WorldWideScience

Sample records for synthesis fuel management

  1. Social science to improve fuels management: a synthesis of research on aesthetics and fuels management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Ryan

    2005-01-01

    A series of syntheses were commissioned by the USDA Forest Service to aid in fuels mitigation project planning. This synthesis focuses on research addressing aesthetic considerations of fuels management. A general finding is that fuels management activities can contribute to the visual quality of a landscape. Topics covered in the synthesis include research findings on...

  2. Social science to improve fuels management: a synthesis of research relevant to communicating with homeowners about fuels management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha C. Monroe; Lisa Pennisi; Sarah McCaffrey; Dennis Mileti

    2006-01-01

    A series of syntheses were commissioned by the USDA Forest Service to aid in fuels mitigation project planning. This synthesis focuses on how managers can most effectively communicate with the public about fuels management efforts. It summarizes what is known about the techniques of persuasive communication programs and provides an outline of the characteristics of...

  3. Social science to improve fuels management: a synthesis of research on collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria Sturtevant; Margaret Ann Moote; Pamela Jakes; Anthony S. Cheng

    2005-01-01

    A series of syntheses were commissioned by the USDA Forest Service to aid in fuels mitigation project planning. This synthesis focuses on collaboration research, and offers knowledge and tools to improve collaboration in the planning and implementation of wildland fire and fuels management projects. It covers a variety of topics including benefits of collaboration,...

  4. Social science to improve fuels management: a synthesis of research on assessing social acceptability of fuels treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry C. Daniel; Michael Valdiserri; Carrie R. Daniel; Pamela Jakes; Pamela Jakes; Susan Barro

    2005-01-01

    A series of syntheses were commissioned by the USDA Forest Service to aid in fuels mitigation project planning. This synthesis focuses on research for assessing the social acceptability of fuels treatments. The synthesis is structured around six important considerations for any social acceptability assessment: defining the fuels treatments being assessed; representing...

  5. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 13: Strategies for managing fuels and visual quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Esposito

    2006-01-01

    The public's acceptance of forest management practices, including fuels reduction, is heavily based on how forests look. Fuels managers can improve their chances of success by considering aesthetics when making management decisions. This fact sheet reviews a three-part general strategy for managing fuels and visual quality: planning, implementation, and monitoring...

  6. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 08: Evaluating sedimentation risks associated with fuel management

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Elliot; Pete Robichaud

    2005-01-01

    This fact sheet describes the sources of sediment in upland forest watersheds in the context of fuel management activities. It presents the dominant forest soil erosion processes, and the principles behind the new sediment delivery interface developed to aid in erosion analysis of fuel management projects.

  7. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; fact sheet: The Fuels Synthesis Project overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    The geographic focus of the "Fuels Planning: Science Synthesis and Integration" project #known as the Fuels Synthesis Project# is on the dry forests of the Western United States. Target audiences include fuels management specialists, resource specialists, National Environmental Policy Act #NEPA# planning team leaders, line officers in the USDA Forest Service...

  8. Fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, E.R.

    1975-01-01

    Description of the operation of power plants and the respective procurement of fuel to fulfil the needs of the grid. The operation of the plants shall be optimised with respect to the fuel cost. (orig./RW) [de

  9. Thorium fuel cycle management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajac, R.; Darilek, P.; Breza, J.; Necas, V.

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with the thorium fuel cycle management. Description of the thorium fuels and thorium fuel cycle benefits and challenges as well as thorium fuel calculations performed by the computer code HELIOS are presented.

  10. VSOP, Neutron Spectra, 2-D Flux Synthesis, Fuel Management, Thermohydraulics Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teuchert, E.; Haas, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: VSOP (Very Superior Old Programs) is a system of codes linked together for the simulation of reactor life histories. It comprises neutron cross section libraries and processing routines, repeated neutron spectrum evaluation, 2-D and 3-D diffusion calculation, depletion and shut-down features, in- core and out-of-pile fuel management, fuel cycle cost analysis, and thermal hydraulics (steady state and transient). Various techniques have been employed to accelerate the iterative processes and to optimize the internal data transfer. The code system has been used extensively for comparison studies of thermal reactors, their fuel cycles, thermal transients, and safety assessment. Besides its use in research and development work for the Gas Cooled High Temperature Reactor, the system has been applied successfully to Light Water and Heavy Water Reactors, MAGNOX, and RBMK. 2 - Method of solution: The nuclear data for 184 isotopes are contained in two libraries. Fast and epithermal data in a 68 group GAM-I structure have been prepared mainly from ENDF/B-V and JEF-1. Resonance cross section data are given as input. Thermal data in a 30 group THERMOS structure have been collapsed from a 96 group THERMALIZATION (GATHER) library by a relevant neutron energy spectrum generated by the THERMALIZATION code. Graphite scattering matrices are based on the Young phonon spectrum in graphite. The neutron spectrum is calculated by a combination of the GAM and THERMOS codes. They can simultaneously be employed for many core regions differing in temperature, burnup, and fuel element lay-out. The thermal cell code THERMOS has been extended to treat the grain structure of the coated particles inside the fuel elements, and the epithermal GAM code uses modified cross sections for the resonance absorbers prepared from double heterogeneous ZUT-DGL calculations. The diffusion module of the code is CITATION with 2 - 8 energy groups. It provides the neutron

  11. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 12: Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) Fuel Management (FuMe) tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Elliot; David Hall

    2005-01-01

    The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) Fuel Management (FuMe) tool was developed to estimate sediment generated by fuel management activities. WEPP FuMe estimates sediment generated for 12 fuel-related conditions from a single input. This fact sheet identifies the intended users and uses, required inputs, what the model does, and tells the user how to obtain the...

  12. Social science to improve fuels management: a synthesis of research on the impacts of wildland fires on communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. McCool; James Burchfield; Daniel R. Williams; Matt Carroll; Patricia Cohn; Yoshitaka Kumagai; Tam Ubben

    2007-01-01

    A series of syntheses were commissioned by the U.S. Forest Service to aid in fuels mitigation project planning. Focusing on research on the social impacts of wildland fire, this synthesis explores decisions and actions taken by communities before, during, and after a wildland fire to minimize its impacts. It then synthesizes the research studying (1) the consequences...

  13. Fuel management and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendryes, G

    1972-11-01

    From international conference on nuclear solutions to world energy problems; Washington, District of Columbia, USA (12 Nov The low cost of the fuel cycle is the most attractive feature of the fast neutron breeder reactor. In order to achieve it a good fuel management is essential, with well balanced fixed investment and renewal fuel costs. In addition the designer can optimize the power station as a whole (fuel cycle and thermal characteristics). (auth)

  14. Fuel cycle management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbin, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    The fuel cycle management is more and more dependent on the management of the generation means among the power plants tied to the grid. This is due mainly because of the importance taken by the nuclear power plants within the power system. The main task of the fuel cycle management is to define the refuelling pattern of the new and irradiated fuel assemblies to load in the core as a function of: 1) the differences which exist between the actual conditions of the core and what was expected for the present cycle, 2) the operating constraints and the reactor availability, 3) the technical requirements in safety and the technological limits of the fuel, 4) the economics. Three levels of fuel cycle management can be considered: 1) a long term management: determination of enrichments and expected cycle lengths, 2) a mid term management whose aim corresponds to the evaluation of the batch to load within the core as a function of both: the next cycle length to achieve and the integrated power history of all the cycles up to the present one, 3) a short term management which deals with the updating of the loaded fuel utilisations to take into account the operation perturbations, or with the alteration of the loading pattern of the next batch to respect unexpected conditions. (orig.) [de

  15. Spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The production of nuclear electricity results in the generation of spent fuel that requires safe, secure and efficient management. Appropriate management of the resulting spent fuel is a key issue for the steady and sustainable growth of nuclear energy. Currently about 10,000 tonnes heavy metal (HM) of spent fuel are unloaded every year from nuclear power reactors worldwide, of which 8,500 t HM need to be stored (after accounting for reprocessed fuel). This is the largest continuous source of civil radioactive material generated, and needs to be managed appropriately. Member States have referred to storage periods of 100 years and even beyond, and as storage quantities and durations extend, new challenges arise in the institutional as well as in the technical area. The IAEA gives high priority to safe and effective spent fuel management. As an example of continuing efforts, the 2003 International Conference on Storage of Spent Fuel from Power Reactors gathered 125 participants from 35 member states to exchange information on this important subject. With its large number of Member States, the IAEA is well-positioned to gather and share information useful in addressing Member State priorities. IAEA activities on this topic include plans to produce technical documents as resources for a range of priority topics: spent fuel performance assessment and research, burnup credit applications, cask maintenance, cask loading optimization, long term storage requirements including records maintenance, economics, spent fuel treatment, remote technology, and influence of fuel design on spent fuel storage. In addition to broader topics, the IAEA supports coordinated research projects and technical cooperation projects focused on specific needs

  16. Strategy of fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guesdon, B.; Le Bars, M.; Mathonniere, G.

    1996-01-01

    The management of nuclear fuels in PWR type reactors has been adapted to improve the safety and the competitiveness of brackets. The economic optimum, at the park level, depends on many parameters, variable with time and in function of them, we favour the annual campaigns and the economy won on the cost of cycle, or long campaigns with benefit on availability. The reduction of the number of stopping improves the availability, limits the doses integrated by the personnel of intervention and reduces the number of incidents during the stopping. An other determining factor is connected to the policy of closed cycle with the the principle of equality between the reprocessing flux and the valorization of reprocessed fuels: plutonium and reprocessed uranium. The progress of fuel have allowed significant improvements in the managements of cores. With the safety, the aim is also to keep if not improve the competitiveness of the Nuclear park by valorizing the matter coming from reprocessing. (N.C.)

  17. Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-12-02

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  18. Alternative fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1998-08-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  19. ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-01-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  20. Alternative Fuels and Chemicals From Synthesis Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none

    1998-07-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  1. Synthesis of fuels and feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, Andrew D.; Brooks, Ty; Jenkins, Rhodri; Moore, Cameron; Staples, Orion

    2017-10-10

    Disclosed herein are embodiments of a method for making fuels and feedstocks from readily available alcohol starting materials. In some embodiments, the method concerns converting alcohols to carbonyl-containing compounds and then condensing such carbonyl-containing compounds together to form oligomerized species. These oligomerized species can then be reduced using by-products from the conversion of the alcohol. In some embodiments, the method further comprises converting saturated, oligomerized, carbonyl-containing compounds to aliphatic fuels.

  2. Fuel management of HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zongxin; Jing Xingqing

    2001-01-01

    The 10 MW high temperature cooled reactor (HTR-10) built in Tsinghua University is a pebble bed type of HTGR. The continuous recharge and multiple-pass of spherical fuel elements are used for fuel management. The initiative stage of core is composed of the mix of spherical fuel elements and graphite elements. The equilibrium stage of core is composed of identical spherical fuel elements. The fuel management during the transition from the initiative stage to the equilibrium stage is a key issue for HTR-10 physical design. A fuel management strategy is proposed based on self-adjustment of core reactivity. The neutron physical code is used to simulate the process of fuel management. The results show that the graphite elements, the recharging fuel elements below the burn-up allowance, and the discharging fuel elements over the burn-up allowance could be identified by burn-up measurement. The maximum of burn-up fuel elements could be controlled below the burn-up limit

  3. Quality management of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Guide presents the quality management requirements to be complied with in the procurement, design, manufacture, transport, receipt, storage, handling and operation of nuclear fuel. The Guide also applies to control rods and shield elements to be placed in the reactor. The Guide is mainly aimed for the licensee responsible for the procurement and operation of fuel, for the fuel designer and manufacturer and for other organisations, whose activities affect fuel quality and the safety of fuel transport, storage and operation. General requirements for nuclear fuel are presented in Section 114 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Decree and in Section 15 of the Government Decision (395/1991). Regulatory control of the safety of fuel is described in Guides YVL6.1, YVL6.2 and YVL6.3. An overview of the regulatory control of nuclear power plants carried out by STUK (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Finland) is clarified in Guide YVL1.1

  4. AGR fuel management using PANTHER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddock, S.A.; Parks, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes recent improvements in the AGR fuel management methodology implemented within PANTHER and the use of the code both for stand-alone calculations and within an automatic optimisation procedure. (author)

  5. Spent fuel management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The spent fuel management strategy in Spain is presented. The strategy includes temporary solutions and plans for final disposal. The need for R and D including partitioning and transmutation, as well as the financial constraints are also addressed. (author)

  6. Fuel cycle management in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaeyrynen, H.; Mikkola, I.

    1987-01-01

    Both Finnish utilities producing nuclear power - Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima Oy (Industrial Power Co. Ltd, TVO) - have created efficient fuel cycle management systems. The systems however differ in almost all respects. The reason is that the principal supplier for IVO is the Soviet Union and for TVO is Sweden. A common feature of both systems at the front end of the cycle is the building of stockpiles in order to provide for interruptions in fuel deliveries. Quality assurance supervision at the fuel factory for IVO is regulated by the Soviet Chamber of Commerce and Industry and a final control is made in Finland. The in-core fuel management is done by IVO using codes developed in Finland. The whole IVO fuel cycle is basically a leasing arrangement. The spent fuel is returned to the USSR after five years cooling. TVO carries out the in-core fuel management using a computer code system supplied by Asea-Atom. TVO is responsable for the back end of the cycle and makes preparations for the final disposal of the spent fuel in Finland. 6 refs., 2 figs

  7. Spent fuel management in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineo, H.; Nomura, Y.; Sakamoto, K.

    1998-01-01

    In Japan 52 commercial nuclear power units are now operated, and the total power generation capacity is about 45 GWe. The cumulative amount of spent fuel arising is about 13,500 tU as of March 1997. Spent fuel is reprocessed, and recovered nuclear materials are to be recycled in LWRs and FBRs. In February 1997 short-term policy measures were announced by the Atomic Energy Commission, which addressed promotion of reprocessing programme in Rokkasho, plutonium utilization in LWRs, spent fuel management, backend measures and FBR development. With regard to the spent fuel management, the policy measures included expansion of spent fuel storage capacity at reactor sites and a study on spent fuel storage away from reactor sites, considering the increasing amount of spent fuel arising. Research and development on spent fuel storage has been carried out, particularly on dry storage technology. Fundamental studies are also conducted to implement the burnup credit into the criticality safety design of storage and transportation casks. Rokkasho reprocessing plant is being constructed towards its commencement in 2003, and Pu utilization in LWRs will be started in 1999. Research and development of future recycling technology are also continued for the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle based on FBRs and LWRs. (author)

  8. Fuel reprocessing and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippone, R.L.; Kaiser, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Because of different economic, social and political factors, there has been a tendency to compartmentalize the commercial nuclear power industry into separate power and fuel cycle operations to a greater degree in some countries compared to other countries. The purpose of this paper is to describe how actions in one part of the industry can affect the other parts and recommend an overall systems engineering approach which incorporates more cooperation and coordination between individual parts of the fuel cycle. Descriptions are given of the fuel cycle segments and examples are presented of how a systems engineering approach has benefitted the fuel cycle. Descriptions of fuel reprocessing methods and the waste forms generated are given. Illustrations are presented describing how reprocessing options affect waste management operations and how waste management decisions affect reprocessing

  9. Spent fuel management overview: a global perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonne, A.; Crijns, M.J.; Dyck, P.H.; Fukuda, K.; Mourogov, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    The paper defines the main spent fuel management strategies and options, highlights the challenges for spent fuel storage and gives an overview of the regional balances of spent fuel storage capacity and spent fuel arising. The relevant IAEA activities in the area of spent fuel management are summarised. (author)

  10. Spent fuel management in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahashi, K.; Maeda, M.; Nakai, T.

    1996-01-01

    Japan has scarce energy resources and depends on foreign resources for 84% of its energy needs. Therefore, Japan has made efforts to utilize nuclear power as a key energy source since mid-1950's. Today, the nuclear energy produced from 49 nuclear power plants is responsible for about 31% of Japan's total electricity supply. The cumulative amount of spent fuel generated as of March 1995 was about 11,600 Mg U. Japan's policy of spent fuel management is to reprocess spent nuclear fuel and recycle recovered plutonium and uranium as nuclear fuel. The Tokai reprocessing plant continues stable operation keeping the annual treatment capacity or around 90 Mg U. A commercial reprocessing plant is under construction at Rokkasho, northern part of Japan. Although FBR is the principal reactor to use plutonium, LWR will be a major power source for some time and recycling of the fuel in LWRs will be prompted. (author). 3 figs

  11. Spent fuel management in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Pattantyus, P.

    1999-01-01

    The current status of the Canadian spent fuel storage is presented. This includes wet and dry interim storage. Extension of wet interim storage facilities is nor planned, as dry technologies have found wide acceptance. The Canadian nuclear program is sustained by commercial Ontario Hydro CANDU type reactors, since 1971, representing 13600 MW(e) of installed capacity, able to produce 9200 spent fuel bundles (1800 tU) every year, and Hydro Quebec and New Brunswick CANDU reactors each producing 685 MW(e) and about 100 tU of spent fuel annually. The implementation of various interim (wt and dry) storage technologies resulted in simple, dense and low cost systems. Economical factors determined that the open cycle option be adopted for the CANDU type reactors rather that recycling the spent fuel. Research and development activities for immobilization and final disposal of nuclear waste are being undertaken in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

  12. Commercializing fuel cells: managing risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Peter B.

    Commercialization of fuel cells, like any other product, entails both financial and technical risks. Most of the fuel cell literature has focussed upon technical risks, however, the most significant risks during commercialization may well be associated with the financial funding requirements of this process. Successful commercialization requires an integrated management of these risks. Like any developing technology, fuel cells face the typical 'Catch-22' of commercialization: "to enter the market, the production costs must come down, however, to lower these costs, the cumulative production must be greatly increased, i.e. significant market penetration must occur". Unless explicit steps are taken to address this dilemma, fuel cell commercialization will remain slow and require large subsidies for market entry. To successfully address this commercialization dilemma, it is necessary to follow a market-driven commercialization strategy that identifies high-value entry markets while minimizing the financial and technical risks of market entry. The financial and technical risks of fuel cell commercialization are minimized, both for vendors and end-users, with the initial market entry of small-scale systems into high-value stationary applications. Small-scale systems, in the order of 1-40 kW, benefit from economies of production — as opposed to economies to scale — to attain rapid cost reductions from production learning and continuous technological innovation. These capital costs reductions will accelerate their commercialization through market pull as the fuel cell systems become progressively more viable, starting with various high-value stationary and, eventually, for high-volume mobile applications. To facilitate market penetration via market pull, fuel cell systems must meet market-derived economic and technical specifications and be compatible with existing market and fuels infrastructures. Compatibility with the fuels infrastructure is facilitated by a

  13. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  14. CANDU-PHW fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frescura, G.M.; Wight, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    This report covers the material presented in a series of six lectures at the Winter College on Nuclear Physics and Reactors held at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy, Jan 22 - March 28, 1980. The report deals with fuel management in natural uranium fuelled CANDU-PHW reactors. Assuming that the reader has a basic knowledge of CANDU core physics, some of the reactor systems which are more closely related to fuelling are described. This is followed by a discussion of the methods used to calculate the power distribution and perform fuel management analyses for the equilibrium core. A brief description of some computer codes used in fuel management is given, together with an overview of the calculations required to provide parameters for core design and support the accident analysis. Fuel scheduling during approach to equilibrium and equilibrium is discussed. Fuel management during actual reactor operation is discussed with a review of the operating experience for some of the Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors. (author)

  15. Spent fuel management and closed nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtsev, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    Strategic objectives set by Rosatom Corporation in the field of spent fuel management are given. By 2030, Russia is to create technological infrastructure for innovative nuclear energy development, including complete closure of the nuclear fuel cycle. A target model of the spent NPP nuclear fuel management system until 2030 is analyzed. The schedule for key stages of putting in place the infrastructure for spent NPP fuel management is given. The financial aspect of the problem is also discussed [ru

  16. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  17. HFIR spent fuel management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begovich, J.M.; Green, V.M.; Shappert, L.B.; Lotts, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems' Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel to Savannah River Site (SRS) for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up in the February 1994 to February 1995 time frame. If a management altemative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented before the HFIR pools are full, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study investigated several alternatives for managing the HFIR spent fuel, attempting to identify options that could be implemented before the HFIR pools are full. The options investigated were: installing a dedicated dry cask storage facility at ORNL, increasing HFIR pool storage capacity by clearing the HFIR pools of debris and either close-packing or stacking the spent fuel elements, storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, and shipping the spent fuel offsite for reprocessing or storage elsewhere

  18. Spent fuel management in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattantyus, P.

    1998-01-01

    The current status of the Canadian Spent Fuel Management is described. This includes wet and dry interim storage, transportation issues and future plans regarding final disposal based on deep underground emplacement in stable granite rock. Extension of wet interim storage facilities is not planned, as dry storage technologies have found wide acceptance. (author)

  19. PWR fuel management optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, Michel.

    1981-10-01

    This report is aimed to the optimization of the refueling pattern of a nuclear reactor. At the beginning of a reactor cycle a batch of fuel assemblies is available: the physical properties of the assemblies are known: the mathematical problem is to determine the refueling pattern which maximizes the reactivity or which provides the flattest possible power distribution. The state of the core is mathematically characterized by a system of partial derivative equations, its smallest eigenvalue and the associated eigenvector. After a study of the convexity properties of the problem, two algorithms are proposed. The first one exhanges assemblies to improve the starting configurations. The enumeration of the exchanges is limited to the 2 by 2, 3 by 3, 4 by 4 permutations. The second one builds a solution in two steps: in the first step the discrete variables are replaced by continuous variables. The non linear optimization problem obtained is solved by ''the Method of Approximation Programming'' and in the second step, the refuelling pattern which provides the best approximation of the optimal power distribution is searched by a Branch an d Bound Method [fr

  20. Management of irradiated CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupien, Mario

    1985-01-01

    The nuclear industry, like any other industrial activity, generates waste and, since these radioactive products are known to be hazardous both to man and his natural environment, they are subject to stringent controls. The irradiated fuel is also highly radioactive and remains so for thousands of years. It is estimated that by the year 2000, nuclear reactors in Canada alone will have produced some 50 Gg of radioactive fuel which is stored at the nuclear plant site itself. The nuclear industry plays a leading role in the research and development effort to find suitable waste-management methods. Its R and D programs cover many scientific fields, including chemistry, and therefore demand a considerable amount of coordination. The knowledge acquired in this multidisciplinary context should form a basis for solving many of today's industrial-waste problems. This paper describes the various stages in the long management process. In the medium term, the irradiated fuel will be stored in surface installations but the long-term solution proposed is to emplace the used fuel or the fuel recycle waste deep underground in a stable geologic formation

  1. Spent fuel management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gago, J.A.; Gravalos, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    There are presently nine Light Water Reactors in operation, representing around a 34% of the overall electricity production. In the early years, a small amount of spent fuel was sent to be reprocessed, although this policy was cancelled in favor of the open cycle option. A state owned company, ENRESA, was created in 1984, which was given the mandate to manage all kinds of radioactive wastes generated in the country. Under the present scenario, a rough overall amount of 7000 tU of spent fuel will be produced during the lifetime of the plants, which will go into final disposal. (author)

  2. Modeled forest inventory data suggest climate benefits from fuels management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremy S. Fried; Theresa B. Jain; Jonathan. Sandquist

    2013-01-01

    As part of a recent synthesis addressing fuel management in dry, mixed-conifer forests we analyzed more than 5,000 Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots, a probability sample that represents 33 million acres of these forests throughout Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, and extreme northern California. We relied on the BioSum analysis framework that...

  3. Nuclear fuel management via fuel quality factor averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingle, J.O.

    1978-01-01

    The numerical procedure of prime number averaging is applied to the fuel quality factor distribution of once and twice-burned fuel in order to evolve a fuel management scheme. The resulting fuel shuffling arrangement produces a near optimal flat power profile both under beginning-of-life and end-of-life conditions. The procedure is easily applied requiring only the solution of linear algebraic equations. (author)

  4. Strategies of management of the nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, J.R.; Perez, A.; Filella, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The management of nuclear fuel is depending on several factors: - Regulatory commission. The enterprises owner of the NPPs.The enterprise owner of the energy distribution. These factors are considered for the management of nuclear fuel. The design of fuel elements, the planning of cycles, the design of core reactors and the costs are analyzed. (Author)

  5. Alternative fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1998-12-01

    A DOE/PETC funded study was conducted to examine the use of a liquid phase mixed alcohol synthesis (LPMAS) plant to produce gasoline blending ethers. The LPMAS plant was integrated into three utilization scenarios: a coal fed IGCC power plant, a petroleum refinery using coke as a gasification feedstock, and a standalone natural gas fed partial oxidation plant. The objective of the study was to establish targets for the development of catalysts for the LPMAS reaction. In the IGCC scenario, syngas conversions need only be moderate because unconverted syngas is utilized by the combined cycle system. A once through LPMAS plant achieving syngas conversions in the range of 38--49% was found to be suitable. At a gas hourly space velocity of 5,000 sL/Kg-hr and a methanol:isobutanol selectivity ratio of 1.03, the target catalyst productivity ranges from 370 to 460 g iBuOH/Kg-hr. In the petroleum refinery scenario, high conversions ({approximately}95%) are required to avoid overloading the refinery fuel system with low Btu content unconverted syngas. To achieve these high conversions with the low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas, a recycle system was required (because of the limit imposed by methanol equilibrium), steam was injected into the LPMAS reactor, and CO{sub 2} was removed from the recycle loop. At the most economical recycle ratio, the target catalyst productivity is 265 g iBuOH/Kg-hr. In the standalone LPMAS scenario, essentially complete conversions are required to achieve a fuel balanced plant. At the most economical recycle ratio, the target catalyst productivity is 285 g iBuOH/Kg-hr. The economics of this scenario are highly dependent on the cost of the natural gas feedstock and the location of the plant. For all three case scenarios, the economics of a LPMAS plant is marginal at current ether market prices. Large improvements over demonstrated catalyst productivity and alcohol selectivity are required.

  6. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1996-02-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Safety Management Plan describes the new nuclear facility regulatory requirements basis for the Spemt Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and establishes the plan to achieve compliance with this basis at the new SNF Project facilities

  7. Overview of spent fuel management and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.; Ernst, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    Results compiled in the research reactor spent fuel database are used to assess the status of research reactor spent fuel worldwide. Fuel assemblies, their types, enrichment, origin of enrichment and geological distribution among the industrialized and developed countries of the world are discussed. Fuel management practices in wet and dry storage facilities and the concerns of reactor operators about long-term storage of their spent fuel are presented and some of the activities carried out by the International Atomic Energy Agency to address the issues associated with research reactor spent fuel are outlined. Some projections of spent fuel inventories to the year 2006 are presented and discussed. (author)

  8. Spent fuel management in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balu, K.

    1998-01-01

    From Indian point of view, the spent fuel management by the reprocessing and plutonium recycle option is considered to be a superior and an inevitable option. The nuclear energy programme in Indian envisages three stages of implementation involving installation of thermal reactors in the first phase followed by recycling of plutonium from reprocessed fuel in fast breeder reactors and in the third phase utilization of its large thorium reserves in reactor system based on U-233-Th cycle. The Indian programme for Waste Management envisages disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste in near surface disposal facilities and deep geological disposal for high level and alpha bearing wastes. A Waste Immobilization Plant (WHIP), employing metallic melter for HLW vitrification is operational at Tarapur. Two more WIPs are being set up at Kalpakkam and Tarapur. A Solid waste Storage Surveillance Facility (SSSF) is also set up for interim storage of vitrified HLW. Site investigations are in progress for selecting site for ultimate disposal in igneous rock formations. R and D works is taken up on partitioning of HLW. Solvent extraction and extraction chromatographic studies are in progress. Presently emphasis is on separation of heat generating short lived nuclides like strontium and alpha emitters. (author)

  9. Areva solutions for management of defective fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morlaes, I.; Vo Van, V.

    2014-01-01

    Defective fuel management is a major challenge for nuclear operators when all fuel must be long-term managed. This paper describes AREVA solutions for managing defective fuel. Transport AREVA performs shipments of defective fuel in Europe and proposes casks that are licensed for that purpose in Europe and in the USA. The paper presents the transport experience and the new European licensing approach of defective fuel transport. Dry Interim Storage AREVA is implementing the defective fuel storage in the USA, compliant with the Safety Authority's requirements. In Europe, AREVA is developing a new, more long-term oriented storage solution for defective fuel, the best available technology regarding safety requirements. The paper describes these storage solutions. Treatment Various types of defective fuel coming from around the world have been treated in the AREVA La Hague plant. Specific treatment procedures were developed when needed. The paper presents operational elements related to this experience. (authors)

  10. Plutonium recycle. In-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, F.; Berthet, A.; Le Bars, M.

    1985-01-01

    Plutonium recycle in France will concern a dozen of PWR 900 MWe controlled in gray mode till 1995. This paper presents the main characteristics of fuel management with plutonium recycle. The organization of management studies will be copied from this developed for classical management studies. Up these studies, a ''feasibility report'' aims at establishing at each stage of the fuel cycle, the impact of the utilization of fuel containing plutonium [fr

  11. The Canadian fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, D.B.

    1986-04-01

    This report is the sixth in the series of annual reports on the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes progress in 1984 for the following activities: storage and transportation of used fuel, immobilization of nuclear fuel waste, geotechnical research, environmental research, and environmental and safety assessment. 186 refs

  12. Spent fuel management newsletter. No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This issue of the newsletter consists of two parts. The first part describes the IAEA Secretariat activities - work and programme of the Nuclear Materials and Fuel Cycle Technology Section of the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, recent and planned meetings and publications, Technical Co-operation projects, Co-ordinated Research programmes. The second part contains country reports - national programmes on spent fuel management: current and planned storage and reprocessing capacities, spent fuel arisings, safety, transportation, storage and treatment of spent fuel

  13. Spent fuel management newsletter. No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-04-01

    This issue of the newsletter consists of two parts. The first part describes the IAEA Secretariat activities - work and programme of the Nuclear Materials and Fuel Cycle Technology Section of the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, recent and planned meetings and publications, Technical Co-operation projects, Co-ordinated Research programmes. The second part contains country reports - national programmes on spent fuel management: current and planned storage and reprocessing capacities, spent fuel arisings, safety, transportation, storage and treatment of spent fuel.

  14. Spent fuel management in France: Programme status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudat, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    France's programme is best characterized as a closed fuel cycle including reprocessing, Plutonium recycling in PWR and use of breeder reactors. The current installed nuclear capacity is 52.5 GWe from 55 units. The spent fuel management scheme chosen is reprocessing. This paper describes the national programme, spent nuclear fuel storage, reprocessing and contracts for reprocessing of spent fuel from various countries. (author). 5 figs, 2 tabs

  15. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1984-04-01

    This report, the fifth of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes activities over the past year in the following areas: public interaction; used fuel storage and transportation; immobilization of used fuel and fuel recycle waste; geoscience research related to deep underground disposal; environmental research; and environmental and safety assessment

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsman, K.H.

    1996-03-01

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts

  17. Fuel management approach in IRIS Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, B.; Franceschini, F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of fuel management approach employed in IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure). It introduces the initial, rather ambitious, fuel management goals and discusses their evolution that reflected the fast pace of progress of the overall project. The updated objectives rely on using currently licensed fuel technology, thus enabling near-term deployment of IRIS, while still providing improved fuel utilization. The paper focuses on the reference core design and fuel management strategy that is considered in pre-application licensing, which enables extended cycle of three to four years. The extended cycle reduces maintenance outage time and increases capacity factor, thus reducing the cost of electricity. Approaches to achieving this goal are discussed, including use of different reloading strategies. Additional fuel management options, which are not part of the licensing process, but are pursued as long-term research for possible future implementation, are presented as well. (Author)

  18. In-core fuel management and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waeckel, N.

    2009-01-01

    The management of nuclear fuel inside the core has to take into account the necessity to stop the reactor periodically to renew the fuel partially and to perform maintenance operations. The fuel management strategy determines the cost of the fuel (through the number of assemblies that have been changed and their enrichment rate) and the duration of the campaign till next stop. Fuel management strategies have to conciliate different objectives: -) the safety of the reactor, -) the reliability of the fuel assemblies, -) the optimization of the fuel cost by increasing the discharge burnup. The necessity of spent fuel processing implies a maximal discharge burnup. During the 1990-2000 period, the discharge burnups have been progressively increased through the following fuel management strategies: Garance, Cyclades and Gemmes. During the years 2000-2009, the progressive absorption of the nuclear over-equipment, the opening of the European electricity markets favored power production through the MOX-parity, Alcade and Galice fuel management strategies. The perspective for next decade is to favor production to the prejudice of higher burnups. (A.C.)

  19. Recent BWR fuel management reactor physics advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, R.L.; Congdon, S.P.; Crawford, B.W.; Kang, C.M.; Martin, C.L.; Reese, A.P.; Savoia, P.J.; Specker, S.R.; Welchly, R.

    1982-01-01

    Improvements in BWR fuel management have been under development to reduce uranium and separative work (SWU) requirements and reduce fuel cycle costs, while also maintaining maximal capacity factors and high fuel reliability. Improved reactor physics methods are playing an increasingly important role in making such advances feasible. The improved design, process computer and analysis methods both increase knowledge of the thermal margins which are available to implement fuel management advance, and improve the capability to reliably and efficiently analyze and design for fuel management advances. Gamma scan measurements of the power distributions of advanced fuel assembly and advanced reactor core designs, and improved in-core instruments also are important contributors to improving 3-d predictive methods and to increasing thermal margins. This paper is an overview of the recent advances in BWR reactor physics fuel management methods, coupled with fuel management and core design advances. The reactor physics measurements which are required to confirm the predictions of performance fo fuel management advances also are summarized

  20. Spent Fuel Management Newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This Newsletter has been prepared in accordance with the recommendations of the International Regular Advisory Group on Spent Fuel Management and the Agency's programme (GC XXXII/837, Table 76, item 14). The main purpose of the Newsletter is to provide Member States with new information about the state-of-the-art in one of the most important parts of the nuclear fuel cycle - Spent Fuel Management. The contents of this publication consists of two parts: (1) IAEA Secretariat contribution -work and programme of the Nuclear Materials and Fuel Cycle Technology Section of the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, recent and planned meetings and publications, Technical Co-operation projects, Co-ordinated Research programmes, etc. (2) Country reports - national programmes on spent fuel management: current and planned storage and reprocessing capacities, spent fuel arisings, safety, transportation, storage, treatment of spent fuel, some aspects of uranium and plutonium recycling, etc. The IAEA expects to publish the Newsletter once every two years between the publications of the Regular Advisory Group on Spent Fuel Management. Figs and tabs

  1. Energy management and vehicle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czysz, P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    The major drivers in the development of launch vehicles for the twenty-first century are reduction in cost of vehicles and operations, continuous reusability, mission abort capability with vehicle recovery, and readiness. One approach to the design of such vehicles is to emphasize energy management and propulsion as being the principal means of improvements given the available industrial capability and the required freedom in selecting configuration concept geometries. A methodology has been developed for the rational synthesis of vehicles based on the setting up and utilization of available data and projections, and a reference vehicle. The application of the methodology is illustrated for a single stage to orbit (SSTO) with various limits for the use of airbreathing propulsion.

  2. Special topics of inner fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuenschmann, A.

    1977-01-01

    Burnable Poison Rod Assemblies (BPRA) are currently used as lumped burnable poison only in the first cycles of many power reactors to insure a negative moderator coefficient at beginning of life and to help shape core power distribution (out-in shuffle scheme). BPRA's are also a valuable tool in later cycles where they can be used as an additional design parameter to improve fuel performance and fuel cycle economics, to shape fuel assembly power, and to increase fuel management flexibility (in-out shuffle scheme). This paper describes the two fuel shuffle schemes and compares the two shuffle strategies concerning economic and flexibility aspects. (orig.) [de

  3. Nuclear fuel management in JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naka, Michihiro; Miyazawa, Masataka; Sato, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Fusao; Ito, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) is the largest scale materials (author)ted the fission gas release compared with the steady state opkW/l in Japan. JMTR as a multi-purpose reactor has been contributing to research and development on nuclear field with a wide variety of irradiation for performing engineering tests and safety research on fuel and component for light water reactor as well as fast breeder reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor etc., for research and development on blanket material for fusion reactor, for fundamental research, and for radio-isotope (RI) production. The driver nuclear fuel used in JMTR is aluminum based MTR type fuel. According to the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program, the JMTR fuel elements had been converted from 93% high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to 45% medium enriched uranium (MEU) fuel in 1986, and then to 20% low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in 1994. The cumulative operation cycles until March 1999 reached to 127 cycles since the first criticality in 1968. JMTR has used 1,628 HEU, 688 MEU and 308 LEU fuel elements for these operation cycles. After these spent fuel elements were cooled in the JMTR water canal more than one year after discharged from the JMTR core, they had been transported to reprocessing plants in Europe, and then to plants in USA in order to extract the uranium remaining in the spent fuel. The JMTR spent fuel transportation for reprocessing had been continued until the end of 1988. However, USA had ceased spent fuel reprocessing in 1989, while USDOE committed to prepare an environmental review of the impacts of accepting spent fuels from foreign research reactors. After that, USDOE decided to implement a new acceptance policy in 1996, the spent fuel transportation from JMTR to Savannah River Site was commenced in 1997. It was the first transportation not only in Japan but in Asia also. Until resuming the transportation, the spent fuel elements stored in JMTR

  4. Safeguards aspects for future fuel management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.; Stein, G.; Gerstler, R.

    1987-01-01

    In the future, more flexible fuel management strategies will be realized in light-water reactor power stations. The incentives for this development are based on considerations related to safe and economic plant operation, e.g. improved fuel strategies can save fuel resources and waste management efforts. A further important aspect of the nuclear fuel cycle deals with recycling strategies. At the back-end of the fuel cycle, the direct final disposal of spent fuel will have to be assessed as an alternative to recycling strategies. These major development fields will also have consequences for international safeguards. In particular, reactor fuel strategies may involve higher burn-up, conditioning of spent fuel directly in the power plant, gadolinium-poisoned fuel and different levels of enrichment. These strategies will have an impact on inspection activities, especially on the applicability of NDA techniques. The inspection frequency could also be affected in recycling strategies using MOX fuel. There may be problems with NDA methods if reprocessed feed is used in enrichment plants. On the other hand, the direct final disposal of spent fuel will raise safeguards problems regarding design verification, long-term safeguarding and the very feasibility of inaccessible nuclear material

  5. Remote technology applications in spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    Spent fuel management has become a prospective area for application of remote technology in recent years with a steadily growing inventory of spent fuel arising from nuclear power production. A remark that could be made from the review of technical information collected from the IAEA meetings was that remote technology in spent fuel management has matured well through the past decades of industrial experiences. Various remote technologies have been developed and applied in the past for facility operation and maintenance work in spent fuel examination, storage, transportation, reprocessing and radioactive waste treatment, among others, with significant accomplishments in dose reduction to workers, enhancement of reliability, etc. While some developmental activities are continuing for more advanced applications, industrial practices have made use of simple and robust designs for most of the remote systems technology applications to spent fuel management. In the current state of affairs, equipment and services in remote technology are available in the market for applications to most of the projects in spent fuel management. It can be concluded that the issue of critical importance in remote systems engineering is to make an optimal selection of technology and equipment that would best satisfy the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) requirements in terms of relevant criteria like dose reduction, reliability, costs, etc. In fact, good selection methodology is the key to efficient implementation of remote systems applications in the modern globalized market. This TECDOC gives a review of the current status of remote technology applications for spent fuel management, based on country reports from some Member States presented at the consultancy meetings, of which updated reports are attached in the annex. The scope of the review covers the series of spent fuel handling operations involved in spent fuel management, from discharge from reactor to reprocessing or

  6. Impact of fuel fabrication and fuel management technologies on uranium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnsberger, P.L.; Stucker, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Uranium utilization in commercial pressurized water reactors is a complex function of original NSSS design, utility energy requirements, fuel assembly design, fuel fabrication materials and fuel fabrication materials and fuel management optimization. Fuel design and fabrication technologies have reacted to the resulting market forcing functions with a combination of design and material changes. The technologies employed have included ever-increasing fuel discharge burnup, non-parasitic structural materials, burnable absorbers, and fissile material core zoning schemes (both in the axial and radial direction). The result of these technological advances has improved uranium utilization by roughly sixty percent from the infancy days of nuclear power to present fuel management. Fuel management optimization technologies have also been developed in recent years which provide fuel utilization improvements due to core loading pattern optimization. This paper describes the development and impact of technology advances upon uranium utilization in modern pressurized water reactors. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs

  7. Overview on spent fuel management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview on spent fuel management strategies which range from reprocessing to interim storage in a centralised facility followed by final disposal in a repository. In either case, more spent fuel storage capacity (wet or dry, at-reactor or away-from-reactor, national or regional) is required as spent fuel is continuously accumulated while most countries prefer to defer their decision to choose between these two strategies. (author)

  8. Nuclear spent fuel management. Experience and options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel can be stored safely for long periods at relatively low cost, but some form of permanent disposal will eventually be necessary. This report examines the options for spent fuel management, explores the future prospects for each stage of the back-end of the fuel cycle and provides a thorough review of past experience and the technical status of the alternatives. Current policies and practices in twelve OECD countries are surveyed

  9. Radwaste management and spent fuel management in JAVYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozik, M.; Strazovec, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work authors present radwaste management and spent fuel management in JAVYS, a.s. Processing of radioactive wastes (RAW) in the Bohunice Radioactive Waste Processing Center and surface storage of RAW in National RAW Repository as well as Interim Spent fuel storage in Jaslovske Bohunice are presented.

  10. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.

    1984-12-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program involves research into the storage and transportation of used nuclear fuel, immobilization of fuel waste, and deep geological disposal of the immobilized waste. The program is now in the fourth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the safety and environmental aspects of the deep underground disposal of immobilized fuel waste in plutonic rock. The objectives of the research for each component of the program and the progress made to the end of 1983 are described in this report

  11. Fuel management at Washington State Ferries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodeur, P.; Olds, J.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation discussed Washington State Ferry (WSF) operations and provided details of a biodiesel research and demonstration project. Washington has the largest ferry system in the United States, with a total of 28 vessels that operate on 10 routes through 20 terminals. Routes vary by transit times, navigational challenges, and the proximity to population centres. WSF fuel and emissions management initiatives include exhaust emission studies, clean fuel initiatives, machinery upgrades, fuel conservation initiatives, and biodiesel testing. The organization is also using waste heat recovery and a positive restraint system. The WSF biodiesel pilot program was conducted using soy-derived fuels with a purifier disk stack. The program is in agreement with recent legislation requiring that 2 per cent of annual diesel fuel sales are from biodiesel fuels, and state legislation requiring that state agencies use a minimum of 20 per cent biodiesel blends in diesel-powered vessels and vehicles. Details of project partnerships were included. tabs., figs

  12. Comparison of spent nuclear fuel management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, C.L.; Caldwell, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the process an results of a trade study of spent nuclear fuel (SNF)management alternatives. The purpose of the trade study was to provide: (1) a summary of various SNF management alternatives, (2) an objective comparison of the various alternatives to facilitate the decision making process, and (3) documentation of trade study rational and the basis for decisions

  13. Spent fuel management: Current status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The main objective of the Advisory Group on Spent Fuel Management is to review the world-wide situation in Spent Fuel Management, to define the most important directions of national efforts and international cooperation in this area, to exchange information on the present status and progress in performing the back-end of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to elaborate the general recommendations for future Agency programmes in the field of spent fuel management. This report which is a result of the third IAEA Advisory Group Meeting (the first and second were held in 1984 and 1986) is intended to provide the reader with an overview of the status of spent fuel management programmes in a number of leading countries, with a description of the past and present IAEA activities in this field of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and with the Agency's plans for the next years, based on the proposals and recommendations of Member States. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 14 papers presented at the advisory group meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Synthesis on power electronics for large fuel cells: From power conditioning to potentiodynamic analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bernardinis, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Active load for fuel cell managing electrical drive constraints: frequency and current ripple can be adjusted independently. • Multi-port resonant soft-switched topology for power management of a thirty kilowatt segmented PEM fuel cell. • Splitting current control strategy for power segmented PEM fuel cell in case of a segment is under fault. • Reversible Buck topology for large fuel cell with control of the fuel cell potential linked to current density nonlinearity. - Abstract: The work addressed in this paper deals with a synthesis on power electronic converters used for fuel cells. The knowledge gap concerns conceptually different electronic converter architectures for PEM (Proton Exchange Membrane) fuel cells able to perform three types of functionalities: The first one is the capacity of emulating an active load representative of electrical drive constraints. In that case, frequency and fuel cell current ripple can be set independently to investigate the dynamic behavior of the fuel cell. The second one is power conditioning applied to large high power and segmented fuel cell systems (“Large” represents several tens of cells and multi-kilowatt stacks), which is a non trivial consideration regarding the topological choices to be made for improving efficiency, compactness and ensure operation under faulty condition. A multi-port resonant isolated boost topology is analyzed enabling soft switching over a large operating range for a thirty kilowatt segmented fuel cell. A splitting current control strategy in case of a segment is under fault is proposed. Each considered converter topologies meet specific constraints regarding fuel cell stack design and power level. The third functionality is the ability for the power electronics to perform analysis and diagnosis techniques, like the cyclic voltammetry on large PEM fuel cell assemblies. The latter technique is an uncommon process for large fuel cell stacks since it is rather performed on

  15. Spent fuel management of NPPs in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, D.E.; Lee Gonzalez, H.M.

    2010-01-01

    There are two Nuclear Power Plants in operation in Argentina: 'Atucha I' (unique PHWR design) in operation since 1974, and 'Embalse' (typical Candu reactor) which started operation in 1984. Both NPPs are operated by 'Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A' which is responsible for the management and interim storage of spent fuel till the end of the operative life of the plants. A third NPP, 'Atucha II' is under construction, with a similar design of Atucha I. The legislative framework establishes that after final shutdown of a NPP the spent fuel will be transferred to the 'National Atomic Energy Commission', which is also responsible for the decommissioning of the Plants. In Atucha I, the spent fuel is stored underwater, until another option is implemented meanwhile in Embalse the spent fuel is stored during six years in pools and then it is moved to a dry storage. A decision about the fuel cycle back-end strategy will be taken before year 2030. (authors)

  16. Waste management and the holistic fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, R.G.G.; Robbins, R.A.; Eilbeck, A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper outlines a holistic approach to the nuclear fuel cycle and the impact that waste management can have on the holistic approach. The philosophy includes regarding irradiated fuel as a resource rather than a waste that can be used as a source of fissile material to be recycled, either Uranium returned to fuel or Plutonium in mixed oxide fuels (MOX) for fast and impact of those compounds that leave the cycle (solid waste, liquid effluent and gaseous effluent) are minimized. This can only be achieved by applying a full life cycle analysis of process benefits. The paper describes some of the work in waste management but notes that waste and its generation must be seen as an integral part of any developed strategy. (authors)

  17. Perturbation theory in nuclear fuel management optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear in-core fuel management involves all the physical aspects which allow optimal operation of the nuclear fuel within the reactor core. In most nuclear power reactors, fuel loading patterns which have a minimum power peak are economically desirable to allow the reactors to operate at the highest power density and to minimize the possibility of fuel failure. In this study, perturbation theory along with a binary fuel shuffling technique is applied to predict the effects of various core configurations, and hence, the optimization of in-core fuel management. The computer code FULMNT has been developed to shuffle the fuel assemblies in search of the lowest possible power peaking factor. An iteration approach is used in the search routine. A two-group diffusion theory method is used to obtain the power distribution for the iterations. A comparison of the results of this method with other methods shows that this approach can save computer time. The code also has a burnup capability which can be used to check power peaking throughout the core life

  18. Management of cladding hulls and fuel hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent fuel from power reactors based on chop-leach technology produces a solid waste product of cladding hulls and other metallic residues. This report describes the current situation in the management of fuel cladding hulls and hardware. Information is presented on the material composition of such waste together with the heating effects due to neutron-induced activation products and fuel contamination. As no country has established a final disposal route and the corresponding repository, this report also discusses possible disposal routes and various disposal options under consideration at present

  19. Fuel management codes for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicard, B.; Coulon, P.; Mougniot, J.C.; Gouriou, A.; Pontier, M.; Skok, J.; Carnoy, M.; Martin, J.

    The CAPHE code is used for managing and following up fuel subassemblies in the Phenix fast neutron reactor; the principal experimental results obtained since this reactor was commissioned are analyzed with this code. They are mainly concerned with following up fuel subassembly powers and core reactivity variations observed up to the beginning of the fifth Phenix working cycle (3/75). Characteristics of Phenix irradiated fuel subassemblies calculated by the CAPHE code are detailed as at April 1, 1975 (burn-up steel damage)

  20. Development of advanced spent fuel management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Won; Shin, Y. J.; Cho, S. H.

