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Sample records for syndrome-associated small gtpase

  1. [Study of the mechanism of Ras-dva small GTPase intracellular localization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshina, M B; Belousov, V V; Zaraĭskiĭ, A G

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of amino acid sequences of small GTPases of the Ras-dva family allowed us to determine the C-terminal prenylation motif, which could be responsible for the membrane localization of these proteins. We demonstrated using in vivo EGFP tracing that the Ras-dva small GTPases from Xenopus laevis embryo cells and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts are localized on both plasma membranes and endomembranes (the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi apparatus, and vesicles). At the same time, the replacement of the Cys residue, the SH group of which must be theoretically farnesylated, in the C-terminal prenylation motif of the Ras-dva small GTPase by the Ser residue prevented the membrane localization of the protein. These results indicate that the C-terminal prenylation site is critical for the membrane localization of small Ras-dva GTPases.

  2. Comparative phylogenetic and expression analysis of small GTPases families in legume and non-legume plants.

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    Flores, Ana Claudia; Via, Virginia Dalla; Savy, Virginia; Villagra, Ulises Mancini; Zanetti, María Eugenia; Blanco, Flavio

    2018-02-01

    Small monomeric GTPases act as molecular switches in several processes that involve polar cell growth, participating mainly in vesicle trafficking and cytoskeleton rearrangements. This gene superfamily has largely expanded in plants through evolution as compared with other Kingdoms, leading to the suggestion that members of each subfamily might have acquired new functions associated to plant-specific processes. Legume plants engage in a nitrogen-fixing symbiotic interaction with rhizobia in a process that involves polar growth processes associated with the infection throughout the root hair. To get insight into the evolution of small GTPases associated with this process, we use a comparative genomic approach to establish differences in the Ras GTPase superfamily between legume and non-legume plants. Phylogenetic analyses did not show clear differences in the organization of the different subfamilies of small GTPases between plants that engage or not in nodule symbiosis. Protein alignments revealed a strong conservation at the sequence level of small GTPases previously linked to nodulation by functional genetics. Interestingly, one Rab and three Rop proteins showed conserved amino acid substitutions in legumes, but these changes do not alter the predicted conformational structure of these proteins. Although the steady-state levels of most small GTPases do not change in response to rhizobia, we identified a subset of Rab, Rop and Arf genes whose transcript levels are modulated during the symbiotic interaction, including their spatial distribution along the indeterminate nodule. This study provides a comprehensive study of the small GTPase superfamily in several plant species. The genetic program associated to root nodule symbiosis includes small GTPases to fulfill specific functions during infection and formation of the symbiosomes. These GTPases seems to have been recruited from members that were already present in common ancestors with plants as distant as monocots

  3. Characterization of the activation of small GTPases by their GEFs on membranes using artificial membrane tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peurois, François; Veyron, Simon; Ferrandez, Yann; Ladid, Ilham; Benabdi, Sarah; Zeghouf, Mahel; Peyroche, Gérald; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2017-03-23

    Active, GTP-bound small GTPases need to be attached to membranes by post-translational lipid modifications in order to process and propagate information in cells. However, generating and manipulating lipidated GTPases has remained difficult, which has limited our quantitative understanding of their activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and their termination by GTPase-activating proteins. Here, we replaced the lipid modification by a histidine tag in 11 full-length, human small GTPases belonging to the Arf, Rho and Rab families, which allowed to tether them to nickel-lipid-containing membranes and characterize the kinetics of their activation by GEFs. Remarkably, this strategy uncovered large effects of membranes on the efficiency and/or specificity in all systems studied. Notably, it recapitulated the release of autoinhibition of Arf1, Arf3, Arf4, Arf5 and Arf6 GTPases by membranes and revealed that all isoforms are efficiently activated by two GEFs with different regulatory regimes, ARNO and Brag2. It demonstrated that membranes stimulate the GEF activity of Trio toward RhoG by ∼30 fold and Rac1 by ∼10 fold, and uncovered a previously unknown broader specificity toward RhoA and Cdc42 that was undetectable in solution. Finally, it demonstrated that the exceptional affinity of the bacterial RabGEF DrrA for the phosphoinositide PI(4)P delimits the activation of Rab1 to the immediate vicinity of the membrane-bound GEF. Our study thus validates the histidine-tag strategy as a potent and simple means to mimic small GTPase lipidation, which opens a variety of applications to uncover regulations brought about by membranes. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. Signaling by Small GTPases at Cell-Cell junctions: Protein Interactions Building Control and Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Vania

    2017-09-11

    A number of interesting reports highlight the intricate network of signaling proteins that coordinate formation and maintenance of cell-cell contacts. We have much yet to learn about how the in vitro binding data is translated into protein association inside the cells and whether such interaction modulates the signaling properties of the protein. What emerges from recent studies is the importance to carefully consider small GTPase activation in the context of where its activation occurs, which upstream regulators are involved in the activation/inactivation cycle and the GTPase interacting partners that determine the intracellular niche and extent of signaling. Data discussed here unravel unparalleled cooperation and coordination of functions among GTPases and their regulators in supporting strong adhesion between cells. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  5. The Ins and Outs of Small GTPase Rac1 in the Vasculature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinković, Goran; Heemskerk, Niels; van Buul, Jaap D.; de Waard, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    The Rho family of small GTPases forms a 20-member family within the Ras superfamily of GTP-dependent enzymes that are activated by a variety of extracellular signals. The most well known Rho family members are RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A), Cdc42 (cell division control protein 42), and

  6. Small GTPases and Stress Responses of vvran1 in the Straw Mushroom Volvariella volvacea

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    Jun-Jie Yan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Small GTPases play important roles in the growth, development and environmental responses of eukaryotes. Based on the genomic sequence of the straw mushroom Volvariella volvacea, 44 small GTPases were identified. A clustering analysis using human small GTPases as the references revealed that V. volvacea small GTPases can be grouped into five families: nine are in the Ras family, 10 are in the Rho family, 15 are in the Rab family, one is in the Ran family and nine are in the Arf family. The transcription of vvran1 was up-regulated upon hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 stress, and could be repressed by diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI, a NADPH oxidase-specific inhibitor. The number of vvran1 transcripts also increased upon cold stress. Diphenyleneiodonium chloride, but not the superoxide dismutase (SOD inhibitor diethy dithiocarbamate (DDC, could suppress the up-regulation of vvran1 gene expression to cold stress. These results combined with the high correlations between gene expression and superoxide anion (O2− generation indicated that vvran1 could be one of the candidate genes in the downstream of O2− mediated pathways that are generated by NADPH oxidase under low temperature and oxidative stresses.

  7. Topological and functional properties of the small GTPases protein interaction network.

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    Anna Delprato

    Full Text Available Small GTP binding proteins of the Ras superfamily (Ras, Rho, Rab, Arf, and Ran regulate key cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell proliferation, cell motility, and vesicle transport. A great deal of experimental evidence supports the existence of signaling cascades and feedback loops within and among the small GTPase subfamilies suggesting that these proteins function in a coordinated and cooperative manner. The interplay occurs largely through association with bi-partite regulatory and effector proteins but can also occur through the active form of the small GTPases themselves. In order to understand the connectivity of the small GTPases signaling routes, a systems-level approach that analyzes data describing direct and indirect interactions was used to construct the small GTPases protein interaction network. The data were curated from the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes (STRING database and include only experimentally validated interactions. The network method enables the conceptualization of the overall structure as well as the underlying organization of the protein-protein interactions. The interaction network described here is comprised of 778 nodes and 1943 edges and has a scale-free topology. Rac1, Cdc42, RhoA, and HRas are identified as the hubs. Ten sub-network motifs are also identified in this study with themes in apoptosis, cell growth/proliferation, vesicle traffic, cell adhesion/junction dynamics, the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase response, transcription regulation, receptor-mediated endocytosis, gene silencing, and growth factor signaling. Bottleneck proteins that bridge signaling paths and proteins that overlap in multiple small GTPase networks are described along with the functional annotation of all proteins in the network.

  8. Small GTPases and phosphoinositides in the regulatory mechanisms of macropinosome formation and maturation

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    Youhei eEgami

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Macropinosome formation requires the sequential activation of numerous signaling pathways that coordinate the actin-driven formation of plasma membrane protrusions (ruffles and circular ruffles (macropinocytic cups, followed by the closure of these macropinocytic cups into macropinosomes. In the process of macropinosome formation, localized productions of phosphoinositides such as PI(4,5P2 and PI(3,4,5P3 spatiotemporally orchestrate actin polymerization and rearrangement through recruiting and activating a variety of actin-associated proteins. In addition, the sequential activation of small GTPases, which are known to be master regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, plays a pivotal role in parallel with phosphoinositides. To complete macropinosome formation, phosphoinositide breakdown and Rho GTPase deactivation must occur in appropriate timings. After the nascent macropinosomes are formed, phosphoinositides and several Rab GTPases control macropinosome maturation by regulating vesicle trafficking and membrane fusion. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the critical functions of phosphoinositide metabolism and small GTPases in association with their downstream effectors in macropinocytosis.

  9. Small GTPases and phosphoinositides in the regulatory mechanisms of macropinosome formation and maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Youhei; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Maekawa, Masashi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Araki, Nobukazu

    2014-01-01

    Macropinosome formation requires the sequential activation of numerous signaling pathways that coordinate the actin-driven formation of plasma membrane protrusions (ruffles) and circular ruffles (macropinocytic cups), followed by the closure of these macropinocytic cups into macropinosomes. In the process of macropinosome formation, localized productions of phosphoinositides such as PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 spatiotemporally orchestrate actin polymerization and rearrangement through recruiting and activating a variety of actin-associated proteins. In addition, the sequential activation of small GTPases, which are known to be master regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, plays a pivotal role in parallel with phosphoinositides. To complete macropinosome formation, phosphoinositide breakdown and Rho GTPase deactivation must occur in appropriate timings. After the nascent macropinosomes are formed, phosphoinositides and several Rab GTPases control macropinosome maturation by regulating vesicle trafficking and membrane fusion. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the critical functions of phosphoinositide metabolism and small GTPases in association with their downstream effectors in macropinocytosis. PMID:25324782

  10. Function of small GTPase Rho3 in regulating growth, conidiation and virulence of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Bang; Li, Boqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2015-02-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family play an important role in regulating biological processes in fungi. In this study, we mainly investigated the biological functions of Rho3 in Botrytis cinerea, and found that deletion of the rho3 from B. cinerea significantly suppressed vegetative growth and conidiation, reduced appressorium formation and decreased virulence. Microscopy analysis revealed that the distance between septa was increased in the Δrho3 mutant. In addition, mitochondria were suggested to be the main sources of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in B. cinerea based on dual staining with 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and MitoTracker orange. The Δrho3 mutant showed less accumulation of ROS in the hyphae tips compared to the WT strain of B. cinerea. These results provide the novel evidence to ascertain the function of small GTPase Rho3 in regulating growth, conidiation and virulence of B. cinerea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and the small GTPase Rab 2 are crucial for Brucella replication.

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    Emilie Fugier

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus survives and replicates inside host cells within an endoplasmic reticulum (ER-derived replicative organelle named the "Brucella-containing vacuole" (BCV. Here, we developed a subcellular fractionation method to isolate BCVs and characterize for the first time the protein composition of its replicative niche. After identification of BCV membrane proteins by 2 dimensional (2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we focused on two eukaryotic proteins: the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and the small GTPase Rab 2 recruited to the vacuolar membrane of Brucella. These proteins were previously described to localize on vesicular and tubular clusters (VTC and to regulate the VTC membrane traffic between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and the Golgi. Inhibition of either GAPDH or Rab 2 expression by small interfering RNA strongly inhibited B. abortus replication. Consistent with this result, inhibition of other partners of GAPDH and Rab 2, such as COPI and PKC iota, reduced B. abortus replication. Furthermore, blockage of Rab 2 GTPase in a GDP-locked form also inhibited B. abortus replication. Bacteria did not fuse with the ER and instead remained in lysosomal-associated membrane vacuoles. These results reveal an essential role for GAPDH and the small GTPase Rab 2 in B. abortus virulence within host cells.

  12. Ablation of p120-Catenin Altering the Activity of Small GTPase in Human Lung Cancer Cells

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    Nan LIU

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective p120-catenin (p120ctn, a member of the Armadillo gene family, has emerged as an important modulator of small GTPase activities. Therefore, it plays novel roles in tumor malignant phenotype, such as invasion and metastasis, whose mechanism are not well clarified yet. The aim of this study is to explore the roles of p120ctn on the regulation of small GTP family members in lung cancer and the effects to lung cancer invasions andmetastasis. Methods After p120ctn was knocked down by siRNA, in vivo and in vitro analysis was applied to investigate the role and possible mechanism of p120ctn in lung cancer, such as Western Blot, pull-down analysis, and nude mice models. Results p120ctn depletion inactivated RhoA, with the the activity of Cdc42 and Rac1 increased, the invasiveness of lung cancer cells was promoted both in vitro and in vivo . Conclusion p120ctn gene knockdown enhances the metastasis of lung cancer cells, probably by altering expression of small GTPase, such as inactivation of RhoA and activation of Cdc42/Rac1.

  13. Rho GTPases and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hui; Peyrollier, Karine; Kilic, Gülcan

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases are a family of small GTPases, which play an important role in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Not surprisingly, Rho GTPases are crucial for cell migration and therefore highly important for cancer cell invasion and the formation of metastases. In addition, Rho GTPases...... are involved in growth and survival of tumor cells, in the interaction of tumor cells with their environment, and they are vital for the cancer supporting functions of the tumor stroma. Recent research has significantly improved our understanding of the regulation of Rho GTPase activity, the specificity of Rho...

  14. Effects of Rho1, a small GTPase on the production of recombinant glycoproteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sha; Zhang, Ge-Yuan; Zhang, Huijie; Kitajima, Toshihiko; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-10-21

    To humanize yeast N-glycosylation pathways, genes involved in yeast specific hyper-mannosylation must be disrupted followed by the introduction of genes catalyzing the synthesis, transport, and addition of human sugars. However, deletion of these genes, for instance, OCH1, which initiates hyper-mannosylation, could cause severe defects in cell growth, morphogenesis and response to environmental challenges. In this study, overexpression of RHO1, which encodes the Rho1p small GTPase, is confirmed to partially recover the growth defect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δalg3Δoch1 double mutant strain. In addition, transmission electron micrographs indicated that the cell wall structure of RHO1-expressed cells have an enhanced glucan layer and also a recovered mannoprotein layer, revealing the effect of Rho1p GTPase on cell wall biosynthesis. Similar complementation phenotypes have been confirmed by overexpression of the gene that encodes Fks2 protein, a catalytic subunit of a 1,3-β-glucan synthase. Besides the recovery of cell wall structure, the RHO1-overexpressed Δalg3Δoch1 strain also showed improved abilities in temperature tolerance, osmotic potential and drug sensitivity, which were not observed in the Δalg3Δoch1-FKS2 cells. Moreover, RHO1 overexpression could also increase N-glycan site occupancy and the amount of secreted glycoproteins. Overexpression of RHO1 in 'humanized' glycoprotein producing yeasts could significantly facilitate its future industrial applications for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  15. RHOA GTPase Controls YAP-Mediated EREG Signaling in Small Intestinal Stem Cell Maintenance

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    Ming Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: RHOA, a founding member of the Rho GTPase family, is critical for actomyosin dynamics, polarity, and morphogenesis in response to developmental cues, mechanical stress, and inflammation. In murine small intestinal epithelium, inducible RHOA deletion causes a loss of epithelial polarity, with disrupted villi and crypt organization. In the intestinal crypts, RHOA deficiency results in reduced cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a loss of intestinal stem cells (ISCs that mimic effects of radiation damage. Mechanistically, RHOA loss reduces YAP signaling of the Hippo pathway and affects YAP effector epiregulin (EREG expression in the crypts. Expression of an active YAP (S112A mutant rescues ISC marker expression, ISC regeneration, and ISC-associated Wnt signaling, but not defective epithelial polarity, in RhoA knockout mice, implicating YAP in RHOA-regulated ISC function. EREG treatment or active β-catenin Catnblox(ex3 mutant expression rescues the RhoA KO ISC phenotypes. Thus, RHOA controls YAP-EREG signaling to regulate intestinal homeostasis and ISC regeneration. : In this article, Zheng and colleagues show that inducible RHOA deletion in mice causes defects in intestine epithelial polarity and deficiencies in intestinal stem cell proliferation, survival, and regeneration. They further demonstrate by genetic rescues that RHOA controls a YAP-EREG axis to mediate canonical Wnt signaling, intestinal stem cell function, and intestinal homeostasis. Keywords: mouse model, intestinal stem cell, regeneration, Rho GTPase, RhoA, Hippo signaling, YAP, Wnt signaling

  16. Essential role of the small GTPase Ran in postnatal pancreatic islet development.

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    Fang Xia

    Full Text Available The small GTPase Ran orchestrates pleiotropic cellular responses of nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling, mitosis and subcellular trafficking, but whether deregulation of these pathways contributes to disease pathogenesis has remained elusive. Here, we generated transgenic mice expressing wild type (WT Ran, loss-of-function Ran T24N mutant or constitutively active Ran G19V mutant in pancreatic islet β cells under the control of the rat insulin promoter. Embryonic pancreas and islet development, including emergence of insulin(+ β cells, was indistinguishable in control or transgenic mice. However, by one month after birth, transgenic mice expressing any of the three Ran variants exhibited overt diabetes, with hyperglycemia, reduced insulin production, and nearly complete loss of islet number and islet mass, in vivo. Deregulated Ran signaling in transgenic mice, adenoviral over-expression of WT or mutant Ran in isolated islets, or short hairpin RNA (shRNA silencing of endogenous Ran in model insulinoma INS-1 cells, all resulted in decreased expression of the pancreatic and duodenal homeobox transcription factor, PDX-1, and reduced β cell proliferation, in vivo. These data demonstrate that a finely-tuned balance of Ran GTPase signaling is essential for postnatal pancreatic islet development and glucose homeostasis, in vivo.

  17. Integrating chemotaxis and contact-inhibition during collective cell migration: Small GTPases at work.

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    Theveneau, Eric; Mayor, Roberto

    2010-09-01

    For directional cell migration to occur cells must interpret guiding cues present in their environment. Chemotaxis based on negative or positive signals has been long thought as the main driving force of guided cell migration. However during collective cell migration cells do receive information from external signals but also upon interactions with their direct neighbours. These multiple inputs must be translated into intracellular reorganisation in order to promote efficient directional migration. Small GTPases, being involved in establishing cell polarity and regulating protrusive activity, are likely to play a central role in signal integration. Indeed, recent findings from our laboratory indicate that Contact-Inhibition of Locomotion controlled by N-Cadherin and chemotaxis dependent on Sdf1/Cxcr4 signaling converge towards regulation of the localized activity of RhoA and Rac1. All together they establish cell polarity and select well-oriented cell protrusions to ensure directional cell migration.

  18. The small GTPase RhoA is required to maintain spinal cord neuroepithelium organization and the neural stem cell pool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Dominik; Loetscher, Pirmin; van Hengel, Jolanda

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of adherens junctions (AJs) is critical for multiple events during CNS development, including the formation and maintenance of the neuroepithelium. We have addressed the role of the small GTPase RhoA in the developing mouse nervous system using tissue-specific conditional gene abla...

