and perpendicular orientations of the wires with respect to the applied field direction. In case of parallel applied field, the coercivity has been found to be decreasing with increasing diameter of the wires while in perpendicular case; the coercivity observes lower values for larger diameter. The results are explained by taking into account the magnetocrystalline and shape anisotropies with respect to the applied field and domain transformation mechanism when single domain limit is surpassed.

  12. Effect of Crystallographic Texture on Magnetic Characteristics of Cobalt Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaz, K.; Karim, S.; Usman, M.; Mumtaz, A.; Liu, J.; Duan, J. L.; Maqbool, M.

    2010-07-01

    Cobalt nanowires with controlled diameters have been synthesized using electrochemical deposition in etched ion-track polycarbonate membranes. Structural characterization of these nanowires with diameter 70, 90, 120 nm and length 30 μm was performed by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction techniques. The as-prepared wires show uniform diameter along the whole length and X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that [002] texture of these wires become more pronounced as diameter is reduced. Magnetic characterization of the nanowires shows a clear difference of squareness and coercivity between parallel and perpendicular orientations of the wires with respect to the applied field direction. In case of parallel applied field, the coercivity has been found to be decreasing with increasing diameter of the wires while in perpendicular case; the coercivity observes lower values for larger diameter. The results are explained by taking into account the magnetocrystalline and shape anisotropies with respect to the applied field and domain transformation mechanism when single domain limit is surpassed.

  13. Cobalt-cadmium bimetallic porphyrin coordination polymers for electrochemistry application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. Y.; Cui, G. Y.; Ding, D.; Zhou, B.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we used tetra (4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin (H2TCPP) and metal cadmium, cobalt as reactants to synthesize metal porphyrin coordination polymers that they had different metal ratio. They were expressed as Co1Cd3TCPP, Co1Cd1TCPP, Co3Cd1TCPP, respectively. The results were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP). Herein, a series of metal porphyrin coordination polymers has multiple metal active centers and constructs electrochemistry sensors. In order to increase the conductivity, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used to modify the electrodes. The polymer/MWCNTs/GCE electrode was studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry as sensor for sodium nitrite. The performance of Co1Cd1TCPP/MWCNTs/GCE electrode is best, the sensitivity for sodium nitrite is 350.95 mA M-1 cm-2 and the. The results indicate that metal porphyrin coordination polymers have excellent performance. It also enriches the application of metal porphyrin coordination polymer in electrochemistry sensor.

  14. DC breakdown experiments with cobalt electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Descoeudres, Antoine; Nordlund, Kai

    2009-01-01

    RF accelerating structures of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) require a material capable of sustaining high electric field with a low breakdown rate and low induced damage. Because of the similarity of many aspects of DC and RF breakdown, a DC breakdown study is underway at CERN in order to test candidate materials and surface preparations, and have a better understanding of the breakdown mechanism under ultra-high vacuum in a simple setup. The conditioning speed, breakdown field and field enhancement factor of cobalt have been measured. The average breakdown field after conditioning reaches 615 MV/m, which places cobalt amongst the best materials tested so far. By comparison with results and properties of other metals, the high breakdown field of Co could be due to its high work function and maybe also to its hexagonal crystal structure. Geneva, Switzerland (June 2009) CLIC – Note – 875

  15. Process for obtaining cobalt and lanthanum nickelate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapcov, V.; Samusi, N.; Gulea, A.; Horosun, I.; Stasiuc, V.; Petrenco, P.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to the process for obtaining polycrystalline ceramics of cobalt and lanthanum nickelate with the perovskite structure from coordinative hetero metallic compounds. The obtained products can be utilized in the industry in the capacity of catalysts. Summary of the invention consists in obtaining polycrystalline ceramics LaCoO 3 and LaNiO 3 with the perovskite structure by pyrolysis of the parent compounds, namely, the coordinative hetero metallic compounds of the lanthanum cobalt or lanthanum nickel. The pyrolysis of the parent compound runs during one hour at 800 C. The technical result of the invention consists in lowering the temperature of the parent compound pyrolysis containing the precise ratio of metals necessary for ceramics obtaining

  16. Cobalt oxides from crystal chemistry to physics

    CERN Document Server

    Raveau, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Unparalleled in the breadth and depth of its coverage of all important aspects, this book systematically treats the electronic and magnetic properties of stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric cobaltites in both ordered and disordered phases. Authored by a pioneer and a rising star in the field, the monograph summarizes, organizes and streamlines the otherwise difficult-to-obtain information on this topic. An introductory chapter sets forth the crystal chemistry of cobalt oxides to lay the groundwork for an understanding of the complex phenomena observed in this materials class. Special emphasis is placed on a comprehensive discussion of cobaltite physical properties in different structural families. Providing a thorough introduction to cobalt oxides from a chemical and physical viewpoint as a basis for understanding their intricacies, this is a must-have for both experienced researchers as well as entrants to the field.

  17. Creep-fatigue of low cobalt superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Testing for the low cycle fatigue and creep fatigue resistance of superalloys containing reduced amounts of cobalt is described. The test matrix employed involves a single high temperature appropriate for each alloy. A single total strain range, again appropriate to each alloy, is used in conducting strain controlled, low cycle, creep fatigue tests. The total strain range is based upon the level of straining that results in about 10,000 cycles to failure in a high frequency (0.5 Hz) continuous strain-cycling fatigue test. No creep is expected to occur in such a test. To bracket the influence of creep on the cyclic strain resistance, strain hold time tests with ore minute hold periods are introduced. One test per composition is conducted with the hold period in tension only, one in compression only, and one in both tension and compression. The test temperatures, alloys, and their cobalt compositions that are under study are given.

  18. Cobalt metabolism and toxicology-A brief update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole, E-mail: LOSimonsen@dadlnet.dk; Harbak, Henrik; Bennekou, Poul

    2012-08-15

    Cobalt metabolism and toxicology are summarized. The biological functions of cobalt are updated in the light of recent understanding of cobalt interference with the sensing in almost all animal cells of oxygen deficiency (hypoxia). Cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) stabilizes the transcriptional activator hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and thus mimics hypoxia and stimulates erythropoietin (Epo) production, but probably also by the same mechanism induces a coordinated up-regulation of a number of adaptive responses to hypoxia, many with potential carcinogenic effects. This means on the other hand that cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) also may have beneficial effects under conditions of tissue hypoxia, and possibly can represent an alternative to hypoxic preconditioning. Cobalt is acutely toxic in larger doses, and in mammalian in vitro test systems cobalt ions and cobalt metal are cytotoxic and induce apoptosis and at higher concentrations necrosis with inflammatory response. Cobalt metal and salts are also genotoxic, mainly caused by oxidative DNA damage by reactive oxygen species, perhaps combined with inhibition of DNA repair. Of note, the evidence for carcinogenicity of cobalt metal and cobalt sulfate is considered sufficient in experimental animals, but is as yet considered inadequate in humans. Interestingly, some of the toxic effects of cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) have recently been proposed to be due to putative inhibition of Ca{sup 2+} entry and Ca{sup 2+}-signaling and competition with Ca{sup 2+} for intracellular Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins. The tissue partitioning of cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) and its time-dependence after administration of a single dose have been studied in man, but mainly in laboratory animals. Cobalt is accumulated primarily in liver, kidney, pancreas, and heart, with the relative content in skeleton and skeletal muscle increasing with time after cobalt administration. In man the renal excretion is initially rapid but decreasing over the first days, followed by a second, slow

  19. Synthesis of surfactant-coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for adsorptive removal of acid blue 45 dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed Mushtaq, Muhammad; Kanwal, Farah; Imran, Muhammad; Ameen, Naila; Batool, Madeeha; Batool, Aisha; Bashir, Shahid; Mustansar Abbas, Syed; Rehman, Ata ur; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad; Ullah, Zaka

    2018-03-01

    Cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized by wet chemical coprecipitation method using metal chlorides as precursors and potassium hydroxide (KOH) as a precipitant. The tergitol-1x (T-1x) and didecyldimethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB) are used as capping agents and their effect is investigated on particle size, size distribution and morphology of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CFNPs). The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms the synthesis of CFNPs and formation of metal-oxygen (M-O) bond. The spinel phase structure, morphology, polydispersity and magnetic properties of ferrite nanoparticles are investigated by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and vibrating sample magnetometry analyses, respectively. The addition of capping agents effects the secondary growth of CFNPs and reduces their particle size, as is investigated by dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy. The results evidence that the DDAB is more promising surfactant to control the particle size (∼13 nm), polydispersity and aggregation of CFNPs. The synthesized CFNPs, CFNPs/T-1x and CFNPs/DDAB are used to study their adsorption potential for removal of acid blue 45 dye, and a maximum adsorptive removal of 92.25% is recorded by 0.1 g of CFNPs/DDAB at pH 2.5 and temperature 20 ± 1 °C. The results show that the dye is physically adsorbed by magnetic NPs and follows the Langmuir isotherm model.

  20. Process optimization and properties of magnetically hard cobalt carbide nanoparticles via modified polyol method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamanpour, Mehdi; Bennett, Steven P. [Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits (CM3IC), Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Majidi, Leily [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Chen, Yajie [Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits (CM3IC), Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harris, Vincent G. [Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits (CM3IC), Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • High-coercivity cobalt carbides were synthesized by polyol method. • No rare earth elements were used during synthesis process. • Process parameters (reaction temperature, precursors’ concentrations, surfactants and reaction duration) were studied/optimized. • Process was scaled-up to synthesis more than 5 g powders per batch. - Abstract: Cobalt carbide magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via a modified polyol process without using a rare-earth catalyst during the synthesis process. The present results show admixtures of Co{sub 2}C and Co{sub 3}C phases possessing magnetization values exceeding 47 emu/g and coercivity values exceeding 2.3 kOe at room temperature. Moreover, these experiments have illuminated the important role of the reaction temperature, hydroxyl ion concentrations and the reaction duration on the crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. The crystallographic structure and particle size of the Co{sub x}C nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. Vibrating sample magnetometry was used to determine magnetic properties. Scale-up of synthesis to more than 5 g per batch was demonstrated with no significant degradation of magnetic properties.

  1. Direct Synthesis of Methanol by Partial Oxidation of Methane with Oxygen over Cobalt Modified Mesoporous H-ZSM-5 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuni Krisyuningsih Krisnandi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Partial oxidation of methane over mesoporous catalyst cobalt modified H-ZSM-5 has been carried out. Mesoporous Na-ZSM-5 (Si/Al = 35.4 was successfully synthesized using double template method which has high surface area (450 m2/g and average pore diameter distribution of 1.9 nm. The as-synthesized Na-ZSM-5 was converted to H-ZSM-5 through multi-exchange treatment with ammonium ion solution, causing decreased crystallinity and surface area, but increased porous diameter, due to dealumination during treatment process. Moreover, H-ZSM-5 was loaded with cobalt (Co = 2.5% w by the incipient impregnation method and calcined at 550 °C. Partial oxidation of methane was performed in the batch reactor with 0.75 bar methane and 2 bar of nitrogen (with impurities of 0.5% oxygen as the input at various reaction time (30, 60 and 120 min. The reaction results show that cobalt species in catalyst has an important role, because H-ZSM-5 cannot produce methanol in partial oxidation of methane. The presence of molecular oxygen increased the percentage of methanol yield. The reaction is time-dependent with the highest methanol yield (79% was acquired using Co/H-ZSM-5 catalyst for 60 min.

  2. Tailoring of crystal phase and Néel temperature of cobalt monoxides nanocrystals with synthetic approach conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindra, A. V.; Behera, B. C.; Padhan, P. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Lebedev, O. I.; Prellier, W. [Laboratoire CRISMAT, CNRS UMR 6508, ENSICAEN, 6 Bd du Marechal Juin, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France)

    2014-07-21

    Cobalt monoxide (CoO) nanocrystals were synthesized by thermal decomposition of cobalt oleate precursor in a high boiling point organic solvent 1-octadecene. The X-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy studies suggest that pure face-centered-cubic (fcc) phase of CoO can be synthesized in the temperature range of 569–575 K. Thermolysis product at higher synthesis temperature 585 K is a mixture of fcc and hexagonal-closed-packed (hcp) phases. These nanocrystals are single crystals of CoO and exhibit mixture of two types of morphologies; one is nearly spherical with 5–25 nm diameter, and other one is 5–10 nm thick flake. The pure fcc-CoO nanocrystals show enhanced, and mixture of fcc- and hcp-CoO nanocrystals show reduced antiferromagnetic ordering temperature. Such results provide new opportunities for optimizing and enhancing the properties and performance of cobalt oxide nanomaterials.

  3. Leather Contains Cobalt and Poses a Risk of Allergic Contact Dermatitis: Cobalt Indicator Solution and X-ray Florescence Spectrometry as Screening Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Dathan; Hamann, Carsten R; Kishi, Patrick; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2016-01-01

    Cobalt was recently identified in a leather couch responsible for dermatitis. Cobalt content/release in leather in the United States is unknown. We evaluated leather for cobalt content/release and investigated screening methods for identifying cobalt in leather. One hundred thirty-one leather swatches were screened for cobalt content/release with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry and cobalt indicator solution (CIS). Samples with positive screens and 1 negative control were analyzed using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). CIS showed that 5 of 131 samples contained cobalt, subsequently found to be between 1 and 190 parts per million (ppm) when evaluated with ICPMS. The XRF analysis showed that 6 samples contained >5% cobalt, subsequently found to contain greater than 300 ppm cobalt by ICPMS. 7 of 12 tested swatches contained cobalt in excess of 100 ppm. One sample contained greater than 1000 ppm cobalt. The prevalence of swatches containing cobalt at levels in excess of 190 ppm was at least 5% (n = 7; total, N = 131). Some leather consumer goods contain and release cobalt. Cobalt indicator solution is a poor screening test for cobalt in leather while XRF screening may be effective. Leather is a new source of cobalt exposure. Exposures to metal allergens are changing in ways that impact clinical decision making.

  4. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopic Study of Carbon-Cobalt Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Tembre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of carbon-cobalt thin films using infrared spectroscopy has shown existence of carbon-cobalt stretching mode and great porosity. The Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy have been used in order to investigate the microstructure of the films. These films exhibit complex Raman spectra suggesting the presence of amorphous and crystallized phases. The different fractions of phases and the correlation between the atomic bond structures and the Raman features depend on the cobalt content.

