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Sample records for synthase enzyme functions

  1. Crystal Structure and Functional Analysis of Homocitrate Synthase, an Essential Enzyme in Lysine Biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Scott, Erin M.; Couture, Jean-François; Pillus, Lorraine; Trievel, Raymond C.; (Michigan); (UCSD)

    2010-01-12

    Homocitrate synthase (HCS) catalyzes the first and committed step in lysine biosynthesis in many fungi and certain Archaea and is a potential target for antifungal drugs. Here we report the crystal structure of the HCS apoenzyme from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and two distinct structures of the enzyme in complex with the substrate 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG). The structures reveal that HCS forms an intertwined homodimer stabilized by domain-swapping between the N- and C-terminal domains of each monomer. The N-terminal catalytic domain is composed of a TIM barrel fold in which 2-OG binds via hydrogen bonds and coordination to the active site divalent metal ion, whereas the C-terminal domain is composed of mixed {alpha}/{beta} topology. In the structures of the HCS apoenzyme and one of the 2-OG binary complexes, a lid motif from the C-terminal domain occludes the entrance to the active site of the neighboring monomer, whereas in the second 2-OG complex the lid is disordered, suggesting that it regulates substrate access to the active site through its apparent flexibility. Mutations of the active site residues involved in 2-OG binding or implicated in acid-base catalysis impair or abolish activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, these results yield new insights into the structure and catalytic mechanism of HCSs and furnish a platform for developing HCS-selective inhibitors.

  2. Functional analysis of the Phycomyces carRA gene encoding the enzymes phytoene synthase and lycopene cyclase.

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    Catalina Sanz

    Full Text Available Phycomyces carRA gene encodes a protein with two domains. Domain R is characterized by red carR mutants that accumulate lycopene. Domain A is characterized by white carA mutants that do not accumulate significant amounts of carotenoids. The carRA-encoded protein was identified as the lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase enzyme by sequence homology with other proteins. However, no direct data showing the function of this protein have been reported so far. Different Mucor circinelloides mutants altered at the phytoene synthase, the lycopene cyclase or both activities were transformed with the Phycomyces carRA gene. Fully transcribed carRA mRNA molecules were detected by Northern assays in the transformants and the correct processing of the carRA messenger was verified by RT-PCR. These results showed that Phycomyces carRA gene was correctly expressed in Mucor. Carotenoids analysis in these transformants showed the presence of ß-carotene, absent in the untransformed strains, providing functional evidence that the Phycomyces carRA gene complements the M. circinelloides mutations. Co-transformation of the carRA cDNA in E. coli with different combinations of the carotenoid structural genes from Erwinia uredovora was also performed. Newly formed carotenoids were accumulated showing that the Phycomyces CarRA protein does contain lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase activities. The heterologous expression of the carRA gene and the functional complementation of the mentioned activities are not very efficient in E. coli. However, the simultaneous presence of both carRA and carB gene products from Phycomyces increases the efficiency of these enzymes, presumably due to an interaction mechanism.

  3. Analysis of the Sequences, Structures, and Functions of Product-Releasing Enzyme Domains in Fungal Polyketide Synthases

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    Lu Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Product-releasing enzyme (PRE domains in fungal non-reducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs play a crucial role in catalysis and editing during polyketide biosynthesis, especially accelerating final biosynthetic reactions accompanied with product offloading. However, up to date, the systematic knowledge about PRE domains is deficient. In the present study, the relationships between sequences, structures, and functions of PRE domains were analyzed with 574 NR-PKSs of eight groups (I–VIII. It was found that the PRE domains in NR-PKSs could be mainly classified into three types, thioesterase (TE, reductase (R, and metallo-β-lactamase-type TE (MβL-TE. The widely distributed TE or TE-like domains were involved in NR-PKSs of groups I–IV, VI, and VIII. The R domains appeared in NR-PKSs of groups IV and VII, while the physically discrete MβL-TE domains were employed by most NR-PKSs of group V. The changes of catalytic sites and structural characteristics resulted in PRE functional differentiations. The phylogeny revealed that the evolution of TE domains was accompanied by complex functional divergence. The diverse sequence lengths of TE lid-loops affected substrate specificity with different chain lengths. The volume diversification of TE catalytic pockets contributed to catalytic mechanisms with functional differentiations. The above findings may help to understand the crucial catalysis of fungal aromatic polyketide biosyntheses and govern recombination of NR-PKSs to obtain unnatural target products.

  4. Germacrene A Synthase in Yarrow (Achillea millefolium Is an Enzyme with Mixed Substrate Specificity: Gene Cloning, Functional Characterization and Expression Analysis

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    Leila ePazouki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Terpenoid synthases constitute a highly diverse gene family producing a wide range of cyclic and acyclic molecules consisting of isoprene (C5 residues. Often a single terpene synthase produces a spectrum of molecules of given chain length, but some terpene synthases can use multiple substrates, producing products of different chain length. Only a few such enzymes has been characterized, but the capacity for multiple-substrate use can be more widespread than previously thought. Here we focused on germacrene A synthase (GAS that is a key cytosolic enzyme in the sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis pathway in the important medicinal plant Achillea millefolium (AmGAS. The full length encoding gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3, functionally characterized, and its in vivo expression was analyzed. The recombinant protein catalyzed formation of germacrene A with the C15 substrate farnesyl diphosphate (FDP, while acyclic monoterpenes were formed with the C10 substrate geranyl diphosphate (GDP and cyclic monoterpenes with the C10 substrate neryl diphosphate (NDP. Although monoterpene synthesis has been assumed to be confined exclusively to plastids, AmGAS can potentially synthesize monoterpenes in cytosol when GDP or NDP become available. AmGAS enzyme had high homology with GAS sequences from other Asteraceae species, suggesting that multi-substrate use can be more widespread among germacrene A synthases than previously thought. Expression studies indicated that AmGAS was expressed in both autotrophic and heterotrophic plant compartments with the highest expression levels in leaves and flowers. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the cloning and characterization of germacrene A synthase coding gene in A. millefolium, and multi-substrate use of GAS enzymes.

  5. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family...

  6. Soluble Starch Synthase III-1 in Amylopectin Metabolism of Banana Fruit: Characterization, Expression, Enzyme Activity, and Functional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hongxia; Sun, Peiguang; Liu, Qing; Jia, Caihong; Liu, Juhua; Hu, Wei; Jin, Zhiqiang; Xu, Biyu

    2017-01-01

    Soluble starch synthase (SS) is one of the key enzymes involved in amylopectin biosynthesis in plants. However, no information is currently available about this gene family in the important fruit crop banana. Herein, we characterized the function of MaSSIII-1 in amylopectin metabolism of banana fruit and described the putative role of the other MaSS family members. Firstly, starch granules, starch and amylopectin content were found to increase during banana fruit development, but decline during storage. The SS activity started to increase later than amylopectin and starch content. Secondly, four putative SS genes were cloned and characterized from banana fruit. Among them, MaSSIII-1 showed the highest expression in banana pulp during fruit development at transcriptional levels. Further Western blot analysis suggested that the protein was gradually increased during banana fruit development, but drastically reduced during storage. This expression pattern was highly consistent with changes in starch granules, amylopectin content, and SS activity at the late phase of banana fruit development. Lastly, overexpression of MaSSIII-1 in tomato plants distinctly changed the morphology of starch granules and significantly increased the total starch accumulation, amylopectin content, and SS activity at mature-green stage in comparison to wild-type. The findings demonstrated that MaSSIII-1 is a key gene expressed in banana fruit and responsible for the active amylopectin biosynthesis, this is the first report in a fresh fruit species. Such a finding may enable the development of molecular markers for banana breeding and genetic improvement of nutritional value and functional properties of banana fruit. PMID:28424724

  7. Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase operates in planta as a bifunctional enzyme with chrysanthemol synthase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Liping; Hu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    (CPP). Three proteins are known to catalyze this cyclopropanation reaction of terpene precursors. Two of them, phytoene and squalene synthase, are bifunctional enzymes with both prenyltransferase and terpene synthase activity. CDS, the other member, has been reported to perform only...

  8. The crystal structures of the tri-functional Chloroflexus aurantiacus and bi-functional Rhodobacter sphaeroides malyl-CoA lyases and comparison with CitE-like superfamily enzymes and malate synthases.

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    Zarzycki, Jan; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2013-11-09

    Malyl-CoA lyase (MCL) is a promiscuous carbon-carbon bond lyase that catalyzes the reversible cleavage of structurally related Coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters. This enzyme plays a crucial, multifunctional role in the 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle for autotrophic CO2 fixation in Chloroflexus aurantiacus. A second, phylogenetically distinct MCL from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is involved in the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway for acetate assimilation. Both MCLs belong to the large superfamily of CitE-like enzymes, which includes the name-giving β-subunit of citrate lyase (CitE), malyl-CoA thioesterases and other enzymes of unknown physiological function. The CitE-like enzyme superfamily also bears sequence and structural resemblance to the malate synthases. All of these different enzymes share highly conserved catalytic residues, although they catalyze distinctly different reactions: C-C bond formation and cleavage, thioester hydrolysis, or both (the malate synthases). Here we report the first crystal structures of MCLs from two different phylogenetic subgroups in apo- and substrate-bound forms. Both the C. aurantiacus and the R. sphaeroides MCL contain elaborations on the canonical β8/α8 TIM barrel fold and form hexameric assemblies. Upon ligand binding, changes in the C-terminal domains of the MCLs result in closing of the active site, with the C-terminal domain of one monomer forming a lid over and contributing side chains to the active site of the adjacent monomer. The distinctive features of the two MCL subgroups were compared to known structures of other CitE-like superfamily enzymes and to malate synthases, providing insight into the structural subtleties that underlie the functional versatility of these enzymes. Although the C. aurantiacus and the R. sphaeroides MCLs have divergent primary structures (~37% identical), their tertiary and quaternary structures are very similar. It can be assumed that the C-C bond formation catalyzed by the MCLs occurs as proposed for

  9. CLYBL is a polymorphic human enzyme with malate synthase and β-methylmalate synthase activity

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    Strittmatter, Laura; Li, Yang; Nakatsuka, Nathan J.; Calvo, Sarah E.; Grabarek, Zenon; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2014-01-01

    CLYBL is a human mitochondrial enzyme of unknown function that is found in multiple eukaryotic taxa and conserved to bacteria. The protein is expressed in the mitochondria of all mammalian organs, with highest expression in brown fat and kidney. Approximately 5% of all humans harbor a premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL that has been associated with reduced levels of circulating vitamin B12. Using comparative genomics, we now show that CLYBL is strongly co-expressed with and co-evolved specifically with other components of the mitochondrial B12 pathway. We confirm that the premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL leads to a loss of protein expression. To elucidate the molecular function of CLYBL, we used comparative operon analysis, structural modeling and enzyme kinetics. We report that CLYBL encodes a malate/β-methylmalate synthase, converting glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA to malate, or glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA to β-methylmalate. Malate synthases are best known for their established role in the glyoxylate shunt of plants and lower organisms and are traditionally described as not occurring in humans. The broader role of a malate/β-methylmalate synthase in human physiology and its mechanistic link to vitamin B12 metabolism remain unknown. PMID:24334609

  10. The Enzyme Function Initiative†

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    Gerlt, John A.; Allen, Karen N.; Almo, Steven C.; Armstrong, Richard N.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Cronan, John E.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C. Dale; Raushel, Frank M.; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily-specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include: 1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation); 2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia; 3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy; 4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization; and 5) dissemination of data via the EFI’s website, enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal and pharmaceutical efforts. PMID

  11. The mechanism for isopenicillin N synthase from density-functional modeling highlights the similarities with other enzymes in the 2-His-1-carboxylate family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Marcus; Siegbahn, Per E M; Morokuma, Keiji

    2008-01-22

    Isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS) catalyzes a key step in the biosynthesis of the important beta-lactam antibiotics penicillins and cephalosporins. Density-functional calculations with the B3LYP functional are used to propose a detailed mechanism for this reaction. The results support the general scheme outlined from experimental observations, with formation of a four-membered beta-lactam ring followed by formation of a five-membered thiazolidine ring. However, an alternative mechanism for the heterolytic O-O bond cleavage and beta-lactam ring formation steps is proposed. The former part involves protonation of the distal oxygen by an iron-bound water ligand. This mechanism highlights the strong similarities that exist between IPNS and other enzymes of the 2-histidine-1-carboxylate family, especially pterin-dependent amino acid hydroxylases and alpha-keto acid-dependent dioxygenases. Both activation of the cysteine beta-C-H bond by an iron-bound superoxo radical and activation of the valine beta-C-H bond by a ferryl-oxo species show reaction barriers close to the experimentally measured one. These results are in agreement with kinetic isotope experiments that suggest both C-H bond activation steps to be partially rate limiting. The ring formation sequence is determined by the relative strengths of the two C-H bonds. Only the ferryl-oxo intermediate is capable of activating the stronger valine beta-C-H bond.

  12. Human Isoprenoid Synthase Enzymes as Therapeutic Targets

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    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios; Berghuis, Albert; Tsantrizos, Youla

    2014-07-01

    The complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids in the human body, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently, pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies.

  13. Functional Annotation, Genome Organization and Phylogeny of the Grapevine (Vitis vinifera Terpene Synthase Gene Family Based on Genome Assembly, FLcDNA Cloning, and Enzyme Assays

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    Toub Omid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Terpenoids are among the most important constituents of grape flavour and wine bouquet, and serve as useful metabolite markers in viticulture and enology. Based on the initial 8-fold sequencing of a nearly homozygous Pinot noir inbred line, 89 putative terpenoid synthase genes (VvTPS were predicted by in silico analysis of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera genome assembly 1. The finding of this very large VvTPS family, combined with the importance of terpenoid metabolism for the organoleptic properties of grapevine berries and finished wines, prompted a detailed examination of this gene family at the genomic level as well as an investigation into VvTPS biochemical functions. Results We present findings from the analysis of the up-dated 12-fold sequencing and assembly of the grapevine genome that place the number of predicted VvTPS genes at 69 putatively functional VvTPS, 20 partial VvTPS, and 63 VvTPS probable pseudogenes. Gene discovery and annotation included information about gene architecture and chromosomal location. A dense cluster of 45 VvTPS is localized on chromosome 18. Extensive FLcDNA cloning, gene synthesis, and protein expression enabled functional characterization of 39 VvTPS; this is the largest number of functionally characterized TPS for any species reported to date. Of these enzymes, 23 have unique functions and/or phylogenetic locations within the plant TPS gene family. Phylogenetic analyses of the TPS gene family showed that while most VvTPS form species-specific gene clusters, there are several examples of gene orthology with TPS of other plant species, representing perhaps more ancient VvTPS, which have maintained functions independent of speciation. Conclusions The highly expanded VvTPS gene family underpins the prominence of terpenoid metabolism in grapevine. We provide a detailed experimental functional annotation of 39 members of this important gene family in grapevine and comprehensive information

  14. Functional Annotation, Genome Organization and Phylogeny of the Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) Terpene Synthase Gene Family Based on Genome Assembly, FLcDNA Cloning, and Enzyme Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Terpenoids are among the most important constituents of grape flavour and wine bouquet, and serve as useful metabolite markers in viticulture and enology. Based on the initial 8-fold sequencing of a nearly homozygous Pinot noir inbred line, 89 putative terpenoid synthase genes (VvTPS) were predicted by in silico analysis of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera) genome assembly [1]. The finding of this very large VvTPS family, combined with the importance of terpenoid metabolism for the organoleptic properties of grapevine berries and finished wines, prompted a detailed examination of this gene family at the genomic level as well as an investigation into VvTPS biochemical functions. Results We present findings from the analysis of the up-dated 12-fold sequencing and assembly of the grapevine genome that place the number of predicted VvTPS genes at 69 putatively functional VvTPS, 20 partial VvTPS, and 63 VvTPS probable pseudogenes. Gene discovery and annotation included information about gene architecture and chromosomal location. A dense cluster of 45 VvTPS is localized on chromosome 18. Extensive FLcDNA cloning, gene synthesis, and protein expression enabled functional characterization of 39 VvTPS; this is the largest number of functionally characterized TPS for any species reported to date. Of these enzymes, 23 have unique functions and/or phylogenetic locations within the plant TPS gene family. Phylogenetic analyses of the TPS gene family showed that while most VvTPS form species-specific gene clusters, there are several examples of gene orthology with TPS of other plant species, representing perhaps more ancient VvTPS, which have maintained functions independent of speciation. Conclusions The highly expanded VvTPS gene family underpins the prominence of terpenoid metabolism in grapevine. We provide a detailed experimental functional annotation of 39 members of this important gene family in grapevine and comprehensive information about gene structure and

  15. Structure of the Varicella Zoster Virus Thymidylate Synthase Establishes Functional and Structural Similarities as the Human Enzyme and Potentiates Itself as a Target of Brivudine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, Kelly; Dahlroth, Sue-Li; Veerappan, Saranya; Pan, Lucy Xin; Cornvik, Tobias; Nordlund, Pär

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a highly infectious human herpesvirus that is the causative agent for chicken pox and shingles. VZV encodes a functional thymidylate synthase (TS), which is the sole enzyme that produces dTMP from dUMP de novo. To study substrate binding, the complex structure of TSVZV with dUMP was determined to a resolution of 2.9 Å. In the absence of a folate co-substrate, dUMP binds in the conserved TS active site and is coordinated similarly as in the human encoded TS (TSHS) in an open conformation. The interactions between TSVZV with dUMP and a cofactor analog, raltitrexed, were also studied using differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), suggesting that TSVZV binds dUMP and raltitrexed in a sequential binding mode like other TS. The DSF also revealed interactions between TSVZV and in vitro phosphorylated brivudine (BVDUP), a highly potent anti-herpesvirus drug against VZV infections. The binding of BVDUP to TSVZV was further confirmed by the complex structure of TSVZV and BVDUP solved at a resolution of 2.9 Å. BVDUP binds similarly as dUMP in the TSHS but it induces a closed conformation of the active site. The structure supports that the 5-bromovinyl substituent on BVDUP is likely to inhibit TSVZV by preventing the transfer of a methylene group from its cofactor and the subsequent formation of dTMP. The interactions between TSVZV and BVDUP are consistent with that TSVZV is indeed a target of brivudine in vivo. The work also provided the structural basis for rational design of more specific TSVZV inhibitors.

  16. Structure of the Varicella Zoster Virus Thymidylate Synthase Establishes Functional and Structural Similarities as the Human Enzyme and Potentiates Itself as a Target of Brivudine.

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    Kelly Hew

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus (VZV is a highly infectious human herpesvirus that is the causative agent for chicken pox and shingles. VZV encodes a functional thymidylate synthase (TS, which is the sole enzyme that produces dTMP from dUMP de novo. To study substrate binding, the complex structure of TSVZV with dUMP was determined to a resolution of 2.9 Å. In the absence of a folate co-substrate, dUMP binds in the conserved TS active site and is coordinated similarly as in the human encoded TS (TSHS in an open conformation. The interactions between TSVZV with dUMP and a cofactor analog, raltitrexed, were also studied using differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF, suggesting that TSVZV binds dUMP and raltitrexed in a sequential binding mode like other TS. The DSF also revealed interactions between TSVZV and in vitro phosphorylated brivudine (BVDUP, a highly potent anti-herpesvirus drug against VZV infections. The binding of BVDUP to TSVZV was further confirmed by the complex structure of TSVZV and BVDUP solved at a resolution of 2.9 Å. BVDUP binds similarly as dUMP in the TSHS but it induces a closed conformation of the active site. The structure supports that the 5-bromovinyl substituent on BVDUP is likely to inhibit TSVZV by preventing the transfer of a methylene group from its cofactor and the subsequent formation of dTMP. The interactions between TSVZV and BVDUP are consistent with that TSVZV is indeed a target of brivudine in vivo. The work also provided the structural basis for rational design of more specific TSVZV inhibitors.

  17. Understanding structure, function, and mutations in the mitochondrial ATP synthase

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    Ting Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial ATP synthase is a multimeric enzyme complex with an overall molecular weight of about 600,000 Da. The ATP synthase is a molecular motor composed of two separable parts: F1 and Fo. The F1 portion contains the catalytic sites for ATP synthesis and protrudes into the mitochondrial matrix. Fo forms a proton turbine that is embedded in the inner membrane and connected to the rotor of F1. The flux of protons flowing down a potential gradient powers the rotation of the rotor driving the synthesis of ATP. Thus, the flow of protons though Fo is coupled to the synthesis of ATP. This review will discuss the structure/function relationship in the ATP synthase as determined by biochemical, crystallographic, and genetic studies. An emphasis will be placed on linking the structure/function relationship with understanding how disease causing mutations or putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes encoding the subunits of the ATP synthase, will affect the function of the enzyme and the health of the individual. The review will start by summarizing the current understanding of the subunit composition of the enzyme and the role of the subunits followed by a discussion on known mutations and their effect on the activity of the ATP synthase. The review will conclude with a summary of mutations in genes encoding subunits of the ATP synthase that are known to be responsible for human disease, and a brief discussion on SNPs.

  18. Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase operates in planta as a bifunctional enzyme with chrysanthemol synthase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Liping; Hu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase (CDS) is the first path-way-specific enzyme in the biosynthesis of pyrethrins, the most widely used plant-derived pesticide. CDS catalyzes c1′-2-3 cyclopropanation reactions of two molecules of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to yield chrysanthemyl diphosphate...

  19. Cellulose Microfibril Formation by Surface-Tethered Cellulose Synthase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Snehasish; Omadjela, Okako; Gaddes, David; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Zimmer, Jochen; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2016-02-23

    Cellulose microfibrils are pseudocrystalline arrays of cellulose chains that are synthesized by cellulose synthases. The enzymes are organized into large membrane-embedded complexes in which each enzyme likely synthesizes and secretes a β-(1→4) glucan. The relationship between the organization of the enzymes in these complexes and cellulose crystallization has not been explored. To better understand this relationship, we used atomic force microscopy to visualize cellulose microfibril formation from nickel-film-immobilized bacterial cellulose synthase enzymes (BcsA-Bs), which in standard solution only form amorphous cellulose from monomeric BcsA-B complexes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques show that surface-tethered BcsA-Bs synthesize highly crystalline cellulose II in the presence of UDP-Glc, the allosteric activator cyclic-di-GMP, as well as magnesium. The cellulose II cross section/diameter and the crystal size and crystallinity depend on the surface density of tethered enzymes as well as the overall concentration of substrates. Our results provide the correlation between cellulose microfibril formation and the spatial organization of cellulose synthases.

  20. Functional isopenicillin N synthase in an animal genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, D.; Timmermans, M.J.T.N.; Hensbergen, P.; van Leeuwen, H.; Koopman, J.; Faddeeva, A.; Suring, W.; de Boer, T.E.; Mariën, J.; Boer, R.; Bovenberg, R.; van Straalen, N.M.

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of genes is widespread among prokaryotes, but is less common between microorganisms and animals. Here, we present evidence for the presence of a gene encoding functional isopenicillin N synthase, an enzyme in the β-lactam antibiotics biosynthesis pathway, in the genome of the

  1. A functional isopenicillin N synthase in an animal genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, D.; Timmermans, M.J.T.N.; Hensbergen, P.J.; van Leeuwen, H.; Koopman, J.; Faddeeva-Vakhrusheva, A.; Suring, W.J.; de Boer, T.E.; Mariën, A.G.H.; Boer, R.; Bovenberg, R.; van Straalen, N.M.

    Horizontal transfer of genes is widespread among prokaryotes, but is less common between microorganisms and animals. Here, we present evidence for the presence of a gene encoding functional isopenicillin N synthase, an enzyme in the β-lactam antibiotics biosynthesis pathway, in the genome of the

  2. Predicting the Functions and Specificity of Triterpenoid Synthases: A Mechanism-Based Multi-intermediate Docking Approach

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    Tian, Bo-Xue; Wallrapp, Frank H.; Holiday, Gemma L.; Chow, Jeng-Yeong; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Poulter, C. Dale; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Terpenoid synthases construct the carbon skeletons of tens of thousands of natural products. To predict functions and specificity of triterpenoid synthases, a mechanism-based, multi-intermediate docking approach is proposed. In addition to enzyme function prediction, other potential applications of the current approach, such as enzyme mechanistic studies and enzyme redesign by mutagenesis, are discussed. PMID:25299649

  3. Genomic Analysis of Terpene Synthase Family and Functional Characterization of Seven Sesquiterpene Synthases from Citrus sinensis

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    Alquézar, Berta; Rodríguez, Ana; de la Peña, Marcos; Peña, Leandro

    2017-01-01

    Citrus aroma and flavor, chief traits of fruit quality, are derived from their high content in essential oils of most plant tissues, including leaves, stems, flowers, and fruits. Accumulated in secretory cavities, most components of these oils are volatile terpenes. They contribute to defense against herbivores and pathogens, and perhaps also protect tissues against abiotic stress. In spite of their importance, our understanding of the physiological, biochemical, and genetic regulation of citrus terpene volatiles is still limited. The availability of the sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) genome sequence allowed us to characterize for the first time the terpene synthase (TPS) family in a citrus type. CsTPS is one of the largest angiosperm TPS families characterized so far, formed by 95 loci from which just 55 encode for putative functional TPSs. All TPS angiosperm families, TPS-a, TPS-b, TPS-c, TPS-e/f, and TPS-g were represented in the sweet orange genome, with 28, 18, 2, 2, and 5 putative full length genes each. Additionally, sweet orange β-farnesene synthase, (Z)-β-cubebene/α-copaene synthase, two β-caryophyllene synthases, and three multiproduct enzymes yielding β-cadinene/α-copaene, β-elemene, and β-cadinene/ledene/allo-aromandendrene as major products were identified, and functionally characterized via in vivo recombinant Escherichia coli assays. PMID:28883829

  4. Genomic Analysis of Terpene Synthase Family and Functional Characterization of Seven Sesquiterpene Synthases from Citrus sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Alquézar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Citrus aroma and flavor, chief traits of fruit quality, are derived from their high content in essential oils of most plant tissues, including leaves, stems, flowers, and fruits. Accumulated in secretory cavities, most components of these oils are volatile terpenes. They contribute to defense against herbivores and pathogens, and perhaps also protect tissues against abiotic stress. In spite of their importance, our understanding of the physiological, biochemical, and genetic regulation of citrus terpene volatiles is still limited. The availability of the sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck genome sequence allowed us to characterize for the first time the terpene synthase (TPS family in a citrus type. CsTPS is one of the largest angiosperm TPS families characterized so far, formed by 95 loci from which just 55 encode for putative functional TPSs. All TPS angiosperm families, TPS-a, TPS-b, TPS-c, TPS-e/f, and TPS-g were represented in the sweet orange genome, with 28, 18, 2, 2, and 5 putative full length genes each. Additionally, sweet orange β-farnesene synthase, (Z-β-cubebene/α-copaene synthase, two β-caryophyllene synthases, and three multiproduct enzymes yielding β-cadinene/α-copaene, β-elemene, and β-cadinene/ledene/allo-aromandendrene as major products were identified, and functionally characterized via in vivo recombinant Escherichia coli assays.

  5. Molecular cloning and functional expression of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase from Coleus forskohlii Briq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engprasert, Surang; Taura, Futoshi; Kawamukai, Makoto; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2004-11-18

    Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP), a common biosynthetic precursor to the labdane diterpene forskolin, has been biosynthesised via a non-mevalonate pathway. Geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthase is an important branch point enzyme in terpenoid biosynthesis. Therefore, GGPP synthase is thought to be a key enzyme in biosynthesis of forskolin. Herein we report the first confirmation of the GGPP synthase gene in Coleus forskohlii Briq. The open reading frame for full-length GGPP synthase encodes a protein of 359 amino acids, in which 1,077 nucleotides long with calculated molecular mass of 39.3 kDa. Alignments of C. forskohlii GGPP synthase amino acid sequences revealed high homologies with other plant GGPP synthases. Several highly conserved regions, including two aspartate-rich motifs were identified. Transient expression of the N-terminal region of C. forskohlii GGPP synthase-GFP fusion protein in tobacco cells demonstrated subcellular localization in the chloroplast. Carotenoid production was observed in Escherichia coli harboring pACCAR25DeltacrtE from Erwinia uredovora and plasmid carrying C. forskohlii GGPP synthase. These results suggested that cDNA encoded functional GGPP synthase. Furthermore, C. forskohlii GGPP synthase expression was strong in leaves, decreased in stems and very little expression was observed in roots. This investigation proposed that forskolin was synthesised via a non-mevalonate pathway. GGPP synthase is thought to be involved in the biosynthesis of forskolin, which is primarily synthesised in the leaves and subsequently accumulates in the stems and roots.

  6. Nitric oxide synthases: regulation and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förstermann, Ulrich; Sessa, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), the smallest signalling molecule known, is produced by three isoforms of NO synthase (NOS; EC 1.14.13.39). They all utilize l-arginine and molecular oxygen as substrates and require the cofactors reduced nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and (6R-)5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). All NOS bind calmodulin and contain haem. Neuronal NOS (nNOS, NOS I) is constitutively expressed in central and peripheral neurons and some other cell types. Its functions include synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system (CNS), central regulation of blood pressure, smooth muscle relaxation, and vasodilatation via peripheral nitrergic nerves. Nitrergic nerves are of particular importance in the relaxation of corpus cavernosum and penile erection. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil) require at least a residual nNOS activity for their action. Inducible NOS (NOS II) can be expressed in many cell types in response to lipopolysaccharide, cytokines, or other agents. Inducible NOS generates large amounts of NO that have cytostatic effects on parasitic target cells. Inducible NOS contributes to the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases and septic shock. Endothelial NOS (eNOS, NOS III) is mostly expressed in endothelial cells. It keeps blood vessels dilated, controls blood pressure, and has numerous other vasoprotective and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Many cardiovascular risk factors lead to oxidative stress, eNOS uncoupling, and endothelial dysfunction in the vasculature. Pharmacologically, vascular oxidative stress can be reduced and eNOS functionality restored with renin- and angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitors, with angiotensin receptor blockers, and with statins. PMID:21890489

  7. Molecular cloning and functional expression of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase from Coleus forskohlii Briq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamukai Makoto

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP, a common biosynthetic precursor to the labdane diterpene forskolin, has been biosynthesised via a non-mevalonate pathway. Geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP synthase is an important branch point enzyme in terpenoid biosynthesis. Therefore, GGPP synthase is thought to be a key enzyme in biosynthesis of forskolin. Herein we report the first confirmation of the GGPP synthase gene in Coleus forskohlii Briq. Results The open reading frame for full-length GGPP synthase encodes a protein of 359 amino acids, in which 1,077 nucleotides long with calculated molecular mass of 39.3 kDa. Alignments of C. forskohlii GGPP synthase amino acid sequences revealed high homologies with other plant GGPP synthases. Several highly conserved regions, including two aspartate-rich motifs were identified. Transient expression of the N-terminal region of C. forskohlii GGPP synthase-GFP fusion protein in tobacco cells demonstrated subcellular localization in the chloroplast. Carotenoid production was observed in Escherichia coli harboring pACCAR25ΔcrtE from Erwinia uredovora and plasmid carrying C. forskohlii GGPP synthase. These results suggested that cDNA encoded functional GGPP synthase. Furthermore, C. forskohlii GGPP synthase expression was strong in leaves, decreased in stems and very little expression was observed in roots. Conclusion This investigation proposed that forskolin was synthesised via a non-mevalonate pathway. GGPP synthase is thought to be involved in the biosynthesis of forskolin, which is primarily synthesised in the leaves and subsequently accumulates in the stems and roots.

  8. Identification, functional characterization and developmental regulation of sesquiterpene synthases from sunflower capitate glandular trichomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpfert, Jens C; MacNevin, Gillian; Ro, Dae-Kyun; Spring, Otmar

    2009-01-01

    Background Sesquiterpene lactones are characteristic metabolites of Asteraceae (or Compositae) which often display potent bioactivities and are sequestered in specialized organs such as laticifers, resin ducts, and trichomes. For characterization of sunflower sesquiterpene synthases we employed a simple method to isolate pure trichomes from anther appendages which facilitated the identification of these genes and investigation of their enzymatic functions and expression patterns during trichome development. Results Glandular trichomes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were isolated, and their RNA was extracted to investigate the initial steps of sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis. Reverse transcription-PCR experiments led to the identification of three sesquiterpene synthases. By combination of in vitro and in vivo characterization of sesquiterpene synthase gene products in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively, two enzymes were identified as germacrene A synthases, the key enzymes of sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis. Due to the very low in vitro activity, the third enzyme was expressed in vivo in yeast as a thioredoxin-fusion protein for functional characterization. In in vivo assays, it was identified as a multiproduct enzyme with the volatile sesquiterpene hydrocarbon δ-cadinene as one of the two main products with α-muuorlene, β-caryophyllene, α-humulene and α-copaene as minor products. The second main compound remained unidentified. For expression studies, glandular trichomes from the anther appendages of sunflower florets were isolated in particular developmental stages from the pre- to the post-secretory phase. All three sesquiterpene synthases were solely upregulated during the biosynthetically active stages of the trichomes. Expression in different aerial plant parts coincided with occurrence and maturity of trichomes. Young roots with root hairs showed expression of the sesquiterpene synthase genes as well. Conclusion This

  9. A functional cellulose synthase from ascidian epidermis

    OpenAIRE

    Matthysse, Ann G.; Deschet, Karine; Williams, Melanie; Marry, Mazz; White, Alan R.; Smith, William C.

    2004-01-01

    Among animals, urochordates (e.g., ascidians) are unique in their ability to biosynthesize cellulose. In ascidians cellulose is synthesized in the epidermis and incorporated into a protective coat know as the tunic. A putative cellulose synthase-like gene was first identified in the genome sequences of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. We describe here a cellulose synthase gene from the ascidian Ciona savignyi that is expressed in the epidermis. The predicted C. savignyi cellulose synthase ami...

  10. Phylogenomic and functional domain analysis of polyketide synthases in Fusarium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Daren W.; Butchko, Robert A.; Baker, Scott E.; Proctor, Robert H.

    2012-02-01

    Fusarium species are ubiquitous in nature, cause a range of plant diseases, and produce a variety of chemicals often referred to as secondary metabolites. Although some fungal secondary metabolites affect plant growth or protect plants from other fungi and bacteria, their presence in grain based food and feed is more often associated with a variety of diseases in plants and in animals. Many of these structurally diverse metabolites are derived from a family of related enzymes called polyketide synthases (PKSs). A search of genomic sequence of Fusarium verticillioides, F. graminearum, F. oxysporum and Nectria haematococca (anamorph F. solani) identified a total of 58 PKS genes. To gain insight into how this gene family evolved and to guide future studies, we conducted a phylogenomic and functional domain analysis. The resulting genealogy suggested that Fusarium PKSs represent 34 different groups responsible for synthesis of different core metabolites. The analyses indicate that variation in the Fusarium PKS gene family is due to gene duplication and loss events as well as enzyme gain-of-function due to the acquisition of new domains or of loss-of-function due to nucleotide mutations. Transcriptional analysis indicate that the 16 F. verticillioides PKS genes are expressed under a range of conditions, further evidence that they are functional genes that confer the ability to produce secondary metabolites.

  11. An uncultivated crenarchaeota contains functional bacteriochlorophyll a synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jun; Wang, Fengping; Wang, Feng; Zheng, Yanping; Peng, Xiaotong; Zhou, Huaiyang; Xiao, Xiang

    2009-01-01

    A fosmid clone 37F10 containing an archaeal 16S rRNA gene was screened out from a metagenomic library of Pearl River sediment, southern China. Sequence analysis of the 35 kb inserted fragment of 37F10 found that it contains a single 16S rRNA gene belonging to Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (MCG) and 36 open reading frames (ORFs). One ORF (orf11) encodes putative bacteriochlorophyll a synthase (bchG) gene. Bacteriochlorophyll a synthase gene has never been reported in a member of the domain Archaea, in accordance with the fact that no (bacterio)-chlorophyll has ever been detected in any cultivated archaea. The putative archaeal bchG (named as ar-bchG) was cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was found to be capable of synthesizing bacteriochlorophyll a by esterification of bacteriochlorophyllide a with phytyl diphosphate or geranylgeranyl diphosphate. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis clearly indicates that the ar-bchG diverges before the bacterial bchGs. Our results for the first time demonstrate that a key and functional enzyme for bacteriochlorophyll a biosynthesis does exist in Archaea.

  12. Structure-function studies on nitric oxide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiying; Poulos, Thomas L

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) catalyzes the oxidation of one l-arginine guanidinium N atom to nitric oxide (NO). NOS consists of a heme domain linked to a flavin mononucleotide (FMN)/flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) reductase that shuttles electrons from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) to the heme. This review summarizes various aspects of NOS structure and function derived from crystal structures coupled with a wealth of biochemical and biophysical data. This includes the binding of diatomic ligands, especially the product, NO, whose binding to the heme iron blocks enzyme activity. An unusual feature of NOS catalysis is the strict requirement for the essential cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin (H4B). It now is generally agreed that H4B serves as an electron donor to the heme-oxy complex. The reason NOS may have recruited H4B as an electron transfer cofactor is to provide rapid coupled proton/electron transfer required for O2 activation. NOS is a highly regulated enzyme which is controlled by calmodulin (CaM) at the level of electron transfer within the FMN/FAD reductase and between the reductase and heme domains. Recent crystal structures provide a basis for developing models on the structural underpinnings of NOS regulation. In addition to the complex and fascinating functional and regulatory features of NOS, NOS is an important therapeutic target. Crystal structures have revealed the structural basis of isoform-selective inhibition by a group of dipeptide inhibitors which opens the way for structure-based inhibitor design.

  13. Characterization of a bifunctional glyoxylate cycle enzyme, malate synthase/isocitrate lyase, of Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Masami; Nishimura, Masaaki; Inoue, Kengo; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Inui, Hiroshi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    The glyoxylate cycle is a modified form of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which enables organisms to synthesize carbohydrates from C2 compounds. In the protozoan Euglena gracilis, the key enzyme activities of the glyoxylate cycle, isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS), are conferred by a single bifunctional protein named glyoxylate cycle enzyme (Euglena gracilis glyoxylate cycle enzyme [EgGCE]). We analyzed the enzymatic properties of recombinant EgGCE to determine the functions of its different domains. The 62-kDa N-terminal domain of EgGCE was sufficient to provide the MS activity as expected from an analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence. In contrast, expression of the 67-kDa C-terminal domain of EgGCE failed to yield ICL activity even though this domain was structurally similar to ICL family enzymes. Analyses of truncation mutants suggested that the N-terminal residues of EgGCE are critical for both the ICL and MS activities. The ICL activity of EgGCE increased in the presence of micro-molar concentrations of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Acetyl-CoA also increased the activity in a mutant type EgGCE with a mutation at the acetyl-CoA binding site in the MS domain of EgGCE. This suggests that acetyl-CoA regulates the ICL reaction by binding to a site other than the catalytic center of the MS reaction. © 2011 The Author(s). Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology© 2011 International Society of Protistologists.

  14. Functional and evolutionary relationships between terpene synthases from Australian Myrtaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszei, Andras; Brubaker, Curt L; Carter, Richard; Köllner, Tobias; Degenhardt, Jörg; Foley, William J

    2010-06-01

    Myrtaceae is one of the chemically most variable and most significant essential oil yielding plant families. Despite an abundance of chemical information, very little work has focussed on the biochemistry of terpene production in these plants. We describe 70 unique partial terpene synthase transcripts and eight full-length cDNA clones from 21 myrtaceous species, and compare phylogenetic relationships and leaf oil composition to reveal clades defined by common function. We provide further support for the correlation between function and phylogenetic relationships by the first functional characterisation of terpene synthases from Myrtaceae: a 1,8-cineole synthase from Eucalyptus sideroxylon and a caryophyllene synthase from Eucalyptusdives. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification, functional characterization and developmental regulation of sesquiterpene synthases from sunflower capitate glandular trichomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ro Dae-Kyun

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sesquiterpene lactones are characteristic metabolites of Asteraceae (or Compositae which often display potent bioactivities and are sequestered in specialized organs such as laticifers, resin ducts, and trichomes. For characterization of sunflower sesquiterpene synthases we employed a simple method to isolate pure trichomes from anther appendages which facilitated the identification of these genes and investigation of their enzymatic functions and expression patterns during trichome development. Results Glandular trichomes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. were isolated, and their RNA was extracted to investigate the initial steps of sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis. Reverse transcription-PCR experiments led to the identification of three sesquiterpene synthases. By combination of in vitro and in vivo characterization of sesquiterpene synthase gene products in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively, two enzymes were identified as germacrene A synthases, the key enzymes of sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis. Due to the very low in vitro activity, the third enzyme was expressed in vivo in yeast as a thioredoxin-fusion protein for functional characterization. In in vivo assays, it was identified as a multiproduct enzyme with the volatile sesquiterpene hydrocarbon δ-cadinene as one of the two main products with α-muuorlene, β-caryophyllene, α-humulene and α-copaene as minor products. The second main compound remained unidentified. For expression studies, glandular trichomes from the anther appendages of sunflower florets were isolated in particular developmental stages from the pre- to the post-secretory phase. All three sesquiterpene synthases were solely upregulated during the biosynthetically active stages of the trichomes. Expression in different aerial plant parts coincided with occurrence and maturity of trichomes. Young roots with root hairs showed expression of the sesquiterpene synthase genes

  16. Identification, Functional Characterization, and Evolution of Terpene Synthases from a Basal Dicot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyaa, Mosaab; Matsuba, Yuki; Brandt, Wolfgang; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Bar, Einat; McClain, Alan; Davidovich-Rikanati, Rachel; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Pichersky, Eran; Ibdah, Mwafaq

    2015-11-01

    Bay laurel (Laurus nobilis) is an agriculturally and economically important dioecious tree in the basal dicot family Lauraceae used in food and drugs and in the cosmetics industry. Bay leaves, with their abundant monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, are used to impart flavor and aroma to food, and have also drawn attention in recent years because of their potential pharmaceutical applications. To identify terpene synthases (TPSs) involved in the production of these volatile terpenes, we performed RNA sequencing to profile the transcriptome of L. nobilis leaves. Bioinformatic analysis led to the identification of eight TPS complementary DNAs. We characterized the enzymes encoded by three of these complementary DNAs: a monoterpene synthase that belongs to the TPS-b clade catalyzes the formation of mostly 1,8-cineole; a sesquiterpene synthase belonging to the TPS-a clade catalyzes the formation of mainly cadinenes; and a diterpene synthase of the TPS-e/f clade catalyzes the formation of geranyllinalool. Comparison of the sequences of these three TPSs indicated that the TPS-a and TPS-b clades of the TPS gene family evolved early in the evolution of the angiosperm lineage, and that geranyllinalool synthase activity is the likely ancestral function in angiosperms of genes belonging to an ancient TPS-e/f subclade that diverged from the kaurene synthase gene lineages before the split of angiosperms and gymnosperms. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Identification, Functional Characterization, and Evolution of Terpene Synthases from a Basal Dicot1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyaa, Mosaab; Matsuba, Yuki; Brandt, Wolfgang; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Bar, Einat; McClain, Alan; Davidovich-Rikanati, Rachel; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Pichersky, Eran; Ibdah, Mwafaq

    2015-01-01

    Bay laurel (Laurus nobilis) is an agriculturally and economically important dioecious tree in the basal dicot family Lauraceae used in food and drugs and in the cosmetics industry. Bay leaves, with their abundant monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, are used to impart flavor and aroma to food, and have also drawn attention in recent years because of their potential pharmaceutical applications. To identify terpene synthases (TPSs) involved in the production of these volatile terpenes, we performed RNA sequencing to profile the transcriptome of L. nobilis leaves. Bioinformatic analysis led to the identification of eight TPS complementary DNAs. We characterized the enzymes encoded by three of these complementary DNAs: a monoterpene synthase that belongs to the TPS-b clade catalyzes the formation of mostly 1,8-cineole; a sesquiterpene synthase belonging to the TPS-a clade catalyzes the formation of mainly cadinenes; and a diterpene synthase of the TPS-e/f clade catalyzes the formation of geranyllinalool. Comparison of the sequences of these three TPSs indicated that the TPS-a and TPS-b clades of the TPS gene family evolved early in the evolution of the angiosperm lineage, and that geranyllinalool synthase activity is the likely ancestral function in angiosperms of genes belonging to an ancient TPS-e/f subclade that diverged from the kaurene synthase gene lineages before the split of angiosperms and gymnosperms. PMID:26157114

  18. Stochastic thermodynamics of a chemical nanomachine: The channeling enzyme tryptophan synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutchko, Dimitri; Eisbach, Maximilian; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    The enzyme tryptophan synthase is characterized by a complex pattern of allosteric interactions that regulate the catalytic activity of its two subunits and opening or closing of their ligand gates. As a single macromolecule, it implements 13 different reaction steps, with an intermediate product directly channeled from one subunit to another. Based on experimental data, a stochastic model for the operation of tryptophan synthase has been earlier constructed [D. Loutchko, D. Gonze, and A. S. Mikhailov, J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 2179 (2016)]. Here, this model is used to consider stochastic thermodynamics of such a chemical nanomachine. The Gibbs energy landscape of the internal molecular states is determined, the production of entropy and its flow within the enzyme are analyzed, and the information exchange between the subunits resulting from allosteric cross-regulations and channeling is discussed.

  19. Stochastic thermodynamics of a chemical nanomachine: The channeling enzyme tryptophan synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutchko, Dimitri; Eisbach, Maximilian; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2017-01-14

    The enzyme tryptophan synthase is characterized by a complex pattern of allosteric interactions that regulate the catalytic activity of its two subunits and opening or closing of their ligand gates. As a single macromolecule, it implements 13 different reaction steps, with an intermediate product directly channeled from one subunit to another. Based on experimental data, a stochastic model for the operation of tryptophan synthase has been earlier constructed [D. Loutchko, D. Gonze, and A. S. Mikhailov, J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 2179 (2016)]. Here, this model is used to consider stochastic thermodynamics of such a chemical nanomachine. The Gibbs energy landscape of the internal molecular states is determined, the production of entropy and its flow within the enzyme are analyzed, and the information exchange between the subunits resulting from allosteric cross-regulations and channeling is discussed.

  20. Zinc Affects Differently Growth, Photosynthesis, Antioxidant Enzyme Activities and Phytochelatin Synthase Expression of Four Marine Diatoms

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Le Nhung Nguyen-Deroche; Aurore Caruso; Thi Trung Le; Trang Viet Bui; Benoît Schoefs; Gérard Tremblin; Annick Morant-Manceau

    2012-01-01

    Zinc-supplementation (20  μ M) effects on growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, catalase), and the expression of phytochelatin synthase gene were investigated in four marine diatoms (Amphora acutiuscula, Nitzschia palea, Amphora coffeaeformis and Entomoneis paludosa). Zn-supplementation reduced the maximum cell density. A linear relationship was found between the evolution of gross photosynthesis and total chlorophyll content. The Z...

  1. Structure of Escherichia coli aminodeoxychorismate synthase: architectural conservation and diversity in chorismate-utilizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, James F; Jensen, Pia Y; Pachikara, Abraham S; Howard, Andrew J; Eisenstein, Edward; Ladner, Jane E

    2002-02-19

    Aminodeoxychorismate synthase is part of a heterodimeric complex that catalyzes the two-step biosynthesis of 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate, a precursor of p-aminobenzoate and folate in microorganisms. In the first step, a glutamine amidotransferase encoded by the pabA gene generates ammonia as a substrate that, along with chorismate, is used in the second step, catalyzed by aminodeoxychorismate synthase, the product of the pabB gene. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of Escherichia coli PabB determined in two different crystal forms, each at 2.0 A resolution. The 453-residue monomeric PabB has a complex alpha/beta fold which is similar to that seen in the structures of homologous, oligomeric TrpE subunits of several anthranilate synthases of microbial origin. A comparison of the structures of these two classes of chorismate-utilizing enzymes provides a rationale for the differences in quaternary structures seen for these enzymes, and indicates that the weak or transient association of PabB with PabA during catalysis stems at least partly from a limited interface for protein interactions. Additional analyses of the structures enabled the tentative identification of the active site of PabB, which contains a number of residues implicated from previous biochemical and genetic studies to be essential for activity. Differences in the structures determined from phosphate- and formate-grown crystals, and the location of an adventitious formate ion, suggest that conformational changes in loop regions adjacent to the active site may be needed for catalysis. A surprising finding in the structure of PabB was the presence of a tryptophan molecule deeply embedded in a binding pocket that is analogous to the regulatory site in the TrpE subunits of the anthranilate synthases. The strongly bound ligand, which cannot be dissociated without denaturation of PabB, may play a structural role in the enzyme since there is no effect of tryptophan on the enzymic synthesis of

  2. Molecular cloning, functional expression and characterization of d-limonene synthase from Agastache rugosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Takuro; Saeki, Daisuke; Ito, Michiho; Honda, Gisho

    2002-05-01

    We cloned the gene of d-limonene synthase (ArLMS) from Agastache rugosa (Labiatae). The function of ArLMS was elucidated by the preparation of recombinant protein and subsequent enzyme assay. ArLMS consisted of 2077 nucleotides including 1839 bp of coding sequence that encodes a protein of 613 amino acids. This protein has a 60 kDa molecular weight, which is identical to that of d-limonene synthase from Schizonepeta tenuifolia (Labiatae). The deduced amino acid sequence of ArLMS shows high homology with the known d- and l-limonene synthases from Labiatae plants. Here, we discussed the amino acid residues responsible for the stereochemical regulation in limonene biosynthesis.

  3. Functional Characterization of Sesquiterpene Synthase from Polygonum minus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Fang Ee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polygonum minus is an aromatic plant, which contains high abundance of terpenoids, especially the sesquiterpenes C15H24. Sesquiterpenes were believed to contribute to the many useful biological properties in plants. This study aimed to functionally characterize a full length sesquiterpene synthase gene from P. minus. P. minus sesquiterpene synthase (PmSTS has a complete open reading frame (ORF of 1689 base pairs encoding a 562 amino acid protein. Similar to other sesquiterpene synthases, PmSTS has two large domains: the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal metal-binding domain. It also consists of three conserved motifs: the DDXXD, NSE/DTE, and RXR. A three-dimensional protein model for PmSTS built clearly distinguished the two main domains, where conserved motifs were highlighted. We also constructed a phylogenetic tree, which showed that PmSTS belongs to the angiosperm sesquiterpene synthase subfamily Tps-a. To examine the function of PmSTS, we expressed this gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. Two transgenic lines, designated as OE3 and OE7, were further characterized, both molecularly and functionally. The transgenic plants demonstrated smaller basal rosette leaves, shorter and fewer flowering stems, and fewer seeds compared to wild type plants. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the transgenic plants showed that PmSTS was responsible for the production of β-sesquiphellandrene.

  4. RNA-seq discovery, functional characterization, and comparison of sesquiterpene synthases from Solanum lycopersicum and Solanum habrochaites trichomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleeker, Petra M; Spyropoulou, Eleni A; Diergaarde, Paul J; Volpin, Hanne; De Both, Michiel T J; Zerbe, Philipp; Bohlmann, Joerg; Falara, Vasiliki; Matsuba, Yuki; Pichersky, Eran; Haring, Michel A; Schuurink, Robert C

    2011-11-01

    Solanum lycopersicum and Solanum habrochaites (f. typicum) accession PI127826 emit a variety of sesquiterpenes. To identify terpene synthases involved in the production of these volatile sesquiterpenes, we used massive parallel pyrosequencing (RNA-seq) to obtain the transcriptome of the stem trichomes from these plants. This approach resulted initially in the discovery of six sesquiterpene synthase cDNAs from S. lycopersicum and five from S. habrochaites. Searches of other databases and the S. lycopersicum genome resulted in the discovery of two additional sesquiterpene synthases expressed in trichomes. The sesquiterpene synthases from S. lycopersicum and S. habrochaites have high levels of protein identity. Several of them appeared to encode for non-functional proteins. Functional recombinant proteins produced germacrenes, β-caryophyllene/α-humulene, viridiflorene and valencene from (E,E)-farnesyl diphosphate. However, the activities of these enzymes do not completely explain the differences in sesquiterpene production between the two tomato plants. RT-qPCR confirmed high levels of expression of most of the S. lycopersicum sesquiterpene synthases in stem trichomes. In addition, one sesquiterpene synthase was induced by jasmonic acid, while another appeared to be slightly repressed by the treatment. Our data provide a foundation to study the evolution of terpene synthases in cultivated and wild tomato.

  5. Evolution of the key alkaloid enzyme putrescine N-methyltransferase from spermidine synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Anne; Fischer, Juliane; Sichhart, Yvonne; Brandt, Wolfgang; Dräger, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Putrescine N-methyltransferases (PMTs) are the first specific enzymes of the biosynthesis of nicotine and tropane alkaloids. PMTs transfer a methyl group onto the diamine putrescine from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) as coenzyme. PMT proteins have presumably evolved from spermidine synthases (SPDSs), which are ubiquitous enzymes of polyamine metabolism. SPDSs use decarboxylated SAM as coenzyme to transfer an aminopropyl group onto putrescine. In an attempt to identify possible and necessary steps in the evolution of PMT from SPDS, homology based modeling of Datura stramonium SPDS1 and PMT was employed to gain deeper insight in the preferred binding positions and conformations of the substrate and the alternative coenzymes. Based on predictions of amino acids responsible for the change of enzyme specificities, sites of mutagenesis were derived. PMT activity was generated in D. stramonium SPDS1 after few amino acid exchanges. Concordantly, Arabidopsis thaliana SPDS1 was mutated and yielded enzymes with both, PMT and SPDS activities. Kinetic parameters were measured for enzymatic characterization. The switch from aminopropyl to methyl transfer depends on conformational changes of the methionine part of the coenzyme in the binding cavity of the enzyme. The rapid generation of PMT activity in SPDS proteins and the wide-spread occurrence of putative products of N-methylputrescine suggest that PMT activity is present frequently in the plant kingdom. PMID:23908659

  6. Evolution of the key alkaloid enzyme putrescine N-methyltransferase from spermidine synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eJunker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Putrescine N-methyltransferases (PMTs are the first specific enzymes of the biosynthesis of nicotine and tropane alkaloids. PMTs transfer a methyl group onto the diamine putrescine from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM as coenzyme. PMT proteins have presumably evolved from spermidine synthases (SPDSs, which are ubiquitous enzymes of polyamine metabolism. SPDS use decarboxylated SAM as coenzyme to transfer an aminopropyl group onto putrescine. In an attempt to identify possible and necessary steps in the evolution of PMT from SPDS, homology based modeling of Datura stramonium SPDS1 and PMT was employed to gain deeper insight in the preferred binding positions and conformations of the substrate and the alternative coenzymes. Based on predictions of amino acids responsible for the change of enzyme specificities, sites of mutagenesis were derived. PMT activity was generated in Datura stramonium SPDS1 after few amino acid exchanges. Concordantly, Arabidopsis thaliana SPDS1 was mutated and yielded enzymes with both, PMT and SPDS activities. Kinetic parameters were measured for enzymatic characterization. The switch from aminopropyl to methyl transfer depends on conformational changes of the methionine part of the coenzyme in the binding cavity of the enzyme. The rapid generation of PMT activity in SPDS proteins and the wide-spread occurrence of putative products of N-methylputrescine suggest that PMT activity is present frequently in the plant kingdom.

  7. Zinc affects differently growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzyme activities and phytochelatin synthase expression of four marine diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Deroche, Thi Le Nhung; Caruso, Aurore; Le, Thi Trung; Bui, Trang Viet; Schoefs, Benoît; Tremblin, Gérard; Morant-Manceau, Annick

    2012-01-01

    Zinc-supplementation (20 μM) effects on growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, catalase), and the expression of phytochelatin synthase gene were investigated in four marine diatoms (Amphora acutiuscula, Nitzschia palea, Amphora coffeaeformis and Entomoneis paludosa). Zn-supplementation reduced the maximum cell density. A linear relationship was found between the evolution of gross photosynthesis and total chlorophyll content. The Zn treatment decreased the electron transport rate except in A. coffeaeformis and in E. paludosa at high irradiance. A linear relationship was found between the efficiency of light to evolve oxygen and the size of the light-harvesting antenna. The external carbonic anhydrase activity was stimulated in Zn-supplemented E. paludosa but was not correlated with an increase of photosynthesis. The total activity of the antioxidant enzymes did not display any clear increase except in ascorbate peroxidase activity in N. palea. The phytochelatin synthase gene was identified in the four diatoms, but its expression was only revealed in N. palea, without a clear difference between control and Zn-supplemented cells. Among the four species, A. paludosa was the most sensitive and A. coffeaeformis, the most tolerant. A. acutiuscula seemed to be under metal starvation, whereas, to survive, only N. palea developed several stress responses.

  8. A Novel N-Acetylglutamate Synthase Architecture Revealed by the Crystal Structure of the Bifunctional Enzyme from Maricaulis maris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Dashuang; Li, Yongdong; Cabrera-Luque, Juan; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Zhao, Gengxiang; Haskins, Nantaporn; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel (Maryland); (GWU); (Georgia)

    2012-05-24

    Novel bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinases (NAGS/K) that catalyze the first two steps of arginine biosynthesis and are homologous to vertebrate N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), an essential cofactor-producing enzyme in the urea cycle, were identified in Maricaulis maris and several other bacteria. Arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of NAGS but not NAGK activity. The crystal structure of M. maris NAGS/K (mmNAGS/K) at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution indicates that it is a tetramer, in contrast to the hexameric structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae NAGS. The quaternary structure of crystalline NAGS/K from Xanthomonas campestris (xcNAGS/K) is similar, and cross-linking experiments indicate that both mmNAGS/K and xcNAGS are tetramers in solution. Each subunit has an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain, which is likely responsible for N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK) activity and has a putative arginine binding site, and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain that contains the putative NAGS active site. These structures and sequence comparisons suggest that the linker residue 291 may determine whether arginine acts as an allosteric inhibitor or activator in homologous enzymes in microorganisms and vertebrates. In addition, the angle of rotation between AAK and NAT domains varies among crystal forms and subunits within the tetramer. A rotation of 26{sup o} is sufficient to close the predicted AcCoA binding site, thus reducing enzymatic activity. Since mmNAGS/K has the highest degree of sequence homology to vertebrate NAGS of NAGS and NAGK enzymes whose structures have been determined, the mmNAGS/K structure was used to develop a structural model of human NAGS that is fully consistent with the functional effects of the 14 missense mutations that were identified in NAGS-deficient patients.

  9. Enzyme structure, enzyme function and allozyme diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In estimates of population genetic diversity based on allozyme heterozygosity, some enzymes are regularly more variable than others. Evolutionary theory suggests that functionally less important molecules, or parts of molecules, evolve more rapidly than more important ones; the latter enzymes should then theoretically be ...

  10. The Catalytic Function of Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splittgerber, Allan G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: structure of the enzyme molecule; active site; reaction mechanism; transition state; factors affecting enzyme reaction rates, concentration of enzyme; concentration of substrate; product concentration; temperature effects and pH effects; factors causing a lowering of activation energy; proximity and orientation effects; substrate strain…

  11. An evolutionary analysis of lateral gene transfer in thymidylate synthase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Adi; Mayrose, Itay; Penn, Osnat; Shaul, Shaul; Gophna, Uri; Pupko, Tal

    2010-03-01

    Thymidylate synthases (Thy) are key enzymes in the synthesis of deoxythymidylate, 1 of the 4 building blocks of DNA. As such, they are essential for all DNA-based forms of life and therefore implicated in the hypothesized transition from RNA genomes to DNA genomes. Two evolutionally unrelated Thy enzymes, ThyA and ThyX, are known to catalyze the same biochemical reaction. Both enzymes are sporadically distributed within each of the 3 domains of life in a pattern that suggests multiple nonhomologous lateral gene transfer (LGT) events. We present a phylogenetic analysis of the evolution of the 2 enzymes, aimed at unraveling their entangled evolutionary history and tracing their origin back to early life. A novel probabilistic evolutionary model was developed, which allowed us to compute the posterior probabilities and the posterior expectation of the number of LGT events. Simulation studies were performed to validate the model's ability to accurately detect LGT events, which have occurred throughout a large phylogeny. Applying the model to the Thy data revealed widespread nonhomologous LGT between and within all 3 domains of life. By reconstructing the ThyA and ThyX gene trees, the most likely donor of each LGT event was inferred. The role of viruses in LGT of Thy is finally discussed.

  12. Propionyl-coenzyme A synthase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, a key enzyme of the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle for autotrophic CO2 fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alber, Birgit E; Fuchs, Georg

    2002-04-05

    The 3-hydroxypropionate cycle has been proposed as a new autotrophic CO(2) fixation pathway for the phototrophic green non-sulfur eubacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus and for some chemotrophic archaebacteria. The cycle requires the reductive conversion of the characteristic intermediate 3-hydroxypropionate to propionyl-CoA. The specific activity of the 3-hydroxypropionate-, CoA-, K(+)-, and MgATP-dependent oxidation of NADPH in autotrophically grown cells was 0.09 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, which was 2-fold down-regulated in heterotrophically grown cells. Unexpectedly, a single enzyme catalyzes the entire reaction sequence: 3-hydroxypropionate + MgATP + CoA + NADPH + H(+) --> propionyl-CoA + MgAMP + PP(i) + NADP(+) + H(2)O. The enzyme was purified 30-fold to near homogeneity and has a very large native molecular mass between 500 and 800 kDa, with subunits of about 185 kDa as judged by SDS-PAGE, suggesting a homotrimeric or homotetrameric structure. Upon incubation of this new enzyme, termed propionyl-CoA synthase, with the proteinase trypsin, the NADPH oxidation function of the enzyme was lost, whereas the enzyme still activated 3-hydroxypropionate to its CoA-thioester and dehydrated it to acrylyl-CoA. SDS-PAGE revealed that the subunits of propionyl-CoA synthase had been cleaved once and the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the two trypsin digestion products were determined. Two parts of the gene encoding propionyl-CoA synthase (pcs) were identified on two contigs of an incomplete genome data base of C. aurantiacus, and the sequence of the pcs gene was completed. Propionyl-CoA synthase is a natural fusion protein of 201 kDa consisting of a CoA ligase, an enoyl-CoA hydratase, and an enoyl-CoA reductase, the reductase domain containing the trypsin cleavage site. Similar polyfunctional large enzymes are common in secondary metabolism (e.g. polyketide synthases) but rare in primary metabolism (e.g. eukaryotic type I fatty acid synthase). These results lend

  13. CYP719B1 is salutaridine synthase, the C-C phenol-coupling enzyme of morphine biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Andreas; Rolf, Megan; Ziegler, Jörg; Díaz Chávez, María Luisa; Huang, Fong-Chin; Kutchan, Toni M

    2009-09-04

    Morphine is a powerful analgesic natural product produced by the opium poppy Papaver somniferum. Although formal syntheses of this alkaloid have been reported, the morphine molecule contains five stereocenters and a C-C phenol linkage that to date render a total synthesis of morphine commercially unfeasible. The C-C phenol-coupling reaction along the biosynthetic pathway to morphine in opium poppy is catalyzed by the cytochrome P450-dependent oxygenase salutaridine synthase. We report herein on the identification of salutaridine synthase as a member of the CYP719 family of cytochromes P450 during a screen of recombinant cytochromes P450 of opium poppy functionally expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells. Recombinant CYP719B1 is a highly stereo- and regioselective enzyme; of forty-one compounds tested as potential substrates, only (R)-reticuline and (R)-norreticuline resulted in formation of a product (salutaridine and norsalutaridine, respectively). To date, CYP719s have been characterized catalyzing only the formation of a methylenedioxy bridge in berberine biosynthesis (canadine synthase, CYP719A1) and in benzo[c]phenanthridine biosynthesis (stylopine synthase, CYP719A14). Previously identified phenol-coupling enzymes of plant alkaloid biosynthesis belong only to the CYP80 family of cytochromes. CYP719B1 therefore is the prototype for a new family of plant cytochromes P450 that catalyze formation of a phenol-couple.

  14. PhaC Synthases and PHA Depolymerases: The Enzymes that Produce and Degrade Plastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amro A. Amara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PHAs are a group of intracellular biodegradable polymer produced by (most bacteria under unbalanced growth conditions. A series of enzymes are involved in different PHAs synthesis, however PhaC synthases are responsible for the polymerization step. PHAs are accumulated in bacterial cells from soluble to insoluble form as storage materials inside the inclusion bodies during unbalanced nutrition or to save organisms from reduces equivalents. PHAs are converted again to soluble components by another pathways and enzymes for the degradation process. PHAs depolymerases are the responsible enzymes. This review is designed to give the non-specialists a condense background about PHAs especially for researcher and students in medicinal and pharmaceutical filled. ABSTRAK: PHAs (polyhydroxyalkanoate merupakan sekumpulan polimer terbiodegradasikan intrasel yang dihasilkan oleh (kebanyakan bakteria di bawah keadaan tumbesaran tak seimbang. Satu rangkaian enzim terlibat dalam sistesis PHAs yang berbeza, namun sintesis PhaC bertanggungjawab dalam peringkat pempolimeran. PHAs dikumpulkan dalam sel bakteria dari bentuk larut dan tak larut sebagai bahan simpan di dalam jasad terangkum semasa nutrisi tak seimbang atau untuk menyelamatkan organisma daripada pengurangan tak keseimbangan. PHAs ditukarkan sekali lagi kepada komponen larut dengan cara lain dan enzim lain untuk proses degradasi. PHAs depoly-merases (enzim yang memangkin penguraian makro molekul kepada molekul yang lebih mudah merupakan enzim yang bertanggunjawab. Kajian semula ini direka untuk memberi mereka yang bukan pakar, satu ringkasan tentang PHAs terutamanya penyelidik dan penuntut dalam bidang peubatan dan farmaseutikal.

  15. Repression of Escherichia coli carbamoylphosphate synthase: relationships with enzyme synthesis in the arginine and pyrimidine pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard, A; Glansdorff, N; Gigot, D; Crabeel, M; Halleux, P; Thiry, L

    1976-07-01

    Cumulative repression of Escherichia coli carbamoylphosphate synthase (CPSase; EC 2.7.2.9) by arginine and pyrimidine was analyzed in relation to control enzyme synthesis in the arginine and pyrimidine pathways. The expression of carA and carB, the adjacent genes that specify the two subunits of the enzyme, was estimated by means of an in vitro complementation assay. The synthesis of each gene product was found to be under repression control. Coordinate expression of the two genes was observed under most conditions investigated. They might thus form an operon. The preparation of strains blocked in the degradation of cytidine and harboring leaky mutations affecting several steps of pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis made it possible to distinguish between the effects of cytidine and uridine compounds in the repression of the pyrimidine pathway enzymes. The data obtained suggest that derivatives of both cytidine and uridine participate in the repression of CPSase. In addition, repression of CPSase by arginine did not appear to occur unless pyrimidines were present at a significant intracellular concentration. This observation, together with our previous report that argR mutations impair the cumulative repression of CPSase, suggests that this control is mediated through the concerted effects of regulatory elements specific for the arginine and pyrimidine pathways.

  16. Insight Mechanism of the Selective Lanosterol Synthase Inhibitor: Molecular Modeling, Docking and Density Functional Theory Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunagaran, Subramanian; Kavitha, Rengarajan; Vadivelu, Muthu; Lee, Keun Woo; Meganathan, Chandrasekaran

    2017-11-10

    Lanosterol synthase (Oxidosqualene cyclase) is an enzyme, which plays a central role in cholesterol and sterols biosynthesis. Lanosterol synthase drugs are used to lower the level of cholesterol in the blood and treat wide variety of diseases like atherosclerosis, coronary heart diseases etc. There is a great interest in the identification of drugs that target this enzyme for anticholesteraemic agent using in silico tools. Ligand based pharmacophore model was developed using Discovery Studio 2.5. The best model was used as a tool to retrieve suitable molecule for Lanosterol synthase inhibitor from commercial database and Virtual screening of large commercially available databases to retrieve the best mole of Hypo1 using. Molecular docking was done using three different tools named as GOLD, GLIDE and AUTODOCK 4.0. Density functional theory approach and Density of State spectrum were carried out using Gaussian 09 and GAUSS SUM 3.0. Contribution of these methods in the selection of anticholesteraemic compounds has been discussed. The best pharmacophore model was used to screen the commercial database. Totally 8 compounds were showed with the best orientation, binding mode and binging energy in the docking analyses. The orbital energies such as HOMO, LUMO and DOS spectrum for 8 hit compounds showed the energy gap that results in charge transfer and stability in the active site region. The results showed that our 8 potent leads could serve for further findings. In silico approaches, our 8 hit compounds could serve as the better understanding to design the novel lanosterol synthase inhibitors as anticholesteraemic activity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Identification of genes coding for putative wax ester synthase/diacylglycerol acyltransferase enzymes in terrestrial and marine environments

    OpenAIRE

    Lanfranconi, Mariana P.; Alvarez, Adri?n F; Alvarez, H?ctor M.