  19. Identification of potential small molecule binding pockets on Rho family GTPases.

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    Juan Manuel Ortiz-Sanchez

    Full Text Available Rho GTPases are conformational switches that control a wide variety of signaling pathways critical for eukaryotic cell development and proliferation. They represent attractive targets for drug design as their aberrant function and deregulated activity is associated with many human diseases including cancer. Extensive high-resolution structures (>100 and recent mutagenesis studies have laid the foundation for the design of new structure-based chemotherapeutic strategies. Although the inhibition of Rho signaling with drug-like compounds is an active area of current research, very little attention has been devoted to directly inhibiting Rho by targeting potential allosteric non-nucleotide binding sites. By avoiding the nucleotide binding site, compounds may minimize the potential for undesirable off-target interactions with other ubiquitous GTP and ATP binding proteins. Here we describe the application of molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, sequence conservation analysis, and ensemble small-molecule fragment mapping to provide an extensive mapping of potential small-molecule binding pockets on Rho family members. Characterized sites include novel pockets in the vicinity of the conformationaly responsive switch regions as well as distal sites that appear to be related to the conformations of the nucleotide binding region. Furthermore the use of accelerated molecular dynamics simulation, an advanced sampling method that extends the accessible time-scale of conventional simulations, is found to enhance the characterization of novel binding sites when conformational changes are important for the protein mechanism.

  20. Mechanisms of membrane binding of small GTPase K-Ras4B farnesylated hypervariable region.

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    Jang, Hyunbum; Abraham, Sherwin J; Chavan, Tanmay S; Hitchinson, Ben; Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Tarasova, Nadya I; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-04-10

    K-Ras4B belongs to a family of small GTPases that regulates cell growth, differentiation and survival. K-ras is frequently mutated in cancer. K-Ras4B association with the plasma membrane through its farnesylated and positively charged C-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) is critical to its oncogenic function. However, the structural mechanisms of membrane association are not fully understood. Here, using confocal microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular dynamics simulations, we observed that K-Ras4B can be distributed in rigid and loosely packed membrane domains. Its membrane binding domain interaction with phospholipids is driven by membrane fluidity. The farnesyl group spontaneously inserts into the disordered lipid microdomains, whereas the rigid microdomains restrict the farnesyl group penetration. We speculate that the resulting farnesyl protrusion toward the cell interior allows oligomerization of the K-Ras4B membrane binding domain in rigid microdomains. Unlike other Ras isoforms, K-Ras4B HVR contains a single farnesyl modification and positively charged polylysine sequence. The high positive charge not only modulates specific HVR binding to anionic phospholipids but farnesyl membrane orientation. Phosphorylation of Ser-181 prohibits spontaneous farnesyl membrane insertion. The mechanism illuminates the roles of HVR modifications in K-Ras4B targeting microdomains of the plasma membrane and suggests an additional function for HVR in regulation of Ras signaling. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Mechanisms of Membrane Binding of Small GTPase K-Ras4B Farnesylated Hypervariable Region*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyunbum; Abraham, Sherwin J.; Chavan, Tanmay S.; Hitchinson, Ben; Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Tarasova, Nadya I.; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B belongs to a family of small GTPases that regulates cell growth, differentiation and survival. K-ras is frequently mutated in cancer. K-Ras4B association with the plasma membrane through its farnesylated and positively charged C-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) is critical to its oncogenic function. However, the structural mechanisms of membrane association are not fully understood. Here, using confocal microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular dynamics simulations, we observed that K-Ras4B can be distributed in rigid and loosely packed membrane domains. Its membrane binding domain interaction with phospholipids is driven by membrane fluidity. The farnesyl group spontaneously inserts into the disordered lipid microdomains, whereas the rigid microdomains restrict the farnesyl group penetration. We speculate that the resulting farnesyl protrusion toward the cell interior allows oligomerization of the K-Ras4B membrane binding domain in rigid microdomains. Unlike other Ras isoforms, K-Ras4B HVR contains a single farnesyl modification and positively charged polylysine sequence. The high positive charge not only modulates specific HVR binding to anionic phospholipids but farnesyl membrane orientation. Phosphorylation of Ser-181 prohibits spontaneous farnesyl membrane insertion. The mechanism illuminates the roles of HVR modifications in K-Ras4B targeting microdomains of the plasma membrane and suggests an additional function for HVR in regulation of Ras signaling. PMID:25713064

  2. Crosstalk between Bcl-2 family and Ras family small GTPases: potential cell fate regulation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jia; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2013-01-01

    Cell fate regulation is a function of diverse cell signaling pathways that promote cell survival and or inhibit cell death execution. In this regard, the role of the Bcl-2 family in maintaining a tight balance between cell death and cell proliferation has been extensively studied. The conventional dogma links cell fate regulation by the Bcl-2 family to its effect on mitochondrial permeabilization and apoptosis amplification. However, recent evidence provide a novel mechanism for death regulation by the Bcl-2 family via modulating cellular redox metabolism. For example overexpression of Bcl-2 has been shown to contribute to a pro-oxidant intracellular milieu and down-regulation of cellular superoxide levels enhanced death sensitivity of Bcl-2 overexpressing cells. Interestingly, gene knockdown of the small GTPase Rac1 or pharmacological inhibition of its activity also reverted death phenotype in Bcl-2 expressing cells. This appears to be a function of an interaction between Bcl-2 and Rac1. Similar functional associations have been described between the Bcl-2 family and other members of the Ras superfamily. These interactions at the mitochondria provide novel opportunities for strategic therapeutic targeting of drug-resistant cancers.

  3. Epidermal activation of the small GTPase Rac1 in psoriasis pathogenesis.

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    Winge, Mårten C G; Marinkovich, M Peter

    2017-01-05

    The small GTPase Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1) plays a central role in skin homeostasis, including barrier function, wound healing and inflammatory responses. Psoriasis is a common skin disease characterized by deregulation of these functions, and affected skin exhibit keratinocyte hyperproliferation, inflammation and immune cell infiltration. Although psoriasis is often triggered by environmental stimulus, there is a strong genetic association with genes expressed in both immune cells and keratinocytes, of which several are linked to Rac1 signaling. Rac1 is highly active in human psoriatic lesional skin and keratinocytes, and keratinocyte-specific overexpression of an activated mutant of Rac1, Rac1 V12 , in a transgenic mouse model closely mimics the presentation of human psoriasis. Both Rac1 activation in keratinocytes and immune derived stimulus are required to drive psoriasiform signaling in transgenic mouse and human xenograft models of psoriasis. Therefore, understanding how increased Rac1 activation in psoriatic epidermis is regulated is central to understanding how the abnormal crosstalk between keratinocytes and immune cells is maintained.

  4. Are small GTPases signal hubs in sugar-mediated induction of fructan biosynthesis?

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    Tita Ritsema

    Full Text Available External sugar initiates biosynthesis of the reserve carbohydrate fructan, but the molecular processes mediating this response remain obscure. Previously it was shown that a phosphatase and a general kinase inhibitor hamper fructan accumulation. We use various phosphorylation inhibitors both in barley and in Arabidopsis and show that the expression of fructan biosynthetic genes is dependent on PP2A and different kinases such as Tyr-kinases and PI3-kinases. To further characterize the phosphorylation events involved, comprehensive analysis of kinase activities in the cell was performed using a PepChip, an array of >1000 kinase consensus substrate peptide substrates spotted on a chip. Comparison of kinase activities in sugar-stimulated and mock(sorbitol-treated Arabidopsis demonstrates the altered phosphorylation of many consensus substrates and documents the differences in plant kinase activity upon sucrose feeding. The different phosphorylation profiles obtained are consistent with sugar-mediated alterations in Tyr phosphorylation, cell cycling, and phosphoinositide signaling, and indicate cytoskeletal rearrangements. The results lead us to infer a central role for small GTPases in sugar signaling.

  5. Are Small GTPases Signal Hubs in Sugar-Mediated Induction of Fructan Biosynthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritsema, Tita; Brodmann, David; Diks, Sander H.; Bos, Carina L.; Nagaraj, Vinay; Pieterse, Corné M.J.; Boller, Thomas; Wiemken, Andres; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2009-01-01

    External sugar initiates biosynthesis of the reserve carbohydrate fructan, but the molecular processes mediating this response remain obscure. Previously it was shown that a phosphatase and a general kinase inhibitor hamper fructan accumulation. We use various phosphorylation inhibitors both in barley and in Arabidopsis and show that the expression of fructan biosynthetic genes is dependent on PP2A and different kinases such as Tyr-kinases and PI3-kinases. To further characterize the phosphorylation events involved, comprehensive analysis of kinase activities in the cell was performed using a PepChip, an array of >1000 kinase consensus substrate peptide substrates spotted on a chip. Comparison of kinase activities in sugar-stimulated and mock(sorbitol)-treated Arabidopsis demonstrates the altered phosphorylation of many consensus substrates and documents the differences in plant kinase activity upon sucrose feeding. The different phosphorylation profiles obtained are consistent with sugar-mediated alterations in Tyr phosphorylation, cell cycling, and phosphoinositide signaling, and indicate cytoskeletal rearrangements. The results lead us to infer a central role for small GTPases in sugar signaling. PMID:19672308

  6. Stage-specific functions of the small Rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 for adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadodaria, Krishna C; Brakebusch, Cord; Suter, Ueli

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the generation, maturation, and integration of new granule cells generated throughout life in the mammalian hippocampus remain poorly understood. Small Rho GTPases, such as Cdc42 and Rac1, have been implicated previously in neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC......) proliferation and neuronal maturation during embryonic development. Here we used conditional genetic deletion and virus-based loss-of-function approaches to identify temporally distinct functions for Cdc42 and Rac1 in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We found that Cdc42 is involved in mouse NSPC proliferation......, initial dendritic development, and dendritic spine maturation. In contrast, Rac1 is dispensable for early steps of neuronal development but is important for late steps of dendritic growth and spine maturation. These results establish cell-autonomous and stage-specific functions for the small Rho GTPases...

  7. Orthogonal ring-closing alkyne and olefin metathesis for the synthesis of small GTPase-targeting bicyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromm, Philipp M; Schaubach, Sebastian; Spiegel, Jochen; Fürstner, Alois; Grossmann, Tom N; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-04-14

    Bicyclic peptides are promising scaffolds for the development of inhibitors of biological targets that proved intractable by typical small molecules. So far, access to bioactive bicyclic peptide architectures is limited due to a lack of appropriate orthogonal ring-closing reactions. Here, we report chemically orthogonal ring-closing olefin (RCM) and alkyne metathesis (RCAM), which enable an efficient chemo- and regioselective synthesis of complex bicyclic peptide scaffolds with variable macrocycle geometries. We also demonstrate that the formed alkyne macrocycle can be functionalized subsequently. The orthogonal RCM/RCAM system was successfully used to evolve a monocyclic peptide inhibitor of the small GTPase Rab8 into a bicyclic ligand. This modified peptide shows the highest affinity for an activated Rab GTPase that has been reported so far. The RCM/RCAM-based formation of bicyclic peptides provides novel opportunities for the design of bioactive scaffolds suitable for the modulation of challenging protein targets.

  8. Spatio-temporal manipulation of small GTPase activity at subcellular level and on timescale of seconds in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRose, Robert; Pohlmeyer, Christopher; Umeda, Nobuhiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Nagano, Tetsuo; Kuo, Scot; Inoue, Takanari

    2012-03-09

    Dynamic regulation of the Rho family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) with great spatiotemporal precision is essential for various cellular functions and events(1, 2). Their spatiotemporally dynamic nature has been revealed by visualization of their activity and localization in real time(3). In order to gain deeper understanding of their roles in diverse cellular functions at the molecular level, the next step should be perturbation of protein activities at a precise subcellular location and timing. To achieve this goal, we have developed a method for light-induced, spatio-temporally controlled activation of small GTPases by combining two techniques: (1) rapamycin-induced FKBP-FRB heterodimerization and (2) a photo-caging method of rapamycin. With the use of rapamycin-mediated FKBP-FRB heterodimerization, we have developed a method for rapidly inducible activation or inactivation of small GTPases including Rac(4), Cdc42(4), RhoA(4) and Ras(5), in which rapamycin induces translocation of FKBP-fused GTPases, or their activators, to the plasma membrane where FRB is anchored. For coupling with this heterodimerization system, we have also developed a photo-caging system of rapamycin analogs. A photo-caged compound is a small molecule whose activity is suppressed with a photocleavable protecting group known as a caging group. To suppress heterodimerization activity completely, we designed a caged rapamycin that is tethered to a macromolecule such that the resulting large complex cannot cross the plasma membrane, leading to virtually no background activity as a chemical dimerizer inside cells(6). Figure 1 illustrates a scheme of our system. With the combination of these two systems, we locally recruited a Rac activator to the plasma membrane on a timescale of seconds and achieved light-induced Rac activation at the subcellular level(6).

  9. Cat eye syndrome associated with aganglionosis of the small and large intestine.

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, J; Sierra, I A; D'Croz, E

    1989-01-01

    A newborn male infant is presented with the characteristic phenotype of the cat eye syndrome and a small supernumerary chromosome shorter than a 22. He also had complete absence of parasympathetic ganglion cells throughout the small and large intestine.

  10. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B, a novel small GTPase, is involved in the regulation of DNA gyrase and drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jun; Han, Jiao; Wu, Hanyu; Hu, Xinling; Deng, Jiaoyu; Fleming, Joy; Maxwell, Anthony; Bi, Lijun; Mi, Kaixia

    2013-01-01

    DNA gyrase plays a vital role in resolving DNA topological problems and is the target of antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein A (MfpA) from Mycobacterium smegmatis is a newly identified DNA gyrase inhibitor that is believed to confer intrinsic resistance to fluoroquinolones. However, MfpA does not prevent drug-induced inhibition of DNA gyrase in vitro, implying the involvement of other as yet unknown factors. Here, we have identified a new factor, named Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B (MfpB), which is involved in the protection of DNA gyrase against drugs both in vivo and in vitro. Genetic results suggest that MfpB is necessary for MfpA protection of DNA gyrase against drugs in vivo; an mfpB knockout mutant showed greater susceptibility to ciprofloxacin than the wild-type, whereas a strain overexpressing MfpA and MfpB showed higher loss of susceptibility. Further biochemical characterization indicated that MfpB is a small GTPase and its GTP bound form interacts directly with MfpA and influences its interaction with DNA gyrase. Mutations in MfpB that decrease its GTPase activity disrupt its protective efficacy. Our studies suggest that MfpB, a small GTPase, is required for MfpA-conferred protection of DNA gyrase. PMID:23275532

  11. Cat eye syndrome associated with aganglionosis of the small and large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, J; Sierra, I A; D'Croz, E

    1989-01-01

    A newborn male infant is presented with the characteristic phenotype of the cat eye syndrome and a small supernumerary chromosome shorter than a 22. He also had complete absence of parasympathetic ganglion cells throughout the small and large intestine. Images PMID:2585462

  12. RhoA of the Rho family small GTPases is essential for B lymphocyte development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangmin Zhang

    Full Text Available RhoA is a member of the Rho family small GTPases that are implicated in various cell functions including proliferation and survival. However, the physiological role of RhoA in vivo remains largely unknown. Here, we deleted RhoA in the B cell and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC populations in RhoA(flox/flox mice with CD19 and Mx promoter-driven Cre expression, respectively. Deletion of RhoA by CD19(Cre/+ significantly blocked B cell development in spleen, leading to a marked reduction in the number of transitional, marginal zone, and follicular B cells. Surprisingly, neither B cell proliferation in response to either LPS or B cell receptor (BCR engagement nor B cell survival rate in vivo was affected by RhoA deletion. Furthermore, RhoA(-/- B cells, like control cells, were rescued from apoptosis by BCR crosslinking in vitro. In contrast, RhoA deficiency led to a defect in B cell activating factor (BAFF-mediated B cell survival that was associated with a dampened expression of BAFF receptor and a loss of BAFF-mediated Akt activation. Finally, HSC deletion of RhoA by Mx-Cre severely reduced proB/preB and immature B cell populations in bone marrow while common lymphoid progenitors were increased, indicating that RhoA is also required for B cell progenitor/precursor differentiation. Taken together, our results uncover an important role for RhoA at multiple stages of B cell development.

  13. The small GTPase RhoB regulates TNFα signaling in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Kroon

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response of endothelial cells triggered by cytokines such as TNFα and IL1β plays a pivotal role in innate immunity. Upon pro-inflammatory cytokine stimulation, endothelial cells produce chemokines and cytokines that attract and activate leukocytes, and express high levels of leukocyte adhesion molecules. This process is mediated by intracellular signaling cascades triggered by activation of e.g. the TNFα receptor (TNFR that lead to the activation of the NFκB transcription factor and of MAP kinases, which in turn activate inflammatory gene transcription. We found that the small GTPase RhoB was strongly and rapidly upregulated in primary human endothelial cells by TNFα, IL1β and LPS. We subsequently investigated the role of RhoB in the regulation of TNFR signaling in endothelial cells by silencing RhoB expression with siRNA. We provide evidence that the TNFα-induced activation of p38 MAP kinase is strongly dependent on RhoB, but not on RhoA, while JNK activation is regulated by both RhoB and RhoA. Consistent with the important role of p38 MAP kinase in inflammation, we demonstrate that loss of RhoB impairs TNFα-induced ICAM-1 expression and reduces cell production of IL6 and IL8. In addition, we show that RhoB silencing alters the intracellular traffic of TNFα after endocytosis. Since RhoB is a known regulator of the intracellular traffic of membrane receptors, our data suggest that RhoB controls TNFα signaling through the regulation of the TNFR traffic.

  14. Nucleophosmin1 is a negative regulator of the small GTPase Rac1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoughlami, Younes; van Stalborgh, Anne M.; van Hennik, Paula B.; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    The Rac1 GTPase is a critical regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics and controls many biological processes, such as cell migration, cell-cell contacts, cellular growth and cell division. These complex processes are controlled by Rac1 signaling through effector proteins. We have previously identified

  15. The small GTPase RhoH is an atypical regulator of haematopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubatzky Katharina F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases are a distinct subfamily of the superfamily of Ras GTPases. The best-characterised members are RhoA, Rac and Cdc42 that regulate many diverse actions such as actin cytoskeleton reorganisation, adhesion, motility as well as cell proliferation, differentiation and gene transcription. Among the 20 members of that family, only Rac2 and RhoH show an expression restricted to the haematopoietic lineage. RhoH was first discovered in 1995 as a fusion transcript with the transcriptional repressor LAZ3/BCL6. It was therefore initially named translation three four (TTF but later on renamed RhoH due to its close relationship to the Ras/Rho family of GTPases. Since then, RhoH has been implicated in human cancer as the gene is subject to somatic hypermutation and by the detection of RHOH as a translocation partner for LAZ3/BCL6 or other genes in human lymphomas. Underexpression of RhoH is found in hairy cell leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia. Some of the amino acids that are crucial for GTPase activity are mutated in RhoH so that the protein is a GTPase-deficient, so-called atypical Rho GTPase. Therefore other mechanisms of regulating RhoH activity have been described. These include regulation at the mRNA level and tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein's unique ITAM-like motif. The C-terminal CaaX box of RhoH is mainly a target for farnesyl-transferase but can also be modified by geranylgeranyl-transferase. Isoprenylation of RhoH and changes in subcellular localisation may be an additional factor to fine-tune signalling. Little is currently known about its signalling, regulation or interaction partners. Recent studies have shown that RhoH negatively influences the proliferation and homing of murine haematopoietic progenitor cells, presumably by acting as an antagonist for Rac1. In leukocytes, RhoH is needed to keep the cells in a resting, non-adhesive state, but the exact mechanism has yet to be elucidated. RhoH has also been

  16. Stage-specific control of neural crest stem cell proliferation by the small rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Herzog, Dominik; Sumara, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    -renewal and proliferation of later stage, but not early migratory NCSCs. This stage-specific requirement for small Rho GTPases is due to changes in NCSCs that, during development, acquire responsiveness to mitogenic EGF acting upstream of both Cdc42 and Rac1. Thus, our data reveal distinct mechanisms for growth control......The neural crest (NC) generates a variety of neural and non-neural tissues during vertebrate development. Both migratory NC cells and their target structures contain cells with stem cell features. Here we show that these populations of neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) are differentially...

