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Sample records for synovial fluid

  1. [Diagnosis: synovial fluid analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Synovial fluid analysis in rheumatological diseases allows a more accurate diagnosis in some entities, mainly infectious and microcrystalline arthritis. Examination of synovial fluid in patients with osteoarthritis is useful if a differential diagnosis will be performed with other processes and to distinguish between inflammatory and non-inflammatory forms. Joint aspiration is a diagnostic and sometimes therapeutic procedure that is available to primary care physicians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Somatomedin activity in synovial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, C L; Burwell, R G; Buttery, P J; Walker, G; Woodward, P M

    1977-01-01

    Abnormalities of synovial fluid, as a lubricant and nutrient, may have relevance to the causation of certain articular diseases. The somatomedin activity in normal synovial fluid obtained from the knee joint of the ox has been studied and compared with the activity in serum from the same animal. The porcine costal cartilage bioassay of Van den Brande and Du Caju (1974) has been used with the isotopes 35S-sulphate and 3H-thymidine. The mean potency ratio of ox synovial fluid in terms of ox serum for 35S-sulphate incorporation was 0-28 (range 0-19-0-47) and for 3H-thymidine incorporation 0-35 (range 0-21-0-63). A significant correlation was found between the somatomedin activity (as measured by 35S-sulphate incorporation) and the total protein and albumin concentrations in the ox synovial fluids and the ox sera, but there was no significant relationship between the somatomedin potency ratios and the globulin concentrations. The possible relevance of these findings to injury and disease in synovial joint is discussed. PMID:843111

  3. Thanatochemistry: Study of synovial fluid potassium | Tumram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this paper is to test previously developed regression formulae for estimating death interval based on synovial fluid potassium and to assess its reliability in estimating death interval. Synovial fluid potassium was measured on a sample of 308 individuals. Death interval was regressed on synovial fluid ...

  4. Synovial fluid over the centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with the most meaningful historical topics on the study of synovial fluid, by starting from the Greco- Roman Medicine, up to Paracelsus (1493-1541, who introduced the term “synovia” to name the intra-articular humour. Afterwards, some till now unreported historical sources are recorded, e.g., a short text by the Italian XVIII century physician Giambattista Contoli (“Breve Instruzione sopre il Glutine, ò Colla…, 1699”. Then, in keeping with some recent researches, a brief history of arthrocentesis is outlined, by considering the first procedures, which should have been performed in Mexico, during the precolonial period. Moreover, the first chemical analysis of synovial fluid, as carried out by the French chemist Jean-Louis Margueron (1792, and the first modern study on the synovial membrane by Marie-François-Xavier Bichat (1800 are explained. Finally, some XIX century investigations concerning the synovial pharmacodynamics, in particular an Italian one based on the elimination of certain chemical substances through the synovial membrane, are discussed.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid increase after meniscus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, Yu; Muneta, Takeshi; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Koga, Hideyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2014-05-01

    Although relatively uncommon, spontaneous healing from a meniscus injury has been observed even within the avascular area. This may be the result of the existence of mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether mesenchymal stem cells existed in the synovial fluid of the knee after meniscus injury. Synovial fluid was obtained from the knees of 22 patients with meniscus injury just before meniscus surgery and from 8 volunteers who had no history of knee injury. The cellular fraction of the synovial fluid was cultured for 14 days followed by analysis for multilineage potential and presentation of surface antigens characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells. Colony-forming efficiency and proliferation potential were also compared between the two groups. Cells with characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells were observed in the synovial fluid of injured knees to a much greater degree than in uninjured knees. The colony-forming cells derived from the synovial fluid of the knee with meniscus injury had multipotentiality and surface epitopes identical to mesenchymal stem cells. The average number of colony formation, obtained from 1 mL of synovial fluid, in meniscus-injured knees was 250, higher than that from healthy volunteers, which was 0.5 (p < 0.001). Total colony number per synovial fluid volume was positively correlated with the postinjury period (r = 0.77, p < 0.001). Mesenchymal stem cells were found to exist in synovial fluid from knees after meniscus injury. Mesenchymal stem cells were present in higher numbers in synovial fluid with meniscus injury than in normal knees. Total colony number per synovial fluid volume was positively correlated with the postinjury period. Our current human study and previous animal studies suggest the possibility that mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid increase after meniscus injury contributing to spontaneous meniscus healing.

  6. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Barnaby, Omar; Steen, Hanno

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid is present in all joint cavities, and protects the articular cartilage surfaces in large by lubricating the joint, thus reducing friction. Several studies have described changes in the protein composition of synovial fluid in patients with joint disease. However, the protein...... concentration, content, and synovial fluid volume change dramatically during active joint diseases and inflammation, and the proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid is incompletely characterized. We performed a normative proteomics analysis of porcine synovial fluid, and report data from optimizing...

  7. Simulation Of The Synovial Fluid In A Deformable Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Gutierrez, Nancy; Ibarra-Bracamontes, Laura A.

    2016-11-01

    The main components of a synovial joint are a cartilage and a biofluid known as the synovial fluid. The results were obtained using the FLUENT software to simulate the behavior of the synovial fluid within a deformable cavity with a simple geometry. The cartilage is represented as a porous region. By reducing the available region for the fluid, a fluid displacement into the cartilage is induced. The total pressure reached in the interface of the deformable cavity and the porous region is presented. The geometry and properties of the system are scaled to values found in a knee joint. The effect of deformation rate, fluid viscosity and properties of the porous medium on the total pressure reached are analyzed. The higher pressures are reached either for high deformation rate or when the fluid viscosity increases. This study was supported by the Mexican Council of Science and Technology (CONACyT) and by the Scientific Research Coordination of the University of Michoacan in Mexico.

  8. Somatomedin activity in synovial fluid from patients with joint diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, C L; Burwell, R G; Lloyd-Jones, K; Swannell, A J; Walker, G; Selby, C

    1978-01-01

    The somatomedin activity in synovial fluids from 50 patients with a variety of joint diseases has been studied and compared with the activity in each of the patient's own serum and a standard reference serum (SRS). The porcine costal cartilage bioassay of Van den Brande and Du Caju (1974a) has been used with the isotopes 3H-thymidine and 35S-sulphate. Synovial fluids from most patients with post-traumatic and post-operative effusions, osteoarthritis and arthritis associated with psoriasis, Reiter's disease, and ankylosing spondylitis stimulated the synthesis of DNA and proteoglycans in cartilage. Synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis either had impaired capacity to stimulate DNA synthesis, or they inhibited it; a similar, but less evident pattern was observed for proteoglycan synthesis. Some synovial fluids from patients with miscellaneous synovitides stimulated, while others inhibited cartilage metabolism. It is concluded that the synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and from some patients with miscellaneous synovitides contained an inhibitor(s) to DNA and possibly proteoglycan synthesis. The sera from nearly all the patients stimulated both DNA and proteoglycan synthesis, but the somatomedin potency ratios for serum in terms of SRS were generally less than 1.0. There was a significant inverse correlation between the serum somatomedin potency ratio and the age of the patient. PMID:686863

  9. Measurement of synovial fluid volume using urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; Stabler, T V; Kong, S Y; Varju, G; McDaniel, G

    2007-10-01

    To examine the utility of using urea concentrations for determining Synovial Fluid (SF) joint volume in effused and non-effused joints. Knee joint SF was aspirated from 159 human study participants with symptomatic osteoarthritis of at least one knee either directly (165 knees) or by lavage (110 knees). Serum was obtained immediately prior to SF aspiration. Participants were asked to rate individual knee pain, aching or stiffness. SF and serum urea levels were determined using a specific enzymatic method run on an automated CMA600 analyzer. Cell counts were performed on direct SF aspirates when volume permitted. The formula for calculating SF joint volume was as follows: V(j)=C(D)(V(I))/(C-C(D)) with V(j)=volume of SF in entire joint, C(D)=concentration of urea in diluted (lavage) SF, V(I)=volume of saline injected into joint, and C=concentration of urea in undiluted (neat) SF derived below where C=0.897(C(S)) and C(s)=concentration of urea in serum. There was an excellent correlation (r(2)=0.8588) between SF and serum urea in the direct aspirates with a ratio of 0.897 (SF/serum). Neither urea levels nor the SF/serum ratio showed any correlation with Kellgren Lawrence (KL) grade, or cell count. While urea levels increased with age there was no change in the ratio. Intraarticular SF volumes calculated for the lavaged knees ranged from 0.555 to 71.71ml with a median volume of 3.048ml. There was no correlation of SF volume to KL grade but there was a positive correlation (P=0.001) between SF volume and self-reported individual knee pain. Our urea results for direct aspirates indicate an equilibrium state between serum and SF with regard to the water fraction. This equilibrium exists regardless of disease status (KL grade), inflammation (cell count), or age, making it possible to calculate intraarticular volume of lavaged joints based upon this urea method. Most of the joint volumes we calculated fell within the previously reported range for normal knees of 0.5-4.0ml

  10. Automated counting of white blood cells in synovial fluid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Jonge (Robert); R.W. Brouwer (Reinoud); M. Smit (Marij); M. de Frankrijker-Merkestijn; R.J. Dolhain; J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); A.W. van Toorenenbergen (Albert); J. Lindemans (Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To evaluate the performance of automated leucocyte (white blood cell; WBC) counting by comparison with manual counting. METHODS: The number of WBC was determined in heparinized synovial fluid samples by the use of (i) a standard urine cytometer (Kova) and a

  11. Development of a Synthetic Synovial Fluid for Tribological Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emely Lea Bortel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wear tests of joint prostheses are usually performed using bovine calf serum. The results from different laboratories are hardly ever comparable as, for example, the protein concentration and the protein composition of the serum-based test liquids vary. In addition, the viscosity of these test liquids is similar to that of water and does not match the more viscous synovial fluid. The present work was aimed at developing a synthetic synovial fluid as an alternative to the existing test liquids. Improved consistency and reproducibility of results at a similar price were required. Hyaluronic acid (HA, the lyophilized proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA and immunoglobulin G (IgG, the phospholipid lecithin (PL and salts were applied in a stepwise approach to replace the actually used test liquid based on newborn calf serum. The in vitro results obtained with ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE pins sliding against CoCrMo discs revealed that the developed synthetic synovial fluid fulfils the set requirements: increase of viscosity, reasonable cost, improved consistency and wear particles which resemble the ones found in vivo. The developed synthetic synovial fluid with 3 g/L HA, 19 g/L BSA, 11 g/L IgG, 0.1 g/L PL and Ringer solution is a more realistic alternative to the used serum-based test liquid.

  12. Osteoarthritis screening using Raman spectroscopy of dried human synovial fluid drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Esmonde-White, Francis W. L.; Raaii, Farhang; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-02-01

    We describe the use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate synovial fluid drops deposited onto fused silica microscope slides. This spectral information can be used to identify chemical changes in synovial fluid associated with osteoarthritis (OA) damage to knee joints. The chemical composition of synovial fluid is predominately proteins (enzymes, cytokines, or collagen fragments), glycosaminoglycans, and a mixture of minor components such as inorganic phosphate crystals. During osteoarthritis, the chemical, viscoelastic and biological properties of synovial fluid are altered. A pilot study was conducted to determine if Raman spectra of synovial fluid correlated with radiological scoring of knee joint damage. After informed consent, synovial fluid was drawn and x-rays were collected from the knee joints of 40 patients. Raman spectra and microscope images were obtained from the dried synovial fluid drops using a Raman microprobe and indicate a coarse separation of synovial fluid components. Individual protein signatures could not be identified; Raman spectra were useful as a general marker of overall protein content and secondary structure. Band intensity ratios used to describe protein and glycosaminoglycan structure were used in synovial fluid spectra. Band intensity ratios of Raman spectra indicate that there is less ordered protein secondary structure in synovial fluid from the damage group. Combination of drop deposition with Raman spectroscopy is a powerful approach to examining synovial fluid for the purposes of assessing osteoarthritis damage.

  13. Thanatochemistry: Study of synovial fluid potassium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nilesh Keshav Tumram

    2014-03-28

    Mar 28, 2014 ... tion of various body fluids immediately after death.2 Several investigators have tried to find the relation between death interval and postmortem biochemical changes in various body fluids such as blood, serum, cerebrospinal, vitreous, and syno- vial fluid.3 Various studies conducted till now have well estab-.

  14. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tue Bjerg Bennike

    2015-12-01

    In addition, we analyzed the proteome of human plasma, and compared the proteomes to the obtained porcine synovial fluid proteome. The proteome of the two body fluids were found highly similar, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. The healthy porcine synovial fluid proteomics data, human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid proteomics data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935.

  15. Effect of tibial plateau fracture on lubrication function and composition of synovial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Brooke L; Antonacci, Jennifer M; Temple-Wong, Michele M; Hui, Alexander Y; Schumacher, Barbara L; Bugbee, William D; Schwartz, Alexandra K; Girard, Paul J; Sah, Robert L

    2012-05-16

    Intra-articular fractures may hasten posttraumatic arthritis in patients who are typically too active and too young for joint replacement. Current orthopaedic treatment principles, including recreating anatomic alignment and establishing articular congruity, have not eliminated posttraumatic arthritis. Additional biomechanical and biological factors may contribute to the development of arthritis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate human synovial fluid for friction-lowering function and the concentrations of putative lubricant molecules following tibial plateau fractures. Synovial fluid specimens were obtained from the knees of eight patients (twenty-five to fifty-seven years old) with a tibial plateau fracture, with five specimens from the injured knee as plateau fracture synovial fluid and six specimens from the contralateral knee as control synovial fluid. Each specimen was centrifuged to obtain a fluid sample, separated from a cell pellet, for further analysis. For each fluid sample, the start-up (static) and steady-state (kinetic) friction coefficients in the boundary mode of lubrication were determined from a cartilage-on-cartilage biomechanical test of friction. Also, concentrations of the putative lubricants, hyaluronan and proteoglycan-4, as well as total protein, were determined for fluid samples. The group of experimental samples were obtained at a mean (and standard deviation) of 11 ± 9 days after injury from patients with a mean age of 45 ± 13 years. Start-up and kinetic friction coefficients demonstrated similar trends and dependencies. The kinetic friction coefficients for human plateau fracture synovial fluid were approximately 100% higher than those for control human synovial fluid. Hyaluronan concentrations were ninefold lower for plateau fracture synovial fluid compared with the control synovial fluid, whereas proteoglycan-4 concentrations were more than twofold higher in plateau fracture synovial fluid compared with the control

  16. First in vivo detection and characterization of hyaluronan-coated extracellular vesicles in human synovial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Nieminen, Petteri; Joukainen, Antti; Jaroma, Antti; Kääriäinen, Tommi; Kröger, Heikki; Lázaro-Ibáñez, Elisa; Siljander, Pia R-M; Kärjä, Vesa; Härkönen, Kai; Koistinen, Arto; Rilla, Kirsi

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) function in intercellular signaling by transporting different membrane and cytosolic molecules, including hyaluronan (HA) and its synthesis machinery. As both EVs and HA are abundant in synovial fluid, we hypothesized that HA synthesized in synovial membrane would be carried on the surface of EVs. Synovial fluid (n = 15) and membrane samples (n = 5) were obtained from knee surgery patients. HA concentrations were analyzed in synovial fluid and HA and its synthesis machinery were examined with histochemical stainings in synovial membrane. To assess the size distribution of EVs in synovial fluid and to visualize HA on EVs, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized. The average HA concentration in synovial fluid was 2.0 ± 0.21 mg/ml without significant differences between the patients with trauma/diagnostic arthroscopy and primary or post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Positive stainings of HA synthases (HAS1-3), HA and its receptor CD44 in synovial cells indicated active HA secretion in synovial membrane. According to NTA, EVs were abundant in synovial fluid and their main populations were ≤300 nm in diameter after differential centrifugation. There were no significant differences in the EV counts between the patients with primary or post-traumatic osteoarthritis. TEM verified that HA-positive particles detected by CLSM were lipid membrane vesicles surrounded by a HA coat. Our results provide the first in vivo evidence that human synovial fluid contains HA-positive EVs, one source of which presumably is the long HAS-positive protrusions of synovial fibroblasts. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1960-1968, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Biochemical Analysis of Synovial Fluid, Cerebrospinal Fluid and Vitreous Humor at Early Postmortem Intervals in Donkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doha Yahia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical analysis of body fluids after death is a helpful tool in veterinary forensic medicine. Synovial fluid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and vitreous humor are easily accessible and well preserved from contamination. Five donkeys (Equus africanus asinus aged 1 - 2 years old were subjected to the study. Samples (Synovial fluid, CSF and vitreous humor were collected before death (antimortem and then at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 hours postmortem. Samples were analyzed for glucose, chloride, sodium, magnesium, potassium, enzymes and total protein. Synovial fluid analysis showed that glucose concentration started to decrease at 6 hours postmortem, while magnesium level increased with time. Other parameters were more stable. CSF analysis showed several changes related to time after death as the decrease in glucose and sodium levels, and the increased levels of potassium, magnesium, calcium and total protein. Vitreous analysis revealed a reduction in glucose level and increased potassium and magnesium concentrations. The present study concluded that biochemical analysis of synovial fluid, vitreous humor and CSF can help in determination of time since death in donkeys. This study recommend using CSF for determination of early post-mortem intervals.

  18. Serum and Synovial Fluid Serum Amyloid A Response in Equine Models of Synovitis and Septic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Elsa K; Brandon Wiese, R; Graham, Megan R; Tyler, Amelia J; Settlage, Julie M; Werre, Stephen R; Petersson-Wolfe, Christina S; Kanevsky-Mullarky, Isis; Dahlgren, Linda A

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the serum and synovial fluid serum amyloid A (SAA) response in equine models of synovitis and septic arthritis and to compare handheld and validated immunoturbidometric assays for SAA quantification. Controlled, experimental study. Healthy adult horses (n = 9). Synovitis (n = 4) and septic arthritis (n = 5) were induced using lipopolysaccharide and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively, and serial serum and synovial fluid samples were collected. Serial synovial fluid cytology was performed for both models and synovial fluid from the septic arthritis model was submitted for bacterial culture. Serum and synovial fluid SAA were quantified by handheld test and immunoturbidometric assay. Cytologic and SAA data were compared within and between models (mixed model ANOVA) and results of SAA assays were compared using category-by-category analysis (weighted kappa coefficient). Synovial fluid total nucleated cell counts and total protein increased significantly following induction of both models. Serum and synovial fluid SAA remained normal in synovitis horses and increased significantly in septic arthritis horses. Serum SAA increased more rapidly than synovial fluid SAA. Agreement was 98% when SAA concentrations were low (septic arthritis in horses. SAA concentrations for the assays diverged and examination using a larger sample size is needed before direct numeric comparisons between the assays can be made. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  19. Type II collagen C2C epitope in human synovial fluid and serum after knee injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumahashi, N; Swärd, P; Larsson, S

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Investigate in a cross-sectional study time-dependent changes of synovial fluid type II collagen epitope C2C concentrations after knee injury and correlate to other joint injury biomarkers. METHODS: Synovial fluid samples were aspirated between 0 days and 7 years after injury (n = 235......). Serum was collected from 71 of the knee injured patients. Synovial fluid from 8 knee-healthy subjects was used as reference. C2C was quantified by immunoassay and structural injury was determined from magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the injured knee acquired 1-38 days after injury (n = 98......). Additional joint injury biomarker results were from earlier investigations of the same samples. RESULTS: Synovial fluid C2C concentrations were higher in injured knees than in knees of reference subjects from 1 day up to 7 years after injury. C2C concentrations in synovial fluid and serum were correlated (r...

  20. Descriptions of therapeutic arthrocenthesis and of synovial fluid in a Nahuatl text from prehispanic Mexico.

    OpenAIRE

    Alarcon-Segovia, D

    1980-01-01

    Paracelsus is considered to have been the first to record the viscid quality of the synovial fluid. However, his contemporary Bernardino de Sahagún, a Franciscan friar who came to Mexico shortly after the Spanish conquest, obtained from elderly Aztec Indians who spoke only Nahuatl the descriptions of therapeutic arthrocentesis and of the viscid nature of the synovial fluid. They compared the fluid from the knee joint to the viscid fluid from the leaves of the nopal cactus (Opuntia sp.). We he...

  1. Detection of multiple viral DNA species in synovial tissue and fluid of patients with early arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stahl, H. D.; Hubner, B.; Seidl, B.; Liebert, U. G.; van der Heijden, I. M.; Wilbrink, B.; Kraan, M. C.; Emmrich, F.; Tak, P. P.

    2000-01-01

    Viruses have a role in the pathogenesis of various forms of arthritis. This study aimed at determining whether viral DNA can be detected in joint samples in the early stages of idiopathic arthritides. Synovial fluid (SF) and synovial tissue (ST) samples were obtained from 73 patients, with

  2. The contents of macromolecule solutes in flexor tendon sheath fluid and their relation to synovial fluid. A quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, L; Heinegård, D; Ohlsson, K

    1992-04-01

    The importance of synovial environment for minimal adhesion formation in flexor tendon healing has recently gained attention. Various techniques have been used to restore an injured synovial tendon sheath. Therefore a quantitative analysis of flexor tendon sheath fluid is of interest to increase our knowledge about the specific synovial milieu and to evaluate the success of different types of sheath reconstructions from a biochemical point of view. Samples of tendon sheath fluid from trigger digits and tendon sheaths containing ganglions have been assayed for contents of hyaluronic acid and proteins of different molecular weights. The results show concentrations of hyaluronate and several proteins similar to those in normal joint fluid. These results indicate that flexor tendon sheath fluid has a character similar to synovial fluid of joints and apparently has specific functions such as soft tissue lubrication and nutrition of avascular tendon tissue.

  3. Synovial fluid lubrication of artificial joints: protein film formation and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jingyun; Myant, Connor; Underwood, Richard; Cann, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    Despite design improvements, wear of artificial implants remains a serious health issue particularly for Metal-on-Metal (MoM) hips where the formation of metallic wear debris has been linked to adverse tissue response. Clearly it is important to understand the fundamental lubrication mechanisms which control the wear process. It is usually assumed that MoM hips operate in the ElastoHydrodynamic Lubrication (EHL) regime where film formation is governed by the bulk fluid viscosity; however there is little experimental evidence of this. The current paper critically examines synovial fluid lubrication mechanisms and the effect of synovial fluid chemistry. Two composition parameters were chosen; protein content and pH, both of which are known to change in diseased or post-operative synovial fluid. Film thickness and wear tests were carried out for a series of model synovial fluid solutions. Two distinct film formation mechanisms were identified; an adsorbed surface film and a high-viscosity gel. The entrainment of this gel controls film formation particularly at low speeds. However wear of the femoral head still occurs and this is thought to be due primarily to a tribo-corrosion mechanisms. The implications of this new lubrication mechanism and the effect of different synovial fluid chemistries are examined. One important conclusion is that patient synovial fluid chemistry plays an important role in determining implant wear and the likelihood of failure.

  4. Effect of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 on Equine Synovial Fluid Chondroprogenitor Expansion and Chondrogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchessi, Marta; Chen, Yuwen; Durgam, Sushmitha; Pondenis, Holly; Stewart, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been identified in the synovial fluid of several species. This study was conducted to characterize chondroprogenitor (CP) cells in equine synovial fluid (SF) and to determine the effect of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) on SF-CP monolayer proliferation and subsequent chondrogenesis. We hypothesized that FGF-2 would stimulate SF-CP proliferation and postexpansion chondrogenesis. SF aspirates were collected from adult equine joints. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assa...

  5. Descriptions of therapeutic arthrocenthesis and of synovial fluid in a Nahuatl text from prehispanic Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon-Segovia, D

    1980-06-01

    Paracelsus is considered to have been the first to record the viscid quality of the synovial fluid. However, his contemporary Bernardino de Sahagún, a Franciscan friar who came to Mexico shortly after the Spanish conquest, obtained from elderly Aztec Indians who spoke only Nahuatl the descriptions of therapeutic arthrocentesis and of the viscid nature of the synovial fluid. They compared the fluid from the knee joint to the viscid fluid from the leaves of the nopal cactus (Opuntia sp.). We here record their description and confirm the accuracy of their comparison.

  6. Descriptions of therapeutic arthrocenthesis and of synovial fluid in a Nahuatl text from prehispanic Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon-Segovia, D

    1980-01-01

    Paracelsus is considered to have been the first to record the viscid quality of the synovial fluid. However, his contemporary Bernardino de Sahagún, a Franciscan friar who came to Mexico shortly after the Spanish conquest, obtained from elderly Aztec Indians who spoke only Nahuatl the descriptions of therapeutic arthrocentesis and of the viscid nature of the synovial fluid. They compared the fluid from the knee joint to the viscid fluid from the leaves of the nopal cactus (Opuntia sp.). We here record their description and confirm the accuracy of their comparison. Images PMID:7416821

  7. Boundary lubrication of articular cartilage: role of synovial fluid constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Tannin A; Gastelum, Nicholas S; Nguyen, Quynhhoa T; Schumacher, Barbara L; Sah, Robert L

    2007-03-01

    To determine whether the synovial fluid (SF) constituents hyaluronan (HA), proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), and surface-active phospholipids (SAPL) contribute to boundary lubrication, either independently or additively, at an articular cartilage-cartilage interface. Cartilage boundary lubrication tests were performed with fresh bovine osteochondral samples. Tests were performed using graded concentrations of SF, HA, and PRG4 alone, a physiologic concentration of SAPL, and various combinations of HA, PRG4, and SAPL at physiologic concentrations. Static (mu(static, Neq)) and kinetic () friction coefficients were calculated. Normal SF functioned as an effective boundary lubricant both at a concentration of 100% ( = 0.025) and at a 3-fold dilution ( = 0.029). Both HA and PRG4 contributed independently to a low mu in a dose-dependent manner. Values of decreased from approximately 0.24 in phosphate buffered saline to 0.12 in 3,300 mug/ml HA and 0.11 in 450 mug/ml PRG4. HA and PRG4 in combination lowered mu further at the high concentrations, attaining a value of 0.066. SAPL at 200 mug/ml did not significantly lower mu, either independently or in combination with HA and PRG4. The results described here indicate that SF constituents contribute, individually and in combination, both at physiologic and pathophysiologic concentrations, to the boundary lubrication of apposing articular cartilage surfaces. These results provide insight into the nature of the boundary lubrication of articular cartilage by SF and its constituents. They therefore provide insight regarding both the homeostatic maintenance of healthy joints and pathogenic processes in arthritic disease.

  8. The role of protein content on the steady and oscillatory shear rheology of model synovial fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Barman, S; Christopher, G F

    2014-08-28

    Recent studies have debated the role of protein content on the bulk rheology of synovial fluid; in particular, it has been questioned if proteins aggregate or interact with hyaluronic acid in synovial fluid to enhance bulk rheology, or if observed effects were due to systematic measurement error caused by interfacial rheology, stemming from protein adsorption to the interface. Utilizing several techniques to ensure results reflect only bulk rheology, an examination of the role of bovine serum albumin and γ-globulin on model synovial fluid rheology has been undertaken. When interfacial rheology caused by protein adsorption to the interface is abrogated, the bulk rheology of a model synovial fluid composed of bovine serum albumin, γ-globulin, and hyaluronic acid is found to be dominated solely by the hyaluronic acid over a wide range of shear rates, strains and frequencies. These results show that the previously reported enhanced rheological properties of model synovial fluids are solely due to interfacial rheology and not from any type of protein aggregation/interaction in bulk solution.

  9. Experimental intrinsic healing of flexor tendons based upon synovial fluid nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundborg, G; Rank, F

    1978-01-01

    The healing process of totally cut and subsequently resutured rabbit flexor tendons kept isolated in the knee joint cavity and free in the synovial fluid was studied by histological and ultrastructural techniques. This experimental model represents a "tissue culture in situ," where the tendon is nourished by diffusion from the synovial fluid only and where no adhesions are formed. Under these conditions there is a proliferation of tendon cells and deposition of collagen resulting in bridging of the suture line. On the basis of these findings, it is assumed that the tendon cells possess an intrinsic potential of repair, provided they obtain a sufficient nutritional supply. In the present experimental model, this nutrition was provided by way of diffusional pathways from the synovial fluid.

  10. On the matter of synovial fluid lubrication: implications for Metal-on-Metal hip tribology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myant, Connor; Cann, Philippa

    2014-06-01

    Artificial articular joints present an interesting, and difficult, tribological problem. These bearing contacts undergo complex transient loading and multi axes kinematic cycles, over extremely long periods of time (>10 years). Despite extensive research, wear of the bearing surfaces, particularly metal-metal hips, remains a major problem. Comparatively little is known about the prevailing lubrication mechanism in artificial joints which is a serious gap in our knowledge as this determines film formation and hence wear. In this paper we review the accepted lubrication models for artificial hips and present a new concept to explain film formation with synovial fluid. This model, recently proposed by the authors, suggests that interfacial film formation is determined by rheological changes local to the contact and is driven by aggregation of synovial fluid proteins. The implications of this new mechanism for the tribological performance of new implant designs and the effect of patient synovial fluid properties are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synovial fluid pharmacokinetics of tulathromycin, gamithromycin and florfenicol after a single subcutaneous dose in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meredyth L; Washburn, Kevin E; Fajt, Virginia R; Rice, Somchai; Coetzee, Johann F

    2015-02-07

    Deep digital septic conditions represent some of the most refractory causes of severe lameness in cattle. The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of tulathromycin, gamithromycin and florfenicol into the synovial fluid of the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint of cattle after single subcutaneous administration of drug to evaluate the potential usefulness of these single-dose, long-acting antimicrobials for treating bacterial infections of the joints in cattle. Twelve cross-bred beef cows were randomly assigned to one of the drugs. Following subcutaneous administration, arthrocentesis of the left metatarsophalangeal joint was performed at various time points up to 240 hours post-injection, and samples were analyzed for drug concentration. In synovial fluid, florfenicol pharmacokinetic parameters estimates were: mean Tmax 7 +/- 2 hours, mean t½ 64.9 +/- 20.1 hours and mean AUC0-inf 154.0 +/- 26.2 ug*h/mL. Gamithromycin synovial fluid pharmacokinetic parameters estimates were: mean Tmax 8 hours, mean t½ 77.9 +/- 30.0 hours, and AUC0-inf 6.5 +/- 2.9 ug*h/mL. Tulathromycin pharmacokinetic parameters estimates in synovial fluid were: Tmax 19 +/- 10 hours, t½ 109 +/- 53.9 hours, and AUC0-inf 57.6 +/- 28.2 ug h/mL. In conclusion, synovial fluid concentrations of all three antimicrobials were higher for a longer duration than that of previously reported plasma values. Although clinical data are needed to confirm microbiological efficacy, florfenicol achieved a synovial fluid concentration greater than the MIC90 for F. necrophorum for at least 6 days.

  12. Measurement of glycosaminoglycans in canine synovial fluid and its correlation with the cause of secondary osteoarthritis, age and body weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Andrysíková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans are natural components of healthy joint cartilage and they also appear in healthy synovial fluid. An increased amount of glycosaminoglycans in synovial fluid is believed to be a marker of secondary osteoarthritis, regardless of its primary cause. The aim of our study was to define the relationship between glycosaminoglycans in the synovial fluid and joint disorders, age, and body weight. The samples of synovial fluid were obtained from dogs suffering from secondary secondary osteoarthritis (n = 35 and from control dogs (n = 18; control dogs had normal body weight. The results were compared among joints of dogs with secondary osteoarthritis divided into groups according to the criteria mentioned above and control dogs. Glycosaminoglycan concentrations in synovial fluid were measured using dimethylmethylene blue assay. The lowest mean value of glycosaminoglycans in synovial fluid was measured in the control group. Significantly higher glycosaminoglycan content (P < 0.05 was found in synovial fluid isolated from obese dogs compared to control dogs. Furthermore, we observed an age-related trend, in which the highest mean values were reached either in old dogs or pups. Despite the absence of significant differences in glycosaminoglycan values among dogs suffering from various types of secondary secondary osteoarthritis, the highest mean values were measured in fragmented coronoid processus group. Our data suggest that abnormally increased body weight has an impact on glycosaminoglycan concentration in synovial fluid which may imply faster degradation and turnover of joint cartilage. Such observation has not yet been published in veterinary medicine.

  13. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis and crystal deposition diseases : a study of crystals in synovial fluid lavages in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Liem, RSB; de Bont, LGM

    To study the presence of crystals in synovial fluid lavages of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints (TMJs): in order to evaluate the possible role of these crystals In the osteoarthritic (OA) process, synovial fluid lavage samples of the upper joint compartment from 44 TMJs were obtained prior to

  14. Changes in Nitric Oxide Level and Thickness Index of Synovial Fluid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To monitor the changes in nitric oxide levels and synovium thickness index in synovial fluid following intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate. Methods: One hundred patients diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the knee from April 2014 to January 2015 in The Third Hospital of Jinan, Jinan, Shandong, China ...

  15. Comparative lipidomic analysis of synovial fluid in human and canine osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosinska, M. K.; Mastbergen, S. C.; Liebisch, G.; Wilhelm, J.; Dettmeyer, R. B.; Ishaque, B.; Rickert, M.; Schmitz, G.; Lafeber, F. P.; Steinmeyer, J.

    Objective: The lipid profile of synovial fluid (SF) is related to the health status of joints. The early stages of human osteoarthritis (OA) are poorly understood, which larger animals are expected to be able to model closely. This study examined whether the canine groove model of OA represents

  16. Clues to pathogenesis of spondyloarthropathy derived from synovial fluid mononuclear cell gene expression profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, Jieruo; Rihl, Markus; Märker-Hermann, Elisabeth; Baeten, Dominique; Kuipers, Jens G.; Song, Yeong Wook; Maksymowych, Walter P.; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Veys, Eric M.; de Keyser, Filip; Deister, Helmuth; Xiong, Momiao; Huang, Feng; Tsai, Wen Chan; Yu, David Tak Yan

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To use gene expression profiles of spondyloarthropathy (SpA) synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC) to determine if there are transcripts that support the unfolded protein response (UPR) hypothesis, and to identify which cytokines/chemokines are being expressed and which cell fractions

  17. Isolation of Chlamydia trachomatis or Ureaplasma urealyticum from the synovial fluid of patients with Reiter's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlica Ljiljana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to contribute to the insight of the role of the infectious agent in ethiopathogenesis of the Reiter’s syndrome development, which could directly influence the choise of treatment of these patients. Methods. Eighteen patients with urogenital form of the Reiter’s syndrome and 16 controls (6 with rheumatoid arthritis and 10 with pigmented villonodular synovitis were included in the study. In all patients standard laboratory analyses of the blood, urine and stool were made; antibody titer to Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum was determined in synovial fluid and serum; isolation of Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in urethral, cervical and conjunctival swabs, as well as in prostatic and synovial fluid, was also made. HLA typing was done, too. Chlamydia was isolated in the McCoy cell culture treated with cycloheximide while Ureaplasma was identified according to its biochemical properties grown on cell-free liquid medium. Results. Chlamydia trachomatis was isolated from the synovial fluid of 4 patients with Reiter's syndrome 22.2%, while Ureaplasma urealyticum was isolated in 7 of them (38.9%. These microorganisms were not found in any synovial fluid of the control group patients. Conclusion. Presence of these bacteria in the inflamed joint might be an important factor in etiopathogenesis of this disease, and it supports the hypothesis that arthritis in Reiter's syndrome is probably of the infectious origin.

  18. Synovial fluid multiplex PCR is superior to culture for detection of low-virulent pathogens causing periprosthetic joint infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Christian; Cabric, Sabrina; Perka, Carsten; Trampuz, Andrej; Renz, Nora

    2018-02-01

    Analysis of joint aspirate is the standard preoperative investigation for diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). We compared the diagnostic performance of culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of synovial fluid for diagnosis of PJI. Patients in whom aspiration of the prosthetic hip or knee joint was performed before revision arthroplasty were prospectively included. The performance of synovial fluid culture and multiplex PCR was compared by McNemar's chi-squared test. A total of 142 patients were included, 82 with knee and 60 with hip prosthesis. PJI was diagnosed in 77 patients (54%) and aseptic failure in 65 patients (46%). The sensitivity of synovial fluid culture and PCR was 52% and 60%, respectively, showing concordant results in 116 patients (82%). In patients with PJI, PCR missed 6 high-virulent pathogens (S. aureus, streptococci, E. faecalis, E. coli) which grew in synovial fluid culture, whereas synovial fluid culture missed 12 pathogens detected by multiplex PCR, predominantly low-virulent pathogens (Cutibacterium acnes and coagulase-negative staphylococci). In patients with aseptic failure, PCR detected 6 low-virulent organisms (predominantly C. acnes). While the overall performance of synovial fluid PCR was comparable to culture, PCR was superior for detection of low-virulent bacteria such as Cutibacterium spp. and coagulase-negative staphylococci. In addition, synovial fluid culture required several days for growth, whereas multiplex PCR provided results within 5hours in an automated manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Retrospective evaluation of the efficacy of isolating bacteria from synovial fluid in dogs with suspected septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, V F; Lewis, S T; Wellehan, J F; Wamsley, H L; Richardson, R; Sundstrom, D A; Lewis, D D

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of synovial fluid culture in obtaining the causative organism from dogs with suspected septic arthritis. In this retrospective evaluation, synovial fluid cytology and microbiology submissions from dogs with suspected septic arthritis from March 2007 to August 2011 were reviewed. Synovial fluid cytology consistent with joint sepsis was identified. Cultures of synovial fluid from dogs with clinical histories and abnormalities consistent with septic arthritis were used to evaluate the efficacy of bacterial isolation. In total, 36 dogs met the inclusion criteria. Initial aerobic cultures of joint fluid yielded bacterial growth in 44% of these dogs. All anaerobic cultures were negative. In 19% of the dogs with positive cultures, antibiotics had been administered prior to arthrocentesis compared with 10% of dogs with negative cultures. There was no association between culture efficacy and the administration of antimicrobial treatment prior to synovial fluid culture or recent surgery involving the affected joint (P=0.637 and P=0.106, respectively). Culture of synovial fluid from dogs with suspected septic arthritis has a low yield, necessitating a more effective means of identifying bacteria from suspected septic joints in dogs. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  20. The effect of endotoxin and anti-endotoxin serum on synovial fluid parameters in the horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D. Gottschalk

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a commercially available equine hyperimmune anti-endotoxin serum on synovial fluid parameters were evaluated in an induced synovitis model in normal horses. Four groups of 3 horses each received lipopolysaccharide (LPS plus hyperimmune antiendotoxin (anti-LPS, LPS, anti-LPS, and Ringers lactate (control respectively injected into the left intercarpal joint. Synovial fluid parameters were measured at 4, 8, 24 and 72 h. It was found that anti-LPS had no attenuating effect on the LPS and that it induced a synovitis almost equivalent to that induced by LPS alone. The introduction of sterile Ringers lactate solution into the carpal joint together with repeated aseptic arthrocentesis induces a mild inflammatory response.

  1. Tribological performance of the biological components of synovial fluid in artificial joint implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Moradi, Ali; Masjuki, H H; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    The concentration of biological components of synovial fluid (such as albumin, globulin, hyaluronic acid, and lubricin) varies between healthy persons and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of such variation on tribological performance in a simulated hip joint model. The study was carried out experimentally by utilizing a pin-on-disk simulator on ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP) hip joint implants. The experimental results show that both friction and wear of artificial joints fluctuate with the concentration level of biological components. Moreover, the performance also varies between material combinations. Wear debris sizes and shapes produced by ceramic and polyethylene were diverse. We conclude that the biological components of synovial fluid and their concentrations should be considered in order to select an artificial hip joint to best suit that patient. PMID:27877822

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase activity and prostaglandin E2 are elevated in the synovial fluid of meniscus tear patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Betty; Goode, Adam P; Carter, Teralyn E; Utturkar, Gangadhar M; Huebner, Janet L; Taylor, Dean C; Moorman, Claude T; Garrett, William E; Kraus, Virginia B; Guilak, Farshid; DeFrate, Louis E; McNulty, Amy L

    Meniscus tears are a common knee injury and are associated with the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study is to evaluate potential OA mediators in the synovial fluid and serum of meniscus tear subjects compared to those in the synovial fluid of radiographic non-OA control knees. Sixteen subjects with an isolated unilateral meniscus injury and six subjects who served as reference controls (knee Kellgren-Lawrence grade 0-1) were recruited. Twenty-one biomarkers were measured in serum from meniscus tear subjects and in synovial fluid from both groups. Meniscus tear subjects were further stratified by tear type to assess differences in biomarker levels. Synovial fluid total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were increased 25-fold and 290-fold, respectively, in meniscus tear subjects as compared to reference controls (p meniscus tear subjects (R = 0.83, p meniscus tear subjects, synovial fluid levels of MMP activity, MMP-2, MMP-3, sGAG, COMP, IL-6, and PGE2 were higher than serum levels (p meniscus tears had higher synovial fluid MMP-10 (p meniscus injury may be targets to promote meniscus repair and prevent OA development.

  3. The limitations of Gram-stain microscopy of synovial fluid in concomitant septic and crystal arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Paul; Tahir, Mohammed; Atkinson, Henry Dushan

    2017-03-29

    Rapid diagnosis of septic arthritis from Gram-stain microscopy is limited by an inherent false-negative rate of 25-78%. The presence of concomitant crystal arthritis in 5% of cases represents a particular diagnostic challenge. This study aims to investigate the effects that a concomitant crystal arthropathy have on the ability of Gram-stain microscopy of synovial fluid to diagnose a septic arthritis. This is a 12-year retrospective cohort study. Inclusion criteria were a positive synovial fluid culture result with a positive clinical diagnosis of septic arthritis. Results were correlated with presence or absence of urate and calcium pyrophosphate crystals, and Gram-stain result. During this time our collection and analysis methods remained unchanged. All samples were collected in Lithium Heparin containers. Chi-squared test with a p value < 0.05 was considered significant. 602 synovial fluid samples were included. 162 cases of concomitant crystal arthritis were identified (27%). Of these, 16 (10%) had an initial negative Gram-stain. Of the 440 samples with no crystals detected, 18 (4%) had an initial negative Gram-stain microscopy result (p < 0.05). The incidence of concurrent septic and crystal arthritis may be higher than previously thought. Synovial fluid samples in concomitant septic and crystal arthritis are significantly less likely to have a positive Gram-stain at microscopy than in cases of an isolated septic arthritis. We would advise the clinician to maintain a high index of suspicion for septic arthritis in these patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. A Comparison Between Rheological Properties of Intra-articular Hyaluronic Acid Preparations and Reported Human Synovial Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Mat; Manjoo, Ajay; Shaw, Peter; Niazi, Faizan; Rosen, Jeffrey

    2018-03-14

    This study aims to compare the properties of currently available intra-articular hyaluronate (IA-HA) products widely available in the USA to those of healthy knee synovial fluid with respect to their bulk rheological properties. We hypothesize that products would have differing rheological properties, with some more closely resembling the properties and physiological aspects of healthy joint fluid HA. We obtained reported HA product molecular weights, as well as measurements of the presence of cross-linking, zero shear rate viscosity, shear thinning ratio, and crossover frequency for the following IA-HA products available in the USA: Euflexxa ® , Orthovisc ® , Supartz ® , Monovisc ® , Synvisc ® , Synvisc-One ® , Gel-One ® , and Hyalgan ® . Differences were seen between the study products across all of the investigated parameters. Hyalgan, Supartz, Orthovisc, and Euflexxa had a linear chain structure, while Synvisc, Synvisc-One, and Monovisc were cross-linked in structure. Molecular weight, shear rates, and crossover frequencies ranged widely across tested products, with values ranging from below to above those reported for healthy knee synovial fluid HA. When compared to healthy knee parameter values reported within the current literature, observed parameters for Euflexxa and Orthovisc were typically seen to be the most similar to healthy knee synovial fluid. When comparing Euflexxa and Orthovisc directly, Euflexxa was more often similar to the properties of healthy knee synovial fluid with respect to the observed parameters of molecular structure, shear rates, and crossover frequency. Available IA-HA products vary with respect to molecular weight, presence of cross-linking, shear rate dependency of viscosity, and crossover frequency. Since IA-HA treatment for osteoarthritis aims to restore synovial fluid back to original HA property characteristics, using HA supplements resembling healthy synovial fluid is a logical approach. Our findings demonstrate that

  5. Procollagen type-III aminoterminal peptide in serum and synovial fluid of dogs with hip dysplasia and coxarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J S; Jensen, L T; Strøm, H

    1990-01-01

    , such as serum and synovial fluid, has further offered the basis for an objective biochemical evaluation of the stabilization process. Our study was performed to evaluate whether determination of procollagen concentrations was suitable for the use in practice. The procollagen type-III aminoterminal peptide (P......-III-NP) concentration was measured in serum and in synovial fluid from coxofemoral joints in 20 dogs. Dogs were grouped on the basis of evidence of dysplasia and osteoarthritic changes of the hip: (1) a control group of 6 dogs without clinical or radiographic signs of hip dysplasia, and (2) dysplastic group of 14 dogs......, which was further grouped with respect to the coxofemoral joint laxity, as determined by the Ortolani test. Synovial fluid concentration of P-III-NP was significantly (P less than 0.05) higher in fluid from dysplastic joints than in fluid from normal joints. Serum concentrations of P-III-NP were...

  6. Magnetic isolation of particles suspended in synovial fluid for diagnostics of natural joint chondropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Kalia; Eliaz, Noam; Benhar, Itai; Hendel, David; Halperin, Nahum

    2010-11-01

    Millions of people are stricken with the degenerative joint disease known as osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is associated with biochemical and mechanical processes, and is characterized by loss of articular cartilage and hypertrophy of bone. As cartilage and bone particles are released into the synovial fluid, a variety of biomarkers have been suggested for the analysis of this fluid. Here we have developed a method for isolating bone and cartilage wear particles suspended in the synovial fluid of the hip, knee and ankle joints of humans, based on specific magnetization of collagens I and II. Bio-ferrography is used to capture the particles on glass slides, allowing microscopic, chemical and statistical analyses. The relations between the level of the disease and the number, dimensions, shape and chemical composition of the particles were established. The method, which was found to be sensitive and reliable, can easily be extended to other applications, such as diagnosis of cancer and infectious diseases, determination of the efficacy of drugs or optimization of implants. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Extra-articular synovial fluid extravasation following operative fixation of an osteochondral fracture of the patella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marberry, Kevin M; Ginsburg, Zach

    2012-08-01

    Osteochondral fracture of the patella following a lateral patellar dislocation can be treated with operative and nonoperative techniques that are dictated by the clinical presentation. In the presence of large fragments following acute fractures, arthroscopic retrieval and fixation are advocated, whereas smaller displaced fragments may be removed and discarded as loose bodies. Several methods of fixation exist for osteochondral fractures of the patella, including the use of cannulated and noncannulated screws.This article describes a case of an elite competitive swimmer who sustained a lateral patellar dislocation with a large osteochondral fracture of the patella that was treated with open reduction and fixation using absorbable cannulated screws in an inside-out fashion. In the early postoperative period, the patient developed a symptomatic synovial fluid fistula through a cannulated screw to the prepatellar space. The diagnosis of this condition was made clinically and confirmed with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging 6 weeks postoperatively. The symptoms of pain, skin erythema, and swelling were self-limited and eventually resolved with observation, allowing the athlete to return to his previous activity level. Magnetic resonance imaging 3 years postoperatively showed the complete resolution of the fluid extravasation. Extra-articular synovial fluid extravasation is as a rare complication following routine knee arthroscopy, accounting for 3.2% of the complications. This article describes a rare, self-limited complication following open fixation of an osteochondral fracture of the patella. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis DNA in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients by real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ghotaslou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of rheumatoid arthritis. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis DNA in the synovial fluid and rheumatoid arthritis. The synovial fluid samples were collected from 22 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 20 patients with not suffering from rheumatism, overall 42 patients were investigated. The presence of P. gingivalis DNA was evaluated by the real-time PCR method. There was a significant relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and non-rheumatoid arthritis with the DNA number (Pv 0.05. DNA of periodontal pathogens can be found in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients. It shows oral bacteria may play a role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Effect of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 on Equine Synovial Fluid Chondroprogenitor Expansion and Chondrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Bianchessi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells have been identified in the synovial fluid of several species. This study was conducted to characterize chondroprogenitor (CP cells in equine synovial fluid (SF and to determine the effect of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2 on SF-CP monolayer proliferation and subsequent chondrogenesis. We hypothesized that FGF-2 would stimulate SF-CP proliferation and postexpansion chondrogenesis. SF aspirates were collected from adult equine joints. Colony-forming unit (CFU assays were performed during primary cultures. At first passage, SF-cells were seeded at low density, with or without FGF-2. Following monolayer expansion and serial immunophenotyping, cells were transferred to chondrogenic pellet cultures. Pellets were analyzed for chondrogenic mRNA expression and cartilage matrix secretion. There was a mean of 59.2 CFU/mL of SF. FGF-2 increased the number of population doublings during two monolayer passages and halved the population doubling times. FGF-2 did not alter the immunophenotype of SF-CPs during monolayer expansion, nor did FGF-2 compromise chondrogenesis. Hypertrophic phenotypic markers were not expressed in control or FGF-2 groups. FGF-2 did prevent the development of a “fibroblastic” cell layer around pellet periphery. FGF-2 significantly accelerates in vitro SF-CP expansion, the major hurdle to clinical application of this cell population, without detrimentally affecting subsequent chondrogenic capacity.

  10. Enhanced levels of leukotriene B4 in synovial fluid in Lyme disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mayatepek

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential role of LTB4 and cysteinyl leukotrienes in Lyme disease (LD. Therefore, a total number of 34 patients divided into four groups was studied. The patients were classified as having Lyme arthritis (n = 7 or Lyme meningitis (n = 10, and as control groups patients with a noninflammatory arthropathy (NIA (n = 7 and healthy subjects (n = 10. LTB4 as well as LTC4 secretion from stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL from all groups of patients showed no statistical differences. LTB4 levels in synovial fluid were significantly increased in patients with Lyme arthritis (median 142 ng/ml, range 88–296 when compared to the control subjects with NIA (median 46 ng/ml, range 28–72 (p < 0.05. No statistical difference of urinary LTE4 levels between all the different groups of patients was observed. These results show that cysteinyl leukotrienes do not play an important role in the pathogenesis of LD. In contrast to previous findings in rheumatoid arthritis, LTB4 production from stimulated PMNL was not found to be increased in LD. However, the significantly elevated levels of LTB4 in synovial fluid of patients with Lyme arthritis underline the involvement of LTB4 in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  11. Effects of ACL Reconstructive Surgery on Temporal Variations of Cytokine Levels in Synovial Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bigoni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction restores knee stability but does not reduce the incidence of posttraumatic osteoarthritis induced by inflammatory cytokines. The aim of this research was to longitudinally measure IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α levels in patients subjected to ACL reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone graft. Synovial fluid was collected within 24–72 hours of ACL rupture (acute, 1 month after injury immediately prior to surgery (presurgery, and 1 month thereafter (postsurgery. For comparison, a “control” group consisted of individuals presenting chronic ACL tears. Our results indicate that levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 vary significantly over time in reconstruction patients. In the acute phase, the levels of these cytokines in reconstruction patients were significantly greater than those in controls. In the presurgery phase, cytokine levels in reconstruction patients were reduced and comparable with those in controls. Finally, cytokine levels increased again with respect to control group in the postsurgery phase. The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α showed no temporal variation. Our data show that the history of an ACL injury, including trauma and reconstruction, has a significant impact on levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 in synovial fluid but does not affect levels of TNF-α and IL-1β.

  12. Effects of loading concentration, blood and synovial fluid on antibiotic release and anti-biofilm activity of bone cement beads

    OpenAIRE

    Dusane, Devendra H.; Diamond, Scott M.; Knecht, Cory S.; Farrar, Nicholas R.; Peters, Casey W.; Howlin, Robert P.; Swearingen, Matthew C.; Calhoun, Jason H.; Plaut, Roger D.; Nocera, Tanya M.; Granger, Jeffrey F.; Stoodley, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic loaded cement beads are commonly used for the treatment of biofilm related orthopaedic periprosthetic infections; however the effects of antibiotic loading and exposure of beads to body fluids on release kinetics are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of (i) antibiotic loading density (ii) loading amount (iii) material type and (iv) exposure to body fluids (blood or synovial fluid) on release kinetics and efficacy of antibiotics against planktonic and l...

  13. A model of synovial fluid lubricant composition in normal and injured joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M E Blewis

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The synovial fluid (SF of joints normally functions as a biological lubricant, providing low-friction and low-wear properties to articulating cartilage surfaces through the putative contributions of proteoglycan 4 (PRG4, hyaluronic acid (HA, and surface active phospholipids (SAPL. These lubricants are secreted by chondrocytes in articular cartilage and synoviocytes in synovium, and concentrated in the synovial space by the semi-permeable synovial lining. A deficiency in this lubricating system may contribute to the erosion of articulating cartilage surfaces in conditions of arthritis. A quantitative intercompartmental model was developed to predict in vivo SF lubricant concentration in the human knee joint. The model consists of a SF compartment that (a is lined by cells of appropriate types, (b is bound by a semi-permeable membrane, and (c contains factors that regulate lubricant secretion. Lubricant concentration was predicted with different chemical regulators of chondrocyte and synoviocyte secretion, and also with therapeutic interventions of joint lavage and HA injection. The model predicted steady-state lubricant concentrations that were within physiologically observed ranges, and which were markedly altered with chemical regulation. The model also predicted that when starting from a zero lubricant concentration after joint lavage, PRG4 reaches steady-state concentration ~10-40 times faster than HA. Additionally, analysis of the clearance rate of HA after therapeutic injection into SF predicted that the majority of HA leaves the joint after ~1-2 days. This quantitative intercompartmental model allows integration of biophysical processes to identify both environmental factors and clinical therapies that affect SF lubricant composition in whole joints.

  14. Three-dimensional structures of human phospholipase A2 from pancreas and synovial fluid by model building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, I T; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Svensson, L A

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional structures of the enzyme phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from human pancreas and from human synovial fluid were constructed by model building based on high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures and homology considerations. The structure of the human pancreatic PLA2 was based...

  15. pH and metal concentration of synovial fluid of osteoarthritic joints and joints with metal replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milošev, Ingrid; Levašič, Vesna; Vidmar, Janja; Kovač, Simon; Trebše, Rihard

    2017-11-01

    Due to degradation and metal dissolution during articulation of metal joint replacements the chemical periprosthetic environment may change. The aim was to establish whether metal replacements cause the local changes in pH and elevated metal concentrations. pH was measured on samples from 167 patients: native hip and knee osteoarthritic joints, joints with hip and knee replacements revised for aseptic or septic reasons. pH of synovial fluid and periprosthetic tissue was measured perioperatively using a microelectrode and pH indicator papers for removed metal components. Metal concentrations were measured in 21 samples using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The mean pH value of synovial fluid at native osteoarthritic joints (n = 101) was 7.78 ± 0.38. The mean pH value of synovial fluid at revision aseptic operation (n = 58) was 7.60 ± 0.31, with statistically significant difference (p = 0.002) compared to native osteoarthritic joints. The mean pH value of synovial fluid at revision septic operation (n = 8) was 7.55 ± 0.25, with statistically significant difference (p = 0.038) compared to native osteoarthritic joints. Measurements in tissue and at stems were not reliable. In the majority of samples taken at revision increased levels of cobalt and chromium were measured. A small but statistically significant difference was observed in the pH of synovial fluid between natural joints with degenerative diseases and joints treated with metal replacements. Based on the increased metal levels we expected the value of pH to be lower, but the influence of metal ions is counteracted by the buffering capacity of human body. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2507-2515, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Disposition of methylprednisolone acetate in plasma, urine, and synovial fluid following intra-articular administration to exercised thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knych, H K; Harrison, L M; Casbeer, H C; McKemie, D S

    2014-04-01

    Methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) is commonly administered to performance horses, and therefore, establishing appropriate withdrawal times prior to performance is critical. The objectives of this study were to describe the plasma pharmacokinetics of MPA and time-related urine and synovial fluid concentrations following intra-articular administration to sixteen racing fit adult Thoroughbred horses. Horses received a single intra-articular administration of MPA (100 mg). Blood, urine, and synovial fluid samples were collected prior to and at various times up to 77 days postdrug administration and analyzed using tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Maximum measured plasma MPA concentrations were 6.06 ± 1.57 at 0.271 days (6.5 h; range: 5.0-7.92 h) and 6.27 ± 1.29 ng/mL at 0.276 days (6.6 h; range: 4.03-12.0 h) for horses that had synovial fluid collected (group 1) and those that did not (group 2), respectively. The plasma terminal half-life was 1.33 ± 0.80 and 0.843 ± 0.414 days for groups 1 and 2, respectively. MPA was undetectable by day 6.25 ± 2.12 (group 1) and 4.81 ± 2.56 (group 2) in plasma and day 17 (group 1) and 14 (group 2) in urine. MPA concentrations in synovial fluid remained above the limit of detection (LOD) for up to 77 days following intra-articular administration, suggesting that plasma and urine concentrations are not a good indicator of synovial fluid concentrations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The ordinary light microscope: an appropriate tool for provisional detection and identification of crystals in synovial fluid.

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual, E; Tovar, J; Ruiz, M T

    1989-01-01

    To determine if the ordinary light microscope is a useful tool in the detection and identification of crystals in synovial fluid 63 fluids (13 with monosodium urate (MSU), 14 with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD), one with both types of crystal, and 35 without crystals) were examined blindly by two observers, first with an ordinary light microscope, then with a polarising light microscope. Tentative identification of the crystals by their shape was attempted. The sensitivity of the ordi...

  18. Anti-xanthine oxidase antibodies in sera and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other joint inflammations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrar, L.; Hanachi, N.; Rouba, K.; Charef, N.; Khennouf, S.; Baghiani, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to study anti-bovine milk xanthine oxidoreductase XOPR antibody levels in synovial fluid as well as in serum of patients suffering from rheumatoid affections to assess a possible correlation between antibody titres and severity of disease. Sera and synovial fluids were collected from volunteer donors at Setif University Hospital, Setif, Algeria from 2001-2007 with the consent of patients. Human IgG and IgM levels of free and bound anti-bovine milk XOR antibodies were determined using bovine XOR as antigen, with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ELISA. Serum IgG anti-bovine milk XOR titres in 30 healthy normal subjects 2.74+-2.31 microgram/mL are in agreement with that reported in the literature. Immunoglobulin G and IgM anti-bovine milk XOR antibody titres were found to be significantly higher in serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis RA and latex positives subjects. Synovial IgM antibody titres to bovine XOR were found to be significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients compared to patients with other joint inflammations. In rheumatoid arthritis patients, high concentrations of antibodies against XOR were noticed. These antibodies may play a major role in RA by inhibiting both xanthine and NADH oxidase activities of XOR. They may also play a key role in eliminating XOR from serum and synovial fluid positive role but unfortunately, immune complex formation could also activate complement and participate in self maintenance of inflammation. (author)

  19. Hairy polyelectrolyte brushes-grafted thermosensitive microgels as artificial synovial fluid for simultaneous biomimetic lubrication and arthritis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqiang; Liu, Zhilu; Li, Na; Wang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Weimin

    2014-11-26

    We report the fabrication of poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt) (PSPMK) brushes grafted poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) microgels and their potential as artificial synovial fluid for biomimetic aqueous lubrication and arthritis treatment. The negatively charged PSPMK brushes and thermosensitive PNIPAAm microgels play water-based hydration lubrication and temperature-triggered drug release, respectively. Under soft friction pairs, an ultralow coefficient of friction was achieved, while the hairy thermosensitive microgels showed a desirable temperature-triggered drugs release performance. Such a soft charged hairy microgel offers great possibility for designing intelligent synovial fluid. What is more, the combination of lubrication and drug loading capabilities enables the large clinical potential of novel soft hairy nanoparticles as synthetic joint lubricant fluid in arthritis treatment.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of synovial fluid, blood markers, and microbiological testing in chronic knee prosthetic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balato, Giovanni; Franceschini, Vincenzo; Ascione, Tiziana; Lamberti, Alfredo; Balboni, Fiamma; Baldini, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    This retrospective study was undertaken to define cut-off values for synovial fluid (SF) leukocyte count and neutrophil percentage for differentiating aseptic failure and periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of blood inflammatory markers, and microbiological testing according to the criteria proposed by the International Consensus Meeting (ICM) of Philadelphia. All patients who underwent revision total knee arthroplasty from January 2010 to July 2015 were included: we identified and classified 31 PJIs and 136 aseptic joints. The diagnostic performance of single test was assessed by receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each of the cut-off values and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. The median SF leukocyte count as well as the neutrophil percentage and inflammatory markers were significantly higher in patients with PJI than in those with aseptic failure (p  2.8 × 10 3 /μL had a sensitivity of 83.8% and a specificity of 89.7% whereas a neutrophil percentage of > 72% yielded a marginally higher sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 91%. Applying the ICM criteria we found a significant correlation between all these diagnostic measures and PJI (p < 0.001) except for a single positive culture. The most accurate criterion of the ICM was the synovial neutrophil differential (AUC = 0.89; 95% CI 0.81-0.97), followed by SF leukocyte count (AUC = 0.86; 95% CI 0.78-0.94), increased inflammatory markers (AUC = 0.85; 95% CI 0.76-0.93), and two positive periprosthetic cultures (AUC = 0.84; 95% CI 0.73-0.94). The presence of sinus tract communicating with the joint and a single positive culture showed unfavourable diagnostic accuracy (AUC = 0.60, 95% CI 0.47-0.72; AUC = 0.49, 95% CI 0.38-0.61, respectively) CONCLUSIONS: The present study highlights the adequate ability of fluid cell count and neutrophil differential to distinguish between PJI

  1. Optimizing human synovial fluid preparation for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Carl Pc; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Yeh, Wen-Lin; Lin, Hsiu-Chu; Hsieh, Sen-Yung; Lin, Shih-Cherng; Chen, Tai-Tzung; Chen, Max Jl; Tang, Simon Ft

    2011-10-11

    Proteome analysis is frequently applied in identifying the proteins or biomarkers in knee synovial fluids (SF) that are associated with osteoarthritis and other arthritic disorders. The 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) is the technique of choice in these studies. Disease biomarkers usually appear in low concentrations and may be masked by high abundant proteins. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to find the most suitable sample preparation method that can optimize the expression of proteins on 2-DE gels that can be used to develop a reference proteome picture for non-osteoarthritic knee synovial fluid samples. Proteome pictures obtained from osteoarthritic knee synovial fluids can then be compared with the reference proteome pictures obtained in this study to assist us in identifying the disease biomarkers more correctly. The proteomic tool of 2-DE with immobilized pH gradients was applied in this study. A total of 12 2-DE gel images were constructed from SF samples that were free of osteoarthritis. In these samples, 3 were not treated with any sample preparation methods, 3 were treated with acetone, 3 were treated with 2-DE Clean-Up Kit, and 3 were treated with the combination of acetone and 2-D Clean-Up Kit prior to 2-DE analysis. Gel images were analyzed using the PDQuest Basic 8.0.1 Analytical software. Protein spots that were of interest were excised from the gels and sent for identification by mass spectrometry. Total SF total protein concentration was calculated to be 21.98 ± 0.86 mg/mL. The untreated SF samples were detected to have 456 ± 33 protein spots on 2-DE gel images. Acetone treated SF samples were detected to have 320 ± 28 protein spots, 2-D Clean-Up Kit treated SF samples were detected to have 413 ± 31 protein spots, and the combined treatment method of acetone and 2-D Clean-Up Kit was detected to have 278 ± 26 protein spots 2-DE gel images. SF samples treated with 2-D Clean-Up Kit revealed clearer presentation of the isoforms

  2. Optimizing Human Synovial Fluid Preparation for Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Max JL

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteome analysis is frequently applied in identifying the proteins or biomarkers in knee synovial fluids (SF that are associated with osteoarthritis and other arthritic disorders. The 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE is the technique of choice in these studies. Disease biomarkers usually appear in low concentrations and may be masked by high abundant proteins. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to find the most suitable sample preparation method that can optimize the expression of proteins on 2-DE gels that can be used to develop a reference proteome picture for non-osteoarthritic knee synovial fluid samples. Proteome pictures obtained from osteoarthritic knee synovial fluids can then be compared with the reference proteome pictures obtained in this study to assist us in identifying the disease biomarkers more correctly. Results The proteomic tool of 2-DE with immobilized pH gradients was applied in this study. A total of 12 2-DE gel images were constructed from SF samples that were free of osteoarthritis. In these samples, 3 were not treated with any sample preparation methods, 3 were treated with acetone, 3 were treated with 2-DE Clean-Up Kit, and 3 were treated with the combination of acetone and 2-D Clean-Up Kit prior to 2-DE analysis. Gel images were analyzed using the PDQuest Basic 8.0.1 Analytical software. Protein spots that were of interest were excised from the gels and sent for identification by mass spectrometry. Total SF total protein concentration was calculated to be 21.98 ± 0.86 mg/mL. The untreated SF samples were detected to have 456 ± 33 protein spots on 2-DE gel images. Acetone treated SF samples were detected to have 320 ± 28 protein spots, 2-D Clean-Up Kit treated SF samples were detected to have 413 ± 31 protein spots, and the combined treatment method of acetone and 2-D Clean-Up Kit was detected to have 278 ± 26 protein spots 2-DE gel images. SF samples treated with 2-D Clean-Up Kit

  3. In vitro and in vivo spin echo diffusion imaging characteristics of synovial fluid: potential non-invasive differentiation of inflammatory and degenerative arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eustace, S.; DiMasi, M.; Adams, J.; Ward, R.; Caruthers, S.; McAlindon, T.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. This study was undertaken to analyse the diffusion characteristics of synovial fluid in degenerative and inflammatory arthropathies.Design and patients. Ten in vitro specimens of synovial fluid from patients with both degenerative and inflammatory arthropathy were studied at body temperature with a navigator-corrected spin echo diffusion sequence (B values 0-512 s/mm 2 ), on a Philips 1.5-T Gyroscan. Subsequently synovial fluid from knee joint effusions of 25 patients (10 patients with osteoarthritis, 10 patients with effusions following trauma and 5 patients with effusions secondary to inflammatory arthritis) was evaluated with the same navigator-corrected spin echo diffusion sequence.Results. Both in vitro and in vivo study demonstrated decreased diffusion in patients with effusions secondary to degenerative joint disease (less than 2.40 x 10 -5 cm 2 /s) relative to patients with effusions accompanying knee trauma (greater than 2.75 x 10 -5 cm 2 /s) and inflammatory arthritis (in vitro and in vivo greater than 3.00 x 10 -5 cm 2 /s).Conclusion. Synovial fluid in degenerative arthritis shows less diffusion or free water movement than synovial fluid in inflammatory arthritis. Diffusion characteristics of synovial fluid may be used to predict the nature of the underlying form of arthritis in patients presenting with knee joint effusions. (orig.)