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of neutral lipids such as triacylglycerols (TAG) and wax esters (WE) is catalyzed in bacteria by wax ester synthase/diacylglycerol acyltransferase enzymes (WS/DGAT). We investigated the diversity of genes encoding this enzyme in contrasting natural environments from Patagonia (Argentina). The content of petroleum hydrocarbons in samples collected from oil-producing areas was measured. PCR-based analysis covered WS/DGAT occurrence in marine sediments and soil. No product was obtained...

  18. Norcoclaurine Synthase: Mechanism of an Enantioselective Pictet-Spengler Catalyzing Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Macone

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of bifunctional catalysts in organic synthesis finds inspiration in the selectivity of enzymatic catalysis which arises from the specific interactions between basic and acidic amino acid residues and the substrate itself in order to stabilize developing charges in the transition state. Many enzymes act as bifunctional catalysts using amino acid residues at the active site as Lewis acids and Lewis bases to modify the substrate as required for the given transformation. They bear a clear advantage over non-biological methods for their ability to tackle problems related to the synthesis of enantiopure compounds as chiral building blocks for drugs and agrochemicals. Moreover, enzymatic synthesis may offer the advantage of a clean and green synthetic process in the absence of organic solvents and metal catalysts. In this work the reaction mechanism of norcoclaurine synthase is described. This enzyme catalyzes the Pictet-Spengler condensation of dopamine with 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (4-HPAA to yield the benzylisoquinoline alkaloids central precursor, (S-norcoclaurine. Kinetic and crystallographic data suggest that the reaction mechanism occurs according to a typical bifunctional catalytic process.

  19. Molecular and functional evolution of the fungal diterpene synthase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marc J C; Rustenhloz, Camille; Leh-Louis, Véronique; Perrière, Guy

    2015-10-19

    Terpenes represent one of the largest and most diversified families of natural compounds and are used in numerous industrial applications. Terpene synthase (TPS) genes originated in bacteria as diterpene synthase (di-TPS) genes. They are also found in plant and fungal genomes. The recent availability of a large number of fungal genomes represents an opportunity to investigate how genes involved in diterpene synthesis were acquired by fungi, and to assess the consequences of this process on the fungal metabolism. In order to investigate the origin of fungal di-TPS, we implemented a search for potential fungal di-TPS genes and identified their presence in several unrelated Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species. The fungal di-TPS phylogenetic tree is function-related but is not associated with the phylogeny based on housekeeping genes. The lack of agreement between fungal and di-TPS-based phylogenies suggests the presence of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGTs) events. Further evidence for HGT was provided by conservation of synteny of di-TPS and neighbouring genes in distantly related fungi. The results obtained here suggest that fungal di-TPSs originated from an ancient HGT event of a single di-TPS gene from a plant to a fungus in Ascomycota. In fungi, these di-TPSs allowed for the formation of clusters consisting in di-TPS, GGPPS and P450 genes to create functional clusters that were transferred between fungal species, producing diterpenes acting as hormones or toxins, thus affecting fungal development and pathogenicity.

  20. Insights into the glycyl radical enzyme active site of benzylsuccinate synthase: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Vivek S; Dean, Anthony M; Maupin, C Mark

    2013-08-21

    The fumarate addition reaction, catalyzed by the enzyme benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS), is considered to be one of the most intriguing and energetically challenging reactions in biology. BSS belongs to the glycyl radical enzyme family and catalyzes the fumarate addition reaction, which enables microorganisms to utilize hydrocarbons as an energy source under anaerobic conditions. Unfortunately, the extreme sensitivity of the glycyl radical to oxygen has hampered the structural and kinetic characterization of BSS, thereby limiting our knowledge on this enzyme. To enhance our molecular-level understanding of BSS, a computational approach involving homology modeling, docking studies, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations has been used to deduce the structure of BSS's catalytic subunit (BSSα) and illuminate the molecular basis for the fumarate addition reaction. We have identified two conserved and distinct binding pockets at the BSSα active site: a hydrophobic pocket for toluene binding and a polar pocket for fumaric acid binding. Subsequent dynamical and energetic evaluations have identified Glu509, Ser827, Leu390, and Phe384 as active site residues critical for substrate binding. The orientation of substrates at the active site observed in MD simulations is consistent with experimental observations of the syn addition of toluene to fumaric acid. It is also found that substrate binding tightens the active site and restricts the conformational flexibility of the thiyl radical, leading to hydrogen transfer distances conducive to the proposed reaction mechanism. The stability of substrates at the active site and the occurrence of feasible radical transfer distances between the thiyl radical, substrates, and the active site glycine indicate a substrate-assisted radical transfer pathway governing fumarate addition.

  1. Characterization and functional analysis of the genes encoding 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase and 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase, the two enzymes in the MEP pathway, from Amomum villosum Lour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinfen; Adhikari, Megha Nath; Liu, Hui; Xu, Hui; He, Guozhen; Zhan, Ruoting; Wei, Jieshu; Chen, Weiwen

    2012-08-01

    A DXR gene, AvDXR (GenBank accession no. FJ459894), and a DXS gene, AvDXS (GenBank accession no. FJ455512), were isolated from the leaves of Amomum villosum, one of the most well-known and authentic herbs in South China. The 1,749-bp full-length cDNA of AvDXR encoded a peptide of 472 amino acids, and the 2,347-bp full-length cDNA of AvDXS encoded a peptide of 715 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequences of the AvDXR and AvDXS proteins share high homology with DXRs and DXSs from other plant species, and AvDXS belongs to class 1 plant DXS. The characterization based on bioinformatic analysis indicated that the AvDXR and AvDXS encoded functional proteins as DXR and DXS, respectively. The functional color assay in Escherichia coli with pAC-BETA implied that AvDXR and AvDXS encoded functional proteins that manipulated the biosynthesis of isoprenoid precursors. Both AvDXR and AvDXS were expressed extensively in the leaves, stems, roots, pericarps and seeds of A. villosum. AvDXS expression was similar in all tissues investigated, whereas higher levels of AvDXR were observed in the fruits, the main part for the accumulation of volatile oil in this plant. AvDXR was transformed into tobacco to confirm its function further. Overexpression of AvDXR in transgenic T1 generation tobacco increased DXR activity, photosynthetic pigment content and volatile isoprenoid components, and the increase of photosynthetic pigment content was consistent with the AvDXR transcription level. This study demonstrated that AvDXR plays important role in isoprenoid biosynthesis and it is useful for metabolic engineering.

  2. The Presence of Amorpha-4, 11-Diene Synthase, a Key Enzyme in Artemisinin Production in Ten Artemisia Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GA. Garoosi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Artemisinin is one of the most effective medicine against malaria, which is produced naturally by Artemisia annua in low yield. It is produced in a metabolic pathway, in which several genes and gene products are involved. One of the key genes in this pathway is am1, which encodes amorpha-4, 11-diene synthase (ADS, a key enzyme in artemisinin biosynthesis pathway. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of this gene in ten Artemisia species in order to increase the yield of production of Artemisinin. Methods : The experiments were carried out using PCR. Specific primers were designed based on the published am1 gene sequence obtained from A. annua (NCBI, accession number AF327527. Results: The amplification of this gene by the specific primers was considered as a positive sign for the potentiality of artemisinin production. Since the entire am1 gene was not amplified in any of the 10 species used, four parts of the gene, essential in ADS enzyme function, corresponding to a pair site of Arg10-Pro12 in the first 100 amino acids, b aspartate rich motif (DDXXD, c active site final lid and d active site including farnesyl diphosphate (FDP ionization sites and catalytic site in the ADS enzyme, were investigated. Major conclusion: The sequence corresponding to ADS active site was amplified only in A. annua, A. aucheri and A. chamaemelifolia. The negative results obtained with other species could be due to some sequence alteration, such as point mutations or INDELs. We propose A. aucheri and A. chamaemelifolia as two potential candidate species for further characterization, breeding and transferring am1 gene for artemisinin overproduction.

  3. Overlapping functions of the starch synthases SSII and SSIII in amylopectin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Hulst Christophe

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biochemical mechanisms that determine the molecular architecture of amylopectin are central in plant biology because they allow long-term storage of reduced carbon. Amylopectin structure imparts the ability to form semi-crystalline starch granules, which in turn provides its glucose storage function. The enzymatic steps of amylopectin biosynthesis resemble those of the soluble polymer glycogen, however, the reasons for amylopectin's architectural distinctions are not clearly understood. The multiplicity of starch biosynthetic enzymes conserved in plants likely is involved. For example, amylopectin chain elongation in plants involves five conserved classes of starch synthase (SS, whereas glycogen biosynthesis typically requires only one class of glycogen synthase. Results Null mutations were characterized in AtSS2, which codes for SSII, and mutant lines were compared to lines lacking SSIII and to an Atss2, Atss3 double mutant. Loss of SSII did not affect growth rate or starch quantity, but caused increased amylose/amylopectin ratio, increased total amylose, and deficiency in amylopectin chains with degree of polymerization (DP 12 to DP28. In contrast, loss of both SSII and SSIII caused slower plant growth and dramatically reduced starch content. Extreme deficiency in DP12 to DP28 chains occurred in the double mutant, far more severe than the summed changes in SSII- or SSIII-deficient plants lacking only one of the two enzymes. Conclusion SSII and SSIII have partially redundant functions in determination of amylopectin structure, and these roles cannot be substituted by any other conserved SS, specifically SSI, GBSSI, or SSIV. Even though SSIII is not required for the normal abundance of glucan chains of DP12 to DP18, the enzyme clearly is capable of functioning in production such chains. The role of SSIII in producing these chains cannot be detected simply by analysis of an individual mutation. Competition between

  4. Functional analysis of the Brassica napus L. phytoene synthase (PSY) gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Emparán, Ada; Quezada-Martinez, Daniela; Zúñiga-Bustos, Matías; Cifuentes, Víctor; Iñiguez-Luy, Federico; Federico, María Laura

    2014-01-01

    Phytoene synthase (PSY) has been shown to catalyze the first committed and rate-limiting step of carotenogenesis in several crop species, including Brassica napus L. Due to its pivotal role, PSY has been a prime target for breeding and metabolic engineering the carotenoid content of seeds, tubers, fruits and flowers. In Arabidopsis thaliana, PSY is encoded by a single copy gene but small PSY gene families have been described in monocot and dicotyledonous species. We have recently shown that PSY genes have been retained in a triplicated state in the A- and C-Brassica genomes, with each paralogue mapping to syntenic locations in each of the three "Arabidopsis-like" subgenomes. Most importantly, we have shown that in B. napus all six members are expressed, exhibiting overlapping redundancy and signs of subfunctionalization among photosynthetic and non photosynthetic tissues. The question of whether this large PSY family actually encodes six functional enzymes remained to be answered. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to: (i) isolate, characterize and compare the complete protein coding sequences (CDS) of the six B. napus PSY genes; (ii) model their predicted tridimensional enzyme structures; (iii) test their phytoene synthase activity in a heterologous complementation system and (iv) evaluate their individual expression patterns during seed development. This study further confirmed that the six B. napus PSY genes encode proteins with high sequence identity, which have evolved under functional constraint. Structural modeling demonstrated that they share similar tridimensional protein structures with a putative PSY active site. Significantly, all six B. napus PSY enzymes were found to be functional. Taking into account the specific patterns of expression exhibited by these PSY genes during seed development and recent knowledge of PSY suborganellar localization, the selection of transgene candidates for metabolic engineering the carotenoid content of oilseeds

  5. Nocardia iowensis sp. nov., an organism rich in biocatalytically important enzymes and nitric oxide synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Andrew S.; Khare, Arshdeep; Conville, Patricia; Lau, Peter C. K.; Bergeron, Hélène; Rosazza, John P. N.

    2009-01-01

    Nocardia strain NRRL 5646, isolated from a garden soil sample in Osceola, Iowa, USA, was initially of interest as an antibiotic producer. It contained biocatalytically important enzymes and represented the first described nitric oxide synthase enzyme system in bacteria. The present polyphasic taxonomic study was undertaken to differentiate strain NRRL 5646T from related species of the genus Nocardia. Chemotaxonomic analyses included determinations of the fatty acid methyl ester profile (C16 : 1ω6c/C16 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω9c and C18 : 0 10-methyl as major components), quinone [cyclo MK-8(H4) as the major component], polar lipid (diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol mannoside as major components) and mycolic acid. These results supported its placement within the genus Nocardia. Biochemical testing and 16S rRNA, 65-kDa heat-shock protein (hsp65) and preprotein translocase (secA1) gene sequence analyses differentiated strain NRRL 5646T from recognized Nocardia species. Previous studies have demonstrated that other genetic sequences (carboxylic acid reductase, Nocardia phosphopantetheinyl transferase and GTP cyclohydrolase I) from strain NRRL 5646T can also be used to substantiate its uniqueness. The level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strain NRRL 5646T and the type strains of Nocardia tenerifensis and Nocardia brasiliensis was 98.8 %. However, strain NRRL 5646T could be clearly distinguished from these Nocardia species based on DNA–DNA hybridization data. Consequently, strain NRRL 5646T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Nocardia, for which the name Nocardia iowensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NRRL 5646T (=UI 122540T=NRRL B-24671T=DSM 45197T). PMID:19622667

  6. Comparative functional characterization of eugenol synthase from four different Ocimum species: Implications on eugenol accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Atul; Jayaramaiah, Ramesha H; Beedkar, Supriya D; Singh, Priyanka A; Joshi, Rakesh S; Mulani, Fayaj A; Dholakia, Bhushan B; Punekar, Sachin A; Gade, Wasudeo N; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V; Giri, Ashok P

    2016-11-01

    Isoprenoids and phenylpropanoids are the major secondary metabolite constituents in Ocimum genus. Though enzymes from phenylpropanoid pathway have been characterized from few plants, limited information exists on how they modulate levels of secondary metabolites. Here, we performed phenylpropanoid profiling in different tissues from five Ocimum species, which revealed significant variations in secondary metabolites including eugenol, eugenol methyl ether, estragole and methyl cinnamate levels. Expression analysis of eugenol synthase (EGS) gene showed higher transcript levels especially in young leaves and inflorescence; and were positively correlated with eugenol contents. Additionally, transcript levels of coniferyl alcohol acyl transferase, a key enzyme diverting pool of substrate to phenylpropanoids, were in accordance with their abundance in respective species. In particular, eugenol methyl transferase expression positively correlated with higher levels of eugenol methyl ether in Ocimum tenuiflorum. Further, EGSs were functionally characterized from four Ocimum species varying in their eugenol contents. Kinetic and expression analyses indicated, higher enzyme turnover and transcripts levels, in species accumulating more eugenol. Moreover, biochemical and bioinformatics studies demonstrated that coniferyl acetate was the preferred substrate over coumaryl acetate when used, individually or together, in the enzyme assay. Overall, this study revealed the preliminary evidence for varied accumulation of eugenol and its abundance over chavicol in these Ocimum species. Current findings could potentially provide novel insights for metabolic modulations in medicinal and aromatic plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cloning and manipulation of the Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase gene: physiological aspects of enzyme overproduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Grogan, D W; Cronan, J E

    1984-01-01

    Like many other eubacteria, cultures of Escherichia coli accumulate cyclopropane fatty acids (CFAs) at a well-defined stage of growth, due to the action of the cytoplasmic enzyme CFA synthase. We report the isolation of the putative structural gene, cfa, for this enzyme on an E. coli-ColE1 chimeric plasmid by the use of an autoradiographic colony screening technique. When introduced into a variety of E. coli strains, this plasmid, pLC18-11, induced corresponding increases in CFA content and C...

  8. Benzalacetone Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuro eAbe

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Benzalacetone synthase, from the medicinal plant Rheum palmatum (Polygonaceae (RpBAS, is a plant-specific chalcone synthase (CHS superfamily of type III polyketide synthase (PKS. RpBAS catalyzes the one-step, decarboxylative condensation of 4-coumaroyl-CoA with malonyl-CoA to produce the C6-C4 benzalacetone scaffold. The X-ray crystal structures of RpBAS confirmed that the diketide-forming activity is attributable to the characteristic substitution of the conserved active-site "gatekeeper" Phe with Leu. Furthermore, the crystal structures suggested that RpBAS employs novel catalytic machinery for the thioester bond cleavage of the enzyme-bound diketide intermediate and the final decarboxylation reaction to produce benzalacetone. Finally, by exploiting the remarkable substrate tolerance and catalytic versatility of RpBAS, precursor-directed biosynthesis efficiently generated chemically and structurally divergent, unnatural novel polyketide scaffolds. These findings provided a structural basis for the functional diversity of the type III PKS enzymes.

  9. Trehalose synthase of Mycobacterium smegmatis: purification, cloning, expression, and properties of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuan T; Koroth Edavana, Vineetha; Jourdian, William J; Edmondson, Rick; Carroll, J David; Pastuszak, Irena; Elbein, Alan D

    2004-11-01

    Trehalose synthase (TreS) catalyzes the reversible interconversion of trehalose (glucosyl-alpha,alpha-1,1-glucose) and maltose (glucosyl-alpha1-4-glucose). TreS was purified from the cytosol of Mycobacterium smegmatis to give a single protein band on SDS gels with a molecular mass of approximately 68 kDa. However, active enzyme exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 390 kDa by gel filtration suggesting that TreS is a hexamer of six identical subunits. Based on amino acid compositions of several peptides, the treS gene was identified in the M. smegmatis genome sequence, and was cloned and expressed in active form in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was synthesized with a (His)(6) tag at the amino terminus. The interconversion of trehalose and maltose by the purified TreS was studied at various concentrations of maltose or trehalose. At a maltose concentration of 0.5 mm, an equilibrium mixture containing equal amounts of trehalose and maltose (42-45% of each) was reached during an incubation of about 6 h, whereas at 2 mm maltose, it took about 22 h to reach the same equilibrium. However, when trehalose was the substrate at either 0.5 or 2 mm, only about 30% of the trehalose was converted to maltose in >or= 12 h, indicating that maltose is the preferred substrate. These incubations also produced up to 8-10% free glucose. The K(m) for maltose was approximately 10 mm, whereas for trehalose it was approximately 90 mm. While beta,beta-trehalose, isomaltose (alpha1,6-glucose disaccharide), kojibiose (alpha1,2) or cellobiose (beta1,4) were not substrates for TreS, nigerose (alpha1,3-glucose disaccharide) and alpha,beta-trehalose were utilized at 20 and 15%, respectively, as compared to maltose. The enzyme has a pH optimum of about 7 and is inhibited in a competitive manner by Tris buffer. [(3)H]Trehalose is converted to [(3)H]maltose even in the presence of a 100-fold or more excess of unlabeled maltose, and [(14)C]maltose produces [(14)C]trehalose in excess

  10. Characterization of the first naturally thermostable terpene synthases and development of strategies to improve thermostability in this family of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, Matthew Q; Nesbitt, Edward A; Marr, Scott; Hutchby, Marc; Leak, David J

    2017-06-01

    The terpenoid family of natural products is being targeted for heterologous microbial production as a cheaper and more reliable alternative to extraction from plants. The key enzyme responsible for diversification of terpene structure is the class-I terpene synthase (TS), and these often require engineering to improve properties such as thermostability, robustness and catalytic activity before they are suitable for industrial use. Improving thermostability typically relies on screening a large number of mutants, as there are no naturally thermostable TSs described upon which to base rational design decisions. We have characterized the first examples of natural TSs exhibiting thermostability, which catalyse the formation of the sesquiterpene τ-muurolol at temperatures up to 78 °C. We also report an enzyme with a kcat value of 0.95 s-1 at 65 °C, the highest kcat recorded for a bacterial sesquiterpene synthase. In turn, these thermostable enzymes were used as a model to inform the rational engineering of another TS, with the same specificity but low sequence identity to the model. The newly engineered variant displayed increased thermostability and turnover. Given the high structural homology of the class-I TS domain, this approach could be generally applicable to improving the properties of other enzymes in this class. Model data are available in the PMDB database under the accession number PM0080780. © 2017 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Functional Analysis of Amorpha-4,11-Diene Synthase (ADS) Homologs from Non-Artemisinin-Producing Artemisia Species: The Discovery of Novel Koidzumiol and (+)-α-Bisabolol Synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangphrom, Paskorn; Seki, Hikaru; Suzuki, Munenori; Komori, Aya; Nishiwaki, Mika; Mikawa, Ryota; Fukushima, Ery Odette; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2016-08-01

    The production of artemisinin, the most effective antimalarial compound, is limited to Artemisia annua. Enzymes involved in artemisinin biosynthesis include amorpha-4,11-diene synthase (ADS), amorpha-4,11-diene 12-monooxygenase (CYP71AV1) and artemisinic aldehyde Δ(11)13 reductase (DBR2). Although artemisinin and its specific intermediates are not detected in other Artemisia species, we reported previously that CYP71AV1 and DBR2 homologs were expressed in some non-artemisinin-producing Artemisia plants. These homologous enzymes showed similar functions to their counterparts in A. annua and can convert fed intermediates into the following products along the artemisinin biosynthesis in planta These findings suggested a partial artemisinin-producing ability in those species. In this study, we examined genes highly homologous to ADS, the first committed gene in the pathway, in 13 Artemisia species. We detected ADS homologs in A. absinthium, A. kurramensis and A. maritima. We analyzed the enzymatic functions of all of the ADS homologs after obtaining their cDNA. We found that the ADS homolog from A. absinthium exhibited novel activity in the cyclization of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) to koidzumiol, a rare natural sesquiterpenoid. Those from A. kurramensis and A. maritima showed similar, but novel, activities in the cyclization of FPP to (+)-α-bisabolol. The unique functions of the novel sesquiterpene synthases highly homologous to ADS found in this study could provide insight into the molecular basis of the exceptional artemisinin-producing ability in A. annua. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis of Squalene Synthase 2(SQS2) in Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Qixian; Jiang, Dan; Chen, Yijun; Shen, Ye; Yuan, Qingjun; Lin, Huixin; Zha, Liangping; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Luqi

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, which is also known as a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, is widely studied for its ability to accumulate the diterpene quinone Tanshinones. In addition to producing a variety of diterpene quinone, S. miltiorrhiza Bunge also accumulates sterol, brassinosteroid and triterpenoids. During their biosynthesis, squalene synthase (SQS, EC 2.5.1.21) converts two molecules of the hydrophilic substrate farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) into a hydrophobic product, squalene. In the present study, cloning and characterization of S. miltiorrhiza Bunge squalene synthase 2 (SmSQS2, Genbank Accession Number: KM408605) cDNA was investigated subsequently followed by its recombinant expression and preliminary enzyme activity. The full-length cDNA of SmSQS2 was 1 597 bp in length, with an open reading frame of 1 245 bp encoding 414 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of SmSQS2 shared high similarity with those of SQSs from other plants. To obtain soluble recombinant enzymes, the truncated SmSQS2 in which 28 amino acids were deleted from the carboxy terminus was expressed as GST-Tag fusion protein in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western Blot analysis, and the resultant bacterial crude extract was incubated with FPP and NADPH. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer analysis showed that squalene was detected in the in vitro reaction mixture. The gene expression level was analyzed through Quantitative real-time PCR, and was found to be higher in roots as compared to the leaves, and was up-regulated upon YE+ Ag(+) treatment. These results could serve as an important to understand the function of the SQS family. In addition, the identification of SmSQS2 is important for further studies of terpenoid and sterol biosynthesis in S. miltiorrhiza Bunge.

  13. Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis of Squalene Synthase 2(SQS2 in Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qixian Rong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge,which is also known as a traditional Chinese herbal medicine,is widely studied for its ability to accumulate the diterpene quinone Tanshinones. In addition to producing a variety of diterpene quinone, S. miltiorrhiza Bunge also accumulates sterol, brassinosteroid and triterpenoids. During their biosynthesis, squalene synthase (SQS, EC 2.5.1.21 converts two molecules of the hydrophilic substrate farnesyl diphosphate into a hydrophobic product, squalene. In the present study, cloning and characterization of S. miltiorrhiza Bunge squalene synthase 2 (SmSQS2, Genbank Accession Number: KM408605 cDNA was investigated subsequently followed by its recombinant expression and preliminary enzyme activity. The full-length cDNA of SmSQS2 was 1 597 bp in length, with an open reading frame (ORF of 1 245 bp encoding 414 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of SmSQS2 shared high similarity with those of SQSs from other plants. To obtain soluble recombinant enzymes, the truncated SmSQS2 in which 28 amino acids were deleted from the carboxy terminus was expressed as GST-Tag fusion protein in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 and confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western Blot analysis, and the resultant bacterial crude extract was incubated with farnesyl diphosphate and NADPH. GC-MS analysis showed that squalene was detected in the in vitro reaction mixture. The gene expression level was analyzed through Quantitative real-time PCR, and was found to be higher in roots as compared to the leaves, and was up-regulated upon YE+ Ag+ treatment. These results could serve as an important to understand the function of the SQS family. In addition, the identification of SmSQS2 is important for further studies of terpenoid and sterol biosynthesis in S. miltiorrhiza Bunge.

  14. ATP synthase in mycobacteria: special features and implications for a function as drug target.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, P.; Lill, H.; Bald, D.

    2014-01-01

    ATP synthase is a ubiquitous enzyme that is largely conserved across the kingdoms of life. This conservation is in accordance with its central role in chemiosmotic energy conversion, a pathway utilized by far by most living cells. On the other hand, in particular pathogenic bacteria whilst employing

  15. Recruitment of alkaloid-specific homospermidine synthase (HSS) from ubiquitous deoxyhypusine synthase: Does Crotalaria possess a functional HSS that still has DHS activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhayati, Niknik; Ober, Dietrich

    2005-06-01

    Quinolizidine alkaloids are the most prominent group of alkaloids occurring in legumes, except for many members of the tribe Crotalarieae that accumulate pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). To study the evolution of PA biosynthesis as a typical pathway of plant secondary metabolism in this tribe, we have searched for a cDNA coding for homospermidine synthase (HSS), the enzyme catalyzing the first specific step in this biosynthesis. HSS was shown to have been recruited from deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) by independent gene duplication in several different angiosperm lineages during evolution. Except for a cDNA sequence coding for the DHS of Crotalaria retusa, no data is available concerning the origin of PA biosynthesis within this tribe of the Fabaceae. In addition to several pseudogenes, we have identified one functional DHS in C. scassellatii and two in C. juncea. Despite C. juncea plants under study being devoid of PAs, we have found that the two sequences of C. juncea are different with respect to their genomic organization, their tissue-specific expression, and their biochemical activities. Supported by the branching pattern of a maximum likelihood analysis of these sequences, they have been classified as "class 1" and "class 2" DHS. It remains open whether the duplicated DHS belonging to class 2 is involved in the biosynthesis of PAs.

  16. Regulation of methylamine and formaldehyde metabolism in Arthrobacter P1. Formaldehyde is the inducing signal for the synthesis of the RuMP cycle enzyme hexulose phosphate synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, L.M.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    The inducing potential of formaldehyde on the synthesis of hexulose phosphate synthase, a key enzyme of the RuMP cycle in Arthrobacter P1, was investigated in resting cell suspensions. Induction of this enzyme only occurred at formaldehyde concentrations of 0.5 mM and below. No evidence was obtained

  17. Functional characterization of nine Norway Spruce TPS genes and evolution of gymnosperm terpene synthases of the TPS-d subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Diane M; Fäldt, Jenny; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2004-08-01

    Constitutive and induced terpenoids are important defense compounds for many plants against potential herbivores and pathogens. In Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst), treatment with methyl jasmonate induces complex chemical and biochemical terpenoid defense responses associated with traumatic resin duct development in stems and volatile terpenoid emissions in needles. The cloning of (+)-3-carene synthase was the first step in characterizing this system at the molecular genetic level. Here we report the isolation and functional characterization of nine additional terpene synthase (TPS) cDNAs from Norway spruce. These cDNAs encode four monoterpene synthases, myrcene synthase, (-)-limonene synthase, (-)-alpha/beta-pinene synthase, and (-)-linalool synthase; three sesquiterpene synthases, longifolene synthase, E,E-alpha-farnesene synthase, and E-alpha-bisabolene synthase; and two diterpene synthases, isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase, each with a unique product profile. To our knowledge, genes encoding isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and longifolene synthase have not been previously described, and this linalool synthase is the first described from a gymnosperm. These functionally diverse TPS account for much of the structural diversity of constitutive and methyl jasmonate-induced terpenoids in foliage, xylem, bark, and volatile emissions from needles of Norway spruce. Phylogenetic analyses based on the inclusion of these TPS into the TPS-d subfamily revealed that functional specialization of conifer TPS occurred before speciation of Pinaceae. Furthermore, based on TPS enclaves created by distinct branching patterns, the TPS-d subfamily is divided into three groups according to sequence similarities and functional assessment. Similarities of TPS evolution in angiosperms and modeling of TPS protein structures are discussed.

  18. Functional Promiscuity of Two Divergent Paralogs of Type III Plant Polyketide Synthases1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandith, Shahzad A.; Dhar, Niha; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Kushwaha, Manoj; Gupta, Ajai P.; Shah, Manzoor A.; Vishwakarma, Ram

    2016-01-01

    Plants effectively defend themselves against biotic and abiotic stresses by synthesizing diverse secondary metabolites, including health-protective flavonoids. These display incredible chemical diversity and ubiquitous occurrence and confer impeccable biological and agricultural applications. Chalcone synthase (CHS), a type III plant polyketide synthase, is critical for flavonoid biosynthesis. It catalyzes acyl-coenzyme A thioesters to synthesize naringenin chalcone through a polyketidic intermediate. The functional divergence among the evolutionarily generated members of a gene family is pivotal in driving the chemical diversity. Against this backdrop, this study was aimed to functionally characterize members of the CHS gene family from Rheum emodi, an endangered and endemic high-altitude medicinal herb of northwestern Himalayas. Two full-length cDNAs (1,179 bp each), ReCHS1 and ReCHS2, encoding unique paralogs were isolated and characterized. Heterologous expression and purification in Escherichia coli, bottom-up proteomic characterization, high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and enzyme kinetic studies using five different substrates confirmed their catalytic potential. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of higher synonymous mutations in the intronless divergents of ReCHS. ReCHS2 displayed significant enzymatic efficiency (Vmax/Km) with different substrates. There were significant spatial and altitudinal variations in messenger RNA transcript levels of ReCHSs correlating positively with metabolite accumulation. Furthermore, the elicitations in the form of methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, ultraviolet B light, and wounding, chosen on the basis of identified cis-regulatory promoter elements, presented considerable differences in the transcript profiles of ReCHSs. Taken together, our results demonstrate differential propensities of CHS paralogs in terms of the accumulation of flavonoids and

  19. Functional Promiscuity of Two Divergent Paralogs of Type III Plant Polyketide Synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandith, Shahzad A; Dhar, Niha; Rana, Satiander; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Kushwaha, Manoj; Gupta, Ajai P; Shah, Manzoor A; Vishwakarma, Ram; Lattoo, Surrinder K

    2016-08-01

    Plants effectively defend themselves against biotic and abiotic stresses by synthesizing diverse secondary metabolites, including health-protective flavonoids. These display incredible chemical diversity and ubiquitous occurrence and confer impeccable biological and agricultural applications. Chalcone synthase (CHS), a type III plant polyketide synthase, is critical for flavonoid biosynthesis. It catalyzes acyl-coenzyme A thioesters to synthesize naringenin chalcone through a polyketidic intermediate. The functional divergence among the evolutionarily generated members of a gene family is pivotal in driving the chemical diversity. Against this backdrop, this study was aimed to functionally characterize members of the CHS gene family from Rheum emodi, an endangered and endemic high-altitude medicinal herb of northwestern Himalayas. Two full-length cDNAs (1,179 bp each), ReCHS1 and ReCHS2, encoding unique paralogs were isolated and characterized. Heterologous expression and purification in Escherichia coli, bottom-up proteomic characterization, high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and enzyme kinetic studies using five different substrates confirmed their catalytic potential. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of higher synonymous mutations in the intronless divergents of ReCHS. ReCHS2 displayed significant enzymatic efficiency (Vmax/Km) with different substrates. There were significant spatial and altitudinal variations in messenger RNA transcript levels of ReCHSs correlating positively with metabolite accumulation. Furthermore, the elicitations in the form of methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, ultraviolet B light, and wounding, chosen on the basis of identified cis-regulatory promoter elements, presented considerable differences in the transcript profiles of ReCHSs. Taken together, our results demonstrate differential propensities of CHS paralogs in terms of the accumulation of flavonoids and

  20. Crystal structure of the 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin pyrophosphokinase•dihydropteroate synthase bifunctional enzyme from Francisella tularensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W Pemble

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin pyrophosphokinase (HPPK and dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS enzymes catalyze sequential metabolic reactions in the folate biosynthetic pathway of bacteria and lower eukaryotes. Both enzymes represent validated targets for the development of novel anti-microbial therapies. We report herein that the genes which encode FtHPPK and FtDHPS from the biowarfare agent Francisella tularensis are fused into a single polypeptide. The potential of simultaneously targeting both modules with pterin binding inhibitors prompted us to characterize the molecular details of the multifunctional complex. Our high resolution crystallographic analyses reveal the structural organization between FtHPPK and FtDHPS which are tethered together by a short linker. Additional structural analyses of substrate complexes reveal that the active sites of each module are virtually indistinguishable from those of the monofunctional enzymes. The fused bifunctional enzyme therefore represents an excellent vehicle for finding inhibitors that engage the pterin binding pockets of both modules that have entirely different architectures. To demonstrate that this approach has the potential of producing novel two-hit inhibitors of the folate pathway, we identify and structurally characterize a fragment-like molecule that simultaneously engages both active sites. Our study provides a molecular framework to study the enzyme mechanisms of HPPK and DHPS, and to design novel and much needed therapeutic compounds to treat infectious diseases.

  1. Real-time NMR monitoring of intermediates and labile products of the bifunctional enzyme UDP-apiose/UDP-xylose synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyett, Paul; Glushka, John; Gu, Xiaogang; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2009-06-12

    The conversion of UDP-alpha-d-glucuronic acid to UDP-alpha-d-xylose and UDP-alpha-d-apiose by a bifunctional potato enzyme UDP-apiose/UDP-xylose synthase was studied using real-time nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. UDP-alpha-d-glucuronic acid is converted via the intermediate uridine 5'-beta-l-threo-pentapyranosyl-4''-ulose diphosphate to UDP-alpha-d-apiose and simultaneously to UDP-alpha-d-xylose. The UDP-alpha-d-apiose that is formed is unstable and is converted to alpha-d-apio-furanosyl-1,2-cyclic phosphate and UMP. High-resolution real-time NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the direct and quantitative characterization of previously undetected transient and labile components formed during a complex enzyme-catalyzed reaction.

  2. Isolation and functional characterisation of banana phytoene synthase genes as potential cisgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlalazi, Bulukani; Welsch, Ralf; Namanya, Priver; Khanna, Harjeet; Geijskes, R Jason; Harrison, Mark D; Harding, Rob; Dale, James L; Bateson, Marion

    2012-11-01

    Carotenoids occur in all photosynthetic organisms where they protect photosystems from auto-oxidation, participate in photosynthetic energy transfer and are secondary metabolites. Of the more than 600 known plant carotenoids, few can be converted into vitamin A by humans and so these pro-vitamin A carotenoids (pVAC) are important in human nutrition. Phytoene synthase (PSY) is a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of pVACs and plays a central role in regulating pVAC accumulation in the edible portion of crop plants. Banana is a major commercial crop and serves as a staple crop for more than 30 million people. There is natural variation in fruit pVAC content across different banana cultivars, but this is not well understood. Therefore, we isolated PSY genes from banana cultivars with relatively high (cv. Asupina) and low (cv. Cavendish) pVAC content. We provide evidence that PSY in banana is encoded by two paralogs (PSY1 and PSY2), each with a similar gene structure to homologous genes in other monocots. Further, we demonstrate that PSY2 is more highly expressed in fruit pulp compared to leaf. Functional analysis of PSY1 and PSY2 in rice callus and E. coli demonstrates that both genes encode functional enzymes, and that Asupina PSYs have approximately twice the enzymatic activity of the corresponding Cavendish PSYs. These results suggest that differences in PSY enzyme activity contribute significantly to the differences in Asupina and Cavendish fruit pVAC content. Importantly, Asupina PSY genes could potentially be used to generate new cisgenic or intragenic banana cultivars with enhanced pVAC content.

  3. Functional Consequences of Deletions of the N Terminus of the [epsilon] Subunit of the Chloroplast ATP Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, J. A.; Radkowski, C. A.; McCarty, R. E.

    1997-04-01

    The [epsilon] subunit of the chloroplast ATP synthase functions in part to prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis by the enzyme. In addition, [epsilon] together with the remainder of the catalytic portion of the synthase (CF1) is required to block the nonproductive leak of protons through the membrane-embedded component of the synthase (CFO). Mutant [epsilon] subunits of the spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplast ATP synthase that lack 5, 11, or 20 amino acids from their N termini ([epsilon]-[delta]5N, [epsilon]-[delta]11N, and [epsilon]-[delta]20N, respectively), were overexpressed as inclusion bodies. Using a procedure that resulted in the folding of full-length, recombinant [epsilon] in a biologically active form, none of these truncated forms resulted in [epsilon] that inhibited the ATPase activity of CF1 deficient in [epsilon], CF1(-[epsilon]). Yet, the [epsilon]-[delta]5N and [epsilon]-[delta]11N peptides significantly inhibited the ATPase activity of CF1(-[epsilon]) bound to CFO in NaBr-treated thylakoids. Although full-length [epsilon] rapidly inhibited the ATPase activity of CF1(-[epsilon]) in solution or bound to CFO, an extended period was required for the truncated forms to inhibit membrane-bound CF1(-[epsilon]). Despite the fact that [epsilon]-[delta]5N significantly inhibited the ATPase activity of CF1(-[epsilon]) bound to CFO, it did not block the proton conductance through CFO in NaBr-treated thylakoids reconstituted with CF1(-[epsilon]). Based on selective proteolysis and the binding of 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid, each of the truncated peptides gained significant secondary structure after folding. These results strongly suggest (a) that the N terminus of [epsilon] is important in its binding to CF1, (b) that CF0 stabilizes [epsilon] binding to the entire ATP synthase, and (c) that the N terminus may play some role in the regulation of proton flux through CFO.

  4. Structural and Functional Characterization of Malate Synthase G from Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Alyssa C; Medarametla, Prasanthi; Chee, Xavier; Bartlett, Sean; Poso, Antti; Spring, David R; Rahman, Taufiq; Welch, Martin

    2017-10-17

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen recognized as a critical threat by the World Health Organization because of the dwindling number of effective therapies available to treat infections. Over the past decade, it has become apparent that the glyoxylate shunt plays a vital role in sustaining P. aeruginosa during infection scenarios. The glyoxylate shunt comprises two enzymes: isocitrate lyase and malate synthase isoform G. Inactivation of these enzymes has been reported to abolish the ability of P. aeruginosa to establish infection in a mammalian model system, yet we still lack the structural information to support drug design efforts. In this work, we describe the first X-ray crystal structure of P. aeruginosa malate synthase G in the apo form at 1.62 Å resolution. The enzyme is a monomer composed of four domains and is highly conserved with homologues found in other clinically relevant microorganisms. It is also dependent on Mg(2+) for catalysis. Metal ion binding led to a change in the intrinsic fluorescence of the protein, allowing us to quantitate its affinity for Mg(2+). We also identified putative drug binding sites in malate synthase G using computational analysis and, because of the high resolution of the experimental data, were further able to characterize its hydration properties. Our data reveal two promising binding pockets in malate synthase G that may be exploited for drug design.

  5. Novel class III phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase: structure and properties of the tetrameric, phosphate-activated, non-allosterically inhibited enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadziola, Anders; Jepsen, Clemens H; Johansson, Eva

    2005-01-01

    , and the crystal structure determined. The enzyme is activated by phosphate ions and only ATP or dATP serve as diphosphoryl donors. The K(m) values are determined as 2.6 mM and 2.8 mM for ATP and ribose 5-phosphate, respectively, and the V(max) value as 2.20 mmol (minxmg of protein)(-1). ADP is a potent inhibitor....... The properties of M.jannaschii PRPP synthase differ widely from previously characterised PRPP synthases by its tetrameric quaternary structure and the simultaneous phosphate ion-activation and lack of allosteric inhibition, and, thus, constitute a novel class of PRPP synthases....

  6. The structure of MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of the siderophore mycobactin, reveals it to be a salicylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Anthony J; Yu, Minmin; Gårdenborg, Therés; Middleditch, Martin; Ramsay, Rochelle J; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun

    2006-09-01

    The ability to acquire iron from the extracellular environment is a key determinant of pathogenicity in mycobacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acquires iron exclusively via the siderophore mycobactin T, the biosynthesis of which depends on the production of salicylate from chorismate. Salicylate production in other bacteria is either a two-step process involving an isochorismate synthase (chorismate isomerase) and a pyruvate lyase, as observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or a single-step conversion catalyzed by a salicylate synthase, as with Yersinia enterocolitica. Here we present the structure of the enzyme MbtI (Rv2386c) from M. tuberculosis, solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at a resolution of 1.8 A, and biochemical evidence that it is the salicylate synthase necessary for mycobactin biosynthesis. The enzyme is critically dependent on Mg2+ for activity and produces salicylate via an isochorismate intermediate. MbtI is structurally similar to salicylate synthase (Irp9) from Y. enterocolitica and the large subunit of anthranilate synthase (TrpE) and shares the overall architecture of other chorismate-utilizing enzymes, such as the related aminodeoxychorismate synthase PabB. Like Irp9, but unlike TrpE or PabB, MbtI is neither regulated by nor structurally stabilized by bound tryptophan. The structure of MbtI is the starting point for the design of inhibitors of siderophore biosynthesis, which may make useful lead compounds for the production of new antituberculosis drugs, given the strong dependence of pathogenesis on iron acquisition in M. tuberculosis.

  7. Purification and characterization of clavaminate synthase from Streptomyces clavuligerus: an unusual oxidative enzyme in natural product biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salowe, S P; Marsh, E N; Townsend, C A

    1990-07-10

    A pivotal step in the biosynthetic pathway to the beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid is the conversion of proclavaminic acid to clavaminic acid in a reaction requiring Fe2+, alpha-ketoglutarate, and oxygen [Elson, S. W., Baggaley, K. H., Gillett, J., Holland, S., Nicholson, N. H., Sime, J. T., & Woroniecki, S. R. (1987) J. Chem. Soc., Chem. Commun., 1736-1738]. Clavaminate synthase, the enzyme that catalyzes this oxidative cyclization/desaturation, has been purified to homogeneity from clavulanic acid producing cells of Streptomyces clavuligerus (ATCC 27064). The enzyme behaved as a monomer during gel filtration and migrated with Mr 47,000 during denaturing gel electrophoresis. After ion-exchange FPLC two active forms of the protein were resolved that differed slightly in kinetic constants and apparent molecular weight. Kinetic comparisons with the four possible diastereomers of proclavaminate confirmed the absolute configuration of the substrate to be 2S,3R. The stoichiometry of the overall transformation was determined to be proclavaminate + 2(alpha-ketoglutarate) + 2O2----clavaminate + 2(succinate) + 2CO2 + 2H2O. In the absence of proclavaminate a slow decarboxylation of alpha-ketoglutarate to succinate and CO2 was observed in an uncoupled reaction which resulted in enzyme inactivation. Steady-state kinetic studies were undertaken for an initial description of the enzyme's catalytic cycle. The double-reciprocal plot with alpha-ketoglutarate as the variable substrate was linear; this supports the proposal that two stepwise oxidations of proclavaminate occur, each with the consumption of alpha-ketoglutarate and oxygen and the release of succinate, CO2, and H2O. The intersecting initial velocity plots obtained from pairwise variation of substrate concentrations were consistent with a sequential kinetic mechanism for the first oxidation. Similarities observed between clavaminate synthase and alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases argue for a common

  8. Selective photoregulation of the activity of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, two key enzymes in glycogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Lobo, Mireia; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Fita, Ignacio; Velasco, Dolores; Guinovart, Joan J; Ferrer, Joan C

    2015-07-14

    Glycogen is a polymer of α-1,4- and α-1,6-linked glucose units that provides a readily available source of energy in living organisms. Glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) are the two enzymes that control, respectively, the synthesis and degradation of this polysaccharide and constitute adequate pharmacological targets to modulate cellular glycogen levels, by means of inhibition of their catalytic activity. Here we report on the synthesis and biological evaluation of a selective inhibitor that consists of an azobenzene moiety glycosidically linked to the anomeric carbon of a glucose molecule. In the ground state, the more stable (E)-isomer of the azobenzene glucoside had a slight inhibitory effect on rat muscle GP (RMGP, IC50 = 4.9 mM) and Escherichia coli GS (EcGS, IC50 = 1.6 mM). After irradiation and subsequent conversion to the (Z)-form, the inhibitory potency of the azobenzene glucoside did not significantly change for RMGP (IC50 = 2.4 mM), while its effect on EcGS increased 50-fold (IC50 = 32 μM). Sucrose synthase 4 from potatoes, a glycosyltransferase that does not operate on glycogen, was only slightly inhibited by the (E)-isomer (IC50 = 0.73 mM). These findings could be rationalized on the basis of kinetic and computer-aided docking analysis, which indicated that both isomers of the azobenzene glucoside mimic the EcGS acceptor substrate and exert their inhibitory effect by binding to the glycogen subsite in the active center of the enzyme. The ability to selectively photoregulate the catalytic activity of key enzymes of glycogen metabolism may represent a new approach for the treatment of glycogen metabolism disorders.

  9. Coccolithophores: Functional Biodiversity, Enzymes and Bioprospecting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Allen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Emiliania huxleyi is a single celled, marine phytoplankton with global distribution. As a key species for global biogeochemical cycling, a variety of strains have been amassed in various culture collections. Using a library consisting of 52 strains of E. huxleyi and an ‘in house‘ enzyme screening program, we have assessed the functional biodiversity within this species of fundamental importance to global biogeochemical cycling, whilst at the same time determining their potential for exploitation in biocatalytic applications. Here, we describe the screening of E. huxleyi strains, as well as a coccolithovirus infected strain, for commercially relevant biocatalytic enzymes such as acid/alkali phosphodiesterase, acid/alkali phosphomonoesterase, EC1.1.1-type dehydrogenase, EC1.3.1-type dehydrogenase and carboxylesterase.

  10. Coccolithophores: functional biodiversity, enzymes and bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Emma L; Worthy, Charlotte A; Probert, Ian; Ali, Sohail T; Love, John; Napier, Johnathan; Littlechild, Jenny A; Somerfield, Paul J; Allen, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Emiliania huxleyi is a single celled, marine phytoplankton with global distribution. As a key species for global biogeochemical cycling, a variety of strains have been amassed in various culture collections. Using a library consisting of 52 strains of E. huxleyi and an 'in house' enzyme screening program, we have assessed the functional biodiversity within this species of fundamental importance to global biogeochemical cycling, whilst at the same time determining their potential for exploitation in biocatalytic applications. Here, we describe the screening of E. huxleyi strains, as well as a coccolithovirus infected strain, for commercially relevant biocatalytic enzymes such as acid/alkali phosphodiesterase, acid/alkali phosphomonoesterase, EC1.1.1-type dehydrogenase, EC1.3.1-type dehydrogenase and carboxylesterase.

  11. Fatty acid synthase modulates intestinal barrier function through palmitoylation of mucin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaochao; Yang, Zhen; Rey, Federico E; Ridaura, Vanessa K; Davidson, Nicholas O; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Semenkovich, Clay F

    2012-02-16

    The intestinal mucus barrier prevents pathogen invasion and maintains host-microbiota homeostasis. We show that fatty acid synthase (FAS), an insulin-responsive enzyme essential for de novo lipogenesis, helps maintain the mucus barrier by regulating Mucin 2, the dominant mucin in the colon and a central component of mucus. Inducible Cre recombinase-directed inactivation of the FAS gene in the colonic epithelium of mice is associated with disruptions in the intestinal mucus barrier as well as increased intestinal permeability, colitis, systemic inflammation, and changes in gut microbial ecology. FAS deficiency blocked the generation of palmitoylated Mucin 2, which must be S-palmitoylated at its N terminus for proper secretion and function. Furthermore, a diabetic mouse model exhibited lower FAS levels and a decreased mucus layer, which could be restored with insulin treatment. Thus, the role of FAS in maintaining intestinal barrier function may explain the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation in diabetes and other disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional genomics reveals that a compact terpene synthase gene family can account for terpene volatile production in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J; Green, Sol A; Chen, Xiuyin; Bailleul, Estelle J D; Matich, Adam J; Wang, Mindy Y; Atkinson, Ross G

    2013-02-01

    Terpenes are specialized plant metabolites that act as attractants to pollinators and as defensive compounds against pathogens and herbivores, but they also play an important role in determining the quality of horticultural food products. We show that the genome of cultivated apple (Malus domestica) contains 55 putative terpene synthase (TPS) genes, of which only 10 are predicted to be functional. This low number of predicted functional TPS genes compared with other plant species was supported by the identification of only eight potentially functional TPS enzymes in apple 'Royal Gala' expressed sequence tag databases, including the previously characterized apple (E,E)-α-farnesene synthase. In planta functional characterization of these TPS enzymes showed that they could account for the majority of terpene volatiles produced in cv Royal Gala, including the sesquiterpenes germacrene-D and (E)-β-caryophyllene, the monoterpenes linalool and α-pinene, and the homoterpene (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene. Relative expression analysis of the TPS genes indicated that floral and vegetative tissues were the primary sites of terpene production in cv Royal Gala. However, production of cv Royal Gala floral-specific terpenes and TPS genes was observed in the fruit of some heritage apple cultivars. Our results suggest that the apple TPS gene family has been shaped by a combination of ancestral and more recent genome-wide duplication events. The relatively small number of functional enzymes suggests that the remaining terpenes produced in floral and vegetative and fruit tissues are maintained under a positive selective pressure, while the small number of terpenes found in the fruit of modern cultivars may be related to commercial breeding strategies.

  13. Functional Genomics Reveals That a Compact Terpene Synthase Gene Family Can Account for Terpene Volatile Production in Apple1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J.; Green, Sol A.; Chen, Xiuyin; Bailleul, Estelle J.D.; Matich, Adam J.; Wang, Mindy Y.; Atkinson, Ross G.

    2013-01-01

    Terpenes are specialized plant metabolites that act as attractants to pollinators and as defensive compounds against pathogens and herbivores, but they also play an important role in determining the quality of horticultural food products. We show that the genome of cultivated apple (Malus domestica) contains 55 putative terpene synthase (TPS) genes, of which only 10 are predicted to be functional. This low number of predicted functional TPS genes compared with other plant species was supported by the identification of only eight potentially functional TPS enzymes in apple ‘Royal Gala’ expressed sequence tag databases, including the previously characterized apple (E,E)-α-farnesene synthase. In planta functional characterization of these TPS enzymes showed that they could account for the majority of terpene volatiles produced in cv Royal Gala, including the sesquiterpenes germacrene-D and (E)-β-caryophyllene, the monoterpenes linalool and α-pinene, and the homoterpene (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene. Relative expression analysis of the TPS genes indicated that floral and vegetative tissues were the primary sites of terpene production in cv Royal Gala. However, production of cv Royal Gala floral-specific terpenes and TPS genes was observed in the fruit of some heritage apple cultivars. Our results suggest that the apple TPS gene family has been shaped by a combination of ancestral and more recent genome-wide duplication events. The relatively small number of functional enzymes suggests that the remaining terpenes produced in floral and vegetative and fruit tissues are maintained under a positive selective pressure, while the small number of terpenes found in the fruit of modern cultivars may be related to commercial breeding strategies. PMID:23256150

  14. Campylobacter jejuni fatty acid synthase II: Structural and functional analysis of [beta]-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew S.; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; (Houston)

    2009-08-14

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is crucial for all living cells. In contrast to higher organisms, bacteria use a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS II) composed of a series of individual proteins, making FAS II enzymes excellent targets for antibiotics discovery. The {beta}-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ) catalyzes an essential step in the FAS II pathway. Here, we report the structure of Campylobacter jejuni FabZ (CjFabZ), showing a hexamer both in crystals and solution, with each protomer adopting the characteristic hot dog fold. Together with biochemical analysis of CjFabZ, we define the first functional FAS II enzyme from this pathogen, and provide a framework for investigation on roles of FAS II in C. jejuni virulence

  15. Clp Protease and OR Directly Control the Proteostasis of Phytoene Synthase, the Crucial Enzyme for Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Ralf; Zhou, Xiangjun; Yuan, Hui; Álvarez, Daniel; Sun, Tianhu; Schlossarek, Dennis; Yang, Yong; Shen, Guoxin; Zhang, Hong; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Li, Li

    2018-01-08

    Phytoene synthase (PSY) is the crucial plastidial enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. However, its post-translational regulation remains elusive. Likewise, Clp protease constitutes a central part of the plastid protease network, but its substrates for degradation are not well known. In this study, we report that PSY is a substrate of the Clp protease. PSY was uncovered to physically interact with various Clp protease subunits (i.e., ClpS1, ClpC1, and ClpD). High levels of PSY and several other carotenogenic enzyme proteins overaccumulate in the clpc1, clpp4, and clpr1-2 mutants. The overaccumulated PSY was found to be partially enzymatically active. Impairment of Clp activity in clpc1 results in a reduced rate of PSY protein turnover, further supporting the role of Clp protease in degrading PSY protein. On the other hand, the ORANGE (OR) protein, a major post-translational regulator of PSY with holdase chaperone activity, enhances PSY protein stability and increases the enzymatically active proportion of PSY in clpc1, counterbalancing Clp-mediated proteolysis in maintaining PSY protein homeostasis. Collectively, these findings provide novel insights into the quality control of plastid-localized proteins and establish a hitherto unidentified post-translational regulatory mechanism of carotenogenic enzymes in modulating carotenoid biosynthesis in plants. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fatty Acid Synthase Modulates Intestinal Barrier Function through Palmitoylation of Mucin 2

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xiaochao; Yang, Zhen; Rey, Federico E.; Ridaura, Vanessa K.; Davidson, Nicholas O.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal mucus barrier prevents pathogen invasion and maintains host-microbiota homeostasis. We show that fatty acid synthase (FAS), an insulin-responsive enzyme essential for de novo lipogenesis, helps maintain the mucus barrier by regulating Mucin 2, the dominant mucin in the colon and a central component of mucus. Inducible Cre recombinase-directed inactivation of the FAS gene in the colonic epithelium of mice is associated with disruptions in the intestinal mucus barrier as well as ...

  17. Regulation of glyoxysomal enzymes during germination of cucumber. Temporal changes in translatable mRNAs for isocitrate lyase and malate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, E M; Riezman, H; Grienenberger, J M; Becker, W M; Leaver, C J

    1980-12-01

    The relative levels of translatable messenger RNA for isocitrate lyase and malate synthase were determined in the dry seed and for the first seven days of development of cucumber cotyledons. After extraction and quantification of total and poly(A)-rich RNA each day, the RNA fractions were translated in an optimized wheat germ system and the specific polypeptides were immunoprecipitated quantitatively. The radiolabeled isocitrate lyase and malate synthase polypeptides were then fractionated on dodecylsulphate/polyacrylamide gels, visualized by exposure to X-ray film and quantified densitometrically. The relative levels of translatable messenger RNA for these enzymes rise and fall with a developmental program similar to the enzyme activities, but preceding the latter by about one day. This implies that the rise in enzyme activity is dependent upon a prior postgerminative increase in translatable messenger RNA for the enzymes. These studies also suggest that messenger RNA levels may be regulated, at least in part, by light.

  18. RNAi and Homologous Over-Expression Based Functional Approaches Reveal Triterpenoid Synthase Gene-Cycloartenol Synthase Is Involved in Downstream Withanolide Biosynthesis in Withania somnifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smrati Mishra

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera Dunal, is one of the most commonly used medicinal plant in Ayurvedic and indigenous medicine traditionally owing to its therapeutic potential, because of major chemical constituents, withanolides. Withanolide biosynthesis requires the activities of several enzymes in vivo. Cycloartenol synthase (CAS is an important enzyme in the withanolide biosynthetic pathway, catalyzing cyclization of 2, 3 oxidosqualene into cycloartenol. In the present study, we have cloned full-length WsCAS from Withania somnifera by homology-based PCR method. For gene function investigation, we constructed three RNAi gene-silencing constructs in backbone of RNAi vector pGSA and a full-length over-expression construct. These constructs were transformed in Agrobacterium strain GV3101 for plant transformation in W. somnifera. Molecular and metabolite analysis was performed in putative Withania transformants. The PCR and Southern blot results showed the genomic integration of these RNAi and overexpression construct(s in Withania genome. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of WsCAS gene was considerably downregulated in stable transgenic silenced Withania lines compared with the non-transformed control and HPLC analysis showed that withanolide content was greatly reduced in silenced lines. Transgenic plants over expressing CAS gene displayed enhanced level of CAS transcript and withanolide content compared to non-transformed controls. This work is the first full proof report of functional validation of any metabolic pathway gene in W. somnifera at whole plant level as per our knowledge and it will be further useful to understand the regulatory role of different genes involved in the biosynthesis of withanolides.

  19. RNAi and Homologous Over-Expression Based Functional Approaches Reveal Triterpenoid Synthase Gene-Cycloartenol Synthase Is Involved in Downstream Withanolide Biosynthesis in Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Smrati; Bansal, Shilpi; Mishra, Bhawana; Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Asha; Jadaun, Jyoti Singh; Sangwan, Neelam S

    2016-01-01

    Withania somnifera Dunal, is one of the most commonly used medicinal plant in Ayurvedic and indigenous medicine traditionally owing to its therapeutic potential, because of major chemical constituents, withanolides. Withanolide biosynthesis requires the activities of several enzymes in vivo. Cycloartenol synthase (CAS) is an important enzyme in the withanolide biosynthetic pathway, catalyzing cyclization of 2, 3 oxidosqualene into cycloartenol. In the present study, we have cloned full-length WsCAS from Withania somnifera by homology-based PCR method. For gene function investigation, we constructed three RNAi gene-silencing constructs in backbone of RNAi vector pGSA and a full-length over-expression construct. These constructs were transformed in Agrobacterium strain GV3101 for plant transformation in W. somnifera. Molecular and metabolite analysis was performed in putative Withania transformants. The PCR and Southern blot results showed the genomic integration of these RNAi and overexpression construct(s) in Withania genome. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of WsCAS gene was considerably downregulated in stable transgenic silenced Withania lines compared with the non-transformed control and HPLC analysis showed that withanolide content was greatly reduced in silenced lines. Transgenic plants over expressing CAS gene displayed enhanced level of CAS transcript and withanolide content compared to non-transformed controls. This work is the first full proof report of functional validation of any metabolic pathway gene in W. somnifera at whole plant level as per our knowledge and it will be further useful to understand the regulatory role of different genes involved in the biosynthesis of withanolides.

  20. Identification of genes coding for putative wax ester synthase/diacylglycerol acyltransferase enzymes in terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranconi, Mariana P; Alvarez, Adrián F; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2015-12-01

    Synthesis of neutral lipids such as triacylglycerols (TAG) and wax esters (WE) is catalyzed in bacteria by wax ester synthase/diacylglycerol acyltransferase enzymes (WS/DGAT). We investigated the diversity of genes encoding this enzyme in contrasting natural environments from Patagonia (Argentina). The content of petroleum hydrocarbons in samples collected from oil-producing areas was measured. PCR-based analysis covered WS/DGAT occurrence in marine sediments and soil. No product was obtained in seawater samples. All clones retrieved from marine sediments affiliated with gammaproteobacterial sequences and within them, most phylotypes formed a unique cluster related to putative WS/DGAT belonging to marine OM60 clade. In contrast, soils samples contained phylotypes only related to actinomycetes. Among them, phylotypes affiliated with representatives largely or recently reported as oleaginous bacteria, as well as with others considered as possible lipid-accumulating bacteria based on the analysis of their annotated genomes. Our study shows for the first time that the environment could contain a higher variety of ws/dgat than that reported from bacterial isolates. The results of this study highlight the relevance of the environment in a natural process such as the synthesis and accumulation of neutral lipids. Particularly, both marine sediments and soil may serve as a useful source for novel WS/DGAT with biotechnological interest.

  1. Domains of macrophage N(O) synthase have divergent roles in forming and stabilizing the active dimeric enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, D K; Abu-Soud, H M; Stuehr, D J

    1996-02-06

    The cytokine-inducible NO synthase (iNOS) is a flavin-containing hemeprotein that must dimerize to generate NO. Trypsin cleaves the dimeric enzyme into an oxygenase domain fragment that remains dimeric, contains heme and H4biopterin, and binds L-arginine and a reductase domain fragment that is monomeric, binds NADPH, FAD, FMN, and catalyzes the reduction of cytochrome c [Ghosh, D. K. & Stuehr, D. J. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 801-807]. The current study investigates the isolated oxygenase and reductase domains of iNOS to understand how they form and stabilize the active dimeric enzyme. The dimeric oxygenase domain dissociated into folded, heme-containing monomers when incubated with 2-5 M urea, whereas the reductase domain unfolded under these conditions and lost its ability to catalyze NADPH-dependent cytochrome c reduction. Spectral analysis of the dissociation reaction showed that it caused structural changes within the oxygenase domain and exposed the distal side of the heme to solvent, enabling it to bind dithiothreitol as a sixth ligand. Importantly, the oxygenase domain monomers could reassociate into a dimeric form even in the absence of the reductase domain. The reaction required L-arginine and H4biopterin and completely reversed the structural changes in heme pocket and protein structure that occurred upon dissociating the original dimer. Together, this confirms that the oxygenase domain contains all of the determinants needed for subunit dimerization and indicates that the dimeric structure greatly affects the heme and protein environment in the oxygenase domain.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase: structure of a key enzyme in methylglucose lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro José Barbosa Pereira

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis constitutes today a serious threat to human health worldwide, aggravated by the increasing number of identified multi-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, its causative agent, as well as by the lack of development of novel mycobactericidal compounds for the last few decades. The increased resilience of this pathogen is due, to a great extent, to its complex, polysaccharide-rich, and unusually impermeable cell wall. The synthesis of this essential structure is still poorly understood despite the fact that enzymes involved in glycosidic bond synthesis represent more than 1% of all M. tuberculosis ORFs identified to date. One of them is GpgS, a retaining glycosyltransferase (GT with low sequence homology to any other GTs of known structure, which has been identified in two species of mycobacteria and shown to be essential for the survival of M. tuberculosis. To further understand the biochemical properties of M. tuberculosis GpgS, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the apo enzyme, as well as of its ternary complex with UDP and 3-phosphoglycerate, by X-ray crystallography, to a resolution of 2.5 and 2.7 A, respectively. GpgS, the first enzyme from the newly established GT-81 family to be structurally characterized, displays a dimeric architecture with an overall fold similar to that of other GT-A-type glycosyltransferases. These three-dimensional structures provide a molecular explanation for the enzyme's preference for UDP-containing donor substrates, as well as for its glucose versus mannose discrimination, and uncover the structural determinants for acceptor substrate selectivity. Glycosyltransferases constitute a growing family of enzymes for which structural and mechanistic data urges. The three-dimensional structures of M. tuberculosis GpgS now determined provide such data for a novel enzyme family, clearly establishing the molecular determinants for substrate recognition and catalysis, while providing an

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase: structure of a key enzyme in methylglucose lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Empadinhas, Nuno; Albuquerque, Luciana; Sá-Moura, Bebiana; da Costa, Milton S; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis constitutes today a serious threat to human health worldwide, aggravated by the increasing number of identified multi-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, its causative agent, as well as by the lack of development of novel mycobactericidal compounds for the last few decades. The increased resilience of this pathogen is due, to a great extent, to its complex, polysaccharide-rich, and unusually impermeable cell wall. The synthesis of this essential structure is still poorly understood despite the fact that enzymes involved in glycosidic bond synthesis represent more than 1% of all M. tuberculosis ORFs identified to date. One of them is GpgS, a retaining glycosyltransferase (GT) with low sequence homology to any other GTs of known structure, which has been identified in two species of mycobacteria and shown to be essential for the survival of M. tuberculosis. To further understand the biochemical properties of M. tuberculosis GpgS, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the apo enzyme, as well as of its ternary complex with UDP and 3-phosphoglycerate, by X-ray crystallography, to a resolution of 2.5 and 2.7 A, respectively. GpgS, the first enzyme from the newly established GT-81 family to be structurally characterized, displays a dimeric architecture with an overall fold similar to that of other GT-A-type glycosyltransferases. These three-dimensional structures provide a molecular explanation for the enzyme's preference for UDP-containing donor substrates, as well as for its glucose versus mannose discrimination, and uncover the structural determinants for acceptor substrate selectivity. Glycosyltransferases constitute a growing family of enzymes for which structural and mechanistic data urges. The three-dimensional structures of M. tuberculosis GpgS now determined provide such data for a novel enzyme family, clearly establishing the molecular determinants for substrate recognition and catalysis, while providing an experimental

  4. The defective phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase in a temperature-sensitive prs-2 mutant of Escherichia coli is compensated by increased enzyme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, D A; Switzer, R L; Hove-Jensen, B

    1996-02-01

    An Escherichia coli strain which is temperature-sensitive for growth due to a mutation (prs-2) causing a defective phosphoribosyl diphosphate (PRPP) synthase has been characterized. The temperature-sensitive mutation was mapped to a 276 bp HindIII-BssHII DNA fragment located within the open reading frame specifying the PRPP synthase polypeptide. Cloning and sequencing of the mutant allele revealed two mutations. One, a G --> A transition, located in the ninth codon, was responsible for the temperature-conditional phenotype and resulted in a serine residue at this position. The wild-type codon at this position specified a glycine residue that is conserved among PRPP synthases across a broad phylogenetic range. Cells harbouring the glycine-to-serine alteration specified by a plasmid contained approximately 50% of the PRPP synthase activity of cells harbouring a plasmid-borne wild-type allele, both grown at 25 degrees C. The mutant enzyme had nearly normal heat stability, as long as it was synthesized at 25 degrees C. In contrast, there was hardly any PRPP synthase activity or anti-PRPP synthase antibody cross-reactive material present in cells harbouring the glycine to serine alteration following temperature shift to 42 degrees C. The other mutation was a C --> T transition located 39 bp upstream of the G --> A mutation, i.e. outside the coding sequence and close to the Shine-Dalgarno sequence. Cells harbouring only the C --> T mutation in a plasmid contained approximately three times as much PRPP synthase activity as a strain harbouring a plasmid-borne wild-type prs allele. In cells harbouring both mutations, the C --> T mutation appeared to compensate for the G --> A mutation by increasing the amount of a partially defective enzyme at the permissive temperature.

  5. Functional and Structural Characterization of a (+)-Limonene Synthase from Citrus sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morehouse, Benjamin R; Kumar, Ramasamy P; Matos, Jason O; Olsen, Sarah Naomi; Entova, Sonya; Oprian, Daniel D

    2017-03-28

    Terpenes make up the largest and most diverse class of natural compounds and have important commercial and medical applications. Limonene is a cyclic monoterpene (C 10 ) present in nature as two enantiomers, (+) and (-), which are produced by different enzymes. The mechanism of production of the (-)-enantiomer has been studied in great detail, but to understand how enantiomeric selectivity is achieved in this class of enzymes, it is important to develop a thorough biochemical description of enzymes that generate (+)-limonene, as well. Here we report the first cloning and biochemical characterization of a (+)-limonene synthase from navel orange (Citrus sinensis). The enzyme obeys classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics and produces exclusively the (+)-enantiomer. We have determined the crystal structure of the apoprotein in an "open" conformation at 2.3 Å resolution. Comparison with the structure of (-)-limonene synthase (Mentha spicata), which is representative of a fully closed conformation (Protein Data Bank entry 2ONG ), reveals that the short H-α1 helix moves nearly 5 Å inward upon substrate binding, and a conserved Tyr flips to point its hydroxyl group into the active site.

  6. A trehalose 6-phosphate synthase gene of the hemocytes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus: cloning, the expression, its enzyme activity and relationship to hemolymph trehalose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J Sook

    2008-12-12

    Trehalose in ectoderms functions in energy metabolism and protection in extreme environmental conditions. We structurally characterized trehalose 6-phosphate synthase (TPS) from hemocytes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. C. sapidus Hemo TPS (CasHemoTPS), like insect TPS, encodes both TPS and trehalose phosphate phosphatase domains. Trehalose seems to be a major sugar, as it shows higher levels than does glucose in hemocytes and hemolymph. Increases in HemoTPS expression, TPS enzyme activity in hemocytes, and hemolymph trehalose levels were determined 24 h after lipopolysaccharide challenge, suggesting that both TPS and TPP domains of CasHemoTPS are active and functional. The TPS gene has a wide tissue distribution in C. sapidus, suggesting multiple biosynthetic sites. A correlation between TPS activity in hemocytes and hemolymph trehalose levels was found during the molt cycle. The current study provides the first evidence of presence of trehalose in hemocytes and TPS in tissues of C. sapidus and implicates its functional role in energy metabolism and physiological adaptation.