  5. Speciation studies of cobalt in sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toteja, R.S.D.; Sudersanan, M.; Iyer, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    Recent results on the speciation of cobalt in simulated and actual sea water is reported using ion exchangers. The influence of magnesium ions in affecting the composition of ion exchangers and subsequent interpretation of the results is discussed. The results indicated that Co +2 may predominate in both the simulated and actual sea water and the presence of other constituents in sea water does not affect the nature of complex species present. (author). 2 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig

  6. Sputtering yield measurements on single crystal cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernysh, V.S.; Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.

    1981-01-01

    Single crystals of cobalt have been bombarded with 80 keV A + ions in the direction of the h.c.p. structure and in the direction of the f.c.c. structure. The sputtering yields, measured by the weight loss method, depend on the crystal structure, and damage, introduced by the ion bombardment, is shown to play a significant role in the explanation of the measured sputtering yields. (Auth.)

  7. Photoionization of cobalt impuritiesin zinc oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ivanov, V.; Godlewski, M.; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 252, č. 9 (2015), s. 1988-1992 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GAP108/12/1941 Grant - others:SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : absorption band * cobalt * photoionization * electron spin resonance * pulsed mode * ZnO Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.522, year: 2015

  8. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Patrick L. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  9. The cobalt radioactive isotopes in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    For the year 1993 the total activity released in cobalt is 69 GBq for the whole of nuclear power plants. The part of activity in cobalt for La Hague in 1993 is 8 GBq of 58 Co and 2 GBq of 60 Co. The radioactive isotopes released by nuclear power plants or the reprocessing plant of La Hague under liquid effluents are shared by half between 58 Co and 60 Co. The exposure to sealed sources is the most important risk for the cobalt. The risk of acute exposure can associate a local irradiation of several decades of grays inducing a radiological burns, deep burn to treat in surgery by resection or graft even amputation. A global irradiation of organism for several grays induces an acute irradiation syndrome, often serious. At long term the stochastic effects are represented by leukemia and radio-induced cancers. The increase of probability of their occurrence is 1% by sievert. We must remind that the natural spontaneous probability is 25%. (N.C.)

  10. Uptake of radionuclides caesium and cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukac, P.; Foldesova, M.

    1995-01-01

    By means of chemical treatment ammonium, potassium, sodium and H-form of zeolite were prepared. The chemical modifications of zeolite were carried out with: 2M solution of NaNO 3 , NH 4 NO 3 , KNO 3 ; 0,1M solution of HCl; NaOH solution of different concentration. The method of model radioactive solution was used to find the sorption ability for cesium and cobalt every modified zeolite. The model solution were 0.05M solution of cobalt labelled by 60 Co or cesium labelled by 137 Cs. The highest sorption ability was observed for zeolite modified by NaOH. The influence of pH on uptake of cesium and cobalt by modified zeolite was searched as well. The experimental data (leaching tests, compressive strength measurement and porosity) were measured for the case the Cs and Cs from model water solution and radioactive waste water were up taken on chemically modified zeolite and were subsequently incorporated into cement casts on blast furnace cement slags basis. The leachability was tested in water, in basis solution and in acid solution. The leachability in water and basic solution was negligible, in acid solution it was less than 4% which is inside of value of applied measure method. The compressive strength, porosity and leaching experiment are hopefully and show good mechanical stability and good retention of observed radionuclides in samples exposed in leaching solutions. (J.K.)

  11. Osseointegration of cobalt-chrome alloy implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Babis, George C

    2011-01-01

    Osseointegration or osteointegration refers to a direct bone-to-metal interface without interposition of non-bone tissue. The long-term clinical success of bone implants is critically related to wide bone-to-implant direct contact. However, only poor bone formation or even host bone resorption have been shown where bone is in tight contact with the implant surface. It has been suggested that an appropriate space between implant and host bone may be useful for early peri-implant bone formation. Additionally, osseointegration depends on the topographical and chemical characteristics of the implant surface. Cobalt-chrome (Co-Cr) is a metal alloy of cobalt and chromium. Because of its high strength, temperature endurance and wear resistance, it is commonly used in dental and orthopedic implants. In orthopedic implants it is usually composed of cobalt with chromium, molybdenum, and traces of other elements. Co-Cr alloys are especially useful where high stiffness or a highly polished and extremely wear-resistant material is required. This article reviews the Co-Cr alloy orthopedic implants in terms of their properties, porous coating, osseointegration, outcome, and failure.

  12. Hot corrosion of low cobalt alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The hot corrosion attack susceptibility of various alloys as a function of strategic materials content are investigated. Preliminary results were obtained for two commercial alloys, UDIMET 700 and Mar-M 247, that were modified by varying the cobalt content. For both alloys the cobalt content was reduced in steps to zero. Nickel content was increased accordingly to make up for the reduced cobalt but all other constituents were held constant. Wedge bar test samples were produced by casting. The hot corrosion test consisted of cyclically exposing samples to the high velocity flow of combustion products from an air-fuel burner fueled with jet A-1 and seeded with a sodium chloride aqueous solution. The flow velocity was Mach 0.5 and the sodium level was maintained at 0.5 ppm in terms of fuel plus air. The test cycle consisted of holding the test samples at 900 C for 1 hour followed by 3 minutes in which the sample could cool to room temperature in an ambient temperature air stream.

  13. Towards a Cycle without Loss. Cobalt in the Aircraft Industry,

    Science.gov (United States)

    COBALT , *AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY, *STRATEGIC MATERIALS, *MANUFACTURING, CYCLES, SUPERALLOYS , HIGH STRENGTH ALLOYS, STEEL, TOOL STEEL, ALLOYS, QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS, MATERIALS RECOVERY, RATES, ALLOYS, RECYCLED MATERIALS, LOSSES, SYMPOSIA

  14. Consumer leather exposure: an unrecognized cause of cobalt sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J.P.; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A patient who had suffered from persistent generalized dermatitis for 7 years was diagnosed with cobalt sensitization, and his leather couch was suspected as the culprit, owing to the clinical presentation mimicking allergic chromium dermatitis resulting from leather furniture exposure...... have found high levels of cobalt sensitization, but not nickel sensitization, in patients with foot dermatitis. We raise the possibility that cobalt may be widely released from leather items, and advise dermatologists to consider this in patients with positive cobalt patch test reactions. © 2013 John...

  15. Measurement for cobalt target activity and its axial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xingyuan; Chen Zigen.

    1985-01-01

    Cobalt target activity and its axial distribution are measured in process of producing radioactive isotopes 60 Co by irradiation in HFETR. Cobalt target activity is obtained with measured data at 3.60 m and 4.60 m, relative axial distribution of cobalt target activity is obtained with one at 30 cm, and axial distribution of cobalt target activity(or specific activity) is obtained with both of data. The difference between this specific activity and measured result for 60 Co teletherapy sources in the end is less than +- 5%

  16. Cobalt metabolism and toxicology—A brief update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole; Harbak, Henrik; Bennekou, Poul

    2012-01-01

    Cobalt metabolism and toxicology are summarized. The biological functions of cobalt are updated in the light of recent understanding of cobalt interference with the sensing in almost all animal cells of oxygen deficiency (hypoxia). Cobalt (Co 2+ ) stabilizes the transcriptional activator hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and thus mimics hypoxia and stimulates erythropoietin (Epo) production, but probably also by the same mechanism induces a coordinated up-regulation of a number of adaptive responses to hypoxia, many with potential carcinogenic effects. This means on the other hand that cobalt (Co 2+ ) also may have beneficial effects under conditions of tissue hypoxia, and possibly can represent an alternative to hypoxic preconditioning. Cobalt is acutely toxic in larger doses, and in mammalian in vitro test systems cobalt ions and cobalt metal are cytotoxic and induce apoptosis and at higher concentrations necrosis with inflammatory response. Cobalt metal and salts are also genotoxic, mainly caused by oxidative DNA damage by reactive oxygen species, perhaps combined with inhibition of DNA repair. Of note, the evidence for carcinogenicity of cobalt metal and cobalt sulfate is considered sufficient in experimental animals, but is as yet considered inadequate in humans. Interestingly, some of the toxic effects of cobalt (Co 2+ ) have recently been proposed to be due to putative inhibition of Ca 2+ entry and Ca 2+ -signaling and competition with Ca 2+ for intracellular Ca 2+ -binding proteins. The tissue partitioning of cobalt (Co 2+ ) and its time-dependence after administration of a single dose have been studied in man, but mainly in laboratory animals. Cobalt is accumulated primarily in liver, kidney, pancreas, and heart, with the relative content in skeleton and skeletal muscle increasing with time after cobalt administration. In man the renal excretion is initially rapid but decreasing over the first days, followed by a second, slow phase lasting several weeks, and

  17. Cobalt, nickel and chromium release from dental tools and alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettelarij, Jolinde A B; Lidén, Carola; Axén, Emmy; Julander, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium alloys are used as casting alloys by dental technicians when producing dental prostheses and implants. Skin exposure and metal release from alloys and tools used by the dental technicians have not been studied previously. To study the release of cobalt, nickel and chromium from alloys and tools that come into contact with the skin of dental technicians. Cobalt and nickel release from tools and alloys was tested with the cobalt spot test and the dimethylglyoxime test for nickel. Also, the release of cobalt, nickel and chromium in artificial sweat (EN1811) at different time-points was assessed. Analysis was performed with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Sixty-one tools were spot tested; 20% released nickel and 23% released cobalt. Twenty-one tools and five dental alloys were immersed in artificial sweat. All tools released cobalt, nickel and chromium. The ranges were 0.0047-820, 0.0051-10 and 0.010-160 µg/cm(2) /week for cobalt, nickel and chromium, respectively. All dental alloys released cobalt in artificial sweat, with a range of 0.0010-17 µg/cm(2) /week, and they also released nickel and chromium at low concentrations. Sensitizing metals are released from tools and alloys used by dental technicians. This may cause contact allergy and hand eczema. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of inorganic cobalt and a vitamin B12 supplement in the Thoroughbred horse: Differentiating cobalt abuse from supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, L L; Ridd, Z; Fenwick, S; Hincks, P; Paine, S W

    2018-05-01

    While cobalt is an essential micronutrient for vitamin B 12 synthesis in the horse, at supraphysiological concentrations, it has been shown to enhance performance in human subjects and rats, and there is evidence that its administration in high doses to horses poses a welfare threat. Animal sport regulators currently control cobalt abuse via international race day thresholds, but this work was initiated to explore means of potentially adding to application of those thresholds since cobalt may be present in physiological concentrations. To devise a scientific basis for differentiation between presence of cobalt from bona fide supplementation and cobalt doping through the use of ratios. Six Thoroughbred horses were given 10 mL vitamin B 12 /cobalt supplement (Hemo-15 ® ; Vetoquinol, Buckingham, Buckinghamshire, UK., 1.5 mg B 12 , 7 mg cobalt gluconate = 983 μg total Co) as an i.v. bolus then an i.v. infusion (15 min) of 100 mg cobalt chloride (45.39 mg Co) 6 weeks later. Pre-and post-administration plasma and urine samples were analysed for cobalt and vitamin B 12 . Urine and plasma samples were analysed for vitamin B 12 using an immunoassay and cobalt concentrations were measured via ICP-MS. Baseline concentrations of cobalt in urine and plasma for each horse were subtracted from their cobalt concentrations post-administration for the PK analysis. Compartmental analysis was used for the determination of plasma PK parameters for cobalt using commercially available software. On administration of a vitamin B 12 /cobalt supplement, the ratio of cobalt to vitamin B 12 in plasma rapidly increased to approximately 3 and then rapidly declined below a ratio of 1 and then back to near baseline over the next week. On administration of 100 mg cobalt chloride, the ratio initially exceeded 10 in plasma and then declined with the lower 95% confidence interval remaining above a ratio of 1 for 7 days. For two horses with extended sampling, the plasma ratio remained above one for

  20. Synthesis of cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetostriction properties by the sol−gel−hydrothermal route using spent Li-ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Lu; Xi, Yuebin; Xi, Guoxi; Feng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The combination of a sol–gel method and a hydrothermal method was successfully used for synthesizing the nano-crystalline cobalt ferrite powders with a spinel structure using spent Li-ion batteries as the raw materials. The phase composition, microstructure, magnetic properties and magnetostriction coefficient of cobalt ferrite were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), magnetometer and magnetostrictive measurement instrument. The microstructure of the products exhibited hedgehog-like microspheres with particle size of approximately 5 μm. The different crystalline sizes and the microstructure of cobalt ferrites precursor were controlled by varying the hydrothermal time, which significantly affected the super-exchange and the deflection direction of the magnetic domain, and led to the change of the magnetic properties of sintered cylindrical samples. The saturation magnetization and maximum magnetostriction coefficient were 81.7 emu/g and −158.5 ppm, respectively, which was larger than that of products prepared by the sol-gel sintered method alone. - Graphical abstract: The magnetostriction of cobalt ferrites with a spinel structure was successfully prepared using the sol–gel–hydrothermal route using spent Li-ion batteries. On the basis of the aforementioned SEM observation, the formation of a hedgehog-like microsphere structure might involve two important steps: Ostwald ripening and self-assembly. - Highlights: • The cobalt ferrites were prepared by the sol–gel–hydrothermal route. • The cobalt ferrites show hedgehog-like microsphere particles in shape. • The microspheres size increased with increasing hydrothermal time. • The magnetostriction properties of the cobalt ferrite were enhanced.