    2004-03-01

    The research on spent fuel management focuses on the maximization of the disposal efficiency by a volume reduction, the improvement of the environmental friendliness by the partitioning and transmutation of the long lived nuclides, and the recycling of the spent fuel for an efficient utilization of the uranium source. In the second phase which started in 2001, the performance test of the advanced spent fuel management process consisting of voloxidation, reduction of spent fuel and the lithium recovery process has been completed successfully on a laboratory scale. The world-premier spent fuel reduction hot test of a 5 kgHM/batch has been performed successfully by joint research with Russia and the valuable data on the actinides and FPs material balance and the characteristics of the metal product were obtained with experience to help design an engineering scale reduction system. The electrolytic reduction technology which integrates uranium oxide reduction in a molten LiCl-Li 2 O system and Li 2 O electrolysis is developed and a unique reaction system is also devised. Design data such as the treatment capacity, current density and mass transfer behavior obtained from the performance test of a 5 kgU/batch electrolytic reduction system pave the way for the third phase of the hot cell demonstration of the advanced spent fuel management technology

  1. Accelerated fuel depreciation as an economic incentive for low-leakage fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis is presented which evaluates the tax depreciation advantage which results from the increased rate of fuel depletion achieved in the current low-leakage fuel-management LWR core reload designs. An analytical fuel-cycle cost model is used to examine the important cost parameters which are then validated using the fuel-cycle cost code CINCAS and data from the Maine Yankee PWR. Results show that low-leakage fuel management, through the tax depreciation advantage from accelerated fuel depletion, provides an improvement of several percent in fuel-cycle costs compared to traditional out-in fuel management and a constant fuel depletion rate. (author)

  2. Burnup credit demands for spent fuel management in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medun, V.

    2001-01-01

    In fact, till now, burnup credit has not be applied in Ukrainian nuclear power for spent fuel management systems (storage and transport). However, application of advanced fuel at VVER reactors, arising spent fuel amounts, represent burnup credit as an important resource to decrease spent fuel management costs. The paper describes spent fuel management status in Ukraine from viewpoint of subcriticality assurance under spent fuel storage and transport. It also considers: 1. Regulation basis concerning subcriticality assurance, 2. Basic spent fuel and transport casks characteristics, 3. Possibilities and demands for burnup credit application at spent fuel management systems in Ukraine. (author)

  3. German Approach to Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jussofie, A.; Graf, R.; Filbert, W.

    2010-01-01

    The management of spent fuel was based on two powerful columns until 30 June 2005, i. e. reprocessing and direct disposal. After this date any delivery of spent fuel to reprocessing plants was prohibited so that the direct disposal of unreprocessed spent fuel is the only available option in Germany today. The main steps of the current concept are: (i) Intermediate storage of spent fuel, which is the only step in practice. After the first cooling period in spent fuel storage pools it continues into cask-receiving dry storage facilities. Identification of casks, 'freezing' of inventories in terms of continuity of knowledge, monitoring the access to spent fuel, verifying nuclear material movements in terms of cask transfers and ensurance against diversion of nuclear material belong to the fundamental safeguards goals which have been achieved in the intermediate storage facilities by containment and surveillance techniques in unattended mode. (ii) Conditioning of spent fuel assemblies by separating the fuel rods from structural elements. Since the pilot conditioning facility in Gorleben has not yet come into operation, the underlying safeguards approach which focuses on safeguarding the key measurement points - the spent fuel related way in and out of the facility - has not been applied yet. (iii) Disposal in deep geological formations, but no decision has been made so far neither regarding the location of a geological repository nor regarding the safeguards approach for the disposal concept of spent fuel. The situation was complicated by a moratorium which suspended the underground exploration of the Gorleben salt dome as potential geological repository for spent fuel. The moratorium expires in October 2010. Nevertheless, considerable progress has been made in the development of disposal concepts. According to the basic, so-called POLLUX (registered) -concept spent fuel assemblies are to be conditioned after dry storage and reloaded into the POLLUX (registered) -cask

  4. Wood fuel price survey for 2008 and 2009. Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Based on interviews on telephone with wood fuel vendors and wholesalers, pellet producers, local community boiler managers, and individuals, this study, while giving several data figures and tables, proposes a price analysis for the housing sector (price evolution for individuals for different kinds and sizes of fuel woods), a comparison with other fuels and energies (electricity, gas) whether wood is used as the primary or secondary heating mean. It also comments the price scattering. It proposes the same kind of analysis for local communities

  5. Fuel Retrieval and Management of Fuel Element Debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chande, Shridhar; Lachaume, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear accidents involving core meltdown have not been so rare. While the first occurred in early fifties, it is reported that about 20 have occurred worldwide in military and commercial reactors. The more recent and major accidents are 1. Three Mile Island, USA in 1979: Approximately half the core was melted, and flowed to the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel however the pressure vessel remained intact and contained the damaged fuel. 2. Chernobyl, former USSR in 1984: Explosive release of radioactive material occurred. About 6 tons of fuel was dispersed as air-borne particles. Most of the core was damaged or melted. 3. Fukushima, Japan 2011: Three units suffered melt down. In unit 1 almost all the fuel assemblies melted and accumulated at the bottom of the vessel. It is reported that the vessel failed and the molten corium has penetrated the concrete. In the units 2 and 3, partial melting of cores has occurred. In several of these cases, fuel retrieval and management activities have been carried out. The experience and insights gained from these activities will be extremely useful for planning and execution of similar activities in future if ever they are needed. The purpose of this session was to exchange this experience and also to share the lessons learned. This is of particularly important, at this juncture, when planning and preparation for retrieval of damaged cores in Fukushima NPP is in progress. (author)

  6. Development of advanced spent fuel management process. System analysis of advanced spent fuel management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, S.G.; Kang, D.S.; Seo, C.S.; Lee, H.H.; Shin, Y.J.; Park, S.W.

    1999-03-01

    The system analysis of an advanced spent fuel management process to establish a non-proliferation model for the long-term spent fuel management is performed by comparing the several dry processes, such as a salt transport process, a lithium process, the IFR process developed in America, and DDP developed in Russia. In our system analysis, the non-proliferation concept is focused on the separation factor between uranium and plutonium and decontamination factors of products in each process, and the non-proliferation model for the long-term spent fuel management has finally been introduced. (Author). 29 refs., 17 tabs., 12 figs

  7. In-core fuel management: New challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolmayer, A.; Vallee, A.; Mondot, J.

    1992-01-01

    Experience accumulated by pressurized water reactor (PWR) utilities allows them to improve their strategies in the use of eventual margins to core design limits. They are used for nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) power upgrading, to improve operating margins, or to adapt fuel management to specific objectives. As a result, in-core fuel management strategies have become very diverse: UO 2 or mixed-oxide loading, out-in or in-out fuel loading patterns, extended or annual cycle lengths with margins on design limits such as moderator temperature coefficients, boron concentrations, or peaking factors. Perspectives also appear concerning use of existing plutonium stocks or actinide incineration. Burnable poisons are most often needed to satisfactorily achieve these goals. Among them, gadolinia are now largely used, owing to their excellent performance. More than 24 Framatome first cores and reloads, representing more than 3000 gadolinia-bearing rods, have been irradiated since 1983

  8. Practice and prospect of advanced fuel management and fuel technology application in PWR in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Min; Zhang Hong; Ma Cang; Bai Chengfei; Zhou Zhou; Wang Lei; Xiao Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Since Daya Bay nuclear power plant implemented 18-month refueling strategy in 2001, China has completed a series of innovative fuel management and fuel technology projects, including the Ling Ao Advanced Fuel Management (AFM) project (high-burnup quarter core refueling) and the Ningde 18-month refueling project with gadolinium-bearing fuel in initial core. First, this paper gives brief introduction to China's advanced fuel management and fuel technology experience. Second, it introduces practices of the advanced fuel management in China in detail, which mainly focuses on the implementation and progress of the Ningde 18-month refueling project with gadolinium-bearing fuel in initial core. Finally, the paper introduces the practices of advanced fuel technology in China and gives the outlook of the future advanced fuel management and fuel technology in this field. (author)

  9. Accelerators and alternative nuclear fuel management options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The development of special accelerators suggests the po tential for new directions in nuclear energy systems evolution. Such directions point towards a more acceptable form of nuclear energy by reason of the consequent accessibility of enhanced fuel management choices. Essential and specifically directed research and development activity needs to be under taken in order to clarify and resolve a number of technical issues

  10. Residents' values and fuels management approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwo-Bao Liou; Christine Vogt; Greg Winter; Sarah McCaffrey

    2008-01-01

    The research utilizes the Forest Value and Salient Value Similarity Scales to examine homeowners' value orientations and relate them to attitudes toward and support for fuels management approaches. Data were collected from homeowners living in the wildland-urban interface of the Huron- Manistee National Forest at two time periods, in 2002 and 2006. The panel data...

  11. Fact sheet on spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The IAEA gives high priority to safe and effective spent fuel management. As an example of continuing efforts, the 2003 International Conference on Storage of Spent Fuel from Power Reactors gathered 125 participants from 35 member states to exchange information on this important subject. With its large number of Member States, the IAEA is well-positioned to gather and share information useful in addressing Member State priorities. IAEA activities on this topic include plans to produce technical documents as resources for a range of priority topics: spent fuel performance assessment and research, burnup credit applications, cask maintenance, cask loading optimization, long term storage requirements including records maintenance, economics, spent fuel treatment, remote technology, and influence of fuel design on spent fuel storage. In addition to broader topics, the IAEA supports coordinated research projects and technical cooperation projects focused on specific needs. The proceedings of the 2003 IAEA conference on storage of spent fuel from power reactors has been ranked in the top twenty most accessed IAEA publications. These proceedings are available for free downloads at http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PubDetails.asp?pubId=6924]. The IAEA organized and held a 2004 meeting focused on long term spent fuel storage provisions in Central and Eastern Europe, using technical cooperation funds to support participation by these Member States. Over ninety percent of the participants in this meeting rated its value as good or excellent, with participants noting that the IAEA is having a positive effect in stimulating communication, cooperation, and information dissemination on this important topic. The IAEA was advised in 2004 that results from a recent coordinated research project (IAEA-TECDOC-1343) were used by one Member State to justify higher clad temperatures for spent fuel in dry storage, leading to more efficient storage and reduced costs. Long term

  12. Past and future IAEA spent fuel management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, A.

    1993-01-01

    The main objectives and strategies of the Agency's activities in the area of spent fuel management are to promote the exchange of information between Member States on technical, safety, environmental and economic aspects of spent fuel management technology, including storage, transport and treatment of spent fuel, and to provide assistance to Member States in the planning, implementation and operation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This paper give a list of the meetings held since the last issue of the Spent Fuel Management Newsletter

  13. Fuel cycle and waste management: A perspective from British nuclear fuels plc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, R.G.G.; Fairhall, G.A.; Robbins, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The phrase fuel cycle and waste management implies two separate and distinct activities. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) has adopted a holistic approach to the fuel cycle that integrates the traditional fuel cycle activities of conversion to uranium hexafluoride, fuel fabrication, power generation, and reprocessing with waste arisings, its subsequent treatment, and disposal

  14. Nuclear-fuel-cycle education: Module 5. In-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.H.

    1980-07-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a series of educational modules for use in nuclear-fuel-cycle education. These modules are designed for use in a traditional classroom setting by lectures or in a self-paced, personalized system of instruction. This module on in-core fuel management contains information on computational methods and theory; in-core fuel management using the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University computer modules; pressurized water reactor in-core fuel management; boiling water reactor in-core fuel management; and in-core fuel management for gas-cooled and fast reactors

  15. Used Fuel Management System Interface Analyses - 13578

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Robert; Busch, Ingrid [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Bldg. 5700, MS-6170, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Nutt, Mark; Morris, Edgar; Puig, Francesc [Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Carter, Joe; Delley, Alexcia; Rodwell, Phillip [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Hardin, Ernest; Kalinina, Elena [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Clark, Robert [U.S. Department of Energy (United States); Cotton, Thomas [Complex Systems Group (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Preliminary system-level analyses of the interfaces between at-reactor used fuel management, consolidated storage facilities, and disposal facilities, along with the development of supporting logistics simulation tools, have been initiated to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other stakeholders with information regarding the various alternatives for managing used nuclear fuel (UNF) generated by the current fleet of light water reactors operating in the United States. An important UNF management system interface consideration is the need for ultimate disposal of UNF assemblies contained in waste packages that are sized to be compatible with different geologic media. Thermal analyses indicate that waste package sizes for the geologic media under consideration by the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign may be significantly smaller than the canisters being used for on-site dry storage by the nuclear utilities. Therefore, at some point along the UNF disposition pathway, there could be a need to repackage fuel assemblies already loaded and being loaded into the dry storage canisters currently in use. The implications of where and when the packaging or repackaging of commercial UNF will occur are key questions being addressed in this evaluation. The analysis demonstrated that thermal considerations will have a major impact on the operation of the system and that acceptance priority, rates, and facility start dates have significant system implications. (authors)

  16. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummery, T.E.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1983-05-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is now well established. This report outlines the generic research and technological development underway in this program to assess the concept of immobilization and subsequent disposal of nuclear fuel waste deep in a stable plutonic rock in the Canadian Shield. The program participants, funding, schedule and associated external review processes are briefly outlined. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely, immobilization studies, geoscience research and environmental and safety assessment, are described in more detail

  17. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummery, T.E.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1984-12-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is in the fourth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the basic safety and environmental aspects of the concept of isolating immobilized fuel waste by deep underground disposal in plutonic rock. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely immobilization studies, geoscience research, and environmental and safety assessment, are described. Program funding, scheduling and associated external review processes are briefly outlined

  18. Electron-beam synthesis of fuel in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev, A.V.; Holodkova, E.M.; Ershov, B.G.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Tendencies of world development focus attention on a vegetative biomass as on the major raw resource for future chemistry and a fuel industry. The significant potential for perfection of biomass conversion processes is concentrated in the field of radiation-chemical methods. Both the mode of post-radiation distillation and mode of electron-beam distillation of biomass have been investigated as well as the mode of gas-phase synthesis of liquid engine fuel from of biomass distillation products. Synergistic action of radiation and temperature has been analyzed at use of the accelerated electron beams allowing to combine radiolysis with effective radiation heating of a material without use of additional heaters. At dose rate above 1 kGy/s the electron-beam irradiation results in intensive decomposition of a biomass and evaporation of formed fragments with obtaining of a liquid condensate (∼ 60 wt%), CO 2 and Co gases (13-18 wt%) and charcoal in the residue. Biomass distillation at radiation heating allows to increase almost three times an organic liquid yield in comparison with pyrolysis. The majority of liquid products from cellulose is represented by the furan derivatives considered among the very perspective components for alternative engine fuels. Distilled-off gases and vapors are diluted with gaseous C 1 -C 5 alkanes and again are exposed to an irradiation to produce liquid fuel from a biomass. This transformation is based on a method of electron-beam circulation conversion of gaseous C 1 -C 5 alkanes (Ponomarev, A.V., Radiat. Phys. Chem., 78, 48, 2009) which consists in formation and removal of liquid products with high degree of carbon skeleton branching. The isomers ratio in a liquid may be controlled by means of change of an irradiation condition and initial gas composition. The irradiation of gaseous alkanes together with vaporous products of biomass destruction allows to synthesize the fuel enriched by conventional

  19. Influence of the fuel in the nanostructure catalyzer oxides synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zampiva, R.Y.S.; Panta, P.C.; Carlos, R.B.; Alves, A.K.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2012-01-01

    Among the techniques used in catalysts production, the solution combustion synthesis (SCS) has been increasingly applied due the possibility of producing, at low cost, highly pure and homogeneous nanostructured powders. The smaller the particle diameter, the greater the activity of the catalyst. In SCS, the size of the particles produced depends on the process variables. In order to formulate the optimal methodology for the preparation of nanostructured oxides for catalysis, it was studied the fuel-oxidant concentration ratio, and the use of glycine and polyethylene glycol with molecular weight 200 (PEG 200) as fuel in the SCS of Iron, Magnesium and Molybdenum based catalysts. The phase identification of the products was performed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Particle size and surface area analysis were done to characterize the particles size and the samples morphology was obtained by scanning electron microscopy. Results indicated the formation of high purity nanomaterials obtained for low concentrations of fuel, and a wide variation in the nanostructure sizes depending on the concentration and type of fuel used. (author)

  20. Perturbation theory in nuclear fuel management optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, L.W.; Rohach, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Perturbation theory along with a binary fuel shuffling technique is applied to predict the effects of various core configurations and, hence, the optimization of in-core fuel management. The computer code FULMNT has been developed to shuffle the fuel assemblies in search of the lowest possible power peaking factor. An iteration approach is used in the search routine. A two-group diffusion theory method is used to obtain the power distribution for the iterations. A comparison of the results of this method with other methods shows that this approach can save computer time and obtain better power peaking factors. The code also has a burnup capability that can be used to check power peaking throughout the core life

  1. Development of advanced spent fuel management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Shin, Y. J.; Do, J. B.; You, G. S.; Seo, J. S.; Lee, H. G.

    1998-03-01

    This study is to develop an advanced spent fuel management process for countries which have not yet decided a back-end nuclear fuel cycle policy. The aims of this process development based on the pyroreduction technology of PWR spent fuels with molten lithium, are to reduce the storage volume by a quarter and to reduce the storage cooling load in half by the preferential removal of highly radioactive decay-heat elements such as Cs-137 and Sr-90 only. From the experimental results which confirm the feasibility of metallization technology, it is concluded that there are no problems in aspects of reaction kinetics and equilibrium. However, the operating performance test of each equipment on an engineering scale still remain and will be conducted in 1999. (author). 21 refs., 45 tabs., 119 figs

  2. Core design and fuel management studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Byung Joo; Chan, P.

    1997-06-01

    The design target for the CANDU 9 requires a 20% increase in electrical power output from an existing 480-channel CANDU core. Assuming a net electrical output of 861 MW(e) for a natural uranium fuelled Bruce-B/Darlington reactor in a warm water site, the net electrical output of the reference CANDU 9 reactor would be 1033 MW(e). This report documents the result of the physics studies for the design of the CANDU 9 480/SEU core. The results of the core design and fuel management studies of the CANDU 9 480/SEU reactor indicated that up to 1033 MW(e) output can be achieved in a 480-channel CANDU core by using SEU core can easily be maintained indefinitely using an automated refuelling program. Fuel performance evaluation based on the data of the 500 FPDs refuelling simulation concluded that SEU fuel failure is not expected. (author). 2 tabs., 38 figs., 5 refs

  3. Energy management in fuel cell power trains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbo, P.; Corcione, F.E.; Migliardini, F.; Veneri, O.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, experimental results obtained on a small size fuel cell power train (1.8 kW) based on a 500 W proton exchange membrane (PEM) stack are reported and discussed with specific regard to energy management issues to be faced for attainment of the maximum propulsion system efficiency. The fuel cell system (FCS) was realized and characterized via investigating the effects of the main operative variables on efficiency. This resulted in an efficiency higher than 30% in a wide power range with a maximum of 38% at medium load. The efficiency of the overall fuel cell power train measured during both steady state and dynamic conditions (European R40 driving cycle) was about 30%. A discussion about the control strategy to direct the power flows is reported with reference to two different test procedures used in dynamic experiments, i.e., load levelled and load following

  4. Fuel mechanical design as a boundary condition for fuel management optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, F.; Aisch, F.W.; Heins, L.

    1988-01-01

    The incentive to reduce fuel cycle costs as well as the amount of active waste requires, among others, measures to optimize fuel management. Improved fuel management in this sense calls, e.g., for reduction of parasitic neutron absorption, for reduction of neutron leakage, and particularly for burnup extension. Such measures result in increased demands for fuel mechanical design. In the first part of this paper their impact on fuel mechanical behaviour is described. In the second part, some examples of practical importance for the interaction between fuel management optimization and fuel mechanical design are discussed. (orig.) [de

  5. Automated and interactive fuel management tools: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.G.; Casadei, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The past, present and future status of automated and interactive fuel management tools are reviewed. Issues such as who are the customers for these products and what are their needs are addressed. The nature of the fuel management problem is reviewed. The Westinghouse fuel management tools and methods are presented as an example of how the technology has evolved

  6. Using climate information for fuels management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolden, Crystal A.; Brown, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Climate has come to the forefront of wildfire discussions in recent years as research contributes to the general understanding of how climate influences fuels availability to burn, the occurrence of severe fire weather conditions and other wildfire parameters. This understanding has crossed over into wildfire management applications through the creation of tools like climate forecasts for wildfire and drought indices, which are now widely used in wildfire suppression and mitigation planning. The overall question is how can climate information help fire managers meet management objectives? Climate underlies weather. For example, a number of days could be generally wet, but that may occur in the context of a two-year overall drought. Knowing the baseline climate is not only critical to preventing escaped prescribed fires, but also how it may affect fire behavior, fire effects and whether or not fire managers will meet their fuels management objectives. Thus, for fire managers to use prescribed and WFU fire safely and effectively, and to minimize the number of escaped fires and conversions to suppression, they need to understand how current climate conditions will impact the use of fire. One example is the need to use prescribed fire under set “burn windows”. Since meteorological conditions vary considerably from year to year for a given day, fire managers will be more successful in utilizing burn windows effectively if they understand those climate thresholds conducive to an increased number of safe burn windows, and are able to predict and take advantage of those burn windows. While climate and wildfire has been studied extensively, climate and fire use has not. The initial goal of this project was to assess how climate impacts prescribed fire use in a more general sense. After a preliminary informal survey in the spring of 2003, we determined that 1) there is insufficient data (less than 10 years) to conduct empirical correlative studies similar to those of

  7. Environmental management at Nuclear Fuel Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, S.; Kalidas, R.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) a unit of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is manufacturing and supplying fuel assemblies and structurals for Atomic Power Reactors, Seamless Stainless Steel/ Special Alloy Tubes and high purity/special materials for various industries including Atomic Energy, Space and Electronics. NFC is spread over about 200 acres area. It consists of various chemical, metallurgical, fabrication and assembly plants engaged in processing uranium from concentrate to final fuel assembly, processing zirconium from ore to metallic products and processing various special high purity materials from ore or intermediate level to the final product. The plants were commissioned in the early seventies and capacities of these plants have been periodically enhanced to cater to the growing demands of the Indian Nuclear Industry. In the two streams of plants processing Uranium and zirconium, various types and categories including low level radioactive wastes are generated. These require proper handling and disposal. The overall management of radioactive and other waste aims at minimizing the generation and release to the environment. In this presentation, the environment management methodologies as practiced in Nuclear Fuel Complex are discussed. (author)

  8. Alternative Fuel Research in Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgenor, Angela D.; Klettlinger, Jennifer L.; Yen, Chia H.; Nakley, Leah M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has recently constructed an Alternative Fuels Laboratory which is solely being used to perform Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reactor studies, novel catalyst development and thermal stability experiments. Facility systems have demonstrated reliability and consistency for continuous and safe operations in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The purpose of this test facility is to conduct bench scale Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst screening experiments while focusing on reducing energy inputs, reducing CO2 emissions and increasing product yields within the F-T process. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is considered a gas to liquid process which reacts syn-gas (a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), over the surface of a catalyst material which is then converted into liquids of various hydrocarbon chain length and product distributions1. These hydrocarbons can then be further processed into higher quality liquid fuels such as gasoline and diesel. The experiments performed in this laboratory will enable the investigation of F-T reaction kinetics to focus on newly formulated catalysts, improved process conditions and enhanced catalyst activation methods. Currently the facility has the capability of performing three simultaneous reactor screening tests, along with a fourth fixed-bed reactor used solely for cobalt catalyst activation.

  9. Research reactor spent fuel management in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audero, M.A.; Bevilacqua, A.M.; Mehlich, A.M.; Novara, O.

    2002-01-01

    The research reactor spent fuel (RRSF) management strategy will be presented as well as the interim storage experience. Currently, low-enriched uranium RRSF is in wet interim storage either at reactor site or away from reactor site in a centralized storage facility. High-enriched uranium RRSF from the centralized storage facility has been sent to the USA in the framework of the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The strategy for the management of the RRSF could implement the encapsulation for interim dry storage. As an alternative to encapsulation for dry storage some conditioning processes are being studied which include decladding, isotopic dilution, oxidation and immobilization. The immobilized material will be suitable for final disposal. (author)

  10. Waste management in MOX fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, V.

    1982-01-01

    After a short description of a MOX fuel fabrication plant's activities the waste arisings in such a plant are discussed according to nature, composition, Pu-content. Experience has shown that proper recording leads to a reduction of waste arisings by waste awareness. Aspects of the treatment of α-waste are given and a number of treatment processes are reviewed. Finally, the current waste management practice and the α-waste treatment facility under construction at ALKEM are outlined. (orig./RW)

  11. Management reporting in gas and fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.L.; Foot, B.G.

    1997-01-01

    Gas and Fuel is the sole supplier of reticulated natural gas to 1.3 m customers in the State of Victoria, Australia. Reporting is performed monthly and is tailored to satisfy the requirements of the Board, executive management and business units. The reports include profit and cash statements, gas sales data, capital expenditure, benchmarks, operational data and human resources information. The reports are a mixture of written commentary, accounting statements and graphical presentations. The reports are used at monthly Board and executive meetings to review performance and manage the business. (au)

  12. The management of nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    A Select Committee of the Legislature of Ontario was established to examine the affairs of Ontario Hydro, the provincial electrical utility. The Committee's terms of reference included examination of the waste management program being carried out jointly by the Ontario provincial government and the Canadian federal government. Public hearings were held which included private citizens as well as officials of organizations in the nuclear field and independent experts. Recommendations were made concerning the future direction of the Canadian fuel waste management program. (O.T.)

  13. Long time storage containers for spent fuels and vitrified wastes: synthesis of the studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beziat, A.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents a synthesis of the studies relatives to the containers devoted to the long time spent fuels storage and vitrified wastes packages. These studies were realized in the framework of the axis 3 of the law of 1991 on the radioactive wastes management. The first part is devoted to the presentation of the studies. The container sizing studies which constitute the first containment barrier are then presented. The material choice and the closed system are also detailed. The studies were validate by the realization of containers models and an associated demonstration program is proposed. A synthesis of the technical and economical studies allowed to determine the components and operation costs. (A.L.B.)

  14. Multimetallic nanosheets: synthesis and applications in fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb Gul Sial, Muhammad Aurang; Ud Din, Muhammad Aizaz; Wang, Xun

    2018-04-03

    Two-dimensional nanomaterials, particularly multimetallic nanosheets with single or few atoms thickness, are attracting extensive research attention because they display remarkable advantages over their bulk counterparts, including high electron mobility, unsaturated surface coordination, a high aspect ratio, and distinctive physical, chemical, and electronic properties. In particular, their ultrathin thickness endows them with ultrahigh specific surface areas and a relatively high surface energy, making them highly favorable for surface active applications; for example, they have great potential for a broad range of fuel cell applications. First, the state-of-the-art research on the synthesis of nanosheets with a controlled size, thickness, shape, and composition is described and special emphasis is placed on the rational design of multimetallic nanosheets. Then, a correlation is performed with the performance of multimetallic nanosheets with modified and improved electrochemical properties and high stability, including for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), formic acid oxidation (FAO), methanol oxidation reaction (MOR), ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR), and methanol tolerance are outlined. Finally, some perspectives and advantages offered by this class of materials are highlighted for the development of highly efficient fuel cell electrocatalysts, featuring low cost, enhanced performance, and high stability, which are the key factors for accelerating the commercialization of future promising fuel cells.

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis for fabrication and reprocessing of MOX nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Suguru; Yamamura, Tomoo; Shirasaki, Kenji; Satoh, Isamu; Shikama, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    To improve the nuclear proliferation resistance and to minimize use of chemicals, a new reprocessing and fabrication process of 'mixed oxide' (MOX) fuel was proposed and studied by using simulated spent fuel solutions. The process is consisting of the two steps, i.e. the removal of fission product (FP) from dissolved spent fuel by using carbonate solutions (Step-1), and hydrothermal synthesis of uranium dioxides (Step-2). In Step-1, rare earth (the precipitation ratio: 90%) and alkaline earth (10-50% for Sr) as FP were removed based on their low solubility of hydroxides and carbonate salts, with uranium kept dissolved for the certain carbonate solutions of weak base (Type 2) or mixtures of relatively strong base and weak base (Type 3). In Step-2, the features of uranium dioxides UO 2+x particles, i.e. stoichiometry (x=0.05-0.2), size (0.2-3 μm) and shape (cubic, spherical, rectangular parallelpiped, etc.), were controlled, and the cesium was removed down to 40 ppm by an addition of organic additives. The decontamination factors (DF) for cesium exceeds 10 5 , whereas the total DF of all the simulated FP were as low as the order of 10 which requires future studies for removal of alkaline earth, Re and Tc etc. (author)

  16. The transportation of PuO2 and MOX fuel and management of irradiated MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, H.P.; Rawl, R.; Durpel, L. van den

    2000-01-01

    Information is given on the transportation of PuO 2 and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, the regulatory requirements for transportation, the packages used and the security provisions for transports. The experience with and management of irradiated MOX fuel and the reprocessing of MOX fuel are described. Information on the amount of MOX fuel irradiated is provided. (author)

  17. Main attributes influencing spent nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreescu, N.; Ohai, D.

    1997-01-01

    All activities regarding nuclear fuel, following its discharge from the NPP, constitute the spent fuel management and are grouped in two possible back end variants, namely reprocessing (including HLW vitrification and geological disposal) and direct disposal of spent fuel. In order to select the appropriate variant it is necessary to analyse the aggregate fulfillment of the imposed requirements, particularly of the derived attributes, defined as distinguishing characteristics of the factors used in the decision making process. The main identified attributes are the following: - environmental impact, - availability of suitable sites, - non-proliferation degree, -strategy of energy, - technological complexity and technical maturity, -possible further technical improvements, - size of nuclear programme, - total costs, - public acceptance, - peculiarity of CANDU fuel. The significance of the attributes in the Romanian case, taking into consideration the present situation, as a low scenario and a high scenario corresponding to an important development of the nuclear power, after the year 2010, is presented. According to their importance the ranking of attributes is proposed . Subsequently, the ranking could be used for adequate weighing of attributes in order to realize a multi-criteria analysis and a relevant comparison of back end variants. (authors)

  18. Viewpoint of utilities regarding fuel management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, C.; Moraw, G.; Schneeberger, M.; Szeless, A.

    1977-01-01

    The engagement of utilities in nuclear power requires them to engage in an increasing amount of fuel management activities in order to carry out all the tasks involved. Essentially, these activities involve two main areas: The procurement of all steps of the fuel cycle from the head to the back end; and in-core fuel management. A general survey of the different steps of the nuclear fuel cycle is presented together with the related activities and responsibilities which have to be borne by the utilities. Today's increasing utility involvement in the nuclear fuel management is shown, as well as future fuel management trends. The fuel management activities of the utilities are analysed with respect to organizational, technical, safeguarding, and financial aspects. The active participation of the utilities in fuel management helps to achieve high availability and flexibility of the nuclear power plant during its whole life as well as safe waste isolation. This can be ensured by continuous optimization of all fuel management aspects of the power plant or, on a larger scale, of a power plant system, i.e. activities by utilities to minimize fuel-cycle effects on the environment, which include optimization of fuel behaviour, and radiation exposure to the public and personnel; and technical and economic evaluations by utilities of out- and in-core fuel management. (author)

  19. CORD, PWR Core Design and Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, Andrej

    1996-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CORD-2 is intended for core design applications of pressurised water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refuelling). 2 - Method of solution: The calculations are performed at the cell level with a lattice code in the supercell approximation to generate the single cell cross sections. Fuel assembly cross section homogenization is done in the diffusion approximation. Global core calculations can be done in the full three-dimensional cartesian geometry. Thermohydraulic feedbacks can be accounted for. The Effective Diffusion Homogenization method is used for generating the homogenized cross sections. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The complexity of the problem is selected by the user, depending on the capacity of his computer

  20. Potential Interface Issues in Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-10-01

    This publication is an output of a series of meetings to identify and evaluate issues and opportunities associated with interfaces in the back end of the fuel cycle (BEFC) and to describe effective management approaches based on the experience of Member States. During the meetings, participants from Member States and other international organizations shared and evaluated the main interfaces and potential interface issues among the spent fuel storage, transport, reprocessing and disposal of the BEFC, and also reviewed the national approaches to addressing these issues. The aim of this publication is to provide an approach to identify the interfaces in the BEFC as well as the potential issues that should be addressed. It also aims at responding to the solutions Member States most often find to be effective and, in some cases, were adjusted or revisited to reach the fixed target. Most of the interfaces and issues are country specific, as evidenced by the variety and diversity of examples provided in this publication

  1. Spent fuel management: reprocessing or storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Soares, M.L. de; Oliveira Lopes, M.J. de

    1986-01-01

    A review of the spent fuel management concepts generally adopted in several countries is presented, including an analysis of the brazilian situation. The alternatives are the reprocessing, the interim storage and the final disposal in a repository after appropriate conditioning. The commercial operating reprocessing facilities in the Western World are located in France and in the United Kingdom. In the USA the anti-reprocessing policy from 1977 changed in 1981, when the government supported the resumption of commercial reprocessing and designated the private sector as responsible for providing these services. Small scale facilities are operating in India, Italy, Japan and West Germany. Pilot plants for LWR fuel are being planned by Spain, Pakistan and Argentina. (Author) [pt

  2. Spent fuel management: reprocessing or storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Soares, M.L. de; Oliveira Lopes, M.J. de.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the spent fuel management concepts generally adopted in several countries is presented, including an analysis of the brazilian situation. The alternatives are the reprocessing, the interim storage and the final disposal in a repository after appropriate conditioning. The commercial operating reprocessing facilities in the Western World are located in France and in the United Kingdom. In the USA the anti-reprocessing policy from 1977 changed in 1981, when the Government supported the resumption of commercial reprocessing and designated the private sector as responsible for providing these services. Small scale facilities are operating in India, Italy, Japan and West Germany. Pilot plant for LWR fuel are being planned by Spain, Pakistan and Argentina. (Author) [pt

  3. Nuclear Spent Fuel Management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuloaga, P.

    2015-01-01

    The radioactive waste management policy is established by the Spanish Government through the Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Commerce. This policy is described in the Cabinet-approved General Radioactive Waste Plan. ENRESA is the Spanish organization in charge of radioactive waste and nuclear SFM and nuclear installations decommissioning. The priority goal in SFM is the construction of the centralized storage facility named Almacén Temporal Centralizado (ATC), whose generic design was approved by the safety authority, Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear. This facility is planned for some 6.700 tons of heavy metal. The ATC site selection process, based on a volunteer community’s scheme, has been launched by the Government in December 2009. After the selection of a site in a participative and transparent process, the site characterization and licensing activities will support the construction of the facility. Meanwhile, extension of the on-site storage capacity has been implemented at the seven nuclear power plants sites, including past reracking at all sites. More recent activities are: reracking performed at Cofrentes NPP; dual purpose casks re-licensing for higher burnup at Trillo NPP; transfer of the spent fuel inventory at Jose Cabrera NPP to a dry-storage system, to allow decommissioning operations; and licence application of a dry-storage installation at Ascó NPP, to provide the needed capacity until the ATC facility operation. For financing planning purposes, the long-term management of spent fuel is based on direct disposal. A final decision about major fuel management options is not made yet. To assist the decision makers a number of activities are under way, including basic designs of a geological disposal facility for clay and granite host rocks, together with associated performance assessment, and supported by a R&D programme, which also includes research projects in other options like advanced separation and transmutation. (author)

  4. Multinational approaches relevant to spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellaud, B.

    2007-01-01

    The storage of spent fuel is a suitable candidate for a multilateral approach, primarily at the regional level. Small countries with only a few nuclear power plants would benefit economically from large joint facilities. The storage of special nuclear materials in a few safe and secure facilities would also enhance safeguards and physical protection. However, the final disposal of spent fuel and high level radioactive waste is the best candidate for a multilateral approach. It would offer major economic benefits and substantial non-proliferation benefits in spite of the legal, political and public acceptance challenges to be expected in most countries. The transfer of nuclear waste from the exporting country to the host country of an interim storage facility or of a final repository would be done under bilateral or multilateral agreements at the commercial and governmental levels, in accordance with the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Bilateral or international oversight of joint facilities should be arranged, as needed, to achieve the confidence of the partners as to the safety and physical security of the proposed facility. Such monitoring should cover the adequacy of the technical design, its safety features, its environmental impact, the physical security of nuclear materials and possibly the financial management of the joint venture. After the initial choice of bilateral arrangements, some kind of international monitoring may become appropriate. Various organizations could fulfil such a function, in particular, the IAEA. Such monitoring would have nothing to do with nuclear safeguards; repository monitoring would be a parallel but independent activity of the IAEA. (author)

  5. Fuel-management simulations for once-through thorium fuel cycle in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, P.S.W.; Boczar, P.G.; Ellis, R.J.; Ardeshiri, F.

    1999-01-01

    High neutron economy, on-power refuelling and a simple fuel bundle design result in unsurpassed fuel cycle flexibility for CANDU reactors. These features facilitate the introduction and exploitation of thorium fuel cycles in existing CANDU reactors in an evolutionary fashion. Detailed full-core fuel-management simulations concluded that a once-through thorium fuel cycle can be successfully implemented in an existing CANDU reactor without requiring major modifications. (author)

  6. Ciclon: A neutronic fuel management program for PWR's consecutive cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragones, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The program description and user's manual of a new computer code is given. Ciclon performs the neutronic calculation of consecutive reload cycles for PWR's fuel management optimization. Fuel characteristics and burnup data, region or batch sizes, loading schemes and state of previously irradiated fuel are input to the code. Cycle lengths or feed enrichments and burnup sharing for each region or batch are calculate using different core neutronic models and printed or punched in standard fuel management format. (author) [es

  7. Management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The National Board for Spent Nuclear Fuel, in submitting its statement of comment to the Government on the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company's (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, SKB) research programme, R and D Programme 86, has also put forward recommendations on the decision-making procedure and on the question of public information during the site selection process. In summary the Board proposes: * that the Government instruct the National Board for Spent Nuclear Fuel to issue certain directives concerning additions to and changes in R and D Programme 86, * that the Board's views on the decision-making procedure in the site selection process be taken into account in the Government's review of the so-called municipal veto in accordance with Chapter 4, Section 3 of the Act (1987:12) on the conservation of natural resources etc., NRL, * that the Board's views on the decision-making procedure and information questions during the site selection process serve as a basis for the continued work. Three appendices are added to the report: 1. Swedish review statements (SV), 2. International Reviews, 3. Report from the site selection group (SV)

  8. Nuclear fuel management optimization for LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turinsky, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    LWR in core nuclear fuel management involves the placement of fuel and control materials so that a specified objective is achieved within constraints. Specifically, one is interested in determining the core loading pattern (LP of fuel assemblies and burnable poisons and for BWR, also control rod insertion versus cycle exposure. Possible objectives include minimization of feed enrichment and maximization of cycle energy production, discharge burnup or thermal margin. Constraints imposed relate to physical constraints, e.g. no discrete burnable poisons in control rod locations, and operational and safety constraints, e.g. maximum power peaking limit. The LP optimization problem is a large scale, nonlinear, mixed-integer decision variables problem with active constraints. Even with quarter core symmetry imposed, there are above 10 100 possible LPs. The implication is that deterministic optimization methods are not suitable, so in this work we have pursued using the stochastic Simulated Annealing optimization method. Adaptive penalty functions are used to impose certain constraints, allowing unfeasible regions of the search space to be transverse. Since ten of thousands of LPs must be examined to achieve high computational efficiency, higher-order Generalized Perturbation Theory is utilized to solve the Nodal Expansion Method for of the two-group neutron diffusion. These methods have been incorporated into the FORMOSA series of codes and used to optimize PWR and BWR reload cores. (author). 9 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Aspects regarding the fuel management for PHWR nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragusin, O.; Bobolea, A.; Voicu, A.

    2001-01-01

    Fuel management for PHWR nuclear reactors is completely different from the PWR reactors fuel management. PHWR reactor fuel loading procedures are repeated after an interval of time, as defined and specified in the project documentation, using a fuel machine that can be attached to the terminal fittings of horizontal pressure tubes while the reactor is a full power. Another aspect of fuel management policy is related to the possibility of bi-directional loading of the reactor, with the primary advantage of uniform and symmetrical characteristics. (authors)

  10. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; forest structure and fire hazard fact sheet 03: visualizing forest structure and fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    The software described in this fact sheet provides managers with tools for visualizing forest and fuels information. Computer-based landscape simulations can help visualize stand and landscape conditions and the effects of different management treatments and fuel changes over time. These visualizations can assist forest planning by considering a range of management...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Tijrn

    2003-05-31

    This Final Report for Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-95PC93052, the ''Development of Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas,'' was prepared by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products), and covers activities from 29 December 1994 through 31 July 2002. The overall objectives of this program were to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture primarily of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at the LaPorte, Texas Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). Laboratory work was performed by Air Products and a variety of subcontractors, and focused on the study of the kinetics of production of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, the production of DME using the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) Process, the conversion of DME to fuels and chemicals, and the production of other higher value products from syngas. Four operating campaigns were performed at the AFDU during the performance period. Tests of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process and the LPDME{trademark} Process were made to confirm results from the laboratory program and to allow for the study of the hydrodynamics of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) at a significant engineering scale. Two campaigns demonstrated the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon products via the slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. Other topics that were studied within this program include the economics of production of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), the identification of trace components in coal-derived syngas and the means to economically remove these species, and the study of systems for separation of wax from catalyst in the F-T process. The work performed under this Cooperative Agreement has continued to promote the development of technologies that use clean syngas produced

  12. In-core fuel management benchmarks for PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    Under its in-core fuel management activities, the IAEA set up two co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) on complete in-core fuel management code packages. At a consultant meeting in November 1988 the outline of the CRP on in-core fuel management benchmars for PHWRs was prepared, three benchmarks were specified and the corresponding parameters were defined. At the first research co-ordination meeting in December 1990, seven more benchmarks were specified. The objective of this TECDOC is to provide reference cases for the verification of code packages used for reactor physics and fuel management of PHWRs. 91 refs, figs, tabs

  13. Utilities' view on the fuel management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, C.; Moraw, G.; Schneeberger, M.; Szeless, A.

    1977-01-01

    Utilities engagement in nuclear power requires an increasing amount of fuel management activities by the utilities in order to meet all tasks involved. These activities comprise essentially two main areas: - activities to secure the procurement of all steps of the fuel cycle from the head to the back end; - activities related to the incore fuel managment. A general survey of the different steps of the nuclear fuel cycle is presented together with the related activities and responsibilities which have to be realized by the utilities. Starting in the past, today's increasing utility involvement in the nuclear fuel management is shown, as well as future fuel management trends. The scope of utilities' fuel management activities is analyzed with respect to organizational aspects, technical aspects, safeguarding aspects, and financial aspects. Utilities taking active part in the fuel management serves to achieve high availability and flexibility of the nuclear power plant during the whole plant life as well as safe waste isolation. This can be assured by continuous optimization of all fuel management aspects of the power plant or on a larger scale of a power plant system, i.e., utility activities to minimize the effects of fuel cycle on the environment, which includes optimization of fuel behaviour, radiation exposure to public and personnel, and utility technical and economic evaluations of out- and incore fuel management. These activities of nuclear power producing utilities in the field of nuclear fuel cycle are together with a close cooperation with fuel industry as well as national and international authorities a necessary basis for the further utilization of nuclear power

  14. Providing flexibility in spent fuel and vitrified waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, N.; O'Tallamhain, C.; Brown, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The UK Central Electricity Generating Board is pondering a decision to build a dry vault store as a buffer in its overall AGR spent fuel management programme. The application of the dry vault is not limited to fuel from gas cooled reactors, it can be used for spent LWR fuel and vitrified waste. A cutaway diagram of such a vault is presented. (UK)

  15. 1st Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference: Fuels Management-How to Measure Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews

    2006-01-01

    The 1st Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference: Fuels Management -- How to Measure Success was held in Portland, Oregon, March 28-30, 2006. The International Association of Wildland Fire (IAWF) initiated a conference on this timely topic primarily in response to the needs of the U.S. National Interagency Fuels Coordinating Group (http://www.nifc.gov/).

  16. Scope and procedures of fuel management for PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zenghua

    1997-01-01

    The fuel management scope of PWR nuclear power plant includes nuclear fuel purchase and spent fuel disposal, ex-core fuel management, in-core fuel management, core management and fuel assembly behavior follow up. A suit of complete and efficient fuel management procedures have to be created to ensure the quality and efficiency of fuel management work. The hierarchy of fuel management procedure is divided into four levels: main procedure, administration procedure, implement procedure and technic procedure. A brief introduction to the fuel management scope and procedures of PWR nuclear power plant are given

  17. A study on the safety of spent fuel management. A scenario study on spent fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo; Ahn, Jin Soo; Hwang, Joo Ho; Choi, Jong Won; Kim, Yeon Soo; Park, Ju Hwan; Chung, Choong Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-01

    In order to produce data applicable for the long-term policy making of spent fuel management and to suggest a basic scenario suitable to domestic situation, the pre-conceptual design of reference disposal facilities for the spent fuel and the vitrified high level radioactive waste from its reprocessing, has been performed. From the results of the pre-conceptual study, further research and development areas to accumulate the disposal technology are suggested. In addition, the physico-chemical properties and functional characteristics of domestic bentonite are analyzed to assess its applicability as a buffer material which would play a major role for the safe disposal of highly active waste including spent fuels. (Author).

  18. Core fuel management using TVS-2M fuel assembly and economic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Min; Wang Hongxia; Li Youyi

    2014-01-01

    To improve the economic efficiency, TVS-2M fuel assembly was considered to apply in Tianwan Nuclear Power Plant units 3, 4. Using KASKAD program package, a preliminary research and design was carried out for the Tianwan Nuclear Power Plant loading TVS-2M fuel assembly from the first cycle to equilibrium cycle. An improved fuel management program was obtained, and the economic analysis of the two fuel management programs with or without TVS-2M assembly was studied. The analysis results show that TVS-2M fuel assembly can improve the economic efficiency of the plant remarkably. (authors)

  19. Advanced Fuel Cell System Thermal Management for NASA Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA exploration program. An analysis of a state-of-the-art fuel cell cooling systems was done to benchmark the portion of a fuel cell system s mass that is dedicated to thermal management. Additional analysis was done to determine the key performance targets of the advanced passive thermal management technology that would substantially reduce fuel cell system mass.

  20. The continual fuel management modification in Qinshan project II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Guodong; Pan Zefei; Zhang Xingtian

    2010-01-01

    The fuel management strategy is the basis of the nuclear power plants. The performance of the fuel management strategy affects the plants' safety and economy indicators directly. The paper summarizes all the modifications on the fuel management work in Qinshan Project II since the plant was established. It includes the surveillance system of physics tests, fetching in high performance fuel assemblies, reloading pattern optimization, and the modifications of the final safety analysis report. At the same time, it evaluates the benefit of the modifications in the few years. The experience in this paper is much helpful and could be implemented on the same type plants. (authors)

  1. Qinshan NPP in-core fuel management improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Deping; Liao Zejun; Wu Xifeng; Wei Wenbin; Wang Yongming; Li Hua

    2006-01-01

    In the 10-year operation of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, the initial designed reloading strategy has been improved step by step based on the operation experiences and the advanced domestic and international fuel management methods. Higher burnup has been achieved and more economic operation gained through the loading pattern improvement and the fuel enrichment increased. The article introduces the in-core fuel management strategy improvement of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant in its 10-year operation. (authors)

  2. Development of information management system on LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. D.; Lee, S. H.; Song, D. Y.; Jeon, I.; Park, S. J.; Seo, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    LWRs in Korea should manage all the information of spent fuel to implement the obligations under Korea-IAEA safeguards agreement and to perform the nuclear material accountancy work at the facility level. The information management system on LWR spent fuel was developed to manage all movement records from receipt to shipment of LWR fuels, and to get the necessary information such as nuclear fuel inventory lists and status, maps of fresh fuel storage, reactor and spent fuel pool, receipt and shipment records and so on. This information management system has a function to setup the system environments to cover the various kinds of storage types for all LWRs ; reactor, spent fuel pool and fresh fuel storage. The movements of nuclear fuel between the storages can be easily done by double click of the mouse to the destination. It also has a several error checking routines for maintaining the correct accounting data. Using this information management system of LWR spent fuel, facility operators can perform efficiently and effectively the safeguards related works including nuclear material accountancy at each facility

  3. PORTABLE PEM FUEL CELL SYSTEM: WATER AND HEAT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SITI NAJIBAH ABD RAHMAN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Portable polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM fuel cell power generator is a PEM fuel cell application that is used as an external charger to supply the demand for high energy. Different environments at various ambient temperatures and humidity levels affect the performance of PEM fuel cell power generators. Thermal and water management in portable PEM fuel cells are a critical technical barrier for the commercialization of this technology. The size and weight of the portable PEM fuel cells used for thermal and water management systems that determine the performance of portable PEM fuel cells also need to be considered. The main objective of this paper review was to determine the importance of water and thermal management systems in portable PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this review investigated heat transfer and water transport in PEM fuel cells. Given that portable PEM fuel cells with different powers require different thermal and water management systems, this review also discussed and compared management systems for low-, medium-, and high-power portable PEM fuel cells.

  4. Development of information management system on LWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. D.; Lee, S. H.; Song, D. Y.; Jeon, I.; Park, S. J.; Seo, D. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    LWRs in Korea should manage all the information of spent fuel to implement the obligations under Korea-IAEA safeguards agreement and to perform the nuclear material accountancy work at the facility level. The information management system on LWR spent fuel was developed to manage all movement records from receipt to shipment of LWR fuels, and to get the necessary information such as nuclear fuel inventory lists and status, maps of fresh fuel storage, reactor and spent fuel pool, receipt and shipment records and so on. This information management system has a function to setup the system environments to cover the various kinds of storage types for all LWRs ; reactor, spent fuel pool and fresh fuel storage. The movements of nuclear fuel between the storages can be easily done by double click of the mouse to the destination. It also has a several error checking routines for maintaining the correct accounting data. Using this information management system of LWR spent fuel, facility operators can perform efficiently and effectively the safeguards related works including nuclear material accountancy at each facility.

  5. Practical constraints on fuel management a utility perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grier, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    The practical and potential constraints of performing fuel management at a large utility are reviewed. Based on approximately six years of experience in performing fuel management the constraints due to commercial, technical, utility system, design methods, and personnel and computer resources are discussed in detail

  6. China's spent nuclear fuel management: Current practices and future strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yun

    2011-01-01

    Although China's nuclear power industry is relatively young and the management of its spent nuclear fuel is not yet a concern, China's commitment to nuclear energy and its rapid pace of development require detailed analyses of its future spent fuel management policies. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of China's fuel cycle program and its reprocessing policy, and to suggest strategies for managing its future fuel cycle program. The study is broken into four sections. The first reviews China's current nuclear fuel cycle program and facilities. The second discusses China's current spent fuel management methods and the storage capability of China's 13 operational nuclear power plants. The third estimates China's total accumulated spent fuel, its required spent fuel storage from present day until 2035, when China expects its first commercialized fast neutron reactors to be operational, and its likely demand for uranium resources. The fourth examines several spent fuel management scenarios for the present period up until 2035; the financial cost and proliferation risk of each scenario is evaluated. The study concludes that China can and should maintain a reprocessing operation to meet its R and D activities before its fast reactor program is further developed. - Highlights: → This study provides an overview of China's fuel cycle program and its reprocessing policy.→ This study suggests strategies for managing its future fuel cycle program.→ China will experience no pressure to lessen the burden of spent fuel storage in the next 30 years.→ China should maintain sufficient reprocessing operations to meet its demands for R and D activities.→ China should actively invest on R and D activities of both fuel cycling and fast reactor programs.