  7. Modeling functional changes to Escherichia coli thymidylate synthase upon single residue replacements: a structure-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Masso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli thymidylate synthase (TS is an enzyme that is indispensable to DNA synthesis and cell division, as it provides the only de novo source of dTMP by catalyzing the reductive methylation of dUMP, thus making it a key target for chemotherapeutic agents. High resolution X-ray crystallographic structures are available for TS and, owing to its relatively small size, successful experimental mutagenesis studies have been conducted on the enzyme. In this study, an in silico mutagenesis technique is used to investigate the effects of single amino acid substitutions in TS on enzymatic activity, one that employs the TS protein structure as well as a knowledge-based, four-body statistical potential. For every single residue TS variant, this approach yields both a global structural perturbation score and a set of local environmental perturbation scores that characterize the mutated position as well as all structurally neighboring residues. Global scores for the TS variants are capable of uniquely characterizing groups of residue positions in the enzyme according to their physicochemical, functional, or structural properties. Additionally, these global scores elucidate a statistically significant structure–function relationship among a collection of 372 single residue TS variants whose activity levels have been experimentally determined. Predictive models of TS variant activity are subsequently trained on this dataset of experimental mutants, whose respective feature vectors encode information regarding the mutated position as well as its six nearest residue neighbors in the TS structure, including their environmental perturbation scores.

  8. Structure, function and regulation of the enzymes in the starch biosynthetic pathway.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Jim

    2013-11-30

    structure of ADP- Glucose pyrophosphorylase from potato in its inhibited conformation, and bound to both ATP and ADP-glucose. In addition, we have determined the first structure of glycogen synthase in its "closed", catalytically active conformation bound to ADP-glucose. We also determined the structure of glycogen synthase bound to malto-oligosaccharides, showing for the first time that an enzyme in the starch biosynthetic pathway recognizes glucans not just in its active site but on binding sites on the surface of the enzyme ten’s of Angstroms from the active site. In addition our structure of a glycogen branching enzyme bound to malto-oligosaccharides identified seven distinct binding sites distributed about the surface of the enzyme. We will now determine the function of these sites to get a molecular-level picture of exactly how these enzymes interact with their polymeric substrates and confer specificity leading to the complex structure of the starch granule. We will extend our studies to other isoforms of the enzymes, to understand how their structures give rise to their distinct function. Our goal is to understand what accounts for the various functional differences between SS and SBE isoforms at a molecular level.

  9. Gene identification and functional analysis of methylcitrate synthase in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Honda, Yuki; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2013-01-01

    Methylcitrate synthase (EC 2.3.3.5; MCS) is a key enzyme of the methylcitric acid cycle localized in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells and related to propionic acid metabolism. In this study, cloning of the gene mcsA encoding MCS and heterologous expression of it in Escherichia coli were performed for functional analysis of the MCS of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L. Only one copy of mcsA (1,495 bp) exists in the A. niger WU-2223L chromosome. It encodes a 51-kDa polypeptide consisting of 465 amino acids containing mitochondrial targeting signal peptides. Purified recombinant MCS showed not only MCS activity (27.6 U/mg) but also citrate synthase (EC 2.3.3.1; CS) activity (26.8 U/mg). For functional analysis of MCS, mcsA disruptant strain DMCS-1, derived from A. niger WU-2223L, was constructed. Although A. niger WU-2223L showed growth on propionate as sole carbon source, DMCS-1 showed no growth. These results suggest that MCS is an essential enzyme in propionic acid metabolism, and that the methylcitric acid cycle operates functionally in A. niger WU-2223L. To determine whether MCS makes a contribution to citric acid production, citric acid production tests on DMCS-1 were performed. The amount of citric acid produced from glucose consumed by DMCS-1 in citric acid production medium over 12 d of cultivation was on the same level to that by WU-2223L. Thus it was found that MCS made no contribution to citric acid production from glucose in A. niger WU-2223L, although MCS showed CS activity.

  10. Cloning and Functional Characterization of Cycloartenol Synthase from the Red Seaweed Laurencia dendroidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegario, Gabriela; Pollier, Jacob; Arendt, Philipp; de Oliveira, Louisi Souza; Thompson, Cristiane; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Goossens, Alain; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2016-01-01

    The red seaweed Laurencia dendroidea belongs to the Rhodophyta, a phylum of eukaryotic algae that is widely distributed across the oceans and that constitute an important source of bioactive specialized metabolites. Laurencia species have been studied since 1950 and were found to contain a plethora of specialized metabolites, mainly halogenated sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenes that possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological and ecological activities. The first committed step in the biosynthesis of triterpenes is the cyclization of 2,3-oxidosqualene, an enzymatic reaction carried out by oxidosqualene cyclases (OSCs), giving rise to a broad range of different compounds, such as the sterol precursors cycloartenol and lanosterol, or triterpene precursors such as cucurbitadienol and β-amyrin. Here, we cloned and characterized the first OSC from a red seaweed. The OSC gene was identified through mining of a L. dendroidea transcriptome dataset and subsequently cloned and heterologously expressed in yeast for functional characterization, which indicated that the corresponding enzyme cyclizes 2,3-oxidosqualene to the sterol precursor cycloartenol. Accordingly, the gene was named L. dendroidea cycloartenol synthase (LdCAS). A phylogenetic analysis using OSCs genes from plants, fungi and algae revealed that LdCAS grouped together with OSCs from other red algae, suggesting that cycloartenol could be the common product of the OSC in red seaweeds. Furthermore, profiling of L. dendroidea revealed cholesterol as the major sterol accumulating in this species, implicating red seaweeds contain a 'hybrid' sterol synthesis pathway in which the phytosterol precursor cycloartenol is converted into the major animal sterol cholesterol.

  11. Enzyme That Makes You Cry–Crystal Structure of Lachrymatory Factor Synthase from Allium cepa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvaroli, Josie A. [Department; Pleshinger, Matthew J. [Department; College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, United States; Banerjee, Surajit [Department; Northeastern; Kiser, Philip D. [Department; Research; Cleveland; Golczak, Marcin [Department; Cleveland

    2017-07-26

    The biochemical pathway that gives onions their savor is part of the chemical warfare against microbes and animals. This defense mechanism involves formation of a volatile lachrymatory factor (LF) ((Z)-propanethial S-oxide) that causes familiar eye irritation associated with onion chopping. LF is produced in a reaction catalyzed by lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS). The principles by which LFS facilitates conversion of a sulfenic acid substrate into LF have been difficult to experimentally examine owing to the inherent substrate reactivity and lability of LF. To shed light on the mechanism of LF production in the onion, we solved crystal structures of LFS in an apo-form and in complex with a substrate analogue, crotyl alcohol. The enzyme closely resembles the helix-grip fold characteristic for plant representatives of the START (star-related lipid transfer) domain-containing protein superfamily. By comparing the structures of LFS to that of the abscisic acid receptor, PYL10, a representative of the START protein superfamily, we elucidated structural adaptations underlying the catalytic activity of LFS. We also delineated the architecture of the active site, and based on the orientation of the ligand, we propose a mechanism of catalysis that involves sequential proton transfer accompanied by formation of a carbanion intermediate. These findings reconcile chemical and biochemical information regarding thioaldehyde S-oxide formation and close a long-lasting gap in understanding of the mechanism responsible for LF production in the onion.

  12. Site-directed Mutagenesis Switching a Dimethylallyl Tryptophan Synthase to a Specific Tyrosine C3-Prenylating Enzyme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Aili; Zocher, Georg; Stec, Edyta; Stehle, Thilo; Li, Shu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The tryptophan prenyltransferases FgaPT2 and 7-DMATS (7-dimethylallyl tryptophan synthase) from Aspergillus fumigatus catalyze C4- and C7-prenylation of the indole ring, respectively. 7-DMATS was found to accept l-tyrosine as substrate as well and converted it to an O-prenylated derivative. An acceptance of l-tyrosine by FgaPT2 was also observed in this study. Interestingly, isolation and structure elucidation revealed the identification of a C3-prenylated l-tyrosine as enzyme product. Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis led to creation of a mutant FgaPT2_K174F, which showed much higher specificity toward l-tyrosine than l-tryptophan. Its catalytic efficiency toward l-tyrosine was found to be 4.9-fold in comparison with that of non-mutated FgaPT2, whereas the activity toward l-tryptophan was less than 0.4% of that of the wild-type. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on an enzymatic C-prenylation of l-tyrosine as free amino acid and altering the substrate preference of a prenyltransferase by mutagenesis. PMID:25477507

  13. Multiple complexes of nitrogen assimilatory enzymes in spinach chloroplasts: possible mechanisms for the regulation of enzyme function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Kimata-Ariga

    Full Text Available Assimilation of nitrogen is an essential biological process for plant growth and productivity. Here we show that three chloroplast enzymes involved in nitrogen assimilation, glutamate synthase (GOGAT, nitrite reductase (NiR and glutamine synthetase (GS, separately assemble into distinct protein complexes in spinach chloroplasts, as analyzed by western blots under blue native electrophoresis (BN-PAGE. GOGAT and NiR were present not only as monomers, but also as novel complexes with a discrete size (730 kDa and multiple sizes (>120 kDa, respectively, in the stromal fraction of chloroplasts. These complexes showed the same mobility as each monomer on two-dimensional (2D SDS-PAGE after BN-PAGE. The 730 kDa complex containing GOGAT dissociated into monomers, and multiple complexes of NiR reversibly converted into monomers, in response to the changes in the pH of the stromal solvent. On the other hand, the bands detected by anti-GS antibody were present not only in stroma as a conventional decameric holoenzyme complex of 420 kDa, but also in thylakoids as a novel complex of 560 kDa. The polypeptide in the 560 kDa complex showed slower mobility than that of the 420 kDa complex on the 2D SDS-PAGE, implying the assembly of distinct GS isoforms or a post-translational modification of the same GS protein. The function of these multiple complexes was evaluated by in-gel GS activity under native conditions and by the binding ability of NiR and GOGAT with their physiological electron donor, ferredoxin. The results indicate that these multiplicities in size and localization of the three nitrogen assimilatory enzymes may be involved in the physiological regulation of their enzyme function, in a similar way as recently described cases of carbon assimilatory enzymes.

  14. Intracellular hydrogen peroxide and superoxide poison 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase, the first committed enzyme in the aromatic biosynthetic pathway of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, Jason M; Gu, Mianzhi; Imlay, James A

    2014-06-01

    In Escherichia coli, aromatic compound biosynthesis is the process that has shown the greatest sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide stress. This pathway has long been recognized to be sensitive to superoxide as well, but the molecular target was unknown. Feeding experiments indicated that the bottleneck lies early in the pathway, and the suppressive effects of fur mutations and manganese supplementation suggested the involvement of a metalloprotein. The 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAHP synthase) activity catalyzes the first step in the pathway, and it is provided by three isozymes known to rely upon a divalent metal. This activity progressively declined when cells were stressed with either oxidant. The purified enzyme was activated more strongly by ferrous iron than by other metals, and only this metalloform could be inactivated by hydrogen peroxide or superoxide. We infer that iron is the prosthetic metal in vivo. Both oxidants displace the iron atom from the enzyme. In peroxide-stressed cells, the enzyme accumulated as an apoprotein, potentially with an oxidized cysteine residue. In superoxide-stressed cells, the enzyme acquired a nonactivating zinc ion in its active site, an apparent consequence of the repeated ejection of iron. Manganese supplementation protected the activity in both cases, which matches the ability of manganese to metallate the enzyme and to provide substantial oxidant-resistant activity. DAHP synthase thus belongs to a family of mononuclear iron-containing enzymes that are disabled by oxidative stress. To date, all the intracellular injuries caused by physiological doses of these reactive oxygen species have arisen from the oxidation of reduced iron centers.

  15. Acute intermittent porphyria: A single-base deletion and a nonsense mutation in the human hydroxymethylbilane synthase gene, predicting truncations of the enzyme polypeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, G.L.; Astrin, K.H.; Desnick, R.J. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-08-28

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal-dominant inborn error of metabolism that results from the half-normal activity of the third enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMB-synthase). AIP is an ecogenetic condition, since the life-threatening acute attacks are precipitated by various factors, including drugs, alcohol, fasting, and certain hormones. Biochemical diagnosis is problematic, and the identification of mutations in the HMB-synthase gene provides accurate detection of presymptomatic heterozygotes, permitting avoidance of the acute precipitating factors. By direct solid-phase sequencing, two mutations causing AIP were identified, an adenine deletion at position 629 in exon 11(629delA), which alters the reading frame and predicts premature truncation of the enzyme protein after amino acid 255, and a nonsense mutation in exon 12 (R225X). These mutations were confirmed by either restriction enzyme analysis or family studies of symptomatic patients, permitting accurate presymptomatic diagnosis of affected relatives. 29 refs., 2 figs.

  16. A functional promoter polymorphism of neuronal nitric oxide synthase moderates prefrontal functioning in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Andreas; Schecklmann, Martin; Eirich, Elisa; Jacob, Christian P; Jarczok, Tomasz A; Kittel-Schneider, Sarah; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Ehlis, Ann-Christine

    2011-08-01

    Cognitive deficits in tasks involving the prefrontal cortex such as working memory or verbal fluency are a key component of schizophrenia. This led to the hypofrontality hypothesis of schizophrenia, which is widely accepted even though molecular underpinnings are elusive. While disturbances of glutamatergic neurotransmission might play a role, other components have rarely been investigated. Recently, the promoter region of nitric oxide (NO) synthase-I (NOS-I, encoded by the gene NOS1), impacting on prefrontal glutamate transmission, has repeatedly been associated with schizophrenia. We thus tested whether an associated schizophrenia risk variant (rs41279104), leading to reduced expression of the transcript, influences prefrontal brain functioning. Forty-three patients suffering from chronic schizophrenia and 44 controls were genotyped for NOS1 rs41279104 and investigated by means of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), while completing a working-memory task (2-back test) and a verbal fluency test (VFT). After matching for genotype, behavioural and brain activation data of 26 patients and 28 comparable controls were correlated to rs41279104. Healthy controls showed significant activation of large parts of the lateral prefrontal cortex during both tasks, whereas task-related changes in oxygenation were significantly reduced in patients. Schizophrenia patients also performed worse in both tasks. The NOS1 schizophrenia risk genotype rs41279104 AA/AG was associated with slower reaction time in the 2-back task, as well as with reduced right-hemispheric activation of the frontal cortex for VFT in patients only. Our fNIRS data extend previous studies suggesting disturbed prefrontal functioning in schizophrenia and suggest that genetic variation of NOS1 has a role in cognitive dysfunction, probably by mediating glutamatergic tone.

  17. Measuring the activity of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, the first enzyme in the MEP pathway, in plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Louwrance P; Phillips, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The first enzyme in the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway is 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) synthase (DXS). As such this enzyme is considered to be important in the control of plastidial isoprenoid production. Measuring the activity of DXS in plant extracts is therefore crucial to understanding the regulation of the MEP pathway. Due to the relatively low amounts of DXS, the activity of this enzyme can only be measured using highly sensitive analytical equipment. Here, a method is described to determine the DXS enzyme activity in a crude plant extract, by measuring DXP production directly using high performance liquid chromatography linked to a tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometry detector (LC-MS/MS).

  18. Targeted quantification of functional enzyme dynamics in environmental samples for microbially mediated biogeochemical processes: Targeted quantification of functional enzyme dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minjing [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 People' s Republic of China; Gao, Yuqian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Qian, Wei-Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Liu, Yuanyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Nelson, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Nicora, Carrie D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Resch, Charles T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Thompson, Christopher [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Yan, Sen [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 People' s Republic of China; Fredrickson, James K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Zachara, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen 518055 People' s Republic of China

    2017-07-13

    Microbially mediated biogeochemical processes are catalyzed by enzymes that control the transformation of carbon, nitrogen, and other elements in environment. The dynamic linkage between enzymes and biogeochemical species transformation has, however, rarely been investigated because of the lack of analytical approaches to efficiently and reliably quantify enzymes and their dynamics in soils and sediments. Herein, we developed a signature peptide-based technique for sensitively quantifying dissimilatory and assimilatory enzymes using nitrate-reducing enzymes in a hyporheic zone sediment as an example. Moreover, the measured changes in enzyme concentration were found to correlate with the nitrate reduction rate in a way different from that inferred from biogeochemical models based on biomass or functional genes as surrogates for functional enzymes. This phenomenon has important implications for understanding and modeling the dynamics of microbial community functions and biogeochemical processes in environments. Our results also demonstrate the importance of enzyme quantification for the identification and interrogation of those biogeochemical processes with low metabolite concentrations as a result of faster enzyme-catalyzed consumption of metabolites than their production. The dynamic enzyme behaviors provide a basis for the development of enzyme-based models to describe the relationship between the microbial community and biogeochemical processes.

  19. Enzymes: An integrated view of structure, dynamics and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Pratul K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microbes utilize enzymes to perform a variety of functions. Enzymes are biocatalysts working as highly efficient machines at the molecular level. In the past, enzymes have been viewed as static entities and their function has been explained on the basis of direct structural interactions between the enzyme and the substrate. A variety of experimental and computational techniques, however, continue to reveal that proteins are dynamically active machines, with various parts exhibiting internal motions at a wide range of time-scales. Increasing evidence also indicates that these internal protein motions play a role in promoting protein function such as enzyme catalysis. Moreover, the thermodynamical fluctuations of the solvent, surrounding the protein, have an impact on internal protein motions and, therefore, on enzyme function. In this review, we describe recent biochemical and theoretical investigations of internal protein dynamics linked to enzyme catalysis. In the enzyme cyclophilin A, investigations have lead to the discovery of a network of protein vibrations promoting catalysis. Cyclophilin A catalyzes peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerization in a variety of peptide and protein substrates. Recent studies of cyclophilin A are discussed in detail and other enzymes (dihydrofolate reductase and liver alcohol dehydrogenase where similar discoveries have been reported are also briefly discussed. The detailed characterization of the discovered networks indicates that protein dynamics plays a role in rate-enhancement achieved by enzymes. An integrated view of enzyme structure, dynamics and function have wide implications in understanding allosteric and co-operative effects, as well as protein engineering of more efficient enzymes and novel drug design.

  20. Leveraging structure for enzyme function prediction: methods, opportunities, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Matthew P; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Zhao, Suwen; Tian, Boxue

    2014-08-01

    The rapid growth of the number of protein sequences that can be inferred from sequenced genomes presents challenges for function assignment, because only a small fraction (currently predict functions of uncharacterized proteins. Recently, there has been significant progress in using protein structures as an additional source of information to infer aspects of enzyme function, which is the focus of this review. Successful application of these approaches has led to the identification of novel metabolites, enzyme activities, and biochemical pathways. We discuss opportunities to elucidate systematically protein domains of unknown function, orphan enzyme activities, dead-end metabolites, and pathways in secondary metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Respiratory Muscle Training Improves Diaphragm Citrate Synthase Activity and Hemodynamic Function in Rats with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Rodrigo Boemo; Bertagnolli, Mariane; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Arena, Ross; Lago, Pedro Dal

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced respiratory muscle strength in patients with heart failure positively alters the clinical trajectory of heart failure. In an experimental model, respiratory muscle training in rats with heart failure has been shown to improve cardiopulmonary function through mechanisms yet to be entirely elucidated. The present report aimed to evaluate the respiratory muscle training effects in diaphragm citrate synthase activity and hemodynamic function in rats with heart failure. Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: sedentary sham (Sed-Sham, n=8), trained sham (RMT-Sham, n=8), sedentary heart failure (Sed-HF, n=7) and trained heart failure (RMT-HF, n=7). The animals were submitted to a RMT protocol performed 30 minutes a day, 5 days/week, for 6 weeks. In rats with heart failure, respiratory muscle training decreased pulmonary congestion and right ventricular hypertrophy. Deleterious alterations in left ventricular pressures, as well as left ventricular contractility and relaxation, were assuaged by respiratory muscle training in heart failure rats. Citrate synthase activity, which was significantly reduced in heart failure rats, was preserved by respiratory muscle training. Additionally, a negative correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular end diastolic pressure and positive correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular systolic pressure. Respiratory muscle training produces beneficial adaptations in the diaphragmatic musculature, which is linked to improvements in left ventricular hemodynamics and blood pressure in heart failure rats. The RMT-induced improvements in cardiac architecture and the oxidative capacity of the diaphragm may improve the clinical trajectory of patients with heart failure.

  2. Functional Characterization of Nine Norway Spruce TPS Genes and Evolution of Gymnosperm Terpene Synthases of the TPS-d Subfamily1[w

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Diane M.; Fäldt, Jenny; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    Constitutive and induced terpenoids are important defense compounds for many plants against potential herbivores and pathogens. In Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst), treatment with methyl jasmonate induces complex chemical and biochemical terpenoid defense responses associated with traumatic resin duct development in stems and volatile terpenoid emissions in needles. The cloning of (+)-3-carene synthase was the first step in characterizing this system at the molecular genetic level. Here we report the isolation and functional characterization of nine additional terpene synthase (TPS) cDNAs from Norway spruce. These cDNAs encode four monoterpene synthases, myrcene synthase, (−)-limonene synthase, (−)-α/β-pinene synthase, and (−)-linalool synthase; three sesquiterpene synthases, longifolene synthase, E,E-α-farnesene synthase, and E-α-bisabolene synthase; and two diterpene synthases, isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase, each with a unique product profile. To our knowledge, genes encoding isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and longifolene synthase have not been previously described, and this linalool synthase is the first described from a gymnosperm. These functionally diverse TPS account for much of the structural diversity of constitutive and methyl jasmonate-induced terpenoids in foliage, xylem, bark, and volatile emissions from needles of Norway spruce. Phylogenetic analyses based on the inclusion of these TPS into the TPS-d subfamily revealed that functional specialization of conifer TPS occurred before speciation of Pinaceae. Furthermore, based on TPS enclaves created by distinct branching patterns, the TPS-d subfamily is divided into three groups according to sequence similarities and functional assessment. Similarities of TPS evolution in angiosperms and modeling of TPS protein structures are discussed. PMID:15310829

  3. Expression and developmental function of the 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthase2 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakozaki, Hirokazu; Park, Jong-In; Endo, Makoto; Takada, Yoshinobu; Kazama, Tomohiko; Takeda, Yoshimitsu; Suzuki, Go; Kawagishi-Kobayashi, Makiko; Watanabe, Masao

    2008-04-01

    The 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) II is a fatty-acid-related enzyme which catalyzes the elongation of 16:0-acyl carrier protein (ACP) to 18:0-ACP in plastids. The fatty acid biosynthesis 1-1 (fab1-1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is partially deficient in its activity of Arabidopsis thaliana 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthase 2 (AtKAS2), and its phenotype has been intensively studied in connection with the chilling resistance and fatty acid composition. In this study, we used the T-DNA insertion mutant of AtKAS2 to examine its possible role in plant development. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR showed that the AtKAS2 gene was expressed in various plant organs, except for roots, and was highly expressed in siliques. The fusion of beta-glucuronidase (GUS) to the AtKAS2 promoter demonstrated that the promoter was active in various tissues such as embryos, stomatal guard cells, inflorescences and pollen grains. We were not able to identify atkas2 homozygous mutant adult plants in heterozygous mutant progeny. Phenotypic and genetic analyses showed that disruption of the AtKAS2 by T-DNA insertion caused embryo lethality, and the development of the embryos was arrested at the globular stage. Taken together, our results suggest that AtKAS2 is required for embryo development in Arabidopsis during the transition from the globular to the heart stage.

  4. Functional replacement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fatty acid synthase with a bacterial type II system allows flexible product profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Moya, Ruben; Leber, Christopher; Cardenas, Javier; Da Silva, Nancy A

    2015-12-01

    The native yeast type I fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a complex, rigid enzyme, and challenging to engineer for the production of medium- or short-chain fatty acids. Introduction of a type II FAS is a promising alternative as it allows expression control for each discrete enzyme and the addition of heterologous thioesterases. In this study, the native Saccharomyces cerevisiae FAS was functionally replaced by the Escherichia coli type II FAS (eFAS) system. The E. coli acpS + acpP (together), fabB, fabD, fabG, fabH, fabI, fabZ, and tesA were expressed in individual S. cerevisiae strains, and enzyme activity was confirmed by in vitro activity assays. Eight genes were then integrated into the yeast genome, while tesA or an alternate thioesterase gene, fatB from Ricinus communis or TEII from Rattus novergicus, was expressed from a multi-copy plasmid. Native FAS activity was eliminated by knocking out the yeast FAS2 gene. The strains expressing only the eFAS as de novo fatty acid source grew without fatty acid supplementation demonstrating that this type II FAS is able to functionally replace the native yeast FAS. The engineered strain expressing the R. communis fatB thioesterase increased total fatty acid titer 1.7-fold and shifted the fatty acid profile towards C14 production, increasing it from <1% in the native strain to more than 30% of total fatty acids, and reducing C18 production from 39% to 8%. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans glutamylating enzymes function redundantly in male mating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G. Chawla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microtubule glutamylation is an important modulator of microtubule function and has been implicated in the regulation of centriole stability, neuronal outgrowth and cilia motility. Glutamylation of the microtubules is catalyzed by a family of tubulin tyrosine ligase-like (TTLL enzymes. Analysis of individual TTLL enzymes has led to an understanding of their specific functions, but how activities of the TTLL enzymes are coordinated to spatially and temporally regulate glutamylation remains relatively unexplored. We have undertaken an analysis of the glutamylating TTLL enzymes in C. elegans. We find that although all five TTLL enzymes are expressed in the embryo and adult worm, loss of individual enzymes does not perturb microtubule function in embryonic cell divisions. Moreover, normal dye-filling, osmotic avoidance and male mating behavior indicate the presence of functional amphid cilia and male-specific neurons. A ttll-4(tm3310; ttll-11(tm4059; ttll-5(tm3360 triple mutant, however, shows reduced male mating efficiency due to a defect in the response step, suggesting that these three enzymes function redundantly, and that glutamylation is required for proper function of the male-specific neurons.

  6. Structure and function of enzymes involved in the anaerobic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the recent past, extensive structural and biochemical studies have been carried out on these enzymes by various groups. Besides detailed structural and functional insights, these studies have also shown the similarities and differences between the other related enzymes present in the metabolic network. In this paper, we ...

  7. Mechanical Control of ATP Synthase Function: Activation Energy Difference between Tight and Loose Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás

    2010-01-26

    Despite exhaustive chemical and crystal structure studies, the mechanistic details of how FoF1-ATP synthase can convert mechanical energy to chemical, producing ATP, are still not fully understood. On the basis of quantum mechanical calculations using a recent highresolution X-ray structure, we conclude that formation of the P-O bond may be achieved through a transition state (TS) with a planar PO3 - ion. Surprisingly, there is a more than 40 kJ/mol difference between barrier heights of the loose and tight binding sites of the enzyme. This indicates that even a relatively small change in active site conformation, induced by the γ-subunit rotation, may effectively block the back reaction in βTP and, thus, promote ATP. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  8. Function, structure, and stability of enzymes confined in agarose gels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Kunkel

    Full Text Available Research over the past few decades has attempted to answer how proteins behave in molecularly confined or crowded environments when compared to dilute buffer solutions. This information is vital to understanding in vivo protein behavior, as the average spacing between macromolecules in the cell cytosol is much smaller than the size of the macromolecules themselves. In our study, we attempt to address this question using three structurally and functionally different model enzymes encapsulated in agarose gels of different porosities. Our studies reveal that under standard buffer conditions, the initial reaction rates of the agarose-encapsulated enzymes are lower than that of the solution phase enzymes. However, the encapsulated enzymes retain a higher percentage of their activity in the presence of denaturants. Moreover, the concentration of agarose used for encapsulation had a significant effect on the enzyme functional stability; enzymes encapsulated in higher percentages of agarose were more stable than the enzymes encapsulated in lower percentages of agarose. Similar results were observed through structural measurements of enzyme denaturation using an 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid fluorescence assay. Our work demonstrates the utility of hydrogels to study protein behavior in highly confined environments similar to those present in vivo; furthermore, the enhanced stability of gel-encapsulated enzymes may find use in the delivery of therapeutic proteins, as well as the design of novel strategies for biohybrid medical devices.

  9. Enzyme technology for precision functional food ingredient processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anne S.

    2010-01-01

    modification of potato starch processing residues. Such targeted enzyme-catalyzed reactions provide new invention opportunities for designing functional foods with significant health benefits. The provision of well-defined naturally structured compounds can, moreover, assist in obtaining the much...

  10. Albino T-DNA tomato mutant reveals a key function of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS1) in plant development and survival

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manuel García-alcázar; Estela Giménez; Benito Pineda; Carmen Capel; Begoña García-sogo; Sibilla Sánchez; Fernando J Yuste-lisbona; Trinidad Angosto; Juan Capel; Vicente Moreno; Rafael Lozano

    2017-01-01

    .... In the non-mevalonate pathway (MEP), the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase 1 (DXS1) enzyme has been postulated to catalyze the rate-limiting step in the formation of plastidial isoprenoids...

  11. Gene polymorphism of endothelial NO-synthase, angiotensin-converting enzyme and receptors of angiotensin II type 1 in patients with coronary artery disease and type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakovleva L.M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the clinical manifestations of coronary artery disease (CAD in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM II type and the possible association of mutations in the genes of endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE and receptor of angiotensin II type 1 (AT2R1 with the development of type II diabetes in these patients. Mate¬rials and methods. The study involved 318 patients with CAD, of whom 54 (17,0% patients had type II DM and 264 (83,0% patients -without diabetes. Study of allelic polymorphism of T-786S of eNOS gene promoter, insertion-deletion (I/D polymorphism of ACE gene and polymorphism A1166S of AT2R1 gene was performed by polymerase chain reaction. Results. In patients with CAD and DM type II such risk factors as hypertension, obesity, family history with early onset of cardiovascular disease were significantly more common; CAD manifestation occurs at a younger age, myocardial ischemia more often has silent nature. In the presence of type II DM, coronary artery lesions were of diffuse and multivessel character, other vascular pools are often involved in the atherosclerotic process. An independent as¬sociation of type II diabetes with hypertension, obesity, and CC genotype of eNOS gene T-786S polymorphism was identified in patients with CAD. Negative independent influence of ACE gene I/D polymorphism of D allele and AT2R1 gene A1166S polymorphism C allele on renal function in patients with CAD and type II DM was proved.

  12. Reduction of hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in the colon of patients with Hirschsprungs's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomuschat, Christian; O'Donnell, Anne Marie; Coyle, David; Puri, Prem

    2017-06-23

    Hirschsprung's associated enterocolitis (HAEC) is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in Hirschsprung's Disease (HSCR). The pathogenesis of HAEC is poorly understood. In recent years, there is increasing evidence that a compromised intestinal barrier function plays a major role in the pathogenesis of HAEC. Hydrogen sulfide, synthesized from L-cysteine by two key enzymes, cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lysase (CSE) is reported to play a key role in regulating gastrointestinal motility and promoting resolution of inflammation. We designed this study to test the hypothesis that CBS and CSE expression is altered in the colon of patients with HSCR. We investigated CBS and CSE protein expression in both the aganglionic and ganglionic regions of HSCR patients (n=10) versus healthy control colon (n=10). Protein distribution was assessed by using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Gene and protein expression was quantified using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Western blot analysis, and densitometry. qPCR and Western blot analysis revealed that CBS and CSE are expressed in the normal human colon. CBS and CSE expression was significantly decreased (p<0.003) in the ganglionic and aganglionic bowel in HSCR compared to controls. Confocal microscopy revealed that CBS and CSE expression in smooth muscles, interstitial cells of Cajal, platelet-derived growth factor-alpha receptor-positive cells, enteric neurons and colonic epithelium was markedly decreased in HSCR specimens compared to controls. We demonstrate for the first time the expression and distribution of CBS/CSE in patients with HSCR. The observed decreased expression of CBS and CSE may affect mucosal integrity and colonic contractility and thus render HSCR patients more susceptible to develop HAEC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification and functional analysis of the geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase gene (crtE) and phytoene synthase gene (crtB) for carotenoid biosynthesis in Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shota; Takaichi, Shinichi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Asahina, Masashi; Takahashi, Senji; Shinomura, Tomoko

    2016-01-05

    Euglena gracilis, a unicellular phytoflagellate within Euglenida, has attracted much attention as a potential feedstock for renewable energy production. In outdoor open-pond cultivation for biofuel production, excess direct sunlight can inhibit photosynthesis in this alga and decrease its productivity. Carotenoids play important roles in light harvesting during photosynthesis and offer photoprotection for certain non-photosynthetic and photosynthetic organisms including cyanobacteria, algae, and higher plants. Although, Euglenida contains β-carotene and xanthophylls (such as zeaxanthin, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin and 9'-cis neoxanthin), the pathway of carotenoid biosynthesis has not been elucidated. To clarify the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in E. gracilis, we searched for the putative E. gracilis geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) synthase gene (crtE) and phytoene synthase gene (crtB) by tblastn searches from RNA-seq data and obtained their cDNAs. Complementation experiments in Escherichia coli with carotenoid biosynthetic genes of Pantoea ananatis showed that E. gracilis crtE (EgcrtE) and EgcrtB cDNAs encode GGPP synthase and phytoene synthase, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the predicted proteins of EgcrtE and EgcrtB belong to a clade distinct from a group of GGPP synthase and phytoene synthase proteins, respectively, of algae and higher plants. In addition, we investigated the effects of light stress on the expression of crtE and crtB in E. gracilis. Continuous illumination at 460 or 920 μmol m(-2) s(-1) at 25 °C decreased the E. gracilis cell concentration by 28-40 % and 13-91 %, respectively, relative to the control light intensity (55 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). When grown under continuous light at 920 μmol m(-2) s(-1), the algal cells turned reddish-orange and showed a 1.3-fold increase in the crtB expression. In contrast, EgcrtE expression was not significantly affected by the light-stress treatments examined. We identified genes

  14. Functional roles of slow enzyme conformational changes in network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhanghan; Xing, Jianhua

    2012-09-05

    Extensive studies from different fields reveal that many macromolecules, especially enzymes, show slow transitions among different conformations. This phenomenon is named such things as dynamic disorder, heterogeneity, hysteretic or mnemonic enzymes across these different fields, and has been directly demonstrated by single molecule enzymology and NMR studies recently. We analyzed enzyme slow conformational changes in the context of regulatory networks. A single enzymatic reaction with slow conformational changes can filter upstream network noises, and can either resonantly respond to the system stimulus at certain frequencies or respond adaptively for sustained input signals of the network fluctuations. It thus can serve as a basic functional motif with properties that are normally for larger intermolecular networks in the field of systems biology. We further analyzed examples including enzymes functioning against pH fluctuations, metabolic state change of Artemia embryos, and kinetic insulation of fluctuations in metabolic networks. The study also suggests that hysteretic enzymes may be building blocks of synthetic networks with various properties such as narrow-banded filtering. The work fills the missing gap between studies on enzyme biophysics and network level dynamics, and reveals that the coupling between the two is functionally important; it also suggests that the conformational dynamics of some enzymes may be evolutionally selected. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 2C-Methyl- D- erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a functional gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hitesh; Singh, Kashmir; Kumar, Sanjay

    2012-12-01

    Stevia [Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni)] is a perennial herb which accumulates sweet diterpenoid steviol glycosides (SGs) in its leaf tissue. SGs are synthesized by 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Of the various enzymes of the MEP pathway, 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase (MDS) (encoded by MDS) catalyzes the cyclization of 4-(cytidine 5' diphospho)-2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2-phosphate into 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate. Complementation of the MDS knockout mutant strain of Escherichia coli, EB370 with putative MDS of stevia (SrMDS) rescued the lethal mutant, suggesting SrMDS to be a functional gene. Experiments conducted in plant growth chamber and in the field suggested SrMDS to be a light regulated gene. Indole 3-acetic acid (IAA; 50, 100 μM) down-regulated the expression of SrMDS at 4 h of the treatment, whereas, abscisic acid did not modulate its expression. A high expression of SrMDS was observed during the light hours of the day as compared to the dark hours. The present work established functionality of SrMDS and showed the role of light and IAA in regulating expression of SrMDS.

  16. The structure of a ketoreductase determines the organization of the beta-carbon processing enzymes of modular polyketide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T; Stroud, Robert M

    2006-04-01

    The structure of the ketoreductase (KR) from the first module of the erythromycin synthase with NADPH bound was solved to 1.79 A resolution. The 51 kDa domain has two subdomains, each similar to a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) monomer. One subdomain has a truncated Rossmann fold and serves a purely structural role stabilizing the other subdomain, which catalyzes the reduction of the beta-carbonyl of a polyketide and possibly the epimerization of an alpha-substituent. The structure enabled us to define the domain boundaries of KR, the dehydratase (DH), and the enoylreductase (ER). It also constrains the three-dimensional organization of these domains within a module, revealing that KR does not make dimeric contacts across the 2-fold axis of the module. The quaternary structure elucidates how substrates are shuttled between the active sites of polyketide synthases (PKSs), as well as related fatty acid synthases (FASs), and suggests how domains can be swapped to make hybrid synthases that produce novel polyketides.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of terpene synthases in soybean: functional characterization of GmTPS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianyu; Huang, Fang; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Man; Zheng, Rui; Wang, Jiao; Yu, Deyue

    2014-07-01

    Terpenes (terpenoids or isoprenoids) constitute a large class of plant natural products and play numerous functional roles in primary and secondary metabolism as well as inecological interactions. This study presents a genomic analysis of 23 putative soybean (Glycine max) terpene synthase genes (GmTPSs) distributed over 10 of 20 chromosomes. The GmTPSs are grouped into six types based on gene architecture and sequence identity. Sequence alignment indicates that most GmTPSs contain the conserved aspartate-rich DDX2D motif, and two clades encoded by TPS-a and TPS-b contain variations of an arginine-rich RRX8W motif. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that GmTPSs were predominantly expressed in reproductive organs. Heterologous expression followed by enzymatic assay suggested that GmTPS3 functions as a geraniol synthase. We also generated transgenic tobacco plants ectopically expressing GmTPS3. In dual-choice feeding-preference and force-feeding assays, the transgenic tobacco lines expressing GmTPS3 exhibited enhanced resistance to cotton leafworms and an increased level of geraniol. Taken together, these data provide a comprehensive understanding of the TPS family in soybeans and suggest a promising approach to engineering transgenic plants with enhanced insect resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 7-Carboxy-7-deazaguanine Synthase: A Radical S -Adenosyl- l -methionine Enzyme with Polar Tendencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruender, Nathan A.; Grell, Tsehai A.J.; Dowling, Daniel P.; McCarty, Reid M.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Bandarian, Vahe (MIT); (Utah); (Ariz)

    2017-01-25

    Radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes are widely distributed and catalyze diverse reactions. SAM binds to the unique iron atom of a site-differentiated [4Fe-4S] cluster and is reductively cleaved to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical, which initiates turnover. 7-Carboxy-7-deazaguanine (CDG) synthase (QueE) catalyzes a key step in the biosynthesis of 7-deazapurine containing natural products. 6-Carboxypterin (6-CP), an oxidized analogue of the natural substrate 6-carboxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin (CPH4), is shown to be an alternate substrate for CDG synthase. Under reducing conditions that would promote the reductive cleavage of SAM, 6-CP is turned over to 6-deoxyadenosylpterin (6-dAP), presumably by radical addition of the 5'-deoxyadenosine followed by oxidative decarboxylation to the product. By contrast, in the absence of the strong reductant, dithionite, the carboxylate of 6-CP is esterified to generate 6-carboxypterin-5'-deoxyadenosyl ester (6-CP-dAdo ester). Structural studies with 6-CP and SAM also reveal electron density consistent with the ester product being formed in crystallo. The differential reactivity of 6-CP under reducing and nonreducing conditions highlights the ability of radical SAM enzymes to carry out both polar and radical transformations in the same active site.

  19. Investigating sesquiterpene biosynthesis in Ginkgo biloba: molecular cloning and functional characterization of (E,E)-farnesol and α-bisabolene synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Iffat; Wang, Mei; Zhao, Jianping; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Ali, Abbas; Baerson, Scott R; Techen, Natascha; Chappell, Joe; Khan, Ikhlas A; Pan, Zhiqiang

    2015-11-01

    Ginkgo biloba is one of the oldest living tree species and has been extensively investigated as a source of bioactive natural compounds, including bioactive flavonoids, diterpene lactones, terpenoids and polysaccharides which accumulate in foliar tissues. Despite this chemical diversity, relatively few enzymes associated with any biosynthetic pathway from ginkgo have been characterized to date. In the present work, predicted transcripts potentially encoding enzymes associated with the biosynthesis of diterpenoid and terpenoid compounds, including putative terpene synthases, were first identified by mining publicly-available G. biloba RNA-seq data sets. Recombinant enzyme studies with two of the TPS-like sequences led to the identification of GbTPS1 and GbTPS2, encoding farnesol and bisabolene synthases, respectively. Additionally, the phylogenetic analysis revealed the two terpene synthase genes as primitive genes that might have evolved from an ancestral diterpene synthase.

  20. REVIEW: Epistasis and dominance in the emergence of catalytic function as exemplified by the evolution of plant terpene synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Jitender; Faraldos, Juan A; O'Maille, Paul E

    2017-02-01

    Epistasis, the interaction between mutations and the genetic background, is a pervasive force in evolution that is difficult to predict yet derives from a simple principle - biological systems are interconnected. Therefore, one effect may be intimately linked to another, hence interdependent. Untangling epistatic interactions between and within genes is a vibrant area of research. Deriving a mechanistic understanding of epistasis is a major challenge. Particularly, elucidating how epistasis can attenuate the effects of otherwise dominant mutations that control phenotypes. Using the emergence of terpene cyclization in specialized metabolism as an excellent example, this review describes the process of discovery and interpretation of dominance and epistasis in relation to current efforts. Specifically, we outline experimental approaches to isolating epistatic networks of mutations in protein structure, formally quantifying epistatic interactions, then building biochemical models with chemical mechanisms in efforts to achieve an understanding of the physical basis for epistasis. From these models we describe informed conjectures about past evolutionary events that underlie the emergence, divergence and specialization of terpene synthases to illustrate key principles of the constraining forces of epistasis in enzyme function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MRI assessment of coronary microvascular endothelial nitric oxide synthase function using myocardial T1 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Sophia X; Epstein, Frederick H

    2017-08-07

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a central role in regulating vascular tone, blood flow, and microvascular permeability. Endothelial dysfunction, including eNOS dysfunction, is an early biomarker of vascular disease. This study aimed to show that myocardial T1 mapping during nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition could assess coronary microvascular eNOS function. Wild-type mice, eNOS-/- mice, and wild-type mice fed a high-fat diet underwent T1 mapping at baseline and for 20 min after injection of NG -nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (LNAME), a NOS inhibitor. First-pass perfusion MRI was performed in wild-type mice at baseline and 5 min after LNAME injection. T1 mapping detected an increase in myocardial T1 5 min after an injection of 4 mg/kg LNAME compared with baseline in control mice (T1  = 1515 ± 30 ms with LNAME versus T1  = 1402 ± 30 ms at baseline, P coronary microvascular eNOS dysfunction in high-fat-diet mice. T1 mapping during NOS inhibition may be useful in preclinical studies aiming to investigate mechanisms underlying and therapies for coronary microvascular eNOS dysfunction. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Rapid Discovery and Functional Characterization of Terpene Synthases from Four Endophytic Xylariaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weihua; Tran, William; Taatjes, Craig A; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Lee, Taek Soon; Gladden, John M

    2016-01-01

    Endophytic fungi are ubiquitous plant endosymbionts that establish complex and poorly understood relationships with their host organisms. Many endophytic fungi are known to produce a wide spectrum of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with potential energy applications, which have been described as "mycodiesel". Many of these mycodiesel hydrocarbons are terpenes, a chemically diverse class of compounds produced by many plants, fungi, and bacteria. Due to their high energy densities, terpenes, such as pinene and bisabolene, are actively being investigated as potential "drop-in" biofuels for replacing diesel and aviation fuel. In this study, we rapidly discovered and characterized 26 terpene synthases (TPSs) derived from four endophytic fungi known to produce mycodiesel hydrocarbons. The TPS genes were expressed in an E. coli strain harboring a heterologous mevalonate pathway designed to enhance terpene production, and their product profiles were determined using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) and GC-MS. Out of the 26 TPS's profiled, 12 TPS's were functional, with the majority of them exhibiting both monoterpene and sesquiterpene synthase activity.

  3. Rapid Discovery and Functional Characterization of Terpene Synthases from Four Endophytic Xylariaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Wu

    Full Text Available Endophytic fungi are ubiquitous plant endosymbionts that establish complex and poorly understood relationships with their host organisms. Many endophytic fungi are known to produce a wide spectrum of volatile organic compounds (VOCs with potential energy applications, which have been described as "mycodiesel". Many of these mycodiesel hydrocarbons are terpenes, a chemically diverse class of compounds produced by many plants, fungi, and bacteria. Due to their high energy densities, terpenes, such as pinene and bisabolene, are actively being investigated as potential "drop-in" biofuels for replacing diesel and aviation fuel. In this study, we rapidly discovered and characterized 26 terpene synthases (TPSs derived from four endophytic fungi known to produce mycodiesel hydrocarbons. The TPS genes were expressed in an E. coli strain harboring a heterologous mevalonate pathway designed to enhance terpene production, and their product profiles were determined using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME and GC-MS. Out of the 26 TPS's profiled, 12 TPS's were functional, with the majority of them exhibiting both monoterpene and sesquiterpene synthase activity.

  4. Nitric-oxide synthase trafficking inducer is a pleiotropic regulator of endothelial cell function and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Shreeta; Ain, Rupasri

    2017-04-21

    Endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) and its bioactive product, nitric oxide (NO), mediate many endothelial cell functions, including angiogenesis and vascular permeability. For example, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated angiogenesis is inhibited upon reduction of NO bioactivity both in vitro and in vivo Moreover, genetic disruption or pharmacological inhibition of eNOS attenuates angiogenesis during tissue repair, resulting in delayed wound closure. These observations emphasize that eNOS-derived NO can promote angiogenesis. Intriguingly, eNOS activity is regulated by nitric-oxide synthase trafficking inducer (NOSTRIN), which sequesters eNOS, thereby attenuating NO production. This has prompted significant interest in NOSTRIN's function in endothelial cells. We show here that NOSTRIN affects the functional transcriptome of endothelial cells by down-regulating several genes important for invasion and angiogenesis. Interestingly, the effects of NOSTRIN on endothelial gene expression were independent of eNOS activity. NOSTRIN also affected the expression of secreted cytokines involved in inflammatory responses, and ectopic NOSTRIN overexpression functionally restricted endothelial cell proliferation, invasion, adhesion, and VEGF-induced capillary tube formation. Furthermore, NOSTRIN interacted directly with TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), leading to the suppression of NFκB activity and inhibition of AKT activation via phosphorylation. Interestingly, TNF-α-induced NFκB pathway activation was reversed by NOSTRIN. We found that the SH3 domain of NOSTRIN is involved in the NOSTRIN-TRAF6 interaction and is required for NOSTRIN-induced down-regulation of endothelial cell proteins. These results have broad biological implications, as aberrant NOSTRIN expression leading to deactivation of the NFκB pathway, in turn triggering an anti-angiogenic cascade, might inhibit tumorigenesis and cancer progression. © 2017 by The American Society for

  5. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of three terpene synthases from unripe fruit of black pepper (Piper nigrum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhehao; Kwon, Moonhyuk; Lee, Ah-Reum; Ro, Dae-Kyun; Wungsintaweekul, Juraithip; Kim, Soo-Un

    2018-01-15

    To identify terpene synthases (TPS) responsible for the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpenes that contribute to the characteristic flavors of black pepper (Piper nigrum), unripe peppercorn was subjected to the Illumina transcriptome sequencing. The BLAST analysis using amorpha-4,11-diene synthase as a query identified 19 sesquiterpene synthases (sesqui-TPSs), of which three full-length cDNAs (PnTPS1 through 3) were cloned. These sesqui-TPS cDNAs were expressed in E. coli to produce recombinant enzymes for in vitro assays, and also expressed in the engineered yeast strain to assess their catalytic activities in vivo. PnTPS1 produced β-caryophyllene as a main product and humulene as a minor compound, and thus was named caryophyllene synthase (PnCPS). Likewise, PnTPS2 and PnTPS3 were, respectively, named cadinol/cadinene synthase (PnCO/CDS) and germacrene D synthase (PnGDS). PnGDS expression in yeast yielded β-cadinene and α-copaene, the rearrangement products of germacrene D. Their k cat /K m values (20-37.7 s -1  mM -1 ) were comparable to those of other sesqui-TPSs. Among three PnTPSs, the transcript level of PnCPS was the highest, correlating with the predominant β-caryophyllene biosynthesis in the peppercorn. The products and rearranged products of three PnTPSs could account for about a half of the sesquiterpenes in number found in unripe peppercorn. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Thymidylate synthase is functionally associated with ZEB1 and contributes to the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Aarif; Vazakidou, Maria Eleni; Schwab, Annemarie; Napoli, Francesca; Fernandez-Molina, Cristina; Rapa, Ida; Stemmler, Marc P; Volante, Marco; Brabletz, Thomas; Ceppi, Paolo

    2017-06-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a fundamental enzyme of nucleotide metabolism and one of the oldest anti-cancer targets. Beginning from the analysis of gene array data from the NCI-60 panel of cancer cell lines, we identified a significant correlation at both gene and protein level between TS and the markers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a developmental process that allows cancer cells to acquire features of aggressiveness, like motility and chemoresistance. TS levels were found to be significantly augmented in mesenchymal-like compared to epithelial-like cancer cells, to be regulated by EMT induction, and to negatively correlate with micro-RNAs (miRNAs) usually expressed in epithelial-like cells and known to actively suppress EMT. Transfection of EMT-suppressing miRNAs reduced TS levels, and a specific role for miR-375 in targeting the TS 3'-untranslated region was identified. A particularly relevant association was found between TS and the powerful EMT driver ZEB1, the shRNA-mediated knockdown of which up-regulated miR-375 and reduced TS cellular levels. The TS-ZEB1 association was confirmed in clinical specimens from lung tumours and in a genetic mouse model of pancreatic cancer with ZEB1 deletion. Interestingly, TS itself appeared to have a regulatory role in EMT in cancer cells, as TS knockdown could directly reduce the EMT phenotype, the migratory ability of cells, the expression of stem-like markers, and chemoresistance. Taken together, these data indicate that the TS enzyme is functionally linked with EMT and cancer differentiation, with several potential translational implications. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Enzyme functional evolution through improved catalysis of ancestrally nonpreferred substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruiqi; Hippauf, Frank; Rohrbeck, Diana; Haustein, Maria; Wenke, Katrin; Feike, Janie; Sorrelle, Noah; Piechulla, Birgit; Barkman, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role for ancestral functional variation that may be selected upon to generate protein functional shifts using ancestral protein resurrection, statistical tests for positive selection, forward and reverse evolutionary genetics, and enzyme functional assays. Data are presented for three instances of protein functional change in the salicylic acid/benzoic acid/theobromine (SABATH) lineage of plant secondary metabolite-producing enzymes. In each case, we demonstrate that ancestral nonpreferred activities were improved upon in a daughter enzyme after gene duplication, and that these functional shifts were likely coincident with positive selection. Both forward and reverse mutagenesis studies validate the impact of one or a few sites toward increasing activity with ancestrally nonpreferred substrates. In one case, we document the occurrence of an evolutionary reversal of an active site residue that reversed enzyme properties. Furthermore, these studies show that functionally important amino acid replacements result in substrate discrimination as reflected in evolutionary changes in the specificity constant (kcat/KM) for competing substrates, even though adaptive substitutions may affect KM and kcat separately. In total, these results indicate that nonpreferred, or even latent, ancestral protein activities may be coopted at later times to become the primary or preferred protein activities. PMID:22315396

  8. Green Polymer Chemistry: Enzyme Catalysis for Polymer Functionalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghamitra Sen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme catalyzed reactions are green alternative approaches to functionalize polymers compared to conventional methods. This technique is especially advantageous due to the high selectivity, high efficiency, milder reaction conditions, and recyclability of enzymes. Selected reactions can be conducted under solventless conditions without the application of metal catalysts. Hence this process is becoming more recognized in the arena of biomedical applications, as the toxicity created by solvents and metal catalyst residues can be completely avoided. In this review we will discuss fundamental aspects of chemical reactions biocatalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase B, and their application to create new functionalized polymers, including the regio- and chemoselectivity of the reactions.

  9. A phylogenetic analysis of normal modes evolution in enzymes and its relationship to enzyme function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jason; Jin, Jing; Kubelka, Jan; Liberles, David A

    2012-09-21

    Since the dynamic nature of protein structures is essential for enzymatic function, it is expected that functional evolution can be inferred from the changes in protein dynamics. However, dynamics can also diverge neutrally with sequence substitution between enzymes without changes of function. In this study, a phylogenetic approach is implemented to explore the relationship between enzyme dynamics and function through evolutionary history. Protein dynamics are described by normal mode analysis based on a simplified harmonic potential force field applied to the reduced C(α) representation of the protein structure while enzymatic function is described by Enzyme Commission numbers. Similarity of the binding pocket dynamics at each branch of the protein family's phylogeny was analyzed in two ways: (1) explicitly by quantifying the normal mode overlap calculated for the reconstructed ancestral proteins at each end and (2) implicitly using a diffusion model to obtain the reconstructed lineage-specific changes in the normal modes. Both explicit and implicit ancestral reconstruction identified generally faster rates of change in dynamics compared with the expected change from neutral evolution at the branches of potential functional divergences for the α-amylase, D-isomer-specific 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase, and copper-containing amine oxidase protein families. Normal mode analysis added additional information over just comparing the RMSD of static structures. However, the branch-specific changes were not statistically significant compared to background function-independent neutral rates of change of dynamic properties and blind application of the analysis would not enable prediction of changes in enzyme specificity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional loss of two ceramide synthases elicits autophagy-dependent lifespan extension in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai-Britt Mosbech

    Full Text Available Ceramide and its metabolites constitute a diverse group of lipids, which play important roles as structural entities of biological membranes as well as regulators of cellular growth, differentiation, and development. The C. elegans genome comprises three ceramide synthase genes; hyl-1, hyl-2, and lagr-1. HYL-1 function is required for synthesis of ceramides and sphingolipids containing very long acyl-chains (≥C24, while HYL-2 is required for synthesis of ceramides and sphingolipids containing shorter acyl-chains (≤C22. Here we show that functional loss of HYL-2 decreases lifespan, while loss of HYL-1 or LAGR-1 does not affect lifespan. We show that loss of HYL-1 and LAGR-1 functions extend lifespan in an autophagy-dependent manner, as knock down of the autophagy-associated gene ATG-12 abolishes hyl-1;lagr-1 longevity. The transcription factors PHA-4/FOXA, DAF-16/FOXO, and SKN-1 are also required for the observed lifespan extension, as well as the increased number of autophagosomes in hyl-1;lagr-1 animals. Both autophagic events and the transcription factors PHA-4/FOXA, DAF-16, and SKN-1 have previously been associated with dietary restriction-induced longevity. Accordingly, we find that hyl-1;lagr-1 animals display reduced feeding, increased resistance to heat, and reduced reproduction. Collectively, our data suggest that specific sphingolipids produced by different ceramide synthases have opposing roles in determination of C. elegans lifespan. We propose that loss of HYL-1 and LAGR-1 result in dietary restriction-induced autophagy and consequently prolonged longevity.

  11. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  12. Transcriptome mining, functional characterization, and phylogeny of a large terpene synthase gene family in spruce (Picea spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dullat Harpreet K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In conifers, terpene synthases (TPSs of the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d subfamily form a diverse array of mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenoid compounds, which are components of the oleoresin secretions and volatile emissions. These compounds contribute to defence against herbivores and pathogens and perhaps also protect against abiotic stress. Results The availability of extensive transcriptome resources in the form of expressed sequence tags (ESTs and full-length cDNAs in several spruce (Picea species allowed us to estimate that a conifer genome contains at least 69 unique and transcriptionally active TPS genes. This number is comparable to the number of TPSs found in any of the sequenced and well-annotated angiosperm genomes. We functionally characterized a total of 21 spruce TPSs: 12 from Sitka spruce (P. sitchensis, 5 from white spruce (P. glauca, and 4 from hybrid white spruce (P. glauca × P. engelmannii, which included 15 monoterpene synthases, 4 sesquiterpene synthases, and 2 diterpene synthases. Conclusions The functional diversity of these characterized TPSs parallels the diversity of terpenoids found in the oleoresin and volatile emissions of Sitka spruce and provides a context for understanding this chemical diversity at the molecular and mechanistic levels. The comparative characterization of Sitka spruce and Norway spruce diterpene synthases revealed the natural occurrence of TPS sequence variants between closely related spruce species, confirming a previous prediction from site-directed mutagenesis and modelling.

  13. Transcriptome mining, functional characterization, and phylogeny of a large terpene synthase gene family in spruce (Picea spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In conifers, terpene synthases (TPSs) of the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d subfamily form a diverse array of mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenoid compounds, which are components of the oleoresin secretions and volatile emissions. These compounds contribute to defence against herbivores and pathogens and perhaps also protect against abiotic stress. Results The availability of extensive transcriptome resources in the form of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and full-length cDNAs in several spruce (Picea) species allowed us to estimate that a conifer genome contains at least 69 unique and transcriptionally active TPS genes. This number is comparable to the number of TPSs found in any of the sequenced and well-annotated angiosperm genomes. We functionally characterized a total of 21 spruce TPSs: 12 from Sitka spruce (P. sitchensis), 5 from white spruce (P. glauca), and 4 from hybrid white spruce (P. glauca × P. engelmannii), which included 15 monoterpene synthases, 4 sesquiterpene synthases, and 2 diterpene synthases. Conclusions The functional diversity of these characterized TPSs parallels the diversity of terpenoids found in the oleoresin and volatile emissions of Sitka spruce and provides a context for understanding this chemical diversity at the molecular and mechanistic levels. The comparative characterization of Sitka spruce and Norway spruce diterpene synthases revealed the natural occurrence of TPS sequence variants between closely related spruce species, confirming a previous prediction from site-directed mutagenesis and modelling. PMID:21385377

  14. Non-metabolic functions of glycolytic enzymes in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X; Li, S

    2017-05-11

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to meet the requirement for survival and rapid growth. One hallmark of cancer metabolism is elevated aerobic glycolysis and reduced oxidative phosphorylation. Emerging evidence showed that most glycolytic enzymes are deregulated in cancer cells and play important roles in tumorigenesis. Recent studies revealed that all essential glycolytic enzymes can be translocated into nucleus where they participate in tumor progression independent of their canonical metabolic roles. These noncanonical functions include anti-apoptosis, regulation of epigenetic modifications, modulation of transcription factors and co-factors, extracellular cytokine, protein kinase activity and mTORC1 signaling pathway, suggesting that these multifaceted glycolytic enzymes not only function in canonical metabolism but also directly link metabolism to epigenetic and transcription programs implicated in tumorigenesis. These findings underscore our understanding about how tumor cells adapt to nutrient and fuel availability in the environment and most importantly, provide insights into development of cancer therapy.

  15. Functional loss of two ceramide synthases elicits autophagy-dependent lifespan extension in C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Mai-Britt; Kruse, Rikke; Harvald, Eva Bang

    2013-01-01

    Ceramide and its metabolites constitute a diverse group of lipids, which play important roles as structural entities of biological membranes as well as regulators of cellular growth, differentiation, and development. The C. elegans genome comprises three ceramide synthase genes; hyl-1, hyl-2...... of HYL-1 or LAGR-1 does not affect lifespan. We show that loss of HYL-1 and LAGR-1 functions extend lifespan in an autophagy-dependent manner, as knock down of the autophagy-associated gene ATG-12 abolishes hyl-1;lagr-1 longevity. The transcription factors PHA-4/FOXA, DAF-16/FOXO, and SKN-1 are also......-1 result in dietary restriction-induced autophagy and consequently prolonged longevity....

  16. Some peculiar effects of NO-synthase inhibition on the structure and function of cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristek, Frantisek

    2011-09-01

    Long-term increase of blood pressure represents one of the most important risk factors triggering many cardiovascular diseases, and via counter-regulatory mechanisms it is itself modulated by them. Adequate perfusion of the respective areas with nutrients requires appropriate production of vasodilatory and vasoconstrictory agents. Disharmony among them has an important impact on mechanical properties of the arteries, resulting in pathological alterations in the cardiovascular system. Defective production of the vasodilatory agent nitric oxide (NO) has a pronounced effect on this delicate balance and can evoke functional and structural changes in the cardiovascular system leading to hypertension. This review is focused mainly on changes in the cardiovascular system of newborn and adult Wistar rats after long-term administration of two different types of NO-synthase inhibitors: nonspecific inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester and specific inhibitor of neuronal NO-synthase 7-nitroindazole. A possible supplementation of decreased endogenous NO production by NO donors is discussed. Particular attention is given to the complex interplay among blood pressure, arterial geometry, including arterial wall thickness, cross-sectional area, inner diameter, and individual components of the arterial wall, as extracellular matrix, endothelial and smooth muscle cell trophicity. Some methodological remarks for determination of the arterial geometry are also presented. Better understanding of the interrelationship among the factors involved can help in explaining more accurately differences in functional manifestations of vessels in various types of hypertension. The review indicates that the current concept of NO production, effect of NO deficiency, substitution of the missing NO in failing NO production in the cardiovascular system appears to be oversimplified.

  17. the effects of antiretroviral treatment on liver function enzymes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    THE EFFECTS OF ANTIRETROVIRAL TREATMENT ON LIVER FUNCTION. ENZYMES AMONG HIV-INFECTED OUT PATIENTS ATTENDING THE CENTRAL. HOSPITAL OF YAOUNDÉ, CAMEROON. Lucien1*, K. F. H. , Clement1 , A,N.J., Fon1, N. P., Weledji1 P. and Ndikvu,2 C. P. 1 Faculty of Health Sciences, University ...

  18. Functional role of arginine during the peri-implantation period of pregnancy. II. Consequences of loss of function of nitric oxide synthase NOS3 mRNA in ovine conceptus trophectoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqiu; Frank, James W; Xu, Jing; Dunlap, Kathrin A; Satterfield, M Carey; Burghardt, Robert C; Romero, Jared J; Hansen, Thomas R; Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W

    2014-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous molecule that regulates angiogenesis and vasodilation via activation of the cGMP pathway. However, functional roles of NO during embryonic development from spherical blastocysts to elongated filamentous conceptuses (embryo and extraembryonic membrane) during the peri-implantation period of pregnancy have not been elucidated in vivo. In order to assess roles of NO production in survival and development of the ovine conceptus, we conducted an in vivo morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (MAO)-mediated knockdown trial of nitric oxide synthase-3 (NOS3) mRNA, the major isoform of NO synthase, in ovine conceptus trophectoderm (Tr). Translational knockdown of NOS3 mRNA results in small, thin, and underdeveloped conceptuses, but normal production of interferon-tau, the pregnancy recognition signal in sheep. MAO-NOS3 knockdown in conceptuses decreased the abundance of NOS3 (72%, P nitric oxide synthase-1 (NOS1) or nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS2) or in expression of enzymes for synthesis of polyamines (ornithine decarboxylase, arginine decarboxylase, agmatinase) from arginine or ornithine with which to rescue development of MAO-NOS3 conceptuses. Thus, the adverse effect of MAO-NOS3 to reduce NO generation and the transport of arginine and ornithine into conceptuses is central to an explanation for failure of normal development of MAO-NOS3, compared to control conceptuses. The study, for the first time, created an NO-deficient mammalian conceptus model in vivo and provided new insights into the orchestrated events of conceptus development during the peri-implantation period of pregnancy. Our data suggest that NOS3 is the key enzyme for NO production by conceptus Tr and that this protein also regulates the availability of arginine in conceptus tissues for synthesis of polyamines that are essential for conceptus survival and development. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  19. Loss of collectrin, an angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 homolog, uncouples endothelial nitric oxide synthase and causes hypertension and vascular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cechova, Sylvia; Zeng, Qing; Billaud, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Collectrin is an orphan member of the renin-angiotensin system and is a homolog of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, sharing ≈50% sequence identity. Unlike angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, collectrin lacks any catalytic domain. Collectrin has been shown to function as a chaperone of amino acid tra...

  20. Transcriptomic insight into terpenoid and carbazole alkaloid biosynthesis, and functional characterization of two terpene synthases in curry tree (Murraya koenigii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Seema; Rajeev Kumar, Sarma; Dwivedi, Varun; Kumar Singh, Anup; Chanotiya, Chandan S; Akhtar, Md Qussen; Kumar, Krishna; Kumar Shasany, Ajit; Nagegowda, Dinesh A

    2017-03-08

    Curry tree (Murraya koenigii L.) is a rich source of aromatic terpenes and pharmacologically important carbazole alkaloids. Here, M. koenigii leaf transcriptome was generated to gain insight into terpenoid and alkaloid biosynthesis. Analysis of de novo assembled contigs yielded genes for terpene backbone biosynthesis and terpene synthases. Also, gene families possibly involved in carbazole alkaloid formation were identified that included polyketide synthases, prenyltransferases, methyltransferases and cytochrome P450s. Further, two genes encoding terpene synthases (MkTPS1 and MkTPS2) with highest in silico transcript abundance were cloned and functionally characterized to determine their involvement in leaf volatile formation. Subcellular localization using GFP fusions revealed the plastidial and cytosolic localization of MkTPS1 and MkTPS2, respectively. Enzymatic characterization demonstrated the monoterpene synthase activity of recombinant MkTPS1, which produced primarily (-)-sabinene from geranyl diphosphate (GPP). Recombinant MkTPS2 exhibited sesquiterpene synthase activity and formed (E,E)-α-farnesene as the major product from farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). Moreover, mRNA expression and leaf volatile analyses indicated that MkTPS1 accounts for (-)-sabinene emitted by M. koenigii leaves. Overall, the transcriptome data generated in this study will be a great resource and the start point for characterizing genes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of medicinally important carbazole alkaloids.

  1. Gene variations of nitric oxide synthase regulate the effects of a saturated fat rich meal on endothelial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene variations have been linked to a higher risk for cardiovascular diseases by unknown mechanisms. Our aim was to determine if two SNPs located in NOS3 (E298D and i19342) interfere with microvascular endothelial function (MEF) and/or oxidative stress du...

  2. Cloning and Functional Characterization of a Gene for Capsanthin-Capsorubin Synthase from Tiger Lily (Lilium lancifolium Thunb. ‘Splendens’)

    OpenAIRE

    Jeknić, Zoran; Morré, Jeffrey T.; Jeknić, Stevan; Jevremović, Slađana; Subotić, Angelina; Chen, Tony H.H.

    2012-01-01

    The orange color of tiger lily (Lolium lancifolium ‘Splendens’) flowers is due, primarily, to the accumulation of two κ-xanthophylls, capsanthin and capsorubin. An enzyme, known as capsanthin-capsorubin synthase (CCS), catalyzes the conversion of antheraxanthin and violaxanthin into capsanthin and capsorubin, respectively. We cloned the gene for capsanthin-capsorubin synthase (Llccs) from flower tepals of L. lancifolium by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) with a heterologous non-de...

  3. Positive selection and functional divergence of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jieying; Liu, Yong; Chao, Naixia; Ma, Chengtong; Chen, Qicong; Sun, Jian; Wu, Yaosheng

    2017-02-04

    Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPS) belongs to the short-chain prenyltransferase family, and it performs a conserved and essential role in the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway. However, its classification, evolutionary history, and the forces driving the evolution of FPS genes in plants remain poorly understood. Phylogeny and positive selection analysis was used to identify the evolutionary forces that led to the functional divergence of FPS in plants, and recombinant detection was undertaken using the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD) method. The dataset included 68 FPS variation pattern sequences (2 gymnosperms, 10 monocotyledons, 54 dicotyledons, and 2 outgroups). This study revealed that the FPS gene was under positive selection in plants. No recombinant within the FPS gene was found. Therefore, it was inferred that the positive selection of FPS had not been influenced by a recombinant episode. The positively selected sites were mainly located in the catalytic center and functional areas, which indicated that the 98S and 234D were important positively selected sites for plant FPS in the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway. They were located in the FPS conserved domain of the catalytic site. We inferred that the diversification of FPS genes was associated with functional divergence and could be driven by positive selection. It was clear that protein sequence evolution via positive selection was able to drive adaptive diversification in plant FPS proteins. This study provides information on the classification and positive selection of plant FPS genes, and the results could be useful for further research on the regulation of triterpenoid biosynthesis.