  1. Synthesis of cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetostriction properties by the sol−gel−hydrothermal route using spent Li-ion battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Lu, E-mail: yaolu1020@126.com [Key Laboratory for Yellow River and Huai River Water Environment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, College of Environment, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xinxiang University, Xinxiang Henan 453003 (China); Xi, Yuebin [Key Laboratory for Yellow River and Huai River Water Environment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, College of Environment, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Xi, Guoxi, E-mail: yaolu001@163.com [Key Laboratory for Yellow River and Huai River Water Environment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, College of Environment, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Feng, Yong [Key Laboratory for Yellow River and Huai River Water Environment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, College of Environment, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China)

    2016-09-25

    The combination of a sol–gel method and a hydrothermal method was successfully used for synthesizing the nano-crystalline cobalt ferrite powders with a spinel structure using spent Li-ion batteries as the raw materials. The phase composition, microstructure, magnetic properties and magnetostriction coefficient of cobalt ferrite were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), magnetometer and magnetostrictive measurement instrument. The microstructure of the products exhibited hedgehog-like microspheres with particle size of approximately 5 μm. The different crystalline sizes and the microstructure of cobalt ferrites precursor were controlled by varying the hydrothermal time, which significantly affected the super-exchange and the deflection direction of the magnetic domain, and led to the change of the magnetic properties of sintered cylindrical samples. The saturation magnetization and maximum magnetostriction coefficient were 81.7 emu/g and −158.5 ppm, respectively, which was larger than that of products prepared by the sol-gel sintered method alone. - Graphical abstract: The magnetostriction of cobalt ferrites with a spinel structure was successfully prepared using the sol–gel–hydrothermal route using spent Li-ion batteries. On the basis of the aforementioned SEM observation, the formation of a hedgehog-like microsphere structure might involve two important steps: Ostwald ripening and self-assembly. - Highlights: • The cobalt ferrites were prepared by the sol–gel–hydrothermal route. • The cobalt ferrites show hedgehog-like microsphere particles in shape. • The microspheres size increased with increasing hydrothermal time. • The magnetostriction properties of the cobalt ferrite were enhanced.

  2. Information Retrieval for Ecological Syntheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Helen R.; Beyer, Fiona R.

    2015-01-01

    Research syntheses are increasingly being conducted within the fields of ecology and environmental management. Information retrieval is crucial in any synthesis in identifying data for inclusion whilst potentially reducing biases in the dataset gathered, yet the nature of ecological information provides several challenges when compared with…

  3. Cobalt Nanoparticle-Embedded Porous Carbon Nanofibers with Inherent N- and F-Doping as Binder-Free Bifunctional Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Richa; Kalra, Vibha

    2017-01-18

    Efficient, low-cost, non-precious metal-based, and stable bifunctional electrocatalysts are key to various energy storage and conversion devices such as regenerative fuel cells and metal-air batteries. In this work, we report cobalt nanoparticle-embedded porous carbon nanofibers with inherent N- and F-doping as binder-free bifunctional electrocatalysts with excellent activity for both the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reaction (ORR/OER) in an alkaline medium. Single-step electrospinning of a solution of the polymer mixture (carbon precursor) and the cobalt precursor followed by controlled pyrolysis with an intermediate reduction step in H 2 (to reduce cobalt oxides to cobalt) was utilized to synthesize an integrated freestanding catalyst. The fabricated catalyst with effective structural and electronic interaction between the cobalt metal nanoparticles and the N- and F-doped carbon defect sites showed enhanced catalytic properties compared to the benchmark catalysts for ORR and OER (Pt, Ir, and Ru). The ORR potential at the current density of -3 mA cm -2 was 0.81 V RHE and the OER potential at a current density of 10 mA cm -2 was 1.595 V RHE , resulting in a ΔE of only 0.785 V. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Analytical method to determine flexoelectric coupling coefficient at nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Pei, Yongmao; Hong, Jiawang; Fang, Daining

    2016-03-01

    Flexoelectricity is defined as the coupling between the strain gradient and polarization, which is expected to be remarkable at nanoscale. However, measuring the flexoelectricity at nanoscale is challenging. In the present work, an analytical method for measuring the flexoelectric coupling coefficient based on nanocompression technique is proposed. It is found that the flexoelectricity can induce stiffness softening of the dielectric nano-cone-frustum. This phenomenon becomes more significant when the sample size decreases or the half cone angle increases. This method avoids measuring the electric polarization or current at nanoscale with dynamical loading, which can be beneficial to the flexoelectric measurement at nanoscale and design of flexoelectric nanodevices.

  5. Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alderson, Norris; Alexander, Catherine; Merzbacher, Celia; Chernicoff, William; Middendorf, Paul; Beck, Nancy; Chow, Flora; Poster, Dianne; Danello, Mary Ann; Barrera, Enriqueta

    2006-01-01

    ...) research and information needs related to understanding and management of potential risks of engineered nanoscale materials that may be used, for example, in commercial or consumer products, medical...

  6. Study of complex formation of cobalt (II) and cobalt (III) in acrylamide aqueous solutions and in the phase of acrylamide hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismailova, M.M.; Egorova, L.A.; Khamidov, B.O.

    1993-01-01

    Present article is devoted to study of complex formation of cobalt (II) and cobalt (III) in acrylamide aqueous solutions and in the phase of acrylamide hydrogel. The condition of cobalt in various rate of oxidation in acrylamide aqueous solutions was studied. The concentration conditions of stability of system Co(II)-Co(III) were defined. The composition of coordination compounds of cobalt (II) and cobalt (III) in acrylamide aqueous solutions and in the phase of acrylamide hydrogel was determined.

  7. Growth of carbon nanotubes on cobalt catalyst film using electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapour deposition without thermal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Tuan; Chen, Kuan-Hua; Hsu, Ching-Ming

    2006-09-01

    This paper demonstrates that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be synthesized on a cobalt coated silicon substrate using electron cyclotron chemical vapour deposition and without intentionally heating the substrate. With the mixed gases of C3H8/N2, CNTs with a multi-walled structure and a diameter up to 70 nm have been observed. Results show that the diameter of the CNTs increases with the thickness of the cobalt catalyst film and the amount of nitrogen incorporated in the CNT films considerably influences the structures of the CNTs. Vertically aligned CNTs can be fabricated with a microwave power as low as 300 W and the flow rate ratio of C3H8/N2 = 20/20 sccm. The CNTs exhibit a turn-on field of 0.2 V µm-1 determined at the emission current density of 10 µA cm-2.

  8. Topotactic Synthesis of Porous Cobalt Ferrite Platelets from a Layered Double Hydroxide Precursor and Their Application in Oxidation Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Klaus Friedel; Anke, Sven; Salamon, Soma; Özcan, Fatih; Heese, Justus; Andronescu, Corina; Landers, Joachim; Wende, Heiko; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Muhler, Martin; Lunkenbein, Thomas; Behrens, Malte

    2017-09-12

    Monocrystalline, yet porous mosaic platelets of cobalt ferrite, CoFe 2 O 4 , can be synthesized from a layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursor by thermal decomposition. Using an equimolar mixture of Fe 2+ , Co 2+ , and Fe 3+ during co-precipitation, a mixture of LDH, (Fe II Co II ) 2/3 Fe III 1/3 (OH) 2 (CO 3 ) 1/6 ⋅m H 2 O, and the target spinel CoFe 2 O 4 can be obtained in the precursor. During calcination, the remaining Fe II fraction of the LDH is oxidized to Fe III leading to an overall Co 2+ :Fe 3+ ratio of 1:2 as required for spinel crystallization. This pre-adjustment of the spinel composition in the LDH precursor suggests a topotactic crystallization of cobalt ferrite and yields phase pure spinel in unusual anisotropic platelet morphology. The preferred topotactic relationship in most particles is [111] Spinel ∥[001] LDH . Due to the anion decomposition, holes are formed throughout the quasi monocrystalline platelets. This synthesis approach can be used for different ferrites and the unique microstructure leads to unusual chemical properties as shown by the application of the ex-LDH cobalt ferrite as catalyst in the selective oxidation of 2-propanol. Compared to commercial cobalt ferrite, which mainly catalyzes the oxidative dehydrogenation to acetone, the main reaction over the novel ex-LDH cobalt is dehydration to propene. Moreover, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activity of the ex-LDH catalyst was markedly higher compared to the commercial material. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Inelastic transport theory for nanoscale systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes theoretical and numerical investigations of inelastic scat- tering and energy dissipation in electron transport through nanoscale sys- tems. A computational scheme, based on a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green’s functions (NEGF), has been...... the conductance. The methods have been applied to a number of specific systems, includ- ing monatomic gold chains, atomic point contacts, and metal-molecule-metal configurations. These studies have clarified the inelastic effects in the elec- tron transport and characterized the vibrational modes that couple...

  10. Probing nanoscale ferroelectricity by ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenne, D A; Bruchhausen, A; Lanzillotti-Kimura, N D; Fainstein, A; Katiyar, R S; Cantarero, A; Soukiassian, A; Vaithyanathan, V; Haeni, J H; Tian, W; Schlom, D G; Choi, K J; Kim, D M; Eom, C B; Sun, H P; Pan, X Q; Li, Y L; Chen, L Q; Jia, Q X; Nakhmanson, S M; Rabe, K M; Xi, X X

    2006-09-15

    We demonstrated that ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy is an effective technique to measure the transition temperature (Tc) in ferroelectric ultrathin films and superlattices. We showed that one-unit-cell-thick BaTiO3 layers in BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices are not only ferroelectric (with Tc as high as 250 kelvin) but also polarize the quantum paraelectric SrTiO3 layers adjacent to them. Tc was tuned by approximately 500 kelvin by varying the thicknesses of the BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 layers, revealing the essential roles of electrical and mechanical boundary conditions for nanoscale ferroelectricity.

  11. Micro- and nanoscale phenomena in tribology

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Yip-Wah

    2011-01-01

    Drawn from presentations at a recent National Science Foundation Summer Institute on Nanomechanics, Nanomaterials, and Micro/Nanomanufacturing, Micro- and Nanoscale Phenomena in Tribology explores the convergence of the multiple science and engineering disciplines involved in tribology and the connection from the macro to nano world. Written by specialists from computation, materials science, mechanical engineering, surface physics, and chemistry, each chapter provides up-to-date coverage of both basic and advanced topics and includes extensive references for further study.After discussing the

  12. Nanoscale microwave microscopy using shielded cantilever probes

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji

    2011-04-21

    Quantitative dielectric and conductivity mapping in the nanoscale is highly desirable for many research disciplines, but difficult to achieve through conventional transport or established microscopy techniques. Taking advantage of the micro-fabrication technology, we have developed cantilever-based near-field microwave probes with shielded structures. Sensitive microwave electronics and finite-element analysis modeling are also utilized for quantitative electrical imaging. The system is fully compatible with atomic force microscope platforms for convenient operation and easy integration of other modes and functions. The microscope is ideal for interdisciplinary research, with demonstrated examples in nano electronics, physics, material science, and biology.

  13. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  14. Preparation of Nano-Scale Biopolymer Extracted from Coconut Residue and Its Performance as Drag Reducing Agent (DRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Muhammad Luqman Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Drag or frictional force is defined as force that acts opposite to the object’s relative motion through a fluid which then will cause frictional pressure loss in the pipeline. Drag Reducing Agent (DRA is used to solve this issue and most of the DRAs are synthetic polymers but has some environmental issues. Therefore for this study, biopolymer known as Coconut Residue (CR is selected as the candidate to replace synthetic polymers DRA. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Nano-scale biopolymer DRA on the application of water injection system. Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC is extracted by synthesizing the cellulose extracted from CR under the alkali-catalyzed reaction using monochloroacetic acid. The synthesize process is held in controlled condition whereby the concentration of NaOH is kept at 60%wt, 60 °C temperature and the reaction time is 4 hours. For every 25 g of dried CR used, the mass of synthesized CMC yield is at an average of 23.8 g. The synthesized CMC is then grinded in controlled parameters using the ball milling machine to get the Nano-scale size. The particle size obtained from this is 43.32 Nm which is in range of Nano size. This study proved that Nano-size CMC has higher percentage of drag reduction (%DR and flow increase (%FI if compared to normal-size CMC when tested in high and low flow rate; 44% to 48% increase in %DR and %FI when tested in low flow rate, and 16% to 18% increase in %DR and %FI when tested in high flow rate. The success of this research shows that Nano-scale DRA can be considered to be used to have better performance in reducing drag.

  15. Solid phase syntheses of oligoureas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, K.; Linthicum, D.S.; Russell, D.H.; Shin, H.; Shitangkoon, A.; Totani, R.; Zhang, A.J.; Ibarzo, J. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1997-02-19

    Isocyanates 7 were formed from monoprotected diamines 3 or 6, which in turn can be easily prepared from commercially available N-BOC- or N-FMOC-protected amino acid derivatives. Isocyanates 7, formed in situ, could be coupled directly to a solid support functionalized with amine groups or to amino acids anchored on resins using CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} as solvent and an 11 h coupling time at 25 {degree}C. Such couplings afforded peptidomimetics with an N-phthaloyl group at the N-terminus. The optimal conditions identified for removal of the N-phthaloyl group were to use 60% hydrazine in DMF for 1-3 h. Several sequences of amino acids coupled to ureas (`peptidic ureas`) and of sequential urea units (`oligoureas`) were prepared via solid phase syntheses and isolated by HPLC. Partition coefficients were measured for two of these peptidomimetics, and their water solubilities were found to be similar to the corresponding peptides. A small library of 160 analogues of the YGGFL-amide sequence was prepared via Houghten`s tea bag methodology. This library was tested for binding to the anti-{beta}-endorphin monoclonal antibody. Overall, this paper describes methodology for solid phase syntheses of oligourea derivatives with side chains corresponding to some of the protein amino acids. The chemistry involved is ideal for high-throughput syntheses and screening operations. 51 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Dosing of anaerobic granular sludge bioreactors with cobalt: Impact of cobalt retention on methanogenic activity

    KAUST Repository

    Fermoso, Fernando G.

    2010-12-01

    The effect of dosing a metal limited anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor with a metal pulse on the methanogenic activity of granular sludge has thus far not been successfully modeled. The prediction of this effect is crucial in order to optimize the strategy for metal dosage and to prevent unnecessary losses of resources. This paper describes the relation between the initial immobilization of cobalt in anaerobic granular sludge cobalt dosage into the reactor and the evolution of methanogenic activity during the subsequent weeks. An operationally defined parameter (A0· B0) was found to combine the amount of cobalt immobilized instantaneously upon the pulse (B0) and the amount of cobalt immobilized within the subsequent 24. h (A0). In contrast with the individual parameters A0 and B0, the parameter A0· B0 correlated significantly with the methanogenic activity of the sludge during the subsequent 16 or 35. days. This correlation between metal retention and activity evolution is a useful tool to implement trace metal dosing strategies for biofilm-based biotechnological processes. © 2010.