  17. Rab17 and rab18, small GTPases with specificity for polarized epithelial cells: genetic mapping in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, E B; Barbosa, M D; Zerial, M; Kingsmore, S F

    1997-11-01

    The Rab subfamily of small GTPases plays an important role in the regulation of membrane traffic in eukaryotic cells. While most Rab proteins are equally expressed in polarized and nonpolarized cells, Rab17 and Rab18 show epithelial cell specificity. Here we report the genetic mapping of Rab17 and Rab18 on mouse chromosomes 1 and 18, respectively. We also discuss some implications of Rab17 and Rab18 mapping, including their candidacy for the mouse mutations ln (leaden), Tw (twirler), and ax (ataxia). Copyright 1997 Academic Press.

  18. Leucine-rich repeat kinase-1 regulates osteoclast function by modulating RAC1/Cdc42 Small GTPase phosphorylation and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Canjun; Goodluck, Helen; Qin, Xuezhong; Liu, Bo; Mohan, Subburaman; Xing, Weirong

    2016-10-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase-1 (Lrrk1) consists of ankyrin repeats (ANK), leucine-rich repeats (LRR), a GTPase-like domain of Roc (ROC), a COR domain, a serine/threonine kinase domain (KD), and WD40 repeats (WD40). Previous studies have revealed that knockout (KO) of Lrrk1 in mice causes severe osteopetrosis, and a human mutation of Lrrk1 leads to osteosclerotic metaphysial dysplasia. The molecular mechanism by which Lrrk1 regulates osteoclast function is unknown. In this study, we generated a series of Lrrk1 mutants and evaluated their ability to rescue defective bone resorption in Lrrk1-deficient osteoclasts by use of pit formation assays. Overexpression of Lrrk1 or LRR-truncated Lrrk1, but not ANK-truncated Lrrk1, WD40-truncated Lrrk1, Lrrk1-KD, or K651A mutant Lrrk1, rescued bone resorption function of Lrrk1 KO osteoclasts. We next examined whether RAC1/Cdc42 small GTPases are direct substrates of Lrrk1 in osteoclasts. Western blot and pull-down assays revealed that Lrrk1 deficiency in osteoclasts resulted in reduced phosphorylation and activation of RAC1/Cdc42. In vitro kinase assays confirmed that recombinant Lrrk1 phosphorylated RAC1-GST protein, and immunoprecipitation showed that the interaction of Lrrk1 with RAC1 occurred within 10 min after RANKL treatment. Overexpression of constitutively active Q61L RAC1 partially rescued the resorptive function of Lrrk1-deficient osteoclasts. Furthermore, lack of Lrrk1 in osteoclasts led to reduced autophosphorylation of p21 protein-activated kinase-1 at Ser 144 , catalyzed by RAC1/Cdc42 binding and activation. Our data indicate that Lrrk1 regulates osteoclast function by directly modulating phosphorylation and activation of small GTPase RAC1/Cdc42 and that its function depends on ANK, ROC, WD40, and kinase domains. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation by targeting Rac1 GTPase with small interference RNA in tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yan; Bi Feng; Zhang Xueyong; Pan Yanglin; Liu Na; Zheng Yi; Fan Daiming

    2004-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced angiogenesis plays an important role in the malignancy of solid tumors. A number of recent studies including our own have suggested that Rho family small GTPases are involved in this process, and Rac1, a prominent member of the Rho family, may be critical in regulating hypoxia-induced gene activation of several angiogenesis factors and tumor suppressors. To further define Rac1 function in angiogenesis and to explore novel approaches to modulate angiogenesis, we employed the small interference RNA technique to knock down gene expression of Rac1 in gastric cancer cell line AGS that expresses a high level of Rac1. Both the mRNA and protein levels of Rac1 in the AGS cells were decreased dramatically after transfection with a Rac1-specific siRNA vector. When the conditioned medium derived from the Rac1 downregulated AGS cells was applied to the human endothelial cells, it could significantly inhibit the cell proliferation. Further study proved that, VEGF and HIF-1α, two angiogenesis promoting factors, were found to be downregulated whereas p53 and VHL, which are tumor suppressors and angiogenesis inhibitors, were upregulated in the Rac1 siRNA transfected cells. Our results suggest that Rac1 may be involved in angiogenesis by controlling the expression of angiogenesis-related factors and provide a possible strategy for the treatment of tumor angiogenesis by targeting the Rac1 GTPase

  20. Exercise modulates redox-sensitive small GTPase activity in the brain microvasculature in a model of brain metastasis formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Wolff

    Full Text Available Tumor cell extravasation into the brain requires passage through the blood-brain barrier (BBB. There is evidence that exercise can alter the oxidation status of the brain microvasculature and protect against tumor cell invasion into the brain, although the mechanisms are not well understood. In the current study, we focused on the role of microenvironment generated by exercise and metastasizing tumor cells at the levels of brain microvessels, influencing oxidative stress-mediated responses and activation of redox-sensitive small GTPases. Mature male mice were exercised for four weeks using a running wheel with the average voluntary running distance 9.0 ± 0.3 km/day. Mice were then infused with 1.0 × 10(6 D122 (murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells into the brain microvasculature, and euthanized either 48 hours (in short-term studies or 2-3 weeks (in long-term studies post tumor cell administration. A significant increase in the level of reactive oxygen species was observed following 48 hours or 3 weeks of tumor cells growth, which was accompanied by a reduction in MnSOD expression in the exercised mice. Activation of the small GTPase Rho was negatively correlated with running distance in the tumor cell infused mice. Together, these data suggest that exercise may play a significant role during aggressive metastatic invasion, especially at higher intensities in pre-trained individuals.

  1. Rho GTPases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadok, Amine; Marshall, Chris J

    2014-01-01

    Since their discovery in the late eighties, the role of Rho GTPases in the regulation of cell migration has been extensively studied and has mainly focused on the hallmark family members Rho, Rac, and Cdc42. Recent technological advances in cell biology, such as Rho-family GTPase activity biosensors, studies in 3D, and unbiased RNAi-based screens, have revealed an increasingly complex role for Rho GTPases during cell migration, with many inter-connected functions and a strong dependency on the physical and chemical properties of the surrounding environment. This review aims to give an overview of recent studies on the role of Rho-family GTPase members in the modulation of cell migration in different environments, and discuss future directions. PMID:24978113

  2. Repeated BCG treatment of mouse bladder selectively stimulates small GTPases and HLA antigens and inhibits single-spanning uroplakins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Donnell Michael A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite being a mainstay for treating superficial bladder carcinoma and a promising agent for interstitial cystitis, the precise mechanism of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG remains poorly understood. It is particularly unclear whether BCG is capable of altering gene expression beyond its well-recognized pro-inflammatory effects and how this relates to its therapeutic efficacy. The objective of this study was to determine differentially expressed genes in the mouse bladder following repeated intravesical BCG therapy. Methods Mice were transurethrally instilled with BCG or pyrogen-free on days 1, 7, 14, and 21. Seven days after the last instillation, urothelia along with the submucosa was removed and amplified ds-DNA was prepared from control- and BCG-treated bladder mucosa and used to generate suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH. Plasmids from control- and BCG-specific differentially expressed clones and confirmed by Virtual Northern were then purified and the inserts were sequenced and annotated. Finally, chromatin immune precipitation combined with real-time polymerase chain reaction assay (ChIP/Q-PCR was used to validate SSH-selected transcripts. Results Repeated intravesical BCG treatment induced an up regulation of genes associated with antigen presentation (B2M, HLA-A, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB2, HLA-E, HLA-G, IGHG, and IGH and representatives of two IFNγ-induced small GTPase families: the GBPs (GBP1, GBP2, and GBP5 and the p47GTPases (IIGTP1, IIGTP2, and TGTP. Genes expressed in saline-treated bladders but down-regulated by BCG included: the single-spanning uroplakins (UPK3a and UPK2, SPRR2G, GSTM5, and RSP 19. Conclusion Here we introduced a hypothesis-generator approach to determine key genes involved in the urothelium/sumbmucosa responses to BCG therapy. Urinary bladder responds to repeated BCG treatment by up-regulating not only antigen presentation-related genes, but also GBP and p47 small GTPases, both potentially

  3. The nutrient stress-induced small GTPase Rab5 contributes to the activation of vesicle trafficking and vacuolar activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Kanada, Akira; Matsuzaki, Mariko; Byrne, Stuart D; Okumura, Fumihiko; Kamura, Takumi

    2014-07-25

    Rab family small GTPases regulate membrane trafficking by spatiotemporal recruitment of various effectors. However, it remains largely unclear how the expression and functions of Rab proteins are regulated in response to extracellular or intracellular stimuli. Here we show that Ypt53, one isoform of Rab5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is up-regulated significantly under nutrient stress. Under non-stress conditions, Vps21, a constitutively expressed Rab5 isoform, is crucial to Golgi-vacuole trafficking and to vacuolar hydrolase activity. However, when cells are exposed to nutrient stress for an extended period of time, the up-regulated Ypt53 and the constitutive Vps21 function redundantly to maintain these activities, which, in turn, prevent the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and maintain mitochondrial respiration. Together, our results clarify the relative roles of these constitutive and nutrient stress-inducible Rab5 proteins that ensure adaptable vesicle trafficking and vacuolar hydrolase activity, thereby allowing cells to adapt to environmental changes.

  4. Abba promotes PDGF-mediated membrane ruffling through activation of the small GTPase Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Datong; Niu, Shuqiong; Yu, Dan; Zhan, Xiaoguo H; Zeng, Xianchun; Cui, Bota; Chen, Yanping; Yoon, Jennifer; Martin, Stuart S; Lu, Xiang; Zhan, Xi

    2010-10-29

    Abba is a member of the I-BAR-domain protein family that is characterized by a convex-shaped membrane-binding motif. Overexpression of GFP-tagged Abba in murine fibroblasts potentiated PDGF-mediated formation of membrane ruffles and lamellipodia. Immunofluorescent microscopy and pull-down analysis revealed that GFP-Abba colocalized with an active form of Rac1 in the membrane ruffles and enhanced the Rac GTPase activity in response to PDGF stimulation. Further immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that GFP-Abba bound to both wild-type and constitutively active Rac1 and that the binding to either of the Rac1 forms was significantly enhanced upon PDGF stimulation. On the other hand, an Abba mutant deficient in Rac1 binding failed to promote membrane ruffling and Rac1 activation in response to PDGF. However, the cells overexpressing a truncated mutant carrying the I-BAR domain alone displayed numerous filopodia-like microspikes in a manner independent of growth factors. Also, the Rac-binding activity of the mutant was not affected by PDGF treatment. Our data indicates that the interaction between full-length Abba and Rac1 is implicated in membrane deformation and subjected to a growth factor-mediated regulation through the C-terminal sequence. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Mai; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Numano, Rika; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Kakeyama, Masaki; Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. ► Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. ► Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  6. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Mai [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Tetsuya [Cell Signaling Group, Waseda Bioscience Research Institute in Singapore (WABOIS), Waseda University, 11 Biopolis Way, 05-01/02 Helios, Singapore 138667 (Singapore); Numano, Rika [The Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS), Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tennpaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Ikematsu, Kazuya [Forensic Pathology and Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kakeyama, Masaki [Laboratory of Environmental Health Sciences, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Tsuboi, Takashi, E-mail: takatsuboi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  7. Catalysis of GTP hydrolysis by small GTPases at atomic detail by integration of X-ray crystallography, experimental, and theoretical IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudack, Till; Jenrich, Sarah; Brucker, Sven; Vetter, Ingrid R; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2015-10-02

    Small GTPases regulate key processes in cells. Malfunction of their GTPase reaction by mutations is involved in severe diseases. Here, we compare the GTPase reaction of the slower hydrolyzing GTPase Ran with Ras. By combination of time-resolved FTIR difference spectroscopy and QM/MM simulations we elucidate that the Mg(2+) coordination by the phosphate groups, which varies largely among the x-ray structures, is the same for Ran and Ras. A new x-ray structure of a Ran·RanBD1 complex with improved resolution confirmed this finding and revealed a general problem with the refinement of Mg(2+) in GTPases. The Mg(2+) coordination is not responsible for the much slower GTPase reaction of Ran. Instead, the location of the Tyr-39 side chain of Ran between the γ-phosphate and Gln-69 prevents the optimal positioning of the attacking water molecule by the Gln-69 relative to the γ-phosphate. This is confirmed in the RanY39A·RanBD1 crystal structure. The QM/MM simulations provide IR spectra of the catalytic center, which agree very nicely with the experimental ones. The combination of both methods can correlate spectra with structure at atomic detail. For example the FTIR difference spectra of RasA18T and RanT25A mutants show that spectral differences are mainly due to the hydrogen bond of Thr-25 to the α-phosphate in Ran. By integration of x-ray structure analysis, experimental, and theoretical IR spectroscopy the catalytic center of the x-ray structural models are further refined to sub-Å resolution, allowing an improved understanding of catalysis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Role of Wasp and the small GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and Cdc42 during capacitation and acrosome reaction in spermatozoa of English guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L; Mújica, Adela; Chiquete-Felix, Natalia; Déciga-Alcaraz, Alejandro; Medina-Reyes, Estefany I; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2016-10-01

    Cytoskeleton remodeling is necessary for capacitation and the acrosome reaction in spermatozoa. F-actin is located in the acrosome and equatorial region during capacitation, but is relocated in the post-acrosomal region during the acrosome reaction in spermatozoa from bull, rat, mice, and guinea pig. Actin polymerization and relocalization are generally regulated by small GTPases that activate Wasp protein, which coordinates with Arp2/3, profilin I, and profilin II to complete cytoskeletal remodeling. This sequence of events is not completely described in spermatozoa, though. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if Wasp interacts with small GTPases (RhoA, RhoB, and Cdc42) and proteins (Arp2/3, profilin I, and profilin II) that co-localize with F-actin during capacitation and the acrosome reaction in English guinea pig spermatozoa obtained from the vas deferens. The spermatozoa were capacitated in calcium-free medium, incubated with an activator or an inhibitor of GTPases, and then induced to acrosome react using calcium. The distribution patterns of F-actin were compared to the patterns of Wasp and its putative interaction partners: Wasp and RhoB, but not RhoA or Cdc42, localization overlap with F-actin during capacitation and the acrosome reaction. Activation of small GTPases localized RhoB to the post-acrosomal region whereas their inhibition prevented acrosome exocytosis. Arp2/3 and profilin II appear to interact with Wasp in the post-acrosomal region and flagellum, while profilin I and Wasp could be found in the equatorial region. Thus, Wasp and F-actin distribution overlap during capacitation and acrosome reaction, and small GTPases play an important role in cytoskeleton remodeling during these processes in spermatozoa. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 927-937, 2016 © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Targeting Ras signaling in AML: RALB is a small GTPase with big potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Emily J; Eckfeldt, Craig E

    2017-07-06

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a devastating malignancy for which novel treatment approaches are desperately needed. Ras signaling is an attractive therapeutic target for AML because a large proportion of AMLs have mutations in NRAS, KRAS, or genes that activate Ras signaling, and key Ras effectors are activated in virtually all AML patient samples. This has inspired efforts to develop Ras-targeted treatment strategies for AML. Due to the inherent difficulty and disappointing efficacy of targeting Ras proteins directly, many have focused on inhibiting Ras effector pathways. Inhibiting the major oncogenic Ras effectors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and/or phosphatidylinositiol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, has generally demonstrated modest efficacy for AML. While this may be in part related to functional redundancy between these pathways, it is now clear that other Ras effectors have key oncogenic roles. Specifically, the Ras-like (Ral) GTPases have emerged as critical mediators of Ras-driven transformation and AML cell survival. Our group recently uncovered a critical role for RALB signaling in leukemic cell survival and a potential mediator of relapse following Ras-targeted therapy in AML. Furthermore, we found that RALB signaling is hyperactivated in AML patient samples, and inhibiting RALB has potent anti-leukemic activity in preclinical AML models. While key questions remain regarding the importance of RALB signaling across the genetically diverse spectrum of AML, the specific mechanism(s) that promotes leukemic cell survival downstream of RALB, and how to pharmacologically target RALB signaling effectively - RALB has emerged as a critical Ras effector and potential therapeutic target for AML.

  10. Different roles of the small GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoG in CALEB/NGC-induced dendritic tree complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jana; Franke, Kristin; Frick, Manfred; Schumacher, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Rho GTPases play prominent roles in the regulation of cytoskeletal reorganization. Many aspects have been elaborated concerning the individual functions of Rho GTPases in distinct signaling pathways leading to cytoskeletal rearrangements. However, major questions have yet to be answered regarding the integration and the signaling hierarchy of different Rho GTPases in regulating the cytoskeleton in fundamental physiological events like neuronal process differentiation. Here, we investigate the roles of the small GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoG in defining dendritic tree complexity stimulated by the transmembrane epidermal growth factor family member CALEB/NGC. Combining gain-of-function and loss-of-function analysis in primary hippocampal neurons, we find that Rac1 is essential for CALEB/NGC-mediated dendritic branching. Cdc42 reduces the complexity of dendritic trees. Interestingly, we identify the palmitoylated isoform of Cdc42 to adversely affect dendritic outgrowth and dendritic branching, whereas the prenylated Cdc42 isoform does not. In contrast to Rac1, CALEB/NGC and Cdc42 are not directly interconnected in regulating dendritic tree complexity. Unlike Rac1, the Rac1-related GTPase RhoG reduces the complexity of dendritic trees by acting upstream of CALEB/NGC. Mechanistically, CALEB/NGC activates Rac1, and RhoG reduces the amount of CALEB/NGC that is located at the right site for Rac1 activation at the cell membrane. Thus, Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoG perform very specific and non-redundant functions at different levels of hierarchy in regulating dendritic tree complexity induced by CALEB/NGC. Rho GTPases play a prominent role in dendritic branching. CALEB/NGC is a transmembrane member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family that mediates dendritic branching, dependent on Rac1. CALEB/NGC stimulates Rac1 activity. RhoG inhibits CALEB/NGC-mediated dendritic branching by decreasing the amount of CALEB/NGC at the plasma membrane. Palmitoylated, but not prenylated form

  11. Role of the Small GTPase Rho3 in Golgi/Endosome trafficking through functional interaction with adaptin in Fission Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Kita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We had previously identified the mutant allele of apm1(+ that encodes a homolog of the mammalian µ1A subunit of the clathrin-associated adaptor protein-1 (AP-1 complex, and we demonstrated the role of Apm1 in Golgi/endosome trafficking, secretion, and vacuole fusion in fission yeast. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we isolated rho3(+, which encodes a Rho-family small GTPase, an important regulator of exocystosis, as a multicopy-suppressor of the temperature-sensitive growth of the apm1-1 mutant cells. Overexpression of Rho3 suppressed the Cl(- sensitivity and immunosuppressant sensitivity of the apm1-1 mutant cells. Overexpression of Rho3 also suppressed the fragmentation of vacuoles, and the accumulation of v-SNARE Syb1 in Golgi/endosomes and partially suppressed the defective secretion associated with apm1-deletion cells. Notably, electron microscopic observation of the rho3-deletion cells revealed the accumulation of abnormal Golgi-like structures, vacuole fragmentation, and accumulation of secretory vesicles; these phenotypes were very similar to those of the apm1-deletion cells. Furthermore, the rho3-deletion cells and apm1-deletion cells showed very similar phenotypic characteristics, including the sensitivity to the immunosuppressant FK506, the cell wall-damaging agent micafungin, Cl(-, and valproic acid. Green fluorescent protein (GFP-Rho3 was localized at Golgi/endosomes as well as the plasma membrane and division site. Finally, Rho3 was shown to form a complex with Apm1 as well as with other subunits of the clathrin-associated AP-1 complex in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our findings reveal a novel role of Rho3 in the regulation of Golgi/endosome trafficking and suggest that clathrin-associated adaptor protein-1 and Rho3 co-ordinate in intracellular transport in fission yeast. To the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence

  12. Ras-Related Small GTPases RalA and RalB Regulate Cellular Survival After Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidd, Ambrose R.; Snider, Jared L.; Martin, Timothy D.; Graboski, Sarah F.; Der, Channing J.; Cox, Adrienne D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Oncogenic activation of Ras renders cancer cells resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), but the mechanisms have not been fully characterized. The Ras-like small GTPases RalA and RalB are downstream effectors of Ras function and are critical for both tumor growth and survival. The Ral effector RalBP1/RLIP76 mediates survival of mice after whole-body irradiation, but the role of the Ral GTPases themselves in response to IR is unknown. We have investigated the role of RalA and RalB in cellular responses to IR. Methods and Materials: RalA, RalB, and their major effectors RalBP1 and Sec5 were knocked down by stable expression of short hairpin RNAs in the K-Ras-dependent pancreatic cancer-derived cell line MIA PaCa-2. Radiation responses were measured by standard clonogenic survival assays for reproductive survival, γH2AX expression for double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs), and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) cleavage for apoptosis. Results: Knockdown of K-Ras, RalA, or RalB reduced colony-forming ability post-IR, and knockdown of either Ral isoform decreased the rate of DSB repair post-IR. However, knockdown of RalB, but not RalA, increased cell death. Surprisingly, neither RalBP1 nor Sec5 suppression affected colony formation post-IR. Conclusions: Both RalA and RalB contribute to K-Ras-dependent IR resistance of MIA PaCa-2 cells. Sensitization due to suppressed Ral expression is likely due in part to decreased efficiency of DNA repair (RalA and RalB) and increased susceptibility to apoptosis (RalB). Ral-mediated radioresistance does not depend on either the RalBP1 or the exocyst complex, the two best-characterized Ral effectors, and instead may utilize an atypical or novel effector.