  4. ATP synthases from archaea: the beauty of a molecular motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüber, Gerhard; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Mayer, Florian; Müller, Volker

    2014-06-01

    Archaea live under different environmental conditions, such as high salinity, extreme pHs and cold or hot temperatures. How energy is conserved under such harsh environmental conditions is a major question in cellular bioenergetics of archaea. The key enzymes in energy conservation are the archaeal A1AO ATP synthases, a class of ATP synthases distinct from the F1FO ATP synthase ATP synthase found in bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts and the V1VO ATPases of eukaryotes. A1AO ATP synthases have distinct structural features such as a collar-like structure, an extended central stalk, and two peripheral stalks possibly stabilizing the A1AO ATP synthase during rotation in ATP synthesis/hydrolysis at high temperatures as well as to provide the storage of transient elastic energy during ion-pumping and ATP synthesis/-hydrolysis. High resolution structures of individual subunits and subcomplexes have been obtained in recent years that shed new light on the function and mechanism of this unique class of ATP synthases. An outstanding feature of archaeal A1AO ATP synthases is their diversity in size of rotor subunits and the coupling ion used for ATP synthesis with H(+), Na(+) or even H(+) and Na(+) using enzymes. The evolution of the H(+) binding site to a Na(+) binding site and its implications for the energy metabolism and physiology of the cell are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Antenatal insults modify newborn olfactory function by nitric oxide produced from neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobyshevsky, Alexander; Yu, Lei; Yang, Yirong; Khalid, Syed; Luo, Kehuan; Jiang, Rugang; Ji, Haitao; Derrick, Matthew; Kay, Leslie; Silverman, Richard B; Tan, Sidhartha

    2012-10-01

    Newborn feeding, maternal, bonding, growth and wellbeing depend upon intact odor recognition in the early postnatal period. Antenatal stress may affect postnatal odor recognition. We investigated the exact role of a neurotransmitter, nitric oxide (NO), in newborn olfactory function. We hypothesized that olfactory neuron activity depended on NO generated by neuronal NO synthase (NOS). Utilizing in vivo functional manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI) in a rabbit model of cerebral palsy we had shown previously that in utero hypoxia-ischemia (H-I) at E22 (70% gestation) resulted in impaired postnatal response to odorants and poor feeding. With the same antenatal insult, we manipulated NO levels in the olfactory neuron in postnatal day 1 (P1) kits by administration of intranasal NO donors or a highly selective nNOS inhibitor. Olfactory function was quantitatively measured by the response to amyl acetate stimulation by MEMRI. The relevance of nNOS to normal olfactory development was confirmed by the increase of nNOS gene expression from fetal ages to P1 in olfactory epithelium and bulbs. In control kits, nNOS inhibition decreased NO production in the olfactory system and increased MEMRI slope enhancement. In H-I kits the MEMRI slope did not increase, implicating modification of endogenous NO-mediated olfactory function by the antenatal insult. NO donors as a source of exogenous NO did not significantly change function in either group. In conclusion, olfactory epithelium nNOS in newborn rabbits probably modulates olfactory signal transduction. Antenatal H-I injury remote from delivery may affect early functional development of the olfactory system by decreasing NO-dependent signal transduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of a previous pregnancy on vascular function in endothelial nitric oxide synthase 3 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghulmiyyah, Labib M; Tamayo, Esther; Clark, Shannon M; Hankins, Gary D V; Anderson, Garland D; Saade, George R; Longo, Monica

    2007-09-01

    Nitric oxide deficiency has been implicated in adverse pregnancy outcomes. Mice that lack endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) have abnormal in vitro vascular reactivity. Our objective was to assess the effect of a previous pregnancy on the abnormal vascular function of NOS3 knockout mice. Carotid arteries from pregnant NOS3 knockout (NOS3(-/-KO)) and wild-type control mice (NOS3(+/+WT)) from first and second pregnancy were obtained for in vitro vascular reactivity studies. Vascular responses to cumulative concentrations of the vasoconstrictors phenylephrine, serotonin, and thromboxane and the vasorelaxants acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and isoproterenol were determined. In the first pregnancy, contractile responses were exaggerated in the knockout animals, compared with the wild-type animals. However, the second pregnancy in knockout animals was associated with normalization of responses to phenylephrine and serotonin and increased responses to the endothelium-independent relaxants. The vascular function of NOS3 knockout mice improves with subsequent pregnancy becoming comparable to wild-type animals.

  7. Functions of Ceramide Synthase Paralogs YPR114w and YJR116w of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamroop K Mallela

    Full Text Available Ceramide is synthesized in yeast by two redundant acyl-CoA dependent synthases, Lag1 and Lac1. In lag1∆ lac1∆ cells, free fatty acids and sphingoid bases are elevated, and ceramides are produced through the redundant alkaline ceramidases Ypc1 and Ydc1, working backwards. Even with all four of these genes deleted, cells are surviving and continue to contain small amounts of complex sphingolipids. Here we show that these residual sphingolipids are not synthesized by YPR114w or YJR116w, proteins of unknown function showing a high degree of homology to Lag1 and Lac1. Indeed, the hextuple lag1∆ lac1∆ ypc1∆ ydc1∆ ypr114w∆ yjr116w∆ mutant still contains ceramides and complex sphingolipids. Yjr116w∆ exhibit an oxygen-dependent hypersensitivity to Cu2+ due to an increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and a mitochondrially orchestrated programmed cell death in presence of copper, but also a general copper hypersensitivity that cannot be counteracted by the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC. Myriocin efficiently represses the synthesis of sphingoid bases of ypr114w∆, but not its growth. Both yjr116w∆ and ypr114w∆ have fragmented vacuoles and produce less ROS than wild type, before and after diauxic shift. Ypr114w∆/ypr114w∆ have an increased chronological life span. Thus, Yjr116w and Ypr114w are related, but not functionally redundant.

  8. Functional analysis of the cellulose synthase-like genes CSLD1, CSLD2 and CSLD4 in tip-growing arabidopsis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal Giraldo, Adriana Jimena; Yoo, Cheol-Min; Mutwil, Marek

    2008-01-01

    A reverse genetic approach was used to investigate the functions of three members of the cellulose synthase superfamily in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE D1 (CSLD1), CSLD2, and CSLD4. CSLD2 is required for normal root hair growth but has a different role from...

  9. Structural and mechanistic analysis of engineered trichodiene synthase enzymes from Trichoderma harzianum: towards higher catalytic activities empowering sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Indu; Chaudhary, Nitika; Sandhu, Padmani; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-06-01

    Trichoderma spp. are well-known bioagents for the plant growth promotion and pathogen suppression. The beneficial activities of the fungus Trichoderma spp. are attributed to their ability to produce and secrete certain secondary metabolites such as trichodermin that belongs to trichothecene family of molecules. The initial steps of trichodermin biosynthetic pathway in Trichoderma are similar to the trichothecenes from Fusarium sporotrichioides. Trichodiene synthase (TS) encoded by tri5 gene in Trichoderma catalyses the conversion of farnesyl pyrophosphate to trichodiene as reported earlier. In this study, we have carried out a comprehensive comparative sequence and structural analysis of the TS, which revealed the conserved residues involved in catalytic activity of the protein. In silico, modelled tertiary structure of TS protein showed stable structural behaviour during simulations. Two single-substitution mutants, i.e. D109E, D248Y and one double-substitution mutant (D109E and D248Y) of TS with potentially higher activities are screened out. The mutant proteins showed more stability than the wild type, an increased number of electrostatic interactions and better binding energies with the ligand, which further elucidates the amino acid residues involved in the reaction mechanism. These results will lead to devise strategies for higher TS activity to ultimately enhance the trichodermin production by Trichoderma spp. for its better exploitation in the sustainable agricultural practices.

  10. Pancreatic function and enzyme synthesis rates in mild chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, I; Boyd, E J; Jacyna, M R; Penston, J G; Soutar, J S; Bouchier, I A

    1986-06-01

    Incorporation of intravenous 75Se-methionine into duodenal juice proteins during pancreatic stimulation was measured as an index of pancreatic enzyme synthesis rates in 12 patients with a normal pancreatogram and in 6 with mild chronic pancreatitis. Isotope incorporation was significantly greater in subjects with mild chronic pancreatitis than in those with a normal pancreatogram. Thus in most patients in whom pancreatography demonstrates the characteristic radiological features of 'mild chronic pancreatitis' pancreatic acinar function is abnormal. The coexistence of morphological and functional abnormality implies that such patients do have chronic pancreatitis.

  11. Electrochemical, Spectroscopic, and Density Functional Theory Characterization of Redox Activity in Nickel-Substituted Azurin: A Model for Acetyl-CoA Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manesis, Anastasia C; Shafaat, Hannah S

    2015-08-17

    Nickel-containing enzymes are key players in global hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane cycles. Many of these enzymes rely on Ni(I) oxidation states in critical catalytic intermediates. However, due to the highly reactive nature of these species, their isolation within metalloenzymes has often proved elusive. In this report, we describe and characterize a model biological Ni(I) species that has been generated within the electron transfer protein, azurin. Replacement of the native copper cofactor with nickel is shown to preserve the redox activity of the protein. The Ni(II/I) couple is observed at -590 mV versus NHE, with an interfacial electron transfer rate of 70 s(-1). Chemical reduction of Ni(II)Az generates a stable species with strong absorption features at 350 nm and a highly anisotropic, axial EPR signal with principal g-values of 2.56 and 2.10. Density functional theory calculations provide insight into the electronic and geometric structure of the Ni(I) species, suggesting a trigonal planar coordination environment. The predicted spectroscopic features of this low-coordinate nickel site are in good agreement with the experimental data. Molecular orbital analysis suggests potential for both metal-centered and ligand-centered reactivity, highlighting the covalency of the metal-thiolate bond. Characterization of a stable Ni(I) species within a model protein has implications for understanding the mechanisms of complex enzymes, including acetyl coenzyme A synthase, and developing scaffolds for unique reactivity.

  12. Optimization of ATP synthase function in mitochondria and chloroplasts via the adenylate kinase equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir U Igamberdiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The bulk of ATP synthesis in plants is performed by ATP synthase, the main bioenergetics engine of cells, operating both in mitochondria and in chloroplasts. The reaction mechanism of ATP synthase has been studied in detail for over half a century; however, its optimal performance depends also on the steady delivery of ATP synthase substrates and the removal of its products. For mitochondrial ATP synthase, we analyze here the provision of stable conditions for (i the supply of ADP and Mg2+, supported by adenylate kinase (AK equilibrium in the intermembrane space, (ii the supply of phosphate via membrane transporter in symport with H+, and (iii the conditions of outflow of ATP by adenylate transporter carrying out the exchange of free adenylates. We also show that, in chloroplasts, AK equilibrates adenylates and governs Mg2+ contents in the stroma, optimizing ATP synthase and Calvin cycle operation, and affecting the import of inorganic phosphate in exchange with triose phosphates. It is argued that chemiosmosis is not the sole component of ATP synthase performance, which also depends on AK-mediated equilibrium of adenylates and Mg2+, adenylate transport and phosphate release and supply.

  13. Functions of Ceramide Synthase Paralogs YPR114w and YJR116w of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallela, Shamroop K; Almeida, Reinaldo; Ejsing, Christer S

    2016-01-01

    ∆ ypc1∆ ydc1∆ ypr114w∆ yjr116w∆ mutant still contains ceramides and complex sphingolipids. Yjr116w∆ exhibit an oxygen-dependent hypersensitivity to Cu2+ due to an increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a mitochondrially orchestrated programmed cell death in presence......Ceramide is synthesized in yeast by two redundant acyl-CoA dependent synthases, Lag1 and Lac1. In lag1∆ lac1∆ cells, free fatty acids and sphingoid bases are elevated, and ceramides are produced through the redundant alkaline ceramidases Ypc1 and Ydc1, working backwards. Even with all four...... of these genes deleted, cells are surviving and continue to contain small amounts of complex sphingolipids. Here we show that these residual sphingolipids are not synthesized by YPR114w or YJR116w, proteins of unknown function showing a high degree of homology to Lag1 and Lac1. Indeed, the hextuple lag1∆ lac1...

  14. Molecular mechanisms of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in cardiac function and pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin Hua; Jin, Chun Zi; Jang, Ji Hyun; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS or NOS1) is the major endogenous source of myocardial nitric oxide (NO), which facilitates cardiac relaxation and modulates contraction. In the healthy heart it regulates intracellular Ca2+, signalling pathways and oxidative homeostasis and is upregulated from early phases upon pathogenic insult. nNOS plays pivotal roles in protecting the myocardium from increased oxidative stress, systolic/diastolic dysfunction, adverse structural remodelling and arrhythmias in the failing heart. Here, we show that the downstream target proteins of nNOS and underlying post-transcriptional modifications are shifted during disease progression from Ca2+-handling proteins [e.g. PKA-dependent phospholamban phosphorylation (PLN-Ser16)] in the healthy heart to cGMP/PKG-dependent PLN-Ser16 with acute angiotensin II (Ang II) treatment. In early hypertension, nNOS-derived NO is involved in increases of cGMP/PKG-dependent troponin I (TnI-Ser23/24) and cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMBP-C-Ser273). However, nNOS-derived NO is shown to increase S-nitrosylation of various Ca2+-handling proteins in failing myocardium. The spatial compartmentation of nNOS and its translocation for diverse binding partners in the diseased heart or various nNOS splicing variants and regulation in response to pathological stress may be responsible for varied underlying mechanisms and functions. In this review, we endeavour to outline recent advances in knowledge of the molecular mechanisms mediating the functions of nNOS in the myocardium in both normal and diseased hearts. Insights into nNOS gene regulation in various tissues are discussed. Overall, nNOS is an important cardiac protector in the diseased heart. The dynamic localization and various mediating mechanisms of nNOS ensure that it is able to regulate functions effectively in the heart under stress. PMID:24756636

  15. Functional roles of the tetramer organization of malic enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Chen, Shao-Hung; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2009-07-03

    Malic enzyme has a dimer of dimers quaternary structure in which the dimer interface associates more tightly than the tetramer interface. In addition, the enzyme has distinct active sites within each subunit. The mitochondrial NAD(P)(+)-dependent malic enzyme (m-NAD(P)-ME) isoform behaves cooperatively and allosterically and exhibits a quaternary structure in dimer-tetramer equilibrium. The cytosolic NADP(+)-dependent malic enzyme (c-NADP-ME) isoform is noncooperative and nonallosteric and exists as a stable tetramer. In this study, we analyze the essential factors governing the quaternary structure stability for human c-NADP-ME and m-NAD(P)-ME. Site-directed mutagenesis at the dimer and tetramer interfaces was employed to generate a series of dimers of c-NADP-ME and m-NAD(P)-ME. Size distribution analysis demonstrated that human c-NADP-ME exists mainly as a tetramer, whereas human m-NAD(P)-ME exists as a mixture of dimers and tetramers. Kinetic data indicated that the enzyme activity of c-NADP-ME is not affected by disruption of the interface. There are no significant differences in the kinetic properties between AB and AD dimers, and the dimeric form of c-NADP-ME is as active as tetramers. In contrast, disrupting the interface of m-NAD(P)-ME causes the enzyme to be less active than wild type and to become less cooperative for malate binding; the k(cat) values of mutants decreased with increasing K(d,24) values, indicating that the dissociation of subunits at the dimer or tetramer interfaces significantly affects the enzyme activity. The above results suggest that the tetramer is required for a fully functional m-NAD(P)-ME. Taken together, the analytical ultracentrifugation data and the kinetic analysis of these interface mutants demonstrate the differential role of tetramer organization for the c-NADP-ME and m-NAD(P)-ME isoforms. The regulatory mechanism of m-NAD(P)-ME is closely related to the tetramer formation of this isoform.

  16. Bio-functionalization of conductive textile materials with redox enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahoush, M.; Behary, N.; Cayla, A.; Nierstrasz, V.

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, immobilization of oxidoreductase enzymes on electrically conductive materials has played an important role in the development of sustainable bio-technologies. Immobilization process allows the re-use of these bio-catalysts in their final applications. In this study, different methods of immobilizing redox enzymes on conductive textile materials were used to produce bio-functionalized electrodes. These electrodes can be used for bio-processes and bio-sensing in eco-designed applications in domains such as medicine and pollution control. However, the main challenge facing the stability and durability of these electrodes is the maintenance of the enzymatic activity after the immobilization. Hence, preventing the enzyme’s denaturation and leaching is a critical factor for the success of the immobilization processes.

  17. Biochemical characterization of the bifunctional enzyme dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase from Leishmania (Viannia) and its evaluation as a drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Edison; Aguilera, Carolina; Naranjo, Nelson; Marín, Marcel; Muskus, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) has been used successfully as a drug target in the area of anti-bacterial, anti-cancer and anti-malarial therapy. Although this bifunctional enzyme is also a potential drug target for treatment of leishmaniasis, there have been no reports on its efficacy against Leishmania (Viannia) species. The gene encoding the bifunctional DHFR and thymidylate synthase (TS) of Le. (V.) braziliensis was isolated and expressed in E. coli. The enzyme was purified and characterized. The inhibitory effects of antifolates and four aporphine alkaloids on its activity were evaluated. The full-length gene consists of a 1560-bp open reading frame encoding a 58 kDa translated peptide containing DHFR and TS domains linked together in a single polypeptide chain. The recombinant DHFR-TS enzyme revealed Km and Vmax values of 55.35 ± 4.02 µ M (mean ± SE) and 0.02 ± 5.34 x 10 -4 µ M/min respectively for dihydrofolic acid (H₂F). The Le. braziliensis rDHFR-TS have Ki values for antimicrobial antifolates in the µM range. Methotrexate (MTX) was a more-potent inhibitor of enzymatic activity (Ki = 22.0 µM) than trimethoprim (Ki = 33 µM) and pyrimethamine (Ki = 68 µM). These Ki values are significantly lower than those obtained for the aporphine alkaloids. The results of the study show the inhibitory effect of antifolate drugs on enzymatic activity, indicating that Le. braziliensis rDHFR-TS could be a model to studying antifolate compounds as potential antiprotozoal drugs.

  18. Pronounced between‐subject and circadian variability in thymidylate synthase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase enzyme activity in human volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Bart A. W.; Deenen, Maarten J.; Pluim, Dick; van Hasselt, J. G. Coen; Krähenbühl, Martin D.; van Geel, Robin M. J. M.; de Vries, Niels; Rosing, Hilde; Meulendijks, Didier; Burylo, Artur M.; Cats, Annemieke; Beijnen, Jos H.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims The enzymatic activity of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) and thymidylate synthase (TS) are important for the tolerability and efficacy of the fluoropyrimidine drugs. In the present study, we explored between‐subject variability (BSV) and circadian rhythmicity in DPD and TS activity in human volunteers. Methods The BSVs in DPD activity (n = 20) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in plasma, measured by means of the dihydrouracil (DHU) and uracil (U) plasma levels and DHU : U ratio (n = 40), and TS activity in PBMCs (n = 19), were examined. Samples were collected every 4 h throughout 1 day for assessment of circadian rhythmicity in DPD and TS activity in PBMCs (n = 12) and DHU : U plasma ratios (n = 23). In addition, the effects of genetic polymorphisms and gene expression on DPD and TS activity were explored. Results Population mean (± standard deviation) DPD activity in PBMCs and DHU : U plasma ratio were 9.2 (±2.1) nmol mg−1 h−1 and 10.6 (±2.4), respectively. Individual TS activity in PBMCs ranged from 0.024 nmol mg−1 h−1 to 0.596 nmol mg−1 h−1. Circadian rhythmicity was demonstrated for all phenotype markers. Between 00:30 h and 02:00 h, DPD activity in PBMCs peaked, while the DHU : U plasma ratio and TS activity in PBMCs showed trough activity. Peak‐to‐trough ratios for DPD and TS activity in PBMCs were 1.69 and 1.62, respectively. For the DHU : U plasma ratio, the peak‐to‐trough ratio was 1.43. Conclusions BSV and circadian variability in DPD and TS activity were demonstrated. Circadian rhythmicity in DPD might be tissue dependent. The results suggested an influence of circadian rhythms on phenotype‐guided fluoropyrimidine dosing and supported implications for chronotherapy with high‐dose fluoropyrimidine administration during the night. PMID:27161955

  19. Pronounced between-subject and circadian variability in thymidylate synthase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase enzyme activity in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Bart A W; Deenen, Maarten J; Pluim, Dick; van Hasselt, J G Coen; Krähenbühl, Martin D; van Geel, Robin M J M; de Vries, Niels; Rosing, Hilde; Meulendijks, Didier; Burylo, Artur M; Cats, Annemieke; Beijnen, Jos H; Huitema, Alwin D R; Schellens, Jan H M

    2016-09-01

    The enzymatic activity of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) and thymidylate synthase (TS) are important for the tolerability and efficacy of the fluoropyrimidine drugs. In the present study, we explored between-subject variability (BSV) and circadian rhythmicity in DPD and TS activity in human volunteers. The BSVs in DPD activity (n = 20) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in plasma, measured by means of the dihydrouracil (DHU) and uracil (U) plasma levels and DHU : U ratio (n = 40), and TS activity in PBMCs (n = 19), were examined. Samples were collected every 4 h throughout 1 day for assessment of circadian rhythmicity in DPD and TS activity in PBMCs (n = 12) and DHU : U plasma ratios (n = 23). In addition, the effects of genetic polymorphisms and gene expression on DPD and TS activity were explored. Population mean (± standard deviation) DPD activity in PBMCs and DHU : U plasma ratio were 9.2 (±2.1) nmol mg(-1) h(-1) and 10.6 (±2.4), respectively. Individual TS activity in PBMCs ranged from 0.024 nmol mg(-1) h(-1) to 0.596 nmol mg(-1) h(-1) . Circadian rhythmicity was demonstrated for all phenotype markers. Between 00:30 h and 02:00 h, DPD activity in PBMCs peaked, while the DHU : U plasma ratio and TS activity in PBMCs showed trough activity. Peak-to-trough ratios for DPD and TS activity in PBMCs were 1.69 and 1.62, respectively. For the DHU : U plasma ratio, the peak-to-trough ratio was 1.43. BSV and circadian variability in DPD and TS activity were demonstrated. Circadian rhythmicity in DPD might be tissue dependent. The results suggested an influence of circadian rhythms on phenotype-guided fluoropyrimidine dosing and supported implications for chronotherapy with high-dose fluoropyrimidine administration during the night. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Replacement of the Endogenous Starch Debranching Enzymes ISA1 and ISA2 of Arabidopsis with the Rice Orthologs Reveals a Degree of Functional Conservation during Starch Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the interchangeability of enzymes in starch metabolism between dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plant species. Amylopectin - a branched glucose polymer - is the major component of starch and is responsible for its semi-crystalline property. Plants synthesize starch with distinct amylopectin structures, varying between species and tissues. The structure determines starch properties, an important characteristic for cooking and nutrition, and for the industrial uses of starch. Amylopectin synthesis involves at least three enzyme classes: starch synthases, branching enzymes and debranching enzymes. For all three classes, several enzyme isoforms have been identified. However, it is not clear which enzyme(s) are responsible for the large diversity of amylopectin structures. Here, we tested whether the specificities of the debranching enzymes (ISA1 and ISA2) are major determinants of species-dependent differences in amylopectin structure by replacing the dicotyledonous Arabidopsis isoamylases (AtISA1 and AtISA2) with the monocotyledonous rice (Oryza sativa) isoforms. We demonstrate that the ISA1 and ISA2 are sufficiently well conserved between these species to form heteromultimeric chimeric Arabidopsis/rice isoamylase enzymes. Furthermore, we were able to reconstitute the endosperm-specific rice OsISA1 homomultimeric complex in Arabidopsis isa1isa2 mutants. This homomultimer was able to facilitate normal rates of starch synthesis. The resulting amylopectin structure had small but significant differences in comparison to wild-type Arabidopsis amylopectin. This suggests that ISA1 and ISA2 have a conserved function between plant species with a major role in facilitating the crystallization of pre-amylopectin synthesized by starch synthases and branching enzymes, but also influencing the final structure of amylopectin. PMID:24642810

  1. Catalysis by nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marletta, M A; Hurshman, A R; Rusche, K M

    1998-10-01

    The enzyme nitric oxide synthase catalyzes the oxidation of the amino acid L-arginine to L-citrulline and nitric oxide in an NADPH-dependent reaction. Nitric oxide plays a critical role in signal transduction pathways in the cardiovascular and nervous systems and is a key component of the cytostatic/cytotoxic function of the immune system. Characterization of nitric oxide synthase substrates and cofactors has outlined the broad details of the overall reaction and suggested possibilities for chemical steps in the reaction; however, the molecular details of the reaction mechanism are still poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests a role for the reduced bound pterin in the first step of the reaction--the hydroxylation of L-arginine.

  2. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Keeps Erection Regulatory Function Balance in the Penis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Liu, Tongyun; Musicki, Biljana; Champion, Hunter C.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: We sought to evaluate the regulatory influence of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) on the basal functional states of the NO and RhoA/Rho-kinase signaling pathways in the penis employing endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) mutant mice and eNOS gene transfer technology. Methods: Four groups of mice were utilized: 1) wild type (WT), 2) eNOS gene deleted (eNOS −/−), 3) eNOS and neuronal NOS gene deleted (dNOS −/−), and 4) eNOS −/− mutant mice transfected intracavernosally with eNOS. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) concentration, protein kinase G (PKG) activity, activated RhoA, and Rho-kinase activity were determined in penes of WT and both mutant mouse groups. Constitutive NOS and PKG activities, RhoA, Rho-kinase-α and-β isoforms, and phosphorylated myosin light chain phosphatase target subunit (p-MYPT-1) expressions as well as Rho-kinase activity were determined in penes of eNOS−/− mice after eNOS gene transfer. Results: When compared with results in the WT penis, eNOS−/− and dNOS−/− mutant mouse penes had significant reductions in NOS activity, cGMP concentration, PKG activity, Rho-kinase activity and p-MYPT-1 expression (ppenis as a regulator of the basal signaling functions of the NO and RhoA/Rho-kinase erection mediatory pathways. These data offer new insight into the homeostasis of erection regulatory biology. PMID:17113219

  3. Invertebrate Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase Gene: Genetic Architecture, Biochemistry, Physiological Function, and Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-reducing disaccharide trehalose is widely distributed among various organisms. It plays a crucial role as an instant source of energy, being the major blood sugar in insects. In addition, it helps countering abiotic stresses. Trehalose synthesis in insects and other invertebrates is thought to occur via the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS and trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP pathways. In many insects, the TPP gene has not been identified, whereas multiple TPS genes that encode proteins harboring TPS/OtsA and TPP/OtsB conserved domains have been found and cloned in the same species. The function of the TPS gene in insects and other invertebrates has not been reviewed in depth, and the available information is quite fragmented. The present review discusses the current understanding of the trehalose synthesis pathway, TPS genetic architecture, biochemistry, physiological function, and potential sensitivity to insecticides. We note the variability in the number of TPS genes in different invertebrate species, consider whether trehalose synthesis may rely only on the TPS gene, and discuss the results of in vitro TPS overexpression experiment. Tissue expression profile and developmental characteristics of the TPS gene indicate that it is important in energy production, growth and development, metamorphosis, stress recovery, chitin synthesis, insect flight, and other biological processes. We highlight the molecular and biochemical properties of insect TPS that make it a suitable target of potential pest control inhibitors. The application of trehalose synthesis inhibitors is a promising direction in insect pest control because vertebrates do not synthesize trehalose; therefore, TPS inhibitors would be relatively safe for humans and higher animals, making them ideal insecticidal agents without off-target effects.

  4. Molecular Diversity of Terpene Synthases in the Liverwort Marchantia polymorpha[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xun; Jiang, Zuodong; Jia, Qidong; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2016-01-01

    Marchantia polymorpha is a basal terrestrial land plant, which like most liverworts accumulates structurally diverse terpenes believed to serve in deterring disease and herbivory. Previous studies have suggested that the mevalonate and methylerythritol phosphate pathways, present in evolutionarily diverged plants, are also operative in liverworts. However, the genes and enzymes responsible for the chemical diversity of terpenes have yet to be described. In this study, we resorted to a HMMER search tool to identify 17 putative terpene synthase genes from M. polymorpha transcriptomes. Functional characterization identified four diterpene synthase genes phylogenetically related to those found in diverged plants and nine rather unusual monoterpene and sesquiterpene synthase-like genes. The presence of separate monofunctional diterpene synthases for ent-copalyl diphosphate and ent-kaurene biosynthesis is similar to orthologs found in vascular plants, pushing the date of the underlying gene duplication and neofunctionalization of the ancestral diterpene synthase gene family to >400 million years ago. By contrast, the mono- and sesquiterpene synthases represent a distinct class of enzymes, not related to previously described plant terpene synthases and only distantly so to microbial-type terpene synthases. The absence of a Mg2+ binding, aspartate-rich, DDXXD motif places these enzymes in a noncanonical family of terpene synthases. PMID:27650333

  5. Functional Enzyme-Based Approach for Linking Microbial Community Functions with Biogeochemical Process Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minjing [School; Qian, Wei-jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Gao, Yuqian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Shi, Liang [School; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; School

    2017-09-28

    The kinetics of biogeochemical processes in natural and engineered environmental systems are typically described using Monod-type or modified Monod-type models. These models rely on biomass as surrogates for functional enzymes in microbial community that catalyze biogeochemical reactions. A major challenge to apply such models is the difficulty to quantitatively measure functional biomass for constraining and validating the models. On the other hand, omics-based approaches have been increasingly used to characterize microbial community structure, functions, and metabolites. Here we proposed an enzyme-based model that can incorporate omics-data to link microbial community functions with biogeochemical process kinetics. The model treats enzymes as time-variable catalysts for biogeochemical reactions and applies biogeochemical reaction network to incorporate intermediate metabolites. The sequences of genes and proteins from metagenomes, as well as those from the UniProt database, were used for targeted enzyme quantification and to provide insights into the dynamic linkage among functional genes, enzymes, and metabolites that are necessary to be incorporated in the model. The application of the model was demonstrated using denitrification as an example by comparing model-simulated with measured functional enzymes, genes, denitrification substrates and intermediates

  6. Molecular Cloning, Expression, Purification, and Functional Characterization of Dammarenediol Synthase from Panax ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to clone and charecterize the expression of dammarenediol synthase gene and then to determine the relationship between the expression of dammarenediol synthase gene that is involved in the ginsenoside biosynthetic pathway and the ginsenoside content. A cDNA phage library was constructed from a five-year-old ginseng root. The cDNA library was screened for the dammarenediol synthase gene by using its specific primers. It was further cloned and expressed in pET-30a vector. The recombinant plasmid pET-30a-DS was expressed in Rosetta E. coli. The recombinant DS protein was purified by affinity chromatography. The production of dammarenediol was detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. Results showed that dammarenediol synthase gene was cloned from the cDNA library and was expressed in Rosetta E. coli and the SDS-PAGE analysis showed the presence of purified DS protein. LS-MS showed the activity of DS protein, as the protein content increases the dammarenediol increases. Our results indicate that the recombinant dammarenediol synthase protein could increase the production of dammarenediol and the expression of DS played a vital role in the biosynthesis of ginsenosides in P. ginseng.

  7. Identification of cystathionine γ-synthase and threonine synthase from Cicer arietinum and Lens culinaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morneau, Dominique J K; Jaworski, Allison F; Aitken, Susan M

    2013-04-01

    In plants, cystathionine γ-synthase (CGS) and threonine synthase (TS) compete for the branch-point metabolite O-phospho-L-homoserine. These enzymes are potential targets for metabolic engineering studies, aiming to alter the flux through the competing methionine and threonine biosynthetic pathways, with the goal of increasing methionine production. Although CGS and TS have been characterized in the model organisms Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana, little information is available on these enzymes in other, particularly plant, species. The functional CGS and TS coding sequences from the grain legumes Cicer arietinum (chickpea) and Lens culinaris (lentil) identified in this study share approximately 80% amino acid sequence identity with the corresponding sequences from Glycine max. At least 7 active-site residues of grain legume CGS and TS are conserved in the model bacterial enzymes, including the catalytic base. Putative processing sites that remove the targeting sequence and result in functional TS were identified in the target species.

  8. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase single nucleotide polymorphism and left ventricular function in early chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Chand

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with accelerated cardiovascular disease and heart failure. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS Glu298Asp single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotype has been associated with a worse phenotype amongst patients with established heart failure and in patients with progression of their renal disease. The association of a cardiac functional difference in non-dialysis CKD patients with no known previous heart failure, and eNOS gene variant is investigated.140 non-dialysis CKD patients, who had cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR imaging and tissue doppler echocardiography as part of two clinical trials, were genotyped for eNOS Glu298Asp SNP retrospectively.The median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was 50 mls/min and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was 74% with no overt diastolic dysfunction in this cohort. There were significant differences in LVEF across eNOS genotypes with GG genotype being associated with a worse LVEF compared to other genotypes (LVEF: GG 71%, TG 76%, TT 73%, p = 0.006. After multivariate analysis, (adjusting for age, eGFR, baseline mean arterial pressure, contemporary CMR heart rate, total cholesterol, high sensitive C-reactive protein, body mass index and gender GG genotype was associated with a worse LVEF, and increased LV end-diastolic and systolic index (p = 0.004, 0.049 and 0.009 respectively.eNOS Glu298Asp rs1799983 polymorphism in CKD patients is associated with relevant sub-clinical cardiac remodelling as detected by CMR. This gene variant may therefore represent an important genetic biomarker, and possibly highlight pathways for intervention, in these patients who are at particular risk of worsening cardiac disease as their renal dysfunction progresses.

  9. Isolation and function of spinach leaf β-ketoacyl-[acyl-carrier-protein] synthases

    OpenAIRE

    Shimakata, Takashi; Stumpf, Paul K.

    1982-01-01

    Crude spinach leaf extract readily forms the stearoyl derivative of acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) when acetyl-ACP and malonyl-ACP are incubated together. Palmitoyl-ACP is also elongated by malonyl-ACP to stearoyl-ACP. When β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase {3-oxoacyl-[ACP] synthase; acyl-[ACP]:malonyl-[ACP] C-acyltransferase (decarboxylating), EC 2.3.1.41} is purified with decanoyl-ACP as the assay substrate, palmitoyl-ACP elongation activity is lost. When palmitoyl-ACP is the assay substrate, another pro...

  10. Increased enzyme production under liquid culture conditions in the industrial fungus Aspergillus oryzae by disruption of the genes encoding cell wall α-1,3-glucan synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Ken; Yoshimi, Akira; Zhang, Silai; Sano, Motoaki; Nakayama, Mayumi; Gomi, Katsuya; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-09-01

    Under liquid culture conditions, the hyphae of filamentous fungi aggregate to form pellets, which reduces cell density and fermentation productivity. Previously, we found that loss of α-1,3-glucan in the cell wall of the fungus Aspergillus nidulans increased hyphal dispersion. Therefore, here we constructed a mutant of the industrial fungus A. oryzae in which the three genes encoding α-1,3-glucan synthase were disrupted (tripleΔ). Although the hyphae of the tripleΔ mutant were not fully dispersed, the mutant strain did form smaller pellets than the wild-type strain. We next examined enzyme productivity under liquid culture conditions by transforming the cutinase-encoding gene cutL1 into A. oryzae wild-type and the tripleΔ mutant (i.e. wild-type-cutL1, tripleΔ-cutL1). A. oryzae tripleΔ-cutL1 formed smaller hyphal pellets and showed both greater biomass and increased CutL1 productivity compared with wild-type-cutL1, which might be attributable to a decrease in the number of tripleΔ-cutL1 cells under anaerobic conditions.

  11. The DapA gene encoding the lysine biosynthetic enzyme dihydrodipicolinate synthase from Coix lacryma-jobi: cloning, characterization, and expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dante, R A; Neto, G C; Leite, A; Yunes, J A; Arruda, P

    1999-11-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHPS) is the main enzyme of a specific branch of the aspartate pathway leading to lysine biosynthesis in higher plants. We have cloned and characterized the DHPS-encoding Dap)A gene from the maize-related grass Coix lacryiana-jobi. The DapA open reading frame is interrupted by two introns and encodes the 326 amino acid-long Coix DHPS protein, which is 95% identical to the maize DHPS protein. Coix DNA gel blot analysis with maize DHPS cDNA as a probe showed a single strongly hybridizing band along with faint bands. RNA gel blot analysis showed that DHPS transcripts are present in coleoptiles, embryos, endosperms, and roots but are almost undetectable in blades of young leaves of both Coix and maize. The 5'-flanking region of the DapA gene contains a TGACTC GCN4-like element located 372 bp upstream the putative translation start codon. Steady-state levels of DHPS mRNA were slightly reduced in the endosperms and embryos of the maize lysine-rich opaque2 mutants when compared with those in normal kernels. Selective binding assay with the maize Opaque2 protein (O2) showed that the GCN4-like element is not an O2 binding site, suggesting that the DHPS gene is not under the control of O2.

  12. Arctigenin promotes degradation of inducible nitric oxide synthase through CHIP-associated proteasome pathway and suppresses its enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiangyang; Li, Guilan; Lü, Chaotian; Xu, Hui; Yin, Zhimin

    2012-10-01

    Arctigenin, a natural dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan compound, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Previous works showed that arctigenin decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced iNOS at transcription level. However, whether arctigenin could regulate iNOS at the post-translational level is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that arctigenin promoted the degradation of iNOS which is expressed under LPS stimulation in murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells. Such degradation of iNOS protein is due to CHIP-associated ubiquitination and proteasome-dependency. Furthermore, arctigenin decreased iNOS phosphorylation through inhibiting ERK and Src activation, subsequently suppressed iNOS enzyme activity. In conclusion, our research displays a new finding that arctigenin can promote the ubiqitination and degradation of iNOS after LPS stimulation. iNOS activity regulated by arctigenin is likely to involve a multitude of crosstalking mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of sucrose-cleaving enzymes in carrot (Daucus carota L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, A

    1996-08-01

    The amount of carbon transported into storage organs of crop plants to a large degree determines crop yield. The role of sucrose-cleaving enzymes in this process is not clear and it is the main goal of our work to tackle this question. Sucrose cleavage is catalysed either by invertase or sucrose synthase both of which exist in several isoforms with different subcellular locations. Carrot (Daucus carota L.) contains three major isoenzymes of acid invertase, which either accumulate as soluble polypeptides in the vacuole (isoenzymes I and II) or are ionically bound to the cell wall. Carrot sucrose synthase is thought to be a cytoplasmic enzyme encoded by two genes. cDNA clones have been isolated and characterized for cell wall invertase, for isoenzymes I and II of vacuolar invertase, and for sucrose synthase. Gene-specific fragments of these clones were used to determine the steady-state levels of transcripts in the prominent sink and source organs of developing carrot plants. The expression patterns of each gene were different and were organ- and development-specific. Developing tap roots contained only transcripts for isoenzyme II of vacuolar invertase and sucrose synthase. The source/sink balance of these plants was manipulated and only the expression of these two genes was markedly altered, indicating their importance in sucrose partitioning. Based on these results, a model is proposed for sucrose partitioning in carrot plants with developing tap roots in which sucrose synthase regulates sucrose utilization, whereas isoenzyme II of vacuolar invertase controls sucrose storage and sugar composition.

  14. The absence of functional glucosylceramide synthase does not sensitize melanoma cells for anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, RJ; Mita, A; Cuvillier, O; Garcia, [No Value; Klappe, K; Medin, JA; Campbell, JD; Carpentier, S; Kok, JW; Levade, T

    Conversion of ceramide, a putative mediator of anticancer drug-induced apoptosis, into glucosylceramide, by the action of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), has been implicated in drug resistance. Herein, we compared GM95 mouse melanoma cells deficient in GCS activity, with cells stably transfected

  15. Eukaryotic beta-alanine synthases are functionally related but have a high degree of structural diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojković, Z; Sandrini, M P; Piskur, J

    2001-01-01

    beta-Alanine synthase (EC 3.5.1.6), which catalyzes the final step of pyrimidine catabolism, has only been characterized in mammals. A Saccharomyces kluyveri pyd3 mutant that is unable to grow on N-carbamyl-beta-alanine as the sole nitrogen source and exhibits diminished beta-alanine synthase activity was used to clone analogous genes from different eukaryotes. Putative PYD3 sequences from the yeast S. kluyveri, the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster complemented the pyd3 defect. When the S. kluyveri PYD3 gene was expressed in S. cerevisiae, which has no pyrimidine catabolic pathway, it enabled growth on N-carbamyl-beta-alanine as the sole nitrogen source. The D. discoideum and D. melanogaster PYD3 gene products are similar to mammalian beta-alanine synthases. In contrast, the S. kluyveri protein is quite different from these and more similar to bacterial N-carbamyl amidohydrolases. All three beta-alanine synthases are to some degree related to various aspartate transcarbamylases, which catalyze the second step of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. PYD3 expression in yeast seems to be inducible by dihydrouracil and N-carbamyl-beta-alanine, but not by uracil. This work establishes S. kluyveri as a model organism for studying pyrimidine degradation and beta-alanine production in eukaryotes. PMID:11454750

  16. VTVH-MCD and DFT studies of thiolate bonding to [FeNO]7/[FeO2]8 complexes of isopenicillin N synthase: substrate determination of oxidase versus oxygenase activity in nonheme Fe enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christina D; Neidig, Michael L; Neibergall, Matthew B; Lipscomb, John D; Solomon, Edward I

    2007-06-13

    Isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS) is a unique mononuclear nonheme Fe enzyme that catalyzes the four-electron oxidative double ring closure of its substrate ACV. A combination of spectroscopic techniques including EPR, absorbance, circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD, and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH-MCD) were used to evaluate the geometric and electronic structure of the [FeNO]7 complex of IPNS coordinated with the ACV thiolate ligand. Density Function Theory (DFT) calculations correlated to the spectroscopic data were used to generate an experimentally calibrated bonding description of the Fe-IPNS-ACV-NO complex. New spectroscopic features introduced by the binding of the ACV thiolate at 13 100 and 19 800 cm-1 are assigned as the NO pi*(ip) --> Fe dx2-y2 and S pi--> Fe dx2-y2 charge transfer (CT) transitions, respectively. Configuration interaction mixes S CT character into the NO pi*(ip) --> Fe dx2-y2 CT transition, which is observed experimentally from the VTVH-MCD data from this transition. Calculations on the hypothetical {FeO2}8 complex of Fe-IPNS-ACV reveal that the configuration interaction present in the [FeNO]7 complex results in an unoccupied frontier molecular orbital (FMO) with correct orientation and distal O character for H-atom abstraction from the ACV substrate. The energetics of NO/O2 binding to Fe-IPNS-ACV were evaluated and demonstrate that charge donation from the ACV thiolate ligand renders the formation of the FeIII-superoxide complex energetically favorable, driving the reaction at the Fe center. This single center reaction allows IPNS to avoid the O2 bridged binding generally invoked in other nonheme Fe enzymes that leads to oxygen insertion (i.e., oxygenase function) and determines the oxidase activity of IPNS.

  17. ES7, encoding a ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase, functions in nitrogen metabolism and impacts leaf senescence in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Yingxin; Wu, Weixun; Zhan, Xiaodeng; Yu, Ning; Xu, Tingting; Liu, Qunen; Li, Zhi; Shen, Xihong; Chen, Daibo; Cheng, Shihua; Cao, Liyong

    2017-06-01

    Glutamate synthase (GOGAT) is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism and ammonium assimilation in plants. In this study, an early senescence 7 (es7) mutant was identified and characterized. The leaves of the es7 mutant begin to senesce at the tillering stage about 60day after sowing, and become increasingly senescent as the plants develop at the heading stage. When es7 plants are grown under photorespiration-suppressed conditions (high CO2), the senescence phenotype and chlorophyll content are rescued. qRT-PCR analysis showed that senescence- associated genes were up-regulated significantly in es7. A map-based cloning strategy was used to identify ES7, which encodes a ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (Fd-GOGAT). ES7 was expressed constitutively, and the ES7 protein was localized in chloroplast. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that several genes related to nitrogen metabolism were differentially expressed in es7. Further, we also demonstrated that chlorophyll synthesis-associated genes were significantly down-regulated in es7. In addition, when seedlings are grown under increasing nitrogen concentrations (NH4NO3) for 15days, the contents of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll were significantly lower in es7. Our results demonstrated that ES7 is involved in nitrogen metabolism, effects chlorophyll synthesis, and may also associated with photorespiration, impacting leaf senescence in rice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular dynamics analysis of the structural and dynamic properties of the functionally enhanced hepta-variant of mouse 5-aminolevulinate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Insung; DeForte, Shelly; Stojanovski, Bosko M; Ferreira, Gloria C; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2018-01-01

    Heme biosynthesis, a complex, multistage, and tightly controlled process, starts with 5-aminolevulinate (ALA) production, which, in metazoa and certain bacteria, is a reaction catalyzed by 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS), a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme. Functional aberrations in ALAS are associated with several human diseases. ALAS can adopt open and closed conformations, with segmental rearrangements of a C-terminal, 16-amino acid loop and an α-helix regulating accessibility to the ALAS active site. Of the murine erythroid ALAS (mALAS2) forms previously engineered to assess the role of the flexible C-terminal loop versus mALAS2 function one stood out due to its impressive gain in catalytic power. To elucidate how the simultaneously introduced seven mutations of this activity-enhanced variant affected structural and dynamic properties of mALAS2, we conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulation analysis of the dimeric forms of wild-type mALAS2, hepta-variant and Rhodobacter capsulatus ALAS (aka R. capsulatus HemA). This analysis revealed that the seven simultaneous mutations in the C-terminal loop, which extends over the active site of the enzyme, caused the bacterial and murine proteins to adopt different conformations. Specifically, a new β-strand in the mutated 'loop' led to interaction with two preexisting β-strands and formation of an anti-parallel three-stranded β-sheet, which likely endowed the murine hepta-variant a more 'stable' open conformation than that of wild-type mALAS2, consistent with a kinetic mechanism involving a faster closed-to-open conformation transition and product release for the mutated than wild-type enzyme. Further, the dynamic behavior of the mALAS2 protomers was strikingly different in the two dimeric forms.

  19. Analysis of the polymerization initiation and activity of Pasteurella multocida heparosan synthase PmHS2, an enzyme with glycosyltransferase and UDP-sugar hydrolase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chavaroche, A.A.E.; Broek, van den L.A.M.; Springer, J.; Boeriu, C.; Eggink, G.

    2011-01-01

    Heparosan synthase catalyzes the polymerization of heparosan [-4GlcUAß1-4GlcNAca1-]n by transferring alternatively the monosaccharide units from UDP-GlcUA and UDP-GlcNAc to an acceptor molecule. Details on the heparosan chain initiation by Pasteurella multocida heparosan synthase PmHS2 and its

  20. Functional Roles of the Tetramer Organization of Malic Enzyme*

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Chen, Shao-Hung; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2009-01-01

    Malic enzyme has a dimer of dimers quaternary structure in which the dimer interface associates more tightly than the tetramer interface. In addition, the enzyme has distinct active sites within each subunit. The mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme (m-NAD(P)-ME) isoform behaves cooperatively and allosterically and exhibits a quaternary structure in dimer-tetramer equilibrium. The cytosolic NADP+-dependent malic enzyme (c-NADP-ME) isoform is noncooperative and nonallosteric and exists...

  1. Structural similarities and functional differences clarify evolutionary relationships between tRNA healing enzymes and the myelin enzyme CNPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandam, Gopinath; Raasakka, Arne; Myllykoski, Matti; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2017-05-16

    Eukaryotic tRNA splicing is an essential process in the transformation of a primary tRNA transcript into a mature functional tRNA molecule. 5'-phosphate ligation involves two steps: a healing reaction catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK) in association with cyclic phosphodiesterase (CPDase), and a sealing reaction catalyzed by an RNA ligase. The enzymes that catalyze tRNA healing in yeast and higher eukaryotes are homologous to the members of the 2H phosphoesterase superfamily, in particular to the vertebrate myelin enzyme 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase). We employed different biophysical and biochemical methods to elucidate the overall structural and functional features of the tRNA healing enzymes yeast Trl1 PNK/CPDase and lancelet PNK/CPDase and compared them with vertebrate CNPase. The yeast and the lancelet enzymes have cyclic phosphodiesterase and polynucleotide kinase activity, while vertebrate CNPase lacks PNK activity. In addition, we also show that the healing enzymes are structurally similar to the vertebrate CNPase by applying synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. We provide a structural analysis of the tRNA healing enzyme PNK and CPDase domains together. Our results support evolution of vertebrate CNPase from tRNA healing enzymes with a loss of function at its N-terminal PNK-like domain.

  2. Structural, Functional, and Evolutionary Analysis of the Unusually Large Stilbene Synthase Gene Family in Grapevine1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parage, Claire; Tavares, Raquel; Réty, Stéphane; Baltenweck-Guyot, Raymonde; Poutaraud, Anne; Renault, Lauriane; Heintz, Dimitri; Lugan, Raphaël; Marais, Gabriel A.B.; Aubourg, Sébastien; Hugueney, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Stilbenes are a small family of phenylpropanoids produced in a number of unrelated plant species, including grapevine (Vitis vinifera). In addition to their participation in defense mechanisms in plants, stilbenes, such as resveratrol, display important pharmacological properties and are postulated to be involved in the health benefits associated with a moderate consumption of red wine. Stilbene synthases (STSs), which catalyze the biosynthesis of the stilbene backbone, seem to have evolved from chalcone synthases (CHSs) several times independently in stilbene-producing plants. STS genes usually form small families of two to five closely related paralogs. By contrast, the sequence of grapevine reference genome (cv PN40024) has revealed an unusually large STS gene family. Here, we combine molecular evolution and structural and functional analyses to investigate further the high number of STS genes in grapevine. Our reannotation of the STS and CHS gene families yielded 48 STS genes, including at least 32 potentially functional ones. Functional characterization of nine genes representing most of the STS gene family diversity clearly indicated that these genes do encode for proteins with STS activity. Evolutionary analysis of the STS gene family revealed that both STS and CHS evolution are dominated by purifying selection, with no evidence for strong selection for new functions among STS genes. However, we found a few sites under different selection pressures in CHS and STS sequences, whose potential functional consequences are discussed using a structural model of a typical STS from grapevine that we developed. PMID:22961129

  3. Functional and structural characterization of a novel mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase from Rubrobacter xylanophilus reveals its dual substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empadinhas, Nuno; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Albuquerque, Luciana; Costa, Joana; Sá-Moura, Bebiana; Marques, Alexandra T; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; da Costa, Milton S

    2011-01-01

    Rubrobacter xylanophilus is the only actinobacterium known to accumulate the organic solute mannosylglycerate (MG); moreover, the accumulation of MG is constitutive. The key enzyme for MG synthesis, catalysing the conversion of GDP-mannose (GDP-Man) and D-3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) into the phosphorylated intermediate mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate and GDP, was purified from R. xylanophilus cell extracts and the corresponding gene was expressed in E. coli. Despite the related solute glucosylglycerate (GG) having never been detected in R. xylanophilus, the cell extracts and the pure recombinant mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (MpgS) could also synthesize glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate (GPG), the precursor of GG, in agreement with the higher homology of the novel MpgS towards GPG-synthesizing mycobacterial glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthases (GpgS) than towards MpgSs from hyper/thermophiles, known to accumulate MG under salt or thermal stress. To understand the specificity and substrate ambiguity of this novel enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the unliganded MpgS and of its complexes with the nucleotide and sugar donors, at 2.2, 2.8 and 2.5 Å resolution respectively. The first three-dimensional structures of a protein from this extremely gamma-radiation-resistant thermophile here reported show that MpgS (GT81 family) contains a GT-A like fold and clearly explain its nucleotide and sugar-donor specificity. In the GDP-Man complex, a flexible loop ((254) RQNRHQ(259) ), located close to the active site moves towards the incoming sugar moiety, providing the ligands for both magnesium ion co-ordination and sugar binding. A triple mutant of R. xylanophilus MpgS, mimicking the (206) PLAGE(210) loop stabilizing hydrogen bond network observed for mycobacterial GpgSs, reduces significantly the affinity to GDP-Man, implicating this loop in the sugar-donor discrimination. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Citrate synthase purified from Tetrahymena mitochondria is identical with Tetrahymena 14-nm filament protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, H; Chiba, J; Watanabe, Y; Numata, O

    1995-07-01

    A 14-nm filament protein (designated as 49K protein) was purified from a ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena, using the polymerization and depolymerization procedure. Previous studies in our laboratory showed that its primary structure shared a high sequence identity with citrate synthases known so far and that the 49K protein possessed citrate synthase activity. To ascertain whether or not Tetrahymena's mitochondrial citrate synthase is identical to the 49K protein, citrate synthase was purified from Tetrahymena mitochondria using ammonium sulfate fractionation, Butyl-Toyopearl and SP-Toyopearl column chromatographies, based on monitoring of the enzymatic activity. The molecular weight of the purified citrate synthase was estimated to be 49 kDa, as was that of the 49K protein and the enzyme cross-reacted with an anti-49K protein antiserum. The purified citrate synthase showed much the same optimum pH, optimum KCl concentration, effects of substrate concentrations (acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate), and inhibitory effect by ATP as those of purified 49K protein. Furthermore, an anti-49K protein monoclonal antibody strongly suppressed the enzymatic activity of the purified citrate synthase. Thus, we suggest that mitochondrial citrate synthase and the 49K protein are identical and that the 49K protein has dual functions in the cytoskeleton in cytoplasm and as a TCA cycle enzyme, citrate synthase, in mitochondria.

  5. The Dictyostelium discoideum cellulose synthase: Structure/function analysis and identification of interacting proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard L. Blanton

    2004-02-19

    OAK-B135 The major accomplishments of this project were: (1) the initial characterization of dcsA, the gene for the putative catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum; (2) the detection of a developmentally regulated event (unidentified, but perhaps a protein modification or association with a protein partner) that is required for cellulose synthase activity (i.e., the dcsA product is necessary, but not sufficient for cellulose synthesis); (3) the continued exploration of the developmental context of cellulose synthesis and DcsA; (4) the isolation of a GFP-DcsA-expressing strain (work in progress); and (5) the identification of Dictyostelium homologues for plant genes whose products play roles in cellulose biosynthesis. Although our progress was slow and many of our results negative, we did develop a number of promising avenues of investigation that can serve as the foundation for future projects.

  6. Lipoic Acid Synthase (LASY)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Indira Padmalayam; Sumera Hasham; Uday Saxena; Sivaram Pillarisetti

    2009-01-01

    Lipoic Acid Synthase (LASY) A Novel Role in Inflammation, Mitochondrial Function, and Insulin Resistance Indira Padmalayam 1 , Sumera Hasham 2 , Uday Saxena 1 and Sivaram Pillarisetti 1 1 Discovery Research, ReddyUS...

  7. Structural and Functional Trends in Dehydrating Bimodules from trans -Acyltransferase Polyketide Synthases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Drew T.; Zeng, Jia; Bailey, Constance B.; Gay, Darren C.; Yuan, Fang; Manion, Hannah R.; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T. (Texas)

    2017-07-01

    In an effort to uncover the structural motifs and biosynthetic logic of the relatively uncharacterized trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthases, we have begun the dissection of the enigmatic dehydrating bimodules common in these enzymatic assembly lines. We report the 1.98 Å resolution structure of a ketoreductase (KR) from the first half of a type A dehydrating bimodule and the 2.22 Å resolution structure of a dehydratase (DH) from the second half of a type B dehydrating bimodule. The KR, from the third module of the bacillaene synthase, and the DH, from the tenth module of the difficidin synthase, possess features not observed in structurally characterized homologs. The DH architecture provides clues for how it catalyzes a unique double dehydration. Correlations between the chemistries proposed for dehydrating bimodules and bioinformatic analysis indicate that type A dehydrating bimodules generally produce an α/β-cis alkene moiety, while type B dehydrating bimodules generally produce an α/β-trans, γ/δ-cis diene moiety.

  8. An innovative strategy for dual inhibitor design and its application in dual inhibition of human thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahreen Arooj

    Full Text Available Due to the diligence of inherent redundancy and robustness in many biological networks and pathways, multitarget inhibitors present a new prospect in the pharmaceutical industry for treatment of complex diseases. Nevertheless, to design multitarget inhibitors is concurrently a great challenge for medicinal chemists. We have developed a novel computational approach by integrating the affinity predictions from structure-based virtual screening with dual ligand-based pharmacophore to discover potential dual inhibitors of human Thymidylate synthase (hTS and human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR. These are the key enzymes in folate metabolic pathway that is necessary for the biosynthesis of RNA, DNA, and protein. Their inhibition has found clinical utility as antitumor, antimicrobial, and antiprotozoal agents. A druglike database was utilized to perform dual-target docking studies. Hits identified through docking experiments were mapped over a dual pharmacophore which was developed from experimentally known dual inhibitors of hTS and hDHFR. Pharmacophore mapping procedure helped us in eliminating the compounds which do not possess basic chemical features necessary for dual inhibition. Finally, three structurally diverse hit compounds that showed key interactions at both active sites, mapped well upon the dual pharmacophore, and exhibited lowest binding energies were regarded as possible dual inhibitors of hTS and hDHFR. Furthermore, optimization studies were performed for final dual hit compound and eight optimized dual hits demonstrating excellent binding features at target systems were also regarded as possible dual inhibitors of hTS and hDHFR. In general, the strategy used in the current study could be a promising computational approach and may be generally applicable to other dual target drug designs.

  9. Characterization, Function, and Transcriptional Profiling Analysis of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA Synthase Gene (GbHMGS1) towards Stresses and Exogenous Hormone Treatments in Ginkgo biloba

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiangxiang Meng; Qiling Song; Jiabao Ye; Lanlan Wang; Feng Xu

    2017-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGS) is one of the rate-limiting enzymes in the mevalonate pathway as it catalyzes the condensation of acetoacetyl-CoA to form 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA...

  10. Suites of terpene synthases explain differential terpenoid production in ginger and turmeric tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jo Koo

    Full Text Available The essential oils of ginger (Zingiber officinale and turmeric (Curcuma longa contain a large variety of terpenoids, some of which possess anticancer, antiulcer, and antioxidant properties. Despite their importance, only four terpene synthases have been identified from the Zingiberaceae family: (+-germacrene D synthase and (S-β-bisabolene synthase from ginger rhizome, and α-humulene synthase and β-eudesmol synthase from shampoo ginger (Zingiber zerumbet rhizome. We report the identification of 25 mono- and 18 sesquiterpene synthases from ginger and turmeric, with 13 and 11, respectively, being functionally characterized. Novel terpene synthases, (--caryolan-1-ol synthase and α-zingiberene/β-sesquiphellandrene synthase, which is responsible for formation of the major sesquiterpenoids in ginger and turmeric rhizomes, were also discovered. These suites of enzymes are responsible for formation of the majority of the terpenoids present in these two plants. Structures of several were modeled, and a comparison of sets of paralogs suggests how the terpene synthases in ginger and turmeric evolved. The most abundant and most important sesquiterpenoids in turmeric rhizomes, (+-α-turmerone and (+-β-turmerone, are produced from (--α-zingiberene and (--β-sesquiphellandrene, respectively, via α-zingiberene/β-sesquiphellandrene oxidase and a still unidentified dehydrogenase.

  11. Suites of Terpene Synthases Explain Differential Terpenoid Production in Ginger and Turmeric Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Gang, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The essential oils of ginger (Zingiber officinale) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) contain a large variety of terpenoids, some of which possess anticancer, antiulcer, and antioxidant properties. Despite their importance, only four terpene synthases have been identified from the Zingiberaceae family: (+)-germacrene D synthase and (S)-β-bisabolene synthase from ginger rhizome, and α-humulene synthase and β-eudesmol synthase from shampoo ginger (Zingiber zerumbet) rhizome. We report the identification of 25 mono- and 18 sesquiterpene synthases from ginger and turmeric, with 13 and 11, respectively, being functionally characterized. Novel terpene synthases, (−)-caryolan-1-ol synthase and α-zingiberene/β-sesquiphellandrene synthase, which is responsible for formation of the major sesquiterpenoids in ginger and turmeric rhizomes, were also discovered. These suites of enzymes are responsible for formation of the majority of the terpenoids present in these two plants. Structures of several were modeled, and a comparison of sets of paralogs suggests how the terpene synthases in ginger and turmeric evolved. The most abundant and most important sesquiterpenoids in turmeric rhizomes, (+)-α-turmerone and (+)-β-turmerone, are produced from (−)-α-zingiberene and (−)-β-sesquiphellandrene, respectively, via α-zingiberene/β-sesquiphellandrene oxidase and a still unidentified dehydrogenase. PMID:23272109

  12. Folate binding site of flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Eric M; Perissinotti, Laura L; Moghram, Salah; Prabhakar, Arjun; Lesley, Scott A; Mathews, Irimpan I; Kohen, Amnon

    2012-09-25

    The DNA nucleotide thymidylate is synthesized by the enzyme thymidylate synthase, which catalyzes the reductive methylation of deoxyuridylate using the cofactor methylene-tetrahydrofolate (CH(2)H(4)folate). Most organisms, including humans, rely on the thyA- or TYMS-encoded classic thymidylate synthase, whereas, certain microorganisms, including all Rickettsia and other pathogens, use an alternative thyX-encoded flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase (FDTS). Although several crystal structures of FDTSs have been reported, the absence of a structure with folates limits understanding of the molecular mechanism and the scope of drug design for these enzymes. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of FDTS with several folate derivatives, which together with mutagenesis, kinetic analysis, and computer modeling shed light on the cofactor binding and function. The unique structural data will likely facilitate further elucidation of FDTSs' mechanism and the design of structure-based inhibitors as potential leads to new antimicrobial drugs.

  13. Quantitative comparison of catalytic mechanisms and overall reactions in convergently evolved enzymes: implications for classification of enzyme function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonacid, Daniel E; Yera, Emmanuel R; Mitchell, John B O; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2010-03-12

    Functionally analogous enzymes are those that catalyze similar reactions on similar substrates but do not share common ancestry, providing a window on the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve required catalysts. Identification and use of this information to improve reaction classification and computational annotation of enzymes newly discovered in the genome projects would benefit from systematic determination of reaction similarities. Here, we quantified similarity in bond changes for overall reactions and catalytic mechanisms for 95 pairs of functionally analogous enzymes (non-homologous enzymes with identical first three numbers of their EC codes) from the MACiE database. Similarity of overall reactions was computed by comparing the sets of bond changes in the transformations from substrates to products. For similarity of mechanisms, sets of bond changes occurring in each mechanistic step were compared; these similarities were then used to guide global and local alignments of mechanistic steps. Using this metric, only 44% of pairs of functionally analogous enzymes in the dataset had significantly similar overall reactions. For these enzymes, convergence to the same mechanism occurred in 33% of cases, with most pairs having at least one identical mechanistic step. Using our metric, overall reaction similarity serves as an upper bound for mechanistic similarity in functional analogs. For example, the four carbon-oxygen lyases acting on phosphates (EC 4.2.3) show neither significant overall reaction similarity nor significant mechanistic similarity. By contrast, the three carboxylic-ester hydrolases (EC 3.1.1) catalyze overall reactions with identical bond changes and have converged to almost identical mechanisms. The large proportion of enzyme pairs that do not show significant overall reaction similarity (56%) suggests that at least for the functionally analogous enzymes studied here, more stringent criteria could be used to refine

  14. Exploiting Unique Structural and Functional Properties of Malarial Glycolytic Enzymes for Antimalarial Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asrar Alam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic enzymes have been known to carry out a variety of functions besides their normal housekeeping roles known as “moonlighting functions.” These functionalities arise from structural changes induced by posttranslational modifications and/or binding of interacting proteins. Glycolysis is the sole source of energy generation for malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, hence a potential pathway for therapeutic intervention. Crystal structures of several P. falciparum glycolytic enzymes have been solved, revealing that they exhibit unique structural differences from the respective host enzymes, which could be exploited for their selective targeting. In addition, these enzymes carry out many parasite-specific functions, which could be of potential interest to control parasite development and transmission. This review focuses on the moonlighting functions of P. falciparum glycolytic enzymes and unique structural differences and functional features of the parasite enzymes, which could be exploited for therapeutic and transmission blocking interventions against malaria.

  15. Surface binding sites in carbohydrate active enzymes: An emerging picture of structural and functional diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Birte; Cockburn, Darrell

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes, particularly those that are active on polysaccharides, are often found associated with carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which can play several roles in supporting enzyme function, such as localizing the enzyme to the substrate. However, the presence of CBMs is not...

  16. The effect of prostaglandin synthase inhibitor, aspirin on the rat intestinal membrane structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, G; Kaur, J; Mittal, N; Nath Sanyal, S

    2010-01-01

    Aspirin at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight was found to decrease the activity of the rat intestinal brush border membrane (BBM) - associated enzymes such as the sucrase, lactase, maltase and alkaline phosphatase. Aspirin treatment also led to a decrease in the microviscosity in the native as well as the benzyl alcohol treated membrane which might be due to the lipid peroxidative damage in the membrane. Physical correlation of the membrane oxidative damage was evident as the Fourier Transformation Infra Red (FTIR) study of the Aspirin treated membrane, which include an increased proportion of gauche to trans conformer, shift in the methylene C-H asymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies, C = O double bond stretching, NH bending, antisymmetric (N)-CH3 bending, C-N stretching and antisymmetric CNC stretching while there was no change in the CH2 wagging and twisting as well as in NH-bending amide bond I and II. Aspirin treatment also caused an alteration in the glucose and histidine transport, as evident by a decreased Vmax value while the apparent Km remaining unchanged in the control and Aspirin-treated animals confirming that there was no change in the substrate affinity constant of the membrane transport proteins for the glucose and the basic amino acid, although the rate of transport decreased considerably. There was a decrease noted in the energy of activation of glucose and histidine transport when studied at different temperature but no change in the temperature of phase transition in the BBM with Aspirin treatment, thus implying that perhaps the thermotropic phase transition in the membrane may have relatively little effect on the transport processes. The result suggests an underlying molecular mechanism indicating the implied membrane damage by Aspirin, an important member of the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) family which could possibly through an oxidative damage may lead to an altered molecular structure, physical state and biological

  17. Functional and Evolutionary Characterization of a UDP-Xylose Synthase Gene from the Plant Pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, Involved in the Synthesis of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Valquíria Campos; Jabes, Daniela Leite; Menegidio, Fabiano Bezerra; Sassaki, Guilherme Lanzi; de Souza, Lucas Rodrigo; Puzer, Luciano; Meneghetti, Maria Cecília Zorél; Lima, Marcelo Andrade; Tersariol, Ivarne Luis Dos Santos; de Oliveira, Regina Costa; Nunes, Luiz R

    2017-02-07

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant-infecting bacillus, responsible for many important crop diseases, such as Pierce's disease of vineyards, citrus variegated chlorosis, and coffee leaf scorch (CLS), among others. Recent genomic comparisons involving two CLS-related strains, belonging to X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca, revealed that one of them carries a frameshift mutation that inactivates a gene encoding an oxidoreductase of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily, which may play important roles in determining structural variations in bacterial glycans and glycoconjugates. However, the exact nature of this SDR has been a matter of controversy, as different annotations of X. fastidiosa genomes have implicated it in distinct reactions. To confirm the nature of this mutated SDR, a comparative analysis was initially performed, suggesting that it belongs to a subgroup of SDR decarboxylases, representing a UDP-xylose synthase (Uxs). Functional assays, using a recombinant derivative of this enzyme, confirmed its nature as XfUxs, and carbohydrate composition analyses, performed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules obtained from different strains, indicate that inactivation of the X. fastidiosa uxs gene affects the LPS structure among CLS-related X. fastidiosa strains. Finally, a comparative sequence analysis suggests that this mutation is likely to result in a morphological and evolutionary hallmark that differentiates two subgroups of CLS-related strains, which may influence interactions between these bacteria and their plant and/or insect hosts.

  18. Integrin-linked kinase is a functional Mn2+-dependent protein kinase that regulates glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3beta phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola Maydan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrin-linked kinase (ILK is a highly evolutionarily conserved, multi-domain signaling protein that localizes to focal adhesions, myofilaments and centrosomes where it forms distinct multi-protein complexes to regulate cell adhesion, cell contraction, actin cytoskeletal organization and mitotic spindle assembly. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ILK can regulate the phosphorylation of various protein and peptide substrates in vitro, as well as the phosphorylation of potential substrates and various signaling pathways in cultured cell systems. Nevertheless, the ability of ILK to function as a protein kinase has been questioned because of its atypical kinase domain.Here, we have expressed full-length recombinant ILK, purified it to >94% homogeneity, and characterized its kinase activity. Recombinant ILK readily phosphorylates glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 peptide and the 20-kDa regulatory light chains of myosin (LC(20. Phosphorylation kinetics are similar to those of other active kinases, and mutation of the ATP-binding lysine (K220 within subdomain 2 causes marked reduction in enzymatic activity. We show that ILK is a Mn-dependent kinase (the K(m for MnATP is approximately 150-fold less than that for MgATP.Taken together, our data demonstrate that ILK is a bona fide protein kinase with enzyme kinetic properties similar to other active protein kinases.

  19. Homology to peptide pattern for annotation of carbohydrate-active enzymes and prediction of function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Pilgaard, Bo; Lezyk, Mateusz Jakub

    2017-01-01

    for prediction of enzyme function. A fastand reliable method for de novo annotation of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes is to identify conserved peptides in the curated enzyme families followed by matching of the conserved peptides to the sequence of interestas demonstrated for the glycosyl hydrolase...... and the lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase families. This approach notonly assigns the enzymes to families but also provides functional prediction of the enzymes with high accuracy. Results: We identified conserved peptides for all enzyme families in the CAZy database with Peptide Pattern Recognition....... The conserved peptides were matched to protein sequence for de novo annotation and functional prediction of carbohydrate-active enzymes with the Hotpep method. Annotation of protein sequences from 12 bacterial and 16 fungal genomes to families with Hotpep had an accuracy of 0.84 (measured as F1-score) compared...