  17. Cobalt(I) and Cobalt(III) Cyclopentadienyl Complexes with New Silicon-branched Fluorous Tags

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strašák, Tomáš; Čermák, Jan; Červenková Šťastná, Lucie; Sýkora, Jan; Fajgar, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 159, MAR 2014 (2014), s. 15-20 ISSN 0022-1139 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/1372 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : fluorous tag * cobalt complex * cyclopentadienyl complex Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.948, year: 2014

  18. Effects of soluble cobalt and cobalt incorporated into calcium phosphate layers on osteoclast differentiation and activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patntirapong, Somying; Habibovic, Pamela; Hauschka, Peter V.

    2009-01-01

    Metal ions originating from mechanical debris and corrosive wear of prosthetic implant alloys accumulate in peri-implant soft tissues, bone mineral, and body fluids. Eventually, metal ions such as cobalt (II) (Co2+), which is a major component of cobalt–chromium-based implant alloys and a known

  19. Linear arrangements of nano-scale ferromagnetic particles spontaneously formed in a copper-base Cu–Ni–Co alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakura, Hibiki; Kim, Jun-Seop; Takeda, Mahoto

    2018-03-01

    We have investigated the influence of magnetic interactions on the microstructural evolution of nano-scale granular precipitates formed spontaneously in an annealed Cu-20at%Ni-5at%Co alloy and the associated changes of magnetic properties. The techniques used included transmission electron microscopy, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, magneto-thermogravimetry (MTG), and first-principles calculations based on the method of Koster–Korringa–Rostker with the coherent potential approximation. Our work has revealed that the nano-scale spherical and cubic precipitates which formed on annealing at 873 K and 973 K comprise mainly cobalt and nickel with a small amount of copper, and are arranged in the 〈1 0 0〉 direction of the copper matrix. The SQUID and MTG measurements suggest that magnetic properties such as coercivity and Curie temperature are closely correlated with the microstructure. The combination of results suggests that magnetic interactions between precipitates during annealing can explain consistently the observed precipitation phenomena.

  20. Bioactivity and mechanical behaviour of cobalt oxide-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evaluation through scanning electron microscopy. Densities and mechanical properties of the samples were found to increase considerably with an increase in the concentration of cobalt oxide. Keywords. Bioactive glass; cobalt oxide; FTIR spectrometry; SEM and mechanical properties. 1. Introduction. Some materials like ...

  1. Comparative toxicity and carcinogenicity of soluble and insoluble cobalt compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Mamta; Stout, Matthew D; Herbert, Ronald A; Dill, Jeffrey A; Baker, Gregory L; Hayden, Barry K; Roycroft, Joseph H; Bucher, John R; Hooth, Michelle J

    2015-07-03

    Occupational exposure to cobalt is of widespread concern due to its use in a variety of industrial processes and the occurrence of occupational disease. Due to the lack of toxicity and carcinogenicity data following exposure to cobalt, and questions regarding bioavailability following exposure to different forms of cobalt, the NTP conducted two chronic inhalation exposure studies in rats and mice, one on soluble cobalt sulfate heptahydrate, and a more recent study on insoluble cobalt metal. Herein, we compare and contrast the toxicity profiles following whole-body inhalation exposures to these two forms of cobalt. In general, both forms were genotoxic in the Salmonella T98 strain in the absence of effects on micronuclei. The major sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity in both chronic inhalation studies were the respiratory tract in rats and mice, and the adrenal gland in rats. In addition, there were distinct sites of toxicity and carcinogenicity noted following exposure to cobalt metal. In rats, carcinogenicity was observed in the blood, and pancreas, and toxicity was observed in the testes of rats and mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that both forms of cobalt, soluble and insoluble, appear to be multi-site rodent carcinogens following inhalation exposure. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Synthesis and phosphatase activity of a Cobalt(II) phenanthroline ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MAMONI GARAI

    2017-09-19

    Sep 19, 2017 ... The cobalt(II) complex has been evaluated as a functional model for phosphatase enzyme by using 4-nitrophenylphosphate. (PNPP) as a standard substrate in aqueous DMF medium. ... Designed coordination molecules with an ability to mimic the ... tion, cobalt complexes have gained importance because.

  3. Sorghum cobalt analysis on not determined wave length with atomic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-24

    Aug 24, 2011 ... right wave length for cobalt analysis with the atomic absorption spectrophotometer method. And this problem on wave length might exist also on the inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) method. The wave length generally employed for cobalt determination is. 240.7 nm (Shapiro and Martin, 1988) ...

  4. IN SITU AND POST REACTION COBALT-INCORPORATION INTO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    such as the nitroaldol condensation and Michael addition reactions [38, 39]. Although unfunctionalized silica materials, including ordered mesoporous silicas (MCM 41) have been used as supports for cobalt-based catalysts in the Fischer Tropsch (FT) synthesis [40 –. 42], there are very few reports in the literature on cobalt ...

  5. Two new twisted helical nickel (II) and cobalt (III) octahedral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 126; Issue 6. Two new twisted helical nickel(II) and cobalt(III) octahedral monomer complexes: Synthesis and structural characterization. Malay Dolai ... Keywords. Coordination chemistry; nickel(II); cobalt(III); Schiff base; twisted helicity; supramolecular interactions.

  6. Study to use graded cobalt adjuster in 540 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Manish; Fernando, M.P.S.; Pradhan, A.S.; Kumar, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: There are 17 adjusters in 540 MWe PHWR, which are essentially provided for xenon override function. They also provide flux flattening being in the central region of the reactor core. The present design of adjusters consists of stainless steel tube. The adjuster rods are grouped into 8 banks for movement. Since adjusters are normally fully inserted during reactor operation, they are best suited for production of cobalt 60. The nickel-plated cobalt in the form of either slugs or pellet are used for the design of cobalt pencils. The number of pencils can be varied to optimize the reactivity load and cobalt 60 production requirement. The worth and activity of cobalt adjusters have been worked out considering different pin configuration for the adjuster assembly. To start with we have assumed all adjusters throughout its length are of the same configuration. The flux depression factors within the cobalt pencils have been considered in the estimations of the specific and total cobalt 60 activities. The option of using graded cobalt adjusters, where different pin configuration along the length is considered for better flux flattening

  7. Surface oxidation of cobalt nanoparticles studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen; Charles, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    The surface oxide formed on cobalt nanoparticles has been studied by Mossbauer emission spectroscopy. Exposure of the cobalt particles to oxygen at room temperature was found to result in the formation of a relatively well-ordered surface oxide with Mossbauer parameters similar to those of CoO....

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of a Schiff Base Cobalt (III) Complex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-18

    Dec 18, 2017 ... activities at a concentration even higher than the compound which confirmed that chelation of ligand with cobalt ion was significant for the activity of this novel compound. The cobalt compound activated caspase-3 via the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway resulting in induces apoptosis on MCF-7 cell ...

  9. Optimal thickness calculation of cobalt targets in HFETR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuiqing; Peng Feng

    1995-01-01

    The ANISN code, which is more exact than 'blacken-theory', is used to calculate the thickness of cobalt targets of 'sandwich' type structure in HFETR core. Result shows: there is a wide radioactivity peak when the cobalt thickness is between 2.5 mm and 3.0 mm, the optimal thickness of maximum's radioactivity is about 2.9 mm

  10. Removal of copper and cobalt from aqueous solutions using natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthetic non-mixed sulphate solutions of copper and cobalt recorded maximum cation uptakes of 79% and 63% with 0.02 M HCl-activated clinoptilolite respectively. From the Cu/Co mixed solutions, both cobalt and copper recorded a 79% uptake with 0.02 M HCl-activation. The 0.04 M HCl activation gave percentage ...

  11. 21 CFR 189.120 - Cobaltous salts and its derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cobaltous salts and its derivatives. 189.120 Section 189.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... malt beverages as a foam stabilizer and to prevent “gushing.” (b) Food containing any added cobaltous...

  12. The role of cobalt on the creep of Waspaloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, R. N.; Chin, L.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Cobalt was systematically replaced with nickel in Waspaloy (which normally contains 13% Co) to determine the effects of cobalt on the creep behavior of this alloy. Effects of cobalt were found to be minimal on tensile strengths and microstructure. The creep resistance and the stress rupture resistance determined in the range from 704 to 760 C (1300 to 1400 C) were found to decrease as cobalt was removed from the standard alloy at all stresses and temperatures. Roughly a ten-fold drop in rupture life and a corresponding increase in minimum creep rate were found under all test conditions. Both the apparent creep activation energy and the matrix contribution to creep resistance were found to increase with cobalt. These creep effects are attributed to cobalt lowering the stacking fault energy of the alloy matrix. The creep resistance loss due to the removal of cobalt is shown to be restored by slightly increasing the gamma' volume fraction. Results are compared to a previous study on Udimet 700, a higher strength, higher gamma' volume fraction alloy with similar phase chemistry, in which cobalt did not affect creep resistance. An explanation for this difference in behavior based on interparticle spacing and cross-slip is presented.

  13. Microwave Mapping Demonstration Using the Thermochromic Cobalt Chloride Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu D.; Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    An update to the thermochromic cobalt(II) chloride equilibrium demonstration is described. Filter paper that has been saturated with aqueous cobalt(II) chloride is heated for seconds in a microwave oven, producing a color change. The resulting pink and blue map is used to colorfully demonstrate Le Châtelier's principle and to illuminate the…

  14. Improving Neural Recording Technology at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, John Eric

    Neural recording electrodes are widely used to study normal brain function (e.g., learning, memory, and sensation) and abnormal brain function (e.g., epilepsy, addiction, and depression) and to interface with the nervous system for neuroprosthetics. With a deep understanding of the electrode interface at the nanoscale and the use of novel nanofabrication processes, neural recording electrodes can be designed that surpass previous limits and enable new applications. In this thesis, I will discuss three projects. In the first project, we created an ultralow-impedance electrode coating by controlling the nanoscale texture of electrode surfaces. In the second project, we developed a novel nanowire electrode for long-term intracellular recordings. In the third project, we created a means of wirelessly communicating with ultra-miniature, implantable neural recording devices. The techniques developed for these projects offer significant improvements in the quality of neural recordings. They can also open the door to new types of experiments and medical devices, which can lead to a better understanding of the brain and can enable novel and improved tools for clinical applications.

  15. Catalysis at the nanoscale may change selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Cyrille; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2016-10-18

    Among the many virtues ascribed to catalytic nanoparticles, the prospect that the passage from the macro- to the nanoscale may change product selectivity attracts increasing attention. To date, why such effects may exist lacks explanation. Guided by recent experimental reports, we propose that the effects may result from the coupling between the chemical steps in which the reactant, intermediates, and products are involved and transport of these species toward the catalytic surface. Considering as a thought experiment the competitive formation of hydrogen and formate upon reduction of hydrogenocarbonate ions on metals like palladium or platinum, a model is developed that allows one to identify the governing parameters and predict the effect of nanoscaling on selectivity. The model leads to a master equation relating product selectivity and thickness of the diffusion layer. The latter parameter varies considerably upon passing from the macro- to the nanoscale, thus predicting considerable variations of product selectivity. These are subtle effects in the sense that the same mechanism might exhibit a reverse variation of the selectivity if the set of parameter values were different. An expression is given that allows one to predict the direction of the effect. There has been a tendency to assign the catalytic effects of nanoscaling to chemical reactivity changes of the active surface. Such factors might be important in some circumstances. We, however, insist on the likely role of short-distance transport on product selectivity, which could have been thought, at first sight, as the exclusive domain of chemical factors.

  16. Nanoscale Science and Engineering in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dascalu, Dan; Topa, Vladimir; Kleps, Irina

    2001-01-01

    In spite of difficult working conditions and with very low financial support, many groups from Romania are involved in emerging fields, such as the nanoscale science and technology. Until the last years, this activity was developed without a central coordination and without many interactions between these research groups. In the year 2000, some of the institutes and universities active in the nanotechnology field in Romania founded the MICRONANOTECH network. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the main activities and results of the Romanian groups working in this novel domain. Most of the groups are deal with the nanomaterial technology and only few of them have activities in nanostructure science and engineering, in new concepts and device modeling and technology. This paper describes the nanotechnology research development in two of the most significant institutes from Romania: Centre for Nanotechnologies from National Institute for Research and Development in Microtehnologies (IMT-Bucharest) and from National Institute for Research and Development in Materials Physics (INCD-FM), Magurele. The Romanian research results in nanotechnology field were presented in numerous papers presented in international conferences or published in national and international journals. They are also presented in patents, international awards and fellowships. The research effort and financial support are outlined. Some future trends of the Romanian nanoscale science and technology research are also described

  17. Recombinant protein-based nanoscale biomemory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagati, A K; Min, J; Choi, J W

    2014-01-01

    Biomolecular computing devices that are based on the properties of biomolecular activities offer a unique possibility for constructing new computing structures. A new concept of using various biomolecules has been proposed in order to develop a protein-based memory device that is capable of switching physical properties when electrical input signals are applied to perform memory switching. To clarify the proposed concept, redox protein is immobilized on Au nanoelectrodes to catalyze reversible reactions of redox-active molecules, which is controlled electrochemically and reversibly converted between its ON/OFF states. In this review, we summarize recent research towards developing nanoscale biomemory devices including design, synthesis, fabrication, and functionalization based on the proposed concept. At first we analyze the memory function properties of the proposed device at bulk material level and then explain the WORM (write-once-read-many times) nature of the device, later we extend the analysis to multi-bit and multi-level storage functions, and then we focus the developments in nanoscale biomemory devices based on the electron transport of redox molecules to the underlying Au patterned surface. The developed device operates at very low voltages and has good stability and excellent reversibility, proving to be a promising platform for future memory devices.