  13. The small Rho GTPase Rac1 controls normal human dermal fibroblasts proliferation with phosphorylation of the oncoprotein c-myc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolova, Ekaterina; Mitev, Vanio; Zhelev, Nikolai; Deroanne, Christophe F.; Poumay, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Proliferation of dermal fibroblasts is crucial for the maintenance of skin. The small Rho GTPase, Rac1, has been identified as a key transducer of proliferative signals in various cell types, but in normal human dermal fibroblasts its significance to cell growth control has not been studied. In this study, we applied the method of RNA interference to suppress endogenous Rac1 expression and examined the consequences on human skin fibroblasts. Rac1 knock-down resulted in inhibition of DNA synthesis. This effect was not mediated by inhibition of the central transducer of proliferative stimuli, ERK1/2 or by activation of the pro-apoptotic p38. Rather, as a consequence of the suppressed Rac1 expression we observed a significant decrease in phosphorylation of c-myc, revealing for the first time that in human fibroblasts Rac1 exerts control on proliferation through c-myc phosphorylation. Thus Rac1 activates proliferation of normal fibroblasts through stimulation of c-myc phosphorylation without affecting ERK1/2 activity

  14. Gain-of-function mutant p53 activates small GTPase Rac1 through SUMOylation to promote tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xuetian; Zhang, Cen; Zhao, Yuhan; Liu, Juan; Lin, Alan W; Tan, Victor M; Drake, Justin M; Liu, Lianxin; Boateng, Michael N; Li, Jun; Feng, Zhaohui; Hu, Wenwei

    2017-08-15

    Tumor suppressor p53 is frequently mutated in human cancer. Mutant p53 often promotes tumor progression through gain-of-function (GOF) mechanisms. However, the mechanisms underlying mutant p53 GOF are not well understood. In this study, we found that mutant p53 activates small GTPase Rac1 as a critical mechanism for mutant p53 GOF to promote tumor progression. Mechanistically, mutant p53 interacts with Rac1 and inhibits its interaction with SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1), which in turn inhibits SENP1-mediated de-SUMOylation of Rac1 to activate Rac1. Targeting Rac1 signaling by RNAi, expression of the dominant-negative Rac1 (Rac1 DN), or the specific Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 greatly inhibits mutant p53 GOF in promoting tumor growth and metastasis. Furthermore, mutant p53 expression is associated with enhanced Rac1 activity in clinical tumor samples. These results uncover a new mechanism for Rac1 activation in tumors and, most importantly, reveal that activation of Rac1 is an unidentified and critical mechanism for mutant p53 GOF in tumorigenesis, which could be targeted for therapy in tumors containing mutant p53. © 2017 Yue et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. Glutaminase 2 is a novel negative regulator of small GTPase Rac1 and mediates p53 function in suppressing metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cen; Liu, Juan; Zhao, Yuhan; Yue, Xuetian; Zhu, Yu; Wang, Xiaolong; Wu, Hao; Blanco, Felix; Li, Shaohua; Bhanot, Gyan; Haffty, Bruce G; Hu, Wenwei; Feng, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Glutaminase (GLS) isoenzymes GLS1 and GLS2 are key enzymes for glutamine metabolism. Interestingly, GLS1 and GLS2 display contrasting functions in tumorigenesis with elusive mechanism; GLS1 promotes tumorigenesis, whereas GLS2 exhibits a tumor-suppressive function. In this study, we found that GLS2 but not GLS1 binds to small GTPase Rac1 and inhibits its interaction with Rac1 activators guanine-nucleotide exchange factors, which in turn inhibits Rac1 to suppress cancer metastasis. This function of GLS2 is independent of GLS2 glutaminase activity. Furthermore, decreased GLS2 expression is associated with enhanced metastasis in human cancer. As a p53 target, GLS2 mediates p53’s function in metastasis suppression through inhibiting Rac1. In summary, our results reveal that GLS2 is a novel negative regulator of Rac1, and uncover a novel function and mechanism whereby GLS2 suppresses metastasis. Our results also elucidate a novel mechanism that contributes to the contrasting functions of GLS1 and GLS2 in tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10727.001 PMID:26751560

  16. The Nutrient Stress-induced Small GTPase Rab5 Contributes to the Activation of Vesicle Trafficking and Vacuolar Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Kanada, Akira; Matsuzaki, Mariko; Byrne, Stuart D.; Okumura, Fumihiko; Kamura, Takumi

    2014-01-01

    Rab family small GTPases regulate membrane trafficking by spatiotemporal recruitment of various effectors. However, it remains largely unclear how the expression and functions of Rab proteins are regulated in response to extracellular or intracellular stimuli. Here we show that Ypt53, one isoform of Rab5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is up-regulated significantly under nutrient stress. Under non-stress conditions, Vps21, a constitutively expressed Rab5 isoform, is crucial to Golgi-vacuole trafficking and to vacuolar hydrolase activity. However, when cells are exposed to nutrient stress for an extended period of time, the up-regulated Ypt53 and the constitutive Vps21 function redundantly to maintain these activities, which, in turn, prevent the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and maintain mitochondrial respiration. Together, our results clarify the relative roles of these constitutive and nutrient stress-inducible Rab5 proteins that ensure adaptable vesicle trafficking and vacuolar hydrolase activity, thereby allowing cells to adapt to environmental changes. PMID:24923442

  17. Ras-dva, a member of novel family of small GTPases, is required for the anterior ectoderm patterning in the Xenopus laevis embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshina, Maria B; Zaraisky, Andrey G; Novoselov, Vladimir V

    2006-02-01

    Ras-like small GTPases are involved in the regulation of many processes essential for the specification of the vertebrate body plan. Recently, we identified the gene of novel small GTPase Ras-dva, which is specifically expressed at the anterior margin of the neural plate of the Xenopus laevis embryo. Now, we demonstrate that Ras-dva and its homologs in other species constitute a novel protein family, distinct from the previously known families of small GTPases. We show that the expression of Ras-dva begins during gastrulation throughout the anterior ectoderm and is activated by the homeodomain transcription factor Otx2; however, later on, Ras-dva expression is inhibited in the anterior neural plate by another homeodomain factor Xanf1. Downregulation of Ras-dva functioning by the dominant-negative mutant or by the antisense morpholino oligonucleotides results in severe malformations of the forebrain and derivatives of the cranial placodes. Importantly, although the observed abnormalities can be rescued by co-injection of the Ras-dva mRNA, they cannot be rescued by the mRNA of the closest Ras-dva homolog from another family of small GTPases, Ras. This fact indicates functional specificity of the Ras-dva signaling pathway. At the molecular level, downregulation of Ras-dva inhibits the expression of several regulators of the anterior neural plate and folds patterning, such as Otx2, BF-1 (also known as Foxg1), Xag2, Pax6, Slug and Sox9, and interferes with FGF8 signaling within the anterior ectoderm. By contrast, expression of the epidermal regulator BMP4 and its target genes, Vent1, Vent2b and Msx1, is upregulated. Together, the data obtained indicate that Ras-dva is an essential component of the signaling network that patterns the early anterior neural plate and the adjacent ectoderm in the Xenopus laevis embryos.

  18. DNA damage response (DDR) induced by topoisomerase II poisons requires nuclear function of the small GTPase Rac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartlick, Friedrich; Bopp, Anita; Henninger, Christian; Fritz, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    Here, we investigated the influence of Rac family small GTPases on mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR) stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons. To this end, we examined the influence of the Rac-specific small molecule inhibitor EHT1864 on Ser139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX, a widely used marker of the DDR triggered by DNA double-strand breaks. EHT1864 attenuated the doxorubicin-stimulated DDR in a subset of cell lines tested, including HepG2 hepatoma cells. EHT1864 reduced the level of DNA strand breaks and increased viability following treatment of HepG2 cells with topo II poisons. Protection by EHT1864 was observed in both p53 wildtype (HepG2) and p53 deficient (Hep3B) human hepatoma cells and, furthermore, remained unaffected upon pharmacological inhibition of p53 in HepG2. Apparently, the impact of Rac on the DDR is independent of p53. Protection from doxorubicin-induced DNA damage by EHT1864 comprises both S and G2 phase cells. The inhibitory effect of EHT1864 on doxorubicin-stimulated DDR was mimicked by pharmacological inhibition of various protein kinases, including JNK, ERK, PI3K, PAK and CK1. EHT1864 and protein kinase inhibitors also attenuated the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Moreover, EHT1864 mitigated the constitutive phosphorylation of topoisomerase IIα at positions S1106, S1213 and S1247. Doxorubicin transport, nuclear import/export of topoisomerase II and Hsp90-related mechanisms are likely not of relevance for doxorubicin-stimulated DDR impaired by EHT1864. We suggest that multiple kinase-dependent but p53- and heat shock protein-independent Rac-regulated nuclear mechanisms are required for activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II poisons. © 2013.

  19. The small GTPase Rac1 is required for smooth muscle contraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahman, Awahan; Davis, Benjamin; Lövdahl, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The role of the small GTP-binding protein Rac1 in smooth muscle contraction was examined using small molecule inhibitors (EHT1864, NSC23766) and a novel smooth muscle-specific, conditional, Rac1 knockout mouse strain. EHT1864, which affects nucleotide binding and inhibits Rac1 activity......, aorta) smooth muscle tissues. This contractile inhibition was associated with inhibition of the Ca2+ transient. Knockout of Rac1 (with a 50% loss of Rac1 protein) lowered active stress in the urinary bladder and the saphenous artery consistent with a role of Rac1 in facilitating smooth muscle...... at lowered intracellular [Ca2+]. These results show that Rac1 activity is required for active contraction in smooth muscle, probably via enabling an adequate Ca2+ transient. At the same time, specific agonists recruit Rac1 signalling via upstream modulators, resulting in either a potentiation of contraction...

  20. Gorlin syndrome associated with small bowel carcinoma and mesenchymal proliferation of the gastrointestinal tract: case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Günther

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Case Presentation A patient with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome presented with two unusual clinical features, i.e. adenocarcinoma of the small bowel and extensive mesenchymal proliferation of the lower gastrointestinal tract. Conclusions We discuss the possibility that these two features are pathogenetically linked to the formerly undescribed patient's PTCH germ line mutation.

  1. Mutations in the small GTPase gene RAB39B are responsible for X-linked mental retardation associated with autism, epilepsy, and macrocephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannandrea, Maila; Bianchi, Veronica; Mignogna, Maria Lidia; Sirri, Alessandra; Carrabino, Salvatore; D'Elia, Errico; Vecellio, Matteo; Russo, Silvia; Cogliati, Francesca; Larizza, Lidia; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Tzschach, Andreas; Kalscheuer, Vera; Oehl-Jaschkowitz, Barbara; Skinner, Cindy; Schwartz, Charles E; Gecz, Jozef; Van Esch, Hilde; Raynaud, Martine; Chelly, Jamel; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Toniolo, Daniela; D'Adamo, Patrizia

    2010-02-12

    Human Mental Retardation (MR) is a common and highly heterogeneous pediatric disorder affecting around 3% of the general population; at least 215 X-linked MR (XLMR) conditions have been described, and mutations have been identified in 83 different genes, encoding proteins with a variety of function, such as chromatin remodeling, synaptic function, and intracellular trafficking. The small GTPases of the RAB family, which play an essential role in intracellular vesicular trafficking, have been shown to be involved in MR. We report here the identification of mutations in the small GTPase RAB39B gene in two male patients. One mutation in family X (D-23) introduced a stop codon seven amino acids after the start codon (c.21C > A; p.Y7X). A second mutation, in the MRX72 family, altered the 5' splice site (c.215+1G > A) and normal splicing. Neither instance produced a protein. Mutations segregate with the disease in the families, and in some family members intellectual disabilities were associated with autism spectrum disorder, epileptic seizures, and macrocephaly. We show that RAB39B, a novel RAB GTPase of unknown function, is a neuronal-specific protein that is localized to the Golgi compartment. Its downregulation leads to an alteration in the number and morphology of neurite growth cones and a significant reduction in presynaptic buttons, suggesting that RAB39B is required for synapse formation and maintenance. Our results demonstrate developmental and functional neuronal alteration as a consequence of downregulation of RAB39B and emphasize the critical role of vesicular trafficking in the development of neurons and human intellectual abilities. Copyright (c) 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Tumor endothelial marker 5 expression in endothelial cells during capillary morphogenesis is induced by the small GTPase Rac and mediates contact inhibition of cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallon, Mario, E-mail: m.vallon@arcor.de [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Rohde, Franziska; Janssen, Klaus-Peter [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Essler, Markus [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany)

    2010-02-01

    Tumor endothelial marker (TEM) 5 is an adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor upregulated in endothelial cells during tumor and physiologic angiogenesis. So far, the mechanisms leading to upregulation of TEM5 and its function during angiogenesis have not been identified. Here, we report that TEM5 expression in endothelial cells is induced during capillary-like network formation on Matrigel, during capillary morphogenesis in a three-dimensional collagen I matrix, and upon confluence on a two-dimensional matrix. TEM5 expression was not induced by a variety of soluble angiogenic factors, including VEGF and bFGF, in subconfluent endothelial cells. TEM5 upregulation was blocked by toxin B from Clostridium difficile, an inhibitor of the small GTPases Rho, Rac, and Cdc42. The Rho inhibitor C3 transferase from Clostridium botulinum did not affect TEM5 expression, whereas the Rac inhibitor NSC23766 suppressed TEM5 upregulation. An excess of the soluble TEM5 extracellular domain or an inhibitory monoclonal TEM5 antibody blocked contact inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation resulting in multilayered islands within the endothelial monolayer and increased vessel density during capillary formation. Based on our results we conclude that TEM5 expression during capillary morphogenesis is induced by the small GTPase Rac and mediates contact inhibition of proliferation in endothelial cells.

  3. Cdc42 and k-Ras Control Endothelial Tubulogenesis through Apical Membrane and Cytoskeletal Polarization: Novel Stimulatory Roles for GTPase Effectors, the Small GTPases, Rac2 and Rap1b, and Inhibitory Influence of Arhgap31 and Rasa1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter R Norden

    Full Text Available A critical and understudied property of endothelial cells is their ability to form lumens and tube networks. Although considerable information has been obtained concerning these issues, including the role of Cdc42 and Rac1 and their effectors such as Pak2, Pak4, Par6b, and co-regulators such as integrins, MT1-MMP and Par3; many key questions remain that are necessary to elucidate molecular and signaling requirements for this fundamental process. In this work, we identify new small GTPase regulators of EC tubulogenesis including k-Ras, Rac2 and Rap1b that act in conjunction with Cdc42 as well as the key downstream effectors, IQGAP1, MRCKβ, beta-Pix, GIT1, and Rasip1 (which can assemble into multiprotein complexes with key regulators including α2β1 integrin and MT1-MMP. In addition, we identify the negative regulators, Arhgap31 (by inactivating Cdc42 and Rac and Rasa1 (by inactivating k-Ras and the positive regulator, Arhgap29 (by inactivating RhoA which play a major functional role during the EC tubulogenic process. Human EC siRNA suppression or mouse knockout of Rasip1 leads to identical phenotypes where ECs form extensive cord networks, but cannot generate lumens or tubes. Essential roles for these molecules during EC tubulogenesis include; i establishment of asymmetric EC cytoskeletal polarization (subapical distribution of acetylated tubulin and basal membrane distribution of F-actin; and ii directed membrane trafficking of pinocytic vacuoles or other intracellular vesicles along acetylated tubulin tracks to the developing apical membrane surface. Cdc42 co-localizes subapically with acetylated tubulin, while Rac1 and k-Ras strongly label vacuole/ vesicle membranes which accumulate and fuse together in a polarized, perinuclear manner. We observe polarized apical membrane and subapical accumulation of key GTPases and effectors regulating EC lumen formation including Cdc42, Rac1, Rac2, k-Ras, Rap1b, activated c-Raf and Rasip1 to control EC

  4. A Pan-GTPase Inhibitor as a Molecular Probe

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Lin; Guo, Yuna; BasuRay, Soumik; Agola, Jacob O.; Romero, Elsa; Simpson, Denise S.; Schroeder, Chad E.; Simons, Peter; Waller, Anna; Garcia, Matthew; Carter, Mark; Ursu, Oleg; Gouveia, Kristine; Golden, Jennifer E.; Aub?, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Overactive GTPases have often been linked to human diseases. The available inhibitors are limited and have not progressed far in clinical trials. We report here a first-in-class small molecule pan-GTPase inhibitor discovered from a high throughput screening campaign. The compound CID1067700 inhibits multiple GTPases in biochemical, cellular protein and protein interaction, as well as cellular functional assays. In the biochemical and protein interaction assays, representative GTPases from Rho...