  7. Solar Power and Solar Fuels Synthesis Report. Technology, market and research activities 2006-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridell, Bengt; Nilsson, Ronny; Rehnlund, Bjoern [Grontmij, Stockholm (Sweden); Kasemo, Bengt [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2012-11-01

    The objectives of the synthesis is to survey the situation and give an accumulated and concentrated knowledge about status, needs and opportunities for Swedish research and Swedish industry within the area of solar power and solar fuels, to be used for prioritisation of further efforts. The synthesis shall identify strengths and weaknesses in areas fundamental for development of solar power and solar fuels, focused on the development in Sweden, but in an international context. The synthesis shall also cover proposals for future Swedish research efforts and organisation of future Swedish research programs.

  8. In-core fuel management activities in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan Keqiang; Chen Renji; Hu Chuanwen

    1990-01-01

    The development of nuclear power in China has reached such a stage that PWR in-core fuel management becomes an urgent problem. At present the main effort is concentrated on solving the Qinshan nuclear power plant and Daya Bay nuclear power plant fuel management problems. For the Qinshan PWR (300 MWe) two packages of in-core fuel management code were developed, one with simplified nodal diffusion method and the other uses advanced Green's function nodal method. Both were used in the PWR core design. With the help of the two code packages first two cycles of the Qinshan PWR core burn-up were calculated. Besides, several research works are under way in the following areas: improvement of the nodal diffusion method and other coarse mesh method in terms of computing speed and accuracy; backward diffusion technique for fuel management application; optimization technique in the fuel loading pattern searching. As for the Daya Bay PWR plant (twin 900 MWe unit), the problem about using what kind of code package for in-core fuel management is still under discussion. In principle the above mentioned code packages are also applicable to it. Besides PWR, in-core fuel management research works are also under way for research reactors, for example, heavy water research reactor and high flux research reactor in some institutes in China. China also takes active participation in international in-core fuel management activities. (author). 19 refs

  9. Development of advanced mixed oxide fuels for plutonium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, S.; Beard, C.; Buksa, J.; Butt, D.; Chidester, K.; Havrilla, G.; Ramsey, K.

    1997-06-01

    A number of advanced Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel forms are currently being investigated at Los Alamos National Laboratory that have the potential to be effective plutonium management tools. Evolutionary Mixed Oxide (EMOX) fuel is a slight perturbation on standard MOX fuel, but achieves greater plutonium destruction rates by employing a fractional nonfertile component. A pure nonfertile fuel is also being studied. Initial calculations show that the fuel can be utilized in existing light water reactors and tailored to address different plutonium management goals (i.e., stabilization or reduction of plutonium inventories residing in spent nuclear fuel). In parallel, experiments are being performed to determine the feasibility of fabrication of such fuels. Initial EMOX pellets have successfully been fabricated using weapons-grade plutonium

  10. Development of advanced mixed oxide fuels for plutonium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, S.; Beard, C.; Buksa, J.; Butt, D.; Chidester, K.; Havrilla, G.; Ramsey, K.

    1997-01-01

    A number of advanced Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel forms are currently being investigated at Los Alamos National Laboratory that have the potential to be effective plutonium management tools. Evolutionary Mixed Oxide (EMOX) fuel is a slight perturbation on standard MOX fuel, but achieves greater plutonium destruction rates by employing a fractional nonfertile component. A pure nonfertile fuel is also being studied. Initial calculations show that the fuel can be utilized in existing light water reactors and tailored to address different plutonium management goals (i.e., stabilization or reduction of plutonium inventories residing in spent nuclear fuel). In parallel, experiments are being performed to determine the feasibility of fabrication of such fuels. Initial EMOX pellets have successfully been fabricated using weapons-grade plutonium. (author)

  11. PEM fuel cells thermal and water management fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yun; Cho, Sung Chan

    2014-01-01

    Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells convert chemical energy in hydrogen into electrical energy with water as the only by-product. Thus, PEM fuel cells hold great promise to reduce both pollutant emissions and dependency on fossil fuels, especially for transportation-passenger cars, utility vehicles, and buses-and small-scale stationary and portable power generators. But one of the greatest challenges to realizing the high efficiency and zero emissions potential of PEM fuel cells technology is heat and water management. This book provides an introduction to the essential concepts for effective thermal and water management in PEM fuel cells and an assessment on the current status of fundamental research in this field. The book offers you: An overview of current energy and environmental challenges and their imperatives for the development of renewable energy resources, including discussion of the role of PEM fuel cells in addressing these issues; Reviews of basic principles pertaining to PEM fuel cel...

  12. Advanced nuclear fuel cycles and radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This study analyses a range of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options from the perspective of their effect on radioactive waste management policies. It presents various fuel cycle options which illustrate differences between alternative technologies, but does not purport to cover all foreseeable future fuel cycles. The analysis extends the work carried out in previous studies, assesses the fuel cycles as a whole, including all radioactive waste generated at each step of the cycles, and covers high-level waste repository performance for the different fuel cycles considered. The estimates of quantities and types of waste arising from advanced fuel cycles are based on best available data and experts' judgement. The effects of various advanced fuel cycles on the management of radioactive waste are assessed relative to current technologies and options, using tools such as repository performance analysis and cost studies. (author)

  13. Fuel reprocessing and waste management in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heafield, W.; Griffin, N.L.

    1994-01-01

    The currently preferred route for the management of irradiated fuel in the UK is reprocessing. This paper, therefore, concentrates on outlining the policies, practices and achievement of British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) associated with the management of its irradiated fuel facilities at Sellafield. The paper covers reprocessing and how the safe management of each of the major waste categories is achieved. BNFL's overall waste management policy is to develop, in close consultation with the regulatory authorities, a strategy to minimize effluent discharges and provide a safe, cost effective method of treating and preparing for disposal all wastes arising on the site

  14. Conceptual development of a test facility for spent fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.W.; Lee, H.H.; Lee, J.Y.; Lee, J.S.; Ro, S.G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Spent fuel management is an important issue for nuclear power program, requiring careful planning and implementation. With the wait-and-see policy on spent fuel management in Korea, research efforts are directed at KAERI to develop advanced technologies for safer and more efficient management of the accumulating spent fuels. In support of these research perspectives, a test facility of pilot scale is being developed with provisions for integral demonstration of a multitude of technical functions required for spent fuel management. The facility, baptized SMART (Spent fuel MAnagement technology Research and Test facility), is to be capable of handling full size assembly of spent PWR fuel (as well as CANDU fuel) with a maximum capacity of 10 MTU/y (about 24 assemblies of PWR type). Major functions of the facility are consolidation of spent PWR fuel assembly into a half-volume package and optionally transformation of the fuel rod into a fuel of CANDU type (called DUPIC). Objectives of these functions are to demonstrate volume reduction of spent fuel (for either longer-term dry storage or direct disposal ) in the former case and direct refabrication of the spent PWR fuel into CANDU-type DUPIC fuel for reuse in CANDU reactors in the latter case, respectively. In addition to these major functions, there are other associated technologies to be demonstrated : such as waste treatment, remote maintenance, safeguards, etc. As the facility is to demonstrate not only the functional processes but also the safety and efficiency of the test operations, engineering criteria equivalent to industrial standards are incorporated in the design concept. The hot cell structure enclosing the radioactive materials is configured in such way to maximize costs within the given functional and operational requirements. (author). 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  15. Conceptual development of a test facility for spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.W.; Lee, H.H.; Lee, J.Y.; Lee, J.S.; Ro, S.G.

    1997-01-01

    Spent fuel management is an important issue for nuclear power program, requiring careful planning and implementation. With the wait-and-see policy on spent fuel management in Korea, research efforts are directed at KAERI to develop advanced technologies for safer and more efficient management of the accumulating spent fuels. In support of these research perspectives, a test facility of pilot scale is being developed with provisions for integral demonstration of a multitude of technical functions required for spent fuel management. The facility, baptized SMART (Spent fuel MAnagement technology Research and Test facility), is to be capable of handling full size assembly of spent PWR fuel (as well as CANDU fuel) with a maximum capacity of 10 MTU/y (about 24 assemblies of PWR type). Major functions of the facility are consolidation of spent PWR fuel assembly into a half-volume package and optionally transformation of the fuel rod into a fuel of CANDU type (called DUPIC). Objectives of these functions are to demonstrate volume reduction of spent fuel (for either longer-term dry storage or direct disposal ) in the former case and direct refabrication of the spent PWR fuel into CANDU-type DUPIC fuel for reuse in CANDU reactors in the latter case, respectively. In addition to these major functions, there are other associated technologies to be demonstrated : such as waste treatment, remote maintenance, safeguards, etc. As the facility is to demonstrate not only the functional processes but also the safety and efficiency of the test operations, engineering criteria equivalent to industrial standards are incorporated in the design concept. The hot cell structure enclosing the radioactive materials is configured in such way to maximize costs within the given functional and operational requirements. (author). 3 tabs., 4 figs

  16. Spent nuclear fuel management. Moving toward a century of spent fuel management: A view from the halfway mark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shephard, L.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A half-century ago, President Eisenhower in his 1953 'Atoms for Peace' speech, offered nuclear technology to other nations as part of a broad nuclear arms control initiative. In the years that followed, the nuclear power generation capabilities of many nations has helped economic development and contributed to the prosperity of the modern world. The growth of nuclear power, while providing many benefits, has also contributed to an increasing global challenge over safe and secure spent fuel management. Over 40 countries have invested in nuclear energy, developing over 400 nuclear power reactors. Nuclear power supplies approximately 16% of the global electricity needs. With the finite resources and challenges of fossil fuels, nuclear power will undoubtedly become more prevalent in the future, both in the U.S. and abroad. We must address this inevitability with new paradigms for managing a global nuclear future. Over the past fifty years, the world has come to better understand the strong interplay between all elements of the nuclear fuel cycle, global economics, and global security. In the modern world, the nuclear fuel cycle can no longer be managed as a simple sequence of technological, economic and political challenges. Rather it must be seen, and managed, as a system of strongly interrelated challenges. Spent fuel management, as one element of the nuclear fuel system, cannot be relegated to the back-end of the fuel cycle as only a disposal or storage issue. There exists a wealth of success and experience with spent fuel management over the past fifty years. We must forge this experience with a global systems perspective, to reshape the governing of all aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle, including spent fuel management. This session will examine the collective experience of spent fuel management enterprises, seeking to shape the development of new management paradigms for the next fifty years. (author)

  17. Cost analysis of spent nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.L.M.; Ford, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) is chartered to develop a waste management system for the safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the 131 nuclear power reactors in the United States and a certain amount of high level waste (HLW) from reprocessing operations. The current schedule is to begin accepting SNF in 1998 for storage at a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. Subsequently, beginning in 2010, the system is scheduled to begin accepting SNF at a permanent geologic repository in 2010 and HLW in 2015. At this time, a MRS site has not been selected. Yucca Mountain, Nevada is currently being evaluated as the candidate site for the repository for permanent geologic disposal of SNF. All SNF, with the possible exception of the SNF from the western reactors, is currently planned to be shipped to or through the MRS site en route to the repository. The repository will operate in an acceptance and performance confirmation phase for a 50 year period beginning in 2010 with an additional nine year closure and five year decontamination and decommissioning period. The MRS has a statutory maximum capacity of 15,000 Metric Tons Uranium (MTU), with a further restriction that it may not store more than 10,000 MTU until the repository begins accepting waste. The repository is currently scheduled to store 63,000 MTU of SNF and an additional 7,000 MTU equivalent of HLW for a total capacity of 70,000 MTU. The amended act specified the MRS storage limits and identified Yucca Mountain as the only site to be characterized. Also, an Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator was established to secure a voluntary host site for the MRS. The MRS, the repository, and all waste containers/casks will go through a Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing process much like the licensing process for a nuclear power plant. Environmental assessments and impact statements will be prepared for both the MRS and repository

  18. Development of Advanced Spent Fuel Management Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chung Seok; Choi, I. K.; Kwon, S. G. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    As a part of research efforts to develop an advanced spent fuel management process, this project focused on the electrochemical reduction technology which can replace the original Li reduction technology of ANL, and we have successfully built a 20 kgHM/batch scale demonstration system. The performance tests of the system in the ACPF hot cell showed more than a 99% reduction yield of SIMFUEL, a current density of 100 mA/cm{sup 2} and a current efficiency of 80%. For an optimization of the process, the prevention of a voltage drop in an integrated cathode, a minimization of the anodic effect and an improvement of the hot cell operability by a modulation and simplization of the unit apparatuses were achieved. Basic research using a bench-scale system was also carried out by focusing on a measurement of the electrochemical reduction rate of the surrogates, an elucidation of the reaction mechanism, collecting data on the partition coefficients of the major nuclides, quantitative measurement of mass transfer rates and diffusion coefficients of oxygen and metal ions in molten salts. When compared to the PYROX process of INL, the electrochemical reduction system developed in this project has comparative advantages in its application of a flexible reaction mechanism, relatively short reaction times and increased process yields.

  19. Development of Advanced Spent Fuel Management Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Chung Seok; Choi, I. K.; Kwon, S. G.

    2007-06-01

    As a part of research efforts to develop an advanced spent fuel management process, this project focused on the electrochemical reduction technology which can replace the original Li reduction technology of ANL, and we have successfully built a 20 kgHM/batch scale demonstration system. The performance tests of the system in the ACPF hot cell showed more than a 99% reduction yield of SIMFUEL, a current density of 100 mA/cm 2 and a current efficiency of 80%. For an optimization of the process, the prevention of a voltage drop in an integrated cathode, a minimization of the anodic effect and an improvement of the hot cell operability by a modulation and simplization of the unit apparatuses were achieved. Basic research using a bench-scale system was also carried out by focusing on a measurement of the electrochemical reduction rate of the surrogates, an elucidation of the reaction mechanism, collecting data on the partition coefficients of the major nuclides, quantitative measurement of mass transfer rates and diffusion coefficients of oxygen and metal ions in molten salts. When compared to the PYROX process of INL, the electrochemical reduction system developed in this project has comparative advantages in its application of a flexible reaction mechanism, relatively short reaction times and increased process yields

  20. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 15: Landscape change and aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Esposito

    2006-01-01

    Fuels management produces changes in the landscape that can impact scenic beauty. If people do not consider a forest to be scenic, they may think that the low scenic quality is a result of poor management or ecological health. This fact sheet looks at the relevency of the effects of natural and human-caused landscape changes, when planning fuels management.

  1. Management of super-grade plutonium in spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, H. F.; Benedict, R. W.

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the security and safeguards implications of potential management options for DOE's sodium-bonded blanket fuel from the EBR-II and the Fermi-1 fast reactors. The EBR-II fuel appears to be unsuitable for the packaging alternative because of DOE's current safeguards requirements for plutonium. Emerging DOE requirements, National Academy of Sciences recommendations, draft waste acceptance requirements for Yucca Mountain and IAEA requirements for similar fuel also emphasize the importance of safeguards in spent fuel management. Electrometallurgical treatment would be acceptable for both fuel types. Meeting the known requirements for safeguards and security could potentially add more than $200M in cost to the packaging option for the EBR-II fuel

  2. Safety aspects in fuel reprocessing and radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, K.

    2018-01-01

    Nuclear energy is used for generation of electricity and for production of a wide range of radionuclides for use in research and development, healthcare and industry. Nuclear industry uses nuclear fission as source of energy so a large amount of energy is available from very small amount of fuel. As India has adopted c losed fuel cycle , spent nuclear fuel from nuclear reactor is considered as a material of resource and reprocessed to recovery valuable fuel elements. Main incentive of reprocessing is to use the uranium resources effectively by recovering/recycling Pu and U present in the spent fuel. This finally leads to a very small percentage of residual material present in spent nuclear fuel requiring their management as radioactive waste. Another special feature of the Indian Atomic Energy Program is the attention paid from the very beginning to the safe management of radioactive waste

  3. Spent fuel management fee methodology and computer code user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, R.L.; White, M.K.

    1982-01-01

    The methodology and computer model described here were developed to analyze the cash flows for the federal government taking title to and managing spent nuclear fuel. The methodology has been used by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate the spent fuel disposal fee that will provide full cost recovery. Although the methodology was designed to analyze interim storage followed by spent fuel disposal, it could be used to calculate a fee for reprocessing spent fuel and disposing of the waste. The methodology consists of two phases. The first phase estimates government expenditures for spent fuel management. The second phase determines the fees that will result in revenues such that the government attains full cost recovery assuming various revenue collection philosophies. These two phases are discussed in detail in subsequent sections of this report. Each of the two phases constitute a computer module, called SPADE (SPent fuel Analysis and Disposal Economics) and FEAN (FEe ANalysis), respectively

  4. Application of fuel management calculation codes for CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Haitao; Wu Hongchun

    2003-01-01

    Qinshan Phase III Nuclear Power Plant adopts CANDU-6 reactors. It is the first time for China to introduce this heavy water pressure tube reactor. In order to meet the demands of the fuel management calculation, DRAGON/DONJON code is developed in this paper. Some initial fuel management calculations about CANDU-6 reactor of Qinshan Phase III are carried out using DRAGON/DONJON code. The results indicate that DRAGON/DONJON can be used for the fuel management calculation for Qinshan Phase III

  5. A cost-benefit analysis of spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamorlette, G.

    2001-01-01

    The back end of the fuel cycle is an area of economic risk for utilities having nuclear power plants to generate electricity. A cost-benefit analysis is a method by which utilities can evaluate advantages and drawbacks of alternative back end fuel cycle strategies. The present paper analyzes how spent fuel management can influence the risks and costs incurred by a utility over the lifetime of its power plants and recommends a recycling strategy. (author)

  6. Modular approach to LWR in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urli, N.; Pevec, D.; Coffou, E.; Petrovic, B.

    1980-01-01

    The most important methods in the LWR in-core fuel management are reviewed. A modular approach and optimization by use of infinite multiplication factor and power form-factor are favoured. A computer program for rotation of fuel assemblies at reloads has been developed which improves further fuel economy and reliability of nuclear power plants. The program has been tested on the PWR core and showed to decrease the power form-factors and flatten the radial power distribution. (author)

  7. The verification of PWR-fuel code for PWR in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surian Pinem; Tagor M Sembiring; Tukiran

    2015-01-01

    In-core fuel management for PWR is not easy because of the number of fuel assemblies in the core as much as 192 assemblies so many possibilities for placement of the fuel in the core. Configuration of fuel assemblies in the core must be precise and accurate so that the reactor operates safely and economically. It is necessary for verification of PWR-FUEL code that will be used in-core fuel management for PWR. PWR-FUEL code based on neutron transport theory and solved with the approach of multi-dimensional nodal diffusion method many groups and diffusion finite difference method (FDM). The goal is to check whether the program works fine, especially for the design and in-core fuel management for PWR. Verification is done with equilibrium core search model at three conditions that boron free, 1000 ppm boron concentration and critical boron concentration. The result of the average burn up fuel assemblies distribution and power distribution at BOC and EOC showed a consistent trend where the fuel with high power at BOC will produce a high burn up in the EOC. On the core without boron is obtained a high multiplication factor because absence of boron in the core and the effect of fission products on the core around 3.8 %. Reactivity effect at 1000 ppm boron solution of BOC and EOC is 6.44 % and 1.703 % respectively. Distribution neutron flux and power density using NODAL and FDM methods have the same result. The results show that the verification PWR-FUEL code work properly, especially for core design and in-core fuel management for PWR. (author)

  8. Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Nuclear Power Plant Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wati, Nurokhim

    2008-01-01

    Management of spent nuclear fuel from Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) reactor had been studied to anticipate program of NPP operation in Indonesia. In this paper the quantity of generated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is predicted based on the national electrical demand, power grade and type of reactor. Data was estimated using Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) NPP type 1.000 MWe and the SNF management overview base on the experiences of some countries that have NPP. There are four strategy nuclear fuel cycle which can be developed i.e: direct disposal, reprocessing, DUPlC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In Candu) and wait and see. There are four alternative for SNF management i.e : storage at the reactor building (AR), away from reactor (AFR) using wet centralized storage, dry centralized storage AFR and prepare for reprocessing facility. For the Indonesian case, centralized facility of the wet type is recommended for PWR or BWR spent fuel. (author)

  9. Radioactive waste management of experimental DUPIC fuel fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. H.; Park, J. J.; Shin, J. M.; Yang, M. S.; Hong, K. P.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of DUPIC(Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) is a dry processing technology to manufacture CANDU compatible DUPIC fuel from spent PWR fuel material. Real spent PWR fuel was used in IMEF M6 hot cell to carry out DUPIC experiment. Afterwards, about 200 kg-U of spent PWR fuel is supposed to be used till 2006. This study has been conducted in some hot cells of PIEF and M6 cell of IMEF. There are various forms of nuclear material such as rod cut, powder, green pellet, sintered pellet, fabrication debris, fuel rod, fuel bundle, sample, and process waste produced from various manufacturing experiment of DUPIC fuel. After completing test, the above nuclear wastes and test equipment etc. will be classified as radioactive waste, transferred to storage facility and managed rigorously according to domestic and international laws until the final management policy is determined. It is desirable to review management options in advance for radioactive waste generated from manufacturing experiment of DUPIC nuclear fuel as well as residual nuclear material and dismantled equipment. This paper includes basic plan for DUPIC radwaste, arising source and estimated amount of radioactive waste, waste classification and packing, transport cask, transport procedures

  10. MISER-I: a computer code for JOYO fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Yoshioki

    1976-06-01

    A computer code ''MISER-I'' is for a nuclear fuel management of Japan Experimental Fast Breeder Reactor JOYO. The nuclear fuel management in JOYO can be regarded as a fuel assembly management because a handling unit of fuel in JOYO plant is a fuel subassembly (core and blanket subassembly), and so the recording of material balance in computer code is made with each subassembly. The input information into computer code is given with each subassembly for a transfer operation, or with one reactor cycle and every one month for a burn-up in reactor core. The output information of MISER-I code is the fuel assembly storage record, fuel storage weight record in each material balance subarea at any specified day, and fuel subassembly transfer history record. Change of nuclear fuel composition and weight due to a burn-up is calculated with JOYO-Monitoring Code by off-line computation system. MISER-I code is written in FORTRAN-IV language for FACOM 230-48 computer. (auth.)

  11. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 04: wildlife responses to fuels treatments: key considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Pilliod

    2004-01-01

    Managers face a difficult task in predicting the effects of fuels treatments on wildlife populations, mostly because information on how animals respond to fuels treatments is scarce or does not exist. This paper discusses key considerations-aspects of an animal's ecology and available information-that, despite the scarcity of information, may make predictions of...

  12. Make use of EDF orientations in PWR fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloaguen, A.

    1989-01-01

    The EDF experience acquired permits to allow the PWR fuel performances and to make use of better management. In this domain low progress can be given considerable financial profits. The industrial and commercial structures, the time constant of the fuel cycle, has for consequence that the electric utilities can take advantage only progressively of the expected profits [fr

  13. Monitoring instrumentation spent fuel management program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary monitoring system methodologies are identified as an input to the risk assessment of spent fuel management. Conceptual approaches to instrumentation for surveillance of canister position and orientation, vault deformation, spent fuel dissolution, temperature, and health physics conditions are presented. In future studies, the resolution, reliability, and uncertainty associated with these monitoring system methodologies will be evaluated

  14. Management of spent fuel; Gestion del combustible irradiado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrampes Blanch, J.

    2015-07-01

    The management of irradiated fuel has become one of the materials that more time and resources deals within their responsibilities that also cover other areas such as the design of the new cycles, supply of fresh fuel, tracking operation cycles and strategies of power changes. (Author)

  15. Application of genetic algorithm in reactor fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Gang

    2002-01-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) has been used in reactor fuel management of core arrangement optimal calculation. The chromosome coding method has been selected, and the parameters in GA operators have been improved, so the quality and efficiency of calculation in GA program have been greatly improved. According to the result, better core fuel position arrangement can be obtained from the GA calculation

  16. Fuels Management-How to Measure Success: Conference Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews; Bret W. Butler

    2006-01-01

    Fuels management programs are designed to reduce risks to communities and to improve and maintain ecosystem health. The International Association of Wildland Fire initiated the 1st Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference to address development, implementation, and evaluation of these programs. The focus was on how to measure success. Over 500 participants from several...

  17. Modeling the optimal management of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachlas, J.A.; Kurstedt, H.A. Jr.; Swindle, D.W. Jr.; Korcz, K.O.

    1977-01-01

    Recent governmental policy decisions dictate that strategies for managing spent nuclear fuel be developed. Two models are constructed to investigate the optimum residence time and the optimal inventory withdrawal policy for fuel material that presently must be stored. The mutual utility of the models is demonstrated through reference case application

  18. Radioactive waste management decommissioning spent fuel storage. V. 3. Waste transport, handling and disposal spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    As part of the book entitled Radioactive waste management decommissioning spent fuel storage, vol. 3 dealts with waste transport, handling and disposal, spent fuel storage. Twelve articles are presented concerning the industrial aspects of nuclear waste management in France [fr

  19. GC of catalytic reactions products involved in the promising fuel synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheivot, V.; Sazonova, N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Boreskov Inst. of Catalysis

    2012-09-15

    Catalytic reactions involved in the synthesis of the promising kinds of novel fuel and products formed in these reactions were systematized according to the resulting fuel type. Generalization of the retention of the substances comprising these products is presented. Chromatograms exhibiting their separation on chromatographic materials with the surface of different chemical properties are summarized. We propose procedures for gas-chromatographic analysis of the catalytic reactions products formed in the synthesis of hydrogen, methanol, dimethyl ether and hydrocarbons as a new generation of fuel alternative to petroleum and coal. For partial oxidation of methane into synthesis gas, on-line determination of the components obtained in the reaction was carried out by gas chromatography and gas analyzer based on different physicochemical methods (IR spectroscopy and electrochemical methods). Similarity of the results obtained using these methods is demonstrated. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousselier, Yves.

    1981-05-01

    After a short description of the nuclear fuel cycle mining, milling, enrichment and reprocessing, radioactive waste management in France is exposed. The different types of radioactive wastes are examined. Storage, solidification and safe disposal of these wastes are described

  1. Radioactive waste management and advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In 2007 ENEA's Department of Nuclear Fusion and Fission, and Related Technologies acted according to national policy and the role assigned to ENEA FPN by Law 257/2003 regarding radioactive waste management and advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies

  2. Comparative techniques for nuclear fuel cycle waste management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelto, P.J.; Voss, J.W.

    1979-09-01

    A safety assessment approach for the evaluation of predisposal waste management systems is described and applied to selected facilities in the light water reactor (LWR) once-through fuel cycle and a potential coprocessed UO 2 -PuO 2 fuel cycle. This approach includes a scoping analysis on pretreatment waste streams and a more detailed analysis on proposed waste management processes. The primary evaluation parameters used in this study include radiation exposures to the public from radionuclide releases from normal operations and potential accidents, occupational radiation exposure from normal operations, and capital and operating costs. On an overall basis, the waste management aspects of the two fuel cycles examined are quite similar. On an individual facility basis, the fuel coprocessing plant has the largest waste management impact

  3. Management number identification method for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Nobuo; Mori, Kazuma.

    1995-01-01

    In the present invention, a management number indicated to appropriate portions of a fuel assembly can be read with no error for the management of nuclear fuel materials in the nuclear fuel assembly (counting management) and physical protection: PP. Namely, bar codes as a management number are printed by electrolytic polishing to one or more portions of a side surface of an upper nozzle of the assembly, an upper surface of a clamp and a side surface of a lower nozzle. The bar codes are read by a reader at one or more portions in a transporting path for transporting the fuel assembly and at a fuel detection device disposed in a fuel storage pool. The read signals are inputted to a computer. With such procedures, the nuclear fuel assembly can be identified with no error by reading the bar codes and without applying no danger to a human body. Since the reader is disposed in the course of the transportation and test for the assembly, and the read signals are inputted to the computer, the management for the counting number and PP is facilitated. (I.S.)

  4. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; economic uses fact sheet 04: My Fuel Treatment Planner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    In the face of rapidly changing public and political attitudes toward fire and fuel planning, one thing remains constant: the fuel planner is ultimately responsible for making decisions on the land. This fact sheet discusses the options for fuel treatments, and the need, development, and use of the MS Excel-based tool, My Fuel Treatment Planner.

  5. Advanced CANDU reactors fuel analysis through optimal fuel management at approach to refuelling equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingle, C.P.; Bonin, H.W.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of alternate CANDU fuels along with natural uranium-based fuel was carried out from the view point of optimal in-core fuel management at approach to refuelling equilibrium. The alternate fuels considered in the present work include thorium containing oxide mixtures (MOX), plutonium-based MOX, and Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel recycled in CANDU reactors (Direct Use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU (DUPIC)); these are compared with the usual natural UO 2 fuel. The focus of the study is on the 'Approach to Refuelling Equilibrium' period which immediately follows the initial commissioning of the reactor. The in-core fuel management problem for this period is treated as an optimization problem in which the objective function is the refuelling frequency to be minimized by adjusting the following decision variables: the channel to be refuelled next, the time of the refuelling and the number of fresh fuel bundles to be inserted in the channel. Several constraints are also included in the optimisation problem which is solved using Perturbation Theory. Both the present 37-rod CANDU fuel bundle and the proposed CANFLEX bundle designs are part of this study. The results include the time to reach refuelling equilibrium from initial start-up of the reactor, the average discharge burnup, the average refuelling frequency and the average channel and bundle powers relative to natural UO 2 . The model was initially tested and the average discharge burnup for natural UO 2 came within 2% of the industry accepted 199 MWh/kgHE. For this type of fuel, the optimization exercise predicted the savings of 43 bundles per full power year. In addition to producing average discharge burnups and other parameters for the advanced fuels investigated, the optimisation model also evidenced some problem areas like high power densities for fuels such as the DUPIC. Perturbation Theory has proven itself to be an accurate and valuable optimization tool in predicting the time between

  6. Influence of safety limitations on the fuel cycle management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, G

    1972-05-03

    The choice of an optimum fuel cycle has been up to now governed from the safety point of view, by the setting of very general limitations on few parameters, as for instance on the fuel temperature and on the surface temperature. As a better understanding of the design and materials limitations become available, the philosophy of the fuel cycle optimisation can be improved. The aim of this contribution is to shortly revise the safety aspects involved in the choice of a fuel cycle management and thereafter try to draw some general conclusions.

  7. Spent fuel interim management: 1995 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.K.

    1995-01-01

    The problems of interim away-from-reactor spent fuel storage and storage in spent fuel pools at the reactor site are discussed. An overview of the state-of-the-art in the USA, Europe, and Japan is presented. The technical facilities for away-from-reactor storage are briefly described, including wet storage pools, interactive concrete systems, metallic containers, and passive concrete systems. Reprocessing technologies are mostly at the design stage only. It is predicted that during the 20 years to come, about 50 000 tonnes of spent fuel will be stored at reactor sites regardless of the advance of spent fuel reprocessing or interim storage projects. (J.B.). 4 tabs., 2 figs

  8. Spent fuel management: Current status and prospects 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    Spent fuel management has always been one of the most important stages in the nuclear fuel cycle and it is still one of the most vital problems common to all countries with nuclear reactors. It begins with the discharge of spent fuel from a power or a research reactor and ends with its ultimate disposition, either by direct disposal or by reprocessing of the spent fuel. Two options exist at present - an open, once-through cycle with direct disposal of the spent fuel and a closed cycle with reprocessing of the spent fuel and recycling of plutonium and uranium in new mixed oxide fuels. The selection of a spent fuel strategy is a complex procedure in which many factors have to be weighed, including political, economic and safeguards issues as well as protection of the environment. Continuous attention is being given by the IAEA to the collection, analysis and exchange of information on spent fuel management. Its role in this area is to provide a forum for the exchange of information and to co-ordinate and to encourage closer co-operation among Member States in certain research an development activities that are of common interest. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Bréon, F.-M.

    2012-01-01

    This synthesis discusses the emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production. While much is known about these emissions, there is still much that is unknown about the details surrounding these emissions. This synthesis explores our knowledge of these emissions in terms......; and the uncertainties associated with these different aspects of the emissions. The magnitude of emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels has been almost continuously increasing with time since fossil fuels were first used by humans. Despite events in some nations specifically designed to reduce emissions......, or which have had emissions reduction as a byproduct of other events, global total emissions continue their general increase with time. Global total fossilfuel carbon dioxide emissions are known to within 10% uncertainty (95% confidence interval). Uncertainty on individual national total fossil-fuel carbon...

  10. Swedish spent fuel management systems, facilities and operating experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, J.

    1998-01-01

    About 50% of the electricity in Sweden is generated by means of nuclear power from 12 LWR reactors located at four sites and with a total capacity of 10,000 MW. The four utilities have jointly created SKB, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, which has been given the mandate to manage the spent fuel and radioactive waste from its origin at the reactors to the final disposal. SKB has developed a system for the safe handling of all kinds of radioactive waste from the Swedish nuclear power plants. The keystones now in operation of this system are a transport system, a central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (CLAB), a final repository for short-lived, low and intermediate level waste (SFR). The remaining, system components being planned are an encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel and a deep repository for encapsulated spent fuel and other long-lived radioactive wastes. (author)

  11. International trade and waste and fuel managment issue, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2006-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: HLW management in France, by Michel Debes, EDF, France; Breakthroughs from future reactors, by Jacques Bouchard, CEA, France; 'MOX for peace' a reality, by Jean-Pierre Bariteau, AREVA Group, France; Swedish spent fuel and radwaste, by Per H. Grahn and Marie Skogsberg, SKB, Sweden; ENC2005 concluding remarks, by Larry Foulke, 'Nuclear Technology Matters'; Fuel crud formation and behavior, by Charles Turk, Entergy; and, Plant profile: major vote of confidence for NP, by Martti Katka, TVO, Finland.

  12. Comparison of spent fuel management fee collection alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.K.; Engel, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Five alternative methods for recovering the costs of spent fuel management were evaluated. These alternatives consist of collecting the fee for various components of spent fuel management cost (AFR basin storage, transportation from AFR basin to the repository, packaging, repository, R and D, and government overhead) at times ranging from generation of power to delivery of the spent fuel to the government. The five fee collection mechanisms were analyzed to determine how well they serve the interests of the public and the electricity ratepayer

  13. A discrete optimization method for nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argaud, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear fuel management can be seen as a large discrete optimization problem under constraints, and optimization methods on such problems are numerically costly. After an introduction of the main aspects of nuclear fuel management, this paper presents a new way to treat the combinatorial problem by using information included in the gradient of optimized cost function. A new search process idea is to choose, by direct observation of the gradient, the more interesting changes in fuel loading patterns. An example is then developed to illustrate an operating mode of the method. Finally, connections with classical simulated annealing and genetic algorithms are described as an attempt to improve search processes. 16 refs., 2 figs

  14. Recent developments in spent fuel management in Norway - 59260

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Peter J.; Oberlaender, Barbara C.

    2012-01-01

    Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) in Norway has arisen from irradiation of fuel in the NORA, Jeep I and Jeep II reactors at Kjeller, and in the Heavy Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) in Halden. In total there is some 16 tonnes of SNF, with 12 tons of aluminium-clad fuel, of which 10 tonnes is metallic uranium fuel and the remainder oxide (UO 2 ). The portion of this fuel that is similar to commercial fuel (UO 2 clad in Zircaloy) may be suitable for direct disposal on the Swedish model or in other repository designs. However, metallic uranium and/or fuels clad in aluminium are chemically reactive and there would be risks associated with direct disposal. Two committees were established by the Government of Norway in January 2009 to make recommendations for the interim storage and final disposal of spent fuel in Norway. The Technical Committee on Storage and Disposal of Metallic Uranium Fuel and Al-clad Fuels was formed with the mandate to recommend treatment (i.e. conditioning) options for metallic uranium fuel and aluminium-clad fuel to render them stable for long term storage and disposal. This committee, whose members were drawn from the nuclear industry, reported in January 2010, and recommended commercial reprocessing as the best option for these fuels. The Phase-2 committee, which in part based its work on the work of previous committees and on the report of the Technical Committee, had the mandate to find the most suitable technical solution and localisation for intermediate storage for spent nuclear fuel and long-lived waste. The membership of this committee was chosen to represent a broad cross section of stakeholders. The committee evaluated different solutions and their associated costs, and recommended one of the options. The committee's report published in early 2011. This paper summarises the conclusions of the two committees, and thereby illustrates the steps taken by one country to formulate a strategy for the long-term management of its SNF. (authors)

  15. Current status of IAEA activities in spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danker, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    Spent fuel storage is a common issue in all IAEA Member States with nuclear reactors. Whatever strategy is selected for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, the storage of spent fuel will be an increasingly significant consideration. Notwithstanding considerable efforts to increase the efficient use of nuclear fuel and to optimize storage capacity, delays in plans for geological repositories or in implementing reprocessing result in increased spent fuel storage capacity needs in combination with longer storage durations over the foreseeable future. As storage inventories and durations increase, issues associated with long term storage compel more attention...monitoring for potential degradation mechanisms, records retention, maintenance, efficiencies through burnup credit. Since the IAEA contribution to ICNC'99 focused exclusively on IAEA burnup credit activities including requirements and methods, this paper provides a broader perspective on IAEA activities in response to the above trends in spent fuel management, while also describing efforts to disseminate information regarding burnup credit applications. (author)

  16. Multi-purpose container technologies for spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    The management of spent nuclear fuel is an integral part of the nuclear fuel cycle. Spent fuel management resides in the back end of the fuel cycle, and is not revenue producing as electric power generation is. It instead results in a cost associated power generation. It is a major consideration in the nuclear power industry today. Because technologies, needs and circumstances vary from country to country, there is no single, standardized approach to spent fuel management. The projected cumulative amount of spent fuel generated worldwide by 2010 will be 330 000 t HM. When reprocessing is accounted for, that amount is likely to be reduced to 215 000 t HM, which is still more than twice as much as the amount now in storage. Considering the limited capacity of at-reactor (AR) storage, various technologies are being developed for increasing storage capacities. At present, many countries are developing away-from-reactor (AFR) storage in the form of pool storage or as dry storage. Further these AFR storage systems may be at-reactor sites or away-from-reactor sites (e.g. centrally located interim storage facilities, serving several reactors). The dry storage technologies being developed are varied and include vaults, horizontal concrete modules, concrete casks, and metal casks. The review of the interim storage plans of several countries indicates that the newest approaches being pursued for spent fuel management use dual-purpose and multi-purpose containers. These containers are envisaged to hold several spent fuel assemblies, and be part of the transport, storage, and possibly geological disposal systems of an integrated spent fuel management system

  17. Development of coating technology for nuclear fuel by self-propagating high temperature synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.; Kim, Bong G.; Lee, Y. W.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the preparation of silicon carbide and graphite layers on a nuclear fuel from silane and propane gases by a conventional chemical vapor deposition and combustion synthesis technologies. The direct reaction between silicon and pyrolytic carbon in a high temperature releases sufficient amount of energy to make a synthesis self-sustaining under the preheating of about 1200 deg C. During this high temperature process, lamellar structure with isotropic carbon synthesis. A full characterization of phase composition and final morphology of the coated layers by X-ray diffraction, SEM and AES is presented. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs

  18. Fuel from the synthesis gas - the role of process engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelmachowski, Marek; Nowicki, Lech [Technical Univ. of Lodz, Dept. of Environmental Engineering Systems, Lodz (Poland)

    2003-02-01

    The paper presents the conclusions obtained in the investigations of methanol synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, and higher alcohols synthesis from syngas as a raw material in slurry reactors. The overview of the role of process engineering was made on the basis of the experience in optimizing process conditions, modeling reactors and working out new technologies. Experimental data, obtained with a laboratory-stirred autoclave and theoretical considerations were used to develop the kinetic models that can describe the product formation and the model of the simultaneous phase and chemical equilibrium for the methanol and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses in the slurry reactors. These models were employed in modeling of the bubble-column slurry reactor (BCSR). Based on these considerations, a computer simulation of the low-pressure methanol synthesis for the pilot-scale, BCSR, was devised. The results of the calculations and the conclusions could be employed in the process for designing an industrial plant. (Author)

  19. Fuel management in CANDU reactors: Daniel Rozon's contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozon, D.; Varin, E.; Chambon, R.

    2010-01-01

    The CANDU fuel management optimization problem is in many ways different from LWRs fuel management, because of the on-line refueling and the complete 3-D geometry problem. Daniel Rozon was an outstanding leader in the understanding and resolution of this optimization problem and remained during his entire career. Daniel Rozon and his students have used the generalized adjoint formalism implemented in standard mathematical programming methods to solve the optimization of the exit burnup in the reactor as well as the optimization of control rod worth or fuel enrichment. We have summarized here the theoretical basis of fuel management and resolution methods, the latest approaches of optimization and results as obtained using the OPTEX code. (author)

  20. An economic analysis of spent fuel management and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Koji

    1998-01-01

    Spent fuel management is becoming a key issue not only in the countries that have already experienced years of nuclear operation but also in the Asian countries that started nuclear utilization rather lately. This paper summarizes the key aspects that essentially determine optimal conditions for desired spent fuel management strategies from the engineering-economic point of view, in both national and regional perspectives. The term 'desired' is intended to highlight positive and beneficial aspects of such strategies, namely mobile and timely exploitation of spent fuel storage. Among all, the economy of scale, the economy of scope, the learning-by-doing effect, and benefits of R and D are reviewed theoretically and empirically, and the paper overviews to what extent these factors are implemented in solving spent fuel management strategy optimization problem. (author)

  1. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 12: Keys to successful collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Esposito

    2006-01-01

    Collaborating on fire and fuels management with a host of public and private partners may seem like an impossible undertaking, and presents many challenges. This fact sheet reviews tips for what to focus on as you embark on a collaborative fuels management project.Other...

  2. Catalytic synthesis of alcoholic fuels for transportation from syngas

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Jensen, Anker Degn; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Temel, Burcin; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    2013-01-01

    This work has investigated the catalytic conversion of syngas into methanol and higher alcohols. Based on input from computational catalyst screening, an experimental investigation of promising catalyst candidates for methanol synthesis from syngas has been carried out. Cu-Ni alloys of different composition have been identified as potential candidates for methanol synthesis. These Cu-Ni alloy catalysts have been synthesized and tested in a fixed-bed continuous-flow reactor for CO hydrogenatio...

  3. National briefing summaries: Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Silviera, D.J.; Leigh, I.W.

    1987-09-01

    This report is a compilation of publicly-available information concerning the nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management strategies and programs of 20 nations and three international agencies that have publicized their activities in this field. The information in this document is compiled to provide summary information on radioactive waste management activities in other countries. This document indicates what is occurring in other countries with regard to strategies, activities, and facilities. This document first presents a short overview of the activities and trends for managing low- to high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel by the entities covered in this review. This is followed by information for each country for nuclear power; fuel cycle and waste management strategy/policy; highlights and major milestones; institutional considerations/organizations; nuclear fuel production; fuel recycle; spent fuel storage and transport; waste conditioning, storage and transport; surface and near-surface waste disposal; geologic waste disposal; management of uranium mine and mill wastes; decommissioning; international; and references. 406 refs

  4. Yugoslav spent nuclear fuel management program and international perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Subotic, K.; Sotic, O.; Plecas, I.; Ljubenov, V.; Peric, A.; Milosevic, M.

    2002-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel stored in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Yugoslavia, consists of about 2.5 tons of metal uranium (initial enrichment 2%) and about 20 kg uranium dioxide (dispersed in aluminum matrix, initial fuel uranium enrichment 80%). This spent nuclear fuel is generated in operation of the RA heavy water research reactor during 1959-1984 period. Both types of fuel are of ex-USSR origin, have the same shape and dimensions and approximately the same initial mass of 235 nuclide. They are known as the TVR-S type of fuel elements. The total of 8030 spent fuel elements are stored at the RA research reactor premises, almost all in the spent fuel pool filled by ordinary water. The last used 480 high-enriched uranium spent fuel elements are kept in the drained RA reactor core since 1984. Fuel layer of both enrichments is covered with thin aluminium cladding. Due to non-suitable chemical parameters of water in the spent fuel storage pool, the corrosion processes penetrated aluminium cladding and aluminium walls od storage containers during storage period long from 20 to 40 years. Activity of fission products ( 137 Cs) is detected in water samples during water inspection in 1996 and experts of the lAEA Russia and USA were invited to help. By end of 2001, some remediation of the water transparency of the storage pool and inspections of water samples taken from the storage containers with the spent fuel elements were carried out by the Vinca Institute staff and with the help of experts from the Russia and the IAEA. Following new initiatives on international perspective on spent fuel management, a proposal was set by the IAEA, and was supported by the governments of the USA and the Russian Federation to ship the spent fuel elements of the RA research reactor to Mayak spent fuel processing plant in Russia. This paper describes current status of the reactor RA spent fuel elements, initiative for new Yugoslav spent fuel management program speculates on some of the

  5. ENS RRFM 2005: 9th international topical meeting on research reactor fuel management. Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The ENS topical meeting on research reactor fuel management is an annual conference launched successfully in 1997. It has since then grown into well established international forum for the exchange and expertise on all significant aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle of research reactors. Oral presentations at this meeting were divided in the following four sessions: International Topics; Fuel Development, Qualification, Fabrication and Licensing; Reactor Operation, Fuel Safety and Core Conversion; Spent Fuel Management, Back-end Options, Transportation. The three poster sessions were devoted to fuel development, qualification, fabrication and licensing; reactor operation, fuel safety, core conversion, spent fuel; spent fuel management, fuel cycle back-end options, transportation

  6. Spent fuel management in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredell, P.J.; Stott, A.K.

    1998-01-01

    Eskom, the South African utility, operates one of the largest electricity networks in the world. However, only 6% of the South African generating capacity is nuclear; the remainder is coal fired and hydroelectric. The nuclear component consists of the Koeberg Nuclear Power Plant, comprising two French supplied PWRs of 920 MWe each, situated approximately 45 kilometres from cape Town. Construction started in 1976 and the two reactors reached criticality in 1984 and 1985 respectively. South Africa also has an Oak Ridge type research reactor, called SAFARI, operated by the South African Atomic Energy Corporation (AEC) at their Pelindaba site near Pretoria. This research reactor was commissioned in 1965, and has been in operation ever since. South Africa has a National Radioactive Waste Disposal facility called Vaalputs, some 600 km north of Cape Town. The facility, operated by AEC, is presently licensed only for the disposal of low and intermediate radioactive level wastes. Vaalputs offers unique features as a potential interim spent fuel storage and final disposal site, such as favorable geology (granite), low seismicity, low population density, remoteness from industrial centres and and conditions. Therefore, this site has been investigated by the AEC as a potential interim spent fuel storage site, but has not yet been licensed for this purpose. Hence, all spent fuel is currently stored on the two sites at Koeberg and Pelindaba respectively. The spent fuel storage pools at Koeberg have recently been enlarged to accommodate the lifetime spent fuel arisings of the plant. Since late 1997, the Safari spent fuel is stored in a pipe storage facility, constructed away from the reactor on the Pelindaba site. (author)

  7. Demonstration of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Management Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian; Colozza, Anthony; Wynne, Robert; Miller, Michael; Meyer, Al; Smith, William

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA Exploration program. The passive thermal management system relies on heat conduction within highly thermally conductive cooling plates to move the heat from the central portion of the cell stack out to the edges of the fuel cell stack. Using the passive approach eliminates the need for a coolant pump and other cooling loop components within the fuel cell system which reduces mass and improves overall system reliability. Previous development demonstrated the performance of suitable highly thermally conductive cooling plates and integrated heat exchanger technology to collect the heat from the cooling plates (Ref. 1). The next step in the development of this passive thermal approach was the demonstration of the control of the heat removal process and the demonstration of the passive thermal control technology in actual fuel cell stacks. Tests were run with a simulated fuel cell stack passive thermal management system outfitted with passive cooling plates, an integrated heat exchanger and two types of cooling flow control valves. The tests were run to demonstrate the controllability of the passive thermal control approach. Finally, successful demonstrations of passive thermal control technology were conducted with fuel cell stacks from two fuel cell stack vendors.

  8. RA3: Application of a calculation model for fuel management with SEFE (Slightly Enriched Fuel Elements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estryk, G.; Higa, M.

    1993-01-01

    The RA-3 (5 MW, MTR) reactor is mainly utilized to produce radioisotopes (Mo-99, I-131, etc.). It started operating with Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) in 1990, and spends around 12 fuels per year. Although this consumption is small compared to a nuclear power station. It is important to do a good management of them. The present report describes: - A reactor model to perform the Fuel Shuffling. - Results of fuel management simulations for 2 and a half years of operation. Some features of the calculations can be summarized as follows: 1) A 3D calculation model is used with the code PUMA. It does not have experimental adjustments, except for some approximations in the reflector representation and predicts: power, flux distributions and reactivity of the core in an acceptable way. 2) Comparisons have been made with the measurements done in the commissioning with LEU fuels, and it has also been compared with the empirical method (the previous one) which had been used in the former times of operation with LEU fuel. 3) The number of points of the model is approximately 13500, an it can be run in 80386 personal computer. The present method has been verified as a good tool to perform the simulations for the fuel management of RA-3 reactor. It is expected to produce some economic advantages in: - Achieving a better utilization of the fuels. - Leaving more time of operation for radioisotopes production. The activation measurements through the whole core required by the previous method can be significantly reduced. (author)

  9. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 18: Issues affecting social acceptability of fuels treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Esposito

    2006-01-01

    Researchers have tried to understand how information about forest management can influence a person's landscape preferences and aesthetic appreciation. These findings are relevant for fuels management projects, since these projects are often characterized by conflicts between aesthetic and ecological objectives. This fact sheet discusses different aspects and ways...

  10. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; economic uses fact sheet 03: economic impacts of fuel treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    With increased interest in reducing hazardous fuels in dry inland forests of the American West, agencies and the public will want to know the economic impacts of fuel reduction treatments. This fact sheet discusses the economic impact tool, a component of My Fuel Treatment Planner, for evaluating economic impacts.

  11. Implementing adaptive phased management (APM) for Canada's used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of Adaptive Phased Management (APM) for Canada's used nuclear fuel. APM is a combination of technology and management system. The technology involves centralized containment and isolation in deep geological repository in a suitable rock formation, as well as shallow storage where used fuel remains retrievable. In both cases there is continuous monitoring. The management system consists of public engagement, phased decision-making, continuous learning and adaption, open and inclusive. Finally, it involves seeking an in formed willing host community

  12. Rocket Fuel Synthesis by Fisher-Tropsch Process

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This study aims to investigate the feasibility of using Fisher Tropsch (FT), a commercial-scale technology that currently produces liquid fuels from syngas (CO &...