  18. Computer simulations for the nano-scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stich, I.

    2007-01-01

    A review of methods for computations for the nano-scale is presented. The paper should provide a convenient starting point into computations for the nano-scale as well as a more in depth presentation for those already working in the field of atomic/molecular-scale modeling. The argument is divided in chapters covering the methods for description of the (i) electrons, (ii) ions, and (iii) techniques for efficient solving of the underlying equations. A fairly broad view is taken covering the Hartree-Fock approximation, density functional techniques and quantum Monte-Carlo techniques for electrons. The customary quantum chemistry methods, such as post Hartree-Fock techniques, are only briefly mentioned. Description of both classical and quantum ions is presented. The techniques cover Ehrenfest, Born-Oppenheimer, and Car-Parrinello dynamics. The strong and weak points of both principal and technical nature are analyzed. In the second part we introduce a number of applications to demonstrate the different approximations and techniques introduced in the first part. They cover a wide range of applications such as non-simple liquids, surfaces, molecule-surface interactions, applications in nano technology, etc. These more in depth presentations, while certainly not exhaustive, should provide information on technical aspects of the simulations, typical parameters used, and ways of analysis of the huge amounts of data generated in these large-scale supercomputer simulations. (author)

  19. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen. This report is a starting point to determine what is known and what needs to be known about selected nanomaterials as part of a process to identify and prioritize research to inform future assessments of the potential ecological and health implications of these materials. Two specific applications of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) are considered: (1) as an agent for removing arsenic from drinking water; and (2) as an active ingredient in topical sunscreen. These case studies are organized around a comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework that combines a product life cycle perspective with the risk assessment paradigm. They are intended to help identify what may need to be known in order to conduct a comprehensive environmental assessment of the potential risks related to nano-TiO2. These “case studies” do not represent completed or even preliminary assessments, nor are they intended to serve as a basis for risk management decisions in the near term on these specific uses of nano TiO2. Rather, the intent is to use this document in developing the scientific and technical information needed for future assessment efforts.

  20. Visualizing copper assisted graphene growth in nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmi, Mohamad Saufi; Yusop, Mohd Zamri; Kalita, Golap; Yaakob, Yazid; Takahashi, Chisato; Tanemura, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Control synthesis of high quality large-area graphene on transition metals (TMs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most fascinating approach for practical device applications. Interaction of carbon atoms and TMs is quite critical to obtain graphene with precise layer number, crystal size and structure. Here, we reveal a solid phase reaction process to achieve Cu assisted graphene growth in nanoscale by in-situ transmission electron microscope (TEM). Significant structural transformation of amorphous carbon nanofiber (CNF) coated with Cu is observed with an applied potential in a two probe system. The coated Cu particle recrystallize and agglomerate toward the cathode with applied potential due to joule heating and large thermal gradient. Consequently, the amorphous carbon start crystallizing and forming sp2 hybridized carbon to form graphene sheet from the tip of Cu surface. We observed structural deformation and breaking of the graphene nanoribbon with a higher applied potential, attributing to saturated current flow and induced Joule heating. The observed graphene formation in nanoscale by the in-situ TEM process can be significant to understand carbon atoms and Cu interaction. PMID:25523645

  1. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  2. Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray. This report represents a case study of engineered nanoscale silver (nano-Ag), focusing on the specific example of nano-Ag as possibly used in disinfectant spr...

  3. Tuning functional properties: From nanoscale building blocks to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ous nanoscale building blocks, metal and semiconductor nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes have gained much attention and a brief summary of their functional properties is discussed. Further- more, the functional properties of nanomaterials can be fine-tuned by a stepwise integration of these nanoscale building blocks ...

  4. Frontier in nanoscale flows fractional calculus and analytical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Roland; Liu, Hong-yan

    2014-01-01

    This ebook covers the basic properties of nanoscale flows, and various analytical and numerical methods for nanoscale flows and environmental flows. This ebook is a good reference not only for audience of the journal, but also for various communities in mathematics, nanotechnology and environmental science.

  5. Nanoscale Engineering of Multiferroic Hybrid Composites for Micro- and Nano-scale Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    layer aluminum nitride (AIN)/ cobalt iron (CoFe) magnetoelectric (ME) thin films using reactive rf/dc magnetron sputtering. The bi-layer thin... complexity " South Eastern-South West Regional American Chemical Society Meeting, December, 1-4, New Orleans, LA. 14) Caruntu, G. "Architectural Design of...K.; Engman, T.; Adireddy, S.; Caruntu, G.; Tenne, D. A. "BaTi03 Nanocrystals studied by Raman Spectroscopy" American Physical Society National

  6. Three-dimensional coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of molten iron in mantle olivine at nanoscale resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huaidong; Xu, Rui; Chen, Chien-Chun; Yang, Wenge; Fan, Jiadong; Tao, Xutang; Song, Changyong; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yong; Fei, Yingwei; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Mao, Wendy L; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-05-17

    We report quantitative 3D coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of a molten Fe-rich alloy and crystalline olivine sample, synthesized at 6 GPa and 1800 °C, with nanoscale resolution. The 3D mass density map is determined and the 3D distribution of the Fe-rich and Fe-S phases in the olivine-Fe-S sample is observed. Our results indicate that the Fe-rich melt exhibits varied 3D shapes and sizes in the olivine matrix. This work has potential for not only improving our understanding of the complex interactions between Fe-rich core-forming melts and mantle silicate phases but also paves the way for quantitative 3D imaging of materials at nanoscale resolution under extreme pressures and temperatures.

  7. Magnetic circular dichroic spectra of cobalt(II) substituted metalloenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, B; Kaden, T A; Vallee, B L

    1975-04-08

    The magnetic circular dichroic (MCD) spectra of cobalt(II) sugstituted metalloenzymes have been studied and compared to a series of four-, five-, and six-coordinate cobalt(II) model complexes previously examined (T. A. Kaden et al. (1974), Inorg. Chem. 13, 2582). The MCD spectra of cobalt substituted carboxypeptidase A, procarboxypeptidase ta, and thermolysin are consistent with earlier deductions of tetrahedral coordination from absorption spectra and also with X-ray structure analysis. Inhibitors fail to alter their MCD spectra significantly. The MCD spectra of cobalt alkaline phosphatase and carbonic anhydrase are more complex and their pH dependence and alteration by inhibitors are discussed in terms of known cobalt(II) models.

  8. Total body irradiation with a reconditioned cobalt teletherapy unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael D C; Larouche, Renée-Xavière; Olivares, Marina; Léger, Pierre; Larkin, Joe; Freeman, Carolyn R; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2006-01-01

    While the current trend in radiotherapy is to replace cobalt teletherapy units with more versatile and technologically advanced linear accelerators, there remain some useful applications for older cobalt units. The expansion of our radiotherapy department involved the decommissioning of an isocentric cobalt teletherapy unit and the replacement of a column-mounted 4-MV LINAC that has been used for total body irradiation (TBI). To continue offering TBI treatments, we converted the decommissioned cobalt unit into a dedicated fixed-field total body irradiator and installed it in an existing medium-energy LINAC bunker. This article describes the logistical and dosimetric aspects of bringing a reconditioned cobalt teletherapy unit into clinical service as a total body irradiator.

  9. Cobalt60 plaques in recurrent retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fass, D.; McCormick, B.; Abramson, D.; Ellsworth, R. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Cobalt60 plaque irradiation is one treatment option for patients with recurrent retinoblastoma following conventional external beam irradiation (ERT). Tumorocidal doses can be delivered without excessive risk of normal tissue injury. In patients not considered candidates for xenon arc or cryotherapy, 60Co is an alternative to enucleation. Between 1968 and 1987, 85 patients were treated with 60Co plaques, 72 of whom had failed prior ERT. Age at diagnosis ranged from 1 week to 4 years. There are 37 males and 35 females. Seventy-one patients had bilateral disease and one had unilateral. Three patients had both eyes plaqued. Prior ERT ranged from 30 to 70 Gy (mean 4200 Gy). Time from initial therapy to failure ranged from 13 to 60 months. Cobalt plaques of 10 mm, 15 mm, or 10 {times} 15 mm were used depending on tumor size and location. Dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median 40 Gy) given over 3 to 8 days. Twelve patients had two plaque applications; three patients had three plaque applications. All patients were followed with routine ophthalmoscopic examinations. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 22 years (mean 8.7). Seven patients died of metastatic disease; 10 patients developed non-ocular second tumors. Thirty patients required enucleation. Twenty-two patients had clear tumor progression, two patients had radiation complications, and six patients had a combination of tumor growth and complications. Cobalt60 can salvage eyes in retinoblastoma patients failing ERT. Currently, the authors are using I125 in an attempt to spare normal ocular tissue and reduce subsequent complications.

  10. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V. [Instituto de Tecnologías y Ciencias de la Ingeniería, “Ing. H. Fernández Long,” Av. Paseo Colón 850 (1063), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Errandonea, D., E-mail: daniel.errandonea@uv.es [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Institut Universitari de Ciència dels Materials, Universitat de Valencia, c/ Doctor Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Agouram, S. [Departamento de Física Aplicada y Electromagnetismo, Universitat de València, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  11. Cobalt60 plaques in recurrent retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fass, D.; McCormick, B.; Abramson, D.; Ellsworth, R.

    1991-01-01

    Cobalt60 plaque irradiation is one treatment option for patients with recurrent retinoblastoma following conventional external beam irradiation (ERT). Tumorocidal doses can be delivered without excessive risk of normal tissue injury. In patients not considered candidates for xenon arc or cryotherapy, 60Co is an alternative to enucleation. Between 1968 and 1987, 85 patients were treated with 60Co plaques, 72 of whom had failed prior ERT. Age at diagnosis ranged from 1 week to 4 years. There are 37 males and 35 females. Seventy-one patients had bilateral disease and one had unilateral. Three patients had both eyes plaqued. Prior ERT ranged from 30 to 70 Gy (mean 4200 Gy). Time from initial therapy to failure ranged from 13 to 60 months. Cobalt plaques of 10 mm, 15 mm, or 10 x 15 mm were used depending on tumor size and location. Dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median 40 Gy) given over 3 to 8 days. Twelve patients had two plaque applications; three patients had three plaque applications. All patients were followed with routine ophthalmoscopic examinations. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 22 years (mean 8.7). Seven patients died of metastatic disease; 10 patients developed non-ocular second tumors. Thirty patients required enucleation. Twenty-two patients had clear tumor progression, two patients had radiation complications, and six patients had a combination of tumor growth and complications. Cobalt60 can salvage eyes in retinoblastoma patients failing ERT. Currently, the authors are using I125 in an attempt to spare normal ocular tissue and reduce subsequent complications

  12. Cobalt-Chromium Metallosis With Normal Electroretinogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Lola M; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsang, Stephen H; Hood, Donald C; Odel, Jeffrey G

    2016-12-01

    Ocular cobalt toxicity is a rare phenomenon reported with increased frequency due to the rise of cobalt-chromium metal hip implants. We report the case of a 66-year-old previously healthy man who developed decreased vision due to cobalt-chromium toxicity from a metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty. Our objective was to determine whether the origin of his visual loss was due to toxicity of the optic nerve, of the retina, or of both. Ocular examination, 10-2 SITA-Standard Humphrey Visual Field (VF), standard full-field electroretinogram (ERG) as indicated by the International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV), multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG), multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were conducted. Ocular examination revealed decreased visual acuity, poor color vision, normal funduscopy, and cecocentral scotomas on VF testing. Because his right eye was amblyopic since childhood, test results from only the left eye are shown. Electrophysiology studies revealed an ISCEV standard full-field ERG with photopic and scotopic responses within normal limits, mfERG with amplitudes and latencies within normal limits, and mfVEP with latencies within normal limits, but with decreased central amplitudes. Peripapillary and macular OCT showed retinal nerve fiber layer and retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness within normal limits. Because decreased color vision and cecocentral scotoma on 10-2 VF are most consistent with toxic optic neuropathy, and decreased central amplitudes on mfVEP are suggestive of neural dysfunction, we hypothesize that our patient presented with an early stage of optic nerve toxicity that was not yet apparent as a structural abnormality on OCT.

  13. SYNTHESIS AND ANTITUMOR ACTIVITY OF COPPER, NICKEL AND COBALT COORDINATION COMPOUNDS WITH 1-(2-HYDROXYPHENYL)ETHANONE N(4)-ALLYL-3-THIOSEMICARBAZONE

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilii GRAUR; Serghei SAVCIN; Victor TSAPKOV; Aurelian GULEA

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the synthesis of the ligand 1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)ethanone N(4)-allyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (H2L) and six coordination compounds of copper, nickel and cobalt with this ligand. The structure of thiosemicarbazone H2L was studied using 1H and 13С NMR spectroscopy. The synthesized coordination compounds were studied using elemental analysis, gravimetric analysis of water content, molar conductivity, and magnetochemistry. For H2L the antitumor activity towards human leukemia HL-60 ce...

  14. Strontium- and cobalt-substituted bioactive glasses seeded with human umbilical cord perivascular cells to promote bone regeneration via enhanced osteogenic and angiogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargozar, Saeid; Lotfibakhshaiesh, Nasrin; Ai, Jafar; Mozafari, Masoud; Brouki Milan, Peiman; Hamzehlou, Sepideh; Barati, Mahmood; Baino, Francesco; Hill, Robert G; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi

    2017-08-01

    Designing and developing new biomaterials to accelerate bone healing are currently under progress. In this study, we attempted to promote osteogenesis using strontium- and cobalt-substituted bioactive glasses (BGs) seeded with human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) in a critical size defect in the distal femur of rabbit animal model. The BG particles were successfully synthesized in the form of granules using the melt-derived route. After being isolated, HUCPVCs were expanded and then characterized to use during in vitro and in vivo procedures. The in vitro effects of the synthesized glasses on the isolated HUCPVCs as well as on cell lines SaOS-2 (selected for screening the osteogenetic potential) and HUVEC (selected for screening the angiogenic potential) were assessed by analyzing cytotoxicity, cell attachment, bone-like nodule formation, and real time PCR. The results of in vitro tests indicated cytocompatibility of the synthesized BG particles. For in vivo study, the HUCPVCs-seeded BGs were implanted into the animal's body. Radiographic imaging, histology and immunohistology staining were performed on the harvested specimens at 4 and 12weeks post-surgery. The in vivo evaluation of the samples showed that all the cell/glass constructs accelerated bone healing process in comparison with blank controls. The best in vitro and in vivo results were associated to the BGs containing both strontium and cobalt ions. This group of bioactive glasses is able to promote both osteogenesis and angiogenesis and can therefore be highly suitable for the development of advanced functional bone substitutes. Bone regeneration is considered as an unmet clinical need. The most recent researches focused on incorporation of strontium (Sr 2+ ) and cobalt (Co 2+ ) ions into bioactive glasses structure. Strontium is an alkaline earth metal which is currently used in the treatment of osteoporosis. Also, cobalt is considered as another promising element in the bone regeneration

  15. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  16. Cyanidotetra-kis-(trimethyl-phosphine)cobalt(I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Feng, Lei; Li, Xiaoyan

    2011-04-01

    The title compound, [Co(CN)(C(3)H(9)P)(4)], was obtained as a product of the reaction of [Co(PMe(3))(4)] with a molar equivalent of 2,6-difluoro-benzonitrile in diethyl ether. This compound is stable in the air for several hours, but rapidly decomposes at room temperature in solution. The cobalt(I) atom has s trigonal-bipyramidal coordination enviroment in which the cyano group and one of the PMe(3) groups are in the axial positions.