  5. Expression patterns of genes encoding small GTPases Ras-dva-1 and Ras-dva-2 in the Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshina, Maria B; Bayramov, Andrey V; Zaraisky, Andrey G

    2011-01-01

    Small GTPases of the recently discovered Ras-dva family are specific to the Vertebrate phylum. In Xenopus laevis, Ras-dva-1 is expressed during gastrulation and neurulation in the anterior ectoderm where it regulates the early development of the forebrain and cranial placodes (Tereshina et al., 2006). In the present work, we studied the expression of Ras-dva-1 at later developmental stages. As a result, the Ras-dva-1 expression was revealed in the eye retina, epiphysis (pineal gland), hypophysis (pituitary), branchial arches, pharynx, oesophagus, stomach and gall bladder of swimming tadpoles. Additionally, we investigated for the first time the expression pattern of Ras-dva-2. This gene encodes a protein belonging to a novel sub-group of Ras-dva GTPases that we identified by phylogenetic analysis within Ras-dva family. In contrast to Ras-dva-1, Ras-dva-2 is not expressed before the swimming tadpole stage. At the swimming tadpole stage, however, Ras-dva-2 transcripts can be detected in the eye retina and brain. Later in development, the expression of Ras-dva-2 can also be revealed in the mesonephros and stomach. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Conservation and function of Rab small GTPases in Entamoeba: annotation of E. invadens Rab and its use for the understanding of Entamoeba biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Husain, Afzal; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2010-11-01

    Entamoeba invadens is a reptilian enteric protozoan parasite closely related to the human pathogen Entamoeba histolytica and a good model organism of encystation. To understand the molecular mechanism of vesicular trafficking involved in the encystation of Entamoeba, we examined the conservation of Rab small GTPases between the two species. E. invadens has over 100 Rab genes, similar to E. histolytica. Most of the Rab subfamilies are conserved between the two species, while a number of species-specific Rabs are also present. We annotated all E. invadens Rabs according to the previous nomenclature [Saito-Nakano, Y., Loftus, B.J., Hall, N., Nozaki, T., 2005. The diversity of Rab GTPases in Entamoeba histolytica. Experimental Parasitology 110, 244-252]. Comparative genomic analysis suggested that the fundamental vesicular traffic machinery is well conserved, while there are species-specific protein transport mechanisms. We also reviewed the function of Rabs in Entamoeba, and proposed the use of the annotation of E. invadens Rab genes to understand the ubiquitous importance of Rab-mediated membrane trafficking during important biological processes including differentiation in Entamoeba. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Involvement of Botrytis cinerea small GTPases BcRAS1 and BcRAC in differentiation, virulence, and the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minz Dub, Anna; Kokkelink, Leonie; Tudzynski, Bettina; Tudzynski, Paul; Sharon, Amir

    2013-12-01

    Small GTPases of the Ras superfamily are highly conserved proteins that are involved in various cellular processes, in particular morphogenesis, differentiation, and polar growth. Here we report on the analysis of RAS1 and RAC homologues from the gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea. We show that these small GTPases are individually necessary for polar growth, reproduction, and pathogenicity, required for cell cycle progression through mitosis (BcRAC), and may lie upstream of the stress-related mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. bcras1 and bcrac deletion strains had reduced growth rates, and their hyphae were hyperbranched and deformed. In addition, both strains were vegetatively sterile and nonpathogenic. A strain expressing a constitutively active (CA) allele of the BcRAC protein had partially similar but milder phenotypes. Similar to the deletion strains, the CA-BcRAC strain did not produce any conidia and had swollen hyphae. In contrast to the two deletion strains, however, the growth rate of the CA-BcRAC strain was normal, and it caused delayed but well-developed disease symptoms. Microscopic examination revealed an increased number of nuclei and disturbance of actin localization in the CA-BcRAC strain. Further work with cell cycle- and RAC-specific inhibitory compounds associated the BcRAC protein with progression of the cell cycle through mitosis, possibly via an effect on microtubules. Together, these results show that the multinucleate phenotype of the CA-BcRAC strain could result from at least two defects: disruption of polar growth through disturbed actin localization and uncontrolled nuclear division due to constitutive activity of BcRAC.

  8. The ketone body metabolite β-hydroxybutyrate induces an antidepression-associated ramification of microglia via HDACs inhibition-triggered Akt-small RhoGTPase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Wang, Peng; Xu, Xing; Zhang, Yaru; Gong, Yu; Hu, Wenfeng; Gao, Minhui; Wu, Yue; Ling, Yong; Zhao, Xi; Qin, Yibin; Yang, Rongrong; Zhang, Wei

    2018-02-01

    Direct induction of macrophage ramification has been shown to promote an alternative (M2) polarization, suggesting that the ramified morphology may determine the function of immune cells. The ketone body metabolite β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) elevated in conditions including fasting and low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) can reduce neuroinflammation. However, how exactly BHB impacts microglia remains unclear. We report that BHB as well as its producing stimuli fasting and KD induced obvious ramifications of murine microglia in basal and inflammatory conditions in a reversible manner, and these ramifications were accompanied with microglial profile toward M2 polarization and phagocytosis. The protein kinase B (Akt)-small RhoGTPase axis was found to mediate the effect of BHB on microglial shape change, as (i) BHB activated the microglial small RhoGTPase (Rac1, Cdc42) and Akt; (ii) Akt and Rac1-Cdc42 inhibition abolished the pro-ramification effect of BHB; (iii) Akt inhibition prevented the activation of Rac1-Cdc42 induced by BHB treatment. Incubation of microglia with other classical histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibitors, but not G protein-coupled receptor 109a (GPR109a) activators, also induced microglial ramification and Akt activation, suggesting that the BHB-induced ramification of microglia may be triggered by HDACs inhibition. Functionally, Akt inhibition was found to abrogate the effects of BHB on microglial polarization and phagocytosis. In neuroinflammatory models induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), BHB prevented the microglial process retraction and depressive-like behaviors, and these effects were abolished by Akt inhibition. Our findings for the first time showed that BHB exerts anti-inflammatory actions via promotion of microglial ramification. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Identification and characterization of a family of secretion-related small GTPase-encoding genes from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger : a putative SEC4 homologue is not essential for growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, P.J.; Seiboth, B.; Weenink, X.O.; Zeijl, C. van; Lenders, M.; Konetschny, C.; Ram, A.F.J.; Montijn, R.; Kubicek, C.P.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    2001-01-01

    DNA fragments containing genetic information for five secretion-related small GTPases of Aspergillus niger (srgA-E) were isolated and identified as members of different Rab/Ypt subfamilies. This isolation and the search for similar sequences in fungal genomic and EST databases showed that, in

  10. The small GTPase RhoU lays downstream of JAK/STAT signaling and mediates cell migration in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovas Nunes, Sara; Manzoni, Martina; Pizzi, Marco; Mandato, Elisa; Carrino, Marilena; Quotti Tubi, Laura; Zambello, Renato; Adami, Fausto; Visentin, Andrea; Barilà, Gregorio; Trentin, Livio; Manni, Sabrina; Neri, Antonino; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Piazza, Francesco

    2018-02-13

    Multiple myeloma is a post-germinal center B-cell neoplasm, characterized by the proliferation of malignant bone marrow plasma cells, whose survival and proliferation is sustained by growth factors and cytokines present in the bone marrow microenvironment. Among them, IL-6 triggers the signal downstream of its receptor, leading to the activation of the JAK/STAT pathway. The atypical GTPase RhoU lays downstream of STAT3 transcription factor and could be responsible for mediating its effects on cytoskeleton dynamics. Here we demonstrate that RHOU is heterogeneously expressed in primary multiple myeloma cells and significantly modulated with disease progression. At the mRNA level, RHOU expression in myeloma patients correlated with the expression of STAT3 and its targets MIR21 and SOCS3. Also, IL-6 stimulation of human myeloma cell lines up-regulated RHOU through STAT3 activation. On the other hand, RhoU silencing led to a decrease in cell migration with the accumulation of actin stress fibers, together with a decrease in cyclin D2 expression and in cell cycle progression. Furthermore, we found that even though lenalidomide positively regulated RhoU expression leading to higher cell migration rates, it actually led to cell cycle arrest probably through a p21 dependent mechanism. Lenalidomide treatment in combination with RhoU silencing determined a loss of cytoskeletal organization inhibiting cell migration, and a further increase in the percentage of cells in a resting phase. These results unravel a role for RhoU not only in regulating the migratory features of malignant plasma cells, but also in controlling cell cycle progression.

  11. A Pan-GTPase Inhibitor as a Molecular Probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hong

    Full Text Available Overactive GTPases have often been linked to human diseases. The available inhibitors are limited and have not progressed far in clinical trials. We report here a first-in-class small molecule pan-GTPase inhibitor discovered from a high throughput screening campaign. The compound CID1067700 inhibits multiple GTPases in biochemical, cellular protein and protein interaction, as well as cellular functional assays. In the biochemical and protein interaction assays, representative GTPases from Rho, Ras, and Rab, the three most generic subfamilies of the GTPases, were probed, while in the functional assays, physiological processes regulated by each of the three subfamilies of the GTPases were examined. The chemical functionalities essential for the activity of the compound were identified through structural derivatization. The compound is validated as a useful molecular probe upon which GTPase-targeting inhibitors with drug potentials might be developed.

  12. Two Components of Aversive Memory in Drosophila, Anesthesia-Sensitive and Anesthesia-Resistant Memory, Require Distinct Domains Within the Rgk1 Small GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Satoshi; Minami-Ohtsubo, Maki; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Tabata, Tetsuya

    2017-05-31

    Multiple components have been identified that exhibit different stabilities for aversive olfactory memory in Drosophila These components have been defined by behavioral and genetic studies and genes specifically required for a specific component have also been identified. Intermediate-term memory generated after single cycle conditioning is divided into anesthesia-sensitive memory (ASM) and anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM), with the latter being more stable. We determined that the ASM and ARM pathways converged on the Rgk1 small GTPase and that the N-terminal domain-deleted Rgk1 was sufficient for ASM formation, whereas the full-length form was required for ARM formation. Rgk1 is specifically accumulated at the synaptic site of the Kenyon cells (KCs), the intrinsic neurons of the mushroom bodies, which play a pivotal role in olfactory memory formation. A higher than normal Rgk1 level enhanced memory retention, which is consistent with the result that Rgk1 suppressed Rac-dependent memory decay; these findings suggest that rgk1 bolsters ASM via the suppression of forgetting. We propose that Rgk1 plays a pivotal role in the regulation of memory stabilization by serving as a molecular node that resides at KC synapses, where the ASM and ARM pathway may interact. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Memory consists of multiple components. Drosophila olfactory memory serves as a fundamental model with which to investigate the mechanisms that underlie memory formation and has provided genetic and molecular means to identify the components of memory, namely short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term memory, depending on how long the memory lasts. Intermediate memory is further divided into anesthesia-sensitive memory (ASM) and anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM), with the latter being more stable. We have identified a small GTPase in Drosophila , Rgk1, which plays a pivotal role in the regulation of olfactory memory stability. Rgk1 is required for both ASM and ARM. Moreover, N

  13. Ras-dva1 small GTPase regulates telencephalon development in Xenopus laevis embryos by controlling Fgf8 and Agr signaling at the anterior border of the neural plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria B. Tereshina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We previously found that the small GTPase Ras-dva1 is essential for the telencephalic development in Xenopus laevis because Ras-dva1 controls the Fgf8-mediated induction of FoxG1 expression, a key telencephalic regulator. In this report, we show, however, that Ras-dva1 and FoxG1 are expressed in different groups of cells; whereas Ras-dva1 is expressed in the outer layer of the anterior neural fold, FoxG1 and Fgf8 are activated in the inner layer from which the telencephalon is derived. We resolve this paradox by demonstrating that Ras-dva1 is involved in the transduction of Fgf8 signal received by cells in the outer layer, which in turn send a feedback signal that stimulates FoxG1 expression in the inner layer. We show that this feedback signal is transmitted by secreted Agr proteins, the expression of which is activated in the outer layer by mediation of Ras-dva1 and the homeodomain transcription factor Otx2. In turn, Agrs are essential for maintaining Fgf8 and FoxG1 expression in cells at the anterior neural plate border. Our finding reveals a novel feedback loop mechanism based on the exchange of Fgf8 and Agr signaling between neural and non-neural compartments at the anterior margin of the neural plate and demonstrates a key role of Ras-dva1 in this mechanism.

  14. Overexpression of the secretory small GTPase Rab27B in human breast cancer correlates closely with lymph node metastasis and predicts poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jia-Xing

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secretory small GTPase Rab27b was recently identified as an oncogene in breast cancer (BC in vivo and in vitro studies. This research was designed to further explore the clinical and prognostic significance of Rab27B in BC patients. Methods The mRNA/protein expression level of Rab27B was examined by performing Real-time PCR, western blot, and immunohistochemistry (IHC assays in 12 paired BC tissues and matched adjacent noncancerous tissues (NAT. Then we carried out IHC assay in a large cohort of 221 invasive BC tissues, 22 normal breast tissues, 40 fibroadenoma (FA, 30 ductual carcinoma in situ (DCIS and 40 metastatic lymph nodes (LNs. The receiver operating characteristic curve method was applied to obtain the optimal cutoff value for high Rab27B expression. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT marker expression levels were detected in relation to Rab27B expression. Results We observed that the increased expression of Rab27B was dependent upon the magnitude of cancer progression (P P  Conclusion Our findings suggest that overexpression of Rab27B in BC coincides with lymph node metastasis and acquisition of a poor prognostic phenotype.

  15. 2D-DIGE and MALDI TOF/TOF MS analysis reveal that small GTPase signaling pathways may play an important role in cadmium-induced colon cell malignant transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jian; Zhou, Zhongping; Zheng, Jianzhou; Zhang, Zhuyi; Lu, Rongzhu; Liu, Hanqing; Shi, Haifeng; Tu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal present in the environment and in industrial materials. Cadmium has demonstrated carcinogenic activity that induces cell transformation, but how this occurs is unclear. We used 2D-DIGE and MALDI TOF/TOF MS combined with bioinformatics and immunoblotting to investigate the molecular mechanism of cadmium transformation. We found that small GTPases were critical for transformation. Additionally, proteins involved in mitochondrial transcription, DNA repair, and translation also had altered expression patterns in cadmium treated cells. Collectively, our results suggest that activation of small GTPases contributes to cadmium-induced transformation of colon cells. - Highlights: • Colon epithelial cell line is firstly successfully transformed by cadmium. • 2D-DIGE is applied to visualize the differentially expressed proteins. • RhoA plays an important role in cadmium induced malignant transformation. • Bioinformatic and experimental methods are combined to explore new mechanisms.

  16. Rho GTPases in ameloblast differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi Otsu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During tooth development, ameloblasts differentiate from inner enamel epithelial cells to enamel-forming cells by modulating the signal pathways mediating epithelial–mesenchymal interaction and a cell-autonomous gene network. The differentiation process of epithelial cells is characterized by marked changes in their morphology and polarity, accompanied by dynamic cytoskeletal reorganization and changes in cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesion over time. Functional ameloblasts are tall, columnar, polarized cells that synthesize and secrete enamel-specific proteins. After deposition of the full thickness of enamel matrix, ameloblasts become smaller and regulate enamel maturation. Recent significant advances in the fields of molecular biology and genetics have improved our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the ameloblast cell life cycle, mediated by the Rho family of small GTPases. They act as intracellular molecular switch that transduce signals from extracellular stimuli to the actin cytoskeleton and the nucleus. In our review, we summarize studies that provide current evidence for Rho GTPases and their involvement in ameloblast differentiation. In addition to the Rho GTPases themselves, their downstream effectors and upstream regulators have also been implicated in ameloblast differentiation.

  17. Comparative Proteomics of Purified Pathogen Vacuoles Correlates Intracellular Replication of Legionella pneumophila with the Small GTPase Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmölders, Johanna; Manske, Christian; Otto, Andreas; Hoffmann, Christine; Steiner, Bernhard; Welin, Amanda; Becher, Dörte; Hilbi, Hubert

    2017-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes a severe lung infection termed "Legionnaires' disease." The pathogen replicates in environmental protozoa as well as in macrophages within a unique membrane-bound compartment, the Legionella -containing-vacuole (LCV). LCV formation requires the bacterial Icm/Dot type IV secretion system, which translocates ca. 300 "effector proteins" into host cells, where they target distinct host factors. The L. pneumophila "pentuple" mutant (Δpentuple) lacks 5 gene clusters (31% of the effector proteins) and replicates in macrophages but not in Dictyostelium discoideum amoeba. To elucidate the host factors defining a replication-permissive compartment, we compare here the proteomes of intact LCVs isolated from D. discoideum or macrophages infected with Δpentuple or the parental strain Lp02. This analysis revealed that the majority of host proteins are shared in D. discoideum or macrophage LCVs containing the mutant or the parental strain, respectively, whereas some proteins preferentially localize to distinct LCVs. The small GTPase Rap1 was identified on D. discoideum LCVs containing strain Lp02 but not the Δpentuple mutant and on macrophage LCVs containing either strain. The localization pattern of active Rap1 on D. discoideum or macrophage LCVs was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and imaging flow cytometry, and the depletion of Rap1 by RNA interference significantly reduced the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila Thus, comparative proteomics identified Rap1 as a novel LCV host component implicated in intracellular replication of L. pneumophila . © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Coordinated regulation by two VPS9 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors in small GTPase Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Kagiwada, Satoshi [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women' s University, Kitauoyanishi-machi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Shimazu, Sayuri [Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Takegawa, Kaoru [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Noguchi, Tetsuko [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women' s University, Kitauoyanishi-machi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Miyamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: miya@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2015-03-20

    The small GTPase Rab5 is reported to regulate various cellular functions, such as vesicular transport and endocytosis. VPS9 domain-containing proteins are thought to activate Rab5(s) by their guanine-nucleotide exchange activities. Numerous VPS9 proteins have been identified and are structurally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. However, the functional relationships among VPS9 proteins in cells remain unclear. Only one Rab5 and two VPS9 proteins were identified in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. Here, we examined the cellular function of two VPS9 proteins and the relationship between these proteins in cellular functions. Vps901-GFP and Vps902-GFP exhibited dotted signals in vegetative and differentiated cells. vps901 deletion mutant (Δvps901) cells exhibited a phenotype deficient in the mating process and responses to high concentrations of ions, such as calcium and metals, and Δvps901Δvps902 double mutant cells exhibited round cell shapes similar to ypt5-909 (Rab5 mutant allele) cells. Deletion of both vps901 and vps902 genes completely abolished the mating process and responses to various stresses. A lack of vacuole formation and aberrant inner cell membrane structures were also observed in Δvps901Δvps902 cells by electron microscopy. These data strongly suggest that Vps901 and Vps902 are cooperatively involved in the regulation of cellular functions, such as cell morphology, sexual development, response to ion stresses, and vacuole formation, via Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast cells. - Highlights: • Roles of Rab5 activator VPS9 proteins in cellular functions. • Cooperation between VPS9 proteins in Rab5 signaling pathway. • Roles of each VPS9 protein in Rab5 signaling pathway are discussed.

  19. Coordinated regulation by two VPS9 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors in small GTPase Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Shimazu, Sayuri; Takegawa, Kaoru; Noguchi, Tetsuko; Miyamoto, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab5 is reported to regulate various cellular functions, such as vesicular transport and endocytosis. VPS9 domain-containing proteins are thought to activate Rab5(s) by their guanine-nucleotide exchange activities. Numerous VPS9 proteins have been identified and are structurally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. However, the functional relationships among VPS9 proteins in cells remain unclear. Only one Rab5 and two VPS9 proteins were identified in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. Here, we examined the cellular function of two VPS9 proteins and the relationship between these proteins in cellular functions. Vps901-GFP and Vps902-GFP exhibited dotted signals in vegetative and differentiated cells. vps901 deletion mutant (Δvps901) cells exhibited a phenotype deficient in the mating process and responses to high concentrations of ions, such as calcium and metals, and Δvps901Δvps902 double mutant cells exhibited round cell shapes similar to ypt5-909 (Rab5 mutant allele) cells. Deletion of both vps901 and vps902 genes completely abolished the mating process and responses to various stresses. A lack of vacuole formation and aberrant inner cell membrane structures were also observed in Δvps901Δvps902 cells by electron microscopy. These data strongly suggest that Vps901 and Vps902 are cooperatively involved in the regulation of cellular functions, such as cell morphology, sexual development, response to ion stresses, and vacuole formation, via Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast cells. - Highlights: • Roles of Rab5 activator VPS9 proteins in cellular functions. • Cooperation between VPS9 proteins in Rab5 signaling pathway. • Roles of each VPS9 protein in Rab5 signaling pathway are discussed

  20. The small GTPase Rab5 homologue Ypt5 regulates cell morphology, sexual development, ion-stress response and vacuolar formation in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Katayama, Chisako [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Shinohara, Miki; Shinohara, Akira [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Maekawa, Shohei [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Miyamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: miya@kobe-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Multiple functions of Rab5 GTPase in fission yeast were found. •Roles of Rab5 in fission yeast were discussed. •Relation between Rab5 and actin cytoskeleton were discussed. -- Abstract: Inner-membrane transport is critical to cell function. Rab family GTPases play an important role in vesicle transport. In mammalian cells, Rab5 is reported to be involved in the regulation of endosome formation, phagocytosis and chromosome alignment. Here, we examined the role of the fission yeast Rab5 homologue Ypt5 using a point mutant allele. Mutant cells displayed abnormal cell morphology, mating, sporulation, endocytosis, vacuole fusion and responses to ion stress. Our data strongly suggest that fission yeast Rab5 is involved in the regulation of various types of cellular functions.