  13. Effect of fuel characteristics on synthesis of calcium hydroxyapatite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    measurements. The particle size of phase pure HA powder was found to be <20 nm in this investigation. ..... selective samples obtained from mixed fuel excess condi- tions. Various .... <50 nm. Figure 6(d) shows the qualitative EDX analysis.

  14. Radiological impacts of spent nuclear fuel management options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riotte, H.; Lazo, T.; Mundigl, S.

    2000-01-01

    An important technical study on radiological impacts of spent nuclear fuel management options, recently completed by the NEA, is intended to facilitate informed international discussions on the nuclear fuel cycle. The study compares the radiological impacts on the public and on nuclear workers resulting from two approaches to handling spent fuel from nuclear power plants: - the reprocessing option, that includes the recycling of spent uranium fuel, the reuse of the separated plutonium in MOX fuel, and the direct disposal of spent MOX fuel; and the once-through option, with no reprocessing of spent fuel, and its direct disposal. Based on the detailed research of a group of 18 internationally recognised experts, under NEA sponsorship, the report concludes that: The radiological impacts of both the reprocessing and the non-reprocessing fuel cycles studied are small, well below any regulatory dose limits for the public and for workers, and insignificantly low as compared with exposures caused by natural radiation. The difference in the radiological impacts of the two fuel cycles studied does not provide a compelling argument in favour of one option or the other. The study also points out that other factors, such as resource utilisation efficiency, energy security, and social and economic considerations would tend to carry more weight than radiological impacts in decision-making processes. (authors)

  15. Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) fuel and In-Core Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, K.D.; Sterbentz, J.; Meyer, M.; Lowden, R.; Hoffman, E.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) has been chosen as one of six candidates for development as a Generation IV nuclear reactor based on: its ability to fully utilize fuel resources; minimize or reduce its own (and other systems) actinide inventory; produce high efficiency electricity; and the possibility to utilize high temperature process heat. Current design approaches include a high temperature (2 850 C) helium cooled reactor using a direct Brayton cycle, and a moderate temperature (550 C - 650 C) helium or supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) cooled reactor using direct or indirect Brayton cycles. These design choices have thermal efficiencies that approach 45% to 50%, and have turbomachinery sizes that are much more compact compared to steam plants. However, there are challenges associated with the GCFR, which are the focus of current research. This includes safety system design for decay heat removal, development of high temperature/high fluence fuels and materials, and development of fuel cycle strategies. The work presented here focuses on the fuel and preliminary in-core fuel management, where advanced ceramic-ceramic (cercer) dispersion fuels are the main focus, and average burnups to 266 M Wd/kg appear achievable for the reference Si C/(U,TRU)C block/plate fuel. Solid solution (pellet) fuel in composite ceramic clad (Si C/Si C) is also being considered, but remains as a backup due to cladding fabrication challenges, and high centerline temperatures in the fuel. (Author)

  16. Development of advanced spent fuel management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Joon; Cho, S. H.; You, G. S.

    2001-04-01

    Currently, the economic advantage of any known approach to the back end fuel cycle of a nuclear power reactor has not been well established. Thus the long term storage of the spent fuel in a safe manner is one of the important issues to be resolved in countries where the nuclear power has a relatively heavy weight in power production of that country. At KAERI, as a solution to this particular issue midterm storage of the spent fuel, an alternative approach has been developed. This approach includes the decladding and pulverization process of the spent PWR fuel rod, the reducing process from the uranium oxide to a metallic uranium powder using Li metal in a LiCl salt, the continuous casting process of the reduced metal, and the recovery process of Li from mixed salts by the electrolysis. We conducted the laboratory scale tests of each processes for the technical feasibility and determination for the operational conditions for this approach. Also, we performed the theoretical safety analysis and conducted integral tests for the equipment integration through the Mock-up facility with non-radioactive samples. There were no major issues in the approach, however, material incompatibility of the alkaline metal and oxide in a salt at a high temperature and the reactor that contains the salt became a show stopper of the process. Also the difficulty of the clear separation of the salt with metals reduced from the oxide became a major issue

  17. Environmental management in Framatome nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiebaut, B.; Ferre, A.

    1999-01-01

    Environmental preservation is both a national regulatory requirement and a condition for economic and social development. The various industrial sites belonging to the Framatome Nuclear Fuel Organisation, whose activities range from the processing and transformation of Zirconium alloy products to the fabrication of fuel assemblies, have always demonstrated that protection of the environment was their prime concern by implementing low pollution level processes and reducing and/or recycling industrial waste and effluents. As early as January 1996, a directive issued by the Framatome Group defined its environmental policy and responsibilities in the matter. Within the Framatome Nuclear Fuel Organization, this directive has been applied by implementation of: low level pollution processes; better performance of recycling of effluents, by-products and waste; environmental information policy. In all its plants, the Framatome Nuclear Fuel Organization has decided to pursue and to step up its environmental protection policy by: officializing its action through compliance with ISO standard 14001 and certification of all its industrial sites by 2001 at the latest; launching new actions and extra investment programs. In this context, FBFC has applied for a modification of the decrees concerning the dumping of liquid and gas effluents at the Romans factory. (authors)

  18. Waste management and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinari, J.

    1982-01-01

    The present lecture deals with energy needs and nuclear power, the importance of waste and its relative place in the fuel cycle, the games of controversies over nuclear waste in the strategies of energy and finally with missions and functions of the IAEA for privileging the rational approach and facilitating the transfer of technology. (RW)

  19. Influence of fuel ratios on auto combustion synthesis of barium ferrite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Influence of fuel ratios on auto combustion synthesis of barium ferrite nano particles. D BAHADUR*, S RAJAKUMAR and ANKIT KUMAR. Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology,. Mumbai 400 076 e-mail: dhirenb@iitb.ac.in. Abstract. Single-domain barium ferrite nano ...

  20. A hydrogen fuel cell for rapid, enzyme-catalysed organic synthesis with continuous monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lei; Megarity, Clare F; Siritanaratkul, Bhavin; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2018-01-23

    A one-pot fuel cell for specific, enzyme-catalysed organic synthesis, with continuous monitoring of rate and reaction progress, combines an electrode catalysing rapid, reversible and diffusion-controlled interconversion of NADP + and NADPH with a Pt electrode catalysing 2H + /H 2 interconversion. This Communication demonstrates its performance and characteristics using the reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate as a test system.

  1. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 05: prescriptions and fire effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanie Miller

    2004-01-01

    Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 5: prescriptions and fire effects. Miller, Melanie. 2004. Res. Note RMRS-RN-23-5-WWW. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 2 p. While our understanding of the causes for variation in postfire effects is increasing, burn...

  2. EDF advanced fuel management strategies for the next century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, A.; Charmensat, P.; Larderet, M.

    1999-01-01

    The French nuclear fleet represents 57 PWRs in operation, accounting for 80 % of France's total electricity production. The performance achieved by EDF reactors, in terms of availability (82.6% in 1997) and good cost control, have allowed to improve the nuclear KWh cost by 2% since 1992. The implementation of longer fuel cycles on the 1300 MW reactors from 1996 has contributed to this improvement and, as competitiveness is one of the main challenges for EDF, improving core management strategies is still at the order of the day. With this aim, a thinking process has been initiated to evaluate the benefit brought by the use of a fuel assembly like ALLIANCE, the new fuel product developed by Framatome-Fragema and FCF (Framatome Cogema Fuels) in close cooperation with EDF. The considered product provides enhanced performance, particularly as regards discharge burnup (at least up to 70 GWd/t) and thermal-hydraulic and mechanical behaviour. Fuel management improvements rely on the expertise gained by Framatome through designing core management strategies in a wide range of operating conditions prevailing in nuclear reactors all over the world. It will however be taken into account the necessity for EDF to adopt a policy of stepwise change owing to the potential impact of a 'series effect' on its numerous units. The proposed paper will describe innovative fuel managements, achievable thanks to advanced fuel assembly performance, that are jointly investigated by EDF and Framatome. It includes the following optimization schemes: extending cycle length by using higher enrichments up to 5%, while keeping the same reload size (1/3 core for example for the 1300 MW reactors); decreasing reload size (from 1/3 to 1/4 core), while keeping the same cycle length, using more enriched (up to 5 %) fuel assemblies; reaching annual cycle, with maximization of fuel cycle cost optimization (1/5 core). Beyond such schemes, combinations of optimized loading patterns and neutronic features of

  3. International trade and waste and fuel managment issue, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2007-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: New plants with high safety and availability, by Bill Poirier, Westinghouse Electric Company; Increased reliability and competitiveness, by Russell E. Stachowski, GE Energy, Nuclear; Fuel for long-term supply of nuclear power, by Kumiaki Moriya, Hitachi, Ltd., Japan; Super high burnup fuel, By Noboru Itagaki and Tamotsu Murata, Nuclear Fuel Industries LTD., Japan; Zero fuel failures by 2010, by Tom Patten, AREVA NP Inc.; Decommissioning opportunities in the UK, by David Brown and William Thorn, US Department of Commerce; Industry's three challenges, by Dale E. Klein, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and, A step ahead of the current ABWR's, compiled by Claire Zurek, GE Energy.

  4. Waste management in IFR [Integral Fast Reactor] fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.R.; Battles, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The fuel cycle of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) has important potential advantage for the management of high-level wastes. This sodium-cooled, fast reactor will use metal fuels that are reprocessed by pyrochemical methods to recover uranium, plutonium, and the minor actinides from spent core and blanket fuel. More than 99% of all transuranic (TRU) elements will be recovered and returned to the reactor, where they are efficiently burned. The pyrochemical processes being developed to treat the high-level process wastes are capable of producing waste forms with low TRU contents, which should be easier to dispose of. However, the IFR waste forms present new licensing issues because they will contain chloride salts and metal alloys rather than glass or ceramic. These fuel processing and waste treatment methods can also handle TRU-rich materials recovered from light-water reactors and offer the possibility of efficiently and productively consuming these fuel materials in future power reactors

  5. General considerations in fuel management for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyror, J.G.; Fayers, F.J.

    1971-07-01

    By fuel management we mean the strategy for fuelling and refuelling a reactor together with any associated absorber movements. It incorporates (a) decisions made about the timing of fuel loading operations; (b) choice of enrichments to be loaded; (c) selection of sites at which reloading occurs; (d) programming of control rods and any other reactivity control facilities such as soluble or burnable poisons; and (e) evaluation of the resulting fuel element performance consequences. The topic of fuel management is thus a vast and vital one. It embraces most of the various aspects of core performance and determines many of a reactor's design characteristics. In this paper we review what to us appear to be some of the important issues in this important field

  6. Fuel management for the Beznau nuclear power plant in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, A.

    1988-01-01

    The Beznau nuclear power plant consists of two 350 MW(e) PWRs of Westinghouse design. A number of special features characterize the nuclear industry in Switzerland: there is no fuel cycle industry; nuclear materials must be moved through several countries before they arrive in our country, it is therefore important that agreements are in place between those countries and Switzerland; nearly all of the materials and services required have to be paid in foreign currencies; the interest rate in Switzerland is traditionally low. Aspects of fuel management at the Beznau plant discussed against this background are: the procurement of natural uranium, its conversion and enrichment; fuel fabrication, in-core management, reprocessing and plutonium recycling; and fuel cycle costs. (author)

  7. Historical fuel reprocessing and HLW management in Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knecht, D.A.; Staiger, M.D.; Christian, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    This article review some of the key decision points in the historical development of spent fuel reprocessing and waste management practices at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant that have helped ICPP to successfully accomplish its mission safely and with minimal impact on the environment. Topics include ICPP reprocessing development; batch aluminum-uranium dissolution; continuous aluminum uranium dissolution; batch zirconium dissolution; batch stainless steel dissolution; semicontinuous zirconium dissolution with soluble poison; electrolytic dissolution of stainless steel-clad fuel; graphite-based rover fuel processing; fluorinel fuel processing; ICPP waste management consideration and design decisions; calcination technology development; ICPP calcination demonstration and hot operations; NWCF design, construction, and operation; HLW immobilization technology development. 80 refs., 4 figs

  8. Introduction of HTR-PM Operation and Fuel Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fucheng; Luo Yong; Gao Qiang

    2014-01-01

    There is a big difference between High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Pebble-modules Demonstration Project(HTR-PM) and PWR in operation mode. HTR-PM is a continually refuelled reactor, and the operation and fuel management of it, which affect each other, are inseparable. Therefore, the analysis of HTR-PM fuel management needs to be carried out “in real time”. HTR-PM operation and fuel management system is developed for on-power refuelling mode of HTR-PM. The system, which calculates the core neutron flux and power distribution, taking high-temperature reactor physics analysis software-VSOP as a basic tool, can track and predict the core state online, and it has the ability to restructure core power distribution online, making use of ex-core detectors to correct and check tracking calculation. Based on the ability to track and predict, it can compute the core parameters to provide support for the operation of the reactor. It can also predict the operation parameters of the reactor to provide reference information for the fuel management.The contents of this paper include the development purposes, architecture, the main function modules, running process, and the idea of how to use the system to carry out HTR-PM fuel management. (author)

  9. Fuel effect on solution combustion synthesis of Co(Cr,Al)2O4 pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilabert, J.; Palacios, M.D.; Sanz, V.; Mestre, S.

    2017-01-01

    The fuel effect on the synthesis of a ceramic pigment with a composition CoCr2−2ΨAl2ΨO4 (0≤Ψ≤1) by means of solution combustion synthesis process (SCS) has been studied. Three different fuels were selected to carry out the synthesis (urea, glycine and hexamethylentetramine (HMT)). Highly foamy pigments with very low density were obtained. Fd-3m spinel-type structure was obtained in all the experiments. Nevertheless, crystallinity and crystallite size of the spinels show significant differences with composition and fuel. The use of glycine along with the chromium-richest composition favours ion rearrangement to obtain the most ordered structure. Lattice parameter does not seem to be affected by fuel, although it evolves with Ψ according to Vegard's law. Colouring power in a transparent glaze shows important variations with composition. On the other hand, fuel effect presents a rather low influence since practically the same shades are obtained. However, it exerts certain effect on luminosity (L*). [es

  10. Fuel isolation research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    This document is intended to give a broad outline of the Fuel Isolatikn program and to indicate how this program fits into the overall framework of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Similar activities in other countries are described, and the differences in philosophy behind these and the Canadian program are highlighted. A program plan is presented that outlines the development of research programs that contribute to the safety assessment of the disposal concept and the development of technology required for selection and optimization of a feasible fuel isolation system. Some indication of the work that might take place beyond concept assessment, at the end of the decade, is also given. The current program is described in some detail, with emphasis on what the prkgram has achieved to date and hopes to achieve in the future for the concept assessment phase of the waste management program. Finally, some major capital facilities associated with the fuel isolation program are described

  11. Status of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.B.

    1985-10-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is in the fifth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The major objective of this phase of the program is to assess the basic safety and environmental aspects of the concept of isolating immobilized fuel waste by deep underground disposal in plutonic rock. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely immobilization studies, geoscience research, and environmental and safety assessment, are well established

  12. Interactive color graphics system for BWR fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    An interactive color graphics system has been developed by the General Electric Company for fuel management engineers. The system consists of a Hewlett-Packard color graphics workstation in communication with a host mainframe. The system aids in such tasks as fuel cycle optimization, refueling bundle shuffle and control blade sequence design. Since being installed in 1983 turn-around time for a typical cycle reload and control blade pattern design has been reduced by a factor of four

  13. A comparative study of fuel management in PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, D.E.G.; Nair, R.P.K.; Vellozo, S.O.

    1981-01-01

    A study about fuel management in PWR reactors, where not only the conventional uranium cycle is considered, but also the thorium cycle as an alternative is presented. The final results are presented in terms of U 3 O 8 demand and SWU and the approximate costs of the principal stages of the fuel cycle, comparing with the stardand cycle without recycling. (E.G.) [pt

  14. Survey regarding the prices of wood fuels over the 2014 - 2015 period - Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fautrad, Alice

    2015-11-01

    The study conducted by CODA Strategies contains, in a first part, the synthesis and the full report of the results of a survey realized in 2015 among distributors of wood fuels for domestic, commercial, industrial and collective housing purposes. A second report presents the 2014-2015 fuel prices for commercial, industrial and collective housing markets only. This report is based on data published by the CEEB and proposes a method to estimate the cost of delivery. A third report presents the 2014-2015 results of a survey realized among distributors of wood fuels for domestic purposes only. This report also presents data regarding wood pellets price, in order to place the French market in its international context. A last report presents a French/English synthesis of the the 2014-2015 survey results

  15. Physics operating experience and fuel management of RAPS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakra, A.N.; Purandare, H.D.; Srinivasan, K.R.; Rastogi, B.P.

    1976-01-01

    Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit-1 achieved criticality on August 11, 1972. Thereafter the reactor was brought to power, in November, 1972. Due to non-availability of the depleted fuel, the loading of which was necessary to obtain full power to begin with, the core was loaded with all natural uranium fuel and only 70% of the full power could be achieved. During the reactor operation for the last three years, the reactor has seen more than one effective full power year and about 1400 fresh fuel bundles have been loaded in the core. The reactor was subjected to about 150 power cycles resulting in more than 30% variation in operating power level and about 10 fuel bundles have failed. For satisfactory fuel management and refuelling decisions, a three dimensional simulator TRIVENI was developed. This was extensively tested during the start-up experiments and was found to be a satisfactory tool for day to day operation of the plant. In this paper, a brief account of analysis of the start-up experiments, approach to full power, power distortions and flux peaking, fuel management service and analysis of the failed fuel data has been given. (author)

  16. LWR Spent Fuel Management for the Smooth Deployment of FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, T.; Yamashita, J.; Hoshino, K.; Sasahira, A.; Inoue, T.; Minato, K.; Sato, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fast breeder reactors (FBR) and FBR fuel cycle are indispensable to prevent the global warming and to secure the long-term energy supply. Commercial FBR expects to be deployed from around 2050 until around 2110 in Japan by the replacement of light water reactors (LWR) after their 60 years life. The FBR deployment needs Pu (MOX) from the LWR-spent fuel (SF) reprocessing. As Japan can posses little excess Pu, its balance control is necessary between LWR-SF management (reprocessing) and FBR deployment. The fuel cycle systems were investigated for the smooth FBR deployment and the effectiveness of proposed flexible system was clarified in this work. (author)

  17. Fuel management simulation for CANFLEX-RU in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Fuel management simulations have been performed for CANFLEX-09% RU fuel in the CANDU 6 reactor. In this study, the bi-directional 4-bundle shift fuelling scheme was assumed. The lattice cell and time-average calculation were carried out. The refuelling simulation calculations were performed for 600 full power days. Time-averaged results show good axial power profile with the CANFLEX-RU fuel. During the simulation period, the maximum channel and bundle power were maintained below the licensing limit of CANDU 6 reactor. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  18. Review of the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, S.R.

    1980-06-01

    Progress over the previous year in the nuclear fuel waste management program is reviewed. Universities, industry and consultants have become increasingly involved, and the work is being overseen by a Technical Advisory Committee. The program has also been investigated by Ontario's Porter Commission and Select Committe on Ontario Hydro Affairs. A public information program has been extended to cover most of the Canadian Shield region of Ontario. Ontario Hydro is studying spent fuel storage and transportation, while AECL is covering immobilization of spent fuel or processing wastes, geotechnical and geochemical research in the laboratory and in the field, design of disposal facilities, and environmental and safety assessments. (L.L.)

  19. Fuel management simulation for CANFLEX-RU in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    Fuel management simulations have been performed for CANFLEX-09% RU fuel in the CANDU 6 reactor. In this study, the bi-directional 4-bundle shift fuelling scheme was assumed. The lattice cell and time-average calculation were carried out. The refuelling simulation calculations were performed for 600 full power days. Time-averaged results show good axial power profile with the CANFLEX-RU fuel. During the simulation period, the maximum channel and bundle power were maintained below the licensing limit of CANDU 6 reactor. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  20. Management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The programme consists of the long-term and short-term programme, the continued bedrock investigations, the underground research laboratory, the decision-making procedure in the site selection process and information questions during the site selection process. The National Board for Spent Nuclear Fuel hereby subunits both the SKB's R and D Programme 86 and the Board's statement concerning the programme. Decisions in the matter have been made by the Board's executive committee. (DG)

  1. Spent fuel management in Japan - Facts and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses recent developments and future issues related to spent fuel management in Japan. With increasing pressure of spent fuel discharge from the power plants in operation and, in contrast, uncertainties in their processing and management services, spent fuel storage in short and medium terms has been receiving the highest priority in nuclear policy discussions in Japan. While small-scale interim storage devices, as well as capacity expansion (re-racking, etc.) and shared uses of existing devices, are introduced at number of power stations, large scale AFR (away from reactor) 'Storage of Recycle Fuel Resources' is expected to come in a medium and long-run. Commercial operation of 'Storage of Recycle Fuel Resources' is allowed its way, as the bill of amendment to the law for regulation of nuclear power reactors and other nuclear-related activities has passed in the Diet. In the meantime, the Atomic Energy Commission has launched working group discussions for revision of 'The Long-term Program of Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy' to be completed in 2000. This revision is hoped to set up a stage of national debate of nuclear policy, which might lead to fill conceptual gaps between bodies promoting nuclear development and general public. The author's attempt to illustrate the role of storage in spent fuel management is also presented from a theoretical point of view. (author)

  2. Management of spent fuel in Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pak, Hyun-Soo; Seo, In-Seok; Pak, Sang-Ki.

    1989-01-01

    At present in Republic of Korea, 8 PWR and 1 CANDU power plants are in operation or under construction, and the total capacity of power generation facilities has become 7.6 GWe. In addition, two PWRs of more than 900 MWe each are expected to be constructed by mid 1990s. More than 50 % of the electric power demand was supplied by nuclear power generation since 1987, but the spent fuel generated in nuclear power plants is stored in storage water tanks in respective reactor sites. The total capacity of spent fuel to be stored in the AR facilities of 9 nuclear power plants is about 2730 MTU, and the spent fuel released from these reactors since 1980 is about 810 MTU. The present capacity of AR storage pools seems to be used up by mid 1990s. According to the revised Atomic Energy Acts in May, 1986, the government is to take the responsibility of spent fuel management, and the policy of constructing the storage facilities outside reactor sites by the end of 1997 was established by the Atomic Energy Commission. The responsibility of the management of spent fuel that exceeds the present capacity of AR pools is to be taken by KEPCO, therefore the preliminary analysis of the feasible option on the extension of AR facilities and the comprehensive management plan for spent fuel placing emphasis on the research and development of away-from-reactor storage were decided. (Kako, I.)

  3. Effect of advanced fuel cycles on waste management policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavedon, J.M.; Haapalehto, T.

    2005-01-01

    The study aims at analysing a range of future fuel cycle options from the perspective of their impact on waste repository demand and specification. The study would focus on: Assessment of the characteristics of radioactive wastes arising from advanced nuclear fuel cycle options, repository performance analysis studies using source terms for waste arising from such advanced nuclear fuel cycles, identification of new options for waste management and disposal. Three families of fuel cycles having increasing recycling capabilities are assessed. Each cycle is composed of waste generating and management processes. Examples of waste generating processes are fuel factories (7 types) and reprocessing plants (7 types). Packaging and conditioning plants (7) and disposal facilities are examples of waste management processes. The characteristic of all these processes have been described and then total waste flows are summarised. In order to simplify the situation, three waste categories have been defined based on the IAEA definitions in order to emphasize the major effects of different types of waste. These categories are: short-life waste for surface or sub-surface disposal, long-life low heat producing waste for geological disposal, high-level waste for geological disposal. The feasibilities of the fuel cycles are compared in terms of economics, primary resource consumption and amount of waste generated. The effect of high-level waste composition for the repository performance is one of the tools in these comparisons. The results of this will be published as an NEA publication before the end of 2005. (authors)

  4. Mutual influences of reactor operation and fuel cycle management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewiner, C.; Schaerer, R.

    1989-01-01

    OPEN (Organisation des Producteurs d'Energie Nucleaire) comprises the electricity producers from seven European countries which now operate or intend to operate nuclear power plants. Its activities include the study of technical, economic and legal subjects related to nuclear electricity. A continuous analysis of the fuel cycle market has been pursued within OPEN for almost 15 years. For the past few years, OPEN has also been concerned with the subject of fuel management in the reactors operated by its members. The purpose of this effort was to obtain an overall picture of possible fuel improvements and to evaluate the effects, in particular the economic ones, of diverse fuel reload managements and of reprocessed uranium and plutonium recycling. The conclusions of this study are as follows: Increase in burn-ups produces notable savings in electricity generating costs. It also permits adaptation of fuel loading mode to the desirable irradiation campaign length. This allows for better management of the country's overall means of electricity generation (nuclear, fossil-fuelled or hydro plants), and adjustment to the electrical demand. These new reload schemes have various impacts on natural uranium consumption and enrichment, but, above all, they affect directly all fuel cycle operations linked to the number of assemblies (fabrication, reprocessing, etc.). 6 figs

  5. A durable and dependable solution for RTR spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomasson, J.

    1999-01-01

    RTR Operators need efficient and cost-effective services for the management of their spent fuel and this, for the full lifetime of their facility. Thanks to the integration of transport, reprocessing and conditioning services, COGEMA provides a cogent solution, with the utmost respect for safety and preservation of the environment, for the short, medium and long terms. As demonstrated in this paper, this option offers the only durable and dependable solution for the RTR spent fuel management, leading to a conditioning for the final residues directly suitable for final disposal. The main advantage of such an option is obviously the significant reduction in terms of volume and radiotoxicity of the ultimate waste when compared to direct disposal of spent fuels. The efficiency of such a solution has been proven, some RTR operators having already trusted COGEMA for the management of their aluminide fuel. With its commitment in R and D activities for the development of a high performance and reprocessable LEU fuels, COGEMA will be able to propose a solution for all types of fuels, HEU and LEU

  6. Considerations Regarding ROK Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, Chaim; Forrest, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss spent fuel management options in the Republic of Korea (ROK) from two interrelated perspectives: Centralized dry cask storage and spent fuel pyroprocessing and burning in sodium fast reactors (SFRs). We argue that the ROK will run out of space for at-reactors spent fuel storage by about the year 2030 and will thus need to transition centralized dry cask storage. Pyroprocessing plant capacity, even if approved and successfully licensed and constructed by that time, will not suffice to handle all the spent fuel discharged annually. Hence centralized dry cask storage will be required even if the pyroprocessing option is successfully developed by 2030. Pyroprocessing is but an enabling technology on the path leading to fissile material recycling and burning in future SFRs. In this regard we discuss two SFR options under development in the U. S.: the Super Prism and the Travelling Wave Reactor (TWR). We note that the U. S. is further along in reactor development than the ROK. The ROK though has acquired more experience, recently in investigating fuel recycling options for SFRs. We thus call for two complementary joint R and D project to be conducted by U. S. and ROK scientists. One leading to the development of a demonstration centralized away-from-reactors spent fuel storage facility. The other involve further R and D on a combined SFR-fuel cycle complex based on the reactor and fuel cycle options discussed in the paper

  7. The final management of nuclear fuel. Legal and economic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villota, C. de

    2009-01-01

    This article gives a brief summary of the characteristics of spent fuel and the lines of action considered for its management. It describes the legal framework that supports the Radioactive Waste Management Plan (PGRR), which contains the lines applicable to Final Spent Fuel Management, as well as the evolution of this legal framework. The article contains the 2008 updated costs of the various items of the PGRR, with a more detailed description of those related to this type of fuel, as well the source and amount of the financial contributions to the fund for meeting these costs, including how they have evolved over time. finally, it provides some personal reflections on this issue. (Author)

  8. Situation and perspective of spent fuel management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Garcia, A.

    2009-01-01

    Between september 2006 and september 2007, the Foundation for Energy Studies carried out the study Radioactive Waste Management: Situation, Analysis and Perspectives. This study focuses specially on spent fuel and high level radioactive waste management. The different aspects covered in this study are as follows: -Description of the different applicable technologies -Analysis and comparison of the different options of spent fuel management, including the strategic and economic aspects. - Situation, strategies and forecasts in the main countries. -Analysis of the situation and alternatives for the spent fuel management in spain. Although the report focuses principally pn the technological and environmental aspects other issues related with the management of these materials were considered, such as the strategic, economic and institutional aspects as well as the social acceptation. In answer to the request of the SNE publication, the article enclosed is a summary of one of the chapters of this study, and more particularly the one dedicated to the situation of spent fuel and high level radioactive waste management in Spain. (Author)

  9. A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Andres

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This synthesis discusses the emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production. While much is known about these emissions, there is still much that is unknown about the details surrounding these emissions. This synthesis explores our knowledge of these emissions in terms of why there is concern about them; how they are calculated; the major global efforts on inventorying them; their global, regional, and national totals at different spatial and temporal scales; how they are distributed on global grids (i.e., maps; how they are transported in models; and the uncertainties associated with these different aspects of the emissions. The magnitude of emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels has been almost continuously increasing with time since fossil fuels were first used by humans. Despite events in some nations specifically designed to reduce emissions, or which have had emissions reduction as a byproduct of other events, global total emissions continue their general increase with time. Global total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions are known to within 10 % uncertainty (95 % confidence interval. Uncertainty on individual national total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions range from a few percent to more than 50 %. This manuscript concludes that carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion continue to increase with time and that while much is known about the overall characteristics of these emissions, much is still to be learned about the detailed characteristics of these emissions.

  10. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Configuration Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a rewrite of the draft ''C'' that was agreed to ''in principle'' by SNF Project level 2 managers on EDT 609835, dated March 1995 (not released). The implementation process philosphy was changed in keeping with the ongoing reengineering of the WHC Controlled Manuals to achieve configuration management within the SNF Project

  11. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Document Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, M.D.; Harizison, G.L.; Rice, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    The SNF Project Document Management Plan identifies and describes the currently available systems and processes for implementing and maintaining an effective document control and records management program. This program governs the methods by which documents are generated, released, distributed, maintained current, retired, and ultimately disposed

  12. Long Term Management of Spent Fuel from NEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kegel, L.; Zeleznik, N.; Lokner, V.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 Slovenian national agency for radioactive waste management ARAO started together with Croatian sister organization APO elaboration of a new revision of Decommissioning, Radioactive waste and Spent fuel management program for NPP Krsko. In scope of this work also new studies for spent fuel storage and disposal were prepared in which technical solutions were analyzed and proposed for specific spent fuel (SF) from NPP Krsko. Time schedules for main activities of SF disposal development were elaborated for two alternative scenarios which correspond to normal NPP Krsko operation and 20 - year lifetime extension. All technical activities were financially assessed and costs estimates of SF storage and geological disposal development provided. The prepared studies were verified by international experts in order to confirm the correctness of technical inputs, proposed solutions, time schedules of activities and costs evaluations. The calculated nominal and discounted costs of spent fuel management served for the recalculation of annuities in the integral scenarios of interrelated activities on NPP Krsko decommissioning, LILW and SF management. Besides new first proposal of long-term management of spent fuel from NPP Krsko the joint work also opened additional questions. One of this is time schedule of proposed activities for long term SF management - what were the criteria used in the determination of actions and are they optimal for both countries. How the process of site selection for SF storage or disposal should be prepared having in mind that it will bring many questions in both countries? Is direct disposal of SF still the best solution in current development of nuclear prospects? The paper will present the current development and solutions for SF management from NPP Krsko and will try to answer questions which need to be solved and future development in the SF management.(author).

  13. An overview on the nuclear spent fuel management in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, M.

    2001-01-01

    The sources of radioactive waste in Romania are users of radiation and radioactive materials in industry (including nuclear electricity generation), medicine, agriculture and research and also the processing of materials that are naturally radioactive, such as uranium ores. The different types of radioactive waste are classified into four categories of waste: excepted waste, low level waste, medium level waste and high level waste. A spent fuel management sub-programme as a part of the Radioactive Waste Management programme was initiated by the former Romanian Electricity Company (RENEL) in 1992. Within the frame of R and D of the Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme, the topics cover investigations, studies and research to identify the sites and the conceptual designs for a Spent Fuel Interim Storage Facility (SFISF) and also a Spent Fuel Disposal Facility (SFDF). Changes in the organization of the nuclear activities of RENEL, involving both responsibilities and financing aspects, led to interruption of the programme. The programme includes study of the main methods and the existing technologies for the design, operation and safety of an interim storage facility (including transport aspects). It also includes analysis of details on the site selection for this facility and for a spent fuel final disposal facility. The achievement of the spent fuel interim storage facility is proceeding. The results from the studies performed in the last years will permit us to prepare the feasibility study next year and the documentation required by our regulatory body for starting the process to obtain a license for a SFISF at Cernavoda. A second phase is the assessment of a long term strategy to select and adopt a proven disposal technology for spent fuel, corresponding with a selected site. The status of the work performed in the frame of this programme and also the situation of the spent fuel from research reactors are presented. (author)

  14. Synthesis on the spent fuel long term evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, C.; Poinssot, Ch.; Lovera, P.; Poulesquen, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DPC), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Broudic, V. [CEA Cadarache, Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires (DRN), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Cappelaere, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire(DMN), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Desgranges, L. [CEA Cadarache, Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires (DRN), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Garcia, Ph. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles (DEC), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Jegou, Ch.; Roudil, D. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN), 30 - Marcoule (France); Lovera, P.; Poulesquen, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DPC), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Marimbeau, P. [CEA Cadarache, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gras, J.M.; Bouffioux, P. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    The French research on spent fuel long term evolution has been performed by CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) since 1999 in the PRECCI project with the support of EDF (Electricite de France). These studies focused on the spent fuel behaviour under various conditions encountered in dry storage or in deep geological disposal. Three main types of conditions were discerned: - The evolution in a closed system which corresponds to the normal scenario in storage and to the first confinement phase in disposal; - The evolution in air which corresponds to an incidental loss of confinement during storage or to a rupture of the canister before the site re-saturation in geological disposal; - The evolution in water which corresponds to the normal scenario after the breaching of the canister in repository conditions. This document produced in the frame of the PRECCI project is an overview of the state of knowledge in 2004 concerning the long-term behavior of spent fuel under these various conditions. The state of the art was derived from the results obtained under the PRECCI project as well as from a review of the literature and of data acquired under the European project on Spent Fuel Stability under Repository Conditions. The main results issued from the French research are underlined. (authors)

  15. SYNTHESIS OF AUTOMOBILE IGNITION SYSTEM USING OZONIZED FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Pilipenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a mathematical model for electronic control system of the angular ignition timing (AIT in the (ICE, which is running on ozonized fuel. An algorithm for  ignition system control of internal combustion engine using ozonized fuel has been developed in the paper. A structure of the dynamic ignition system while using a control unit for supplying  ozone into fuel with a purpose to improve automobile ecological and economical indices adapted to operational conditions. Application of the given system allows to ensure minimum reduction of operational petrol consumption and concentration of incomplete combustion products due to optimum ozone dosage into the fuel.  The paper proposes a controlled automobile ignition system as a sequential scheme which has a great number of discrete inputs and outputs and many discrete internal  states. The scheme establishes a functional dependence between input and output states. The paper provides an assessment of ecological indices according to massive emissions of carbon monoxide СО, hydrocarbon СпНт and nitric oxide NOx .  The analysis of  investigations results has been carried out in the paper.

  16. Synthesis on the spent fuel long term evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferry, C.; Poinssot, Ch.; Lovera, P.; Poulesquen, A.; Broudic, V.; Cappelaere, Ch.; Desgranges, L.; Garcia, Ph.; Jegou, Ch.; Roudil, D.; Lovera, P.; Poulesquen, A.; Marimbeau, P.; Gras, J.M.; Bouffioux, P.

    2005-01-01

    The French research on spent fuel long term evolution has been performed by CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) since 1999 in the PRECCI project with the support of EDF (Electricite de France). These studies focused on the spent fuel behaviour under various conditions encountered in dry storage or in deep geological disposal. Three main types of conditions were discerned: - The evolution in a closed system which corresponds to the normal scenario in storage and to the first confinement phase in disposal; - The evolution in air which corresponds to an incidental loss of confinement during storage or to a rupture of the canister before the site re-saturation in geological disposal; - The evolution in water which corresponds to the normal scenario after the breaching of the canister in repository conditions. This document produced in the frame of the PRECCI project is an overview of the state of knowledge in 2004 concerning the long-term behavior of spent fuel under these various conditions. The state of the art was derived from the results obtained under the PRECCI project as well as from a review of the literature and of data acquired under the European project on Spent Fuel Stability under Repository Conditions. The main results issued from the French research are underlined. (authors)

  17. CRACKEL: a computer code for CFR fuel management calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burstall, R.F.; Ball, M.A.; Thornton, D.E.J.

    1975-12-01

    The CRACKLE computer code is designed to perform rapid fuel management surveys of CFR systems. The code calculates overall features such as reactivity, power distributions and breeding gain, and also calculates for each sub-assembly plutonium content and power output. A number of alternative options are built into the code, in order to permit different fuel management strategies to be calculated, and to perform more detailed calculations when necessary. A brief description is given of the methods of calculation, and the input facilities of CRACKLE, with examples. (author)

  18. Program summary. Nuclear waste management and fuel cycle programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This Program Summary Document describes the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Programs. Particular emphasis is given to near-term, specifically Fiscal Year (FY) 1982, activities. The overall objective of these programs will be achieved by the demonstration of: (1) safe radioactive waste management practices for storage and disposal of high-level waste and (2) advanced technologies necessary to close the nuclear fuel cycle on a schedule which would assure a healthy future for the development of nuclear power in this country

  19. Overview of the spent fuel management policy in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, Jussi

    1985-01-01

    The basic factors affecting the spent fuel management policy are highlighted: small size of the nuclear programme in the worldwide scale, no recycling of plutonium envisaged, no governmental organizations for back-end operations foreseen. The prinsiple objective of the policy permanent disposal of high-level wastes irrevocably outside the domestic territory, and the limited success in its implementation are discussed. The preparations of the implementation of the back-up alternative, direct disposal of spent fuel in the Finnish bedrock are described. The basic philosophy behind the system of funding the future waste management costs is clarified. (author)

  20. Catalytic synthesis of alcoholic fuels for transportation from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao

    This work has investigated the catalytic conversion of syngas into methanol and higher alcohols. Based on input from computational catalyst screening, an experimental investigation of promising catalyst candidates for methanol synthesis from syngas has been carried out. Cu-Ni alloys of different...... composition have been identified as potential candidates for methanol synthesis. These Cu-Ni alloy catalysts have been synthesized and tested in a fixed-bed continuous-flow reactor for CO hydrogenation. The metal area based activity for a Cu-Ni/SiO2 catalyst is at the same level as a Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 model...... catalyst. The high activity and selectivity of silica supported Cu-Ni alloy catalysts agrees with the fact that the DFT calculations identified Cu-Ni alloys as highly active and selective catalysts for the hydrogenation of CO to form methanol. This work has also provided a systematic study of Cu...

  1. Reactivity management and burn-up management on JRR-3 silicide-fuel-core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tomoaki; Araki, Masaaki; Izumo, Hironobu; Kinase, Masami; Torii, Yoshiya; Murayama, Yoji

    2007-08-01

    On the conversion from uranium-aluminum-dispersion-type fuel (aluminide fuel) to uranium-silicon-aluminum-dispersion-type fuel (silicide fuel), uranium density was increased from 2.2 to 4.8 g/cm 3 with keeping uranium-235 enrichment of 20%. So, burnable absorbers (cadmium wire) were introduced for decreasing excess reactivity caused by the increasing of uranium density. The burnable absorbers influence reactivity during reactor operation. So, the burning of the burnable absorbers was studied and the influence on reactor operation was made cleared. Furthermore, necessary excess reactivity on beginning of operation cycle and the time limit for restart after unplanned reactor shutdown was calculated. On the conversion, limit of fuel burn-up was increased from 50% to 60%. And the fuel exchange procedure was changed from the six-batch dispersion procedure to the fuel burn-up management procedure. The previous estimation of fuel burn-up was required for the planning of fuel exchange, so that the estimation was carried out by means of past operation data. Finally, a new fuel exchange procedure was proposed for effective use of fuel elements. On the procedure, burn-up of spent fuel was defined for each loading position. The average length of fuel's staying in the core can be increased by two percent on the procedure. (author)

  2. Japan's spent fuel and plutonium management challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuta, Tadahiro; Suzuki, Tatsujiro

    2011-01-01

    Japan's commitment to plutonium recycling has been explicitly stated in its long-term program since 1956. Despite the clear cost disadvantage compared with direct disposal or storage of spent fuel, the Rokkasho reprocessing plant started active testing in 2006. Japan's cumulative consumption of plutonium has been only 5 tons to date and its future consumption rate is still uncertain. But once the Rokkasho reprocessing plant starts its full operation, Japan will separate about 8 tons of plutonium annually. Our analysis shows that, with optimum use of available at-reactor and away-from-reactor storage capacity, there would be no need for reprocessing until the mid-2020s. With an additional 30,000 tons of away-from-reactor (AFR) spent-fuel storage capacity reprocessing could be avoided until 2050. Deferring operation of the Rokkasho plant, at least until the plutonium stockpile had been worked down to the minimum required level, would also minimize international concern about Japan's plutonium stockpile. The authors are happy to acknowledge Frank von Hippel, Harold Feiveson, Jungming Kang, Zia Mian, M.V. Ramana, and other IPFM members, as well as the generous grant from the MacArthur Foundation for helping make this research possible.

  3. Analysis of fuel management in the KIPT neutron source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong Zhaopeng, E-mail: zzhong@anl.gov [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Fuel management of KIPT ADS was analyzed. > Core arrangement was shuffled in stage wise. > New fuel assemblies was added into core periodically. > Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life. - Abstract: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility consisting of an electron accelerator driven sub-critical assembly. The neutron source driving the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The sub-critical assembly surrounding the target is fueled with low enriched WWR-M2 type hexagonal fuel assemblies. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel material is <20%. The facility will be utilized for basic and applied research, producing medical isotopes, and training young specialists. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is {approx}360 kW including the fission power of {approx}260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products continuously reduce the system reactivity during the operation, decrease the neutron flux level, and consequently impact the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, the fuel assemblies should be added and shuffled for compensating the lost reactivity caused by burnup. Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life time in the sub-critical core. This paper studies the fuel cycles and shuffling schemes of the fuel assemblies of the sub-critical assembly to preserve the system reactivity and the neutron flux level during the operation.

  4. Analysis of fuel management in the KIPT neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Zhaopeng; Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Fuel management of KIPT ADS was analyzed. → Core arrangement was shuffled in stage wise. → New fuel assemblies was added into core periodically. → Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life. - Abstract: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility consisting of an electron accelerator driven sub-critical assembly. The neutron source driving the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The sub-critical assembly surrounding the target is fueled with low enriched WWR-M2 type hexagonal fuel assemblies. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel material is <20%. The facility will be utilized for basic and applied research, producing medical isotopes, and training young specialists. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is ∼360 kW including the fission power of ∼260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products continuously reduce the system reactivity during the operation, decrease the neutron flux level, and consequently impact the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, the fuel assemblies should be added and shuffled for compensating the lost reactivity caused by burnup. Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life time in the sub-critical core. This paper studies the fuel cycles and shuffling schemes of the fuel assemblies of the sub-critical assembly to preserve the system reactivity and the neutron flux level during the operation.

  5. Synthesis of biodiesel fuel from safflower oil using various reaction parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meka, Pavan Kumar; Tripathi, Vinay; Singh, R P

    2006-01-01

    Biodiesel fuel is gaining more and more importance because of the depletion and uncontrollable prices of fossil fuel resources. The use of vegetable oil and their derivatives as alternatives for diesel fuel is the best answer and as old as Diesel Engine. Chemically biodiesel fuel is the mono alkyl esters of fatty acids derived from renewable feed stocks like vegetable oils and animal fats. Safflower oil contains 75-80% of linoleic acid; the presence of this unsaturated fatty acid is useful in alleviating low temperature properties like pour point, cloud point and cold filter plugging point. In this paper we studied the effect of various parameters such as temperature, molar ratio (oil to alcohol), and concentration of catalyst on synthesis of biodiesel fuel from safflower oil. The better suitable conditions of 1:6 molar ratio (oil to alcohol), 60 degrees C temperature and catalyst concentration of 2% (by wt. of oil) were determined. The finally obtained biodiesel fuel was analyzed for fatty acid composition by GLC and some other properties such as flash point, specific gravity and acid value were also determined. From the results it was clear that the produced biodiesel fuel was with in the recommended standards of biodiesel fuel with 96.8% yield.

  6. Addressing ethical considerations about nuclear fuel waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greber, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Ethical considerations will be important in making decisions about the long-term management of nuclear fuel waste. Public discussions of nuclear fuel waste management are dominated by questions related to values, fairness, rights and responsibilities. To address public concerns, it is important to demonstrate that ethical responsibilities associated with the current management of the waste are being fulfilled. It is also important to show that our responsibilities to future generations can be met, and that ethical principles will be applied to the implementation of disposal. Canada's nuclear fuel waste disposal concept, as put forward in an Environmental Impact Statement by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), is currently under public review by a Federal Environmental Assessment Panel. Following this review, recommendations will be made about the direction that Canada should take for the long-term management of this waste. This paper discusses the ethical principles that are seen to apply to geological disposal and illustrates how the Canadian approach to nuclear fuel waste management can meet the challenge of fulfilling these responsibilities. The author suggests that our ethical responsibilities require that adaptable technologies to site, design, construct, operate decommission and close disposal facilities should de developed. We cannot, and should not, present future generations from exercising control over what they inherit, nor control whether they modify or even reverse today's decisions if that is what they deem to be the right thing to do. (author)

  7. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 05: The importance of working locally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    People who evaluate their actions in terms of what others think are often said to be guided by community norms. With respect to fuels management, this means that when you are "selling" a property owner on taking steps to reduce fuels, you are not just "selling" to one person, but to a network of people. This fact sheet discusses three tools to help...

  8. Centralized disassembly and packaging of spent fuel in the DOE spent fuel management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    In October 1984, E.R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) initiated a study of the prospective use of a centralized facility for the disassembly and packaging of spent fuel to support the various elements of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) spent fuel management system, including facilities for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and repositories. It was DOE's original plan to receive spent fuel at each repository where it would be disassembled and packaged (overpacked) for disposal purposes. Subsequently, DOE considered the prospective use of MRS of spent fuel as an option for providing safe and reliable management of spent fuel. This study was designed to consider possible advantages of the use of centralized facilities for disassembly and packaging of spent fuel at whose location storage facilities could be added as required. The study was divided into three principal technical tasks that covered: (a) development of requirements and criteria for the central disassembly and packaging facility and associated systems. (2) Development of conceptual designs for the central disassembly and packaging facility and associated systems. (3) Estimation of capital and operating costs involved for all system facilities and determination of life cycle costs for various scenarios of operation - for comparison with the reference system

  9. Issues related to EM management of DOE spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, D.G.; Abashian, M.S.; Chakraborti, S.; Roberson, K.; Meloin, J.M.

    1993-07-01

    This document is a summary of the important issues involved in managing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). Issues related to civilian SNF activities are not discussed. DOE-owned SNF is stored primarily at the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River Site (SRS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and West Valley Demonstration Project. Smaller quantities of SNF are stored at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There is a wide variety of fuel types, including both low and high enrichment fuels from weapons production, DOE reactors, research and development programs, naval programs, and universities. Most fuel is stored in pools associated with reactor or reprocessing facilities. Smaller quantities are in dry storage. Physical conditions of the fuel range from excellent to poor or severely damaged. An issue is defined as an important question that must be answered or decision that must be made on a topic or subject relevant to achieving the complimentary objectives of (a) storing SNF in compliance with applicable regulations and orders until it can be disposed, and (b) safely disposing of DOE's SNF. The purpose of this document is to define the issues; no recommendations are made on resolutions. As DOE's national SNF management program is implemented, a system of issues identification, documentation, tracking, and resolution will be implemented. This document is an initial effort at issues identification. The first section of this document is an overview of issues that are common to several or all DOE facilities that manage SNF. The common issues are organized according to specific aspects of spent fuel management. This is followed by discussions of management issues that apply specifically to individual DOE facilities. The last section provides literature references

  10. A new coupled system for BWR nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, A.; Ortiz-Servin, J.J.; Montes-Tadeo, J.L.; Perusquia, R.; Rizos, R.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a system to solve four stages of the fuel management problem is showed.The system uses different heuristic techniques to solve each stage of that area, and this problem is solved in a coupled way. Considered problems correspond to the following designs: fuel lattice, fuel assembly, fuel reload and control rod patterns. Even though, each stage of the problem can have its own objective function, the complete problem was solved using a multi-objective function. The solution strategy is to solve each stage of design in an iterative process, taking into account previous results for the next stage, until to achieve a complete solution. The solution strategy to solve the coupled problem is the following: the first solved stage is the fuel lattice design, the second one is fuel assembly design, finally an internal loop between both fuel reload design and control rod pattern design is carried out.For this internal loop, a seed reload using Haling principle is generated. The obtained results showed the advantage to solve the whole problem in a coupled way. (author)

  11. Recommendations for the nuclear fuel management in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega C, R.F.

    2003-01-01

    In this work some observations about the economic and strategic importance of the nuclear fuel management of a nucleo electric power station are presented, especially of the fuel management outside of the reactor core or supply function. We know that the economic competitiveness of the nucleo electric generation in fact resides in its low cost of fuel, in comparison with other alternative energy generation sources. Notwithstanding, frequently it is not given to this function the importance that should to have. The objective of this work is to focus again the mission of this activity, at view of the evolution and the peculiarities of the international markets of the nuclear fuel cycle. Equally a brief exhibition of the markets is made, from the uranium supply until the post- irradiation phase. In the case of the pre-irradiation phase we are in front of a market that the buyers dominate and that seemingly it will not present bigger problems in the next years, however situations exist like the decrease of the existent uranium inventories and the lack opening of new mines that can change the panorama. In relation with the post-irradiation phase, is necessary to study the strategies followed by other countries as the one uranium and plutonium recycled. As I have observed that the reality of that this passing in these markets and the practice of the fuel management, sometimes do not go of the hand, I have looked for to contribute some ideas and suggestions, on as going adapting this important function. (Author)

  12. Spent fuel management in China: Current status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the development of nuclear power in China, its status of operating nuclear power plants and progress of on-going NPP projects are described. With the arising of spent fuel from NPPs, a national policy of a closed nuclear fuel cycle has been determined. Following storage at reactor sites for at least 5 years (generally maximum 10 years), spent fuel will be transferred to an away-from-reactor pool type centralized storage facility. Adjacent to the storage facility, a multi-purpose reprocessing pilot plant will be set up by the end of this century. An industrial scale reprocessing plant would be succeeded around the year 2020. China's spent fuel management activities include at-reactor storage, transportation, away-from-reactor storage and reprocessing. Relatively detailed description of the work done up to now on spent fuel management and plans for the future are described. It should be noted that activities related to the management of high level radioactive waste are not included here. (author)

  13. Development of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Management Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Colozza, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA Exploration program. The passive thermal management system relies on heat conduction within highly thermally conductive cooling plates to move the heat from the central portion of the cell stack out to the edges of the fuel cell stack. Using the passive approach eliminates the need for a coolant pump and other cooling loop components within the fuel cell system which reduces mass and improves overall system reliability. Previous development demonstrated the performance of suitable highly thermally conductive cooling plates that could conduct the heat, provide a sufficiently uniform temperature heat sink for each cell of the fuel cell stack, and be substantially lighter than the conventional thermal management approach. Tests were run with different materials to evaluate the design approach to a heat exchanger that could interface with the edges of the passive cooling plates. Measurements were made during fuel cell operation to determine the temperature of individual cooling plates and also to determine the temperature uniformity from one cooling plate to another.