  17. HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-SUPPORTED COBALT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benner, Linda S.; Perkins, Patrick; Vollhardt, K.Peter C.

    1980-10-01

    In this report we detail the synthesis catalytic chemistry of polystyrene supported {eta}{sup 5} ~cyclopentadienyl- dicarbonyl cobalt, CpCo(CO){sub 2}. This material is active in the hydrogenation of CO to saturated linear hydrocarbons and appears to retain its "homogeneous", mononuclear character during the course of its catalysis, During ·the course of our work 18% and 20% crosslinked analogs of polystyrene supported CpCo(CO){sub 2} were shown to exhibit limited catalytic activity and no CO activation.

  18. Future of U.S. cobalt irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clouser, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    An examination of future cobalt needs requires us to review our base business, customer trends, technology trends, and people, the human aspect of our business. I am approaching this discussion from the perspective of a contract supplier of gamma irradiation services in the United States. The base business is comprised primarily of the sterilization of medical devices followed by containers, labware, food products, and other items. Since the core business is serving the medical industry, trends observed within medical device manufacturers can impact our growth and the type of services needed to support that industry. (author)

  19. Bifunctional cobalt F-T catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.G.; Coughlin, P.K.; Yang, C.L.; Rabo, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    Results on the catalytic screening of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts containing shape selective components are reported. Catalysts consist of promoted cobalt intimately contacted with Union Carbide molecular sieves and were tested using a Berty type internally recycled reactor. Methods of preparation, promoters and shape selective components were varied and aimed at improving catalyst performance. Catalysts were developed demonstrating high C/sub 5/ + yields with high olefin content and low methane production while maintaining stability under both low and high H/sub 2/:CO ratio conditions.

  20. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Jochen; Snively, Christopher M.; Vijay, Rohit; Hendershot, Reed; Feist, Ben

    2010-10-12

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  1. Diffusion of cobalt in alpha zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, U.; Pruthi, D.D.; Anand, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    The diffusion of 60 Co in alpha zirconium has been studied in the temperature range of 873-1123 K using the sectioning technique. The diffusion parameters obey the following Arrhenius equation:- D = (1.132 +- 0.22)10 -4 exp((-136.43 +- 3.50 KJ)/RT)m 2 s -1 . The diffusivity in this phase is as high as that observed in β-phase. It is also about five orders of magnitude higher when compared to the self diffusion values. The high diffusivity of cobalt in alpha zirconium has been explained on the basis of an interstitial mechanism. (auth.)

  2. Electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended inliquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongjian; Guo, Jinghua; Yin, Yadong; Augustsson, Andreas; Dong, Chungli; Nordgren, Joseph; Chang, Chinglin; Alivisatos, Paul; Thornton, Geoff; Ogletree, D. Frank; Requejo, Felix G.; de Groot, Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-07-16

    The electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended in liquid as a function of size has been investigated using in-situ x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. A sharp absorption peak associated with the ligand molecules is found that increases in intensity upon reducing the nanocrystal size. X-ray Raman features due to d-d and to charge-transfer excitations of ligand molecules are identified. The study reveals the local symmetry of the surface of {var_epsilon}-Co phase nanocrystals, which originates from a dynamic interaction between Co nanocrystals and surfactant + solvent molecules.

  3. Characterization of a Cobalt-Tungsten Interconnect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Caspersen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A ferritic steel interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell must be coated in order to prevent chromium evaporation from the steel substrate. The Technical University of Denmark and Topsoe Fuel Cell have developed an interconnect coating based on a cobalt-tungsten alloy. The purpose of the coating...... for 300 h at 800 °C. The coating was characterized with Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy (GDOES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The oxidation properties were evaluated by measuring weight change of coated samples of Crofer 22 H and Crofer 22 APU as a function...

  4. Optical properties and electrical transport of thin films of terbium(III bis(phthalocyanine on cobalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Robaschik

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The optical and electrical properties of terbium(III bis(phthalocyanine (TbPc2 films on cobalt substrates were studied using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE and current sensing atomic force microscopy (cs-AFM. Thin films of TbPc2 with a thickness between 18 nm and 87 nm were prepared by organic molecular beam deposition onto a cobalt layer grown by electron beam evaporation. The molecular orientation of the molecules on the metallic film was estimated from the analysis of the spectroscopic ellipsometry data. A detailed analysis of the AFM topography shows that the TbPc2 films consist of islands which increase in size with the thickness of the organic film. Furthermore, the cs-AFM technique allows local variations of the organic film topography to be correlated with electrical transport properties. Local current mapping as well as local I–V spectroscopy shows that despite the granular structure of the films, the electrical transport is uniform through the organic films on the microscale. The AFM-based electrical measurements allow the local charge carrier mobility of the TbPc2 thin films to be quantified with nanoscale resolution.

  5. Removal of Cobalt Ions from Contaminated Water Using Magnetite Based Nanocomposites: Effects of Various Parameters on the Removal Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Tizro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt is one of the most hazardous heavy metals present in the environment. Magnetic based nanoadsorbents were used for removal of Co(II ions in this work. The characteristics results of FT-IR, XRD, TGA, and FE-SEM show that applied coatings were modified magnetite nanoparticles efficiently. The results of TEM indicate that magnetic nanoadsorbents were produced on the nanoscale with average particle sizes of 60±10 nm. Batch experiments were carried out to determine the removal efficiency of the nanoadsorbents. pH, temperature, contact time, adsorbent dose, shaking rate and the initial concentration of analyte were the studied parameters. At optimized conditions of operation parameters, the maximum removal percentage of 92% was obtained by using magnetite-citric acid as an adsorbent. Equilibrium data for Co(II ions adsorption onto magnetite-citric acid were fitted well by Langmuir isotherm model and the maximum adsorption capacity for Co(IIions was obtained 43.292 mg/g at 313 K. Also, thermodynamic parameters reveal the spontaneity, feasibility and endothermic nature of the Co(II ions adsorption process. In addition, the cobalt ions can be desorbed from magnetite-citric acid nanoadsorbent by using nitric acid solution with 95% desorption efficiency and the magnetite-citric acid nanoadsorbent exhibits good recyclability.

  6. Pronounced Size Dependence in Structure and Morphology of Gas-Phase Produced, Partially Oxidized Cobalt Nanoparticles under Catalytic Reaction Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartling, Stephan; Yin, Chunrong; Barke, Ingo; Oldenburg, Kevin; Hartmann, Hannes; von Oeynhausen, Viola; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Houben, Kelly; Tyo, Eric C; Seifert, Sönke; Lievens, Peter; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Vajda, Stefan

    2015-06-23

    It is generally accepted that optimal particle sizes are key for efficient nanocatalysis. Much less attention is paid to the role of morphology and atomic arrangement during catalytic reactions. Here, we unravel the structural, stoichiometric, and morphological evolution of gas-phase produced and partially oxidized cobalt nanoparticles in a broad size range. Particles with diameters between 1.4 and 22 nm generated in cluster sources are size selected and deposited on amorphous alumina (Al2O3) and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films. A combination of different techniques is employed to monitor particle properties at the stages of production, exposure to ambient conditions, and catalytic reaction, in this case, the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane at elevated temperatures. A pronounced size dependence is found, naturally classifying the particles into three size regimes. While small and intermediate clusters essentially retain their compact morphology, large particles transform into hollow spheres due to the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. Depending on the substrate, an isotropic (Al2O3) or anisotropic (UNCD) Kirkendall effect is observed. The latter results in dramatic lateral size changes. Our results shed light on the interplay between chemical reactions and the catalyst's structure and provide an approach to tailor the cobalt oxide phase composition required for specific catalytic schemes.

  7. Pronounced Size Dependence in Structure and Morphology of Gas-Phase Produced, Partially Oxidized Cobalt Nanoparticles under Catalytic Reaction Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartling, Stephan; Yin, Chunrong; Barke, Ingo; Oldenburg, Kevin; Hartmann, Hannes; von Oeynhausen, Viola; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Houben, Kelly; Tyo, Eric C.; Seifert, Sönke; Lievens, Peter; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Vajda, Stefan

    2015-06-23

    It is generally accepted that optimal particle sizes are key for efficient nanocatalysis. Much less attention is paid to the role of morphology and atomic arrangement during catalytic reactions. Here we unravel the structural, stoichiometric, and morphological evolution of gas-phase produced cobalt nanoparticles in a broad size range. Particles with diameters between 1.4 nm and 22nm generated in cluster sources are size selected and deposited on amorphous alumina (Al2O3) and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films. A combination of different techniques is employed to monitor particle properties at the stages of production, exposure to ambient conditions, and catalytic reaction, in this case the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane at elevated temperatures. A pronounced size dependence is found, naturally classifying the particles into three size regimes. While small and intermediate clusters essentially retain their compact morphology, large particles transform into hollow spheres due to the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. Depending on the substrate an isotropic (Al2O3) or anisotropic (UNCD) Kirkendall effect is observed. The latter results in dramatic lateral size changes. Our results shed light on the interplay between chemical reactions and the catalyst's structure and provide an approach to tailor the cobalt oxide phase composition required for specific catalytic schemes.

  8. Thermophysical properties study of micro/nanoscale materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xuhui

    Thermal transport in low-dimensional structure has attracted tremendous attentions because micro/nanoscale materials play crucial roles in advancing micro/nanoelectronics industry. The thermal properties are essential for understanding of the energy conversion and thermal management. To better investigate micro/nanoscale materials and characterize the thermal transport, pulse laser-assisted thermal relaxation 2 (PLTR2) and transient electrothermal (TET) are both employed to determine thermal property of various forms of materials, including thin films and nanowires. As conducting polymer, Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) thin film is studied to understand its thermal properties variation with P3HT weight percentage. 4 P3HT solutions of different weight percentages are compounded to fabricate thin films using spin-coating technique. Experimental results indicate that weight percentage exhibits impact on thermophysical properties. When percentage changes from 2% to 7%, thermal conductivity varies from 1.29 to 1.67 W/m·K and thermal diffusivity decreases from 10-6 to 5×10-7 m2/s. Moreover, PLTR2 technique is applied to characterize the three-dimensional anisotropic thermal properties in spin-coated P3HT thin films. Raman spectra verify that the thin films embrace partially orientated P3HT molecular chains, leading to anisotropic thermal transport. Among all three directions, lowest thermal property is observed along out-of-plane direction. For in-plane characterization, anisotropic ratio is around 2 to 3, indicating that the orientation of the molecular chains has strong impact on the thermal transport along different directions. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin film is synthesized by electrospinning features porous structure composed by TiO2 nanowires with random orientations. The porous structure caused significant degradation of thermal properties. Effective thermal diffusivity, conductivity, and density of the films are 1.35˜3.52 × 10-6 m2/s, 0.06˜0.36 W/m·K, and

  9. Comparative study of the acute lung toxicity of pure cobalt powder and cobalt-tungsten carbide mixture in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasfargues, G; Lison, D; Maldague, P; Lauwerys, R

    1992-01-01

    Alveolitis progressing to lung fibrosis has been reported in workers exposed to cobalt containing dust (e.g., tungsten carbide-cobalt mixture as produced by the hard metal industry) but rarely following exposure to pure cobalt dust (e.g., in cobalt-producing factories). We have previously demonstrated that tungsten carbide-cobalt mixture is more toxic toward rat alveolar macrophages in vitro than pure cobalt metal powder. The present study was undertaken to compare in female rats the acute pulmonary response (lung weight, lung histology, cellular and biochemical analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and mortality) following the intratracheal instillation of pure cobalt (Co) particles (median particle size, d50:4 microns), pure tungsten carbide (WC) particles (d50:2 microns), tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) powder (d50:2 microns; cobalt 6.3%, tungsten 84%, carbon 5.4%) and crystalline silica (d50 less than 5 micron) used as pneumotoxic reference material. WC alone (15.67 mg/100 g body wt) behaves as an inert dust producing only a mild accumulation of macrophages in the alveolar duct walls. Co alone (1.0 mg/100 g) only causes a moderate inflammatory response. An identical amount of Co given as WC-Co mixture (16.67 mg/100 g; corresponding to 1.0 mg Co/100 g) produces a severe alveolitis and fatal pulmonary edema. Cellular and biochemical characteristics of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid collected 24 hr after the intratracheal instillation of WC (1.0 mg/100 g) or Co (0.06 mg/100 g) are not significantly different from those of control animals instilled with sterile saline. On the contrary, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid changes following administration of the WC-Co mixture (1.0 mg/100 g; corresponding to 0.06 mg Co/100 g) are very similar to those induced by crystalline silica (1.0 mg/100 g). The amount of cobalt excreted in urine is significantly higher when the animals are exposed to WC-Co powder as compared to an equivalent amount of pure cobalt particles

  10. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  11. Local and systemic toxicity of nanoscale debris particles in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzois, Ioannis; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Michos, Ioannis; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2012-04-01

    Over the past 30 years joint replacement prostheses have been developed and refined to enhance durability and reproducibility. Total hip joint arthroplasty is being performed in an increasing number of younger patients; therefore orthopaedic surgeons seek implants with a longer life span. With regards to the progress of mechanical behaviour of the biomaterials used in an arthroplasty, little is known about the long-term biological effects of wear debris. Owing to the composition of the prostheses currently in use, systemic exposure to chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni) and aluminium (Al) alloys occurs as a result of the formation of metal wear nano-particles that are released both from metal-on-metal and polyethylene-on-metal bearings, resulting in a postoperative increase in metal ion levels at different organ sites. These particles circulate both locally and systemically, penetrate cell plasma membranes, bind to cellular proteins and enzymes and modulate cytokine expression. Their physiologic effects are poorly understood and their potential toxicity, hypersensitivity and carcinogenicity remain a cause for concern. In this article we will address the issue of whether these nanoscale degradation products are associated with adverse, clinically significant local or systemic toxicologic sequelae. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. 3D Magnetic Induction Maps of Nanoscale Materials Revealed by Electron Holographic Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Daniel; Rodriguez, Luis A; Béché, Armand; Javon, Elsa; Serrano, Luis; Magen, Cesar; Gatel, Christophe; Lubk, Axel; Lichte, Hannes; Bals, Sara; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Fernández-Pacheco, Amalio; De Teresa, José M; Snoeck, Etienne

    2015-10-13

    The investigation of three-dimensional (3D) ferromagnetic nanoscale materials constitutes one of the key research areas of the current magnetism roadmap and carries great potential to impact areas such as data storage, sensing, and biomagnetism. The properties of such nanostructures are closely connected with their 3D magnetic nanostructure, making their determination highly valuable. Up to now, quantitative 3D maps providing both the internal magnetic and electric configuration of the same specimen with high spatial resolution are missing. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative 3D reconstruction of the dominant axial component of the magnetic induction and electrostatic potential within a cobalt nanowire (NW) of 100 nm in diameter with spatial resolution below 10 nm by applying electron holographic tomography. The tomogram was obtained using a dedicated TEM sample holder for acquisition, in combination with advanced alignment and tomographic reconstruction routines. The powerful approach presented here is widely applicable to a broad range of 3D magnetic nanostructures and may trigger the progress of novel spintronic nonplanar nanodevices.