  1. The small GTPase Rab5 homologue Ypt5 regulates cell morphology, sexual development, ion-stress response and vacuolar formation in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Katayama, Chisako; Shinohara, Miki; Shinohara, Akira; Maekawa, Shohei; Miyamoto, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Multiple functions of Rab5 GTPase in fission yeast were found. •Roles of Rab5 in fission yeast were discussed. •Relation between Rab5 and actin cytoskeleton were discussed. -- Abstract: Inner-membrane transport is critical to cell function. Rab family GTPases play an important role in vesicle transport. In mammalian cells, Rab5 is reported to be involved in the regulation of endosome formation, phagocytosis and chromosome alignment. Here, we examined the role of the fission yeast Rab5 homologue Ypt5 using a point mutant allele. Mutant cells displayed abnormal cell morphology, mating, sporulation, endocytosis, vacuole fusion and responses to ion stress. Our data strongly suggest that fission yeast Rab5 is involved in the regulation of various types of cellular functions

  2. The Small GTPase MoSec4 Is Involved in Vegetative Development and Pathogenicity by Regulating the Extracellular Protein Secretion in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huakun Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Rab GTPase proteins play important roles in the membrane trafficking, and consequently protein secretion and development of eukaryotic organisms. However, little is known about the function of Rab GTPases in Magnaporthe oryzae. To further explore the function of Rab GTPases, we deleted the ortholog of the yeast Sec4p protein in M. oryzae, namely MoSEC4. The Mosec4 mutant is defective in polarized growth and conidiation, and it displays decreased appressorium turgor pressure and attenuated pathogenicity. Notably, the biotrophic invasive hyphae produced in rice cells are more bulbous and compressed in the Mosec4 mutant. Further studies showed that deletion of the MoSEC4 gene resulted in decreased secretion of extracellular enzymes and mislocalization of the cytoplasmic effector PWL2-mCherry-NLS. In accordance with its role in secretion, the GFP-MoSec4 fusion protein mainly accumulates at tips of growing vegetative hyphae. Our results suggest that the MoSec4 protein plays important roles in the secretion of extracellular proteins and consequently hyphal development and pathogenicity in the rice blast fungus.

  3. In situ detection of the activation of Rac1 and RalA small GTPases in mouse adipocytes by immunofluorescent microscopy following in vivo and ex vivo insulin stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Nihata, Yuma; Ueda, Sho; Satoh, Takaya

    2017-11-01

    Rac1 has been implicated in insulin-dependent glucose uptake by mechanisms involving plasma membrane translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 in skeletal muscle. Although the uptake of glucose is also stimulated by insulin in adipose tissue, the role for Rac1 in adipocyte insulin signaling remains controversial. As a step to reveal the role for Rac1 in adipocytes, we aimed to establish immunofluorescent microscopy to detect the intracellular distribution of activated Rac1. The epitope-tagged Rac1-binding domain of a Rac1-specific target was utilized as a probe that specifically recognizes the activated form of Rac1. Rac1 activation in response to ex vivo and in vivo insulin stimulations in primary adipocyte culture and mouse white adipose tissue, respectively, was successfully observed by immunofluorescent microscopy. These Rac1 activations were mediated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase. Another small GTPase RalA has also been implicated in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Similarly to Rac1, immunofluorescent microscopy using an activated RalA-specific polypeptide probe allowed us to detect intracellular distribution of insulin-activated RalA in adipocytes. These novel approaches to visualize the activation status of small GTPases in adipocytes will largely contribute to the understanding of signal transduction mechanisms particularly for insulin action. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shia, Jinru; Holck, Susanne; Depetris, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    of such information. This article provides an overview of the development of histopathology and immunohistochemistry in Lynch syndrome-associated tumors, particularly in colorectal and endometrial cancers, and outlines the issues and current status of these specific pathologic aspects in not only the major tumors...

  5. Paraneoplastic chronic demyelinating neuropathy and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome associated with multiple anti-neural antibodies and small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozsa, Csilla; Vincent, Angela; Aranyi, Zsuzsanna; Kovacs, Gabor G; Komoly, Samuel; Illes, Zsolt

    2008-09-30

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) developed in a patient with presumed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and negative chest CT. Since antibodies against both Hu and voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) were detected, repeated chest CT was performed, which eventually showed a pulmonary mass lesion. Biopsy revealed small cell lung cancer (SCLC) indicating the importance of repeated chest CT in LEMS even when an existing autoimmune-like disease and negative CT may suggest an autoimmune origin. This is the first report of paraneoplastic CIDP and LEMS associated with anti-Hu, anti-VGCC and SCLC.

  6. The C. elegans evl-20 gene is a homolog of the small GTPase ARL2 and regulates cytoskeleton dynamics during cytokinesis and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoshechkin, Igor; Han, Min

    2002-05-01

    The in vivo functions of ARF-like members of the Ras superfamily of GTPases are relatively unexplored. Here we describe the analysis of C. elegans evl-20 gene that encodes a functional homolog of human ARL2. Elimination of evl-20 function results in abnormal vulval, gonad, and male tail development and disrupts embryonic proliferation, hypodermal enclosure, and elongation. Loss of evl-20 function causes specific defects in the microtubule cytoskeleton, which is the likely molecular basis for the observed defects. EVL-20 is closely associated with both the cell cortex and astral microtubules, suggesting that it may directly interact with microtubule structures at those locations. Our data indicate that EVL-20 functions in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics during cytokinesis and morphogenesis.

  7. Rho GTPase function in tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, R; Pedersen, Esben Ditlev Kølle; Wang, Zhipeng

    2009-01-01

    Malignant tumor cells display uncontrolled proliferation, loss of epithelial cell polarity, altered interactions with neighboring cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix, and enhanced migratory properties. Proteins of the Rho GTPase family regulate all these processes in cell culture and, ...... patients and in animal models. This review will give a very brief overview of Rho GTPase function in general and then focus on in vivo evidence for a role of Rho GTPases in malignant tumors, both in human patients and in genetically modified mice......., for that reason, Rho GTPases, their regulators, and their effectors have been suggested to control tumor formation and progression in humans. However, while the tumor-relevant functions of Rho GTPases are very well documented in vitro, we are only now beginning to assess their contribution to cancer in human...

  8. Gallic acid inhibits gastric cancer cells metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Hsieh-Hsun [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chi-Sen [Department of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Division of Gastroenterology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ho, Wei-Chi [Division of Gastroenterology, Jen-Ai Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Liao, Sheng-You [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Wea-Lung [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chau-Jong, E-mail: wcj@csmu.edu.tw [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of gallic acid (GA) for controlling tumor metastasis through its inhibitory effect on the motility of AGS cells. A noteworthy finding in our previous experiment was increased RhoB expression in GA-treated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of RhoB expression on the inhibitory effects of GA on AGS cells. By applying the transfection of RhoB siRNA into AGS cells and an animal model, we tested the effect of GA on inhibition of tumor growth and RhoB expression. The results confirmed that RhoB-siRNA transfection induced GA to inhibit AGS cells’ invasive growth involving blocking the AKT/small GTPase signals pathway and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Finally, we evaluated the effect of GA on AGS cell metastasis by colonization of tumor cells in nude mice. It showed GA inhibited tumor cells growth via the expression of RhoB. These data support the inhibitory effect of GA which was shown to inhibit gastric cancer cell metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Thus, GA might be a potential agent in treating gastric cancer. Highlights: ► GA could downregulate AKT signal via increased expression of RhoB. ► GA inhibits metastasis in vitro in gastric carcinoma. ► GA inhibits tumor growth in nude mice model.

  9. The Small GTPase Rac1 Contributes to Extinction of Aversive Memories of Drug Withdrawal by Facilitating GABAA Receptor Endocytosis in the vmPFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weisheng; Ju, Yun-Yue; Zhou, Qi-Xin; Tang, Jian-Xin; Li, Meng; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Shuo; Chen, Zhong-Guo; Wang, Yu-Jun; Ji, Hui; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Xu, Lin; Liu, Jing-Gen

    2017-07-26

    Extinction of aversive memories has been a major concern in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as anxiety disorders and drug addiction. However, the mechanisms underlying extinction of aversive memories are not fully understood. Here, we report that extinction of conditioned place aversion (CPA) to naloxone-precipitated opiate withdrawal in male rats activates Rho GTPase Rac1 in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in a BDNF-dependent manner, which determines GABA A receptor (GABA A R) endocytosis via triggering synaptic translocation of activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) through facilitating actin polymerization. Active Rac1 is essential and sufficient for GABA A R endocytosis and CPA extinction. Knockdown of Rac1 expression within the vmPFC of rats using Rac1-shRNA suppressed GABA A R endocytosis and CPA extinction, whereas expression of a constitutively active form of Rac1 accelerated GABA A R endocytosis and CPA extinction. The crucial role of GABA A R endocytosis in the LTP induction and CPA extinction is evinced by the findings that blockade of GABA A R endocytosis by a dynamin function-blocking peptide (Myr-P4) abolishes LTP induction and CPA extinction. Thus, the present study provides first evidence that Rac1-dependent GABA A R endocytosis plays a crucial role in extinction of aversive memories and reveals the sequence of molecular events that contribute to learning experience modulation of synaptic GABA A R endocytosis. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study reveals that Rac1-dependent GABA A R endocytosis plays a crucial role in extinction of aversive memories associated with drug withdrawal and identifies Arc as a downstream effector of Rac1 regulations of synaptic plasticity as well as learning and memory, thereby suggesting therapeutic targets to promote extinction of the unwanted memories. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/377096-15$15.00/0.

  10. Rac and Rho GTPases in cancer cell motility control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parri Matteo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases represent a family of small GTP-binding proteins involved in cell cytoskeleton organization, migration, transcription, and proliferation. A common theme of these processes is a dynamic reorganization of actin cytoskeleton which has now emerged as a major switch control mainly carried out by Rho and Rac GTPase subfamilies, playing an acknowledged role in adaptation of cell motility to the microenvironment. Cells exhibit three distinct modes of migration when invading the 3 D environment. Collective motility leads to movement of cohorts of cells which maintain the adherens junctions and move by photolytic degradation of matrix barriers. Single cell mesenchymal-type movement is characterized by an elongated cellular shape and again requires extracellular proteolysis and integrin engagement. In addition it depends on Rac1-mediated cell polarization and lamellipodia formation. Conversely, in amoeboid movement cells have a rounded morphology, the movement is independent from proteases but requires high Rho GTPase to drive elevated levels of actomyosin contractility. These two modes of cell movement are interconvertible and several moving cells, including tumor cells, show an high degree of plasticity in motility styles shifting ad hoc between mesenchymal or amoeboid movements. This review will focus on the role of Rac and Rho small GTPases in cell motility and in the complex relationship driving the reciprocal control between Rac and Rho granting for the opportunistic motile behaviour of aggressive cancer cells. In addition we analyse the role of these GTPases in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination.

  11. DENN Domain Proteins: Regulators of Rab GTPases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marat, Andrea L.; Dokainish, Hatem; McPherson, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    The DENN domain is a common, evolutionarily ancient, and conserved protein module, yet it has gone largely unstudied; until recently, little was known regarding its functional roles. New studies reveal that various DENN domains interact directly with members of the Rab family of small GTPases and that DENN domains function enzymatically as Rab-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors. Thus, DENN domain proteins appear to be generalized regulators of Rab function. Study of these proteins will provide new insights into Rab-mediated membrane trafficking pathways. PMID:21330364

  12. DENN domain proteins: regulators of Rab GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marat, Andrea L; Dokainish, Hatem; McPherson, Peter S

    2011-04-22

    The DENN domain is a common, evolutionarily ancient, and conserved protein module, yet it has gone largely unstudied; until recently, little was known regarding its functional roles. New studies reveal that various DENN domains interact directly with members of the Rab family of small GTPases and that DENN domains function enzymatically as Rab-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors. Thus, DENN domain proteins appear to be generalized regulators of Rab function. Study of these proteins will provide new insights into Rab-mediated membrane trafficking pathways.

  13. Role of Rab family GTPases and their effectors in melanosomal logistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2012-04-01

    Rab GTPases constitute a family of small GTPases that regulate a variety of membrane trafficking events in all eukaryotic cells by recruiting their specific effector molecules. Recent accumulating evidence indicates that members of the mammalian Rab small GTPase family are involved in certain physiological and pathological processes. In particular, functional impairments of specific Rab proteins, e.g. Rab38 and Rab27A, their regulators or their effectors cause pigmentation disorders in humans and coat colour variations in mice because such impairments cause defects in melanosomal logistics, i.e. defects in melanosome biogenesis and transport. Genetic and biochemical analyses of the gene products responsible for mammalian pigmentation disorders in the past decade have revealed that Rab-mediated endosomal transport systems and melanosome transport systems play crucial roles in the efficient darkening of mammalian hair and skin. In this article, we review current knowledge regarding melanosomal logistics, with particular focus on the roles of Rab small GTPases and their effectors.

  14. Prune belly syndrome associated with incomplete VACTERL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghritlaharey R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A Prune Belly syndrome with VATER/VACTERL association is an extremely rare. They are either stillborn or die within few days of life, only few such cases have been reported in literature. We are presenting here a male neonate of Prune Belly syndrome associated with incomplete VACTERL with brief review of literature.

  15. Netherton syndrome associated with idiopathic congenital hemihypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerebakan, Ozlem; Uğuz, Ayşen; Keser, Ibrahim; Lüleci, Güven; Ciftçioğlu, Mehmet Akif; Başaran, Erdal; Alpsoy, Erkan

    2002-01-01

    Netherton syndrome is a rare genodermatosis comprised of anichthyosiform dermatitis, hair shaft defects, and atopic features. Other problems associated with Netherton syndrome are delayed growth and development, immune abnormalities, recurrent infections, and intermittent aminoaciduria. We describe an 18-month-old girl with Netherton syndrome who had idiopathic congenital hemihypertrophy on her right side with contralateral benign nephromegaly in addition to the characteristic clinical signs of the syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first case of Netherton syndrome associated with idiopathic congenital hemihypertrophy to be reported.

  16. Rho GTPases: masters of cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadok, Amine; Marshall, Chris J

    2014-01-01

    Since their discovery in the late eighties, the role of Rho GTPases in the regulation of cell migration has been extensively studied and has mainly focused on the hallmark family members Rho, Rac, and Cdc42. Recent technological advances in cell biology, such as Rho-family GTPase activity biosensors, studies in 3D, and unbiased RNAi-based screens, have revealed an increasingly complex role for Rho GTPases during cell migration, with many inter-connected functions and a strong dependency on the physical and chemical properties of the surrounding environment. This review aims to give an overview of recent studies on the role of Rho-family GTPase members in the modulation of cell migration in different environments, and discuss future directions.

  17. Rab GTPases in Immunity and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akriti Prashar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Strict spatiotemporal control of trafficking events between organelles is critical for maintaining homeostasis and directing cellular responses. This regulation is particularly important in immune cells for mounting specialized immune defenses. By controlling the formation, transport and fusion of intracellular organelles, Rab GTPases serve as master regulators of membrane trafficking. In this review, we discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Rab GTPases regulate immunity and inflammation.

  18. Rab GTPases in Immunity and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashar, Akriti; Schnettger, Laura; Bernard, Elliott M; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G

    2017-01-01

    Strict spatiotemporal control of trafficking events between organelles is critical for maintaining homeostasis and directing cellular responses. This regulation is particularly important in immune cells for mounting specialized immune defenses. By controlling the formation, transport and fusion of intracellular organelles, Rab GTPases serve as master regulators of membrane trafficking. In this review, we discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Rab GTPases regulate immunity and inflammation.

  19. Molecular imaging analysis of Rab GTPases in the regulation of phagocytosis and macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Youhei

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis and macropinocytosis, actin-dependent endocytic pathways that mediate the uptake of particles and fluid, respectively, are fundamental routes that enable cells to sample their environment, eliminate pathogens and endogenous cell debris, and contribute to immunoprotection and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. These processes require a well-organized network of actin cytoskeletal remodeling and membrane transport, which are spatiotemporally regulated by small GTPases. The Rab family of small GTPases, which functions as molecular switches, plays central roles in intracellular membrane trafficking. Although multiple Rab proteins are localized to phagosomes and regulate phagosome maturation, the precise role of each Rab family member in Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated phagocytosis is not fully characterized. Recently, we revealed that Rab35 and Rab20 are important regulators of phagosome formation and maturation, respectively. This review summarizes the functional implication of these Rab GTPases during FcγR-mediated phagocytosis in macrophages. Currently, compared with our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of receptor-mediated endocytosis including phagocytosis, the molecular components and signaling cascades of macropinocytosis remain poorly elucidated. Our time-lapse imaging showed that several Rab GTPases are sequentially recruited to the membrane of macropinosomes. Based on our observations, these findings regarding the spatiotemporal localization of Rab GTPases during macropinocytosis are introduced.

  20. Regulation of ER-Golgi Transport Dynamics by GTPases in Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Suda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of proteins are synthesized de novo in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. They are transported through the Golgi apparatus and then delivered to their proper destinations. The ER and the Golgi play a central role in protein processing and sorting and show dynamic features in their forms. Ras super family small GTPases mediate the protein transport through and between these organelles. The ER-localized GTPase, Sar1, facilitates the formation of COPII transport carriers at the ER exit sites (ERES on the ER for the transport of cargo proteins from the ER to the Golgi. The Golgi-localized GTPase, Arf1, controls intra-Golgi, and Golgi-to-ER transport of cargo proteins by the formation of COPI carriers. Rab GTPases localized at the Golgi, which are responsible for fusion of membranes, are thought to establish the identities of compartments. Recent evidence suggests that these small GTPases regulate not only discrete sites for generation/fusion of transport carriers, but also membrane dynamics of the organelles where they locate to ensure the integrity of transport. Here we summarize the current understandings about the membrane traffic between these organelles and highlight the cutting-edge advances from super-resolution live imaging of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  1. Dominantly inherited isolated hyperparathyroidism: a syndromic association?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, K.; Czerminska-Kowalska, A.; Kulczycka, H.; Rowinska, E.; Pronicka, E.

    1999-01-01

    Dominantly inherited isolated hyperparathyroidism (DIIH) is rare in childhood. It may be the first biochemical abnormality in the multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN I) and type II (MEN II) syndromes. Its clinical course is usually asymptomatic or of low morbidity. Radiographic examination is most often normal. We describe six members of a family with distinctive phenotype and DIIH. Limited systemic symptoms and severe radiographic osteitis fibrosa cystica were further unusual features in this family. The diagnosis of DIIH was made only after a 9-year-old girl developed hypercalcaemic crisis after a pathological femoral fracture. Distinctive phenotype, unusual clinical course and unparalleled radiographic changes suggest a not yet described syndromic association. (orig.)

  2. Activation of PAK by a bacterial type III effector EspG reveals alternative mechanisms of GTPase pathway regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Selyunin, Andrey S; Alto, Neal M

    2011-01-01

    Small Rho GTPases regulate a diverse range of cellular behavior within a cell. Their ability to function as molecular switches in response to a bound nucleotide state allows them to regulate multiple dynamic processes, including cytoskeleton organization and cellular adhesion. Because the activation of downstream Rho GTPase signaling pathways relies on conserved structural features of target effector proteins (i.e., CRIB domain), these pathways are particularly vulnerable to microbial pathoge...