  4. COMPARISON OF CULTURE OF SYNOVIAL FLUID, PERIPROSTHETIC TISSUE AND PROSTHESIS SONICATE FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF KNEE PROSTHESIS INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Trampuž

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Synovial fluid and periprosthetic tissue specimens are the standard specimens cultured for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI. We hypothesize that ultrasonication of the explanted prosthesis may improve diagnosis of PJI by dislodging biofilm bacteria from the prosthesis surface and improve the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis of PJI.Methods. Included were patients undergoing knee prosthesis exchange for septic or biomechanical failure and have not received antimicrobial therapy in the last 2 weeks prior specimen collection. Cultures of synovial fluid and periprosthetic tissue specimens were performed per the usual clinical practice. Additionally, explanted joint components were sonicated for 5 minutes at frequency 40 kHz in sterile Ringer’s solution; aliquots of 0.5 ml sonicate were plated onto five aerobic and five anaerobic blood agar plates, and incubated at 37 °C and examined for the next seven days. The number and identity of each colony morphology was recorded.Results. 35 patients undergoing knee replacement have been studied (24 for aseptic biomechanical failure and 11 for suspected PJI. In patients with PJI, coagulase-negative staphylococci (7 cases, Corynebacterium spp. (2 cases, Staphylococcus aureus (1 case, and viridans group streptococcus (1 case were recovered. Culture sensitivity and specificity were for synovial fluid 88% and 100%, for periprosthetic tissue 83% and 81%, and for explant sonicate 91% and 100%, respectively. In sonicate cultures higher numbers of microorganisms than in periprosthetic tissue cultures were consistently detected.Conclusions. Using synovial fluid, periprosthetic tissue, and explant sonicate cultures, 12%, 17% and 9% of PJI were missed, respectively. Explant sonicate cultures were the most sensitive with respect to the diagnosis of PJI, indicating that explant ultrasonication may improve bacterial recovery. In sonicate cultures, infecting organisms were detected in

  5. Global metabolite profiling of synovial fluid for the specific diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis from other inflammatory arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooah Kim

    Full Text Available Currently, reliable biomarkers that can be used to distinguish rheumatoid arthritis (RA from other inflammatory diseases are unavailable. To find possible distinctive metabolic patterns and biomarker candidates for RA, we performed global metabolite profiling of synovial fluid samples. Synovial fluid samples from 38 patients with RA, ankylosing spondylitis, Behçet's disease, and gout were analyzed by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF MS. Orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant and hierarchical clustering analyses were performed for the discrimination of RA and non-RA groups. Variable importance for projection values were determined, and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test and the breakdown and one-way analysis of variance were conducted to identify potential biomarkers for RA. A total of 105 metabolites were identified from synovial fluid samples. The score plot of orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis showed significant discrimination between the RA and non-RA groups. The 20 metabolites, including citrulline, succinate, glutamine, octadecanol, isopalmitic acid, and glycerol, were identified as potential biomarkers for RA. These metabolites were found to be associated with the urea and TCA cycles as well as fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. The metabolomic analysis results demonstrated that global metabolite profiling by GC/TOF MS might be a useful tool for the effective diagnosis and further understanding of RA.

  6. Metabolic analysis of knee synovial fluid as a potential diagnostic approach for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickiewicz, Beata; Kelly, Jordan J; Ludwig, Taryn E; Weljie, Aalim M; Wiley, J Preston; Schmidt, Tannin A; Vogel, Hans J

    2015-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of chronic joint pain in the older human population. Diagnosis of OA at an earlier stage may enable the development of new treatments to one day effectively modify the progression and prognosis of the disease. In this work, we explore whether an integrated metabolomics approach could be utilized for the diagnosis of OA. Synovial fluid (SF) samples were collected from symptomatic chronic knee OA patients and normal human cadaveric knee joints. The samples were analyzed using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) followed by multivariate statistical analysis. Based on the metabolic profiles, we were able to distinguish OA patients from the controls and validate the statistical models. Moreover, we have integrated the (1)H NMR and GC-MS results and we found that 11 metabolites were statistically important for the separation between OA and normal SF. Additionally, statistical analysis showed an excellent predictive ability of the constructed metabolomics model (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 1.0). Our findings indicate that metabolomics might serve as a promising approach for the diagnosis and prognosis of degenerative changes in the knee joint and should be further validated in clinical settings. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Characterization of the Proinflammatory Profile of Synovial Fluid-Derived Exosomes of Patients with Osteoarthritis

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    Rossana Domenis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to characterize synovial fluid- (SF- derived exosomes of patients with gonarthrosis comparing two methods of isolation and to investigate their immune regulatory properties. Extracellular vesicles (EVs have been isolated from inflamed SF by polymer precipitation method and quantified by Exocet kit and by nanoparticle tracking analysis. Vesicles expressed all the specific exosomal markers by immunoblot and FACS. After isolation with Exoquick, a relevant contamination by immune complexes was detected, which required further magnetic bead-based purification to remove. SF-derived exosomes significantly stimulated the release of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and metalloproteinases by M1 macrophages but did not influence the expression of CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules. In conclusion, we characterized purified exosomes isolated from inflamed SF and demonstrate that purified exosomes are functionally active in their ability to stimulate the release of proinflammatory factors from M1 macrophages. Our data indicate that SF-derived exosomes from gonarthrosis patients play a role in disease progression.

  8. Lubricin expression in human osteoarthritic knee meniscus and synovial fluid: a morphological, immunohistochemical and biochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Loreto, Carla; Leonardi, Rosalia; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Castorina, Sergio; Mobasheri, Ali

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of lubricin, the product of the human PRG4 (proteoglycan 4) gene, in menisci and synovial fluid from normal donors and patients with osteoarthritis (OA), using a combination of histology, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and Western blotting analysis, to provide further insight on the role of this protein in the progression of OA and pathological processes in the meniscus. Lubricin expression was studied in samples from 40 patients and in 9 normal donors after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Histological analysis confirmed normal microanatomy and the absence of structural changes in control samples. Menisci derived from OA patients showed evidence of structural alterations, fibrillations and clefts. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed very strong lubricin immunostaining in normal menisci in contrast to weak/moderate staining seen in osteoarthritic menisci. Quantitative ELISA and Western blot analysis confirmed the above results. The findings of this study support the notion that changes in lubricin expression and boundary-lubricating ability of cartilage is followed by the development of OA. This study could provide the biological foundation for the development of novel therapeutic treatments, to be applied before the surgery, for the prevention of post-traumatic cartilage damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemical nature of implant-derived titanium(IV) ions in synovial fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silwood, Christopher J.L.; Grootveld, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Previous investigations have indicated a deleterious leakage of Ti(III) and/or Ti(IV) species from Ti-Al-V alloy joint prostheses into adjacent tissue, synovium or synovial fluid (SF) in vivo. In view of the importance of the particular chemical nature of such complexes in determining their biological activity, we have employed high field proton ( 1 H) NMR spectroscopy to 'speciate' Ti(IV) in inflammatory SF. Treatment of osteoarthritic SF samples with increasing concentrations of Ti(IV) (0.10-1.03 mM [TiO(C 2 O 4 ) 2 ] 2- ) gave rise to a specific broadening of the citrate proton resonances, indicating that this bioavailable oxygen-donor ligand plays an important role in complexing implant-derived Ti(IV). 1 H NMR analysis of Ti(IV)-loaded SF samples subsequently treated with a large excess of ascorbate (0.05 M) showed that this added Ti(IV) chelator was only poorly effective in removing this metal ion from Ti(IV)-citrate/Ti(IV)-oxycitrate complexes. The results obtained here provide evidence for complexation of the low-molecular-mass (non-protein-bound) fraction of implant-derived Ti(IV) by citrate in vivo

  10. The adsorption and lubrication behavior of synovial fluid proteins and glycoproteins on the bearing-surface materials of hip replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roba, Marcella; Naka, Marco; Gautier, Emanuel; Spencer, Nicholas D; Crockett, Rowena

    2009-04-01

    The selectivity of synovial fluid protein adsorption onto ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and alumina (Al(2)O(3)), and in particular the ability of glycoproteins to adsorb in the presence of all the other synovial fluid proteins, was investigated by means of fluorescence microscopy and gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The non-specific nature of protein adsorption from synovial fluid indicated that the lubrication of artificial hip-joint materials may not be attributable to a single protein as has been frequently suggested. The friction behavior of polyethylene (PE) sliding against Al(2)O(3) in solutions of bovine serum albumin (BSA), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) was investigated by means of colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. BSA was shown to be a poorer boundary lubricant than the phosphate buffered saline used as a control. This was attributed to denaturation of the BSA upon adsorption, which provided a high-shear-strength layer at the interface, impairing the lubrication. Interestingly, both the glycoproteins AGP and A1AT, despite their low concentrations, improved lubrication. The lubricating properties of AGP and A1AT were attributed to adsorption via the hydrophobic backbone, allowing the hydrophilic carbohydrate moieties to be exposed to the aqueous solution, thus providing a low-shear-strength fluid film that lubricated the system. The amount of glycoprotein adsorbed on hydrophobic surfaces was determined by means of optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS), allowing conclusions to be drawn about the conformation of the glycan residues following adsorption.

  11. Measuring synovial fluid procalcitonin levels in distinguishing cases of septic arthritis, including prosthetic joints, from other causes of arthritis and aseptic loosening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, K; Dryden, M; Sitjar, A; White, G

    2013-08-01

    Differentiating septic arthritis from non-septic arthritis can be challenging as the clinical pictures are similar and an efficacious diagnostic test is not yet available. Our objectives in this study were to establish if procalcitonin (PCT) could be reproducibly measured from synovial fluid, if there is a difference in synovial procalcitonin values between patients with septic and non-septic arthritis, respectively, including those with implants and to determine cut-off levels that could be used as a practical tool in the management of these conditions. Using a standard serum assay, synovial fluid PCT levels were measured retrospectively in 26 septic and 50 non-septic predefined arthritis cases. The reproducibility of synovial PCT was also assessed at various concentrations. Synovial PCT can be measured and is reproducible. In this cohort, statistically significant higher synovial PCT levels were found in cases of septic arthritis than in non-septic arthritis. Sensitivities, specificities and positive and negative predictive values varied at different cut-off levels. The test could be added to other microbiological and biochemical tests and may be used to supplement other clinical, radiological and laboratory findings in the assessment of patients with acute painful joints. In our cohort, findings of very high synovial PCT levels supported an infection process, including in prosthesis-related infections. The high negative predictive value of low synovial PCT levels could exclude infection in both native and prosthetic joints. Larger prospective studies are needed to further validate these results and to examine the cost effectiveness of synovial PCT.

  12. The effect of transient conditions on synovial fluid protein aggregation lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myant, Connor William; Cann, Philippa

    2014-06-01

    Little is known about the prevailing lubrication mechanisms in artificial articular joints and the way in which these mechanisms determine implant performance. The authors propose that interfacial film formation is determined by rheological changes local to the contact and is driven by aggregation of synovial fluid proteins within the contact inlet region. A direct relationship between contact film thickness and size of the protein aggregation within the inlet region has been observed. In this paper the latest experimental observations of the protein aggregation mechanism are presented for conditions which more closely mimic joint kinematics and loading. Lubricant films were measured for a series of bovine calf serum solutions for CoCrMo femoral component sliding against a glass disc. An optical interferometric apparatus was employed to study the effects of transient motion on lubricant film formation. Central film thickness was measured as a function of time for a series of transient entrainment conditions; start-up motion, steady-state and non-steady-state uni-directional sliding, and bi-directional sliding. The size of the inlet aggregations was found to be dependent upon the type of transient condition. Thick protective protein films were observed to build up within the main contact region for all uni-directional tests. In contrast the inlet aggregation was not observed for bi-directional tests. Contact film thickness and wear was found to be directly proportional to the presence of the inlet protein phase. The inlet phase and contact films were found to be fragile when disrupted by surface scratches or subjected to reversal of the sliding direction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microwave Heating of Crystals with Gold Nanoparticles and Synovial Fluid under Synthetic Skin Patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLemore, Gabrielle L; Toker, Salih; Boone-Kukoyi, Zainab; Ajifa, Hillary; Lansiquot, Carisse; Nwawulu, Chinenye; Onyedum, Stanley; Kioko, Bridgit M; Aslan, Kadir

    2017-09-30

    Gout is a disease with elusive treatment options. Reduction of the size of l-alanine crystals as a model crystal for gouty tophi with the use of a monomode solid-state microwave was examined as a possible therapeutic aid. The effect of microwave heating on l-alanine crystals in the presence of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in solution and synovial fluid (SF) in a plastic pouch through a synthetic skin patch was investigated. In this regard, three experimental paradigms were employed: Paradigm 1 includes the effect of variable microwave power (5-10 W) and variable heating time (5-60 s) and Au NPs in water (20 nm size, volume of 10 μL) in a plastic pouch (1 × 2 cm 2 in size). Paradigm 2 includes the effect of a variable volume of 20 nm Au NPs in a variable volume of SF up to 100 μL in a plastic pouch at a constant microwave power (10 W) for 30 s. Paradigm 3 includes the effect of constant microwave power (10 W) and microwave heating time (30 s), constant volume of Au NPs (100 μL), and variable size of Au NPs (20-200 nm) placed in a plastic pouch through a synthetic skin patch. In these experiments, an average of 60-100% reduction in the size of an l-alanine crystal (initial size = 450 μm) without damage to the synthetic skin or increasing the temperature of the samples beyond the physiological range was reported.

  14. LEVELS OF ANGIOGENESIS-REGULATORY CHEMOKINES IN THE SYNOVIAL FLUID OF PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    D. A. Zhebrun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of chemokines in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA has been actively investigated in recent years. Angiogenic and angiostatic chemokines are important mediators of angiogenesis in the development and extent of pannus. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid (SF is a major biomaterial in clinical and immunological studies. At the same time, it is the SF test that may yield the most informative results since that gives an idea of the processes that occur locally within a joint. Objective: to perform a comparative analysis of the levels of a number of CXC, CC, and CX3C chemokines in the SF of patients with RA, osteoarthritis (OA, and joint injuries. Subjects and methods. The multiplex analysis using xMAP technology (Luminex, USA was used to analyze levels of CXC, CC, and CX3C chemokines in SF and serum of patients with RA (n = 20, OA (n = 9 and controls (n = 9. Results and discussion. The SF levels of CCL24/eotaxin-2, as well as those of the angiostatic chemokines CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/IP10, CXCL11/ITAC, and CXCL13/BCA-1 were higher in the RA group than in the control and OA groups. There was a direct correlation between SF levels of CCL5/RANTES and DAS28, as well as patient global disease activity assessment on visual analogue scale, and that between the level of CCL2/MCP-1 in the SF and that of anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP antibodies in the serum. The SF concentrations of CXCL5/ENA78 and CXCL7/NAP-2 were shown to depend on the presence of serum anti-CCP. Serum CXCL13/BCA-1 levels were higher in RA than those in OA, as that of CXCL7/NAP-2 than in the control group.

  15. Osteopontin level in synovial fluid is associated with the severity of joint pain and cartilage degradation after anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

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    Mika Yamaga

    Full Text Available To explore the molecular function of Osteopontin (OPN in the pathogenesis of human OA, we compared the expression levels of OPN in synovial fluid with clinical parameters such as arthroscopic observation of cartilage damage and joint pain after joint injury.Synovial fluid was obtained from patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction surgery from 2009 through 2011 in our university hospital. The amounts of intact OPN (OPN Full and it's N-terminal fragment (OPN N-half in synovial fluid from each patient were quantified by ELISA and compared with clinical parameters such as severity of articular cartilage damage (TMDU cartilage score and severity of joint pain (Visual Analogue Scale and Lysholm score.Within a month after ACL rupture, both OPN Full and N-half levels in patient synovial fluid were positively correlated with the severity of joint pain. In contrast, patients with ACL injuries greater than one month ago felt less pain if they had higher amounts of OPN N-half in synovial fluid. OPN Full levels were positively correlated with articular cartilage damage in lateral tibial plateau.Our data suggest that OPN Full and N-half have distinct functions in articular cartilage homeostasis and in human joint pain.

  16. Correlation between arthroscopic diagnosis of osteoarthritis and synovitis of the human temporomandibular joint and keratan sulfate levels in the synovial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, H A; Diamond, B E; Saed-Nejad, F; Ratcliffe, A

    1997-03-01

    The specific aims of this investigation were to determine if there is a relationship between an arthroscopic diagnosis of synovitis and osteoarthritis, and if the presence of synovitis influences the level of cartilage degradation, as evidenced by keratan sulfate levels in the synovial fluid. Arthroscopic surgery was performed on 114 temporomandibular joints in 88 patients who had significant pain or dysfunction and whose condition had failed to improve with conservative treatment. Synovial fluid aspirates were obtained immediately before arthroscopy and used for the determination of keratan sulfate levels. Arthroscopic examination included assessment of the presence or absence of osteoarthritis and synovitis. Synovitis was present in 90% of joints, and osteoarthritis was present in 62% of joints examined arthroscopically. Both osteoarthritis and synovitis existed in 57% of the joints. Joints with an arthroscopic diagnosis of synovitis had significantly lower levels of keratan sulfate in the synovial fluid aspirates than joints with osteoarthritis. Synovial fluid aspirates from temporomandibular joints with osteoarthritis had significantly higher levels of keratan sulfate than synovial fluids from joints without osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis and synovitis are common diagnoses and are often present concurrently in patients with symptomatic temporomandibular joints. Osteoarthritis is associated with elevated keratan sulfate levels; however, the elevation of keratan sulfate is less in patients with concomitant synovitis.

  17. Does Use of Lidocaine Affect Culture of Synovial Fluid Obtained to Diagnose Periprosthetic Joint Infection (PJI)? An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kan; Ye, Liyan; Sun, Wei; Hao, Libo; Luo, Yanping; Chen, Jiying

    2018-01-01

    Background Synovial fluid culture (SFC) is recommended as one of the major diagnostic criteria by the Musculoskeletal Infection Society (MSIS) for diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). Local anesthetic agents are used for anesthesia and analgesia in some clinical settings to relieve pain. As a local anesthetic, lidocaine is safely used in arthrocentesis to obtain synovial fluid. The goal of this study was to determine if infiltration anesthesia with additive-free lidocaine 2% has antibacterial effects that might interfere with subsequent SFC. Material/Methods Eight isolates of reference strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hominis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Candida albicans were incubated on the plates. Each bacterial suspension was formed by 50-fold dilution before the test lidocaine 2% was added. For each strain, bacterial suspension was divided into 2 groups (5 samples each) exposed either lidocaine 2% or sterile non-bacteriostatic 0.45% saline. The antimicrobial property of lidocaine 2% was determined by measuring the bacterial density on agar plates incubated for 24 h and comparing it with controls unexposed to lidocaine 2%. Results Exposure to lidocaine 2% negatively affected microbial viability in vitro. Of the lidocaine 2% exposure, reference strains but no Streptococcus pyogenes strain resulted in fewer colony-forming units compared with the sterile saline control. The antibacterial property of lidocaine 2% appears to affect the ability to culture the organism in synovial fluid. Conclusions Lidocaine 2% has strong antimicrobial activities against some commonly encountered bacterial strains in PJI. As a result, infiltration anesthesia with additive-free lidocaine 2% before the arthrocentesis procedure may affect the results of SFC. To further evaluate its potential antibacterial usefulness in clinical applications, studies are needed to

  18. Disposition of isoflupredone acetate in plasma, urine and synovial fluid following intra-articular administration to exercised Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knych, Heather K; Harrison, Linda M; White, Alexandria; McKemie, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    The use of isoflupredone acetate in performance horses and the scarcity of published pharmacokinetic data necessitate further study. The objective of the current study was to describe the plasma pharmacokinetics of isoflupredone acetate as well as time-related urine and synovial fluid concentrations following intra-articular administration to horses. Twelve racing-fit adult Thoroughbred horses received a single intra-articular administration (8 mg) of isoflupredone acetate into the right antebrachiocarpal joint. Blood, urine and synovial fluid samples were collected prior to and at various times up to 28 days post drug administration. All samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Plasma data were analyzed using a population pharmacokinetic compartmental model. Maximum measured plasma isoflupredone concentrations were 1.76 ± 0.526 ng/mL at 4.0 ± 1.31 h and 1.63 ± 0.243 ng/mL at 4.75 ± 0.5 h, respectively, for horses that had synovial fluid collected and for those that did not. The plasma beta half-life was 24.2 h. Isoflupredone concentrations were below the limit of detection in all horses by 48 h and 7 days in plasma and urine, respectively. Isoflupredone was detected in the right antebrachiocarpal and middle carpal joints for 8.38 ± 5.21 and 2.38 ± 0.52 days, respectively. Results of this study provide information that can be used to regulate the use of intra-articular isoflupredone in the horse. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Synovial Fluid Findings and Demographic Analysis of Patients With Coexistent Intra-articular Monosodium Urate and Calcium Pyrophosphate Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heselden, Emilia L; Freemont, Antony J

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of arthritis in which monosodium urate (urate) and calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals coexisted in synovial fluid (SF) to aid patient management and set a baseline from which to investigate the pathophysiological basis of an unusual coexistence of 2 disorders. Synovial fluid analyses of 33,000 patients were reviewed, identifying those containing urate and/or CPP crystals. Synovial fluid cell count and differential cell count, together with patient age and gender, were retrieved from a computerized database spanning 22 years of SF analysis. In 6983 consecutive SF samples containing crystals, CPP crystals were found in 3685 (53%), urate in 3127 (44.5%), and both in 171 (2.5%). These 171 cases were deemed to have a mixed crystal arthropathy (MCA). Patients with MCA were 77% male and 23% female, and the highest incidence was found in those aged 76 to 80 years.Most commonly (69.4% of cases of MCA), high numbers (>20/10 high-power field) of both crystals and an acute inflammatory cell count were found. In the remainder, other patterns of crystals and cells were observed, perhaps suggesting different clinical situations in which these crystals coexist. This study presents evidence showing that with careful microscopic analysis the coexistence of urate and CPP crystals in a single joint is found in 2.5% of cases of crystal arthritis. The different patterns of SF findings and patient demography described here are novel and might have implications for patient management.

  20. Squeeze-film Lubrication of the Human Ankle Joint with Synovial Fluid Filtrated by Articular Cartilage with the Superficial Zone Worn out

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Miroslav

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 11 (2000), s. 1415-1422 ISSN 0021-9290 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/00/0008 Keywords : human ankle joint * squeeze-film lubrication * synovial fluid filtration * worn-out cartilage superficial zone Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.474, year: 2000

  1. Synovial Fluid Filtration by Articular Cartilage with a Worn-out Surface Zone in the Human Ankle Joint during Walking- II. Numerical Results for Steady Pure Sliding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Miroslav

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2000), s. 375-396 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/00/0008 Keywords : biphasic articular cartilage * biphasic synovial fluid * boundary lubrication * human ankle joint Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  2. Synovial Fluid Filtration by Articular Cartilage with a Worn-out Surface Zone in the Human Ankle Joint during Walking- I.A Mathematical Mixture Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Miroslav

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2000), s. 295-321 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/00/0008 Keywords : asymptotic solution * biphasic articular cartilage * biphasic synovial fluid * human ankle joint Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  3. Interleukin-6 in serum and in synovial fluid enhances the differentiation between periprosthetic joint infection and aseptic loosening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Randau

    Full Text Available The preoperative differentiation between septic and aseptic loosening after total hip or knee arthroplasty is essential for successful therapy and relies in part on biomarkers. The objective of this study was to assess synovial and serum levels of inflammatory proteins as diagnostic tool for periprosthetic joint infection and compare their accuracy with standard tests. 120 patients presenting with a painful knee or hip endoprosthesis for surgical revision were included in this prospective trial. Blood samples and samples of intraoperatively acquired joint fluid aspirate were collected. White blood cell count, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin and interleukin-6 were determined. The joint aspirate was analyzed for total leukocyte count and IL-6. The definite diagnosis of PJI was determined on the basis of purulent synovial fluid, histopathology and microbiology. IL-6 in serum showed significantly higher values in the PJI group as compared to aseptic loosening and control, with specificity at 58.3% and a sensitivity of 79.5% at a cut-off value of 2.6 pg/ml. With a cut-off >6.6 pg/ml, the specificity increased to 88.3%. IL-6 in joint aspirate had, at a cut-off of >2100 pg/ml, a specificity of 85.7% and sensitivity of 59.4%. At levels >9000 pg/ml, specificity was almost at 100% with sensitivity just below 50%, so PJI could be considered proven with IL-6 levels above this threshold. Our data supports the published results on IL-6 as a biomarker in PJI. In our large prospective cohort of revision arthroplasty patients, the use of IL-6 in synovial fluid appears to be a more accurate marker than either the white blood cell count or the C-reactive protein level in serum for the detection of periprosthetic joint infection. On the basis of the results we recommend the use of the synovial fluid biomarker IL-6 for the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection following total hip and knee arthroplasty.

  4. Serum amyloid A isoforms in serum and synovial fluid from spontaneously diseased dogs with joint diseases or other conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads Jens; Christensen, Michelle B.; Lee, Marcel Huisung

    2007-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute phase protein in dogs. However, knowledge of qualitative properties of canine SAA and extent of its synthesis in extrahepatic tissues is limited. The aim of the study was to investigate expression of different SAA isoforms in serum and synovial fluid...... in samples obtained from dogs (n = 16) suffering from different inflammatory or non-inflammatory conditions, which were either related or unrelated to joints. Expression of SAA isoforms was visualized by denaturing isoelectric focusing and Western blotting. Serum amyloid A was present in serum from all dogs...

  5. Effects of loading concentration, blood and synovial fluid on antibiotic release and anti-biofilm activity of bone cement beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusane, Devendra H; Diamond, Scott M; Knecht, Cory S; Farrar, Nicholas R; Peters, Casey W; Howlin, Robert P; Swearingen, Matthew C; Calhoun, Jason H; Plaut, Roger D; Nocera, Tanya M; Granger, Jeffrey F; Stoodley, Paul

    2017-02-28

    Antibiotic loaded cement beads are commonly used for the treatment of biofilm related orthopaedic periprosthetic infections; however the effects of antibiotic loading and exposure of beads to body fluids on release kinetics are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of (i) antibiotic loading density (ii) loading amount (iii) material type and (iv) exposure to body fluids (blood or synovial fluid) on release kinetics and efficacy of antibiotics against planktonic and lawn biofilm bacteria. Short-term release into an agar gel was evaluated using a fluorescent tracer (fluorescein) incorporated in the carrier materials calcium sulfate (CaSO 4 ) and poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA). Different fluorescein concentrations in CaSO 4 beads were evaluated. Mechanical properties of fluorescein-incorporated beads were analyzed. Efficacy of the antibiotics vancomycin (VAN) or tobramycin (TOB) alone and in combination was evaluated against lawn biofilms of bioluminescent strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Zones of inhibition of cultures (ZOI) were measured visually and using an in-vivo imaging system (IVIS). The influence of body fluids on release was assessed using CaSO 4 beads that contained fluorescein or antibiotics and were pre-coated with human blood or synovial fluid. The spread from the beads followed a square root of time relationship in all cases. The loading concentration had no influence on short-term fluorescein release and pre-coating of beads with body fluids did not affect short-term release or antibacterial activity. Compared to PMMA, CaSO 4 had a more rapid short term rate of elution and activity against planktonic and lawn biofilms. This study highlights the importance of considering antibiotic loading and packing density when investigating the clinical application of bone cements for infection management. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tenascin-C levels in synovial fluid are elevated after injury to the human and canine joint and correlate with markers of inflammation and matrix degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chockalingam, P S; Glasson, S S; Lohmander, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    , and to correlate TN-C levels with markers of cartilage matrix degradation and inflammation. METHOD: Human knee synovial fluid samples (n = 164) were from a cross-sectional convenience cohort. Diagnostic groups were knee healthy reference, knee anterior cruciate ligament rupture, with or without concomitant......OBJECTIVE: We have previously shown the capacity of tenascin-C (TN-C) to induce inflammatory mediators and matrix degradation in vitro in human articular cartilage. The objective of the present study was to follow TN-C release into knee synovial fluid after acute joint injury or in joint disease...... meniscus lesions, isolated knee meniscus injury, acute inflammatory arthritis (AIA) and knee osteoarthritis (OA). TN-C was measured in synovial fluid samples using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and results correlated to other cartilage markers. TN-C release was also monitored in joints...

  7. Detection of Calcium Crystals in Knee Osteoarthritis Synovial Fluid: A Comparison Between Polarized Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frallonardo, Paola; Oliviero, Francesca; Peruzzo, Luca; Tauro, Leonardo; Scanu, Anna; Galozzi, Paola; Ramonda, Roberta; Punzi, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    The identification of calcium crystals in synovial fluid (SF) of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) represents an important step in understanding the role of these crystals in synovial inflammation and disease progression. This study aimed to investigate the presence of calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) and basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals in SF collected from patients with symptomatic knee OA by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled to x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, compensated polarized light microscopy (CPLM), and alizarin red staining. Seventy-four patients with knee OA were included in the study. Synovial fluid samples were collected after arthrocentesis and examined under CPLM for the assessment of CPP crystals. Basic calcium phosphate crystals were evaluated by alizarin red staining. All the samples were examined by SEM. The concordance between the 2 techniques was evaluated by Cohen κ agreement coefficient. Calcium pyrophosphate and BCP crystals were found, respectively, in 23 (31.1%) and 13 (17.5%) of 74 OA SFs by SEM analysis. Calcium pyrophosphate crystals were identified in 23 (31.1%) of 74 samples by CPLM, whereas BCP crystals were suspected in 27 (36.4%) of 74 samples. According to κ coefficient, the concordance between CPLM and SEM was 0.83 for CPP, and that between alizarin red and SEM was 0.68 for BCP. The results of our study showed a high level of concordance between the 2 microscope techniques as regards CPP crystal identification and a lower agreement for BCP crystals. Although this finding highlights the difficulty in identifying BCP crystals by alizarin red staining, the use of SEM remains unsuitable to apply in the clinical setting. Because of the in vitro inflammatory effect of BCP crystals, further work on their analysis in SF could provide important information about the OA process.

  8. Indian Hedgehog in Synovial Fluid Is a Novel Marker for Early Cartilage Lesions in Human Knee Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congming Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether there is a correlation between the concentration of Indian hedgehog (Ihh in synovial fluid (SF and the severity of cartilage damage in the human knee joints, the knee cartilages from patients were classified using the Outer-bridge scoring system and graded using the Modified Mankin score. Expression of Ihh in cartilage and SF samples were analyzed with immunohistochemistry (IHC, western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Furthermore, we detected and compared Ihh protein levels in rat and mice cartilages between normal control and surgery-induced osteoarthritis (OA group by IHC and fluorescence molecular tomography in vivo respectively. Ihh expression was increased 5.2-fold in OA cartilage, 3.1-fold in relative normal OA cartilage, and 1.71-fold in OA SF compared to normal control samples. The concentrations of Ihh in cartilage and SF samples was significantly increased in early-stage OA samples when compared to normal samples (r = 0.556; p < 0.001; however, there were no significant differences between normal samples and late-stage OA samples. Up-regulation of Ihh protein was also an early event in the surgery-induced OA models. Increased Ihh is associated with the severity of OA cartilage damage. Elevated Ihh content in human knee joint synovial fluid correlates with early cartilage lesions.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of betamethasone in plasma, urine, and synovial fluid following intra-articular administration to exercised thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knych, Heather K; Stanley, Scott D; Harrison, Linda M; Mckemie, Daniel S

    2017-09-01

    The use of corticosteroids, such as betamethasone, in performance horses is tightly regulated. The objective of the current study was to describe the plasma pharmacokinetics of betamethasone as well as time-related urine and synovial fluid concentrations following intra-articular administration to horses. Twelve racing-fit adult Thoroughbred horses received a single intra-articular administration (9 mg) of a betamethasone sodium phosphate and betamethasone acetate injectable suspension into the right antebrachiocarpal joint. Blood, urine, and synovial fluid samples were collected prior to and at various times up to 21 days post drug administration. All samples were analyzed using tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Plasma data were analyzed using compartmental pharmacokinetic modeling. Maximum measured plasma betamethasone concentrations were 3.97 ± 0.23 ng/mL at 1.45 ± 0.20 h. The plasma elimination half-life was 7.48 ± 0.39 h. Betamethasone concentrations were below the limit of detection in all horses by 96 h and 7 days in plasma and urine, respectively. Betamethasone fell below the limit of detection in the right antebrachiocarpal joint between 14 and 21 days. Results of this study provide information that can be used to regulate the use of intra-articular betamethasone in the horse. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Original paper The effect of leptin on the respiratory burst of human neutrophils cultured in synovial fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Gajewski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Leptin is a hormone responsible for nutritional status and immune competence coordination. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA increased leptin levels were observed in both serum and synovial fluid. Its influence on development of the disease still remains unclear. So far, research on leptin’s influence on the emission of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI measured with chemiluminescence (CL has provided unclear and contradictory results. In this study, we evaluated the influence of leptin on oxidative activity of neutrophils isolated from blood of healthy volunteers and cultured in different amounts of synovial fluid (SF from patients with RA. Material and methods: Neutrophils’ oxidative metabolism was measured by two types of CL. The first one, luminol-dependent CL (CL-lum, allows one to determine phagocytic activity and the level of ROI generated in a myeloperoxidase-dependent manner. The second method used was lucigenin-dependent CL (CL-luc, which monitors ROI production dependent on the NADPH oxidase enzyme complex located in the cell membranes of neutrophils and enables one to determine the scope of extracellular ROI emission. Results: Neutrophils stimulated by opsonized zymosan show a decrease in the level of CL-lum, proportional to the increasing concentration of both SF and serum collected from healthy donors. The observed effect of decreased CL-lum may, therefore, be dependent on the physical conditions (viscosity of fluids used. None of these experiments showed any effect of leptin on the level of CL-lum. Conclusions : The present study showed that leptin does not affect the level of any of the CL types in inactive neutrophils incubated in normal serum, and it does not affect the level of oxidative activity in resting neutrophils incubated with SF. However, leptin influences extracellular ROI emission (measured by CL-luc. Leptin reduces extracellular emission of ROI, and this effect is dependent on concentration and duration

  11. Human monocyte elastolytic activity, the propeptides of types I and III procollagen, proteoglycans, and interleukin-6 in synovial fluid from patients with arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H S; Jensen, L T; Saxne, T

    1991-01-01

    Elastolytic activity by live human monocytes (M phi) is mainly caused by cell surface related leucocyte elastase, capable of degrading matrix components. In order to examine the possible correlation between enzyme activity and tissue turnover in the joint, we examined 24 synovial fluids for M phi...

  12. The role of the synovial fluid and tendon sheath for flexor tendon nutrition. An experimental tracer study on diffusional pathways in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundborg, G; Holm, S; Myrhage, R

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive tracers were used to analyse nutritional mechanisms of flexor tendons of dogs during various experimental conditions. The transport and distribution of methyl glucose in the tendon was analysed 15 min after intravenous injection during the following experimental conditions: (1) normal state--rest; (2) passive mobilization of the tendon; (3) active mobilization of the tendon; (4) exclusion of exposure to synovial fluid-preservation of vascular supply; (5) exclusion of vascular supply--preservation of exposure to synovial fluid. The results indicate that active mobilization gives a significant increase in tracer concentration in the volar part of the tendon, while passive mobilization has no such effect. Diffusional pathways from the synovial fluid plays a major role for transport of tracer into the tendon, while the intrinsic vascular system apparently is of no or minor importance in this respect. The main mechanism for solute transport within the tendon is passive diffusion. Transport of sulphate in the volar part follows a similar pattern as in other avascular tissues and the incorporation of sulphate by the cells is low and comparable to that in articular cartilage. The results support our previous hypothesis that the flexor tendon system physiologically corresponds to a joint, and that the synovial fluid plays an important role for flexor tendon nutrition.

  13. Demonstration of extracellular peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) activity in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis using a novel assay for citrullination of fibrinogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Dres; Senolt, Ladislav; Nielsen, Michael Friberg

    2014-01-01

    in general. PAD activity has been demonstrated in various cell lysates, but so far not in synovial fluid. We aimed to develop an assay for detection of PAD activity, if any, in synovial fluid from RA patients. METHODS: An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human fibrinogen as the immobilized substrate...... for citrullination and anti-citrullinated fibrinogen antibody as the detecting agent were used for measurement of PAD activity in synovial fluid samples from five RA patients. The concentrations of PAD2 and calcium were also determined. RESULTS: Approximately 150 times lower levels of recombinant human PAD2 (rhPAD2......) than of rhPAD4 were required for citrullination of fibrinogen. PAD activity was detected in four of five synovial fluid samples from RA patients and correlated with PAD2 concentrations in the samples (r = 0.98, P = 0.003). The calcium requirement for half-maximal activities of PAD2 and PAD4 were found...

  14. Alpha beta but not gamma delta T cell clones in synovial fluids of patients with reactive arthritis show active transcription of tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rihl, M.; Gu, J.; Baeten, D.; Märker-Hermann, E.; Goodall, J. C.; Gaston, J. S. H.; Kuipers, J. G.; Zeidler, H.; Yu, D. T. Y.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the cytokine expression profile of three CD8+, three CD4+, and three gammadelta+ T cell clones all derived from the synovial fluids of three patients with reactive arthritis (ReA). METHODS: Complementary DNA based microarrays containing the specific sequence of 56 cytokine

  15. Lubrication of the Human Anklejoint in Walking with the Synovial Fluid Filtrated by the Cartilage with the Surface Zone Worn-out:Steady Pure Sliding Motion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Miroslav

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 10 (1999), s. 1059-1069 ISSN 0021-9290 Keywords : biphasic articular cartilage * biphasic synovial fluid * boooundary lubrication * human ankle joint * sliding motion Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics Impact factor: 1.536, year: 1999

  16. The efficacy of 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing in the diagnosis of bacteria from blood, bone and synovial fluid samples of children with musculoskeletal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashavya, S; Gross, I; Michael-Gayego, A; Simanovsky, N; Lamdan, R

    2018-04-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are among the most common bacterial infections in children leading to hospitalization, invasive procedures and prolonged antibiotic administration. Blood, synovial and sometimes tissue cultures are essential for the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal infections; 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing is a novel diagnostic tool for the detection of bacteria.While the yield of 16S rDNA sequencing in synovial fluid was previously assessed, data regarding the efficacy of this method from blood samples or partially treated children with suspected musculoskeletal infections is lacking.In this study we assessed the yield of 16S rDNA sequencing in blood, bone and synovial samples of children with musculoskeletal infections. Blood, synovial and bone samples were collected from children with suspected musculoskeletal infections and analyzed for the presence of 16S rDNA, the results were then compared with the benchmark microbial cultures. During the study period, 41 children (18 boys and 23 girls) with suspected acute musculoskeletal infection were enrolled. A positive blood culture was found in 6/31 cases (19.4%) with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus being the most commonly isolated bacterium. No significant 16S rDNA detection in blood samples was recorded.Synovial fluid culture was positive in 6/28 samples (21%), Kingella kingae being the most common pathogen. When using the 16S rDNA sequencing method, the rate of positive results in synovial fluid was higher with bacterial detection in 12/23 (52%) samples. The 16S rDNA sequencing method was also able to identify pathogens in samples taken from partially treated children where cultures were negative with 16S rDNA detection in 5/5 samples. Although 16S rDNA sequencing may increase the yield of bacterial detection in synovial samples of patients with musculoskeletal infections, there is no benefit from applying this method on blood samples. The 16S rDNA sequencing method may be

  17. Zymographic analysis using gelatin-coated film of the effect of etanercept on the extracellular matrix-degrading activity in synovial fluids of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamataki, Akihisa; Ishida, Mutsuko; Komagamine, Masataka; Yoshida, Masaaki; Ando, Takanobu; Sawai, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease. Most RA patients develop cartilage and bone destruction, and various proteinases are involved in the destruction of extracellular matrix of cartilage and bone. The aim of this study is to evaluate the utility of our newly developed method to measure total gelatinolytic activity. We adopted this method for measurement in synovial fluid from RA patients treated by the anti-rheumatic drug etanercept (ETN), a recombinant human soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor fusion protein, and compared the findings with clinical and laboratory data. Enzymatic activity of synovial fluid was analyzed by zymography using gelatin-coated film, and compared with the index of Disease Activity Score of 28 joints - C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP), CRP and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 level before and after ETN therapy. Synovial fluids of 19 patients were collected before and after administration of ETN therapy. In nine of 19 patients, who showed a decrease in gelatin-degrading activity in synovial fluid, the index of DAS28-CRP (4.85-2.85, ΔDAS = -2.00) and CRP (3.30-0.94 mg/dL, ΔCRP = -2.36) was alleviated after ETN therapy, while cases with no change or an increase in gelatin-degrading activity showed a modest improvement in clinical data: DAS28-CRP (4.23-3.38, ΔDAS = -0.85) and CRP (1.70-0.74 mg/dL, ΔCRP = -0.96). Our newly developed method for measurement of gelatin-degrading activity in synovial fluid from RA patients is highly practicable and useful for predicting the effect of ETN therapy. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Synovial fluid protein adsorption on polymer-based artificial hip joint material investigated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie M. Fröhlich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available UHMW-PE (ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene, most frequently used material in acetabular cup replacement, is affected by the interaction with its surrounding synovial fluid. It is assumed that protein layer formation is of high importance for lubrication, however alters polymer characteristics. This study investigates in vitro protein adsorption on gamma-irradiated and Vitamin E doped UHMW-PE using synovia as modeling system. SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry imaging showed adsorption of high abundance proteins in a mass range between 2 and 200 kDa. Protein layer formation was observed on planar UHMW-PE material, whereas morphologically modified UHMW-PE regions were highly affected by protein aggregation.

  19. The influence of the acetabular labrum seal, intact articularsuperficial zone and synovial fluid thixotropy on squeeze-filmlubrication of a spherical synovial joint

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Miroslav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 10 (2002), s. 1325-1335 ISSN 0021-9290 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/00/0008 Keywords : synovial joint * lubrication * articular cartilage Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.889, year: 2002

  20. Changes of synovial fluid protein concentrations in supra-patellar bursitis patients after the injection of different molecular weights of hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Carl P C; Hsu, Chih Chin; Pei, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Ruo Li; Zhou, Shaobo; Shen, Hsuan-Chen; Lin, Shih-Cherng; Tsai, Wen Chung

    2014-04-01

    Knee pain is commonly seen in orthopedic and rehabilitation outpatient clinical settings, and in the aging population. Bursitis of the knee joint, especially when the volume of the synovial fluid is large enough, can compress and distend the nearby soft tissues, causing pain in the knee joint. Out of all the bursae surrounding the knee joint, supra-patellar bursitis is most often associated with knee pain. Treatment strategies in managing supra-patellar bursitis include the aspiration of joint synovial fluid and then followed by steroid injection into the bursa. When supra-patellar bursitis is caused by degenerative disorders, the concept of viscosupplementation treatment may be effective by injecting hyaluronic acid into the bursa. However, the rheology or the changes in the concentrations of proteins (biomarkers) that are related to the development of bursitis in the synovial fluid is virtually unexplored. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the concentration changes in the synovial fluid total protein amount and individual proteins associated with supra-patellar bursitis using the Bradford protein assay and western immunoglobulin methods. A total of 20 patients were divided into two groups with 10 patients in each group. One group received the high molecular weight hyaluronic acid product of Synvisc Hylan G-F 20 and the other group received the low molecular weight hyaluronic acid product of Hya-Joint Synovial Fluid Supplement once per week injection into the bursa for a total of 3 weeks. Significant decreases in the synovial fluid total protein concentrations were observed after the second dosage of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid injections. Apolipoprotein A-I, interleukin 1 beta, alpha 1 antitrypsin, and matrix metalloproteinase 1 proteins revealed a trend of decreasing western immunoblotting band densities after hyaluronic acid injections. The decreases in apolipoprotein A-I and interleukin 1 beta protein band densities were significant in the high

  1. Determination of MMP-2 and -9 activities in synovial fluid of horses with osteoarthritic and arthritic joint diseases using gelatin zymography and immunocapture activity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietz, S; Einspanier, R; Hoppner, S; Hertsch, B; Bondzio, A

    2008-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9 activities have been found elevated in synovial fluid from various joint diseases in man. However, in the horse few data are available. To explore the clinical significance of MMP-2 and -9 activities in synovial fluid of horses with different forms of joint diseases. Gelatin zymography and MMP-2 and -9 immunocapture activity assays were applied on synovial fluids from control joints and joints with aseptic joint disease (AJD) and septic arthritis (SA). Additionally, MMP-2 and -9 activities were measured in samples from SA to monitor the disease process. Zymographic analysis revealed that samples from AJD and SA contained significantly increased latent MMP-2 activity compared to controls. Samples from SA showed significantly increased monomeric latent MMP-9 activity compared with all other affected joints and controls. Trace amounts of MMP-9 activity, due to the active and dimer form, were detected in samples from SA; however, these bands were absent in samples from AJD and controls. Using immunocapture activity assays, MMP-2 and -9 activities were found to be significantly elevated in joints from SA compared to controls and AJD samples. MMP-2 activity in samples from AJD was significantly increased compared to controls. Both MMP activities decreased in the joints from SA in the course of successful therapy. Data from zymographic analysis confirmed that MMP-2 and -9 were elevated in equine joint diseases. Immunocapture activity assays have been shown to be suitable for the quantitative determination of MMP-2 and -9 activities in synovial fluid of horses. Both MMP-2 and -9 activities seem to be useful to indicate SA, and MMP-2 activity might be a suitable marker for AJD. These findings encourage the potential use of MMP-2 and -9 as additional aids to clinical investigation. Further work is required to validate the clinical significance of MMP activities in the progress of different joint diseases in horses.

  2. Synovium fragment-derived cells exhibit characteristics similar to those of dissociated multipotent cells in synovial fluid of the temporomandibular joint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-peng Sun

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs found in the synovial fluid (SFMSCs of the tempromandibular joint (TMJ remain poorly understood. During TMJ arthrocentesis, we discovered that synovial fluid collected from some patients with TMJ disorders contained not only SFMSCs but also synovium fragments (SFs. In this study, we attempted to characterize both the SFMSCs and SF-derived cells (SFCs in order to further understand the role of MSCs in the synovial fluid of the TMJ. The SFs were membranous and translucent and consisted of several cell layers, indicating that their origin was only from the intima. SFCs were obtained by digestion of the SFs and subsequently expanded in vitro. SFMSCs were enriched by centrifugation of the synovial fluid and expanded in vitro. SFCs and SFMSCs displayed a similar fibroblast-like, spindle-shaped morphology, and we observed that some SFMSCs grew out of small tissue masses in culture. Flow cytometric analysis showed that both groups of cells expressed similar surface markers, including CD90, CD44, CD105, and CD73. However, both were negative for Stro-1, CD146, CD45, CD34, CD11b, CD19, and HLA-DR. Immunofluorescent staining showed that both SFs and SFMSCs expressed vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Both SFCs and SFMSCs could be induced to differentiate down osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic lineages in vitro. Together, our results indicate that the intima is the most likely tissue origin of SFMSCs in the TMJ. Moreover, the SFs are composed of only intima and thus offer an improved source of synovium-derived MSCs compared to synovium specimens obtained by surgery, which contain both intima and subintima.

  3. Influence of exogenous leptin on redox homeostasis in neutrophils and lymphocytes cultured in synovial fluid isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    Michał Gajewski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Leptin is an adipose cells derived hormone that regulates energy homeostasis within the body. Energy metabolism of immune cells influences their activity within numerous pathological states, but the effect of leptin on these cells in unclear. On the one hand, it was observed that leptin induces neutrophils chemotaxis and modulates phagocytosis. On the other hand, neutrophils exposed to leptin did not display detectable Ca 2+ ions mobilization or β 2 -integrin upregulation. In this study, we investigated the effect of leptin on the redox homeostasis in lymphocytes and neutrophils. Material and methods : Neutrophils and lymphocytes were isolated by density-gradient centrifugation of blood from healthy volunteers. Cells were cultured with or without leptin (100 ng/ml for lymphocytes and 500 ng/ml for neutrophils or with or without synovial fluid (85% for 0–72 h. Culture media were not changed during incubation. Cells were homogenized and homogenate was frozen until laboratory measurements. Redox homeostasis was assessed by the reduced glutathione (GSH vs. oxidized glutathione (GSSG ratio and membrane lipid peroxidation evaluation. Results : Lymphocytes cultured with leptin and synovial fluid showed a significant increase of the GSSG level. The GSSG/GSH ratio increased by 184 ±37%. In neutrophils incubated in a similar environment, the GSSG/GSH ratio increased by just 21 ±7%, and the effect was observed irrespectively of whether they were exposed to leptin or synovial fluid or both together. Neither leptin nor synovial fluid influenced lipid peroxidation in neutrophils, but in lymphocytes leptin intensified lipid peroxidation. Conclusions : Leptin altered the lymphocytes, but not neutrophils redox state. Because firstly neutrophils are anaerobic cells and have just a few mitochondria and secondly lymphocytes have typical aerobic metabolism, the divergence of our data supports the hypothesis that leptin induces oxidative stress by

  4. Clinical cases of joint disease in horse. Total glycosaminoglycans sulphate and keratansulphate in synovial fluid as markers of degenerative cartilage processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, F.M.; Pezzoli, G.; Borghetti, P.; Benazzi, C.

    1997-01-01

    Total glycosaminoglycans sulphate (GAGs) and keratan sulphate (KS) were measured in synovial fluid (SF) obtained from 28 horses with different joint diseases (degenerative joint disease (DJD), osteochondrosis (OCD), positivity to Flex Test (FT)) and 15 horses without any clinical sign of lameness. All groups of animals with joint disease showed levels of total GAGs significantly higher (P0.001) than normal. On the contrary, only DJD affected joints showed a significantly (P0.01) higher level of KS [it

  5. Agreement of manual cell counts and automated counts of the scil Vet abc Plus(+) hematology analyzer for analysis of equine synovial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Water, Eline; Oosterlinck, Maarten; Duchateau, Luc; Pille, Frederik

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the scil Vet abc Plus(+) (SCIL Animal Care Company, Altorf, France), an impedance hematology analyzer, can accurately quantify and differentiate nucleated blood cells (NBCs) in equine synovial fluid. Synovial fluid samples (n=242) in different stages of experimentally induced inflammation were analyzed with and without hyaluronidase pretreatment and compared to manual hemocytometer counts and smear reviews. No significant effect of hyaluronidase pretreatment was observed. Total nucleated cell counts of the scil Vet abc Plus(+) were significantly higher compared to the manual method (P=0.02), yet the difference was small and clinically irrelevant (ratio manual/automated count equal to 0.97 with 95% CI [0.95, 1.00]). Differential cell counts of the scil Vet abc Plus(+) were not accurate. In conclusion, the scil Vet abc Plus(+) hematology analyzer is highly accurate for quantification, but not accurate for differentiation of NBCs in equine synovial fluid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Adverse reactions to metal on polyethylene implants: Highly destructive lesions related to elevated concentration of cobalt and chromium in synovial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltit, Felipe; Assiri, Ali; Garbuz, Donald; Duncan, Clive; Masri, Bassam; Greidanus, Nelson; Bell, Robert; Sharma, Manju; Cox, Michael; Wang, Rizhi

    2017-07-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR) are the primary cause of failure of metal on metal (MoM) hip implants, and fewer but not negligible number cases of nonmodular metal on polyethylene (MoP) implants. In this study, we analyzed 17 cases of MoP ALTR, and equal number of MoM, by histological observation, cobalt and chromium concentration in serum and synovial fluid and cytokine analysis in ALTR tissues. ALTRs in MoP are highly necrotic, affecting larger areas than MoM ALTRs. Degenerative changes in blood vessels' wall were seen in all MoP ALTRs. The concentration of cobalt and chromium was higher in synovial fluid but lower in serum of MoP patients compared to MoM patients. Elevated concentrations of chemokines were observed in ALTR tissues. We conclude that ALTRs in MoP systems are highly necrotizing lesions that seem to have a similar development to ALTRs in MoM. Alteration of vessels wall seems to have a role in the tissues necrosis, as well as the elevated concentration of cobalt and chromium in synovial fluid of MoP patients. Chemokines may be involved in the pathogenesis of ALTR and constitute possible diagnostic targets. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1876-1886, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Modulation of Synovial Fluid-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Intra-Articular and Intraosseous Platelet Rich Plasma Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Muiños-López

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of intra-articular (IA or a combination of intra-articular and intraosseous (IO infiltration of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP on the cellular content of synovial fluid (SF of osteoarthritic patients. Thirty-one patients received a single infiltration of PRP either in the IA space (n=14 or in the IA space together with two IO infiltrations, one in the medial femoral condyle and one in the tibial plateau (n=17. SF was collected before and after one week of the infiltration. The presence in the SF of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, monocytes, and lymphocytes was determined and quantified by flow cytometry. The number and identity of the MSCs were further confirmed by colony-forming and differentiation assays. PRP infiltration into the subchondral bone (SB and the IA space induced a reduction in the population of MSCs in the SF. This reduction in MSCs was further confirmed by colony-forming (CFU-F assay. On the contrary, IA infiltration alone did not cause variations in any of the cellular populations by flow cytometry or CFU-F assay. The SF of osteoarthritic patients contains a population of MSCs that can be modulated by PRP infiltration of the SB compartment.

  8. Correlation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Levels in Serum and Synovial Fluid with Disease Severity of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Hou, Ruizhi; Yin, Ruofeng; Yin, Weitian

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) levels in serum and synovial fluid (SF) of patients with primary knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to exam its correlation with radiographic and symptomatic severity of the disease. Material/Methods A total of 37 knee OA patients and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Knee OA radiographic grading was performed according to the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading system by evaluating X-ray changes observed in anteroposterior knee radiography. Symptomatic severity of the disease was evaluated according to the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores. BMP-2 levels in serum and SF were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Serum BMP-2 level in patients with knee OA was higher than that in healthy controls. Knee OA patients with KL grade 4 showed significantly elevated BMP-2 levels in the serum and SF compared with those with KL grade 2 and 3. Knee OA patients with KL grade 3 had significant higher SF levels of BMP-2 than those with KL grade 2. BMP-2 levels in the serum and SF of knee OA patients were both positively correlated with KL grades and WOMAC scores. Conclusions BMP2 levels in serum and SF were closely related to the radiographic and symptomatic severity of knee OA and may serve as an alternative biochemical parameter to determine disease severity of primary knee OA. PMID:25644704

  9. Total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status of synovial fluids in patients with temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etöz, Osman A; Akçay, Hüseyin; Neşelioğlu, Salim; Erel, Özcan; Alkan, Alper

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether a relationship exists between total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) of synovial fluids (SFs) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain patients with pain and dysfunction. Forty-two patients with TMJ pain were included in this study. TAC and TOS values of SFs were measured with a novel colorimetric method. Independent t test and correlations were used to analyze the data. TAC of SFs in patients with TMJ pain and limited mouth opening (LMO; n = 21) were significantly lower (P = 0.03) than patients without LMO (n = 21). TOS of SF was negatively correlated with duration of the disease. There was no correlation between TAC, TOS, and VAS scores of the patients as well as age and maximum mouth opening values. Antioxidant response to oxidative changes (TAC and TOS) in SF decreased as the stage of dysfunction increased. Local administration of antioxidant agents might be considered in management of TMJ pain and dysfunction to prevent possible increased oxidative stress.

  10. Changes in concentrations of haemostatic and inflammatory biomarkers in synovial fluid after intra-articular injection of lipopolysaccharide in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Stine Mandrup; Vinther, Anne Mette Lindberg; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Septic arthritis is a common and potentially devastating disease characterized by severe intra-articular (IA) inflammation and fibrin deposition. Research into equine joint pathologies has focused on inflammation, but recent research in humans suggests that both haemostatic and inflam......BACKGROUND: Septic arthritis is a common and potentially devastating disease characterized by severe intra-articular (IA) inflammation and fibrin deposition. Research into equine joint pathologies has focused on inflammation, but recent research in humans suggests that both haemostatic...... and inflammatory pathways are activated in the joint compartment in arthritic conditions. The aim of this study was to characterize the IA haemostatic and inflammatory responses in horses with experimental lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced joint inflammation. Inflammation was induced by IA injection of LPS into one...... antebrachiocarpal joint of six horses. Horses were evaluated clinically with subjective grading of lameness, and blood and synovial fluid (SF) samples were collected at post injection hours (PIH) -120, -96, -24, 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 36, 48, 72 and 144. Total protein (TP), white blood cell counts (WBC), serum amyloid...

  11. The cytospin technique improves the detection of calcium pyrophosphate crystals in synovial fluid samples with a low leukocyte count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robier, Christoph; Quehenberger, Franz; Neubauer, Manfred; Stettin, Mariana; Rainer, Franz

    2014-06-01

    In synovial fluids (SF) with low leukocyte or/and crystal counts, important features may be missed, if exclusively smears are examined by polarized microscopy. That may be overcome by cytocentrifuges, which use low-speed centrifugal force to concentrate cells onto a glass slide and thus enhance the number of cells per high power field (HPF). We compared the calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystal counts in cytospin preparations with those in common smears of SF. The number of CPP crystals was counted in 50 SF samples by polarized microscopy, and statistical comparisons of the mean values of the cytospin and smear preparations were performed using the Wilcoxon test. The reproducibility within the slides of the cytocentrifuge and smear samples was determined by Spearman's rank correlation. The crystal counts were significantly higher in the cytospin than in the smear preparations (median 96/10 HPF vs. 2.5/10 HPF, p < 0.0001). The correlation in the crystal count between the slides 1 and 2 was significantly higher within the cytocentrifuge than in the smear group (0.97 vs. 0.73, p = 0.0004). CPP-negative cytospin preparations in initially smear-positive slides were not observed. We confirmed that the cytospin technique significantly enhances the number of examinable crystals per HPF, compared to common smears.