  13. The Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Particulate and Soluble Cobalt in Human Urothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Rachel M; The, Therry; Xie, Hong; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M; Wise, John Pierce

    2017-11-01

    Cobalt use is increasing particularly due to its use as one of the primary metals in cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) metal-on-metal prosthetics. CoCrMo is a high-strength, wear-resistant alloy with reduced risk for prosthetic loosening and device fracture. More than 500,000 people receive hip implants each year in the USA which puts them at potential risk for exposure to metal ions and particles released by the prosthetic implants. Data show cobalt ions released from prosthetics reach the bloodstream and accumulate in the bladder. As patients with failed hip implants show increased urinary and blood cobalt levels, no studies have considered the effects of cobalt on human urothelial cells. Accordingly, we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of particulate and soluble cobalt in urothelial cells. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ions. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found, when compared to particulate cobalt, soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic, but induced similar levels of genotoxicity. Interestingly, at similar intracellular cobalt ion concentrations, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by a lack of metaphases not observed after particulate cobalt treatment. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human urothelial cells and solubility may play a key role in cobalt-induced toxicity.

  14. A spot test for detection of cobalt release - early experience and findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2010-01-01

    It is often difficult to establish clinical relevance of metal exposure in cobalt-allergic patients. Dermatologists and patients may incorrectly assume that many metallic items release cobalt at levels that may cause cobalt dermatitis. Cobalt-allergic patients may be unaware that they are exposed...

  15. Spin-dependent transport in cobalt nanocontacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarau, G.

    2007-04-16

    The magnetoresistance response of cobalt nanocontacts with varying geometries formed between two extended electrodes has been experimentally investigated and linked to micromagnetic simulations. The contribution of the nanoconstriction to the measured magnetoresistance signal has been separated from that of the electrode bulk. The different nanocontact geometries exhibit different shape anisotropies resulting in a characteristic behavior of the magnetization at each nanocontact. The magnetization reversal processes are explained on the basis of the anisotropic magnetoresistance and domain wall scattering effects. The domain wall resistance takes positive values, which is in agreement with models based on the spin mistracking inside the domain wall. The 4 K MR measurements are found to be influenced by the exchange bias effect between the ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes and the antiferromagnetic oxidized Co surface. When cooling down in an applied magnetic field, the uniform biased Co layer behaves as if it possesses a unidirectional anisotropy axis along the field cooling direction. In the zero field cooling case, the exchange bias varies locally throughout the sample giving rise to non-reproducible successive MR traces. (orig.)

  16. Preparation and characterization of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irshad, M. I., E-mail: imrancssp@gmail.com; Mohamed, N. M., E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 PERAK (Malaysia); Ahmad, F., E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Abdullah, M. Z., E-mail: zaki-abdullah@petronas.com.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 PERAK (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Electrochemical deposition technique has been used to deposit cobalt nanowires into the nano sized channels of Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. CoCl{sub 2}Ðœ‡6H2O salt solution was used, which was buffered with H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and acidified by dilute H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to increase the plating life and control pH of the solution. Thin film of copper around 150 nm thick on one side of AAO template coated by e-beam evaporation system served as cathode to create electrical contact. FESEM analysis shows that the as-deposited nanowires are highly aligned, parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. The TEM results show that electrodeposited cobalt nanowires are crystalline in nature. The Hysteresis loop shows the magnetization properties for in and out of plane configuration. The in plane saturation magnetization (Ms) is lower than out of plane configuration because of the easy axis of magnetization is perpendicular to nanowire axis. These magnetic nanowires could be utilized for applications such as spintronic devices, high density magnetic storage, and magnetic sensor applications.

  17. Rare earth-cobalt permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strnat, K.J.; Strnat, R.M.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the historical background and the development of rare earth-cobalt-based permanent magnets from basic science studies on rare earth-transition metal alloys in the 1960's to today's broad spectrum of commercial magnet types and their applications. It puts the RE-Co magnetis in perspective relative to older magnet types and also traces the path to the subsequent development of the related Nd-Fe-B magnets. The treatment is qualitative, with emphasis on the relationship between fundamental properties of the compounds and the interaction between microstructure and magnetic domain walls that makes high coercivity and the exceptional hard magnetic properties of the rare-earth magnets possible. The various kinds of RE-Co magnets in production and use today, some of their engineering properties, and economic aspects governing their applicability, cost and availability are also discussed. Many references provide a guide to the special literature regarding the physics, metallurgy, manufacture, product selection and properties of rare earth-cobalt magnets. (orig.)

  18. Leather Contains Cobalt and Poses a Risk of Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Dathan; Hamann, Carsten R; Kishi, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    thirty-one leather swatches were screened for cobalt content/release with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry and cobalt indicator solution (CIS). Samples with positive screens and 1 negative control were analyzed using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). RESULTS: CIS showed that 5...... of 131 samples contained cobalt, subsequently found to be between 1 and 190 parts per million (ppm) when evaluated with ICPMS. The XRF analysis showed that 6 samples contained >5% cobalt, subsequently found to contain greater than 300 ppm cobalt by ICPMS. 7 of 12 tested swatches contained cobalt...... in excess of 100 ppm. One sample contained greater than 1000 ppm cobalt. The prevalence of swatches containing cobalt at levels in excess of 190 ppm was at least 5% (n = 7; total, N = 131). DISCUSSION: Some leather consumer goods contain and release cobalt. Cobalt indicator solution is a poor screening test...

  19. Cobalt nanoparticles-embedded magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon for highly effective adsorption of rhodamine B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Lin; Cai, Ye; Yang, Guide; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zeng, Guangming; Zhou, Yaoyu; Li, Sisi; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Sheng; Fang, Yan; He, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Cobalt nanoparticles-embedded magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon (Co/OMC) was applied as a novel adsorption material to remove rhodamine B. • Co/OMC was synthesized by directly introducing cobalt into OMC through a simple infusing method. • High removal capacity of rhodamine B: maximum adsorption capacity reaches 468 mg/g at 200 mg/L initial rhodamine B concentration. • Very quick adsorption property: 96% of rhodamine B can be removed within 25 min. - Abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles-embedded magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon (Co/OMC), prepared through a simple method involving infusing and calcination, was used as a highly effective adsorbent for rhodamine B (Rh B) removal. Several techniques, including SEM, HRTEM, nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms, XRD, Raman spectra, EDX, zeta potential and VSM measurement, were applied to characterize the adsorbent. Batch tests were conducted to investigate the adsorption performance. The adsorption capacity of the resultant adsorbent was relatively high compared with raw ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) and reached an equilibrium value of 468 mg/g at 200 mg/L initial Rh B concentration. Removal efficiency even reached 96% within 25 min at 100 mg/L initial Rh B concentration. Besides, the adsorption amount increased with the increase of solution pH, adsorbent dose and initial Rh B concentration. Kinetics study showed that the adsorption agreed well with pseudo-second-order model (R 2 = 0.999) and had a significant correlation with intra-particle diffusion model in the both two adsorption periods. Furthermore, thermodynamics research indicated that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. The adsorption isotherms fitted well with Langmuir model, demonstrating the formation of mono-molecular layer on the surface of Co/OMC during adsorption process. The results confirmed that Co/OMC has the potential superiority in removal of Rh B from aqueous solution

  20. Cobalt nanoparticles-embedded magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon for highly effective adsorption of rhodamine B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Lin, E-mail: tanglin@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Cai, Ye; Yang, Guide; Liu, Yuanyuan [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Guangming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhou, Yaoyu; Li, Sisi; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Sheng; Fang, Yan; He, Yibin [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Cobalt nanoparticles-embedded magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon (Co/OMC) was applied as a novel adsorption material to remove rhodamine B. • Co/OMC was synthesized by directly introducing cobalt into OMC through a simple infusing method. • High removal capacity of rhodamine B: maximum adsorption capacity reaches 468 mg/g at 200 mg/L initial rhodamine B concentration. • Very quick adsorption property: 96% of rhodamine B can be removed within 25 min. - Abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles-embedded magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon (Co/OMC), prepared through a simple method involving infusing and calcination, was used as a highly effective adsorbent for rhodamine B (Rh B) removal. Several techniques, including SEM, HRTEM, nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms, XRD, Raman spectra, EDX, zeta potential and VSM measurement, were applied to characterize the adsorbent. Batch tests were conducted to investigate the adsorption performance. The adsorption capacity of the resultant adsorbent was relatively high compared with raw ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) and reached an equilibrium value of 468 mg/g at 200 mg/L initial Rh B concentration. Removal efficiency even reached 96% within 25 min at 100 mg/L initial Rh B concentration. Besides, the adsorption amount increased with the increase of solution pH, adsorbent dose and initial Rh B concentration. Kinetics study showed that the adsorption agreed well with pseudo-second-order model (R{sup 2} = 0.999) and had a significant correlation with intra-particle diffusion model in the both two adsorption periods. Furthermore, thermodynamics research indicated that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. The adsorption isotherms fitted well with Langmuir model, demonstrating the formation of mono-molecular layer on the surface of Co/OMC during adsorption process. The results confirmed that Co/OMC has the potential superiority in removal of Rh B from aqueous solution.

  1. A binuclear cobalt(II) complex of an NO3-donor Schiff base derived from 3-carboxylsalicylaldehyde and 2-nitroaniline

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao-Wen Yu; Ling Chang; Peng Sun; Min-Hui He

    2009-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the centrosymmetric title complex, bis{μ-3-[(2-nitrophenyl)iminomethyl]-2-oxidobenzoato}dicobalt(II), [Co2(C14H8N2O5)2], in which the ligand is 3-[(2-nitrophenyl)iminomethyl]-2-oxidobenzoate, a Schiff base synthesized from 2-nitroaniline with 3-carboxylsalicylaldehyde, the two cobalt(II) ions in the molecular unit are bridged by two phenolate O atoms of the ligands. Each metal centre has a distorted square-planar geometry. In the crystal structure, molecules a...

  2. Designing pseudocubic perovskites with enhanced nanoscale polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, I. [Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899, USA; Laws, W. J. [Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899, USA; Wang, D. [Department of Materials Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD, United Kingdom; Reaney, I. M. [Department of Materials Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD, United Kingdom

    2017-11-20

    A crystal-chemical framework has been proposed for the design of pseudocubic perovskites with nanoscale ferroelectric order, and its applicability has been demonstrated using a series of representative solid solutions that combined ferroelectric (K0.5Bi0.5TiO3, BaTiO3, and PbTiO3) and antiferroelectric (Nd-substituted BiFeO3) end members. The pseudocubic structures obtained in these systems exhibited distortions that were coherent on a scale ranging from sub-nanometer to tens of nanometers, but, in all cases, the macroscopic distortion remained unresolvable even if using high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction. Different coherence lengths for the local atomic displacements account for the distinctly different dielectric, ferroelectric, and electromechanical properties exhibited by the samples. The guidelines identified provide a rationale for chemically tuning the coherence length to obtain the desired functional response.

  3. Quantum Transport Simulations of Nanoscale Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Obodo, Tobechukwu Joshua

    2016-01-07

    Nanoscale materials have many potential advantages because of their quantum confinement, cost and producibility by low-temperature chemical methods. Advancement of theoretical methods as well as the availability of modern high-performance supercomputers allow us to control and exploit their microscopic properties at the atomic scale, hence making it possible to design novel nanoscale molecular devices with interesting features (e.g switches, rectifiers, negative differential conductance, and high magnetoresistance). In this thesis, state-of-the-art theoretical calculations have been performed for the quantum transport properties of nano-structured materials within the framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Nonequilibrium Green\\'s Function (NEGF) formalism. The switching behavior of a dithiolated phenylene-vinylene oligomer sandwiched between Au(111) electrodes is investigated. The molecule presents a configurational bistability, which can be exploited in constructing molecular memories, switches, and sensors. We find that protonation of the terminating thiol groups is at the origin of the change in conductance. H bonding at the thiol group weakens the S-Au bond, and thus lowers the conductance. Our results allow us to re-interpret the experimental data originally attributing the conductance reduction to H dissociation. Also examined is current-induced migration of atoms in nanoscale devices that plays an important role for device operation and breakdown. We studied the migration of adatoms and defects in graphene and carbon nanotubes under finite bias. We demonstrate that current-induced forces within DFT are non-conservative, which so far has only been shown for model systems, and can lower migration barrier heights. Further, we investigated the quantum transport behavior of an experimentally observed diblock molecule by varying the amounts of phenyl (donor) and pyrimidinyl (acceptor) rings under finite bias. We show that a tandem configuration of

  4. Nanoscale surface characterization using laser interference microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatyev, Pavel S.; Skrynnik, Andrey A.; Melnik, Yury A.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscale surface characterization is one of the most significant parts of modern materials development and application. The modern microscopes are expensive and complicated tools, and its use for industrial tasks is limited due to laborious sample preparation, measurement procedures, and low operation speed. The laser modulation interference microscopy method (MIM) for real-time quantitative and qualitative analysis of glass, metals, ceramics, and various coatings has a spatial resolution of 0.1 nm for vertical and up to 100 nm for lateral. It is proposed as an alternative to traditional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. It is demonstrated that in the cases of roughness metrology for super smooth (Ra >1 nm) surfaces the application of a laser interference microscopy techniques is more optimal than conventional SEM and AFM. The comparison of semiconductor test structure for lateral dimensions measurements obtained with SEM and AFM and white light interferometer also demonstrates the advantages of MIM technique.