  3. Rho GTPase expression in human myeloid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne F G van Helden

    Full Text Available Myeloid cells are critical for innate immunity and the initiation of adaptive immunity. Strict regulation of the adhesive and migratory behavior is essential for proper functioning of these cells. Rho GTPases are important regulators of adhesion and migration; however, it is unknown which Rho GTPases are expressed in different myeloid cells. Here, we use a qPCR-based approach to investigate Rho GTPase expression in myeloid cells.We found that the mRNAs encoding Cdc42, RhoQ, Rac1, Rac2, RhoA and RhoC are the most abundant. In addition, RhoG, RhoB, RhoF and RhoV are expressed at low levels or only in specific cell types. More differentiated cells along the monocyte-lineage display lower levels of Cdc42 and RhoV, while RhoC mRNA is more abundant. In addition, the Rho GTPase expression profile changes during dendritic cell maturation with Rac1 being upregulated and Rac2 downregulated. Finally, GM-CSF stimulation, during macrophage and osteoclast differentiation, leads to high expression of Rac2, while M-CSF induces high levels of RhoA, showing that these cytokines induce a distinct pattern. Our data uncover cell type specific modulation of the Rho GTPase expression profile in hematopoietic stem cells and in more differentiated cells of the myeloid lineage.

  4. Rho GTPases and Nox dependent ROS production in skin. Is there a connection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanley, Alanna; Hynes, Ailish; Brakebusch, Cord Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPases are a family of small GTP binding proteins most commonly known for the regulation of many cellular processes, including actin cytoskeleton re-organisation, cell proliferation, signal transduction and regulation of apoptosis. Additionally, a link between Rho GTPases and reactive oxygen...... cell biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis, aimed at maintaining tissue homeostasis. Data suggests that skin cells are capable of a regulated ROS production via Nox complexes. Members of the Rho GTPase family have been found to play a central regulatory...... species (ROS) has been shown. In line with the growing interest in the role of ROS in cell biology, the relevance of this connection is becoming increasingly clearer. ROS production is classically associated with oxidative metabolic pathways (e.g. respiratory chain, arachidonic acid). During...

  5. The Rho-GTPase cdc42 regulates neural progenitor fate at the apical surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappello, Silvia; Attardo, Alessio; Wu, Xunwei

    2006-01-01

    the fundamental difference between these progenitors. Here we show that the conditional deletion of the small Rho-GTPase cdc42 at different stages of neurogenesis in mouse telencephalon results in an immediate increase in basal mitoses. Whereas cdc42-deficient progenitors have normal cell cycle length...

  6. The Small Rho GTPases Rac1 and Rac2 Are Important for T-Cell Independent Antigen Responses and for Suppressing Switching to IgG2b in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimčik, Natalija; He, Minghui; Dahlberg, Carin I M; Kuznetsov, Nikolai V; Severinson, Eva; Westerberg, Lisa S

    2017-01-01

    The Rho GTPases Cdc42, Rac1, and Rac2 coordinate receptor signaling to cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Deletion of Rac1 and Rac2 early during B cell development leads to failure in B cell entry into the splenic white pulp. Here, we sought to understand the role of Rac1 and Rac2 in B cell functionality and during the humoral antibody response. To circumvent the migratory deficiency of B cells lacking both Rac1 and Rac2, we took the approach to inducibly delete Rac1 in Rac2 -/- B cells in the spleen (Rac1 B Rac2 -/- B cells). Rac1 B Rac2 -/- mice had normal differentiation of splenic B cell populations, except for a reduction in marginal zone B cells. Rac1 B Rac2 -/- B cells showed normal spreading response on antibody-coated layers, while both Rac2 -/- and Rac1 B Rac2 -/- B cells had reduced homotypic adhesion and decreased proliferative response when compared to wild-type B cells. Upon challenge with the T-cell-independent antigen TNP-conjugated lipopolysaccharide, Rac1 B Rac2 -/- mice showed reduced antibody response. In contrast, in response to the T-cell-dependent antigen sheep red blood cells, Rac1 B Rac2 -/- mice had increased serum titers of IgG1 and IgG2b. During in vitro Ig class switching, Rac1 B Rac2 -/- B cells had elevated germline γ2b transcripts leading to increased Ig class switching to IgG2b. Our data suggest that Rac1 and Rac2 serve an important role in regulation of the B cell humoral immune response and in suppressing Ig class switching to IgG2b.

  7. Redundant functions of Rac GTPases in inner ear morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley-Myers, Cynthia M; Sipe, Conor W; Wu, Doris K; Lu, Xiaowei

    2012-02-15

    Development of the mammalian inner ear requires coordination of cell proliferation, cell fate determination and morphogenetic movements. While significant progress has been made in identifying developmental signals required for inner ear formation, less is known about how distinct signals are coordinated by their downstream mediators. Members of the Rac family of small GTPases are known regulators of cytoskeletal remodeling and numerous other cellular processes. However, the function of Rac GTPases in otic development is largely unexplored. Here, we show that Rac1 and Rac3 redundantly regulate many aspects of inner ear morphogenesis. While no morphological defects were observed in Rac3(-/-) mice, Rac1(CKO); Rac3(-/-) double mutants displayed enhanced vestibular and cochlear malformations compared to Rac1(CKO) single mutants. Moreover, in Rac1(CKO); Rac3(-/-) mutants, we observed compromised E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion, reduced cell proliferation and increased cell death in the early developing otocyst, leading to a decreased size and malformation of the membranous labyrinth. Finally, cochlear extension was severely disrupted in Rac1(CKO); Rac3(-/-) mutants, accompanied by a loss of epithelial cohesion and formation of ectopic sensory patches underneath the cochlear duct. The compartmentalized expression of otic patterning genes within the Rac1(CKO); Rac3(-/-) mutant otocyst was largely normal, however, indicating that Rac proteins regulate inner ear morphogenesis without affecting cell fate specification. Taken together, our results reveal an essential role for Rac GTPases in coordinating cell adhesion, cell proliferation, cell death and cell movements during otic development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rho GTPases in collective cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, M.M.; Friedl, P.

    2014-01-01

    The family of Rho GTPases are intracellular signal transducers that link cell surface signals to multiple intracellular responses. They are best known for their role in regulating actin dynamics required for cell migration, but in addition control cell-cell adhesion, polarization, vesicle

  9. Cdc42 GTPase dynamics control directional growth responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Alexandra C.; Morrison, Emma; Milne, Stephen; Gonia, Sara; Gale, Cheryl A.; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polarized cells reorient their direction of growth in response to environmental cues. In the fungus Candida albicans, the Rho-family small GTPase, Cdc42, is essential for polarized hyphal growth and Ca2+ influx is required for the tropic responses of hyphae to environmental cues, but the regulatory link between these systems is unclear. In this study, the interaction between Ca2+ influx and Cdc42 polarity-complex dynamics was investigated using hyphal galvanotropic and thigmotropic responses as reporter systems. During polarity establishment in an applied electric field, cathodal emergence of hyphae was lost when either of the two Cdc42 apical recycling pathways was disrupted by deletion of Rdi1, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, or Bnr1, a formin, but was completely restored by extracellular Ca2+. Loss of the Cdc42 GTPase activating proteins, Rga2 and Bem3, also abolished cathodal polarization, but this was not rescued by Ca2+. Expression of GTP-locked Cdc42 reversed the polarity of hypha emergence from cathodal to anodal, an effect augmented by Ca2+. The cathodal directional cue therefore requires Cdc42 GTP hydrolysis. Ca2+ influx amplifies Cdc42-mediated directional growth signals, in part by augmenting Cdc42 apical trafficking. The Ca2+-binding EF-hand motif in Cdc24, the Cdc42 activator, was essential for growth in yeast cells but not in established hyphae. The Cdc24 EF-hand motif is therefore essential for polarity establishment but not for polarity maintenance. PMID:24385582

  10. Epidermal Nevus Syndrome Associated with Brain Malformations and Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at Juntendo University and Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Japan; and University of California, San Francisco, Ca, report a male infant with epidermal nevus syndrome associated with brainstem and cerebellar malformations and neonatal medulloblastoma.

  11. Systematic functional analysis of the Ras GTPase family unveils a conserved network required for anterograde protein trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Marie-Elaine; Jenna, Sarah; Baillie, David L; Bossé, Roger; Simpson, Jeremy C; Chevet, Eric; Taouji, Saïd

    2017-01-01

    Phylogeny is often used to compare entire families of genes/proteins. We previously showed that classification of Caenorhabditis elegans Rho GTPases on the basis of their enzymatic properties was significantly different from sequence alignments. To further develop this concept, we have developed an integrated approach to classify C. elegans small GTPases based on functional data comprising affinity for GTP, sub-cellular localization, tissue distribution and silencing impact. This analysis led to establish a novel functional classification for small GTPases. To test the relevance of this classification in mammals, we focused our attention on the human orthologs of small GTPases from a specific group comprising arf-1.2, evl-20, arl-1, Y54E10BR.2, unc-108 and rab-7. We then tested their involvement in protein secretion and membrane traffic in mammalian systems. Using this approach we identify a novel network containing 18 GTPases, and 23 functionally interacting proteins, conserved between C. elegans and mammals, which is involved in membrane traffic and protein secretion. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. BAR domain proteins regulate Rho GTPase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspenström, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    BAR proteins comprise a heterogeneous group of multi-domain proteins with diverse biological functions. The common denominator is the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain that not only confers targeting to lipid bilayers, but also provides scaffolding to mold lipid membranes into concave or convex surfaces. This function of BAR proteins is an important determinant in the dynamic reconstruction of membrane vesicles, as well as of the plasma membrane. Several BAR proteins function as linkers between cytoskeletal regulation and membrane dynamics. These links are provided by direct interactions between BAR proteins and actin-nucleation-promoting factors of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family and the Diaphanous-related formins. The Rho GTPases are key factors for orchestration of this intricate interplay. This review describes how BAR proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases, as well as how Rho GTPases regulate the function of BAR proteins. This mutual collaboration is a central factor in the regulation of vital cellular processes, such as cell migration, cytokinesis, intracellular transport, endocytosis, and exocytosis.

  13. Activation of PAK by a bacterial type III effector EspG reveals alternative mechanisms of GTPase pathway regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selyunin, Andrey S; Alto, Neal M

    2011-07-01

    Small Rho GTPases regulate a diverse range of cellular behavior within a cell. Their ability to function as molecular switches in response to a bound nucleotide state allows them to regulate multiple dynamic processes, including cytoskeleton organization and cellular adhesion. Because the activation of downstream Rho GTPase signaling pathways relies on conserved structural features of target effector proteins (i.e., CRIB domain), these pathways are particularly vulnerable to microbial pathogenic attack. Here, we discuss new findings for how the bacterial virulence factor EspG from EHEC O157:H7 exploits a CRIB-independent activation mechanism of the Rho GTPase effector PAK. We also compare this mechanism to that of EHEC EspFU, a bacterial virulence factor that directly activates N-WASP. While both virulence factors break the inhibitory interaction between the autoinhibitory and activity-bearing domains of PAK or WASP, the underlying mechanics are very distinct from endogenous Cdc42/Rac GTPase regulation. The ability of bacterial proteins to identify novel regulatory principles of host signaling enzymes highlights the multi-level nature of protein activation, and makes them effective tools to study mammalian Rho GTPase signaling pathways.

  14. ATPase and GTPase Tangos Drive Intracellular Protein Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shu-Ou

    2016-12-01

    The GTPase superfamily of proteins provides molecular switches to regulate numerous cellular processes. The 'GTPase switch' paradigm, in which external regulatory factors control the switch of a GTPase between 'on' and 'off' states, has been used to interpret the regulatory mechanism of many GTPases. However, recent work unveiled a class of nucleotide hydrolases that do not adhere to this classical paradigm. Instead, they use nucleotide-dependent dimerization cycles to regulate key cellular processes. In this review article, recent studies of dimeric GTPases and ATPases involved in intracellular protein targeting are summarized. It is suggested that these proteins can use the conformational plasticity at their dimer interface to generate multiple points of regulation, thereby providing the driving force and spatiotemporal coordination of complex cellular pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neutron Crystal Structure of RAS GTPase Puts in Question the Protonation State of the GTP γ-Phosphate*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; Meilleur, Flora; Mattos, Carla

    2015-01-01

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated γ-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the start of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. The neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases. PMID:26515069

  16. Rho GTPases and Nox dependent ROS production in skin. Is there a connection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanley, Alanna; Hynes, Ailish; Brakebusch, Cord Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPases are a family of small GTP binding proteins most commonly known for the regulation of many cellular processes, including actin cytoskeleton re-organisation, cell proliferation, signal transduction and regulation of apoptosis. Additionally, a link between Rho GTPases and reactive oxygen...... species (ROS) has been shown. In line with the growing interest in the role of ROS in cell biology, the relevance of this connection is becoming increasingly clearer. ROS production is classically associated with oxidative metabolic pathways (e.g. respiratory chain, arachidonic acid). During...... these metabolic pathways, ROS are produced as by-products and these can be potentially toxic. However, numerous cell types contain dedicated enzymatic complexes, i.e., NADPH oxidase (Nox) complexes, for regulated production of ROS. This regulated production of ROS seems to be important for a number of fundamental...

  17. Solubilization and partial characterization of a microsomal high affinity GTPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicchitta, C.; Williamson, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Isolated rat liver microsomes release sequestered Ca 2+ following addition of GTP. In contrast to permeabilized cells, GTP dependent microsomal Ca 2+ release requires low concentrations of polyethylene glycol (PEG). They have identified a microsomal, PEG-sensitive high affinity GTPase which shares a number of characteristics with the GTP-dependent Ca 2+ release system. To aid in further characterization of this activity they have initiated studies on the solubilization and purification of the microsomal GTPases. When microsomes are solubilized under the following conditions (150 mM NaCl, 5 mg protein/ml, 1% Triton X-114) PEG sensitive GTPase activity selectively partitions into the detergent rich phase of the Triton X-114 extract. As observed in intact microsomal membranes the Triton X-114 soluble GTPase is maximally stimulated by 3% PEG. Half maximal stimulation is observed at 1% PEG. PEG increases the Vmax of this activity; no effects on Km were observed. The Km for GTP of the detergent soluble GTPase is 5 μM. This GTPase is sensitive to inhibition by sulfhydryl reagents. PEG-sensitive GTPase activity was completely inhibited in the presence of 25 μM p-hydroxymercuribenzoate (PHMB); half maximal inhibition was observed at 5 μM. Labeling of the Triton X-114 extract with the photosensitive compound [ 32 P] 8-azido GTP indicated the presence of two prominent GTP binding proteins of approximate molecular weights 17 and 54 kD

  18. Paving the Rho in cancer metastasis: Rho GTPases and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sepp; Gosens, Reinoud; Wieland, Thomas; Schmidt, Martina

    2018-03-01

    Malignant carcinomas are often characterized by metastasis, the movement of carcinoma cells from a primary site to colonize distant organs. For metastasis to occur, carcinoma cells first must adopt a pro-migratory phenotype and move through the surrounding stroma towards a blood or lymphatic vessel. Currently, there are very limited possibilities to target these processes therapeutically. The family of Rho GTPases is an ubiquitously expressed division of GTP-binding proteins involved in the regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics and intracellular signaling. The best characterized members of the Rho family GTPases are RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42. Abnormalities in Rho GTPase function have major consequences for cancer progression. Rho GTPase activation is driven by cell surface receptors that activate GTP exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). In this review, we summarize our current knowledge on Rho GTPase function in the regulation of metastasis. We will focus on key discoveries in the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), cell-cell junctions, formation of membrane protrusions, plasticity of cell migration and adaptation to a hypoxic environment. In addition, we will emphasize on crosstalk between Rho GTPase family members and other important oncogenic pathways, such as cyclic AMP-mediated signaling, canonical Wnt/β-catenin, Yes-associated protein (YAP) and hypoxia inducible factor 1α (Hif1α) and provide an overview of the advancements and challenges in developing pharmacological tools to target Rho GTPase and the aforementioned crosstalk in the context of cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reverse engineering GTPase programming languages with reconstituted signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Scott M

    2016-07-02

    The Ras superfamily GTPases represent one of the most prolific signaling currencies used in Eukaryotes. With these remarkable molecules, evolution has built GTPase networks that control diverse cellular processes such as growth, morphology, motility and trafficking. (1-4) Our knowledge of the individual players that underlie the function of these networks is deep; decades of biochemical and structural data has provided a mechanistic understanding of the molecules that turn GTPases ON and OFF, as well as how those GTPase states signal by controlling the assembly of downstream effectors. However, we know less about how these different activities work together as a system to specify complex dynamic signaling outcomes. Decoding this molecular "programming language" would help us understand how different species and cell types have used the same GTPase machinery in different ways to accomplish different tasks, and would also provide new insights as to how mutations to these networks can cause disease. We recently developed a bead-based microscopy assay to watch reconstituted H-Ras signaling systems at work under arbitrary configurations of regulators and effectors. (5) Here we highlight key observations and insights from this study and propose extensions to our method to further study this and other GTPase signaling systems.

  20. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of the GTPase-activating (GAP) and Ral binding domains (GBD) of RLIP76 (RalBP1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekar, Karthik V; Campbell, Louise J; Nietlispach, Daniel; Owen, Darerca; Mott, Helen R

    2012-10-01

    RLIP76 (also known as RalBP1) is an effector for Ral small G proteins. RLIP76 is a multifunctional, multi-domain protein that includes a GTPase activating domain for the Rho family (RhoGAP domain) and a GTPase binding domain (GBD) for the Ral small G proteins. The juxtaposition of these two domains (GAP and GBD) may be a strategy employed to co-ordinate regulation of Rho family and Ral-controlled signalling pathways at a crossover node. Here we present the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C NMR backbone and sidechain resonance assignments of the GAP and GBD di-domain (31 kDa).

  1. Muir-Torre syndrome-associated pleomorphic liposarcoma arising in a previous radiation field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yozu, Masato; Symmans, Pennie; Dray, Michael; Griffin, Jennifer; Han, Catherine; Ng, Daniel; Parry, Susan; Wong, Kp

    2013-03-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome is a variant of Lynch syndrome, characterised by sebaceous neoplasia and/or keratoacanthomas associated with visceral malignancies. Muir-Torre syndrome is caused by germline mutations of one of the mismatch repair genes, frequently MSH2 and less frequently MLH1 and MSH6. Visceral malignancies associated with Muir-Torre syndrome and Lynch syndrome include colorectal, endometrial and other gastrointestinal, urological and gynaecological malignancies. Small numbers of Lynch syndrome-associated soft tissue sarcomas have been reported, but there are no reported cases of soft tissue sarcomas in Muir-Torre syndrome. In this study, we report a 74-year-old man with known Muir-Torre syndrome with confirmed MSH2 germline mutation, diagnosed with pleomorphic liposarcoma of the right buttock in a previous radiation field. The tumour showed loss of expression of MSH2 and MSH6 on immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry on another pleomorphic liposarcoma in a different patient with no previous history of Muir-Torre syndrome or Lynch syndrome showed no loss of expression of mismatch repair proteins. This is the first report of Muir-Torre syndrome-associated sarcoma and the first case of post-radiation sarcoma in Lynch syndrome.

  2. Gitelman syndrome associated with chondrocalcinosis: description of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Filippucci

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Gitelman syndrome is a rare inherited tubulopathy, characterized by hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypocalciuria and hyperreninemic hyperaldosteronism. The clinical spectrum is wide and includes: cramps, myalgies, muscle weakness, until episodes of carpo-podalic spasm, tetania, rabdomyolisis and paralysis. Some cases have been described in literature underlining the association of this condition with chondrocalcinosis, as a typical example of hypomagnesemia-induced crystal deposition disease. The therapy of Gitelman syndrome consists on the administration of defective electrolytes, althought not always effective. We describe two cases of Gitelman syndrome associated with chondrocalcinosis showing the wide range of presentation of this clinical condition.