  12. Tribological investigation of diamond-like carbon coated micro-dimpled surface under bovine serum and osteoarthritis oriented synovial fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Mamat, Azuddin Bin; Masjuki, H. H.; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-06-01

    Osteoarthritis-oriented synovial fluid (OASF), i.e., that typical of a patient with osteoarthritis, has different physical and biological characteristics than bovine serum (BS), a lubricant widely used in biotribological investigations. Micro-dimpled and diamond-like carbon- (DLC) coated surfaces are key emerging interfaces for orthopedic implants. In this study, tribological performances of dimpled surfaces, with and without DLC coating, have been investigated under both BS and OASF. The friction tests were performed utilizing a pin on a disk tribometer, whereas contact pressure, speed, and temperature were simulated to a ‘medium walking gait’ of hip joint conditions. The mechanical properties of the specimen and the physical properties of the lubricant were characterized before the friction test. Raman analysis was conducted to identify the coating condition both before and after the test. The DLC-coated dimpled surface showed maximum hardness and residual stress. A DLC-coated dimpled surface under an OASF lubricated condition yielded a lower friction coefficient and wear compared to those of plain and dimpled specimens. The higher graphitization of coated materials with increasing load was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Tribological investigation of diamond-like carbon coated micro-dimpled surface under bovine serum and osteoarthritis oriented synovial fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Subir; Roy, Taposh; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Choudhury, Dipankar; Bin Mamat, Azuddin; Masjuki, H H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis-oriented synovial fluid (OASF), i.e., that typical of a patient with osteoarthritis, has different physical and biological characteristics than bovine serum (BS), a lubricant widely used in biotribological investigations. Micro-dimpled and diamond-like carbon- (DLC) coated surfaces are key emerging interfaces for orthopedic implants. In this study, tribological performances of dimpled surfaces, with and without DLC coating, have been investigated under both BS and OASF. The friction tests were performed utilizing a pin on a disk tribometer, whereas contact pressure, speed, and temperature were simulated to a ‘medium walking gait’ of hip joint conditions. The mechanical properties of the specimen and the physical properties of the lubricant were characterized before the friction test. Raman analysis was conducted to identify the coating condition both before and after the test. The DLC-coated dimpled surface showed maximum hardness and residual stress. A DLC-coated dimpled surface under an OASF lubricated condition yielded a lower friction coefficient and wear compared to those of plain and dimpled specimens. The higher graphitization of coated materials with increasing load was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. (paper)

  14. Tribological investigation of diamond-like carbon coated micro-dimpled surface under bovine serum and osteoarthritis oriented synovial fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Bin Mamat, Azuddin; Masjuki, H H; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis-oriented synovial fluid (OASF), i.e., that typical of a patient with osteoarthritis, has different physical and biological characteristics than bovine serum (BS), a lubricant widely used in biotribological investigations. Micro-dimpled and diamond-like carbon- (DLC) coated surfaces are key emerging interfaces for orthopedic implants. In this study, tribological performances of dimpled surfaces, with and without DLC coating, have been investigated under both BS and OASF. The friction tests were performed utilizing a pin on a disk tribometer, whereas contact pressure, speed, and temperature were simulated to a ‘medium walking gait’ of hip joint conditions. The mechanical properties of the specimen and the physical properties of the lubricant were characterized before the friction test. Raman analysis was conducted to identify the coating condition both before and after the test. The DLC-coated dimpled surface showed maximum hardness and residual stress. A DLC-coated dimpled surface under an OASF lubricated condition yielded a lower friction coefficient and wear compared to those of plain and dimpled specimens. The higher graphitization of coated materials with increasing load was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27877803

  15. The prevalence of monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate crystals in synovial fluid from wrist and finger joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galozzi, Paola; Oliviero, Francesca; Frallonardo, Paola; Favero, Marta; Hoxha, Ariela; Scanu, Anna; Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Ortolan, Augusta; Punzi, Leonardo; Ramonda, Roberta

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of monosodium urate (MSU) and calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals in synovial fluids (SFs) aspirated from wrist and finger joints of patients with previously diagnosed joint diseases. We reviewed the results of SF analysis of 1593 samples and identified 126 patients with effusions in the small joints of the hands and wrists. We reported from patients' medical files data about sex, age, diagnosis, disease duration and the microscopic SF results. The prevalence of CPP crystals in SF was 85.71% in CPP-crystals arthritis (CPP-CA), 19.35% in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 13.89% in osteoarthritis (OA) and 0% in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), spondyloarthritis (SpA), gout and miscellanea. The prevalence of MSU crystals in SF was 83.3% in gout, 10% in PsA, 2.8% in OA and 0% in RA, SpA, miscellanea and CPP-CA. Consistent with previously reported data concerning the big joints, microcrystals can be frequently found also in the small joints of patients with previous diagnosis. The finding underlines the importance of analyzing SF from the hand and wrist joints in the attempt to identify comorbidities associated with the presence of crystals and to develop targeted treatment strategies.

  16. Decreased synovial fluid ghrelin levels are linked with disease severity in primary knee osteoarthritis patients and are increased following laser therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yu-Cong; Deng, Hong-Yu; Mao, Zheng; Zhao, Chang; Huang, Ju; Liu, Gang

    2017-07-01

    Ghrelin has been proved to inhibit inflammation and promote cartilage growth. So far, its role in patients with primary knee osteoarthritis has not been investigated. The current study was performed to explore the serum and synovial ghrelin levels as well as the relationship between ghrelin levels and disease severity in primary knee OA patients. 52 primary knee OA patients were recruited in the study. 52 sex and age-matched patients visiting our hospital for regular body check were selected as controls. The serum and synovial fluid ghrelin levels were examined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) before treatment, one week and four weeks after laser therapy, respectively. The inflammation markers IL-6 and TNF-α were also investigated. The radiographic progression was assessed by Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade scale and the symptomatic severity was evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS), Lequesne index and Lysholm scores. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis curve was conducted to test the diagnostic value of ghrelin, IL-6 and TNF-α for radiographic progression. No significant difference of serum ghrelin levels was found between knee OA patients and healthy controls. Synovial fluid ghrelin concentrations were significantly negatively correlated with K-L grading (r=-0.591, Pghrelin levels were also related to clinical severity determined by Lequesne index (r=-0.308, P=0.025),VAS scores (r=-0.591, Pghrelin levels were also negatively associated with TNF-α (r=-0.424, P=0.002) and IL-6 concentrations (r=-0.428, P=0.002). ROC curve analysis demonstrated that ghrelin exhibited more diagnostic value than IL-6 and TNF-α for assessing radiographic progression in medium-late stage. Decreased synovial fluid ghrelin levels are related to disease severity in patients with primary osteoarthritis and are increased following laser therapy. Local application of ghrelin may serve as an adjunctive therapy for knee OA. Copyright © 2017. Published by

  17. Macroscopic assessment of cartilage shear: effects of counter-surface roughness, synovial fluid lubricant, and compression offset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quynhhoa T; Wong, Benjamin L; Chun, June; Yoon, Yeoung C; Talke, Frank E; Sah, Robert L

    2010-06-18

    During joint articulation, cartilage is subjected to compression, shear, and sliding, mechanical factors that regulate and affect cartilage metabolism. The objective of this study was to use an in vitro material-on-cartilage shear test to elucidate the effects of counter-surface roughness (Polished, Mildly rough, and Rough), lubricants (phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and bovine synovial fluid (bSF)), and compression offset on the shearing and sliding of normal human talar cartilage under dynamic lateral displacement. Peak shear stress (sigma(xz,m)) and strain (E(xz,m)) increased with increasing platen roughness and compression offset, and were 30% higher with PBS than with bSF. Compared to PBS, bSF was more effective as a lubricant for P than for M and R platens as indicated by the higher reduction in kinetic friction coefficient (-60% vs. -20% and -19%, respectively), sigma(xz,m) (-50% vs. -14% and -17%) and E(xz,m) (-54% vs. -19% and -17%). Cartilage shear and sliding were evident for all counter-surfaces either at low compression offset (10%) or with high lateral displacement (70%), regardless of lubricant. An increase in tissue shear occurred with either increased compression offset or increased surface roughness. This material and biomechanical test system allow control of cartilage sigma(xz,m) and E(xz,m), and hence, sliding magnitude, for an imposed lateral displacement. It therefore can facilitate study of cartilage mechanobiological responses to distinct regimes of cartilage loading and articulation, such as shear with variable amounts of sliding. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chondrogenic differentiation of human subchondral progenitor cells is affected by synovial fluid from donors with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krüger Jan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microfracture is a first-line treatment option for cartilage repair. In microfracture, subchondral mesenchymal cortico-spongious progenitor cells (CSP enter the defect and form cartilage repair tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of joint disease conditions on the in vitro chondrogenesis of human CSP. Methods CSP were harvested from the subchondral bone marrow. CSP characterization was performed by analysis of cell surface antigen pattern and by assessing the chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential, histologically. To assess the effect of synovial fluid (SF on chondrogenesis of CSP, micro-masses were stimulated with SF from healthy (ND, osteoarthritis (OA and rheumatoid arthritis donors (RA without transforming growth factor beta 3. Results CSP showed the typical cell surface antigen pattern known from mesenchymal stem cells and were capable of osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. In micro-masses stimulated with SF, histological staining as well as gene expression analysis of typical chondrogenic marker genes showed that SF from ND and OA induced the chondrogenic marker genes aggrecan, types II and IX collagen, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP and link protein, compared to controls not treated with SF. In contrast, the supplementation with SF from RA donors decreased the expression of aggrecan, type II collagen, COMP and link protein, compared to CSP treated with SF from ND or OA. Conclusion These results suggest that in RA, SF may impair cartilage repair by subchondral mesenchymal progenitor cells in microfracture, while in OA, SF may has no negative, but a delaying effect on the cartilage matrix formation.

  19. Pathogen or contaminant? Distinguishing true infection from synovial fluid culture contamination in patients with suspected septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Mary Louise; Zhu, Clara; Byrne, Kevin; Lieber, Sarah B; Moore, Andrew; Shmerling, Robert H; Paz, Ziv

    2017-12-01

    Isolation of bacteria from synovial fluid (SF) is the gold standard for diagnosis of septic arthritis (SA). Contamination results in misdiagnosis and mismanagement. This study identifies clinical characteristics, microbiology, and outcomes of patients with contaminated SF and compares them with patients with true SA. We conducted a retrospective study including all patients aged 18 and older admitted to a single, tertiary-care hospital between 1998 and 2015 with suspected SA and positive SF cultures. Contamination cases were determined by infectious disease specialists involved in the patients' care and a clinical course inconsistent with SA. 398 patients with true SA and 22 with contaminated SF were identified. The SA group was younger (60.9 vs. 75.6 years; p < 0.01), had higher peripheral polymorphonuclear lymphocytes (78.0 vs. 69.4%; p < 0.01) and SF white blood cell count (91.7 vs. 25.6K/mL; p = 0.02), and longer mean length of stay (10.9 vs. 6.7 days; p = 0.02). The average time to positive culture was longer in the contaminated group (3.62 vs. 1.4 days; p < 0.01). The SA group was less likely to receive a new rheumatologic diagnosis within 1 year (3.0 vs. 36.4%; p < 0.01). This is the first study of its kind looking at clinical features and outcomes of patients with contaminated SF. These patients present with less severe disease, have better outcomes, and receive new rheumatologic diagnoses in more than a third of cases within 1 year. We recommend a conservative approach for patients with suspected contaminated SF, mild symptoms, and no bacterial growth within the first 48 h.

  20. Release of Active Peptidyl Arginine Deiminases by Neutrophils Can Explain Production of Extracellular Citrullinated Autoantigens in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Julia; Lugonja, Božo; Jimmy Ytterberg, A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Pearson, Mark J.; Grant, Melissa M.; Milward, Michael; Lundberg, Karin; Buckley, Christopher D.; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Paul R.; Chapple, Iain L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antibodies specifically recognize citrullinated autoantigens that are generated by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs). Neutrophils express high levels of PAD and accumulate in the synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients during disease flares. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that neutrophil cell death, induced by either NETosis (extrusion of genomic DNA–protein complexes known as neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) or necrosis, can contribute to production of autoantigens in the inflamed joint. Methods Extracellular DNA was quantified in the SF of patients with RA, patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Release of PAD from neutrophils was investigated by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence staining, and PAD activity assays. PAD2 and PAD4 protein expression, as well as PAD enzymatic activity, were assessed in the SF of patients with RA and those with OA. Results Extracellular DNA was detected at significantly higher levels in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.001) or PsA SF (P < 0.05), and its expression levels correlated with neutrophil concentrations and PAD activity in RA SF. Necrotic neutrophils released less soluble extracellular DNA compared to NETotic cells in vitro (P < 0.05). Higher PAD activity was detected in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.05). The citrullinated proteins PAD2 and PAD4 were found attached to NETs and also freely diffused in the supernatant. PAD enzymatic activity was detected in supernatants of neutrophils undergoing either NETosis or necrosis. Conclusion Release of active PAD isoforms into the SF by neutrophil cell death is a plausible explanation for the generation of extracellular autoantigens in RA. PMID:26245941

  1. Effects of Equine Joint Injury on Boundary Lubrication of Articular Cartilage by Synovial Fluid: Role of Hyaluronan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, Jennifer M.; Schmidt, Tannin A.; Serventi, Lisa A.; Cai, Matthew Z.; Shu, YuYu L.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Sah, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare equine synovial fluid (eSF) from post-injury and control joints for (1) cartilage boundary lubrication function, (2) putative boundary lubricant molecules hyaluronan (HA), proteoglycan-4 (PRG4), and surface-active phospholipids (SAPL), (3) relationships between lubrication function and composition, and (4) lubrication restoration by addition of HA. Methods eSF from normal (NL), acute injury (AI), and chronic injury (CI) joints were analyzed for boundary lubrication of normal articular cartilage as kinetic friction coefficient (μkinetic). eSF were also analyzed for HA, PRG4, and SAPL concentrations and HA molecular weight (MW) distribution. The effect of addition of HA, of different concentrations and MW, to AI- and NL-eSF samples on μkinetic was determined. Results The μkinetic of AI-eSF (0.036) was higher (+39%) than that of NL-eSF (0.026). Compared to NL-eSF, AI-eSF had a lower HA concentration (−30%) of lower MW forms, higher PRG4 concentration (+83%), and higher SAPL concentration (+144%). CI-eSF had μkinetic, HA, PRG4, and SAPL characteristics intermediate to that of AI-eSF and NL-eSF. Regression analysis revealed that μkinetic decreased with increasing HA concentration in eSF. The friction-reducing properties of HA alone improved with increasing concentration and MW. Addition of high-MW HA (4,000kDa) to AI-eSF reduced μkinetic to a value near that of NL-eSF. Conclusion In the acute post-injury stage, eSF exhibits poor boundary lubrication properties as indicated by a high μkinetic. HA of diminished concentration and MW may be the basis for this, and adding HA to deficient eSF restored lubrication function. PMID:22605527

  2. Effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines on chondrogenesis of equine mesenchymal stromal cells derived from bone marrow or synovial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, M N; Schumacher, J; Misk, N; Dhar, M S

    2016-11-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into cells of mesenchymal lineage, such as chondrocytes, and have potential for use in regeneration of equine articular cartilage. MSCs instilled intra-articularly would be exposed to the inflamed environment associated with equine osteoarthritis (OA), which may compromise their function and ability to heal a cartilaginous defect. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of equine adult MSCs to differentiate into chondrocytes when stimulated with pro-inflammatory cytokines. MSCs derived from equine bone marrow (BM) and from synovial fluid (SF) were cultured in chondrogenic induction medium containing transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. BM-derived MSCs (BMMSCs) and SF-derived MSCs (SFMSCs) were stimulated with 100 ng/mL interferon (IFN)-γ and 10 ng/mL tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Chondrogenic differentiation was measured quantitatively with the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) assay and qualitatively by immunofluorescence (IF) for SOX-9, TGF-β1, aggrecan and collagen II. The viability of equine MSCs was maintained in the presence of IFN-γ and TNF-α, but production of GAGs from both types of MSCs was decreased in stimulated medium. Exposure of BMMSCs to pro-inflammatory cytokines reduced the levels of SOX-9, TGF-β1, aggrecan and collagen II, whereas exposure of SFMSCs to these cytokines reduced the levels of aggrecan only. These data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines do not affect proliferation of MSCs, but could inhibit chondrogenesis of MSCs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Synovial fluid proteins are required for the induction of interleukin-1β production by monosodium urate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanu, A; Oliviero, F; Gruaz, L; Galozzi, P; Luisetto, R; Ramonda, R; Burger, D; Punzi, L

    2016-10-01

    Monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition in gouty joints promotes the release of inflammatory mediators, in particular interleukin (IL)-1β. The induction of IL-1β production by MSU crystals requires a co-stimulus. The objective of this study was to determine which part of the synovial fluid (SF) provides co-stimulation to MSU crystals to induce IL-1β in macrophages. The lipidic fraction (LF) and the protein fraction (PF) were isolated from the SF of patients with arthropathies. The PF was subfractionated according to different molecular weight (MW) ranges. THP-1 cells or human primary monocytes were stimulated with MSU crystals in the presence or absence of SF or SF fractions. IL-1β and IL-8 production and IL-1β mRNA expression were assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Exposure of monocytes/macrophages to MSU crystals alone induced the moderate release of IL-8 but not of IL-1β. The production of IL-1β required the presence of both SF from patients with inflammatory arthritis (SFi) and MSU crystals. SF from patients with non-inflammatory arthritis, that is patients with osteoarthritis (OA), did not affect the IL-1β production but slightly enhanced the secretion of IL-8. Both MSU crystals and SFi were required for the induction of the IL-1β transcript, which was not expressed in the presence of either stimulus alone. SFi fractionation demonstrated that the MSU crystal co-stimulus was contained in the PF of SFi with MW > 50 kDa but not in the LF. This study shows that the SF of inflammatory arthritis patients, including gout patients, contains proteins required for the induction of IL-1β by MSU crystals in macrophages whereas lipids are not involved.

  4. Improving the accuracy of synovial fluid analysis in the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection with simple and inexpensive biomarkers: C-reactive protein and adenosine deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, R; Serrano, P; Gomes Dias, J; Oliveira, J C; Oliveira, A

    2017-03-01

    The aims of this study were to increase the diagnostic accuracy of the analysis of synovial fluid in the differentiation of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) by the addition of inexpensive biomarkers such as the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), adenosine deaminase (ADA), alpha-2-macrogloblulin (α2M) and procalcitonin. Between January 2013 and December 2015, synovial fluid and removed implants were requested from 143 revision total joint arthroplasties. A total of 55 patients met inclusion criteria of the receipt of sufficient synovial fluid, tissue samples and removed implants for analysis. The diagnosis of PJI followed the definition from a recent International Consensus Meeting to create two groups of patients; septic and aseptic. Using receiver operating characteristic curves we determined the cutoff values and diagnostic accuracy for each marker. There were 23 PJIs and 32 patients with aseptic loosening. The levels of total leucocyte count, proportion of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs), CRP, ADA and α2M in the synovial fluid were all significantly higher in those with a PJI than in those with aseptic loosening. The levels of procalcitonin were comparable in the two groups. Cutoff values for the optimal performance in the diagnosis of infection were: total leucocyte count > 1463 cells/μL (sensitivity (Sens) 100%, specificity (Spec) 71.9%, positive predictive value (PPV) 71.9%, negative predictive value (NPV) 100%); proportion of PMNs > 81% (Sens 78.3%, Spec 75.0%, PPV 69.2%, NPV 82.8%); CRP > 6.7mg/L (Sens 78.3%, Spec 93.8%, PPV 90.0%, NPV 85.7%); ADA > 61U/L (Sens 78.3%, Spec 96.9%, PPV 94.7%, NPV 86.1%) and α2M > 958 mg/L (Sens 47.8%, Spec 96.9%, PPV 91.7%, NPV 72.1%). The addition of a raised level of CRP or ADA to the total leukocyte count increased the specificity: total leukocyte count > 1463 cells/μL and CRP > 6.7mg/L (Sens 78.3%, Spec 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 86.5%) or with ADA > 61U/L (Sens 78.3%, Spec 96.9%, PPV 94.7%, NPV 86.1%). The total

  5. Comparison of manual and automated cell counts in EDTA preserved synovial fluids. Storage has little influence on the results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, M; Rosas, J; Iborra, J; Manero, H; Pascual, E

    1997-10-01

    To determine the precision and agreement of synovial fluid (SF) cell counts done manually and with automated counters, and to determine the degree of variability of the counts in SF samples, kept in the tubes used for routine white blood cell (WBC) counts--which use liquid EDTA as anticoagulant--at 24 and 48 hours at 4 degrees C, and at room temperature. To determine precision, cell counts were repeated 10 times--both manually and by an automated counter--in a SF sample of low, medium, and high cellularity. The variances were calculated to determine the interobserver variation in two manual (M1,M2) and two automated cell counts (C1,C2). The agreement between a manual (M1) and automated counter (C1) results, was analysed by the Bland and Altman method and the difference against the mean of the two methods was plotted. Then, the mean difference between the two methods was estimated and the standard deviation of the difference. To determine the effects of storage, SF samples were kept in a refrigerator at 4 degrees C, and at room temperature; cell counts were done manually (M1) and automatically (C1) at 24 and 48 hours and the changes analysed by the Bland and Altman method. The variances were compared using an F test. (1) Precision. With the manual technique, the coefficients of variation were 27.9%, 14%, and 10.7% when used for counting the SF with low (270), medium (6200), and high cellularities (25,000). With the automated technique the coefficients of variation were 20%, 3.4%, and 2.9% in the same SF samples. In the fluids of medium and high cellularity, the variances of the automated cell counts were significatively lower (F test, p automated counter. (4) Influence of storage. The coulter counts of SF samples preserved at 4 degrees C showed less variance (F test, p Automated cell count of the SF offers advantages: it gives higher precision and consumes less time. The stability of the samples preserved in the EDTA tubes used for routine WBC counts is of

  6. Oral rosmarinic acid-enhanced Mentha spicata modulates synovial fluid biomarkers of inflammation in horses challenged with intra-articular LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, W; Fletcher, R S; Kott, L S

    2012-10-01

    A biological extract of high-rosmarinic acid mint (HRAM) has previously demonstrated inhibitory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), nitric oxide (NO) and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release in vitro. This study was undertaken to determine whether HRAM added to feed produces similar effects in horses challenged with intra-articular LPS. Eight horses received HRAM (0 or 28.1 ± 1.3 g/day; n = 4 per group) in their feed for 24 days in a blinded manner. On day 21, all horses received an intra-articular injection of LPS (0.3 ng) into their left or right intercarpal joint. Synovial fluid (SF) samples were taken on postinjection day (PID)-21 (i.e. prior to commencement of supplementation), PID0, PID0.25, PID0.5, PID1 and PID3 and analysed for PGE(2), GAG, NO, protein and total nucleated cells counts. Blood biochemistry and haematology screens were conducted at PID-21, PID0, PID1 and PID3. There was a significant reduction in LPS-induced PGE(2) and GAG in SF in horses supplemented with HRAM compared with controls and a tendency to increase complement recognition protein accumulation in synovial fluid of HRAM horses. Plasma from HRAM horses had reduced total white blood cells, segmented neutrophils (compared with baseline concentrations) and lymphocytes (compared with controls), and increased SF nucleated cell count (compared with baseline concentrations and controls). It is concluded that HRAM offered as part of the feed alter biomarkers of inflammation in SF of LPS-challenged horses. Larger studies that seek to clarify effects of HRAM on synovial fluid cell counts and possible role of HRAM-induced interference with complement signalling are warranted. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Synovial fluid sedimentation in the immobile patient: a commentary on modern septic arthritis and the addition of a new variable confounding diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham G

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gregory Cunningham,1 Brendan Ricciardo21Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; 2Bunbury Regional Hospital, Bunbury, Western Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Septic arthritis is a serious cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances, monoarticular and polyarticular septic arthritis (SA have a mortality rate of approximately 11% and 30%, respectively. SA has a 40% risk of permanent loss of joint function. Diagnosis of SA is difficult, given that no rapidly available individual test proves 100% sensitive or 100% specific. There are no previous reports on the phenomenon of synovial fluid sedimentation in an immobile patient, although the occurrence has been identified in vitro. This commentary also presents an extended report of a patient who had been immobile and supine for 24 hours before her right knee was aspirated and treated for septic arthritis. Due to her immobilization, the synovial fluid had settled. The color and opacity of the sequential aliquots from one arthrocentesis was noted to change from light straw-colored, to thick opaque purulent material. Laboratory reports showed increasing white cell counts (WCCs, from 2.6 × 109 to 78 × 109 between the sequential samples. This demonstrates a newly identified phenomenon of sedimentation. This might have led to a diagnostic difficulty, had the knee not been fully aspirated. Aspiration serves as a diagnostic tool, because it collects a sample, but it also serves as a treatment measure, because it removes purulent material. Complete aspiration of the joint should be performed for full therapeutic benefit and to avoid the potential diagnostic confusion of a falsely low WCC due to this newly identified phenomenon of synovial fluid sedimentation in the immobile patient.Keywords: septic arthritis, inflammatory arthritis, joint, sedimentation, orthopedic

  8. Diagnostic Value of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in Synovial Fluid for Identifying Osteoarthritis in the Distal Interphalangeal Joint in Horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zrimšek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to examine the diagnostic potential of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 for identifying osteoarthritis in the horse. Horses were divided into two groups - a positive group consisting of 28 horses with cartilage damage in the distal interphalangeal joint and a negative group of 17 control horses. Clinical examination of the horses included evaluation of lameness, flexion test, diagnostic nerve blocks, X-ray and arthroscopy. MMP-2 and MMP-9 were detected in synovial fluid using gelatin zymography. Monomers of MMP-2 and MMP-9 appeared not to be specific for osteoarthritis since they also occurred in control samples. In contrast, detection of active forms of MMPs was found to be more effective than radiological examination in identifying horses with osteoarthritis, on the grounds of higher sensitivity. Active forms of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were observed with 88.24% and 82.35% specificity respectively, indicating the high accuracy in correctly identifying horses without osteoarthritis. Thus, as an addition to clinical examination, detection of MMPs could improve the diagnosis of osteoarthritis. Detection of active forms of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was evaluated as an additional diagnostic tool in diagnosing osteoarthritis, especially in the case of a negative X-ray result. The proportions of animals with confirmed osteoarthritis, which tested positive, were found to be 81.82% and 76.92%, respectively. The results of this study confirm that active forms of MMP occur in synovial fluid of osteoarthritic joints more frequently than in synovial fluid from normal joints of the horse. Detection of active forms of MMP-2 and MMP-9 is shown to have an important diagnostic potential.

  9. Comparison of detection procedures of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, and Mycoplasma hyorhinis in lungs, tonsils, and synovial fluid of slaughtered pigs and their distributions in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhanon, Metta; Tummaruk, Padet; Thongkamkoon, Pacharee; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether direct PCR (DP) gave similar results to culture prior to PCR (CPP) for detecting mycoplasmas in different types of pig tissues. A total of 724 samples obtained from lungs, tonsils, or synovial fluids from 270 slaughtered pigs were used. The history of clinical signs, lung score, and the presence of joint lesions were recorded during sample collection. The rates of detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, and Mycoplasma hyorhinis using both procedures were evaluated. The overall prevalences of M. hyopneumoniae, M. hyosynoviae, and M. hyorhinis were 40.3%, 12.3%, and 64.6%, respectively, and the detection rate depended on the sample type and the procedure used. With lung tissue, DP gave a higher detection rate for M. hyopneumoniae (77.4%) than CPP (38.5%). M. hyorhinis was detected by CPP at 15.6% and 18.1% and by DP at 31.5% and 5.2%, respectively. The positive rate derived from tonsil from CPP was closed to that of DP. Using synovial fluid could not yield any positive M. hyorhinis from CPP whereas 37.2% was positive from DP. In contrast, using sample tissue from lung and tonsil by CPP could show much higher positive number than that of DP. There was a significant relationship between joint lesion and M. hyorhinis detection by DP (P hyopneumoniae and M. hyorhinis detection by DP and CPP, respectively. Tonsil was likely the community of persistent M. hyosynoviae and M. hyorhinis with highly detection by CPP. Synovial fluid was apparently unsuitable for mycoplasmal culture. The accuracy of mycoplasmal detection may depend upon the type of sample relevant to the detection procedure used.

  10. Synovial Fluid Profile at the Time of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Its Association With Cartilage Matrix Composition 3 Years After Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Keiko; Huebner, Janet L; Stabler, Thomas V; Tanaka, Matthew; McCulloch, Charles E; Lobach, Iryna; Lane, Nancy E; Kraus, Virginia B; Ma, C Benjamin; Li, Xiaojuan

    2018-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament tears can lead to posttraumatic osteoarthritis. In addition to biomechanical factors, changes in biochemical profiles within the knee joint after injury and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) may play a role in accelerating joint degeneration. Hypothesis/Purpose: It was hypothesized that cartilage matrix composition after ACLR is associated with the degree of inflammatory response after initial injury. This study evaluated the association between the inflammatory response after injury-as indicated by cytokine, metalloproteinase, and cartilage degradation marker concentrations in synovial fluid-and articular cartilage degeneration, measured by T1ρ and T2 quantitative magnetic resonance imaging up to 3 years after ACLR. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Twenty-six subjects from a longitudinal cohort study who underwent ACLR at a mean 8.5 weeks after injury (range, 4-19 weeks) had synovial fluid aspirated at the time of surgery. Immunoassays quantified biomarkers in synovial fluid. T1ρ and T2 values of articular cartilage were calculated with magnetic resonance scans acquired prior to surgery and at 6 months and 1, 2, and 3 years after surgery. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated among the various biomarkers. K-means clustering was used to group subjects with similar biomarker profiles. Generalized estimating equations were used to find the overall differences in T1ρ and T2 values throughout these first 3 years after surgery between the clusters while controlling for other factors. Significant and strong correlations were observed between several cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor α) and 2 matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1 and MMP-3) ( P matrix protein, and sulfated glycosaminoglycan ( P values in the medial tibial and patellar cartilage over the first 3 years after ACLR. At the time of ACLR surgery, profiles of synovial fluid inflammatory cytokines, degradative enzymes

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Obtained from Synovial Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells on a Matrigel Coating Exhibited Enhanced Proliferation and Differentiation Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yang-Peng; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Rui; Li, Wen-Yu; Zheng, You-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) serve as a promising source for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. However, optimal methods for transforming iPSCs into MSCs and the characteristics of iPSC-MSCs obtained from different methods remain poorly understood. In this study, we developed a one-step method for obtaining iPSC-MSCs (CD146+STRO-1+ MSCs) from human synovial fluid MSC-derived induced iPSCs (SFMSC-iPSCs). CD146-STRO-1-SFMSCs were reprogram...

  12. Development and validation of an HPLC-MS/MS method for the analysis of dexamethasone from pig synovial fluid using dried matrix spotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Chad D; Laine, Derek F; Zimmer, Jennifer Sd; Johnson, Casey Jl; Sheaff, Chrystal N; Carpenter, Anna; Needham, Shane R

    2010-11-01

    Dried matrix spot techniques were employed to validate an HPLC-MS/MS assay for the determination of dexamethasone in clear Yorkshire pig synovial fluid using 15 µl of sample. We have adopted the term dried matrix spot to indicate that the techniques used for dried blood spots can be applied to nonblood matrices. The dried matrix spot method employs a color-indicating process developed at Alturas Analytics that enhances the ability to analyze transparent fluids spotted onto collection paper by allowing the analyst to visually verify the location of the dried sample spot. The method was shown to be accurate (±4.3%) and precise (14.2% at the LLOQ and ≤10.0% at all other concentrations) across the dynamic range of the assay. The method shows the potential application of dried matrix spot techniques for the analysis of transparent biological fluids.

  13. Development of a synovial fluid analogue with bio-relevant rheology for wear testing of orthopaedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alan M; Fleming, Leigh; Wudebwe, Uchena; Bowen, James; Grover, Liam M

    2014-04-01

    The rheological properties of synovial fluid (SF) are crucial to the performance of joint prostheses. During the development of joint prostheses, wear tests are performed, which simulate joint movements in diluted solutions (usually between 25 and 33% v/v) of bovine serum which has very different rheological properties compared with native SF, where rheology is maintained by hyaluronan. Consequently, there is a need to develop a more suitable artificial SF. In this study, we used rheological techniques to understand SF flow properties which provided an insight into the mechanical behaviour required of a practical SF analogue. Steady-shear viscosity measurements were performed to reveal changes as a function of shear rate. To analyse the viscoelastic properties small deformation oscillatory measurements of storage modulus (G') loss modulus (G″) and complex viscosity (η(⁎)) were made. The rheological properties of the SF where compared with those of the polysaccharides sodium alginate, gellan gum and mixtures of both polymers. Initial results revealed classic shear thinning behaviour for the SF with a small Newtonian plateau at low shear rates with a gradual reduction in viscosity with increasing shear rate. Viscoelasticity measurements also showed that at low frequencies of oscillation there was a viscous response with G″ greater than G' and at higher frequencies there was an elastic response. Rheological properties were found to be similar to that of a 50:50 mix of 2% w/v high molecular weight alginate and 0.75% w/v gellan gum. Importantly, the lubricating behaviour of the serum differed significantly from the biopolymer blend over a full range of sliding velocities. The biopolymer blend was shown to lubricate the opposing surfaces more effectively. This difference was attributed to the more rapid alignment of the polysaccharide during shear when compared with the bovine albumin (the most abundant protein in serum), which typically exhibits a globular

  14. Identification of bacterial antigens and super antigens in synovial fluid of patients with arthritis: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samileh Noorbakhsh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Background: An accurate and prompt diagnosis of bacterial arthritis is essential for earlier treatment and a good outcome. Superantigens produced by Staph. Aureus are among the most lethal toxins. The paper objective was Identification of common bacterial antigens and S.aureus superantigens in synovial fluid (SF of children with negative culture and direct smear for other bacteria except for S.aureus. Methods: In this cross-sectional study a total of 62 patients with a mean age of 11 ± 3.8 years (range: 5 months- 16 years with acute arthritis in pediatric and orthopedic wards of Rasoul hospital (2008-2010 were studied. Three common bacterial antigens (e.g. S.Pneumonia, H.influenza, N. meningitis using LPA (latex particle antigen and Staphylococcal superantigens (TSST1; Enterotoxin A; B; C using ELISA method (ABcam; USA were identified in 60 adequate SF samples with negative culture and negative direct smears (for other bacteria except for S.aureus. Staphylococcal superantigens were compared with S.aureus infection (positive culture or direct smear. Results: Positive bacterial antigens (LPA test were found in 4 cases including two S. Pneumonia, one N.meningitis, and one H.influenza. S.aureus was diagnosed in 7 cases including 4 positive cultures and 3 positive smears. Staphylococcal superantigens (toxins were found in 73% of SF samples. Some cases had 2 or 3 types of toxins. S.aureus toxins were reported in 47% of culture negative SF samples. Positive TSST1, Enterotoxin B, Enterotoxin A, and Enterotoxin C were found in 47% (n= 28, 18% (n= 10, 39% (n= 22, and 39% (n=21 of cases respectively. The most common type of superantigens was TSST1; and Enterotoxin A was the less common type. Except for Enterotoxin A, no relation between positive S.aureus culture and positive tests for superantigens in SF was found. Conclusion: S.aureus has a prominent role in septic arthritis. S.aureus toxins might have a prominent role in arthritis with

  15. Metabolic profiling of synovial fluid in a unilateral ovine model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee suggests biomarkers for early osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickiewicz, Beata; Heard, Bryan J; Chau, Johnny K; Chung, May; Hart, David A; Shrive, Nigel G; Frank, Cyril B; Vogel, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    Joint injuries and subsequent osteoarthritis (OA) are the leading causes of chronic joint disease. In this work, we explore the possibility of applying magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based metabolomics to detect host responses to an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction injury in synovial fluid in an ovine model. Using multivariate statistical analysis, we were able to distinguish post-injury joint samples (ACL and sham surgery) from the uninjured control samples, and as well the ACL surgical samples from sham surgery. In all samples there were 65 metabolites quantified, of which six could be suggested as biomarkers for early post-injury degenerative changes in the knee joints: isobutyrate, glucose, hydroxyproline, asparagine, serine, and uridine. Our results raise a cautionary note indicating that surgical interventions into the knee can result in metabolic alterations that need to be distinguished from those caused by the early onset of OA. Our findings illustrate the potential application of metabolomics as a diagnostic and prognostic tool for detection of injuries to the knee joint. The ability to detect a unique pattern of metabolic changes in the synovial fluid of sheep offers the possibility of extending the approach to precision medicine protocols in patient populations in the future. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Synovial Fluid Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Creatinine Ratio Valproic Acid Vancomycin Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) VAP Vitamin A Vitamin B12 and Folate Vitamin D ... et. al. (Updated 2012 February 7). Septic Arthritis Aspiration Techniques and Indications for Surgery. Medscape Reference [On- ...

  17. Synovial fluid analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the rheumatic diseases. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 257. Review Date 4/18/2017 Updated by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic ...

  18. Synovial sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucari S.C. Vlok

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is a malignant, predominantly juxta-articular, soft-tissue tumour representing approximately 10% of all soft-tissue sarcomas. Frequently initially incorrectly diagnosed as a benign lesion, it should be considered as a diagnosis when a young adult patient presents with a calcified juxta-articular soft-tissue mass of insidious onset.

  19. Dynamic detection of non-protein-bound strychnine and brucine in rabbit muscle and synovial fluid after topical application of total Strychnos alkaloid patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huaibo; Yan, Miao; Li, Huande; Xun, Tianrong; Deng, Yang; Zhao, Yeye; Deng, Long

    2014-04-01

    Semen Strychni, a known toxic drug in Chinese pharmacopoeia, is notable for its therapeutic effects on local muscle and joint pain. However, oral administration can be risky. Topically administered drugs accumulate in the topical muscles and knee joints without any major increase in plasma levels; only non-protein-bound drugs in the biological fluids of target tissues are effective for therapeutic effects. A sensitive and rapid ultra performance liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) method coupled with a microdialysis technique was developed to determine the non-protein-bound strychnine (Str) and brucine (Bru) in rabbit muscle and synovial fluid microdialysate. The UPLC separation was carried out using a 1.7μm BEH C18 column (50 mm × 2.1 mm) with a mobile phase consisting of methanol: water (29.5:70.5, v/v) with 0.1% formic acid and 20 mM ammonium acetate in water. The method was validated at concentrations ranging from 0.58 ng/ml to 467.20 ng/ml for Str and from 0.42 ng/ml to 422.40 ng/ml for Bru. Intra-day and inter-day accuracy ranged from 99.1% to 103.2% for Str and from 95.8% to 108.8% for Bru with intra-day and inter-day precision within 9.7%. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine non-protein-bound Str and Bru, and the analysates concentration remained stable in rabbit muscle and synovial fluid after topical application of total Strychnos alkaloid patches, which indicated that total Strychnos alkaloid patches could substitute for the traditional oral administration of Semen Strychni. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Attenuated synovial fluid ghrelin levels are linked with cartilage damage, meniscus injury, and clinical symptoms in patients with knee anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yu-Cong; Chen, Liang-Hua; Ye, Yong-Liang; Yang, Guang-Gang; Mao, Zheng; Liu, Dan-Dan; Chen, Jun-Qi; Chen, Jing-Jie; Liu, Gang

    2016-12-01

    The meniscus injury and post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis (PTOA) following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesions often cause great burdens to patients. Ghrelin, a recently identified 28-amino-acid peptide, has been shown to inhibit inflammation and perform as a growth factor for chondrocyte. This study was aimed at investigating ghrelin concentration in synovial fluid and its association with the degree of meniscus injury, articular degeneration, and clinical severity in patients suffering from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. 61 ACL deficiency patients admitted to our hospital were drafted in the current study. The Noyes scale and Mankin scores were used to assess articular cartilage damage arthroscopically and histopathologically, respectively. The Lysholm scores and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective scores were utilized to evaluate the clinical severity. The radiological severity of meniscus injury was assessed by MR imaging. Serum and synovial fluid ghrelin levels were determined using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cartilage degradation markers collagen type II C-telopeptide (CTX-II) and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in addition to inflammatory markers interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were also examined. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was performed and the area under curve (AUC) was calculated to assess the diagnostic value of ghrelin levels for the prediction of the MRI grading for meniscus injury by comparing with other biomarkers. SF ghrelin levels were positively related to Lysholm and IKDC scores. PTOA patients with grade 3 showed significantly decreased levels of ghrelin in SF compared with those with grade 2. The ghrelin levels in SF were negatively related to MRI signal grades for meniscus injury. SF ghrelin levels were also inversely associated with Noyes scale and Mankin scores, and levels of inflammation markers IL-6, TNF-α, and

  1. MR findings of synovial disease in children and young adults: Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee K.; Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Merrow, Arnold C.; Emery, Kathleen H. [Cincinnati Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-One [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Synovium is the thin membranous lining of a joint. It produces synovial fluid, which lubricates and nourishes the cartilage and bone in the joint capsule. Synovial diseases in children can be classified as normal structures as potential sources of pathology (synovial folds: plicae, infrapatellar fat pad clefts), noninfectious synovial proliferation (juvenile idiopathic arthritis, hemophilic arthropathy, lipoma arborescens, synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, reactive synovitis), infectious synovial proliferation (pyogenic arthritis, tuberculous arthritis), deposition disease (gouty arthropathy), vascular malformation, malignancy (metastasis) and intra-/periarticular cysts and cyst-like structures. Other intra-articular neoplasms, such as intra-articular synovial sarcoma, can mimic synovial disease in children. (orig.)

  2. Patients with inflammatory arthritic diseases harbor elevated serum and synovial fluid levels of free and immune-complexed glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaller, Monica; Stohl, William; Benoit, Vivian

    2006-01-01

    In K/BxN mice, anti-glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI) IgG antibodies (Abs) cause joint-specific inflammation and destruction. Anti-G6PI Abs are also present in humans with inflammatory arthritis, especially among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A contributing factor to the induction...... of such autoantibodies may be upregulated expression of the corresponding antigen G6PI in affected tissues and/or increased levels of G6PI in the circulation. To determine G6PI levels and the presence of free G6PI and/or G6PI-containing immune complexes in sera and synovial fluids (SF) of patients with different...

  3. Progression of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae infection in three pig herds. Development of tonsillar carrier state, arthritis and antibodies in serum and synovial fluid in pigs from birth to slaughter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagedorn-Olsen, T.; Nielsen, N.C.; Friis, N.F.

    1999-01-01

    In this investigation, natural infection with Mycoplasma hyosynoviae was followed in groups of individual pigs in three different herds with regard to occurrence of tonsillar carrier state, clinical arthritis and development of antibodies in serum and in synovial fluid. Antibodies were detected...... by a polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed for experimental use. The infection with M hyosynoviae progressed very differently in the three herds investigated. In one herd, the infection was apparently limited to adult Figs. In a second herd, all pigs became tonsillar carriers of M....... hyosynoviae, but no mycoplasma-related arthritis nor any serological response was demonstrated within the growing-finishing period. In the third herd investigated, tonsillar infection was detected in all pigs, clinical cases of M. hyosynoviae arthritis followed and a moderate serological response was observed...

  4. Coexpression of CD69 and HLADR activation markers on synovial fluid T lymphocytes of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis: a three-colour cytometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AFELTRA, ANTONELLA; GALEAZZI, MAURO; DOMENICO SEBASTIANI, GIAN; MARIA FERRI, GIOVANNI; CACCAVO, DOMENICO; ASSUNTA ADDESSI, MARIA; MARCOLONGO, ROBERTO; BONOMO, LORENZO

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the coexpression of very early (CD69), early (CD25) and late (HLADR) antigens and to analyse the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of such activation markers on synovial fluid (SF) and peripheral blood (PB) lymphocytes of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other types of chronic synovitis (OCS). A three colour cytometric analysis was performed using a peridinin chlorophyll protein conjugated anti-CD3 antibody in combination with fluorescein isothiocyanate or phycoerythrin labelled anti-CD69, anti-HLADR, anti-CD25 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). A T cell gating method was utilized, so that three sets of bivariant dot plot quadrant displays were obtained (CD69/HLADR, CD69/CD25, CD25/HLADR). A large percentage of SF T lymphocytes in RA showed the coexpression of very early and late activation antigens (CD3 + CD69 + HLADR +), whereas CD3 + CD69 + CD25 + bearing cells and CD3 + CD25 + HLADR + lymphocytes were only a small percentage. Similar results were obtained in patients with OCS, although to a lesser extent. No statistically significant differences in MFI of CD69 and HLADR positive SF T cells between RA and OCS were observed. The CD69 + CD25-HLADR + T cell subset is the most commonly represented in the synovial environment, among those we have evaluated; this phenotype may be characteristic of chronic inflammatory arthritis. PMID:9462230

  5. V2 regions of 16S ribosomal RNA used as a molecular marker for the species identification of streptococci in peripheral blood and synovial fluid from patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Vasey, F B; Mahfood, J P; Valeriano, J; Kanik, K S; Anderson, B E; Bridgeford, P H

    1999-10-01

    To detect the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of 3 streptococcal species in the peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection targets bacterial 16S rRNA, which is present in bacteria at high copy numbers. The 3 species-specific primers for group A streptococci (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes), group B streptococci (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae), and Streptococcus pneumoniae were designed from the fragments of highly variable V2 regions of 16S rRNA. Total RNA was prepared from whole peripheral blood and joint fluid obtained from patients with PsA and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). All positive PCR reactions were then sequenced with a Pharmacia ALF DNA sequencing system. Our data in 19 PsA patients showed that 7 peripheral blood samples were positive for GAS (P = 0.006 versus GAS-positive RA patients [n = 0], by Fisher's exact test), and 2 were also positive for GBS. One synovial fluid sample from a PsA patient was positive for GAS. S pneumoniae was absent from all specimens. Seventeen patients with RA were PCR negative for the 3 streptococcal species. Peripheral blood from a patient with inflammatory bowel disease was positive for GAS. The presence of GAS 16S rRNA in the peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with PsA supports the concept that PsA is a reactive arthritis to certain streptococci.

  6. Serum and synovial fluid C-reactive protein level variations in dogs with degenerative joint disease and their relationships with physiological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boal, S; Miguel Carreira, L

    2015-09-01

    Degenerative joint disease (DJD) is a progressive, chronic joint disease with an inflammatory component promoting an acute phase protein (APP) response. C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the most important APPs, used as an inflammation marker in human, but not veterinary medicine. The study was developed in a sample of 48 dogs (n = 48) with DJD and aimed to: 1) identify and quantify the synovial fluid CRP (SFCRP) in these specimens using a validated ELISA test for serum CRP (SCRP) detection and quantification; and 2) to study the possible relationship between SCRP and SFCRP levels variations in DJD patients evaluating the influence of some physical parameters such as gender, body weight, pain level, DJD grade, and the physical activity (PA) of the patients. Statistical analysis considered the results significant for p values <0.05. Our study showed that it is possible to detect and quantify SFCRP levels in DJD patients using a previously validated canine SCRP ELISA test, allowing us to point out a preliminary reference value for SFCRP in patients with DJD. Although, individuals with DJD presents SCRP values within the normal reference range and the SFCRP levels were always lower. Obesity, pain, and the DJD grade presented by the patients are conditions which seem to influence the SCRP levels but not the SFCRP.

  7. Alterações no líquido sinovial do joelho de cães com osteoartrite induzida pelo modelo Pond e Nuki Synovial fluid changes in the dog knee with osteoarthritis induced by Pond and Nuki model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. De Biasi

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se as alterações do líquido sinovial do joelho de 19 cães submetidos à desmotomia unilateral do cruzado cranial, baseado no modelo experimental de Pond & Nuki, colhido e analisado aos 30 dias de pós-operatório. Cinco animais foram analisados novamente aos 90 dias de pós-operatório. As características analisadas foram volume, cor, aspecto, densidade, pH, proteínas, fibrinogênio, coágulo de mucina, contagem de hemácias e contagem total e diferencial de células nucleadas. O líquido sinovial apresentou padrão inflamatório que persistiu durante todo o período de observação, com efusão articular. Houve aumento na contagem de células nucleadas e na concentração de fibrinogênio aos 90 dias. A qualidade da precipitação da mucina apresentou melhora aos 90 dias quando comparada à de 30 dias, porém ainda marcadamente anormal. Foi possível concluir que até 90 dias de pós-operatório no modelo utilizado o fluído sinovial apresenta características inflamatórias e não degenerativas.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in knee synovial fluid of 19 dogs with experimentally-induced cranial cruciate ligament rupture, based on Pond & Nuki model. Synovial fluid was achieved and analyzed at 30 days postoperative time. Five animals had further synovial fluid evaluation at 90 days postoperatively. The characteristics observed were color, turbidity, density, pH, protein, fibrinogen, mucin clot, cell count and citology. The synovial fluid exhibited an inflammatory pattern during the postoperative observation time and joint effusion was observed. An increased number of nucleated cells and increased fibrinogen concentration were observed at 90 days when compared to 30 days after desmotomy. Although severely abnormal, an improvement of the mucin clot was observed at 90 days. It can be concluded that synovial fluid in this experimental model, showed inflammatory and no degenerative changes until 90 days

  8. Wide-field synovial fluid imaging using polarized lens-free on-chip microscopy for point-of-care diagnostics of gout (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibo; Lee, Seung Yoon; Zhang, Yun; Furst, Daniel; Fitzgerald, John; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Gout and pseudogout are forms of crystal arthropathy caused by monosodium urate (MSU) and calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate (CPPD) crystals in the joint, respectively, that can result in painful joints. Detecting the unique-shaped, birefringent MSU/CPPD crystals in a synovial fluid sample using a compensated polarizing microscope has been the gold-standard for diagnosis since the 1960's. However, this can be time-consuming and inaccurate, especially if there are only few crystals in the fluid. The high-cost and bulkiness of conventional microscopes can also be limiting for point-of-care diagnosis. Lens-free on-chip microscopy based on digital holography routinely achieves high-throughput and high-resolution imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable design. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, polarized lens-free on-chip imaging of MSU and CPPD crystals over a wide field-of-view (FOV ~ 20.5 mm2, i.e., slide, after which a quarter-wave-plate and an angle-mismatched linear polarizer are used to analyze the transmitted light. Two lens-free holograms of the MSU/CPPD sample are taken, with the sample rotated by 90°, to rule out any non-birefringent objects within the specimen. A phase-recovery algorithm is also used to improve the reconstruction quality, and digital pseudo-coloring is utilized to match the color and contrast of the lens-free image to that of a gold-standard microscope image to ease the examination by a rheumatologist or a laboratory technician, and to facilitate computerized analysis.

  9. Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis-DNA in synovial fluid: evaluation of the sensitivity of different DNA extraction methods and amplification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freise, Julia; Bernau, Iris; Meier, Sabine; Zeidler, Henning; Kuipers, Jens G

    2009-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and ligase chain reaction (LCR) are used in research for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (C. tr.) in synovial fluid (SF). However there is no standardized system for diagnostic use in clinical practice, therefore this study aimed at determining the molecular biology method best suited to detect C. tr. from SF. SF samples were spiked with C. tr. elementary bodies (EB) and human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMo) persistently infected with C. tr. in vitro to evaluate the sensitivity of different molecular biology methods and assays. Five different DNA-extraction methods were tested: 1) Alkaline lysis, 2) QIAex II Gel Extraction Kit+ CTAB, 3) Chelex-extraction, 4) QIAmp Tissue Kit and 5) QIAmp DNA Stool Kit. All DNA extracts were subjected to 5 different DNA amplification systems to detect C. tr.- DNA in the spiked SF samples: two C. tr. -omp1-- directed PCR, one C. tr.-plasmid-PCR, one C. tr. -16s RNA directed PCR, and one commercially available LCR (LCX), Abbott laboratories). In SF samples spiked with C. tr.-EB and with C. tr.-PBMo, alkaline lysis, detecting 1 C. tr.-EB/ml SF, 0,1 C. tr.-PBMo/ml SF and QIAmp gel extraction kit+ CTAB detecting 0,1 C. tr. -EB/ml SF, 1 C. tr.-PBMo/ml, respectively, allowed most sensitive detection of the organism in combination with the C. tr.- omp1-(152 bp) PCR. Sensitivity decreased in all methods after storage of the DNA of C. tr.- dilution series at -20 degrees C for 4 months by at least one log phase. The sensitivity to detect C. tr.- DNA from SF is highly dependent on the DNA extraction method and the detection system applied. Alkaline lysis as well as the QIAmp Gel extraction kit + CTAB in combination with C. tr.- omp1 - (152 bp) PCR evolved as the most sensitive methods to identify C. tr. in serial dilutions.

  10. Cell source-dependent in vivo immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells derived from the bone marrow and synovial fluid of minipigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won-Jae [College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Gyeongnam (Korea, Republic of); Hah, Young-Sool [Biomedical Research Institute, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Ock, Sun-A. [Animal Biotechnology Division, National Institute of Animal Science, RDA, Suwon 441-706, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Hoon; Jeon, Ryong-Hoon; Park, Ji-Sung [College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Gyeongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Il [Department of Internal Medicine and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Na-Young [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 4S7 (Canada); Rho, Gyu-Jin [College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Gyeongnam (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Gyeongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung-Lim, E-mail: sllee@gnu.ac.kr [College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Gyeongnam (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Gyeongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    The in vitro differentiation and immunosuppressive capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from synovial fluid (SF-MSCs) and bone marrow extract (BM-MSCs) in an isogenic background of minipigs were comparatively analyzed in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The proliferation capacity and expression of pluripotent transcription factors (Oct3/4 and Sox2) were significantly (P<0.05) higher in SF-MSCs than in BM-MSCs. The differentiation capacity of SF-MSCs into adipocytes, osteocytes and neurocytes was significantly (P<0.05) lower than that of BM-MSCs, and the differentiation capacity of SF-MSCs into chondrocytes was significantly (P<0.05) higher than that of BM-MSCs. Systemic injection of BM- and SF-MSCs significantly (P<0.05) ameliorated the clinical symptoms of CIA mice, with SF-MSCs having significantly (P<0.05) higher clinical and histopathological recovery scores than BM-MSCs. Furthermore, the immunosuppressive properties of SF-MSCs in CIA mice were associated with increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10, and decreased levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β and osteoclast-related sRANKL. In conclusion, SF-MSCs exhibited eminent pluripotency and differentiation capacity into chondrocytes, addition to substantial in vivo immunosuppressive capacity by elevating IL-10 and reducing IL-1β levels in CIA mice. - Highlights: • Immunosuppressive capacity of BM-, SM-, and SF-MSCs was evaluated in an RA model. • Proliferation, pluripotency and chondrogenic differentiation capacity were higher in SF-MSCs. • SF-MSCs exhibited improved therapeutic effects than BM-MSCs. • SF-MSCs may have applications as immunosuppressive therapy in autoimmune diseases.

  11. Effect of arthritic synovial fluids on the expression of immunomodulatory factors by mesenchymal stem cells: an explorative in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten J.C. Leijs

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In diseased joints, the catabolic environment results in progressive joint damage. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can have immunomodulatory effect by secreting anti-inflammatory factors. To exert these effects, MSCs need to be triggered by pro-inflammatory cytokines. To explore the potential of MSCs as a treatment for diseased joints, we studied the effect of synovial fluid (SF from donors with different joint diseases and donors without joint pathology on the immunomodulatory capacities of human MSCs in vitro. We hypothesized that SF of diseased joints influences the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs. Materials & Methods: MSCs were cultured in medium with SF of six osteoarthritis (OA or six rheumatoid arthritis (RA donors and three donors without joint pathology were used as control. Gene expressions of IL-6, HGF, TNFa, TGFb1 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO were analysed. L-kynurenine concentration in conditioned medium (CM by MSCs with SF was determined as a measure of IDO activity by MSCs. Furthermore, the effect of CM with SF on proliferation of activated lymphocytes was analysed. Results: Addition of SF significantly up-regulated the mRNA expression of IL-6 and IDO in MSCs. SF(OA induced significantly higher expression of IDO than SF(control, although no difference in IDO activity of the MSCs could be shown with a L-kynurenine assay. Medium conditioned by MSCs with SF(OA or RA suppressed activated lymphocyte proliferation in vitro more than medium conditioned by MSCs without SF or with SF(control.Discussion: SF can influence the expression of genes involved in immunomodulation by MSCs and the effect on lymphocyte proliferation. We found indications for disease-specific differences between SFs but the variation between donors, even within one disease group was high. These data warrant further research to examine the potential application of MSC therapy in arthritic joints.

  12. Condromatose sinovial Synovial chondromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neylor Pace Lasmar

    2010-01-01

    the site. He was referred to a knee specialist with a suspected meniscal injury. Upon examination, we detected severe swelling of the joint with limitation of motion, pain exacerbated, and negative joint aspiration. Since simple radiographic results were normal, an MRI of the knee was requested. The MRI revealed massive accumulation of synovial fluid, together with marked synovial proliferation, especially focal thickening clumps with intermediate signal on T1 and T2, a hypointense signal on T2, and discreet suggestive of pigmented villonodular synovitis with intact meniscus and ligaments. The patient underwent arthroscopy of the left knee, which revealed whitish irregular fragments, and underwent arthrotomy with removal of the lesion and extensive synovectomy. The material was submitted to pathological examination, which showed the presence of synovial chondromatosis. Eight months after surgery, the patient presents with no complaints, with a 130° range in the left knee without joint bleeding or signs of inflammation. Synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign metaplasia of the synovial membrane, leading to the formation of cartilaginous loose bodies in the joint space. It is difficult to diagnose because 95% of the nodules, when not calcified, can be overlooked radiologically.

  13. Cystic Pleural Synovial Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Atif; Akhtar, Tasleem; Akhtar, Mumtaz; Zia, Naeem

    2016-11-01

    Fewer than 40 cases of primary pleural synovial sarcoma have been reported so far with only 3 cases of cystic synovial sarcoma including cases originating from sites other than the pleura. Here, we present an exceedingly rare case of cystic synovial sarcoma originating from the mediastinal side of the visceral pleura in a 25-year man presenting with hemoptysis. On contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), cystic synovial sarcoma and cystic thymoma were difficult to be distinguished due to mediastinal location. Histopathological examination showed spindled morphology of tumor cells with hypercellularity and nuclear atypia. As these features are associated with both monophasic fibrous synovial sarcoma and type Athymoma, immunohistochemistry was performed. Adiagnosis of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by detection of CD99 and EMAand negativity of other markers. Fluorescence in situhybridization (FISH) was not done. Surgical excision was done and followed by oncology referral.

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Obtained from Synovial Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells on a Matrigel Coating Exhibited Enhanced Proliferation and Differentiation Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yang-Peng; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Rui; Li, Wen-Yu; Zheng, You-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) serve as a promising source for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. However, optimal methods for transforming iPSCs into MSCs and the characteristics of iPSC-MSCs obtained from different methods remain poorly understood. In this study, we developed a one-step method for obtaining iPSC-MSCs (CD146+STRO-1+ MSCs) from human synovial fluid MSC-derived induced iPSCs (SFMSC-iPSCs). CD146-STRO-1-SFMSCs were reprogrammed into iPSCs by transduction with lentivirus-mediated Sox2, Oct-3/4, klf4, and c-Myc. SFMSC-iPSCs were maintained with mTeSR1 medium in Matrigel-coated culture plates. Single dissociated cells were obtained by digesting the SFMSC-iPSCs with trypsin. The dissociated cells were then plated into Matrigel-coated culture plate with alpha minimum essential medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 1× Glutamax, and the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. Cells were then passaged in standard cell culture plates with alpha minimum essential medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1× Glutamax. After passaging in vitro, the cells showed a homogenous spindle-shape similar to their ancestor cells (SFMSCs), but with more robust proliferative activity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed typical MSC surface markers, including expression of CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD44 and lack of CD45, CD34, CD11b, CD19, and HLA-DR. However, these cells were positive for CD146 and stro-1, which the ancestor cells were not. Moreover, the cells could also be induced to differentiate in osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages in vitro. The differentiation potential was improved compared with the ancestor cells in vitro. The cells were not found to exhibit oncogenicity in vivo. Therefore, the method presented herein facilitated the generation of STRO-1+CD146+ MSCs from SFMSC-iPSCs exhibiting enhanced proliferation and differentiation potential.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Obtained from Synovial Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells on a Matrigel Coating Exhibited Enhanced Proliferation and Differentiation Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Liang Zheng

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iPSC-MSCs serve as a promising source for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. However, optimal methods for transforming iPSCs into MSCs and the characteristics of iPSC-MSCs obtained from different methods remain poorly understood. In this study, we developed a one-step method for obtaining iPSC-MSCs (CD146+STRO-1+ MSCs from human synovial fluid MSC-derived induced iPSCs (SFMSC-iPSCs. CD146-STRO-1-SFMSCs were reprogrammed into iPSCs by transduction with lentivirus-mediated Sox2, Oct-3/4, klf4, and c-Myc. SFMSC-iPSCs were maintained with mTeSR1 medium in Matrigel-coated culture plates. Single dissociated cells were obtained by digesting the SFMSC-iPSCs with trypsin. The dissociated cells were then plated into Matrigel-coated culture plate with alpha minimum essential medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 1× Glutamax, and the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. Cells were then passaged in standard cell culture plates with alpha minimum essential medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1× Glutamax. After passaging in vitro, the cells showed a homogenous spindle-shape similar to their ancestor cells (SFMSCs, but with more robust proliferative activity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed typical MSC surface markers, including expression of CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD44 and lack of CD45, CD34, CD11b, CD19, and HLA-DR. However, these cells were positive for CD146 and stro-1, which the ancestor cells were not. Moreover, the cells could also be induced to differentiate in osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages in vitro. The differentiation potential was improved compared with the ancestor cells in vitro. The cells were not found to exhibit oncogenicity in vivo. Therefore, the method presented herein facilitated the generation of STRO-1+CD146+ MSCs from SFMSC-iPSCs exhibiting enhanced proliferation and differentiation potential.

  16. Primary pericardial synovial sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Takashi; Takeshita, Shinji; Tanaka, Yoko; Morooka, Hiroaki; Higure, Ryota; Shiono, Motomi

    2015-10-01

    A 57-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with cardiomegaly on a chest roentgenogram. A mediastinal tumor was observed during a chest computed tomographic scan and the patient was diagnosed with pericardial synovial sarcoma as a result of a tumor biopsy. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were carried out, and although the tumor temporarily decreased in size, it subsequently increased and the patient died approximately 3 years following the initial medical examination. Most synovial sarcomas commonly occur in the vicinity of the joints of the extremities. Therefore, we herein report a rare case of synovial sarcoma which occurred in the pericardium.

  17. Changes in Cytokines and Aggrecan ARGS Neoepitope in Synovial Fluid and Serum and in C-Terminal Crosslinking Telopeptide of Type II Collagen and N-Terminal Crosslinking Telopeptide of Type I Collagen in Urine Over Five Years After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Struglics, André; Larsson, Staffan; Kumahashi, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. METHODS: Synovial fluid, serum, and urine were collected from 121 adults on 6 occasions over 5 years after acute ACL injury. Reference samples were obtained from subjects without knee injury. Concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-10, interferon...

  18. Primary pericardial synovial sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Muramatsu, Takashi; Takeshita, Shinji; Tanaka, Yoko; Morooka, Hiroaki; Higure, Ryota; Shiono, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with cardiomegaly on a chest roentgenogram. A mediastinal tumor was observed during a chest computed tomographic scan and the patient was diagnosed with pericardial synovial sarcoma as a result of a tumor biopsy. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were carried out, and although the tumor temporarily decreased in size, it subsequently increased and the patient died approximately 3 years following the initial medical examination. Most synovial ...

  19. Líquido sinovial da articulação femuropatelar após desmotomia patelar medial experimental em eqüinos Evaluation of the synovial fluid of the femuropatellar joint after experimental medial patellar desmotomy in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivaldo Aparecido Nunes Martins

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A desmotomia patelar medial (DPM é comumente realizada para o tratamento da fixação dorsal da patela (FDP. É de fácil execução e na maioria dos casos seus resultados são imediatos. Porém, alterações articulares após a DPM têm sido freqüentemente descritas na literatura. O objetivo deste trabalho é descrever as possíveis alterações no líquido sinovial da articulação femuropatelar após desmotomia patelar medial experimental, em eqüinos mantidos em repouso por 120 dias. Foram utilizados oito eqüinos hígidos, adultos, que não apresentaram histórico de lesões no joelho, e que não demonstraram claudicação após exame físico ou teste de flexão dos membros pélvicos. A desmotomia patelar medial foi realizada no membro pélvico direito de cada cavalo. O líquido sinovial foi obtido através de artrocentese durante o período pré-operatório e seqüencialmente no período pós-operatório (po nos dias 15, 30, 60, 90 e 120, sendo avaliado quanto à coloração, viscosidade, proteína total, e contagem total de células nucleadas e contagem diferencial dos leucócitos. A única alteração significativa no líquido sinovial de cavalos submetidos a desmotomia patelar medial e mantidos em repouso por 120 dias foi a alteração da viscosidade no 30° dia po.Medial patellar desmotomy (MPD is a common treatment for upward fixation of the patella (UFP. It is easy to perform, and in most cases results are immediate. However, joint changes after MPD have been described. The purpose of this study is to use synovial fluid evaluate the effects of MPD in horses subjected to restricted exercis in the first 120 days postoperatively. Eight sounds adult horses, weighing from 350 to 480kg, were used in the study. The selected animals had no history of lesions in the femuropatellar joint and did not demonstrate lameness on physical examination or after hind limb flexion tests. Right medial patellar desmotomy was performed on each horse. The

  20. Optimized “In Vitro” Culture Conditions for Human Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Casnici

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of synovial fluid in rheumatoid arthritis (RA is complex and strongly influences the microenvironment of joints and it is an inseparable element of the disease. Currently, “in vitro” studies are performed on RA cells cultured in the presence of either recombinant proinflammatory cytokines-conditioned medium or medium alone. In this study, we evaluated the use of synovial fluid, derived from RA patients, as optimal culture condition to perform “in vitro” studies on RA synovial fibroblasts. We observed that synovial fluid is more effective in inducing cell proliferation with respect to TNF-alpha or culture medium alone. Spontaneous apoptosis in fibroblasts was also decreased in response to synovial fluid. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the presence of synovial fluid was significantly elevated with respect to cells cultured with TNF-alpha or medium, and the overall morphology of cells was also modified. In addition, modulation of intracellular calcium dynamics elicited in response to synovial fluid or TNF-alpha exposure is different and suggests a role for the purinergic signalling in the modulation of the effects. These results emphasize the importance of using RA synovial fluid in “in vitro” studies involving RA cells, in order to reproduce faithfully the physiopathological environmental characteristic of RA joints.