  20. Antioxidant Functions of Nitric Oxide Synthase in a Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Vaish

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide and its derivative peroxynitrites are generated by host defense system to control bacterial infection. However certain Gram positive bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus possess a gene encoding nitric oxide synthase (SaNOS in their chromosome. In this study it was determined that under normal growth conditions, expression of SaNOS was highest during early exponential phase of the bacterial growth. In oxidative stress studies, deletion of SaNOS led to increased susceptibility of the mutant cells compared to wild-type S. aureus. While inhibition of SaNOS activity by the addition of L-NAME increased sensitivity of the wild-type S. aureus to oxidative stress, the addition of a nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside, restored oxidative stress tolerance of the SaNOS mutant. The SaNOS mutant also showed reduced survival after phagocytosis by PMN cells with respect to wild-type S. aureus.

  1. Diversity of sesquiterpene synthases in the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agger, Sean; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2009-06-01

    Fungi are a rich source of bioactive secondary metabolites, and mushroom-forming fungi (Agaricomycetes) are especially known for the synthesis of numerous bioactive and often cytotoxic sesquiterpenoid secondary metabolites. Compared with the large number of sesquiterpene synthases identified in plants, less than a handful of unique sesquiterpene synthases have been described from fungi. Here we describe the functional characterization of six sesquiterpene synthases (Cop1 to Cop6) and two terpene-oxidizing cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (Cox1 and Cox2) from Coprinus cinereus. The genes were cloned and, except for cop5, functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and/or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cop1 and Cop2 each synthesize germacrene A as the major product. Cop3 was identified as an alpha-muurolene synthase, an enzyme that has not been described previously, while Cop4 synthesizes delta-cadinene as its major product. Cop6 was originally annotated as a trichodiene synthase homologue but instead was found to catalyse the highly specific synthesis of alpha-cuprenene. Coexpression of cop6 and the two monooxygenase genes next to it yields oxygenated alpha-cuprenene derivatives, including cuparophenol, suggesting that these genes encode the enzymes for the biosynthesis of antimicrobial quinone sesquiterpenoids (known as lagopodins) that were previously isolated from C. cinereus and other Coprinus species.

  2. Detailed characterization of the substrate specificity of mouse wax synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklaszewska, Magdalena; Kawiński, Adam; Banaś, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Wax synthases are membrane-associated enzymes catalysing the esterification reaction between fatty acyl-CoA and a long chain fatty alcohol. In living organisms, wax esters function as storage materials or provide protection against harmful environmental influences. In industry, they are used as ingredients for the production of lubricants, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Currently the biological sources of wax esters are limited to jojoba oil. In order to establish a large-scale production of desired wax esters in transgenic high-yielding oilseed plants, enzymes involved in wax esters synthesis from different biological resources should be characterized in detail taking into consideration their substrate specificity. Therefore, this study aims at determining the substrate specificity of one of such enzymes -- the mouse wax synthase. The gene encoding this enzyme was expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the in vitro assays (using microsomal fraction from transgenic yeast), we evaluated the preferences of mouse wax synthase towards a set of combinations of 11 acyl-CoAs with 17 fatty alcohols. The highest activity was observed for 14:0-CoA, 12:0-CoA, and 16:0-CoA in combination with medium chain alcohols (up to 5.2, 3.4, and 3.3 nmol wax esters/min/mg microsomal protein, respectively). Unsaturated alcohols longer than 18°C were better utilized by the enzyme in comparison to the saturated ones. Combinations of all tested alcohols with 20:0-CoA, 22:1-CoA, or Ric-CoA were poorly utilized by the enzyme, and conjugated acyl-CoAs were not utilized at all. Apart from the wax synthase activity, mouse wax synthase also exhibited a very low acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity. However, it displayed neither acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase, nor acyl-CoA:sterol acyltransferase activity.

  3. Patterns of functional enzyme activity in fungus farming ambrosia beetles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Fine Licht Henrik H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In wood-dwelling fungus-farming weevils, the so-called ambrosia beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae, wood in the excavated tunnels is used as a medium for cultivating fungi by the combined action of digging larvae (which create more space for the fungi to grow and of adults sowing and pruning the fungus. The beetles are obligately dependent on the fungus that provides essential vitamins, amino acids and sterols. However, to what extent microbial enzymes support fungus farming in ambrosia beetles is unknown. Here we measure (i 13 plant cell-wall degrading enzymes in the fungus garden microbial consortium of the ambrosia beetle Xyleborinus saxesenii, including its primary fungal symbionts, in three compartments of laboratory maintained nests, at different time points after gallery foundation and (ii four specific enzymes that may be either insect or microbially derived in X. saxesenii adult and larval individuals. Results We discovered that the activity of cellulases in ambrosia fungus gardens is relatively small compared to the activities of other cellulolytic enzymes. Enzyme activity in all compartments of the garden was mainly directed towards hemicellulose carbohydrates such as xylan, glucomannan and callose. Hemicellulolytic enzyme activity within the brood chamber increased with gallery age, whereas irrespective of the age of the gallery, the highest overall enzyme activity were detected in the gallery dump material expelled by the beetles. Interestingly endo-β-1,3(4-glucanase activity capable of callose degradation was identified in whole-body extracts of both larvae and adult X. saxesenii, whereas endo-β-1,4-xylanase activity was exclusively detected in larvae. Conclusion Similar to closely related fungi associated with bark beetles in phloem, the microbial symbionts of ambrosia beetles hardly degrade cellulose. Instead, their enzyme activity is directed mainly towards comparatively more easily

  4. Patterns of functional enzyme activity in fungus farming ambrosia beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In wood-dwelling fungus-farming weevils, the so-called ambrosia beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae), wood in the excavated tunnels is used as a medium for cultivating fungi by the combined action of digging larvae (which create more space for the fungi to grow) and of adults sowing and pruning the fungus. The beetles are obligately dependent on the fungus that provides essential vitamins, amino acids and sterols. However, to what extent microbial enzymes support fungus farming in ambrosia beetles is unknown. Here we measure (i) 13 plant cell-wall degrading enzymes in the fungus garden microbial consortium of the ambrosia beetle Xyleborinus saxesenii, including its primary fungal symbionts, in three compartments of laboratory maintained nests, at different time points after gallery foundation and (ii) four specific enzymes that may be either insect or microbially derived in X. saxesenii adult and larval individuals. Results We discovered that the activity of cellulases in ambrosia fungus gardens is relatively small compared to the activities of other cellulolytic enzymes. Enzyme activity in all compartments of the garden was mainly directed towards hemicellulose carbohydrates such as xylan, glucomannan and callose. Hemicellulolytic enzyme activity within the brood chamber increased with gallery age, whereas irrespective of the age of the gallery, the highest overall enzyme activity were detected in the gallery dump material expelled by the beetles. Interestingly endo-β-1,3(4)-glucanase activity capable of callose degradation was identified in whole-body extracts of both larvae and adult X. saxesenii, whereas endo-β-1,4-xylanase activity was exclusively detected in larvae. Conclusion Similar to closely related fungi associated with bark beetles in phloem, the microbial symbionts of ambrosia beetles hardly degrade cellulose. Instead, their enzyme activity is directed mainly towards comparatively more easily accessible hemicellulose

  5. Evolution of Enzyme Superfamilies: Comprehensive Exploration of Sequence-Function Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, F; Copp, J N; Tokuriki, N

    2016-11-22

    The sequence and functional diversity of enzyme superfamilies have expanded through billions of years of evolution from a common ancestor. Understanding how protein sequence and functional "space" have expanded, at both the evolutionary and molecular level, is central to biochemistry, molecular biology, and evolutionary biology. Integrative approaches that examine protein sequence, structure, and function have begun to provide comprehensive views of the functional diversity and evolutionary relationships within enzyme superfamilies. In this review, we outline the recent advances in our understanding of enzyme evolution and superfamily functional diversity. We describe the tools that have been used to comprehensively analyze sequence relationships and to characterize sequence and function relationships. We also highlight recent large-scale experimental approaches that systematically determine the activity profiles across enzyme superfamilies. We identify several intriguing insights from this recent body of work. First, promiscuous activities are prevalent among extant enzymes. Second, many divergent proteins retain "function connectivity" via enzyme promiscuity, which can be used to probe the evolutionary potential and history of enzyme superfamilies. Finally, we discuss open questions regarding the intricacies of enzyme divergence, as well as potential research directions that will deepen our understanding of enzyme superfamily evolution.

  6. THE PREPARATION AND FUNCTION OF THE HYPERTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeggs, Leonard T.; Kahn, Joseph R.; Shumway, Norman P.

    1956-01-01

    It has been shown by use of isolated, perfused rat kidneys that hypertensin II is a potent vasoconstrictor substance while hypertensin I is not. Hence it would appear that in intact animals the pressor activity of hypertensin I results from its rapid conversion to hypertensin II. An enzyme which effects this conversion has been procured from horse plasma in a semipurified form by means of ammonium sulfate fractionation and isoelectric precipitation. A method is described for estimating the activity of the enzyme. An example of the use of the preparation in converting purified hypertensin I to hypertensin II has been described. PMID:13295487

  7. Structure and function of α-glucan debranching enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Sofie; Henriksen, Anette; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    α-Glucan debranching enzymes hydrolyse α-1,6-linkages in starch/glycogen, thereby, playing a central role in energy metabolism in all living organisms. They belong to glycoside hydrolase families GH13 and GH57 and several of these enzymes are industrially important. Nine GH13 subfamilies include α...... (GH13_41) in two-domain amylase–pullulanases. GH57 harbours type II pullulanases. Specificity differences, domain organisation, carbohydrate binding modules, sequence motifs, three-dimensional structures and specificity determinants are discussed. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that GH13...

  8. Not an exception to the rule: the functional significance of intrinsically disordered protein regions in enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForte, Shelly; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2017-02-28

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) are remarkably common and have unique and important biological functions. Enzymes have long been considered an exception to the rule of protein intrinsic disorder due to the structural requirements for catalysis. Although functionally significant IDPRs have been described in several enzymes, there has been no study quantifying the extent of this phenomenon. We have conducted a multilevel computational analysis of missing regions in X-ray crystal structures in the PDB and predicted disorder in 66 representative proteomes. We found that the fraction of predicted disorder was higher in non-enzymes than enzymes, because non-enzymes were more likely to be fully disordered. However, we also found that transferases, hydrolases and enzymes with multiple assigned functional classifications were similar to non-enzymes in terms of the length of the longest continuous stretch of predicted disorder. Both eukaryotic enzymes and non-enzymes had a greater disorder content than was seen in bacteria. Disorder at the proteome level appears to emerge in response to organismic and functional complexity, and enzymes are not an exception to this rule.

  9. Cloning, Expression Profiling and Functional Analysis of CnHMGS, a Gene Encoding 3-hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Synthase from Chamaemelum nobile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiyuan Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile L. is renowned for its production of essential oils, which major components are sesquiterpenoids. As the important enzyme in the sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase (HMGS catalyze the crucial step in the mevalonate pathway in plants. To isolate and identify the functional genes involved in the sesquiterpene biosynthesis of C. nobile L., a HMGS gene designated as CnHMGS (GenBank Accession No. KU529969 was cloned from C. nobile. The cDNA sequence of CnHMGS contained a 1377 bp open reading frame encoding a 458-amino-acid protein. The sequence of the CnHMGS protein was highly homologous to those of HMGS proteins from other plant species. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that CnHMGS clustered with the HMGS of Asteraceae in the dicotyledon clade. Further functional complementation of CnHMGS in the mutant yeast strain YSC6274 lacking HMGS activity demonstrated that the cloned CnHMGS cDNA encodes a functional HMGS. Transcript profile analysis indicated that CnHMGS was preferentially expressed in flowers and roots of C. nobile. The expression of CnHMGS could be upregulated by exogenous elicitors, including methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid, suggesting that CnHMGS was elicitor-responsive. The characterization and expression analysis of CnHMGS is helpful to understand the biosynthesis of sesquiterpenoid in C. nobile at the molecular level and also provides molecular wealth for the biotechnological improvement of this important medicinal plant.

  10. The defective phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase in a temperature-sensitive prs-2 mutant of Escherichia coli is compensated by increased enzyme synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Post, David A.; Switzer, Robert L.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    An Escherichia coli strain which is temperature-sensitive for growth due to a mutation (prs-2) causing a defective phosphoribosyl diphosphate (PRPP) synthase has been characterized. The temperature-sensitive mutation was mapped to a 276 bp HindIII-BssHII DNA fragment located within the open readi...

  11. A Comparative Analysis of Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Daniel; Frane, Nicole D; Brecht, Ryan M; Keeler, Jesse; Nagarajan, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Quorum sensing is cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to coordinate attacks on their hosts by inducing virulent gene expression, biofilm production, and other cellular functions, including antibiotic resistance. AHL synthase enzymes synthesize N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones, commonly referred to as autoinducers, to facilitate quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria. Studying the synthases, however, has proven to be a difficult road. Two assays, including a radiolabeled assay and a colorimetric (DCPIP) assay are well-documented in literature to study AHL synthases. In this paper, we describe additional methods that include an HPLC-based, C-S bond cleavage and coupled assays to investigate this class of enzymes. In addition, we compare and contrast each assay for both acyl-CoA- and acyl-ACP-utilizing synthases. The expanded toolkit described in this study should facilitate mechanistic studies on quorum sensing signal synthases and expedite discovery of antivirulent compounds. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Cloning of the sdsA gene encoding solanesyl diphosphate synthase from Rhodobacter capsulatus and its functional expression in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, K; Kamiya, Y; Zhu, X; Suzuki, K; Tanaka, K; Nakagawa, T; Matsuda, H; Kawamukai, M

    1997-10-01

    Different organisms produce different species of isoprenoid quinones, each with its own distinctive length. These differences in length are commonly exploited in microbial classification. The side chain length of quinone is determined by the nature of the polyprenyl diphosphate synthase that catalyzes the reaction. To determine if the side chain length of ubiquinone (UQ) has any distinct role to play in the metabolism of the cells in which it is found, we cloned the solanesyl diphosphate synthase gene (sdsA) from Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003 and expressed it in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sequence analysis revealed that the sdsA gene encodes a 325-amino-acid protein which has similarity (27 to 40%) with other prenyl diphosphate synthases. Expression of the sdsA gene complemented a defect in the octaprenyl diphosphate synthase gene of E. coli and the nonrespiratory phenotype resulting from a defect in the hexaprenyl diphosphate synthase gene of S. cerevisiae. Both E. coli and S. cerevisiae expressing the sdsA gene mainly produced solanesyl diphosphate, which resulted in the synthesis of UQ-9 without any noticeable effect on the growth of the cells. Thus, it appears that UQ-9 can replace the function of UQ-8 in E. coli and UQ-6 in S. cerevisiae. Taken together with previous results, the results described here imply that the side chain length of UQ is not a critical factor for the survival of microorganisms.

  13. Functional analysis of a cotton cellulose synthase A4 gene promoter in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ai-Min; Hu, John S; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2009-10-01

    A 1,482-bp promoter sequence of the cotton cellulose synthase gene (GhCesA4) was isolated from Chinese cultivar CRI12 of Gossypium hirsutum, and transcriptionally fused to a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene for investigation of important regions controlling gene expression in transgenic tobacco plants. Histochemical staining showed that the full-length promoter directs efficient expression of the reporter gene in the roots, hypocotyls, vascular tissues of stems, trichomes, the central leaf veins, as well as in the anthers and pollen. Quantitative measurements of GUS activity demonstrated that higher expression levels were detected in the stems, fully expanded leaves, and styles of flowers. A series of 5' progressive deletions of the promoter revealed the presence of a negative regulatory region (-767 to -424) for promoter activity and a 247-bp fragment (-247 to -1) with the vascular tissue specificity of the basic transcription activity in the GhCesA4 promoter. Exposure of the transgenic tobacco to various abiotic stresses showed that the full-length construct predominantly responded to NAA, kinetin, and sugar. Furthermore, the NAA-response region was found to be located in the -1,482/-1204 fragment, while the element(s) for the sucrose-responsive expression may be present in the -247/-1 region in the GhCesA4 promoter. These findings will not only contribute to an explanation of the molecular mechanisms by which GhCesA4 participates in secondary cell wall morphogenesis and stress responses, but will also provide a good candidate for expression or accumulation of foreign genes of interest whose products are preferentially required in vascular tissues and are inducible under auxin treatment.

  14. Identification of sesquiterpene synthases from Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agger, Sean A; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Hoye, Thomas R; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2008-09-01

    Cyanobacteria are a rich source of natural products and are known to produce terpenoids. These bacteria are the major source of the musty-smelling terpenes geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol, which are found in many natural water supplies; however, no terpene synthases have been characterized from these organisms to date. Here, we describe the characterization of three sesquiterpene synthases identified in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 (terpene synthase NS1) and Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 (terpene synthases NP1 and NP2). The second terpene synthase in N. punctiforme (NP2) is homologous to fusion-type sesquiterpene synthases from Streptomyces spp. shown to produce geosmin via an intermediate germacradienol. The enzymes were functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and their terpene products were structurally identified as germacrene A (from NS1), the eudesmadiene 8a-epi-alpha-selinene (from NP1), and germacradienol (from NP2). The product of NP1, 8a-epi-alpha-selinene, so far has been isolated only from termites, in which it functions as a defense compound. Terpene synthases NP1 and NS1 are part of an apparent minicluster that includes a P450 and a putative hybrid two-component protein located downstream of the terpene synthases. Coexpression of P450 genes with their adjacent located terpene synthase genes in E. coli demonstrates that the P450 from Nostoc sp. can be functionally expressed in E. coli when coexpressed with a ferredoxin gene and a ferredoxin reductase gene from Nostoc and that the enzyme oxygenates the NS1 terpene product germacrene A. This represents to the best of our knowledge the first example of functional expression of a cyanobacterial P450 in E. coli.

  15. Discovery and functional characterization of two diterpene synthases for sclareol biosynthesis in Salvia sclarea (L.) and their relevance for perfume manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniard, Anne; Zerbe, Philipp; Legrand, Sylvain; Cohade, Allison; Valot, Nadine; Magnard, Jean-Louis; Bohlmann, Jörg; Legendre, Laurent

    2012-07-26

    Sclareol is a diterpene natural product of high value for the fragrance industry. Its labdane carbon skeleton and its two hydroxyl groups also make it a valued starting material for semisynthesis of numerous commercial substances, including production of Ambrox® and related ambergris substitutes used in the formulation of high end perfumes. Most of the commercially-produced sclareol is derived from cultivated clary sage (Salvia sclarea) and extraction of the plant material. In clary sage, sclareol mainly accumulates in essential oil-producing trichomes that densely cover flower calices. Manool also is a minor diterpene of this species and the main diterpene of related Salvia species. Based on previous general knowledge of diterpene biosynthesis in angiosperms, and based on mining of our recently published transcriptome database obtained by deep 454-sequencing of cDNA from clary sage calices, we cloned and functionally characterized two new diterpene synthase (diTPS) enzymes for the complete biosynthesis of sclareol in clary sage. A class II diTPS (SsLPPS) produced labda-13-en-8-ol diphosphate as major product from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) with some minor quantities of its non-hydroxylated analogue, (9 S, 10 S)-copalyl diphosphate. A class I diTPS (SsSS) then transformed these intermediates into sclareol and manool, respectively. The production of sclareol was reconstructed in vitro by combining the two recombinant diTPS enzymes with the GGPP starting substrate and in vivo by co-expression of the two proteins in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Tobacco-based transient expression assays of green fluorescent protein-fusion constructs revealed that both enzymes possess an N-terminal signal sequence that actively targets SsLPPS and SsSS to the chloroplast, a major site of GGPP and diterpene production in plants. SsLPPS and SsSS are two monofunctional diTPSs which, together, produce the diterpenoid specialized metabolite sclareol in a two-step process. They

  16. Discovery and functional characterization of two diterpene synthases for sclareol biosynthesis in Salvia sclarea (L. and their relevance for perfume manufacture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caniard Anne

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sclareol is a diterpene natural product of high value for the fragrance industry. Its labdane carbon skeleton and its two hydroxyl groups also make it a valued starting material for semisynthesis of numerous commercial substances, including production of Ambrox® and related ambergris substitutes used in the formulation of high end perfumes. Most of the commercially-produced sclareol is derived from cultivated clary sage (Salvia sclarea and extraction of the plant material. In clary sage, sclareol mainly accumulates in essential oil-producing trichomes that densely cover flower calices. Manool also is a minor diterpene of this species and the main diterpene of related Salvia species. Results Based on previous general knowledge of diterpene biosynthesis in angiosperms, and based on mining of our recently published transcriptome database obtained by deep 454-sequencing of cDNA from clary sage calices, we cloned and functionally characterized two new diterpene synthase (diTPS enzymes for the complete biosynthesis of sclareol in clary sage. A class II diTPS (SsLPPS produced labda-13-en-8-ol diphosphate as major product from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP with some minor quantities of its non-hydroxylated analogue, (9 S, 10 S-copalyl diphosphate. A class I diTPS (SsSS then transformed these intermediates into sclareol and manool, respectively. The production of sclareol was reconstructed in vitro by combining the two recombinant diTPS enzymes with the GGPP starting substrate and in vivo by co-expression of the two proteins in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Tobacco-based transient expression assays of green fluorescent protein-fusion constructs revealed that both enzymes possess an N-terminal signal sequence that actively targets SsLPPS and SsSS to the chloroplast, a major site of GGPP and diterpene production in plants. Conclusions SsLPPS and SsSS are two monofunctional diTPSs which, together, produce the diterpenoid

  17. Discovery and functional characterization of two diterpene synthases for sclareol biosynthesis in Salvia sclarea (L.) and their relevance for perfume manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Sclareol is a diterpene natural product of high value for the fragrance industry. Its labdane carbon skeleton and its two hydroxyl groups also make it a valued starting material for semisynthesis of numerous commercial substances, including production of Ambrox® and related ambergris substitutes used in the formulation of high end perfumes. Most of the commercially-produced sclareol is derived from cultivated clary sage (Salvia sclarea) and extraction of the plant material. In clary sage, sclareol mainly accumulates in essential oil-producing trichomes that densely cover flower calices. Manool also is a minor diterpene of this species and the main diterpene of related Salvia species. Results Based on previous general knowledge of diterpene biosynthesis in angiosperms, and based on mining of our recently published transcriptome database obtained by deep 454-sequencing of cDNA from clary sage calices, we cloned and functionally characterized two new diterpene synthase (diTPS) enzymes for the complete biosynthesis of sclareol in clary sage. A class II diTPS (SsLPPS) produced labda-13-en-8-ol diphosphate as major product from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) with some minor quantities of its non-hydroxylated analogue, (9 S, 10 S)-copalyl diphosphate. A class I diTPS (SsSS) then transformed these intermediates into sclareol and manool, respectively. The production of sclareol was reconstructed in vitro by combining the two recombinant diTPS enzymes with the GGPP starting substrate and in vivo by co-expression of the two proteins in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Tobacco-based transient expression assays of green fluorescent protein-fusion constructs revealed that both enzymes possess an N-terminal signal sequence that actively targets SsLPPS and SsSS to the chloroplast, a major site of GGPP and diterpene production in plants. Conclusions SsLPPS and SsSS are two monofunctional diTPSs which, together, produce the diterpenoid specialized metabolite sclareol

  18. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2014-01-01

    The enigmatic kinetics, half-of-the-sites binding, and structural asymmetry of the homodimeric microbial OMP synthases (orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.10) have been proposed to result from an alternating site mechanism in these domain-swapped enzymes [R.W. McClard et al., Biochemistry...... and ablated ability to bind PRPP, complemented to produce a heterodimer with a single fully functional active site showing intersecting initial velocity plots. Equilibrium binding of PRPP and orotidine 5'-monophosphate showed a single class of two binding sites per dimer in WT and K106S enzymes. Evidence here...... shows that the enzyme does not follow half-of-the-sites cooperativity; that interplay between catalytic sites is not an essential feature of the catalytic mechanism; and that parallel lines in steady-state kinetics probably arise from tight substrate binding....

  19. 3D-Fun: predicting enzyme function from structure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grotthuss, M. von; Plewczynski, D.; Vriend, G.; Rychlewski, L.

    2008-01-01

    The 'omics' revolution is causing a flurry of data that all needs to be annotated for it to become useful. Sequences of proteins of unknown function can be annotated with a putative function by comparing them with proteins of known function. This form of annotation is typically performed with BLAST

  20. Widespread Perturbation of Function, Structure, and Dynamics by a Conservative Single-Atom Substitution in Thymidylate Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Paul J; Lee, Andrew L

    2016-10-11

    Thymidylate synthase (TSase) is responsible for synthesizing the sole de novo source of dTMP in all organisms. TSase is a drug target, and as such, it has been well studied in terms of both structure and reaction mechanism. Cysteine 146 in Escherichia coli TSase is universally conserved because it serves as the nucleophile in the enzyme mechanism. Here we use the C146S mutation to probe the role of the sulfur atom in early events in the catalytic cycle beyond serving as the nucleophile. Surprisingly, the single-atom substitution severely decreases substrate binding affinity, and the unfavorable ΔΔG° bind is comprised of roughly equal enthalpic and entropic components at 25 °C. Chemical shifts in the free and dUMP-bound states show the mutation causes perturbations throughout TSase, including regions important for complex stability, in agreement with a less favorable enthalpy change. We measured the nuclear magnetic resonance methyl symmetry axis order parameter (S 2 axis ), a proxy for conformational entropy, for TSase at all vertices of the dUMP binding/C146S mutation thermodynamic cycle and found that the calculated TΔΔS° conf is similar in sign and magnitude to the calorimetric TΔΔS°. Further, we ascribed minor resonances in wild-type-dUMP spectra to a state with a covalent bond between Sγ of C146 and C6 of dUMP and find S 2 axis values are unaffected by covalent bond formation, indicating this reaction step is neutral with respect to ΔS° conf . Lastly, the C146S mutation allowed us to measure cofactor analog binding by isothermal titration calorimetry without the confounding heat signature of covalent bond formation. Raltitrexed binds free and singly bound TSase with similar affinities, yet the two binding events have different enthalpy changes, providing further evidence of communication between the two active sites.

  1. Applying Knowledge of Enzyme Biochemistry to the Prediction of Functional Sites for Aiding Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Priyadarshini P; Mondal, Sukanta

    2017-01-01

    Enzymes are biological catalysts that play an important role in determining the patterns of chemical transformations pertaining to life. Many milestones have been achieved in unraveling the mechanisms in which the enzymes orchestrate various cellular processes using experimental and computational approaches. Experimental studies generating nearly all possible mutations of target enzymes have been aided by rapid computational approaches aiming at enzyme functional classification, understanding domain organization, functional site identification. The functional architecture, essentially, is involved in binding or interaction with ligands including substrates, products, cofactors, inhibitors, providing for their function, such as in catalysis, ligand mediated cell signaling, allosteric regulation and post-translational modifications. With the increasing availability of enzyme information and advances in algorithm development, computational approaches have now become more capable of providing precise inputs for enzyme engineering, and in the process also making it more efficient. This has led to interesting findings, especially in aberrant enzyme interactions, such as hostpathogen interactions in infection, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and diabetes. This review aims to summarize in retrospection - the mined knowledge, vivid perspectives and challenging strides in using available experimentally validated enzyme information for characterization. An analytical outlook is presented on the scope of exploring future directions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Functionalization of a Membrane Sublayer Using Reverse Filtration of Enzymes and Dopamine Coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jianquan; Meyer, Anne S.; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina

    2014-01-01

    , and the resulting enzyme-loaded sublayer was covered with a dopamine coating. After membrane reversal, the virgin membrane skin layer was facing the feed and the enzymes were entrapped by a polydopamine network in the membrane sublayer. Thus, the membrane sublayer was functionalized as a catalytically active layer......Da membrane with sponge-like sublayer to immobilize laccase with dopamine coating, the trade-off between permeability and enzyme loading was broken, and enzyme loading reached 44.5% without any permeability loss. After 85 days of storage and reuse 14 times, more than 80% of the immobilized laccase activity...

  3. Prediction of detailed enzyme functions and identification of specificity determining residues by random forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chioko Nagao

    Full Text Available Determining enzyme functions is essential for a thorough understanding of cellular processes. Although many prediction methods have been developed, it remains a significant challenge to predict enzyme functions at the fourth-digit level of the Enzyme Commission numbers. Functional specificity of enzymes often changes drastically by mutations of a small number of residues and therefore, information about these critical residues can potentially help discriminate detailed functions. However, because these residues must be identified by mutagenesis experiments, the available information is limited, and the lack of experimentally verified specificity determining residues (SDRs has hindered the development of detailed function prediction methods and computational identification of SDRs. Here we present a novel method for predicting enzyme functions by random forests, EFPrf, along with a set of putative SDRs, the random forests derived SDRs (rf-SDRs. EFPrf consists of a set of binary predictors for enzymes in each CATH superfamily and the rf-SDRs are the residue positions corresponding to the most highly contributing attributes obtained from each predictor. EFPrf showed a precision of 0.98 and a recall of 0.89 in a cross-validated benchmark assessment. The rf-SDRs included many residues, whose importance for specificity had been validated experimentally. The analysis of the rf-SDRs revealed both a general tendency that functionally diverged superfamilies tend to include more active site residues in their rf-SDRs than in less diverged superfamilies, and superfamily-specific conservation patterns of each functional residue. EFPrf and the rf-SDRs will be an effective tool for annotating enzyme functions and for understanding how enzyme functions have diverged within each superfamily.

  4. Prediction of Detailed Enzyme Functions and Identification of Specificity Determining Residues by Random Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Chioko; Nagano, Nozomi; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Determining enzyme functions is essential for a thorough understanding of cellular processes. Although many prediction methods have been developed, it remains a significant challenge to predict enzyme functions at the fourth-digit level of the Enzyme Commission numbers. Functional specificity of enzymes often changes drastically by mutations of a small number of residues and therefore, information about these critical residues can potentially help discriminate detailed functions. However, because these residues must be identified by mutagenesis experiments, the available information is limited, and the lack of experimentally verified specificity determining residues (SDRs) has hindered the development of detailed function prediction methods and computational identification of SDRs. Here we present a novel method for predicting enzyme functions by random forests, EFPrf, along with a set of putative SDRs, the random forests derived SDRs (rf-SDRs). EFPrf consists of a set of binary predictors for enzymes in each CATH superfamily and the rf-SDRs are the residue positions corresponding to the most highly contributing attributes obtained from each predictor. EFPrf showed a precision of 0.98 and a recall of 0.89 in a cross-validated benchmark assessment. The rf-SDRs included many residues, whose importance for specificity had been validated experimentally. The analysis of the rf-SDRs revealed both a general tendency that functionally diverged superfamilies tend to include more active site residues in their rf-SDRs than in less diverged superfamilies, and superfamily-specific conservation patterns of each functional residue. EFPrf and the rf-SDRs will be an effective tool for annotating enzyme functions and for understanding how enzyme functions have diverged within each superfamily. PMID:24416252

  5. Functional Characterization of UDP-apiose Synthases from Bryophytes and Green Algae Provides Insight into the Appearance of Apiose-containing Glycans during Plant Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James; Yang, Yiwen; Levy, Shahar; Adelusi, Oluwatoyin Oluwayemi; Hahn, Michael G; O'Neill, Malcolm A; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2016-10-07

    Apiose is a branched monosaccharide that is present in the cell wall pectic polysaccharides rhamnogalacturonan II and apiogalacturonan and in numerous plant secondary metabolites. These apiose-containing glycans are synthesized using UDP-apiose as the donor. UDP-apiose (UDP-Api) together with UDP-xylose is formed from UDP-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcA) by UDP-Api synthase (UAS). It was hypothesized that the ability to form Api distinguishes vascular plants from the avascular plants and green algae. UAS from several dicotyledonous plants has been characterized; however, it is not known if avascular plants or green algae produce this enzyme. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of UAS homologs from avascular plants (mosses, liverwort, and hornwort), from streptophyte green algae, and from a monocot (duckweed). The recombinant UAS homologs all form UDP-Api from UDP-glucuronic acid albeit in different amounts. Apiose was detected in aqueous methanolic extracts of these plants. Apiose was detected in duckweed cell walls but not in the walls of the avascular plants and algae. Overexpressing duckweed UAS in the moss Physcomitrella patens led to an increase in the amounts of aqueous methanol-acetonitrile-soluble apiose but did not result in discernible amounts of cell wall-associated apiose. Thus, bryophytes and algae likely lack the glycosyltransferase machinery required to synthesize apiose-containing cell wall glycans. Nevertheless, these plants may have the ability to form apiosylated secondary metabolites. Our data are the first to provide evidence that the ability to form apiose existed prior to the appearance of rhamnogalacturonan II and apiogalacturonan and provide new insights into the evolution of apiose-containing glycans. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Localization of nitric oxide synthase and haemoxygenase, and functional effects of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in the pig and human intravesical ureter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iselin, C E; Alm, P; Schaad, N C; Larsson, B; Graber, P; Andersson, K E

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-immunoreactive (IR) and haemoxygenase (HO)-IR nerves was investigated in the pig and human intravesical ureter (IVU). NOS activity was measured by monitoring the conversion of [3H]-arginine to [3H]-citrulline. Effects of NO and resulting changes in cyclic nucleotide concentrations were assessed in vitro. The effects of carbon monoxide (CO) on IVU motility was also tested. Immunohistochemistry revealed an abundant overall innervation of the IVU and numerous NOS-IR nerves. Nerve trunks were also found expressing immunoreactivity for HO-1, one of the enzymes synthetising CO. Similar profiles of nerve structures expressing immunoreactivities for NOS and tyrosine-hydroxylase (TH), as well as NOS and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were demonstrated. In the pig IVU, measurement of NOS activity revealed a moderate calcium-dependent catalytic activity, NO and the NO-donor SIN-1 reduced in a concentration-dependent manner serotonin-induced contractions of pig and human IVU, and the spontaneous contractions of pig IVU. In pig IVU strips precontracted with the thromboxane analogue U-46619, tetrodotoxin-sensitive relaxations were abolished by the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine. CO exerted no significant effect on spontaneous or induced contractions in the pig and human IVU. In precontracted strips of the pig and human IVU exposed to SIN-1 or NO, significant increases of cyclic GMP levels were measured in comparison to control preparations. The results suggest that the L-arginine/NO/cyclic GMP pathway may play a role in the regulation of the valve function in the uretero-vesical junction (UVJ). A role for CO in the UVJ has yet to be established.

  7. Quantum-mechanical analysis of amino acid residues function in the proton transport during F0F1-ATP synthase catalytic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivontsin, L. A.; Mashkovtseva, E. V.; Nartsissov, Ya R.

    2017-11-01

    Implications of quantum-mechanical approach to the description of proton transport in biological systems are a tempting subject for an overlapping of fundamental physics and biology. The model of proton transport through the integrated membrane enzyme FoF1-ATP synthase responsible for ATP synthesis was developed. The estimation of the mathematical expectation of the proton transfer time through the half-channel was performed. Observed set of proton pathways through the inlet half-channel showed the nanosecond timescale highly dependable of some amino acid residues. There were proposed two types of crucial amino acids: critically localized (His245) and being a part of energy conserving system (Asp119).

  8. Homology to peptide pattern for annotation of carbohydrate-active enzymes and prediction of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busk, P K; Pilgaard, B; Lezyk, M J; Meyer, A S; Lange, L

    2017-04-12

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes are found in all organisms and participate in key biological processes. These enzymes are classified in 274 families in the CAZy database but the sequence diversity within each family makes it a major task to identify new family members and to provide basis for prediction of enzyme function. A fast and reliable method for de novo annotation of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes is to identify conserved peptides in the curated enzyme families followed by matching of the conserved peptides to the sequence of interest as demonstrated for the glycosyl hydrolase and the lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase families. This approach not only assigns the enzymes to families but also provides functional prediction of the enzymes with high accuracy. We identified conserved peptides for all enzyme families in the CAZy database with Peptide Pattern Recognition. The conserved peptides were matched to protein sequence for de novo annotation and functional prediction of carbohydrate-active enzymes with the Hotpep method. Annotation of protein sequences from 12 bacterial and 16 fungal genomes to families with Hotpep had an accuracy of 0.84 (measured as F1-score) compared to semiautomatic annotation by the CAZy database whereas the dbCAN HMM-based method had an accuracy of 0.77 with optimized parameters. Furthermore, Hotpep provided a functional prediction with 86% accuracy for the annotated genes. Hotpep is available as a stand-alone application for MS Windows. Hotpep is a state-of-the-art method for automatic annotation and functional prediction of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

  9. Development of Activity-based Cost Functions for Cellulase, Invertase, and Other Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowers, Chris C.; Ferguson, Elizabeth M.; Tanner, Robert D.

    As enzyme chemistry plays an increasingly important role in the chemical industry, cost analysis of these enzymes becomes a necessity. In this paper, we examine the aspects that affect the cost of enzymes based upon enzyme activity. The basis for this study stems from a previously developed objective function that quantifies the tradeoffs in enzyme purification via the foam fractionation process (Cherry et al., Braz J Chem Eng 17:233-238, 2000). A generalized cost function is developed from our results that could be used to aid in both industrial and lab scale chemical processing. The generalized cost function shows several nonobvious results that could lead to significant savings. Additionally, the parameters involved in the operation and scaling up of enzyme processing could be optimized to minimize costs. We show that there are typically three regimes in the enzyme cost analysis function: the low activity prelinear region, the moderate activity linear region, and high activity power-law region. The overall form of the cost analysis function appears to robustly fit the power law form.

  10. Extracellular Enzyme Activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Winding, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular Enzyme Activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity Niels Bohse Hendriksen, Anne Winding. Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark Soil enzymes originate from a variety of organisms, notably fungi and bacteria...... and especially hydrolytic extracellular enzymes are of pivotal importance for decomposition of organic substrates and biogeochemical cycling. Their activity reflects the functional diversity and activity of the microorganisms involved in decomposition processes which are essential processes for soil functioning......, experimental conditions of extraction of enzymes from soils, buffer and pH, substrate concentration, temperature and the necessary controls were optimized and standardized. This has resulted in an optimized standard operating procedure of EEA, which are being tested as an indicator of soil functional diversity...

  11. Temperature-dependent structural and functional features of a hyperthermostable enzyme using elastic neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S; van der Oost, J; Norde, W

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus was investigated using elastic neutron scattering. The temperature dependence of the atomic motions was correlated with conformational. and functional characteristics of the enzyme. The onset of

  12. Enzymes for ecdysteroid biosynthesis: their biological functions in insects and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Ryusuke; Niwa, Yuko S

    2014-01-01

    Steroid hormones are responsible for the coordinated regulation of many aspects of biological processes in multicellular organisms. Since the last century, many studies have identified and characterized steroidogenic enzymes in vertebrates, including mammals. However, much less is known about invertebrate steroidogenic enzymes. In the last 15 years, a number of steroidogenic enzymes and their functions have been characterized in ecdysozoan animals, especially in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In this review, we summarize the latest knowledge of enzymes crucial for synthesizing ecdysteroids, the principal insect steroid hormones. We also discuss the functional conservation and diversity of ecdysteroidogenic enzymes in other insects and even non-insect species, such as nematodes, vertebrates, and lower eukaryotes.

  13. Human β-glucuronidase: structure, function, and application in enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Huma; Islam, Asimul; Waheed, Abdul; Sly, William S; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Imtaiyaz

    2013-10-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases occur due to incomplete metabolic degradation of macromolecules by various hydrolytic enzymes in the lysosome. Despite structural differences, most of the lysosomal enzymes share many common features including a lysosomal targeting motif and phosphotransferase recognition sites. β-Glucuronidase (GUSB) is an important lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of glucuronate-containing glycosaminoglycan. The deficiency of GUSB causes mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPSVII), leading to lysosomal storage in the brain. GUSB is a well-studied protein for its expression, sequence, structure, and function. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of sequence, structure, function, and evolution of GUSB and its lysosomal enzyme targeting. Enzyme replacement therapy reported for this protein is also discussed.

  14. Cloning and functional expression of cycloartenol synthases from mangrove species Rhizophora stylosa Griff. and Kandelia candel (L.) Druce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, Mohammad; Oku, Hirosuke; Tsujimoto, Etsuko; Baba, Shigeyuki

    2007-07-01

    To obtain cDNAs encoding oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC), we cloned two cDNAs, KcCAS and RsCAS, from roots of Kandelia candel (L.) Druce and leaves of Rhizophora stylosa Griff. by homology based PCR method respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of both OSCs showed 82% homology to cycloartenol synthases from Lotus japonicus (OSC5) and Ricinus cummunis (RcCAS), suggesting that these are cycloartenol synthases of K. candel and R. stylosa. The genes obtained were expressed in a lanosterol synthase deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ERG7) strain, GIL77. GC-MS analysis identified the accumulated reaction product in the yeast transformant to be cycloartenol, indicating that both KcCAS and RsCAS encode cycloartenol synthase.

  15. Functional Expression of Electron Transport Chain and FoF1-ATP Synthase in Optic Nerve Myelin Sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolucci, Martina; Ravera, Silvia; Garbarino, Greta; Ramoino, Paola; Ferrando, Sara; Calzia, Daniela; Candiani, Simona; Morelli, Alessandro; Panfoli, Isabella

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies reported evidence for aerobic ATP synthesis by myelin from both bovine brainstem and rat sciatic nerve. Considering that the optic nerve displays a high oxygen demand, here we evaluated the expression and activity of the five Respiratory Complexes in myelin purified from either bovine or murine optic nerves. Western blot analyses on isolated myelin confirmed the expression of ND4L (subunit of Complex I), COX IV (subunit of Complex IV) and β subunit of F1Fo-ATP synthase. Moreover, spectrophotometric and in-gel activity assays on isolated myelin, as well as histochemical activity assays on both bovine and murine transversal optic nerve sections showed that the respiratory Complexes are functional in myelin and are organized in a supercomplex. Expression of oxidative phosphorylation proteins was also evaluated on bovine optic nerve sections by confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Having excluded a mitochondrial contamination of isolated myelin and considering the results form in situ analyses, it is proposed that the oxidative phosphorylation machinery is truly resident in optic myelin sheath. Data may shed a new light on the unknown trophic role of myelin sheath. It may be energy supplier for the axon, explaining why in demyelinating diseases and neuropathies, myelin sheath loss is associated with axonal degeneration.

  16. Structural and Functional Characterization of Nrf2 Degradation by the Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3/β-TrCP Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Patricia; Rojo, Ana I.; Evrard-Todeschi, Nathalie; Innamorato, Nadia G.; Cotte, Axelle; Jaworski, Tomasz; Tobón-Velasco, Julio C.; Devijver, Herman; García-Mayoral, María Flor; Van Leuven, Fred; Hayes, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulator of a genetic program, termed the phase 2 response, that controls redox homeostasis and participates in multiple aspects of physiology and pathology. Nrf2 protein stability is regulated by two E3 ubiquitin ligase adaptors, Keap1 and β-TrCP, the latter of which was only recently reported. Here, two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and site-directed mutagenesis allowed us to identify two serines of Nrf2 that are phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) in the sequence DSGISL. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies defined key residues of this phosphosequence involved in docking to the WD40 propeller of β-TrCP, through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. We also identified three arginine residues of β-TrCP that participate in Nrf2 docking. Intraperitoneal injection of the GSK-3 inhibitor SB216763 led to increased Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 levels in liver and hippocampus. Moreover, mice with hippocampal absence of GSK-3β exhibited increased levels of Nrf2 and phase 2 gene products, reduced glutathione, and decreased levels of carbonylated proteins and malondialdehyde. This study establishes the structural parameters of the interaction of Nrf2 with the GSK-3/β-TrCP axis and its functional relevance in the regulation of Nrf2 by the signaling pathways that impinge on GSK-3. PMID:22751928

  17. Gene transfer of neuronal nitric oxide synthase to carotid body reverses enhanced chemoreceptor function in heart failure rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Long; Li, Yi-Fan; Liu, Dongmei; Cornish, Kurtis G; Patel, Kaushik P; Zucker, Irving H; Channon, Keith M; Schultz, Harold D

    2005-08-05

    Our previous studies showed that decreased nitric oxide (NO) production enhanced carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor activity in chronic heart failure (CHF) rabbits. In the present study, we investigated the effects of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) gene transfer on CB chemoreceptor activity in CHF rabbits. The nNOS protein expression and NO production were suppressed in CBs (Pchemoreceptors in CHF versus sham rabbits. Ad.nNOS decreased the baseline discharge (4.5+/-0.3 versus 7.3+/-0.4 imp/s at 105+/-1.9 mm Hg) and the response to hypoxia (18.3+/-1.2 imp/s versus 35.6+/-1.1 at 40+/-2.1 mm Hg) from CB chemoreceptors in CHF rabbits (Ad.nNOS CB versus contralateral noninfected CB respectively, Pactivity in CHF rabbits. In addition, nNOS gene transfer to the CBs also significantly blunted the baseline renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and the response of RSNA to hypoxia in CHF rabbits (Pactivity in the CB plays an important role in the enhanced activity of the CB chemoreceptors and peripheral chemoreflex function in CHF rabbits.

  18. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of Catharanthus roseus hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase gene promoter from the methyl erythritol phosphate pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginis, Olivia; Courdavault, Vincent; Melin, Céline; Lanoue, Arnaud; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; St-Pierre, Benoit; Courtois, Martine; Oudin, Audrey

    2012-05-01

    The Madagascar periwinkle produces monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIA) of high interest due to their therapeutical values. The terpenoid moiety of MIA is derived from the methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) and seco-iridoid pathways. These pathways are regarded as the limiting branch for MIA biosynthesis in C. roseus cell and tissue cultures. In previous studies, we demonstrated a coordinated regulation at the transcriptional and spatial levels of genes from both pathways. We report here on the isolation of the 5'-flanking region (1,049 bp) of the hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase (HDS) gene from the MEP pathway. To investigate promoter transcriptional activities, the HDS promoter was fused to GUS reporter gene. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of young tobacco leaves revealed that the cloned HDS promoter displays a tissue-specific GUS staining restricted to the vascular region of the leaves and limited to a part of the vein that encompasses the phloem in agreement with the previous localization of HDS transcripts in C. roseus aerial organs. Further functional characterizations in stably or transiently transformed C. roseus cells allowed us to identify the region that can be consider as the minimal promoter and to demonstrate the induction of HDS promoter by several hormonal signals (auxin, cytokinin, methyljasmonate and ethylene) leading to MIA production. These results, and the bioinformatic analysis of the HDS 5'-region, suggest that the HDS promoter harbours a number of cis-elements binding specific transcription factors that would regulate the flux of terpenoid precursors involved in MIA biosynthesis.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 synthase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common in particular ethnic groups? ... an enzyme called GM3 synthase, which carries out a chemical reaction that is the first step in the production ...

  20. AVE3085, an enhancer of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, restores endothelial function and reduces blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qin; Xue, Hong-Mei; Wong, Wing-Tak; Tian, Xiao-Yu; Huang, Yu; Tsui, Stephen KW; Ng, Patrick KS; Wohlfart, Paulus; Li, Huige; Xia, Ning; Tobias, Silke; Underwood, Malcolm John; He, Guo-Wei

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in endothelial function, and impaired NO production is involved in hypertension. Therefore, compounds that regulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) may be of therapeutic benefit. A novel, low molecular weight compound AVE3085 is a recently developed compound with the ability to enhance eNOS transcription. The present study investigated the effects of AVE3085 in endothelial dysfunction associated with hypertension. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were treated with AVE 3085 (10 mg·kg·day−1, orally) for 4 weeks. Isometric force measurement was performed on rings of isolated aortae in organ baths. Protein expression of eNOS, phosphorylated-eNOS and nitrotyrosine in the aortae were examined by Western blotting. mRNA for eNOS in rat aortae were examined by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). KEY RESULTS AVE3085 greatly improved endothelium-dependent relaxations in the aortae of SHRs. This functional change was accompanied by up-regulated expression of eNOS protein and mRNA, enhanced eNOS phosphorylation and decreased formation of nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, AVE3085 treatment reduced the blood pressure in SHR without affecting that of hypertensive eNOS−/− mice. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The eNOS-transcription enhancer AVE3085 restored impaired endothelial function in a hypertensive model. The present study provides a solid basis for the potential development of eNOS-targeting drugs to restore down-regulated eNOS, as a new strategy in hypertension. PMID:21385179

  1. Heterologous gene expression and functional analysis of a type III polyketide synthase from Aspergillus niger NRRL 328.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Watanabe, Shotaro; Kobayashi, Keiichi

    2016-05-13

    Type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze the formation of pyrone- and resorcinol-types aromatic polyketides. The genomic analysis of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger NRRL 328 revealed that this strain has a putative gene (chr_8_2: 2978617-2979847) encoding a type III PKS, although its functions are unknown. In this study, for functional analysis of this putative type III PKS designated as An-CsyA, cloning and heterologous expression of the An-CsyA gene (An-csyA) in Escherichia coli were performed. Recombinant His-tagged An-CsyA was successfully expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3), purified by Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography, and used for in vitro assay. Tests on the substrate specificity of the His-tagged An-CsyA with myriad acyl-CoAs as starter substrates and malonyl-CoA as extender substrate showed that His-tagged An-CsyA accepted fatty acyl-CoAs (C2-C14) and produced triketide pyrones (C2-C14), tetraketide pyrones (C2-C10), and pentaketide resorcinols (C10-C14). Furthermore, acetoacetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA, isobutyryl-CoA, and benzoyl-CoA were also accepted as starter substrates, and both of triketide pyrones and tetraketide pyrones were produced. It is noteworthy that the His-tagged An-CsyA produced polyketides from malonyl-CoA as starter and extender substrates and produced tetraketide pyrones from short-chain fatty acyl-CoAs as starter substrates. Therefore, this is the first report showing the functional properties of An-CsyA different from those of other fungal type III PKSs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Deletion of Inducible Nitric-Oxide Synthase in Leptin-Deficient Mice Improves Brown Adipose Tissue Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Sara; Rodríguez, Amaia; Catalán, Victoria; Sáinz, Neira; Ramírez, Beatriz; Collantes, María; Peñuelas, Iván; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2010-01-01

    Background Leptin and nitric oxide (NO) on their own participate in the control of non-shivering thermogenesis. However, the functional interplay between both factors in this process has not been explored so far. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to analyze the impact of the absence of the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) gene in the regulation of energy balance in ob/ob mice. Methods and Findings Double knockout (DBKO) mice simultaneously lacking the ob and iNOS genes were generated, and the expression of molecules involved in the control of brown fat cell function was analyzed by real-time PCR, western-blot and immunohistochemistry. Twelve week-old DBKO mice exhibited reduced body weight (p<0.05), decreased amounts of total fat pads (p<0.05), lower food efficiency rates (p<0.05) and higher rectal temperature (p<0.05) than ob/ob mice. Ablation of iNOS also improved the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism of ob/ob mice. DBKO showed a marked reduction in the size of brown adipocytes compared to ob/ob mutants. In this sense, in comparison to ob/ob mice, DBKO rodents showed an increase in the expression of PR domain containing 16 (Prdm16), a transcriptional regulator of brown adipogenesis. Moreover, iNOS deletion enhanced the expression of mitochondria-related proteins, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1 α (Pgc-1α), sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1) and sirtuin-3 (Sirt-3). Accordingly, mitochondrial uncoupling proteins 1 and 3 (Ucp-1 and Ucp-3) were upregulated in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of DBKO mice as compared to ob/ob rodents. Conclusion Ablation of iNOS improved the energy balance of ob/ob mice by decreasing food efficiency through an increase in thermogenesis. These effects may be mediated, in part, through the recovery of the BAT phenotype and brown fat cell function improvement. PMID:20532036

  3. Structural and functional insights into enzymes of the vitamin K cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, J-K; Stafford, D W

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin K-dependent proteins require carboxylation of certain glutamates for their biological functions. The enzymes involved in the vitamin K-dependent carboxylation include: gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX), vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) and an as-yet-unidentified vitamin K reductase (VKR). Due to the hydrophobicity of vitamin K, these enzymes are likely to be integral membrane proteins that reside in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, structure-function studies on these enzymes have been challenging, and some of the results are notably controversial. Patients with naturally occurring mutations in these enzymes, who mainly exhibit bleeding disorders or are resistant to oral anticoagulant treatment, provide valuable information for the functional study of the vitamin K cycle enzymes. In this review, we discuss: (i) the discovery of the enzymatic activities and gene identifications of the vitamin K cycle enzymes; (ii) the identification of their functionally important regions and their active site residues; (iii) the membrane topology studies of GGCX and VKOR; and (iv) the controversial issues regarding the structure and function studies of these enzymes, particularly, the membrane topology, the role of the conserved cysteines and the mechanism of active site regeneration of VKOR. We also discuss the possibility that a paralogous protein of VKOR, VKOR-like 1 (VKORL1), is involved in the vitamin K cycle, and the importance of and possible approaches for identifying the unknown VKR. Overall, we describe the accomplishments and the remaining questions in regard to the structure and function studies of the enzymes in the vitamin K cycle. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. The endogenous hydrogen sulfide producing enzyme cystathionine-β synthase contributes to visceral hypersensitivity in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jiande DZ

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity, a characteristic pathophysiological feature of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, remains elusive. Recent studies suggest a role for hydrogen sulfide (H2S in pain signaling but this has not been well studied in visceral models of hyperalgesia. We therefore determined the role for the endogenous H2S producing enzyme cystathionine-β-synthetase (CBS in a validated rat model of IBS-like chronic visceral hyperalgesia (CVH. CVH was induced by colonic injection of 0.5% acetic acid (AA in 10-day-old rats and experiments were performed at 8–10 weeks of age. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons innervating the colon were labeled by injection of DiI (1,1'-dioleyl-3,3,3',3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine methanesulfonate into the colon wall. Results In rat DRG, CBS-immunoreactivity was observed in approximately 85% of predominantly small- and medium-sized neurons. Colon specific DRG neurons revealed by retrograde labeling DiI were all CBS-positive. CBS-positive colon neurons co-expressed TRPV1 or P2X3 receptors. Western blotting analysis showed that CBS expression was significantly increased in colon DRGs 8 weeks after neonatal AA-treatment. Furthermore, the CBS inhibitor hydroxylamine markedly attenuated the abdominal withdrawal reflex scores in response to colorectal distention in rats with CVH. By contrast, the H2S donor NaHS significantly enhanced the frequency of action potentials of colon specific DRG neurons evoked by 2 times rheobase electrical stimulation. Conclusion Our results suggest that upregulation of CBS expression in colonic DRG neurons and H2S signaling may play an important role in developing CVH, thus identifying a specific neurobiological target for the treatment of CVH in functional bowel syndromes.

  5. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat...

  6. S100A1 deficiency impairs postischemic angiogenesis via compromised proangiogenic endothelial cell function and nitric oxide synthase regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Patrick; Lerchenmüller, Carolin; Rengo, Giuseppe; Mahlmann, Adrian; Ritterhoff, Julia; Rohde, David; Goodman, Chelain; Busch, Cornelius J; Laube, Felix; Heissenberg, Julian; Pleger, Sven T; Weiss, Norbert; Katus, Hugo A; Koch, Walter J; Peppel, Karsten

    2013-01-04

    Mice lacking the EF-hand Ca2+ sensor S100A1 display endothelial dysfunction because of distorted Ca2+ -activated nitric oxide (NO) generation. To determine the pathophysiological role of S100A1 in endothelial cell (EC) function in experimental ischemic revascularization. Patients with chronic critical limb ischemia showed almost complete loss of S100A1 expression in hypoxic tissue. Ensuing studies in S100A1 knockout (SKO) mice subjected to femoral artery resection unveiled insufficient perfusion recovery and high rates of autoamputation. Defective in vivo angiogenesis prompted cellular studies in SKO ECs and human ECs, with small interfering RNA-mediated S100A1 knockdown demonstrating impaired in vitro and in vivo proangiogenic properties (proliferation, migration, tube formation) and attenuated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated and hypoxia-stimulated endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity. Mechanistically, S100A1 deficiency compromised eNOS activity in ECs by interrupted stimulatory S100A1/eNOS interaction and protein kinase C hyperactivation that resulted in inhibitory eNOS phosphorylation and enhanced VEGF receptor-2 degradation with attenuated VEGF signaling. Ischemic SKO tissue recapitulated the same molecular abnormalities with insufficient in vivo NO generation. Unresolved ischemia entailed excessive VEGF accumulation in SKO mice with aggravated VEGF receptor-2 degradation and blunted in vivo signaling through the proangiogenic phosphoinositide-3-kinase/Akt/eNOS cascade. The NO supplementation strategies rescued defective angiogenesis and salvaged limbs in SKO mice after femoral artery resection. Our study shows for the first time downregulation of S100A1 expression in patients with critical limb ischemia and identifies S100A1 as critical for EC function in postnatal ischemic angiogenesis. These findings link its pathological plasticity in critical limb ischemia to impaired neovascularization, prompting further studies to probe the

  7. Functionalized graphene sheets as immobilization matrix for Fenugreek β-amylase: enzyme kinetics and stability studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Srivastava

    Full Text Available β-Amylase finds application in food and pharmaceutical industries. Functionalized graphene sheets were customised as a matrix for covalent immobilization of Fenugreek β-amylase using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker. The factors affecting the process were optimized using Response Surface Methodology based Box-Behnken design of experiment which resulted in 84% immobilization efficiency. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM, TEM and Fourier Tansform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were employed for the purpose of characterization of attachment of enzyme on the graphene. The enzyme kinetic studies were carried out for obtaining best catalytic performance and enhanced reusability. Optimum temperature remained unchanged, whereas optimum pH showed shift towards acidic range for immobilized enzyme. Increase in thermal stability of immobilized enzyme and non-toxic nature of functionalized graphene can be exploited for production of maltose in food and pharmaceutical industries.

  8. CYP4 enzymes as potential drug targets: focus on enzyme multiplicity, inducers and inhibitors, and therapeutic modulation of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthase and fatty acid ω-hydroxylase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, Katheryne Z; Rettie, Allan E

    2013-01-01

    The Cytochrome P450 4 (CYP4) family of enzymes in humans is comprised of thirteen isozymes that typically catalyze the ω-oxidation of endogenous fatty acids and eicosanoids. Several CYP4 enzymes can biosynthesize 20- hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, or 20-HETE, an important signaling eicosanoid involved in regulation of vascular tone and kidney reabsorption. Additionally, accumulation of certain fatty acids is a hallmark of the rare genetic disorders, Refsum disease and X-ALD. Therefore, modulation of CYP4 enzyme activity, either by inhibition or induction, is a potential strategy for drug discovery. Here we review the substrate specificities, sites of expression, genetic regulation, and inhibition by exogenous chemicals of the human CYP4 enzymes, and discuss the targeting of CYP4 enzymes in the development of new treatments for hypertension, stroke, certain cancers and the fatty acid-linked orphan diseases.

  9. Heterologous gene expression and functional analysis of a type III polyketide synthase from Aspergillus niger NRRL 328

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirimura, Kohtaro, E-mail: kkohtaro@waseda.jp; Watanabe, Shotaro; Kobayashi, Keiichi

    2016-05-13

    Type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze the formation of pyrone- and resorcinol-types aromatic polyketides. The genomic analysis of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger NRRL 328 revealed that this strain has a putative gene (chr-8-2: 2978617–2979847) encoding a type III PKS, although its functions are unknown. In this study, for functional analysis of this putative type III PKS designated as An-CsyA, cloning and heterologous expression of the An-CsyA gene (An-csyA) in Escherichia coli were performed. Recombinant His-tagged An-CsyA was successfully expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3), purified by Ni{sup 2+}-affinity chromatography, and used for in vitro assay. Tests on the substrate specificity of the His-tagged An-CsyA with myriad acyl-CoAs as starter substrates and malonyl-CoA as extender substrate showed that His-tagged An-CsyA accepted fatty acyl-CoAs (C2-C14) and produced triketide pyrones (C2-C14), tetraketide pyrones (C2-C10), and pentaketide resorcinols (C10-C14). Furthermore, acetoacetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA, isobutyryl-CoA, and benzoyl-CoA were also accepted as starter substrates, and both of triketide pyrones and tetraketide pyrones were produced. It is noteworthy that the His-tagged An-CsyA produced polyketides from malonyl-CoA as starter and extender substrates and produced tetraketide pyrones from short-chain fatty acyl-CoAs as starter substrates. Therefore, this is the first report showing the functional properties of An-CsyA different from those of other fungal type III PKSs. -- Highlights: •Type III PKS from Aspergillus niger NRRL 328, An-CsyA, was cloned and characterized. •An-CsyA produced triketide pyrones, tetraketide pyrones and pentaketide resorcinols. •Functional properties of An-CsyA differs from those of other fungal type III PKSs.

  10. Heterologous Gene Expression of N-Terminally Truncated Variants of LipPks1 Suggests a Functionally Critical Structural Motif in the N-terminus of Modular Polyketide Synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuzawa, Satoshi; Bailey, Constance B.; Fujii, Tatsu A.

    2017-01-01

    Streptomyces-derived, Well-characterized modular, polyketide synthase (PKS). Using this enzyme as a model, we experimentally investigated the effects of alternative TSSs using a heterologous host, Streptomyces venezuelae. One of the TSSs employed boosted the protein level by 59-fold and the product yield by 23...

  11. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677C>T and methionine synthase 2756A>G mutations: no impact on survival, cognitive functioning, or cognitive decline in nonagenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bathum, Lise; von Bornemann Hjelmborg, Jacob; Christiansen, Lene

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several reports have shown an association between homocysteine, cognitive functioning, and survival among the oldest-old. Two common polymorphisms in the genes coding for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C>T) and methionine synthase (MTR 2756A>G) have an impact on plasma...... homocysteine level. METHODS: We examined the effect of the MTHFR 677C>T and MTR 2756A>G genotypes on baseline cognitive functioning, cognitive decline over 5 years measured in three assessments, and survival in a population-based cohort of 1581 nonagenarians. Cognitive functioning was assessed by using...

  12. Delineating the structural, functional and evolutionary relationships of sucrose phosphate synthase gene family II in wheat and related grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Zaynali

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS is an important component of the plant sucrose biosynthesis pathway. In the monocotyledonous Poaceae, five SPS genes have been identified. Here we present a detailed analysis of the wheat SPSII family in wheat. A set of homoeologue-specific primers was developed in order to permit both the detection of sequence variation, and the dissection of the individual contribution of each homoeologue to the global expression of SPSII. Results The expression in bread wheat over the course of development of various sucrose biosynthesis genes monitored on an Affymetrix array showed that the SPS genes were regulated over time and space. SPSII homoeologue-specific assays were used to show that the three homoeologues contributed differentially to the global expression of SPSII. Genetic mapping placed the set of homoeoloci on the short arms of the homoeologous group 3 chromosomes. A resequencing of the A and B genome copies allowed the detection of four haplotypes at each locus. The 3B copy includes an unspliced intron. A comparison of the sequences of the wheat SPSII orthologues present in the diploid progenitors einkorn, goatgrass and Triticum speltoides, as well as in the more distantly related species barley, rice, sorghum and purple false brome demonstrated that intronic sequence was less well conserved than exonic. Comparative sequence and phylogenetic analysis of SPSII gene showed that false purple brome was more similar to Triticeae than to rice. Wheat - rice synteny was found to be perturbed at the SPS region. Conclusion The homoeologue-specific assays will be suitable to derive associations between SPS functionality and key phenotypic traits. The amplicon sequences derived from the homoeologue-specific primers are informative regarding the evolution of SPSII in a polyploid context.

  13. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of chalcone synthase from Syringa oblata Lindl. in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Dou, Ying; Wang, Rui; Guan, Xuelian; Hu, Zenghui; Zheng, Jian

    2017-11-30

    The flower color of Syringa oblata Lindl., which is often modulated by the flavonoid content, varies and is an important ornamental feature. Chalcone synthase (CHS) catalyzes the first key step in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. However, little is known about the role of S. oblata CHS (SoCHS) in flavonoid biosynthesis in this species. Here, we isolate and analyze the cDNA (SoCHS1) that encodes CHS in S. oblata. We also sought to analyzed the molecular characteristics and function of flavonoid metabolism by SoCHS1. We successfully isolated the CHS-encoding genomic DNA (gDNA) in S. oblata (SoCHS1), and the gene structural analysis indicated it had no intron. The opening reading frame (ORF) sequence of SoCHS1 was 1170bp long and encoded a 389-amino acid polypeptide. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that both the conserved CHS active site residues and CHS signature sequence were in the deduced amino acid sequence of SoCHS1. Crystallographic analysis revealed that the protein structure of SoCHS1 is highly similar to that of FnCHS1 in Freesia hybrida. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed to detect the SoCHS1 transcript expression levels in flowers, and other tissues revealed the expression was significantly correlated with anthocyanin accumulation during flower development. The ectopic expression results of Nicotiana tabacum showed that SoCHS1 overexpression in transgenic tobacco changed the flower color from pale pink to pink. In conclusion, these results suggest that SoCHS1 plays an essential role in flavonoid biosynthesis in S. oblata, and could be used to modify flavonoid components in other plant species. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-07-01

    NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key industrial enzyme, the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 cellulase (Cel6A), predict that aromatic residues near the enzyme's active site and at the entrance and exit tunnel perform different functions in substrate binding and catalysis, depending on their location in the enzyme. These results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide variety of binding affinities for diverse functions. Outcomes also suggest that protein engineering strategies in which mutations are made around the binding sites may require tailoring specific to the enzyme family. Cellulase enzymes ubiquitously exhibit tunnels or clefts lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrate polymers to monomers, but the molecular-level role of these aromatic residues remains unknown. In silico mutation of the aromatic residues near the catalytic site of Cel6A has little impact on the binding affinity, but simulation suggests that these residues play a major role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for cleaving glycosidic bonds to produce fermentable sugars. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the cellulase tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity. This suggests that these residues play a role in acquiring cellulose chains from the cellulose crystal and stabilizing the reaction product, respectively. These results illustrate that the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions varies dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, the results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering

  15. Deletion of inducible nitric-oxide synthase in leptin-deficient mice improves brown adipose tissue function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Becerril

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leptin and nitric oxide (NO on their own participate in the control of non-shivering thermogenesis. However, the functional interplay between both factors in this process has not been explored so far. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to analyze the impact of the absence of the inducible NO synthase (iNOS gene in the regulation of energy balance in ob/ob mice. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Double knockout (DBKO mice simultaneously lacking the ob and iNOS genes were generated, and the expression of molecules involved in the control of brown fat cell function was analyzed by real-time PCR, western-blot and immunohistochemistry. Twelve week-old DBKO mice exhibited reduced body weight (p<0.05, decreased amounts of total fat pads (p<0.05, lower food efficiency rates (p<0.05 and higher rectal temperature (p<0.05 than ob/ob mice. Ablation of iNOS also improved the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism of ob/ob mice. DBKO showed a marked reduction in the size of brown adipocytes compared to ob/ob mutants. In this sense, in comparison to ob/ob mice, DBKO rodents showed an increase in the expression of PR domain containing 16 (Prdm16, a transcriptional regulator of brown adipogenesis. Moreover, iNOS deletion enhanced the expression of mitochondria-related proteins, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (Pgc-1alpha, sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1 and sirtuin-3 (Sirt-3. Accordingly, mitochondrial uncoupling proteins 1 and 3 (Ucp-1 and Ucp-3 were upregulated in brown adipose tissue (BAT of DBKO mice as compared to ob/ob rodents. CONCLUSION: Ablation of iNOS improved the energy balance of ob/ob mice by decreasing food efficiency through an increase in thermogenesis. These effects may be mediated, in part, through the recovery of the BAT phenotype and brown fat cell function improvement.

  16. The Structural and Functional Coordination of Glycolytic Enzymes in Muscle: Evidence of a Metabolon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynda Menard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism sustains life through enzyme-catalyzed chemical reactions within the cells of all organisms. The coupling of catalytic function to the structural organization of enzymes contributes to the kinetic optimization important to tissue-specific and whole-body function. This coupling is of paramount importance in the role that muscle plays in the success of Animalia. The structure and function of glycolytic enzyme complexes in anaerobic metabolism have long been regarded as a major regulatory element necessary for muscle activity and whole-body homeostasis. While the details of this complex remain to be elucidated through in vivo studies, this review will touch on recent studies that suggest the existence of such a complex and its structure. A potential model for glycolytic complexes and related subcomplexes is introduced.

  17. 18-Hydroxydolabella-3,7-diene synthase - a diterpene synthase from Chitinophaga pinensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickschat, Jeroen S.; Rinkel, Jan; Rabe, Patrick; Kashkooli, Arman Beyraghdar; Bouwmeester, Harro J.