  5. Preface: Charge transport in nanoscale junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    Understanding the fundamentals of nanoscale charge transfer is pivotal for designing future nano-electronic devices. Such devices could be based on individual or groups of molecular bridges, nanotubes, nanoparticles, biomolecules and other 'active' components, mimicking wire, diode and transistor functions. These have operated in various environments including vacuum, air and condensed matter, in two- or three-electrode configurations, at ultra-low and room temperatures. Interest in charge transport in ultra-small device components has a long history and can be dated back to Aviram and Ratner's letter in 1974 (Chem. Phys. Lett. 29 277-83). So why is there a necessity for a special issue on this subject? The area has reached some degree of maturity, and even subtle geometric effects in the nanojunction and noise features can now be resolved and rationalized based on existing theoretical concepts. One purpose of this special issue is thus to showcase various aspects of nanoscale and single-molecule charge transport from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The main principles have 'crystallized' in our minds, but there is still a long way to go before true single-molecule electronics can be implemented. Major obstacles include the stability of electronic nanojunctions, reliable operation at room temperature, speed of operation and, last but not least, integration into large networks. A gradual transition from traditional silicon-based electronics to devices involving a single (or a few) molecule(s) therefore appears to be more viable from technologic and economic perspectives than a 'quantum leap'. As research in this area progresses, new applications emerge, e.g. with a view to characterizing interfacial charge transfer at the single-molecule level in general. For example, electrochemical experiments with individual enzyme molecules demonstrate that catalytic processes can be studied with nanometre resolution, offering a route towards optimizing biosensors at

  6. Energy Conversion at Micro and Nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammaitoni, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Energy management is considered a task of strategic importance in contemporary society. It is a common fact that the most successful economies of the planet are the economies that can transform and use large quantities of energy. In this talk we will discuss the role of energy with specific attention to the processes that happens at micro and nanoscale. The description of energy conversion processes at these scales requires approaches that go way beyond the standard equilibrium termodynamics of macroscopic systems. In this talk we will address from a fundamental point of view the physics of the dissipation of energy and will focus our attention to the energy transformation processes that take place in the modern micro and nano information and communication devices

  7. Nanoscale Particle Motion in Attractive Polymer Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senses, Erkan; Narayanan, Suresh; Mao, Yimin; Faraone, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    Using x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, we examined slow nanoscale motion of silica nanoparticles individually dispersed in entangled poly (ethylene oxide) melt at particle volume fractions up to 42 %. The nanoparticles, therefore, serve as both fillers for the resulting attractive polymer nanocomposites and probes for the network dynamics therein. The results show that the particle relaxation closely follows the mechanical reinforcement in the nanocomposites only at the intermediate concentrations below the critical value for the chain confinement. Quite unexpectedly, the relaxation time of the particles does not further slowdown at higher volume fractions- when all chains are practically on the nanoparticle interface- and decouples from the elastic modulus of the nanocomposites that further increases orders of magnitude.

  8. Quantum Nonlinear Optics in Optomechanical Nanoscale Waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoubi, Hashem; Hammerer, Klemens

    2017-09-22

    We show that strong nonlinearities at the few photon level can be achieved in optomechanical nanoscale waveguides. We consider the propagation of photons in cm-scale one-dimensional nanophotonic structures where stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is strongly enhanced by radiation pressure coupling. We introduce a configuration that allows slowing down photons by several orders of magnitude via SBS from sound waves using two pump fields. Slowly propagating photons can then experience strong nonlinear interactions through virtual off-resonant exchange of dispersionless phonons. As a benchmark we identify requirements for achieving a large cross-phase modulation among two counterpropagating photons applicable for photonic quantum gates. Our results indicate that strongly nonlinear quantum optics is possible in continuum optomechanical systems realized in nanophotonic structures.

  9. Nanoscale device physics science and engineering fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2017-01-01

    Nanoscale devices are distinguishable from the larger microscale devices in their specific dependence on physical phenomena and effects that are central to their operation. The size change manifests itself through changes in importance of the phenomena and effects that become dominant and the changes in scale of underlying energetics and response. Examples of these include classical effects such as single electron effects, quantum effects such as the states accessible as well as their properties; ensemble effects ranging from consequences of the laws of numbers to changes in properties arising from different magnitudes of the inter-actions, and others. These interactions, with the limits placed on size, make not just electronic, but also magnetic, optical and mechanical behavior interesting, important and useful. Connecting these properties to the behavior of devices is the focus of this textbook. Description of the book series: This collection of four textbooks in the Electroscience series span the undergrad...

  10. Nanoscale Particle Motion in Attractive Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senses, Erkan; Narayanan, Suresh; Mao, Yimin; Faraone, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    Using x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, we examined the slow nanoscale motion of silica nanoparticles individually dispersed in an entangled poly (ethylene oxide) melt at particle volume fractions up to 42%. The nanoparticles, therefore, serve as both fillers for the resulting attractive polymer nanocomposites and probes for the network dynamics therein. The results show that the particle relaxation closely follows the mechanical reinforcement in the nanocomposites only at the intermediate concentrations below the critical value for the chain confinement. Quite unexpectedly, the relaxation time of the particles does not further slow down at higher volume fractions—when all chains are practically on the nanoparticle interface—and decouples from the elastic modulus of the nanocomposites that further increases orders of magnitude.

  11. Detecting nanoscale vibrations as signature of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasas, Sandor; Ruggeri, Francesco Simone; Benadiba, Carine; Maillard, Caroline; Stupar, Petar; Tournu, Hélène; Dietler, Giovanni; Longo, Giovanni

    2015-01-13

    The existence of life in extreme conditions, in particular in extraterrestrial environments, is certainly one of the most intriguing scientific questions of our time. In this report, we demonstrate the use of an innovative nanoscale motion sensor in life-searching experiments in Earth-bound and interplanetary missions. This technique exploits the sensitivity of nanomechanical oscillators to transduce the small fluctuations that characterize living systems. The intensity of such movements is an indication of the viability of living specimens and conveys information related to their metabolic activity. Here, we show that the nanomotion detector can assess the viability of a vast range of biological specimens and that it could be the perfect complement to conventional chemical life-detection assays. Indeed, by combining chemical and dynamical measurements, we could achieve an unprecedented depth in the characterization of life in extreme and extraterrestrial environments.

  12. Control of friction at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhen, Jacob; Braiman, Yehuda Y.; Protopopescu, Vladimir

    2010-04-06

    Methods and apparatus are described for control of friction at the nanoscale. A method of controlling frictional dynamics of a plurality of particles using non-Lipschitzian control includes determining an attribute of the plurality of particles; calculating an attribute deviation by subtracting the attribute of the plurality of particles from a target attribute; calculating a non-Lipschitzian feedback control term by raising the attribute deviation to a fractionary power .xi.=(2m+1)/(2n+1) where n=1, 2, 3 . . . and m=0, 1, 2, 3 . . . , with m strictly less than n and then multiplying by a control amplitude; and imposing the non-Lipschitzian feedback control term globally on each of the plurality of particles; imposing causes a subsequent magnitude of the attribute deviation to be reduced.

  13. Self-healing at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Vincenzo; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2009-09-01

    The design of self-healing materials is a very important but challenging topic in nanotechnology. Self-healing strategies, also inspired by natural processes, allow the fabrication of auto-repairing systems, and in recent years, materials engineering at the nanoscale has allowed further advances in this emerging field. In this mini review, we recall some interesting self-healing systems found in natural processes and others created by man-made activity with special emphasis on the role played in this field by nanostructures. Finally, the self-healing of gold nanoparticles during laser irradiation is considered in more detail since it is a rare example of a functional nanomaterial with self-repairing properties.

  14. System reduction for nanoscale IC design

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the computational challenges posed by the progression toward nanoscale electronic devices and increasingly short design cycles in the microelectronics industry, and proposes methods of model reduction which facilitate circuit and device simulation for specific tasks in the design cycle. The goal is to develop and compare methods for system reduction in the design of high dimensional nanoelectronic ICs, and to test these methods in the practice of semiconductor development. Six chapters describe the challenges for numerical simulation of nanoelectronic circuits and suggest model reduction methods for constituting equations. These include linear and nonlinear differential equations tailored to circuit equations and drift diffusion equations for semiconductor devices. The performance of these methods is illustrated with numerical experiments using real-world data. Readers will benefit from an up-to-date overview of the latest model reduction methods in computational nanoelectronics.

  15. Nanoscale spin sensing in artificial cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson David

    2014-01-01

    The use of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond as a single spin sensor or magnetometer has attracted considerable interest in recent years because of its unique combination of sensitivity, nanoscale resolution, and optical initialisation and readout at room temperature. Nanodiamonds in particular hold great promise as an optical magnetometer probe for bio applications. In this work we employ nanodiamonds containing single NV spins to detect freely diffusing Mn2+ ions by detecting changes in the transverse relaxation time (T2) of the single spin probe. We also report the detection of gadolinium spin labels present in an artificial cell membrane by measuring changes in the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) of the probe. (author)

  16. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lawrence H; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low- k ) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low- k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties-all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low- k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts.

  17. Nickel-cobalt hydroxide nanosheets: Synthesis, morphology and electrochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderová, Barbora; Demel, Jan; Zhigunov, Alexander; Bohuslav, Jan; Tarábková, Hana; Janda, Pavel; Lang, Kamil

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports the synthesis, characterization, and electrochemical performance of nickel-cobalt hydroxide nanosheets. The hydroxide nanosheets of approximately 0.7nm thickness were prepared by delamination of layered nickel-cobalt hydroxide lactate in water and formed transparent colloids that were stable for months. The nanosheets were deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by spin coating, and their electrochemical behavior was investigated by cyclic voltammetry in potassium hydroxide electrolyte. Our method of electrode preparation allows for studying the electrochemistry of nanosheets where the majority of the active centers can participate in the charge transfer reaction. The observed electrochemical response was ascribed to mutual compensation of the cobalt and nickel response via electron sharing between these metals in the hydroxide nanosheets, a process that differentiates the behavior of nickel-cobalt hydroxide nanosheets from single nickel hydroxide or cobalt hydroxide nanosheets or their physical mixture. The presence of cobalt in the nickel-cobalt hydroxide nanosheets apparently decreases the time of electrochemical activation of the nanosheet layer, which for the nickel hydroxide nanosheets alone requires more potential sweeps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Concentration of radioactive cobalt by seaweeds in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Motokazu; Koyanagi, Taku; Saiki, Masamichi

    1976-01-01

    On the pathway of radioactive substances in marine environments, seaweeds play an important role because of their higher concentration factors for many radionuclides and because they constitute a link of food chain in the sea. In the present work, uptake, distribution and excretion of radioactive cobalt were studied on several kinds of seaweeds by radioisotope tracer experiments under laboratory conditions and concentration factors were calculated. The concentration factors were also estimated from the results of stable cobalt determination by activation analysis or atomic absorption spectrometry on seaweeds and seawater, and compared with the results of tracer expts. The seaweeds showed the species specificity for the concentration of stable and radioactive cobalt with diverse values of concentration factors and biological half-lives. The transfer of radioactive cobalt in the food chain from contaminated seaweeds to mollusca was examined by feeding abalones, Haliotis discus, with four kinds of seaweed labelled with 60 Co and observing retention. Absorption rate for radioactive cobalt by abalones calculated at two days after feeding showed diverse values depending upon the species of seaweed, as follows: 47% through Laminaria japonica and Ulva pertusa, 31% through Undaria pinnatifida and 26 through Eisenia bicyclis, respectively. From the results, it was assumed that the accumulation of radioactive cobalt by mollusca is affected by the species of seaweeds as food. A very high concentration of ingested radioactive cobalt in the midgut gland was seen on the autoradiograph of abalone samples. (auth.)

  19. Concentration of radioactive cobalt by seaweeds in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, M.; Koyanagi, T.; Saiki, M.

    1975-01-01

    On the pathway of radioactive substances in marine environments, seaweeds play an important role because of their higher concentration factors for many radionuclides and because they constitute a link in the food chain. In the present work, uptake, distribution and excretion of radioactive cobalt were studied on several kinds of seaweeds by radioisotope tracer experiments under laboratory conditions and concentration factors were calculated. The concentration factors were also estimated from the results of stable cobalt determination by activation analysis or atomic absorption spectrometry on seaweeds and seawater, and compared with the results of tracer experiments. The seaweeds showed the species specificity for the concentration of stable and radioactive cobalt with diverse values of concentration factors and biological half-lives. The transfer of radioactive cobalt in the food chain from contaminated seaweeds to mollusca was examined by feeding abalones, Haliotis discus, with four kinds of seaweed labelled with 60 Co and observing retention. Absorption rate for radioactive cobalt by abalones calculated at two days after feeding showed diverse values depending upon the species of seaweed, as follows: 47% through Laminaria japonica and Ulva pertusa, 31% through Undaria pinnatifida and 26% through Eisenia bicyclis, respectively. From the results, it was assumed that the accumulation of radioactive cobalt by mollusca is affected by the species of seaweeds as food. A very high concentration of ingested radioactive cobalt in the midgut gland was seen on the autoradiograph of abalone samples. (author)

  20. Incentives and opportunities for reducing the cobalt content in reactor core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocken, H.

    1985-01-01

    Cobalt in core components contributes to radiation field buildup on out-of-core surfaces. Core components containing cobalt-base alloys and cobalt as an impurity are identified. The use of cobalt-free wear-resistant alloys and construction materials with lower impurity levels of cobalt is disused. It is argued that such measures are cost effective. Lower radiation fields and disposal costs will offset higher raw material costs. Component performance will not be affected. (author)