  1. Primary renal synovial sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish D. Bakhshi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary Renal Sarcoma is rare tumor comprising only 1% of all renal tumours. Synovial sarcomas are generally deep-seated tumors arising in the proximity of large joints of adolescents and young adults and account for 5-10% of all soft tissue tumours. Primary synovial sarcoma of kidney is rare and has poor prognosis. It can only be diagnosed by immunohistochemistry. It should be considered as a differential in sarcomatoid and spindle cell tumours. We present a case of 33-year-old female, who underwent left sided radical nephrectomy for renal tumour. Histopathology and genetic analysis diagnosed it to be primary renal synovial sarcoma. Patient underwent radiation therapy and 2 years follow up is uneventful. A brief case report with review of literature is presented.

  2. Lexicon of synovial bursae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszek, B; Kwolczak, A; Glinkowski, W

    2000-12-30

    A synovial bursa (bursa synovialis) is a recess in the articular cavity, formed at a point where the fibrous layer of the articular capsule has become thin and the synovia is able to extrude beyond it. Many bursae lose their connection with the articular cavity they accompany. Their function is to enhance the sliding of muscles, tendons, and other soft tissues in relation to movable bone structures, and to shift loads between bones and soft tissues. The anatomy of bursae is of importance in the endoscopic surgery of joints and of the bursae themselves. In many clinical situations the dominant symptoms may originate from particular synovial bursae. The Terminologia Anatomica (1998) lists ca. 50 bursae. The authors review the current state of knowledge regarding the anatomy of synovial bursae. Those of particular clinical importance are identified and suggestions are made for reconciling differences in clinical and anatomical terminology.

  3. Primary intrathoracic biphasic synovial sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezcan, Yilmaz; Koc, Mehmet; Kocak, Husnu; Kaya, Yusuf

    2012-05-01

    Synovial sarcomas are most frequently observed in the extremities. Although synovial sarcomas are the third most common histological type of soft-tissue sarcomas of the extremities, primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma is extremely rare. Monophasic synovial sarcoma is the most commonly observed subtype. whereas the biphasic subtype is less common. We present our case which was diagnosed as biphasic synovial sarcoma located in the anterior mediastinum, which is considered to be a rare entity. The patient underwent surgical resection together with multimodal adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  4. Synovial tissue research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orr, Carl; Sousa, Elsa; Boyle, David L

    2017-01-01

    The synovium is the major target tissue of inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis. The study of synovial tissue has advanced considerably throughout the past few decades from arthroplasty and blind needle biopsy to the use of arthroscopic and ultrasonographic technologies that enab...

  5. Synovial sarcoma mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2013-01-01

    Human synovial sarcoma is caused by a chromosome translocation, which fuses DNA encoding SSX to that encoding the SS18 protein. Kadoch and Crabtree now show that the resulting cellular transformation stems from disruption of the normal architecture and function of the human SWI/SNF (BAF) complex....

  6. Synovial tissue hypoxia and inflammation in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ng, C T

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia is a microenvironmental feature in the inflamed joint, which promotes survival advantage for cells. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of partial oxygen pressure in the synovial tissue (tPO(2)) in patients with inflammatory arthritis with macroscopic\\/microscopic inflammation and local levels of proinflammatory mediators. METHODS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis underwent full clinical assessment and video arthroscopy to quantify macroscopic synovitis and measure synovial tPO(2) under direct visualisation. Cell specific markers (CD3 (T cells), CD68 (macrophages), Ki67 (cell proliferation) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (cell apoptosis)) were quantified by immunohistology. In vitro migration was assessed in primary and normal synoviocytes (synovial fibroblast cells (SFCs)) using a wound repair scratch assay. Levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1beta (IL1beta), interferon gamma (IFNgamma), IL6, macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha (MIP3alpha) and IL8 were quantified, in matched serum and synovial fluid, by multiplex cytokine assay and ELISA. RESULTS: The tPO(2) was 22.5 (range 3.2-54.1) mm Hg and correlated inversely with macroscopic synovitis (r=-0.421, p=0.02), sublining CD3 cells (-0.611, p<0.01) and sublining CD68 cells (r=-0.615, p<0.001). No relationship with cell proliferation or apoptosis was found. Primary and normal SFCs exposed to 1% and 3% oxygen (reflecting the median tPO(2) in vivo) induced cell migration. This was coupled with significantly higher levels of synovial fluid tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), IL1beta, IFNgamma and MIP3alpha in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (all p values <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show a direct in vivo correlation between synovial tPO(2), inflammation and cell migration, thus it is proposed that hypoxia is a possible primary driver of inflammatory processes in the arthritic joint.

  7. Value of CT scan in synovial diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamisier, J.N.; Regent, D.; Thomas, P.; Pere, P.; Gaucher, A.; Capesius, P.

    1986-02-01

    The authors have developed a technique of CT arthroscan which, by the use of a gas or opaque contrast medium, is able to demonstrate the synovial structures of the knee, the shoulder and the hip. Among the essential indications, they include the demonstration of neoplasia of the synovium and the evaluation of the pannus in rheumatoid arthritis. Their secondary indications include the demonstration of fluid effusions in the hip, the precise evaluation of hyperostotic lesions in the same joint, the detection of ossification phenomena in the capsule of the inter-apophyseal joints in ankylosing spondylitis and, in some cases, following negative or doubtful arthrography for the detection of synovial plica. They also recall the usefulness or the arthroscan in the diagnosis of lesions of the labrum glenoidale.

  8. Percentages of CD4+CD161+ and CD4−CD8−CD161+ T Cells in the Synovial Fluid Are Correlated with Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlin Miao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. CD161 has been identified as a marker of human IL-17-producing T cells that are implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. This study aimed to investigate the potential link between the percentage of CD161+ T cells and disease activity in RA patients. Methods. Peripheral blood (PB from 54 RA patients and 21 healthy controls was evaluated. Paired synovial fluid (SF (n = 17 was analyzed. CD161 expression levels on CD4+, CD8+, and CD4−CD8− T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Results. The percentage of CD4+CD161+ T cells in RA SF was higher than RA PB, and it was positively correlated with DAS28, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, and C-reactive protein (CRP. CD4−CD8−CD161+ T cell percentage was decreased in RA PB and was further reduced in RA SF, and its level in SF was inversely correlated with DAS28, ESR, and CRP. However, CD8+CD161+ T cell percentage was neither changed in RA PB and SF nor correlated with disease activity indices. Conclusion. An increased CD4+CD161+ T cell percentage and a decreased CD4−CD8−CD161+ T cell percentage are present in RA SF and are associated with disease activity, and the accumulation of CD4+CD161+ T cells in SF may contribute to the local inflammation of RA.

  9. Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeganathan, Reubendra; Davis, Richard; Wilson, Lorraine; McGuigan, James; Sidhu, Pushpinder

    2007-05-01

    Synovial sarcoma occurs predominantly in the soft tissues of the extremities, but is exceedingly rare in the mediastinum. It has overlapping histological and immunophenotypic features with other tumours in the differential diagnosis. We report a case of a patient who had an incidental finding of such a tumour. Because of the rarity of this tumour in the mediastinum, optimal therapy is unknown and the prognosis remains guarded.

  10. Primary Mediastinal Synovial Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jeganathan, Reubendra; Davis, Richard; Wilson, Lorraine; McGuigan, James; Sidhu, Pushpinder

    2007-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma occurs predominantly in the soft tissues of the extremities, but is exceedingly rare in the mediastinum. It has overlapping histological and immunophenotypic features with other tumours in the differential diagnosis. We report a case of a patient who had an incidental finding of such a tumour. Because of the rarity of this tumour in the mediastinum, optimal therapy is unknown and the prognosis remains guarded.

  11. Cystic synovial sarcomas: imaging features with clinical and histopathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Hirofumi; Araki, Nobuhito [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3, Nakamichi, Higashinari-Ku, 537-8511, Osaka (Japan); Sawai, Yuka [Department of Radiology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Kudawara, Ikuo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Mano, Masayuki; Ishiguro, Shingo [Department of Pathology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ueda, Takafumi; Yoshikawa, Hideki [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    To characterize the radiological and clinicopathologic features of cystic synovial sarcoma. Seven patients with primary cystic synovial sarcoma were evaluated. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were undertaken at the first presentation. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was made on the basis of histological examinations followed by molecular analysis. Radiological and clinicopathologic findings were reviewed. CT showed well-defined soft tissue mass without cortical bone erosion and invasion. Calcification was seen at the periphery of the mass in three cases. T2-weighted MR images showed multilocular inhomogeneous intensity mass in all cases, five of which showed fluid-fluid levels. On gross appearance, old and/or fresh hematomas were detected in six cases. In the one remaining case, microscopic hemorrhage in the cystic lumen was proven. Four cases had poorly differentiated areas. In five cases prominent hemangiopericytomatous vasculature was observed. Histologic grade was intermediate in one tumor and high in six. One case had a history of misdiagnosis for tarsal tunnel syndrome, one for lymphadenopathy, two for sciatica and two for hematoma. All cystic synovial sarcomas demonstrated multilocularity with well-circumscribed walls and internal septae. Synovial sarcoma should be taken into consideration in patients with deeply situated multicystic mass with triple signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. (orig.)

  12. Synovial microparticles from arthritic patients modulate chemokine and cytokine release by synoviocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berckmans, René J; Nieuwland, Rienk; Kraan, Maarten C; Schaap, Marianne C L; Pots, Desirée; Smeets, Tom J M; Sturk, Augueste; Tak, Paul P

    2005-01-01

    Synovial fluid from patients with various arthritides contains procoagulant, cell-derived microparticles. Here we studied whether synovial microparticles modulate the release of chemokines and cytokines by fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Microparticles, isolated from the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and arthritis control (AC) patients (n = 8 and n = 3, respectively), were identified and quantified by flow cytometry. Simultaneously, arthroscopically guided synovial biopsies were taken from the same knee joint as the synovial fluid. FLS were isolated, cultured, and incubated for 24 hours in the absence or presence of autologous microparticles. Subsequently, cell-free culture supernatants were collected and concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-6, IL-8, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were determined. Results were consistent with previous observations: synovial fluid from all RA as well as AC patients contained microparticles of monocytic and granulocytic origin. Incubation with autologous microparticles increased the levels of MCP-1, IL-8 and RANTES in 6 of 11 cultures of FLS, and IL-6, ICAM-1 and VEGF in 10 cultures. Total numbers of microparticles were correlated with the IL-8 (r = 0.91, P derived microparticles (r = 0.89, P microparticles might modulate the release of chemokines and cytokines by FLS and might therefore have a function in synovial inflammation and angiogenesis.

  13. Synovial microparticles from arthritic patients modulate chemokine and cytokine release by synoviocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berckmans, René J; Nieuwland, Rienk; Kraan, Maarten C; Schaap, Marianne CL; Pots, Desirée; Smeets, Tom JM; Sturk, Augueste; Tak, Paul P

    2005-01-01

    Synovial fluid from patients with various arthritides contains procoagulant, cell-derived microparticles. Here we studied whether synovial microparticles modulate the release of chemokines and cytokines by fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Microparticles, isolated from the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and arthritis control (AC) patients (n = 8 and n = 3, respectively), were identified and quantified by flow cytometry. Simultaneously, arthroscopically guided synovial biopsies were taken from the same knee joint as the synovial fluid. FLS were isolated, cultured, and incubated for 24 hours in the absence or presence of autologous microparticles. Subsequently, cell-free culture supernatants were collected and concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-6, IL-8, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were determined. Results were consistent with previous observations: synovial fluid from all RA as well as AC patients contained microparticles of monocytic and granulocytic origin. Incubation with autologous microparticles increased the levels of MCP-1, IL-8 and RANTES in 6 of 11 cultures of FLS, and IL-6, ICAM-1 and VEGF in 10 cultures. Total numbers of microparticles were correlated with the IL-8 (r = 0.91, P derived microparticles (r = 0.89, P microparticles might modulate the release of chemokines and cytokines by FLS and might therefore have a function in synovial inflammation and angiogenesis. PMID:15899040

  14. Synovial folds in equine articular process joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Line Nymann; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Markussen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Cervical synovial folds have been suggested as a potential cause of neck pain in humans. Little is known about the extent and characteristics of cervical synovial folds in horses.......Cervical synovial folds have been suggested as a potential cause of neck pain in humans. Little is known about the extent and characteristics of cervical synovial folds in horses....

  15. Lipid bilayer membranes: Missing link in the comprehension of synovial lubrication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Ross; Cowley, Leonie; Dubief, Yves

    2010-03-01

    The human body hosts an extremely efficient tribological system in its synovial joints that operate under very low friction and virtually no wear. It has long been assumed that the higher molecular weight molecules present in the synovial fluid (hyaluronic acid, lubricin) are solely responsible for the mechanical properties of joint. Smaller components, unsaturated phospholipids, have a virtually an undefined role, most probably because of the cancellation of their amphiphilic properties ex vivo caused by oxidation. Using experimental observations of multilamellar arrangements in synovial joints, we formulate the assumption that self-assembling structures provide the anisotropy necessary to synovial fluid to resist drainage under normal compression. Our molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate the tremendous mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and also highlight their weakening consistent with modifications resulting from injuries or joint prosthesis.

  16. Synovial osteochondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemnon, Jorge; Nemnon, Marcelo; Staffieri, Roberto; Villavicencio, C.; Marconi, G.; Masjoan, Diego

    2004-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SO) is a meta plastic process by which synovial mesenchymal cells transform into chondroblasts and chondrocytes. This disease affects most frequently the knee, the hip, the elbow, and uncommonly the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The authors present 2 cases of synovial osteochondromatosis of the TMJ. (author)

  17. Synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matushita, J.P.K.; Matushita, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    A case report of synovial sarcoma arising in the abdominal wall is presented. A brief review of the clinical and radiological features of synovial sarcoma is made. Pre-operative diagnosis of an abdominal wall synovial sarcoma is virtually impossible, but should be considered when a soft tissue swelling is found to show amorphous stippled calcification X-ray. (author) [pt

  18. Para-oesophageal synovial sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulpeiro, J.R.; Cruz, R.; Arenas, A.; Perez-Espejo, G.

    1988-01-01

    An unusual case of mediastinal synovial sarcoma with secondary invasion of the oesophagus simulating an intra-oesophageal mass is reported. The location and radiological appearance of this tumour are exceptional, and, to the authors' knowledge, have not been reported previously. (orig.)

  19. A neglected case of giant synovial chondromatosis in knee joint ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign condition arising from the synovial membrane of the joints, synovial sheaths or bursae around the joints. Primary synovial chondromatosis typically affects the large joints in the third to fifth decade of life. The purpose of this case report is to document this rare synovial pathology, ...

  20. Blockade of Toll-like receptor 2 prevents spontaneous cytokine release from rheumatoid arthritis ex vivo synovial explant cultures

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nic An Ultaigh, Sinead

    2011-02-23

    Abstract Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the effect of blocking Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial cells. Methods RA synovial tissue biopsies, obtained under direct visualization at arthroscopy, were established as synovial explant cultures ex vivo or snap frozen for immunohistology. Mononuclear cell cultures were isolated from peripheral blood and synovial fluid of RA patients. Cultures were incubated with the TLR1\\/2 ligand, Pam3CSK4 (200 ng, 1 and 10 μg\\/ml), an anti-TLR2 antibody (OPN301, 1 μg\\/ml) or an immunoglobulin G (IgG) (1 μg\\/ml) matched control. The comparative effect of OPN301 and adalimumab (anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha) on spontaneous release of proinflammatory cytokines from RA synovial explants was determined using quantitative cytokine MSD multiplex assays or ELISA. OPN301 penetration into RA synovial tissue explants cultures was assessed by immunohistology. Results Pam3CSK4 significantly upregulated interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in RA peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and RA synovial explant cultures (P < 0.05). OPN301 significantly decreased Pam3CSK4-induced cytokine production of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-8 compared to IgG control in RA PBMCs and SFMCs cultures (all P < 0.05). OPN301 penetration of RA synovial tissue cultures was detected in the lining layer and perivascular regions. OPN301 significantly decreased spontaneous cytokine production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-8 from RA synovial tissue explant cultures (all P < 0.05). Importantly, the inhibitory effect of OPN on spontaneous cytokine secretion was comparable to inhibition by anti-TNFα monoclonal antibody adalimumab. Conclusions These findings further support targeting TLR2 as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA.

  1. Synovial distribution of “systemically” administered acetylsalicylic acid in the isolated perfused equine distal limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated synovial concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and its metabolite salicylic acid (SA) in the equine fetlock joint following systemic administration of ASA. Salicylates were chosen because SA is the only nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug for which threshold levels exist for plasma and urine in equine sports. To avoid animal experiments, the study was conducted using an ex vivo model of the isolated perfused equine distal limb in combination with plasma concentrations obtained from literature. Salicylate concentrations in the joint were determined using microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Any anti-inflammatory effect of synovial ASA concentrations was assessed using an ASA EC50 (half maximal effective concentration) determined in equine whole blood. Results The ASA concentration in the synovial fluid (n = 6) reached a maximum of 4 μg/mL, the mean concentration over the entire perfusion period was 2 μg/mL. Maximum SA concentration was 17 μg/mL, the average was 14 μg/mL. ASA and SA concentration in the synovial fluid exceeded systemic concentrations 2 h and 3.5 h after “systemic” administration, respectively. Conclusions ASA and SA accumulated in the in the synovial fluid of the ex vivo model despite decreasing systemic concentrations. This suggests a prolonged anti-inflammatory effect within the joint that remains to be further elucidated. PMID:23531229

  2. Synovial sarcoma of the foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beus, J.; Kreitner, K.F.; Rompe, J.D.; Riehle, H.M.

    1996-01-01

    The case of a 29 year-old female patient who had experienced pain in the right midfoot for 5 years which was diagnosed as a degenerative or rheumatic change and treated by physiotherapy and medication. By means of magnetic resonance imaging we identified a soft-tissue tumor of the midfoot. Histology provided the findings of a monophasic fibrous synovial sarcoma. The case history is reported together with a presentation of the disease and its radiological diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  3. Synovial Lipoma of the Subtalar Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Jeffrey M; Richards, Sarah; LeCastre, Michael J; Hooke, Thomas G

    2017-07-01

    Lipomas are benign adipose masses that are rarely associated with synovial membranes. In addition, there are only a few reports describing synovial lipomas in the foot. No reported occurrence of this lesion in the subtalar joint currently exists. This case report documents the presentation, clinical evaluation, advanced imaging, and surgical management of a 45-year-old man with a large synovial lipoma of the subtalar joint.

  4. Synovial Hemangioma in the Knee: MRI Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Arslan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial hemangiomas are rare benign tumors of vascular origin. A 23-year-old boy presented with knee pain and swelling. The boy had developed symptoms 18-months earlier. He was diagnosed with synovial hemangioma based on magnetic resonnance imaging examination and histopathologic findings of the arthroscopic biopsy tissue. We present the magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic findings of synovial hemangioma of the knee.

  5. Liquid crystals in biotribology synovial joint treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Ermakov, Sergey; Eismont, Oleg; Nikolaev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    This book summarizes the theoretical and experimental studies confirming the concept of the liquid-crystalline nature of boundary lubrication in synovial joints. It is shown that cholesteric liquid crystals in the synovial liquid play a significant role in the mechanism of intra-articular friction reduction. The results of structural, rheological and tribological research of the creation of artificial synovial liquids - containing cholesteric liquid crystals in natural synovial liquids - are described. These liquid crystals reproduce the lubrication properties of natural synovia and provide a high chondroprotective efficiency. They were tested in osteoarthritis models and in clinical practice.

  6. Intraneural synovial sarcoma of the median nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kasukurthi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcomas are soft-tissue malignancies with a poor prognosis and propensity for distant metastases. Although originally believed to arise from the synovium, these tumors have been found to occur anywhere in the body. We report a rare case of synovial sarcoma arising from the median nerve. To our knowledge, this is the twelfth reported case of intraneural synovial sarcoma, and only the fourth arising from the median nerve. Because the diagnosis may not be apparent until after pathological examination of the surgical speci­men, synovial sarcoma should be kept in mind when dealing with what may seem like a benign nerve tumor.

  7. Histopathology of Synovial Cysts of the Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebib, Ivan; Chang, Connie Y; Schwab, Joseph H; Kerr, Darcy A; Deshpande, Vikram; Nielsen, G Petur

    2018-01-04

    Cystic lesions derived from the synovial and ligamentous structures of the spine have varied histologic appearances. Not uncommonly, there is discrepancy between the clinico-radiologic diagnosis and histology. Therefore, we sought to characterize the histologic features of tissue submitted as "synovial cysts" of the spine. Resected specimens of the spine labeled "synovial cysts" and "lumbar cysts" were histologically evaluated and classified based on histopathologic features. 75 histologic samples of spinal cysts were identified. 31 were classified as synovial cysts (definite synovial lining), 28 showed pseudocystic degeneration of the ligamentum flavum, 7 showed pseudocyst formation without evidence of synovial lining or degeneration of the ligamentum flavum, 8 showed cyst contents only or no histologic evidence of cyst wall for evaluation. Twenty-five cases (33%), especially those showing pseudocystic degeneration of the ligamentum flavum were associated with very characteristic tumor calcinosis-like calcium deposition with surrounding foreign-body giant cell reaction. Histology of "synovial cysts" of the spine shows varied types of cysts; a large proportion are not synovial lined cysts but rather show pseudocystic degenerative changes of the ligamentum flavum often associated with very characteristic finely granular calcifications and foreign body giant cell reaction. This may have implications, not only in understanding the pathogenesis of these lesions, but also in their varied response to non-surgical interventions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Synovial sarcoma | Vlok | SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synovial sarcoma. SSC Vlok, GWW Wagener, D Zaharie. Abstract. Synovial sarcoma is a malignant, predominantly juxta-articular, soft-tissue tumour representing approximately 10% of all soft-tissue sarcomas. Frequently initially incorrectly diagnosed as a benign lesion, it should be considered as a diagnosis when a young ...

  9. Cervical Synovial Sarcoma In a Young Boy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical Synovial Sarcoma. •. In a Young Boy. R. M. FISHER,. SUMMARY. Synovial sarcomas comprise about 8% of all tumours of somatic soft-tissues, and are the most common sar- comas of the 'hands and feet. Occasionally they may occur in the trunk, but they have rarely been reported in the neck. We present a case of ...

  10. Angiography of histopathologic variants of synovial sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lois, J.F.; Fischer, H.J.; Mirra, J.M.; Gomes, A.S.; California Univ., Los Angeles

    1986-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas are rare soft tissue tumors which histopathologically can be divided into monophasic, biphasic and mixed variants. As part of a protocol for intra-arterial chemotherapy 12 patients with biopsy proven synovial sarcoma underwent angiography. The angiograms on these patients were reviewed to determine whether synovial sarcomas and their variants demonstrated a characteristic angiographic appearance. Synovial sarcomas appeared angiographically as soft tissue masses which showed a fine network of tumor vessels with an inhomogeneous capillary blush. Their degree of vascularity varied according to their histopathology. Monophasic synovial sarcomas demonstrated in general a higher degree of neovascularity than the biphasic form. This finding was also suggested by histopathologic analysis of the vessels in the tumor. Although angiography did not show a distinctive vascular pattern it may be useful to evaluate tumor size and vascularity. (orig.)

  11. FEATURES OF SYNOVIAL ENVIRONMENT AND SUBHONDRAL AREA OF JOINTS IN PATIENS SUFFERING FROM GONARTROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Matveeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to investigate the changes in the values of synovial fluid electrolyte composition in patients with degenerative-and-dystrophic involvements of the joints, as well as to study the dynamics of the mean optical density of femoral and tibial epiphyseal bone structures. The samples of synovial fluid have been studied, as well as the x-rays of 37 patients with deforming arthrosis of the knee of idiopathic and posttraumatic etiology. The decrease of ionized calcium value and the increase of total calcium/inorganic phosphate ratio value have been found. The change in the mean optical density of epiphysis shadow has been demonstrated to be depended on the stage of the pathological process. The relationship of the values of bone structure mean optical density and the concentration of synovial fluid electrolytes evidences the involvement of subchondral zone mineral component in the development of joint pathology. These values can be used as an additional criterion in osteoarthrosis diagnosis, as well as for assessment of subchondral bone condition by biochemical synovial fluid test.

  12. Características fisicoquímicas e citológicas do líquido sinovial da articulação temporomandibular em eqüinos Physical, biochemical and cytological characteristics of the equine temporomandibular joint synovial fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda A. Fonseca

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudadas as características fisicoquímicas e citológicas do líquido sinovial da articulação temporomandibular de dez eqüinos hígidos. Verificou-se que o líquido é viscoso, amarelo claro a citrino, límpido e livre de partículas à temperatura ambiente. Houve contaminação da amostra por sangue em três amostras que se apresentaram amarelo avermelhadas a vermelhas e de aspecto turvo. A taxa de glicose variou entre 100 e 250 e a concentração protéica não ultrapassou 3,8g/dL. O número médio de células nucleadas foi de 417 células/µL, com predominância de grandes células mononucleares e linfócitos. As mensurações das características pesquisadas no líquido sinovial da articulação temporomandibular de eqüinos são de execução simples e passíveis de implantação na rotina de atendimentos clínico-cirúrgicos.Physical, biochemical and cytological characteristics of the temporomandibular joint synovial fluid were studied in ten clinically normal horses. It is a viscous, pale yellow, clear fluid and without flocculent material at room temperature. There was blood contamination in three samples, they presented red-yellow to red and cloudy. The range of glucose levels were 100 to 250 and its protein concentration was up to 3,8g/dL. Nucleated cells mean number was 417 cells/µL, with predominating large mononuclear cells and lymphocytes. Equine temporomandibular synovial fluids can be easily evaluated, being feasible in clinical and surgical routine, and the information may be useful to the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of animals with temporomandibular alterations.

  13. Synovial Sarcoma in the Rectovesical Space: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kil, Min Chul; Cho, Bum Sang; Han, Gi Seok; Park, Kil Sun; Kim, Sung Jin; Cha, Sang Hoon; Lee, Seung Young; Kang, MIn Ho; Lee, Ok Jun

    2011-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is an uncommon soft tissue malignancy usually arising in the extremities of young adults. Synovial sarcomas at unusual anatomic locations have been reported; however, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reports on primary synovial sarcoma in the rectovesical space. Here, we describe the radiologic findings of primary synovial sarcoma in the rectovesical space and review relevant literature.

  14. Synovial Chondrosarcoma in the Hand and Wrist: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Yeong Yi; Kim, Jee Young; Kang, Seok Jin; Kang, Yong Koo; Baik, Jun Hyun [Catholic University St. Vincent' s Hospital, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    Synovial chondrosarcoma is extremely rare and arises de novo or from malignant transformation of synovial chondromatosis. It commonly involves large joints, such as the knee or hip. Here, we present an unusual case of synovial chondrosarcoma from synovial chondromatosis in the hand and wrist, clearly demonstrating the characteristic findings on plain radiograph and MR imaging.

  15. Synovial Chondrosarcoma in the Hand and Wrist: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Yeong Yi; Kim, Jee Young; Kang, Seok Jin; Kang, Yong Koo; Baik, Jun Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Synovial chondrosarcoma is extremely rare and arises de novo or from malignant transformation of synovial chondromatosis. It commonly involves large joints, such as the knee or hip. Here, we present an unusual case of synovial chondrosarcoma from synovial chondromatosis in the hand and wrist, clearly demonstrating the characteristic findings on plain radiograph and MR imaging

  16. Functional phenotype of synovial monocytes modulating inflammatory T-cell responses in rheumatoid arthritis (RA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ruem Yoon

    Full Text Available Monocytes function as crucial innate effectors in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases, including autoimmunity, as well as in the inflammatory response against infectious pathogens. Human monocytes are heterogeneous and can be classified into three distinct subsets based on CD14 and CD16 expression. Although accumulating evidence suggests distinct functions of monocyte subsets in inflammatory conditions, their pathogenic roles in autoimmune diseases remain unclear. Thus, we investigated the phenotypic and functional characteristics of monocytes derived from synovial fluid and peripheral blood in RA patients in order to explore the pathogenic roles of these cells. In RA patients, CD14+CD16+, but not CD14dimCD16+, monocytes are predominantly expanded in synovial fluid and, to a lesser degree, in peripheral blood. Expression of co-signaling molecules of the B7 family, specifically CD80 and CD276, was markedly elevated on synovial monocytes, while peripheral monocytes of RA and healthy controls did not express these molecules without stimulation. To explore how synovial monocytes might gain these unique properties in the inflammatory milieu of the synovial fluid, peripheral monocytes were exposed to various stimuli. CD16 expression on CD14+ monocytes was clearly induced by TGF-β, although co-treatment with IL-1β, TNF-α, or IL-6 did not result in any additive effects. In contrast, TLR stimulation with LPS or zymosan significantly downregulated CD16 expression such that the CD14+CD16+ monocyte subset could not be identified. Furthermore, treatment of monocytes with IFN-γ resulted in the induction of CD80 and HLA-DR expression even in the presence of TGF-β. An in vitro assay clearly showed that synovial monocytes possess the unique capability to promote Th1 as well as Th17 responses of autologous peripheral CD4 memory T cells. Our findings suggest that the cytokine milieu of the synovial fluid shapes the unique features of synovial

  17. Líquido sinovial de eqüinos: proteína, celularidade e precipitação de mucina, a fresco, após refrigeração e congelamento Synovial equine fluid: protein, cellularity and mucin clot, on fresh, after cooling and freezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola de Oliveira Paes Leme

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Considerando que as patologias que determinam claudicação são comuns e representam um importante aspecto na Medicina Veterinária Eqüina, com cerca de 33% das claudicações devendo-se a enfermidades articulares, o presente trabalho teve por objetivo comparar o líquido sinovial de eqüinos a fresco, após refrigeração e após congelamento, para avaliar sua estabilidade e possível utilização como terapêutica. Foram utilizados 25 animais dos quais foram obtidos, por artrocentese, 5ml de líquido sinovial de ambas as articulações intertársicas proximais. As amostras de cada animal foram misturadas e a amostra final foi dividida em três alíquotas, sendo então analisadas a fresco (GI, após refrigeração (GII e após congelamento (GIII. A proteína foi significativamente diferente entre os grupos I e II, e II e III (p0,05. Os grupos I e II, e I e III foram significativamente diferentes (p0,05. O linfócito foi a célula de predomínio. Alterações morfológicas foram observadas em 8% dos leucócitos em animais do Grupo II e em 64% em animais do GIII. Os três grupos estudados foram equivalentes quanto à precipitação de mucina (p>0,05. Com base nos resultados, pode-se concluir que o líquido sinovial sofre alterações quanto à proteína e celularidade após refrigeração e congelamento, porém ainda permanece dentro dos parâmetros aceitáveis de normalidade.Lameness related to arthropathies are common and so very important to Equine Veterinary Medicine, considering that almost 33% of all lamenesses are due to arthropathies. The present experiment aimed the evaluation of synovial fluid estability after cooling and freezing and its possible therapeutical utilization. Samples of synovial fluid were taken from 25 equines, from both intertarsus proximall joints by arthrocentesis. Samples from each animal were mixed and then divided into 3 aliquotes, and analysed fresh (GI, after cooling (GII and after freezing (GIII. The protein

  18. Oxytetracycline hydrochloride in the horse: serum, synovial, peritoneal and urine concentrations after single dose intravenous administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M P; Stover, S M; Kelly, R H; Farver, T B; Knight, H D

    1981-03-01

    Six adult mares were given a single intravenous injection of oxytetracycline HCl (50 mg/ml) at a dosage of 5 mg/kg. Serum, synovial fluid, peritoneal fluid, and urine oxytetracycline concentrations were measured serially over a 48-h period. The highest measured serum oxytetracycline concentration was 8.01 mcg/ml at 1/2 h. Oxytetracycline was detected in synovial fluid and peritoneal fluid, which obtained mean peak oxytetracycline concentrations of 4.43 mcg/ml and 4.20 mcg/ml, at 1/2 h and 1 h, respectively. These concentrations steadily declined in parallel with serum concentrations and were not measurable at 48 h. Urine oxytetracycline concentration was relatively high, with a peak concentration of 1565.2 mcg/ml at 1/2 h after drug administration.

  19. Gross and histopathological findings in synovial membranes of pigs with experimentally induced Mycoplasma hyosynoviae arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagedorn-Olsen, T.; Basse, A.; Jensen, Tim Kåre

    1999-01-01

    or contact exposure with M. hyosynoviae induced arthritis in 13- to 17-week-old pigs. The acute to subacute arthritis was characterized by increased amounts of serohaemorrhagic, serofibrinous or mahogany coloured synovial fluid combined with edema and hyperaemia, followed by yellow to brownish discoloration...... and moderate villous proliferation of the synovial membrane. In the chronic phase moderate fibrosis was seen, but no periarticular or articular cartilage involvement. The acute to subacute histopathological characteristics were edema, hyperaemia, variable hyperplasia of synovial lining cells, increased density...... of subsynovial cell populations, diffuse and perivascular infiltration with lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophage-like cells, fibrinous material, mild to moderate villous hypertrophy and mild to moderate fibrosis in chronic cases. The morphogenetic changes during the course of the infection may be described...

  20. Synovial sarcoma of the mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khalili

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma (SS is a relatively common soft tissue tumor but only 6%-7% of cases are diagnosed in the head and neck region. It typically occurs in young adults and is slightly more common in males. The most common sites in the head and neck region are hypopharynx and parapharyngeal spaces. However, SS can also occur in tonsils, tongue, and orofacial soft tissues. It is not difficult to diagnose SS microscopically with its classic biphasic appearance, but the diagnosis of monophasic forms is more challenging especially in unusual locations. In this article, we report a rare case of monophasic SS of the mandible. The clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical features are discussed and compared with previously reported cases in the literature. To our knowledge, only six primary involvements have been reported in the jaws. Therefore, our case represents the seventh reported case of SS in the area.

  1. Synovial sarcoma of the mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Maryam; Eshghyar, Nosratollah; Ensani, Fereshteh; Shakib, Pouyan Amini

    2012-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a relatively common soft tissue tumor but only 6%-7% of cases are diagnosed in the head and neck region. It typically occurs in young adults and is slightly more common in males. The most common sites in the head and neck region are hypopharynx and parapharyngeal spaces. However, SS can also occur in tonsils, tongue, and orofacial soft tissues. It is not difficult to diagnose SS microscopically with its classic biphasic appearance, but the diagnosis of monophasic forms is more challenging especially in unusual locations. In this article, we report a rare case of monophasic SS of the mandible. The clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical features are discussed and compared with previously reported cases in the literature. To our knowledge, only six primary involvements have been reported in the jaws. Therefore, our case represents the seventh reported case of SS in the area. PMID:23833586

  2. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazaki, Carlos Renato Ticianelli; Trippia, Carlos Henrique; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda Sales Ferreira; Medaglia, Carla Regina Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head), and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder. (author)

  3. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Ticianelli Terazaki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head, and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder.

  4. MR imaging of abnormal synovial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, S.F.; Sanchez, R.; Murray, W.T.; Silbiger, M.L.; Ogden, J.; Cochran, C.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging can directly image abnormal synovium. The authors reviewed over 50 cases with abnormal synovial processes. The abnormalities include Baker cysts, semimembranous bursitis, chronic shoulder bursitis, peroneal tendon ganglion cyst, periarticular abscesses, thickened synovium from rheumatoid and septic arthritis, and synovial hypertrophy secondary to Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. MR imaging has proved invaluable in identifying abnormal synovium, defining the extent and, to a limited degree, characterizing its makeup

  5. Synovial sarcoma: MR evaluation in 23 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galant, J.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Lafuente, J.; Hernandez, L.; Soler, R.; Saez, F.

    1997-01-01

    The synovial sarcoma is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas. MR is the technique of choice to determine to local extension of malignant soft tissue tumors. To assess the clinical and MR imaging parameters associated with synovial sarcomas that aid in establishing their diagnosis. We review the clinical findings and images of 23 histologically confirmed synovial sarcomas that were studied by MR. Synovial sarcomas usually develop in young adults as soft tissue tumors, preferentially in the deep tissues of an extremity in close proximity to a joint. They are characterized as having a lobulated contour and septa, frequently infiltrating neighboring tissues at some point, and are heterogeneous. The presence of hemorrhage, as well as infiltration of the fascia in subcutaneous tumors, suggests the diagnosis of synovial sarcoma. The development of perilesional edema is not uncommon. Although, logically, the clinical and radiological features of synovial sarcomas can overlap with those of other soft tissue tumors, the findings described here are fairly characteristic of these lesions: thus, when present, they should serve to orient the diagnostic process. (Author) 16 refs

  6. Proinflammatory cytokines increase iron uptake into human monocytes and synovial fibroblasts from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telfer, Joan F; Brock, Jeremy H

    2004-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that iron is stored in the synovium of patients with rheumatoid arthritis which perpetuates inflamation by aiding the production of oxygen free radicals. Proinflammatory cytokines are produced by macrophages and lymphocytes present within synovium and by mononuclear cells of in synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. There are two known systems for iron uptake. The first involves binding of iron to transferrin and uptake via transferrin receptors. The second involves uptake by low molecular weight organic anions such as ascorbate and citrate (non-transferrin bound uptake). Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNFalpha and interferon gamma) were added to fibroblasts isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and human monocytes in culture and their effect on 59Fe-transferrin and citrate uptake was determined. Proinflammatory cytokines increase transferrin and non-transferrin bound iron uptake into human monocytes and increase transferrin-bound iron uptake by synovial fibroblasts, but have no effect on non-transferrin bound uptake into fibroblasts. Proinflammatory cytokines produced in human rheumatoid arthritis synovium and synovial fluid may contribute to the accumulation of iron that occurs in rheumatoid arthritis synovium which may lead to damage to synovial fibroblasts, macrophages and lymphocytes.

  7. A guided tour of current research in synovial joints with reference to wavelet methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ruchi; Salimath, C. S.; Alam, Khursheed

    2017-10-01

    Main aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive overview of biomechanical aspects of synovial joints of human body. This can be considered as a part of continued research work carried out by various authors over a period of time. Almost every person once in life time has suffered from joint disease; this has triggered intensive investigation into various biomechanical aspects of synovial joints. This has also resulted into an increase of arthroplasty with introduction to various clinical trials. From last few decades new improvements and ideas for new technologies have been introduced to decrease the incidence of joint problem. In this paper a literature survey of recent advances, developments and recognition of wear and tear of human joint is presented. Wavelet method in Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is relatively a new research field. This review aims to provide a glimpse of wavelet methodology in CFD. Wavelets methodology has played a vital role in the solution of governing equation of synovial fluid flow in the synovial joints represented by Reynolds equation and its modified version.

  8. Joint histology in Alligator mississippiensis challenges the identification of synovial joints in fossil archosaurs and inferences of cranial kinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Alida M; Holliday, Casey M

    2017-03-29

    Archosaurs, like all vertebrates, have different types of joints that allow or restrict cranial kinesis, such as synovial joints and fibrous joints. In general, synovial joints are more kinetic than fibrous joints, because the former possess a fluid-filled cavity and articular cartilage that facilitate movement. Even though there is a considerable lack of data on the microstructure and the structure-function relationships in the joints of extant archosaurs, many functional inferences of cranial kinesis in fossil archosaurs have hinged on the assumption that elongated condylar joints are (i) synovial and/or (ii) kinetic. Cranial joint microstructure was investigated in an ontogenetic series of American alligators, Alligator mississippiensis All the presumably synovial, condylar joints found within the head of the American alligator (the jaw joint, otic joint and laterosphenoid-postorbital (LS-PO) joint) were studied by means of paraffin histology and undecalcified histology paired with micro-computed tomography data to better visualize three-dimensional morphology. Results show that among the three condylar joints of A. mississippiensis , the jaw joint was synovial as expected, but the otherwise immobile otic and LS-PO joints lacked a synovial cavity. Therefore, condylar morphology does not always imply the presence of a synovial articulation nor mobility. These findings reveal an undocumented diversity in the joint structure of alligators and show that crocodylians and birds build novel, kinetic cranial joints differently. This complicates accurate identification of synovial joints and functional inferences of cranial kinesis in fossil archosaurs and tetrapods in general. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Synovial sarcoma of the chest wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Daigo; Yoshino, Ichiro; Shoji, Fumihiro; Morodomi, Yosuke; Yano, Tokujiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2010-02-01

    We here report a rare case of synovial sarcoma of the chest wall. A 71-year-old Japanese woman noticed a left anterior chest wall mass after twice having had surgery for lung cancer. An aspiration biopsy diagnosed synovial sarcoma. She then underwent a surgical resection. Pathology examination revealed a biphasic-type synovial sarcoma. When the prepared RNA from the tumor was subjected to a polymerase chain reaction, SYT-SSX1 fusion gene transcripts were demonstrated. Patients with the SYT-SSX1 fusion gene have a worse clinical outcome than patients with SYT-SSX2-positive tumors. After a second surgery, performed in 1 year later, there was no evidence of recurrence for 30 months; however, careful observation may be required.

  10. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaul Beyth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature.

  11. Subchondral synovial cysts (intra-osseous ganglion)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, L.; Freyschmidt, J.

    1988-01-01

    Twelve cases of subchondral synovial cysts (intra-osseous ganglion) have been seen and their clinical features, radiological findings and differential diagnosis are described. The lesion is a benign cystic tumour-like mass in the subchondral portion of a synovial joint. Our findings in respect of age, sex and localisation are compared with those of other authors. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the lesion is not completely understood. There is an increased incidence in middle life and joints with high dynamic and static stress are favoured, particularly in the lower extremities. Chronic stress or microtrauma, causing damage to the involved joint, therefore appears to be a plausible explanation. (orig.) [de

  12. The fate of isolated segments of flexor tendons within the digital sheath--a study in synovial nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, P

    1976-07-01

    A study has been made of the fate of isolated, devascularised segments of profundus tendon replaced within the synovial flexor sheaths in the front paws of adult rabbits. In all the experiments the segments were found to have survived as viable "loose bodies" and no adhesions developed. Active remodelling processes occurred over the cut ends of the segments and degenerative changes were confined to the most deeply lying tissue. The experiments confirm the existence of a synovial fluid pathway of nutrition, concerned, it is suggested, with nourishing the more superficial layers of the tendon.

  13. Ultrasound guided synovial biopsy of the wrist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, R. M.; van Dalen, A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Seven patients (4 female and 3 male, mean age 46) with arthritis of the wrist (n = 7) without known etiology were evaluated. High-definition ultrasound equipment was used for localization of synovial hypertrophy, suitable for ultrasound guided biopsy without risk. A 18-gauge diameter Tru-cut biopsy

  14. Oxidative damage in synovial tissue is associated with in vivo hypoxic status in the arthritic joint.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess levels of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanine; 8-oxo-dG) and lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal; 4-HNE) in serum, synovial fluid and tissue of patients with inflammatory arthritis in relation to in vivo hypoxia levels, disease activity and angiogenic markers. METHODS: Oxygen levels in synovial tissue were assessed using an oxygen\\/temperature probe. Nuclear and cytoplasmic 8-oxo-dG and 4-HNE levels were assessed in synovial tissue from 23 patients by immunohistochemistry. 8-Oxo-dG and 4-HNE levels in serum and synovial fluid were determined using 8-oxo-dG and hexanoyl-Lys (HEL) adduct ELISAs, respectively. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin 2 (Ang2) levels were also measured by ELISA. RESULTS: The median oxygen tension in synovial tissue was profoundly hypoxic at 19.35 mm Hg (2.5%). Nuclear 8-oxo-dG levels were significantly higher than nuclear 4-HNE levels in the lining and sublining layers (all p<0.001). In contrast, cytoplasmic 4-HNE levels were higher than cytoplasmic 8-oxo-dG levels in both cell layers (all p<0.001). Reduced in vivo oxygen tension correlated with high lipid peroxidation in synovial fluid (p=0.027; r=0.54) and tissue (p=0.004; r=0.58). Serum VEGF levels were positively correlated with cytoplasmic 4-HNE expression (p=0.05; r=0.43) and intensity (p=0.006; r=0.59) in the lining layer. Serum Ang2 levels were positively correlated with nuclear 4-HNE expression and intensity in both cell layers (all p < or = 0.05). DAS28-C-reactive protein was correlated with nuclear 4-HNE expression in the sublining layer (p=0.02; r=0.48) and DAS28-erythrocyte sedimentation rate was correlated with nuclear 4-HNE expression in both cell layers (p < or = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Lipid peroxidation is associated with low oxygen tension in vivo, disease activity and angiogenic marker expression in inflammatory arthritis.

  15. Wavelet analysis of polarization maps of polycrystalline biological fluids networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, Y. A.

    2011-12-01

    The optical model of human joints synovial fluid is proposed. The statistic (statistic moments), correlation (autocorrelation function) and self-similar (Log-Log dependencies of power spectrum) structure of polarization two-dimensional distributions (polarization maps) of synovial fluid has been analyzed. It has been shown that differentiation of polarization maps of joint synovial fluid with different physiological state samples is expected of scale-discriminative analysis. To mark out of small-scale domain structure of synovial fluid polarization maps, the wavelet analysis has been used. The set of parameters, which characterize statistic, correlation and self-similar structure of wavelet coefficients' distributions of different scales of polarization domains for diagnostics and differentiation of polycrystalline network transformation connected with the pathological processes, has been determined.

  16. Synovial cell production of IL-26 induces bone mineralization in spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heftdal, Line Dam; Andersen, Thomas; Jaehger, Ditte

    2017-01-01

    expression in SpA patients, and examine the in vitro production of IL-26 by synovial cells and the effects of IL-26 on human osteoblasts. IL-26 was measured by ELISA in plasma and synovial fluid (SF) of 15 SpA patients and in plasma samples from 12 healthy controls. Facet joints from axial SpA patients were...... and the myofibroblast marker α-smooth-muscle-actin (αSMA) and analyzed by flow cytometry. Human osteoblasts were cultured in the presence of IL-26, and the degree of mineralization was quantified. We found that IL-26 levels in SF were increased compared with plasma (P ... in facet joints of axial SpA patients within the bone marrow. IL-26 secretion was primarily found in αSMA+ myofibroblasts. In contrast, Th17 cells did not produce detectable amounts of IL-26. Human osteoblasts treated with IL-26 showed increased mineralization compared with untreated osteoblasts (P = 0...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Comparison of Intra-Articular Cavernous Synovial Hemangioma and Cystic Synovial Hyperplasia of the Knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Filippo, M.; Rovani, C.; Sudberry, J. J.; Rossi, F.; Pogliacomi, F.; Zompatori, M. [Univ. of Parma (Italy). Dept. of Clinical Sciences

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To identify and compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics, with and without intravenous contrast medium, of cavernous synovial hemangiomas and cystic synovial hyperplasia. Material and Methods: Four cases of cavernous synovial hemangioma and five of cystic synovial hyperplasia of the knee were studied retrospectively. The patients (5 F and 4 M; 15-25 years of age) all had long-standing knee pain. At clinical examination we observed elastic swelling and pain without significant joint effusion. The patients underwent conventional radiography and MRI without and following intravenous contrast medium before arthroscopic biopsy. Results: The radiographs were interpreted as negative in all patients. MRI examination without contrast medium revealed a similar multicystic appearance for both lesions. Following intravenous contrast agent administration, cavernous synovial hemangiomas demonstrated avid, rather homogenous enhancement, whereas cystic synovial hyperplasia demonstrated less intense, peripheral enhancement only. Arthroscopy with histological examination of the lesions confirmed the MRI diagnosis in every case. Conclusion: In our experience, cavernous synovial hemangioma and cystic synovial hyperplasia have a similar appearance on unenhanced MRI, but can be reliably differentiated on the basis of enhancement characteristics following intravenous contrast administration. Keywords: Cavernous synovial hemangioma; cystic synovial hyperplasia; knee; MRI.

  18. Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma: a report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaira, Kyoichi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Sunaga, Noriaki; Hashimoto, Koshi; Yanagitani, Noriko; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Ebara, Takeshi; Hisada, Takeshi; Mori, Masatomo

    2008-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is the third most common histological type of extremity soft tissue sarcoma. However, primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma is extremely rare. We present 2 cases of unresectable primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma. The radiographic imaging of our present cases was characteristic of a heterogeneously enhancing mass. They were treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, there was complete obstruction of esophagus resulting from progressive diseases. The radiographic findings and treatment were discussed.

  19. Experimental restoration of the digital synovial sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiken, O; Rank, F

    1977-01-01

    The digital synovial sheath constitutes an important component of the delicate mechanism of flexor tendon nutrition and gliding function, In the present study the true nature of the inner cell layers of secondary healed defects in the tendon sheath as well as of free tendon sheath autografts were studied. Leghorn chickens were used as experimental animals and the gradual development of the pseudosheath as well as the healing of sheath autografts were studied both macroscopically and histologically including transmission electron miscroscopy. Synovial regeneration by extension from intact parts of the sheath was never observed and the pseudosheath formed around silastic rods consisted of granulation tissue with fibroblasts and macrophages. The free tendon sheath autografts demonstrated a normal process of healing at the edges of the defect. Synovial regeneration appeared to be that of metaplasia and proliferation of fibroblasts and macrophages. This phenomenon was demonstrable both in the secondary healed defects and more convincingly in the sheath autografts. Further, the silastic rod was found to induce foreign body reaction in the healing synovium. It is concluded that grafting of autologous tendon sheath tissue seems to be a promising method for restoration of defects in the digital tendon sheath.

  20. CT imaging of primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.-D.; Guan, Y.-B.; Chen, Y.-F.; Li, C.-X.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the computed tomography (CT) imaging findings of primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma. Materials and methods: Five cases of synovial sarcoma confirmed by histopathology and cytogenetic study were retrospectively analysed. All patients had undergone chest radiography and unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT examinations, and three had also undergone multiphase CT enhancement examinations. Image characteristics, including shape, size, margin, and attenuation of each lesion before and after contrast enhancement, were analysed. Results: The chest radiographs of the five patients showed well-defined or partly well-defined masses, which were homogeneous and without associated calcification or lymphadenopathy. Pneumothorax was present in one patient. The unenhanced CT images showed well-defined, heterogeneous masses with patchy low density in all five patients. The contrast-enhanced CT images showed heterogeneous enhancement in all cases, three of which demonstrated cystic and necrotic areas. The tumour showed no prolonged or delayed enhancement in three cases using multiphase CT. There were small pleural effusions in four cases. No calcification was observed in any of the cases. There was no evidence of hilar or mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Conclusions: In these five patients, primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma presented as a well-defined mass with patchy low density and heterogeneous enhancement, with no evidence of regional lymphadenopathy. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of regional tumours.

  1. CT imaging of primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W-D; Guan, Y-B; Chen, Y-F; Li, C-X

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the computed tomography (CT) imaging findings of primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma. Five cases of synovial sarcoma confirmed by histopathology and cytogenetic study were retrospectively analysed. All patients had undergone chest radiography and unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT examinations, and three had also undergone multiphase CT enhancement examinations. Image characteristics, including shape, size, margin, and attenuation of each lesion before and after contrast enhancement, were analysed. The chest radiographs of the five patients showed well-defined or partly well-defined masses, which were homogeneous and without associated calcification or lymphadenopathy. Pneumothorax was present in one patient. The unenhanced CT images showed well-defined, heterogeneous masses with patchy low density in all five patients. The contrast-enhanced CT images showed heterogeneous enhancement in all cases, three of which demonstrated cystic and necrotic areas. The tumour showed no prolonged or delayed enhancement in three cases using multiphase CT. There were small pleural effusions in four cases. No calcification was observed in any of the cases. There was no evidence of hilar or mediastinal lymphadenopathy. In these five patients, primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma presented as a well-defined mass with patchy low density and heterogeneous enhancement, with no evidence of regional lymphadenopathy. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of regional tumours. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Primary synovial sarcoma of the posterior chest wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jung-Jyh; Chou, Teh-Ying; Sun, Chih-Hao; Liu, Jung-Sen; Hsu, Wen-Hu

    2008-06-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a malignant soft-tissue tumor that most commonly occurs in the extremities of young adults. Only several cases of synovial sarcomas of the chest wall and pleura had been reported. We present a 24-year-old man who had right back pain, chest pain, dyspnea, and intermittent fever from a huge primary synovial sarcoma of the right posterior chest wall. Multimodality therapies, including surgical resection, and chemotherapy and radiation therapy were applied, but the tumor progressed rapidly and the patient died 6 months after diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive surgical resection is mandatory for primary synovial sarcoma of the chest wall because of its aggressive behavior.

  3. Multidrug resistant tuberculosis diagnosed by synovial fluid analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. van Zeller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem worldwide. HIV co-infection is contributing to an increased incidence of the disease, particularly that caused by multidrug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT. We describe an HIV-infected patient with pleural and lymph node tuberculosis diagnosed by pleural effusion characteristics and biopsy specimens, without MT identification, that further presented with knee-joint involvement. Arthrocentesis allowed MT isolation and drug susceptibility testing, resulting in a diagnosis of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and an appropriate treatment regimen.MT identification and drug susceptibility tests are very important, especially for HIV co-infected patients. Resumo: A tuberculose constitui um importante problema de saúde pública mundial. A co-infecção pelo HIV contribui para o aumento da incidência da doença e em particular a causada por estirpes de Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT multirresistentes. Os autores descrevem um doente HIV-positivo com tuberculose pleural e ganglionar diagnosticada pelas características bioquímicas do líquido pleural e resultados anatomo-patológicos de biopsias mas sem identificação do agente, que posteriormente apresentou envolvimento do joelho. A artrocentese do joelho permitiu o isolamento do MT e a realização de teste de sensibilidade possibilitando o diagnóstico de tuberculose multirresistente e a instituição de um esquema terapêutico adequado.A identificação do MT e a realização de testes de sensibilidade são muito importantes, especialmente em doentes com co-infecção por HIV. Keywords: Multidrug resistant tuberculosis, Drug susceptibility test, HIV, Palavras-chave: Tuberculose multirresistente, Teste de sensibilidade aos antimicrobiana, Infecção VIH

  4. Synovial fluid as a mirror of equine joint (patho) physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, R. van den

    2004-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a serious problem in the equine industry and an important cause of the (early) retirement of sport horses. Currently the diagnosis is usually based on X-rays, but by the time changes become radiographically visible, extensive (often irreversible) joint damage is present. This

  5. MR imaging finding of synovial sarcoma: emphasis on signal characteristics on T2-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Won; Jung, Hye Weon; Cho, So Yeon; Han, Moon Hee; Im, Jung Gi; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-01-01

    To determine the MR imaging findings of synovial sarcoma, with emphasis on the signal characteristics of pathologically correlated T2-weighted images. Necrosis, cystic change or hemorrhage was suggested in 11 cases, ten of which showed triple signal intensity, and in all cases, was pathologically confirmed. Fluid-fluid levels were found in three cases and internal septa in ten. In four cases, maximum diameter was less than 5 cm, and in nine, was greater than this. No mass was detected in one case. The tumor was located in the low extremity(n=9), pelvic girdle and hip joint area(n=2), scapular (n=1), shoulder joint area(n=1), and scalp(n=1). Eleven cases showed a relatively well-defined margin and nine showed lobulation. Except in the area of necrosis and cystic change, the pattern of contrast enhancement was diffuse and inhomogeneous. Bony invasion was detected in two cases, neurovascular encasement in four, calcification in four, and joint capsule invasion in four. On T2-weighted images, synovial sarcoma frequently showed triple signal intensity and internal septa with fluid-fluid levels: this was induced by cystic changes due to necrosis and hemorrhage. (author). 13 refs., 2 figs.

  6. A Rare Case of Synovial Sarcoma of the Prostate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Urology, KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India. AbStRACt. Prostatic synovial sarcomas are exceedingly rare. To our knowledge, only six primary cases have been reported so far. We herein describe a primary synovial sarcoma of the prostate seen in a 25- year-old male patient, the youngest patient seen with this ...

  7. Giant primary synovial sarcoma of the anterior mediastinum: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-11

    Jun 11, 2015 ... Primary synovial sarcoma is a very rare tumor of the mediastinum, which is unreported in the entire subcontinent of West. Africa, and presents daunting challenges from diagnosis to management with lack of standard management strategies. We present a case of primary monophasic synovial sarcoma of ...

  8. Giant primary synovial sarcoma of the anterior mediastinum: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary synovial sarcoma is a very rare tumor of the mediastinum, which is unreported in the entire subcontinent of West Africa, and presents daunting challenges from diagnosis to management with lack of standard management strategies. We present a case of primary monophasic synovial sarcoma of the anterior ...

  9. Synovial chondromatosis of the foot presenting with Lisfranc dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harish, Srinivasan; Saifuddin, Asif; Cannon, Stephen R.; Flanagan, Adrienne M.

    2005-01-01

    Primary synovial chondromatosis is rare in the foot. We report a case of synovial chondromatosis affecting multiple sites of the foot and causing bone erosions in a 44-year-old woman. Radiographs demonstrated erosions of multiple metatarsals including the tarsometatarsal joints, resulting in Lisfranc tarsometatarsal dislocation. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the widespread synovial proliferation and soft tissue masses affecting the foot and helped in arriving at a differential diagnosis and plan for needle biopsy. Diagnosis was made initially by needle biopsy under computed tomography guidance and was subsequently confirmed by histopathological assessment of the surgically excised synovial masses. To our knowledge, multifocal synovial chondromatosis causing Lisfranc dislocation in the foot has not been reported previously. (orig.)

  10. Synovial Sarcoma of the Buccal Mucosa: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T. S. Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma (SS is a rare malignant neoplasm that arises most commonly in joint capsules and articular tendons, but its relationship to the synovium is not always obvious. Synovial sarcoma is a malignant soft tissue tumor representing 5.6% to 10% of all soft tissue sarcomas. They are termed SS because of their histologic resemblance to the synovium, but they rarely involve a synovial structure and are thought to arise from pluripotential mesenchymal cells. The tumor usually occurs in close association with tendon sheaths, bursae, and joint capsules, primarily in the para-articular regions of the extremities, with approximately 9% occurring in the head and neck region. Synovial sarcoma has been reported rarely in the oral cavity. We report a very rare case of Synovial sarcoma of the buccal mucosa in a 24-year-old male patient.

  11. MRI features of three paediatric intra-articular synovial lesions: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN (United States)], E-mail: herman.kan@vanderbilt.edu; Hernanz-Schulman, M. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN (United States); Damon, B.M.; Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Connolly, S.A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, IL (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Aim: To determine reliable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features differentiating three paediatric intra-articular congenital or neoplastic synovial lesions that contain blood products, from post-traumatic or haemorrhagic inflammatory processes. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective review of MRI findings of 22 paediatric intra-articular congenital or neoplastic synovial lesions, including venous malformation (VM) (n = 12), pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS; n = 8), and synovial sarcoma (SS; n = 2). These MRI features were compared with 22 paediatric post-traumatic or inflammatory intra-articular processes containing blood products and producing mass effect. The following imaging features were assessed: presence of a discrete mass, extension, extra-articular oedema, susceptibility, joint effusion, and size. Fisher's exact test was used and results were considered statistically significant when p < 0.05. Results: The three intra-articular synovial lesions, compared with controls, were more likely to directly invade osseous structures when a discrete mass was present (13/16, 81.3% versus 1/9, 11.1%; p < 0.002) and extend into extra-articular soft tissues (13/21, 61.9% versus 2/17, 11.8%; p < 0.003), but were less likely to show extra-articular oedema (3/22, 13.6% versus 13/22, 59.1%; p < 0.004), a joint effusion (10/22,45.5% versus 19/22, 86.4%, p < 0.01), susceptibility within a joint effusion (0/22, 0% versus 11/22, 40.9%; p = 0.00), osseous oedema (3/16, 18.8% versus 7/9, 77.8%; p < 0.009), and synovial enhancement (8/21, 38.1% versus 14/16, 87.5%; p < 0.003). VMs had characteristic tubular vessels with internal fluid-fluid levels (11/12) that extended into bone (10/12) and extracapsular soft tissues (11/12). Conclusion: Our study indicates that, despite the overlapping presence of haemorrhagic products, intra-articular VM, PVNS, and SS show MRI features that permit distinction from acquired post-traumatic and haemorrhagic inflammatory

  12. The early clinical presentation of synovial sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, H; Wickstrom, J K; Hoerner, H E; Derbes, V L

    1979-01-01

    While synovial sarcoma most commonly presents as a painless mass, occasionally the cancer emerges in a misleading manner resulting in an unfavorable delay or error in diagnosis. A review of the litrature reveals 4 such occult patterns: pretumor phase characterized only by pain or tenderness; the acute inflammatory lesion presenting as a "hot" arthritis or bursitis; the chronic contracture; the post traumatic tumor. These conditions, especially when otherwise unaccounted for, are indications for biopsy. Four avoidable pitfalls in biopsy management also emerged from the review.

  13. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  14. Synovial sarcoma of the shoulder: A series of 14 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Bianca M; Kaiser, Courtney L; Larque, Ana B; Hornicek, Francis J; Raskin, Kevin A; Schwab, Joseph H; Chen, Yen-Lin; Lozano Calderón, Santiago A

    2018-03-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma with poor long-term prognosis due to late recurrence and metastasis. Synovial sarcoma arises in less than 6% from the shoulder. As a result, there is limited information in the literature about synovial sarcoma of the shoulder (SSS). We included all patients treated for SSS at our institution between 1985 and 2013. Medical charts were retrospectively reviewed to collect demographics, information about the clinical course, and outcome. This subgroup was compared to our institution's entire synovial sarcoma patient cohort and the data in the published literature. SSS Patients presented most commonly with pain and a growing mass; the majority of tumors were grade 2 and measured greater than 5 cm. 43% (7) of SSS patients developed metastatic disease and 36% (5) had died at a median follow-up of 64 months (36-127); SSS 5-year survival (83.3%) was higher in our series than in the general literature (57-75%). We found better prognosis in patients with synovial sarcoma of the shoulder than expected based on the current literature. The clinical behavior of synovial sarcoma in the shoulder is closer to that of synovial sarcoma in the extremities than the trunk. Level IV, Case Series. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging as marker of synovial membrane regeneration and recurrence of synovitis after arthroscopic knee joint synovectomy: a one year follow up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Ejbjerg, B; Stoltenberg, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: By repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study synovial membrane regeneration and recurrence of synovitis after arthroscopic knee joint synovectomy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other (non-RA) causes of persistent knee joint synovitis. METHODS: Contrast enhanced...... MRI was performed in 15 knees (nine RA, six non-RA) before and one day, seven days, two months, and 12 months after arthroscopic synovectomy. Synovial membrane volumes, joint effusion volumes, and cartilage and bone destruction were assessed on each MRI set. Baseline microscopic and macroscopic...... assessments of synovitis and baseline and follow up standard clinical and biochemical examinations were available. RESULTS: Synovial membrane and joint fluid volumes were significantly reduced two and 12 months after synovectomy. However, MRI signs of recurrent synovitis were already present in most knees...