    2017-01-01

    The product obtained in vitro from a diterpene synthase encoded in the genome of the bacterium Chitinophaga pinensis, an enzyme previously reported to have germacrene A synthase activity during heterologous expression in Escherichia coli, was identified by extensive NMR-spectroscopic methods as

  18. Genetic mapping and characterization of the globe artichoke (+)-germacrene A synthase gene, encoding the first dedicated enzyme for biosynthesis of the bitter sesquiterpene lactone cynaropicrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menin, Barbara; Comino, Cinzia; Portis, Ezio; Moglia, Andrea; Cankar, Katarina; Bouwmeester, Harro J; Lanteri, Sergio; Beekwilder, Jules

    2012-07-01

    Globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus L., Asteraceae) is a perennial crop traditionally consumed as a vegetable in the Mediterranean countries and rich in nutraceutically and pharmaceutically active compounds, including phenolic and terpenoid compounds. Its bitter taste is caused by its high content of sesquiterpene lactones (STLs), such as cynaropicrin. The biosynthetic pathway responsible for STL biosynthesis in globe artichoke is unknown, but likely proceeds through germacrene A, as has been shown for other Asteraceae species. Here, we investigated the accumulation of cynaropicrin in different tissues of globe artichoke, and compared it to accumulation of phenolic compounds. Cynaropicrin concentration was highest in old leaves. A putative germacrene A synthase (GAS) gene was identified in a set of ~19,000 globe artichoke unigenes. When heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, the putative globe artichoke GAS converted farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) into (+)-germacrene A. Among various tissues assayed, the level of globe artichoke GAS expression was highest in mature (six week old) leaves. A sequence polymorphism within a mapping population parent allowed the corresponding GAS gene to be positioned on a genetic map. This study reports the isolation, expression and mapping of a key gene involved in STL biosynthesis in C. cardunculus. This is a good basis for further investigation of this pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification and characterization of class 1 DXS gene encoding 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase, the first committed enzyme of the MEP pathway from soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Man; Li, Kai; Zhang, Chunhong; Gai, Junyi; Yu, Deyue

    2009-05-01

    1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS) catalyses the first committed step of the 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, which is an alternative isoprenoids biosynthetic route that has been recently discovered. In this work, a DXS1-like cDNA (GmDXS1) was isolated from soybean. The full-length cDNA of GmDXS1 encoded 708 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 76.4 KD. Sequence alignment showed that GmDXS1 had high homology to known DXS proteins from other plant species and contained the conserved N-terminal plastid transit peptide, the N-terminal thiamine binding domain and pyridine binding DRAG domain. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that GmDXS1 belonged to the plant DXS1 cluster. Southern blot analysis indicated that a single copy of GmDXS1 gene existed in soybean genome. Tissue expression analysis revealed that GmDXS1 expressed in all photosynthetic tissues except pod walls and roots. Green fluorescence analysis with the fusion protein 35S:GmDXS1:GFP suggested that GmDXS1 was localized in plastid. The relatively higher photosynthetic pigment content in transgenic tobacco leaves compared to the control implied that GmDXS1 catalyzed the first potential regulatory step in photosynthetic pigment biosynthesis via the MEP pathway.

  20. Identification of novel isoprene synthases through genome mining and expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmén, Marja; Oja, Merja; Huuskonen, Anne; Lee, Sangmin; Ruohonen, Laura; Jung, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Isoprene is a naturally produced hydrocarbon emitted into the atmosphere by green plants. It is also a constituent of synthetic rubber and a potential biofuel. Microbial production of isoprene can become a sustainable alternative to the prevailing chemical production of isoprene from petroleum. In this work, sequence homology searches were conducted to find novel isoprene synthases. Candidate sequences were functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and the desired enzymes were identified based on an isoprene production assay. The activity of three enzymes was shown for the first time: expression of the candidate genes from Ipomoea batatas, Mangifera indica, and Elaeocarpus photiniifolius resulted in isoprene formation. The Ipomoea batatas isoprene synthase produced the highest amounts of isoprene in all experiments, exceeding the isoprene levels obtained by the previously known Populus alba and Pueraria montana isoprene synthases that were studied in parallel as controls. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Trinuclear Metal Clusters in Catalysis by Terpenoid Synthases

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron, Julie A.; Christianson, David. W.

    2010-01-01

    Terpenoid synthases are ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze the formation of structurally and stereochemically diverse isoprenoid natural products. Many isoprenoid coupling enzymes and terpenoid cyclases from bacteria, fungi, protists, plants, and animals share the class I terpenoid synthase fold. Despite generally low amino acid sequence identity among these examples, class I terpenoid synthases contain conserved metal binding motifs that coordinate to a trinuclear metal cluster. This cluster n...

  2. Enhanced growth and improved vascular function in offspring from successive pregnancies in endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Longo, M; Jain, [No Value; Langenveld, J; Vedernikov, YP; Garfield, RE; Hankins, GDV; Anderson, GD; Saade, GR

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Transgenic mice that lack endothelial nitric oxide synthase have offspring with growth deficiency and abnormal vascular reactivity in later life. Our objective was to evaluate the role of parity in the modulation of the fetal programming of growth and vascular responses in these

  3. RNA-seq discovery, functional characterization, and comparison of sesquiterpene synthases from Solanum lycopersicum and Solanum habrochaites trichomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, P.M.; Spyropoulou, E.A.; Diergaarde, P.J.; Volpin, P.; de Both, M.T.J.; Zerbe, P.; Bohlmann, J.; Falara, V.; Matsuba, Y.; Pichersky, E.; Haring, M.A.; Schuurink, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Solanum lycopersicum and Solanum habrochaites (f. typicum) accession PI127826 emit a variety of sesquiterpenes. To identify terpene synthases involved in the production of these volatile sesquiterpenes, we used massive parallel pyrosequencing (RNA-seq) to obtain the transcriptome of the stem

  4. Functional expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase fused to green fluorescent protein in transgenic mice : Animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Haperen (Rien); C. Cheng (Caroline (Ka Lai)); B.M.E. Mees (Barend); E.D. van Deel (Elza); M.C. de Waard (Monique); T. van Gent (Teus); T. van Aken (Thijs); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); R. Krams (Rob); M.P.G. de Crom (Rini); L.C.A. van Damme (Luc)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is subject to complex transcriptional and post-translational regulation including the association with several proteins and variations in subcellular distribution. In the present study we describe a transgenic

  5. BRENDA in 2013: integrated reactions, kinetic data, enzyme function data, improved disease classification: new options and contents in BRENDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomburg, Ida; Chang, Antje; Placzek, Sandra; Söhngen, Carola; Rother, Michael; Lang, Maren; Munaretto, Cornelia; Ulas, Susanne; Stelzer, Michael; Grote, Andreas; Scheer, Maurice; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    The BRENDA (BRaunschweig ENzyme DAtabase) enzyme portal (http://www.brenda-enzymes.org) is the main information system of functional biochemical and molecular enzyme data and provides access to seven interconnected databases. BRENDA contains 2.7 million manually annotated data on enzyme occurrence, function, kinetics and molecular properties. Each entry is connected to a reference and the source organism. Enzyme ligands are stored with their structures and can be accessed via their names, synonyms or via a structure search. FRENDA (Full Reference ENzyme DAta) and AMENDA (Automatic Mining of ENzyme DAta) are based on text mining methods and represent a complete survey of PubMed abstracts with information on enzymes in different organisms, tissues or organelles. The supplemental database DRENDA provides more than 910 000 new EC number-disease relations in more than 510 000 references from automatic search and a classification of enzyme-disease-related information. KENDA (Kinetic ENzyme DAta), a new amendment extracts and displays kinetic values from PubMed abstracts. The integration of the EnzymeDetector offers an automatic comparison, evaluation and prediction of enzyme function annotations for prokaryotic genomes. The biochemical reaction database BKM-react contains non-redundant enzyme-catalysed and spontaneous reactions and was developed to facilitate and accelerate the construction of biochemical models.

  6. Characterization of the N-Acetyl-[alpha]-d-glucosaminyl l-Malate Synthase and Deacetylase Functions for Bacillithiol Biosynthesis in Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsonage, Derek; Newton, Gerald L.; Holder, Robert C.; Wallace, Bret D.; Paige, Carleitta; Hamilton, Chris J.; Dos Santos, Patricia C.; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Reid, Sean D.; Claiborne, Al (Wake Forest); (UNC); (East Anglia); (UCSD)

    2012-02-21

    Bacillithiol (Cys-GlcN-malate, BSH) has recently been identified as a novel low-molecular weight thiol in Bacillus anthracis, Staphylococcus aureus, and several other Gram-positive bacteria lacking glutathione and mycothiol. We have now characterized the first two enzymes for the BSH biosynthetic pathway in B. anthracis, which combine to produce {alpha}-D-glucosaminyl L-malate (GlcN-malate) from UDP-GlcNAc and L-malate. The structure of the GlcNAc-malate intermediate has been determined, as have the kinetic parameters for the BaBshA glycosyltransferase ({yields}GlcNAc-malate) and the BaBshB deacetylase ({yields}GlcN-malate). BSH is one of only two natural products reported to contain a malyl glycoside, and the crystal structure of the BaBshA-UDP-malate ternary complex, determined in this work at 3.3 {angstrom} resolution, identifies several active-site interactions important for the specific recognition of L-malate, but not other {alpha}-hydroxy acids, as the acceptor substrate. In sharp contrast to the structures reported for the GlcNAc-1-D-myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MshA) apo and ternary complex forms, there is no major conformational change observed in the structures of the corresponding BaBshA forms. A mutant strain of B. anthracis deficient in the BshA glycosyltransferase fails to produce BSH, as predicted. This B. anthracis bshA locus (BA1558) has been identified in a transposon-site hybridization study as required for growth, sporulation, or germination [Day, W. A., Jr., Rasmussen, S. L., Carpenter, B. M., Peterson, S. N., and Friedlander, A. M. (2007) J. Bacteriol. 189, 3296-3301], suggesting that the biosynthesis of BSH could represent a target for the development of novel antimicrobials with broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive pathogens like B. anthracis. The metabolites that function in thiol redox buffering and homeostasis in Bacillus are not well understood, and we present a composite picture based on this and other recent work.

  7. Arginase Inhibitor 2,3,5,4'-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-Glucoside Activates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Improves Vascular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Bonggu; Nguyen, Minh Cong; Won, Moo-Ho; Kim, Young Myeong; Ryoo, Sungwoo

    2017-02-01

    Endothelial arginase constrains the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by reducing nitric oxide bioavailability, which contributes to vascular diseases. During screening, we identified a novel compound from the rhizome of Polygonum multiflorum (Polygonaceae), 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (THSG), which inhibited arginase activity. THSG exhibited noncompetitive inhibition of arginase II and inhibited both arginases I and II in a dose-dependent manner. THSG-dependent arginase inhibition reciprocally increased nitric oxide production and decreased reactive oxygen species generation in aortic endothelia. These effects were associated with increased dimerization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase without changes in the protein expression levels of arginase I, arginase II, or endothelial nitric oxide synthase. In vascular tension assays, when aortic vessels from wild-type mice are incubated with THSG, responses to the nitric oxide-dependent vasorelaxant acetylcholine were augmented, but responses to an nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside, were not affected. On the other hand, phenylephrine-dependent vasoconstriction was significantly retarded in THSG-treated vessels. In a high-cholesterol diet-fed atherogenic model mice (ApoE-/-), THSG improved endothelial function by enhancement of the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that THSG may exert vasoprotective effects through augmentation of nitric oxide signaling by inhibiting arginase. Therefore, THSG may be useful in the treatment of vascular diseases that are derived from endothelial dysfunction, such as atherosclerosis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Extracellular enzyme activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Winding, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular enzyme activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity Niels Bohse Hendriksen, Anne Winding. Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark Soils provide numerous essential ecosystem services such as carbon cycling......, recycling of nutrients and waste, soil remediation, plant growth support and regulation of above ground biodiversity, resilience, and soil suppressiveness. As such, soil ecosystem services are beneficial and vital for human life and at the same time threatened by anthropogenic activities. Increasing...... of soil microbial functions is still needed. In soil, enzymes originate from a variety of organisms, notably fungi and bacteria and especially hydrolytic extracellular enzymes are of pivotal importance for decomposition of organic substrates and biogeochemical cycling. Their activity will reflect...

  9. Functional Applications of Lignocellulolytic Enzymes in the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toushik, Sazzad Hossen; Lee, Kyung-Tai; Lee, Jin-Sung; Kim, Keun-Sung

    2017-03-01

    Cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin (carbohydrate), and lignin (noncarbohydrate) polymers are the main substrates of lignocellulose-degrading enzymes. They are present in large amounts in the primary cell wall and dietary fibers of major fruits and vegetables. During processing of fruits and vegetables to the corresponding final food products, lignocellulosic substrates are hydrolyzed by different lignocellulolytic enzymes. Currently, lignocellulolytic enzymes such as cellulases, xylanases, pectinases, and laccases are extensively used during the processing of fruits and vegetables, in applications like texturizing and flavoring of products in the food industries. The present article provides an updated overview of functional applications of lignocellulolytic enzymes in the juice processing, oil extraction, and alcoholic beverage processing industries. Extensive use of lignocellulolytic enzymes in different food processing industries not only accelerates the production rates but also improves product quality. It is also possible to ensure the efficient use of fruits and vegetables globally by employing lignocellulolytic enzymes in the corresponding processing industries to convert them into food commodities, which will not only raise their economic value in the global market but also increase food availability, which will help mitigate nutritional problems worldwide. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  10. Prediction of enzyme function based on 3D templates of evolutionarily important amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Brian Y

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural genomics projects such as the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI yield many new structures, but often these have no known molecular functions. One approach to recover this information is to use 3D templates – structure-function motifs that consist of a few functionally critical amino acids and may suggest functional similarity when geometrically matched to other structures. Since experimentally determined functional sites are not common enough to define 3D templates on a large scale, this work tests a computational strategy to select relevant residues for 3D templates. Results Based on evolutionary information and heuristics, an Evolutionary Trace Annotation (ETA pipeline built templates for 98 enzymes, half taken from the PSI, and sought matches in a non-redundant structure database. On average each template matched 2.7 distinct proteins, of which 2.0 share the first three Enzyme Commission digits as the template's enzyme of origin. In many cases (61% a single most likely function could be predicted as the annotation with the most matches, and in these cases such a plurality vote identified the correct function with 87% accuracy. ETA was also found to be complementary to sequence homology-based annotations. When matches are required to both geometrically match the 3D template and to be sequence homologs found by BLAST or PSI-BLAST, the annotation accuracy is greater than either method alone, especially in the region of lower sequence identity where homology-based annotations are least reliable. Conclusion These data suggest that knowledge of evolutionarily important residues improves functional annotation among distant enzyme homologs. Since, unlike other 3D template approaches, the ETA method bypasses the need for experimental knowledge of the catalytic mechanism, it should prove a useful, large scale, and general adjunct to combine with other methods to decipher protein function in the structural proteome.

  11. Role of Myeloperoxidase Oxidants in the Modulation of Cellular Lysosomal Enzyme Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ismael, Fahd O; Barrett, Tessa J; Sheipouri, Diba

    2016-01-01

    with the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the effect of HOCl, HOSCN and LDL pre-treated with these oxidants on the function of lysosomal enzymes responsible for protein catabolism and lipid hydrolysis in murine macrophage-like J774A.1 cells. In each case, the cells were exposed to HOCl...

  12. The effect of rutin on lipid profile and liver function enzymes on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effects of rutin on lipid profile and liver function enzymes on alloxan induced hyperglycaemia in Wistar rats. Hyperglycaemic was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 150 mg/kg alloxan monohydrate. The rats were grouped into five groups of five rats each. Group 1 served as ...

  13. In Vitro Biochemical Characterization of All Barley Endosperm Starch Synthases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Cuesta-Seijo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Starch is the main storage polysaccharide in cereals and the major source of calories in the human diet. It is synthesized by a panel of enzymes including five classes of starch synthases (SSs. While the overall starch synthase (SS reaction is known, the functional differences between the five SS classes are poorly understood. Much of our knowledge comes from analyzing mutant plants with altered SS activities, but the resulting data are often difficult to interpret as a result of pleitropic effects, competition between enzymes, overlaps in enzyme activity and disruption of multi-enzyme complexes. Here we provide a detailed biochemical study of the activity of all five classes of SSs in barley endosperm. Each enzyme was produced recombinantly in E. coli and the properties and modes of action in vitro were studied in isolation from other SSs and other substrate modifying activities. Our results define the mode of action of each SS class in unprecedented detail; we analyze their substrate selection, temperature dependence and stability, substrate affinity and temporal abundance during barley development. Our results are at variance with some generally accepted ideas about starch biosynthesis and might lead to the reinterpretation of results obtained in planta. In particular, they indicate that granule bound SS is capable of processive action even in the absence of a starch matrix, that SSI has no elongation limit, and that SSIV, believed to be critical for the initiation of starch granules, has maltoligosaccharides and not polysaccharides as its preferred substrates.

  14. Explaining an Unusually Fast Parasitic Enzyme: Folate Tail-Binding Residues Dictate Substrate Positioning and Catalysis in Cryptosporidium hominis Thymidylate Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martucci,W.; Vargo, M.; Anderson, K.

    2008-01-01

    The essential enzyme TS-DHFR from Cryptosporidium hominis undergoes an unusually rapid rate of catalysis at the conserved TS domain, facilitated by two nonconserved residues, Ala287 and Ser290, in the folate tail-binding region. Mutation of these two residues to their conserved counterparts drastically affects multiple steps of the TS catalytic cycle. We have determined the crystal structures of all three mutants (A287F, S290G, and A287F/S290G) in complex with active site ligands dUMP and CB3717. The structural data show two effects of the mutations: an increased distance between the ligands in the active site and increased flexibility of the folate ligand in the partially open enzyme state that precedes conformational change to the active catalytic state. The latter effect is able to be rescued by the mutants containing the A287F mutation. In addition, the conserved water network of TS is altered in each of the mutants. The structural results point to a role of the folate tail-binding residues in closely positioning ChTS ligands and restricting ligand flexibility in the partially open state to allow for a rapid transition to the active closed state and enhanced rate of catalysis. These results provide an explanation on how folate tail-binding residues at one end of the active site affect long-range interactions throughout the TS active site and validate these residues as targets for species-specific drug design.

  15. Single Enzyme Studies Reveal the Existence of Discrete Functional States for Monomeric Enzymes and How They Are “Selected” upon Allosteric Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzakis, Nikos S.; Wei, Li; Jørgensen, Sune Klamer

    2012-01-01

    Allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity forms the basis for controlling a plethora of vital cellular processes. While the mechanism underlying regulation of multimeric enzymes is generally well understood and proposed to primarily operate via conformational selection, the mechanism underlying...... with the enzyme’s major conformational states and are redistributed in the presence of the regulatory effector. Thus, our data support allosteric regulation of monomeric enzymes to operate via selection of preexisting functional states and not via induction of ones.......Allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity forms the basis for controlling a plethora of vital cellular processes. While the mechanism underlying regulation of multimeric enzymes is generally well understood and proposed to primarily operate via conformational selection, the mechanism underlying...... allosteric regulation of monomeric enzymes is poorly understood. Here we monitored for the first time allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity at the single molecule level. We measured single stochastic catalytic turnovers of a monomeric metabolic enzyme (Thermomyces lanuginosus Lipase) while titrating...

  16. Exercise training enhanced myocardial endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS function in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaminski Pawel M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different mechanisms of diabetic-induced NO dysfunction have been proposed and central to most of them are significant changes in eNOS function as the rate-limiting step in NO bioavailability. eNOS exists in both monomeric and dimeric conformations, with the dimeric form catalyzing the synthesis of nitric oxide, while the monomeric form catalyzes the synthesis of superoxide (O2-. Diabetic-induced shifts to decrease the dimer:monomer ratio is thought to contribute to the degradation of nitric oxide (NO bioavailability. Exercise has long been useful in the management of diabetes. Although exercise-induced increases expression of eNOS has been reported, it is unclear if exercise may alter the functional coupling of eNOS. Methods To investigate this question, Goto-Kakizaki rats (a model of type II diabetes were randomly assigned to a 9-week running program (train or sedentary (sed groups. Results Exercise training significantly (p 4, but not in the presence of exogenous BH4. Exercise training also significantly decreased NADPH-dependent O2- activity. Conclusion Exercise-induced increased eNOS dimerization resulted in an increased coupling of the enzyme to facilitate production of NO at the expense of ROS generation. This shift that could serve to decrease diabetic-related oxidative stress, which should serve to lessen diabetic-related complications.

  17. Homology modeling and functional sites prediction of azoreductase enzyme from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Philem Priyadarshini; Adhikari, Samrat

    2012-12-01

    Industrial dyes such as azodyes are potential environmental pollutants causing deleterious health hazards complications. These dyes are potentially degraded by azoreductase enzyme which is widely distributed in bacteria and also cyanobacteria. The azoreductase enzymes from cyanobacteria have not been explored in detail. Hence this enzyme from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 has been addressed in detail in the present study considering to explore the physico-chemical properties, evolutionary relationships, functional sites and structural properties using various bioinformatics tools. Four conserved regions were obtained from the multiple sequence analysis. The multiple sequence alignment showed conserved regions at different stretches from 1-11, 40-57, 82-120 and 161-177 amino acid residues. These regions could be used for designing degenerate primers or probes for PCR-based amplification or hybridization-based detection of azoreductase sequences from different source organisms. Domain analysis and functional site prediction showed the presence of functional sites and domain such as flavodoxin like fold responsible for enzyme activity. 3D model was constructed and the best model was selected and validated. Superimposition of the final structure and the template showed variations in certain regions which might be involved in the accommodation of various dyes. Our results may be helpful for further investigations like docking studies as well as in vivo and in vitro conditions although these predictions still need to be studied.

  18. Structure-function relationships of family GH70 glucansucrase and 4,6-α-glucanotransferase enzymes, and their evolutionary relationships with family GH13 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangfeng; Gangoiti, Joana; Bai, Yuxiang; Pijning, Tjaard; Van Leeuwen, Sander S; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-07-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known to produce large amounts of α-glucan exopolysaccharides. Family GH70 glucansucrase (GS) enzymes catalyze the synthesis of these α-glucans from sucrose. The elucidation of the crystal structures of representative GS enzymes has advanced our understanding of their reaction mechanism, especially structural features determining their linkage specificity. In addition, with the increase of genome sequencing, more and more GS enzymes are identified and characterized. Together, such knowledge may promote the synthesis of α-glucans with desired structures and properties from sucrose. In the meantime, two new GH70 subfamilies (GTFB- and GTFC-like) have been identified as 4,6-α-glucanotransferases (4,6-α-GTs) that represent novel evolutionary intermediates between the family GH13 and "classical GH70 enzymes". These enzymes are not active on sucrose; instead, they use (α1 → 4) glucans (i.e. malto-oligosaccharides and starch) as substrates to synthesize novel α-glucans by introducing linear chains of (α1 → 6) linkages. All these GH70 enzymes are very interesting biocatalysts and hold strong potential for applications in the food, medicine and cosmetic industries. In this review, we summarize the microbiological distribution and the structure-function relationships of family GH70 enzymes, introduce the two newly identified GH70 subfamilies, and discuss evolutionary relationships between family GH70 and GH13 enzymes.

  19. Characterization, Function, and Transcriptional Profiling Analysis of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA Synthase Gene (GbHMGS1 towards Stresses and Exogenous Hormone Treatments in Ginkgo biloba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangxiang Meng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGS is one of the rate-limiting enzymes in the mevalonate pathway as it catalyzes the condensation of acetoacetyl-CoA to form 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA. In this study, A HMGS gene (designated as GbHMGS1 was cloned from Ginkgo biloba for the first time. GbHMGS1 contained a 1422-bp open-reading frame encoding 474 amino acids. Comparative and bioinformatics analysis revealed that GbHMGS1 was extensively homologous to HMGSs from other plant species. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the GbHMGS1 belonged to the plant HMGS superfamily, sharing a common evolutionary ancestor with other HMGSs, and had a further relationship with other gymnosperm species. The yeast complement assay of GbHMGS1 in HMGS-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YSC6274 demonstrated that GbHMGS1 gene encodes a functional HMGS enzyme. The recombinant protein of GbHMGS1 was successfully expressed in E. coli. The in vitro enzyme activity assay showed that the kcat and Km values of GbHMGS1 were 195.4 min−1 and 689 μM, respectively. GbHMGS1 was constitutively expressed in all tested tissues, including the roots, stems, leaves, female flowers, male flowers and fruits. The transcript accumulation for GbHMGS1 was highest in the leaves. Expression profiling analyses revealed that GbHMGS1 expression was induced by abiotic stresses (ultraviolet B and cold and hormone treatments (salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethephon in G. biloba, indicating that GbHMGS1 gene was involved in the response to environmental stresses and plant hormones.

  20. Effects of protease and non-starch polysaccharide enzyme on performance, digestive function, activity and gene expression of endogenous enzyme of broilers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yuan

    Full Text Available Three hundred one-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308 were fed corn-soybean basal diets containing non-starch polysaccharide (NSP enzyme and different levels of acid protease from 1 to 42 days of age to investigate the effects of exogenous enzymes on growth performance, digestive function, activity of endogenous digestive enzymes in the pancreas and mRNA expression of pancreatic digestive enzymes. For days 1-42, compared to the control chickens, average daily feed intake (ADFI and average daily gain (ADG were significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme in combination with protease supplementation at 40 or 80 mg/kg (p<0.05. Feed-to-gain ratio (FGR was significantly improved by supplementation with NSP enzymes or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease compared to the control diet (p<0.05. Apparent digestibility of crude protein (ADCP was significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease (p<0.05. Cholecystokinin (CCK level in serum was reduced by 31.39% with NSP enzyme combined with protease supplementation at 160 mg/kg (p<0.05, but the CCK level in serum was increased by 26.51% with NSP enzyme supplementation alone. After 21 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 74.13%, 70.66% and 42.59% (p<0.05, respectively. After 42 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 32.45% and 27.41%, respectively (p<0.05. However, supplementation with NSP enzyme and 80 or 160 mg/kg protease decreased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 10.75% and 25.88%, respectively (p<0.05. The activities of pancreatic lipase and amylase were significantly higher in treated animals than they were in the control group (p<0.05. Supplementation with NSP enzyme, NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased

  1. Concentrations of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, angiotensin-converting enzyme, vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor in maternal blood and maternal metabolic status in pregnancy complicated by hypertensive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawiejska, A; Wender-Ozegowska, E; Iciek, R; Brazert, J

    2014-11-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDPs) are associated with altered maternal metabolism, impaired perinatal outcome and increased risk for remote maternal complications. The aim of our study was to analyse associations between circulating levels of angiogenic factors and markers of oxidative stress and metabolic status in women with HDP. Forty-six women in singleton pregnancies complicated by HDP and 30 healthy controls were enrolled in a prospective observational study. Serum concentrations of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), angiotensin-converting enzyme, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PlGF) were measured in the third trimester and correlated with maternal anthropometrics and metabolic status. We found significantly lower eNOS levels in patients with severe hypertension vs controls, a strong association between eNOS and PlGF in the study group, a significant association between maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and VEGF levels and an inverse correlation between VEGF and PlGF. Maternal prepregnancy BMI was the only independent predictor for VEGF concentrations. We noted reduced levels of PlGF and eNOS and increased VEGF levels in women with severe hypertension/preeclampsia. First, different forms of HDP are associated with different alteration patterns in concentrations of angiogenic factors and markers of oxidative stress. Second, maternal prepregnancy BMI, but not body weight, is a significant predictor for VEGF levels in late pregnancy.

  2. Sterol biosynthesis by a prokaryote: first in vitro identification of the genes encoding squalene epoxidase and lanosterol synthase from Methylococcus capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Chiaki; Motegi, Akihiro; Sato, Tsutomu; Onodera, Masayuki; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2007-10-01

    Sterol biosynthesis by prokaryotic organisms is very rare. Squalene epoxidase and lanosterol synthase are prerequisite to cyclic sterol biosynthesis. These two enzymes, from the methanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus, were functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. Structural analyses of the enzymatic products indicated that the reactions proceeded in a complete regio- and stereospecific fashion to afford (3S)-2,3-oxidosqualene from squalene and lanosterol from (3S)-2,3-oxidosqualene, in full accordance with those of eukaryotes. However, our result obtained with the putative lanosterol synthase was inconsistent with a previous report that the prokaryote accepts both (3R)- and (3S)-2,3-oxidosqualenes to afford 3-epi-lanosterol and lanosterol, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the existence of the genes encoding squalene epoxidase and lanosterol synthase in prokaryotes by establishing the enzyme activities. The evolutionary aspect of prokaryotic squalene epoxidase and lanosterol synthase is discussed.

  3. The role of surface electrostatics on the stability, function and regulation of human cystathionine β-synthase, a complex multidomain and oligomeric protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pey, Angel L; Majtan, Tomas; Kraus, Jan P

    2014-09-01

    Human cystathionine β-synthase (hCBS) is a key enzyme of sulfur amino acid metabolism, controlling the commitment of homocysteine to the transsulfuration pathway and antioxidant defense. Mutations in hCBS cause inherited homocystinuria (HCU), a rare inborn error of metabolism characterized by accumulation of toxic homocysteine in blood and urine. hCBS is a complex multidomain and oligomeric protein whose activity and stability are independently regulated by the binding of S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) to two different types of sites at its C-terminal regulatory domain. Here we study the role of surface electrostatics on the complex regulation and stability of hCBS using biophysical and biochemical procedures. We show that the kinetic stability of the catalytic and regulatory domains is significantly affected by the modulation of surface electrostatics through noticeable structural and energetic changes along their denaturation pathways. We also show that surface electrostatics strongly affect SAM binding properties to those sites responsible for either enzyme activation or kinetic stabilization. Our results provide new insight into the regulation of hCBS activity and stability in vivo with implications for understanding HCU as a conformational disease. We also lend experimental support to the role of electrostatic interactions in the recently proposed binding modes of SAM leading to hCBS activation and kinetic stabilization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel polyhydroxyalkanoate copolymers produced in Pseudomonas putida by metagenomic polyhydroxyalkanoate synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiujun; Charles, Trevor C

    2016-09-01

    Bacterially produced biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) with versatile properties can be achieved using different PHA synthases (PhaCs). This work aims to expand the diversity of known PhaCs via functional metagenomics and demonstrates the use of these novel enzymes in PHA production. Complementation of a PHA synthesis-deficient Pseudomonas putida strain with a soil metagenomic cosmid library retrieved 27 clones expressing either class I, class II, or unclassified PHA synthases, and many did not have close sequence matches to known PhaCs. The composition of PHA produced by these clones was dependent on both the supplied growth substrates and the nature of the PHA synthase, with various combinations of short-chain-length (SCL) and medium-chain-length (MCL) PHA. These data demonstrate the ability to isolate diverse genes for PHA synthesis by functional metagenomics and their use for the production of a variety of PHA polymer and copolymer mixtures.

  5. Structural and functional analysis of validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate synthase ValL involved in validamycin A biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Zheng

    Full Text Available Validamycin A (Val-A is an effective antifungal agent widely used in Asian countries as crop protectant. Validoxylamine A, the core structure and intermediate of Val-A, consists of two C(7-cyclitol units connected by a rare C-N bond. In the Val-A biosynthetic gene cluster in Streptomyces hygroscopicus 5008, the ORF valL was initially annotated as a validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate(V7P synthase, whose encoded 497-aa protein shows high similarity with trehalose 6-phosphate(T6P synthase. Gene inactivation of valL abolished both validoxylamine A and validamycin A productivity, and complementation with a cloned valL recovered 10% production of the wild-type in the mutant, indicating the involvement of ValL in validoxylamine A biosynthesis. Also we determined the structures of ValL and ValL/trehalose complex. The structural data indicates that ValL adopts the typical fold of GT-B protein family, featuring two Rossmann-fold domains and an active site at domain junction. The residues in the active site are arranged in a manner homologous to that of Escherichia coli (E.coli T6P synthase OtsA. However, a significant discrepancy is found in the active-site loop region. Also noticeable structural variance is found around the active site entrance in the apo ValL structure while the region takes an ordered configuration upon binding of product analog trehalose. Furthermore, the modeling of V7P in the active site of ValL suggests that ValL might have a similar SNi-like mechanism as OtsA.

  6. Functional genomic analysis supports conservation of function among cellulose synthase-like a gene family members and suggests diverse roles of mannans in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liepman, Aaron H; Nairn, C Joseph; Willats, William G T

    2007-01-01

    from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), guar (Cyamopsis tetragonolobus), and Populus trichocarpa catalyze beta-1,4-mannan and glucomannan synthase reactions in vitro. Mannan polysaccharides and homologs of CslA genes appear to be present in all lineages of land plants analyzed to date. In many plants...... in insect cells, and each CslA protein catalyzed mannan and glucomannan synthase reactions in vitro. Microarray mining and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that transcripts of Arabidopsis and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) CslA genes display tissue...

  7. Cation-induced formation of a macro-glucan synthase complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmer, D.; Solomon, M.; Andrawis, A.; Amor, Y. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel))

    1990-05-01

    Incubation of Chaps or digitonin-solubilized membrane proteins from cotton fiber with Ca{sup 2+} in combination with Mg{sup 2+}, leads to formation of a complex which can be sedimented within 15 min at 15,000 g. The complex is enriched >10-fold in callose synthase activity and possesses a characteristic pattern of enriched polypeptides when analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Although cation dependent, formation of the complex is not dependent upon the presence of the callose synthase substrate, UDP-glc, indicating that complex formation is not due to entrapment of the enzyme by association with glucan product. The enriched polypeptides include: >200, 50, and 46 kD, all of which have been shown by direct photo-labeling to interact with {sup 92}P-UDP-glc in a Ca{sup 2+} or beta-glucoside dependent reaction are considered likely subunits of callose synthase; a 60-62 kD doublet which is recognized by our MAb 2-1 which can form an immune complex with callose synthase; 74 and 34 kD polypeptides which also interact with UDP-glc, but do not associate with callose synthase in the presence of EDTA. A similar phenomenon is also observed with solubilized membrane proteins from mung beans. Possible functions of each of the enriched polypeptides, the catalytic properties, and ultra-structure of this macro-glucan synthase complex are currently under investigation.

  8. Investigating Information Dynamics in Living Systems through the Structure and Function of Enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gatenby

    Full Text Available Enzymes are proteins that accelerate intracellular chemical reactions often by factors of 105-1012s-1. We propose the structure and function of enzymes represent the thermodynamic expression of heritable information encoded in DNA with post-translational modifications that reflect intra- and extra-cellular environmental inputs. The 3 dimensional shape of the protein, determined by the genetically-specified amino acid sequence and post translational modifications, permits geometric interactions with substrate molecules traditionally described by the key-lock best fit model. Here we apply Kullback-Leibler (K-L divergence as metric of this geometric "fit" and the information content of the interactions. When the K-L 'distance' between interspersed substrate pn and enzyme rn positions is minimized, the information state, reaction probability, and reaction rate are maximized. The latter obeys the Arrhenius equation, which we show can be derived from the geometrical principle of minimum K-L distance. The derivation is first limited to optimum substrate positions for fixed sets of enzyme positions. However, maximally improving the key/lock fit, called 'induced fit,' requires both sets of positions to be varied optimally. We demonstrate this permits and is maximally efficient if the key and lock particles pn, rn are quantum entangled because the level of entanglement obeys the same minimized value of the Kullback-Leibler distance that occurs when all pn ≈ rn. This implies interchanges pn ⇄ brn randomly taking place during a reaction successively improves key/lock fits, reducing the activation energy Ea and increasing the reaction rate k. Our results demonstrate the summation of heritable and environmental information that determines the enzyme spatial configuration, by decreasing the K-L divergence, is converted to thermodynamic work by reducing Ea and increasing k of intracellular reactions. Macroscopically, enzyme information increases the order

  9. Functional Expression of Enterobacterial O-Polysaccharide Biosynthesis Enzymes in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäffer, Christina; Wugeditsch, Thomas; Messner, Paul; Whitfield, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The expression of heterologous bacterial glycosyltransferases is of interest for potential application in the emerging field of carbohydrate engineering in gram-positive organisms. To assess the feasibility of using enzymes from gram-negative bacteria, the functional expression of the genes wbaP (formerly rfbP), wecA (formerly rfe), and wbbO (formerly rfbF) from enterobacterial lipopolysaccharide O-polysaccharide biosynthesis pathways was examined in Bacillus subtilis. WbaP and WecA are initiation enzymes for O-polysaccharide formation, catalyzing the transfer of galactosyl 1-phosphate from UDP-galactose and N-acetylglucosaminyl 1-phosphate from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, respectively, to undecaprenylphosphate. The WecA product (undecaprenylpyrophosphoryl GlcNAc) is used as an acceptor to which the bifunctional wbbO gene product sequentially adds a galactopyranose and a galactofuranose residue from the corresponding UDP sugars to form a lipid-linked trisaccharide. Genes were cloned into the shuttle vectors pRB374 and pAW10. In B. subtilis hosts, the genes were effectively transcribed under the vegII promoter control of pRB374, but the plasmids were susceptible to rearrangements and deletion. In contrast, pAW10-based constructs, in which genes were cloned downstream of the tet resistance cassette, were stable but yielded lower levels of enzyme activity. In vitro glycosyltransferase assays were performed in Escherichia coli and B. subtilis, using membrane preparations as sources of enzymes and endogenous undecaprenylphosphate as an acceptor. Incorporation of radioactivity from UDP-α-d-14C-sugar into reaction products verified the functionality of WbaP, WecA, and WbbO in either host. Enzyme activities in B. subtilis varied between 20 and 75% of those measured in E. coli. PMID:12324313

  10. Substrate specificity determinants of the methanogen homoaconitase enzyme: structure and function of small subunit residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center; Drevland, Randy [University of Texas, Austin; Gayathri, Dasara [University of Madras; Velmurugan, Devadasan [University of Madras; Shinkai, Akeo [SPring8/JASRI, Mikazuki, Hyogo and RIKEN, Japan; Kuramitsu, Seiki [SPring8/JASRI, Mikazuki, Hyogo and RIKEN, Japan; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki [University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Graham, David E [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The aconitase family of hydro-lyase enzymes includes three classes of proteins that catalyze the isomerization of -hydroxyacids to -hydroxyacids. Besides aconitase, isopropylmalate isomerase (IPMI) proteins specifically catalyze the isomerization of , -dicarboxylates with hydrophobic -chain groups, and homoaconitase (HACN) proteins catalyze the isomerization of tricarboxylates with variable chain length -carboxylate groups. These enzymes stereospecific hydro-lyase activities make them attractive catalysts to produce diastereomers from unsaturated precursors. However, sequence similarity and convergent evolution among these proteins leads to widespread misannotation and uncertainty about gene function. To find the substrate specificity determinants of homologous IPMI and HACN proteins from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, the small-subunit HACN protein (MJ1271) was crystallized for X-ray diffraction. The structural model showed characteristic residues in a flexible loop region between 2 and 3 that distinguish HACN from IPMI and aconitase proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis of MJ1271 produced loop-region variant proteins that were reconstituted with wild-type MJ1003 large-subunit protein. The heteromers formed promiscuous hydro-lyases with reduced activity but broader substrate specificity. Both R26K and R26V variants formed relatively efficient IPMI enzymes, while the T27A variant had uniformly lower specificity constants for both IPMI and HACN substrates. The R26V T27Y variant resembles the MJ1277 IPMI small subunit in its flexible loop sequence, but demonstrated the broad substrate specificity of the R26V variant. These mutations may reverse the evolution of HACN activity from an ancestral IPMI gene, demonstrating the evolutionary potential for promiscuity in hydro-lyase enzymes. Understanding these specificity determinants enables the functional reannotation of paralogous HACN and IPMI genes in numerous genome sequences. These structural and kinetic results will

  11. New insights into the catalytic mechanism of Bombyx mori prostaglandin E synthase gained from structure–function analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Kohji, E-mail: yamamok@agr.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University Graduate School, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Suzuki, Mamoru; Higashiura, Akifumi [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Aritake, Kosuke; Urade, Yoshihiro; Uodome, Nobuko [Department of Molecular Behavioral Biology, Osaka Bioscience Institute, 6-2-4 Furuedai, Suita, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Hossain, MD. Tofazzal [Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University Graduate School, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Nakagawa, Atsushi [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Structure of Bombyx mori prostaglandin E synthase is determined. •Bound glutathione sulfonic acid is located at the glutathione-binding site. •Electron-sharing network is present in this protein. •This network includes Asn95, Asp96, and Arg98. •Site-directed mutagenesis reveals that the residues contribute to the catalytic activity. -- Abstract: Prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) catalyzes the isomerization of PGH{sub 2} to PGE{sub 2}. We previously reported the identification and structural characterization of Bombyx mori PGES (bmPGES), which belongs to Sigma-class glutathione transferase. Here, we extend these studies by determining the structure of bmPGES in complex with glutathione sulfonic acid (GTS) at a resolution of 1.37 Å using X-ray crystallography. GTS localized to the glutathione-binding site. We found that electron-sharing network of bmPGES includes Asn95, Asp96, and Arg98. Site-directed mutagenesis of these residues to create mutant forms of bmPGES mutants indicate that they contribute to catalytic activity. These results are, to our knowledge, the first to reveal the presence of an electron-sharing network in bmPGES.

  12. Bacterial Over-Expression and Purification of the 3'phosphoadenosine 5'phosphosulfate (PAPS Reductase Domain of Human FAD Synthase: Functional Characterization and Homology Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Barile

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available FAD synthase (FADS, EC 2.7.7.2 is a key enzyme in the metabolic pathway that converts riboflavin into the redox cofactor, FAD. Human FADS is organized in two domains: -the 3'phosphoadenosine 5'phosphosulfate (PAPS reductase domain, similar to yeast Fad1p, at the C-terminus, and -the resembling molybdopterin-binding domain at the N-terminus. To understand whether the PAPS reductase domain of hFADS is sufficient to catalyze FAD synthesis, per se, and to investigate the role of the molybdopterin-binding domain, a soluble “truncated” form of hFADS lacking the N-terminal domain (Δ1-328-hFADS has been over-produced and purified to homogeneity as a recombinant His-tagged protein. The recombinant Δ1-328-hFADS binds one mole of FAD product very tightly as the wild-type enzyme. Under turnover conditions, it catalyzes FAD assembly from ATP and FMN and, at a much lower rate, FAD pyrophosphorolytic hydrolysis. The Δ1-328-hFADS enzyme shows a slight, but not significant, change of Km values (0.24 and 6.23 µM for FMN and ATP, respectively and of kcat (4.2 × 10−2 s−1 compared to wild-type protein in the forward direction. These results demonstrate that the molybdopterin-binding domain is not strictly required for catalysis. Its regulatory role is discussed in light of changes in divalent cations sensitivity of the Δ1-328-hFADS versus wild-type protein.

  13. Arg126 and Asp49 Are Essential for the Catalytic Function of Microsomal Prostaglandin E2 Synthase 1 and Ser127 Is Not.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Raouf

    Full Text Available Prostaglandins are signaling molecules that regulate different physiological processes, involving allergic and inflammatory responses and cardiovascular control. They are involved in several pathophysiological processes, including inflammation and cancer. The inducible terminal enzyme, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (MPGES1, catalyses prostaglandin E2 production during inflammation. MPGES1 has therefore been intensively studied as a pharmaceutical target and many competitive inhibitors targeting its active site have been developed. However, little is known about its catalytic mechanism.The objective of this study was to investigate which amino acids play a key role in the catalytic mechanism of MPGES1.Based on results and predictions from previous structural studies, the amino acid residues Asp49, Arg73, Arg126, and Ser127 were chosen and altered by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutated enzyme variants were cloned and expressed in both the E. coli and the Baculovirus expression systems. Their catalytic significance was evaluated by activity measurements with prostanoid profiling.Our study shows that Arg126 and Asp49 are absolutely required for the catalytic activity of MPGES1, as when exchanged, the enzyme variants loose activity. Ser127 and Arg73 on the other hand, don't seem to be central to the catalytic mechanism because when exchanged, their variants retain considerable activity. Our finding that the Ser127Ala variant retains activity was surprising since high-resolution structural data supported a role in glutathione activation. The close proximity of Ser127 to the active site is, however, supported since the Ser127Cys variant displays 80% lowered activity.

  14. Extracellular functions of glycolytic enzymes of parasites: unpredicted use of ancient proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Arreaza, Amaranta; Acosta, Hector; Quiñones, Wilfredo; Concepción, Juan Luis; Michels, Paul A M; Avilán, Luisana

    2014-02-01

    In addition of their usual intracellular localization where they are involved in catalyzing reactions of carbohydrate and energy metabolism by glycolysis, multiple studies have shown that glycolytic enzymes of many organisms, but notably pathogens, can also be present extracellularly. In the case of parasitic protists and helminths, they can be found either secreted or attached to the surface of the parasites. At these extracellular localizations, these enzymes have been shown to perform additional, very different so-called "moonlighting" functions, such as acting as ligands for a variety of components of the host. Due to this recognition, different extracellular glycolytic enzymes participate in various important parasite-host interactions such as adherence and invasion of parasites, modulation of the host's immune and haemostatic systems, promotion of angiogenesis, and acquisition of specific nutrients by the parasites. Accordingly, extracellular glycolytic enzymes are important for the invasion of the parasites and their establishment in the host, and in determining their virulence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The influence of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition on renal tubular function in progressive chronic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Leyssac, P P

    1996-01-01

    The influence of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition on renal tubular function in progressive chronic nephropathy was investigated in 69 patients by the lithium clearance (C(Li)) method. Studies were done repeatedly for up to 2 years during a controlled trial on the effect of enalapril...... with conventional antihypertensive drugs (n = 35), C(Li) was unchanged until severe reduction in GFR, APR and FPR decreased gradually, and potassium clearance was almost unchanged. These differences in tubular function between the two treatment regimens were significant (P

  16. Evolutionary and mechanistic insights from the reconstruction of α-humulene synthases from a modern (+)-germacrene A synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Veronica; Touchet, Sabrina; Grundy, Daniel J; Faraldos, Juan A; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2014-10-15

    Germacrene A synthase (GAS) from Solidago canadensis catalyzes the conversion of farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) to the plant sesquiterpene (+)-germacrene A. After diphosphate expulsion, farnesyl cation reacts with the distal 10,11-double bond to afford germacrene A (>96%) and <2% α-humulene, which arises from 1,11-cyclization of FDP. The origin of the 1,11-activity of GAS was investigated by amino acid sequence alignments of 1,10- and 1,11-synthases and comparisons of X-ray crystal structures with the homology model of GAS; a triad [Thr 401-Gly 402-Gly 403] that might be responsible for the predominant 1,10-cyclization activity of GAS was identified. Replacement of Gly 402 with residues of increasing size led to a progressive increase of 1,11-cyclization. The catalytic robustness of these 1,10- /1,11-GAS variants point to Gly 402 as a functional switch of evolutionary significance and suggests that enzymes with strict functionalities have evolved from less specific ancestors through a small number of substitutions. Similar results were obtained with germacrene D synthase (GDS) upon replacement of the homologous active-site residue Gly 404: GDS-G404V generated approximately 20% bicyclogermacrene, a hydrocarbon with a cyclopropane ring that underlines the dual 1,10-/1,11-cyclization activity of this mutant. This suggests that the reaction pathways to germacrenes and humulenes might be connected through a bridged 1,10,11-carbocation intermediate or transition state that resembles bicyclogermacrene. Mechanistic studies using [1-(3)H1]-10-fluorofarnesyl diphosphate and deuterium-labeling experiments with [12,13-(2)H6]-FDP support a germacrene-humulene rearrangement linking 1,10- and 1,11-pathways. These results support the bioinformatics proposal that modern 1,10-synthases could have evolved from promiscuous 1,11-sesquiterpene synthases.

  17. Binding and inhibition of human spermidine synthase by decarboxylated S-adenosylhomocysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Še; #269; kut; #279; , Jolita; McCloskey, Diane E.; Thomas, H. Jeanette; Secrist III, John A.; Pegg, Anthony E.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Southern Research); (UPENN-MED)

    2011-11-17

    Aminopropyltransferases are essential enzymes that form polyamines in eukaryotic and most prokaryotic cells. Spermidine synthase (SpdS) is one of the most well-studied enzymes in this biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme uses decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine and a short-chain polyamine (putrescine) to make a medium-chain polyamine (spermidine) and 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine as a byproduct. Here, we report a new spermidine synthase inhibitor, decarboxylated S-adenosylhomocysteine (dcSAH). The inhibitor was synthesized, and dose-dependent inhibition of human, Thermatoga maritima, and Plasmodium falciparum spermidine synthases, as well as functionally homologous human spermine synthase, was determined. The human SpdS/dcSAH complex structure was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution and showed consistent active site positioning and coordination with previously known structures. Isothermal calorimetry binding assays confirmed inhibitor binding to human SpdS with K{sub d} of 1.1 {+-} 0.3 {mu}M in the absence of putrescine and 3.2 {+-} 0.1 {mu}M in the presence of putrescine. These results indicate a potential for further inhibitor development based on the dcSAH scaffold.

  18. Heme A synthase in bacteria depends on one pair of cysteinyls for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Anna; Hederstedt, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Heme A is a prosthetic group unique for cytochrome a-type respiratory oxidases in mammals, plants and many microorganisms. The poorly understood integral membrane protein heme A synthase catalyzes the synthesis of heme A from heme O. In bacteria, but not in mitochondria, this enzyme contains one or two pairs of cysteine residues that are present in predicted hydrophilic polypeptide loops on the extracytoplasmic side of the membrane. We used heme A synthase from the eubacterium Bacillus subtilis and the hyperthermophilic archeon Aeropyrum pernix to investigate the functional role of these cysteine residues. Results with B. subtilis amino acid substituted proteins indicated the pair of cysteine residues in the loop connecting transmembrane segments I and II as being essential for catalysis but not required for binding of the enzyme substrate, heme O. Experiments with isolated A. pernix and B. subtilis heme A synthase demonstrated that a disulfide bond can form between the cysteine residues in the same loop and also between loops showing close proximity of the two loops in the folded enzyme protein. Based on the findings, we propose a classification scheme for the four discrete types of heme A synthase found so far in different organisms and propose that essential cysteinyls mediate transfer of reducing equivalents required for the oxygen-dependent catalysis of heme A synthesis from heme O. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Insights into the phosphatase and the synthase activities of human bisphosphoglycerate mutase: a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2014-03-07

    Bisphosphoglycerate mutase (BPGM) is a multi-activity enzyme. Its main function is to synthesize the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, the allosteric effector of hemoglobin. This enzyme can also catalyze the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate to the 3-phosphoglycerate. In this study, the reaction mechanisms of both the phosphatase and the synthase activities of human bisphosphoglycerate mutase were theoretically calculated by using the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method based on the metadynamics and umbrella sampling simulations. The simulation results not only show the free energy curve of the phosphatase and the synthase reactions, but also reveal the important role of some residues in the active site. Additionally, the energy barriers of the two reactions indicate that the activity of the synthase in human bisphosphoglycerate mutase is much higher than that of the phosphatase. The estimated reaction barriers are consistent with the experimental data. Therefore, our work can give important information to understand the catalytic mechanism of the bisphosphoglycerate mutase family.

  20. Acetolactate synthase (AlsS) in Bacillus licheniformis WX-02: enzymatic properties and efficient functions for acetoin/butanediol and L-valine biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yanli; Zhan, Yangyang; Wang, Qin; Li, Shunyi; Yang, Shihui; Nomura, Christopher T; Wang, Changjun; Chen, Shouwen

    2018-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase catalyzes two molecules of pyruvates to form α-acetolactate, which is further converted to acetoin and 2,3-butanediol. In this study, by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli, the enzymatic properties of acetolactate synthase (AlsS) from Bacillus licheniformis WX-02 were characterized. Its K m and k cat for pyruvate were 3.96 mM and 514/s, respectively. It has the optimal activity at pH 6.5, 37 °C and was feedback inhibited by L-valine, L-leucine and L-isoleucine. Furthermore, the alsS-deficient strain could not produce acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, and L-valine, while the complementary strain was able to restore these capacities. The alsS overexpressing strain produced higher amounts of acetoin/2,3-butanediol (57.06 g/L) and L-valine (2.68 mM), which were 10.90 and 92.80% higher than those of the control strain, respectively. This is the first report regarding the in-depth understanding of AlsS enzymatic properties and its functions in B. licheniformis, and overexpression of AlsS can effectively improve acetoin/2,3-butanediol and L-valine production in B. licheniformis. We envision that this AlsS can also be applied in the improvement of acetoin/2,3-butanediol and L-valine production in other microbes.

  1. Optimizing Porcine Islet Isolation to Markedly Reduce Enzyme Consumption Without Sacrificing Islet Yield or Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdcraft, Robert W; Green, Michael L; Breite, Andrew G; Circle, Lisa; Meyer, Eric D; Adkins, Hollie; Harbeck, Steven G; Smith, Barry H; Gazda, Lawrence S

    2016-07-01

    Human allogeneic islet transplantation for treatment of type 1 diabetes provides numerous clinical benefits, such as fewer episodes of hypoglycemic unawareness and tighter control of blood glucose levels. Availability of human pancreas for clinical and research use, however, is severely limited. Porcine pancreas offers an abundant source of tissue for optimization of islet isolation methodology and future clinical transplantation, thereby increasing patient access to this potentially lifesaving procedure. Porcine islet isolations were performed using varying amounts of collagenase (7.5, 3.75, or 2.5 Wunsch units per gram tissue) and neutral protease activity (12 000, 6000, or 4000 neutral protease units per gram tissue) and perfusion volumes (1.7 or 0.85 mL/g tissue) to assess their effects on isolation outcomes. Retention of dissociative enzymes within the pancreas during perfusion and digestion was evaluated, along with distribution of the perfusion solution within the tissue. Reducing enzyme usage by as much as 67% and perfusion volume by 50% led to equally successful islet isolation outcomes when compared with the control group (48 ± 7% of tissue digested and 1088 ± 299 islet equivalents per gram of pancreas vs 47 ± 11% and 1080 ± 512, respectively). Using margin-marking dye in the perfusion solution to visualize enzyme distribution demonstrated that increasing perfusion volume did not improve tissue infiltration. Current protocols for porcine islet isolation consume excessive amounts of dissociative enzymes, elevating cost and limiting research and development. These data demonstrate that islet isolation protocols can be optimized to significantly reduce enzyme usage while maintaining yield and function and thus accelerating progress toward clinical application.

  2. Crystal structures of nitric oxide reductases provide key insights into functional conversion of respiratory enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosha, Takehiko; Shiro, Yoshitsugu

    2013-03-01

    Respiration is an essential biological process to get bioenergy, ATP, for all kingdoms of life. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) plays central role in aerobic respiration, catalyzing the reduction of O(2) coupled with pumping proton across the biological membrane. Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) involved in anaerobic nitrate respiration is suggested to be evolutionary related to COX and share the same progenitor with COX, on the basis of the amino acid sequence homology. Contrary to COX, NOR catalyzes the reduction of nitric oxide and shows no proton pumping ability. Thus, the respiratory enzyme acquires (or loses) proton pumping ability in addition to the conversion of the catalytic property along with the environmental change on earth. Recently, we solved the structures of two types of NORs, which provides novel insights into the functional conversion of the respiratory enzymes. In this review, we focus on the structural similarities and differences between COXs and NORs and discuss possible mechanism for the functional conversion of these enzymes during molecular evolution. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Functional argument for the existence of an avian nitric oxide synthase in muscle mitochondria: effect of cold acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Benjamin; Roussel, Damien; Teulier, Loïc; Eyenga, Pierre; Degletagne, Cyril; Belouze, Maud; Duchamp, Claude

    2011-01-03

    We report the first evidence of a mitochondrial NO synthase (mtNOS) in bird skeletal muscle. In vitro, mtNOS activity stimulated by L-arginine reduced intermyofibrillar mitochondrial oxygen uptake and ATP synthesis rates, stimulated endogenous H(2)O(2) generation, but had no effect on oxidative phosphorylation efficiency. Arginine-induced effects were fully reversed by L-NAME, a known NOS inhibitor. When ducklings were cold exposed for 4 weeks, muscle mitochondria displayed an increased state 3 respiration, a reduced H(2)O(2) generation but no significant alteration in mtNOS activity. We conclude that mtNOS is expressed in avian skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enzyme-mimicking polymer brush-functionalized surface for combating biomaterial-associated infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rujian; Xin, Zhirong; Xu, Shiai; Shi, Hengchong; Yang, Huawei; Song, Lingjie; Yan, Shunjie; Luan, Shifang; Yin, Jinghua; Khan, Ather Farooq; Li, Yonggang

    2017-11-01

    Biomaterial-associated infections critically compromise the functionality and performance of the medical devices, and pose a serious threat to human healthcare. Recently, natural DNase enzyme has been recognized as a potent material to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. However, the vulnerability of DNase dramatically limits its long-term performance in antibacterial applications. In this work, DNase-mimicking polymer brushes were constructed to mimic the DNA-cleavage activity as well as the macromolecular scaffold of the natural DNase. The bacteria repellent efficacy of DNase-mimicking polymer brush-functionalized surface was comparable to that of the DNase-functionalized surface. More importantly, due to their inherent stability, DNase-mimicking polymer brushes presented the much better performance in inhibiting bacterial biofilm development for prolonged periods of time, as compared to the natural DNase. The as-developed DNase-mimicking polymer brush-functionalized surface presents a promising approach to combat biomaterial-associated infections.

  5. Label-free fluorescent enzymatic assay of citrate synthase by CoA-Au(I) co-ordination polymer and its application in a multi-enzyme logic gate cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Wang, Huixia; Dai, Futao; Li, Pei; Jin, Xin; Huang, Yan; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-12-15

    Citrate synthase (CS) is one of the key metabolic enzymes in the Krebs tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. It regulates energy generation in mitochondrial respiration by catalysing the reaction between oxaloacetic acid (OAA) and acetyl coenzyme A (Ac-CoA) to generate citrate and coenzyme A (CoA). CS has been shown to be a biomarker of neurological diseases and various kinds of cancers. Here, a label-free fluorescent assay has been developed for homogeneously detecting CS and its inhibitor based on the in situ generation of CoA-Au(I) co-ordination polymer (CP) and the fluorescence signal-on by SYBR Green II-stained CoA-Au(I) CP. Because of the unique property of the CoA-Au(I) CP, this CS activity assay method could achieve excellent selectivity and sensitivity, with a linear range from 0.0033 U/μL to 0.264 U/μL and a limit of detection to be 0.00165 U/μL. Meanwhile, this assay method has advantages of being facile and cost effective with quick detection. Moreover, based on this method, a biomimetic logic system was established by rationally exploiting the cascade enzymatic interactions in TCA cycle for chemical information processing. In the TCA cycle-derived logic system, an AND-AND-AND-cascaded gate was rigorously operated step by step in one pot, and is outputted by a label-free fluorescent signal with visualized readout. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional Characterization of CYP716 Family P450 Enzymes in Triterpenoid Biosynthesis in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumoto, Shuhei; Seki, Hikaru; Shimizu, Yuko; Fukushima, Ery O; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2017-01-01

    Triterpenoids are a group of structurally diverse specialized metabolites that frequently show useful bioactivities. These chemicals are biosynthesized from the common precursor 2,3-oxidosqualene in plants. The carbon skeletons produced by oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) are usually modified by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) and UDP-dependent glycosyltransferases. These biosynthetic enzymes contribute to the structural diversification of plant triterpenoids. Until now, many P450 enzymes have been characterized as triterpenoid oxidases. Among them, the CYP716 family P450 enzymes, which have been isolated from a wide range of plant families, seem to contribute to the triterpenoid structural diversification. Many CYP716 family P450 enzymes have been characterized as the multifunctional triterpene C-28 oxidases, which oxidize α-amyrin and β-amyrin to the widely distributed triterpenoids ursolic and oleanolic acids, respectively. Tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) is one of the most important solanaceous crops in the world. However, little information is known regarding its triterpenoid biosynthesis. To understand the mechanism of triterpenoid biosynthesis in tomato, we focused on the function of CYP716 family enzymes as triterpenoid oxidases. We isolated all six CYP716 family genes from the Micro-Tom cultivar of tomato, and functionally characterized them in the heterologous yeast expression system. The in vivo enzymatic assays showed that CYP716A44 and CYP716A46 exhibited the ordinary C-28 oxidation activity against α-amyrin and β-amyrin to produce ursolic and oleanolic acids, respectively. Interestingly, one CYP716E subfamily enzyme, CYP716E26, exhibited the previously unreported C-6β hydroxylation activity against β-amyrin to produce a rare bioactive triterpenoid, daturadiol (olean-12-ene-3β,6β-diol). To determine the roles of the CYP716 family genes in tomato triterpenoid biosynthesis, we analyzed the gene expression and triterpenoid accumulation patterns

  7. Occurrence of theobromine synthase genes in purine alkaloid-free species of Camellia plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Mariko; Kitao, Naoko; Mizuno, Kouichi; Tanikawa, Natsu; Kato, Misako

    2009-02-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) are purine alkaloids that are present in high concentrations in plants of some species of Camellia. However, most members of the genus Camellia contain no purine alkaloids. Tracer experiments using [8-(14)C]adenine and [8-(14)C]theobromine showed that the purine alkaloid pathway is not fully functional in leaves of purine alkaloid-free species. In five species of purine alkaloid-free Camellia plants, sufficient evidence was obtained to show the occurrence of genes that are homologous to caffeine synthase. Recombinant enzymes derived from purine alkaloid-free species showed only theobromine synthase activity. Unlike the caffeine synthase gene, these genes were expressed more strongly in mature tissue than in young tissue.

  8. Structure of the ATP Synthase Catalytic Complex (F1) from Escherichia coli in an Autoinhibited conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G Cingolani; T Duncan

    2011-12-31

    ATP synthase is a membrane-bound rotary motor enzyme that is critical for cellular energy metabolism in all kingdoms of life. Despite conservation of its basic structure and function, autoinhibition by one of its rotary stalk subunits occurs in bacteria and chloroplasts but not in mitochondria. The crystal structure of the ATP synthase catalytic complex (F{sub 1}) from Escherichia coli described here reveals the structural basis for this inhibition. The C-terminal domain of subunit {var_epsilon} adopts a heretofore unknown, highly extended conformation that inserts deeply into the central cavity of the enzyme and engages both rotor and stator subunits in extensive contacts that are incompatible with functional rotation. As a result, the three catalytic subunits are stabilized in a set of conformations and rotational positions distinct from previous F{sub 1} structures.

  9. Functional analysis of the α-1,3-glucan synthase genes agsA and agsB in Aspergillus nidulans: agsB is the major α-1,3-glucan synthase in this fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yoshimi

    Full Text Available Although α-1,3-glucan is one of the major cell wall polysaccharides in filamentous fungi, the physiological roles of α-1,3-glucan remain unclear. The model fungus Aspergillus nidulans possesses two α-1,3-glucan synthase (AGS genes, agsA and agsB. For functional analysis of these genes, we constructed several mutant strains in A. nidulans: agsA disruption, agsB disruption, and double-disruption strains. We also constructed several CagsB strains in which agsB expression was controlled by the inducible alcA promoter, with or without the agsA-disrupting mutation. The agsA disruption strains did not show markedly different phenotypes from those of the wild-type strain. The agsB disruption strains formed dispersed hyphal cells under liquid culture conditions, regardless of the agsA genetic background. Dispersed hyphal cells were also observed in liquid culture of the CagsB strains when agsB expression was repressed, whereas these strains grew normally in plate culture even under the agsB-repressed conditions. Fractionation of the cell wall based on the alkali solubility of its components, quantification of sugars, and (13C-NMR spectroscopic analysis revealed that α-1,3-glucan was the main component of the alkali-soluble fraction in the wild-type and agsA disruption strains, but almost no α-1,3-glucan was found in the alkali-soluble fraction derived from either the agsB disruption strain or the CagsB strain under the agsB-repressed conditions, regardless of the agsA genetic background. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the two AGS genes are dispensable in A. nidulans, but that AgsB is required for normal growth characteristics under liquid culture conditions and is the major AGS in this species.

  10. An Open and Shut Case: The Interaction of Magnesium with MST Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneely, Kathleen M; Sundlov, Jesse A; Gulick, Andrew M; Moran, Graham R; Lamb, Audrey L

    2016-07-27

    The shikimate pathway of bacteria, fungi, and plants generates chorismate, which is drawn into biosynthetic pathways that form aromatic amino acids and other important metabolites, including folates, menaquinone, and siderophores. Many of the pathways initiated at this branch point transform chorismate using an MST enzyme. The MST enzymes (menaquinone, siderophore, and tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes) are structurally homologous and magnesium-dependent, and all perform similar chemical permutations to chorismate by nucleophilic addition (hydroxyl or amine) at the 2-position of the ring, inducing displacement of the 4-hydroxyl. The isomerase enzymes release isochorismate or aminodeoxychorismate as the product, while the synthase enzymes also have lyase activity that displaces pyruvate to form either salicylate or anthranilate. This has led to the hypothesis that the isomerase and lyase activities performed by the MST enzymes are functionally conserved. Here we have developed tailored pre-steady-state approaches to establish the kinetic mechanisms of the isochorismate and salicylate synthase enzymes of siderophore biosynthesis. Our data are centered on the role of magnesium ions, which inhibit the isochorismate synthase enzymes but not the salicylate synthase enzymes. Prior structural data have suggested that binding of the metal ion occludes access or egress of substrates. Our kinetic data indicate that for the production of isochorismate, a high magnesium ion concentration suppresses the rate of release of product, accounting for the observed inhibition and establishing the basis of the ordered-addition kinetic mechanism. Moreover, we show that isochorismate is channeled through the synthase reaction as an intermediate that is retained in the active site by the magnesium ion. Indeed, the lyase-active enzyme has 3 orders of magnitude higher affinity for the isochorismate complex relative to the chorismate complex. Apparent negative-feedback inhibition by ferrous

  11. Thiamine diphosphate adenylyl transferase from E. coli: functional characterization of the enzyme synthesizing adenosine thiamine triphosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brans Alain

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently identified a new thiamine derivative, adenosine thiamine triphosphate (AThTP, in E. coli. In intact bacteria, this nucleotide is synthesized only in the absence of a metabolizable carbon source and quickly disappears as soon as the cells receive a carbon source such as glucose. Thus, we hypothesized that AThTP may be a signal produced in response to carbon starvation. Results Here we show that, in bacterial extracts, the biosynthesis of AThTP is carried out from thiamine diphosphate (ThDP and ADP or ATP by a soluble high molecular mass nucleotidyl transferase. We partially purified this enzyme and characterized some of its functional properties. The enzyme activity had an absolute requirement for divalent metal ions, such as Mn2+ or Mg2+, as well as for a heat-stable soluble activator present in bacterial extracts. The enzyme has a pH optimum of 6.5–7.0 and a high Km for ThDP (5 mM, suggesting that, in vivo, the rate of AThTP synthesis is proportional to the free ThDP concentration. When ADP was used as the variable substrate at a fixed ThDP concentration, a sigmoid curve was obtained, with a Hill coefficient of 2.1 and an S0.5 value of 0.08 mM. The specificity of the AThTP synthesizing enzyme with respect to nucleotide substrate is restricted to ATP/ADP, and only ThDP can serve as the second substrate of the reaction. We tentatively named this enzyme ThDP adenylyl transferase (EC 2.7.7.65. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of an enzyme activity transferring a nucleotidyl group on thiamine diphosphate to produce AThTP. The existence of a mechanism for the enzymatic synthesis of this compound is in agreement with the hypothesis of a non-cofactor role for thiamine derivatives in living cells.

  12. Kinetic and structural evidences on human prolidase pathological mutants suggest strategies for enzyme functional rescue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Besio

    Full Text Available Prolidase is the only human enzyme responsible for the digestion of iminodipeptides containing proline or hydroxyproline at their C-terminal end, being a key player in extracellular matrix remodeling. Prolidase deficiency (PD is an intractable loss of function disease, characterized by mutations in the prolidase gene. The exact causes of activity impairment in mutant prolidase are still unknown. We generated three recombinant prolidase forms, hRecProl-231delY, hRecProl-E412K and hRecProl-G448R, reproducing three mutations identified in homozygous PD patients. The enzymes showed very low catalytic efficiency, thermal instability and changes in protein conformation. No variation of Mn(II cofactor affinity was detected for hRecProl-E412K; a compromised ability to bind the cofactor was found in hRecProl-231delY and Mn(II was totally absent in hRecProl-G448R. Furthermore, local structure perturbations for all three mutants were predicted by in silico analysis. Our biochemical investigation of the three causative alleles identified in perturbed folding/instability, and in consequent partial prolidase degradation, the main reasons for enzyme inactivity. Based on the above considerations we were able to rescue part of the prolidase activity in patients' fibroblasts through the induction of Heath Shock Proteins expression, hinting at new promising avenues for PD treatment.

  13. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and renal function. A review of the current status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L

    1991-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are well established in the treatment of hypertension and cardiac failure. Experimental studies in rats have suggested that these agents may protect renal function in chronic nephropathy by a mechanism other than simply lowering the systemic blood...... was reduced by 2 months' treatment with enalapril to less than half of the values obtained in a control group treated with metoprolol. Nonrandomised trials have suggested that ACE inhibitors may slow the deterioration of renal function, but no comparisons with other antihypertensive agents in prospective...... studies have been published to date. In chronic renal failure, ACE inhibitors may worsen anaemia and hyperkalaemia. Renovascular hypertension can be treated with ACE inhibitors, but the treatment may lead to a compromised renal function. The dosage of these drugs should be reduced in renal failure...