  14. Growing dimensions. Spent fuel management at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.

    1998-01-01

    More than 550 nuclear research reactors are operating or shout down around the world. At many of these reactors, spent fuel from their operations is stored, pending decisions on its final disposition. In recent years, problems associated with this spent fuel storage have loomed larger in the international nuclear community. In efforts to determine the overall scope of problems and to develop a database on the subject, the IAEA has surveyed research reactor operators in its Member States. Information for the Research Reactor Spent Fuel Database (RRSFDB) so far has been obtained from a limited but representative number of research reactors. It supplements data already on hand in the Agency's more established Research Reactor Database (RRDB). Drawing upon these database resources, this article presents an overall picture of spent fuel management and storage at the world's research reactors, in the context of associated national and international programmes in the field

  15. Optimization of in-core fuel management and control rod strategy in equilibrium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1975-01-01

    An in-core fuel management problem is formulated for the equilibrium fuel cycle in an N-region nuclear reactor model. The formulation shows that the infinite multiplication factor k infinity requisite for newly charged fuel can be separated into two terms - one corresponding to the average k infinity at the end of the cycle and the other representing the direct contribution of the shuffling scheme and control rod programming. This formulation is applied to a three-region cylindrical reactor to obtain simultaneous optimization of shuffling and control rod programming. It is demonstrated that this formulation aids greatly in gaining a better understanding of the effects of changes in the shuffling scheme and control rod programming on equilibrium fuel cycle performance. (auth.)

  16. Safety aspects of dry spent fuel storage and spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botsch, W.; Smalian, S.; Hinterding, P.; Voelzke, H.; Wolff, D.; Kasparek, E.

    2014-01-01

    The storage of spent nuclear fuel (SF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) must conform to safety requirements. Safety aspects like safe enclosure of radioactive materials, safe removal of decay heat, nuclear criticality safety and avoidance of unnecessary radiation exposure must be achieved throughout the storage period. The implementation of these safety requirements can be achieved by dry storage of SF and HLW in casks as well as in other systems such as dry vault storage systems or spent fuel pools, where the latter is neither a dry nor a passive system. In Germany dual purpose casks for SF or HLW are used for safe transportation and interim storage. TUV and BAM, who work as independent experts for the competent authorities, present the storage licensing process including sites and casks and inform about spent nuclear fuel management and issues concerning dry storage of spent nuclear fuel, based on their long experience in these fields (authors)

  17. Synthesis of the diazonium (perfluoroalkyl) benzenesulfonimide monomer from Nafion monomer for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Hua; D'Andrea, Dan; Nguyen, Tuyet-Trinh; Nworie, Chima

    2014-02-01

    One diazonium (perfluoroalkyl) benzenesulfonimide monomer, perfluoro-3, 6-dioxa-4-methyl-7-octene benzenesulfonyl imide, has been synthesized from Nafion monomer for the first time. With trifluorovinyl ether and diazonium precursors, the partially-fluorinated diazonium PFSI monomer can be polymerized and will provide chemically bonding with carbon electrode in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. A systematic study of the synthesis and characterization of this diazonium PFSI monomer has been conducted by varying reaction conditions. The optimized synthesis method has been established in the lab.

  18. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormuth, K.W.; Nuttall, K.

    1987-01-01

    Canada has established an extensive research program to develop and demonstrate the technology for safely disposing of nuclear fuel waste from Canadian nuclear electric generating stations. The program focuses on the concept of disposal deep in plutonic rock, which is abundant in the province of Ontario, Canada's major producer of nuclear electricity. Research is carried out at field research areas in the Canadian Precambrian Shield, and in government and university laboratories. The schedule calls for a document assessing the disposal concept to be submitted to regulatory and environmental agencies in late 1988. This document will form the basis for a review of the concept by these agencies and by the public. No site selection will be carried out before this review is completed. 10 refs.; 2 figs

  19. Influence of the poison management in the optimization of the fuel management in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Ipojuca, T. da.

    1981-03-01

    The global optimum fuel and poison management policy was determined by the method of Dynamic Programming. A 620 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor similar to Angra I was studied. The reactor core was divided into three regions of equal volume surrounded by a reflector. Two fuel shuffling schemes and three poison management schemes were simultaneously employed, and fifteen consecutive stages were studied. When uniform poisoning was permitted in all the three regions the out-in scheme of fuel shuffling was the best scheme along the cycles. For the first stages the poison management reduces the generated energy cost, but this reduction gets smaller along the cycles. (Author) [pt

  20. Fuel management for TRIGA reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totenbier, R.E.; Levine, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    One responsibility of the Supervisor of Reactor Operations is to follow the TRIGA core depletion and recommend core loading changes for refueling and special experiments. Calculations required to analyze such changes normally use digital computers and are extremely difficult to perform for one who is not familiar with computer language and nuclear reactor diffusion theory codes. The TRICOM/SCRAM program developed to perform such calculations for the Penn State TRIGA Breazeale Reactor (PSBR), has a very simple input format and is one which can be used by persons having no knowledge of computer codes. The person running the program need not understand computer language such as Fortran, but should be familiar with reactor core geometry and effects of loading changes. To further simplify the input requirements but still allow for all of the studies normally needed by the reactor operations supervisor, the options required for input have been isolated to two. Given a master deck of computer cards one needs to change only three cards; a title card, core energy history information card and one with core changes. With this input, the program can provide individual fuel element burn-up for a given period of operation and the k eff of the core. If a new loading is desired, a new master deck containing the changes is also automatically provided. The life of a new core loading can be estimated by feeding in projected core burn-up factors and observing the resulting loss in individual fuel elements. The code input and output formats have now been made sufficiently convenient and informative as to be incorporated into a standard activity for the Reactor Operations Supervisor. (author)

  1. A database system for enhancing fuel records management capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieke, Phil; Razvi, Junaid

    1994-01-01

    The need to modernize the system of managing a large variety of fuel related data at the TRIGA Reactors Facility at General Atomics, as well as the need to improve NRC nuclear material reporting requirements, prompted the development of a database to cover all aspects of fuel records management. The TRIGA Fuel Database replaces (a) an index card system used for recording fuel movements, (b) hand calculations for uranium burnup, and (c) a somewhat aged and cumbersome system of recording fuel inspection results. It was developed using Microsoft Access, a relational database system for Windows. Instead of relying on various sources for element information, users may now review individual element statistics, record inspection results, calculate element burnup and more, all from within a single application. Taking full advantage of the ease-of-use features designed in to Windows and Access, the user can enter and extract information easily through a number of customized on screen forms, with a wide variety of reporting options available. All forms are accessed through a main 'Options' screen, with the options broken down by categories, including 'Elements', 'Special Elements/Devices', 'Control Rods' and 'Areas'. Relational integrity and data validation rules are enforced to assist in ensuring accurate and meaningful data is entered. Among other items, the database lets the user define: element types (such as FLIP or standard) and subtypes (such as fuel follower, instrumented, etc.), various inspection codes for standardizing inspection results, areas within the facility where elements are located, and the power factors associated with element positions within a reactor. Using fuel moves, power history, power factors and element types, the database tracks uranium burnup and plutonium buildup on a quarterly basis. The Fuel Database was designed with end-users in mind and does not force an operations oriented user to learn any programming or relational database theory in

  2. Generic waste management concepts for six LWR fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePue, J.D.

    1979-04-01

    This report supplements the treatment of waste management issues provided in the Generic Environmental Statement on the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel in light water cooled reactors (GESMO, NUREG-0002). Three recycle and three no-recycle options are described in this document. Management of the radioactive wastes that would result from implementation of either type of fuel cycle alternative is discussed. For five of the six options, wastes would be placed in deep geologic salt repositories for which thermal criteria are considered. Radiation doses to the workers at the repositories and to the general population are discussed. The report also covers the waste management schedule, the land and salt commitments, and the economic costs for the management of wastes generated

  3. ETRR-2 in-core fuel management strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.Y.; Amin, Esmat; Belal, M.G.

    2005-01-01

    The Egypt second research reactor has many irradiation channels, beam tubes and irradiation boxes, inside and outside the reactor core. The core reload configuration has great effect on the core performance and fluxes in the irradiation channels. This paper deals with the design and safety analysis that were performed for the determination of ETRR2 in-core fuel management strategy which fulfills neutronic design criteria, safety reactor operation, utility optimization and achieve the overall fuel management criteria. The core is divided into 8 zones, in order to obtain the minimum and adjacent fuel movement scheme that is recommended from the operational point of view. Then a search for the initial core using backward iteration, one get different initial cores, one initial core would assume the equilibrium core after 250 full power days of operation, while the other assumes equilibrium after 199 full power days, and shows a better performance of power peaking factor. (author)

  4. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 17: Considering social acceptability of fuels treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Esposito

    2006-01-01

    When making decisions about fuels treatments, forest managers need to assess not only the biological impacts of a treatment, but the social impacts as well. Social acceptability is based on value judgments by people-their notions of what is "good" and what is "better." This fact sheet discusses six questions that may be useful for framing initial...

  5. Methods and techniques of nuclear in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, A.J. de.

    1992-04-01

    Review of methods of nuclear in-core fuel management (the minimal critical mass problem, minimal power peaking) and calculational techniques: reactorphysical calculations (point reactivity models, continuous refueling, empirical methods, depletion perturbation theory, nodal computer programs); optimization techniques (stochastic search, linear programming, heuristic parameter optimization). (orig./HP)

  6. In-core fuel management code package validation for BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The main goal of the present CRP (Coordinated Research Programme) was to develop benchmarks which are appropriate to check and improve the fuel management computer code packages and their procedures. Therefore, benchmark specifications were established which included a set of realistic data for running in-core fuel management codes. Secondly, the results of measurements and/or operating data were also provided to verify and compare with these parameters as calculated by the in-core fuel management codes or code packages. For the BWR it was established that the Mexican Laguna Verde 1 BWR would serve as the model for providing data on the benchmark specifications. It was decided to provide results for the first 2 cycles of Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde reactor. The analyses of the above benchmarks are performed in two stages. In the first stage, the lattice parameters are generated as a function of burnup at different voids and with and without control rod. These lattice parameters form the input for 3-dimensional diffusion theory codes for over-all reactor analysis. The lattice calculations were performed using different methods, such as, Monte Carlo, 2-D integral transport theory methods. Supercell Model and transport-diffusion model with proper correction for burnable absorber. Thus the variety of results should provide adequate information for any institute or organization to develop competence to analyze In-core fuel management codes. 15 refs, figs and tabs

  7. Transition cycle fuel management problems of NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, B.; Pevec, D.; Smuc, T.; Urli, N.

    1989-01-01

    Transition cycle fuel management problems are described and illustrated using results and experience attained during core reload design of NPP Krsko. Improved version of computer code package PSU-LEOPARD/Mcrac is successfully applied to NPP Krsko loading pattern design. (author)

  8. Fuels and fire in land-management planning. Part 1. Forest-fuel classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne G. Maxwell; Franklin R. Ward

    1981-01-01

    This report describes a way to collect and classify the total fuel complex within a planning area. The information can be used as input for appraising and rating probable fire behavior and calculating expected costs and losses from various land uses and management alternatives, reported separately as Part 2 and Part 3 of this series. This total package can be used...

  9. Synthesis of novel acid electrolytes for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcock, James L.

    1988-11-01

    A 40 millimole per hour scale aerosol direct fluorination reactor was constructed. F-Methyl F-4-methoxybutanoate and F-4-methoxybutanoyl fluoride were synthesized by aerosol direct fluorination of methyl 4-methoxybutanoate. Basic hydrolysis of the perfluorinated derivatives produce sodium F-4 methoxybutanoate which was pyrolyzed to F-3-methoxy-1-propene. Purification and shipment of 33 grams of F-3-methoxy-1-propene followed. Syntheses by analogous methods allowed production and shipment of 5 grams of F-3-ethoxy 1-propene, 18 grams of F-3-(2-methoxy.ethoxy) 1-propene, and 37 grams of F-3,3-dimethyl 1-butene. Eighteen grams of F-2,2-dimethyl 1-chloropropane was produced directly and shipped. As suggested by other contractors, 5 grams of F-3-methoxy 1-iodopropane, and 5 grams of F-3-(2-methoxy.ethoxy) 1-iodopropane were produced by converting the respective precursor acid sodium salts produced for olefin synthesis to the silver salts and pyrolyzing them with iodine. Each of these compounds was prepared for the first time by the aerosol fluorination process during the course of the contract. These samples were provided to other Gas Research Institute (GRI) contractors for synthesis of perfluorinated sulfur (VI) and phosphorous (V) acids.

  10. Critical management system for nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, Ichiro; Seki, Eiji.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to provide display for the scale of accidents and critical state by detecting gamma-rays issued from nuclear fuels by gamma-ray level indicators to obtain outputs in proportion to the input level of the gamma-rays based on the detected pulse signals. Constitution: The gamma-ray level indicators comprises a plastic scintillator that emits light upon input of gamma-rays and a photomultiplier that amplifies weak fluorescence obtained from the scintillator. The photomultiplier is applied with a high voltage from a power source. A pre-amplifier amplifies pulse signals corresponding to individual gamma-rays at a high amplification factor and send them to a pulse counter circuit if the detected signal level from the gamma-ray level indicators is low, or amplifies the pulse detection signals at a low amplification factor and sends them to a voltage pulse averaging circuit if the detection signal level is high. A signal procession circuit selects the output from the pulse counter circuit or the voltage pulse averaging circuit. Thus, the system has a linear characteristic over a wide range equivalent to a wide range of incident gamma-rays. (Horiuchi, T.)

  11. Catalytic synthesis of alcoholic fuels for transportation from syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiongxiao Wu

    2012-12-15

    Based on input from computational catalyst screening, an experimental investigation of promising catalyst candidates for methanol synthesis from syngas has been carried out. Cu-Ni alloys of different composition have been identified as potential candidates for methanol synthesis. These Cu-Ni alloy catalysts have been synthesized and tested in a fixed-bed continuous-flow reactor for CO hydrogenation. The metal area based activity for a Cu-Ni/SiO2 catalyst is at the same level as a Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 model catalyst. The high activity and selectivity of silica supported Cu-Ni alloy catalysts agrees with the fact that the DFT calculations identified Cu-Ni alloys as highly active and selective catalysts for the hydrogenation of CO to form methanol. This work has also provided a systematic study of Cu-Ni catalysts for methanol synthesis from syngas. The following observations have been made: (1) Cu-Ni catalysts (Cu/Ni molar ratio equal to 1) supported on SiO2, ZrO2, {gamma}-Al2O3, and carbon nanotubes exhibit very different selectivities during CO hydrogenation. However, the metal area based CO conversion rates of all supported Cu-Ni catalysts are at the same level. Carbon nanotubes and SiO2 supported Cu-Ni catalysts show high activity and selectivity for methanol synthesis. The Cu-Ni/ZrO2 catalyst exhibits high methanol selectivity at lower temperatures (250 deg. C), but the selectivity shifts to hydrocarbons and dimethyl ether at higher temperatures (> 275 deg. C). It seems likely that the Cu-Ni alloys always produce methanol, but that some supports further convert methanol to different products. (2) Cu-Ni/SiO2 catalysts have been prepared with different calcination and reduction procedures and tested in the synthesis of methanol from H2/CO. The calcination of the impregnated catalysts (with/without calcination step) and different reduction procedures with varying hydrogen concentration have significant influence on Cu-Ni alloy formation and the alloy particle size and

  12. Fuel cells and electricity companies - new risk management opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whale, M.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' Deregulation, distributed generation, combined heat and power, renewables, fuel cells, hydrogen. Power companies are facing a rapidly evolving environment that is testing their ability to effectively deploy capital and earn profits. While recent deregulation trends have shifted the structure of power markets into separating generators from distributors, the improving economic value proposition offered by smaller scale distributed generation technologies - such as fuel cells - would seem to be a conflicting development. In this complex and changing environment, decisions based on the economic reality of the capital markets are likely to prevail. By examining the opportunity to enhance risk management offered by stationary fuel cells, particularly in CHP applications, we provide a context for the issues being discussed in today's sessions focusing on power companies and electric utilities. Our risk management perspective suggests a pathway for implementing fuel cells in combined heat and power applications that large power generators can introduce in increasingly smaller sizes. With capital costs of fuel cells high and risk tolerance of power companies low, the challenge for smaller technology developers will be to reduce the apparently long time horizon that persists for substantial deployment. (author)

  13. Status of spent fuel management in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, R.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear generating capacity in the UK is static with no units currently under construction following the completion of the Sizewell B PWR. The Government's reviews of nuclear energy policy and radioactive waste management policy have been published following a public consultation procedure, largely with an endorsement of current policies. Nuclear Electric plc (NE) and Scottish Nuclear Limited's (SNL) AGR and PWR stations are to be privatised as two subsidiaries of a holding company, and it is planned that the Magnox stations and their liabilities will be kept in the public sector, initially in a stand alone company but ultimately integrated with BNFL. Prompt reprocessing of all Magnox fuel will continue. NE and SNL have signed contracts for extensive reprocessing of AGR fuel. In addition, SNL has agreed contractual arrangements with BNFL for long term storage of its remaining overlife arisings of AGR fuel and has therefore on commercial ground opted not to dry store their fuel at the reactor site. NE have not yet made a decision on the fate of their AGR fuel not covered by existing reprocessing contracts. No option selection has taken place for PWR fuel. Following the closure of the Dounreay PFR and the withdrawal from the EFR project, the option of recycle of plutonium in fast reactors has been suspended. (author)

  14. Sustainomics of the AMBIDEXTER-NEC Fuel Cycle and Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Se Kee; Lee, Young Joon; Ham, Tae Kyu; Seo, Myung Hwan; Hong, Sung Taek; Kwon, Tae An [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Energy issues these days become planetary concerns, recognized as the major driver for the resiliency of the earth in the sustainomics framework of the society, economy and environment axes. In the circumstances, in order for the nuclear to take advantage of its GHG-free nature, criticisms associated with the fuel cycle should be defied. As long as the uranium fuel cycle persists, problems bearing on the HLW management and the proliferation prevention could be neither completely decoupled nor independently resolved. Geopolitics around the Korean peninsula makes them be more complicated. Reference of the AMBIDEXTER fuel cycle relies on the DUPIC technology. Combined with fluoride volatility process, desired quantity of uranium contents in the PWR spent fuel powder could be removed. Then, the reactor system runs with the fluorides salt of this uranium-reduced DUPIC fuel material. Surplus uranium from the AMBIDEXTER-DUPIC1 processes should satisfy the LLW classification criteria. So far, the sustainomics goal of the AMBIDEXTER fuel cycle focuses on generating energy from the HLW, meanwhile, converting into LLW without jeopardizing proliferation transparency.

  15. Colloidal sol-gel synthesis of oxides: application to the precursors of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossard, Alban

    2014-01-01

    One of the main objectives for the future nuclear fuel cycle is the recycling of the minor actinides. Different options are considered: their integration into a new fuel for a prospect of a closed fuel cycle or their transmutation in order to significantly decrease the long-term radiotoxicity of ultimate wastes. In both cases, the synthesis of new advanced materials integrating the actinides jointly is required. Sol-gel processes allow the organization of the material at the colloidal scale or the insertion of controlled porosity using 'templates'. Furthermore, the possibility to work in a 'wet environment' prevents the formation of pulverulent powders which are contaminant in the case of materials incorporating radioactive elements. The main purpose of this work is to demonstrate the adaptability of this route to the nuclear field. Firstly, a methodology of synthesis from a colloidal sol-gel route was set up on a non-radioactive zirconium-based system in order to characterize and understand of the different mechanisms of this synthesis. Then, studies on shaping, including insertion of porosity, were performed. Zirconia monoliths have been obtained thanks to a coupling between a colloidal sol-gel process and the formation of an emulsion stabilized by clusters of solid particles. Finally, a transposition of this work to an uranium-based system was introduced, pointing out different promising perspectives specially concerning the possibilities of shaping of the final material. (author) [fr

  16. Used fuel management system architecture and interface analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nutt, Mark [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Howard, Robert; Busch, Ingrid [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carter, Joe; Delley, Alexcia [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Hardin, Ernest; Kalinina, Elena [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM (United States); Cotton, Thomas [Complex Systems LLC, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-07-01

    between at-reactor used fuel management, consolidated storage facilities, and disposal facilities, along with the development of supporting logistics simulation tools, have been initiated to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other stakeholders with information regarding the various alternatives for managing used nuclear fuel (UNF) generated by the current fleet of light water reactors operating in the United States. An important UNF management system interface consideration is the need for ultimate disposal of UNF assemblies contained in waste packages that are sized to be compatible with different geologic media. Thermal analyses indicate that waste package sizes for the geologic media under consideration by the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign may be significantly smaller than the canisters being used for on-site dry storage by the nuclear utilities. Therefore, at some point along the UNF disposition pathway, there could be a need to repackage fuel assemblies already loaded and being loaded into the dry storage canisters currently in use. The implications of where and when the packaging or repackaging of commercial UNF will occur are key questions being addressed in this evaluation. The analysis demonstrated that thermal considerations will have a major impact on the operation of the system and that acceptance priority, rates, and facility start dates have significant system implications. (authors)

  17. Aviation Management Perception of Biofuel as an Alternative Fuel Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marticek, Michael

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore lived experiences and perceptions from a population of 75 aviation managers in various locations in Pennsylvania about the use of aviation biofuel and how it will impact the aviation industry. The primary research question for this study focused on the impact of biofuel on the airline industry and how management believes biofuel can contribute to the reduction of fossil fuel. Grounded in the conceptual framework of sustainability, interview data collected from 27 airline and fueling leaders were analyzed for like terms, coded, and reduced to 3 themes. Data were organized and prioritized based on frequency of mention. The findings represented themes of (a) flight planning tools, (b) production, and (c) costs that are associated with aviation fuel. The results confirmed findings addressed in the literature review, specifically that aviation biofuel will transform the airline industry through lower cost and production. These findings have broad applicability for all management personnel in the aviation industry. Implications for social change and improved business environments could be realized with a cleaner environment, reduced fuel emissions, and improved air quality.

  18. Used fuel management system architecture and interface analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, Mark; Howard, Robert; Busch, Ingrid; Carter, Joe; Delley, Alexcia; Hardin, Ernest; Kalinina, Elena; Cotton, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    between at-reactor used fuel management, consolidated storage facilities, and disposal facilities, along with the development of supporting logistics simulation tools, have been initiated to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other stakeholders with information regarding the various alternatives for managing used nuclear fuel (UNF) generated by the current fleet of light water reactors operating in the United States. An important UNF management system interface consideration is the need for ultimate disposal of UNF assemblies contained in waste packages that are sized to be compatible with different geologic media. Thermal analyses indicate that waste package sizes for the geologic media under consideration by the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign may be significantly smaller than the canisters being used for on-site dry storage by the nuclear utilities. Therefore, at some point along the UNF disposition pathway, there could be a need to repackage fuel assemblies already loaded and being loaded into the dry storage canisters currently in use. The implications of where and when the packaging or repackaging of commercial UNF will occur are key questions being addressed in this evaluation. The analysis demonstrated that thermal considerations will have a major impact on the operation of the system and that acceptance priority, rates, and facility start dates have significant system implications. (authors)

  19. Status and prospects for spent fuel management in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, P.

    1998-01-01

    The 70's oil crisis has shown that the energy resource dependence of France was too high. The decision was made by the French government to accelerate the implementation of an ambitious nuclear power programme, based on Light Water Reactors, and to do the utmost to reuse the energy bearing material included in the spent fuel. The French nuclear policy has not changed since then. This paper is aimed at describing the present status of implementation of this policy, and the associated prospects. It will first sum up the presentation made in 1995 to the Regular Advisory Group of IAEA on Spent Fuel Management. Then, it will update the situation of the main actors of the spent fuel management policy in France: EDF, the national utility; COGEMA, world leader on almost all the steps of the fuel cycle; CEA, the national research body in the field of nuclear science and its applications; ANDRA, national body in charge of the management of the waste arising from the nuclear activities in France, final disposal included. (author)

  20. In-core fuel management via perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingle, J.O.

    1975-01-01

    A two-step procedure is developed for the optimization of in-core nuclear fuel management using perturbation theory to predict the effects of various core configurations. The first procedure is a cycle cost minimization using linear programming with a zoned core and discrete burnup groups. The second program utilizes an individual fuel assembly shuffling sequence to minimize the maldistribution of power generation. This latter quantity is represented by a figure of merit or by an assembly power peaking factor. A pressurized water reactor example calculation is utilized. 24 references

  1. A discrete optimization method for nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argaud, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    Nuclear loading pattern elaboration can be seen as a combinational optimization problem of tremendous size and with non-linear cost-functions, and search are always numerically expensive. After a brief introduction of the main aspects of nuclear fuel management, this paper presents a new idea to treat the combinational problem by using informations included in the gradient of a cost function. The method is to choose, by direct observation of the gradient, the more interesting changes in fuel loading patterns. An example is then developed to illustrate an operating mode of the method, and finally, connections with simulated annealing and genetic algorithms are described as an attempt to improve search processes

  2. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, A.; Dufour, Ph.; Golfier, H.; Grouiller, J.P.; Guillet, J.L.; Poinot, Ch.; Youinou, G.; Zaetta, A.

    2003-01-01

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h) -1 . More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate

  3. Synthesis of Diopside by Solution Combustion Process Using Glycine Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherikar, Baburao N.; Umarji, A. M.

    Nano ceramic Diopside (CaMgSi2O6) powders are synthesized by Solution Combustion Process(SCS) using Calcium nitrate, Magnesium nitrate as oxidizer and glycine as fuel, fumed silica as silica source. Ammonium nitrate (AN) is used as extra oxidizer. Effect of AN on Diopside phase formation is investigated. The adiabatic flame temperatures are calculated theoretically for varying amount of AN according to thermodynamic concept and correlated with the observed flame temperatures. A “Multi channel thermocouple setup connected to computer interfaced Keithley multi voltmeter 2700” is used to monitor the thermal events during the process. An interpretation based on maximum combustion temperature and the amount of gases produced during reaction for various AN compositions has been proposed for the nature of combustion and its correlation with the characteristics of as synthesized powder. These powders are characterized by XRD, SEM showing that the powders are composed of polycrystalline oxides with crystallite size of 58nm to 74nm.

  4. Synthesis gas from biomass for fuels and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Drift, A.; Boerrigter, H.

    2006-01-01

    Making H2 and CO (syngas) from biomass is widely recognised as a necessary step in the production of various second generation biofuels. There are two major ways to produce a biosyngas: fluidised bed gasification with catalytic reformer or entrained flow gasification. The latter option requires extensive pre-treatment such as flash pyrolysis, slow pyrolysis, torrefaction, or fluidized bed gasification at a low temperature. Cleaned and conditioned biosyngas can be used to synthesize second generation biofuels such as Fischer-Tropsch fuels, methanol, DME, mixed alcohols, and even pure hydrogen. The report describes the different technical options to produce, clean and condition bio-syngas. Furthermore, issues related to scale and biomass transport are covered shortly

  5. Spent fuel management options for research reactors in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    Research reactors (RRs) have been operated in Latin America since the late 1950s, and a total of 23 RRs have been built in the region. At the time of writing (November 2005), 18 RRs are in operation, 4 have been shut down and 1 has been decommissioned. The number of operating RRs in Latin America represents around 6% of the existing operational RRs worldwide and around 21% of the RRs operating in developing countries. Common to all RRs in the region is a consistent record of safe and successful operation. With the purpose of carrying out a collaborative study of different aspects of the management of spent fuel from RRs, some countries from the region proposed to the IAEA in 2000 the organization of a Regional Project. The project (IAEA TC Regional Project RLA/4/018) that was approved for the biennium 2001-2002 and extended for 2003-2004 included the participation of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico and Peru. The main objectives of this project were: (a) to define the basic conditions for a regional strategy for managing spent fuel that will provide solutions compatible with the economic and technological realities of the countries involved; and (b) to determine what is needed for the temporary wet and dry storage of spent fuel from the research reactors in the countries of the Latin American region that participated in the project. This TECDOC is based on the results of TC Regional Project RLA/4/018. This project was successful in identifying and assessing a number of viable alternatives for RRSF management in the Latin American region. Options for operational and interim storage, spent fuel conditioning and final disposal have been carefully considered. This report presents the views of Latin American experts on RR spent fuel management and will be useful as reference material for the Latin American RR community, decision making authorities in the region and the public in general

  6. Engineered Barrier System - Mechanical Integrity of KBS-3 Spent Fuel Canisters. Report from a Workshop. Synthesis and extended abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-09-15

    SKI is preparing to review the license applications being developed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) for a final repository for the geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel in the year 2009. As part of its preparation, SKI is conducting a series of technical workshops on key aspects of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS). The workshop reported here mainly dealt with the mechanical integrity of KBS-3 spent fuel canisters. This included assessment and review of various loading conditions, structural integrity models and mechanical properties of the copper shell and the cast iron insert. Degradation mechanisms such as stress corrosion cracking and brittle creep fracture were also briefly addressed. Previous workshops have addressed the overall concept for long-term integrity of the EBS, the manufacturing, testing and QA of the EBS, the performance confirmation for the EBS, long-term stability of the buffer and the backfill, corrosion properties of copper canisters and the spent fuel dissolution and source term modelling. The goal of ongoing review work in connection of the workshop series is to achieve a comprehensive overview of all aspects of SKB's EBS and spent fuel work prior to the handling of the forthcoming license application. This report aims to summarise the issues discussed at the workshop and to extract the essential viewpoints that have been expressed. The report is not a comprehensive record of all the discussions at the workshop, and individual statements made by workshop participants should be regarded as personal opinions rather than SKI viewpoints. Results from the EBS workshops series will be used as one important basis in future review work. This reports includes in addition to the workshop synthesis, questions to SKB identified prior to the workshop, and extended abstracts for introductory presentations

  7. Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, G. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology)

    1993-05-01

    The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H[sub 2] and CO, usually containing CO[sub 2]) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

  8. Brief draft on surface and subsurface storage of high level and long-lived radioactive wastes. Spent fuels synthesis file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, C.; Jaecki, P.

    2002-01-01

    This document makes a synthesis of the results of two brief draft studies performed in 2002 about the surface and subsurface storage of spent fuels. These studies stress on the long duration aspect of the disposal: feasibility of a secular disposal facility, potential risks and safety level of such a facility, estimation of the initial investment and of operation and maintenance costs. The main points of the specifications and the input data are presented first, and then the subsurface and surface draft studies are described. Content: specifications (imposed design principles and options, dry corrosion, input data); subsurface storage (description and design options, thermal dimensioning and ventilation, geotechnical stability of the facility, subsurface water management, dry corrosion, infrastructure durability, safety, monitoring, security and physical protection, technical-economical aspects, case of Mox fuel, case of glass packages); surface storage (description and design options, thermal dimensioning and ventilation, mechanical dimensioning of the facility, dry corrosion, infrastructure durability, safety, monitoring, security and physical protection, technical-economical aspects, case of Mox fuel, case of glass packages); conclusions and perspectives. (J.S.)

  9. The Spent Fuel Management in Finland and Modifications of Spent Fuel Storages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maaranen, Paeivi

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to share the Finnish regulator's (STUK) experiences on regulatory oversight of the enlargement of a spent fuel interim storage. An overview of the current situation of spent fuel management in Finland will also be given. In addition, the planned modifications and requirements set for spent fuel storages due to the Fukushima accident are discussed. In Finland, there are four operating reactors, one under construction and two reactors that have a Council of State's Decision-in-Principle to proceed with the planning and licensing of a new reactor. In Olkiluoto, the two operating ASEA-Atom BWR units and the Areva EPR under construction have a shared interim storage for the spent fuel. The storage was designed and constructed in 1980's. The option for enlarging the storage was foreseen in the original design. Considering three operating units to produce their spent fuel and the final disposal to begin in 2022, extra space in the spent fuel storage is estimated to be needed in around 2014. The operator decided to double the number of the spent fuel pools of the storage and the construction began in 2010. The capacity of the enlarged spent fuel storage is considered to be sufficient for the three Olkiluoto units. The enlargement of the interim storage was included in Olkiluoto NPP 1 and 2 operating license. The licensing of the enlargement was conducted as a major plant modification. The operator needed the approval from STUK to conduct the enlargement. Prior to the construction of this modification, the operator was required to submit the similar documentation as needed for applying for the construction license of a nuclear facility. When conducting changes in an old nuclear facility, the new safety requirements have to be followed. The major challenge in the designing the enlargement of the spent fuel storage was to modify it to withstand a large airplane crash. The operator chose to cover the pools with protecting slabs and also to

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Oxide Feedstock Powders for the Fuel Cycle R and D Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voit, Stewart L.; Vedder, Raymond James; Johnson, Jared A.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear fuel feedstock properties, such as physical, chemical, and isotopic characteristics, have a significant impact on the fuel fabrication process and, by extension, the in-reactor fuel performance. This has been demonstrated through studies with UO 2 spanning greater than 50 years. The Fuel Cycle R and D Program with The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy has initiated an effort to develop a better understanding of the relationships between oxide feedstock, fresh fuel properties, and in-reactor fuel performance for advanced mixed oxide compositions. Powder conditioning studies to enable the use of less than ideal powders for ceramic fuel pellet processing are ongoing at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and an understanding of methods to increase the green density and homogeneity of pressed pellets has been gained for certain powders. Furthermore, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing methods for the co-conversion of mixed oxides along with techniques to analyze the degree of mixing. Experience with the fabrication of fuel pellets using co-synthesized multi-constituent materials is limited. In instances where atomically mixed solid solutions of two or more species are needed, traditional ceramic processing methods have been employed. Solution-based processes may be considered viable synthesis options, including co-precipitation (AUPuC), direct precipitation, direct-conversion (Modified Direct Denitration or MDD) and internal/external gelation (sol-gel). Each of these techniques has various advantages and disadvantages. The Fiscal Year 2010 feedstock development work at ORNL focused on the synthesis and characterization of one batch of UO x and one batch of U 80 Ce 20 O x . Oxide material synthesized at ORNL is being shipped to LANL for fuel fabrication process development studies. The feedstock preparation was performed using the MDD process which utilizes a rotary kiln to continuously thermally denitrate double salts of ammonium

  11. International trade and waste and fuel managment issue, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2008-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A global solution for clients, by Yves Linz, AREVA NP; A safer, secure and economical plant, by Andy White, GE Hitachi Nuclear; Robust global prospects, by Ken Petrunik, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited; Development of NPPs in China, by Chen Changbing and Li Huiqiang, Huazhong University of Science and Technology; Yucca Mountain update; and, A class of its own, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear. The Industry Innovation articles in this issue are: Fuel assembly inspection program, by Jim Lemons, Tennessee Valley Authority; and, Improved in-core fuel shuffle for reduced refueling duration, by James Tusar, Exelon Nuclear.

  12. Management of wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heafield, W.; Barlow, P.

    1988-01-01

    The management of wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle is a key activity which affects all stages of the cycle and in which there is intense public interest, particularly at the culmination of waste management activities where dispersal and disposal are practised or are proposed. The different categories of waste are considered - high, intermediate and low level. A description is given of how and where in the fuel cycle they are produced, giving indications of volumes and activities. The fundamental objectives of waste management are reviewed and the application of these objectives to select practicable waste management processes, covering process systems product and safety considerations is discussed. Current technology can deal with the wastes now in storage, those which will be generated from oxide fuel reprocessing and future decommissioning activities; examples of these technologies, ranging from compaction and incineration for low level waste, encapsulation for intermediate level waste through to vitrification for high level waste, are described. The specific objectives relating to disposal are considered in the context of international co-operation on development and national strategies aimed at providing safe, deep repositories over the next 20 years. (author)

  13. Radioactive wastes and spent fuels management in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maset, Elvira R.

    2006-01-01

    CNEA was created in 1950 and since then has carried out research and development activities, production of radioisotopes, medical and industrial applications, and those activities related with the nuclear fuel cycle, including the operation of two nuclear power stations. More ever, different public and private institutions use radioactive materials in medical, industrial and research activities. These activities generate different types of radioactive waste, desuse sealed sources and spent fuel. The management of radioactive waste of all types produced in the country, as the spent nuclear fuel of power and research reactors and the used radioactive sources was always and it is at present a CNEA's responsibility. In February 2003, according to the Law No. 25.018, called 'Management of Radioactive Waste Regimen', the 'Radioactive Waste Management National Programme' was created by CNEA to fulfill the institutional functions and responsibilities established in the Law, in order to guarantee the safe management of radioactive waste according to the regulations established by the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Agency and to the legislation in force. (author) [es

  14. Practice of fuel management and outage strategy at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farago, P.; Hamvas, I.; Szecsenyi, Zs.; Nemes, I.; Javor, E.

    2000-01-01

    The Paks Nuclear Power Plant generates almost 40% of Hungarian electricity production at lowest price. In spite of this fact the reduction of operational and maintenance costs is one of the most important goal of the plant management. The proper fuel management and outage strategy can give a considerable influence for this cost reduction. The aim of loading pattern planning is to get the required cycle length with available fuel cassettes and to keep all key parameters of safety analysis under safety limits. Another important point is production at profit, where both the fuel and spent fuel cost are determining. Earlier the conditions given by our only fuel supplier restricted our possibilities, so at the beginning the fuel arrangement changing was the only way to improve efficiency of fuel using. As first step we introduced the low leakage core design. The next step was the 4 years cycle using of some cassettes. By this way nearly half of 3 years cycle old cassettes remained in the core for fourth cycle. In the immediate future we want to use profiled cassettes developed by Russian supplier. Simultaneously we will load new type of WWER cassettes with burnable poison developed by BNFL Company. Hereby we can apply more BNFL cassettes for four years cycle even more. Both cost of fuel and number of spent fuel can be reduced besides keeping parameters under safety limits. The Hungarian in service inspection rules determine that every four year we have to make a complete inspection of reactor vessel. Therefore earlier we had two types of outages. Every 4 years we planned a long outage with 55-65 days duration and normal ones with about 30-35 days duration between the long ones. During the normal outages this way did not give us enough room to utilise the shortest possible critical path determined by works on reactor. Some years ago we changed our outage strategy. Now we plan every 4 years a long outage, and between them one normal and two short ones. As a result the

  15. Integrating fire behavior models and geospatial analysis for wildland fire risk assessment and fuel management planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan A. Ager; Nicole M. Vaillant; Mark A. Finney

    2011-01-01

    Wildland fire risk assessment and fuel management planning on federal lands in the US are complex problems that require state-of-the-art fire behavior modeling and intensive geospatial analyses. Fuel management is a particularly complicated process where the benefits and potential impacts of fuel treatments must be demonstrated in the context of land management goals...

  16. 78 FR 13315 - Bridger-Teton National Forest; Wyoming; Teton to Snake Fuels Management Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Fuels Management Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an...) to document the potential effects of the Teton to Snake Fuels Management Project. The analysis will... Caribou-Targhee National Forest. The Teton to Snake Fuels Management Project was previously scoped and...

  17. Use of expert knowledge to develop fuel maps for wildland fire management [chapter 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Matt Reeves

    2012-01-01

    Fuel maps are becoming an essential tool in fire management because they describe, in a spatial context, the one factor that fire managers can control over many scales ­ surface and canopy fuel characteristics. Coarse-resolution fuel maps are useful in global, national, and regional fire danger assessments because they help fire managers effectively plan, allocate, and...

  18. Development of Experimental Facilities for Advanced Spent Fuel Management Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, G. S.; Jung, W. M.; Ku, J. H. [and others

    2004-07-01

    The advanced spent fuel management process(ACP), proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel, is under research and development. This technology convert spent fuels into pure metal-base uranium with removing the highly heat generating materials(Cs, Sr) efficiently and reducing of the decay heat, volume, and radioactivity from spent fuel by 1/4. In the next phase(2004{approx}2006), the demonstration of this technology will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For this demonstration, the hot cell facilities of {alpha}-{gamma} type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of {beta}-{gamma} type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. In this study, the design requirements are established, and the process detail work flow was analysed for the optimum arrangement to ensure effective process operation in hot cell. And also, the basic and detail design of hot cell facility and process, and safety analysis was performed to secure conservative safety of hot cell facility and process.

  19. Spent fuel management in Hungary: Current status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferenczi, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Paks Nuclear Power Plant Ltd. operates the only NPP of Hungary, consisting of a 4 WWER-440 type units. Since 1989, approximately 40-50 % of the total yearly electricity generation of the country has been supplied by this plant. The fresh fuel is imported from Russia (previously from the Soviet Union) and the spent fuel assemblies are shipped back to Russia for later reprocessing after 5 years of decay storage in the spent fuel pools of the plant. Seeing the political and economical changes that started in Russia, the Paks NPP's management made a decision in 1990 to study the implementation of an independent spent fuel storage facility (ISFSF) at the Paks site and in 1992 to choose the GEC-ALSTHOM's MVDS. On the basis of the Construction License issued by the HAEC, the construction of the ISFSF was started in March 1995. The paper gives general information on the spent fuel arisings, the storage at the site, the shipment to Russia and on the implementation of the ISFSF. (author). 3 refs

  20. Fuel Management at the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, V.L.; Nguyen, N.D.; Luong, B.V.; Le, V.V.; Huynh, T.N.; Nguyen, K.C. [Nuclear Research Institute, 01 Nguyen Tu Luc Street, Dalat City (Viet Nam)

    2011-07-01

    among JSC TVEL, Moscow, Russia and Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute and Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho Falls, USA has been realized. The plan for realization of full core configuration of LEU fuel is planned. In the plan the first working core with 92 fresh LEU FAs will be created. This paper presents the fuel management at the DNRR. (author)

  1. Management of radioactive wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The increased emphasis in many countries on the development and utilization of nuclear power is leading to an expansion of all sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle, giving rise to important policy issues and radioactive-waste management requirements. Consequently, the IAEA and the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD felt that it would be timely to review latest technology for the management of the radioactive wastes arising from nuclear fuel cycle facilities, to identify where important advances have been made, and to indicate those areas where further technological development is needed. Beginning in 1959, the IAEA, either by itself or jointly with OECD/NEA has held seven international symposia on the management of radioactive wastes. The last symposium, on the management of radioactive wastes from fuel reprocessing, was held jointly by the IAEA and OECD/NEA in Paris in November 1972. An objective of the 1976 symposium was to update the information presented at the previous symposia with the latest technological developments and thinking regarding the management and disposal of all categories of radioactive wastes. Consequently, although the scope of the symposium was rather broad, attention was focussed on operational experience and progress in unresolved areas of radioactive waste management. The programme dealt primarily with the solidification of liquid radioactive wastes and disposal of the products, especially the high-level fission products and actinide-containing waste from fuel reprocessing. Other topics covered policy and planning, treatment of hulls and solvent, management of plutonium-contaminated waste, and removal of gaseous radionuclides. The major topic of interest was the current state of the technology for the reduction and incorporation of the high-level radioactive liquid from fuel reprocessing into solid forms, such as calcines, glasses or ceramics, for safe interim storage and eventual disposal. The approaches to vitrification ranged from two stage

  2. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 02: Developing personal responsibility for fuels reduction: Types of information to encourage proactive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    Fuels management responsibilities may include providing local property owners with the information for taking responsibility for reducing fuels on their land. This fact sheet discusses three different types of information that may be useful in programs to engage property owners in fuel reduction activities.

  3. Fuel element burnup measurements for the equilibrium LEU silicide RSG GAS (MPR-30) core under a new fuel management strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinem, Surian; Liem, Peng Hong; Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Surbakti, Tukiran

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Burnup measurement of fuel elements comprising the new equilibrium LEU silicide core of RSG GAS. • The burnup measurement method is based on a linear relationship between reactivity and burnup. • Burnup verification was conducted using an in-house, in-core fuel management code BATAN-FUEL. • A good agreement between the measured and calculated burnup was confirmed. • The new fuel management strategy was confirmed and validated. - Abstract: After the equilibrium LEU silicide core of RSG GAS was achieved, there was a strong need to validate the new fuel management strategy by measuring burnup of fuel elements comprising the core. Since the regulatory body had a great concern on the safety limit of the silicide fuel element burnup, amongst the 35 burnt fuel elements we selected 22 fuel elements with high burnup classes i.e. from 20 to 53% loss of U-235 (declared values) for the present measurements. The burnup measurement method was based on a linear relationship between reactivity and burnup where the measurements were conducted under subcritical conditions using two fission counters of the reactor startup channel. The measurement results were compared with the declared burnup evaluated by an in-house in-core fuel management code, BATAN-FUEL. A good agreement between the measured burnup values and the calculated ones was found within 8% uncertainties. Possible major sources of differences were identified, i.e. large statistical errors (i.e. low fission counters’ count rates), variation of initial U-235 loading per fuel element and accuracy of control rod indicators. The measured burnup of the 22 fuel elements provided the confirmation of the core burnup distribution planned for the equilibrium LEU silicide core under the new fuel management strategy.

  4. Thermal hydraulic model validation for HOR mixed core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Vries, J.W. de; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1997-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic core management model has been developed for the Hoger Onderwijsreactor (HOR), a 2 MW pool-type university research reactor. The model was adopted for safety analysis purposes in the framework of HEU/LEU core conversion studies. It is applied in the thermal-hydraulic computer code SHORT (Steady-state HOR Thermal-hydraulics) which is presently in use in designing core configurations and for in-core fuel management. An elaborate measurement program was performed for establishing the core hydraulic characteristics for a variety of conditions. The hydraulic data were obtained with a dummy fuel element with special equipment allowing a.o. direct measurement of the true core flow rate. Using these data the thermal-hydraulic model was validated experimentally. The model, experimental tests, and model validation are discussed. (author)

  5. In-core fuel management programs for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    In response to the interest shown by Member States, the IAEA organized a co-ordinated research programme to develop and make available in the open domain a set of programs to perform in-core fuel management calculations. This report summarizes the work performed in the context of the CRP. As a result of this programme, complete in-core fuel management packages for three types of reactors, namely PWR's, BWR's and PHWR are now available from the NEA Data Bank. For some reactor types, these program packages are available with three levels of sophistication ranging from simple methods for educational purposes to more comprehensive methods that can be used for reactor design and operation. In addition some operating data have been compiled to allow code validation. (author)

  6. Data requirements and maintenance of records for spent fuel management: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-11-01

    Data collection and maintenance are an essential part of activities required in the lifetime management of spent fuel. Key data on spent fuel are required from the earliest phase of any project. To allow informed decisions for spent fuel management to be made, the data need to be maintained throughout the lifetime of spent fuel management including storage, transport, reprocessing or disposal. This publication is intended to provide a state-of-the-art review of spent fuel data management, including what data need to be gathered for the relevant activities in spent fuel management and how to maintain them by the responsible bodies at various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. It provides some insights on a rational approach to spent fuel data management, considering the common requirements involved in spent fuel management for any Member State. In this regard, the information provided in these sections is mostly generic. After the introductory Section 1 and the Section 2 on data requirements for spent fuel management, Section 3 examines technical parameters that could specify spent fuel characteristics and associated conditions, followed by Section 4 on life cycle management of spent fuel data which includes the maintenance of records and other issues. Finally, some specific examples of the approaches already developed by a number of utilities and national organisations to characterise and track their spent-fuel data are presented in the Annex

  7. Underlying chemistry research for the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.; Sagert, N.H.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Taylor, P.

    1984-04-01

    This document reviews the underlying chemistry research part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, carried out in the Research Chemistry Branch. This research is concerned with developing the basic chemical knowledge and under-standing required in other parts of the Program. There are four areas of underlying research: Waste Form Chemistry, Solute and Solution Chemistry, Rock-Water-Waste Interactions, and Abatement and Monitoring of Gas-Phase Radionuclides

  8. UK methods for studying fuel management in water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayers, F.J.

    1970-10-01

    Current UK methods for studying fuel management and for predicting the reactor physics performance for both light and heavy water moderated power reactors are reviewed. Brief descriptions are given of the less costly computer codes used for initial assessment studies, and also the more elaborate programs associated with detailed evaluation are discussed. Some of the considerations influencing the accuracy of predictions are included with examples of various types of experimental confirmation. (author)

  9. Fuel cycle and waste management demonstration in the IFR Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; Benedict, R.W.; Laidler, J.J.; Battles, J.E.; Miller, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    Argonne's National Laboratory's Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is the main element in the US advanced reactor development program. A unique fuel cycle and waste process technology is being developed for the IFR. Demonstration of this technology at engineering scale will begin within the next year at the EBR-II test facility complex in Idaho. This paper describes the facility being readied for this demonstration, the process to be employed, the equipment being built, and the waste management approach

  10. Review of decommissioning, spent fuel and radwaste management in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamrich, J.