  16. A case of synovial sarcoma in the submandibular region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Chie; Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Kaminou, Toshio; Adachi, Akira; Kinoshita, Fumiko; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2005-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas are a less common cervical tumor in young patients. We report a 23-year-old man with synovial sarcoma in the submandibular region. T2-weighted MR images demonstrated a mixed-intensity tumor attached to the submandibular gland. T1-weighted MR images revealed a focal area with mildly increased signal intensity, indicating intratumoral hemorrhage. MR images were also useful for visualization of tumor extension. Synovial sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of well-defined in homogeneous tumors adjacent to the submandibular gland in young adults. (author)

  17. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulian, M A; Mosby, E L; Chisum, J W

    1989-01-01

    Two cases of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint are reported. This condition is rare but benign, with only 36 cases reported in the literature to date. Symptoms include tenderness, swelling, and limited range of motion, with deviation to the affected side. Diagnosis is made both from the clinical presentation and histologic examination. The etiology is thought to be cartilaginous foci within the synovial membrane that become detached and proliferate in the synovium as chondrocytes. Treatment includes removal of the "loose bodies" and possible resection of the synovial membrane, condyle, and disk.

  18. Primary mediastinal giant synovial sarcoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Rea

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma has been defined by the World Health Organization (WHO in 2002 as a type of mesenchymal tissue cell tumor that exhibits epithelial differentiation and represents the third most common soft-tissue sarcoma in adults, accounting for approximately 10% of soft-tissue sarcomas. To date, only few reports have focused on mediastinal synovial sarcoma imaging findings. Herein, we report a case of a 13 cm primary mediastinal giant synovial sarcoma, diagnosed in a 56-year-old patient admitted in our Department of Radiology with a six-month history of dyspnea and back pain.

  19. Primary mediastinal giant synovial sarcoma: A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    Rea, Gaetano; Somma, Francesco; Valente, Tullio; Antinolfi, Giuseppe; Di Grezia, Graziella; Gatta, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma has been defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2002 as a type of mesenchymal tissue cell tumor that exhibits epithelial differentiation and represents the third most common soft-tissue sarcoma in adults, accounting for approximately 10% of soft-tissue sarcomas. To date, only few reports have focused on mediastinal synovial sarcoma imaging findings. Herein, we report a case of a 13 cm primary mediastinal giant synovial sarcoma, diagnosed in a 56-year-old patient ad...

  20. Recurrent primary synovial sarcoma of the chest wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Aubry, Marie-Christine

    2007-07-01

    We present a case of recurrent primary synovial sarcoma of the chest wall in a 55-year-old man. Imaging at the time of recurrence revealed extensive involvement of the left pleural cavity by the tumor. The patient developed severe congestive heart failure with restrictive/constrictive physiology and subsequently died in the hospital 5 months after initial presentation. At autopsy, the tumor encased the entire left lung in a rind-like fashion and diffusely involved the pericardium. Recurrent synovial sarcoma was confirmed by histological examination. Synovial sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chest masses, especially in young or middle-aged adults.

  1. Hyaluronate synthesis by synovial villi in organ culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.L.; Christine, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    Individual canine synovial villi were used to establish short-term synovial organ cultures. These villi incorporated 3 H-glucosamine into highly-polymerized 3 H-hyaluronic acid ( 3 H-HA), which was the only 3 H-glycosaminoglycan identified in the culture medium. Some 3 H-HA, and larger amounts of other 3 H-glycosaminoglycans, were recovered from cultured tissues. Culture medium 3 H-HA content was proportional to the surface area of cultured villi. Organ cultures of nonvillous synovium were compared with villi; nonvillous cultures synthesized less 3 H-HA per mm2 of their synovial intimal surface than villi. These cultures complement cell culture techniques for in vitro studies of synovial lining cell function

  2. Multielemental determination in sinovial fluid using PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naab, Fabian; Ozafran, Mabel J.; Leyva, Ana G.; Vazquez, Monica E.; Burlon, Alejandro A.; Caraballo, Maria E.; Debray, Mario E.; Kreiner, Andres J.; Kesque, Jose M.; Stoliar, Pablo; Benyacar, Maria; Schuff, Juan A.; Somacal, Hector; Valda, Alejandro; Davidson, Jorge; Davidson, Miguel

    2000-01-01

    The aluminium concentration in samples of synovial fluid has been measured using the PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission ) technique. In the present work, two sample preparation methods have been developed and compared in order to achieve lower aluminium detection limits. The concentrations of Na, P, S, Cl, K and Ca have also been determined. (author)

  3. Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma: A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ershadi, Reza; Rahim, Mohamadbagher; Davari, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Synovial sarcomas commonly occur in the extremities of young adults. A primary occurrence in the mediastinum is very rare with only a few reported cases in the world literature. We report a case of mediastinal synovial sarcoma. This paper is about a 47-year-old male who presented with retrosternal chest pain and shortness of breath on exertion. Imaging showed an anterior mediastinal mass. Pathological examination of the resected mass showed a biphasic neoplasm with a spindle ...

  4. The vascularization of human flexor tendons within the digital synovial sheath region--structureal and functional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundborg, G; Myrhage, R; Rydevik, B

    1977-11-01

    The intrinsic vascularization of human flexor tendons within the digital sheath region was studied on fresh amputation specimens with the aid of angiographic and histochemical techniques. In the flexor digitorum profundus tendon, three separate vascular systems of various origin and with no or very little communication could be verified. In the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon, two such systems were observed. The volar surface of both tendons is more or less devoid of vessels. Moreover, at the proximal interphalangeal joint level, the flexor digitorum profundus tendon has a volar avascular zone, constituting about 1 mm, i.e., about one-third to one-fourth of the thickness of the tendon. It is assumed that the synovial fluid is of importance for the nutrition of the tendons and that therefore the synovial sheath should be preserved as much as possible.

  5. In arthritis the Doppler based degree of hypervascularisation shows a positive correlation with synovial leukocyte count and distinguishes joints with leukocytes greater and less than 5/nL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Christian; Sattler, Horst; Peters, Lena; Tuleweit, Anika; Löffler, Uta; Wadsack, Daniel; Uppenkamp, Michael; Bergner, Raoul

    2016-10-01

    Power Doppler ultrasound is used to assess joint vascularity in acute arthritis. PDUS signals have been correlated with synovial histology and bone deterioration. Little is known about the correlation between power Doppler signals and synovial white blood count. In our study, we analyzed power Doppler signals in inflammatory joint diseases including gout, calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis and others and correlated power Doppler signals with synovial white blood count and with serologic markers of inflammation. We retrospectively evaluated 194 patients with arthritis. All patients underwent joint sonography, power Doppler ultrasound, synovial fluid analysis and blood examination of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Correlation analyses (Spearman and Pearson), Chi(2) test, t-tests, a unifactorial ANOVA and regression analyses were applied. Hypervascularisation in power Doppler was most prominent in gout and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. Spondyloarthritis and non-inflammatory joint diseases presented with low degrees of hypervascularisation. Mean synovial white blood count did not differ significantly between crystal-related arthritides, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis or other inflammatory joint diseases. There was a positive but weak correlation between power Doppler signals and synovial white blood count (Pleukocytesleukocytes≥5/nL (P<0.001). Copyright © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Polyethylene particles in joint fluid and osteolysis in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñol, Ignasi; Torres, Alberto; Gil, Gabriel; Prats, Eva; Puig-Verdier, Lluis; Hinarejos, Pedro

    2014-03-01

    One of the most frequent reasons for total knee arthroplasty late failure is osteolysis. It has been related to foreign body reaction to polyethylene particles. The aim of this study is to analyse the number, size and morphology of polyethylene particles in synovial fluid in total knee arthroplasty revision and correlate them to the pathology and the degree of osteolysis. Synovial fluid was obtained in 12 patients before the revision total knee arthroplasty. Polyethylene particles were isolated and analysed through scanning electron microscopy. Samples of synovial tissue were analysed with optical microscopy while considering the parameters of particles and histiocytic infiltration. Osteolysis was analysed with plain radiography and the macroscopic aspect during surgery. The statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between a high concentration of polyethylene particles in synovial fluid and a high degree of osteolysis. The concentration of particles in synovial fluid also showed a significant correlation with a high degree of particles and histiocytes in the histological analysis. There was a relationship between the size of particles and the degree of osteolysis. No relationship was found between the shape of the particles and the histological findings or the degree of osteolysis. In an "in vivo" TKA scenario, the presence of a high concentration of polyethylene particles in the synovial fluid seems to be the cause of a highly active foreign body histological reaction, with an increased number of histiocytes, which seems to be the cause of a significant degree of osteolysis around the implant. © 2013.

  7. Synovial Cytokines and the MSIS Criteria Are Not Useful for Determining Infection Resolution After Periprosthetic Joint Infection Explantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangiamore, Salvatore J; Siqueira, Marcelo B P; Saleh, Anas; Daly, Thomas; Higuera, Carlos A; Barsoum, Wael K

    2016-07-01

    Diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) requires a combination of clinical and laboratory parameters, which may be expensive and difficult to interpret. Synovial fluid cytokines have been shown to accurately differentiate septic from aseptic failed total knee (TKA) and hip (THA) arthroplasties. However, after first-stage explantation, there is still no reliable test to rule out PJI before a second-stage reimplantation procedure. (1) Which synovial fluid cytokines have the highest diagnostic accuracy for PJI? (2) Which cytokine shows the greatest decrease associated with the resolution of infection in the same patient between explantation and subsequent reimplantation of an infected arthroplasty? (3) What is the accuracy of synovial fluid cytokines and the Musculoskeletal Infection Society (MSIS) criteria to rule out PJI after first-stage explantation? (4) What are the most studied synovial fluid cytokines for diagnosing PJI as reported in the literature and what are their cumulative diagnostic accuracy? Between May 2013 and March 2014, 104 patients with painful THA and TKA evaluated for possible PJI were included in our study. Of these, 90 (87%) had cytokine levels measured from synovial fluid samples collected as part of this prospective study (n = 33 hips, n = 57 knees). A second group of 35 patients (n = 36 samples) who presented during the same time period with an antibiotic spacer also had synovial cytokines measured before second-stage reimplantation. For the first group of 90 patients, the MSIS definition classified each joint at the time of surgery as infected (n = 31) or not infected (n = 59) and was used as the standard to test the accuracy in diagnosing PJI. Of the 35 patients with synovial marker data before second-stage surgery, 15 patients had cytokine measurements both at explantation and reimplantation and were used to quantify the change between stages. The reimplantation group had a minimum 1-year followup (with four [11%] patients lost to

  8. Fluid-fluid level on MR image: significance in Musculoskeletal diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hye Won; Lee, Kyung Won [Seoul Naitonal University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Song, Chi Sung [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang Wook; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul Naitonal University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency, number and signal intensity of fluid-fluid levels of musculoskeletal diseases on MR images, and to determine the usefulness of this information for the differentiation of musculoskeletal diseases. MR images revealed fluid-fluid levels in the following diseases : giant cell tumor(6), telangiectatic osteosarcoma(4), aneurysmal bone cyst(3), synovial sarcoma(3), chondroblastoma(2), soft tissue tuberculous abscess(2), hematoma(2), hemangioma (1), neurilemmoma(1), metastasis(1), malignant fibrous histiocytoma(1), bursitis(1), pyogenic abscess(1), and epidermoid inclusion cyst(1). Fourteen benign tumors and ten malignant, three abscesses, and the epidermoid inclusion cyst showed only one fluid-fluid level in a unilocular cyst. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensities of fluid varied, but on T2-weighted images, superior layers were in most cases more hyperintense than inferior layers. Because fluid-fluid layers are a nonspecific finding, it is difficult to specifically diagnose each disease according to the number of fluid-fluid levels or signal intensity of fluid. In spite of the nonspecificity of fluid-fluid levels, they were frequently seen in cases of giant cell tumor, telangiectatic osteosarcoma, aneurysmal bone cycle, and synovial sarcoma. Nontumorous diseases such abscesses and hematomas also demonstrated this finding. (author). 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  9. Fluid-fluid level on MR image: significance in Musculoskeletal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hye Won; Lee, Kyung Won; Han, Sang Wook; Kang, Heung Sik

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency, number and signal intensity of fluid-fluid levels of musculoskeletal diseases on MR images, and to determine the usefulness of this information for the differentiation of musculoskeletal diseases. MR images revealed fluid-fluid levels in the following diseases : giant cell tumor(6), telangiectatic osteosarcoma(4), aneurysmal bone cyst(3), synovial sarcoma(3), chondroblastoma(2), soft tissue tuberculous abscess(2), hematoma(2), hemangioma (1), neurilemmoma(1), metastasis(1), malignant fibrous histiocytoma(1), bursitis(1), pyogenic abscess(1), and epidermoid inclusion cyst(1). Fourteen benign tumors and ten malignant, three abscesses, and the epidermoid inclusion cyst showed only one fluid-fluid level in a unilocular cyst. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensities of fluid varied, but on T2-weighted images, superior layers were in most cases more hyperintense than inferior layers. Because fluid-fluid layers are a nonspecific finding, it is difficult to specifically diagnose each disease according to the number of fluid-fluid levels or signal intensity of fluid. In spite of the nonspecificity of fluid-fluid levels, they were frequently seen in cases of giant cell tumor, telangiectatic osteosarcoma, aneurysmal bone cycle, and synovial sarcoma. Nontumorous diseases such abscesses and hematomas also demonstrated this finding. (author). 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  10. SYNOVIAL CYST IN THE PROJECTION OF TIBIAL TUNNEL AFTER ACL RECONSTRUCTION (CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Bogatov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ACL  tears  are the  most  widespread  lesions  among  isolated  trauma  of knee  ligaments  that  require  early  surgical treatment especially in young active patients. There  are various ACL reconstruction techniques where femur and tibia tunnels are formed and graft is fixed by cannulated interference screws. One of the possible complications is the formation of a postoperative soft tissue cyst in the projection of tibial tunnel.  The nature  as well as mechanism of cyst formation  is still unclear.A relevant  clinical case of cyst formation  in a patient five years after ACL grating  is described  in this publication. MRI findings demonstrated that  the origin of the cyst was hole of the tibial interference screw.Conclusion. The authors  observed that  synovial cyst was formed due to use of cannulated interference screws where synovial  fluid was leaking  from joint  cavity  through screw holes. Cystectomy and  autografting of tibial  bone tunnel allowed to reduce such complication.

  11. Primary synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsaif H Saif

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm which commonly occurs in the extremities of adults, in close association with joint capsules, tendon sheaths, bursae and fascial structures. Only a few cases of synovial sarcoma occurring in the abdominal wall have been reported. A case of a primary synovial sarcoma arising from the anterior abdominal wall fascial aponeurosis is presented.

  12. Are Bicipital Synovial Cysts in Children with Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis still a Significant Clinical Challenge?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyvsgaard, Nini; Herlin, Troels

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Large synovial cysts are rarely seen in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. When they do appear, they usually appear in the popliteal space (Baker’s cyst). Less commonly, they occur in the antecubital area or as bicipital synovial cysts. Bicipital synovial cysts present as a sudden-onset p...

  13. Condromatosis sinovial de la articulación témporo-mandibular Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Moretti

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available La condromatosis sinovial es una condición patológica rara que usualmente afecta a grandes articulaciones, en especial de las rodillas. Se caracteriza por múltiples nódulos cartilaginosos en el espacio articular. Los cuerpos condrales usualmente envuelven la sinovial de la articulación y son el producto de metaplasia mesenquimal; con frecuencia estos se encuentran sueltos dentro de la articulación; pueden estar adheridos a la sinovial y/o al disco intraarticular, y si son abundantes producen aumento del tamaño articular, dolor, chasquidos y llegan a comprometer la función de la articulación. El compromiso de la articulación témporo-mandibular es excepcional, encontrándose 50 casos publicados en la literatura mundial hasta la fecha. Se presenta el compromiso de la ATM en un paciente de sexo masculino, de 73 años, siendo éste el primer caso descrito para Ibero Latinoamérica.Synovial chondromatosis is a rare pathological condition which affects big joints, especially knees. This condition presents multiple cartilage nodes inside the joint space. These cartilage bodies are in close contact with the synovial and are free inside the fluid. The nodes could be stick at the synovial or at the articular disk, and produce increase of the articular size, pain, cracks, and compromise of the articular functions. The temporomandibular joint is affected exceptionally and only 50 cases are published in the medical literature until now. We present a synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint in a 73 years old, male patient. This is the first report in Iberolatinamerica.

  14. [Generalised Form of Synovial Chondromatosis of the Knee Joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vališ, P; Vyskočil, R

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm in a 53-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with a synovial chondromatosis of the knee joint extending to the popliteal fossa and soft tissues around the knee. Because of the presence of massive nodules, the patient was indicated for total synovectomy, with removal of pathologically changed cartilaginous tissue, performed by combined anterior and posterior approaches to the knee joint. Despite complete removal of the synovium and loose cartilage bodies and the patient's pain relief in the post-operative time, three years after the operation new problems appeared. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed a relapse of synovial chondromatosis and the patient was indicated for revision surgery of the knee joint. The results of physical examination and MRI scans, and intra-operative findings in the patient are reported. synovial chondromatosis, total synovectomy, direct anterior and posterior approaches to the knee joint.

  15. Synovial cyst of the lumbar spine: CT and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vives, Daniel A.; Bauni, Carlos E.; Mendoza, Monica E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this revision article is to show the images of intraspinal synovial cysts, using MR and CT. The synovial cyst is an infrequent entity that predominates in the lower lumbar spine. It shows a prevalence on the L4-L5 level, and is uncommon before the age of 30 years. The cyst communicates with the adjacent apophysial joint, and these joints are frequently altered by osteoarthritis. The simple X-ray and the myelography do not contribute to the diagnosis. The CT and MR are the most accurate methods for this anatomical alteration. The synovial cysts have similar behavior: iso-hypointense in T1 weighted and hyperintense in T2 weighted in the MR examinations and some of them show the classical calcification of their wall in the CT studies. (author)

  16. Synovial chondromatosis of the elbow in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Narasimhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is cartilaginous metaplasia of mesenchymal remnants of synovial tissue of the joints. Its main characteristic is the formation of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium and inside the articular space (loose bodies. It usually presents between the third and fifth decades and is rare in children. It presents as a mono-articular pathology affecting large joints such as the knee, hip, and elbow. The main symptoms are pain, swelling, and limitation of movements in the affected joint. Diagnosis is made by panoramic radiographs, computed tomography scan, and mainly magnetic resonance imaging and on surgery. The authors describe of synovial chondromatosis presenting in the elbow of an 11 year-old girl which is unreported to the best of our knowledge.

  17. Synovial sarcoma: a rare presentation of parapharyngeal mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaariyah, Mohd Mokhtar; Mazita, Ami; Masaany, Mansor; Razif, Mohd Yunus; Isa, Mohamed Rose; Asma, Abdullah

    2010-06-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma of the head and neck region involving the parapharyngeal space. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma can be very challenging to the pathologists. We present a rare case of parapharyngeal synovial sarcoma in a young female patient who had a two-month history of left cervical intumescent mass at level II. The fine needle aspiration cytology of the mass was proved inconclusive. Transcervical excision of the mass was performed and the first case of parapharyngeal sarcoma was identified in our center by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Repeat imaging revealed residual tumor. The patient successfully underwent a second excision of the residual tumor and received adjuvant radiotherapy.

  18. Poorly differentiated monophasic synovial sarcoma of the mediastinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafah, Maha; Zaidi, Shaesta N

    2011-01-01

    Poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma is a diagnostically challenging neoplasm. Most commonly they occur in the soft tissue of the extremities and are rare in the mediastinum. They can be indistinguishable from other "round cell tumors" based on the morphology alone or at times by immunohistochemical studies. Here in, we report an extremely rare case of metastatic poorly differentiated monophasic synovial sarcoma of the mediastinum without a known primary in a 30-year-old man. The imaging studies on admission showed 10 × 9.5 cm anterior mediastinal mass with multiple nodules in the lung and pleura along with multiple enlarged mediastinal and axillary lymph nodes. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis supported the diagnosis of poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma, which was further confirmed by molecular genetic analysis.

  19. Poorly differentiated monophasic synovial sarcoma of the mediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Arafah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma is a diagnostically challenging neoplasm. Most commonly they occur in the soft tissue of the extremities and are rare in the mediastinum. They can be indistinguishable from other "round cell tumors" based on the morphology alone or at times by immunohistochemical studies. Here in, we report an extremely rare case of metastatic poorly differentiated monophasic synovial sarcoma of the mediastinum without a known primary in a 30-year-old man. The imaging studies on admission showed 10 × 9.5 cm anterior mediastinal mass with multiple nodules in the lung and pleura along with multiple enlarged mediastinal and axillary lymph nodes. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis supported the diagnosis of poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma, which was further confirmed by molecular genetic analysis.

  20. Primary Synovial Sarcoma of the Mediastinum : A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Ravikumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcomas commonly occur in the extremities of young adults. A primary occurrence in the mediastinum is very rare with only a few reported cases in the world literature. This paper is about a 42-year-old male who presented with chest pain and dyspnoea on exertion. Imaging showed an anterior mediastinal mass with adhesions to the lung. Pathological examination of the resected mass showed a biphasic neoplasm with a spindle cell component admixed with gland-like elements. The tumour showed positive staining with cytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen, and Bcl-2 confirming the diagnosis of a biphasic synovial sarcoma. A wide range of neoplasms, both primary and metastatic, occur in the mediastinum, which pose considerable diagnostic difficulties. A synovial sarcoma should always be considered in the differential diagnosis, and immunohistochemistry is an important adjuvant tool in this situation. This paper highlights the importance of recognizing an unusual presentation of this aggressive neoplasm to aid appropriate clinical management.

  1. Primary synovial sarcoma of the mediastinum : a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Gayatri; Mullick, Shalini; Ananthamurthy, Anuradha; Correa, Marjorie

    2011-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas commonly occur in the extremities of young adults. A primary occurrence in the mediastinum is very rare with only a few reported cases in the world literature. This paper is about a 42-year-old male who presented with chest pain and dyspnoea on exertion. Imaging showed an anterior mediastinal mass with adhesions to the lung. Pathological examination of the resected mass showed a biphasic neoplasm with a spindle cell component admixed with gland-like elements. The tumour showed positive staining with cytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen, and Bcl-2 confirming the diagnosis of a biphasic synovial sarcoma. A wide range of neoplasms, both primary and metastatic, occur in the mediastinum, which pose considerable diagnostic difficulties. A synovial sarcoma should always be considered in the differential diagnosis, and immunohistochemistry is an important adjuvant tool in this situation. This paper highlights the importance of recognizing an unusual presentation of this aggressive neoplasm to aid appropriate clinical management.

  2. FoxP3 mRNA splice forms in synovial CD4+ T cells in rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryder, L Rebekka; Bartels, Else Marie; Woetmann, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to elucidate the relative amount of the different splice forms of FoxP3 mRNA in CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood (PB) compared to synovial fluid (SF) in RA and PsA patients. FoxP3 mRNA was measured using a quantitative real-time PCR method. CD4+ T cells were isolated from 17 paired sa...

  3. Infiltrating Cardiac Synovial Sarcoma Presenting as Acute Cerebrovascular Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelechukwu U. Okoro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cardiac sarcoma is a rare malignant myocardial neoplasm that does not exhibit gender predominance or age predilection. The classification of these tumors includes several subtypes, of which synovial sarcoma is a rare manifestation. When present, these tumors portend a poor prognosis with high morbidity and mortality that is attributable to their inherent infiltrative capacity, especially in the absence of treatment. The general consensus for treatment is surgical excision and neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this report, a case of synovial sarcoma involving the left ventricular outflow tract and aortic valve is presented.

  4. Percutaneous biopsy of the synovial membrane of large joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begule, V.

    1989-01-01

    Using flouroscopy, the authors have developed new techniques of percutaneous synovial biopsy (PSB) of large joints of limbs (other than the knee). PSB was performed on outpatients under local anesthesia. They have performed 84 biopsies (hips: 57), shoulders: 10, elbows: six, wrists: five, ankles: six). The PSB technique was gradually improved. Main technical refinements were use of a Tru-Cut needle introduced through a Jamshidi trephine needle, placement of the cutting window parallel to the anterior aspect of the joint, and selection of an optimal approach and biopsy site. With these improvements, the success rate of attaining synovial membrane was raised from 49% to 81%. No complications were encountered

  5. Experimental Investigations of Biological Lubrication at the Nanoscale: The Cases of Synovial Joints and the Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sotres

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between surfaces are ubiquitous phenomena in living organisms. Nature has developed sophisticated strategies for lubricating these systems, increasing their efficiency and life span. This includes the use of water-based lubricants, such as saliva and synovial fluid. These fluids overcome the limitations of water as a lubricant by the presence of molecules such as proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides. Such molecules may alter surface interactions through different mechanisms. They can increase viscosity enabling fluid-film lubrication. Moreover, molecules adsorb on the surfaces providing mechanisms for boundary lubrication and preventing wear. The mentioned molecules have typical sizes in the nanometer range. Their interaction, as well as the interaction with the entrapping surfaces, takes place through forces in the range of nanonewtons. It is therefore not surprising that the investigation of these systems have been boosted by development of techniques such as scanning probe microscopies and the surface force apparatus which allow studying tribological processes at the nanoscale. Indeed, these approaches have generated an enormous amount of studies over the last years. The aim of this review is to perform a critical analysis of the current stage of this research, with a main focus on studies on synovial joints and the oral cavity.

  6. Synovial effusion in reflex sympathetic dystrophy: an additional sign for diagnosis and staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graif, M.; Matteucci, T. [Ichilov-Sourasky Med. Center, Tel Aviv (Israel). Dept. of Radiol.; Schweitzer, M.E.; Marks, B. [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 132 S. 10th Street, 1096 Main Bldg., Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Mandel, S. [Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Purpose. To improve the present MRI criteria for diagnosis and staging of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) by including increased joint fluid as an additional MRI sign of RSD. Design and patients. One hundred and fourteen extremities (69 affected and 45 contralateral controls) in 57 consecutive patients with RSD were evaluated using a 1.5-T unit. T1- and T2-weighted pulse sequences, often with fat suppression, were used before and after administration of intravenous contrast enhancement (Gd). Following T2-weighted image digitization the volume of synovial fluid was measured with a computer model. Results. Effusions were detected in 61% of the extremities suspected of RSD and in 44% of the contralateral control joints. The mean fluid quantity measured in the symptomatic articulation was 201 mm{sup 3}. MRI diagnosis of RSD based on previously described criteria was done in 62% of the patients, yielding a sensitivity of 60%. Effusions were present in 79% of the false negative MRI cases. Retrospectively considering the presence of fluid as a potential positive criterion for RSD increases the sensitivity by 31% (to 91%). Conclusions. Joint effusions are probably associated with early stages of RSD. Adding effusion to the list of radiological criteria for RSD increases the sensitivity of MRI from 60% to 91%. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 9 refs.

  7. Reduced culture time and improved isolation rate through culture of sonicate fluid in blood culture bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, Viktor; Trampuz, Andrej; Perka, Carsten F; Wassilew, Georgi I

    2017-08-09

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the cultivation of sonicate fluid (SFC) in blood culture bottles (BCB) leads to a higher rate of bacterial isolations than agar plate culture (APC) and to investigate whether the utilization of BCB leads to a reduction in culture time. We performed a retrospective analysis of 206 revision total knee and total hip arthroplasty patients comparing the results of both synovial fluid culture and SFC in both BCB and conventional APC. The use of BCB improved both the rate of positive bacterial isolations and reduced the culture time for synovial fluid as well as SFC. Fifty-one patients showed a bacterial isolation in SFC-APC and 101 in SFC-BCB. For synovial fluid 24 patients showed a bacterial isolation on APC and 37 showed a bacterial isolation in BCB. The synovial fluid cultures showed growth on APC after an average of 2.8 days vs. 1.8 days in BCB. The SFC-APC showed growth after an average of 4.2 days vs. 2.9 days for SFC-BCB. The culture of synovial and sonicate fluid in BCB leads to more positive bacterial isolations and quicker bacterial growth than conventional agar plate cultures.

  8. Bakers Cyst with Synovial Chondromatosis of Knee - A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Daivesh P; Diwakar, Manish; Dargar, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare intraarticular benign condition arising from the synovial membrane of the joints, synovial sheaths or bursae around the joints. Primary synovial chondromatosis typically affects the large joints in the third to fifth decade of life, although involvement of smaller joints and presentation in younger age group is also documented. The purpose of this case report is to document this rare extra articular synovial pathology present inside the baker's cyst which required open synovectomy and debridement to eradicate it. A 43 yearold male presented with a two year history of pain, swelling and restriction of right knee joint. After the clinical and radiological assessment, open synovectomy, removal of cyst and thorough joint debridement procedure was performed. Histopathological study confirmed the findings of synovial chondromatosis. Synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign condition. Complete synovectomy offers reliable cure rate.

  9. Synovial sarcoma mimicking benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larque, Ana B.; Nielsen, G.P.; Chebib, Ivan [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-11-15

    To assess the radiographic and clinicopathologic features of synovial sarcoma of the nerve that were clinically or radiologically interpreted as benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Five patients with synovial sarcoma arising from the peripheral nerve and interpreted clinically and radiologically as peripheral nerve sheath tumors were identified. Clinicopathologic and imaging features were evaluated. There were three females and two males, ranging in age from 28 to 50 (mean 35.8) years. Most patients (4/5) complained of a mass, discomfort or pain. MR images demonstrated a heterogeneous, enhancing, soft tissue mass contiguous with the neurovascular bundle. On histologic examination, most tumors were monophasic synovial sarcoma (4/5). At the time of surgery, all tumors were noted to arise along or within a peripheral nerve. All patients were alive with no evidence of disease with median follow-up of 44 (range 32-237) months. For comparison, approximately 775 benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities were identified during the same time period. Primary synovial sarcoma of the nerve can mimic peripheral nerve sheath tumors clinically and on imaging and should be included in the differential diagnosis for tumors arising from peripheral nerves. (orig.)

  10. Synovial Sarcoma-A Rare Tumor of the Larynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodrat Mohammadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malignant mesenchymal tumors of the larynx are rare. One type of malignant mesenchymal tumor is synovial sarcoma with unknown histogenesis, which occurs predominantly in the lower extremities of young adults. The head and neck region is a relatively rare location. There are few cases of malignant mesenchymal tumors with laryngeal localization in literature.  Case Report: In this report, a new case in a 23-year-old man, which was referred with increasing hoarseness for eight months, and dysphagia, odynophagia, and dyspnea since nearly one year ago, is reported. Indirect laryngoscopy revealed a laryngeal submucosal mass. The patient was operated and the histopathological diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by IHC (Immunohistochemisry.  Conclusion:  Synovial sarcoma occurs predominantly in the lower extremities of young adults. Because very few cases of laryngeal synovial sarcoma are reported, every new case will bring some new information about diagnosis and therapy. It is of utmost importance to get to know new aspects and therapeutical modalities of this rare tumor.

  11. Synovial Hemangioma of the Knee: A Rare Pathology | Yalta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 77 year old female patient was admitted to our clinic with a history of swelling in the right knee. After surgical excision of the mass, the pathological examination was found to be consistent with the synovial hemangioma of the knee which has been rarely reported up till now. Pathologists and clinicians dealing with the ...

  12. CD14-negative isolation enhances chondrogenesis in synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgen, Bahar; Ren, Yuexin; Pei, Ming; Aaron, Roy K; Ciombor, Deborah McK

    2009-11-01

    Synovial membrane has been shown to contain mesenchymal stem cells. We hypothesized that an enriched population of synovial fibroblasts would undergo chondrogenic differentiation and secrete cartilage extracellular matrix to a greater extent than would a mixed synovial cell population (MSCP). The optimum doses of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta1) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) for chondrogenesis were investigated. CD14-negative isolation was used to obtain a porcine cell population enriched in type-B synovial fibroblasts (SFB) from an MSCP. The positive cell surface markers in SFB were CD90, CD44, and cadherin-11. SFB and MSCP were cultured in the presence of 20 ng/mL TGF-beta1 for 7 days, and SFB were demonstrated to have higher chondrogenic potential. Further dose-response studies were carried out using the SFB cells and several doses of TGF-beta1 (2, 10, 20, and 40 ng/mL) and/or IGF-1 (1, 10, 100, and 500 ng/mL) for 14 days. TGF-beta1 supplementation was essential for chondrogenesis and prevention of cell death, whereas IGF-1 did not have a significant effect on the SFB cell number or glycosaminoglycan production. This study demonstrates that the CD14-negative isolation yields an enhanced cell population SFB that is more potent than MSCP as a cell source for cartilage tissue engineering.

  13. Primary Renal Synovial Sarcoma: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Numan Yıkılmaz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma (SS is mainly derived from soft tissues. Primary renal SS is a very rare malignancy with around 60 cases reported in the literature. We report a renal mass which was undistinguishable from urothelial carcinoma clinically and pathologically but diagnosed as a primary renal SS at the definitive pathological diagnosis.

  14. Cellular electrophysiological principles that modulate secretion from synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R B; Schmidt, T A; Sachse, F B; Boyle, D; Firestein, G S; Giles, W R

    2017-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a progressive disease that affects both pediatric and adult populations. The cellular basis for RA has been investigated extensively using animal models, human tissues and isolated cells in culture. However, many aspects of its aetiology and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Some of the electrophysiological principles that regulate secretion of essential lubricants (hyaluronan and lubricin) and cytokines from synovial fibroblasts have been identified. Data sets describing the main types of ion channels that are expressed in human synovial fibroblast preparations have begun to provide important new insights into the interplay among: (i) ion fluxes, (ii) Ca 2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, (iii) intercellular coupling, and (iv) both transient and longer duration changes in synovial fibroblast membrane potential. A combination of this information, knowledge of similar patterns of responses in cells that regulate the immune system, and the availability of adult human synovial fibroblasts are likely to provide new pathophysiological insights. © 2016 University of Calgary. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  15. Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershadi, Reza; Rahim, Mohamadbagher; Davari, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas commonly occur in the extremities of young adults. A primary occurrence in the mediastinum is very rare with only a few reported cases in the world literature. We report a case of mediastinal synovial sarcoma. This paper is about a 47-year-old male who presented with retrosternal chest pain and shortness of breath on exertion. Imaging showed an anterior mediastinal mass. Pathological examination of the resected mass showed a biphasic neoplasm with a spindle cell component admixed with gland-like elements. The tumor showed positive staining with cytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen and vimentin confirming the diagnosis of a biphasic synovial sarcoma. A wide range of neoplasms, both primary and metastatic, occur in the mediastinum, which pose considerable diagnostic difficulties. A synovial sarcoma should always be considered in the differential diagnosis, and immunohistochemistry is an important adjuvant tool in this situation. This paper highlights the importance of recognizing an unusual presentation of this aggressive neoplasm to aid appropriate clinical management. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Management of locally advanced primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Ambarish S; Kumar, Rajiv; Purandare, Nilendu; Jiwnani, Sabita; Karimundackal, George; Pramesh, C S

    2017-01-01

    Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma (PMSS) is a relatively rare disease, and patients are treated predominantly with surgery for resectable disease. Management of locally advanced borderline resectable and unresectable PMSS is not only challenging but also lacks standard guidelines. We present three patients with PMSS, who were unresectable or borderline resectable at presentation and were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy.

  17. Management of locally advanced primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ambarish S Chatterjee; Rajiv Kumar; Nilendu Purandare; Sabita Jiwnani; George Karimundackal; C S Pramesh

    2017-01-01

    Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma (PMSS) is a relatively rare disease, and patients are treated predominantly with surgery for resectable disease. Management of locally advanced borderline resectable and unresectable PMSS is not only challenging but also lacks standard guidelines. We present three patients with PMSS, who were unresectable or borderline resectable at presentation and were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy.

  18. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma: a rare primary pulmonary tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenstern-Ge, Roger Fei; Kimmich, Martin; Grabner, Andreas; Horn, Heike; Friedel, Godehard; Ott, German; Kohlhäufl, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Pulmonary sarcomas overall are very uncommon and comprise only 0.5 % of all primary lung malignancies. The diagnosis is established only after sarcoma-like primary lung malignancies and a metastatic extrathoracic sarcoma have been excluded. Synovial sarcoma accounts for ~8 % of soft-tissue sarcomas. Synovial sarcoma arising from the pleura has rarely been reported. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman who complained of right-sided chest pain and shortness of breath. Chest CT scan revealed a large heterogeneous mass, occupying most of the right hemithorax. Histologic diagnosis was supplemented by interphase cytogenetic (FISH) analysis. Computed tomography guided Tru-cut biopsy was suspicious for a sarcomatous or fibrous malignancy. However, intraoperative frozen-section diagnostics confirmed the diagnosis of a sarcoma. Immunohistochemistry showed that tumor cells expressed epithelial membrane antigen, CD99 and BCL2. Based on immunohistochemistry, the diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was suspected and was confirmed by FISH analysis. The patient was treated with right upper bilobectomy. Due to R1-resection status, postsurgical systemic chemotherapy was administered. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma is a rare primary lung tumor. Due to extensive size of the tumor with pleural and mediastinal invasion only a R1-resection status could be achieved by thoracic surgery.

  19. Assessment of the effects of diet and physical rehabilitation on radiographic findings and markers of synovial inflammation in dogs following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpaalen, Valentine D; Baltzer, Wendy I; Smith-Ostrin, Sarah; Warnock, Jennifer J; Stang, Bernadette; Ruaux, Craig G

    2018-03-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of an omega-3 fatty acid and protein-enriched diet, physical rehabilitation, or both on radiographic findings and markers of synovial inflammation in dogs following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy and arthroscopic surgery for treatment of cranial cruciate ligament disease. DESIGN Randomized, prospective clinical trial. ANIMALS 48 dogs with unilateral cranial cruciate ligament disease. PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive a dry omega-3 fatty acid and protein-enriched dog food formulated to support joint health (test food [TF]), a dry food formulated for adult canine maintenance (control food [CF]), TF plus rehabilitation, or CF plus rehabilitation after surgery. Synovial fluid prostaglandin (PG) E 2 and interleukin-1β concentrations, radiographic osteoarthritis scores, osteotomy site healing, and patellar ligament thickness were assessed at predetermined time points up to 6 months after surgery. RESULTS Dogs that received CF had significantly higher PGE 2 concentrations over time following surgery than did dogs that received TF, regardless of rehabilitation status. Synovial fluid interleukin-1β concentrations did not change over time in any groups. Diet and rehabilitation were both associated with osteoarthritis scores, with significantly lower scores over time for dogs that received TF versus CF and for dogs that underwent rehabilitation versus those that did not. Proportions of dogs with complete osteotomy healing 8 and 24 weeks after surgery were significantly lower for dogs that received TF than for dogs that received CF, regardless of rehabilitation status. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that feeding the TF can result in lower synovial fluid PGE 2 concentrations and that both the TF and rehabilitation can reduce progression of osteoarthritis in the 6 months following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy; clinical relevance of slower osteotomy healing in dogs fed the TF was unclear.

  20. TLR3 Ligand Poly(I:C Exerts Distinct Actions in Synovial Fibroblasts When Delivered by Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Frank-Bertoncelj

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV can modulate the responses of cells to toll-like receptor (TLR ligation; conversely, TLR ligands such as double-stranded RNA (dsRNA can enhance the release of EV and influence of the composition and functions of EV cargos. Inflamed synovial joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA are rich in EV and extracellular RNA; besides, RNA released from necrotic synovial fluid cells can activate the TLR3 signaling in synovial fibroblasts (SFs from patients with RA. Since EV occur prominently in synovial joints in RA and may contribute to the pathogenesis, we questioned whether EV can interact with dsRNA, a TLR3 ligand, and modify its actions in arthritis. We have used as model the effects on RA SFs, of EV released from monocyte U937 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells upon stimulation with Poly(I:C, a synthetic analog of dsRNA. We show that EV released from unstimulated cells and Poly(I:C-stimulated U937 cells [Poly(I:C EV] differ in size but bind similar amounts of Annexin V and express comparable levels of MAC-1, the receptor for dsRNA, on the vesicular membranes. Specifically, Poly(I:C EV contain or associate with Poly(I:C and at least partially protect Poly(I:C from RNAse III degradation. Poly(I:C EV shuttle Poly(I:C to SFs and reproduce the proinflammatory and antiviral gene responses of SFs to direct stimulation with Poly(I:C. Poly(I:C EV, however, halt the death receptor-induced apoptosis in SFs, thereby inverting the proapoptotic nature of Poly(I:C. These prosurvival effects sharply contrast with the high toxicity of cationic liposome-delivered Poly(I:C and may reflect the route of Poly(I:C delivery via EV or the fine-tuning of Poly(I:C actions by molecular cargo in EV. The demonstration that EV may safeguard extracellular dsRNA and allow dsRNA to exert antiapoptotic effects on SFs highlights the potential of EV to amplify the pathogenicity of dsRNA in arthritis beyond inflammation (by concurrently enhancing the

  1. TLR3 Ligand Poly(I:C) Exerts Distinct Actions in Synovial Fibroblasts When Delivered by Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Pisetsky, David S; Kolling, Christoph; Michel, Beat A; Gay, Renate E; Jüngel, Astrid; Gay, Steffen

    2018-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) can modulate the responses of cells to toll-like receptor (TLR) ligation; conversely, TLR ligands such as double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) can enhance the release of EV and influence of the composition and functions of EV cargos. Inflamed synovial joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are rich in EV and extracellular RNA; besides, RNA released from necrotic synovial fluid cells can activate the TLR3 signaling in synovial fibroblasts (SFs) from patients with RA. Since EV occur prominently in synovial joints in RA and may contribute to the pathogenesis, we questioned whether EV can interact with dsRNA, a TLR3 ligand, and modify its actions in arthritis. We have used as model the effects on RA SFs, of EV released from monocyte U937 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells upon stimulation with Poly(I:C), a synthetic analog of dsRNA. We show that EV released from unstimulated cells and Poly(I:C)-stimulated U937 cells [Poly(I:C) EV] differ in size but bind similar amounts of Annexin V and express comparable levels of MAC-1, the receptor for dsRNA, on the vesicular membranes. Specifically, Poly(I:C) EV contain or associate with Poly(I:C) and at least partially protect Poly(I:C) from RNAse III degradation. Poly(I:C) EV shuttle Poly(I:C) to SFs and reproduce the proinflammatory and antiviral gene responses of SFs to direct stimulation with Poly(I:C). Poly(I:C) EV, however, halt the death receptor-induced apoptosis in SFs, thereby inverting the proapoptotic nature of Poly(I:C). These prosurvival effects sharply contrast with the high toxicity of cationic liposome-delivered Poly(I:C) and may reflect the route of Poly(I:C) delivery via EV or the fine-tuning of Poly(I:C) actions by molecular cargo in EV. The demonstration that EV may safeguard extracellular dsRNA and allow dsRNA to exert antiapoptotic effects on SFs highlights the potential of EV to amplify the pathogenicity of dsRNA in arthritis beyond inflammation (by concurrently enhancing the

  2. Extensor and flexor digit synovial sheath, sac and synovial capsule in the distal part of the limbs in buffalos and camels and its relation of surgical interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. AL-sadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty one samples of the distal parts of limbs were obtained from different ages of buffalo and camels of both sex to study the synovial structures to determine the suitable sites for injection of surgical interference. The result showed that extensor digit synovial sheath was extend between middle or distal part of metacarpal (metatarsal to the extensor processes and this formed with synovial capsule dorsal pouches which serve in surgical interference. The flexor digit synovial sheath extended to palmar (planter between distal extremity of metacarpal (metatarsal to the middle of second phalanx in buffalo while in camel it extended to the proximal extremity of second phalanx, that sheath was formed with suspensory ligament and sessamoid bone palmar or planter pouches which were serve the surgical interference. Fourth synovial bursa observed situated dorsally between the extensor digit laterals tendon and capsule of fetlock joint, forms site of injection during surgical interference, while the other two synovial bursa were located to palmer (planter between deep flexor tendon and distal sessamoid bone in buffalo while in camel these bursa were located between deep flexor tendon and cartilage of the second phalanx, these bursa were served for surgical interference. The synovial capsule which serve the surgical interference through digit cushion these were shown extended from the claw capsule. The result show that surgical interference was form six pouches in buffalo and eight pouches in camel, which formed by synovial structures and the tissue associated with them.

  3. Metacarpophalangeal joint synovial pad fibrotic proliferation in 63 horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabareiner, R.M.; White, N.A.; Sullins, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    Medical records, radiographs, and sonograms of 63 horses with metacarpophalangeal joint synovial pad proliferation were examined retrospectively. AR horses had lameness, joint effusion, or both signs associated with one or both metacarpophalangeal joints. Bony remodeling and concavity of the distodorsal aspect of the third metacarpal bone (Mc3) just proximal to the metacarpal condyles was identified by radiography in 71 joints (93%); 24 joints (32%) had radiographic evidence of a chip fracture located at the proximal dorsal aspect of the proximal phalanx. Fifty-four joints (71%) were examined by ultrasound. The mean +- SD sagittal thickness of the synovial pad was 11.3 +- 2.8 mm. Seventy-nine percent of the horses had single joint involvement with equal distribution between the right and left forelimbs. Sixty-eight joints in 55 horses were treated by arthroscopic surgery. Sixty joints (88%) had debridement of chondral or osteochondral fragmentation from the dorsal surface of Mc3 beneath the synovial pad and 30 joints (44%) had a bone chip fracture removed from the medial or lateral proximal dorsal eminence of the proximal phalanx. Complete or partial excision of both medial and lateral synovial pads was completed in 42 joints. Only the medial synovial pad was excised or trimmed in 21 joints, and 5 joints had only the lateral pad removed. Eight joints in eight horses were treated by stall rest, administration of intra-articular medication and systemic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Follow-up information was obtained for 50 horses treated surgically and for eight horses treated medically. Forty-three (86%) that had surgery returned to racing; 34 (68%) raced at an equivalent or better level than before surgery. Three (38%) of the medically treated horses returned to racing; only one horse raced better than the preinjury level. Horses that returned to racing at a similar or equal level of performance were significantly younger in age than horses returning at a

  4. Synovial sarcoma. An immunohistochemical study of the epithelial component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L J; Lyon, H; Myhre-Jensen, O

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-five synovial sarcomas were studied with a battery of antibodies directed against keratin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). The keratin antibody MNF 116 showed reactivity in 24 tumors. In addition, 22 tumors showed reactivity with the antibody Keratin Wide Spectrum, 20 with the antibody...... Keratin 56, 64, and 19 with CAM 5.2. Seventeen tumors showed reactivity with EMA. The keratin and EMA reactivity was present in cells lining obvious cleft-like structures in biphasic tumors. In the spindle cell areas of both biphasic and monophasic fibrous tumors, we found clusters of a few reacting cells...... apparently located around small clefts. In the synovioblastic tumors, clusters of plump tumor cells reactive for both the keratins and EMA were present. In conclusion, we found that proper identification of epithelial differentiation in synovial sarcomas is facilitated by an immunohistochemical application...

  5. Symptomatic intraspinal synovial cysts: Opacification and treatment by percutaneous injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorkengren, A.G.; Resnick, D.; Kurz, L.T.; Garfin, S.R.; Sartoris, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Synovial cysts in an intraspinal location, associated with facet joint osteoarthritis, have been diagnosed using CT. Surgical removal of the cyst, when believed to be the cause of radiculopathy, has resulted in symptomatic relief. The authors have applied a nonoperative treatment method consisting of CT-guided needle placement in the facet joint adjacent to the cyst, followed by injection of contrast material and corticosteroids. Three patients were treated without complications and with complete relief of symptoms in two cases and partial relief in one, although no decrease in the size of the cysts was demonstrated on follow-up CT scans. The preliminary results indicate a possible role for this treatment technique in patients with intraspinal synovial cysts

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging-determined synovial membrane and joint effusion volumes in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis: comparison with the macroscopic and microscopic appearance of the synovium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Løvgreen-Nielsen, P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between synovial membrane and joint effusion volumes determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and macroscopic and microscopic synovial pathologic findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Synovial biopsies...

  7. Infiltrating Cardiac Synovial Sarcoma Presenting as Acute Cerebrovascular Accident

    OpenAIRE

    Kelechukwu U. Okoro; Matthew D. Roby; David C. Sane; Robert E. Budin

    2017-01-01

    Primary cardiac sarcoma is a rare malignant myocardial neoplasm that does not exhibit gender predominance or age predilection. The classification of these tumors includes several subtypes, of which synovial sarcoma is a rare manifestation. When present, these tumors portend a poor prognosis with high morbidity and mortality that is attributable to their inherent infiltrative capacity, especially in the absence of treatment. The general consensus for treatment is surgical excision and neoadjuv...

  8. Heterogeneity of synovial molecular patterns in patients with arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard R Lauwerys

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an unmet medical need in the field of rheumatology. Previously, we performed high-density transcriptomic studies on synovial biopsies from patients with arthritis, and found that synovial gene expression profiles were significantly different according to the underlying disorder. Here, we wanted to further explore the consistency of the gene expression signals in synovial biopsies of patients with arthritis, using low-density platforms.Low-density assays (cDNA microarray and microfluidics qPCR were designed, based on the results of the high-density microarray data. Knee synovial biopsies were obtained from patients with RA, spondyloarthropathies (SA or osteoarthritis (OA (n = 39, and also from patients with initial undifferentiated arthritis (UA (n = 49.According to high-density microarray data, several molecular pathways are differentially expressed in patients with RA, SA and OA: T and B cell activation, chromatin remodelling, RAS GTPase activation and extracellular matrix regulation. Strikingly, disease activity (DAS28-CRP has a significant influence on gene expression patterns in RA samples. Using the low-density assays, samples from patients with OA are easily discriminated from RA and SA samples. However, overlapping molecular patterns are found, in particular between RA and SA biopsies. Therefore, prediction of the clinical diagnosis based on gene expression data results in a diagnostic accuracy of 56.8%, which is increased up to 98.6% by the addition of specific clinical symptoms in the prediction algorithm. Similar observations are made in initial UA samples, in which overlapping molecular patterns also impact the accuracy of the diagnostic algorithm. When clinical symptoms are added, the diagnostic accuracy is strongly improved.Gene expression signatures are overall different in patients with OA, RA and SA, but overlapping molecular signatures are found in patients with these conditions

  9. Pathophysiology and imaging in inflammatory and blastomatous synovial diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.-M.; Gahleitner, A.; Kainberger, F.; Krestan, C.; Trattnig, S. [Osteology, Universitaets Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH Vienna (Austria); Sulzbacher, I. [Klinisches Institut fuer klinische Pathologie, AKH Vienna (Austria)

    2002-06-01

    Variable pathologies are subsumed under the term ''synovial disease'', including common pathologies such as rheumatoid arthritis. While formerly radiologists had to rely on conventional radiographs and bone scintigraphy with their inherent problems in visualizing soft tissue, noninvasive imaging of the synovium has recently improved substantially with the technical development of MRI and (Doppler) ultrasound. These imaging modalities allow differentiation of characteristic pathologic features based on a profound knowledge of normal anatomy and pathophysiology. (orig.)

  10. Management of locally advanced primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambarish S Chatterjee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma (PMSS is a relatively rare disease, and patients are treated predominantly with surgery for resectable disease. Management of locally advanced borderline resectable and unresectable PMSS is not only challenging but also lacks standard guidelines. We present three patients with PMSS, who were unresectable or borderline resectable at presentation and were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy.

  11. Anterior mediastinal synovial sarcoma: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-xiang YUE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the clinical manifestations, pathologic features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of primary synovial sarcoma in the anterior mediastinum. Methods A case of primary synovial sarcoma in the anterior mediastinum was reported. Clinical features, imaging manifestations, pathology features and therapeutic effect were analysed and the relevant literature was reviewed. Results A 48-year-male patient was admitted with complaint of right chest pain for 4 days. Chest computerized tomography revealed a large mass located at the right anterior mediastinum, and it was primarily diagnosed as invasive thymoma. Pathological examination by CT-guided percutaneous needle biopsy manifested that, under microscope, the tumor cells were short and spindle in shape forming a nest structure, suggested it was a thymoma. The patient then underwent resection of thymoma with removal of fat and connective tissue in the anterior mediastinum. During the operation the size of the tumor was 15cm×15cm×10cm, being located at the anterior mediastinum, and it tended to bleed. The diagnosis of primary monophasic synovial sarcoma in the mediastinum was confirmed by postoperative/pathology examination. Immunohistochemistry staining showed that the tumor cells were positive for the markers Bcl-2 and EMA, but negative for the markers CK (pan and S100. The patient suffered from local recurrence with metastases to lung 4 months after surgery. The patient received 2 chemotherapeutic courses with ifosfamide, epirubicin and cisplatin. He died 6 months after surgery. Conclusion Primary synovial sarcoma in the anterior mediastinum is an extremely rare and highly malignant tumor with poor prognosis. The diagnosis depends on the pathological features, immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Radical resection combined with comprehensive treatment may improve the survival rate. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.12.12

  12. Primary Synovial Sarcoma of the Mediastinum : A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ravikumar, Gayatri; Mullick, Shalini; Ananthamurthy, Anuradha; Correa, Marjorie

    2011-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas commonly occur in the extremities of young adults. A primary occurrence in the mediastinum is very rare with only a few reported cases in the world literature. This paper is about a 42-year-old male who presented with chest pain and dyspnoea on exertion. Imaging showed an anterior mediastinal mass with adhesions to the lung. Pathological examination of the resected mass showed a biphasic neoplasm with a spindle cell component admixed with gland-like eleme...

  13. Intermetatarsal bursa primary synovial chondromatosis. Case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevino, Manuel; Laks, Shaked; Sundarakumar, Dinesh K.; Smith, Crysela M. [Texas Tech Univ. Health Science Center, El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Kafchinski, Lisa [Texas Tech Univ. Health Science Center, El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery and Rehabilitation

    2017-12-15

    Primary synovial chondromatosis is a benign neoplastic process, occurring mostly in large joints, more rarely in tendon sheaths, and extremely uncommonly in bursae. We describe a patient with primary synovial chondromatosis arising in the fourth intermetatarsal bursa. Knowledge of the bursal anatomy of the forefoot, and of characteristic imaging findings and the pathogenesis of synovial chondromatosis, is essential in including this uncommon entity in the differential when occurring in unusual locations. (orig.)

  14. HUGE SYNOVIAL SARCOMA ARISING FROM CHEST WALL: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waddi Sudhakar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcomas are the fourth most common malignant soft - tissue tumors, and typically develop in para - articular locations of the extremities. However, the occurrence of these tumors in the chest wall is rare. In this article, we report the interesting case of a 27 - year - old male with spindle cell variant of synovial sarcoma arising in the anterior chest wall with a brief review of the literature. KEYWORDS:Synovial sarcoma;chest wall;spindle cell variant

  15. Intraosseus and extraosseus juxtaarticular calcification: Osteopoikilosis with synovial osteochondromatosis - an association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parangama Chatterjee

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Osteopoikilosis presents as round or ovoid sclerotic lesions with an appearance like enostosis on pathology. Synovial osteochondromatosis occurs due to cartilaginous metaplasia with synovial villous proliferation with calcified nodules in proximity to joints. A case of osteopoikilosis associated with synovial osteochondromatosis is described. Intraosseus and juxta osseus sclerotic bone lesions were identified on radiographs and computed tomography in a patient with knee pain. The association of osteopoikilosis with synovial osteochondromatosis is rare and to our knowledge has received little attention in the literature.

  16. Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma with transdiaphragmatic extension presenting as a pericardial effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korula, A; Shah, A; Philip, M A; Kuruvila, K; Pradhip, J; Pai, M C; Chacko, R T

    2009-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a distinctive soft tissue neoplasm, most commonly seen in the extremities of young adults. Mediastinal synovial sarcoma is a well-documented entity; however, in many cases, the differentiation between this and other spindle cell tumours may be difficult, especially in monophasic tumours. Unlike most pleuropulmonary synovial sarcomas which are well circumscribed, mediastinal tumours are often infiltrative and resection may not be adequate, leading to a high rate of recurrence. We present a 49-year-old man with a primary pericardial synovial sarcoma, with transdiaphragmatic intra-abdominal extension, which clinically, radiologically and grossly mimicked a tuberculous pericarditis.

  17. Increased uptake of sup(99m)Tc-MDP in calcified synovial sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horne, T.; Mogle, P.; Finsterbush, A.; Gordin, M.; Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Mount Scopus; Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Mount Scopus

    1983-01-01

    We present a case of a partially calcified synovial sarcoma of the soft tissues of the thigh in a young girl. The roentgenographic, arteriographic and radio-nuclide scans were unusual. The finding and possible causes of increased uptake of sup(99m)Tc-MDP in synovial sarcoma are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Machine learning integration of rheumatoid arthritis synovial histology and RNAseq data identifies three disease subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, Dana E; Agius, Phaedra; DiCarlo, Edward F; Robine, Nicolas; Geiger, Heather; Szymonifka, Jackie; McNamara, Michael; Cummings, Ryan; Andersen, Kathleen M; Mirza, Serene; Figgie, Mark; Ivashkiv, Lionel; Pernis, Alessandra B; Jiang, Caroline; Frank, Mayu; Darnell, Robert; Lingampali, Nithya; William, Robinson; Gravallese, Ellen; Bykerk, Vivian P; Goodman, Susan M; Donlin, Laura T

    2018-02-22

    We sought to refine histologic scoring of rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue by training with gene expression data and machine learning. Twenty histologic features were assessed on 129 synovial tissue samples. Consensus clustering was performed on gene expression data from a subset of 45 synovial samples. Support vector machine learning was used to predict gene expression subtypes using histology data as input. Corresponding clinical data were compared across subtypes. Consensus clustering of gene expression data revealed three distinct synovial subtypes, including a highly inflammatory subtype characterized by extensive infiltration of leukocytes, a low inflammatory subtype characterized by enrichment in pathways including TGF-β, glycoproteins and neuronal genes, and a mixed subtype. Machine learning applied to histology features using gene expression subtypes as labels generated an algorithm for scoring histology features. Patients with highly inflammatory synovial subtypes exhibited higher levels of markers of systemic inflammation and autoantibodies. CRP was significantly correlated with pain in the high inflammatory group but not the others. Gene expression analysis of synovial tissue revealed three distinct synovial subtypes. We used these labels to generate a histology scoring algorithm that associates with levels of ESR, CRP and autoantibodies. Comparison of gene expression patterns to clinical features revealed a potentially clinically important distinction: mechanisms of pain may differ in patients with different synovial subtypes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Epithelial predominant synovial sarcoma presenting as chronic non-healing ulcer of foot: A rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Salgaonkar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is a morphologically and cytogenetically distinct aggressive neoplasm which presents as a deep seated painful mass in the lower extremities of young adult males. We report a rare case of synovial sarcoma presenting as a non-healing ulcer over the foot in a 29 year old male, which was misdiagnosed initially as a malignant skin adnexal tumour.

  20. A rare case of synovial sarcoma of the prostate | Dhabalia | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prostatic synovial sarcomas are exceedingly rare. To our knowledge, only six primary cases have been reported so far. We herein describe a primary synovial sarcoma of the prostate seen in a 25- year-old male patient, the youngest patient seen with this disease to date. He was referred to our department with the diagnosis ...

  1. Effects of cranberry components on IL-1β-stimulated production of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF by human TMJ synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, David A; Christian, James; Blumer, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in the TMJ is characterized by deterioration of articular cartilage and secondary inflammatory changes. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) stimulates IL-6, IL-8, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in synovial fluid of TMJ with internal derangement and bony changes. The cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) contains polyphenolic compounds that inhibit production of pro-inflammatory molecules by gingival cells in response to several stimulators. This study examined effects of cranberry components on IL-1β-stimulated IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF production by human TMJ synovial fibroblast-like cells. Cranberry high molecular weight non-dialyzable material (NDM) was derived from cranberry juice. Human TMJ synovial fibroblast-like cells from joints with degenerative OA and an ankylosed TMJ without degeneration were incubated with IL-1β (0.001-1nM)±NDM (25-250μg/ml) (2h preincubation). Viability was assessed via activity of a mitochondrial enzyme. IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA; NF-κB and AP-1 transcription factors were measured in nuclear extracts via binding to specific oligonucleotides. ANOVA and Scheffe's F procedure for post hoc comparisons. NDM did not affect cell viability but inhibited IL-1β stimulated IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF production in all cell lines (pCranberry NDM inhibition of IL-1β-stimulated IL- 6, IL-8, and VEGF production by TMJ synovial fibroblast-like cells suggests that cranberry components may be useful as a host modulatory therapeutic agent to prevent or treat inflammatory arthropathies of the TMJ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Synovial sarcoma of the kidney in a young patient with a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Abbas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma (SS is a soft tissue, generally deep seated neoplasms that occurs generally in the proximity of large joints. We report of a case of a 33-year-old man who was diagnosed with primary SS of the kidney which is an extremely rare tumor that accounts for less than 2% of malignant renal tumors. Contemporary management of renal synovial sarcoma includes surgical resection and ifosfamide-based chemotherapy and they remain the mainstay of therapy of synovial sarcoma, which is often applied, combined as part of an aggressive treatment approach. Fewer than 50 patients have been described in the English literature. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of malignancy in cystic renal masses and raise the suspicion of synovial sarcoma, especially when patients with renal masses are young adults. Along with the case report a literature review on primary synovial sarcomas of the kidney is provided with focus on the renal tumors’ differential diagnosis.

  3. Solitary synovial chondromatosis arising in the gluteus maximus bursa: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Noriko; Nambu, Atsushi; Tago, Masao; Shibuya, Isao; Kawamoto, Masashi

    2016-03-01

    Chondral tumors in soft tissue are referred to as soft-tissue chondromas or extraskeletal chondromas, or as synovial chondromatosis if they arise in synovial tissue. We report the case of a 29-year-old man with synovial chondromatosis, also called synovial osteochondromatosis, which appeared in a solitary and extra-articular form. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography, the central portion of the tumor showed similar characteristics to bone marrow, despite the absence of any connection to adjacent bone. T2-weighted imaging displayed marked peripheral hyperintensity consistent with a cartilaginous area. These findings suggested the presence of enchondral ossification and were similar to those of skeletal osteochondroma, with the exception of the absence of attachment to bone. MRI is useful for distinguishing solitary synovial chondromatosis from other lesions, such as myositis ossificans, extraskeletal chondrosarcoma, and parosteal osteosarcoma.

  4. Synovial folds in the knee joint. The plica parapatellaris medialis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, H.