  14. Structure-function analysis of human enzymes initiating nucleobase repair in DNA and RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Sundheim, Ottar

    2008-01-01

    In humans, there are four known glycosylases that initiate repair of uracils in DNA. These are UNG, TDG, SMUG1, and MBD4. It was proposed that the replication independent SMUG1 was the main enzyme initiating removal of deaminated cytosine, whereas UNG2 was responsible for replication associated repair of mis-incorporated dUTP (Nilsen et al., 2001). We aimed at elucidating the specific function of the two main human uracil-DNA glycosylases in vitro and in vivo to further clarify their distinct...

  15. Platelet content of nitric oxide synthase 3 phosphorylated at Serine 1177 is associated with the functional response of platelets to aspirin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Modrego

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyse if platelet responsiveness to aspirin (ASA may be associated with a different ability of platelets to generate nitric oxide (NO. PATIENTS/METHODS: Platelets were obtained from 50 patients with stable coronary ischemia and were divided into ASA-sensitive (n = 26 and ASA-resistant (n = 24 using a platelet functionality test (PFA-100. RESULTS: ASA-sensitive platelets tended to release more NO (determined as nitrite + nitrate than ASA-resistant platelets but it did not reach statistical significance. Protein expression of nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3 was higher in ASA-sensitive than in ASA-resistant platelets but there were no differences in the platelet expression of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2 isoform. The highest NOS3 expression in ASA-sensitive platelets was independent of the presence of T-to-C mutation at nucleotide position -786 (T(-786 → C in the NOS3-coding gene. However, platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 at Serine (Ser(1177, an active form of NOS3, was higher in ASA-sensitive than in ASA-resistant platelets. The level of platelet NOS3 Ser(1177 phosphorylation was positively associated with the closure time in the PFA-100 test. In vitro, collagen failed to stimulate the aggregation of ASA-sensitive platelets, determined by lumiaggregometry, and it was associated with a significant increase (p = 0.018 of NOS3 phosphorylation at Ser(1177. On the contrary, collagen stimulated the aggregation of ASA-resistant platelets but did not significantly modify the platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 Ser(1177. During collagen stimulation the release of NO from ASA-sensitive platelets was significantly enhanced but it was not modified in ASA-resistant platelets. CONCLUSIONS: Functional platelet responsiveness to ASA was associated with the platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 at Ser(1177.

  16. Hotspots in an obligate homodimeric anticancer target. Structural and functional effects of interfacial mutations in human thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Tochowicz, Anna; Pozzi, Cecilia; Cardinale, Daniela; Ferrari, Stefania; Boum, Yap; Mangani, Stefano; Stroud, Robert M; Saxena, Puneet; Myllykallio, Hannu; Costi, Maria Paola; Ponterini, Glauco; Wade, Rebecca C

    2015-04-23

    Human thymidylate synthase (hTS), a target for antiproliferative drugs, is an obligate homodimer. Single-point mutations to alanine at the monomer-monomer interface may enable the identification of specific residues that delineate sites for drugs aimed at perturbing the protein-protein interactions critical for activity. We computationally identified putative hotspot residues at the interface and designed mutants to perturb the intersubunit interaction. Dimer dissociation constants measured by a FRET-based assay range from 60 nM for wild-type hTS up to about 1 mM for single-point mutants and agree with computational predictions of the effects of these mutations. Mutations that are remote from the active site retain full or partial activity, although the substrate KM values were generally higher and the dimer was less stable. The lower dimer stability of the mutants can facilitate access to the dimer interface by small molecules and thereby aid the design of inhibitors that bind at the dimer interface.

  17. Functional Characterization of New Polyketide Synthase Genes Involved in Ochratoxin A Biosynthesis in Aspergillus Ochraceus fc-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuqing Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA, a potentially carcinogenic mycotoxin which contaminates grains, is produced by several Aspergillus species. A comparative sequence analysis of the OTA-producing Aspergillus ochraceus fc-1 strain and other Aspergillus species was performed. Two new OTA-related polyketide synthase (PKS (AoOTApks genes were identified. The predicted amino acid sequence of AoOTApks-1 displayed high similarity to previously identified PKSs from OTA-producing A. carbonarius ITEM 5010 (67%; [PI] No. 173482 and A. niger CBS 513.88 (62%; XP_001397313. However, the predicted amino acid sequence of AoOTApks-2 displayed lower homology with A. niger CBS 513.88 (38% and A. carbonarius ITEM 5010 (28%. A phylogenetic analysis of the β-ketosynthase and acyl-transferase domains of the AoOTApks proteins indicated that they shared a common origin with other OTA-producing species, such as A. carbonarius, A. niger, and A. westerdijkiae. A real-time reverse-transcription PCR analysis showed that the expression of AoOTApks-1 and -2 was positively correlated with the OTA concentration. The pks gene deleted mutants ∆AoOTApks-1 and ∆AoOTApks-2 produced nil and lesser OTA than the wild-type strain, respectively. Our study suggests that AoOTApks-1 could be involved in OTA biosynthesis, while AoOTApks-2 might be indirectly involved in OTA production.

  18. Molecular devices for the regulation of chloroplast ATP synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hisabori, T.; Konno, H.; Ichimura, H.; Strotmann, H.; Bald, D.

    2002-01-01

    In chloroplasts, synthesis of ATP is energetically coupled with the utilization of a proton gradient formed by photosynthetic electron transport. The involved enzyme, the chloroplast ATP synthase, can potentially hydrolyze ATP when the magnitude of the transmembrane electrochemical potential

  19. Structure and function studies on enzymes with a catalytic carboxyl group(s): from ribonuclease T1 to carboxyl peptidases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TAKAHASHI, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    .... This review follows mainly the trail of studies performed by the author and his colleagues on the structure and function of such enzymes, starting from ribonuclease T1, then extending to three major...

  20. Mutations in hereditary phosphoglucomutase 1 deficiency map to key regions of enzyme structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, Lesa J

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have identified phosphoglucomutase 1 (PGM1) deficiency as an inherited metabolic disorder in humans. PGM1 deficiency is classified as both a muscle glycogenosis (type XIV) and a congenital disorder of glycosylation of types I and II. Affected patients show multiple disease phenotypes, reflecting the central role of the enzyme in glucose homeostasis, where it catalyzes the interconversion of glucose 1-phosphate and glucose 6-phosphate. The influence of PGM1 deficiency on protein glycosylation patterns is also widespread, affecting both biosynthesis and processing of glycans and their precursors. To date, 21 different mutations involved in PGM1 deficiency have been identified, including 13 missense mutations resulting in single amino acid changes. Growing clinical interest in PGM1 deficiency prompts a review of the molecular context of these mutations in the three-dimensional structure of the protein. Here the known crystal structure of PGM from rabbit (97 % sequence identity to human) is used to analyze the mutations associated with disease and find that many map to regions with clear significance to enzyme function. In particular, amino acids in and around the active site cleft are frequently involved, including regions responsible for catalysis, binding of the metal ion required for activity, and interactions with the phosphosugar substrate. Several of the known mutations, however, are distant from the active site and appear to manifest their effects indirectly. An understanding of how the different mutations that cause PGM1 deficiency affect enzyme structure and function is foundational to providing clinical prognosis and the development of effective treatment strategies.

  1. Isolation of the GFA1 gene encoding glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase of Sporothrix schenckii and its expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-López, Juan Francisco; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; Álvarez-Vargas, Aurelio; Milewski, Slawomir; Villagómez-Castro, Julio César; Cano-Canchola, Carmen; López-Romero, Everardo

    2015-06-01

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase (GlcN-6-P synthase) is an essential enzyme involved in cell wall biogenesis that has been proposed as a strategic target for antifungal chemotherapy. Here we describe the cloning and functional characterization of Sporothrix schenckii GFA1 gene which was isolated from a genomic library of the fungus. The gene encodes a predicted protein of 708 amino acids that is homologous to GlcN-6-P synthases from other sources. The recombinant enzyme restored glucosamine prototrophy of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gfa1 null mutant. Purification and biochemical analysis of the recombinant enzyme revealed some differences from the wild type enzyme, such as improved stability and less sensitivity to UDP-GlcNAc. The sensitivity of the recombinant enzyme to the selective inhibitor FMDP [N(3)-(4-methoxyfumaroyl)-l-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid] and other properties were similar to those previously reported for the wild type enzyme. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Stability of alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase in human control and peroxisomal disorder fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biermann, J.; Gootjes, J.; Wanders, R. J.; van den Bosch, H.

    1999-01-01

    Alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase (alkyl-DHAP synthase) is a peroxisomal enzyme that plays a key role in ether phospholipid biosynthesis. To determine the turnover of alkyl-DHAP synthase in several peroxisomal disorders, pulse-chase experiments were performed. In control fibroblasts, mature

  3. Role of Liver Function Enzymes in Diagnosis of Choledocholithiasis in Biliary Colic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hussein Mirshamsi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Liver functional tests due to inflammatory process which induced by cholecystitis might changed and some clinicians suggested that these changes might help us to stone prediction in common bile ducts and decrease hazards of performing ERCP and other invasive procedures. Present study was performed for assessment of role of liver functional test in diagnosis of common bile duct stone in patients with cholecystitis and help in their management. Present prospective study was performed between April 2010 and March 2011 on 350 patients who come to our hospital with cholecystitis or biliary colic diagnosis. Patients with cholesistitis diagnosis were underwent operation for removing gall bladder stone and retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP was performed for patients with suspicious to biliary colic and common bile duct (CBD stones. Ultrasonography, Aspartate Aminotransferases (AST, Alanine Aminotransferases (ALT, Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP and direct and total serum bilirubin were measured for all of participated patients. Mean of AST. ALT, ALP and total and direct bilirubin were had no significant differences between two study groups. In logistic regression analysis, after entering into the model only CBD diameter (OR: 20; P=0.00 and elevated serum level of ALT (OR: 2; P=0.04 were remained into the model and were known as independent predictor of cholelithiasis. Elevated level of liver enzymes had not main role in CBD diagnosis and ERCP had no to perform for suspicious CBD stone only with elevated liver enzyme and even with normal ultrasonography findings. Endosonography as non invasive procedure recommend for patients before ERCP.

  4. RNA Targeting by Functionally Orthogonal Type VI-A CRISPR-Cas Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East-Seletsky, Alexandra; O'Connell, Mitchell R; Burstein, David; Knott, Gavin J; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-05-04

    CRISPR adaptive immunity pathways protect prokaryotic cells against foreign nucleic acids using CRISPR RNA (crRNA)-guided nucleases. In type VI-A CRISPR-Cas systems, the signature protein Cas13a (formerly C2c2) contains two separate ribonuclease activities that catalyze crRNA maturation and ssRNA degradation. The Cas13a protein family occurs across different bacterial phyla and varies widely in both protein sequence and corresponding crRNA sequence conservation. Although grouped phylogenetically together, we show that the Cas13a enzyme family comprises two distinct functional groups that recognize orthogonal sets of crRNAs and possess different ssRNA cleavage specificities. These functional distinctions could not be bioinformatically predicted, suggesting more subtle co-evolution of Cas13a enzymes. Additionally, we find that Cas13a pre-crRNA processing is not essential for ssRNA cleavage, although it enhances ssRNA targeting for crRNAs encoded internally within the CRISPR array. We define two Cas13a protein subfamilies that can operate in parallel for RNA detection both in bacteria and for diagnostic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid preparation of functional polysaccharides from Pyropia yezoensis by microwave-assistant rapid enzyme digest system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hyeok; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Ko, Ju-Young; Jang, Jun-Ho; Kim, Gwang-Hoon; Lee, Jung-Suck; Nah, Jae-Woon; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-11-20

    This study describes a simple preparation of functional polysaccharides from Pyropia yezoensis using a microwave-assistant rapid enzyme digest system (MAREDS) with various carbohydrases, and evaluates their antioxidative effects. Polysaccharide hydrolysates were prepared using MAREDS under different hydrolytic conditions of the carbohydrases and microwave powers. Polysaccharides less than 10kDa (Low molecular weight polysaccharides, LMWP, ≤10kDa) were efficiently obtained using an ultrafiltration (molecular weight cut-off of 10kDa). MAREDS increases AMG activation via an increased degree of hydrolysis; the best AMG hydrolysate was prepared using a 10:1 ratio of substrate to enzyme for 2h in MAREDS with 400W. LMWP consisted of galactose (27.3%), glucose (64.5%), and mannose (8.3%) from the AMG hydrolysate had stronger antioxidant effects than the high molecular weight polysaccharides (>10kDa). We rapidly prepared functional LMWPs by using MAREDS with carbohydrases, and suggest that LMWP might be potentially a valuable algal polysaccharide antioxidant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Has substrate-dependent co-evolution of enzyme function occured in the attine ant-fungus symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Schiøtt, Morten; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    the plant material that the ants provide or different efficiencies of enzyme function. Here we present the fist partial amino acid sequences from a fungal xylanase gene to test the hypothesis that fungal enzymes that degrade plant cell walls have functionally co-evolved with the ants....... as substrate for their fungus gardens, whereas the more basal attine genera use substrates such as flowers, plant debris, small twigs, insect feces and insect carcasses. This diverse array of fungal substrates across the attine lineage implies that the symbiotic fungus needs different enzymes to break down...

  7. Glutamine Synthetase in Legumes: Recent Advances in Enzyme Structure and Functional Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Betti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase (GS is the key enzyme involved in the assimilation of ammonia derived either from nitrate reduction, N2 fixation, photorespiration or asparagine breakdown. A small gene family is encoding for different cytosolic (GS1 or plastidic (GS2 isoforms in legumes. We summarize here the recent advances carried out concerning the quaternary structure of GS, as well as the functional relationship existing between GS2 and processes such as nodulation, photorespiration and water stress, in this latter case by means of proline production. Functional genomic analysis using GS2-minus mutant reveals the key role of GS2 in the metabolic control of the plants and, more particularly, in carbon metabolism.

  8. Glutamate synthase: An archaeal horizontal gene transfer?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (GOGAT) which is a key enzyme in ammonia assimilation in bacteria, algae and plants. It catalyzes the reductive transamidation of amido nitrogen from glutamine to 2-oxoglutarate to form two molecules of glutamate (Temple et al 1998). Glutamate synthases differ according to their molecular weights, subunit compositions, ...

  9. Relationship between endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the enzyme in charge of nitric oxide production, plays a crucial role in vascular biology. However, the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affecting the gene encoding for eNOS (eNOS) on coronary artery diseases remains under debate and no data were ...

  10. Functional analysis of Gossypium hirsutum cellulose synthase catalytic subunit 4 promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis and cotton tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Murai, Norimoto; Fang, David D; Triplett, Barbara A

    2011-02-01

    Gossypium hirsutum cellulose synthase catalytic subunit 4 (GhCesA4) plays an important role in cellulose biosynthesis during cotton fiber development. The transcript levels of GhCesA4 are significantly up-regulated as secondary cell wall cellulose is produced in developing cotton fibers. To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in transcriptional regulation of GhCesA4, β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity regulated by a GhCesA4 promoter (-2574/+56) or progressively deleted promoters were determined in both cotton tissues and transgenic Arabidopsis. The spatial regulation of GhCesA4 expression was similar between cotton tissues and transgenic Arabidopsis. GUS activity regulated by the GhCesA4 promoter (-2574/+56) was found in trichomes and root vascular tissues in both cotton and transgenic Arabidopsis. The -2574/-1824 region was responsible for up-regulation of GhCesA4 expression in trichomes and root vascular tissues in transgenic Arabidopsis. The -1824/-1355 region negatively regulated GhCesA4 expression in most Arabidopsis vascular tissues. For vascular expression in stems and leaves, the -898/-693 region was required. The -693/-320 region of the GhCesA4 promoter was necessary for basal expression of GhCesA4 in cotton roots as well as Arabidopsis roots. Exogenous phytohormonal treatments on transgenic Arabidopsis revealed that phytohormones may be involved in the differential regulation of GhCesA4 during cotton fiber development. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Discovering novel enzymes by functional screening of plurigenomic libraries from alga-associated Flavobacteriia and Gammaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Marjolaine; Vandermies, Marie; Joyeux, Coline; Martin, Renée; Barbeyron, Tristan; Michel, Gurvan; Vandenbol, Micheline

    2016-01-01

    Alga-associated microorganisms, in the context of their numerous interactions with the host and the complexity of the marine environment, are known to produce diverse hydrolytic enzymes with original biochemistry. We recently isolated several macroalgal-polysaccharide-degrading bacteria from the surface of the brown alga Ascophyllum nodosum. These active isolates belong to two classes: the Flavobacteriia and the Gammaproteobacteria. In the present study, we constructed two "plurigenomic" (with multiple bacterial genomes) libraries with the 5 most interesting isolates (regarding their phylogeny and their enzymatic activities) of each class (Fv and Gm libraries). Both libraries were screened for diverse hydrolytic activities. Five activities, out of the 48 previously identified in the natural polysaccharolytic isolates, were recovered by functional screening: a xylanase (GmXyl7), a beta-glucosidase (GmBg1), an esterase (GmEst7) and two iota-carrageenases (Fvi2.5 and Gmi1.3). We discuss here the potential role of the used host-cell, the average DNA insert-sizes and the used restriction enzymes on the divergent screening yields obtained for both libraries and get deeper inside the "great screen anomaly". Interestingly, the discovered esterase probably stands for a novel family of homoserine o-acetyltransferase-like-esterases, while the two iota-carrageenases represent new members of the poorly known GH82 family (containing only 19 proteins since its description in 2000). These original results demonstrate the efficiency of our uncommon "plurigenomic" library approach and the underexplored potential of alga-associated cultivable microbiota for the identification of novel and algal-specific enzymes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Beyond Vmax and Km: How details of enzyme function influence geochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Enzymes catalyze the vast majority of chemical reactions relevant to geomicrobiology. Studies of the activities of enzymes in environmental systems often report Vmax (the maximum possible rate of reaction; often proportional to the concentration of enzymes in the system) and sometimes Km (a measure of the affinity between enzymes and their substrates). However, enzyme studies - particularly those related to enzymes involved in organic carbon oxidation - are often limited to only those parameters, and a relatively limited and mixed set of enzymes. Here I will discuss some novel methods to assay and characterize the specific sets of enzymes that may be important to the carbon cycle in aquatic environments. First, kinetic experiments revealed the collective properties of the complex mixtures of extracellular peptidases that occur where microbial communities are diverse. Crystal structures combined with biochemical characterization of specific enzymes can yield more detailed information about key steps in organic carbon transformations. These new techniques have the potential to provide mechanistic grounding to geomicrobiological models.

  13. The Nucleotide Synthesis Enzyme CAD Inhibits NOD2 Antibacterial Function in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Amy L.; Kabi, Amrita; Homer, Craig R.; García, Noemí Marina; Nickerson, Kourtney P.; NesvizhskiI, Alexey I.; Sreekumar, Arun; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Nuñez, Gabriel; McDonald, Christine

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Polymorphisms that reduce the function of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)2, a bacterial sensor, have been associated with Crohn’s disease (CD). No proteins that regulate NOD2 activity have been identified as selective pharmacologic targets. We sought to discover regulators of NOD2 that might be pharmacologic targets for CD therapies. METHODS Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase/ aspartate transcarbamylase/dihydroorotase (CAD) is an enzyme required for de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis; it was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein by immunoprecipitation-coupled mass spectrometry. CAD expression was assessed in colon tissues from individuals with and without inflammatory bowel disease by immunohistochemistry. The interaction between CAD and NOD2 was assessed in human HCT116 intestinal epithelial cells by immunoprecipitation, immunoblot, reporter gene, and gentamicin protection assays. We also analyzed human cell lines that express variants of NOD2 and the effects of RNA interference, overexpression and CAD inhibitors. RESULTS CAD was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein expressed at increased levels in the intestinal epithelium of patients with CD compared with controls. Overexpression of CAD inhibited NOD2-dependent activation of nuclear factor κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as intracellular killing of Salmonella. Reduction of CAD expression or administration of CAD inhibitors increased NOD2-dependent signaling and antibacterial functions of NOD2 variants that are and are not associated with CD. CONCLUSIONS The nucleotide synthesis enzyme CAD is a negative regulator of NOD2. The antibacterial function of NOD2 variants that have been associated with CD increased in response to pharmacologic inhibition of CAD. CAD is a potential therapeutic target for CD. PMID:22387394

  14. Class II recombinant phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase from spinach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krath, B N; Hove-Jensen, B

    2001-01-01

    to other PRPP synthases the activity of spinach PRPP synthase isozyme 3 is independent of P(i), and the enzyme is inhibited by ribonucleoside diphosphates in a purely competitive manner, which indicates a lack of allosteric inhibition by these compounds. In addition spinach PRPP synthase isozyme 3 shows...... an unusual low specificity toward diphosphoryl donors by accepting dATP, GTP, CTP, and UTP in addition to ATP. The kinetic mechanism of the enzyme is an ordered steady state Bi Bi mechanism with K(ATP) and K(Rib-5-P) values of 170 and 110 micrometer, respectively, and a V(max) value of 13.1 micromol (min x...

  15. Enzyme Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  16. High-Throughput Functional Screening of Steroid Substrates with Wild-Type and Chimeric P450 Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Urban

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The promiscuity of a collection of enzymes consisting of 31 wild-type and synthetic variants of CYP1A enzymes was evaluated using a series of 14 steroids and 2 steroid-like chemicals, namely, nootkatone, a terpenoid, and mifepristone, a drug. For each enzyme-substrate couple, the initial steady-state velocity of metabolite formation was determined at a substrate saturating concentration. For that, a high-throughput approach was designed involving automatized incubations in 96-well microplate with sixteen 6-point kinetics per microplate and data acquisition using LC/MS system accepting 96-well microplate for injections. The resulting dataset was used for multivariate statistics aimed at sorting out the correlations existing between tested enzyme variants and ability to metabolize steroid substrates. Functional classifications of both CYP1A enzyme variants and steroid substrate structures were obtained allowing the delineation of global structural features for both substrate recognition and regioselectivity of oxidation.

  17. Structure and functional regulation of RipA, a mycobacterial enzyme essential for daughter cell separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Alessia; Marasco, Daniela; Squeglia, Flavia; Soldini, Silvia; Pedone, Emilia; Pedone, Carlo; Berisio, Rita

    2010-09-08

    Cell separation depends on cell-wall hydrolases that cleave the peptidoglycan layer connecting daughter cells. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, this process is governed by the predicted endopeptidase RipA. In the absence of this enzyme, the bacterium is unable to divide and exhibits an abnormal phenotype. We here report the crystal structure of a relevant portion of RipA, containing its catalytic-domain and an extra-domain of hitherto unknown function. The structure clearly demonstrates that RipA is produced as a zymogen, which needs to be activated to achieve cell-division. Bacterial cell-wall degradation assays and proteolysis experiments strongly suggest that activation occurs via proteolytic processing of a fully solvent exposed loop identified in the crystal structure. Indeed, proteolytic cleavage at this loop produces an activated form, consisting of the sole catalytic domain. Our work provides the first evidence of self-inhibition in cell-disconnecting enzymes and opens a field for the design of novel antitubercular therapeutics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The valine and lysine residues in the conserved FxVTxK motif are important for the function of phylogenetically distant plant cellulose synthases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slabaugh, Erin; Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess; Chaves, Arielle; Wilson, Liza; Wilson, Carmen; Davis, Jonathan K.; Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Anderson, Charles T.; Roberts, Alison W.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2015-12-08

    Cellulose synthases (CESAs) synthesize the β-1,4-glucan chains that coalesce to form cellulose microfibrils in plant cell walls. In addition to a large cytosolic (catalytic) domain, CESAs have eight predicted transmembrane helices (TMHs). However, analogous to the structure of BcsA, a bacterial CESA, predicted TMH5 in CESA may instead be an interfacial helix. This would place the conserved FxVTxK motif in the plant cell cytosol where it could function as a substrate-gating loop as occurs in BcsA. To define the functional importance of the CESA region containing FxVTxK, we tested five parallel mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana CESA1 and Physcomitrella patens CESA5 in complementation assays of the relevant cesa mutants. In both organisms, the substitution of the valine or lysine residues in FxVTxK severely affected CESA function. In Arabidopsis roots, both changes were correlated with lower cellulose anisotropy, as revealed by Pontamine Fast Scarlet. Analysis of hypocotyl inner cell wall layers by atomic force microscopy showed that two altered versions of Atcesa1 could rescue cell wall phenotypes observed in the mutant background line. Overall, the data show that the FxVTxK motif is functionally important in two phylogenetically distant plant CESAs. The results show that Physcomitrella provides an efficient model for assessing the effects of engineered CESA mutations affecting primary cell wall synthesis and that diverse testing systems can lead to nuanced insights into CESA structure–function relationships. Although CESA membrane topology needs to be experimentally determined, the results support the possibility that the FxVTxK region functions similarly in CESA and BcsA.

  19. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Ke-Mian [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Chang, Chia-Chun [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shen, Qing-Ji [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); Sung, Li-Ying, E-mail: liyingsung@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Ji-Long, E-mail: jilong.liu@dpag.ox.ac.uk [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  20. Structure-function relationships of glucansucrase and fructansucrase enzymes from lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Kralj, S.; Ozimek, L.K.; Dijkhuizen, L.; Geel-Schutten, G.H. van

    2006-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) employ sucrase-type enzymes to convert sucrose into homopolysaccharides consisting of either glucosyl units (glucans) or fructosyl units (fructans). The enzymes involved are labeled glucansucrases (GS) and fructansucrases (FS), respectively. The available molecular,

  1. BrEPS: a flexible and automatic protocol to compute enzyme-specific sequence profiles for functional annotation

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    Schomburg D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Models for the simulation of metabolic networks require the accurate prediction of enzyme function. Based on a genomic sequence, enzymatic functions of gene products are today mainly predicted by sequence database searching and operon analysis. Other methods can support these techniques: We have developed an automatic method "BrEPS" that creates highly specific sequence patterns for the functional annotation of enzymes. Results The enzymes in the UniprotKB are identified and their sequences compared against each other with BLAST. The enzymes are then clustered into a number of trees, where each tree node is associated with a set of EC-numbers. The enzyme sequences in the tree nodes are aligned with ClustalW. The conserved columns of the resulting multiple alignments are used to construct sequence patterns. In the last step, we verify the quality of the patterns by computing their specificity. Patterns with low specificity are omitted and recomputed further down in the tree. The final high-quality patterns can be used for functional annotation. We ran our protocol on a recent Swiss-Prot release and show statistics, as well as a comparison to PRIAM, a probabilistic method that is also specialized on the functional annotation of enzymes. We determine the amount of true positive annotations for five common microorganisms with data from BRENDA and AMENDA serving as standard of truth. BrEPS is almost on par with PRIAM, a fact which we discuss in the context of five manually investigated cases. Conclusions Our protocol computes highly specific sequence patterns that can be used to support the functional annotation of enzymes. The main advantages of our method are that it is automatic and unsupervised, and quite fast once the patterns are evaluated. The results show that BrEPS can be a valuable addition to the reconstruction of metabolic networks.

  2. Functional Metagenomics: Construction and High-Throughput Screening of Fosmid Libraries for Discovery of Novel Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufarté, Lisa; Bozonnet, Sophie; Laville, Elisabeth; Cecchini, Davide A; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Simonet, Pascal; Franqueville, Laure; Veronese, Gabrielle Potocki

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based metagenomics is one of the most efficient approaches to boost the discovery of novel biocatalysts from the huge reservoir of uncultivated bacteria. In this chapter, we describe a highly generic procedure of metagenomic library construction and high-throughput screening for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Applicable to any bacterial ecosystem, it enables the swift identification of functional enzymes that are highly efficient, alone or acting in synergy, to break down polysaccharides and oligosaccharides.

  3. The dead seed coat functions as a long-term storage for active hydrolytic enzymes.

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    Buzi Raviv

    Full Text Available Seed development culminates in programmed cell death (PCD and hardening of organs enclosing the embryo (e.g., pericarp, seed coat providing essentially a physical shield for protection during storage in the soil. We examined the proposal that dead organs enclosing embryos are unique entities that store and release upon hydration active proteins that might increase seed persistence in soil, germination and seedling establishment. Proteome analyses of dead seed coats of Brassicaceae species revealed hundreds of proteins being stored in the seed coat and released upon hydration, many are stress-associated proteins such as nucleases, proteases and chitinases. Functional analysis revealed that dead seed coats function as long-term storage for multiple active hydrolytic enzymes (e.g., nucleases that can persist in active forms for decades. Substances released from the dead seed coat of the annual desert plant Anastatica hierochuntica displayed strong antimicrobial activity. Our data highlighted a previously unrecognized feature of dead organs enclosing embryos (e.g., seed coat functioning not only as a physical shield for embryo protection but also as a long-term storage for active proteins and other substances that are released upon hydration to the "seedsphere" and could contribute to seed persistence in the soil, germination and seedling establishment.

  4. Metatranscriptomics Reveals the Functions and Enzyme Profiles of the Microbial Community in Chinese Nong-Flavor Liquor Starter

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    Yuhong Huang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chinese liquor is one of the world's best-known distilled spirits and is the largest spirit category by sales. The unique and traditional solid-state fermentation technology used to produce Chinese liquor has been in continuous use for several thousand years. The diverse and dynamic microbial community in a liquor starter is the main contributor to liquor brewing. However, little is known about the ecological distribution and functional importance of these community members. In this study, metatranscriptomics was used to comprehensively explore the active microbial community members and key transcripts with significant functions in the liquor starter production process. Fungi were found to be the most abundant and active community members. A total of 932 carbohydrate-active enzymes, including highly expressed auxiliary activity family 9 and 10 proteins, were identified at 62°C under aerobic conditions. Some potential thermostable enzymes were identified at 50, 62, and 25°C (mature stage. Increased content and overexpressed key enzymes involved in glycolysis and starch, pyruvate and ethanol metabolism were detected at 50 and 62°C. The key enzymes of the citrate cycle were up-regulated at 62°C, and their abundant derivatives are crucial for flavor generation. Here, the metabolism and functional enzymes of the active microbial communities in NF liquor starter were studied, which could pave the way to initiate improvements in liquor quality and to discover microbes that produce novel enzymes or high-value added products.

  5. Evolution toward small molecule inhibitor resistance affects native enzyme function and stability, generating acarbose-insensitive cyclodextrin glucanotransferase variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ronan M; Leemhuis, Hans; Gätjen, Linda; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2008-04-18

    Small molecule inhibitors play an essential role in the selective inhibition of enzymes associated with human infection and metabolic disorders. Targeted enzymes may evolve toward inhibitor resistance through selective incorporation of mutations. Acquisition of insensitivity may, however, result in profound devolution of native enzyme function and stability. We therefore investigated the consequential effects on native function and stability by evolving a cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase) enzyme toward insensitivity to the small molecule inhibitor of the protein, acarbose. Error-prone PCR mutagenesis was applied to search the sequence space of CGTase for acarbose-insensitive variants. Our results show that all selected mutations were localized around the active site of the enzyme, and in particular, at the acceptor substrate binding sites, highlighting the regions importance in acarbose inhibition. Single mutations conferring increased resistance, K232E, F283L, and A230V, raised IC(50) values for acarbose between 3,500- and 6,700-fold when compared with wild-type CGTase but at a significant cost to catalytic efficiency. In addition, the thermostability of these variants was significantly lowered. These results reveal not only the relative ease by which resistance may be acquired to small molecule inhibitors but also the considerable cost incurred to native enzyme function and stability, highlighting the subsequent constraints in the further evolutionary potential of inhibitor-resistant variants.

  6. C-C bond formation and cleavage in radical enzymes, a theoretical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himo, Fahmi

    2005-02-25

    Quantum chemical methods are today a viable tool in the study of enzyme catalysis. The development of new density functional techniques and the enormous advancement in computer power have made it possible to accurately describe active sites of enzymes. This review gives a brief account of the methods and models used in this field. Three specific enzymes are discussed: pyruvate-formate lyase (PFL), spore photoproduct lyase (SPL), and benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS). What these enzymes have in common is that they use radical chemistry to catalyze C-C bond formation or cleavage reactions.

  7. The bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase thymidylate synthase of Tetrahymena thermophila provides a tool for molecular and biotechnology applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiedtke Arno

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR and thymidylate synthase (TS are crucial enzymes in DNA synthesis. In alveolata both enzymes are expressed as one bifunctional enzyme. Results Loss of this essential enzyme activities after successful allelic assortment of knock out alleles yields an auxotrophic marker in ciliates. Here the cloning, characterisation and functional analysis of Tetrahymena thermophila's DHFR-TS is presented. A first aspect of the presented work relates to destruction of DHFR-TS enzyme function in an alveolate thereby causing an auxotrophy for thymidine. A second aspect is to knock in an expression cassette encoding for a foreign gene with subsequent expression of the target protein. Conclusion This system avoids the use of antibiotics or other drugs and therefore is of high interest for biotechnological applications.

  8. Thrombolytic, anticoagulant and antiplatelet activities of codiase, a bi-functional fibrinolytic enzyme from Codium fragile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Sapkota, Kumar; Park, Se-Eun; Kim, Seung; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2013-06-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Thrombolytic agents are important for both the prevention and treatment of thrombosis. In this study, codiase, a new bi-functional fibrinolytic serine protease having thrombolytic, anticoagulant, and antiplatelet activities was purified from marine green alga, Codium fragile. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 48.9 kDa by SDS-PAGE, and mass spectrometry. Fibrin zymography analysis showed an active band with similar molecular weight. The N-terminal sequence was found to be APKASTDQTLPL, which is different from that of other known fibrinolytic enzymes. Codiase displayed maximum activity at 30 °C and pH 6.0, and the activity was inhibited by Zn(2+) and Fe(2+). Moreover, the enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by serine protease inhibitor such as PMSF. Codiase exhibited high specificity for the substrate S-2288, and the Km and Vmax values for this substrate were found to be 0.24 mM and 79 U/ml respectively. Fibrin plate assays revealed that it was able to hydrolyze fibrin clot either directly or by activation of plasminogen. Codiase effectively hydrolyzed fibrin and fibrinogen, preferentially degrading α- and Aα chains, followed by γ-γ, and γ-chains. However, it provoked slower degradation of Bβ and β-chains. The structural change of fibrin clot and fibrinogen by codiase was also detected by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy analysis. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that codiase reduces thrombosis in concentration-dependent manner. Codiase was found to prolong activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and prothrombin time (PT). PFA-100 studies showed that codiase prolonged the closure time (CT) of citrated whole human blood. These favorable antithrombotic profiles together with its anticoagulant and platelet disaggregation properties, and lack of toxicity to mice and NIH-3T3 cells, make it a potential agent for thrombolytic therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  9. Rational engineering of plasticity residues of sesquiterpene synthases from Artemisia annua: product specificity and catalytic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Xu; Fang, Xin; Zhao, Qin; Ruan, Ju-Xin; Yang, Chang-Qing; Wang, Ling-Jian; Miller, David J; Faraldos, Juan A; Allemann, Rudolf K; Chen, Xiao-Ya; Zhang, Peng

    2013-05-01

    Most TPSs (terpene synthases) contain plasticity residues that are responsible for diversified terpene products and functional evolution, which provide a potential for improving catalytic efficiency. Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone from Artemisia annua L., is widely used for malaria treatment and progress has been made in engineering the production of artemisinin or its precursors. In the present paper, we report a new sesquiterpene synthase from A. annua, AaBOS (A. annua α-bisabolol synthase), which has high sequence identity with AaADS (A. annua amorpha-4,11-diene synthase), a key enzyme in artemisinin biosynthesis. Comparative analysis of the two enzymes by domain-swapping and structure-based mutagenesis led to the identification of several plasticity residues, whose alteration changed the product profile of AaBOS to include γ-humulene as the major product. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we solved the crystal structures of AaBOS and a γ-humulene-producing AaBOS mutant (termed AaBOS-M2). Among the plasticity residues, position 399, located in the substrate-binding pocket, is crucial for both enzymes. In AaBOS, substitution of threonine for leucine (AaBOSL339T) is required for γ-humulene production; whereas in AaADS, replacing the threonine residue with serine (AaADST399S) resulted in a substantial increase in the activity of amorpha-4,11-diene production, probably as a result of accelerated product release. The present study demonstrates that substitution of plasticity residues has potential for improving catalytic efficiency of the enzyme.

  10. Structural and functional analysis of a glycoside hydrolase family 97 enzyme from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Momoyo; Okuyama, Masayuki; Tanzawa, Fumiko; Mori, Haruhide; Kitago, Yu; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Kimura, Atsuo; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2008-12-26

    SusB, an 84-kDa alpha-glucoside hydrolase involved in the starch utilization system (sus) of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, belongs to glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 97. We have determined the enzymatic characteristics and the crystal structures in free and acarbose-bound form at 1.6A resolution. SusB hydrolyzes the alpha-glucosidic linkage, with inversion of anomeric configuration liberating the beta-anomer of glucose as the reaction product. The substrate specificity of SusB, hydrolyzing not only alpha-1,4-glucosidic linkages but also alpha-1,6-, alpha-1,3-, and alpha-1,2-glucosidic linkages, is clearly different from other well known glucoamylases belonging to GH15. The structure of SusB was solved by the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction method with sulfur atoms as anomalous scatterers using an in-house x-ray source. SusB includes three domains as follows: the N-terminal, catalytic, and C-terminal domains. The structure of the SusB-acarbose complex shows a constellation of carboxyl groups at the catalytic center; Glu532 is positioned to provide protonic assistance to leaving group departure, with Glu439 and Glu508 both positioned to provide base-catalyzed assistance for inverting nucleophilic attack by water. A structural comparison with other glycoside hydrolases revealed significant similarity between the catalytic domain of SusB and those of alpha-retaining glycoside hydrolases belonging to GH27, -36, and -31 despite the differences in catalytic mechanism. SusB and the other retaining enzymes appear to have diverged from a common ancestor and individually acquired the functional carboxyl groups during the process of evolution. Furthermore, sequence comparison of the active site based on the structure of SusB indicated that GH97 included both retaining and inverting enzymes.

  11. Functional screening of metagenome and genome libraries for detection of novel flavonoid-modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabausch, U; Juergensen, J; Ilmberger, N; Böhnke, S; Fischer, S; Schubach, B; Schulte, M; Streit, W R

    2013-08-01

    The functional detection of novel enzymes other than hydrolases from metagenomes is limited since only a very few reliable screening procedures are available that allow the rapid screening of large clone libraries. For the discovery of flavonoid-modifying enzymes in genome and metagenome clone libraries, we have developed a new screening system based on high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC). This metagenome extract thin-layer chromatography analysis (META) allows the rapid detection of glycosyltransferase (GT) and also other flavonoid-modifying activities. The developed screening method is highly sensitive, and an amount of 4 ng of modified flavonoid molecules can be detected. This novel technology was validated against a control library of 1,920 fosmid clones generated from a single Bacillus cereus isolate and then used to analyze more than 38,000 clones derived from two different metagenomic preparations. Thereby we identified two novel UDP glycosyltransferase (UGT) genes. The metagenome-derived gtfC gene encoded a 52-kDa protein, and the deduced amino acid sequence was weakly similar to sequences of putative UGTs from Fibrisoma and Dyadobacter. GtfC mediated the transfer of different hexose moieties and exhibited high activities on flavones, flavonols, flavanones, and stilbenes and also accepted isoflavones and chalcones. From the control library we identified a novel macroside glycosyltransferase (MGT) with a calculated molecular mass of 46 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence was highly similar to sequences of MGTs from Bacillus thuringiensis. Recombinant MgtB transferred the sugar residue from UDP-glucose effectively to flavones, flavonols, isoflavones, and flavanones. Moreover, MgtB exhibited high activity on larger flavonoid molecules such as tiliroside.

  12. Functional Screening of Metagenome and Genome Libraries for Detection of Novel Flavonoid-Modifying Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabausch, U.; Juergensen, J.; Ilmberger, N.; Böhnke, S.; Fischer, S.; Schubach, B.; Schulte, M.

    2013-01-01

    The functional detection of novel enzymes other than hydrolases from metagenomes is limited since only a very few reliable screening procedures are available that allow the rapid screening of large clone libraries. For the discovery of flavonoid-modifying enzymes in genome and metagenome clone libraries, we have developed a new screening system based on high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC). This metagenome extract thin-layer chromatography analysis (META) allows the rapid detection of glycosyltransferase (GT) and also other flavonoid-modifying activities. The developed screening method is highly sensitive, and an amount of 4 ng of modified flavonoid molecules can be detected. This novel technology was validated against a control library of 1,920 fosmid clones generated from a single Bacillus cereus isolate and then used to analyze more than 38,000 clones derived from two different metagenomic preparations. Thereby we identified two novel UDP glycosyltransferase (UGT) genes. The metagenome-derived gtfC gene encoded a 52-kDa protein, and the deduced amino acid sequence was weakly similar to sequences of putative UGTs from Fibrisoma and Dyadobacter. GtfC mediated the transfer of different hexose moieties and exhibited high activities on flavones, flavonols, flavanones, and stilbenes and also accepted isoflavones and chalcones. From the control library we identified a novel macroside glycosyltransferase (MGT) with a calculated molecular mass of 46 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence was highly similar to sequences of MGTs from Bacillus thuringiensis. Recombinant MgtB transferred the sugar residue from UDP-glucose effectively to flavones, flavonols, isoflavones, and flavanones. Moreover, MgtB exhibited high activity on larger flavonoid molecules such as tiliroside. PMID:23686272

  13. Alteration of Fatty-Acid-Metabolizing Enzymes Affects Mitochondrial Form and Function in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesson, Christelle; Nawara, Magdalena; Salih, Mustafa A.M.; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Zaki, Maha S.; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Schule, Rebecca; Mignot, Cyril; Obre, Emilie; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Durand, Christelle M.; Oteyza, Andrés Caballero; El-Hachimi, Khalid H.; Al Drees, Abdulmajeed; Bouslam, Naima; Lamari, Foudil; Elmalik, Salah A.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Esteves, Typhaine; Gaussen, Marion; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Gyapay, Gabor; Lechner, Doris; Gonzalez, Michael; Depienne, Christel; Mochel, Fanny; Lavie, Julie; Schols, Ludger; Lacombe, Didier; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Al Abdulkareem, Ibrahim; Zuchner, Stephan; Yamashita, Atsushi; Benomar, Ali; Goizet, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Darios, Frederic; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is considered one of the most heterogeneous groups of neurological disorders, both clinically and genetically. The disease comprises pure and complex forms that clinically include slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity resulting from degeneration of the corticospinal tract. At least 48 loci accounting for these diseases have been mapped to date, and mutations have been identified in 22 genes, most of which play a role in intracellular trafficking. Here, we identified mutations in two functionally related genes (DDHD1 and CYP2U1) in individuals with autosomal-recessive forms of HSP by using either the classical positional cloning or a combination of whole-genome linkage mapping and next-generation sequencing. Interestingly, three subjects with CYP2U1 mutations presented with a thin corpus callosum, white-matter abnormalities, and/or calcification of the basal ganglia. These genes code for two enzymes involved in fatty-acid metabolism, and we have demonstrated in human cells that the HSP pathophysiology includes alteration of mitochondrial architecture and bioenergetics with increased oxidative stress. Our combined results focus attention on lipid metabolism as a critical HSP pathway with a deleterious impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic function. PMID:23176821

  14. Identification and characterization of the geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C; Sun, Z; Shen, S; Lin, L; Li, T; Tian, B; Hua, Y

    2014-03-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 utilizes multiple antioxidants including a unique carotenoid, deinoxanthin, to fight again oxidative stress. Most of the enzymes involved in the deinoxanthin biosynthetic pathway have been identified. However, the enzyme catalysing the synthesis of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP), which is a precursor of carotenoid biosynthesis, has yet to be identified. Two putative isoprenyl diphosphate synthases (IPPS) homologues (DR1395 and DR932) were screened out by analysis of conserved amino acid regions, and their biochemical functions were investigated. Gene mutation, gene expression in Escherichia coli and analysis of carotenoid products were used to investigate the functions of these candidates. The results suggested that DR1395 encodes the protein for GGPP synthesis. Site-directed mutant analysis indicated that the amino acid composition of and around the first aspartate-rich motif is vital for GGPP synthase function. Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 produces a unique carotenoid product, deinoxanthin, as an antioxidant. In this study, DR1395 was identified as the gene encoding geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) for entrance to deinoxanthin biosynthesis in D. radiodurans. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis studies on DR1395 identified the effect of amino acid composition of the aspartate-rich motif on the production of this carotenoid. This study demonstrated the entrance step in the deinoxanthin biosynthetic pathway. These results can be useful in genetic engineering strategies for deinoxanthin production including enhancement of GGPPS gene expression in D. radiodurans. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Tracking protons from respiratory chain complexes to ATP synthase c-subunit: The critical role of serine and threonine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfoli, Isabella; Ponassi, Marco; Ravera, Silvia; Calzia, Daniela; Beitia, Maider; Morelli, Alessandro; Rosano, Camillo

    2017-01-22

    F1Fo-ATP synthase is a multisubunit enzyme responsible for the synthesis of ATP. Among its multiple subunits (8 in E. coli, 17 in yeast S. cerevisiae, 16 in vertebrates), two subunits a and c are known to play a central role controlling the H(+) flow through the inner mitochondrial membrane which allows the subsequent synthesis of ATP, but the pathway followed by H(+) within the two proteins is still a matter of debate. In fact, even though the structure of ATP synthase is now well defined, the molecular mechanisms determining the function of both F1 and FO domains are still largely unknown. In this study, we propose a pathway for proton migration along the ATP synthase by hydrogen-bonded chain mechanism, with a key role of serine and threonine residues, by X-ray diffraction data on the subunit a of E. coli Fo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 regulates expression of nuclear factor-erythroid-2 related transcription factor-1 (Nrf1) and inhibits pro-survival function of Nrf1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Madhurima; Kwong, Erick K.; Park, Eujean; Nagra, Parminder; Chan, Jefferson Y., E-mail: jchan@uci.edu

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor-1 (Nrf1) is a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that is known to regulate antioxidant and cytoprotective gene expression. It was recently shown that Nrf1 is regulated by SCF–Fbw7 ubiquitin ligase. However our knowledge of upstream signals that targets Nrf1 for degradation by the UPS is not known. We report here that Nrf1 expression is negatively regulated by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) in Fbw7-dependent manner. We show that GSK3 interacts with Nrf1 and phosphorylates the Cdc4 phosphodegron domain (CPD) in Nrf1. Mutation of serine residue in the CPD of Nrf1 to alanine (S350A), blocks Nrf1 from phosphorylation by GSK3, and stabilizes Nrf1. Knockdown of Nrf1 and expression of a constitutively active form of GSK3 results in increased apoptosis in neuronal cells in response to ER stress, while expression of the GSK3 phosphorylation resistant S350A–Nrf1 attenuates apoptotic cell death. Together these data suggest that GSK3 regulates Nrf1 expression and cell survival function in response to stress activation. Highlights: • The effect of GSK3 on Nrf1 expression was examined. • GSK3 destabilizes Nrf1 protein via Fbw7 ubiquitin ligase. • GSK3 binds and phosphorylates Nrf1. • Protection from stress-induced apoptosis by Nrf1 is inhibited by GSK3.

  17. Ginsenoside Rd attenuates beta-amyloid-induced tau phosphorylation by altering the functional balance of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta and protein phosphatase 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Liu, Zhirong; Liu, Juanfang; Tai, Xuhui; Hu, Xinghua; Liu, Xuedong; Wu, Zhongliang; Zhang, Guangyun; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Gang

    2013-06-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles are aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau that are one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau phosphorylation is regulated by a balance of kinase and phosphatase activities. Our previous study has demonstrated that ginsenoside Rd, one of the principal active ingredients of Pana notoginseng, inhibits okadaic acid-induced tau phosphorylation in vivo and in vitro, but the underlying mechanism(s) is unknown. In this study, we showed that ginsenoside Rd pretreatment inhibited tau phosphorylation at multiple sites in beta-amyloid (Aβ)-treated cultured cortical neurons, and in vivo in both a rat and transgenic mouse model. Ginsenoside Rd not only reduced Aβ-induced increased expression of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3β), the most important kinase involved in tau phosphorylation, but also inhibited its activity by enhancing and attenuating its phosphorylation at Ser9 and Tyr216, respectively. Moreover, ginsenoside Rd enhanced the activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP-2A), a key phosphatase involved in tau dephosphorylation. Finally, an in vitro biochemical assay revealed that ginsenoside Rd directly affected GSK-3β and PP-2A activities. Thus, our findings provide the first evidence that ginsenoside Rd attenuates Aβ-induced pathological tau phosphorylation by altering the functional balance of GSK-3β and PP-2A. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression of thromboxane A2 receptor gene and thromboxane A2 synthase in bovine corpora lutea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Z M; Rao, C V; Chakraborty, C

    1992-08-01

    Studies were undertaken to investigate the expression of thromboxane (TXA2) receptor gene, from mRNA to functional receptor protein in terms of ligand binding, along with the cellular and subcellular distribution of the enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the ligand for the receptors. Bovine corpora lutea contained a single TXA2 receptor mRNA transcript of 2.8 kb. All the cell types in bovine corpora lutea contained immunoreactive TXA2 synthase, TXB2, TXA2 receptor transcripts, and receptor protein that bound the TXA2 antagonist 9,11-dimethylmethano-11,12-methano-16 (3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)-13-14-dihydro-13-aza-15 alpha beta-omega-tetranor TXA2. The large luteal cells (20-35 microns) contained more receptor transcripts, receptor protein, and immunoreactive TXA2 synthase than did the small luteal cells (12-19 microns), luteal blood vessels, and nonluteal cells (7-12 microns). After correction for the cellular area differences, small luteal cells were seen to contain more receptor protein than did large luteal cells and nonluteal cells. All the cells showed an increase of TXA2 receptors and catalytically active TXA2 synthase from mid-luteal phase to early pregnancy, suggesting the possibility that TXA2 could be a luteotropic eicosanoid. Bovine lung homogenates (a positive control), bovine luteal plasma membranes-mitochondria-lysosomes fraction, rough-smooth endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi fraction, and highly purified nuclei contained 65-kDa immunoreactive protein, presumably representing TXA2 synthase. In addition, the luteal fractions, but not bovine lung, contained other small and large molecular-size immunoreactive proteins. Immunogold electron microscopy showed that immunoreactive TXA2 synthase was present primarily in plasma membranes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, nuclear membranes, and chromatin; and immunoreactive TXB2 was present primarily in different-size vesicles and nuclear chromatin. In summary, the present studies demonstrate for the first time that

  19. Transcriptome-enabled discovery and functional characterization of enzymes related to (2S)-pinocembrin biosynthesis from Ornithogalum caudatum and their application for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Chen, Xi; Li, Li-Na; Tang, Wei; Pan, Yi-Ting; Kong, Jian-Qiang

    2016-02-04

    (2S)-Pinocembrin is a chiral flavanone with versatile pharmacological and biological activities. Its health-promoting effects have spurred on research effects on the microbial production of (2S)-pinocembrin. However, an often-overlooked salient feature in the analysis of microbial (2S)-pinocembrin is its chirality. Here, we presented a full characterization of absolute configuration of microbial (2S)-pinocembrin from engineered Escherichia coli. Specifically, a transcriptome-wide search for genes related to (2S)-pinocembrin biosynthesis from Ornithogalum caudatum, a plant rich in flavonoids, was first performed in the present study. A total of 104,180 unigenes were finally generated with an average length of 520 bp. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway mapping assigned 26 unigenes, representing three enzyme families of 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL), chalcone synthase (CHS) and chalcone isomerase(CHI), onto (2S)-pinocembrin biosynthetic pathway. A total of seven, three and one full-length candidates encoding 4CL, CHS and CHI were then verified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. These candidates were screened by functional expression in E. coli individual or coupled multienzyme reaction systems based on metabolic engineering processes. Oc4CL1, OcCHS2 and OcCHI were identified to be bona fide genes encoding respective pathway enzymes of (2S)-pinocembrin biosynthesis. Then Oc4CL1, OcCHS2 and MsCHI from Medicago sativa, assembled as artificial gene clusters in different organizations, were used for fermentation production of (2S)-pinocembrin in E. coli. The absolute configuration of the resulting microbial pinocembrin at C-2 was assigned to be 2S-configured by combination of retention time, UV spectrum, LC-MS, NMR, optical rotation and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Improvement of (2S)-pinocembrin titres was then achieved by optimization of gene organizations, using of codon-optimized pathway enzymes and

  20. 25. Steenbock symposium -- Biosynthesis and function of metal clusters for enzymes: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This symposium was held June 10--14, 1997 in Madison, Wisconsin. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on biochemistry of enzymes that have an affinity for metal clusters. Attention is focused on the following: metal clusters involved in energy conservation and remediation; tungsten, molybdenum, and cobalt-containing enzymes; Fe proteins, and Mo-binding proteins; nickel enzymes; and nitrogenase.

  1. RATIONAL APPROACHES FOR ENGINEERING NOVEL FUNCTIONALITIES IN CARBON-CARBON BOND FORMING ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrin Baker

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes that catalyze carbon-carbon bond formation can be exploited as biocatalyst for synthetic organic chemistry. However, natural enzymes frequently do not possess the required properties or specificities to catalyze industrially useful transformations. This mini-review describes recent work using knowledge-guided site-specific mutagenesis of key active site residues to alter substrate specificity, stereospecificity and reaction specificity of these enzymes. In addition, examples of de novo designed enzymes that catalyze C-C bond reactions not found in nature will be discussed.

  2. Multiscale modeling of biological functions: from enzymes to molecular machines (Nobel Lecture).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshel, Arieh

    2014-09-15

    A detailed understanding of the action of biological molecules is a pre-requisite for rational advances in health sciences and related fields. Here, the challenge is to move from available structural information to a clear understanding of the underlying function of the system. In light of the complexity of macromolecular complexes, it is essential to use computer simulations to describe how the molecular forces are related to a given function. However, using a full and reliable quantum mechanical representation of large molecular systems has been practically impossible. The solution to this (and related) problems has emerged from the realization that large systems can be spatially divided into a region where the quantum mechanical description is essential (e.g. a region where bonds are being broken), with the remainder of the system being represented on a simpler level by empirical force fields. This idea has been particularly effective in the development of the combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) models. Here, the coupling between the electrostatic effects of the quantum and classical subsystems has been a key to the advances in describing the functions of enzymes and other biological molecules. The same idea of representing complex systems in different resolutions in both time and length scales has been found to be very useful in modeling the action of complex systems. In such cases, starting with coarse grained (CG) representations that were originally found to be very useful in simulating protein folding, and augmenting them with a focus on electrostatic energies, has led to models that are particularly effective in probing the action of molecular machines. The same multiscale idea is likely to play a major role in modeling of even more complex systems, including cells and collections of cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Enzyme-mediated coupling of a bi-functional phenolic compound onto wool to enhance its physical, mechanical and functional properties

    OpenAIRE

    Gaffar Hossain, Kh. M.; Díaz González, María; Riva Juan, Ascensión; Tzanov, Tzanko

    2009-01-01

    Electronic version of an article published as "Enzyme and microbial technology", 08 Desembre 2009, p. 1-5 Wool fibres have been modified with nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) to improve their performance at use. This water insoluble bi-functional phenolic compound has been grafted on wool through a laccase enzyme catalyzed reaction in an aqueous-ethanol mixture. The capacity of laccase to oxidise NDGA in this aqueous-organic medium has been studied electrochemicaly. The increase of CH2, CH...

  4. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.; (MSU)

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  5. Controlling water deficit by osmolytes and enzymes: Enhancement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water stress accentuated sucrose synthase/phosphate synthase activities while sucrolytic enzymes namely; acid, neutral and sucrose synthase (cleavage) got repressed. Higher build up of sucrose and lower activity of amylase in root and shoot further decreased reducing sugar (glucose, fructose) content in stressed ...

  6. Inactivation of phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (Ser-1177) by O-GlcNAc in diabetes-associated erectile dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Musicki, Biljana; Kramer, Melissa F.; Becker, Robyn E.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2005-01-01

    Impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function is associated with erectile dysfunction in diabetes mellitus, but the exact molecular basis for the eNOS defect in the diabetic penis remains unclear. We investigated whether hyperglycemia increases O-GlcNAc modification of eNOS in the penis, preventing phosphorylation at the primary positive regulatory site on the enzyme and hampering mechanisms of the erectile response. Type I diabetes mellitus was induced in male rats by alloxan (1...

  7. Plant diversity effects on soil microbial functions and enzymes are stronger than warming in a grassland experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinauer, Katja; Tilman, David; Wragg, Peter D; Cesarz, Simone; Cowles, Jane M; Pritsch, Karin; Reich, Peter B; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic changes in biodiversity and atmospheric temperature significantly influence ecosystem processes. However, little is known about potential interactive effects of plant diversity and warming on essential ecosystem properties, such as soil microbial functions and element cycling. We studied the effects of orthogonal manipulations of plant diversity (one, four, and 16 species) and warming (ambient, +1.5 degrees C, and +3 degrees C) on soil microbial biomass, respiration, growth after nutrient additions, and activities of extracellular enzymes in 2011 and 2012 in the BAC (biodiversity and climate) perennial grassland experiment site at Cedar Creek, Minnesota, USA. Focal enzymes are involved in essential biogeochemical processes of the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles. Soil microbial biomass and some enzyme activities involved in the C and N cycle increased significantly with increasing plant diversity in both years. In addition, 16-species mixtures buffered warming induced reductions in topsoil water content. We found no interactive effects of plant diversity and warming on soil microbial biomass and growth rates. However, the activity of several enzymes (1,4-beta-glucosidase, 1,4-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, phosphatase, peroxidase) depended on interactions between plant diversity and warming with elevated activities of enzymes involved in the C, N, and P cycles at both high plant diversity and high warming levels. Increasing plant diversity consistently decreased microbial biomass-specific enzyme activities and altered soil microbial growth responses to nutrient additions, indicating that plant diversity changed nutrient limitations and/or microbial community composition. In contrast to our expectations, higher plant diversity only buffered temperature effects on soil water content, but not on microbial functions. Temperature effects on some soil enzymes were greatest at high plant diversity. In total, our results suggest that the fundamental

  8. Functional analysis of MmeI from methanol utilizer Methylophilus methylotrophus, a subtype IIC restriction-modification enzyme related to type I enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakonieczna, Joanna; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz; Obarska-Kosinska, Agnieszka; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2009-01-01

    MmeI from Methylophilus methylotrophus belongs to the type II restriction-modification enzymes. It recognizes an asymmetric DNA sequence, 5'-TCCRAC-3' (R indicates G or A), and cuts both strands at fixed positions downstream of the specific site. This particular feature has been exploited in transcript profiling of complex genomes (using serial analysis of gene expression technology). We have shown previously that the endonucleolytic activity of MmeI is strongly dependent on the presence of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (J. Nakonieczna, J. W. Zmijewski, B. Banecki, and A. J. Podhajska, Mol. Biotechnol. 37:127-135, 2007), which puts MmeI in subtype IIG. The same cofactor is used by MmeI as a methyl group donor for modification of an adenine in the upper strand of the recognition site to N(6)-methyladenine. Both enzymatic activities reside in a single polypeptide (919 amino acids [aa]), which puts MmeI also in subtype IIC of the restriction-modification systems. Based on a molecular model, generated with the use of bioinformatic tools and validated by site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to localize three functional domains in the structure of the MmeI enzyme: (i) the N-terminal portion containing the endonucleolytic domain with the catalytic Mg2+-binding motif D(70)-X(9)-EXK(82), characteristic for the PD-(D/E)XK superfamily of nucleases; (ii) a central portion (aa 310 to 610) containing nine sequence motifs conserved among N(6)-adenine gamma-class DNA methyltransferases; (iii) the C-terminal portion (aa 610 to 919) containing a putative target recognition domain. Interestingly, all three domains showed highest similarity to the corresponding elements of type I enzymes rather than to classical type II enzymes. We have found that MmeI variants deficient in restriction activity (D70A, E80A, and K82A) can bind and methylate specific nucleotide sequence. This suggests that domains of MmeI responsible for DNA restriction and modification can act independently. Moreover, we

  9. Application of enzymes for efficient extraction, modification, and development of functional properties of lime pectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominiak, Malgorzata Maria; Marie Søndergaard, Karen; Wichmann, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to transform “Waste to Food” using enzymes to recover value-added food ingredients from biomass. Six commercial cellulases were screened to generate proof of concept that enzymes are selective and efficient catalysts for opening of lime peel biomass to recover...

  10. Hepatic fatty acid oxidation : activity, localization and function of some enzymes involved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Tol (Arie)

    1971-01-01

    textabstractFatty acid oxidation is an important pathway for energy production in mammals and birds. In animal tissues the enzymes of fatty acid oxidation are located in the mitochondrion. Recent reports suggest that this is not the case in Castor bean endosperm. In this tissue the enzymes of

  11. Assessment of the pectin degrading enzyme network of Aspergillus niger by functional genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens-Uzunova, E.S.; Schaap, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    The saprobic fungus Aspergillus niger is an efficient producer of a suite of extracellular enzymes involved in carbohydrate modification and degradation. Genome mining has resulted in the prediction of at least 39 genes encoding enzymes involved in the depolymerisation of the backbone of pectin.

  12. Functions of the RNA Editing Enzyme ADAR1 and Their Relevance to Human Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunzi; Sakurai, Masayuki; Shiromoto, Yusuke; Nishikura, Kazuko

    2016-12-17

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) convert adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Among the three types of mammalian ADARs, ADAR1 has long been recognized as an essential enzyme for normal development. The interferon-inducible ADAR1p150 is involved in immune responses to both exogenous and endogenous triggers, whereas the functions of the constitutively expressed ADAR1p110 are variable. Recent findings that ADAR1 is involved in the recognition of self versus non-self dsRNA provide potential explanations for its links to hematopoiesis, type I interferonopathies, and viral infections. Editing in both coding and noncoding sequences results in diseases ranging from cancers to neurological abnormalities. Furthermore, editing of noncoding sequences, like microRNAs, can regulate protein expression, while editing of Alu sequences can affect translational efficiency and editing of proximal sequences. Novel identifications of long noncoding RNA and retrotransposons as editing targets further expand the effects of A-to-I editing. Besides editing, ADAR1 also interacts with other dsRNA-binding proteins in editing-independent manners. Elucidating the disease-specific patterns of editing and/or ADAR1 expression may be useful in making diagnoses and prognoses. In this review, we relate the mechanisms of ADAR1's actions to its pathological implications, and suggest possible mechanisms for the unexplained associations between ADAR1 and human diseases.

  13. Enzymatic hydrolysis of rice dreg protein: effects of enzyme type on the functional properties and antioxidant activities of recovered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Xiong, Hua; Selomulya, Cordelia; Chen, Xiao Dong; Zhong, Honglan; Wang, Shenqi; Sun, Wenjing; Zhou, Qiang

    2012-10-01

    The effects of various proteases on the formation and characteristics of rice dreg protein hydrolysates (RDPHs) were investigated. Enzymatic hydrolysis of often under-utilised rice dreg protein (RDP) with different enzymes studied here was found to significantly improve protein content and solubility. RDPHs prepared by alkaline protease showed better protein recovery, producing higher protein content with much smaller peptides, while hydrolysates generated by Protamex showed the highest antioxidant activities with more than 80% solubility over a wide pH range. The results indicated that the type of protease greatly influenced the molecular weight and amino acid residue composition of RDPH. The enzyme type also determined the functional properties and antioxidant activity of the recovered proteins. It was found that an optimum allocation of alkaline protease in addition to the Neutrase enzyme could be an appropriate strategy to produce RDPH with desirable functionalities, antioxidant properties, and low salt content. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification and characterization of a second isogene encoding γ-terpinene synthase in Thymus caespititius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Marta D; Barroso, José G; Oliveira, M Margarida; Trindade, Helena

    2014-07-15

    Thymus caespititius Brot. is an Iberian endemic species, whose essential oils possess high polymorphism. They consist mostly of mono- and sesquiterpene, some of them with interest for the pharmaceutical and food industries. The search for terpene synthase genes was performed in three in vitro T. caespititius genotypes. For these plants, the expression of a previously described γ-terpinene synthase gene, Tctps2, was confirmed, occurring concomitantly with a new gene encoding an enzyme with similar activity, named Thymus caespititius terpene synthase 4 (Tctps4). The two isogenes were isolated and functionally characterized in the three plant genotypes. Alignment of the two Tctps revealed a transit peptide much shorter in Tctps4 than in Tctps2 (3-4 amino acids instead of 47). The Tctps4 open reading frame is shorter than Tctps2 (1665 bp versus 1794 bp). The amino acid sequence of both γ-terpinene synthases shared an 88% pairwise identity. The fact that T. caespititius carries two isogenes for γ-terpinene synthases, suggests gene duplication along the evolutionary process, followed by mutations leading to the differentiation of both genes. These mutations didn't compromise protein activity. A high accumulation of transcripts from both genes was found in shoots of in vitro plantlets, while in roots they could not be detected. Still, γ-terpinene levels in aerial parts were reduced, probably due to fast conversion into carvacrol and thymol, the main components from T. caespititius essential oils. This study is a contribution to the identification of terpene synthase genes in Lamiaceae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of Protein Complexes in Wheat Amyloplasts Reveals Functional Interactions among Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetlow, Ian J.; Beisel, Kim G.; Cameron, Scott; Makhmoudova, Amina; Liu, Fushan; Bresolin, Nicole S.; Wait, Robin; Morell, Matthew K.; Emes, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions among enzymes of amylopectin biosynthesis were investigated in developing wheat (Triticum aestivum) endosperm. Physical interactions between starch branching enzymes (SBEs) and starch synthases (SSs) were identified from endosperm amyloplasts during the active phase of starch deposition in the developing grain using immunoprecipitation and cross-linking strategies. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments using peptide-specific antibodies indicate that at least two distinct complexes exist containing SSI, SSIIa, and either of SBEIIa or SBEIIb. Chemical cross linking was used to identify protein complexes containing SBEs and SSs from amyloplast extracts. Separation of extracts by gel filtration chromatography demonstrated the presence of SBE and SS forms in protein complexes of around 260 kD and that SBEII forms may also exist as homodimers. Analysis of cross-linked 260-kD aggregation products from amyloplast lysates by mass spectrometry confirmed SSI, SSIIa, and SBEII forms as components of one or more protein complexes in amyloplasts. In vitro phosphorylation experiments with γ-32P-ATP indicated that SSII and both forms of SBEII are phosphorylated. Treatment of the partially purified 260-kD SS-SBE complexes with alkaline phosphatase caused dissociation of the assembly into the respective monomeric proteins, indicating that formation of SS-SBE complexes is phosphorylation dependent. The 260-kD SS-SBEII protein complexes are formed around 10 to 15 d after pollination and were shown to be catalytically active with respect to both SS and SBE activities. Prior to this developmental stage, SSI, SSII, and SBEII forms were detectable only in monomeric form. High molecular weight forms of SBEII demonstrated a higher affinity for in vitro glucan substrates than monomers. These results provide direct evidence for the existence of protein complexes involved in amylopectin biosynthesis. PMID:18263778

  16. Exploiting fine-scale genetic and physiological variation of closely related microbes to reveal unknown enzyme functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badur, Ahmet H; Plutz, Matthew J; Yalamanchili, Geethika; Jagtap, Sujit Sadashiv; Schweder, Thomas; Unfried, Frank; Markert, Stephanie; Polz, Martin F; Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Rao, Christopher V

    2017-08-04

    Polysaccharide degradation by marine microbes represents one of the largest and most rapid heterotrophic transformations of organic matter in the environment. Microbes employ systems of complementary carbohydrate-specific enzymes to deconstruct algal or plant polysaccharides (glycans) into monosaccharides. Because of the high diversity of glycan substrates, the functions of these enzymes are often difficult to establish. One solution to this problem may lie within naturally occurring microdiversity; varying numbers of enzymes, due to gene loss, duplication, or transfer, among closely related environmental microbes create metabolic differences akin to those generated by knock-out strains engineered in the laboratory used to establish the functions of unknown genes. Inspired by this natural fine-scale microbial diversity, we show here that it can be used to develop hypotheses guiding biochemical experiments for establishing the role of these enzymes in nature. In this work, we investigated alginate degradation among closely related strains of the marine bacterium Vibrio splendidus One strain, V. splendidus 13B01, exhibited high extracellular alginate lyase activity compared with other V. splendidus strains. To identify the enzymes responsible for this high extracellular activity, we compared V. splendidus 13B01 with the previously characterized V. splendidus 12B01, which has low extracellular activity and lacks two alginate lyase genes present in V. splendidus 13B01. Using a combination of genomics, proteomics, biochemical, and functional screening, we identified a polysaccharide lyase family 7 enzyme that is unique to V. splendidus 13B01, secreted, and responsible for the rapid digestion of extracellular alginate. These results demonstrate the value of querying the enzymatic repertoires of closely related microbes to rapidly pinpoint key proteins with beneficial functions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Functional analysis of Plasmodium vivax dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase genes through stable transformation of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyson M Auliff

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of drug resistance in Plasmodium vivax have been difficult to study partially because of the difficulties in culturing the parasite in vitro. This hampers monitoring drug resistance and research to develop or evaluate new drugs. There is an urgent need for a novel method to study mechanisms of P. vivax drug resistance. In this paper we report the development and application of the first Plasmodium falciparum expression system to stably express P. vivax dhfr-ts alleles. We used the piggyBac transposition system for the rapid integration of wild-type, single mutant (117N and quadruple mutant (57L/58R/61M/117T pvdhfr-ts alleles into the P. falciparum genome. The majority (81% of the integrations occurred in non-coding regions of the genome; however, the levels of pvdhfr transcription driven by the P. falciparum dhfr promoter were not different between integrants of non-coding and coding regions. The integrated quadruple pvdhfr mutant allele was much less susceptible to antifolates than the wild-type and single mutant pvdhfr alleles. The resistance phenotype was stable without drug pressure. All the integrated clones were susceptible to the novel antifolate JPC-2067. Therefore, the piggyBac expression system provides a novel and important tool to investigate drug resistance mechanisms and gene functions in P. vivax.