    2000-01-01

    Two nuclear power plants with two WWER reactors are currently under operation in Jaslovske Bohunice and NPP A-1 is under decommissioning on the same site. At the second nuclear site in the Slovak Republic in Mochovce third nuclear power plant with two units is in operation. In accordance with the basic Slovak legislation (Act on Peaceful Utilisation of Nuclear Energy) defining the responsibilities, roles and authorities for all organisations involved in the decommissioning of nuclear installations Nuclear Regulatory Authority requires submission of conceptual decommissioning plans by the licensee. The term 'decommissioning' is used to describe the set of actions to be taken at the end of the useful life of a facility, in order to retire the facility from service while, simultaneously, ensuring proper protection of the workers, the general public and the environment. This set of activities is in principle comprised of planning and organisation of decommissioning inclusive strategy development, post-operational activities, implementation of decommissioning (physical and radiological characterisation, decontamination, dismantling and demolition, waste and spent fuel management), radiological, aspects, completion of decommissioning as well as ensuring of funding for these activities. Responsibility for nuclear installations decommissioning, radwaste and spent fuel, management in Slovakia is with a subsidiary of Slovak Electric called Nuclear Installations Decommissioning Radwaste and Spent Fuel Management (acronym SE VYZ), established on January 1, 1996. This paper provides description of an approach to planning of the NPP A-1 and NPPs with WWER reactors decommissioning, realisation of treatment, conditioning and disposal of radwaste, as well as spent fuel management in Slovakia. It takes into account that detail papers on all these issues will follow later during this meeting. (author)

  11. In-core fuel management practice in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Hark Rho; Lee Choong Sung; Lee Jo Bok

    1997-01-01

    KAERI (KOREA Atomic Energy Research Institute) completed the system performance tests for the HANARO (Hi-flux Advanced Neutron Application Research Reactor) on December 1994. Its initial criticality was achieved on February 8, 1995. A variety of the reactor physics experiments were performed in parallel with configuring the first cycle core and now HANARO is in the third cycle operation. The in-core fuel management in HANARO is performed on the following strategy: 1) the cycle length of the equilibrium core is at least 4 week FPDs, 2) the maximum linear heat generation rate should be within the design limit, 3) the reactor should have shutdown margin of 1% Δk/k at minimum, 4) the available thermal flux should satisfy the users' requirements. This paper presents the fuel management practice in HANARO. Section II briefly describes the design feature of the HANARO and the method of analysis follows in section III and section IV describes In-core fuel management practice and the conclusion is remarked in the final section. (author)

  12. An integrated expert system for optimum in core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Elmoatty, Mona S.; Nagy, M.S.; Aly, Mohamed N.; Shaat, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → An integrated expert system constructed for optimum in core fuel management. → Brief discussion of the ESOIFM Package modules, inputs and outputs. → Package was applied on the DALAT Nuclear Research Reactor (0.5 MW). → The Package verification showed good agreement. - Abstract: An integrated expert system called Efficient and Safe Optimum In-core Fuel Management (ESOIFM Package) has been constructed to achieve an optimum in core fuel management and automate the process of data analysis. The Package combines the constructed mathematical models with the adopted artificial intelligence techniques. The paper gives a brief discussion of the ESOIFM Package modules, inputs and outputs. The Package was applied on the DALAT Nuclear Research Reactor (0.5 MW). Moreover, the data of DNRR have been used as a case study for testing and evaluation of ESOIFM Package. This paper shows the comparison between the ESOIFM Package burn-up results, the DNRR experimental burn-up data, and other DNRR Codes burn-up results. The results showed good agreement.

  13. USA: energy policy and spent fuel and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroll, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    The new US administration under President Bush has shifted political weights in the country's energy policy. The policy pursued by the Clinton administration, which had been focused strongly on energy efficiency and environmental protection, will be revoked in a number of points, and the focus instead will now be on economics and continuity of supply, also against the backdrop of the current power supply crisis in California. However, it is more likely that fossil-fired generating capacity will be expanded or added than new nuclear generating capacity. As far as the policy of managing radioactive waste is concerned, no fast and fundamental changes are expected. Low-level waste arising in medicine, research, industry, and nuclear power plants will be stored in a number of shallow ground burial facilities also involving more than one federal state. The Yucca Mountain repository project will be advanced with a higher budget, and WIPP (Waste Isolation Plant) in the state of New Mexico has been in operation since 1998. Plans for the management of spent fuel elements include interim stores called ISFSIs (Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations) both near and independent of nuclear power sites. Nineteen sites have been licensed, another eighteen are ready to be licensed. In addition, also international spent fuel and nuclear waste management approaches are being discussed in the United States which, inter alia, are meant to offer comprehensive solutions to countries running only a small number of nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  14. Interface agreement for the management of FFTF Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormack, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Hanford Site Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project was formed to manage the SNF at Hanford. The mission of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project is to place the facility in a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition for turnover to the Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) for subsequent D ampersand D. To satisfy both project missions, FFTF SNF must be removed from the FFTF and subsequently dispositioned. This documented provides the interface agreement between FFTF Transition Project and SNF Project for management of the FFTF SNF

  15. Management of the fuel-cycle back-end: The Electricite de France's strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteve, B.

    2001-01-01

    Countries are following three options for management of spent fuel from nuclear power plants: reprocess-recycle, direct disposal, and ''wait and see''. France has adopted the reprocess-recycle strategy for managing its spent fuel, which has created a stable environment for Electricite de France to plan its spent fuel management. However, the French government is planning to debate its spent fuel management strategy and may choose a different direction. A number of factors affecting the choice of spent fuel management strategy are discussed and the benefits of maintaining the status quo from the point of view of the nuclear utility are explained. (author)

  16. The economic production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, E.L.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Yang, R.Y.K. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to discover, (1) study and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalytic systems for the production of oxygenated fuel enhancers from synthesis gas. Specifically, alternative methods of preparing catalysts are to be investigated, and novel catalysts, including sulfur-tolerant ones, are to be pursued. (Task 1); (2) explore, analytically and on the bench scale, novel reactor and process concepts for use in converting syngas to liquid fuel products. (Task 1); (3) simulate by computer the most energy efficient and economically efficient process for converting coal to energy, with primary focus on converting syngas to fuel alcohols. (Task 2); (4) develop on the bench scale the best holistic combination of chemistry, catalyst, reactor and total process configuration integrated with the overall coal conversion process to achieve economic optimization for the conversion of syngas to liquid products within the framework of achieving the maximum cost effective transformation of coal to energy equivalents. (Tasks 1 and 2); and (5) evaluate the combustion, emission and performance characteristics of fuel alcohols and blends of alcohols with petroleum-based fuels. (Task 2)

  17. Safety case for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto - Synthesis 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    TURVA-2012 is Posiva's safety case in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR 2012) and application for a construction licence for a spent nuclear fuel repository. Consistent with the Government Decisions-in- Principle, this foresees a repository developed in bedrock at the Olkiluoto site according to the KBS-3 method, designed to accept spent nuclear fuel from the lifetime operations of the Olkiluoto and Loviisa reactors. Synthesis 2012 presents a synthesis of Posiva Oy's Safety Case 'TURVA-2012' portfolio. It summarises the design basis for the repository at the Olkiluoto site, the assessment methodology and key results of performance and safety assessments. It brings together all the lines of argument for safety, evaluation of compliance with the regulatory requirements, and statement of confidence in long-term safety and Posiva's safety analyses. The TURVA-2012 safety case demonstrates that the proposed repository design provides a safe solution for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, and that the performance and safety assessments are fully consistent with all the legal and regulatory requirements related to long-term safety as set out in Government Decree 736/2008 and in guidance from the nuclear regulator - the STUK. Moreover, Posiva considers that the level of confidence in the demonstration of safety is appropriate and sufficient to submit the construction licence application to the authorities. The assessment of long-term safety includes uncertainties, but these do not affect the basic conclusions on the long-term safety of the repository. (orig.)

  18. The management of the Spend Fuel Pool Water Quality (1996-2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Eui Gyu; Choi, Ho Young; Choi, Mun Jo; Kim, Hyung Wook; Lee, Mun; Lee, Choong Sung; Hur, Soon Ock; Ahn, Guk Hun

    2008-12-15

    The water quality management of spent fuel storage pool water quality in HANARO is important to prevent the corrosion of nuclear fuel and reactor structure material. The condition of the spent fuel storage pool water has been monitored by measuring the electrical conductivity of the spent fuel storage pool purification system and pH periodically. The status of the spent fuel storage pool water quality management was investigated by using the measured data. taken from 1996 to 2007. In general, the electrical conductivity of the spent fuel storage pool water have been managed within 1 {mu}S/cm which is an operation target of HANARO.

  19. Development of pyrochemical spent fuel management in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banfield, Zara; Cogan, John; Farrant, Dave; Gaubert, Emmanuel; Hopkins, Phil; Lewin, Bob [BNFL - Nexia Solutions Limited, Workington Facility, B291 Trenches, Sellafield (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Nexia Solutions is undertaking a programme to investigate the role of pyrochemical techniques for spent nuclear fuel and legacy fuel management. The principal UK client is the energy unit, and the other clients are the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), for legacy fuel conditioning, and BNFL's corporate investment in advanced reactor systems which is contributing to the Generation IV programme. The emphasis of the programme is pragmatic industrialization, which we have identified as key for the establishment of pyrochemical fuel management. From our experience operating fuel manufacture, power generation and reprocessing plant we know that the areas which require particular attention for successful implementation are: - Plant Interfaces, - Operability, - Process Definition, - Underpinning Science. Plant Interfaces encompass the definition of feeds, products, effluents and wastes and whether the process can meet the constraints they impose. Operability is concerned with the sustainability of the plant processes and is linked to the use of nil-maintenance continuous systems and elimination of batch / mechanical operations and maintenance. Process Definition focuses on the performance, control, recovery and safety of individual unit operations. Together these underpin industrial nuclear plant implementability. As an example, we have built a test rig to demonstrate molten salts transfers, since we consider this to be a capability without which pyrochemical processing will not be viable. Similarly, we have developed pilot scale electro-refiner designs for high continuous throughput and we are building development modules to underpin key features of the designs. Scientific work has been targeted at electro-refiner actinide partitioning and has been expanded to investigate other critical areas of the process which include efficient uranium / salt separation, salt clean up and the development of waste forms which perform at least as well as borosilicate glass

  20. Development of pyrochemical spent fuel management in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banfield, Zara; Cogan, John; Farrant, Dave; Gaubert, Emmanuel; Hopkins, Phil; Lewin, Bob

    2006-01-01

    Nexia Solutions is undertaking a programme to investigate the role of pyrochemical techniques for spent nuclear fuel and legacy fuel management. The principal UK client is the energy unit, and the other clients are the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), for legacy fuel conditioning, and BNFL's corporate investment in advanced reactor systems which is contributing to the Generation IV programme. The emphasis of the programme is pragmatic industrialization, which we have identified as key for the establishment of pyrochemical fuel management. From our experience operating fuel manufacture, power generation and reprocessing plant we know that the areas which require particular attention for successful implementation are: - Plant Interfaces, - Operability, - Process Definition, - Underpinning Science. Plant Interfaces encompass the definition of feeds, products, effluents and wastes and whether the process can meet the constraints they impose. Operability is concerned with the sustainability of the plant processes and is linked to the use of nil-maintenance continuous systems and elimination of batch / mechanical operations and maintenance. Process Definition focuses on the performance, control, recovery and safety of individual unit operations. Together these underpin industrial nuclear plant implementability. As an example, we have built a test rig to demonstrate molten salts transfers, since we consider this to be a capability without which pyrochemical processing will not be viable. Similarly, we have developed pilot scale electro-refiner designs for high continuous throughput and we are building development modules to underpin key features of the designs. Scientific work has been targeted at electro-refiner actinide partitioning and has been expanded to investigate other critical areas of the process which include efficient uranium / salt separation, salt clean up and the development of waste forms which perform at least as well as borosilicate glass. Other

  1. System to solve three designs of the fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo M, J. A.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Montes T, J. L.; Perusquia del C, R.; Marinez R, R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper preliminary results are presented, obtained with the development of a computer system that resolves three stages of the nuclear fuel management, which are: the axial and radial designs of fuel, as well as the design of nuclear fuel reloads. The novelty of the system is that the solution is obtained solving the 3 mentioned stages, in coupled form. For this, heuristic techniques are used for each stage, in each one of these has a function objective that is applied to particular problems, but in all cases the obtained partial results are used as input data for the next stage. The heuristic techniques that were used to solve the coupled problem are: tabu search, neural networks and a hybrid between the scatter search and path re linking. The system applies an iterative process from the design of a fuel cell to the reload design, since are preliminary results the reload is designed using the operation strategy Haling type. In each one of the stages nuclear parameters inherent to the design are monitored. The results so far show the advantage of solving the problem in a coupled manner, even when a large amount of computer resources is used. (Author)

  2. Spent fuel management in France: Reprocessing, conditioning, recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Montalembert, J.A. de

    1994-01-01

    The French energy policy has been based for 20 years on the development of nuclear power. The some 75% share of nuclear in the total electricity generation, representing an annual production of 317 TWh requires full fuel cycle control from the head-end to the waste management. This paper presents the RCR concept (Reprocessing, Conditioning, Recycling) with its industrial implementation. The long lasting experience acquired in reprocessing and MOX fuel fabrication leads to a comprehensive industrial organization with minimized impact on the environment and waste generation. Each 900 MWe PWR loaded with MOX fuel avoids piling up 2,500 m 3 per year of mine tailings. By the year 2000, less than 500 m 3 of high-level and long-lived waste will be annually produced at La Hague for the French program. The fuel cycle facilities and the associated MOX loading programs are ramping-up according to schedule. Thus, the RCR concept is a reality as well as a policy adopted in several countries. Last but not least, RCR represents a strong commitment to non-proliferation as it is the way to fully control and master the plutonium inventory

  3. Application of Self-Propagating High Temperature Synthesis to the Fabrication of Actinide Bearing Nitride and Other Ceramic Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, John J.; Reigel, Marissa M.; Donohoue, Collin D.

    2009-01-01

    The project uses an exothermic combustion synthesis reaction, termed self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), to produce high quality, reproducible nitride fuels and other ceramic type nuclear fuels (cercers and cermets, etc.) in conjunction with the fabrication of transmutation fuels. The major research objective of the project is determining the fundamental SHS processing parameters by first using manganese as a surrogate for americium to produce dense Zr-Mn-N ceramic compounds. These fundamental principles will then be transferred to the production of dense Zr-Am-N ceramic materials. A further research objective in the research program is generating fundamental SHS processing data to the synthesis of (i) Pu-Am-Zr-N and (ii) U-Pu-Am-N ceramic fuels. In this case, Ce will be used as the surrogate for Pu, Mn as the surrogate for Am, and depleted uranium as the surrogate for U. Once sufficient fundamental data has been determined for these surrogate systems, the information will be transferred to Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for synthesis of Zr-Am-N, Pu-Am-Zr-N and U-Pu-Am-N ceramic fuels. The high vapor pressures of americium (Am) and americium nitride (AmN) are cause for concern in producing nitride ceramic nuclear fuel that contains Am. Along with the problem of Am retention during the sintering phases of current processing methods, are additional concerns of producing a consistent product of desirable homogeneity, density and porosity. Similar difficulties have been experienced during the laboratory scale process development stage of producing metal alloys containing Am wherein compact powder sintering methods had to be abandoned. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop a low-temperature or low-heat fuel fabrication process for the synthesis of Am-containing ceramic fuels. Self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS), also called combustion synthesis, offers such an alternative process for the synthesis of Am nitride fuels. Although SHS

  4. The neutron beam intensity increase by in-core fuel management enhancement in multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.; Vukadin, Z.; Konstantinovic, J.

    1986-01-01

    The exploitation characteristics of an existing multipurpose research reactor can be increased not only by great reconstruction, but also, to the considerable extent, by the in-core fuel management sophistication. The optimisation of the in-core fuel management procedure in such reactors is governed (among others) by the identified reactor utilisation goals, i.e. by weighting factors dedicated to different utilisation goals, which are often (regarding the in-core fuel management procedure) highly controversial. In this work the best solution for in-core fuel management is sought, with the highest weighting factor dedicated to the neutron beam usage, rather than sample irradiation in the reactor core. The term in-core fuel management includes: the core configuration, the locations of the fresh fuel inflow zone and spent fuel excite zone, and the fuel transfers between these two zones (author)

  5. Addressing the long time horizon for managing used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The time horizon that must be considered in developing an approach to managing used nuclear fuel extends many thousands of years. Such a time horizon is without precedent in environmental, economic, social, technical and public policy terms. As a first step in addressing this issue, the Nuclear Waste Management Organization convened a team of 33 individuals to undertake a formal scenarios exercise. Such an exercise is a way of framing potential futures that might occur. There is no intent to predict the future. This exercise represents the first time that the scenarios technique has been used for such a long time horizon. The approach involved identifying two principle axes of potential change: (1) social - political - environmental well-being; and (2) magnitude of the used nuclear fuel challenge. Using this organizing template, four scenarios were developed reaching out 25 years, and an additional twelve were developed at 175 years branching out from the original four. In addition, a series of sixteen possible 'end-points' were identified to span conditions 500 years out and for 10,000 years a large number of 'what- ifs' were developed. The scenarios, end-points, and what- ifs were then used to identify a number of criteria that could be used for testing proposed management options and their capacity to deal with future conditions. This paper describes this work and the role that it has played in the deliberations of the Nuclear Waste Management Organization. (author)

  6. Artificial intelligence applied to fuel management in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz S, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    In this work two techniques of artificial intelligence, neural networks and genetic algorithms were applied to a practical problem of nuclear fuel management; the determination of the optimal fuel reload for a BWR type reactor. This is an important problem in the design of the operation cycle of the reactor. As a result of the application of these techniques, comparable or even better reloads proposals than those given by expert companies in the subject were obtained. Additionally, two other simpler problems in reactor physics were solved: the determination of the axial power profile and the prediction of the value of some variables of interest at the end of the operation cycle of the reactor. Neural networks and genetic algorithms have been applied to solve many problems of engineering because of their versatility but they have been rarely used in the area of fuel management. The results obtained in this thesis indicates the convenience of undertaking further work on this area and suggest the application of these techniques of artificial intelligence to the solution of other problems in nuclear reactor physics. (Author)

  7. Challenges facing air management for fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P.B. [Department of Energy (United States); Sutton, R. [Argonne National Lab. (United States); Wagner, F.W. [Energetics Incorporated (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. automotive industry are working cooperatively under the auspices of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) to develop a six-passenger automobile that can achieve up to 80 mpg. while meeting customer needs and all safety and emission requirements. These partners are continuing to invest heavily in the research and development of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells as a clean and efficient energy conversion system for the PNGV. A critical challenge facing fuel cell systems for the PNGV is the development of efficient, compact, cost-effective air management systems. The U.S. Department of Energy has been exploring several compressor/expander options for pressurized fuel cell systems, including scroll, toroidal intersecting vane, turbine, twin screw, and piston technologies. Each of these technologies has strengths and weaknesses regarding efficiency, pressure ratio over turndown, size and weight, and cost. This paper will present data from the U.S. Department of Energy's research and development efforts on air management systems and will discusses recent program developments resulting from an independent peer review evaluation. (author)

  8. Implementation of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, L.; Tonkay, D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The Joint Convention: establishes a commitment with respect to safe management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste; requires the Parties to ''take appropriate steps'' to ensure the safety of their spent fuel and waste management activities, but does not delineate standards the Parties must meet; and seeks to attain, through its Contracting Parties, a higher level of safety with respect to management of their spent nuclear fuel, disused sealed sources, and radioactive waste

  9. Management of spent fuel from research and prototype power reactors and residues from post-irradiation examination of fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    The safe and economic management of spent fuel is important for all countries which have nuclear research or power reactors. It involves all aspects of the handling, transportation, storage, conditioning and reprocessing or final disposal of the spent fuel. In the case of spent fuel management from power reactors the shortage of available reprocessing capacity and the rising economic interest in the direct disposal of spent fuel have led to an increasing interest in the long term storage and management of spent fuel. The IAEA has played a major role in coordinating the national activities of the Member States in this area. It was against this background that the Technical Committee Meeting on ''Safe Management of Spent Fuel From Research Reactors, Prototype Power Reactors and Fuel From Commercial Power Reactors That Has Been Subjected to PIE (Post Irradiated Examination)'' (28th November - 1st December 1988) was organised. The aims of the current meeting have been to: 1. Review the state-of-the-art in the field of management of spent fuel from research and prototype power reactors, as well as the residues from post irradiation examination of commercial power reactor fuel. The emphasis was to be on the safe handling, conditioning, transportation, storage and/or disposal of the spent fuel during operation and final decommissioning of the reactors. Information was sought on design details, including shielding, criticality and radionuclide release prevention, heat removal, automation and remote control, planning and staff training; licensing and operational practices during each of the phases of spent fuel management. 2. Identify areas where additional research and development are needed. 3. Recommend areas for future international cooperation in this field. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Economic analysis of fuel management philosophy amendment in the second Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Guangming

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve economic benefit, the Second Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant prepares to amend its fuel management philosophy after several fuel cycles. Economic evaluation is necessary before amendment of fuel management philosophy. Strong points and shortcomings are compared in this paper between yearly 1/4 refueling philosophy and 18 months refueling philosophy. (authors)

  11. Electricity generation from synthesis gas by microbial processes: CO fermentation and microbial fuel cell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daehee; Chang, In Seop

    2009-10-01

    A microbiological process was established to harvest electricity from the carbon monoxide (CO). A CO fermenter was enriched with CO as the sole carbon source. The DGGE/DNA sequencing results showed that Acetobacterium spp. were enriched from the anaerobic digester fluid. After the fermenter was operated under continuous mode, the products were then continuously fed to the microbial fuel cell (MFC) to generate electricity. Even though the conversion yield was quite low, this study proved that synthesis gas (syn-gas) can be converted to electricity with the aid of microbes that do not possess the drawbacks of metal catalysts of conventional methods.

  12. In situ synthesis of nanocomposite membranes: comprehensive improvement strategy for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Siyuan; Xiu, Ruijie; Si, Jiangju; Lu, Shanfu; Yang, Meng; Xiang, Yan

    2014-03-01

    In situ synthesis is a powerful approach to control nanoparticle formation and consequently confers extraordinary properties upon composite membranes relative to conventional doping methods. Herein, uniform nanoparticles of cesium hydrogen salts of phosphotungstic acid (CsPW) are controllably synthesized in situ in Nafion to form CsPW–Nafion nanocomposite membranes with both improved proton conductivity and methanol-crossover suppression. A 101.3% increase of maximum power density has been achieved relative to pristine Nafion in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), indicating a potential pathway for large-scale fabrication of DMFC alternative membranes.

  13. Optimization of fuel management and control poison of a nuclear power reactor by dynamic programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, C.A.R. de.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of fuel and control poison in a nuclear reactor was optimized by the method of Dynamic Programming. A 620 M We Pressurized Water Reactor similar to Angra-1 was studied. The reactor operation was simulated in a IBM-1130 computer. Two fuel shuffling schemes and three poison management schemes were simultaneously employed in the reactor divided into three regions of equal volume and two consecutive stages were studied in order to determine the influence of poison management on the optimum fuel management policy. When uniform poisoning on all the three regions was permitted the traditional out-in fuel management policy proved to be more economic. On introducing simultaneous poison management, the optimum fuel management sequence was found to be different. The results obtained indicate a stronger interaction between the fuel management and the poison management than anticipated in previous works. (author)

  14. MANAGING SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL WASTES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Thomas J

    2005-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) has a large inventory of diverse types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This legacy is in part due to the history of the INL as the National Reactor Testing Station, in part to its mission to recover highly enriched uranium from SNF and in part to it’s mission to test and examine SNF after irradiation. The INL also has a large diversity of SNF storage facility, some dating back 50 years in the site history. The success of the INL SNF program is measured by its ability to: 1) achieve safe existing storage, 2) continue to receive SNF from other locations, both foreign and domestic, 3) repackage SNF from wet storage to interim dry storage, and 4) prepare the SNF for dispositioning in a federal repository. Because of the diversity in the SNF and the facilities at the INL, the INL is addressing almost very condition that may exist in the SNF world. Many of solutions developed by the INL are applicable to other SNF storage sites as they develop their management strategy. The SNF being managed by the INL are in a variety of conditions, from intact assemblies to individual rods or plates to powders, rubble, and metallurgical mounts. Some of the fuel has been in wet storage for over forty years. The fuel is stored bare, or in metal cans and either wet under water or dry in vaults, caissons or casks. Inspections have shown varying degrees of corrosion and degradation of the fuel and the storage cans. Some of the fuel has been recanned under water, and the conditions of the fuel inside the second or third can are unknown. The fuel has been stored in one of 10 different facilities: five wet pools and one casks storage pad, one vault, two generations of caisson facilities, and one modular Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The wet pools range from forty years old to the most modern pool in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The near-term objective is moving the fuel in the older wet storage facilities to

  15. Improved HOR fuel management by flux measurement data feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serov, I.V.; Leege, P.F.A. de; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M. [Delft University of Technology, Reactor Physics Dep., Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    Flux distribution in a nuclear reactor can be obtained by utilizing different calculational and experimental methods. The obtained flux distributions are associated with uncertainties and therefore always differ from each other. By combining information from the calculation and experiment using the confluence method, it is possible to obtain a more reliable estimate of the flux distribution than exhibited by the calculation or experiment separately. As a feedback, the fuel burnup distribution, which is used as initial data to the calculation can be improved as well. The confluence method is applied to improvement of the burnup distribution estimates for the HOR research reactor of the Delft University of Technology. An integrated code system CONHOR is developed to match the CITATION results of in-core foil activation rate calculations with in-core experimental data through confluence. The system forms the basis for the advanced fuel management of the reactor. (author)

  16. Improved HOR fuel management by flux measurement data feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serov, I.V.; Leege, P.F.A. de; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M. [Delft University of Technology, Reactor Physics Dep., Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    Flux distribution in a nuclear reactor can be obtained by utilizing different calculational and experimental methods. The obtained flux distributions are associated with uncertainties and therefore always differ from each other. By combining information from the calculation and experiment using the confluence method, it is possible to obtain a more reliable estimate of the flux distribution than exhibited by the calculation or experiment separately. As a feedback, the fuel burnup distribution, which is used as initial data to the calculation can be improved as well. The confluence method is applied to improvement of the burnup distribution estimates for the HOR research reactor of the Delft University of Technology. An integrated code system CONHOR is developed to match the CITATION results of in-core foil activation rate calculations with in-core experimental data through confluence. The system forms the basis for the advanced fuel management of the reactor. (author) 1 fig., 8 refs.

  17. Improved HOR fuel management by flux measurement data feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serov, I.V.; Leege, P.F.A. de; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Flux distribution in a nuclear reactor can be obtained by utilizing different calculational and experimental methods. The obtained flux distributions are associated with uncertainties and therefore always differ from each other. By combining information from the calculation and experiment using the confluence method, it is possible to obtain a more reliable estimate of the flux distribution than exhibited by the calculation or experiment separately. As a feedback, the fuel burnup distribution, which is used as initial data to the calculation can be improved as well. The confluence method is applied to improvement of the burnup distribution estimates for the HOR research reactor of the Delft University of Technology. An integrated code system CONHOR is developed to match the CITATION results of in-core foil activation rate calculations with in-core experimental data through confluence. The system forms the basis for the advanced fuel management of the reactor. (author)

  18. Implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, H.P.

    2001-01-01

    Improved calculational methods allow one to take credit for the reactivity reduction associated with fuel burnup. This means reducing the analysis conservatism while maintaining an adequate safety margin. The motivation for using burnup credit in criticality safety applications is based on economic considerations and additional benefits contributing to public health and safety and resource conservation. Interest in the implementation of burnup credit has been shown by many countries. In 1997, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) started a task to monitor the implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems, to provide a forum to exchange information, to discuss the matter and to gather and disseminate information on the status of national practices of burnup credit implementation in the Member States. The task addresses current and future aspects of burnup credit. This task was continued during the following years. (author)

  19. A discrete optimization method for nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argaud, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    Nuclear loading pattern elaboration can be seen as a combinational optimization problem, of tremendous size and with non-linear cost-functions, and search are always numerically expensive. After a brief introduction of the main aspects of nuclear fuel management, this note presents a new idea to treat the combinational problem by using informations included in the gradient of a cost function. The method is to choose, by direct observation of the gradient, the more interesting changes in fuel loading patterns. An example is then developed to illustrate an operating mode of the method, and finally, connections with simulated annealing and genetic algorithms are described as an attempt to improve search processes. (author). 1 fig., 16 refs

  20. Geoscience research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of deep disposal of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock. As part of that assessment, a broad program of geoscience and geotechnical work has been undertaken to develop methods for characterizing sites, incorporating geotechnical data into disposal facility design, and incorporating geotechnical data into environmental and safety assessment of the disposal system. General field investigations are conducted throughout the Precambrian Shield, subsurface investigations are conducted at designated field research areas, and in situ rock mass experiments are being conducted in an Underground Research Laboratory. Samples from the field research areas and elsewhere are subjected to a wide range of tests and experiments in the laboratory to develop an understanding of the physical and chemical processes involved in ground-water-rock-waste interactions. Mathematical models to simulate these processes are developed, verified and validated. 114 refs.; 13 figs

  1. National briefing summaries: Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Silviera, D.J.

    1988-12-01

    The National Briefing Summaries is a compilation of publicly available information concerning the nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management strategies and programs of 21 nations, including the United States and three international agencies that have publicized their activities in this field. It presents available highlight information with references that may be used by the reader for additional information. The information in this document is compiled primarily for use by the US Department of Energy and other US federal agencies and their contractors to provide summary information on radioactive waste management activities in other countries. This document provides an awareness to managers and technical staff of what is occurring in other countries with regard to strategies, activities, and facilities. The information may be useful in program planning to improve and benefit United States' programs through foreign information exchange. Benefits to foreign exchange may be derived through a number of exchange activities.

  2. National briefing summaries: Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Bradley, D.J.; Fletcher, J.F.; Konzek, G.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Mitchell, S.J.; Molton, P.M.; Nightingale, R.E.

    1991-04-01

    Since 1976, the International Program Support Office (IPSO) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has collected and compiled publicly available information concerning foreign and international radioactive waste management programs. This National Briefing Summaries is a printout of an electronic database that has been compiled and is maintained by the IPSO staff. The database contains current information concerning the radioactive waste management programs (with supporting information on nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle) of most of the nations (except eastern European countries) that now have or are contemplating nuclear power, and of the multinational agencies that are active in radioactive waste management. Information in this document is included for three additional countries (China, Mexico, and USSR) compared to the prior issue. The database and this document were developed in response to needs of the US Department of Energy

  3. National briefing summaries: Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Bradley, D.J.; Fletcher, J.F.; Konzek, G.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Mitchell, S.J.; Molton, P.M.; Nightingale, R.E.

    1991-04-01

    Since 1976, the International Program Support Office (IPSO) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has collected and compiled publicly available information concerning foreign and international radioactive waste management programs. This National Briefing Summaries is a printout of an electronic database that has been compiled and is maintained by the IPSO staff. The database contains current information concerning the radioactive waste management programs (with supporting information on nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle) of most of the nations (except eastern European countries) that now have or are contemplating nuclear power, and of the multinational agencies that are active in radioactive waste management. Information in this document is included for three additional countries (China, Mexico, and USSR) compared to the prior issue. The database and this document were developed in response to needs of the US Department of Energy.

  4. National briefing summaries: Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Silviera, D.J.

    1988-12-01

    The National Briefing Summaries is a compilation of publicly available information concerning the nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management strategies and programs of 21 nations, including the United States and three international agencies that have publicized their activities in this field. It presents available highlight information with references that may be used by the reader for additional information. The information in this document is compiled primarily for use by the US Department of Energy and other US federal agencies and their contractors to provide summary information on radioactive waste management activities in other countries. This document provides an awareness to managers and technical staff of what is occurring in other countries with regard to strategies, activities, and facilities. The information may be useful in program planning to improve and benefit United States' programs through foreign information exchange. Benefits to foreign exchange may be derived through a number of exchange activities

  5. Fuel Management in Candu Reactors Using Tabu Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambon, R.; Varin, E.

    2008-01-01

    Meta-heuristic methods are perfectly suited to solve fuel management optimization problem in LWR. Indeed, they are originally designed for combinatorial or integer parameter problems which can represent the reloading pattern of the assemblies. For the Candu reactors the problem is however completely different. Indeed, this type of reactor is refueled online. Thus, for their design at fuel reloading equilibrium, the parameter to optimize is the average exit burnup of each fuel channel (which is related to the frequency at which each channel has to be reloaded). It is then a continuous variable that we have to deal with. Originally, this problem was solved using gradient methods. However, their major drawback is the potential local optimum into which they can be trapped. This makes the meta-heuristic methods interesting. In this paper, we have successfully implemented the Tabu Search (TS) method in the reactor diffusion code DONJON. The case of an ACR-700 using 7 burnup zones has been tested. The results have been compared to those we obtained previously with gradient methods. Both methods give equivalent results. This validates them both. The TS has however a major drawback concerning the computation time. A problem with the enrichment as an additional parameter has been tested. In this case, the feasible domain is very narrow, and the optimization process has encountered limitations. Actually, the TS method may not be suitable to find the exact solution of the fuel management problem, but it may be used in a hybrid method such as a TS to find the global optimum region coupled with a gradient method to converge faster on the exact solution. (authors)

  6. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 10: The Understory Response Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Sutherland; Melanie Miller

    2005-01-01

    The Understory Response Model is a species-specific computer model that qualitatively predicts change in total species biomass for grasses, forbs, and shrubs after thinning, prescribed fire, or wildfire. The model examines the effect of fuels management on plant survivorship and reproduction. This fact sheet identifies the intended users and uses, required inputs, what...

  7. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 14: Landscape preference in forested ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Esposito

    2006-01-01

    It is important to understand what types of landscape settings most people prefer to be able to plan fuels treatment and other forest management activities that will be acceptable to the general public. This fact sheet considers the four common elements of visually preferred forest settings: large trees; herbacious, smooth groundcover; open midstory canopy; and vistas...

  8. Impact of advanced fuel cycle options on waste management policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordelier, Stan; Cavedon, Jean-Marc

    2006-01-01

    OECD/NEA has performed a study on the impact of advanced fuel cycle options on waste management policies with 33 experts from 12 member countries, 1 non-member country and 2 international organizations. The study extends a series of previous ones on partitioning and transmutation (P and T) issues, focusing on the performance assessments for repositories of high-level waste (HLW) arising from advanced fuel cycles. This study covers a broader spectrum than previous studies, from present industrial practice to fully closed cycles via partially closed cycles (in terms of transuranic elements); 9 fuel cycle schemes and 4 variants. Elements of fuel cycles are considered primarily as sources of waste, the internal mass flows of each scheme being kept for the sake of mass conservation. The compositions, activities and heat loads of all waste flows are also tracked. Their impact is finally assessed on the waste repository concepts. The study result confirms the findings from the previous NEA studies on P and T on maximal reduction of the waste source term and maximal use of uranium resources. In advanced fuel cycle schemes the activity of the waste is reduced by burning first plutonium and then minor actinides and also the uranium consumption is reduced, as the fraction of fast reactors in the park is increased to 100%. The result of the repository performance assessments, analysing the effect of different HLW isotopic composition on repository performance and on repository capacity, shows that the maximum dose released to biosphere at any time in normal conditions remains, for all schemes and for all the repository concepts examined, well below accepted radiation protection thresholds. The major impact is on the detailed concept of the repositories, through heat load and waste volume. Advanced fuel cycles could allow a repository to cover waste produced from 5 to 20 times more electricity generation than PWR once-through cycle. Given the flexibility of the advanced fuel

  9. Relative importance of fuel management, ignition management and weather for area burned: Evidence from five landscape-fire-succession models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey J. Cary; Mike D. Flannigan; Robert E. Keane; Ross A. Bradstock; Ian D. Davies; James M. Lenihan; Chao Li; Kimberley A. Logan; Russell A. Parsons

    2009-01-01

    The behaviour of five landscape fire models (CAFE, FIRESCAPE, LAMOS(HS), LANDSUM and SEMLAND) was compared in a standardised modelling experiment. The importance of fuel management approach, fuel management effort, ignition management effort and weather in determining variation in area burned and number of edge pixels burned (a measure of potential impact on assets...

  10. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 14: Fuels reduction and compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah Page-Dumroese

    2005-01-01

    Moving equipment and logs over the surface of forest soils causes gouges and ruts in the mineral soil, displaces organic matter, and can cause compaction. Compaction is the component of soil productivity most influenced by forest management, but the degree to which soils may be compacted depends on initial soil bulk density. For example, low bulk density soils (such as...

  11. Synthesis of Poly(3,4-Ethylenedioxy thiophene)-Poly(Styrene-4-Sulfonate) Composites for Support Fuel Cell Catalyst Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eko Sulistiyono; Murni Handayani

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene)-poly(styrene-4-sulfonate) composites for support fuel cell catalyst layer are synthesis composites which become fuel cell catalyst support so that catalyst has optimal performance. Main function of composites is support platinum particle for application in fuel cell. This article explains the result of composites production process from ( 3,4 Ethylenedioxy thiophene) and Sodium poly( styrene - 4-sulfonate) using two methods Jingning Shan method (method 1) and Zhigang Qi and Peter G.Pickup method (method 2). Analysis of the synthesis results used Scanning Electron Microscopic –Electron Dispersive X – Ray Spectrophotometer (SEM-EDS ). The analysis result show that both methods produce polymer agglomerate into a sponge-like morphology. Composite from method 1 has morphology, pores and proton transport better than composite produced by method 2. (author)

  12. Proceedings of spent fuel management technology workshop, 1997. 11. 13 - 11. 14, Taejon, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This proceedings cover the advanced spent fuel process technology, the development of a test facility for spent fuel management and remote handling technology, and the characteristics test technology. Fifteen papers are submitted

  13. Proceedings of spent fuel management technology workshop, 1997. 11. 13 - 11. 14, Taejon, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This proceedings cover the advanced spent fuel process technology, the development of a test facility for spent fuel management and remote handling technology, and the characteristics test technology. Fifteen papers are submitted.

  14. Short, medium and long term consequences of inadequate defect fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.G.; McQueen, M.; Nashiem, R.; Ma, G.

    2011-01-01

    Defect fuel pencils result in short, medium and long term consequences to the environment within and external to the nuclear power station. The paper will describe these consequences and specify the Defect Fuel Management Practices required to avoid these consequences.

  15. Short, medium and long term consequences of inadequate defect fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J.G. [CANTECH Associates Ltd., Burlington, ON (Canada); McQueen, M.; Nashiem, R.; Ma, G. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Defect fuel pencils result in short, medium and long term consequences to the environment within and external to the nuclear power station. The paper will describe these consequences and specify the Defect Fuel Management Practices required to avoid these consequences.

  16. Proceedings of spent fuel management technology workshop, 1997. 11. 13 - 11. 14, Taejon, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This proceedings cover the advanced spent fuel process technology, the development of a test facility for spent fuel management and remote handling technology, and the characteristics test technology. Fifteen papers are submitted.

  17. Improvements of nuclear fuel management in pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    1978-07-01

    The severe variations to which the different elements contributing to the determination of the fuel cycle cost are subjected have led to a reopening of the problem of ''optimization'' of nuclear fuel management. The increase in costs of uranium ore, isotope separation work units (swu), reprocessing, the political implications of proliferation associated with the employment of reprocessing operations have been at the origin of a reassessment of present-day management. It therefore appeared to be appropriate to study variants with respect to a reference mode represented by the management of the PWR 900 MWe systems, without burnable poison in the cycle at equilibrium (Case 3 of Table 1). In order to obtain a complete view of impacts of such modifications, computations were carried out as far as the appraisal of the cycle cost and with reprocessing. There has likewise been added to this the estimate of the gain anticipated from certain improvements in the neutron balance contributed at the level of the lattice

  18. Development of advanced spent fuel management process. The fabrication and oxidation behavior of simulated metallized spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Shin, Y.J.; You, G.S.; Joo, J.S.; Min, D.K.; Chun, Y.B.; Lee, E.P.; Seo, H.S.; Ahn, S.B

    1999-03-01

    The simulated metallized spent fuel ingots were fabricated and evaluated the oxidation rates and the activation energies under several temperature conditions to develop an advanced spent fuel management process. It was also checked the alloying characteristics of the some elements with metal uranium. (Author). 3 refs., 1 tab., 36 figs.

  19. On the problem of in-core fuel management in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, N.; Matausek, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    Within the scope of in-core fuel management including refuelling schedule and reactivity control it is indispensable to define nuclear fuel worth, optimal depletion of the spent fuel assemblies as well as isotopic composition of the spent fuel. This paper shows the computed values of the mentioned parameters in case of different reactor types, PWR, WWER, HWR and BWR of 1000 MWe as well as the intensity of radiation of the spent fuel 3 and 1 years after fission.(author)

  20. Performance assessment of advanced engineering workstations for fuel management applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turinsky, P.J.

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this project was to assess the performance of an advanced engineering workstation [AEW] with regard to applications to incore fuel management for LWRs. The attributes of most interest to us that define an AEW are parallel computational hardware and graphics capabilities. The AEWs employed were super microcomputers manufactured by MASSCOMP, Inc. These computers utilize a 32-bit architecture, graphics co-processor, multi-CPUs [up to six] attached to common memory and multi-vector accelerators. 7 refs., 33 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Methods for studying fuel management in advanced gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckler, A.N.; Griggs, C.F.; Tyror, J.G.

    1971-07-01

    The methods used for studying fuel and absorber management problems in AGRs are described. The basis of the method is the use of ARGOSY lattice data in reactor calculations performed at successive time steps. These reactor calculations may be quite crude but for advanced design calculations a detailed channel-by-channel representation of the whole core is required. The main emphasis of the paper is in describing such an advanced approach - the ODYSSEUS-6 code. This code evaluates reactor power distributions as a function of time and uses the information to select refuelling moves and determine controller positions. (author)

  2. TracWorks - global fuel assembly data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooney, B.F.

    1997-01-01

    The TracWorks Data Management System is a workstation-based software product that provides a utility with a single, broadly available, regularly updated source for virtually every data item available for a fuel assembly or core component. TracWorks is designed to collect, maintain and provide information about assembly and component locations and movements during the refuelling process and operation, assembly burnup and isotopic inventory (both in-core and out-of-core), pin burnup and isotopics for pins that have been removed from their original assemblies, assembly and component inspection results (including video) and manufacturing data provided by the fabrication plant. (UK)

  3. TracWorksTM-global fuel assembly data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooney, B.F.

    1997-01-01

    The TracWorks TM Data Management System is a workstation-based software product that provides a utility with a single, broadly available, regularly updated source for virtually every data item available for a fuel assembly or core component. TracWorks is designed to collect, maintain and provide information about assembly and component locations and movements during the refueling process and operation, assembly burnup and isotopic inventory (both in-core and out-of-core), pin burnup and isotopics for pins that have been removed from their original assemblies, assembly and component inspection results (including video) and manufacturing data provided by the fabrication plant

  4. Direct synthesis of Pt-free catalyst on gas diffusion layer of fuel cell and usage of high boiling point fuels for efficient utilization of waste heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandan, Ravi; Goswami, Gopal Krishna; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Direct-grown boron-doped carbon nanotubes on gas-diffusion layer as efficient Pt-free cathode catalyst for alcohol fuel cells, high boiling point fuels used to obtain hot fuels for the enhancement of cell performance that paves the way for the utilization of waste heat. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •One-step direct synthesis of boron-doped carbon nanotubes (BCNTs) on gas diffusion layer (GDL). •Home built fuel-cell testing using BCNTs on GDL as Pt-free cathode catalyst. •BCNTs exhibit concentration dependent oxygen reduction reaction and the cell performance. •Effective utilization of waste heat to raise the fuel temperature. •Fuel selectivity to raise the fuel temperature and the overall performance of the fuel cells. -- Abstract: Gas diffusion layers (GDL) and electrocatalysts are integral parts of fuel cells. It is, however, a challenging task to grow Pt-free robust electrocatalyst directly on GDL for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) – a key reaction in fuel cells. Here, we demonstrate that boron-doped carbon nanotubes (BCNTs) grown directly on gas-diffusion layer (which avoid the need of ionomer solution used for catalyst loading) can be used as efficient Pt-free catalyst in alcohol fuel cells. Increase in boron concentration improves the electrochemical ORR activity in terms of onset and ORR peak positions, half-wave potentials and diffusion-limited current density that ensure the optimization of the device performance. The preferential 4e − pathway, excellent cell performance, superior tolerance to fuel crossover and long-term stability makes directly grown BCNTs as an efficient Pt-free cathode catalyst for cost-effective fuel cells. The maximum power density of the fuel cell is found to increase monotonically with boron concentration. In addition to the application of BCNTs in fuel cell, we have introduced the concept of hot fuels so that waste heat can effectively be used and external power sources can be avoided. The fuel

  5. Core-state models for fuel management of equilibrium and transition cycles in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragones, J.M.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Corella, M.R.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel management requires that mass, energy, and reactivity balance be satisfied in each reload cycle. Procedures for selection of alternatives, core-state models, and fuel cost calculations have been developed for both equilibrium and transition cycles. Effective cycle lengths and fuel cycle variables--namely, reload batch size, schedule of incore residence for the fuel, feed enrichments, energy sharing cycle by cycle, and discharge burnup and isotopics--are the variables being considered for fuel management planning with a given energy generation plan, fuel design, recycling strategy, and financial assumptions

  6. Non-standard constraints within In-Core Fuel Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, G.I. [University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 210072, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072 (United States); Torres, C. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Gestion de Combustible, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Marrote, G.N.; Ruiz U, V. [Global Nuclear Fuel, Americas, LLC, PO Box 780, M/C A16, Wilmington, NC28402 (United States)]. e-mail: Ivan.Maldonado@uc.edu

    2004-07-01

    Recent advancements in the area of nuclear fuel management optimization have been considerable and widespread. Therefore, it is not surprising that the design of today's nuclear fuel reloads can be a highly automated process that is often accompanied by sophisticated optimization software and graphical user interfaces to assist core designers. Most typically, among other objectives, optimization software seeks to maximize the energy efficiency of a fuel cycle while satisfying a variety of safety, operational, and regulatory constraints. Concurrently, the general industry trend continues to be one of pursuing higher generating capacity (i.e., power up-rates) alongside cycle length extensions. As these increasingly invaluable software tools and ambitious performance goals are pursued in unison, more aggressive core designs ultimately emerge that effectively minimize the margins to limits and, in some cases, may turn out less forgiving or accommodating to changes in underlying key assumptions. The purpose of this article is to highlight a few 'non-standard', though common constraints that can affect a BWR core design but which are often difficult, if not impossible, to implement into an automated setting. In a way, this article indirectly emphasizes the unique and irreplaceable role of the experienced designer in light of 'real life' situations. (Author)

  7. Non-standard constraints within In-Core Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, G.I.; Torres, C.; Marrote, G.N.; Ruiz U, V.

    2004-01-01

    Recent advancements in the area of nuclear fuel management optimization have been considerable and widespread. Therefore, it is not surprising that the design of today's nuclear fuel reloads can be a highly automated process that is often accompanied by sophisticated optimization software and graphical user interfaces to assist core designers. Most typically, among other objectives, optimization software seeks to maximize the energy efficiency of a fuel cycle while satisfying a variety of safety, operational, and regulatory constraints. Concurrently, the general industry trend continues to be one of pursuing higher generating capacity (i.e., power up-rates) alongside cycle length extensions. As these increasingly invaluable software tools and ambitious performance goals are pursued in unison, more aggressive core designs ultimately emerge that effectively minimize the margins to limits and, in some cases, may turn out less forgiving or accommodating to changes in underlying key assumptions. The purpose of this article is to highlight a few 'non-standard', though common constraints that can affect a BWR core design but which are often difficult, if not impossible, to implement into an automated setting. In a way, this article indirectly emphasizes the unique and irreplaceable role of the experienced designer in light of 'real life' situations. (Author)

  8. Fuel management options to extend the IRIS reactor cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, B.; Franceschini, F.

    2004-01-01

    To optimize plant operation, reduce scheduled maintenance outage, and increase capacity factor, IRIS is designed to enable extended cycles of up to four years. However, due to the enrichment licensing limitation (less than 5% enriched uranium oxide) there is a tradeoff between the achievable cycle length and fuel utilization, i.e., the average fuel discharge burnup. The longest individual cycle may be achieved with the single-batch straight burn, but at the expense of a lower burnup. Considering the IRIS basic performance requirements, a cycle length in the range of three to four years is deemed desirable. This paper examines different fuel management options, i.e., the influence of the required cycle length on the corresponding reloading strategy, including a two-batch and a three-batch reloading. A reference two-batch core design has been developed for the first cycle, as well as for the transition cycles leading to equilibrium. Main core performance parameters are evaluated. This core design provides the framework for the safety analyses needed to prepare the IRIS safety evaluations. Alternate designs are also considered.(author)

  9. In-core fuel management for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.F.; Visner, S.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes in-core fuel management for nuclear reactor in which the first cycle of a pressurized water nuclear power reactor has a multiplicity of elongated, square fuel assemblies supported side-by-side to form a generally cylindrical, stationary core consisting entirely of fresh fuel assemblies. Each assembly of the first type has a substantially similar low average fissile enrichment of at least about 1.8 weight percent U-235, each assembly of the second type having a substantially similar intermediate average fissile enrichment at least about 0.4 weight percent greater than that of the first type, and each assembly of the third type having a substantially similar high average fissile enrichment at least about 0.4 weight percent greater than that of the intermediate type, the arrangement of the low, intermediate, and high enrichment assembly types which consists of: a generally cylindrical inner core region consisting of approximately two-thirds the total assemblies in the core and forming a figurative checkerboard array having a first checkerboard component at least two-thirds of which consists of high enrichment and intermediate enrichment assemblies, at least some of the high enrichment assemblies containing fixed burnable poison shims, and a second checkerboard component consisting of assemblies other than the high enrichment type; and a generally annular outer region consisting of the remaining assemblies and including at least some but less than two-thirds of the high enrichment type assemblies

  10. Fuel cycle strategies and plutonium management in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, D.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: An overview will first be drawn on the present nuclear power production in Europe, and on the fuel cycle strategies followed in various countries. Indeed, for most countries in Europe, spent fuel is presently stored at reactor site, either for further conditioning and final deep geological storage, or in the expectation on a further decision on one of these options. Other countries have opted for spent fuel reprocessing as basic fuel cycle strategy. This option presents amongst other the merit of leading to a reduction of the final high level waste volume that will need in any case a geological disposal. It also allows the recovery from the spent fuel of energetic elements, principally the plutonium (Pu). The intention at the origin was to use this Pu in a fleet of fast breeder reactors, with the aim to make the best use of the uranium ore. However, fore reasons mainly linked to the low price of uranium (but also due to technical difficulties and political opposition), the project failed to develop. Now, the countries having followed the reprocessing option have to cope with an increasing amount of separated Pu. One industrial path, namely Pu recycling as MOX is presently operational in several European countries. It allows to reduce the increase in Pu stocks, but not to reduce it. Moreover, the quality of recycled Pu (in terms of its energetic value and of its radiotoxicity) decreases at each potential step of re-irradiation. Therefore, optimised or new ways of managing the Pu stocks in the medium and long term are required. The paper will present a status of the options considered today: - optimised Pu recycling as MOX in advanced LWR reactors (100 % MOX), as well as related optimised core designs; - utilisation of non-uranium matrices instead of uranium to prevent further Pu and minor actinides creation; - once-through Pu burning (up to high rates of destruction) in HTR fuel kernels; - multi-recycling of Pu in fast reactors of

  11. Comparison of platinum/MWCNTs Nanocatalysts Synthesis Processes for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan

    Due to the growing concerns on the depletion of petroleum based energy resources and climate change; fuel cell technologies have received much attention in recent years. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFCs) features high energy conversion efficiency and nearly zero greenhouse gas emissions, because of its combination of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) at anode side and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at cathode side. Synthesis of Pt nanoparticles supported on multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) possess a highly durable electrochemical surface area (ESA) and show good power output on proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell performance. Platinum on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) support were synthesized by two different processes to transfer PtCl62- from aqueous to organic phase. While the first method of Pt/MWCNTs synthesis involved dodecane thiol (DDT) and octadecane thiol (ODT) as anchoring agent, the second method used ammonium lauryl sulfate (ALS) as the dispersion/anchoring agent. The particle size and distribution of platinum were examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The TEM images showed homogenous distribution and uniform particle size of platinum deposited on the surface of MWCNTs. The single cell fuel cell performance of the Pt/MWCNTs synthesized thiols and ALS based electrode containing 0.2 (anode) and 0.4 mg (cathode) Pt.cm-2 were evaluated using Nafion-212 electrolyte with H2 and O2 gases at 80 °C and ambient pressure. The catalyst synthesis with ALS is relatively simple compared to that with thiols and also showed higher performance (power density reaches about 1070 mW.cm -2). The Electrodes with Pt/MWCNTs nanocatalysts synthesized using ALS were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for durability evaluation using humidified H2 and N2 gases at room temperature (21 °C) along with commercial Pt/C for comparison. The ESA measured by cyclic voltammetry between 0.15 and 1.2 V showed significant

  12. NEPA implementation: The Department of Energy's program to manage spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) in its management of spent nuclear fuel. The DOE strategy is to address the short-term safety concerns about existing spent nuclear fuel, to study alternatives for interim storage, and to develop a long-range program to manage spent nuclear fuel. This paper discusses the NEPA process, the environmental impact statements for specific sites as well as the overall program, the inventory of DOE spent nuclear fuel, the alternatives for managing the fuel, and the schedule for implementing the program

  13. Social science informing forest management — bringing new knowledge to fuels managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela Jakes

    2007-01-01

    To improve access, interpretability, and use of the full body of research, a pilot project was initiated by the USDA Forest Service to synthesize relevant scientific information and develop publications and decision support tools that managers can use to inform fuels treatment plans. This article provides an overview of the work of the Social Science Core Team. Team...