    1987-12-01

    Stimulated by arthroscopic insight into central abnormalities of the knee joint and by the large number of unexplained case of 'anterior knee pain', we have studied the synovia in more than 2000 contrast examinations of the joint. Surprisingly, and contrary to the views expressed in the literature, the clinically significant plica parapatellaris medialis was seen as frequently during pneumo-arthrography as during more complex procedures. Abnormalities in the synovial fold emerged as a discreet disease identified as the 'medial shelf syndrome' and should be included in the differential diagnosis of causes of pain round the lower end of the femur and patella.

  5. Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine; diagnosed with magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez Munoz, Sonia; Charry Lopez, Marco Luciano

    1998-01-01

    A series of nine cases of synovial cysts of the lumbar spine, diagnosed with magnetic resonance is presented. The cysts were found in patients aged 24 to 73 yrs, most of which had symptoms related with this finding. Some were seen as incidental findings or unrelated to symptoms. The most typical characteristic of these lesions is that of a rounded, ovoid or bilobed image, with close anatomical relation with the facet joints or the ligamentum flavum, that presented with facet joint arthrosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis was significant and useful for diagnosis

  6. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelien Dinh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient.

  7. Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine; Cistos sinoviais lombares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Ana Claudia Ferreira; Machado, Marcio Martins [Goias Univ., Goiania, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas]. E-mail: anaclaudiaferreira@ig.com.br; Figueiredo, Marco Antonio Junqueira [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Tomografia Computadorizada; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia

    2002-10-01

    Intraspinal synovial cysts of the lumbar spine are rare and commonly associated with osteoarthritis of the facet joints, particularly at level L4-L5. Symptoms are uncommon and may include low-back pain or sciatica. These cysts are accurately diagnosed by using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnosis is essential for the correct management of the cysts. Several treatment options are available including rest and immobilization, computed tomography guided corticosteroid injection, and surgery in patients that are nonresponsive to other treatment methods. (author)

  8. Interleukin-17A expression in human synovial mast cells in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Jun-Ichiro; Mishima, Shintaro; Kashiwakura, Jun-Ichi; Sasaki-Sakamoto, Tomomi; Seki, Masayuki; Saito, Shu; Ra, Chisei; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Okayama, Yoshimichi

    2016-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The expression of IL-17A in synovial mast cells (MCs) in RA and osteoarthritis (OA) has been reported, but the frequencies of IL-17A expression in synovial MCs have varied. The aim of this study was to investigate whether IL-17A expression is upregulated in human synovial MCs in RA and to elucidate the mechanism of IL-17A expression in synovial MCs. Synovial tissues were obtained from patients with RA or OA undergoing joint replacement surgery, and synovial MCs were enzymatically dispersed. Synovium-derived cultured MCs were generated by culturing synovial cells with stem cell factor. IL-17A expression was investigated using immunofluorescence in synovial tissues. IL-17A mRNA expression and its production from MCs were examined using RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. The number of IL-17A-positive ((+)) synovial MCs and the percentage of IL-17A(+) MCs among all the IL-17A(+) cells from RA patients were not significantly increased compared with those from OA subjects. The synovium-derived cultured MCs spontaneously released small amounts of IL-17A. Neither IgE- nor IgG-dependent stimulation increased IL-17A production from the MCs. IL-33, tumor necrosis factor-α, C5a, lipopolysaccharide or IL-23 plus IL-1β did not affect IL-17A production in MCs. The synovial MCs are not a main source of IL-17A in RA. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fucosyltransferase 1 mediates angiogenesis, cell adhesion and rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue fibroblast proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We previously reported that sialyl Lewisy, synthesized by fucosyltransferases, is involved in angiogenesis. Fucosyltransferase 1 (fut1) is an α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase responsible for synthesis of the H blood group and Lewisy antigens. However, the angiogenic involvement of fut 1 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue (RA ST) has not been clearly defined. Methods Assay of α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA was performed by enzyme-linked lectin assay. Fut1 expression was determined in RA ST samples by immunohistological staining. We performed angiogenic Matrigel assays using a co-culture system of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) and fut1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfected RA synovial fibroblasts. To determine if fut1 played a role in leukocyte retention and cell proliferation in the RA synovium, myeloid THP-1 cell adhesion assays and fut1 siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblast proliferation assays were performed. Results Total α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA ST were significantly higher compared to normal (NL) ST. Fut1 expression on RA ST lining cells positively correlated with ST inflammation. HMVECs from a co-culture system with fut1 siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblasts exhibited decreased endothelial cell tube formation compared to control siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblasts. Fut1 siRNA also inhibited myeloid THP-1 adhesion to RA synovial fibroblasts and RA synovial fibroblast proliferation. Conclusions These data show that α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins are upregulated in RA ST compared to NL ST. We also show that fut1 in RA synovial fibroblasts is important in angiogenesis, leukocyte-synovial fibroblast adhesion, and synovial fibroblast proliferation, all key processes in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:24467809

  10. The accuracy of MRI-determined synovial membrane and joint effusion volumes in arthritis. A comparison of pre- and post-aspiration volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Henriksen, O

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 18 knees of patients with arthritis was performed before and immediately after arthrocentesis. Pre- and post-aspiration volumes were calculated by adding the outlined areas of synovium/effusion from a continuous series of gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced 5 mm transversal...... T1-weighted MR-images. The difference between MRI-determined and syringe-determined volumes of aspirated joint fluid was 0-7 ml, median 2 ml, corresponding to 0-18%, median 7%, of the pre-aspiration effusion volume. Synovial membrane volumes, determined before and after arthrocentesis varied 0-10 ml...

  11. Symptomatic intraspinal synovial cysts of the lumbar spine: correlation of MR and surgical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tillich, M.; Lindbichler, F. [Graz Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Trummer, M.; Flaschka, G. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Karl-Franzens Medical School and University Hospital (Austria)

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the frequency of associated MR imaging findings in patients with symptomatic lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts, and to correlate MR with surgical findings. MR imaging studies of 18 patients with surgically and histopathologically proven lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with surgical findings. The diameters of the synovial cysts ranged from 10 mm to 28 mm, with a mean of 16 mm. A nonhemorrhagic cyst was found in 15 patients (83%), and a hemorrhagic cyst in three patients (17%). Degenerative spondylolisthesis was found in six patients (33%) at the level of the synovial cyst, with displacement ranging from 3 to 5 mm, mean 4 mm. Surgery revealed instability and hypermobility of the facet joint at the level of the synovial cyst in all patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis, and in five additional patients. Symptomatic synovial cysts of the lumbar spine were associated with degenerative spondylolisthesis in six of 18 patients (33%) and with instability of the facet joint in 11 (61%). These findings may support the theory that increased segmental motion plays a role in the pathogenesis of synovial cysts. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of Inflammatory Biomarkers in Synovial Tissue Extracts by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, Sanna; Firestein, Gary S.; Boyle, David L.

    2003-01-01

    We developed methods for measuring inflammatory biomarkers (cytokines, chemokines, and metalloproteinases) in synovial biopsy specimens from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). Soluble extracts of synovial fragments were prepared with mild detergent and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and matrix metalloproteinase 3. The optimal detergent was 0.1% Igepal CA-630, which interfered minimally with ELISA detection but extracted 80% of IL-6 from synovial tissue. Upon spiking, 81 to 107% of added biomarkers could be recovered. To determine within-tissue variability, multiple biopsy specimens from each RA synovial extract were analyzed individually. A resulting coefficient of variation of 35 to 62% indicated that six biopsy specimens per synovial extract would result in a sampling error of ≤25%. Preliminary power analysis suggested that 8 to 15 patients per group would suffice to observe a threefold difference before and after treatment in a serial biopsy clinical study. The previously described significant differences in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α levels between RA and OA could be detected, thereby validating the use of synovial extracts for biomarker analysis in arthritis. These methods allow monitoring of biomarker protein levels in synovial tissue and could potentially be applied to early-phase clinical trials to provide a preliminary estimate of drug efficacy. PMID:14607859

  13. Primary Cardiac Synovial Sarcoma: A Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Boulmay

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma comprises approximately 10% of all soft tissue sarcoma diagnoses; a primary synovial sarcoma of the myocardium is exceedingly rare. There have been very few cases reported in the literature thus far. With the identification of the characteristic and diagnostic chromosomal abnormality t(X;18, this may become an increasingly recognized entity. Our report adds to the limited published cases of primary cardiac synovial sarcoma with the characteristic t(X;18. Further elucidation of the effects of this translocation on the cell cycle may lead to directed therapies in the future.

  14. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Ankle Joint: Clinical, Radiological, and Intraoperative Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedeek Mohamed Sedeek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis, also termed synovial osteochondromatosis, is a rare benign disorder characterized by the presence of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium of the joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae. It most commonly involves large joints, such as the knee, hip, and shoulder, but its presence in smaller joints has also been reported. Nevertheless, ankle involvement is unusual. The diagnosis is commonly made following a thorough history, clinical, physical, and radiographic examination. We report a case of a young patient with primary synovial chondromatosis of the ankle joint and present the clinical, radiographic, and intraoperative findings.

  15. Surgical excision for mediastinal synovial sarcoma with limited response to chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, H Volkan; Javidfar, Jeffrey; D'Amico, Thomas A

    2014-09-01

    Primary synovial sarcoma of the mediastinum is an exceedingly rare neoplasm. We describe a 31-year-old woman who had an incidental diagnosis of mediastinal mass. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry analysis confirmed the diagnosis of primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma. The patient underwent concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, with minimal response radiologically. Resection was subsequently performed, with negative margins. The histopathologic examination revealed the diagnosis with a limited pathologic response. Because of the rarity of primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma, the optimal therapy is still unclear. We report this case of induction therapy followed by en bloc surgical resection. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Myostatin Promotes Interleukin-1β Expression in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts through Inhibition of miR-21-5p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Lin Hu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is characterized by the infiltration of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines into synovial fluid and patients with RA often develop joint destruction and deficits in muscle mass. The growth factor myostatin is a key regulator linking muscle mass and bone structure. We sought to determine whether myostatin regulates rheumatoid synovial fibroblast activity and inflammation in RA. We found that levels of myostatin and interleukin (IL-1β (a key pro-inflammatory cytokine in RA in synovial fluid from RA patients were overexpressed and positively correlated. In in vitro investigations, we found that myostatin dose-dependently regulated IL-1β expression through the ERK, JNK, and AP-1 signal-transduction pathways. Computational analysis confirmed that miR-21-5p directly targets the expression of the 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR of IL-1β. Treatment of cells with myostatin inhibited miR-21-5p expression and miR-21-5p mimic prevented myostatin-induced enhancement of IL-1β expression, showing an inverse correlation between miR-21-5p and IL-1β expression during myostatin treatment. We also found significantly increased paw swelling in an animal model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, compared with controls; immunohistochemistry staining revealed substantially higher levels of myostatin and IL-1β expression in CIA tissue. Our evidence indicates that myostatin regulates IL-1β production. Thus, targeting myostatin may represent a potential therapeutic target for RA.

  17. Ultrasound evaluation of fluid in knee recesses at varying degrees of flexion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandl, P; Brossard, M; Aegerter, P

    2012-01-01

    Various methods are utilized in daily practice to obtain optimal information on effusion in the knee. Our aim is to investigate which scanning position provides the best information about synovial fluid in the knee by using ultrasound and to evaluate the magnitude of difference for measuring syno...

  18. Synovial hemangioma of the hip joint in a pediatric patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demertzis, Jennifer L.; Loomans, Rachel; Wessell, Daniel E. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Kyriakos, Michael [Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Surgical Pathology, St. Louis, MO (United States); McDonald, Douglas J. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Hemangiomas of the articular synovium are rare and commonly associated with recurrent joint swelling and painful limitation of motion. The knee joint is the most commonly involved site, with most patients diagnosed in the second to third decade of life [1]. Although over 200 cases have been reported in the English-language medical literature, only three have originated within the hip joint, all of which were in adult patients reported in the surgical literature [2-4]. We describe a histologically proven synovial hemangioma of the hip joint in a pediatric patient that invaded the femur, acetabulum, and adjacent soft tissues, with a detailed discussion of the differential diagnosis based on the radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. (orig.)

  19. [Synovial cyst of chest wall; report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chujo, Masao; Anami, Kentaro; Miura, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    A 55-year-old male taxi driver visited our hospital because of a left dorsal tumor. The tumor was palpated at the inferior angle of the left scapula with tenderness. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a homogeneous 5-cm mass with capsule between the latissimus dorsi muscle and rib. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging( MRI) demonstrated the tumor with high intensity. The latissimus dorsi muscle was divided and separated off from the tumor and the lower layer;then, an applied wound retractor (Alexis) was placed under the lower layer of the latissimus dorsi muscle and the operative field was developed. Next, the anterior serratus and greater rhomboid muscles were separated off from the tumor and the lower layer, the Alexis was placed under the lower layer of those muscles. All muscles were preserved and the tumor was removed. The tumor was 56×32 mm in size. The histological diagnosis was synovial cyst.

  20. Synovial sarcoma of the foot; Synovialsarkom des Fusses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beus, J. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Kreitner, K.F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Rompe, J.D. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie; Riehle, H.M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie

    1996-09-01

    The case of a 29 year-old female patient who had experienced pain in the right midfoot for 5 years which was diagnosed as a degenerative or rheumatic change and treated by physiotherapy and medication. By means of magnetic resonance imaging we identified a soft-tissue tumor of the midfoot. Histology provided the findings of a monophasic fibrous synovial sarcoma. The case history is reported together with a presentation of the disease and its radiological diagnosis. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wird ueber den Fall einer 29jaehrigen Patientin berichtet, die 5 Jahre lang wegen Schmerzen im rechten Mittelfuss unter der Diagnose degenerativer oder rheumatischer Veraenderungen physikalisch und medikamentoes behandelt wurde. Magnetresonanztomographisch wurde ein Weichteiltumor des Mittelfusses diagnostiziert. Die histologische Untersuchung erbrachte den Befund eines monophasisch-fibroesen Synovialsarkoms. Mit der Kasuistik verbunden ist eine Darstellung des Krankheitsbildes und dessen radiologischer Diagnostik. (orig.)

  1. Hemorrhagic Synovial Cyst Associated with Rheumatoid Atlantoaxial Subluxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Jae Jon; Seo, Dong Kwang; Choi, Seung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Synovial cyst on prevertebral space of C1-2 joint is rare but may be associated hemorrhagic event. We describe a case of a 72-year-old woman who presented with sudden severe headache in her left occipital area with dyspnea. She had rheumatoid arthritis for 14-years. Large hemorrhagic cystic mass was seen around prevertebral space of the atlantoaxial joint on the left side on cervical MRI (magnetic resonance image) and it obstructed the nasopharyngeal cavity. Aspiration of the cystic lesion was performed via transoral approach, followed by posterior occipito-cervical fusion. The specimen was xanthochromic, suggesting old hemorrhage. The patient was tolerable on her postoperative course and showed good respiration and relieved headache. We suggest that repeated microtrauma due to atalantoaxial subluxation associated with rheumatoid arthritis as a main cause of hemorrhagic event on the cyst. PMID:24757465

  2. Imaging findings of primary synovial sarcoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Yubao; Chen Ling; Zeng Qingsi; Zheng Xiaotao; Chen Huai; Zhang Chaoliang; Cen Renli; Gu Yingying

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging characteristics of primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma and improve its diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Methods: The clinical, imaging and pathology findings of 5 patients were retrospectively analyzed. All 5 patients received X-ray and CT scan, 1 case had MRI and PET-CT examination. SYT-SSX fusion gene was analyzed in 4 patients using reverse transcriptase- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: All the 5 patients had solid mass in the lungs and their diameter were 5.3 to 15.7 cm. One was associated with pneumothorax and the others were with moderate pleural effusion. Peripheral tumors, which showed clear margin partly with inhomogeneous density, was found in CT scan. On the contrast-enhanced CT scan, 3 cases were inhomogeneous enhancement and 2 were circular enhancement. Pleural invasion or conglutination was detected in 5 patients. No hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes metastasis were seen in all eases. MRI showed intermediate signal on T 1 WI and heterogeneous on T 2 WI of one case with right upper lobe lesion and showed thick mural enhancement after Gadolinium enhancement. The adjacent chest wall, rib thoracic vertebra, vertebral canal and thoracic cord were invaded. PET-CT showed increased uptake of FDG (SUV=12.3) in tumors. The immunohistochemical examination of Vim, CK and EMA were positive and SYT-SSX gene was detected in 4 patients. Conclusions: There are some relatively specific imaging findings of primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma. However it is necessary for diagnosing the disease to combine pathology, immunohistochemistry and SYT-SSX gene detection. (authors)

  3. Primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma mimicking a carcinoid tumor: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeid Al-Ani, MBChB, MRCP, FRCR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma is a rare malignancy. Commonly described radiologic features in the literature include pleural disease and/or effusion, lack of calcification and high uptake on positron emission tomography computerised tomography. A 68-year-old woman presented with a 3-month history of cough. Imaging studies showed a right upper lobe mass with internal foci of calcification, endobronchial extension, and low fluorodeoxyglucose avidity on positron emission tomography computerised tomography, leading to an initial diagnosis of carcinoid tumor. However, histologic specimens suggested an unexpected diagnosis of aggressive synovial sarcoma, and the case was referred to the sarcoma MDT. Metastatic synovial sarcoma was ruled out, and radical surgical excision of the lesion was performed. This article highlights the multiple atypical features of primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma as seen in this case and reviews imaging findings described in the literature. Radiologists should be aware of this unusual yet aggressive type of sarcoma.

  4. Incidental diagnosis of bilateral synovial lipomatosis in long standing knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjushree Das, MBBS, MD Pathology

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Though most cases of synovial lipomatosis occur de-novo it may be associated with a degenerative process. Possibly it occurs as a secondary process following a chronic joint disease like osteoarthritis.

  5. A case of synovial lipomatosis with chronic synovitis presenting as acute knee pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma HM, Anoosha K, Vijay Shankar S, Amita K

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Synovial lipomatosis is a rare, benign, intra-articular lipoma-like lesion characterized by villous proliferation of the synovium, most commonly affecting the knee joint. The usual presentation is long standing progressive swelling of the affected joint, with or without pain and restriction of movements. Histopathology is confirmatory. Case Report: We present the case of a 35- year old male patient with long standing history of swelling, short history of pain in the left knee joint. X-Ray and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the left knee showed the characteristic features of synovial lipomatosis with chronic synovitis. The patient underwent diagnostic arthroscopy with lavage of left knee joint. Histopathological study confirmed synovial lipomatosis with chronic synovitis. Conclusion: Synovial lipomatosis is a rare, benign, intra-articular lipoma-like lesion. Although rare, clinically it should be considered as an important differential in evaluating neoplastic and non- neoplastic conditions of the knee joint.

  6. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings; Osteocondromatose sinovial no ombro: achados por metodos de imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terazaki, Carlos Renato Ticianelli; Trippia, Carlos Henrique; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda Sales Ferreira; Medaglia, Carla Regina Miranda, E-mail: reticianelli@hotmail.com [Hospital Sao Vicente (FUNEF), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem; Trippia, Cesar Rodrigo [Hospital Sao Vicente (FUNEF), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head), and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder. (author)

  7. Outcome in the arthroscopic treatment of synovial chondromatosis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Lucjan; Mazurkiewicz, Stanisław; Treder, Mariusz; Wiśniewski, Piotr

    2005-08-30

    Background. Synovial osteochondromatosis is a disease in which loose cartilaginous bodies develop around large joints, usually the knee. It is caused by synovial metaplasia of unknown etiology. Symptoms are due either to mechanical problems caused by the loose bodies or to the degenerative arthritis that follows after several years. Surgical or arthroscopic removal of the loose bodies appears to be the only effective treatment. This article reports treatment outcome in synovial chondromatosis of the knee. Material and methods. We treated 13 patients: 11 by arthroscopy and 2 by arthrotomy. The follow-up examination was performed at least two years after after surgery. Results. There were 6 good and very good outcomes, while 2 patients required arthroscopic re-operation. Conclusions. Arthroscopy seems to be the treatment of choice in synovial chondromatosis of the knee.

  8. Endogenous MMP-9 and not MMP-2 promotes rheumatoid synovial fibroblast survival, inflammation and cartilage degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Meilang; McKelvey, Kelly; Shen, Kaitlin; Minhas, Nikita; March, Lyn; Park, Sang-Youel; Jackson, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of endogenous matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9) on the invasive characteristics of RA synovial fibroblasts. Synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with RA or OA were treated with MMP small interfering RNA (siRNA), inhibitors and recombinant proteins or TNF-α, with or without cartilage explants. Cell viability and proliferation were measured by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) proliferation assays, respectively; apoptosis by an in situ cell death detection kit; migration and invasion by CytoSelect invasion assay, scratch migration and collagen gel assays; cartilage degradation by 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue assay; and inflammatory mediators and MMPs by ELISA, western blot and zymography. MMP-2 was expressed by both OA and RA synovial fibroblasts, whereas only RA synovial fibroblasts expressed MMP-9. Suppressing MMP-2 or MMP-9 reduced RA synovial fibroblast proliferation equally. However, MMP-9 siRNA had greater effects compared with MMP-2 siRNA on promoting apoptosis and suppressing RA synovial fibroblast viability, migration and invasion. Suppression/inhibition of MMP-9 also decreased the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α, inactivated nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and suppressed RA synovial fibroblast-mediated cartilage degradation. In contrast, suppression/inhibition of MMP-2 stimulated TNF-α and IL-17 secretion and activated NF-κB, while recombinant MMP-2 (rMMP-2) inactivated NF-κB and suppressed RA synovial fibroblast-mediated cartilage degradation. Results using specific inhibitors and rMMPs provided supportive evidence for the siRNA results. Endogenous MMP-2 or MMP-9 contribute to RA synovial fibroblast survival, proliferation, migration and invasion, with MMP-9 having more potent effects. Additionally, MMP-9 stimulates RA synovial

  9. Thoracic spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic synovial sarcoma: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Paul M.; Park, Michael C.; Newell, Kathy; Kepes, John J.; Thrasher, J. Brantley

    2009-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is an uncommon malignant soft tissue neoplasm, occurring primarily in adolescents and young adults. It is prevalent in the periarticular soft tissues near large joints of the extremities and rarely involves the trunk. Metastases are not uncommon and usually involve the lungs; metastasis to the thoracic spine is rare. We report the case of a 47-year-old man with a history of synovial sarcoma of the lower back, with subsequent metastases to the lung, penis, and perineum (all pr...

  10. OSTEOCHONDROMA OF THE PROXIMAL HUMERUS WITH FRICTIONAL BURSITIS AND SECONDARY SYNOVIAL OSTEOCHONDROMATOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, J; Geerts, B; Mermuys, K; Verstraete, K

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of multiple hereditary exostosis in a 33-year old patient with clinical symptoms of pain and impression of a growing mass of the left shoulder alerting potential risk of malignant transformation of an osteochondroma. Imaging studies illustrated perilesional bursitis surrounding an osteochondroma of the proximal humerus. Malignant transformation was excluded with MRI. Fragments of the osteochondroma were dislocated in the inflammatory synovial bursa illustrating a case of secondary synovial osteochondromatosis.

  11. Synovial and tenosynovial lipoma arborescens of the ankle in an adult: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babar, S.A.; Mitchell, A.W. [Hammersmith Hospital Trust, Imaging Department, London (United Kingdom); Sandison, A. [Charing Cross Hospital, Hammersmith Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-15

    Lipoma arborescens is a rare benign fat-containing synovial proliferative lesion that is typically known to affect the knee joint in adults. We present the first case of lipoma arborescens of the ankle joint in an adult patient with involvement of the intra-articluar synovium as well as the synovial sheath of the tendons around the ankle. The MRI features of this lesion in the adult ankle are described. (orig.)

  12. Unusual Presentation of Synovial Sarcoma as Meniscal Cyst: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Khodamorad; Yahyazadeh, Hooman; Bagherifard, Abolfazl

    2015-10-01

    Periarticular cyst and cystic soft tissue lesion around the knee are common. Synovial sarcoma is a rare and malignant soft tissue tumor accounting for approximately 5% of soft tissue sarcoma. A case is presented where a lesion adjacent to the joint line of the knee was diagnosed clinically and on imaging as a meniscal cyst. MRI signal was homogenous and no concomitant meniscal tears were seen. The tissue diagnosis was monophasic synovial sarcoma.

  13. Unusual Presentation of Synovial Sarcoma as Meniscal Cyst: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodamorad Jamshidi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Periarticular cyst and cystic soft tissue lesion around the knee are common. Synovial sarcoma is a rare and malignant soft tissue tumor accounting for approximately 5% of soft tissue sarcoma. A case is presented where a lesion adjacent to the joint line of the knee was diagnosed clinically and on imaging as a meniscal cyst. MRI signal was homogenous and no concomitant meniscal tears were seen. The tissue diagnosis was monophasic synovial sarcoma.

  14. Unusual Presentation of Synovial Sarcoma as Meniscal Cyst: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodamorad Jamshidi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Periarticular cyst and cystic soft tissue lesion around the knee are common. Synovial sarcoma is a rare and malignant soft tissue tumor accounting for approximately 5% of soft tissue sarcoma. A case is presented where a lesion adjacent to the joint line of the knee was diagnosed clinically and on imaging as a meniscal cyst. MRI signal was homogenous and no concomitant meniscal tears were seen. The tissue diagnosis was monophasic synovial sarcoma.

  15. Unusual Presentation of Synovial Sarcoma as Meniscal Cyst: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Khodamorad Jamshidi; Hooman Yahazadeh; Abolfazl Bagherifard

    2015-01-01

    Periarticular cyst and cystic soft tissue lesion around the knee are common. Synovial sarcoma is a rare and malignant soft tissue tumor accounting for approximately 5% of soft tissue sarcoma. A case is presented where a lesion adjacent to the joint line of the knee was diagnosed clinically and on imaging as a meniscal cyst. MRI signal was homogenous and no concomitant meniscal tears were seen. The tissue diagnosis was monophasic synovial sarcoma.

  16. Meniscal repair by synovial flap transfer. Healing of the avascular zone in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisa, J; Basora, J; Madarnas, P; Ghibely, A; Navarro-Quilis, A

    1995-02-01

    We studied repair of a longitudinal incision of the right medial meniscus in 44 rabbits after the transfer of a pedunculated synovial flap, without immobilization of the knee. The left medial meniscus was used as the control, after creating the same lesion without synovial flap. Healing was analyzed by histologic studies, including India ink perfusion after 8, 12, 24, and 48 weeks. In three quarters of the cases, the meniscus showed healing with vascularization of an originally avascular zone.

  17. Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Henninger, Benjamin; Freund, Martin; Zelger, Bettina; Putzer, Daniel; Bonatti, Hugo; M?ller, Ludwig; Fiegl, Michael; Geltner, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma is a rare malignancy with only a few cases reported so far. A 56-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for an investigation of a nodule in the left middle lung on chest radiography. Computed tomography revealed a mediastinal mass first described as a solitary fibrous tumor. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was established by computed tomography-guided percutaneous needle biopsy. Work up showed no metastasis to distant organs or contralateral pleural...

  18. Primary giant mediastinal synovial sarcoma of the neck: A case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    ZHOU, YAN; DONG, WEN; ZOU, FANGWEN; ZHOU, DONG-AI; MA, JIN-AN

    2013-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas commonly occur in the soft tissue of the extremities, while a primary occurrence in the mediastinum is quite rare. The current study reports the case of an 11-year-old male who presented with a neck mass, which computed tomography showed was due to a giant mediastinal mass involving the thyroid gland. The tumor was resected by thoracotomy and diagnosed as monophasic synovial sarcoma by histopathology. The patient received adjuvant combination chemotherapy and radiation thera...

  19. HMGB1-LPS complex promotes transformation of osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts to a rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblast-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Y; Chen, Y; Wang, W; Wang, Z; Tang, G; Zhang, P; He, Z; Liu, Y; Dai, S-M; Shen, Q

    2014-02-20

    It is generally believed that some inflammatory antigens can recognize Toll-like receptors on synovial fibroblasts (SFs) and then activate downstream signals, leading to the formation of RASFs and inducing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of the current work was to study on the hypothesis that outer PAMP (LPS) binds to the inner DAMP (HMGB1) and becomes a complex that recognizes TLRs/RAGE on SFs, thus initiating a signaling cascade that leads to the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, production of tissue-destructive enzymes, and formation of RASFs, finally resulting in RA. Osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts (OASFs) were co-cultured with HMGB1-LPS complex in vitro for five generations to induce the transformation of human SFs to RA-like SFs (tOASFs). Then, changes of tOASFs in cell cycle and apoptosis-autophagy balance were investigated in vitro, and the pathogenicity of tOASFs was evaluated in a SCID mouse model in vivo. In vitro cell cycle analysis showed more tOASFs passing through the G1/S checkpoint and moving to S or G2 phase. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that apoptosis was reduced and autophagy was enhanced significantly in tOASFs as compared with those in OASFs. The expression of certain receptors and adhesion molecules in tOASFs was upregulated. In vivo experiments showed that tOASFs attached to, invaded, and degraded the co-implanted cartilage. In addition, histochemistry showed excessive proliferation of tOASFs and the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Based on the above findings, we conclude that HMGB1-LPS complex could promote the formation of RASFs.

  20. Patellar Subluxation With Early-Phase Synovial Chondromatosis of the Knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashaireh, Khaldoon M

    2016-01-01

    Primary synovial chondromatosis is a rare, benign, monoarticular disease process that affects the synovial membrane of the joint, the synovial sheath, or the bursa around the joint. The etiology is unknown, but it has been associated with trauma in some cases. Although it is a benign lesion, if left untreated, it may lead to early secondary osteoarthritis of the joint. The knee joint is affected in 50% to 65% of cases, followed by the elbow and the hip. This article reports a 30-year-old active woman who presented to the author's clinic with a large infrapatellar mass that caused lateral subluxation of the patella, swelling, and episodic pain with crepitations 14 months after direct trauma to the knee. Clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopy revealed a large infrapatellar mass causing lateral subluxation of the patella with no loose bodies. Hoffa's disease, para-articular osteochondroma, and early-phase synovial chondromatosis were considered in the differential diagnosis. The histopathologic and clinical features were consistent with early synovial chondromatosis. The patient underwent local excision of the mass through a medial parapatellar arthrotomy. At 5 years of follow-up, she had no recurrence of the lesion or progression of the disease. Early diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis with local excision offers a reliable cure. However, long-term follow-up is advised because of the high recurrence rates as well as the risk of metaplastic transformation. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Th1-Induced CD106 Expression Mediates Leukocytes Adhesion on Synovial Fibroblasts from Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Laura; Margheri, Francesca; Luciani, Cristina; Capone, Manuela; Rossi, Maria Caterina; Chillà, Anastasia; Santarlasci, Veronica; Mazzoni, Alessio; Cimaz, Rolando; Liotta, Francesco; Maggi, Enrico; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Del Rosso, Mario; Annunziato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that subsets of human T helper cells can orchestrate leukocyte adhesion to synovial fibroblasts (SFbs), thus regulating the retention of leukocytes in the joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Several cell types, such as monocytes/macrophages, granulocytes, T and B lymphocytes, SFbs and osteoclasts participate in joint tissue damage JIA. Among T cells, an enrichment of classic and non-classic Th1 subsets, has been found in JIA synovial fluid (SF), compared to peripheral blood (PB). Moreover, it has been shown that IL-12 in the SF of inflamed joints mediates the shift of Th17 lymphocytes towards the non-classic Th1 subset. Culture supernatants of Th17, classic and non-classic Th1 clones, have been tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation, and to induce expression of adhesion molecules on SFbs, obtained from healthy donors. Culture supernatants of both classic and non-classic Th1, but not of Th17, clones, were able to induce CD106 (VCAM-1) up-regulation on SFbs. This effect, mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, was crucial for the adhesion of circulating leukocytes on SFbs. Finally, we found that SFbs derived from SF of JIA patients expressed higher levels of CD106 than those from healthy donors, resembling the phenotype of SFbs activated in vitro with Th1-clones supernatants. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that classic and non-classic Th1 cells induce CD106 expression on SFbs through TNF-α, an effect that could play a role in leukocytes retention in inflamed joints.

  2. Fluid collections and juxta-articular cystic lesions of the shoulder: spectrum of MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellado, J.M.; Salvado, E.; Camins, A.; Ramos, A.; Sauri, A. [Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Hospital Joan XXIII, Tarragona (Spain); Merino, X. [Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Hospital Vall' Ebron, Barcelona (Spain); Calmet, J. [Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital Joan XXIII, Carrer Doctor Mallafre Guasch, Tarragona (Spain)

    2002-03-01

    The MR imaging features of fluid collections and juxta-articular cystic lesions of the shoulder are discussed, with special focus on those related to subacromial impingement and rotator cuff tears. Other more unusual fluid collections and cystic lesions are described, including rice-bodies bursitis, idiopathic synovial osteochondromatosis, dialysis-related amyloid arthropathy, hemophilic arthropathy, infectious conditions, non-infectious inflammatory arthritis, and paralabral cysts. (orig.)

  3. Synovial cyst of the hip joint as a rare cause of unlateral leg edema; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji Hun; Chang, Il Soo; Park, Sang Woo; Yun, Ik Jin; Park, Hyung Kyu; Kim, Wan Seop; Lee, Hui Jin; Kim, Na Ra; Moon, Sung Gyu [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    A synovial cyst of the hip joint is a rare cause of unilateral leg edema, and it is usually associated with arthropathies such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. An asymptomatic synovial cyst of the hip joint that is not associated with an arthritic condition occurs infrequently. In this paper, we described the case of a 52-year-old woman who presented with unilateral right leg edema caused by a synovial cyst of the hip joint.

  4. Transition of healthy to diseased synovial tissue in rheumatoid arthritis is associated with gain of mesenchymal/fibrotic characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Steenvoorden, Marjan MC; Tolboom, Tanja CA; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Löwik, Clemens; Visser, Cornelis PJ; DeGroot, Jeroen; Gittenberger-DeGroot, Adriana C; DeRuiter, Marco C; Wisse, Bert J; Huizinga, Tom WJ; Toes, René EM

    2006-01-01

    The healthy synovial lining layer consists of a single cell layer that regulates the transport between the joint cavity and the surrounding tissue. It has been suggested that abnormalities such as somatic mutations in the p53 tumor-suppressor gene contribute to synovial hyperplasia and invasion in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, expression of epithelial markers on healthy and diseased synovial lining tissue was examined. In addition, we investigated whether a regulated process, rese...

  5. Changes in Nitric Oxide Level and Thickness Index of Synovial Fluid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    articular injection of sodium hyaluronate, while the effect is insignificant in severe ..... B. New clinical applications of hyaluronic acid. Food Drug A, 2006; 12: 8-10. 14. Wang GX, Zheng CY, Li L, Fang W. Clinical effect of articular cavity injection of ...

  6. An ARGS-aggrecan assay for analysis in blood and synovial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, S; Lohmander, Stefan; Struglics, A

    2014-01-01

    ) on the Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) platform for detection of ARGS-aggrecan was validated, using a standard made from recombinant human aggrecan. Matched samples of SF, serum, plasma, and urine were obtained from 36 subjects at different time points after knee injury, and analysed for ARGS-aggrecan content...

  7. Synovial mesenchymal stem cells promote healing after meniscal repair in microminipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Y; Muneta, T; Kondo, S; Mizuno, M; Takakuda, K; Ichinose, S; Tabuchi, T; Koga, H; Tsuji, K; Sekiya, I

    2015-06-01

    The induction of synovial tissue to the meniscal lesion is crucial for meniscal healing. Synovial Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source because of their high proliferative and chondrogenic potentials. We examined whether transplantation of synovial MSCs promoted healing after meniscal repair of extended longitudinal tear of avascular area in a microminipig model. Longitudinal tear lesion was made in medial menisci and sutured in both knees, and then a synovial MSC suspension was administered for 10 min only in unilateral knee. The sutured meniscus was evaluated morphologically and biomechanically at 2, 4, and 12 weeks. The behavior of transplanted MSCs was also examined. The meniscal healing at 12 weeks was significantly better in the MSC group than in the control group; macroscopically, histologically and by T1rho mapping analysis. Transmission electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that the meniscus lesion was occupied by dense collagen fibrils only in the MSC group. Biomechanical analysis revealed that the tensile strength to failure of the meniscus higher in the MSC group than in the control group in each microminipig. Synovial tissue covered better along the superficial layer from the outer zone into the lesion of the meniscus in the MSC group at 2 and 4 weeks in each microminipig. Synovial MSCs labeled with ferucarbotran were detected in the meniscus lesion and adjacent synovium by MRI at 2 weeks. Transplantation of synovial MSCs promoted healing after meniscal repair with induction of synovium into the longitudinal tear in the avascular zone of meniscus in pigs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Minimally invasive surgery for lumbar synovial cysts with coexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Daniel; Shah, Saumya; Lu, Daniel C.; Holly, Langston T.

    2016-01-01

    Background About one third of lumbar synovial cysts are associated with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Segmental instability is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis and recurrence of synovial cysts and lumbar fusion has been advocated as a treatment of choice in the presence of spondylolisthesis. In patients with spondylolisthesis, minimally invasive resection of lumbar synovial cysts, without fusion, could minimize surgically induced segmental instability while providing good pain relief. Methods Clinical and radiological outcomes of lumbar synovial cyst patients with and without spondylolisthesis were retrospectively compared. Pain outcomes were assessed with modified Macnab criteria. Results Fifty-three patients (18 with grade 1 spondylolisthesis) underwent minimally invasive synovial cyst resection and all had either excellent or good pain outcome at ≤ 8 post- operative weeks (P = 1.000, n = 53). At > 8 post-operative weeks (mean (SD) follow-up of 200 (175) weeks), excellent or good outcomes were noted in 89% of patients without spondylolisthesis and in 75% of patients with spondylolisthesis (P = 0.425, n = 40). Four patients developed a new grade 1 spondylolisthesis at a mean follow-up of 2.6 ± 2.1 years. Nine patients were assessed for spondylolisthesis measurements at 1.2 ± 1.3 years of follow up and no significant difference was observed (5 ± 0 vs 5 ± 1 mm; P = 0.791). Two patients without spondylolisthesis and none of the patients with spondylolisthesis had a synovial cyst recurrence. Conclusion Patients with concomitant lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and synovial cyst can have good short- and long-term clinical outcomes with minimally invasive surgery without fusion. Post-operative segmental instability does not appear to be significant in patients with spondylolisthesis. All patients included in this article signed an informed consent for the use of their medical information for research. PMID:27909658

  9. Cricothyroid Articulation in Elderly Japanese With Special Reference to Morphology of the Synovial and Capsular Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Ai; Honkura, Yohei; Suzuki, Ryoji; Abe, Hiroshi; Abe, Shin-Ichi; Murakami, Gen; Katori, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to clarify individual variations in the cricothyroid joint (CT joint). Using 30 specimens of the CT joint obtained from elderly donated cadavers, we examined the composite fibers of the capsular ligament as well as the morphology of the synovial tissue. The capsular ligament consistently contained abundant thick elastic fiber bundles on the anterior side of the joint (anterior band) and an elastic fiber-made mesh on the posterior side (posterior mesh). The synovial membrane, lined by synovial macrophages, was usually restricted to the recesses in the medial or inferior end of the joint cavity. Without the synovial lining, elastic fibers of the capsular ligament were subsequently detached, dispersed, and exposed to the joint cavity. We also observed a folded and thickened synovial membrane and a hypertrophic protrusion of the capsular ligament. In six specimens, the joint cavity was obliterated by debris of synovial folds and elastic fiber-rich tissues continuous with the usual capsular ligament. Notably, with the exception of two specimens, we did not find lymphocyte infiltration in the degenerative synovial tissue. We considered the CT joint degeneration to be a specific, silent form of osteoarthritis from the absence of lymphocyte infiltration. For high-pitched phonation, the elderly CT joint seemed to maintain its anterior gliding and rotation with the aid of elastic fiber-rich tissues compensating for the loss of congruity between the joint cartilage surfaces. Conversely, however, high-pitched phonation may accelerate obliteration of the joint. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging allows accurate assessment of the synovial inflammatory activity in rheumatoid arthritis knee joints: a comparison with synovial histology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Mette Bjørndal; Stoltenberg, M.; Poggenborg, R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) evaluated using semi-automatic image processing software can accurately assess synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) knee joints. Methods: In 17 RA patients undergoing knee surgery, the ave......Objective: To determine whether dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) evaluated using semi-automatic image processing software can accurately assess synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) knee joints. Methods: In 17 RA patients undergoing knee surgery......, the average grade of histological synovial inflammation was determined from four biopsies obtained during surgery. A preoperative series of T(1)-weighted dynamic fast low-angle shot (FLASH) MR images was obtained. Parameters characterizing contrast uptake dynamics, including the initial rate of enhancement...... (IRE), were generated by the software in three different areas: (I) the entire slice (Whole slice); (II) a manually outlined region of interest (ROI) drawn quickly around the joint, omitting large artefacts such as blood vessels (Quick ROI); and (III) a manually outlined ROI following the synovial...

  11. Progressive growth of primary synovial sarcoma of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Jun; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Huang, Cheng-Long; Misaki, Noriyuki; Chang, Sung-Soo; Okuda, Masaya; Kushida, Yoshio; Haba, Reiji

    2010-06-01

    An 80-year-old male was admitted because of a giant mass in the left lower lobe of the lung on a routine chest X-ray. Chest computed tomography verified this to be a well-defined heterogeneous mass as described with no associated lymphadenopathy. FDG-PET depicted moderately marginal FDG uptake. The patient underwent a left lower lobectomy and lymphadenectomy. Grossly, the tumor measured 60 × 50 mm and was uniformly filled with a pure white, pudding-like friable substance. No lymph node metastasis was observed microscopically. Histologically, the tumor showed a dense proliferation of rounded or spindled malignant cells with a frequent mitotic activity and an increased nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio. The immunohistochemical staining was positive for vimentin, negative for cytokeratin, keratin-wide, EMA, CD34. A SYT-SSX2 fusion gene transcript was detected as a result of RT-PCR analysis. Because of these results, the tumor was diagnosed as a monophasic synovial sarcoma.

  12. MR imaging of lumbar facet joint synovial cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolaki, E.; Davies, A.M.; Evans, N. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom)

    2000-04-01

    The increasing application of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine has raised the awareness of lumbar facet synovial cysts (LFSC). This well recognised, yet uncommon condition, presents with low back pain and radiculopathy due to the presence of an extradural mass. The commonest affected level is L4/5 with a mild degenerative spondylolisthesis a frequent associated finding. MR imaging is the technique of choice to detect and diagnose a LFSC. This pictorial essay, drawing on experience of 43 cases seen in 40 patients, illustrates the spectrum of appearances that can be encountered and suggest differing causes for the variable signal characteristics exhibited. Computed tomography (CT) can be of value in some cases to aid interpretation of the MR images. In addition, CT facet arthrography by injection of air or iodinated non-ionic contrast medium may be used to confirm the diagnosis in doubtful cases as well as noting whether the patients presenting symptoms can be provoked. A comprehensive review of the existing literature is presented. (orig.)

  13. Cistos sinoviais lombares Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Ferreira Rosa

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Os cistos sinoviais localizados na coluna lombar são raros, em geral associados a alterações degenerativas das articulações facetárias, mais freqüentemente vistos na transição L4-L5. Raramente causam sintomas, que, quando ocorrem, são sobretudo lombociatalgia. O diagnóstico é feito de maneira satisfatória pela tomografia computadorizada e pela ressonância magnética e é importante para que se institua o correto tratamento dos cistos. Existem diversas formas de tratamento, desde repouso e imobilização até a injeção de corticóide no cisto sinovial guiada por tomografia computadorizada, e mesmo cirurgia nos casos refratários aos outros tipos de tratamento.Intraspinal synovial cysts of the lumbar spine are rare and commonly associated with osteoarthritis of the facet joints, particularly at level L4-L5. Symptoms are uncommon and may include low-back pain or sciatica. These cysts are accurately diagnosed by using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnosis is essential for the correct management of the cysts. Several treatment options are available including rest and immobilization, computed tomography guided corticosteroids injection, and surgery in patients that are nonresponsive to other treatment methods.

  14. Intra-Articular Synovial Sarcomas: Incidence and Differentiating Features from Localized Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nordemar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and investigate if any radiological variables can differentiate them from localized (unifocal pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS and if multivariate data analysis could be used as a complementary clinical tool. Methods. Magnetic resonance images and radiographs of 7 cases of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and 14 cases of localized PVNS were blindedly reviewed. Variables analyzed were size, extra-articular growth, tumor border, blooming, calcification, contrast media enhancement, effusion, bowl of grapes sign, triple signal intensity sign, synovial low signal intensity, synovitis, age, and gender. Univariate and multivariate data analysis, the method of partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA, were used. Register data on all synovial sarcomas were extracted for comparison. Results. The incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas was 3%. PLS-DA showed that age, effusion, size, and gender were the most important factors for discrimination between sarcomas and localized PVNS. No sarcomas were misclassified as PVNS with PLS-DA, while some PVNS were misclassified as sarcomas. Conclusions. The most important variables in differentiating intra-articular sarcomas from localized PVNS were age, effusion, size, and gender. Multivariate data analysis can be helpful as additive information to avoid a biopsy, if the tumor is classified as most likely being PVNS.

  15. Effect of SonoVue on the synovial membrane in rabbit knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech, Ernesto; Berná-Serna, Juan de Dios; Polo, Luis; Reus, Manuel; Berná-Mestre, Juan de Dios; Canteras, Manuel

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of intra-articular injection of SonoVue (sulfur hexafluoride with a phospholipid shell; Bracco SpA, Milan, Italy) on the synovial membrane in an animal model. Twenty-one New Zealand White rabbits (42 knees) were used in this study. We injected the knees with normal saline (saline group; n = 21) and SonoVue (SonoVue group; n = 21). A histologic examination of the knees was performed out at 3 and 12 hours and 3, 7, 15, 30, and 45 days after injection. Four histologic parameters (synovial hyperplasia, synovial stroma, vascular dilatation, and inflammatory infiltrates) were graded separately. We found no significant differences in this study for synovial hyperplasia, vascular dilatation, or inflammatory infiltrates between the saline and SonoVue groups. A significant difference was only observed for synovial stroma (P SonoVue group. The histologic changes observed in this study are considered transitory and reversible. The results suggest that intra-articular injection of SonoVue is a safe procedure.

  16. Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine--pathological considerations and surgical strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganau, Mario; Ennas, Franco; Bellisano, Giulia; Ganau, Laura; Ambu, Rossano; Faa, Gavino; Maleci, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic lumbar synovial cysts (LSCs) are a rare cause of degenerative narrowing of the spinal canal, with thecal sac or nerve root compression. True synovial cysts have a thick wall lined by synovial cells, containing granulation tissue, numerous histiocytes, and giant cells. In contrast, pseudo-cysts lack specialized epithelium, have a collagenous capsule filled with myxoid material, and may be classified into ganglion cysts, originating from periarticular fibrous tissues, and ligamentous cysts, arising from the ligamentum flavum or even from the posterior longitudinal ligament. Here we present the surgical series of the Chair of Neurosurgery at the University of Cagliari (Italy) including a total of 17 LSCs. Surgical technique consisted of facet sparing excision of LSC, achieved by simple hemilaminectomy/laminectomy, and diagnosis was always confirmed by histological specimen examination, which detected the typical synovial epithelium, the intracystic presence of hemosiderin, histiocytes, and calcifications. Further immunohistochemical investigation revealed positive staining for cytokeratin: CK5, CK6, and AE1/AE3. Clinically, our cohort experienced rapid and complete resolution of symptoms, without perioperative complications, or recurrence of cysts or vertebral instability at a median follow up of 28 months, when the MacNab score was generally excellent. A review of the literature, retrieving articles published from 1973, collected a total of 101 articles concerning all the cases of LSC scientifically described to date. Both clinical and histological findings described in our study support the theory of degenerative microtraumatic pathogenesis of synovial cysts.

  17. Bilateral synovial chondromatosis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint: a report case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stecco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a rare pathology of unknown aetiology. It originates from the chondroid metaplasia of the connective tissue of the synovial membrane. Consequently, cartilaginous nodules develop in the affected joints, first calcifying and then ossifying. The bursae mucosae, the vaginae tendinis and the para-articular connective tissue are less frequently affected. The most common locations of this pathology are the knee, the hip, the shoulder, the elbow and the ankle. The small articulations are rarely affected, even less the bilateral involving of joints, above all of hand or foot, is exceptional. In a clinical and radiological valuation, it is difficult to distinguish synovial chondromatosis from arthrosis and from degenerative arthopathies in general. A sure diagnosis can be obtained only by means of a histological examination. We here report a case of synovial chondromatosis bilaterally located on the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Clinical and radiological features were analogous to those of hallux rigidus, a typical and peculiar metatarsophalangeal joint pathology. The diagnostic suspicion that it was a synovial chondromatosis arose during surgical surgery, and was subsequently confirmed by histological examination. During the following visits, the patient did not present any painful symptomatology.

  18. Synovial CD4+ T-cell-derived GM-CSF supports the differentiation of an inflammatory dendritic cell population in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, G; Gibbon, J R; Pratt, A G; Wood, M J; Coady, D; Raftery, G; Lorenzi, A R; Gray, A; Filer, A; Buckley, C D; Haniffa, M A; Isaacs, J D; Hilkens, C M U

    2016-01-01

    Objective A population of synovial inflammatory dendritic cells (infDCs) has recently been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is thought to be monocyte-derived. Here, we investigated the role and source of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the differentiation of synovial infDC in RA. Methods Production of GM-CSF by peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) CD4+ T cells was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. In vitro CD4+ T-cell polarisation experiments were performed with T-cell activating CD2/CD3/CD28-coated beads in the absence or presence of pro-Th1 or pro-Th17 cytokines. CD1c+ DC and CD16+ macrophage subsets were flow-sorted and analysed morphologically and functionally (T-cell stimulatory/polarising capacity). Results RA-SF CD4+ T cells produced abundant GM-CSF upon stimulation and significantly more than RA-SF mononuclear cells depleted of CD4+ T cells. GM-CSF-producing T cells were significantly increased in RA-SF compared with non-RA inflammatory arthritis SF, active RA PB and healthy donor PB. GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells were expanded by Th1-promoting but not Th17-promoting conditions. Following coculture with RA-SF CD4+ T cells, but not healthy donor PB CD4+ T cells, a subpopulation of monocytes differentiated into CD1c+ infDC; a process dependent on GM-CSF. These infDC displayed potent alloproliferative capacity and enhanced GM-CSF, interleukin-17 and interferon-γ production by CD4+ T cells. InfDC with an identical phenotype to in vitro generated cells were significantly enriched in RA-SF compared with non-RA-SF/tissue/PB. Conclusions We demonstrate a therapeutically tractable feedback loop of GM-CSF secreted by RA synovial CD4+ T cells promoting the differentiation of infDC with potent capacity to induce GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells. PMID:25923217

  19. Nitrated type III collagen as a biological marker of nitric oxide-mediated synovial tissue metabolism in osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardot, P; Charni-Ben Tabassi, N; Toh, L

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Nitric oxide (NO) is a major mediator of joint tissue inflammation and damage in osteoarthritis (OA) and mediates the nitration of tyrosine (Y*) residues in proteins. We investigated the nitration of type III collagen, a major constituent of synovial membrane, in knee OA. METHODS: A p...... investigation of oxidative-related alterations of synovial tissue metabolism in OA....

  20. Research Paper: The Impact of Synovial NF-ĸB Activation on Apoptosis Pattern Change During Adjuvant-induced Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Golabi

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: It seems that apoptosis pattern change plays an important role in the progression and modulation of CFA-induced inflammation and its related symptoms. Also, it can be concluded that synovial NF-ĸB had a crucial role in synovial apoptosis change during the study period.

  1. Arthroscopic Treatment of a Case with Concomitant Subacromial and Subdeltoid Synovial Chondromatosis and Labrum Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevres Hurriyet Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a disease that seldomly seen in shoulder joint and is related to benign synovial proliferation and synchronous chondral tissue formation within the joint cavity. Patients suffer from progressive restriction of range of motion and shoulder pain. Extra-articular involvement is an extremely rare condition. Degenerative osteoarthritis, joint subluxation, and bursitis are common complications in untreated patients. Open or arthroscopic surgery is suitable while there is no consensus related to superiority of different approaches. We presented an arthroscopic treatment of a male patient, 48 years old with labrum tear and synovial chondromatosis localized in subacromial and subdeltoid region. Advantages of arthroscopic surgery in the presence of intra- and extra-articular combined pathologies are also discussed.

  2. MR tomography of hemophilic osteoarthropathy with special reference to synovial and chondrogenic alterations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlemann, R.; Pollmann, H.; Vestring, T.; Peters, P.E.

    1992-01-01

    52 knee and ankle joints of hemophiliacs were examined by MRI using FLASH and FISP-3-D sequences; and the degree of synovial hypertrophy and of cartilage destruction were assessed. Findings of synovial hypertrophy varied between thin membranes and tumorous tissue destroying the joint cartilage. Degree of cartilage destruction varied between focal signal decrease and total loss. In spite of recurrent joint bleedings no synovial or cartilaginous changes were seen in 31% and 29% of joints, respectively. Changes were more frequently seen and degree was more marked in the ankle than in the knee joints. With the exception of cysts, osseous destruction was more obvious with radiographs. MRI is suitable for the investigation of joints of hemophiliacs showing no osseous destruction. (orig.) [de

  3. Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, Benjamin; Freund, Martin; Zelger, Bettina; Putzer, Daniel; Bonatti, Hugo; Müller, Ludwig; Fiegl, Michael; Geltner, Christian

    2009-08-07

    Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma is a rare malignancy with only a few cases reported so far. A 56-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for an investigation of a nodule in the left middle lung on chest radiography. Computed tomography revealed a mediastinal mass first described as a solitary fibrous tumor. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was established by computed tomography-guided percutaneous needle biopsy. Work up showed no metastasis to distant organs or contralateral pleural cavity. The mass was surgically resected; pathological and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the diagnosis of a monophasic spindle cell synovial sarcoma probably originating from phrenic nerve. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation and is free of recurrence after a follow up of 16 months.

  4. Primary giant mediastinal synovial sarcoma of the neck: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Dong, Wen; Zou, Fangwen; Zhou, Dong-Ai; Ma, Jin-An

    2014-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas commonly occur in the soft tissue of the extremities, while a primary occurrence in the mediastinum is quite rare. The current study reports the case of an 11-year-old male who presented with a neck mass, which computed tomography showed was due to a giant mediastinal mass involving the thyroid gland. The tumor was resected by thoracotomy and diagnosed as monophasic synovial sarcoma by histopathology. The patient received adjuvant combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy following surgery. At the 3-month follow-up, no local tumor recurrence was found. The present case report highlights the significance of recognizing the unusual presentation and clinical manifestation of synovial sarcoma to aid clinical management. Written informed consent was obtained from the patient's family.

  5. [Primary synovial sarcoma of the mediastinum. A case report with immunohistochemistry, ultrastructural and cytogenetic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoc'h, M; Le Marc'hardour, F; Bost, F; Pasquier, D; Roux, J J; Pinel, N; Leroux, D; Pasquier, B

    1995-01-01

    A biphasic synovial sarcoma occurring in the anterior and inferior mediastinum in a 19-year-old woman is reported. A biopsy showed a mesenchymal proliferation and the tumor was first misdiagnosed as a hemangiopericytoma. Inefficacy of chemotherapy led to a tumorectomy. Histologic and immunohistochemical studies on multiple samples showed a biphasic tumor. Ultrastructural study confirmed the presence of epithelial elements and cytogenetic analysis disclosed a translocation t(X;18) (p11;q11), leading to a diagnosis of synovial sarcoma. Synovial sarcoma of the mediastinum is very rare and to our knowledge has not been previously studied with the help of cytogenetics. Given the biphasic pattern of the tumor and its mediastinal location, it can be confused with mesothelioma. This stresses the interest of chromosome analysis in the study of tumors histologically difficult to classify.

  6. Giant primary synovial sarcoma of the anterior mediastinum: A case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukekwe, F I; Ezemba, N; Olusina, D B; Igbokwe, U; Ngene, C

    2016-01-01

    Primary synovial sarcoma is a very rare tumor of the mediastinum, which is unreported in the entire subcontinent of West Africa, and presents daunting challenges from diagnosis to management with lack of standard management strategies. We present a case of primary monophasic synovial sarcoma of the anterior mediastinum, in a 22-year-old Nigerian lady who presented with cough, chest pain, and pleural effusion. Chest X-ray (CXR) and computed tomography on admission showed a left-sided huge mass in the left anterior mediastinum with no metastasis to the contralateral pleural cavity. Complete resection of the mediastinal tumor was done and histologic and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed a diagnosis of monophasic synovial sarcoma. However, 10 months postoperation she represented with chest pain, productive cough and a repeat CXR showed multiple left pulmonary nodules. She received two cycles of docetaxel and gemcitabine chemotherapy, but declined further treatment until her demise 8 months later.

  7. Synovial sarcoma of the chest wall: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braham, Emna; Aloui, Slim; Aouadi, Samira; Drira, Ikram; Kilani, Tarek; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2013-04-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a malignant soft-tissue tumor that most commonly occurs in the extremities of young adults. Synovial sarcoma arising from the chest wall is rare and only some cases had been reported in the literature. We present a 57-year-old woman who presented with chest pain. Radiologic evaluation revealed a right parietal tumor destructing the mid-portion of the 8(th) rib, with heterogeneous enhancement and invasion of the pectoral muscle and extra pleural fat. A surgical resection consisting in parietectomy was achieved. The histological and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with synovial sarcoma. An adjuvant chemotherapy was prescribed but the patient was lost of view. She presented 6 months later with a recurrent huge parietal mass.

  8. Rapidly progressive course of primary renal synovial sarcoma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković-Lipkovski Jasmina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Primary kidney sarcoma, especially synovial sarcoma (SS, is a very rare neoplasm. Pre-operative signs and symptoms are very similar to renal cell carcinoma, therefore, the proper diagnosis is very difficult and usually made after nephrectomy. This is a case report of primary renal SS. Case Outline. A 38-year-old man presented with a history of fever and hematuria, and right flank pain 3 weeks ago. Abdominal computerized tomography revealed a heterogeneous well-marginated soft tissue mass arising in the lower part of the right kidney. Right nephrectomy was performed. A cystic tumor of 120x85 mm in size with soft solid growth, and with the extensive areas of hemorrhage and necrosis was seen on gross examination. Histopathology revealed a neoplasm composed of solid monomorphic sheets of spindle cells. Immunohistochemistry showed tumor cells strongly positive for BCL2, CD99, CD56 and vimentin, and focally positive for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA. The histological diagnosis of primary renal SS was based on morphology and immunohistochemistry. FISH analysis and RT-PCR was carried out on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections. The molecular analysis demonstrated translocation of SYT gene on chromosome 18 and SSX2 gene on chromosome X. The findings were consistent with diagnosis of SS. Conclusion. Our case shows that histopathological diagnosis of primary kidney SS, although difficult, is possible to be made on the basis of morphological and immunohistochemical analysis. However, this diagnosis should be corroborated by molecular techniques confirming SYT-SSX translocation on chromosome 18 and chromosome X. Here we present visceral monophasic SS with aggressive clinical course and poor outcome. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 175047

  9. Synovial DKK1 expression is regulated by local glucocorticoid metabolism in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Rowan; Juarez, Maria; Naylor, Amy; Tu, Jinwen; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H; Filer, Andrew; Stewart, Paul M; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Mark S

    2012-10-18

    Inflammatory arthritis is associated with increased bone resorption and suppressed bone formation. The Wnt antagonist dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is secreted by synovial fibroblasts in response to inflammation and this protein has been proposed to be a master regulator of bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis. Local glucocorticoid production is also significantly increased during joint inflammation. Therefore, we investigated how locally derived glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytokines regulate DKK1 synthesis in synovial fibroblasts during inflammatory arthritis. We examined expression and regulation of DKK1 in primary cultures of human synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with inflammatory arthritis. The effect of TNFα, IL-1β and glucocorticoids on DKK1 mRNA and protein expression was examined by real-time PCR and ELISA. The ability of inflammatory cytokine-induced expression of the glucocorticoid-activating enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) to sensitise fibroblasts to endogenous glucocorticoids was explored. Global expression of Wnt signalling and target genes in response to TNFα and glucocorticoids was assessed using a custom array. DKK1 expression in human synovial fibroblasts was directly regulated by glucocorticoids but not proinflammatory cytokines. Glucocorticoids, but not TNFα, regulated expression of multiple Wnt agonists and antagonists in favour of inhibition of Wnt signalling. However, TNFα and IL-1β indirectly stimulated DKK1 production through increased expression of 11β-HSD1. These results demonstrate that in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts, DKK1 expression is directly regulated by glucocorticoids rather than TNFα. Consequently, the links between synovial inflammation, altered Wnt signalling and bone remodelling are not direct but are dependent on local activation of endogenous glucocorticoids.

  10. Synovial sarcoma of the maxillary sinus: an extremely rare case with excellent response to chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito S

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Shin Saito,1 Hiroyuki Ozawa,1 Yuuichi Ikari,1 Nana Nakahara,1 Fumihiro Ito,2 Mariko Sekimizu,1 Junichi Fukada,3 Kaori Kameyama,4 Kaoru Ogawa1 1Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Keio University, School of Medicine, 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, NHO Tokyo Medical Center, 3Department of Radiology, 4Department of Pathology, Keio University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: This paper presents an extremely rare case of synovial sarcoma arising from the maxillary sinus, which resulted in a clinically complete response to chemotherapy. Synovial sarcoma is a rare soft tissue malignant tumor, most commonly affecting the extremities. While ~10% occur in the head and neck region, synovial sarcoma of the sinonasal tract is extremely rare, with only 11 cases having been reported previously. As with other sarcomas, the standard treatment is complete resection while allowing for a safe margin, but this is often difficult in the head and neck area due to the complicated anatomy there. This makes the treatment of head and neck sarcoma challenging and leads to the need for a multimodal approach in advanced cases. However, the exact efficacy of chemotherapy is not well understood. In this report, we present a case of unresectable maxillary sinus synovial sarcoma that was successfully treated by chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy. A 53-year-old Japanese man was referred to our hospital with a history of left nose obstruction over the previous couple of years. Computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging revealed a tumor arising from the maxillary sinus that extended to adjacent tissues. A biopsy was performed, and the tumor was diagnosed as synovial sarcoma. Since the tumor was unresectable, neoadjuvant chemotherapy was administered. The response was excellent, and the tumor became undetectable under endoscopy and radiological imaging. This provided us with a clinical evaluation of

  11. Synovial Cyst: A Culprit for Recalcitrant Iliotibial Band Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoh CSN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 56-year old gentleman who presented with recalcitrant iliotibial band (ITB friction syndrome which did not improve with various modalities of conservative treatment. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the affected knee did not show pathology typical of ITB friction syndrome. However, open exploration revealed a synovial cyst deep to the iliotibial band, abutting against the anterolateral capsule. The presence of distinctive clinical signs on physical examination should alert clinicians to consider knee synovial cyst as a differential diagnosis when dealing with recalcitrant ITB syndrome.

  12. [Primary Synovial Sarcoma in the Anterior Mediastinum;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Naoki; Shiono, Satoshi; Katahira, Masato; Osakabe, Mitsumasa; Abiko, Masami; Ogata, Shinya

    2016-06-01

    We report a rare case of synovial sarcoma in the anterior mediastinum. A 43-year-old man consulted our hospital with a complaint of dyspnea and chest discomfort. Chest computed tomography revealed an anterior mediastinal mass. Small open biopsy was performed, and the pathological examination revealed spindle-shaped cells with severe atypia. Tumor resection was performed. On pathology, fascicular and storiform patterns of spindle-shaped cells with severe atypia were noted. The tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin 7, vimentin, Bcl -2 and CD99, and the amplification of SYT-SSX fusion gene was also found. Therefore it was diagnosed as a synovial sarcoma.