  18. Functional analysis of Plasmodium vivax dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase genes through stable transformation of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auliff, Alyson M; Balu, Bharath; Chen, Nanhua; O'Neil, Michael T; Cheng, Qin; Adams, John H

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms of drug resistance in Plasmodium vivax have been difficult to study partially because of the difficulties in culturing the parasite in vitro. This hampers monitoring drug resistance and research to develop or evaluate new drugs. There is an urgent need for a novel method to study mechanisms of P. vivax drug resistance. In this paper we report the development and application of the first Plasmodium falciparum expression system to stably express P. vivax dhfr-ts alleles. We used the piggyBac transposition system for the rapid integration of wild-type, single mutant (117N) and quadruple mutant (57L/58R/61M/117T) pvdhfr-ts alleles into the P. falciparum genome. The majority (81%) of the integrations occurred in non-coding regions of the genome; however, the levels of pvdhfr transcription driven by the P. falciparum dhfr promoter were not different between integrants of non-coding and coding regions. The integrated quadruple pvdhfr mutant allele was much less susceptible to antifolates than the wild-type and single mutant pvdhfr alleles. The resistance phenotype was stable without drug pressure. All the integrated clones were susceptible to the novel antifolate JPC-2067. Therefore, the piggyBac expression system provides a novel and important tool to investigate drug resistance mechanisms and gene functions in P. vivax.

  19. Functionalization of Oxidases with Peroxidase Activity Creates Oxiperoxidases : A New Breed of Hybrid Enzyme Capable of Cascade Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, Remko T.; van den Berg, Tomas E.; Colpa, Dana I.; van Bloois, Edwin; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2012-01-01

    The covalent flavoprotein alditol oxidase (AldO) from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) was endowed with an extra catalytic functionality by fusing it to a microperoxidase. Purification of the construct resulted in the isolation of a synthetic bifunctional enzyme that was both fully covalently

  20. Comparing the effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers on renal function decline in diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Yunyu; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Voorham, Jaco

    Aim: To compare effectiveness of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) for protecting Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients from renal function decline in a real-world setting. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of new ACEi/ARB users in 2007-2012 in

  1. A dual enzyme functionalized nanostructured thulium oxide based interface for biomedical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jay; Roychoudhury, Appan; Srivastava, Manish; Solanki, Pratima R.; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Seung Hee; Malhotra, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    nanorods has been electrophoretically deposited (EPD) onto an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrate. The n-Tm2O3 nanorods are found to provide improved sensing characteristics to the electrode interface in terms of electroactive surface area, diffusion coefficient, charge transfer rate constant and electron transfer kinetics. The structural and morphological studies of n-Tm2O3 nanorods have been carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques. This interfacial platform has been used for fabrication of a total cholesterol biosensor by immobilizing cholesterol esterase (ChEt) and cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) onto a Tm2O3 nanostructured surface. The results of response studies of the fabricated ChEt-ChOx/n-Tm2O3/ITO bioelectrode show a broad linear range of 8-400 mg dL-1, detection limit of 19.78 mg (dL cm-2)-1, and high sensitivity of 0.9245 μA (mg per dL cm-2)-1 with a response time of 40 s. Further, this bioelectrode has been utilized for estimation of total cholesterol with negligible interference (3%) from analytes present in human serum samples. The utilization of this n-Tm2O3 modified electrode for enzyme-based biosensor analysis offers an efficient strategy and a novel interface for application of the rare earth metal oxide materials in the field of electrochemical sensors and bioelectronic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XPS spectra of n-Tm2O3, differential pulse voltammograms, magnitude of potential difference as a function of scan rate (10-100 mV s-1), effect of working potential, amount of enzyme used for immobilization, amount of enzyme loading, effect of interferents, response time, effect of temperature, determination of cholesterol in serum samples and photometric enzyme activity studies. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05043b

  2. ATP synthase in slow- and fast-growing mycobacteria is active in ATP synthesis and blocked in ATP hydrolysis direction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagsma, A.C.; Driessen, N.N.; Hahn, M.M.; Lill, H.; Bald, D.

    2010-01-01

    ATP synthase is a validated drug target for the treatment of tuberculosis, and ATP synthase inhibitors are promising candidate drugs for the treatment of infections caused by other slow-growing mycobacteria, such as Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium ulcerans. ATP synthase is an essential enzyme

  3. ATP synthase from slow and fast growing mycobacteria is active in ATP synthesis and blocked in ATP hydrolysis direction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagsma, A.C.; Driessen, N.N.; Hahn, M.M.; Lill, H.; Bald, D.

    2010-01-01

    ATP synthase is a validated drug target for the treatment of tuberculosis, and ATP synthase inhibitors are promising candidate drugs for the treatment of infections caused by other slow-growing mycobacteria, such as Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium ulcerans. ATP synthase is an essential enzyme

  4. Heterologous expression of an active chitin synthase from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Lugo, Holjes; Sánchez-Arreguín, Alejandro; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2016-12-01

    Chitin synthases are highly important enzymes in nature, where they synthesize structural components in species belonging to different eukaryotic kingdoms, including kingdom Fungi. Unfortunately, their structure and the molecular mechanism of synthesis of their microfibrilar product remain largely unknown, probably because no fungal active chitin synthases have been isolated, possibly due to their extreme hydrophobicity. In this study we have turned to the heterologous expression of the transcript from a small chitin synthase of Rhizopus oryzae (RO3G_00942, Chs1) in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was active, but accumulated mostly in inclusion bodies. High concentrations of arginine or urea solubilized the enzyme, but their dilution led to its denaturation and precipitation. Nevertheless, use of urea permitted the purification of small amounts of the enzyme. The properties of Chs1 (Km, optimum temperature and pH, effect of GlcNAc) were abnormal, probably because it lacks the hydrophobic transmembrane regions characteristic of chitin synthases. The product of the enzyme showed that, contrasting with chitin made by membrane-bound Chs's and chitosomes, was only partially in the form of short microfibrils of low crystallinity. This approach may lead to future developments to obtain active chitin synthases that permit understanding their molecular mechanism of activity, and microfibril assembly. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. The chemical complexity of cellular microtubules: tubulin post-translational modification enzymes and their roles in tuning microtubule functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnham, Christopher P.; Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2012-01-01

    Cellular microtubules are marked by abundant and evolutionarily conserved post-translational modifications that have the potential to tune their functions. This review focuses on the astonishing chemical complexity introduced in the tubulin heterodimer at the post-translational level and summarizes the recent advances in identifying the enzymes responsible for these modifications and deciphering the consequences of tubulin’s chemical diversity on the function of molecular motors and microtubule associated proteins. PMID:22422711

  6. Several RNase T2 enzymes function in induced tRNA and rRNA turnover in the ciliate Tetrahymena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Langebjerg; Collins, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    RNase T2 enzymes are produced by a wide range of organisms and have been implicated to function in diverse cellular processes, including stress-induced anticodon loop cleavage of mature tRNAs to generate tRNA halves. Here we describe a family of eight RNase T2 genes (RNT2A-RNT2H) in the ciliate...... by growth arrest that functions to recycle idle protein synthesis machinery....

  7. Effects of canrenoate plus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors versus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors alone on systolic and diastolic function in patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, Pietro; Cannizzaro, Sergio; Scalzo, Sebastiano; Parrinello, Gaspare; Fasullo, Sergio; Giambanco, Francesco; Fatta, Antonio; Paterna, Salvatore

    2005-11-01

    Aldosterone (ALDO) exerts profibrotic effects, acting via the mineralocorticoid receptors in cardiovascular tissues. Aldosterone antagonism in combination with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition may better protect against the untoward effects of ALDO than angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition alone. In a double-blind randomized study, the tolerability and efficacy of canrenoate (25 mg/d) plus captopril versus captopril alone were evaluated in 510 patients with an acute anterior myocardial infarction (MI), a serum creatinine concentration function, and incidence of surgical interventions and angioplasty were comparable. Overall, creatinine, blood urea, and serum potassium levels did not show significant differences between groups. However, in 18 patients in group A, increases in serum potassium levels to > 5.5 mEq/L and creatinine levels to > 2.0 mg/L after 10 days of treatment were observed. At 180 days, the mitral E-wave-A-wave ratio was higher (P = .0001) and left ventricular end-systolic volume was smaller (P = .0001) in patients treated with canrenoate than in those receiving placebo. No further side effects were observed during the study period. Our data suggest that the combination of captopril plus canrenoate is well tolerated after an acute MI and has beneficial effect on systolic and diastolic parameters and may decrease post-MI remodeling.

  8. Stimuli-Responsive Directional Vesicular Assembly with Tunable Surface Functionality and Impact on Enzyme Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Amrita; Ray, Debes; Aswal, Vinod K; Ghosh, Suhrit

    2017-08-08

    density of the anionic surface and accordingly the radius of curvature and particle size could be tuned precisely as a function of the extent of charge delocalization in the phenoxide or carboxylate headgroup. These distinct self-assembly modes resulted in very different abilities of these vesicles for electrostatic-interaction-driven biomolecular recognition, which was studied by testing their ability to bind with cationic protein chymotripsin and inhibit its enzymatic activity. The enzyme inhibition ability followed the order NDI-1 > NDI-3 > NDI-4 > NDI-2 ≈ NDI-1a, which could be rationalized by their distinct functional group display and surface charge density factors.

  9. Distinct molecular regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha isozyme controlled by its N-terminal region: functional role in calcium/calpain signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Yaffe, Yakey; Licht-Murava, Avital; Urbanska, Malgorzata; Jaworski, Jacek; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Hirschberg, Koret; Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit

    2011-04-15

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is expressed as two isozymes α and β. They share high similarity in their catalytic domains but differ in their N- and C-terminal regions, with GSK-3α having an extended glycine-rich N terminus. Here, we undertook live cell imaging combined with molecular and bioinformatic studies to understand the distinct functions of the GSK-3 isozymes focusing on GSK-3α N-terminal region. We found that unlike GSK-3β, which shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm, GSK-3α was excluded from the nucleus. Deletion of the N-terminal region of GSK-3α resulted in nuclear localization, and treatment with leptomycin B resulted in GSK-3α accumulation in the nucleus. GSK-3α rapidly accumulated in the nucleus in response to calcium or serum deprivation, and accumulation was strongly inhibited by the calpain inhibitor calpeptin. This nuclear accumulation was not mediated by cleavage of the N-terminal region or phosphorylation of GSK-3α. Rather, we show that calcium-induced GSK-3α nuclear accumulation was governed by GSK-3α binding with as yet unknown calpain-sensitive protein or proteins; this binding was mediated by the N-terminal region. Bioinformatic and experimental analyses indicated that nuclear exclusion of GSK-3α was likely an exclusive characteristic of mammalian GSK-3α. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of GSK-3α reduced the nuclear pool of β-catenin and its target cyclin D1. Taken together, these data suggest that the N-terminal region of GSK-3α is responsible for its nuclear exclusion and that binding with a calcium/calpain-sensitive product enables GSK-3α nuclear retention. We further uncovered a novel link between calcium and nuclear GSK-3α-mediated inhibition of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  10. Tetrahydrobiopterin Protects Against Hypertrophic Heart Disease Independent of Myocardial Nitric Oxide Synthase Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Toru; Sivakumaran, Vidhya; Carnicer, Ricardo; Zhu, Guangshuo; Hahn, Virginia S; Bedja, Djahida; Recalde, Alice; Duglan, Drew; Channon, Keith M; Casadei, Barbara; Kass, David A

    2016-03-21

    Nitric oxide synthase uncoupling occurs under conditions of oxidative stress modifying the enzyme's function so it generates superoxide rather than nitric oxide. Nitric oxide synthase uncoupling occurs with chronic pressure overload, and both are ameliorated by exogenous tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)-a cofactor required for normal nitric oxide synthase function-supporting a pathophysiological link. Genetically augmenting BH4 synthesis in endothelial cells fails to replicate this benefit, indicating that other cell types dominate the effects of exogenous BH4 administration. We tested whether the primary cellular target of BH4 is the cardiomyocyte or whether other novel mechanisms are invoked. Mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (mGCH1) and wild-type littermates underwent transverse aortic constriction. The mGCH1 mice had markedly increased myocardial BH4 and, unlike wild type, maintained nitric oxide synthase coupling after transverse aortic constriction; however, the transverse aortic constriction-induced abnormalities in cardiac morphology and function were similar in both groups. In contrast, exogenous BH4 supplementation improved transverse aortic constricted hearts in both groups, suppressed multiple inflammatory cytokines, and attenuated infiltration of inflammatory macrophages into the heart early after transverse aortic constriction. BH4 protection against adverse remodeling in hypertrophic cardiac disease is not driven by its prevention of myocardial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, as presumed previously. Instead, benefits from exogenous BH4 are mediated by a protective effect coupled to suppression of inflammatory pathways and myocardial macrophage infiltration. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  11. The Oligomycin-Sensitivity Conferring Protein of Mitochondrial ATP Synthase: Emerging New Roles in Mitochondrial Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Antoniel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The oligomycin-sensitivity conferring protein (OSCP of the mitochondrial FOF1 ATP synthase has long been recognized to be essential for the coupling of proton transport to ATP synthesis. Located on top of the catalytic F1 sector, it makes stable contacts with both F1 and the peripheral stalk, ensuring the structural and functional coupling between FO and F1, which is disrupted by the antibiotic, oligomycin. Recent data have established that OSCP is the binding target of cyclophilin (CyP D, a well-characterized inducer of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP, whose opening can precipitate cell death. CyPD binding affects ATP synthase activity, and most importantly, it decreases the threshold matrix Ca2+ required for PTP opening, in striking analogy with benzodiazepine 423, an apoptosis-inducing agent that also binds OSCP. These findings are consistent with the demonstration that dimers of ATP synthase generate Ca2+-dependent currents with features indistinguishable from those of the PTP and suggest that ATP synthase is directly involved in PTP formation, although the underlying mechanism remains to be established. In this scenario, OSCP appears to play a fundamental role, sensing the signal(s that switches the enzyme of life in a channel able to precipitate cell death.

  12. Crystallization of Δ{sup 1}-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase from Cannabis sativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoyama, Yoshinari; Takeuchi, Ayako; Taura, Futoshi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Tamada, Taro; Adachi, Motoyasu; Kuroki, Ryota [Neutron Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shoyama, Yukihiro; Morimoto, Satoshi, E-mail: morimoto@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    Δ{sup 1}-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase from C. sativa was crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution with sufficient quality for further structure determination. Δ{sup 1}-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase is a novel oxidoreductase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of the psychoactive compound THCA in Cannabis sativa (Mexican strain). In order to investigate the structure–function relationship of THCA synthase, this enzyme was overproduced in insect cells, purified and finally crystallized in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 1.4 M sodium citrate. A single crystal suitable for X-ray diffraction measurement was obtained in 0.09 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 1.26 M sodium citrate. The crystal diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution at beamline BL41XU, SPring-8. The crystal belonged to the primitive cubic space group P432, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 178.2 Å. The calculated Matthews coefficient was approximately 4.1 or 2.0 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} assuming the presence of one or two molecules of THCA synthase in the asymmetric unit, respectively.

  13. Four terpene synthases contribute to the generation of chemotypes in tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovan, Amanda; Keszei, Andras; Hassan, Yasmin; Krause, Sandra T; Köllner, Tobias G; Degenhardt, Jörg; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Külheim, Carsten; Foley, William J

    2017-10-04

    Terpene rich leaves are a characteristic of Myrtaceae. There is significant qualitative variation in the terpene profile of plants within a single species, which is observable as "chemotypes". Understanding the molecular basis of chemotypic variation will help explain how such variation is maintained in natural populations as well as allowing focussed breeding for those terpenes sought by industry. The leaves of the medicinal tea tree, Melaleuca alternifolia, are used to produce terpinen-4-ol rich tea tree oil, but there are six naturally occurring chemotypes; three cardinal chemotypes (dominated by terpinen-4-ol, terpinolene and 1,8-cineole, respectively) and three intermediates. It has been predicted that three distinct terpene synthases could be responsible for the maintenance of chemotypic variation in this species. We isolated and characterised the most abundant terpene synthases (TPSs) from the three cardinal chemotypes of M. alternifolia. Functional characterisation of these enzymes shows that they produce the dominant compounds in the foliar terpene profile of all six chemotypes. Using RNA-Seq, we investigated the expression of these and 24 additional putative terpene synthases in young leaves of all six chemotypes of M. alternifolia. Despite contributing to the variation patterns observed, variation in gene expression of the three TPS genes is not enough to explain all variation for the maintenance of chemotypes. Other candidate terpene synthases as well as other levels of regulation must also be involved. The results of this study provide novel insights into the complexity of terpene biosynthesis in natural populations of a non-model organism.

  14. Quaternary structure of human fatty acid synthase by electron cryomicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Jacob; Ludtke, Steven J.; Yang, Chao-Yuh; Gu, Zei-Wei; Wakil, Salih J.; Chiu, Wah

    2002-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional reconstruction of human fatty acid synthase obtained by electron cryomicroscopy and single-particle image processing. The structure shows that the synthase is composed of two monomers, arranged in an antiparallel orientation, which is consistent with biochemical data. The monomers are connected to each other at their middle by a bridge of density, a site proposed to be the combination of the interdomain regions of the two monomers. Each monomer subunit appears to be subdivided into three structural domains. With this reconstruction of the synthase, we propose a location for the enzyme's two fatty acid synthesis sites. PMID:11756679

  15. Functional biopolymer-based matrices for modulation of chronic wound enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesko, Antonio; Soares da Costa, Diana; Reis, Rui L; Pashkuleva, Iva; Tzanov, Tzanko

    2013-02-01

    Collagen, collagen/hyaluronic acid (HA) and collagen/HA/chitosan (CS) sponges loaded with epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), catechin (CAT) and gallic acid (GA) were developed and evaluated as active chronic wound dressings. Their physico-mechanical properties, biostability, biocompatibility and ability to inhibit in vitro myeloperoxidase (MPO) and collagenase--major enzymes related with the persistent inflammation in chronic wounds--were investigated as a function of the biopolymer composition and the polyphenolic compound used. The results demonstrated that the molecular weight of HA influences significantly the bulk properties of the obtained materials: higher elastic modulus, swelling ability and biostability against collagenase were measured when HA with higher molecular weights (830 and 2000 kDa) were added to the collagen matrices. The addition of CS and the polyphenols increased further the biostability of the sponges. Preliminary in vitro tests with fibroblasts revealed that the cells were able to adhere to all sponges. Cell viability was not affected significantly by the addition of the polyphenols; however, the presence of CS or high molecular weight HA in the sponge composition was associated with lower cellular viability. Finally, all specimens containing polyphenols efficiently inhibited the MPO activity. The highest inhibition capacity was observed for EGCG (IC₅₀=15±1μM) and it was coupled to the highest extent of binding to the biopolymers (>80%) and optimal release profile from the sponges that allowed for prolonged (up to 3-5 days) effects. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Functionalization of PDMS modified and plasma activated two-component polyurethane coatings by surface attachment of enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Alexej; Richter, Katharina; Sell, Stephan; Fenske, Mandus; Tornow, Christian; Stenzel, Volkmar; Grunwald, Ingo

    2013-05-01

    This article describes a new strategy for coupling the enzyme horseradish peroxidase to a two-component polyurethane (2C-PUR) coating. A stable polymer conjugate was achieved by combining the enzyme and the 2C-PUR coating which was modified with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), located at the surface. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet system was used to convert alkyl groups from the PDMS into polar silanol functionalities. This conversion was proven by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the stability of the activated 2C-PUR surface containing silanol groups was determined by measuring the contact angle as a function of time. Compared to the non-modified 2C-PUR systems the one with PDMS displayed a higher stability over a time period over 28 h. In a silanization process the coating was treated with (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane and the enzyme was subsequently immobilized to the coating via the cross linker glutaraldehyde to receive new biomimetic catalytic/enzymatic functions. The chemical immobilization (chemisorption) of the enzyme to the surface showed statistically significant higher biological activity as compared to references samples without using a cross linker (physisorption). The presented technique offers the opportunity to design new and smart multifunctional surface coatings which employ biomimetic capabilities.

  17. Functionalization of PDMS modified and plasma activated two-component polyurethane coatings by surface attachment of enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreider, Alexej; Richter, Katharina; Sell, Stephan; Fenske, Mandus; Tornow, Christian; Stenzel, Volkmar [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials - IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Grunwald, Ingo, E-mail: ingo.grunwald@ifam.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials - IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    This article describes a new strategy for coupling the enzyme horseradish peroxidase to a two-component polyurethane (2C-PUR) coating. A stable polymer conjugate was achieved by combining the enzyme and the 2C-PUR coating which was modified with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), located at the surface. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet system was used to convert alkyl groups from the PDMS into polar silanol functionalities. This conversion was proven by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the stability of the activated 2C-PUR surface containing silanol groups was determined by measuring the contact angle as a function of time. Compared to the non-modified 2C-PUR systems the one with PDMS displayed a higher stability over a time period over 28 h. In a silanization process the coating was treated with (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane and the enzyme was subsequently immobilized to the coating via the cross linker glutaraldehyde to receive new biomimetic catalytic/enzymatic functions. The chemical immobilization (chemisorption) of the enzyme to the surface showed statistically significant higher biological activity as compared to references samples without using a cross linker (physisorption). The presented technique offers the opportunity to design new and smart multifunctional surface coatings which employ biomimetic capabilities.

  18. Engineering of a novel tri-functional enzyme with MnSOD, catalase and cell-permeable activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangwattananun, Piriya; Yainoy, Sakda; Eiamphungporn, Warawan; Songtawee, Napat; Bülow, Leif; Ayudhya, Chartchalerm Isarankura Na; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2016-04-01

    Cooperative function of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), in protection against oxidative stress, is known to be more effective than the action of either single enzyme. Chemical conjugation of the two enzymes resulted in molecules with higher antioxidant activity and therapeutic efficacy. However, chemical methods holds several drawbacks; e.g., loss of enzymatic activity, low homogeneity, time-consuming, and the need of chemical residues removal. Yet, the conjugated enzymes have never been proven to internalize into target cells. In this study, by employing genetic and protein engineering technologies, we reported designing and production of a bi-functional protein with SOD and CAT activities for the first time. To enable cellular internalization, cell penetrating peptide from HIV-1 Tat (TAT) was incorporated. Co-expression of CAT-MnSOD and MnSOD-TAT fusion genes allowed simultaneous self-assembly of the protein sequences into a large protein complex, which is expected to contained one tetrameric structure of CAT, four tetrameric structures of MnSOD and twelve units of TAT. The protein showed cellular internalization and superior protection against paraquat-induced cell death as compared to either complex bi-functional protein without TAT or to native enzymes fused with TAT. This study not only provided an alternative strategy to produce multifunctional protein complex, but also gained an insight into the development of therapeutic agent against oxidative stress-related conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Eugenol synthase genes in floral scent variation in Gymnadenia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Alok K; Schauvinhold, Ines; Pichersky, Eran; Schiestl, Florian P

    2014-12-01

    Floral signaling, especially through floral scent, is often highly complex, and little is known about the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary causes of this complexity. In this study, we focused on the evolution of "floral scent genes" and the associated changes in their functions in three closely related orchid species of the genus Gymnadenia. We developed a benchmark repertoire of 2,571 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in Gymnadenia odoratissima. For the functional characterization and evolutionary analysis, we focused on eugenol synthase, as eugenol is a widespread and important scent compound. We obtained complete coding complementary DNAs (cDNAs) of two copies of putative eugenol synthase genes in each of the three species. The proteins encoded by these cDNAs were characterized by expression and testing for activity in Escherichia coli. While G. odoratissima and Gymnadenia conopsea enzymes were found to catalyze the formation of eugenol only, the Gymnadenia densiflora proteins synthesize eugenol, as well as a smaller amount of isoeugenol. Finally, we showed that the eugenol and isoeugenol producing gene copies of G. densiflora are evolutionarily derived from the ancestral genes of the other species producing only eugenol. The evolutionary switch from production of one to two compounds evolved under relaxed purifying selection. In conclusion, our study shows the molecular bases of eugenol and isoeugenol production and suggests that an evolutionary transition in a single gene can lead to an increased complexity in floral scent emitted by plants.

  20. Cold adaptation of enzyme reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelic, Sinisa; Brandsdal, Bjørn O; Aqvist, Johan

    2008-09-23

    A major issue for organisms living at extreme temperatures is to preserve both stability and activity of their enzymes. Cold-adapted enzymes generally have a reduced thermal stability, to counteract freezing, and show a lower enthalpy and a more negative entropy of activation compared to mesophilic and thermophilic homologues. Such a balance of thermodynamic activation parameters can make the reaction rate decrease more linearly, rather than exponentially, as the temperature is lowered, but the structural basis for rate optimization toward low working temperatures remains unclear. In order to computationally address this problem, it is clear that reaction simulations rather than standard molecular dynamics calculations are needed. We have thus carried out extensive computer simulations of the keto-enol(ate) isomerization steps in differently adapted citrate synthases to explore the structure-function relationships behind catalytic rate adaptation to different temperatures. The calculations reproduce the absolute rates of the psychrophilic and mesophilic enzymes at 300 K, as well as the lower enthalpy and more negative entropy of activation of the cold-adapted enzyme, where the latter simulation result is obtained from high-precision Arrhenius plots. The overall catalytic effect originates from electrostatic stabilization of the transition state and enolate and the reduction of reorganization free energy. The simulations, however, show psychrophilic, mesophilic, and hyperthermophilic citrate synthases to have increasingly stronger electrostatic stabilization of the transition state, while the energetic penalty in terms of internal protein interactions follows the reverse order with the cold-adapted enzyme having the most favorable energy term. The lower activation enthalpy and more negative activation entropy observed for cold-adapted enzymes are found to be associated with a decreased protein stiffness. The origin of this effect is, however, not localized to the

  1. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr; Palmowski, Paweł; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Maj, Piotr; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Ostafil, Sylwia; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Shugar, David; Rode, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat, Trichinella spiralis and Caenorhabditis elegans TSs, expressed in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated, compared to non-phosphorylated recombinant enzyme forms, showed a decrease in Vmax(app), bound their cognate mRNA (only rat enzyme studied), and repressed translation of their own and several heterologous mRNAs (human, rat and mouse enzymes studied). However, attempts to determine the modification site(s), whether endogenously expressed in mammalian cells, or recombinant proteins, did not lead to unequivocal results. Comparative ESI-MS/analysis of IEF fractions of TS preparations from parental and FdUrd-resistant mouse leukemia L1210 cells, differing in sensitivity to inactivation by FdUMP, demonstrated phosphorylation of Ser(10) and Ser(16) in the resistant enzyme only, although PGS staining pointed to the modification of both L1210 TS proteins. The TS proteins phosphorylated in bacterial cells were shown by (31)P NMR to be modified only on histidine residues, like potassium phosphoramidate (KPA)-phosphorylated TS proteins. NanoLC-MS/MS, enabling the use of CID and ETD peptide fragmentation methods, identified several phosphohistidine residues, but certain phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues were also implicated. Molecular dynamics studies, based on the mouse TS crystal structure, allowed one to assess potential of several phosphorylated histidine residues to affect catalytic activity, the effect being phosphorylation site dependent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell wall-associated enzymes in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Dora M; Baumgartner, Daniel; Mayer, Christoph; Hollenstein, G O

    2003-09-01

    This review compiles and discusses previous reports on the identity of wall-associated enzymes (WAEs) in fungi and addresses critically the widely different terminologies used in the literature to specify the type of bonding of WAEs to other entities of the cell wall compartment, the extracellular matrix (ECM). A facile and rapid fractionation protocol for catalytically active WAEs is presented, which uses crude cell walls as the experimental material, a variety of test enzymes (including representatives of polysaccharide synthases and hydrolases, phosphatases, gamma-glutamyltransferases, pyridine-nucleotide dehydrogenases and phenol-oxidising enzymes) and a combination of simple hydrophilic and hydrophobic extractants. The protocol provides four fully operationally defined classes of WAEs, with constituent members of each class displaying the same basic type of physicochemical interaction with binding partners in situ. The routine application of the protocol to different species and cell types could yield easily accessible data useful for building-up a general objective information retrieval system of WAEs, suitable as an heuristic basis both for the unravelling of the role and for the biotechnological potentialities of WAEs. A detailed account is given of the function played in the ECM by WAEs in the metabolism of chitin (chitin synthase, chitinase and beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase) and of phenols (tyrosinase).

  3. Functional Trade-Offs in Promiscuous Enzymes Cannot Be Explained by Intrinsic Mutational Robustness of the Native Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Kaltenbach

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which an emerging new function trades off with the original function is a key characteristic of the dynamics of enzyme evolution. Various cases of laboratory evolution have unveiled a characteristic trend; a large increase in a new, promiscuous activity is often accompanied by only a mild reduction of the native, original activity. A model that associates weak trade-offs with "evolvability" was put forward, which proposed that enzymes possess mutational robustness in the native activity and plasticity in promiscuous activities. This would enable the acquisition of a new function without compromising the original one, reducing the benefit of early gene duplication and therefore the selection pressure thereon. Yet, to date, no experimental study has examined this hypothesis directly. Here, we investigate the causes of weak trade-offs by systematically characterizing adaptive mutations that occurred in two cases of evolutionary transitions in enzyme function: (1 from phosphotriesterase to arylesterase, and (2 from atrazine chlorohydrolase to melamine deaminase. Mutational analyses in various genetic backgrounds revealed that, in contrast to the prevailing model, the native activity is less robust to mutations than the promiscuous activity. For example, in phosphotriesterase, the deleterious effect of individual mutations on the native phosphotriesterase activity is much larger than their positive effect on the promiscuous arylesterase activity. Our observations suggest a revision of the established model: weak trade-offs are not caused by an intrinsic robustness of the native activity and plasticity of the promiscuous activity. We propose that upon strong adaptive pressure for the new activity without selection against the original one, selected mutations will lead to the largest possible increases in the new function, but whether and to what extent they decrease the old function is irrelevant, creating a bias towards initially weak

  4. The role of two Pseudomonas aeruginosa anthranilate synthases in tryptophan and quorum signal production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gregory C.; Jorth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that causes infections in the lungs of individuals with the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Density-dependent production of toxic factors regulated by the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone; PQS) have been proposed to be involved in P. aeruginosa virulence. PQS biosynthesis requires conversion of the central metabolite chorismate to anthranilate by anthranilate synthase. This reaction is also the first step in tryptophan biosynthesis. P. aeruginosa possesses two functional anthranilate synthases, TrpEG and PhnAB, and these enzymes are not functionally redundant, as trpEG mutants are tryptophan auxotrophs but produce PQS while mutants in phnAB are tryptophan prototrophs but do not produce PQS in minimal media. The goal of the work described in this paper was to determine the mechanism for this lack of functional complementation of TrpEG and PhnAB. Our results reveal that overexpression of either enzyme compensates for tryptophan auxotrophy and PQS production in the trpEG and phnAB mutants respectively, leading to the hypothesis that differential regulation of these genes is responsible for the lack of functional complementation. In support of this hypothesis, trpEG was shown to be expressed primarily during low-density growth while phnAB was expressed primarily at high density. Furthermore, dysregulation of phnAB expression eliminated tryptophan auxotrophy in the P. aeruginosa trpEG mutant. Based on these data, we propose a model for anthranilate sequestration by differential transcriptional regulation of the two P. aeruginosa anthranilate synthase enzymes. PMID:23449919

  5. The small subunit of snapdragon geranyl diphosphate synthase modifies the chain length specificity of tobacco geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Irina; Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Kish, Christine M; Gutensohn, Michael; Maeda, Hiroshi; Varbanova, Marina; Fridman, Eyal; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Hanada, Atsushi; Kamiya, Yuji; Krichevsky, Alexander; Citovsky, Vitaly; Pichersky, Eran; Dudareva, Natalia

    2009-12-01

    Geranyl diphosphate (GPP), the precursor of many monoterpene end products, is synthesized in plastids by a condensation of dimethylallyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) in a reaction catalyzed by homodimeric or heterodimeric GPP synthase (GPPS). In the heterodimeric enzymes, a noncatalytic small subunit (GPPS.SSU) determines the product specificity of the catalytic large subunit, which may be either an active geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) or an inactive GGPPS-like protein. Here, we show that expression of snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) GPPS.SSU in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants increased the total GPPS activity and monoterpene emission from leaves and flowers, indicating that the introduced catalytically inactive GPPS.SSU found endogenous large subunit partner(s) and formed an active snapdragon/tobacco GPPS in planta. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and in vitro enzyme analysis of individual and hybrid proteins revealed that two of four GGPPS-like candidates from tobacco EST databases encode bona fide GGPPS that can interact with snapdragon GPPS.SSU and form a functional GPPS enzyme in plastids. The formation of chimeric GPPS in transgenic plants also resulted in leaf chlorosis, increased light sensitivity, and dwarfism due to decreased levels of chlorophylls, carotenoids, and gibberellins. In addition, these transgenic plants had reduced levels of sesquiterpene emission, suggesting that the export of isoprenoid intermediates from the plastids into the cytosol was decreased. These results provide genetic evidence that GPPS.SSU modifies the chain length specificity of phylogenetically distant GGPPS and can modulate IPP flux distribution between GPP and GGPP synthesis in planta.

  6. Flavin-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase as a New Antibiotic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In humans de novo synthesis of 2′-deoxythymidine-5′-monophosphate (dTMP, an essential building block of DNA, utilizes an enzymatic pathway requiring thymidylate synthase (TSase and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR. The enzyme flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase (FDTS represents an alternative enzymatic pathway to synthesize dTMP, which is not present in human cells. A number of pathogenic bacteria, however, depend on this enzyme in lieu of or in conjunction with the analogous human pathway. Thus, inhibitors of this enzyme may serve as antibiotics. Here, we review the similarities and differences of FDTS vs. TSase including aspects of their structure and chemical mechanism. In addition, we review current progress in the search for inhibitors of flavin dependent thymidylate synthase as potential novel therapeutics.

  7. Flavin-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase as a New Antibiotic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael; Karunaratne, Kalani; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-05-20

    In humans de novo synthesis of 2'-deoxythymidine-5'-monophosphate (dTMP), an essential building block of DNA, utilizes an enzymatic pathway requiring thymidylate synthase (TSase) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The enzyme flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase (FDTS) represents an alternative enzymatic pathway to synthesize dTMP, which is not present in human cells. A number of pathogenic bacteria, however, depend on this enzyme in lieu of or in conjunction with the analogous human pathway. Thus, inhibitors of this enzyme may serve as antibiotics. Here, we review the similarities and differences of FDTS vs. TSase including aspects of their structure and chemical mechanism. In addition, we review current progress in the search for inhibitors of flavin dependent thymidylate synthase as potential novel therapeutics.

  8. Structure and Function of APH(4)-Ia, a Hygromycin B Resistance Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stogios, Peter J.; Shakya, Tushar; Evdokimova, Elena; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D. (Toronto); (McMaster U.)

    2011-11-18

    The aminoglycoside phosphotransferase (APH) APH(4)-Ia is one of two enzymes responsible for bacterial resistance to the atypical aminoglycoside antibiotic hygromycin B (hygB). The crystal structure of APH(4)-Ia enzyme was solved in complex with hygB at 1.95 {angstrom} resolution. The APH(4)-Ia structure adapts a general two-lobe architecture shared by other APH enzymes and eukaryotic kinases, with the active site located at the interdomain cavity. The enzyme forms an extended hydrogen bond network with hygB primarily through polar and acidic side chain groups. Individual alanine substitutions of seven residues involved in hygB binding did not have significant effect on APH(4)-Ia enzymatic activity, indicating that the binding affinity is spread across a distributed network. hygB appeared as the only substrate recognized by APH(4)-Ia among the panel of 14 aminoglycoside compounds. Analysis of the active site architecture and the interaction with the hygB molecule demonstrated several unique features supporting such restricted substrate specificity. Primarily the APH(4)-Ia substrate-binding site contains a cluster of hydrophobic residues that provides a complementary surface to the twisted structure of the substrate. Similar to APH(2{double_prime}) enzymes, the APH(4)-Ia is able to utilize either ATP or GTP for phosphoryl transfer. The defined structural features of APH(4)-Ia interactions with hygB and the promiscuity in regard to ATP or GTP binding could be exploited for the design of novel aminoglycoside antibiotics or inhibitors of this enzyme.

  9. Substrate channeling between the human dihydrofolate reductase and thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nuo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In vivo, as an advanced catalytic strategy, transient non-covalently bound multi-enzyme complexes can be formed to facilitate the relay of substrates, i. e. substrate channeling, between sequential enzymatic reactions and to enhance the throughput of multi-step enzymatic pathways. The human thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase catalyze two consecutive reactions in the folate metabolism pathway, and experiments have shown that they are very likely to bind in the same multi-enzyme complex in vivo. While reports on the protozoa thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase bifunctional enzyme give substantial evidences of substrate channeling along a surface "electrostatic highway," attention has not been paid to whether the human thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase, if they are in contact with each other in the multi-enzyme complex, are capable of substrate channeling employing surface electrostatics. This work utilizes protein-protein docking, electrostatics calculations, and Brownian dynamics to explore the existence and mechanism of the substrate channeling between the human thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase. The results show that the bound human thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase are capable of substrate channeling and the formation of the surface "electrostatic highway." The substrate channeling efficiency between the two can be reasonably high and comparable to that of the protozoa. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  10. The effect of glycosaminoglycan enzymes and proteases on the viscosity of alpaca seminal plasma and sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw-Young, C M; Stuart, C; Evans, G; Maxwell, W M C

    2013-05-01

    In order to advance the development of cryopreservation and other assisted reproductive technologies in camelids it is necessary to eliminate the viscous component of the seminal plasma without impairing sperm function. It has been postulated that glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) or proteoglycans are responsible for this viscosity. This study investigated the effect of the GAG enzymes hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC and keratanase and the proteases papain and proteinase K on seminal plasma viscosity and sperm function in order to aid identification of the cause of seminal plasma viscosity and propose methods for the reduction of viscosity. Sperm motility, DNA integrity, acrosome integrity and viability were assessed during 2h incubation. All enzymes reduced seminal plasma viscosity compared to control (Palpaca seminal plasma viscosity. Papain treatment of alpaca semen may be a suitable technique for reduction of seminal plasma viscosity prior to sperm cryopreservation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of the gene encoding serine acetyltransferase, a regulated enzyme of cysteine biosynthesis from the protist parasites Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar. Regulation and possible function of the cysteine biosynthetic pathway in Entamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, T; Asai, T; Sanchez, L B; Kobayashi, S; Nakazawa, M; Takeuchi, T

    1999-11-05

    The enteric protist parasites Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar possess a cysteine biosynthetic pathway, unlike their mammalian host, and are capable of de novo production of L-cysteine. We cloned and characterized cDNAs that encode the regulated enzyme serine acetyltransferase (SAT) in this pathway from these amoebae by genetic complementation of a cysteine-auxotrophic Escherichia coli strain with the amoebic cDNA libraries. The deduced amino acid sequences of the amoebic SATs exhibited, within the most conserved region, 36-52% identities with the bacterial and plant SATs. The amoebic SATs contain a unique insertion of eight amino acids, also found in the corresponding region of a plasmid-encoded SAT from Synechococcus sp., which showed the highest overall identities to the amoebic SATs. Phylogenetic reconstruction also revealed a close kinship of the amoebic SATs with cyanobacterial SATs. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant E. histolytica SAT revealed several enzymatic features that distinguished the amoebic enzyme from the bacterial and plant enzymes: 1) inhibition by L-cysteine in a competitive manner with L-serine; 2) inhibition by L-cystine; and 3) no association with cysteine synthase. Genetically engineered amoeba strains that overproduced cysteine synthase and SAT were created. The cysteine synthase-overproducing amoebae had a higher level of cysteine synthase activity and total thiol content and revealed increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate that the cysteine biosynthetic pathway plays an important role in antioxidative defense of these enteric parasites.

  12. Targeted discovery and functional characterisation of complex-xylan degrading enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gool, van M.P.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of a screening method to discover efficient hemicellulase producers in a wide range of fungi. The method is based on the potential of soil fungi to degrade soluble and insoluble xylan-rich substrates, by assigning various individual enzyme activities. Released

  13. Cysteine digestive peptidases function as post-glutamine cleaving enzymes in tenebrionid stored product pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereals have storage proteins with high amounts of the amino acids glutamine and proline. Therefore, storage pests need to have digestive enzymes that are efficient in hydrolyzing these types of proteins. Post-glutamine cleaving peptidases (PGP) were isolated from the midgut of the stored product pe...

  14. Functional diversity of carbohydrate-active enzymes enabling a bacterium to ferment plant biomass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Boutard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbial metabolism of plant polysaccharides is an important part of environmental carbon cycling, human nutrition, and industrial processes based on cellulosic bioconversion. Here we demonstrate a broadly applicable method to analyze how microbes catabolize plant polysaccharides that integrates carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme assays, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq, and anaerobic growth screening. We apply this method to study how the bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans ferments plant biomass components including glucans, mannans, xylans, galactans, pectins, and arabinans. These polysaccharides are fermented with variable efficiencies, and diauxies prioritize metabolism of preferred substrates. Strand-specific RNA-seq reveals how this bacterium responds to polysaccharides by up-regulating specific groups of CAZymes, transporters, and enzymes to metabolize the constituent sugars. Fifty-six up-regulated CAZymes were purified, and their activities show most polysaccharides are degraded by multiple enzymes, often from the same family, but with divergent rates, specificities, and cellular localizations. CAZymes were then tested in combination to identify synergies between enzymes acting on the same substrate with different catalytic mechanisms. We discuss how these results advance our understanding of how microbes degrade and metabolize plant biomass.

  15. Functional diversity of carbohydrate-active enzymes enabling a bacterium to ferment plant biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Nogue, Pierre-Yves; Alberti, Adriana; Weissenbach, Jean; Salanoubat, Marcel; Tolonen, Andrew C

    2014-11-01

    Microbial metabolism of plant polysaccharides is an important part of environmental carbon cycling, human nutrition, and industrial processes based on cellulosic bioconversion. Here we demonstrate a broadly applicable method to analyze how microbes catabolize plant polysaccharides that integrates carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme) assays, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and anaerobic growth screening. We apply this method to study how the bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans ferments plant biomass components including glucans, mannans, xylans, galactans, pectins, and arabinans. These polysaccharides are fermented with variable efficiencies, and diauxies prioritize metabolism of preferred substrates. Strand-specific RNA-seq reveals how this bacterium responds to polysaccharides by up-regulating specific groups of CAZymes, transporters, and enzymes to metabolize the constituent sugars. Fifty-six up-regulated CAZymes were purified, and their activities show most polysaccharides are degraded by multiple enzymes, often from the same family, but with divergent rates, specificities, and cellular localizations. CAZymes were then tested in combination to identify synergies between enzymes acting on the same substrate with different catalytic mechanisms. We discuss how these results advance our understanding of how microbes degrade and metabolize plant biomass.

  16. Structure and functions of tumor necrosis factor-alpha converting enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezyk, Renata; Bzowska, Monika; Bereta, Joanna

    2003-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha converting enzyme (TACE) is the first described and best characterized secretase. In this review the structure and the possible roles for TACE are summarized. The substrate specificity and the regulation of TACE activity as well as redundancy and possible cooperations of distinct secretases are also discussed.

  17. Correspondence between radioactive and functional methods in the quality control of DNA restriction and modifying enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, L E; Pupo, E; Miranda, F

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the use of two radiolabeled lambda DNA/Hpa II substrates to detect 5'-->3', 3'-->5' single and double stranded DNA dependent exonuclease and phosphatase activities found as contaminants in restriction and modifying enzyme preparations. Looking for the meaning of the radioactive assay...

  18. Role of reactive nitrogen species generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase in vesicant-induced lung injury, inflammation and altered lung functioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunil, Vasanthi R., E-mail: sunilvr@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States); Shen, Jianliang; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Gow, Andrew J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by sulfur mustard and related vesicants is associated with oxidative stress. In the present studies we analyzed the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung injury and inflammation induced by vesicants using 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) as a model. C57Bl/6 (WT) and iNOS −/− mice were sacrificed 3 days or 14 days following intratracheal administration of CEES (6 mg/kg) or control. CEES intoxication resulted in transient (3 days) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell and protein content in WT, but not iNOS −/− mice. This correlated with expression of Ym1, a marker of oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. In contrast, in iNOS −/− mice, Ym1 was only observed 14 days post-exposure in enlarged alveolar macrophages, suggesting that they are alternatively activated. This is supported by findings that lung tumor necrosis factor and lipocalin Lcn2 expression, mediators involved in tissue repair were also upregulated at this time in iNOS −/− mice. Conversely, CEES-induced increases in the proinflammatory genes, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, were abrogated in iNOS −/− mice. In WT mice, CEES treatment also resulted in increases in total lung resistance and decreases in compliance in response to methacholine, effects blunted by loss of iNOS. These data demonstrate that RNS, generated via iNOS play a role in the pathogenic responses to CEES, augmenting oxidative stress and inflammation and suppressing tissue repair. Elucidating inflammatory mechanisms mediating vesicant-induced lung injury is key to the development of therapeutics to treat mustard poisoning. -- Highlights: ► Lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress are induced by the model vesicant CEES ► RNS generated via iNOS are important in the CEES-induced pulmonary toxicity ► iNOS −/− mice are protected from CEES-induced lung toxicity and

  19. Genome-wide Identification and analysis of the stress-resistance function of the TPS (Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase) gene family in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Min; Lu, Xu-Ke; Wang, Jun-Juan; Wang, De-Long; Yin, Zu-Jun; Wang, Shuai; Fan, Wei-Li; Ye, Wu-Wei

    2016-03-18

    Trehalose (a-D-glucopyranosyl a-D-glucopyranoside) is a nonreducing disaccharide and is widely distributed in bacteria, fungi, algae, plants and invertebrates. In the study, the identification of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) genes stress-related in cotton, and the genetic structure analysis and molecular evolution analysis of TPSs were conducted with bioinformatics methods, which could lay a foundation for further research of TPS functions in cotton. The genome information of Gossypium raimondii (group D), G. arboreum L. (group A), and G. hirsutum L. (group AD) was used in the study. Fifty-three TPSs were identified comprising 15 genes in group D, 14 in group A, and 24 in group AD. Bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the genetic structure and molecular evolution of TPSs. Real-time PCR analysis was performed to investigate the expression patterns of gene family members. All TPS family members in cotton can be divided into two subfamilies: Class I and Class II. The similarity of the TPS sequence is high within the same species and close within their family relatives. The genetic structures of two TPS subfamily members are different, with more introns and a more complicated gene structure in Class I. There is a TPS domain(Glyco transf_20) at the N-terminal in all TPS family members and a TPP domain(Trehalose_PPase) at the C-terminal in all except GrTPS6, GhTPS4, and GhTPS9. All Class II members contain a UDP-forming domain. The responses to environmental stresses showed that stresses could induce the expression of TPSs but the expression patterns vary with different stresses. The distribution of TPSs varies with different species but is relatively uniform on chromosomes. Genetic structure varies with different gene members, and expression levels vary with different stresses and exhibit tissue specificity. The upregulated genes in upland cotton TM-1 is significantly more than that in G. raimondii and G. arboreum L. Shixiya 1.

  20. Immobilisation and characterisation of biocatalytic co-factor recycling enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and NADH oxidase, on aldehyde functional ReSynTM polymer microspheres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Twala, BV

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available the immobilisation of two biocatalytically relevant co-factor recycling enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and NADH oxidase (NOD) on aldehyde functional ReSynTM polymer microspheres with varying functional group densities. The successful immobilisation...

  1. Ack kinase regulates CTP synthase filaments during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strochlic, Todd I; Stavrides, Kevin P; Thomas, Sam V; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; O'Reilly, Alana M; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2014-11-01

    The enzyme CTP synthase (CTPS) dynamically assembles into macromolecular filaments in bacteria, yeast, Drosophila, and mammalian cells, but the role of this morphological reorganization in regulating CTPS activity is controversial. During Drosophila oogenesis, CTPS filaments are transiently apparent in ovarian germline cells during a period of intense genomic endoreplication and stockpiling of ribosomal RNA. Here, we demonstrate that CTPS filaments are catalytically active and that their assembly is regulated by the non-receptor tyrosine kinase DAck, the Drosophila homologue of mammalian Ack1 (activated cdc42-associated kinase 1), which we find also localizes to CTPS filaments. Egg chambers from flies deficient in DAck or lacking DAck catalytic activity exhibit disrupted CTPS filament architecture and morphological defects that correlate with reduced fertility. Furthermore, ovaries from these flies exhibit reduced levels of total RNA, suggesting that DAck may regulate CTP synthase activity. These findings highlight an unexpected function for DAck and provide insight into a novel pathway for the developmental control of an essential metabolic pathway governing nucleotide biosynthesis. © 2014 The Authors.

  2. Accommodation of GDP-Linked Sugars in the Active Site of GDP-Perosamine Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Paul D.; Carney, Amanda E.; Holden, Hazel M. (UW)

    2009-01-12

    Perosamine (4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-d-mannose), or its N-acetylated form, is one of several dideoxy sugars found in the O-antigens of such infamous Gram-negative bacteria as Vibrio cholerae O1 and Escherichia coli O157:H7. It is added to the bacterial O-antigen via a nucleotide-linked version, namely GDP-perosamine. Three enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of GDP-perosamine starting from mannose 1-phosphate. The focus of this investigation is GDP-perosamine synthase from Caulobacter crescentus, which catalyzes the final step in GDP-perosamine synthesis, the conversion of GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose to GDP-perosamine. The enzyme is PLP-dependent and belongs to the aspartate aminotransferase superfamily. It contains the typically conserved active site lysine residue, which forms a Schiff base with the PLP cofactor. Two crystal structures were determined for this investigation: a site-directed mutant protein (K186A) complexed with GDP-perosamine and the wild-type enzyme complexed with an unnatural ligand, GDP-3-deoxyperosamine. These structures, determined to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, revealed the manner in which products, and presumably substrates, are accommodated within the active site pocket of GDP-perosamine synthase. Additional kinetic analyses using both the natural and unnatural substrates revealed that the K{sub m} for the unnatural substrate was unperturbed relative to that of the natural substrate, but the k{sub cat} was lowered by a factor of approximately 200. Taken together, these studies shed light on why GDP-perosamine synthase functions as an aminotransferase whereas another very similar PLP-dependent enzyme, GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose 3-dehydratase or ColD, catalyzes a dehydration reaction using the same substrate.

  3. Purification, Structure and Properties of Escherichia coli tRNA Pseudouridine Synthase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    enzymes which are reactive at C5 of uracil ( thymidylate synthase and aminoacyl synthetases). The deduced amino acid sequence of PSUI was also compared with...localize the sites of tRNA interaction with PSUI. The mechanism elucidated by Santi and others for thymidylate synthase (34-38) provides a conceptual...aminoacyl tRNA synthetases with residue U8 of their cognate tRNA substrates (39,40). In the case of thymidylate synthase , I the catalytic nucleophile is

  4. Ubiquitin-Like Protein SAMP1 and JAMM/MPN+ Metalloprotease HvJAMM1 Constitute a System for Reversible Regulation of Metabolic Enzyme Activity in Archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyun Cao

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin/ubiquitin-like (Ub/Ubl proteins are involved in diverse cellular processes by their covalent linkage to protein substrates. Here, we provide evidence for a post-translational modification system that regulates enzyme activity which is composed of an archaeal Ubl protein (SAMP1 and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease (HvJAMM1. Molybdopterin (MPT synthase activity was found to be inhibited by covalent linkage of SAMP1 to the large subunit (MoaE of MPT synthase. HvJAMM1 was shown to cleave the covalently linked inactive form of SAMP1-MoaE to the free functional individual SAMP1 and MoaE subunits of MPT synthase, suggesting reactivation of MPT synthase by this metalloprotease. Overall, this study provides new insight into the broad idea that Ub/Ubl modification is a post-translational process that can directly and reversibly regulate the activity of metabolic enzymes. In particular, we show that Ub/Ubl linkages on the active site residues of an enzyme (MPT synthase can inhibit its catalytic activity and that the enzyme can be reactivated through cleavage by a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease.

  5. Cloning of the sdsA gene encoding solanesyl diphosphate synthase from Rhodobacter capsulatus and its functional expression in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, K.; Kamiya, Y.; Zhu, X; Suzuki, K; Tanaka, K; Nakagawa, T; Matsuda, H.; Kawamukai, M

    1997-01-01

    Different organisms produce different species of isoprenoid quinones, each with its own distinctive length. These differences in length are commonly exploited in microbial classification. The side chain length of quinone is determined by the nature of the polyprenyl diphosphate synthase that catalyzes the reaction. To determine if the side chain length of ubiquinone (UQ) has any distinct role to play in the metabolism of the cells in which it is found, we cloned the solanesyl diphosphate synt...

  6. Terpene synthases are widely distributed in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuuki; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Komatsu, Mamoru; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Omura, Satoshi; Cane, David E.; Ikeda, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Odoriferous terpene metabolites of bacterial origin have been known for many years. In genome-sequenced Streptomycetaceae microorganisms, the vast majority produces the degraded sesquiterpene alcohol geosmin. Two minor groups of bacteria do not produce geosmin, with one of these groups instead producing other sesquiterpene alcohols, whereas members of the remaining group do not produce any detectable terpenoid metabolites. Because bacterial terpene synthases typically show no significant overall sequence similarity to any other known fungal or plant terpene synthases and usually exhibit relatively low levels of mutual sequence similarity with other bacterial synthases, simple correlation of protein sequence data with the structure of the cyclized terpene product has been precluded. We have previously described a powerful search method based on the use of hidden Markov models (HMMs) and protein families database (Pfam) search that has allowed the discovery of monoterpene synthases of bacterial origin. Using an enhanced set of HMM parameters generated using a training set of 140 previously identified bacterial terpene synthase sequences, a Pfam search of 8,759,463 predicted bacterial proteins from public databases and in-house draft genome data has now revealed 262 presumptive terpene synthases. The biochemical function of a considerable number of these presumptive terpene synthase genes could be determined by expression in a specially engineered heterologous Streptomyces host and spectroscopic identification of the resulting terpene products. In addition to a wide variety of terpenes that had been previously reported from fungal or plant sources, we have isolated and determined the complete structures of 13 previously unidentified cyclic sesquiterpenes and diterpenes. PMID:25535391

  7. Structure of the dimeric form of CTP synthase from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Iben; Willemoës, Martin; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2011-01-01

    CTP synthase catalyzes the last committed step in de novo pyrimidine-nucleotide biosynthesis. Active CTP synthase is a tetrameric enzyme composed of a dimer of dimers. The tetramer is favoured in the presence of the substrate nucleotides ATP and UTP; when saturated with nucleotide, the tetramer...... completely dominates the oligomeric state of the enzyme. Furthermore, phosphorylation has been shown to regulate the oligomeric states of the enzymes from yeast and human. The crystal structure of a dimeric form of CTP synthase from Sulfolobus solfataricus has been determined at 2.5 Å resolution....... A comparison of the dimeric interface with the intermolecular interfaces in the tetrameric structures of Thermus thermophilus CTP synthase and Escherichia coli CTP synthase shows that the dimeric interfaces are almost identical in the three systems. Residues that are involved in the tetramerization of S...

  8. Inhibition studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis salicylate synthase (MbtI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; Bulloch, Esther M M; Rutledge, Peter J; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun; Payne, Richard J

    2010-07-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis salicylate synthase (MbtI), a member of the chorismate-utilizing enzyme family, catalyses the first committed step in the biosynthesis of the siderophore mycobactin T. This complex secondary metabolite is essential for both virulence and survival of M. tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB). It is therefore anticipated that inhibitors of this enzyme may serve as TB therapies with a novel mode of action. Herein we describe the first inhibition study of M. tuberculosis MbtI using a library of functionalized benzoate-based inhibitors designed to mimic the substrate (chorismate) and intermediate (isochorismate) of the MbtI-catalyzed reaction. The most potent inhibitors prepared were those designed to mimic the enzyme intermediate, isochorismate. These compounds, based on a 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate scaffold, proved to be low-micromolar inhibitors of MbtI. The most potent inhibitors in this series possessed hydrophobic enol ether side chains at C3 in place of the enol-pyruvyl side chain found in chorismate and isochorismate.

  9. Inkjet-printed selective microfluidic biosensor using CNTs functionalized by cytochrome P450 enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivec, Matic; Leitner, Raimund; Überall, Florian; Hochleitner, Johannes

    2017-05-01

    An additive manufacturing concept, consisting of 3D photopolymer printing and Ag nanoparticle printing, was investigated for the construction of a microfluidic biosensor based on immobilized cytochrome P450 enzyme. An acylate-type microfluidic chamber composed of two parts, i.e. chamber-housing and chamber-lid was printed with a polyjet 3D printer. A 3-electrode sensor structure was inkjet-printed on the lid using a combination of Ag and graphene printing. The working electrode was covered with carbon nanotubes by drop-casting and immobilized with cytochrome P450 2D6 enzyme. The microfluidic sensor shows a significant response to a test xenobiotic, i.e. dextromethorphan; the cyclic voltammetrical measurements show a corresponding oxidation peak at 0.4 V with around 5 μM detection limit.

  10. Identification of avian wax synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biester, Eva-Maria; Hellenbrand, Janine; Gruber, Jens; Hamberg, Mats; Frentzen, Margrit

    2012-02-04

    Bird species show a high degree of variation in the composition of their preen gland waxes. For instance, galliform birds like chicken contain fatty acid esters of 2,3-alkanediols, while Anseriformes like goose or Strigiformes like barn owl contain wax monoesters in their preen gland secretions. The final biosynthetic step is catalyzed by wax synthases (WS) which have been identified in pro- and eukaryotic organisms. Sequence similarities enabled us to identify six cDNAs encoding putative wax synthesizing proteins in chicken and two from barn owl and goose. Expression studies in yeast under in vivo and in vitro conditions showed that three proteins from chicken performed WS activity while a sequence from chicken, goose and barn owl encoded a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing both wax ester and triacylglycerol synthesis. Mono- and bifunctional WS were found to differ in their substrate specificities especially with regard to branched-chain alcohols and acyl-CoA thioesters. According to the expression patterns of their transcripts and the properties of the enzymes, avian WS proteins might not be confined to preen glands. We provide direct evidence that avian preen glands possess both monofunctional and bifunctional WS proteins which have different expression patterns and WS activities with different substrate specificities.

  11. Identification of avian wax synthases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biester Eva-Maria

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bird species show a high degree of variation in the composition of their preen gland waxes. For instance, galliform birds like chicken contain fatty acid esters of 2,3-alkanediols, while Anseriformes like goose or Strigiformes like barn owl contain wax monoesters in their preen gland secretions. The final biosynthetic step is catalyzed by wax synthases (WS which have been identified in pro- and eukaryotic organisms. Results Sequence similarities enabled us to identify six cDNAs encoding putative wax synthesizing proteins in chicken and two from barn owl and goose. Expression studies in yeast under in vivo and in vitro conditions showed that three proteins from chicken performed WS activity while a sequence from chicken, goose and barn owl encoded a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing both wax ester and triacylglycerol synthesis. Mono- and bifunctional WS were found to differ in their substrate specificities especially with regard to branched-chain alcohols and acyl-CoA thioesters. According to the expression patterns of their transcripts and the properties of the enzymes, avian WS proteins might not be confined to preen glands. Conclusions We provide direct evidence that avian preen glands possess both monofunctional and bifunctional WS proteins which have different expression patterns and WS activities with different substrate specificities.

  12. Enzyme-inspired functional surfactant for aerobic oxidation of activated alcohols to aldehydes in water

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Batian

    2015-02-06

    We describe an enzyme-inspired catalytic system based on a rationally designed multifunctional amphiphile. The resulting micelles feature metal-binding sites and stable free radical moieties as well as fluorous pockets that attract and preconcentrate molecular oxygen. In the presence of copper ions, the micelles effect chemoselective aerobic alcohol oxidation under ambient conditions in water, a transformation that is challenging to achieve nonenzymatically.

  13. Functional characterization of enzymes forming volatile esters from strawberry and banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekwilder, Jules; Alvarez-Huerta, Mayte; Neef, Evert; Verstappen, Francel W A; Bouwmeester, Harro J; Aharoni, Asaph

    2004-08-01

    Volatile esters are flavor components of the majority of fruits. The last step in their biosynthesis is catalyzed by alcohol acyltransferases (AATs), which link alcohols to acyl moieties. Full-length cDNAs putatively encoding AATs were isolated from fruit of wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca) and banana (Musa sapientum) and compared to the previously isolated SAAT gene from the cultivated strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa). The potential role of these enzymes in fruit flavor formation was assessed. To this end, recombinant enzymes were produced in Escherichia coli, and their activities were analyzed for a variety of alcohol and acyl-CoA substrates. When the results of these activity assays were compared to a phylogenetic analysis of the various members of the acyltransferase family, it was clear that substrate preference could not be predicted on the basis of sequence similarity. In addition, the substrate preference of recombinant enzymes was not necessarily reflected in the representation of esters in the corresponding fruit volatile profiles. This suggests that the specific profile of a given fruit species is to a significant extent determined by the supply of precursors. To study the in planta activity of an alcohol acyltransferase and to assess the potential for metabolic engineering of ester production, we generated transgenic petunia (Petunia hybrida) plants overexpressing the SAAT gene. While the expression of SAAT and the activity of the corresponding enzyme were readily detected in transgenic plants, the volatile profile was found to be unaltered. Feeding of isoamyl alcohol to explants of transgenic lines resulted in the emission of the corresponding acetyl ester. This confirmed that the availability of alcohol substrates is an important parameter to consider when engineering volatile ester formation in plants.

  14. Structure-function relationships of family GH70 glucansucrase and 4,6-α-glucanotransferase enzymes, and their evolutionary relationships with family GH13 enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, Xiangfeng; Gangoiti, Joana; Bai, Yuxiang; Pijning, Tjaard; Van Leeuwen, Sander S; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known to produce large amounts of α-glucan exopolysaccharides. Family GH70 glucansucrase (GS) enzymes catalyze the synthesis of these α-glucans from sucrose. The elucidation of the crystal structures of representative GS enzymes has advanced our understanding of their

  15. Bringing functions together with fusion enzymes--from nature's inventions to biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleuche, Skander

    2015-02-01

    It is a mammoth task to develop a modular protein toolbox enabling the production of posttranslational organized multifunctional enzymes that catalyze reactions in complex pathways. However, nature has always guided scientists to mimic evolutionary inventions in the laboratory and, nowadays, versatile methods have been established to experimentally connect enzymatic activities with multiple advantages. Among the oldest known natural examples is the linkage of two or more juxtaposed proteins catalyzing consecutive, non-consecutive, or opposing reactions by a native peptide bond. There are multiple reasons for the artificial construction of such fusion enzymes including improved catalytic activities, enabled substrate channelling by proximity of biocatalysts, higher stabilities, and cheaper production processes. To produce fused proteins, it is either possible to genetically fuse coding open reading frames or to connect proteins in a posttranslational process. Molecular biology techniques that have been established for the production of end-to-end or insertional fusions include overlap extension polymerase chain reaction, cloning, and recombination approaches. Depending on their flexibility and applicability, these methods offer various advantages to produce fusion genes in high throughput, different orientations, and including linker sequences to maximize the flexibility and performance of fusion partners. In this review, practical techniques to fuse genes are highlighted, enzymatic parameters to choose adequate enzymes for fusion approaches are summarized, and examples with biotechnological relevance are presented including a focus on plant biomass-degrading glycosyl hydrolases.

  16. Substrate tunnels in enzymes: structure-function relationships and computational methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Laura J; Lill, Markus A

    2015-04-01

    In enzymes, the active site is the location where incoming substrates are chemically converted to products. In some enzymes, this site is deeply buried within the core of the protein, and, in order to access the active site, substrates must pass through the body of the protein via a tunnel. In many systems, these tunnels act as filters and have been found to influence both substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism. Identifying and understanding how these tunnels exert such control has been of growing interest over the past several years because of implications in fields such as protein engineering and drug design. This growing interest has spurred the development of several computational methods to identify and analyze tunnels and how ligands migrate through these tunnels. The goal of this review is to outline how tunnels influence substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency in enzymes with buried active sites and to provide a brief summary of the computational tools used to identify and evaluate these tunnels. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Molecular and biochemical characterization of caffeine synthase and purine alkaloid concentration in guarana fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpl, Flávia Camila; Kiyota, Eduardo; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Gonçalves, José Francisco de Carvalho; da Silva, José Ferreira; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2014-09-01

    Guarana seeds have the highest caffeine concentration among plants accumulating purine alkaloids, but in contrast with coffee and tea, practically nothing is known about caffeine metabolism in this Amazonian plant. In this study, the levels of purine alkaloids in tissues of five guarana cultivars were determined. Theobromine was the main alkaloid that accumulated in leaves, stems, inflorescences and pericarps of fruit, while caffeine accumulated in the seeds and reached levels from 3.3% to 5.8%. In all tissues analysed, the alkaloid concentration, whether theobromine or caffeine, was higher in young/immature tissues, then decreasing with plant development/maturation. Caffeine synthase activity was highest in seeds of immature fruit. A nucleotide sequence (PcCS) was assembled with sequences retrieved from the EST database REALGENE using sequences of caffeine synthase from coffee and tea, whose expression was also highest in seeds from immature fruit. The PcCS has 1083bp and the protein sequence has greater similarity and identity with the caffeine synthase from cocoa (BTS1) and tea (TCS1). A recombinant PcCS allowed functional characterization of the enzyme as a bifunctional CS, able to catalyse the methylation of 7-methylxanthine to theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine), and theobromine to caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), respectively. Among several substrates tested, PcCS showed higher affinity for theobromine, differing from all other caffeine synthases described so far, which have higher affinity for paraxanthine. When compared to previous knowledge on the protein structure of coffee caffeine synthase, the unique substrate affinity of PcCS is probably explained by the amino acid residues found in the active site of the predicted protein. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genomic characterization, molecular cloning and expression analysis of two terpene synthases from Thymus caespititius (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, A Sofia; Schimmel, Jette; Lukas, Brigitte; Novak, Johannes; Barroso, José G; Figueiredo, A Cristina; Pedro, Luis G; Degenhardt, Jörg; Trindade, Helena

    2013-07-01

    The identification, isolation and functional characterization of two genes encoding two monoterpene synthases-γ-terpinene synthase (Tctps2) and α-terpineol synthase (Tctps5)-from three chemically distinct Thymus caespititius (Lamiaceae) genotypes were performed. Genomic exon-intron structure was also determined for both terpene synthase genes, revealing an organization with seven exons and six introns. The cDNA of Tctps2 was 2,308 bp long and had an open reading frame of 1,794 bp encoding for a protein with 598 amino acids. Tctps5 was longer, mainly due to intron sequences, and presented high intraspecific variability on the plants analyzed. It encoded for a protein of 602 amino acids from an open reading frame of 1,806 bp comprising a total of 2,507 bp genomic sequence. The amino acid sequence of these two active Tctps genes shared 74 % pairwise identity, ranging between 42 and 94 % similarity with about 50 known terpene synthases of other Lamiaceae species. Gene expression revealed a multi-product Tctps2 and Tctps5 enzymes, producing γ-terpinene and α-terpineol as major components, respectively. These enzymatic results were consistent with the monoterpene profile present in T. caespititius field plants, suggesting a transcriptional regulation in leaves. Herewith reported for the first time for this species, these two newly characterized Tctps genes improve the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of reaction responsible for terpene biosynthesis and chemical diversity found in T. caespititius.

  19. Comparative impact of AAV and enzyme replacement therapy on respiratory and cardiac function in adult Pompe mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin J Falk

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme responsible for degradation of lysosomal glycogen (acid α-gluco