  14. One pot electrochemical synthesis of polymer/CNT/metal nanoparticles for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrapragada, Lakshman; Zhu, Jingyi; Karakaya, Mehmet; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Nanomaterials center Team

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have become a key player in the design of materials for energy applications. They gained their popularity in industrial and scientific research due to their unique properties like excellent conductivity, high surface area, etc. Here we used chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to synthesize two types of CNTs namely, helically coiled CNTs and vertically aligned CNTs. These CNTs were subsequently used to make composites with conducting polymers and metal nanoparticles. One pot electrochemical synthesis was designed to electropolymerize aniline, pyrrole etc. on the surface of the electrode with simultaneous deposition of platinum and gold metal nanoparticles, and CNTs in the polymer matrix. The as synthesized composite materials were characterized with scanning electron microscope for surface morphology and spectroscopic techniques like Raman, UV-Vis for functionality. These were used to study electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol and ethanol for alkaline fuel cell applications. Electrodes fabricated from these composites not only showed good kinetics but also exhibited excellent stability. Uniqueness of this composite lies in its simple two step synthesis and it doesn't involve any surfactants unlike conventional chemical synthesis routes.

  15. Solution combustion synthesis of strontium aluminate, SrAl2O4, powders: single-fuel versus fuel-mixture approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianoş, Robert; Istratie, Roxana; Păcurariu, Cornelia; Lazău, Radu

    2016-01-14

    The solution combustion synthesis of strontium aluminate, SrAl2O4, via the classic single-fuel approach and the modern fuel-mixture approach was investigated in relation to the synthesis conditions, powder properties and thermodynamic aspects. The single-fuel approach (urea or glycine) did not yield SrAl2O4 directly from the combustion reaction. The absence of SrAl2O4 was explained by the low amount of energy released during the combustion process, in spite of the highly negative values of the standard enthalpy of reaction and standard Gibbs free energy. In the case of single-fuel recipes, the maximum combustion temperatures measured by thermal imaging (482 °C - urea, 941 °C - glycine) were much lower than the calculated adiabatic temperatures (1864 °C - urea, 2147 °C - glycine). The fuel-mixture approach (urea and glycine) clearly represented a better option, since (α,β)-SrAl2O4 resulted directly from the combustion reaction. The maximum combustion temperature measured in the case of a urea and glycine fuel mixture was the highest one (1559 °C), which was relatively close to the calculated adiabatic temperature (1930 °C). The addition of a small amount of flux, such as H3BO3, enabled the formation of pure α-SrAl2O4 directly from the combustion reaction.

  16. Catalysis engineering of bifunctional solids for the one-step synthesis of liquid fuels from syngas: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Sartipi, S.; Makkee, M.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2014-01-01

    The combination of acidic zeolites and Fischer–Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts for one-step production of liquid fuels from syngas is critically reviewed. Bifunctional systems are classified by the proximity between FTS and acid functionalities on three levels: reactor, catalyst particle, and active phase. A thorough analysis of the published literature on this topic reveals that efficiency in the production of liquid fuels correlates well with the proximity of FTS and acid sites. Moreover,...

  17. Commentary on the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, G.; Shemilt, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    A summary of the first formal review of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited on the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is presented. The Program is described briefly and the composition and role of TAC in relation to the Program is outlined. Salient points and major recommendations are presented from the First Annual Report of TAC in which geoscience aspects of the Program were emphasized. It is the view of the Committee that overall, the whole Waste Management Program is well conceived, that there are many impressive accomplishments of high quality, that detailed research objectives are becoming more clearly delineated, that there is growing clarification as to the most critical areas in which research needs to be accomplished and that the increasing participation by university and industry scientists and engineers is reassuring

  18. Waste management implications of irradiated nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrick, A.P.; Schneidmiller, D.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel is stored underwater in large recirculating basins prior to reprocessing in chemical separations plants. A small number of the fuel rods contain minor defects which allow fission products to seep into the basin water. The predominant radionuclides leached into the water are dependent upon the decay time after removal from the reactor. Freshly discharged fuel releases short half-lived radioiodine which presents exposure and airborne release problems on a short-term basis but does not impose significant long-term waste management problems. After a reasonable decay period, the major radionuclides present are 137 Cs, 144 Ce, 90 Sr, 3 H, and 239 / 240 Pu. Each of the radionuclides imposes specific waste management problems which require individual consideration in their control, packaging and shipment, and permanent disposal. These considerations are reviewed in this paper for general industry practices and specific illustrative examples are presented. Control of radionuclide concentrations and water purity are normally achieved by filtration and ion exchange treatment. Cartridge-type filters are the most common but improved filtration techniques that minimize personnel exposure, particularly during filter replacements, are now being adopted. Mixed bed ion exchange resins are most commonly utilized for soluble radionuclide removal, particularly for basins filled with demineralized water. Cesium-specific exchange media are employed at basins where demineralized water is not employed; these media operate for very long periods of time since they are not depleted by the normal dissolved non-radioactive water impurities. The resins are either buried when depleted or regenerated and the regeneration solutions concentrated for burial. Resin run lengths are usually determined by ionic or radiochemical depletion of the resin or in some cases by limiting radionuclide concentrations specified by shipping regulations or established ion column dose rates

  19. Safety case for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto - Synthesis 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-12-15

    TURVA-2012 is Posiva's safety case in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR 2012) and application for a construction licence for a spent nuclear fuel repository. Consistent with the Government Decisions-in- Principle, this foresees a repository developed in bedrock at the Olkiluoto site according to the KBS-3 method, designed to accept spent nuclear fuel from the lifetime operations of the Olkiluoto and Loviisa reactors. Synthesis 2012 presents a synthesis of Posiva Oy's Safety Case 'TURVA-2012' portfolio. It summarises the design basis for the repository at the Olkiluoto site, the assessment methodology and key results of performance and safety assessments. It brings together all the lines of argument for safety, evaluation of compliance with the regulatory requirements, and statement of confidence in long-term safety and Posiva's safety analyses. The TURVA-2012 safety case demonstrates that the proposed repository design provides a safe solution for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, and that the performance and safety assessments are fully consistent with all the legal and regulatory requirements related to long-term safety as set out in Government Decree 736/2008 and in guidance from the nuclear regulator - the STUK. Moreover, Posiva considers that the level of confidence in the demonstration of safety is appropriate and sufficient to submit the construction licence application to the authorities. The assessment of long-term safety includes uncertainties, but these do not affect the basic conclusions on the long-term safety of the repository. (orig.)

  20. Myconanoparticles: synthesis and their role in phytopathogens management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghuthaymi, Mousa A.; Almoammar, Hassan; Rai, Mahindra; Said-Galiev, Ernest; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology can offer green and eco-friendly alternatives for plant disease management. Apart from being eco-friendly, fungi are used as bio-manufacturing units, which will provide an added benefit in being easy to use, as compared to other microbes. The non-pathogenic nature of some fungal species in combination with the simplicity of production and handling will improve the mass production of silver nanoparticles. Recently, a diverse range of fungi have been screened for their ability to create silver nanoparticles. Mycosynthesis of gold, silver, gold–silver alloy, selenium, tellurium, platinum, palladium, silica, titania, zirconia, quantum dots, usnic acid, magnetite, cadmium telluride and uraninite nanoparticles has also been reported by various researchers. Nanotechnological application in plant pathology is still in the early stages. For example, nanofungicides, nanopesticides and nanoherbicides are being used extensively in agriculture practices. Remote activation and monitoring of intelligent nano-delivery systems can assist agricultural growers of the future to minimize fungicides and pesticides use. Nanoparticle-mediated gene transfer would be useful for improvement of crops resistant to pathogens and pest. This review critically assesses the role of fungi in the synthesis of nanoparticles, the mechanism involved in the synthesis, the effect of different factors on the reduction of metal ions in developing low-cost techniques for the synthesis and recovery of nanoparticles. Moreover, the application of nanoparticles in plant disease control, antimicrobial mechanisms, and nanotoxicity on plant ecosystem and soil microbial communities has also been discussed in detail. PMID:26019636

  1. Process analysis of an oxygen lean oxy-fuel power plant with co-production of synthesis gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normann, Fredrik; Thunman, Henrik; Johnsson, Filip

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates new possibilities and synergy effects for an oxy-fuel fired polygeneration scheme (transportation fuel and electricity) with carbon capture and co-firing of biomass. The proposed process has the potential to make the oxy-fuel process more effective through a sub-stoichiometric combustion in-between normal combustion and gasification, which lowers the need for oxygen within the process. The sub-stoichiometric combustion yields production of synthesis gas, which is utilised in an integrated synthesis to dimethyl ether (DME). The process is kept CO 2 neutral through co-combustion of biomass in the process. The proposed scheme is simulated with a computer model with a previous study of an oxy-fuel power plant as a reference process. The degree of sub-stoichiometric combustion, or amount of synthesis gas produced, is optimised with respect to the overall efficiency. The maximal efficiency was found at a stoichiometric ratio just below 0.6 with the efficiency for the electricity producing oxy-fuel process of 0.35 and a DME process efficiency of 0.63. It can be concluded that the proposed oxygen lean combustion process constitutes a way to improve the oxy-fuel carbon capture processes with an efficient production of DME in a polygeneration process

  2. Status and prospects for spent fuel management in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portal, R.; L'Epine, P. de

    1996-01-01

    The spent fuel arisings and storage capacities, the interface between fuel storage and transportation activities, the spent fuel storage technology, the reprocessing and recycling industrial activities in France are described in the paper. (author). 6 figs, 8 tabs

  3. Engineering Yarrowia lipolytica as a platform for synthesis of drop-in transportation fuels and oleochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Qiao, Kangjian; Ahn, Woo Suk; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Harnessing lipogenic pathways and rewiring acyl-CoA and acyl-ACP (acyl carrier protein) metabolism in Yarrowia lipolytica hold great potential for cost-efficient production of diesel, gasoline-like fuels, and oleochemicals. Here we assessed various pathway engineering strategies in Y. lipolytica toward developing a yeast biorefinery platform for sustainable production of fuel-like molecules and oleochemicals. Specifically, acyl-CoA/acyl-ACP processing enzymes were targeted to the cytoplasm, peroxisome, or endoplasmic reticulum to generate fatty acid ethyl esters and fatty alkanes with tailored chain length. Activation of endogenous free fatty acids and the subsequent reduction of fatty acyl-CoAs enabled the efficient synthesis of fatty alcohols. Engineering a hybrid fatty acid synthase shifted the free fatty acids to a medium chain-length scale. Manipulation of alternative cytosolic acetyl-CoA pathways partially decoupled lipogenesis from nitrogen starvation and unleashed the lipogenic potential of Y. lipolytica. Taken together, the strategies reported here represent promising steps to develop a yeast biorefinery platform that potentially upgrades low-value carbons to high-value fuels and oleochemicals in a sustainable and environmentally friendly manner. PMID:27621436

  4. Engineering Yarrowia lipolytica as a platform for synthesis of drop-in transportation fuels and oleochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Qiao, Kangjian; Ahn, Woo Suk; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-09-27

    Harnessing lipogenic pathways and rewiring acyl-CoA and acyl-ACP (acyl carrier protein) metabolism in Yarrowia lipolytica hold great potential for cost-efficient production of diesel, gasoline-like fuels, and oleochemicals. Here we assessed various pathway engineering strategies in Y. lipolytica toward developing a yeast biorefinery platform for sustainable production of fuel-like molecules and oleochemicals. Specifically, acyl-CoA/acyl-ACP processing enzymes were targeted to the cytoplasm, peroxisome, or endoplasmic reticulum to generate fatty acid ethyl esters and fatty alkanes with tailored chain length. Activation of endogenous free fatty acids and the subsequent reduction of fatty acyl-CoAs enabled the efficient synthesis of fatty alcohols. Engineering a hybrid fatty acid synthase shifted the free fatty acids to a medium chain-length scale. Manipulation of alternative cytosolic acetyl-CoA pathways partially decoupled lipogenesis from nitrogen starvation and unleashed the lipogenic potential of Y. lipolytica Taken together, the strategies reported here represent promising steps to develop a yeast biorefinery platform that potentially upgrades low-value carbons to high-value fuels and oleochemicals in a sustainable and environmentally friendly manner.

  5. Mixture of fuels for solution combustion synthesis of porous Fe3O4 powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnianfar, H.; Masoudpanah, S. M.; Alamolhoda, S.; Fathi, H.

    2017-06-01

    The solution combustion synthesis of porous magnetite (Fe3O4) powders by a mixture of glycine and urea fuels was investigated concerning the thermodynamic aspects and powder characteristics. The adiabatic combustion temperature and combusted species were thermodynamically calculated as a function of the fuel to oxidant molar ratio (ϕ). The combustion behavior, phase evolution, porous structure and magnetic properties were characterized by thermal analysis, X-ray diffractometry, N2 adsorption-desorption, electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry techniques. Nearly single phase Fe3O4 powders were synthesized by the mixture of fuels at ϕ values of 0.75 and 1. The as-combusted Fe3O4 powders at ϕ = 1 exhibited porous structure with the specific surface area of 83.4 m2/g. The highest saturation magnetization of 75.5 emu/g and the lowest coercivity of 84 Oe were achieved at ϕ = 1, due to the high purity and large crystallite size, inducing from the highest adiabatic combustion temperature.

  6. Mathematical modeling of synthesis gas fueled electrochemistry and transport including H2/CO co-oxidation and surface diffusion in solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Cheng; Jiang, Zeyi; Zhang, Xinxin

    2015-10-01

    Fuel flexibility is a significant advantage of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). A comprehensive macroscopic framework is proposed for synthesis gas (syngas) fueled electrochemistry and transport in SOFC anode with two main novelties, i.e. analytical H2/CO electrochemical co-oxidation, and correction of gas species concentration at triple phase boundary considering competitive absorption and surface diffusion. Staring from analytical approximation of the decoupled charge and mass transfer, we present analytical solutions of two defined variables, i.e. hydrogen current fraction and enhancement factor. Giving explicit answer (rather than case-by-case numerical calculation) on how many percent of the current output contributed by H2 or CO and on how great the water gas shift reaction plays role on, this approach establishes at the first time an adaptive superposition mechanism of H2-fuel and CO-fuel electrochemistry for syngas fuel. Based on the diffusion equivalent circuit model, assuming series-connected resistances of surface diffusion and bulk diffusion, the model predicts well at high fuel utilization by keeping fixed porosity/tortuosity ratio. The model has been validated by experimental polarization behaviors in a wide range of operation on a button cell for H2-H2O-CO-CO2-N2 fuel systems. The framework could be helpful to narrow the gap between macro-scale and meso-scale SOFC modeling.

  7. Characteristics of used CANDU fuel relevant to the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasywich, K M

    1993-05-01

    Literature data on the characteristics of used CANDU power reactor fuel that are relevant to its performance as a waste form have been compiled in a convenient handbook. Information about the quantities of used fuel generated, burnup, radionuclide inventories, fission gas release, void volume and surface area, fuel microstructure, fuel cladding properties, changes in fuel bundle properties due to immobilization processes, radiation fields, decay heat and future trends is presented for various CANDU fuel designs. (author). 199 refs., 39 tabs., 100 figs.

  8. Characteristics of used CANDU fuel relevant to the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasywich, K.M.

    1993-05-01

    Literature data on the characteristics of used CANDU power reactor fuel that are relevant to its performance as a waste form have been compiled in a convenient handbook. Information about the quantities of used fuel generated, burnup, radionuclide inventories, fission gas release, void volume and surface area, fuel microstructure, fuel cladding properties, changes in fuel bundle properties due to immobilization processes, radiation fields, decay heat and future trends is presented for various CANDU fuel designs. (author). 199 refs., 39 tabs., 100 figs

  9. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 09: Fire and Fuels Extension to the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FFE-FVS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizabeth Reinhardt

    2005-01-01

    FFE-FVS is a model linking stand development, fuel dynamics, fire behavior and fire effects. It allows comparison of mid- to long-term effects of management alternatives including harvest, mechanical fuel treatment, prescribed fire, salvage, and no action. This fact sheet identifies the intended users and uses, required inputs, what the model does, and tells the user...

  10. Development of a computer program for the cost analysis of spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, Jong Youl; Choi, Jong Won; Cha, Jeong Hun; Whang, Joo Ho

    2009-01-01

    So far, a substantial amount of spent fuels have been generated from the PWR and CANDU reactors. They are being temporarily stored at the nuclear power plant sites. It is expected that the temporary storage facility will be full of spent fuels by around 2016. The government plans to solve the problem by constructing an interim storage facility soon. The radioactive management act was enacted in 2008 to manage the spent fuels safety in Korea. According to the act, the radioactive waste management fund which will be used for the transportation, interim storage, and the final disposal of spent fuels has been established. The cost for the management of spent fuels is surprisingly high and could include a lot of uncertainty. KAERI and Kyunghee University have developed cost estimation tools to evaluate the cost for a spent fuel management based on an engineering design and calculation. It is not easy to develop a tool for a cost estimation under the situation that the national policy on a spent fuel management has not yet been fixed at all. Thus, the current version of the computer program is based on the current conceptual design of each management system. The main purpose of this paper is to introduce the computer program developed for the cost analysis of a spent fuel management. In order to show the application of the program, a spent fuel management scenario is prepared, and the cost for the scenario is estimated

  11. Fuel management study on quarter core refueling for Ling Ao NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong; Li Jinggang

    2012-01-01

    The fuel management study on quarter core refueling is introduced for Ling Ao NPP. Starting from the selection of the objective of fuel management for quarter core refueling, the code and method used and the analysis carried out are explained in details to reach the final loading pattern chosen. The start-up physics test results are listed to demonstrate the realized quarter core fuel management. In the end, the advantage and disadvantage after turning to quarter core refueling has been given for the power plant from the fuel management point of view. (authors)

  12. Regulations for the safe management of radioactive wastes and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voica, Anca

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the national, international and European regulations regarding radioactive waste management. ANDRAD is the national authority charged with nation wide coordination of safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste including their final disposal. ANDRAD's main objectives are the following: - establishing the National Strategy concerning the safety management of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel; - establishing the national repositories for the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste; - developing the technical procedures and establishing norms for all stages of management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste, including the disposal and the decommissioning of the nuclear and radiologic facilities

  13. A synthesis of possible separation and transmutation scenarios studied in the frame of the French law for waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grouiller, Jean-Paul; Boucher, Lionel; Bourdot, Patrick; Varaine, Frederic; Delpech, Marc; Warin, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    In the frame of the French law for the waste management, we have studied different dynamic scenarios from the present fleet which consists in a single stage of Plutonium recycling in PWRs to the future generation systems taking into account different possible solutions to transmute the minor actinides. This paper presents a synthesis of the different solutions with the accessible technologies (PWRs or SFRs) or with the innovative concepts (ADT, GFRs), analyses the impact on the fuel cycle and on the characteristics of the different waste packages and defines an optimised scenario for managing the actinides in the French fleet. The results presented in this paper give the impact on: The natural uranium resources, The inventory function of time, of different elements (Pu, Np, Am, Cm) at each stage of the fuel cycle and in the wastes, The physic characteristics (thermal power, radiation sources) of the fuel and of the wastes. The fast reactor systems are the more efficiency to manage minor actinides and present less impacts in the fuel cycle. (author)

  14. Myconanoparticles: synthesis and their role in phytopathogens management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alghuthaymi, Mousa A.; Almoammar, Hassan; Rai, Mahindra; Said-Galiev, Ernest; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology can offer green and eco-friendly alternatives for plant disease management. Apart from being eco-friendly, fungi are used as bio-manufacturing units, which will provide an added benefit in being easy to use, as compared to other microbes. The non-pathogenic nature of some fungal species in combination with the simplicity of production and handling will improve the mass production of silver nanoparticles. Recently, a diverse range of fungi have been screened for their ability to create silver nanoparticles. Mycosynthesis of gold, silver, gold-silver alloy, selenium, tellurium, platinum, palladium, silica, titania, zirconia, quantum dots, usnic acid, magnetite, cadmium telluride and uraninite nanoparticles has also been reported by various researchers. Nanotechnological application in plant pathology is still in the early stages. For example, nanofungicides, nanopesticides and nanoherbicides are being used extensively in agriculture practices. Remote activation and monitoring of intelligent nano-delivery systems can assist agricultural growers of the future to minimize fungicides and pesticides use. Nanoparticle-mediated gene transfer would be useful for improvement of crops resistant to pathogens and pest. This review critically assesses the role of fungi in the synthesis of nanoparticles, the mechanism involved in the synthesis, the effect of different factors on the reduction of metal ions in developing low-cost techniques for the synthesis and recovery of nanoparticles. Moreover, the application of nanoparticles in plant disease control, antimicrobial mechanisms, and nanotoxicity on plant ecosystem and soil microbial communities has also been discussed in detail. Keywords: disease management; antimicrobial action; phytotoxicity; nanophytopathology

  15. Catalysis engineering of bifunctional solids for the one-step synthesis of liquid fuels from syngas : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartipi, S.; Makkee, M.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2014-01-01

    The combination of acidic zeolites and Fischer–Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts for one-step production of liquid fuels from syngas is critically reviewed. Bifunctional systems are classified by the proximity between FTS and acid functionalities on three levels: reactor, catalyst particle, and

  16. Predicting cumulative watershed effects of fuel management with improved WEPP technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Elliot; Joan Q. Wu

    2005-01-01

    The increase in severe wildfires in recent years is due in part to an abundance of fuels in forests. In an effort to protect values at risk, and decrease the severity of wildfires, forest managers have embarked on a major program of fuel reduction. Past research has shown that such fuel reduction may have minimal impact at a hillslope scale, but when numerous hillsides...

  17. Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles: Resources for Fleet Managers (Clean Cities) (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, A.

    2011-04-01

    A discussion of the tools and resources on the Clean Cities, Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center, and the FuelEconomy.gov Web sites that can help vehicle fleet managers make informed decisions about implementing strategies to reduce gasoline and diesel fuel use.

  18. Radiological aspects of postfission waste management for light-water reactor fuel cycle options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipler, D B; Nelson, I C [Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA (United States)

    1978-12-01

    A generic environmental impact statement on the management of radioactive postfission wastes from various light-water reactor fuel cycles in the United States has been prepared. The environmental analysis for post-fission waste management includes an examination of radiological impacts related to different waste treatment, storage, transportation, and disposal options at the process level. Effects addressed include effluents from plants, and radiological impacts from facility operation (routine and accidents), and decommissioning. Environmental effects are combined for fuel reprocessing plants, mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plants, and waste repositories. Radiological effects are also aggregated for several fuel cycle options over the period 1980 and 2050. Fuel cycles analyzed are (1) once-through cycle in which spent reactor fuel is cooled in water basins for at least 6-1/2 years and then disposed of in deep geologic repositories; (2) spent fuel reprocessing in which uranium only and uranium and plutonium is recycled and solidified high level waste, fuel residues, and non-high-level transuranic wastes are disposed of in deep geologic repositories; and (3) deferred cycle that calls for storage of spent fuel at Federal spent fuel storage facilities until the year 2000 at which time a decision is made whether to dispose of spent fuel as a waste or to reprocess the fuel to recover uranium and plutonium. Key environmental issues for decision-making related to waste management alternatives and fuel cycle options are highlighted. (author)

  19. Design of distributed systems of hydrolithosphere processes management. A synthesis of distributed management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershin, I. M.; Pervukhin, D. A.; Ilyushin, Y. V.; Afanaseva, O. V.

    2017-10-01

    The paper considers an important problem of designing distributed systems of hydrolithosphere processes management. The control actions on the hydrolithosphere processes under consideration are implemented by a set of extractive wells. The article shows the method of defining the approximation links for description of the dynamic characteristics of hydrolithosphere processes. The structure of distributed regulators, used in the management systems by the considered processes, is presented. The paper analyses the results of the synthesis of the distributed management system and the results of modelling the closed-loop control system by the parameters of the hydrolithosphere process.

  20. Managing ADHD in Adulthood: A Meta-Synthesis of How Adults Diagnosed With ADHD Manage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Merete; Larsen, Palle; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich

    , manage to live, life impairment, social life skills, attitude, coping behaviour, academic functioning, social adjustment, interpersonal relation, family health, social support, adult 19-44 years, middle aged 45-64 years. Results Four themes emerged from the included studies: ‘Being different from others......Managing ADHD in adulthood A meta-synthesis of how adults diagnosed with ADHD manage life with the symptoms Merete Bjerrum, Associate Professor, PhD, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark and Danish Centre for Systematic Review in Nursing; Palle Larsen, MScN, PhD-student, Deputy....... But how do the adult experience ADHD symptoms affect the management of daily life skills? And which factors support their ability to manage the symptoms? Aim Our aim is to synthesise the existing literature to investigate how adults experience and manage life with ADHD, and to study the protective factors...

  1. Nanostructured electrocatalyst for fuel cells : silica templated synthesis of Pt/C composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stechel, Ellen Beth; Switzer, Elise E.; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov; Cornelius, Christopher James; Hibbs, Michael R.

    2007-09-01

    Platinum-based electrocatalysts are currently required for state-of-the-art fuel cells and represent a significant portion of the overall fuel cell cost. If fuel cell technology is to become competitive with other energy conversion technologies, improve the utilization of precious metal catalysts is essential. A primary focus of this work is on creating enhanced nanostructured materials which improve precious-metal utilization. The goal is to engineer superior electrocatalytic materials through the synthesis, development and investigation of novel templated open frame structures synthesized in an aerosol-based approach. Bulk templating methods for both Pt/C and Pt-Ru composites are evaluated in this study and are found to be limited due to the fact that the nanostructure is not maintained throughout the entire sample. Therefore, an accurate examination of structural effects was previously impossible. An aerosol-based templating method of synthesizing nanostructured Pt-Ru electrocatalysts has been developed wherein the effects of structure can be related to electrocatalytic performance. The aerosol-based templating method developed in this work is extremely versatile as it can be conveniently modified to synthesize alternative materials for other systems. The synthesis method was able to be extended to nanostructured Pt-Sn for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media. Nanostructured Pt-Sn electrocatalysts were evaluated in a unique approach tailored to electrocatalytic studies in alkaline media. At low temperatures, nanostructured Pt-Sn electrocatalysts were found to have significantly higher ethanol oxidation activity than a comparable nanostructured Pt catalyst. At higher temperatures, the oxygen-containing species contribution likely provided by Sn is insignificant due to a more oxidized Pt surface. The importance of the surface coverage of oxygen-containing species in the reaction mechanism is established in these studies. The investigations in this work present

  2. Safe ageing management of nuclear power plants: An European synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandemange, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Ageing of nuclear power plants means evolution of material or equipment properties on one side, and evolution of personnel skill and procedure adequacy on the other side, both of which, after a certain time, may not be compatible with the required safety provisions, or with an economic operation of the plant. Repair or replacement of components, as well as change in service conditions for a better compatibility with component reduced capabilities can be used to mitigate ageing effects. The paper summarises the results of a study conducted in this field with the support of the European Commission. It presents: the synthesis of the work done under international auspices, and in the European context; the comparison of ageing management approaches used in several European countries with international recommendations; the summary of the various potential phenomena and their governing parameters, the methods of in-service ageing identification and possible mitigation methods; illustrative ageing management practices, taking material ageing aspects as examples. Concerning the first topic, the European report identifies 56 OECD and IAEA reports on ageing management issues, 35 being summarised in an appendix to the report. It also identifies numerous European and international studies covering topics of interest to ageing and Plant Life management. ageing management approaches have been considered from the regulatory point of view and from the utilities management point of view. Contributors to the study have identified a general consensus in Europe, with no limited time operating authorisation, the safety being a utility responsibility under continuous surveillance by the regulatory authority. Practical ageing management methods include: periodic safety reviews (PSR), a ten years periodicity being a common practice, completed by continuous ageing management taking into account safety and industrial anticipation needs; the implementation of life-time management programmes

  3. Safety Aspects of Radioactive Waste Management in Different Nuclear Fuel Cycle Policies, a Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gad Allah, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing demand of energy worldwide, and due to the depletion of conventional natural energy resources, energy policies in many countries have been devoted to nuclear energy option. On the other hand, adopting a safe and reliable nuclear fuel cycle concept guarantees future nuclear energy sustain ability is a vital request from environmental and economic point of views. The safety aspects of radioactive waste management in the nuclear fuel cycle is a topic of great importance relevant to public acceptance of nuclear energy and the development of nuclear technology. As a part of nuclear fuel cycle safety evaluation studies in the department of nuclear fuel cycle safety, National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NCNSRC), this study evaluates the radioactive waste management policies and radiological safety aspects of three different nuclear fuel cycle policies. The once-through fuel cycle (OT- fuel cycle) or the direct spent fuel disposal concept for both pressurized light water reactor ( PWR) and pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR or CANDU) systems and the s elf-generated o r recycling fuel cycle concept in PWR have been considered in the assessment. The environmental radiological safety aspects of different nuclear fuel cycle options have been evaluated and discussed throughout the estimation of radioactive waste generated from spent fuel from these fuel cycle options. The decay heat stored in the spent fuel was estimated and a comparative safety study between the three fuel cycle policies has been implemented

  4. Management of experimental and exotic fuels by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) has been engaged in nuclear research and development at its Chalk River Laboratories since the 1940's. During this time, a wide variety of irradiated research reactor and experimental fuels have been stored in a variety of storage facilities. Some of these fuels are of unique composition and configuration, and some fuels have been degraded as a result of research activities. In preparing decommissioning plans for these storage facilities, AECL has developed a strategy that identifies how each type of fuel will be dispositioned in the future. The goal of this strategy is to ensure that the fuels are maintained in a safe stable state until a repository for these fuels becomes available. This paper describes the current storage facilities, options considered for long-term fuel management, and the strategy selected to manage these fuels. (author)

  5. Update on Canada's nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.

    1992-09-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP) was launched in 1978 as a joint initiative by the governments of Canada and Ontario. Under the program, AECL has been developing and assessing a generic concept to dispose of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The disposal concept has been referred for review under the Environmental Assessment and Review Process. AECL will submit an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to an Environmental Assessment Panel, which was appointed in late 1989. Hearings will be held in areas that have a particular interest in the concept and its application. At the end of the review, the Panel will make recommendations as to the acceptability of the concept and the course of future action. The federal government will decide on the next steps to be taken. In the spring of 1990 public open houses were held to tell prospective participants how to enter the process. Sessions designed to assist the Panel in determining the scope of the EIS took place in the autumn of 1990. In June 1991 the Panel issued for comment a set of draft guidelines for the EIS. More than 30 groups and individuals submitted comments. The final guidelines were issued in March 1992, and AECL expects to submit its EIS to the Panel in 1993. If the concept review is completed by 1995 and if the concept is approved, disposal could begin some time after 2025. (L.L.) (12 refs.)

  6. International trade and waste and fuel management issue, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2009-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on international trade and waste and fuel managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Innovative financing and workforce planning, by Donna Jacobs, Entergy Nuclear; Nuclear power - a long-term need, by John C. Devine, Gerald Goldsmith and Michael DeLallo, WorleyParsons; Importance of loan guarantee program, by Donald Hintz; EPC contracts for new plants, by Dave Barry, Shaw Power Group; GNEP and fuel recycling, by Alan Hanson, AREVA NC Inc.; Safe and reliable reactor, by Kiyoshi Yamauchi, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.; Safe, small and simple reactors, by Yoshi Sakashita, Toshiba Corporation; Nuclear power in Thailand, by Tatchai Sumitra, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology; and, Nuclear power in Vietnam, by Tran Huu Phat, Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission. The Industry Innovation article this issue is Rectifying axial-offset-anomaly problems, by Don Adams, Tennessee Valley Authority. The Plant Profile article is Star of Stars Excellence, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.

  7. Severe accident analysis and management in nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golshan, Mina

    2013-01-01

    Within the UK regulatory regime, assessment of risks arising from licensee's activities are expected to cover both normal operations and fault conditions. In order to establish the safety case for fault conditions, fault analysis is expected to cover three forms of analysis: design basis analysis (DBA), probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and severe accident analysis (SAA). DBA should provide a robust demonstration of the fault tolerance of the engineering design and the effectiveness of the safety measures on a conservative basis. PSA looks at a wider range of fault sequences (on a best estimate basis) including those excluded from the DBA. SAA considers significant but unlikely accidents and provides information on their progression and consequences, within the facility, on the site and off site. The assessment of severe accidents is not limited to nuclear power plants and is expected to be carried out for all plant states where the identified dose targets could be exceeded. This paper sets out the UK nuclear regulatory expectation on what constitutes a severe accident, irrespective of the type of facility, and describes characteristics of severe accidents focusing on nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Key rules in assessment of severe accidents as well as the relationship to other fault analysis techniques are discussed. The role of SAA in informing accident management strategies and offsite emergency plans is covered. The paper also presents generic examples of scenarios that could lead to severe accidents in a range of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (authors)

  8. Some global aspects regarding nuclear spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohai, Dumitru; Postoaca, Marius Marcel

    2002-01-01

    The globalization means the worldwide extension of certain aspects of social or economic processes, structural or environmental changes, or concerning working methodologies, technical activity, industrial production, etc. At present the emergence of global aspects is more frequently observed, being determined by the rapid development of computerized systems and of transfer of information, by the development of big transnational companies and due to the increasing international co-operation. Some of the manifested global aspects could be beneficial for the development of the human society, other could be not. It is necessary to perform an adequate analysis from this view point and to promote appropriate measures to enhance the positive global aspects and to mitigate the negative global aspects. These measures can have a good efficiency only if they are pursued at global level, but for this it is necessary to build an adequate international coordinating body, having the corresponding instruments for action. The global aspects identified in the field of nuclear power may be divided into two categories, namely: - related to the main features of nuclear power; - regarding the specific features of some subdivisions of the field, as for example, spent fuel management. In the paper both categories are discussed. The influence of the global aspects on the development of nuclear power and particularly on the back end activities of the fuel cycle, is also presented. At the same time, some possible actions for enhancing nuclear power development are proposed

  9. Axial temperatures and fuel management models for a HTR system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, U

    1971-11-12

    In the HTR system, there is a large difference in temperature between different parts of the reactor core. The softer neutron spectrum in the upper colder core regions tends to shift the power productions in the fresh fuel upwards. As uranium 235 depletes and plutonium with its higher cross sections in the lower hot regions is built-up, an axial power flattening takes place. These effects have been studied in detail for a single column in an equilibrium environment. The aim of this paper is to relate these findings to a whole reactor core and to investigate the influence of axial temperatures on the overall performance and in particular, the fuel management scheme chosen for the reference design. A further objective has been to calculate the reactivity requirements for different part load conditions and for various daily and weekly load diagrams. As the xenon cross section changes significantly with temperature these investigations are performed for an equilibrium core with due representation of axial temperature zones.

  10. Water chemistry control in thermal and nuclear power plants. 9. Nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The chemical management of fuels in nuclear power plants aims at maintenance of the soundness of nuclear fuels and at reduction of the radiation exposure of the working employees. With regard to the former, particular attention should be paid to the fabrication process of fuel assembly, mainly for chemical management for fuel cladding tubes together with fuel pellet-clad chemical interactions, and to the outer tubes in the power plants. With regard to the latter, the fabrication process should be carefully controlled to prevent radioactive impurity increase in primary cooling water systems by maintaining cleaning level and decreasing surface contamination. Reactions of zircalloy with water or hydrogen forming ZrH 2 , sintered density of UO 2 pellet controlling water content, pellet-clad interactions, stress corrosion cracking, crud induced fuel failure, behaviors of such fission products as I, Xe, Kr, and Cs in plants are also important to water and chemical management of nuclear fuels. (S. Ohno)

  11. Fast Flux Test Facility fuel and test management: The first 10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.A.; Bennett, C.L.; Campbell, L.R.; Dobbin, K.D.; Tang, E.L.

    1991-07-01

    Core design and fuel and test management have been performed efficiently at the Fast Flux Test Facility. No outages have been extended to adjust core loadings. Development of mixed oxide fuels for advanced liquid metal breeder reactors has been carried out successfully. In fact, the fuel performance is extraordinary. Failures have been so infrequent that further development and refinement of fuel requirements seem appropriate and could lead to a significant reduction in projected electrical busbar costs. The Fast Flux Test Facility is also involved in early metal fuel development tests and appears to be an ideal test bed for any further fuel development or refinement testing. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Managing spent nuclear fuel: What is the purpose?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaaberger, T.

    1999-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel may be considered a resource for further production of electricity or as a source of materials for nuclear weapon production. It may also be seen as a toxic waste that may be misused for radiological terrorism or the production of nuclear explosives. Different assessments of the relative importance of different perspective may lead to very different waste management strategies. Very different perspectives may also lead to agreement on early stages of waste management while disagreement will be revealed at later stages. In order to facilitate a transparent decision making process the purpose of waste management must be made clear. From the defined purpose, the relevance of facts, arguments and counter arguments can be assessed. Having a clearly defined purpose will also show the what needs there are to define the distribution of economic liabilities for possible costs among different actors. The economic, social and ideological stake-holders involved in the decision making process are unlikely to reach consensus. However, making the clarification's suggested above will serve the purpose of revealing the rational interests behind what presently is interpreted as real - or imagined - hidden agendas of the actors in the process

  13. Synthesis of yttria-doped zirconia anodes and calcium-doped ceria electrolyte to fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, G.R.S de; Fagury Neto, E.; Rabelo, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    From the pursuit of lower operating temperature of fuel cells solid oxide was used polymeric precursor for the synthesis of reactive powder compositions Zr 0,92 Y 0,08 O 2 for the anode and Ce 0,88 Ca 0,12 O 2 for the electrolyte. The solutions were prepared using the metal in much of the composition and citric acid molar ratio of 1:3, under stirring at 60 deg C/1 h. The mixture of metallic citrates was subjected to agitation at a temperature of 80 deg C which was added ethylene glycol in the ratio 60:40 by weight citric acid / ethylene glycol, to form a resin that was pre-calcined at 300 deg C/3 h for to form the expanded resin. The powders were disaggregated in a mortar, screened and calcined at 400, 600 and 800 deg C/2 h. The powders were characterized by standard X-ray diffraction. (author)

  14. The performance of a thermophilic microbial fuel cell fed with synthesis gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, A; Mehta, P; Raghavan, V; Wang, H; Guiot, S R; Tartakovsky, B

    2012-08-10

    This study demonstrated electricity generation in a thermophilic microbial fuel cell (MFC) operated on synthesis gas (syngas) as the sole electron donor. At 50°C, a volumetric power output of 30-35 mWL(R)(-1) and a syngas conversion efficiency of 87-98% was achieved. The observed pathway of syngas conversion to electricity primarily consisted of a two-step process, where the carbon monoxide and hydrogen were first converted to acetate, which was then consumed by the anodophilic bacteria to produce electricity. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the 16S rDNA revealed the presence of Geobacter species, Acetobacter, methanogens and several uncultured bacteria and archaea in the anodic chamber. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. From furfural to fuel: synthesis of furoins by organocatalysis and their hydrodeoxygenation by cascade catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegenhart, Benjamin L; Yang, Linan; Kwan, Soon Cheong; Harris, Remi; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis of furoins from biomass-derived furfural and 2-methylfurfural is demonstrated in high yields in green and renewable solvents using N-heterocyclic carbene organocatalysts. The resulting furoin molecules are used as precursors for fuels using cascade catalysis, first by using Pd/C with acidic co-catalysts under very mild conditions to yield oxygenated C12 molecules. Two main products were formed, which we identified as 1,2-bis(5-methyltetrahydrofuran-2-yl)ethane and 1-(5-methyltetrahydrofuran-2-yl)heptanol. The use of a Pd/Zeolite-β catalyst under more extreme conditions resulted in the complete hydrodeoxygenation of 5,5'-dimethylfuroin to dodecanes in high yields (76%) and exceptional selectivity (94%) for n-dodecane. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Photoelectroactivity of bismuth vanadate prepared by combustion synthesis: effect of different fuels and surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonso, Renata; Serafim, Jessica A.; Lucilha, Adriana C.; Dall' Antonia, Luiz H., E-mail: luizh@uel.br [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil). Dept. Quimica. Lab. de Eletroquimica e Materiais; Silva, Marcelo R. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (CTI/UNESP), Bauru, SP (Brazil). Colegio Tecnico Industrial; Lepre, Luiz F.; Ando, Romulo A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de Espectroscopia Molecular

    2014-04-15

    The bismuth vanadate (BiVO{sub 4}) is a semiconductor that has attracted much attention due to the photocatalytic efficiency in the visible light region. The objective of this work was to synthesize monoclinic BiVO{sub 4} by solution combustion synthesis, with different surfactants and fuels and apply it as photoelectrodes. The characterization by infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy showed that all samples showed characteristic bands of the monoclinic structure BiVO{sub 4}. The samples synthesized with glycine and glycine/Tween® 80 had V{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The film obtained from the alanine/ Tween® 80 showed highest photocurrent values, which may be related to smaller size particles (200 to 300 nm) observed by scanning electron microscopy images. The films obtained using alanine showed highest values of rate constant reaction and percentage discoloration of methylene blue. (author)

  17. Chemistry research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikis, A.C.; Garisto, F.; Lemire, R.J.; Paquette, J.; Sagert, N.H.; Saluja, P.P.S.; Sunder, S.; Taylor, P.

    1988-01-01

    This publication reviews chemical research in support of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The overall objective of this research is to develop the fundamental understanding required to demonstrate the suitability of waste immobilization media and processes, and to develop the chemical information required to predict the long-term behaviour of radionuclides in the geosphere after the waste form and the various engineered barriers containing it have failed. Key studies towards the above objective include experimental and theoretical studies of uranium dioxide oxidation/dissolution; compilation of thermodynamic databases and an experimental program to determine unavailable thermodynamic data; studies of hydrothermal alteration of minerals and radionuclide interactions with such minerals; and a study examining actinide colloid formation, as well as sorption of actinides on groundwater colloids

  18. Fourth annual report of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinger, E.L.J.; Dixon, R.S.

    1982-12-01

    This report, the fourth of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes activities over the past year in the following areas: public interaction, used fuel storage and transportation, immobilization of used fuel and fuel recycle waste, geoscience research associated with deep underground disposal, environmental research, environmental and safety assessment

  19. Preliminary concepts: coordinated safeguards for materials management in a thorium--uranium fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Shipley, J.P.

    1978-10-01

    This report addresses preliminary concepts for coordinated safeguards materials management in a typical generic thorium--uranium-fueled light-water reactor (LWR) fuels reprocessing plant. The reference facility is designed to recover thorium and uranium from first-generation (denatured 235 U) startup fuels, first-recycle and equilibrium (denatured 233 U) thorium--uranium LWR fuels, and to recover the plutonium generated in the 238 U denaturant as well. 12 figures, 3 tables

  20. Third annual report of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1981-12-01

    This report, the third of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel wastes. The report summarizes activities over the past year, in the areas of public interaction, irradiated fuel storage and transportation, immobilization of irradiated fuel and fuel recycle wastes, research and development associated with deep underground disposal, and environmental and safety assessment

  1. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Appendix B: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to assist its management in making two decisions. The first decision, which is programmatic, is to determine the management program for DOE spent nuclear fuel. The second decision is on the future direction of environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1 of the EIS, which supports the programmatic decision, considers the effects of spent nuclear fuel management on the quality of the human and natural environment for planning years 1995 through 2035. DOE has derived the information and analysis results in Volume 1 from several site-specific appendixes. Volume 2 of the EIS, which supports the INEL-specific decision, describes environmental impacts for various environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management alternatives for planning years 1995 through 2005. This Appendix B to Volume 1 considers the impacts on the INEL environment of the implementation of various DOE-wide spent nuclear fuel management alternatives. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is a joint Navy/DOE program, is responsible for spent naval nuclear fuel examination at the INEL. For this appendix, naval fuel that has been examined at the Naval Reactors Facility and turned over to DOE for storage is termed naval-type fuel. This appendix evaluates the management of DOE spent nuclear fuel including naval-type fuel.

  2. Nuclear spent fuel management scenarios. Status and assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufek, J.; Arzhanov, V.; Gudowski, W.

    2006-06-01

    The strategy for management of spent nuclear fuel from the Swedish nuclear power programme is interim storage for cooling and decay for about 30 years followed by direct disposal of the fuel in a geologic repository. In various contexts it is of interest to compare this strategy with other strategies that might be available in the future as a result of ongoing research and development. In particular partitioning and transmutation is one such strategy that is subject to considerable R and D-efforts within the European Union and in other countries with large nuclear programmes. To facilitate such comparisons for the Swedish situation, with a planned phase out of the nuclear power programme, SKB has asked the team at Royal Inst. of Technology to describe and explore some scenarios that might be applied to the Swedish programme. The results of this study are presented in this report. The following scenarios were studied by the help of a specially developed computer programme: Phase out by 2025 with direct disposal. Burning plutonium and minor actinides as MOX in BWR. Burning plutonium and minor actinides as MOX in PWR. Burning plutonium and minor actinides in ADS. Combined LWR-MOX plus ADS. For the different scenarios nuclide inventories, waste amounts, costs, additional electricity production etc have been assessed. As a general conclusion it was found that BWR is more efficient for burning plutonium in MOX fuel than PWR. The difference is approximately 10%. Furthermore the BWR produces about 10% less americium inventory. An ADS reactor park can theoretically in an ideal case burn (transmute) 99% of the transuranium isotopes. The duration of such a scenario heavily depends on the interim time needed for cooling the spent fuel before reprocessing. Assuming 10 years for cooling of nuclear fuel from ADS, the duration will be at least 200 years under optimistic technical assumptions. The development and use of advanced pyro-processing with an interim cooling time of only

  3. Nuclear spent fuel management scenarios. Status and assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufek, J.; Arzhanov, V.; Gudowski, W. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics

    2006-06-15

    The strategy for management of spent nuclear fuel from the Swedish nuclear power programme is interim storage for cooling and decay for about 30 years followed by direct disposal of the fuel in a geologic repository. In various contexts it is of interest to compare this strategy with other strategies that might be available in the future as a result of ongoing research and development. In particular partitioning and transmutation is one such strategy that is subject to considerable R and D-efforts within the European Union and in other countries with large nuclear programmes. To facilitate such comparisons for the Swedish situation, with a planned phase out of the nuclear power programme, SKB has asked the team at Royal Inst. of Technology to describe and explore some scenarios that might be applied to the Swedish programme. The results of this study are presented in this report. The following scenarios were studied by the help of a specially developed computer programme: Phase out by 2025 with direct disposal. Burning plutonium and minor actinides as MOX in BWR. Burning plutonium and minor actinides as MOX in PWR. Burning plutonium and minor actinides in ADS. Combined LWR-MOX plus ADS. For the different scenarios nuclide inventories, waste amounts, costs, additional electricity production etc have been assessed. As a general conclusion it was found that BWR is more efficient for burning plutonium in MOX fuel than PWR. The difference is approximately 10%. Furthermore the BWR produces about 10% less americium inventory. An ADS reactor park can theoretically in an ideal case burn (transmute) 99% of the transuranium isotopes. The duration of such a scenario heavily depends on the interim time needed for cooling the spent fuel before reprocessing. Assuming 10 years for cooling of nuclear fuel from ADS, the duration will be at least 200 years under optimistic technical assumptions. The development and use of advanced pyro-processing with an interim cooling time of only

  4. Masters Study in Advanced Energy and Fuels Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Kanchan [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

    2014-12-08

    There are currently three key drivers for the US energy sector a) increasing energy demand and b) environmental stewardship in energy production for sustainability and c) general public and governmental desire for domestic resources. These drivers are also true for energy nation globally. As a result, this sector is rapidly diversifying to alternate sources that would supplement or replace fossil fuels. These changes have created a need for a highly trained workforce with a the understanding of both conventional and emerging energy resources and technology to lead and facilitate the reinvention of the US energy production, rational deployment of alternate energy technologies based on scientific and business criteria while invigorating the overall economy. In addition, the current trends focus on the the need of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) graduate education to move beyond academia and be more responsive to the workforce needs of businesses and the industry. The SIUC PSM in Advanced Energy and Fuels Management (AEFM) program was developed in response to the industries stated need for employees who combine technical competencies and workforce skills similar to all PSM degree programs. The SIUC AEFM program was designed to provide the STEM graduates with advanced technical training in energy resources and technology while simultaneously equipping them with the business management skills required by professional employers in the energy sector. Technical training include core skills in energy resources, technology and management for both conventional and emerging energy technologies. Business skills training include financial, personnel and project management. A capstone internship is also built into the program to train students such that they are acclimatized to the real world scenarios in research laboratories, in energy companies and in government agencies. The current curriculum in the SIUC AEFM will help fill the need for training both recent

  5. Linking fuel design features ampersand plant management to uranium, SWU savings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This article, contributed by Scott Garrett, Manager of Planning and Uranium Operations for Siemens Power Corporation in Bellevue, Washington, explores the impact of advances in fuel design and fuel management strategies on uranium utilization in the United States. Nuclear plant operators are deriving substantial benefits from these changes, including longer fuel cycle lengths, increased burnup, and added capacity - and experiencing cost savings in both uranium and enrichment services at the same time

  6. Studies on equilibrium fuel management schemes on the Dragon HTR core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daub, J; Pedersen, J

    1971-02-03

    The Dragon Project has recently started investigations on fuel management in HTR's with the assumed Dragon design. The study covers the results of investigations into a number of equilibrium fuel management schemes with the 1-dimensional FLATTER code and calculations of the corresponding total power generating costs with the programme TECO.