  13. Gadolinium Contrast Agent is of Limited Value for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Synovial Hypertrophy in Hemophiliacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, B.; Berntorp, E.; Pettersson, H.; Wirestam, R.; Jonsson, K.; Staahlberg, F.; Ljung, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ Hospital of Lund, Lund (Sweden)

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To examine the influence of different doses of gadolinium contrast agent on synovial enhancement, to compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of synovial hypertrophy and radiographic joint changes in hemophiliacs, and to investigate the value of gadolinium in MRI assessment of synovial hypertrophy in hemophiliacs using dynamic MRI and MRI scoring. Material and Methods: Twenty-one hemophiliacs on prophylactic factor treatment without recent bleeds were subjected to radiography and gadolinium contrast-enhanced dynamic and static MRI of the knee using a standard dose of 0.1 mmol/kg b.w. gadoteridol. In 17 of the patients, the MRI procedure was repeated after a triple dose of gadoteridol. Results: MRI findings of synovial hypertrophy were significantly correlated with Pettersson radiographic scores. In 19 of the 21 MRI investigated joints, administration of contrast agent did not alter the result of the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy. Conclusion: The optimal time interval for volume assessment of synovial hypertrophy after injection of gadolinium contrast agent is dose dependent. Hemophiliacs without recent bleeds have minor to abundant synovial hypertrophy in joints with pronounced radiographic changes. Dynamic MRI is not useful for evaluating hemophilic arthropathy, and gadolinium contrast agent is not routinely indicated for MRI scoring of joints in hemophiliacs.

  14. Recurrent Mycobacterium marinum tenosynovitis of the wrist mimicking extraarticular synovial chondromatosis on MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Rubin, David A. [Department of Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Brown, David M. [The Orthopedic Center of St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Tenosynovitis caused by atypical mycobacterial infections may produce rice bodies within affected tendon sheaths. We report a case of recurrent M. marinum infection involving the flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel in which the rice bodies were mistaken for synovial chondromatosis on MR images. (orig.)

  15. Recurrent Mycobacterium marinum tenosynovitis of the wrist mimicking extraarticular synovial chondromatosis on MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Rubin, David A.; Brown, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Tenosynovitis caused by atypical mycobacterial infections may produce rice bodies within affected tendon sheaths. We report a case of recurrent M. marinum infection involving the flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel in which the rice bodies were mistaken for synovial chondromatosis on MR images. (orig.)

  16. Stromal cell markers are differentially expressed in the synovial tissue of patients with early arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, Ivy Y.; Karpus, Olga N.; Turner, Jason D.; Hardie, Debbie; Marshall, Jennifer L.; de Hair, Maria J. H.; Maijer, Karen I.; Tak, Paul P.; Raza, Karim; Hamann, Jörg; Buckley, Christopher D.; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Filer, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown increased expression of stromal markers in synovial tissue (ST) of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, ST expression of stromal markers in early arthritis in relationship to diagnosis and prognostic outcome was studied. ST from 56 patients included

  17. Synovial inflammation, immune cells and their cytokines in osteoarthritis: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange-Brokaar, B.J.E. de; Ioan-Facsinay, A.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zuurmond, A.-M.; Schoones, J.; Toes, R.E.M.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Kloppenburg, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although osteoarthritis (OA) is considered a non-inflammatory condition, it is widely accepted that synovial inflammation is a feature of OA. However, the role of immune cells and their cytokines in OA is largely unknown. This narrative systematic review summarizes the knowledge of

  18. Condromatose sinovial de joelho: relato de caso Synovial chondromatosis of the knee: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Sayum Filho

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam o relato de caso de um paciente ex-atleta de futebol com osteocondromatose sinovial em joelho.The authors report the case of a patient with synovial osteochondromatosis of the knee, who had previously been a soccer player.

  19. Clock gene expression in different synovial cells of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, Tatjana; Tohidast-Akrad, Makiyeh; Humpeler, Susanne; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Kiener, Hans-Peter; Zenz, Peter; Steiner, Günter; Ekmekcioglu, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) show modulated circadian rhythms of inflammatory cytokines and cortisol, which may be associated with a modified expression of clock genes. The expression of major clock genes was previously studied in synovial tissues and fibroblasts of patients with RA and

  20. Epidural cystic masses associated with interspinous bursitis, synovial and discal cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Frederico Guilherme de Paula Lopes; Souza, Ricardo Andre de; Brotto, Marcos Pama D'Almeida; Suguita, Fabio Massaaki; Amaral, Denise Tokechi; Amaral, Lazaro Luis Faria do

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe some cases of epidural cysts, namely synovial, discal, ligamentum flavum cysts, and cysts secondary to interspinous bursitis, all of these conditions determining radicular, dural sac compression or spinal canal stenosis. Magnetic resonance imaging findings and localization of these entities are described. (author)

  1. CD55 deposited on synovial collagen fibers protects from immune complex-mediated arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karpus, Olga N.; Kiener, Hans P.; Niederreiter, Birgit; Yilmaz-Elis, A. Seda; van der Kaa, Jos; Ramaglia, Valeria; Arens, Ramon; Smolen, Josef S.; Botto, Marina; Tak, Paul P.; Verbeek, J. Sjef; Hamann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    CD55, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored, complement-regulating protein (decay-accelerating factor), is expressed by fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) with high local abundance in the intimal lining layer. We here explored the basis and consequences of this uncommon presence. Synovial tissue,

  2. Cricoarytenoid Articulation in Elderly Japanese With Special Reference to Morphology of the Synovial Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto-Hirano, Ai; Honkura, Yohei; Shibata, Shunichi; Abe, Shin-ichi; Murakami, Gen; Katori, Yukio

    2016-03-01

    To clarify composite fibers and cells in the synovial tissues of the cricoarytenoid joint (CA joint). Routine histology and immunohistrochemistry using sagittal or nearly sagittal sections obtained from 18 elderly cadaveric specimens. The CA joint capsule was thin and contained few elastic fibers. A limited supportive ligament, namely, a thickened fascia of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscles, was sometimes evident on the lateral aspect of the CA joint. However, even in the weaker medial aspect of the joint, no marked destruction of the synovial tissues was found. The CA joint always contained synovial folds--a short medial fold and long lateral folds--but these contained no or few macrophages, lymphocytes, and blood capillaries. In 2 exceptional specimens showing inflammatory cell infiltration in the submucosal tissue of the larynx, the macrophage-rich area extended toward the capsule and medial synovial fold. The lateral aspect of the CA joint was likely to be supported mechanically by the muscle-associated tissues. Strong support of the arytenoid by muscles might reduce the degree of CA joint injury with age. However, some patients with hoarseness due to mucosal inflammation of the larynx might have accompanying synovitis and subsequent cartilage injury in the CA joint. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Osteoprotegerin expression in synovial tissue from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropathies and osteoarthritis and normal controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haynes, D. R.; Barg, E.; Crotti, T. N.; Holding, C.; Weedon, H.; Atkins, G. J.; Zannetino, A.; Ahern, M. J.; Coleman, M.; Roberts-Thomson, P. J.; Kraan, M.; Tak, P. P.; Smith, M. D.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To demonstrate the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) in synovial tissue from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, establish the cell lineage expressing OPG and compare the expression of OPG in RA, spondyloarthropathies,

  4. Synovial sarcoma with relevant immunocytochemistry and special emphasis on the monophasic fibrous variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottu Radhika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Monophasic fibrous synovial sarcoma (SS is the most common variant of SS. Only a few cytological studies are available on this entity. Bcl-2 protein expression has been described as a characteristic marker of SS and is useful for its differentiation from other sarcomas. Cytokeratin and CD99 are also used in detecting SS. Aims: To evaluate synovial sarcoma and its variants cytomorphologically. Materials and Methods: During a period of 10 years 7 months, i.e. from January 1998 to July 2008, 12 cytologic specimens diagnosed as synovial sarcoma were reviewed. Ten cases were diagnosed as SS on aspiration alone but two cases required ancillary technique i.e., immunocytochemistry staining with bcl-2 and cytokeratin. The smears were stained with Papanicolaou and May-Grόnwald-Giemsa stains. Results: All cytologic specimens in our study had similar appearance. Most smears were highly cellular and were made up of densely packed tri-dimensional groups and singly scattered round to oval cells. Cellular monomorphism and vascular channels within the cell groups were the remarkable findings. Only one case showed cytologic evidence of epithelial differentiation. Bcl-2, cytokeratin, CD99 positivity was seen on immunohistochemistry staining. Results were categorized according to age, sex and morphologic variants. Conclusions: Although cytomorphologic features of synovial sarcomas are characteristic enough to permit its recognition, clinical correlation is necessary for accurate diagnosis. Monophasic variant is the most common entity observed in the present study.

  5. Interleukin-17-positive mast cells contribute to synovial inflammation in spondylarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordenbos, Troy; Yeremenko, Nataliya; Gofita, Ioana; van de Sande, Marleen; Tak, Paul P.; Caňete, Juan D.; Baeten, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Objective Studies comparing spondylarthritis (SpA) to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis suggest that innate immune cells may play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of SpA. Recent observations have indicated a marked synovial mast cell infiltration in psoriatic SpA. We therefore undertook the

  6. Kyste synovial postérieur lombaire | Badaoui | Pan African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lumbar synovial cyst is a periarticular cystic developing from the posterior interapophyseal joints and representing a rare, non discal etiology of lower back pain and/or of sciatica of spinal origin. We report the case of a 50-year old woman who consulted with left L5 radiculopathy. Lumbar CT scan (A) showed, at the ...

  7. An MRI assessment of chronic synovial-based inflammation in gout and its correlation with serum urate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John D; Patelli, Michelle; Anderson, Scott R; Prakash, Neelesh; Rodriquez, Ernesto J; Bateman, Helen; Sterrett, Ashley; Valeriano, Joanne; Ricca, Louis R

    2015-02-01

    It is unclear when the synovial-based inflammatory process of gout begins. The aim of this study was to determine the percentage of patients with inter-critical gout who have chronic synovial-based inflammation as evidenced by synovial pannus on a contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of their most involved joint and determine if the presence and/or severity correlates with their serum urate levels. All patients received a 3 T MRI of their index joint, serum urate level, CRP, and creatinine. The primary endpoint was to determine the prevalence of synovial pannus and the correlation of serum urate levels with the presence and/or severity of the synovial pannus on that same joint. MRI erosions, tophi, swelling, effusion, and osteitis were also documented. Seventy-two of 74 subjects (90% men) completed the protocol. Fifty-three of 72 (74%) index joints were the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Thirty-nine (54.2%) of the patients were on urate-lowering therapy; 15 (20.8%) and 7 (9.7%) were taking colchicine or a NSAID daily, respectively. Of the 72 subjects, 63 (87.5%) had synovial pannus on their MRI with good inter-reader agreement between the two radiologists. The mean serum urate level was 7.93 mg/dL. There was no correlation with the presence (p = 0.33) or severity (p = 0.34) of synovial pannus and serum urate levels. There was also no correlation with the presence or severity of synovial pannus and the secondary endpoints. The majority of patients with inter-critical gout have evidence of chronic synovial-based inflammation. However, the presence and severity of this inflammation do not appear to correlate with serum urate levels.

  8. Prevalence, extension and characteristics of fluid-fluid levels in bone and soft tissue tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, P. van; Venstermans, C.; Gielen, J.; Parizel, P.M. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Vanhoenacker, F.M. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); AZ St-Maarten, Department of Radiology, Duffel/Mechelen (Belgium); Vogel, J. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Orthopedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Kroon, H.M.; Bloem, J.L. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Schepper, A.M.A. de [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, extension and signal characteristics of fluid-fluid levels in a large series of 700 bone and 700 soft tissue tumors. Out of a multi-institutional database, MRI of 700 consecutive patients with a bone tumor and MRI of 700 consecutive patients with a soft tissue neoplasm were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of fluid-fluid levels. Extension (single, multiple and proportion of the lesion occupied by fluid-fluid levels) and signal characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging of fluid-fluid levels were determined. In all patients, pathologic correlation was available. Of 700 patients with a bone tumor, 19 (10 male and 9 female; mean age, 29 years) presented with a fluid-fluid level (prevalence 2.7%). Multiple fluid-fluid levels occupying at least one half of the total volume of the lesion were found in the majority of patients. Diagnoses included aneurysmal bone cyst (ten cases), fibrous dysplasia (two cases), osteoblastoma (one case), simple bone cyst (one case), telangiectatic osteosarcoma (one case), ''brown tumor'' (one case), chondroblastoma (one case) and giant cell tumor (two cases). Of 700 patients with a soft tissue tumor, 20 (9 males and 11 females; mean age, 34 years) presented with a fluid-fluid level (prevalence 2.9%). Multiple fluid-fluid levels occupying at least one half of the total volume of the lesion were found in the majority of patients. Diagnoses included cavernous hemangioma (12 cases), synovial sarcoma (3 cases), angiosarcoma (1 case), aneurysmal bone cyst of soft tissue (1 case), myxofibrosarcoma (1 case) and high-grade sarcoma ''not otherwise specified'' (2 cases). In our series, the largest reported in the literature to the best of our knowledge, the presence of fluid-fluid levels is a rare finding with a prevalence of 2.7 and 2.9% in bone and soft tissue tumors, respectively. Fluid-fluid levels remain a non-specific finding and can

  9. Prevalence, extension and characteristics of fluid-fluid levels in bone and soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, P. van; Venstermans, C.; Gielen, J.; Parizel, P.M.; Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Vogel, J.; Kroon, H.M.; Bloem, J.L.; Schepper, A.M.A. de

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, extension and signal characteristics of fluid-fluid levels in a large series of 700 bone and 700 soft tissue tumors. Out of a multi-institutional database, MRI of 700 consecutive patients with a bone tumor and MRI of 700 consecutive patients with a soft tissue neoplasm were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of fluid-fluid levels. Extension (single, multiple and proportion of the lesion occupied by fluid-fluid levels) and signal characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging of fluid-fluid levels were determined. In all patients, pathologic correlation was available. Of 700 patients with a bone tumor, 19 (10 male and 9 female; mean age, 29 years) presented with a fluid-fluid level (prevalence 2.7%). Multiple fluid-fluid levels occupying at least one half of the total volume of the lesion were found in the majority of patients. Diagnoses included aneurysmal bone cyst (ten cases), fibrous dysplasia (two cases), osteoblastoma (one case), simple bone cyst (one case), telangiectatic osteosarcoma (one case), ''brown tumor'' (one case), chondroblastoma (one case) and giant cell tumor (two cases). Of 700 patients with a soft tissue tumor, 20 (9 males and 11 females; mean age, 34 years) presented with a fluid-fluid level (prevalence 2.9%). Multiple fluid-fluid levels occupying at least one half of the total volume of the lesion were found in the majority of patients. Diagnoses included cavernous hemangioma (12 cases), synovial sarcoma (3 cases), angiosarcoma (1 case), aneurysmal bone cyst of soft tissue (1 case), myxofibrosarcoma (1 case) and high-grade sarcoma ''not otherwise specified'' (2 cases). In our series, the largest reported in the literature to the best of our knowledge, the presence of fluid-fluid levels is a rare finding with a prevalence of 2.7 and 2.9% in bone and soft tissue tumors, respectively. Fluid-fluid levels remain a non-specific finding and can occur in a wide range of bone and soft

  10. Inner Synovial Membrane Footprint of the Anterior Elbow Capsule: An Arthroscopic Boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinath Kamineni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study is to describe the inner synovial membrane (SM of the anterior elbow capsule, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Materials and Methods. Twenty-two cadaveric human elbows were dissected and the distal humerus and SM attachments were digitized using a digitizer. The transepicondylar line (TEL was used as the primary descriptor of various landmarks. The distance between the medial epicondyle and medial SM edge, SM apex overlying the coronoid fossa, the central SM nadir, and the apex of the SM insertion overlying the radial fossa and distance from the lateral epicondyle to lateral SM edge along the TEL were measured and further analyzed. Gender and side-to-side statistical comparisons were calculated. Results. The mean age of the subjects was 80.4 years, with six male and five female cadavers. The SM had a distinctive double arched attachment overlying the radial and coronoid fossae. No gender-based or side-to-side quantitative differences were noted. In 18 out of 22 specimens (81.8%, an infolding extension of the SM was observed overlying the medial aspect of the trochlea. The SM did not coincide with the outer fibrous attachment in any specimen. Conclusion. The humeral footprint of the synovial membrane of the anterior elbow capsule is more complex and not as capacious as commonly understood from the current literature. The synovial membrane nadir between the two anterior fossae may help to explain and hence preempt technical difficulties, a reduction in working arthroscopic volume in inflammatory and posttraumatic pathologies. This knowledge should allow the surgeon to approach this aspect of the anterior elbow compartment space with the confidence that detachment of this synovial attachment, to create working space, does not equate to breaching the capsule. Alternatively, stripping the synovial attachment from the anterior humerus does not constitute an anterior capsular release.

  11. Local fibroblast proliferation but not influx is responsible for synovial hyperplasia in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Fumitaka; Saito, Tetsuya [Department of Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) Program, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-0075 (Japan); Kawahata, Kimito [Department of Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan); Ueha, Satoshi; Matsushima, Kouji [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) Program, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-0075 (Japan); Department of Molecular Preventive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Inagaki, Yutaka [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) Program, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-0075 (Japan); Center for Matrix Biology and Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and the Institute of Medical Sciences, Tokai University, 143 Shimo-kasuya, Isehara, Kanagawa, 259-1193 (Japan); Miyasaka, Nobuyuki [Department of Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan); Kohsaka, Hitoshi, E-mail: kohsaka.rheu@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8519 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) Program, Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-0075 (Japan)

    2016-02-12

    Synovial fibroblasts play crucial roles in inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). How they accumulate in the RA joints remains unclear. This study was conducted to discern whether cellular influx from the outside of the joints and local proliferation are responsible for synovial fibroblast accumulation in an animal model of RA. We found that synovial fibroblasts were identified as GFP+ cells using collagen type I alpha 2 (Col1a2)-GFP transgenic reporter mice. Then, bone marrow transplantation and parabiosis techniques were utilized to study the cellular influx. Irradiated wild-type mice were transplanted with bone marrow from Col1a2-GFP mice. Col1a2-GFP and wild-type mice were conjoined for parabiosis. The transplanted mice and the parabionts were subjected to collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA). We found no GFP+ cells in the hyperplastic synovial tissues from the transplanted mice with CAIA and from the wild-type parabionts with CAIA. Furthermore, normal and CAIA synovial tissues from Col1a2-GFP mice and from fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) transgenic mice, in which cells in S/G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle express Azami-Green, were studied for Ki67, a cellular proliferation marker, and vimentin, a fibroblast marker, expression. The percentages of Ki67+/GFP+ and Azami-Green+/vimentin+ cells in the CAIA synovial tissues were higher than those in the untreated synovial tissues (34% vs. 0.40% and 19% vs. 0.26%, respectively). These findings indicate that local fibroblast proliferation but not cellular influx is responsible for the synovial hyperplasia in CAIA. Suppression of proliferation of the local synovial fibroblasts should be a promising treatment for RA. - Highlights: • We studied how synovial fibroblasts accumulate in joints in a murine model of RA. • Bone marrow-derived cells did not accumulate in arthritic joints. • Synovial fibroblasts did not accumulate in arthritic joints via

  12. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  13. Fluid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2001-01-01

    Fluid interaction, interaction by the user with the system that causes few breakdowns, is essential to many user interfaces. We present two concrete software systems that try to support fluid interaction for different work practices. Furthermore, we present specificity, generality, and minimality...... as design goals for fluid interfaces....

  14. Analysis of the cell infiltrate and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases in arthroscopic synovial biopsies: comparison with synovial samples from patients with end stage, destructive rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, T. J. M.; Barg, E. C.; Kraan, M. C.; Smith, M. D.; Breedveld, F. C.; Tak, P. P.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Synovial tissue (ST) from end stage destructive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and arthroscopic biopsies obtained during active inflammation might exhibit different characteristics. Objective: To define the cell infiltrate and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, angiogenic factors,

  15. Fluid dynamics of dilatant fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-01-01

    A dense mixture of granules and liquid often shows a severe shear thickening and is called a dilatant fluid. We construct a fluid dynamics model for the dilatant fluid by introducing a phenomenological state variable for a local state of dispersed particles. With simple assumptions for an equation...

  16. Fluids engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Fluids engineering has played an important role in many applications, from ancient flood control to the design of high-speed compact turbomachinery. New applications of fluids engineering, such as in high-technology materials processing, biotechnology, and advanced combustion systems, have kept up unwaining interest in the subject. More accurate and sophisticated computational and measurement techniques are also constantly being developed and refined. On a more fundamental level, nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior of fluid flow are no longer an intellectual curiosity and fluid engineers are increasingly interested in finding practical applications for these emerging sciences. Applications of fluid technology to new areas, as well as the need to improve the design and to enhance the flexibility and reliability of flow-related machines and devices will continue to spur interest in fluids engineering. The objectives of the present seminar were: to exchange current information on arts, science, and technology of fluids engineering; to promote scientific cooperation between the fluids engineering communities of both nations, and to provide an opportunity for the participants and their colleagues to explore possible joint research programs in topics of high priority and mutual interest to both countries. The Seminar provided an excellent forum for reviewing the current state and future needs of fluids engineering for the two nations. With the Seminar ear-marking the first formal scientific exchange between Korea and the United States in the area of fluids engineering, the scope was deliberately left broad and general

  17. Lunasin Inhibits Cell Proliferation via Apoptosis and Reduces the Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Cultured Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohui Jia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lunasin, a peptide with 43 amino acid residues and initially isolated and identified in soybean cotyledon, has gained extensive attention due to its anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. However, its treatment efficacy on rheumatoid arthritis (RA and corresponding mechanisms have not been reported. Herein, the synovial fibroblasts harvested and isolated from patients with RA were treated with lunasin at various concentrations to examine the proliferation, apoptosis status, and corresponding cell cycle of cultured RA synovial fibroblasts. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanisms of lunasin for RA treatment are explored through Western blot, real-time PCR, ELISA, and luciferase reporter assays. Lunasin significantly inhibited the proliferation and induced the apoptosis of cultured RA synovial fibroblasts. In addition, lunasin reduced the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-8, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3 and suppressed the activation of NF-κB in cultured RA synovial fibroblasts but did not reveal obvious modulation on the secretion and gene expression of MMP-1. Therefore, lunasin will have promising potential as a novel nutritional supplement or drug candidate for RA due to its potency of suppressing synovial cell proliferation and decreasing the production of proinflammatory cytokines and MMPs in synovial cells.

  18. Hypoxia enhances proliferation through increase of colony formation rate with chondrogenic potential in primary synovial mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Toshiyuki; Muneta, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Matsukura, Yu; Ichinose, Shizuko; Koga, Hideyuki; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for cartilage and meniscus regeneration. Use of primary MSCs is the preferable because these cells are safer than cells passaged several times in terms of probability of chromosome abnormalities. The effect of hypoxia on the proliferation of MSCs is controversial and remains unknown in primary synovial MSCs. Primary synovial MSCs were cultured at normoxia or hypoxia, and colony number, cell number, surface epitopes, mitochondria activity, TEM finding, and chondrogenic potential were analyzed. To investigate the effect of hypoxia on attachment of synovial MSCs, cells were cultured at hypoxia for the first 3 days, then cultured at normoxia. To investigate the effect of hypoxia on proliferation, cells were also cultured at hypoxia for the last 11 days. Hypoxia increased colony number and cell number per dish in primary synovial MSCs. Hypoxia did not affect cell number per colony, surface epitopes, mitochondria activity, TEM finding or chondrogenic potential. Hypoxia for the first 3 days did not alter colony number per dish or cell number per dish, while hypoxia for the last 11 days increased. Hypoxia enhanced proliferation through increase of colony formation rate with chondrogenic potential in primary synovial MSCs.

  19. Fluid machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jae Hyeon; Son, Byeong Jin

    2001-04-01

    This book tells of definition and classification of fluid machinery, energy equation of incompressible fluid, principle of momentum, classification and structure of pump, size, safety of centrifugal pump, theory and operation of contraction pump, reciprocating pump, rotary pump, special pump, using of water power, classification of water turbine, impulse water turbine, reaction water turbine, pump water turbine, liquid movement apparatus, fluid type control machinery and solid and gas type pneumatic machine.

  20. Autotaxin expression from synovial fibroblasts is essential for the pathogenesis of modeled arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitopoulou, Ioanna; Oikonomou, Nikos; Karouzakis, Emmanuel; Sevastou, Ioanna; Nikolaidou-Katsaridou, Nefeli; Zhao, Zhenwen; Mersinias, Vassilis; Armaka, Maria; Xu, Yan; Masu, Masayuki; Mills, Gordon B.; Gay, Steffen; Kollias, George

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a destructive arthropathy characterized by chronic synovial inflammation that imposes a substantial socioeconomic burden. Under the influence of the proinflammatory milieu, synovial fibroblasts (SFs), the main effector cells in disease pathogenesis, become activated and hyperplastic, releasing proinflammatory factors and tissue-remodeling enzymes. This study shows that activated arthritic SFs from human patients and animal models express significant quantities of autotaxin (ATX; ENPP2), a lysophospholipase D that catalyzes the conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). ATX expression from SFs was induced by TNF, and LPA induced SF activation and effector functions in synergy with TNF. Conditional genetic ablation of ATX in mesenchymal cells, including SFs, resulted in disease attenuation in animal models of arthritis, establishing the ATX/LPA axis as a novel player in chronic inflammation and the pathogenesis of arthritis and a promising therapeutic target. PMID:22493518

  1. Different approaches to synovial membrane volume determination by magnetic resonance imaging: manual versus automated segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel

    1997-01-01

    Automated fast (5-20 min) synovial membrane volume determination by MRI, based on pre-set post-gadolinium-DTPA enhancement thresholds, was evaluated as a substitute for a time-consuming (45-120 min), previously validated, manual segmentation method. Twenty-nine knees [rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 13...... values of the automated estimates were extremely dependent on the threshold chosen. At the optimal threshold of 45%, the median numerical difference from SynMan was 7 ml (17%) in knees and 2 ml (25%) in wrists. At this threshold, the difference was not related to diagnosis, clinical inflammation...... or synovial membrane volume, e.g. no systematic errors were found. The inter-MRI variation, evaluated in three knees and three wrists, was higher than by manual segmentation, particularly due to sensitivity to malalignment artefacts. Examination of test objects proved the high accuracy of the general...

  2. Clinical, epidemiological and endoscopic characteristics of the synovial plica in patients with arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliste Manzano, Osvaldo; Morasen Cuevas, Ricardo; Fresneda Labori, Ramon; Matamoros Rodriguez, Adis

    2011-01-01

    A prospective study of patients with surgical treatment of the knee through arthroscopy was carried out at the Rheumatology Service, belonging to 'Saturnino Lora' Teaching Clinical Surgical Provincial Hospital from Santiago de Cuba during the years 2000-2009; a decade in which 663 knees were surgically treated and, 208 due to a synovial plica. This last one turned out to be the most frequent disease, with predominance in the female sex and the ages from 16 to 25 years. There was a marked clinicoarthroscopic correspondence. Preoperative diagnosis consisted of lesion of the internal meniscus, chondromalacia patellae and synovitis, reason why they should be kept in mind as differential diagnosis in this syndrome. The way of healing the surgical section of the synovial plica is the cause of symptomatic relapse and surgical reintervention, as it happened in the patients of the case material 54,0 %, mainly attributable to fibrosis in the wound area.(author)

  3. The surprising outcome of a giant primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balieiro, Marcos Alexandre; Lopes, Agnaldo José; Costa, Bruno Pinheiro; Veras, Gustavo Perissé Moreira; Perelson, Paulo Sergio; Acatauassú Nunes, Rodolfo; Saito, Eduardo Haruo

    2013-02-01

    There are only a few cases of primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma in the literature. Normally, they do not respond well to chemotherapy. In our case, a 30-year-old patient was admitted due to thoracic pain, dyspnea, orthopnea, cough, hoarseness and weight loss over a 3-month period as well as a dramatic worsening a week before the admission. A chest radiography showed a completely white left hemithorax and contralateral mediastinal shift; in addition, a chest tomography revealed a giant heterogeneous mediastinal mass, lung atelectasia and a small pleural effusion. The patient was submitted to Chamberlain procedure (biopsy) under local anesthesia and the diagnosis of a synovial sarcoma was obtained after immunohistochemical analysis. Due to his poor general condition, he received chemotherapy first, with a dramatic response, after what, the mass that had been reduced was removed surgically. After a 5-year- follow-up period there are no signs of disease recurrence.

  4. Synovial Plica Syndrome of the Knee: A Commonly Overlooked Cause of Anterior Knee Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Paul Yuh Feng; Nixion, Amy; Chandratreya, Amit; Murray, Judith M.

    2017-01-01

    Synovial plica syndrome (SPS) occurs in the knee, when an otherwise normal structure becomes a source of pain due to injury or overuse. Patients may present to general practitioners, physiotherapists, or surgeons with anterior knee pain with or without mechanical symptoms, and the diagnosis can sometimes be difficult. Several studies have examined the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of SPS. We review these resources to provide an evidence-based guide to the diagnosis and treatment of S...

  5. Distinguishing multiple rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis from synovial chondromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Albert; Wong, Lun-Yick; Sheu, Chin-Yin; Chen, Be-Fong

    2002-01-01

    Multiple rice body formation is a complication of chronic bursitis. Although it resembles synovial chondromatosis clinically and on imaging, the literature suggests that analysis of radiographic and MR appearances should allow discrimination. We report the imaging findings in a 41-year-old man presenting with rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis. We found that the signal intensity of the rice bodies is helpful in making the diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. Distinguishing multiple rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis from synovial chondromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Albert; Wong, Lun-Yick; Sheu, Chin-Yin [Department of Radiology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Chen, Be-Fong [Department of Pathology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2002-02-01

    Multiple rice body formation is a complication of chronic bursitis. Although it resembles synovial chondromatosis clinically and on imaging, the literature suggests that analysis of radiographic and MR appearances should allow discrimination. We report the imaging findings in a 41-year-old man presenting with rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis. We found that the signal intensity of the rice bodies is helpful in making the diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Development of a Lubricant Therapy to Prevent Development of Osteoarthritis after Acute Injury of Synovial Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The UCSD IACUC animal protocol (#S10018) was updated to include 3 doses of chelation therapy based on preliminary ​in vitro​ cytotoxicity...development has the project provided? Undergraduate and graduate students were trained in animal procedures, biochemical...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0562 TITLE: Development of a Lubricant Therapy to Prevent Development of Osteoarthritis after Acute Injury of Synovial

  8. Synovial DKK1 expression is regulated by local glucocorticoid metabolism in inflammatory arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hardy, Rowan; Juarez, Maria; Naylor, Amy; Tu, Jinwen; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H; Filer, Andrew; Stewart, Paul M; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Inflammatory arthritis is associated with increased bone resorption and suppressed bone formation. The Wnt antagonist dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is secreted by synovial fibroblasts in response to inflammation and this protein has been proposed to be a master regulator of bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis. Local glucocorticoid production is also significantly increased during joint inflammation. Therefore, we investigated how locally derived glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytok...

  9. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from osteoarthritis patient-derived synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Son, Myung Jin; Son, Mi-Young; Seol, Binna; Kim, Janghwan; Park, Jongjin; Kim, Jung Hwa; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Su A; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Kang-Sik; Han, Yong-Mahn; Chang, Jae-Suk; Cho, Yee Sook

    2011-10-01

    This study was undertaken to generate and characterize human induced pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and to examine whether these cells can be developed into disease-relevant cell types for use in disease modeling and drug discovery. Human synovial cells isolated from two 71-year-old women with advanced OA were characterized and reprogrammed into induced PSCs by ectopic expression of 4 transcription factors (Oct-4, SOX2, Klf4, and c-Myc). The pluripotency status of each induced PSC line was validated by comparison with human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We found that OA patient-derived human synovial cells had human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like characteristics, as indicated by the expression of specific markers, including CD14-, CD19-, CD34-, CD45-, CD44+, CD51+, CD90+, CD105+, and CD147+. Microarray analysis of human MSCs and human synovial cells further determined their unique and overlapping gene expression patterns. The pluripotency of established human induced PSCs was confirmed by their human ESC-like morphology, expression of pluripotency markers, gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, normal karyotype, and in vitro and in vivo differentiation potential. The potential of human induced PSCs to differentiate into distinct mesenchymal cell lineages, such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes, was further confirmed by positive expression of markers for respective cell types and positive staining with alizarin red S (osteoblasts), oil red O (adipocytes), or Alcian blue (chondrocytes). Functional chondrocyte differentiation of induced PSCs in pellet culture and 3-dimensional polycaprolactone scaffold culture was assessed by chondrocyte self-assembly and histology. Our findings indicate that patient-derived synovial cells are an attractive source of MSCs as well as induced PSCs and have the potential to advance cartilage tissue engineering and cell-based models of cartilage defects. Copyright © 2011 by the

  10. Transplantation of autologous synovial mesenchymal stem cells promotes meniscus regeneration in aged primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shimpei; Muneta, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Koga, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Sotome, Shinichi; Okawa, Atsushi; Kiuchi, Shinji; Ono, Hideo; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2017-06-01

    Transplantation of aggregates of synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) enhanced meniscus regeneration in rats. Anatomy and biological properties of the meniscus depend on animal species. To apply this technique clinically, it is valuable to investigate the use of animals genetically close to humans. We investigated whether transplantation of aggregates of autologous synovial MSCs promoted meniscal regeneration in aged primates. Chynomolgus primates between 12 and 13 years old were used. After the anterior halves of the medial menisci in both knees were removed, an average of 14 aggregates consisting of 250,000 synovial MSCs were transplanted onto the meniscus defect. No aggregates were transplanted to the opposite knee for the control. Meniscus and articular cartilage were analyzed macroscopically, histologically, and by MRI T1rho mapping at 8 (n = 3) and 16 weeks (n = 4). The medial meniscus was larger and the modified Pauli's histological score for the regenerated meniscus was better in the MSC group than in the control group in each primate at 8 and 16 weeks. Mankin's score for the medial femoral condyle cartilage was better in the MSC group than in the control group in all primates at 16 weeks. T1rho value for both the regenerated meniscus and adjacent articular cartilage in the MSC group was closer to the normal meniscus than in the control group in all primates at 16 weeks. Transplantation of aggregates of autologous synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration and delayed progression of degeneration of articular cartilage in aged primates. This is the first report dealing with meniscus regeneration in primates. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1274-1282, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Synovial sarcoma presenting with huge mediastinal mass: a case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Salah, Samer; Al-Ibraheem, Akram; Daboor, Amal; Al-Hussaini, Maysa

    2013-01-01

    Background Synovial sarcoma presenting in the mediastinum is exceedingly rare. Furthermore, data addressing optimal therapy is limited. Herein we present a case where an attempt to downsize the tumor to a resectable state with chemotherapy was employed. Case presentation A 32 year female presented with massive pericardial effusion and unresectable huge mediastinal mass. Computed axial tomography scan - guided biopsy with adjunctive immunostains and molecular studies confirmed a diagnosis of s...

  12. Sciatica as the first manifestation of synovial sarcoma. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnosis; Sciatique revelatrice d`un synovialosarcome. Interet de l`IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillard, E.; Le Dantec, P.; Chales, G.; Jean, S.; Pawlotsky, Y. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 35 - Rennes (France)

    1995-07-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with paralyzing sciatica as the first manifestation of synovial sarcoma of his right leg. Although neurologic symptoms sometimes occur as manifestations of synovial sarcoma, they are exceptionally inaugural. Magnetic resonance imaging is a valuable tool in patients with synovial tumors, both for establishing the diagnosis and for evaluating the extent of the lesion. (authors). 13 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Anatomical Basis and Clinical Application of Synovial Flaps in the Wrist and Distal Forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colen, David L; Yeh, Jiun-Ting; Colen, Lawrence B

    2017-05-01

    Neuropathic symptoms after median nerve repair at the wrist or secondary to refractory carpal tunnel syndrome may become debilitating. These symptoms develop because of perineural adhesions, intraneural fibrosis, and fixation of the nerve to the transverse carpal ligament after surgery, and often require neurolysis. Interposition of vascularized soft tissue over the median nerve at the time of neurolysis prevents recurrence of such adhesions. The synovial flap, fashioned from the synovial lining of the flexor tendon sheath, is an ideal tissue for this purpose. Previous authors have described the surgical technique of the synovial flap, but the anatomical basis and design of the flap have not been previously discussed. Twenty fresh cadaver upper extremities were injected with Microfil to analyze the arterial anatomy, flap dimensions, and arc of rotation of the flexor tendon synovium mobilized as a flap suitable for coverage of the median nerve at the wrist. The authors determined that both radial and ulnar-based flaps are clinically useful for providing coverage in the wrist and distal forearm. This flap was used in 18 patients with complicated median nerve lesions in this region. All patients had an uncomplicated postoperative course. Of 13 patients treated for posttraumatic median nerve neuromas, all but two had significant resolution of symptoms. When used as a vascularized flap, the flexor tendon synovium provides adequate protection of the median nerve. Flap dimensions and vascularity of this tissue make it an ideal local flap option when performing reoperative surgery on the median nerve.

  14. Photodynamic therapy with ATX-S10.Na(II) inhibits synovial sarcoma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Ken; Kunisada, Toshiyuki; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Nakae, Yoshinori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2008-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective cancer treatment modality that allows selective destruction of malignant tumor cells. We asked whether PDT could inhibit in vivo and in vitro growth of synovial sarcoma cells. We analyzed PDT using ATX-S10.Na(II) and a diode laser for a synovial sarcoma cell line (SYO-1). Photodynamic therapy with ATX-S10.Na(II) showed an in vitro cytotoxic effect on the cultured SYO-1 cells. The in vitro effect of PDT depended on the treatment concentration of ATX-S10.Na(II) and the laser dose of irradiation. ATX-S10.Na(II) was detected in the tumor tissue specimens that were excised from nude mice bearing SYO-1 within 6 hours after intravenous injection, but it was eliminated from the tumor 12 hours after injection. Photodynamic therapy suppressed the tumor growth of nude mice bearing SYO-1, and high-dose irradiation induced no viable tumor cells in histologic specimens. Photodynamic therapy performed after marginal resection of the tumor of nude mice bearing SYO-1 reduced the rate of local recurrence of the tumor. Our results suggest PDT using ATX-S10.Na(II) and laser irradiation may be a potentially useful treatment for synovial sarcoma, especially to reduce the surgical margin and preserve critical anatomic structures adjacent to the tumor.

  15. Synovial sarcoma presenting with huge mediastinal mass: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Samer; Al-Ibraheem, Akram; Daboor, Amal; Al-Hussaini, Maysa

    2013-06-25

    Synovial sarcoma presenting in the mediastinum is exceedingly rare. Furthermore, data addressing optimal therapy is limited. Herein we present a case where an attempt to downsize the tumor to a resectable state with chemotherapy was employed. A 32 year female presented with massive pericardial effusion and unresectable huge mediastinal mass. Computed axial tomography scan - guided biopsy with adjunctive immunostains and molecular studies confirmed a diagnosis of synovial sarcoma. Following three cycles of combination Ifosfamide and doxorubicin chemotherapy, no response was demonstrated. The patient refused further therapy and had progression of her disease 4 months following the last cycle. Synovial sarcoma presenting with unresectable mediastinal mass carry a poor prognosis. Up to the best of our knowledge there are only four previous reports where primary chemotherapy was employed, unfortunately; none of these cases had subsequent complete surgical resection. Identification of the best treatment strategy for patients with unresectable disease is warranted. Our case can be of benefit to medical oncologists and thoracic surgeons who might be faced with this unique and exceedingly rare clinical scenario.

  16. Yields and chondrogenic potential of primary synovial mesenchymal stem cells are comparable between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Yuji; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Ozeki, Nobutake; Katano, Hisako; Komori, Keiichiro; Fujii, Shizuka; Otabe, Koji; Horie, Masafumi; Koga, Hideyuki; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Matsumoto, Mikio; Kaneko, Haruka; Takazawa, Yuji; Muneta, Takeshi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2017-05-16

    Mesenchymal stem cells derived from the synovial membrane (synovial MSCs) are a candidate cell source for regenerative medicine of cartilage and menisci due to their high chondrogenic ability. Regenerative medicine can be expected for RA patients with the inflammation well-controlled as well as OA patients and transplantation of synovial MSCs would also be a possible therapeutic treatment. Some properties of synovial MSCs vary dependent on the diseases patients have, and whether or not the pathological condition of RA affects the chondrogenesis of synovial MSCs remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare the properties of primary synovial MSCs between RA and OA patients. Human synovial tissue was harvested during total knee arthroplasty from the knee joints of eight patients with RA and OA respectively. Synovial nucleated cells were cultured for 14 days. Total cell yields, surface markers, and differentiation potentials were analyzed for primary synovial MSCs. Nucleated cell number per 1 mg synovium was 8.4 ± 3.9 thousand in RA and 8.0 ± 0.9 thousand in OA. Total cell number after 14-day culture/1 mg synovium was 0.7 ± 0.4 million in RA and 0.5 ± 0.3 million in OA, showing no significant difference between in RA and OA. Cells after 14-day culture were mostly positive for CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, negative for CD45 both in RA and OA. There was no significant difference for the cartilage pellet weight and sGAG content per pellet between in RA and OA. Both oil red O-positive colony rate and alizarin red-positive colony rate were similar in RA and OA. Yields, surface markers and chondrogenic potential of primary synovial MSCs in RA were comparable to those in OA. Synovium derived from RA patients can be the cell source of MSCs for cartilage and meniscus regeneration.

  17. Schroedinger fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, K.K.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of nuclear internal flow and collective inertia, the difference of this flow from that of a classical fluid, and the approach of this flow to rigid flow in independent-particle model rotation are elucidated by reviewing the theory of Schroedinger fluid and its implications for collective vibration and rotation. (author)

  18. Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University.......These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University....

  19. Adiponectin aggravates bone erosion by promoting osteopontin production in synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jie; Xu, Lingxiao; Sun, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Yani; Xuan, Wenhua; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Pengfei; Wu, Qin; Liu, Rui; Che, Nan; Wang, Fang; Tan, Wenfeng; Zhang, Miaojia

    2018-02-08

    We have previously reported that adiponectin (AD), an adipokine that is secreted by adipocytes, correlates well with progressive bone erosion in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The exact mechanism of AD in promoting joint destruction remains unclear. Osteopontin (OPN) is required for osteoclast recruitment. We hypothesized that AD exacerbates bone erosion by inducing OPN expression in synovial tissue. This study aimed to evaluate a novel role for AD in RA. The serum levels of AD and OPN were determined in 38 patients with RA, 40 patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and 20 healthy controls using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). AD and OPN production were measured by double immunofluorescence in RA and OA synovial tissue. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression levels of OPN in RA synovial fibroblasts (RASFs) and OA synovial fibroblasts after pre-incubation with AD, respectively. Migration of the RAW264.7 osteoclast precursor cell line was assessed using the Transwell migration assay and co-culture system. Bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis were assessed by immunohistochemical staining, microcomputed tomography and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining in AD-treated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice with or without OPN silencing. The expression levels of OPN and integrin α v β 3 in the ankle joint tissues of the mice were examined by double immunofluorescence. Our results indicated that the AD and OPN expression levels increased noticeably and were associated with each other in the RA serum. The AD distribution was coincident with that of OPN in the RA synovial tissue. AD stimulation of RASFs increased OPN production in a dose-dependent manner. AD-treated RASFs promoted RAW264.7 cell migration, and the effect was blocked with a specific antibody against OPN. Silencing of OPN using lentiviral-OPN short hairpin RNA reduced the number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts and the extent

  20. Chikungunya virus exploits miR-146a to regulate NF-κB pathway in human synovial fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakthi Priya Selvamani

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Chikungunya virus causes chronic infection with manifestations of joint pain. Human synovial fibroblasts get infected with CHIKV and could lead to pro-inflammatory responses. MicroRNAs have potentials to regulate the gene expression of various anti-viral and pro-inflammatory genes. The study aims to investigate the role of miR-146a in modulation of inflammatory responses of human synovial fibroblasts by Chikungunya virus. METHODS: To study the role of miR-146a in CHIKV pathogenesis in human synovial cells and underlying inflammatory manifestations, we performed CHIKV infection in primary human synovial fibroblasts. Western blotting, real-time PCR, luciferase reporter assay, overexpression and knockdown of cellular miR-146a strategies have been employed to validate the role of miR-146a in regulation of pro-inflammatory NF-κB pathway. RESULTS: CHIKV infection induced the expression of cellular miR-146a, which resulted into down-regulation of TRAF6, IRAK1, IRAK2 and increased replication of CHIKV in human synovial fibroblasts. Exogenous expression of miR-146a in human synovial fibroblasts led to decreased expression of TRAF6, IRAK1, IRAK2 and decreased replication of CHIKV. Inhibition of cellular miR-146a by anti-miR-146a restored the expression levels of TRAF6, IRAK1 and IRAK2. Downregulation of TRAF6, IRAK1 and IRAK2 led to downstream decreased NF-κB activation through negative feedback loop. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated the mechanism of exploitation of cellular miR-146a by CHIKV in modulating the host antiviral immune response in primary human synovial fibroblasts.

  1. Primary pulmonary and mediastinal synovial sarcoma: a clinicopathologic study of 60 cases and comparison with five prior series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartel, Paul H; Fanburg-Smith, Julie C; Frazier, Aletta A; Galvin, Jeffrey R; Lichy, Jack H; Shilo, Konstantin; Franks, Teri J

    2007-07-01

    Primary pulmonary and mediastinal synovial sarcoma is rare and poses a diagnostic challenge particularly when unusual histological features are present. We present 60 cases of primary pulmonary and mediastinal synovial sarcoma (29 male and 27 female subjects; mean age, 42 years) and compare our results with five prior series to better define unusual histological features. Clinically, patients with mediastinal synovial sarcoma were younger with a male gender bias. Radiologically, tumors were well delineated with distinctive magnetic resonance imaging features and little vascular enhancement. In all, 21/46 patients died of disease within 5 years. Histologically, all tumors had dense cellularity, interlacing fascicles, hyalinized stroma, and mast cell influx. Hemangiopericytoma-like vasculature (48/60), focal myxoid change (30/60), and entrapped pneumocytes (23/60) were seen. Calcification was not prevalent (10/60). Unusual histological features included Verocay body-like formations (7/60), vague rosettes (6/60), well-formed papillary structures (3/60), adenomatoid change (3/60), and rhabdoid morphology (2/60). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated expression of pancytokeratin (39/58), epithelial membrane antigen (29/53), cytokeratin 7 (26/40), cytokeratin 5/6 (5/7), calretinin (15/23), CD99 (19/23), bcl-2 (24/24), CD56 (11/11), S-100 (9/51), and smooth muscle actin (8/32). In total, 92% (36/39) of primary pulmonary and mediastinal synovial sarcomas studied were positive for t(x;18). In conclusion, our study confirms the clinical, histological, immunohistochemical, and molecular data from previous large series of primary pulmonary and mediastinal synovial sarcoma. Compared with soft tissue synovial sarcoma, primary pulmonary and mediastinal synovial sarcoma has less calcification, less obvious mast cell influx, and less radiologic vascularity, but similar magnetic resonance imaging features, percentage of poorly differentiated tumors, and number of t(x;18)-positive tumors

  2. KNEE CARTILAGE AND SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE STRUCTURAL CHANGES DURING TIBIA DISTRACTION WITH PLATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Stupina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study — to analyze the changes in knee articular cartilage and synovial membrane during distraction external fixation of the tibia in combination with plating.Material and methods. Articular cartilage and synovial membrane of the knee joint were studied using histomorphometry methods in 9 mongrel dogs during distraction external fixation of the tibia combined with plating. Tibia and fibula osteotomies were performed at the border of middle and upper third, plate was fixed on tibia diaphysis. Lengthening was achieved at rate of 1 mm per day in four stages during 21–28 days. Animals were withdrawn from experiment in 30 and 90 days. After autopsy of knee joints the authors excised sections of synovial membrane from suprapatellar area, articular cartilage with underlying subchondral bone from loadable surface of femoral condyles. Thickness of articular cartilage, its area and volumetric density of chondrocytes was measured, proportion of chondrocytes within isogenic groups from the overall number of chondrocytes as well as proportion of empty lacunae. In synovial membrane the authors measured thickness of surface layer and numeric density of micro vessels. Articular cartilage of 5 intact animals was used as a control group.Results. After 30 days of plate fixation a hyperplasia of the integument layer, mild synovitis, and hypervascularization were observed in synovial membrane. Density of micro vessels increased to 363.93±33.71 (control group — 335.05±28.88. The authors also observed subperineural and endoneural edema as well as destruction of nerve fibers in subsynovial layer. Articular cartilage retained the zonal structure. Destructive changes were manifested by fibers separation in the superficial part of surface zone and by partial loss of chondrocytes. The following parameters were reduced: cartilage thickness, area and volumetric density of chondrocytes, proportion of isogenic groups; empty lacunae exceeded the values in

  3. Review of Prospects of Biological Fluid Biomarkers in Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lich Thi; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Saibaba, Balaji; Ahn, Moo-Eob; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2017-03-12

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease of the joints and is one of the leading causes of disability in adults. However, there are no key therapeutics for OA and medical treatment is based on managing the symptoms and slowing down progression of the disease. Diagnostics based on clinical examination and radiography have provided little information about metabolic changes in joint tissues, disease onset and progression. Due to lack of effective methods for early detection and evaluation of treatment outcome, the measurement of biochemical markers (biomarkers) shows promise as a prospective method aiding in disease monitoring. OA biomarkers that are present in biological fluids such as blood, urine and synovial fluid, sources that are easily isolated from body, are of particular interest. Moreover, there are increasingly more studies identifying and developing new biomarkers for OA. In this review, efforts have been made to summarize the biomarkers that have been reported in recent studies on patients. We also tried to classify biomarkers according to tissue metabolism (bone, cartilage and synovial metabolism markers), pathological pathways (inflammatory and genetic markers) and biological function (chemokines, growth factors, acute phase proteins, etc.).

  4. Tenosynovial (Extra-articular) Chondromatosis of the Extensor Digitorum Longus Tendon and Synovial Chondromatosis of the Ankle: Treated by Extensor Digitorum Longus Tendoscopy and Ankle Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare pathology in the foot and ankle region. We present a case of concomitant tenosynovial chondromatosis of the extensor digitorum longus tendon and synovial chondromatosis of the ankle, which was successfully treated by extensor digitorum tendon tendoscopy and ankle arthroscopy. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case study. © 2014 The Author(s).

  5. Synovial sarcoma in children and adolescents: the European Pediatric Soft Tissue Sarcoma Study Group prospective trial (EpSSG NRSTS 2005)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, A.; de Salvo, G. L.; Brennan, B.; van Noesel, M. M.; de Paoli, A.; Casanova, M.; Francotte, N.; Kelsey, A.; Alaggio, R.; Oberlin, O.; Carli, M.; Ben-Arush, M.; Bergeron, C.; Merks, J. H. M.; Jenney, M.; Stevens, M. C.; Bisogno, G.; Orbach, D.

    2015-01-01

    To report the results of the first European prospective nonrandomized trial dedicated to pediatric synovial sarcoma. From August 2005 to August 2012, 138 patients <21 years old with nonmetastatic synovial sarcoma were registered in 9 different countries (and 60 centers). Patients were treated with a

  6. Synovial haemangioma of the knee joint: an unusual cause of knee pain in a 14-month old girl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, D.W.; Rasheed, S. [KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); Tan, T.J. [Changi General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Singapore (Singapore)

    2016-06-15

    We report a histologically proven case of synovial haemangioma of the knee in a 14-month old girl who presented to the emergency department with an acute 1-day history of refusing to weight-bear on the right leg and a preceding 3-week history of a right knee lump. Physical examination revealed a non-tender, soft lump over the lateral infrapatellar region. Radiographs revealed a poorly defined soft tissue density over the infrapatellar fat pad and a suprapatellar joint effusion. Ultrasound was used to confirm the presence of a vascular soft tissue mass compatible with a synovial haemangioma within the infrapatellar fat pad which showed both intra-articular and extra-articular extension. There was good correlation of the ultrasound findings with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), highlighting the potential clinical utility of ultrasound as an alternative imaging modality in establishing the pre-operative diagnosis and extent of a synovial haemangioma about the knee joint. (orig.)

  7. The relative composition of the inflammatory infiltrate as an additional tool for synovial tissue classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Della Beffa

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Traditionally, differences in absolute numbers of cells expressing a certain marker (e.g., positive staining cells per mm² have been used in immunohistological synovial tissue classification. We have begun to evaluate the relative composition of the inflammatory infiltrates, i.e. percentages of inflammatory cell types in inflammatory infiltrates, as an alternate classification tool that may potentially improve tissue diagnostics, subgrouping in clinical trials, and understanding of pathogenesis of inflammatory and noninflammatory arthropathies. METHODS: Synovial tissue specimens (normal synovium, n=15; orthopedic arthropathies, n=6; osteoarthritis, n=26; early undifferentiated arthritis, n=10; rheumatoid arthritis, n=26; chronic septic arthritis, n=11 were stained for CD15, CD68, CD3, CD20, and CD38. Densities of cells expressing a given marker were determined in the superficial subintima. Binary and multicategory receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis and naïve Bayes classifier were used to compare the abilities of (1 the absolute densities of cells expressing a given marker (absolute method with (2 the percentages of these cells in the inflammatory cell population (relative method to differentiate among the six tissue classes. RESULTS: The inflammatory infiltrates in normal synovium and the orthopedic arthropathies consisted almost exclusively of CD68+ and CD3+ cells. Notable fractions of CD20+ and CD38+ cells appeared in a subset of osteoarthritis samples, and increased further in early, rheumatoid and chronic septic arthritis. ROC analyses and naïve Bayes classifier ranked the absolute method above the relative method in terms of overall discriminatory ability. The relative method became slightly superior when the samples were also stratified according to the total number of inflammatory cells/mm². CONCLUSIONS: This exploratory investigation featuring a variety of joint disorders revealed that measuring the relative

  8. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Inflammatory Rheumatoid Synovial Tissues Using Anti-Human Podoplanin Monoclonal Antibody Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomoto; Takakubo, Yuya; Oki, Hiroharu; Liu, Xing; Honma, Ryusuke; Naganuma, Yasushi; Goodman, Stuart B; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari; Takagi, Michiaki

    2018-02-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is a transmembrane sialoglycoprotein, which is expressed in several normal tissues and malignant tumors. Although PDPN expression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been reported, the role of PDPN in RA and other arthritic conditions has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined PDPN expression in inflammatory synovial tissues using an anti-human PDPN (hPDPN) monoclonal antibody (mAb) panel to select the most useful one for evaluation of synovitis. Synovial tissue samples were obtained from 11 RA patients and 9 osteoarthritis (OA) patients undergoing joint surgery. PDPN-positive cells were immunostained by a panel of PDPN mAbs (NZ-1, LpMab-3, LpMab-7, LpMab-10, LpMab-12, LpMab-13, and LpMab-17), followed by cell grading of inflammation and cell counting of PDPN-positivity by a quantitative analyzer. Immunohistochemistry showed that PDPN was markedly expressed in both macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B lining cells of the hyperplastic synovial lining cell layer, and macrophages and fibroblasts in the stroma of RA. Among anti-PDPN mAbs, LpMab-12 showed the highest score. In inflammatory OA synovium, PDPN expression was also detectable. Although LpMab-12 also showed the highest score in OA, the difference was not statistically significant. The inflammatory synovitis score of RA was significantly higher than that of OA. PDPN was expressed in inflammatory lining cells and sublining stroma of RA and OA synovium. In the seven anti-hPDPN antibodies examined, LpMab-12 was the most stainable antibody for PDPN in RA synovitis. Thus, LpMab-12 for PDPN has a possible and promising specific biomarker for evaluating synovitis in RA and inflammatory OA.

  9. Lumbar spine joint synovial cysts of intraspinal development. CT scan imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallee, C.; Chevrot, A.; Benhamouda, M.

    1987-01-01

    CT scan imaging findings are described in 22 patients with lumbar spine joint synovial cysts, of intraspinal development, provoking sciatica or lumbosciatica from nerve compression in spinal canal. Diagnosis was suggested by a mass at the posterior joint level, of variable density, sometimes with peripheral calcification, presenting a vacuum appearance on occasions, and with enhanced image with contrast. Differential diagnosis is from excluded hernia and postoperative fibrosis. Posterior intra-articular arthrography can confirm diagnosis and allow treatment with prolonged action corticoid infiltrations [fr

  10. Synovial explant inflammatory mediator production corresponds to rheumatoid arthritis imaging hallmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin; Boesen, Mikael; Ellegaard, Karen

    2014-01-01

    was to compare site-specific release of inflammatory mediators and evaluate the corresponding anatomical sites by examining colour Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) and MRI scans. METHODS: RA patients were evaluated on the basis of CDUS and 3-T MRI scans and subsequently underwent synovectomy using a needle arthroscopic...... procedure of the hand joints. The synovial tissue specimens were incubated for 72 hours, and spontaneous release of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β) and IL-8 was measured by performing multiplex immunoassays. Bone marrow oedema...

  11. Different approaches to synovial membrane volume determination by magnetic resonance imaging: manual versus automated segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel

    1997-01-01

    methodology for volume determinations (maximal error 6.3%). Preceded by the determination of reproducibility and the optimal threshold at the available MR unit, automated 'threshold' segmentation appears to be acceptable when changes rather than absolute values of synovial membrane volumes are most important......, osteoarthritis (OA) 16] and 17 RA wrists were examined. At enhancement thresholds between 30 and 60%, the automated volumes (Syn(x%)) were highly significantly correlated to manual volumes (SynMan) (knees: rho = 0.78-0.91, P 6)). The absolute...

  12. Synovial cysts of the hip joint and iliopsoas bursitis: A spectrum of imaging abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.; Greenway, G.

    1985-01-01

    Synovium-related soft tissue disease around the hip constitutes a spectrum ranging from isolated iliopsoas bursitis to pure articular synovial herniations without bursal involvement. The clinical, pathologic, and radiographic features of these entities are discussed as they pertain to the variety of underlying disorder which predispose to their occurrence. Nine case reports are utilized to illustrate the variable clinical and radiographic presentations which may be encountered. Based upon these cases as well as those in the literature, an imaging algorithm has been developed which should eliminate unnecessary studies and allow prompt and accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. In-vitro chondrogenic potential of synovial stem cells and chondrocytes allocated for autologous chondrocyte implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubosch, Eva Johanna; Heidt, Emanuel; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The use of passaged chondrocytes is the current standard for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). De-differentiation due to amplification and donor site morbidity are known drawbacks highlighting the need for alternative cell sources. Methods: Via clinically validated flow cytometry...... analysis, we compared the expression of human stem cell and cartilage markers (collagen type 2 (Col2), aggrecan (ACAN), CD44) of chondrocytes (CHDR), passaged chondrocytes for ACI (CellGenix™), bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), and synovial derived stem cells (SDSC). Results: Primary...

  14. Measurement of synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis with technetium 99m labelled human polyclonal immunoglobulin G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubbe, P.A.H.M. van der; Breedveld, F.C.; Rijksuniversiteit Leiden; Arndt, J.W.; Calame, W.; Ferreira, T.C.; Pauwels, E.K.J.

    1991-01-01

    The ability of technetium 99m labelled non-specific, polyclonal human immunoglobulin G ( 99m Tc-IgG) scintigraphy to depict and quantify synovial inflammation was studied in patients with rheumatoid arhritis (RA). Eight patients with clinically active synovitis were injected with 350 MBq 99m Tc-IgG, and imaging took place 4 h later. This resulted in excellent images of inflamed synovium. Significant correlations were observed between individual joint uptake on the scan and scores for joint pain (n=316, p 99m Tc-IgG scintigraphy may provide an objective, non-invasive test to detect and measure synovitis. (orig.)

  15. Localization of surfactant protein-D in the rheumatoid synovial membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Friesgaard; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Junker, Kirsten

    2018-01-01

    Surfactant protein-D (SP-D) is a collectin, which plays an important role in airway protection and inflammation. The molecule has both pro- and anti-inflammatory capacities depending on its molecular size. Its involvement in joint diseases is largely unknown and the aim of this investigation...... and subsequently prepared for immunohistochemistry. In this first, small-scale comparative study on the occurrence of SP-D in the synovial membrane of RA and OA, we report that SP-D was only present in the microvascular endothelium in subsynovial and pannus tissue and that the immunostaining was much stronger than...

  16. Primary monophasic mediastinal, cardiac and pericardial synovial sarcoma: a young man in distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zwaan, C; Bekkers, S C A M; van Garsse, L A F M; Jansen, R L H; van Suylen, R J

    2007-01-01

    A 19-year-old male was admitted because of exertional dyspnoea. The imaging studies revealed epicardial, pericardial and mediastinal masses. The tumours could not be resected through a minor thoracotomy, only biopsies could be taken. Analyses led to the final diagnosis of a monophasic synovial sarcoma. The patient preferred a conservative and palliative approach. Three months later he died at home. Autopsy demonstrated dramatic extension of the tumour masses. We conclude this report with a discussion on primary cardiac tumours. (Neth Heart J 2007;15:226-8.).

  17. Synovial sarcoma: CT imaging of a rare primary malignant tumour of the thorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polverosi, R; Muzzio, P C; Panunzio, A; Pasquotti, G; Schiavon, M; Rea, F

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents computed tomography (CT) features of three patients with primary synovial sarcoma of the lung (PSSL) who came to our attention and underwent surgery; reviews of the literature on this rare thoracic tumour are also presented. The patients, all men, with a mean age of 58 years, underwent clinical and radiological re-evaluation after receiving a histological diagnosis. None of the patients had multifocal disease or other concomitant neoplasms. All patients had undergone both chest X-rays and computed tomography, and two had also been studied with positron emission tomography (PET)-CT. Two patients underwent surgical removal of the tumour, whereas the third initially underwent surgery (following an incorrect diagnosis) and then thoracoscopic biopsy of the pleural lesions that subsequently arose. In each case, chest X-rays showed changes, with the presence of pulmonary masses noted in all patients. In one patient, pleural effusion was also visible. CT scans showed parenchymal masses that were largely of a colliquative nature (in two out of three patients). Ipsilateral pleural effusion was present in two patients, associated in one with solid nodules within the pleura. Mediastinal lymphadenopathy, which was not radiologically significant, was present in only one patient. The two patients who also underwent PET-CT examination showed pathological tracer uptake confined to the lesion site without other thoracoabdominal or musculoskeletal localisations. CT-guided biopsy, performed in one patient only, was positive for mesenchymal tumour. In the two patients who underwent surgery, a definitive diagnosis of monophasic synovial sarcoma of the lung was made. The diagnosis of monophasic synovial sarcoma in the third patient was confirmed using thoracoscopic biopsy Both in the cases described and in those identified in the literature review, standard chest X-rays mainly showed a parenchymal mass of pleural origin with either irregular or well-defined margins

  18. Complete human serum maintains viability and chondrogenic potential of human synovial stem cells: suitable conditions for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Mitsuru; Katano, Hisako; Otabe, Koji; Komori, Keiichiro; Kohno, Yuji; Fujii, Shizuka; Ozeki, Nobutake; Horie, Masafumi; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Koga, Hideyuki; Muneta, Takeshi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2017-06-13

    In our clinical practice, we perform transplantations of autologous synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cartilage and meniscus regenerative medicine. One of the most important issues to ensuring clinical efficacy involves the transport of synovial MSCs from the processing facility to the clinic. Complete human serum (100% human serum) is an attractive candidate material in which to suspend synovial MSCs for their preservation during transport. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether complete human serum maintained MSC viability and chondrogenic potential and to examine the optimal temperature conditions for the preservation of human synovial MSCs. Human synovium was harvested from the knees of 14 donors with osteoarthritis during total knee arthroplasty. Passage 2 synovial MSCs were suspended at 2 million cells/100 μL in Ringer's solution or complete human serum at 4, 13, and 37 °C for 48 h. These cells were analyzed for live cell rates, cell surface marker expression, metabolic activity, proliferation, and adipogenic, calcification, and chondrogenic differentiation potentials before and after preservation. After preservation, synovial MSCs maintained higher live cell rates in human serum than in Ringer's solution at 4 and 13 °C. Synovial MSCs preserved in human serum at 4 and 13 °C also maintained high ratios of propidium iodide - and annexin V - cells. MSC surface marker expression was not altered in cells preserved at 4 and 13 °C. The metabolic activities of cells preserved in human serum at 4 and 13 °C was maintained, while significantly reduced in other conditions. Replated MSCs retained their proliferation ability when preserved in human serum at 4 and 13 °C. Adipogenesis and calcification potential could be observed in cells preserved in each condition, whereas chondrogenic potential was retained only in cells preserved in human serum at 4 and 13 °C. The viability and chondrogenic potential of synovial MSCs were

  19. Synovial sarcoma with radiological appearances of primitive neuroectodermal tumour/Ewing sarcoma: differentiation by molecular genetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, P.; Diss, T.C.; Whelan, J.; Flanagan, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) arises in soft tissues but may invade adjacent bone. We describe a case of SS presenting as aggressive lysis of the proximal ulna, the imaging of which suggested a primary bone lesion. Needle biopsy showed a 'small round blue cell tumour', and a primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET)/Ewing sarcoma was suggested on the basis of the imaging appearances. The definitive diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was made following molecular genetic studies, which demonstrated a fusion product incorporating the genes SYT and SSX1. The importance of correct diagnosis to guide appropriate management, and, therefore, the necessity for molecular genetic studies, is discussed. (orig.)

  20. The Role of Interstitial Fluid Pressurization in Articular Cartilage Lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been reported in the field of cartilage mechanics that impacts our understanding of the role of interstitial fluid pressurization on cartilage lubrication. Theoretical and experimental studies have demonstrated that the interstitial fluid of cartilage pressurizes considerably under loading, potentially supporting most of the applied load under various transient or steady-state conditions. The fraction of the total load supported by fluid pressurization has been called the fluid load support. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the friction coefficient of cartilage correlates negatively with this variable, achieving remarkably low values when the fluid load support is greatest. A theoretical framework that embodies this relationship has been validated against experiments, predicting and explaining various outcomes, and demonstrating that a low friction coefficient can be maintained for prolonged loading durations under normal physiological function. This paper reviews salient aspects of this topic, as well as its implications for improving our understanding of boundary lubrication by molecular species in synovial fluid and the cartilage superficial zone. Effects of cartilage degeneration on its frictional response are also reviewed. PMID:19464689

  1. Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  2. Des-Lys58-beta 2m and native beta 2m in rheumatoid arthritis serum and synovial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, R C; Malone, C C; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1995-01-01

    factor by adsorption to monomeric IgG columns did not change serum levels of beta 2m or Des-Lys58-beta 2m. Native beta 2m was found in all of 20 RA sera, but only rarely in SLE sera. No serum beta 2m was found in 20 patients with ankylosing spondylitis or 25 normal controls. Significant elevations of Des...

  3. Increased levels of peptidylarginine deiminase 2 in synovial fluid from anti-CCP-positive rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Dres; Senolt, Ladislav; Nielsen, Claus H

    2016-01-01

    .0001-0.05). SF PAD2 levels were higher among anti-CCP-positive patients than among anti-CCP-negative patients (P = 0.005). PAD2 levels in SF from RA patients correlated with disease activity, as assessed by DAS28 (P CCP levels (P ....0006), as well as with leucocyte count, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 levels in SF (P CCP-positive RA...... patients have higher PAD2 levels in SF than anti-CCP-negative RA patients and OA patients. Since we could demonstrate enzymatically active PADs in SF, we propose that free, extracellular PAD is of pathogenic relevance....

  4. Primary peripheral neurolymphomatosis mimicking synovial sarcoma: FDG PETCT to the rescue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Padma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the association between synovial sarcoma and peripheral neurolymphomatosis is limited to a few case reports in literature. Delay in diagnosis or misdiagnosis is possible due to its insidious onset and varied presentation compounded by non-specific imaging findings. Needle biopsy also may not be confirmatory especially, in cases of biphasic sarcoma as in our case, and it may be necessary to proceed to open biopsy. Here, is a case of a non-tender right calf muscle mass, which was reported as biphasic synovial sarcoma by FNAC. Positron emission tomography computed tomography - computed tomography (PETCT showed right sciatic nerve involvement and multiple infra diaphragmatic lymph nodal lesions. Intensity of 18 F FDG ( 18 Flourine labeled fluro de oxy glucose uptake and the infra diaphragmatic lymph nodal lesions distribution, was more in favour of a lymphoma diagnosis rather than a sarcoma, (which are usually low metabolically active tumors. Thus, this case highlights the usefulness of FDG PETCT in arriving at a diagnosis in the background of indeterminate clinicopathological and radiologic findings.

  5. The Effects of Amphiregulin Induced MMP-13 Production in Human Osteoarthritis Synovial Fibroblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Te Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA belongs to a group of degenerative diseases. Synovial inflammation, cartilage abrasion, and subchondral sclerosis are characteristics of OA. Researchers do not fully understand the exact etiology of OA. However, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, which are responsible for cartilage matrix degradation, play a pivotal role in the progression of OA. Amphiregulin (AREG binds to the EGF receptor (EGFR and activates downstream proteins. AREG is involved in a variety of pathological processes, such as the development of tumors, inflammatory diseases, and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the relationship between AREG and MMP-13 in OA synovial fibroblasts (SFs remains unclear. We investigated the signaling pathway involved in AREG-induced MMP-13 production in SFs. AREG caused MMP-13 production in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The results of using pharmacological inhibitors and EGFR siRNA to block EGFR revealed that the EGFR receptor was involved in the AREG-mediated upregulation of MMP-13. AREG-mediated MMP-13 production was attenuated by PI3K and Akt inhibitors. The stimulation of cells by using AREG activated p65 phosphorylation and p65 translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus. Our results provide evidence that AREG acts through the EGFR and activates PI3K, Akt, and finally NF-kappaB on the MMP-13 promoter, thus contributing to cartilage destruction during osteoarthritis.

  6. Histopathological Analysis of PEEK Wear Particle Effects on the Synovial Tissue of Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Paulus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Increasing interest developed in the use of carbon-fiber-reinforced-poly-ether-ether-ketones (CFR-PEEK as an alternative bearing material in knee arthroplasty. The effects of CFR-PEEK wear in in vitro and animal studies are controversially discussed, as there are no data available concerning human tissue. The aim of this study was to analyze human tissue containing CFR-PEEK as well as UHMWPE wear debris. The authors hypothesized no difference between the used biomaterials. Methods and Materials. In 10 patients during knee revision surgery of a rotating-hinge-knee-implant-design, synovial tissue samples were achieved (tibial inserts: UHMWPE; bushings and flanges: CFR-PEEK. One additional patient received revision surgery without any PEEK components as a control. The tissue was paraffin-embedded, sliced into 2 μm thick sections, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin in a standard process. A modified panoptical staining was also done. Results. A “wear-type” reaction was seen in the testing and the control group. In all samples, the UHMWPE particles were scattered in the tissue or incorporated in giant cells. CFR-PEEK particles were seen as conglomerates and only could be found next to vessels. CFR-PEEK particles showed no giant-cell reactions. In conclusion, the hypothesis has to be rejected. UHMWPE and PEEK showed a different scatter-behavior in human synovial tissue.

  7. Histopathological Analysis of PEEK Wear Particle Effects on the Synovial Tissue of Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, V.; Giurea, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Increasing interest developed in the use of carbon-fiber-reinforced-poly-ether-ether-ketones (CFR-PEEK) as an alternative bearing material in knee arthroplasty. The effects of CFR-PEEK wear in in vitro and animal studies are controversially discussed, as there are no data available concerning human tissue. The aim of this study was to analyze human tissue containing CFR-PEEK as well as UHMWPE wear debris. The authors hypothesized no difference between the used biomaterials. Methods and Materials. In 10 patients during knee revision surgery of a rotating-hinge-knee-implant-design, synovial tissue samples were achieved (tibial inserts: UHMWPE; bushings and flanges: CFR-PEEK). One additional patient received revision surgery without any PEEK components as a control. The tissue was paraffin-embedded, sliced into 2 μm thick sections, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin in a standard process. A modified panoptical staining was also done. Results. A “wear-type” reaction was seen in the testing and the control group. In all samples, the UHMWPE particles were scattered in the tissue or incorporated in giant cells. CFR-PEEK particles were seen as conglomerates and only could be found next to vessels. CFR-PEEK particles showed no giant-cell reactions. In conclusion, the hypothesis has to be rejected. UHMWPE and PEEK showed a different scatter-behavior in human synovial tissue. PMID:27766256

  8. Condromatosis sinovial de la articulación temporomandibular Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Quirós Alvarez

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available La afectación de la ATM por una condromatosis sinovial es un hecho muy poco frecuente. Trastorno metaplásico del tejido sinovial, suele producir cuerpos libres, condromas, intraarticulares. Tiene una clínica variable y muy inespecífica. Las pruebas diagnósticas de elección son la RM y la artroscopia. La retirada de cuerpos libres y sinovectomía parcial suele ser terapéutica. Ocasionalmente puede destruir la base del cráneo y extenderse intracranealmente. Se han descrito casos de malignización secundaria. Es necesario el seguimiento a largo plazo del paciente. Presentamos un caso con osteolisis incipiente de la fosa cerebral media.Synovial chondromatosis very rarely affects the TMJ. It is a metaplastic disorder of the synovial tissue that usually produces intra-articular loose bodies, or chondromas. It has variable clinical features and the symptoms are unspecific. Examination by means of magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic observation are the diagnostic techniques of choice. Treatment consists in the removal the loose bodies and partial synovectomy. Occasionally the skull has been destroyed and the middle cranial fossa invaded. There are cases of malignant transformation to chondrosarcoma. A long-term follow up is necessary. We describe a case with incipient intracranial extension.

  9. Mouse synovial mesenchymal stem cells increase in yield with knee inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, Yu; Muneta, Takeshi; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Miyatake, Kazumasa; Yamada, Jun; Abula, Kahaer; Koga, Hideyuki; Tomita, Makoto; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Even though mouse studies have various advantages, harvesting an adequate number of synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is difficult in mice. We investigated whether the total yield of MSCs increased in synovium with inflammation in mice. Infrapatellar fat pads (IFPs) were harvested from 10 knees of 5 mice 3, 7, and 14 days after intraarticular injection of carrageenan. Ten IFPs were also harvested from untreated knees as a control. Seven days after initial plating, the total yield of cells was compared among the 4 groups (n = 4-6). The harvested cells were analyzed for multipotentiality and surface epitopes. Furthermore, knee synovitis was compared among the 4 groups in histology. The number of cells in the 3 and 7 days treated group was significantly higher than the other groups. The harvested cells had characteristics of MSCs. Synovitis in the 3 and 7 days treated groups was significantly severer than the other groups. There seemed to be a relationship between the synovitis score and the total yield of cells derived from IFPs. In mice, it became possible to increase the yield 50-fold by inducing inflammation. This method makes it possible to analyze the molecular mechanisms of cartilage regeneration of synovial MSCs in mice models. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society.

  10. In vitro anti-inflammatory activity of fractionated Euphorbia hirta aqueous extract on rabbit synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jocelyn; Er, Hui Meng; Mohamed, Shar Mariam; Chen, Yu Sui

    2015-01-01

    Euphorbia hirta has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory activity. This study was carried out to determine the prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) inhibition activity of the fractions of the E. hirta aqueous extract on rabbit synovial fibroblast cells (HIG-82). E. hirta aqueous extract was fractionated into five fractions (fractions A, B, C, D, and E) by reversed phase flash chromatography. Rabbit synovial fibroblast cells (HIG-82) were activated with phorbol myristate acetate and treated with the fractions. The amount of PGE 2 released into the medium was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fraction A (0.1, 1, and 10 μg/ml) had the greatest PGE 2 inhibitory effect among the five fractions, and showed a greater extent of PGE 2 inhibition compared to the aqueous extract. In contrast, Fraction E had the greatest stimulatory effect on PGE 2 release. Fraction A of the aqueous extract inhibited the production of PGE 2 from activated HIG-82 cells to a greater extent than the crude aqueous extract. Bioactive compounds with anti-inflammatory activity are likely to be concentrated in Fraction A of E. hirta aqueous extract.

  11. Isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy secondary to an atlantooccipital joint juxtafacet synovial cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Farhat, Hamad; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Morcos, Jacques J

    2009-03-01

    Juxtafacet cysts of the atlantooccipital joint that present with isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy are rare and may mimic more common pathological entities. The authors report on the third such case in the literature and discuss the differential diagnosis, imaging hallmarks, preoperative recognition, and surgical management of this lesion, and provide a review of the literature. The authors discuss their experience with the treatment of a 67-year-old woman who presented with an isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by a nonenhancing cystic septated lesion abutting the lateral medulla just medial to the left hypoglossal canal. The lesion was presumed to be a necrotic hypoglossal schwannoma or epidermoid tumor. Intradural surgical exploration failed to demonstrate an intradural lesion, but confirmed the presence of an extradural mass caudal to the hypoglossal nerve. Extradural exploration revealed a synovial cyst of the atlantooccipital joint, which was then resected. Postoperatively, the patient developed worsening dysphagia and hoarseness. Failure to recognize this rare entity preoperatively resulted in unnecessary intradural exploration and cranial nerve morbidity. In retrospect, the preoperative diagnosis of this lesion was suggested by lack of central enhancement, absence of dumbbell formation and the presence of erosive synovial changes. Regardless, the extreme rarity of this lesion at this location will always make its recognition challenging.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and distribution of voriconazole in body fluids of dogs after repeated oral dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemetayer, J D; Dowling, P M; Taylor, S M; Papich, M G

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this project was to determine the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole and its concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), aqueous humor, and synovial fluid in five healthy dogs following once daily oral dose of 6 mg/kg for 2 weeks. Body fluid and plasma drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Mild to moderate gastrointestinal adverse effects were seen. The mean AUC0-24 : minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ratio was 15.23 for a chosen MIC of 1 μg/mL, which is lower than the recommended target of 20-25 and also lower than previously reported in dogs, perhaps reflecting induction of metabolizing enzymes by multiple dosing. Voriconazole concentrations in the CSF, aqueous humor, and synovial fluid were only 13-30% the concurrent plasma concentration, which is lower than previously reported in other species. Results of this study suggest that twice daily, administration may be necessary to maintain therapeutic plasma concentrations in dogs but further studies are warranted. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Detection of bacterial DNA in serial synovial samples obtained during antibiotic treatment from patients with septic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, I. M.; Wilbrink, B.; Vije, A. E.; Schouls, L. M.; Breedveld, F. C.; Tak, P. P.

    1999-01-01

    The management of septic arthritis could benefit from sensitive tests that detect the persistence of microorganisms in the joint. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of monitoring the presence of bacterial DNA in synovial samples from septic arthritis patients during antibiotic

  14. A Challenging Case of Metastatic Intra-Abdominal Synovial Sarcoma with Unusual Immunophenotype and Its Differential Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Che Changchien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary and metastatic gastrointestinal synovial sarcoma is rare with a wide differential diagnosis. It usually expresses cytokeratins EMA, BCL2 with an occasional CD99, and S100 positivity but not desmin. We present a case of metastatic synovial sarcoma with unusual immunophenotype causing diagnostic challenges. The tumor cells showed focal cytokeratin, EMA, and, unexpectedly, desmin positivity. Additional intranuclear TLE-1 positivity and negativity for CD34 and DOG-1 were also identified. A diagnosis of monophasic synovial sarcoma was confirmed by using FISH break-apart probe. RT-PCR revealed the SYT-SSX1 fusion gene. Intra-abdominal synovial sarcoma, either primary or metastatic, with unusual desmin positivity raises the diagnostic challenge, since a wide range of differential diagnoses could show a similar immunophenotype (leiomyosarcoma, desmoid tumor, myofibroblastic tumor, and rarely GIST etc.. Typical morphology and focal cytokeratin/EMA positivity should alert to this tumor, and FISH and RT-PCR remain the gold standard for the confirmation.

  15. Intimal lining layer macrophages but not synovial sublining macrophages display an IL-10 polarized-like phenotype in chronic synovitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambarus, Carmen A.; Noordenbos, Troy; de Hair, Maria J. H.; Tak, Paul P.; Baeten, Dominique L. P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Synovial tissue macrophages play a key role in chronic inflammatory arthritis, but the contribution of different macrophage subsets in this process remains largely unknown. The main in vitro polarized macrophage subsets are classically (M1) and alternatively (M2) activated macrophages,

  16. A reappraisal of hemangiopericytoma of bone; analysis of cases reclassified as synovial sarcoma and solitary fibrous tumor of bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Sofie L J; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Alberghini, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Hemangiopericytoma (HPC) was first described as a neoplasm with distinct morphologic features, presumably composed of pericytes. In soft tissue, it is accepted that most such lesions are solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs), monophasic synovial sarcomas (SSs), or myofibromatoses. It is unclear whether...

  17. The dual regulation of substance P-mediated inflammation via human synovial mast cells in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Okamura

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Activated synovial MCs may rapidly degrade SP, which may downregulate the SP-mediated activation of synoviocytes in RA. On the other hand, SP activates MCs to induce inflammatory mediators, suggesting the dual regulation of SP-mediated inflammation by MCs in RA.

  18. A reappraisal of hemangiopericytoma of bone; analysis of cases reclassified as synovial sarcoma and solitary fibrous tumor of bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Sofie L J; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Alberghini, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Hemangiopericytoma (HPC) was first described as a neoplasm with distinct morphologic features, presumably composed of pericytes. In soft tissue, it is accepted that most such lesions are solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs), monophasic synovial sarcomas (SSs), or myofibromatoses. It is unclear whether ...

  19. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of synovial sarcoma. A cytomorphologic analysis of primary, recurrent, and metastatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, S E; Teot, L A; Stanley, M W; Ward, W G; Savage, P D; Geisinger, K R

    1996-12-01

    Thirteen fine-needle aspiration specimens from 10 patients with histologically proven synovial sarcoma are described. The aspiration biopsy specimens were obtained from the primary tumor in five cases, locally recurrent tumors in four cases, pulmonary metastases in three cases, and mediastinal metastasis in one case. Patient's ages ranged from 22 years to 65 years; there were four women and six men. All cases had a confirmation biopsy and/or resection specimen that were reviewed. Histologic subtypes included monophasic fibrous (5 cases), monophasic epithelial (1 case), biphasic (3 cases), and poorly differentiated (1 case). The majority of the aspiration biopsy specimens were similar with moderate to marked smear cellularity dominated by cohesive clusters of spindle-shaped cells with ovoid, hyperchromatic nuclei and scanty tapering cytoplasm. Nucleoli were not prominent. Epithelial tumor cells with ovoid to round, mostly regular, centrally to eccentrically located nuclei, surrounded by scant to abundant cytoplasm predominated in one case (monophasic epithelial) and were admixed with spindle cells in a second (classical biphasic). Multi-nucleated tumor giant cells were not observed in any of the tumors. In biphasic synovial sarcoma, the neoplastic spindle cells are generally more numerous and frequent than the epithelial cells, making distinction from monophasic synovial sarcoma or other spindle cell soft tissue tumors difficult. Although synovial sarcoma may be diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration cytology, clinical correlation, especially in monophasic types, is necessary to minimize errors in sarcoma classification.

  20. Giant synovial cell sarcoma of the thorax in a 46-year-old man: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Although synovial cell sarcoma is a common tumor of the extremities, its occurrence in the thorax has been less frequently documented. Case presentation A 46-year-old Pakistani man presented with a 2 month history of progressively increasing cough and left lower chest pain. Initial evaluation was done using a chest x-ray; the patient was found to have a large mass involving the lower portion of the left chest. A computed tomography scan was performed next which showed a large mass involving the left chest wall with invasion into the pericardium and left hemidiaphragm. En bloc surgical resection of the tumor was undertaken. Final pathology showed synovial cell sarcoma of the thorax. At one-year follow-up, the patient has shown no recurrence of the disease. Conclusion We have described a rare case of a large synovial cell sarcoma of the thorax. Surgical resection appears an appropriate modus operandi for managing giant synovial cell sarcomas of the thorax. However, there is a need to clearly define post-operative strategies for cases with extensive involvement of surrounding structures. PMID:20062586

  1. Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pnueli, David; Gutfinger, Chaim

    1997-01-01

    This text is intended for the study of fluid mechanics at an intermediate level. The presentation starts with basic concepts, in order to form a sound conceptual structure that can support engineering applications and encourage further learning. The presentation is exact, incorporating both the mathematics involved and the physics needed to understand the various phenomena in fluid mechanics. Where a didactical choice must be made between the two, the physics prevails. Throughout the book the authors have tried to reach a balance between exact presentation, intuitive grasp of new ideas, and creative applications of concepts. This approach is reflected in the examples presented in the text and in the exercises given at the end of each chapter. Subjects treated are hydrostatics, viscous flow, similitude and order of magnitude, creeping flow, potential flow, boundary layer flow, turbulent flow, compressible flow, and non-Newtonian flows. This book is ideal for advanced undergraduate students in mechanical, chemical, aerospace, and civil engineering. Solutions manual available.

  2. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ruban, Anatoly I

    This is the first book in a four-part series designed to give a comprehensive and coherent description of Fluid Dynamics, starting with chapters on classical theory suitable for an introductory undergraduate lecture course, and then progressing through more advanced material up to the level of modern research in the field. The present Part 1 consists of four chapters. Chapter 1 begins with a discussion of Continuum Hypothesis, which is followed by an introduction to macroscopic functions, the velocity vector, pressure, density, and enthalpy. We then analyse the forces acting inside a fluid, and deduce the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible and compressible fluids in Cartesian and curvilinear coordinates. In Chapter 2 we study the properties of a number of flows that are presented by the so-called exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, including the Couette flow between two parallel plates, Hagen-Poiseuille flow through a pipe, and Karman flow above an infinite rotating disk. Chapter 3 is d...

  3. Increasing substance P levels in serum and synovial tissues from patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Zheng, Xin-Feng; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Zheng; Shen, Chao; Zhu, Jun-Feng; Cui, Yi-Min; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2014-03-19

    The tachykininergic neurotransmitters have been proved to be involved in the inflammatory progress and chronic pain in series of disease. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the levels of substance P (SP) and its receptors NK-1 receptor (NK-1R) in both serum and synovial tissues of hip joint from patients with different stages of DDH, and to detect the possible correlation of serum SP levels with pain sensation and dysfunction of the hip joint. SP levels in serum and synovial tissues from patients with DDH and DDH combined with osteoarthritis (DDH&OA) group were compared through immunohistochemistry (IHC), ELISA, and 2-step acetic acid extraction method respectively. Expression of NK-1R in synovial tissues was compared through IHC, quantitive Real-Time PCR (QRT-PCR) and Western-Blot. The severities of pain sensation and the functional activities of hip joint were assessed by Visual analogue scale (VAS) and Harris hip score (HHS). Correlations of serum SP levels with VAS, HHS and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were evaluated respectively in these groups. Significantly elevated serum SP levels were detected in group of DDH and DDH&OA compared to that in normal group. IHC, QRT-PCR as well as tissue Elisa showed that SP levels in synovial tissue of DDH&OA group is stronger than that in DDH group. Serum SP levels in each group have no gender differences. The enhanced SP levels in synovial tissue mainly came from the segregation of peripheral nerve endings. Serum SP correlated with VAS and HHS in patients with DDH&OA (Male + Female). Serum SP correlated with HHS in patients with DDH (Male). Serum SP levels also correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in patients with DDH&OA (Male + Female). Up-regulated expression of NK-1R was also observed in synovial tissue of patients with DDH&OA compared to patients with DDH, through western-blot, IHC, and QRT-PCR. These findings indicated that the increasing SP levels in serum and synovial tissues

  4. High expression of SDF-1 and VEGF is associated with poor prognosis in patients with synovial sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qi; Guo, Peng; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Hui-Chai; Feng, Jian-Gang

    2018-03-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) predicts poor clinical outcomes of certain types of cancer. Furthermore, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes the growth and metastasis of solid tumors. The aim of the present study was to examine the expression of SDF-1 and VEGF in patients with synovial sarcoma and to determine their expression is correlated with unfavorable outcomes. Levels of SDF-1 and VEGF proteins were evaluated in 54 patients with synovial sarcoma using immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence staining. Potential associations between the expression of SDF-1 and VEGF and various clinical parameters were analyzed using Pearson's χ 2 test and the Spearman-rho test. Additionally, univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to identify potential prognostic factors, and the Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze the overall survival rates of patients. Low SDF-1 and VEGF expression was detected in 20.4% (11/54) and 22.2% (12/54) of patients with synovial sarcoma; moderate expression was detected in 35.2% (19/54) and 37.0% (20/54) of patients and high expression was detected in 44.4% (24 of 54) and 40.7% (22 of 54) of patients, respectively. Levels of SDF-1 and VEGF proteins were significantly associated with histological grade (PSDF-1 and VEGF expression were positively correlated with each other (PSDF-1 expression was associated with shorter patient survival rates (PSDF-1 and VEGF expression were associated with various characteristics of synovial sarcoma. Therefore, SDF-1 expression may be a potential independent prognostic indicator in patients with synovial sarcomas.

  5. Evaluation of the lesions of synovial-lined clefts in the Hoffa's infrapatella fat pad with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Min Sun; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kim, Young Cheol; Hwang, Eai Hong; Joo, Jung Hyun; Chung, Tae Woong; Kang, Heoung Keun; Oh, Hee Yeon

    1998-01-01

    Within Hoffa's infrapatellar fat pad there are two synovial clefts, horizontal and vertical, which communicate with the intra-articular space. Intra-articular lesions can also occur in these clefts, and are often difficult to differentiate from extra-articular lesions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate, using MR imaging, the lesions occurring in these synovial lined clefts, as well as associated abnormalities. Thirty-one knees of 31 patients with lesions in horizontal and vertical clefts in Hoffa's infrapatellar fat pad were retrospectively evaluated. Using a 1.5T MR imager, axial, sagittal, and coronal MR images of knees were obtained. Lesions in clefts, degree of joint effusion and associated knee abnormalities were analyzed. Horizontal cleft lesions were noted in 21 cases; there were 17 cystic dilatations, two loose bodies, one synovial chondroma, and one case of pigmented villonodular synovitis(PVNS). Vertical cleft lesions were noted in 15 cases; these comprised 11 cystic dilatations, two loose bodies, one synovial osteochondromatosis, and one PVNS. Among all cases, three cystic dilatations, one loose body, and one PVNS occurred in both horizontal and vertical clefts. Among 25 knees with cystic dilatations of clefts, five showed grade 1, joint effusion, ten grade 2, and ten grade 3, Associated abnormalities were meniscal tear in 16 cases, osteoarthritis in 13, cruciate ligament tear in five, osteochondritis dissecans in three, osteochondral fracture in two, osteonecrosis in one, loose body in one, and synovitis in one. Among synovial-lined clefts in Hoffa's fat pad, the most common lesion was cystic dilatation;there were various associated abnormalities and a close relationship to joint effusion. An awareness of the types of lesions found in clefts is helpful for narrowing the differential diagnosis of lesions occurring in the area of Hoffa's fat pad.=20

  6. Amniotic mesenchymal stem cells mitigate osteoarthritis progression in a synovial macrophage-mediated in vitro explant coculture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topoluk, Natasha; Steckbeck, Kathleen; Siatkowski, Sandra; Burnikel, Brian; Tokish, John; Mercuri, Jeremy

    2017-11-13

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease of the synovial joint marked by chronic, low-grade inflammation leading to cartilage destruction. Regenerative medicine strategies for mitigating OA progression and/or promoting cartilage regeneration must be assessed using models that mimic the hallmarks of OA. More specifically, these models should maintain synovial macrophage phenotype in their native micro-environment. Herein, an in vitro coculture model of patient-matched human OA cartilage and synovium was assessed for viability, macrophage phenotype, and progressive cartilage destruction in the presence of an inflammatory milieu. Additionally, the influence of synovial macrophages and their polarization within the model was defined using depletion studies. Finally, the model was used to compare the ability of human amniotic stem cells (hAMSCs) and human adipose stem cells (hADSCs) to mitigate OA progression. OA cocultures demonstrated progressive and significant reductions in chondrocyte viability and cartilage glycosaminoglycan content within a proinflammatory environment. Selective depletion of synovial macrophages resulted in significant decreases in M1:M2 percentage ratio yielding significant reductions in concentrations of interleukin-1 beta, matrix metalloproteinase-13 and attenuation of cartilage damage. Finally, hAMSCs were found to be more chondroprotective versus hADSCs as indicated by significantly improved OA chondrocyte viability (89.8 ± 2.4% vs. 58.4 ± 2.4%) and cartilage glycosaminoglycan content (499.0 ± 101.9 μg/mg dry weight vs. 155.0 ± 26.3 μg/mg dry weight) and were more effective at shifting OA synovial macrophage M1:M2 ratio (1.3:1 vs. 5:1), respectively. Taken together, the coculture model mimics salient features of OA, including macrophage-mediated cartilage destruction that was effectively abrogated by hAMSCs but not hADSCs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Scoring of synovial membrane hypertrophy and bone erosions by MR imaging in clinically active and inactive rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Gideon, P; Sørensen, K

    1995-01-01

    MRI-scores of synovial membrane hypertrophy and bone erosions of the RA-wrist are introduced. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and conventional radiography (CR) of the wrist were performed in 16 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 3 healthy controls. A MRI......-score of synovial membrane hypertrophy was obtained by summation of gradings of synovial hypertrophy in 6 regions of the wrist. The score was significantly higher in wrists with than in wrists without clinical signs of active arthritis. The score was 0 in all healthy controls. Each bone of the wrist was assessed...

  8. Quantitative MRI Evidence of Synovial Proliferation is Associated with Radiographic Severity of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Belitskaya-Lévy, Ilana; Bencardino, Jenny; Samuels, Jonathan; Attur, Mukundan; Regatte, Ravinder; Rosenthal, Pamela; Greenberg, Jeffrey; Schweitzer, Mark; Abramson, Steven B.; Rybak, Leon

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationships of quantitative and semi-quantitative (SQ) assessments of synovium with knee OA severity by radiographic and 3T MRI findings. Methods 58 knee OA patients underwent non-fluoroscopic fixed-flexion knee radiographs. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (CE) 3T MRI was performed pre-/post-gadolinium administration to quantify synovial volume (qSV). SQ synovial outcomes were assessed on CE and unenhanced images. Two radiologists scored X-rays using the OARSI atlas; inter-reader agreement was assessed using Kappas and concordance correlation coefficients. Multiple linear and logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations among variables while controlling the effects of age, BMI, gender and meniscal extrusion. Results KL grade, diseased compartment joint space width (dcJSW) and diseased compartment joint space narrowing (dcJSN) were significantly associated with synovial proliferation, measured as CE qSV (β = 0.78, p = 0.0001; β = -0.22, p = 0.0003; β = 0.53, p = 0.0001, respectively). Furthermore, qSV strongly correlated with total subchondral BML volume (β = 0.22, p = 0.0003). KL grade, dcJSW, and dcJSN were significantly associated with BLOKS SQ infrapatellar synovitis (OR [95%CI]: 9.05, [1.94,42.3]; 0.75 [0.54,1.03]; 2.22 [1.15,4.31], respectively) and effusion (OR [95%CI]: 5.75, [1.23,26.8]; 0.70, [0.50,0.98]; 1.96, [1.02,3.74], respectively). CE SQ synovitis also significantly associated with KL and dcJSN (β = 0.036, p = 0.0040; β = 0.015, p=0.0266, respectively), and BLOKS synovitis. Conclusion Synovitis is a characteristic feature of advancing knee OA stages, and is significantly associated with KL, JSW, JSN, and BMLs. BLOKS synovitis scoring on unenhanced MRI is associated with CE synovitis measures. PMID:21647860

  9. Fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Prud'homme, M.; Robillard, L.; Vasseur, P.

    2003-01-01

    This book constitutes at the same time theoretical and practical base relating to the phenomena associated with fluid mechanics. The concept of continuum is at the base of the approach developed in this work. The general advance proceeds of simple balances of forces as into hydrostatic to more complex situations or inertias, the internal stresses and the constraints of Reynolds are taken into account. This advance is not only theoretical but contains many applications in the form of solved problems, each chapter ending in a series of suggested problems. The major part of the applications relates to the incompressible flows

  10. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and in architectural design. Aesthetics, psychoacoustics, perception, and cognition are all present in this expanding field embracing such categories as soundscape composition, sound art, sonic art, sound design, sound studies and auditory culture. Of greatest significance to the overall field is the investigation...... of sound, site and the social, and how the spatial, the visual, and the bodily interact in sonic environments, how they are constructed and how they are entangled in other practices. With the Seismograf special issue Fluid Sounds, we bring this knowledge into the dissemination of audio research itself...

  11. Principles of fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreider, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is an introduction on fluid mechanics incorporating computer applications. Topics covered are as follows: brief history; what is a fluid; two classes of fluids: liquids and gases; the continuum model of a fluid; methods of analyzing fluid flows; important characteristics of fluids; fundamentals and equations of motion; fluid statics; dimensional analysis and the similarity principle; laminar internal flows; ideal flow; external laminar and channel flows; turbulent flow; compressible flow; fluid flow measurements

  12. Synovial tuberculosis of the hand: An ancient disease in an unusual localisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Franz Matta Ramos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis is the most prevalent infectious disease in the world. It is mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Osteoarticular tuberculosis represents 1%–3%. Tenosynovitis is the most common form of the disease in the hand. Aims: The aim of this study is to present an update of synovial tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: The authors present a literature review, the clinical and surgical management and case reports. Results: The outcomes were satisfactory and were not report complications. Conclusions: Early diagnosis, surgical transection of the transverse carpal ligament, debridement and complete excision of the infected synovium may be required, along with antituberculosis drugs. Knowledge of this disease in the hand can provide a better diagnosis and outcome.

  13. Synovial hemangiohamartoma presenting as knee pain, swelling and a soft tissue mass: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senol Serkan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of a patient with juxtaarticular hemangiohamartoma with a synovial extension associated with hemorrhagic synovitis and recurrent spontaneous hemarthrosis. Case presentation A 21-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of pain and swelling at her knee for 6 months. In the magnetic resonance imaging, T2-weighted and fat-suppressed scans revealed a mass with high signal intensity just posterior to the patellar tendon. We performed an excisional biopsy of the mass through an anterior longitudinal incision. Excised material included arterial and venous vascular structures, which were found to be spread among the fat, connective and peripheral nerve tissues microscopically. Conclusion Although hemangiohamartomas are not true neoplasms, they may cause knee pain, swelling and hemarthrosis that warrant surgical resection. This lesion, although rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis, especially in teenagers and young adults.

  14. Hyaluronan Inhibits Tlr-4-Dependent RANKL Expression in Human Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Watanabe

    Full Text Available The Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling pathway is activated in synovial fibroblast cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK and its ligand, RANKL, are key molecules involved in the differentiation of osteoclasts and joint destruction in RA. Hyaluronan (HA is a major extracellular component and an important immune regulator. In this study, we show that lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation significantly increases RANKL expression via a TLR-4 signaling pathway. We also demonstrate that HA suppresses LPS-induced RANKL expression, which is dependent on CD44, but not intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1. Our study provides evidence for HA-mediated suppression of TLR-4-dependent RANKL expression. This could present an alternative target for the treatment of destructed joint bones and cartilages in RA.

  15. Cytoskeletal rearrangements in synovial fibroblasts as a novel pathophysiological determinant of modeled rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Aidinis

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a high prevalence and substantial socioeconomic burden. Despite intense research efforts, its aetiology and pathogenesis remain poorly understood. To identify novel genes and/or cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, we utilized a well-recognized tumour necrosis factor-driven animal model of this disease and performed high-throughput expression profiling with subtractive cDNA libraries and oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations, coupled with independent statistical analysis. This twin approach was validated by a number of different methods in other animal models of arthritis as well as in human patient samples, thus creating a unique list of disease modifiers of potential therapeutic value. Importantly, and through the integration of genetic linkage analysis and Gene Ontology-assisted functional discovery, we identified the gelsolin-driven synovial fibroblast cytoskeletal rearrangements as a novel pathophysiological determinant of the disease.

  16. Diagnosis of a rare primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma with endobronchial ultrasound‐guided transbronchial needle aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai‐hua; Xu, Chuan‐cai; Chen, Yan‐bin; Zhan, Sheng‐hua

    2016-01-01

    Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is a rare disease. Diagnosis is made postoperatively following resection of the tumor. We describe the case of a 39‐year‐old non‐smoking woman whose chest imaging revealed a heterogeneous mass (5.4 cm × 4.6 cm), with soft tissue density in the right upper lobe and pleural effusion in the right hemithorax. The tumor was enhanced on a computed tomography scan, in which enlargement of the mediastinal lymph nodes compressing the adjacent superior vena cava was observed. Endobronchial ultrasound‐guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS‐TBNA) was then performed, which demonstrated PPSS, subsequently confirmed by immunohistochemistry and the detection of a SYT‐SSX fusion gene. We believe that a diagnostic approach of EBUS‐TBNA for lung sarcoma would provide helpful information to clinicians. PMID:27755806

  17. Imaging features of primary and recurrent intrathoracic synovial sarcoma: a single-institute experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baheti, Akshay D; Sewatkar, Rani; Hornick, Jason L; Saboo, Sachin S; Jagannathan, Jyothi P; Ramaiya, Nikhil H; Tirumani, Sree Harsha

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to study the imaging features of primary and metastatic intrathoracic synovial sarcoma (ISS). We reviewed the imaging of 42 patients with ISS (31 pleural, 7 intrapulmonary, 4 mediastinal), with baseline imaging of 19 patients and follow-up imaging in all. Primary tumors (n=19) were well circumscribed (15/19), homogeneous or heterogeneously enhancing, with mean size 9.1 cm (range: 1.8-25 cm). Recurrent/metastatic disease developed in 28/42 patients (67%). Lung was the most common site of metastases (21/28), with most of them predominantly pleural (11/21). On pathology, 30 patients had monophasic tumors, and 6 each had biphasic tumors and poorly differentiated tumors. Intrathoracic SS most commonly presents as a large heterogeneous pleural mass without associated adenopathy. Lung metastases are often pleural based and ipsilateral. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Diagnosis of a rare primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai-Hua; Xu, Chuan-Cai; Jiang, Jun-Hong; Chen, Yan-Bin; Zhan, Sheng-Hua

    2016-11-01

    Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is a rare disease. Diagnosis is made postoperatively following resection of the tumor. We describe the case of a 39-year-old non-smoking woman whose chest imaging revealed a heterogeneous mass (5.4 cm × 4.6 cm), with soft tissue density in the right upper lobe and pleural effusion in the right hemithorax. The tumor was enhanced on a computed tomography scan, in which enlargement of the mediastinal lymph nodes compressing the adjacent superior vena cava was observed. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) was then performed, which demonstrated PPSS, subsequently confirmed by immunohistochemistry and the detection of a SYT-SSX fusion gene. We believe that a diagnostic approach of EBUS-TBNA for lung sarcoma would provide helpful information to clinicians. © 2016 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Periodontal bacterial colonization in synovial tissues exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis in B10.RIII mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes; Gehlot, Prashasnika; Velsko, Irina; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Calise, S John; Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Edward K L; Holoshitz, Joseph; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2016-07-12

    It has been previously hypothesized that oral microbes may be an etiological link between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease. However, the mechanistic basis of this association is incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of periodontal bacteria in induction of joint inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in B10.RIII mice. CIA-prone B10.RIII mice were infected orally with a polybacterial mixture of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia for 24 weeks before induction of CIA. The ability of polybacterial mixture to colonize the periodontium and induce systemic response, horizontal alveolar bone resorption in infected B10.RIII mice was investigated. Arthritis incidence, severity of joint inflammation, pannus formation, skeletal damage, hematogenous dissemination of the infection, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) levels, and interleukin-17 expression levels were evaluated. B10.RIII mice had gingival colonization with all three bacteria, higher levels of anti-bacterial immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies, significant alveolar bone resorption, and hematogenous dissemination of P. gingivalis to synovial joints. Infected B10.RIII mice had more severe arthritis, and higher serum matrix metalloproteinase 3 levels and activity. Histopathological analysis showed increased inflammatory cell infiltration, destruction of articular cartilage, erosions, and pannus formation. Additionally, involved joints showed had expression levels of interleukin-17. These findings demonstrate that physical presence of periodontal bacteria in synovial joints of B10.RIII mice with collagen-induced arthritis is associated with arthritis exacerbation, and support the hypothesis that oral bacteria, specifically P. gingivalis, play a significant role in augmenting autoimmune arthritis due to their intravascular dissemination to the joints.

  20. Cryotherapy decreases synovial Doppler activity and pain in knee arthritis: A randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Xavier; Tordi, Nicolas; Prati, Clément; Verhoeven, Frank; Pazart, Lionel; Wendling, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    To measure and compare the effects of 2 local cryotherapy techniques on synovial power Doppler activity (primary outcome) and pain in non-septic knee arthritis without any concurrent treatment. 30 patients were randomized (ice: 30min, n=15 or cold CO 2 : 2min, n=15 both applied twice at 8h interval). Contralateral non-treated arthritic knees were used as paired controls (n=11 and n=10 respectively). The PDUS semi-quantitative score (0-3) and pain visual analogic scale were evaluated before/after each cold application, 2min, 2h, 24h after the first application. PDUS scores were checked in double-blind by 2 ultrasonographists. The inter-class effect size of local cryotherapy on the power Doppler score remained significant the day after treatment in local cryotherapy-treated compared to contralateral non-treated knees (Global difference: -1 [95% confidence interval: -1.23; -0.77]; ice: -0.73 [-1.06; -0.4]; CO 2 : -0.7 [-1.18; -0.22]). Both techniques significantly and to the same extent reduced the power Doppler score and pain visual analogic scale at all evaluation times and globally throughout the 24 hour-study period. No dropout nor adverse event was reported. In multivariate analysis, the Power Doppler score decrease was associated with pain decrease, while pain decrease was associated with the female sex and ice technique. Local ice and cold CO 2 applied twice equally reduced synovial Power Doppler activity and pain over 24h in knee arthritis. These effects remained significant the day after treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02573298. Copyright © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Synovial plicae of the hip: evaluation using MR arthrography in patients with hip pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencardino, Jenny T.; La Rocca Vieira, Renata; Kassarjian, Ara; Schwartz, Richard; Mellado, Jose M.; Kocher, Mininder

    2011-01-01

    The appearance and distribution of the intra-articular plicae of the hip have been addressed in few reports in the anatomic and radiological literature. This study aims to determine the prevalence of visible synovial hip plicae using MR arthrography and to measure the association of visible synovial hip plicae with MR arthrographic diagnosis of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis. Following institutional review board approval, 63 direct MR arthrographic examinations of the hip in 61 patients with a clinical history of hip pain were retrospectively reviewed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. The following variables were measured using a binary system (0 = absent; 1 = present): labral plica, neck plica, ligamental plica, labral tear, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis. The surgical reports and arthroscopic images of 10 patients were reviewed. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher's exact test. In all 63 cases at least one plica was visualized on MR-arthrographic images. Labral, neck, and ligamental plicae were found with a prevalence of 76, 97, and 78%, respectively. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis among patients with visible labral, neck, and ligamental plicae. The prevalence of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis in our patient population was 79, 28, and 28%, respectively. The presence of intra-articular plicae was the only MR-arthrographic finding in 5 of our 63 symptomatic cases. Visible labral, neck, and/or ligamental plicae are highly prevalent on MR-arthrographic images of the hip performed in the setting of hip pain. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of labral tears, femoroacetabular impingement, and osteoarthritis and visible labral, neck, and ligamental plicae. (orig.)

  2. Stromal cell markers are differentially expressed in the synovial tissue of patients with early arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Y Choi

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown increased expression of stromal markers in synovial tissue (ST of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Here, ST expression of stromal markers in early arthritis in relationship to diagnosis and prognostic outcome was studied.ST from 56 patients included in two different early arthritis cohorts and 7 non-inflammatory controls was analysed using immunofluorescence to detect stromal markers CD55, CD248, fibroblast activation protein (FAP and podoplanin. Diagnostic classification (gout, psoriatic arthritis, unclassified arthritis (UA, parvovirus associated arthritis, reactive arthritis and RA, disease outcome (resolving vs persistent and clinical variables were determined at baseline and after follow-up, and related to the expression of stromal markers.We observed expression of all stromal markers in ST of early arthritis patients, independent of diagnosis or prognostic outcome. Synovial expression of FAP was significantly higher in patients developing early RA compared to other diagnostic groups and non-inflammatory controls. In RA FAP protein was expressed in both lining and sublining layers. Podoplanin expression was higher in all early inflammatory arthritis patients than controls, but did not differentiate diagnostic outcomes. Stromal marker expression was not associated with prognostic outcomes of disease persistence or resolution. There was no association with clinical or sonographic variables.Stromal cell markers CD55, CD248, FAP and podoplanin are expressed in ST in the earliest stage of arthritis. Baseline expression of FAP is higher in early synovitis patients who fulfil classification criteria for RA over time. These results suggest that significant fibroblast activation occurs in RA in the early window of disease.

  3. Infiltration of the synovial membrane with macrophage subsets and polymorphonuclear cells reflects global disease activity in spondyloarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Dominique; Kruithof, Elli; De Rycke, Leen; Boots, Anemieke M; Mielants, Herman; Veys, Eric M; De Keyser, Filip

    2005-01-01

    Considering the relation between synovial inflammation and global disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the distinct but heterogeneous histology of spondyloarthropathy (SpA) synovitis, the present study analyzed whether histopathological features of synovium reflect specific phenotypes and/or global disease activity in SpA. Synovial biopsies obtained from 99 SpA and 86 RA patients with active knee synovitis were analyzed for 15 histological and immunohistochemical markers. Correlations with swollen joint count, serum C-reactive protein concentrations, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were analyzed using classical and multiparameter statistics. SpA synovitis was characterized by higher vascularity and infiltration with CD163+ macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and by lower values for lining-layer hyperplasia, lymphoid aggregates, CD1a+ cells, intracellular citrullinated proteins, and MHC-HC gp39 complexes than RA synovitis. Unsupervised clustering of the SpA samples based on synovial features identified two separate clusters that both contained different SpA subtypes but were significantly differentiated by concentration of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Global disease activity in SpA correlated significantly with lining-layer hyperplasia as well as with inflammatory infiltration with macrophages, especially the CD163+ subset, and with PMNs. Accordingly, supervised clustering using these synovial parameters identified a cluster of 20 SpA patients with significantly higher disease activity, and this finding was confirmed in an independent SpA cohort. However, multiparameter models based on synovial histopathology were relatively poor predictors of disease activity in individual patients. In conclusion, these data indicate that inflammatory infiltration of the synovium with CD163+ macrophages and PMNs as well as lining-layer hyperplasia reflect global disease activity in SpA, independently of the SpA subtype

  4. Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Meniscus Regeneration Augmented by an Autologous Achilles Tendon Graft in a Rat Partial Meniscus Defect Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Matsuta, Seiya; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Mabuchi, Yo; Akazawa, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Although meniscus defects and degeneration are strongly correlated with the later development of osteoarthritis, the promise of regenerative medicine strategies is to prevent and/or delay the disease's progression. Meniscal reconstruction has been shown in animal models with tendon grafting and transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); however, these procedures have not shown the same efficacy in clinical studies. Here, our aim was to investigate the ability of tendon grafts pretreated with exogenous synovial-derived MSCs to prevent cartilage degeneration in a rat partial meniscus defect model. We removed the anterior half of the medial meniscus and grafted autologous Achilles tendons with or without a 10-minute pretreatment of the tendon with synovial MSCs. The meniscus and surrounding cartilage were evaluated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (n = 5). Tendon grafts increased meniscus size irrespective of synovial MSCs. Histological scores for regenerated menisci were better in the tendon + MSC group than in the other two groups at 4 and 8 weeks. Both macroscopic and histological scores for articular cartilage were significantly better in the tendon + MSC group at 8 weeks. Implanted synovial MSCs survived around the grafted tendon and native meniscus integration site by cell tracking assays with luciferase+, LacZ+, DiI+, and/or GFP+ synovial MSCs and/or GFP+ tendons. Flow cytometric analysis showed that transplanted synovial MSCs retained their MSC properties at 7 days and host synovial tissue also contained cells with MSC characteristics. Synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration augmented by autologous Achilles tendon grafts and prevented cartilage degeneration in rats. Stem Cells 2015;33:1927–1938 PMID:25993981

  5. Gyroelastic fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-20

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch.

  6. Gyroelastic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch

  7. Elimination of BMP7 from the developing limb mesenchyme leads to articular cartilage degeneration and synovial inflammation with increased age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abula, Kahaer; Muneta, Takeshi; Miyatake, Kazumasa; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Inoue, Makiko; Sekiya, Ichiro; Graf, Daniel; Economides, Aris N; Rosen, Vicki; Tsuji, Kunikazu

    2015-05-08

    While osteo- and chondro-inductive activities of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 7 are well established, evaluation of the role of endogenous BMP7 in skeletal homeostasis has been hampered by perinatal lethality in BMP7 knockout mice. Here, we examined physiological roles of endogenous BMP7 in joint homeostasis and showed that proteoglycan contents in articular cartilage were significantly reduced in the absence of BMP7. Loss of BMP7 did not affect survival of articular cartilage cells, but resulted in reduced expression of aggrecan and enhanced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 13. We also found extensive synovial hyperplasia and enhanced expression of Activin A. These findings suggest that locally produced BMP7 is prerequisite for postnatal synovial joint homeostasis and may be involved in osteoarthritic changes in adults. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrasound colour Doppler is associated with synovial pathology in biopsies from hand joints in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin; Ellegaard, Karen; Hebsgaard, Josephine B

    2014-01-01

    -3). Data were clustered within patients, thus a linear mixed model was applied for the statistical tests. Parsimony in the statistical models was achieved omitting covariates from the model in the case of what was judged no statistical significance (p>0.1). RESULTS: Doppler colour fraction showed...... an association with the overall synovitis score (approximated Spearman, approximately r=0.43, p=0.003). The density of all immunohistochemical stainings showed a significant association with Doppler colour fraction: von Willebrand factor (approximately r=0.44, p=0.01), CD68 (approximately r=0.53, p=0.02), Ki67...... (approximately r=0.57, p=0.05) and CD3 (approximately r=0.57, p=0.0003). CONCLUSIONS: Colour Doppler activity is associated with the extent of inflammation present in the synovial biopsies from RA patients. However, synovial pathology was also seen in biopsies taken from Doppler negative sites....

  9. Thermophysical Properties of Fluids and Fluid Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengers, Jan V.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2004-05-03

    The major goal of the project was to study the effect of critical fluctuations on the thermophysical properties and phase behavior of fluids and fluid mixtures. Long-range fluctuations appear because of the presence of critical phase transitions. A global theory of critical fluctuations was developed and applied to represent thermodynamic properties and transport properties of molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. In the second phase of the project, the theory was extended to deal with critical fluctuations in complex fluids such as polymer solutions and electrolyte solutions. The theoretical predictions have been confirmed by computer simulations and by light-scattering experiments. Fluctuations in fluids in nonequilibrium states have also been investigated.

  10. Intraarticular application of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and their uptake by synovial membrane-an experimental study in sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, Katja [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Koch, Annette [Department of Chemistry and Applied BioSciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich), Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Schoepf, Bernhard [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Petri, Alke [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Steitz, Benedikt [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Chastellain, Mathieu [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Hofmann, Margarethe [MatSearch, Chemin Jean Pavillard 14, 1009 Pully (Switzerland); Hofmann, Heinrich [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Rechenberg, Brigitte von [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: bvonrechenberg@vetclinics.unizh.ch

    2005-05-15

    A superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle, coated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA-SPION) and its fluorescently functionalized analogue (amino-PVA-Cy3.5-SPION) were compared in vivo as proof of principle for future use in magnetic drug targeting in inflammatory joint diseases. They were injected either intraarticularly or periarticularly and their uptake by cells of the synovial membrane was evaluated. Uptake was completed in 48 h and was enforced by an extracorporally applied magnet.

  11. Preclinical Evidence of Anti-Tumor Activity Induced by EZH2 Inhibition in Human Models of Synovial Sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kawano

    Full Text Available The catalytic activities of covalent and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling are central to regulating the conformational state of chromatin and the resultant transcriptional output. The enzymes that catalyze these activities are often contained within multiprotein complexes in nature. Two such multiprotein complexes, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 methyltransferase and the SWItch/Sucrose Non-Fermentable (SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler have been reported to act in opposition to each other during development and homeostasis. An imbalance in their activities induced by mutations/deletions in complex members (e.g. SMARCB1 has been suggested to be a pathogenic mechanism in certain human cancers. Here we show that preclinical models of synovial sarcoma-a cancer characterized by functional SMARCB1 loss via its displacement from the SWI/SNF complex through the pathognomonic SS18-SSX fusion protein-display sensitivity to pharmacologic inhibition of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of PRC2. Treatment with tazemetostat, a clinical-stage, selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule inhibitor of EZH2 enzymatic activity reverses a subset of synovial sarcoma gene expression and results in concentration-dependent cell growth inhibition and cell death specifically in SS18-SSX fusion-positive cells in vitro. Treatment of mice bearing either a cell line or two patient-derived xenograft models of synovial sarcoma leads to dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition with correlative inhibition of trimethylation levels of the EZH2-specific substrate, lysine 27 on histone H3. These data demonstrate a dependency of SS18-SSX-positive, SMARCB1-deficient synovial sarcomas on EZH2 enzymatic activity and suggests the potential utility of EZH2-targeted drugs in these genetically defined cancers.

  12. Automatic fluid dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellaris, P. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Fluid automatically flows to individual dispensing units at predetermined times from a fluid supply and is available only for a predetermined interval of time after which an automatic control causes the fluid to drain from the individual dispensing units. Fluid deprivation continues until the beginning of a new cycle when the fluid is once again automatically made available at the individual dispensing units.

  13. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory actions of various functional food materials including glucosamine on synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yoshie; Someya, Akimasa; Imai, Kensuke; Nagao, Junji; Nagaoka, Isao

    2017-08-01

    The anti-inflammatory actions of glucosamine (GlcN) on arthritic disorders involve the suppression of inflammatory mediator production from synovial cells. GlcN has also been reported to inhibit the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The present study aimed to determine the cooperative and anti‑inflammatory actions of functional food materials and evaluated the production of interleukin (IL)‑8 and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in IL-1β-activated synovial cells, incubated with the combination of GlcN and various functional food materials containing L‑methionine (Met), undenatured type II collagen (UC‑II), chondroitin sulfate (CS), methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) and agaro-oligosaccharide (AO). The results indicated that Met, UC‑II, CS, MSM and AO slightly or moderately suppressed the IL-1β-stimulated IL‑8 production by human synovial MH7A cells. The same compounds further decreased the IL‑8 level lowered by GlcN. Similarly, they slightly suppressed the phosphorylation level of p38 MAPK and further reduced the phosphorylation level lowered by GlcN. These observations suggest a possibility that these functional food materials exert an anti‑inflammatory action (inhibition of IL‑8 production) in combination with GlcN by cooperatively suppressing the p38 MAPK signaling (phosphorylation).

  14. Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitabh Bhattacharya

    decades, mainly due to the rapid improvement in computational efficiency, cameras, optics and instrumentation, both computational and experimental techniques have improved significantly, allowing researchers in Fluid Mechanics to build better mechanistic and analytical models for processes involving dynamics of fluids.

  15. Cationic PLGA/Eudragit RL nanoparticles for increasing retention time in synovial cavity after intra-articular injection in knee joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sung Rae Kim,1 Myoung Jin Ho,2 Eugene Lee,3 Joon Woo Lee,3 Young Wook Choi,1 Myung Joo Kang21College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Dongjak-gu, Seoul, 2College of Pharmacy, Dankook University, Dongnam-gu, Cheonan, Chungnam, 3Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Bundang-gu, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do, South KoreaAbstract: Positively surface-charged poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA/Eudragit RL nanoparticles (NPs were designed to increase retention time and sustain release profile in joints after intra-articular injection, by forming micrometer-sized electrostatic aggregates with hyaluronic acid, an endogenous anionic polysaccharide found in high amounts in synovial fluid. The cationic NPs consisting of PLGA, Eudragit RL, and polyvinyl alcohol were fabricated by solvent evaporation technique. The NPs were 170.1 nm in size, with a zeta potential of 21.3 mV in phosphate-buffered saline. Hyperspectral imaging (CytoViva® revealed the formation of the micrometer-sized filamentous aggregates upon admixing, due to electrostatic interaction between NPs and the polysaccharides. NPs loaded with a fluorescent probe (1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3' tetramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide, DiR displayed a significantly improved retention time in the knee joint, with over 50% preservation of the fluorescent signal 28 days after injection. When DiR solution was injected intra-articularly, the fluorescence levels rapidly decreased to 30% of the initial concentration within 3 days in mice. From these findings, we suggest that PLGA-based cationic NPs could be a promising tool for prolonged delivery of therapeutic agents in joints selectively.Keywords: PLGA, Eudragit RL, hyaluronic acid, cationic nanoparticles, intra-articular injection, electrostatic interaction

  16. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeya, Makoto [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuta, Makoto [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Woltjen, Knut [Department of Reprogramming Sciences, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Otsuka, Takanobu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Toguchida, Junya, E-mail: togjun@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly

  17. Primary synovial sarcomas of the mediastinum: a clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study of 15 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suster, Saul; Moran, Cesar A

    2005-05-01

    A series of 15 cases of primary mediastinal neoplasms displaying histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features of synovial sarcoma is presented. The patients' ages ranged from 3 to 83 years, with a male-to-female ratio of 2:1. Nine cases presented as anterior mediastinal masses with chest pain, shortness of breath, and pleural effusion, and 6 cases were in paravertebral location in the posterior mediastinum and presented with neck or back pain and pleural effusion. The tumors measured from 5 to 20 cm in greatest diameter and showed a tan white, soft to rubbery cut surface with areas of hemorrhage and necrosis and foci of gelatinous material. Four cases showed areas of cystic degeneration. In 7 cases, the tumors were well circumscribed; in 6 cases, the tumors grossly invaded the pleura, pericardium, heart, great vessels, chest wall, rib, and vertebra. Histologically, 5 cases displayed a biphasic growth pattern, with well-formed glandular elements admixed with a monotonous spindle cell population. Ten cases were exclusively composed of a monotonous atypical spindle cell proliferation. Immunohistochemical studies showed focal positivity of the tumor cells for cytokeratin and/or epithelial membrane antigen, and strong positivity for vimentin and bcl-2 in the spindle cells in all cases studied (10 of 10). Eight cases also showed focal positivity for CD99. Electron microscopic examination in 5 cases showed oval to spindle tumor cells with closely apposed cell membranes, abundant cytoplasmic intermediate filaments and rough endoplasmic reticulum, and immature desmosome-type cell junctions. Ten patients were treated by complete surgical excision and two by partial excision followed by radiation therapy. In 4 patients, the tumors were inoperable and treated with radiation therapy only. Clinical follow-up was available in 5 patients and showed local recurrence with metastases to lung, lymph nodes, and epidural space from 1 to 3 years in 4 cases and liver

  18. Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitabh Bhattacharya

    of renewable energy (e.g., via wind, hydrokinetic generators), creating low-cost healthcare (e.g., via point-of-care medical testing) and improvement of energy efficiency of fluid power systems, depends on improving our understanding of Fluid. Mechanics. Fluids are ubiquitous in both nature and technological applications, ...

  19. Enhance and Maintain Chondrogenesis of Synovial Fibroblasts by Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Protein Matrilins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Ming; Luo, Junming; Chen, Qian

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective Cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been proposed to play key roles in modulating cellular phenotypes during chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. Matrilin (MATN) 1 and 3 are among the most up-regulated ECM proteins during chondrogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze their roles in chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts from synovium. Methods Primary synovial fibroblasts (SFBs) were purified from porcine synovium and incubated in pellet culture for 18 days. Chondrogenesis of SFB was analyzed by histological staining with safranin-O/fast green, and by quantifying glycosaminoglycans with dimethylmethylene blue assay. The mRNA levels of chondrogenic markers including collagen II, aggrecan, and Sox 9 were quantified by real-time RT-PCR, while the protein levels of Col II and matrilins were determined by western blot analysis. Results SFBs underwent chondrogenesis after incubation with TGF-β1 for three days; however, this process was attenuated during the subsequent incubation period. Expression of a MATN1 or 3 cDNA maintained and further enhanced chondrogenesis of SFBs as shown by increased cartilaginous matrix areas, elevated amount of glycosaminoglycans, and stimulated expression of chondrogenic markers. Conclusion Our findings suggest a novel function for MATN1 and 3 to maintain and enhance chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts initiated by TGF-β. Our results also support a critical role of cartilage-specific ECM proteins to modulate cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment during chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:18282772

  20. Enhancing and maintaining chondrogenesis of synovial fibroblasts by cartilage extracellular matrix protein matrilins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, M; Luo, J; Chen, Q

    2008-09-01

    Cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been proposed to play key roles in modulating cellular phenotypes during chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. Matrilin (MATN)1 and MATN3 are among the most up-regulated ECM proteins during chondrogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze their roles in chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts from synovium. Primary synovial fibroblasts (SFBs) were purified from porcine synovium and incubated in pellet culture for 18 days. Chondrogenesis of SFB was analyzed by histological staining with safranin-O/fast green, and by quantifying glycosaminoglycans (GAG) with dimethylmethylene blue assay. The mRNA levels of chondrogenic markers including collagen II, aggrecan, and Sox 9 were quantified by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, while the protein levels of Col II and MATNs were determined by western blot analysis. SFBs underwent chondrogenesis after incubation with transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) for 3 days; however, this process was attenuated during the subsequent incubation period. Expression of a Matn1 or Matn3 cDNA maintained and further enhanced chondrogenesis of SFBs as shown by increased cartilaginous matrix areas, elevated amount of GAG, and stimulated expression of chondrogenic markers. Our findings suggest a novel function for MATN1 and MATN3 to maintain and enhance chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts initiated by TGF-beta. Our results also support a critical role of cartilage-specific ECM proteins to modulate cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment during chondrogenic differentiation.