  7. Key convention on safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste to enter into force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    At a ceremony at IAEA Headquarters today, Ireland deposited its instrument of ratification to an important convention on the safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste, thereby ensuring its entry into force. The Convention will be the first international instrument to address the safety of management and storage of radioactive wastes and spent fuels in countries with and without nuclear programmes

  8. The concept of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel management in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suransky, F.; Duda, V.

    2003-01-01

    The article briefly comments on the status of nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel management in the Czech Republic in the context of the document entitled 'The Concept of Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel Management in the Czech Republic', which was adopted by the Czech Government in May 2002 as a national strategy in this field. (author)

  9. Risk and Cooperation: Managing Hazardous Fuel in Mixed Ownership Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, A. Paige; Charnley, Susan

    2012-06-01

    Managing natural processes at the landscape scale to promote forest health is important, especially in the case of wildfire, where the ability of a landowner to protect his or her individual parcel is constrained by conditions on neighboring ownerships. However, management at a landscape scale is also challenging because it requires cooperation on plans and actions that cross ownership boundaries. Cooperation depends on people's beliefs and norms about reciprocity and perceptions of the risks and benefits of interacting with others. Using logistic regression tests on mail survey data and qualitative analysis of interviews with landowners, we examined the relationship between perceived wildfire risk and cooperation in the management of hazardous fuel by nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) owners in fire-prone landscapes of eastern Oregon. We found that NIPF owners who perceived a risk of wildfire to their properties, and perceived that conditions on nearby public forestlands contributed to this risk, were more likely to have cooperated with public agencies in the past to reduce fire risk than owners who did not perceive a risk of wildfire to their properties. Wildfire risk perception was not associated with past cooperation among NIPF owners. The greater social barriers to private-private cooperation than to private-public cooperation, and perceptions of more hazardous conditions on public compared with private forestlands may explain this difference. Owners expressed a strong willingness to cooperate with others in future cross-boundary efforts to reduce fire risk, however. We explore barriers to cooperative forest management across ownerships, and identify models of cooperation that hold potential for future collective action to reduce wildfire risk.

  10. Great Lakes rivermouth ecosystems: scientific synthesis and management implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.; Trebitz, Anett S.; Steinman, Alan D.; Wiley, Michael J.; Carlson Mazur, Martha; Pebbles, Victoria; Braun, Heather A.; Seelbach, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    At the interface of the Great Lakes and their tributary rivers lies the rivermouths, a class of aquatic ecosystem where lake and lotic processes mix and distinct features emerge. Many rivermouths are the focal point of both human interaction with the Great Lakes and human impacts to the lakes; many cities, ports, and beaches are located in rivermouth ecosystems, and these human pressures often degrade key ecological functions that rivermouths provide. Despite their ecological uniqueness and apparent economic importance, there has been relatively little research on these ecosystems as a class relative to studies on upstream rivers or the open-lake waters. Here we present a synthesis of current knowledge about ecosystem structure and function in Great Lakes rivermouths based on studies in both Laurentian rivermouths, coastal wetlands, and marine estuarine systems. A conceptual model is presented that establishes a common semantic framework for discussing the characteristic spatial features of rivermouths. This model then is used to conceptually link ecosystem structure and function to ecological services provided by rivermouths. This synthesis helps identify the critical gaps in understanding rivermouth ecology. Specifically, additional information is needed on how rivermouths collectively influence the Great Lakes ecosystem, how human alterations influence rivermouth functions, and how ecosystem services provided by rivermouths can be managed to benefit the surrounding socioeconomic networks.

  11. Synthesis and sintering of UN-UO{sub 2} fuel composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaques, Brian J., E-mail: BrianJaques@BoiseState.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Watkins, Jennifer; Croteau, Joseph R.; Alanko, Gordon A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Tyburska-Püschel, Beata [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Meyer, Mitch [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Xu, Peng; Lahoda, Edward J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA 15235 (United States); Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: DarrylButt@BoiseState.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The design and development of an economical, accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for use in the current light water reactor (LWR) fleet is highly desirable for the future of nuclear power. Uranium mononitride has been identified as an alternative fuel with higher uranium density and thermal conductivity when compared to the benchmark, UO{sub 2}, which could also provide significant economic benefits. However, UN by itself reacts with water at reactor operating temperatures. In order to reduce its reactivity, the addition of UO{sub 2} to UN has been suggested. In order to avoid carbon impurities, UN was synthesized from elemental uranium using a hydride-dehydride-nitride thermal synthesis route prior to mixing with up to 10 wt% UO{sub 2} in a planetary ball mill. UN and UN – UO{sub 2} composite pellets were sintered in Ar – (0–1 at%) N{sub 2} to study the effects of nitrogen concentration on the evolved phases and microstructure. UN and UN-UO{sub 2} composite pellets were also sintered in Ar – 100 ppm N{sub 2} to assess the effects of temperature (1700–2000 °C) on the final grain morphology and phase concentration.

  12. Efficient utilization of waste date pits for the synthesis of green diesel and jet fuel fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Muhtaseb, Ala’a H.; Jamil, Farrukh; Al-Haj, Lamya; Al-Hinai, Mohab A.; Baawain, Mahad; Myint, Myo Tay Zar; Rooney, David

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Active catalysts Pt/C and Pd/C were developed from waste date pits. • Catalysts showed good activity in hydrodeoxygenation of date pit oil to alkane fuels. • The liquid product fractions lay within the range of the jet fuel and green diesel. • Green diesel fraction obtained by Pd/C was 72.03% and jet fuel was 30.39%. • Date pits can be a promising platform for the production of catalysts and biofuels. - Abstract: Date pits are considered one of the major agricultural wastes in Oman. The present work involves the synthesis of active catalysts from waste date pits carbon produced by carbonization and impregnation with Pt and Pd metals. Synthesized catalysts Pt/C and Pd/C were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, EDX, BET and XPS. The activity of the catalysts’ performance was evaluated by the hydrodeoxygenation of date pits oil for the production of second-generation biofuels, which includes jet fuel and green diesel fractions. Results indicate that the synthesized catalysts were highly active for the hydrodeoxygenation of date pits oil. Based on the elemental analysis, the degree of deoxygenation (DOD) of product oil was 97.5% and 89.4% for the Pd/C and Pt/C catalysts respectively. The high DOD was also confirmed by product analyses that mainly consist of paraffinic hydrocarbons. Results also showed that between the two catalysts, Pd/C showed a higher activity towards hydrodeoxygenation, a conclusion that was based on the high DOD of the product oil due to hydrocarbons formation. Based on the type of components in the product oil, the maximum fraction of hydrocarbons formed lay within the range of 72.03% and 72.78% green diesel, and 30.39% and 28.25% jet fuel using Pd/C and Pt/C catalysts respectively. It can be concluded that waste date pits can be a promising platform for the production of catalysts and biofuels.

  13. Control system design specification of advanced spent fuel management process units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S. H.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, J. S

    2003-06-01

    In this study, the design specifications of instrumentation and control system for advanced spent fuel management process units are presented. The advanced spent fuel management process consists of several process units such as slitting device, dry pulverizing/mixing device, metallizer, etc. In this study, the control and operation characteristics of the advanced spent fuel management mockup process devices and the process devices developed in 2001 and 2002 are analysed. Also, a integral processing system of the unit process control signals is proposed, which the operation efficiency is improved. And a redundant PLC control system is constructed which the reliability is improved. A control scheme is proposed for the time delayed systems compensating the control performance degradation caused by time delay. The control system design specification is presented for the advanced spent fuel management process units. This design specifications can be effectively used for the detail design of the advanced spent fuel management process.

  14. Environmental Justice, Place and Nuclear Fuel Waste Management in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, Richard G.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the basis of a Nuclear Fuel Waste management strategy for Canada, taking into account the unique legal tenets (Aboriginal rights; federal - provincial jurisdiction) and the orientation that the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) has taken to date. The focus of the paper are grounded in notions of environmental justice. Bullard's definition provides a useful guideline: 'the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, colour, national origin or income with respect to the development, implementation and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations and policies'. The overriding concern is to work towards a process that is inclusive and just. Prior to developing a specific strategy to site a NFW disposal facility, we maintain that the NWMO needs to first address three fundamental issues: Expand its mandate to include the future of nuclear energy in Canada; Provide an inclusive role for First Nations (Aboriginal people) in all stages of the process; Adhere to the requirement of specifying an economic region and deal more overtly with the transportation of NF

  15. Environmental Justice, Place and Nuclear Fuel Waste Management in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Richard G. [Univ. of Guelph (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Murphy, Brenda L. [Wilfrid Launer Univ., Brantford (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the basis of a Nuclear Fuel Waste management strategy for Canada, taking into account the unique legal tenets (Aboriginal rights; federal - provincial jurisdiction) and the orientation that the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) has taken to date. The focus of the paper are grounded in notions of environmental justice. Bullard's definition provides a useful guideline: 'the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, colour, national origin or income with respect to the development, implementation and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations and policies'. The overriding concern is to work towards a process that is inclusive and just. Prior to developing a specific strategy to site a NFW disposal facility, we maintain that the NWMO needs to first address three fundamental issues: Expand its mandate to include the future of nuclear energy in Canada; Provide an inclusive role for First Nations (Aboriginal people) in all stages of the process; Adhere to the requirement of specifying an economic region and deal more overtly with the transportation of NF.

  16. Management and storage of spent fuel from CEA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, F.

    1996-01-01

    CEA research reactors and their interim spent fuel storage facilities are described. Long-term solutions for spent fuel storage problems, involving wet storage at PEGASE or dry storage at CASCAD, are outlined in some detail. (author)

  17. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 01: Developing personal responsibility for fuels reduction: Building a successful program to engage property owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    In the course of work as a land manager, you will no doubt be involved in developing programs to achieve various objectives, including the improvement of fuels management on private lands. This fact sheet describes six steps that will help you plan and conduct a successful program.

  18. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; forest structure and fire hazard fact sheet 05: fuel treatment principles for complex landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    Appropriate types of thinning and surface fuel treatments are clearly useful in reducing surface and crown fire hazards under a wide range of fuels and topographic situations. This paper provides well-established scientific principles and simulation tools that can be used to adjust fuel treatments to attain specific risk levels.

  19. Axial shuffling fuel-management schemes for 1.2% SEU in CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younis, M.H.; Boczar, P.G.

    1989-11-01

    The use of slightly enriched uranium (SEU) in CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) requires a different fuel-management strategy than that usually employed with natural uranium fuel. Axial shuffling is a fuel-management strategy in which some or all of the fuel bundles are removed from the channel, rearranged, and reinserted into the same channel, along with fresh fuel. An axial shuffling scheme has been devised for 1.2% SEU which results in excellent power profiles, from the perspectives of both good axial flattening and power histories. With the CANFLEX (CANdu FLEXible fuelling) advanced fuel bundle, fuel rating can be reduced to below 40kW/m, with consequent safety benefits

  20. Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley; Weber, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.; Balliet, Ryan; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Newman, John

    2007-09-07

    Fuel cells may become the energy-delivery devices of the 21st century with realization of a carbon-neutral energy economy. Although there are many types of fuel cells, polymerelectrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are receiving the most attention for automotive and small stationary applications. In a PEFC, hydrogen and oxygen are combined electrochemically to produce water, electricity, and waste heat. During the operation of a PEFC, many interrelated and complex phenomena occur. These processes include mass and heat transfer, electrochemical reactions, and ionic and electronic transport. Most of these processes occur in the through-plane direction in what we term the PEFC sandwich as shown in Figure 1. This sandwich comprises multiple layers including diffusion media that can be composite structures containing a macroporous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) and microporous layer (MPL), catalyst layers (CLs), flow fields or bipolar plates, and a membrane. During operation fuel is fed into the anode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and reacts electrochemically at the anode CL to form hydrogen ions and electrons. The oxidant, usually oxygen in air, is fed into the cathode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and is electrochemically reduced at the cathode CL by combination with the generated protons and electrons. The water, either liquid or vapor, produced by the reduction of oxygen at the cathode exits the PEFC through either the cathode or anode flow field. The electrons generated at the anode pass through an external circuit and may be used to perform work before they are consumed at the cathode. The performance of a PEFC is most often reported in the form of a polarization curve, as shown in Figure 2. Roughly speaking, the polarization curve can be broken down into various regions. First, it should be noted that the equilibrium potential differs from the open-circuit voltage due mainly to hydrogen crossover through the membrane (i.e., a mixed potential

  1. Forests at risk: integrating risk science into fuel management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan. Thompson

    2008-01-01

    The threat from wildland fire continues to grow across many regions of the Western United States. Drought, urbanization, and a buildup of fuels over the last century have contributed to increasing wildfire risk to property and highly valued natural resources. Fuel treatments, including thinning overly dense forests to reduce fuel and lower fire risk, have become a...

  2. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; forest structure and fire hazard fact sheet 01: forest structure and fire hazard overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    Many managers and policymakers guided by the National Environmental Policy Act process want to understand the scientific principles on which they can base fuel treatments for reducing the size and severity of wildfires. These Forest Structure and Fire Hazard fact sheets discuss how to estimate fire hazard, how to visualize fuel treatments, and how the role of...

  3. An Integrated Model for Identifying Linkages Between the Management of Fuel Treatments, Fire and Ecosystem Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, R. R.; Anderson, S.; Moritz, M.; Plantinga, A.; Tague, C.

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation fuel treatments (e.g. thinning, prescribed burning) are a frequent tool for managing fire-prone landscapes. However, predicting how fuel treatments may affect future wildfire risk and associated ecosystem services, such as forest water availability and streamflow, remains a challenge. This challenge is in part due to the large range of conditions under which fuel treatments may be implemented, as response is likely to vary with species type, rates of vegetation regrowth, meteorological conditions and physiographic properties of the treated site. It is also due to insufficient understanding of how social factors such as political pressure, public demands and economic constraints affect fuel management decisions. To examine the feedbacks between ecological and social dimensions of fuel treatments, we present an integrated model that links a biophysical model that simulates vegetation and hydrology (RHESSys), a fire spread model (WMFire) and an empirical fuel treatment model that accounts for agency decision-making. We use this model to investigate how management decisions affect landscape fuel loads, which in turn affect fire severity and ecosystem services, which feedback to management decisions on fuel treatments. We hypothesize that this latter effect will be driven by salience theory, which predicts that fuel treatments are more likely to occur following major wildfire events. The integrated model provides a flexible framework for answering novel questions about fuel treatments that span social and ecological domains, areas that have previously been treated separately.

  4. Transdisciplinary synthesis for ecosystem science, policy and management: The Australian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, A J J; Thackway, R; Specht, A; Beggs, P J; Brisbane, S; Burns, E L; Byrne, M; Capon, S J; Casanova, M T; Clarke, P A; Davies, J M; Dovers, S; Dwyer, R G; Ens, E; Fisher, D O; Flanigan, M; Garnier, E; Guru, S M; Kilminster, K; Locke, J; Mac Nally, R; McMahon, K M; Mitchell, P J; Pierson, J C; Rodgers, E M; Russell-Smith, J; Udy, J; Waycott, M

    2015-11-15

    Mitigating the environmental effects of global population growth, climatic change and increasing socio-ecological complexity is a daunting challenge. To tackle this requires synthesis: the integration of disparate information to generate novel insights from heterogeneous, complex situations where there are diverse perspectives. Since 1995, a structured approach to inter-, multi- and trans-disciplinary(1) collaboration around big science questions has been supported through synthesis centres around the world. These centres are finding an expanding role due to ever-accumulating data and the need for more and better opportunities to develop transdisciplinary and holistic approaches to solve real-world problems. The Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (ACEAS ) has been the pioneering ecosystem science synthesis centre in the Southern Hemisphere. Such centres provide analysis and synthesis opportunities for time-pressed scientists, policy-makers and managers. They provide the scientific and organisational environs for virtual and face-to-face engagement, impetus for integration, data and methodological support, and innovative ways to deliver synthesis products. We detail the contribution, role and value of synthesis using ACEAS to exemplify the capacity for synthesis centres to facilitate trans-organisational, transdisciplinary synthesis. We compare ACEAS to other international synthesis centres, and describe how it facilitated project teams and its objective of linking natural resource science to policy to management. Scientists and managers were brought together to actively collaborate in multi-institutional, cross-sectoral and transdisciplinary research on contemporary ecological problems. The teams analysed, integrated and synthesised existing data to co-develop solution-oriented publications and management recommendations that might otherwise not have been produced. We identify key outcomes of some ACEAS working groups which used synthesis to

  5. Development of a strategy for the management of PBMR spent fuel in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.W., E-mail: Schalk.Smith@necsa.co.z [South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Ltd (Necsa), Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Bredell, P.J. [South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Ltd (Necsa), Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2010-10-15

    South Africa is planning to expand its nuclear power generating capacity by deploying a number of pressurized-water reactors and pebble-bed modular reactors. It can be expected that this program will impact on the current and planned spent fuel and radioactive waste management systems in South Africa. This paper proposes an approach to develop a strategy for the management of PBMR spent fuel that would form an integral part of the overall national radwaste management system. The approach is expected to provide a conceptual spent fuel management strategy and will also highlight areas that need to be further developed, thus providing guidance for basic technology development.

  6. Leveraging fuel purchasing and management activities within a competitive power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stallard, S.; Anderson, A.; Schick, J.

    1998-01-01

    Worldwide, one can see that competition, deregulation, or at a minimum, a closer focus on the overall economies of power generation is stimulating change within the power sector. Power generation markets are becoming liberalized providing for independent power producers and, in some cases, providing third-party access to the grid. In the US, fuel costs are being transformed from a pass-through expense to the consumer to one of a strategic asset or liability. In every case, fuel quality, fuel-related costs, and managing the fuel purchasing process are key factors in the overall efficiency and financial performance on the power generator. This paper illustrates how effective fuel management requires that the utility or GenCo improve upon historical fuel management/purchasing practices to lower overall generation costs and address the opportunities present in the power and fuel markets. Key framework/principles to be discussed include: Tighter coupling of fuel purchasing, short-term planning, and dispatch functions. Effective planning to link purchased fuel to system demand forecasts, consider contract/transportation constraints/economics, evaluate alternative sources, and consider fuel mix strategies (e.g., between sport, contract, and various regions/qualities). Tools and processes needed to support the new business environment such as fuel impact analysis, application of integrated fuel evaluation/management systems, market forecasting, purchasing, and the role of fuel management in energy trading. Flexibility to support optimal purchasing strategies including shorter purchase cycles, special buys, buys for third parties, and coal tolling. This framework would be discussed using examples from the US, UK, European, and Pacific Rim markets

  7. Remote technology in spent fuel management. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Spent fuel management has always been one of the important stages in the nuclear fuel cycle and it is still one of the most vital problems common to all countries with nuclear reactors. It begins with the discharge of spent fuel from a power or research reactor and ends with its ultimate disposition either by direct disposal or by reprocessing of the spent fuel. Continuous attention is being given by the IAEA to the collection, analysis and exchange of information on spent fuel management. Its role in this area is to provide a forum for exchanging information and development activities that are of common interest. Within its spent fuel management programme, the IAEA has monitored the progress, the benefits and the implementation of remote technologies such as remote tools, robotics, etc. An Advisory Group Meeting on Remote Technology in Spent Fuel Management was held in September 1997 in order to bring together specialists working in this field and to collect information on new technical and economic developments. The objective of the Advisory Group meeting was to review remote technologies in use for the complete range of spent fuel handling and spent fuel management covering wet and dry environments, to describe ongoing developments and to prepare a technical report. This document contains contributions presented at the Meeting. Each paper was indexed and provided with an abstract

  8. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; social issues fact sheet 06: Important considerations for communicating about hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    Effective public education and communication campaigns about wildland fire and fuels management should have clear objectives, and use the right techniques to achieve these objectives. This fact sheet lists seven important considerations for planning or implementing a hazard communication effort.

  9. Integrated data management system for radioactive waste and spent fuel in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Ho

    2001-03-01

    An integrated data management system for the safe management of radioactive waste and spent fuel in Korea is developed to collect basic information, provide the framework for national regulation, and improve national competition and efficiency in the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel. This system can also provide public access to information such as a statistical graphs and integrated data from various waste generators to meet increased public needs and interests. So through the system, the five principles (independence, openness, clearance, efficiency and reliance) of safety regulation can be realized, and public understanding and reliance on the safety of spent fuel and radioactive waste management can be promoted by providing reliable information, it can ensure an openness within the international nuclear community and efficiently support international agreements among contracting parties by operating safe and efficient management of spent fuel and radioactive waste (IAEA joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management), the system can compensate for the imperfections in safe regulation of radioactive waste and spent fuel management related to waste generation, storage and disposal, and make it possible to holistic control and finally re-organize the basic framework of KINS's intermediate and long term research organization and trends, regarding waste management policy is to integrate safe management and unit safe disposal. For this objectives, benchmark study was performed on similar data base system worldwide and data specification with major input/output data during the first phase of this project

  10. Fuel utilization experience in Bohunice NPP and regulatory requirements for implementation of progressive fuel management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patenyi, V [Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Bratislava (Slovakia); Darilek, P; Majercik, J [Vyskumny Ustav Jadrovych Elektrarni, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1994-12-31

    The experience gained in fuel utilization and the basic requirements for fuel licensing in the Slovak NPPs is described. The original project of WWER-440 reactors supposes 3-year fuel cycle with cycle length of about 320 full power days (FPD). Since 1984 it was reduced to 290 FPD. Based on the experience of other countries, a 4-year fuel cycle utilization started in 1987. It is illustrated with data from the Bohunice NPP units. Among 504 fuel assemblies left for the fourth burnup cycle no leakage was observed. The mean burnup achieved in the different units varied from 33.1 to 38.5 Mwd/kg U. The new fuel assemblies used are different from the recent ones in construction, thermohydraulics, water-uranium ratio, enrichment and material design. To meet the safety criteria, regulatory requirements for exploitation of new fuel in WWER-440 were formulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Slovak Republic. 1 tab., 5 refs.

  11. Waste biomass-to-energy supply chain management: a critical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovou, E; Karagiannidis, A; Vlachos, D; Toka, A; Malamakis, A

    2010-10-01

    The development of renewable energy sources has clearly emerged as a promising policy towards enhancing the fragile global energy system with its limited fossil fuel resources, as well as for reducing the related environmental problems. In this context, waste biomass utilization has emerged as a viable alternative for energy production, encompassing a wide range of potential thermochemical, physicochemical and bio-chemical processes. Two significant bottlenecks that hinder the increased biomass utilization for energy production are the cost and complexity of its logistics operations. In this manuscript, we present a critical synthesis of the relative state-of-the-art literature as this applies to all stakeholders involved in the design and management of waste biomass supply chains (WBSCs). We begin by presenting the generic system components and then the unique characteristics of WBSCs that differentiate them from traditional supply chains. We proceed by discussing state-of-the-art energy conversion technologies along with the resulting classification of all relevant literature. We then recognize the natural hierarchy of the decision-making process for the design and planning of WBSCs and provide a taxonomy of all research efforts as these are mapped on the relevant strategic, tactical and operational levels of the hierarchy. Our critical synthesis demonstrates that biomass-to-energy production is a rapidly evolving research field focusing mainly on biomass-to-energy production technologies. However, very few studies address the critical supply chain management issues, and the ones that do that, focus mainly on (i) the assessment of the potential biomass and (ii) the allocation of biomass collection sites and energy production facilities. Our analysis further allows for the identification of gaps and overlaps in the existing literature, as well as of critical future research areas. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Core management and fuel handling for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Safety Guide supplements and elaborates upon the safety requirements for core management and fuel handling that are presented in Section 5 of the Safety Requirements publication on the operation of nuclear power plants. The present publication supersedes the IAEA Safety Guide on Safety Aspects of Core Management and Fuel Handling, issued in 1985 as Safety Series No. 50-SG-010. It is also related to the Safety Guide on the Operating Organization for Nuclear Power Plants, which identifies fuel management as one of the various functions to be performed by the operating organization. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations for core management and fuel handling at nuclear power plants on the basis of current international good practice. The present Safety Guide addresses those aspects of fuel management activities that are necessary in order to allow optimum reactor core operation without compromising the limits imposed by the design safety considerations relating to the nuclear fuel and the plant as a whole. In this publication, 'core management' refers to those activities that are associated with fuel management in the core and reactivity control, and 'fuel handling' refers to the movement, storage and control of fresh and irradiated fuel. Fuel management comprises both core management and fuel handling. This Safety Guide deals with fuel management for all types of land based stationary thermal neutron power plants. It describes the safety objectives of core management, the tasks that have to be accomplished to meet these objectives and the activities undertaken to perform those tasks. It also deals with the receipt of fresh fuel, storage and handling of fuel and other core components, the loading and unloading of fuel and core components, and the insertion and removal of other reactor materials. In addition, it deals with loading a transport container with irradiated fuel and its preparation for transport off the site. Transport

  13. Core management and fuel handling for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This Safety Guide supplements and elaborates upon the safety requirements for core management and fuel handling that are presented in Section 5 of the Safety Requirements publication on the operation of nuclear power plants. The present publication supersedes the IAEA Safety Guide on Safety Aspects of Core Management and Fuel Handling, issued in 1985 as Safety Series No. 50-SG-010. It is also related to the Safety Guide on the Operating Organization for Nuclear Power Plants, which identifies fuel management as one of the various functions to be performed by the operating organization. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations for core management and fuel handling at nuclear power plants on the basis of current international good practice. The present Safety Guide addresses those aspects of fuel management activities that are necessary in order to allow optimum reactor core operation without compromising the limits imposed by the design safety considerations relating to the nuclear fuel and the plant as a whole. In this publication, 'core management' refers to those activities that are associated with fuel management in the core and reactivity control, and 'fuel handling' refers to the movement, storage and control of fresh and irradiated fuel. Fuel management comprises both core management and fuel handling. This Safety Guide deals with fuel management for all types of land based stationary thermal neutron power plants. It describes the safety objectives of core management, the tasks that have to be accomplished to meet these objectives and the activities undertaken to perform those tasks. It also deals with the receipt of fresh fuel, storage and handling of fuel and other core components, the loading and unloading of fuel and core components, and the insertion and removal of other reactor materials. In addition, it deals with loading a transport container with irradiated fuel and its preparation for transport off the site. Transport

  14. State-of-the-art report of spent fuel management technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, S. G.; Park, S. W.; Shin, Y. J. and others

    1998-06-01

    Essential technologies for a long-term management of domestic nuclear fuel have been described in this report. The technologies of interest are advanced processes for spent fuel management, spent fuel examination technology, evaluation of radiation effect on equipment, chemical characterization of spent fuel, and hot cell-related technology state of the art for the above-mentioned technologies has been reviewed and analyzed in detail. As a result, a future R and D direction that seems to be appropriate for us is drawn up in due consideration of in- and out-circumstances encountered with. (author). 304 refs., 28 tabs., 43 figs

  15. Intelligent Power Management of hybrid Wind/ Fuel Cell/ Energy Storage Power Generation System

    OpenAIRE

    A. Hajizadeh; F. Hassanzadeh

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an intelligent power management strategy for hybrid wind/ fuel cell/ energy storage power generation system. The dynamic models of wind turbine, fuel cell and energy storage have been used for simulation of hybrid power system. In order to design power flow control strategy, a fuzzy logic control has been implemented to manage the power between power sources. The optimal operation of the hybrid power system is a main goal of designing power management strategy. The hybrid ...

  16. National Option of China's Nuclear Energy Systems for Spent Fuel Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, R.X. [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ko, W. I.; Lee, S. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Along with safety concerns, these long standing environmental challenges are the major factors influencing the public acceptance of nuclear power. Although nuclear power plays an important role in reducing carbon emissions from energy generation, this could not fully prove it as a sustainable energy source unless we find a consensus approach to treat the nuclear wastes. There are currently no countries that have completed a whole nuclear fuel cycle, and the relative comparison of the reprocessing spent fuel options versus direct disposal option is always a controversial issue. Without exception, nowadays, China is implementing many R and D projects on spent fuel management to find a long-term solution for nuclear fuel cycle system transition, such as deep geological repositories for High Level Waste (HLW), Pu Reduction by Solvent Extraction (PUREX) technology, and fast reactor recycling Mixed U-Pu Oxide (MOX) fuels, etc. This paper integrates the current nation's projects of back-end fuel cycle, analyzes the consequences of potential successes, failures and delays in the project development to future nuclear fuel cycle transition up to 2100. We compared the dynamic results of four scenarios and then assessed relative impact on spent fuel management. The result revealed that the fuel cycle transition of reprocessing and recycling of spent fuel would bring advantages to overall nuclear systems by reducing high level waste inventory, saving natural uranium resources, and reducing plutonium management risk.

  17. A comparison study on radioactive waste management effectiveness in various nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Won Il; Kim, Ho Dong

    2001-07-01

    This study examines whether the DUPIC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In CANDU) fuel cycle make radioactive waste management more effective, by comparing it with other fuel cycles such as the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) once-through cycle, the HWR (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor) once-through cycle and the thermal recycling option to use an existing PWR with MOX (Mixed Oxide) fuel. This study first focuses on the radioactive waste volume generated in all fuel cycle steps, which could be one of the measures of effectiveness of the waste management. Then the total radioactive waste disposition cost is estimated based on two units measuring; m3/GWe-yr and US$/GWe-yr. We find from the radioactive waste volume estimation that the DUPIC fuel cycle could have lower volumes for milling tailings, low level waste and spent fuel than those of other fuel cycle options. From the results of the disposition cost analysis, we find that the DUPIC waste disposition cost is the lowest among fuel cycle options. If the total waste disposition cost is used as a proxy for quantifying the easiness or difficulty in managing wastes, then the DUPIC option actually make waste management easier

  18. Fuel-Cell-Powered Vehicle with Hybrid Power Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2010-01-01

    Figure 1 depicts a hybrid electric utility vehicle that is powered by hydrogenburning proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells operating in conjunction with a metal hydride hydrogen-storage unit. Unlike conventional hybrid electric vehicles, this vehicle utilizes ultracapacitors, rather than batteries, for storing electric energy. This vehicle is a product of continuing efforts to develop the technological discipline known as hybrid power management (HPM), which is oriented toward integration of diverse electric energy-generating, energy-storing, and energy- consuming devices in optimal configurations. Instances of HPM were reported in five prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, though not explicitly labeled as HPM in the first three articles: "Ultracapacitors Store Energy in a Hybrid Electric Vehicle" (LEW-16876), Vol. 24, No. 4 (April 2000), page 63; "Photovoltaic Power Station With Ultracapacitors for Storage" (LEW- 17177), Vol. 27, No. 8 (August 2003), page 38; "Flasher Powered by Photovoltaic Cells and Ultracapacitors" (LEW-17246), Vol. 27, No. 10 (October 2003), page 37; "Hybrid Power Management" (LEW-17520), Vol. 29, No. 12 (December 2005), page 35; and "Ultracapacitor-Powered Cordless Drill" (LEW-18116-1), Vol. 31, No. 8 (August 2007), page 34. To recapitulate from the cited prior articles: The use of ultracapacitors as energy- storage devices lies at the heart of HPM. An ultracapacitor is an electrochemical energy-storage device, but unlike in a conventional rechargeable electrochemical cell or battery, chemical reactions do not take place during operation. Instead, energy is stored electrostatically at an electrode/electrolyte interface. The capacitance per unit volume of an ultracapacitor is much greater than that of a conventional capacitor because its electrodes have much greater surface area per unit volume and the separation between the electrodes is much smaller.

  19. Workstation computer systems for in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccone, L.; Casadei, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    The advancement of powerful engineering workstations has made it possible to have thermal-hydraulics and accident analysis computer programs operating efficiently with a significant performance/cost ratio compared to large mainframe computer. Today, nuclear utilities are acquiring independent engineering analysis capability for fuel management and safety analyses. Computer systems currently available to utility organizations vary widely thus requiring that this software be operational on a number of computer platforms. Recognizing these trends Westinghouse adopted a software development life cycle process for the software development activities which strictly controls the development, testing and qualification of design computer codes. In addition, software standards to ensure maximum portability were developed and implemented, including adherence to FORTRAN 77, and use of uniform system interface and auxiliary routines. A comprehensive test matrix was developed for each computer program to ensure that evolution of code versions preserves the licensing basis. In addition, the results of such test matrices establish the Quality Assurance basis and consistency for the same software operating on different computer platforms. (author). 4 figs

  20. Synthesis and ceramic processing of zirconia alumina composites for application as solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari

    2007-01-01

    The global warmness and the necessity to obtain clean energy from alternative methods than petroleum raises the importance of developing cleaner and more efficient systems of energy generation, among then, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Cubic stabilized zirconia (CSZ) has been the most studied material as electrolyte in SOFC, due to its ionic conductivity and great stability at operation conditions. However, its low fracture toughness difficulties its application as a thin layer, what could lead to an improvement of cell efficiency. In this sense, the alumina addition in CSZ forms a composite, which can shift its mechanical properties, without compromising its electrical properties. In this work, coprecipitation synthesis route and ceramic processing of zirconia-alumina composites were studied, in order to establish optimum conditions to attain high density, homogeneous microstructure, and better mechanical properties than CSZ, without compromising ionic conductivity. For this purpose, composites containing up to 40 wt % of alumina, in a 9 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (9Y-CSZ) matrix were evaluated. In order to optimize the synthesis of the composites, a preliminary study of powder obtaining and processing were carried out, at compositions containing 20 wt % of alumina, in 9Y-CSZ. The ceramic powders were characterized by helium picnometry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, granulometry by laser diffraction and gas adsorption (BET). The characterization of sinterized compacts were performed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, density measurements, Vickers indentation and impedance spectroscopy. The obtained results show that the alumina addition, in the 9Y-CSZ matrix powders, raises the specific surface area, promotes deagglomeration of powders and elevates the oxides crystallization temperature, requiring higher

  1. Spent fuel management: Current status and prospects 1997. Proceedings of a regular advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    Spent fuel management has always been one of the important stages in the nuclear fuel cycle and it is still most vital problems common to all countries with nuclear reactors. It begins with the discharge of spent fuel from a power or a research reactor and ends with its ultimate disposition. Two options exist - an open, once-through cycle with direct disposal of the spent fuel and a closed cycle with reprocessing of the spent fuel, recycling of reprocessed plutonium and uranium in new mixed oxide fuels and disposal of the radioactive waste. Continuous attention is being given by the IAEA to the collection, analysis and exchange of information on spent fuel management. Its role in this area is to provide a forum for exchanging information and to co-ordinate and to encourage closer co-operation among Member States in certain research and development activities that are of common interest. Spent fuel management is recognized as a high priority IAEA activity. The Regular Advisory Group on Spent Fuel Management was established in 1982. The objective of the Regular Advisory Group is to serve as a means of exchanging information on the current status and progress of national programmes on spent fuel management and to provide advice to the IAEA. The results of the last Regular Advisory Group meeting (9-12 September 1997) are reflected in this report. It gives an overview of the status of spent fuel management programmes in a number of countries, a description of the current status and prospects of activities in this field and recommendations of the participants

  2. Perovskites synthesis for solid oxide fuel cells; Sintese de perovsquitas para celulas a combustivel de oxido solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Sibelle F.C.X.; Melo, Dulce M.A.; Pimentel, Patricia M.; Melo, Marcus A. Freitas; Martinelli, Daniele M.H. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: sibelle.cunha@gmail

    2008-07-01

    This work aims to study on the obtaining powders of lanthanum manganite oxides with partial substitution of La with strontium at 20% for the application as a cathode for solid oxide fuel cell, through a route of synthesis that are similar to the Pechini method, in which gelatin replaces the ethylene glycol as polymerization agent. The method highlights itself due to its simplicity, low cost and capability to obtain crystalline powders with the high purity and good stoichiometric control. The perovskite obtained were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, X ray diffraction, electronic scanning microscopy and the superficial area by BET method. The deposition of the perovskite on electrolyte/anode system was done through the spin coating technique. The methodology used for the perovskite synthesis was very efficient, considering a monophasic material was obtained and with characteristics that were proper to the application as electrode to solid oxide fuel cells. (author)

  3. Examination of fuel reinsertion strategies for out-of core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comes, S.A.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code for determining out-of-core fuel loading strategies in order to minimize levelized fuel cycle cost within constraints has been developed and previously reported by the authors. While past work in this area has dealt with optimizations during equilibrium operating conditions, this work has considered the more realistic conditions of nonequilibrium cycles. The code, called OCEON, seeks to determine a family of economically attractive fuel reload strategies through the optimum selection of feed batch sizes, enrichments, and partially burned fuel reinsertion strategies within operating constraints. This paper presents recent work on expanding the code to allow for different fuel reinsertion options when determining the family of near-optimum fuel reload strategies

  4. Irradiated Fuel Management Advisory Programme (IFMAP). An interregional technical co-operation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    Delays in the implementation of the fuel reprocessing option in some countries, the complete abandonment of this option in other countries, and delays in the availability of final spent fuel disposal in almost all countries, has led to increasingly long periods of 'interim' spent fuel storage. The problem of the management of irradiated fuels has therefore increased in importance for many Member States. For power reactors or research reactors, irradiated fuel management includes all of the procedures involving irradiated fuel from the time that it is discharged from the reactor core until it is either reprocessed or placed in a permanent disposal site. Although the IAEA has had programmes in this area in the past and has ongoing activities at present, there is a clear need to provide support to individual Member States which require advice and/or assistance in the resolution of particular questions and concerns

  5. Fuel cycle management by the electric enterprises and spanish nuclear Power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celma, E. M.; Gonzalez, C.; Lopez, J. V.; Melara, J.; Lopez, L.; Martinez, J. C.; Culbras, F.; Blanco, J.; Francia, L.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Group reports to the Technology Committee of the UNESA Nuclear Energy Committee, and is constituted by representatives of both the Spanish Utilities and the Nuclear Power Plants. The Group addresses the nuclear plant common issues in relation to the operation and management of the nuclear fuel in their different stages of the Fuel Cycle. The article reviews the activities developed by the Group in the Front-End, mainly in the monitoring of international programs that define criteria to improve the Fuel Reliability and in the establishment of common bases for the implementation of changes in the regulation applying the nuclear fuel. Concerning the Back-End the Group focuses on those activities of coordination with third parties related to the management of used fuel. (Author)

  6. Energy management strategy based on fuzzy logic for a fuel cell hybrid bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dawei; Jin, Zhenhua; Lu, Qingchun

    Fuel cell vehicles, as a substitute for internal-combustion-engine vehicles, have become a research hotspot for most automobile manufacturers all over the world. Fuel cell systems have disadvantages, such as high cost, slow response and no regenerative energy recovery during braking; hybridization can be a solution to these drawbacks. This paper presents a fuel cell hybrid bus which is equipped with a fuel cell system and two energy storage devices, i.e., a battery and an ultracapacitor. An energy management strategy based on fuzzy logic, which is employed to control the power flow of the vehicular power train, is described. This strategy is capable of determining the desired output power of the fuel cell system, battery and ultracapacitor according to the propulsion power and recuperated braking power. Some tests to verify the strategy were developed, and the results of the tests show the effectiveness of the proposed energy management strategy and the good performance of the fuel cell hybrid bus.

  7. The management committee for post-accidental management - CODIRPA. Synthesis and report by each work group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This huge document contains several parts and reports. The first part contains a report addressing zoning (proposition for the definition of zones just after the emergency phase). The other parts contain stage reports, seminar synthesis, presentations, and final reports made by the different work groups. The topics of these work groups are: Lifting emergency actions of protection of population and reducing the contact between the body and a radioactive source in built environment; Life in contaminated rural territories, agriculture and water; Assessment of radiological and dosimetric consequences; Health monitoring of populations; Compensation; Management of contaminated soils, products and wastes; Organization of public authorities and commitment of stakeholders; Communication; Hypotheses (choice of hypotheses for the assessment of radiological and dosimetric consequences); Interveners; Water (management of water resources); Regulation; Culture; Centre for population reception and information. A last report has been published by a commission on guidelines for preparation to the long-term management of contaminated territories after a nuclear accident

  8. The continuous improvement in quality management for nuclear fuel manufacturing in CNNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoling

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear fuel plant has been keeping good records in quality. Only one pot failure has been found in the fuels loaded in the reactors at more than ten years. The paper describes quality management in nuclear fuel manufacturing and focuses on the continuous improvement on quality system and process by running the quality management system, process by quality control group, and data analyze, the requirements and the improvements for the quality system, the measurement system and the standardization system, the importance of clearance system. It also describes the future plans in quality management

  9. Spent nuclear fuel project high-level information management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Main, G.C.

    1996-09-13

    This document presents the results of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Information Management Planning Project (IMPP), a short-term project that identified information management (IM) issues and opportunities within the SNFP and outlined a high-level plan to address them. This high-level plan for the SNMFP IM focuses on specific examples from within the SNFP. The plan`s recommendations can be characterized in several ways. Some recommendations address specific challenges that the SNFP faces. Others form the basis for making smooth transitions in several important IM areas. Still others identify areas where further study and planning are indicated. The team`s knowledge of developments in the IM industry and at the Hanford Site were crucial in deciding where to recommend that the SNFP act and where they should wait for Site plans to be made. Because of the fast pace of the SNFP and demands on SNFP staff, input and interaction were primarily between the IMPP team and members of the SNFP Information Management Steering Committee (IMSC). Key input to the IMPP came from a workshop where IMSC members and their delegates developed a set of draft IM principles. These principles, described in Section 2, became the foundation for the recommendations found in the transition plan outlined in Section 5. Availability of SNFP staff was limited, so project documents were used as a basis for much of the work. The team, realizing that the status of the project and the environment are continually changing, tried to keep abreast of major developments since those documents were generated. To the extent possible, the information contained in this document is current as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. Programs and organizations on the Hanford Site as a whole are trying to maximize their return on IM investments. They are coordinating IM activities and trying to leverage existing capabilities. However, the SNFP cannot just rely on Sitewide activities to meet its IM requirements

  10. Supercritical water-cooled reactor fuel management and economic comparison and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Guangming; Ruan Liangcheng; Liu Xuechun

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is expected to have an excellent fuel economical efficiency because of its high thermal efficiency. This article compares CSR1OOO with the current mainstream PWR and ABWR on the aspect of the economical efficiency of fuel management, and finally makes an unexpected conclusion that the SCWR has worse fuel economy than others. And it remains to be deliberated whether the SCWR will be the fourth generation of nuclear system. (authors)

  11. Summary of non-US national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Kelman, J.A.

    1982-08-01

    Brief program overviews of fuel cycle, spent fuel, and waste management activities in the following countries are provided: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, France, German Federal Republic, India, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Mexico, Netherlands, Pakistan, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, USSR, and the United Kingdom. International nonproliferation activities, multilateral agreements and projects, and the international agencies specifically involved in the nuclear fuel cycle are also described

  12. Wastes and waste management in the uranium fuel cycle for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.

    1975-08-01

    The manufacturing processes in the uranium fuel cycle for light water reactors have been described with particular reference to the chemical and radiological wastes produced and the waste management procedures employed. The problems and possible solutions of ultimate disposal of high activity fission products and transuranium elements from reprocessing of irradiated fuel have been reviewed. Quantities of wastes arising in each stage of the fuel cycle have been summarised. Wastes arising from reactor operation have been described briefly. (author)

  13. Summary of non-US national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, K.M.; Kelman, J.A.

    1982-08-01

    Brief program overviews of fuel cycle, spent fuel, and waste management activities in the following countries are provided: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, France, German Federal Republic, India, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Mexico, Netherlands, Pakistan, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, USSR, and the United Kingdom. International nonproliferation activities, multilateral agreements and projects, and the international agencies specifically involved in the nuclear fuel cycle are also described.

  14. 18-months fuel cycle engineering and its project management of the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xiangang; Jiao Ping; Liu Yong; Wu Zhiming

    2002-01-01

    The author introduces aspects related to the performing of 18-months fuel cycle engineering evaluation to the Daya Bay nuclear power plant, including the assessment on proposed technical solutions, appointment to the contractors, breaking down and implementation of project, experience on the project management and risk control, and etc. And it also briefs the prompting to the localization of the long fuel cycle engineering technology and AFA 3G fuel manufacturing and design technology via adequate technology transferring of this project

  15. Storage of spent fuel from power reactors in India management and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changrani, R.D.; Bajpai, D.D.; Kodilkar, S.S.

    1999-01-01

    The spent fuel management programme in India is based on closing the nuclear fuel cycle with reprocessing option. This will enable the country to enhance energy security through maximizing utilization of available limited uranium resources while pursuing its Three Stage Nuclear Power Programme. Storage of spent fuel in water pools remains as prevailing mode in the near term. In view of inventory build up of spent fuel, an Away-From-Reactor (AFR) On-Site (OS) spent fuel storage facility has been made operational at Tarapur. Dry storage casks also have been developed as 'add on' system for additional storage of spent fuels. The paper describes the status and experience pertaining to spent fuel storage practices in India. (author)

  16. Implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this Technical Committee Meeting was to explore the status of international activities related to the use of burnup credit for spent fuel applications. This was the second major meeting on the issues of burnup credit for spent fuel management systems held since the IAEA began to monitor the uses of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems in 1997. Burnup credit for wet and dry storage systems is needed in many Member States to allow for increased initial fuel enrichment, and to increase the storage capacity and thus to avoid the need for extensive modifications of the spent fuel management systems involved. This document contains 31 individual papers presented at the Meeting; each of the papers was indexed separately.

  17. Implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this Technical Committee Meeting was to explore the status of international activities related to the use of burnup credit for spent fuel applications. This was the second major meeting on the issues of burnup credit for spent fuel management systems held since the IAEA began to monitor the uses of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems in 1997. Burnup credit for wet and dry storage systems is needed in many Member States to allow for increased initial fuel enrichment, and to increase the storage capacity and thus to avoid the need for extensive modifications of the spent fuel management systems involved. This document contains 31 individual papers presented at the Meeting; each of the papers was indexed separately

  18. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; forest structure and fire hazard fact sheet 04: role of silviculture in fuel treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    The principal goals of fuel treatments are to reduce fireline intensities, reduce the potential for crown fires, improve opportunities for successful fire suppression, and improve forest resilience to forest fires. This fact sheet discusses thinning, and surface fuel treatments, as well as challenges associated with those treatments.

  19. Direct synthesis of nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes on carbon paper for fuel cell electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wong Wai; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir Hassan; Majlan, Edy Herianto; Shyuan, Loh Kee

    2012-06-01

    Organic catalyst has recently been identified as the potential substitution for expensive platinum electrocatalyst for fuel cell application. Numerous studies have shown that the nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes (N-CNT) can be synthesized through spray pyrolysis or floating chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique using various type of organometallic as precursors. This paper presents the method of synthesis and the initial findings of the growth of N-CNT directly on carbon paper using a modified CVD technique. In this research, nickel (II) phthalocyanines (Ni-Pc) as precursor was dissolved in ethanol solvent, stirred and sonicated to become homogenized. The solution was poured into a bubbler and heated up to allow the mixture to vaporize. Subsequently, the solution vapor was flowed into the tubical reactor maintained at 900°C. Carbon paper sputtered with nickel nanoparticles was used as the substrate. The synthesized sample was examined through Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR). Long, entangled and compartmentalized nanotubes with tube diameter ranging 23-27 nm were found covered the carbon paper surface with approximate of 5.5-6.0 μm in thickness. EDX analysis has successfully showed the presence of nitrogen in the carbon nanotube. FTIR analysis showed the presence of the C-N bond on CNT.

  20. Mesoporous catalysts for the synthesis of clean diesel fuels by oligomerisation of olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catani, Roberto; Rossini, Stefano [Snamprogetti SpA, Via F. Maritano 26, 20092 , MI S. Donato Milanese (Italy); Mandreoli, Monica; Vaccari, Angelo [Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale e dei Materiali, Universita di Bologna, INSTM-UdR di Bologna, Viale del Risorgimento 4, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2002-07-03

    Si/Al MCM-41 type mesoporous compounds, as such or containing small amounts of metal (Ni, Rh or Pt), were investigated in the synthesis of clean diesel fuels by oligomerisation of orphan olefin streams. Very good catalytic performances were obtained with C{sub 4} and C{sub 5} olefins, while almost no conversion occurred with ethylene. The activity increased with increasing reaction pressure, temperature and contact time, while high Si/Al ratios had a negative effect on both activity and catalyst stability. The presence of small amount of metal inside the mesoporous structure did not significantly modify the catalytic activity, although specific effects were detected for each element. Since the evaluation of the cetane number by H-NMR gave rise to values about 20% lower than the actual value, a new and more complex algorithm is proposed to calculate the cetane number. Using the proposed algorithm, a good correlation index was found between calculated and motor values for pure compounds. Further study is necessary to move from pure compounds to experimental mixtures.