  3. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Liang; Yang, Yi; Wu, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Kabicek and colleagues described a case of nephritic-syndrome-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) (Kabicek, et al. 2010). This adds to the accumulating evidence that PRES can be associated with disorders other than hypertension. However, we wonder how the authors would explain the neuroimaging findings unsuggestive of vasogenic oedema. PRES (also named reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome, RPLS) represents a clinicoradiological syndrome characterized by vasogenic oedema as revealed by apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) (Bartynski, 2008). The pathogenesis of PRES has been suggested to be autoregulation failure and endothelial dysfunction (Sharma, et al.). ...

  4. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor αPIX leads to activation of the Rac 1 GTPase/glycogen phosphorylase pathway in interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llavero, Francisco; Urzelai, Bakarne; Osinalde, Nerea

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have reported that the active form of Rac 1 GTPase binds to the glycogen phosphorylase muscle isoform (PYGM) and modulates its enzymatic activity leading to T cell proliferation. In the lymphoid system, Rac 1 and in general other small GTPases of the Rho family participate...... in the signaling cascades that are activated after engagement of the T cell antigen receptor. However, little is known about the IL-2-dependent Rac 1 activator molecules. For the first time, a signaling pathway leading to the activation of Rac 1/PYGM in response to IL-2-stimulated T cell proliferation is described....... More specifically, αPIX, a known guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPases of the Rho family, preferentially Rac 1, mediates PYGM activation in Kit 225 T cells stimulated with IL-2. Using directed mutagenesis, phosphorylation of αPIX Rho-GEF serines 225 and 488 is required for activation...

  5. Roles of rho GTPases in intracellular transport and cellular transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiaojuan; Wang, Song; Huang, Yifan; Stamnes, Mark; Chen, Ji-Long

    2013-03-28

    Rho family GTPases belong to the Ras GTPase superfamily and transduce intracellular signals known to regulate a variety of cellular processes, including cell polarity, morphogenesis, migration, apoptosis, vesicle trafficking, viral transport and cellular transformation. The three best-characterized Rho family members are Cdc42, RhoA and Rac1. Cdc42 regulates endocytosis, the transport between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, post-Golgi transport and exocytosis. Cdc42 influences trafficking through interaction with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and the Arp2/3 complex, leading to changes in actin dynamics. Rac1 mediates endocytic and exocytic vesicle trafficking by interaction with its effectors, PI3kinase, synaptojanin 2, IQGAP1 and phospholipase D1. RhoA participates in the regulation of endocytosis through controlling its downstream target, Rho kinase. Interestingly, these GTPases play important roles at different stages of viral protein and genome transport in infected host cells. Importantly, dysregulation of Cdc42, Rac1 and RhoA leads to numerous disorders, including malignant transformation. In some cases, hyperactivation of Rho GTPases is required for cellular transformation. In this article, we review a number of findings related to Rho GTPase function in intracellular transport and cellular transformation.

  6. Ral-GTPases: approaching their 15 minutes of fame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Larry A

    2003-08-01

    Andy Warhol, the famous pop artist, once claimed that "in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes". The same, it seems, can be said of proteins, because at any given time some proteins become more "fashionable" to study than others. But most proteins have been highly conserved throughout millions of years of evolution, which implies that they all have essential roles in cell biology. Thus, each one will no doubt enter the limelight if the right experiment in the right cell type is done. A good example of this is the Ras-like GTPases (Ral-GTPases), which until recently existed in the shadow of their close cousins--the Ras proto-oncogenes. Recent studies have yielded insights into previously unappreciated roles for Ral-GTPases in intensively investigated disciplines such as vesicle trafficking, cell morphology, transcription and possibly even human oncogenesis.

  7. HIV signaling through CD4 and CCR5 activates Rho family GTPases that are required for optimal infection of primary CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucera, Mark B; Fleissner, Zach; Tabler, Caroline O; Schlatzer, Daniela M; Troyer, Zach; Tilton, John C

    2017-01-24

    HIV-1 hijacks host cell machinery to ensure successful replication, including cytoskeletal components for intracellular trafficking, nucleoproteins for pre-integration complex import, and the ESCRT pathway for assembly and budding. It is widely appreciated that cellular post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein activity within cells; however, little is known about how PTMs influence HIV replication. Previously, we reported that blocking deacetylation of tubulin using histone deacetylase inhibitors promoted the kinetics and efficiency of early post-entry viral events. To uncover additional PTMs that modulate entry and early post-entry stages in HIV infection, we employed a flow cytometric approach to assess a panel of small molecule inhibitors on viral fusion and LTR promoter-driven gene expression. While viral fusion was not significantly affected, early post-entry viral events were modulated by drugs targeting multiple processes including histone deacetylation, methylation, and bromodomain inhibition. Most notably, we observed that inhibitors of the Rho GTPase family of cytoskeletal regulators-including RhoA, Cdc42, and Rho-associated kinase signaling pathways-significantly reduced viral infection. Using phosphoproteomics and a biochemical GTPase activation assay, we found that virion-induced signaling via CD4 and CCR5 activated Rho family GTPases including Rac1 and Cdc42 and led to widespread modification of GTPase signaling-associated factors. Together, these data demonstrate that HIV signaling activates members of the Rho GTPase family of cytoskeletal regulators that are required for optimal HIV infection of primary CD4+ T cells.

  8. Case report: nephrotic syndrome associated with a total hydatidiform mole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsuda, A; Nakamoto, Y; Asakura, K; Yasuda, T; Imai, H; Miura, A B

    1992-05-01

    The authors describe a 51-year-old Japanese woman who developed nephrotic syndrome in association with a total hydatidiform mole. The nephrotic syndrome remitted completely following hysterectomy. A renal biopsy performed before the operation showed diffuse mesangial cell proliferation of a moderate degree, and thickened capillary walls with focal and segmental subendothelial deposits, as well as circumferential mesangial interposition. Occasional foci of the mesangiolysis were also observed. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed granular staining of IgM along the glomerular capillary walls in a fringe pattern. A review of the literature revealed that this patient appears to be the first case of nephrotic syndrome associated with a total mole, although there have been two cases of nephrotic syndrome due to preeclamptic nephropathy associated with a partial or transitional mole.

  9. Capgras Syndrome associated with the use of psychoactive substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Ezequiel N

    2011-04-01

    Capgras syndrome has originally been described as psychiatric syndrome. However, in the last few years reports of patients with this syndrome has significantly increased in patients with neurological, metabolic, and infectious diseases and those who consume alcohol. Different hypotheses have been proposed to explain the neurobiology of this very unusual symptom, such as changes in the dopamine circuit and specific dysfunctions in facial processing. In this work we present a new case of Capgras syndrome, associated with an acute cocaine overdose, which was transient and reversible. The neurobiological bases of this syndrome are analysed, along with their relationship with the changes induced by cocaine use. Thus, Capgras syndrome could be the expression of functional changes at frontal-temporal level, and the paralimbic region secondary to the consumption of psychoactive substances such as cocaine. Copyright © 2010 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. A case of Werner's syndrome associated with osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, K; Hatamochi, A; Shinkai, H; Ishikawa, Y; Kawaguchi, N; Goto, M

    1999-10-01

    We described a case of Werner's syndrome associated with osteosarcoma. A 37-year-old Japanese man was diagnosed as having Werner's syndrome by the presence of juvenile cataracts, skin sclerosis and hyperpigmentation of the feet, high-pitched voice, characteristic bird-like appearance of the face with beak-shaped nose, thinning of the entire skin and hyperkeratoses on soles, hyperlipemia, hyperuricemia, diabetes melitus, and the mutated responsible gene (WRN). He had a 3-month history of a tumor on his left forearm. Histologically, the tumor included four histological patterns; a malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like, a desmoid-like, a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans-like, and a chondrosarcoma-like pattern. Tumoral osteoid formation was also found in the tumor. Therefore, the tumor was diagnosed as osteosarcoma.

  11. Mirizzi syndrome associated with hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Oliver

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This is the first case report of Mirizzi syndrome associated with hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm. Case presentation A 54-year-old man presented with painful obstructive jaundice and weight loss. Computed tomography showed a hilar mass in the liver. Following an episode of haemobilia, angiography demonstrated a pseudoaneurysm of a branch of the right hepatic artery that was embolised. At surgery, a gallstone causing Mirizzi type II syndrome was found to be responsible for the biliary obstruction and a necrotic inflammatory mass and haematoma were found to be extending into the liver. The mass was debrided and drained, the obstructing stones removed and the bile duct drained with a t-tube. The patient made a full recovery. Conclusion This case highlights another situation where there may be difficulty in differentiating Mirizzi syndrome from biliary tract cancer.

  12. The Rho-family GTPase Rac1 regulates integrin localization in Drosophila immunosurveillance cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel J Xavier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi lays an egg in a Drosophila larva, phagocytic cells called plasmatocytes and specialized cells known as lamellocytes encapsulate the egg. The Drosophila β-integrin Myospheroid (Mys is necessary for lamellocytes to adhere to the cellular capsule surrounding L. boulardi eggs. Integrins are heterodimeric adhesion receptors consisting of α and β subunits, and similar to other plasma membrane receptors undergo ligand-dependent endocytosis. In mammalian cells it is known that integrin binding to the extracellular matrix induces the activation of Rac GTPases, and we have previously shown that Rac1 and Rac2 are necessary for a proper encapsulation response in Drosophila larvae. We wanted to test the possibility that Myospheroid and Rac GTPases interact during the Drosophila anti-parasitoid immune response. RESULTS: In the current study we demonstrate that Rac1 is required for the proper localization of Myospheroid to the cell periphery of haemocytes after parasitization. Interestingly, the mislocalization of Myospheroid in Rac1 mutants is rescued by hyperthermia, involving the heat shock protein Hsp83. From these results we conclude that Rac1 and Hsp83 are required for the proper localization of Mys after parasitization. SIGNIFICANCE: We show for the first time that the small GTPase Rac1 is required for Mysopheroid localization. Interestingly, the necessity of Rac1 in Mys localization was negated by hyperthermia. This presents a problem, in Drosophila we quite often raise larvae at 29°C when using the GAL4/UAS misexpression system. If hyperthermia rescues receptor endosomal recycling defects, raising larvae in hyperthermic conditions may mask potentially interesting phenotypes.

  13. Control of T lymphocyte morphology by the GTPase Rho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caudell Eva G

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rho family GTPase regulation of the actin cytoskeleton governs a variety of cell responses. In this report, we have analyzed the role of the GTPase Rho in maintenance of the T lymphocyte actin cytoskeleton. Results Inactivation of the GTPase Rho in the human T lymphocytic cell line HPB-ALL does not inhibit constitutively high adhesion to the integrin β1 substrate fibronectin. It did however result in the aberrant extension of finger-like dendritic processes on the substrates VCAM-1, Fn, and mAb specific to β1 integrins. Time-lapse video microscopy demonstrated that C3 induced extensions were primarily the result of an altered pseudopod elongation rather than retraction. Once the stellate pseudopodia extended, none retracted, and cells became completely immobile. Filipodial structures were absent and the dendritic-like processes in C3 treated cells were rich in filamentous actin. Immunolocalization of RhoA in untreated HPB-ALL cells spreading on fibronectin demonstrated a diffuse staining pattern within the pseudopodia. In C3 treated cells, clusters of RhoA were pronounced and localized within the altered extensions. Conclusions GTPase Rho is actively involved in the regulation of T lymphocyte morphology and motility.

  14. Targeting an Essential GTPase Obg for the Development of Broad-Spectrum Antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine A Bonventre

    Full Text Available A promising new drug target for the development of novel broad-spectrum antibiotics is the highly conserved small GTPase Obg (YhbZ, CgtA, a protein essential for the survival of all bacteria including Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC. GC is the agent of gonorrhea, a prevalent sexually transmitted disease resulting in serious consequences on reproductive and neonatal health. A preventive anti-gonorrhea vaccine does not exist, and options for effective antibiotic treatments are increasingly limited. To address the dire need for alternative antimicrobial strategies, we have designed and optimized a 384-well GTPase assay to identify inhibitors of Obg using as a model Obg protein from GC, ObgGC. The assay was validated with a pilot screen of 40,000 compounds and achieved an average Z' value of 0.58 ± 0.02, which suggests a robust assay amenable to high-throughput screening. We developed secondary assessments for identified lead compounds that utilize the interaction between ObgGC and fluorescent guanine nucleotide analogs, mant-GTP and mant-GDP, and an ObgGC variant with multiple alterations in the G-domains that prevent nucleotide binding. To evaluate the broad-spectrum potential of ObgGC inhibitors, Obg proteins of Klebsiella pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were assessed using the colorimetric and fluorescence-based activity assays. These approaches can be useful in identifying broad-spectrum Obg inhibitors and advancing the therapeutic battle against multidrug resistant bacteria.

  15. Orbital apex syndrome associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurimoto T

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Takuji Kurimoto1, Masahiro Tonari1, Norihiko Ishizaki1, Mitsuhiro Monta2, Saori Hirata2, Hidehiro Oku1, Jun Sugasawa1, Tsunehiko Ikeda11Department of Ophthalmology, Osaka Medical College, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Shitennoji Hospital, Osaka, JapanAbstract: We report our findings for a patient with orbital apex syndrome associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus. Our patient was initially admitted to a neighborhood hospital because of nausea and loss of appetite of 10 days' duration. The day after hospitalization, she developed skin vesicles along the first division of the trigeminal nerve, with severe lid swelling and conjunctival injection. On suspicion of meningoencephalitis caused by varicella zoster virus, antiviral therapy with vidarabine and betamethasone was started. Seventeen days later, complete ptosis and ophthalmoplegia developed in the right eye. The light reflex in the right eye was absent and anisocoria was present, with the right pupil larger than the left. Fat-suppressed enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance images showed high intensity areas in the muscle cone, cavernous sinus, and orbital optic nerve sheath. Our patient was diagnosed with orbital apex syndrome, and because of skin vesicles in the first division of the trigeminal nerve, the orbital apex syndrome was considered to be caused by herpes zoster ophthalmicus. After the patient was transferred to our hospital, prednisolone 60 mg and vidarabine antiviral therapy was started, and fever and headaches disappeared five days later. The ophthalmoplegia and optic neuritis, but not the anisocoria, gradually resolved during tapering of oral therapy. From the clinical findings and course, the cause of the orbital apex syndrome was most likely invasion of the orbital apex and cavernous sinus by the herpes virus through the trigeminal nerve ganglia.Keywords: varicella zoster virus, orbital apex syndrome, herpes zoster ophthalmicus, complete ophthalmoplegia

  16. A Case of Swyer Syndrome Associated with Advanced Gonadal Dysgerminoma Involving Long Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Da Silva Rios

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Swyer syndrome is caused by abnormal sex differentiation during the embryonic period, resulting in incomplete intrauterine masculinization and undifferentiated gonads. The current case report describes a patient with Swyer syndrome associated with stage 3 gonadal dysgerminoma who has survived for 23 years. At age 18, this patient sought assistance for primary amenorrhea from the Gynecological Services Department of the University of Brasília Hospital. A physical examination revealed that the patient was at Tanner stage 4 with respect to axillary hair, breasts, and pubic hair; she presented with a eutrophic vagina and a small cervix. She was treated with a combination of estrogens and progestogens to induce cycling. Approximately 4 years later, a complex tumor was found and resected; a histopathological analysis revealed that this tumor was a right adnexal dysgerminoma with peritoneal affection. The patient was also subjected to chemotherapy. Her follow-up has continued to the present time, with no signs of tumor recurrence. In conclusion, this report describes an extremely rare case in which Swyer syndrome was associated with ovarian dysgerminoma; relative to similar patients, the described patient has survived for an unusually prolonged time.

  17. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Hélène; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stéphanie; Paris, François; Corre, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. ► RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. ► Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. ► Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. ► Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial functions linked to actin cytoskeleton.

  18. Toward understanding RhoGTPase specificity: structure, function and local activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, Antje; Reinhard, Nathalie R.; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are regulated through the concerted action of cytoskeletal dynamics and adhesion proteins, the activity of which is governed by RhoGTPases. Specific RhoGTPase signaling requires spatio-temporal activation and coordination of subsequent protein-protein and protein-lipid

  19. Identification of the GTPase superfamily in Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Luiz Borges

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas are the smallest known prokaryotes with self-replication ability. They are obligate parasites, taking up many molecules of their hosts and acting as pathogens in men, animals, birds and plants. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the infective agent of swine mycoplasmosis and Mycoplasma synoviae is responsible for subclinical upper respiratory infections that may result in airsacculitis and synovitis in chickens and turkeys. These highly infectious organisms present a worldwide distribution and are responsible for major economic problems. Proteins of the GTPase superfamily occur in all domains of life, regulating functions such as protein synthesis, cell cycle and differentiation. Despite their functional diversity, all GTPases are believed to have evolved from a single common ancestor. In this work we have identified mycoplasma GTPases by searching the complete genome databases of Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, J (non-pathogenic and 7448 (pathogenic strains. Fifteen ORFs encoding predicted GTPases were found in M. synoviae and in the two strains of M. hyopneumoniae. Searches for conserved G domains in GTPases were performed and the sequences were classified into families. The GTPase phylogenetic analysis showed that the subfamilies were well resolved into clades. The presence of GTPases in the three strains suggests the importance of GTPases in 'minimalist' genomes.

  20. RhoGDI: multiple functions in the regulation of Rho family GTPase activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dovas, Athanassios; Couchman, John R

    2005-01-01

    insight as to how RhoGDI exerts its effects on nucleotide binding, the membrane association-dissociation cycling of the GTPase and how these activities are controlled. Despite the initial negative roles attributed to RhoGDI, recent evidence has come to suggest that it may also act as a positive regulator...... and the importance of the particular membrane microenvironment that represents the site of action for GTPases. All these results point to a wider role for RhoGDI than initially perceived, making it a binding partner that can tightly control Rho GTPases, but which also allows them to reach their full spectrum......RhoGDI (Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor) was identified as a down-regulator of Rho family GTPases typified by its ability to prevent nucleotide exchange and membrane association. Structural studies on GTPase-RhoGDI complexes, in combination with biochemical and cell biological results, have provided...

  1. Comprehensive functional analysis of Rab GTPases in Drosophila nephrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yulong; Zhu, Jun-Yi; Zhang, Fujian; Richman, Adam; Zhao, Zhanzheng; Han, Zhe

    2017-06-01

    The Drosophila nephrocyte is a critical component of the fly renal system and bears structural and functional homology to podocytes and proximal tubule cells of the mammalian kidney. Investigations of nephrocyte cell biological processes are fundamental to understanding the insect renal system. Nephrocytes are highly active in endocytosis and vesicle trafficking. Rab GTPases regulate endocytosis and trafficking but specific functions of nephrocyte Rabs remain undefined. We analyzed Rab GTPase expression and function in Drosophila nephrocytes and found that 11 out of 27 Drosophila Rabs were required for normal activity. Rabs 1, 5, 7, 11 and 35 were most important. Gene silencing of the nephrocyte-specific Rab5 eliminated all intracellular vesicles and the specialized plasma membrane structures essential for nephrocyte function. Rab7 silencing dramatically increased clear vacuoles and reduced lysosomes. Rab11 silencing increased lysosomes and reduced clear vacuoles. Our results suggest that Rab5 mediates endocytosis that is essential for the maintenance of functionally critical nephrocyte plasma membrane structures and that Rabs 7 and 11 mediate alternative downstream vesicle trafficking pathways leading to protein degradation and membrane recycling, respectively. Elucidating molecular pathways underlying nephrocyte function has the potential to yield important insights into human kidney cell physiology and mechanisms of cell injury that lead to disease. The Drosophila nephrocyte is emerging as a useful in vivo model system for molecular target identification and initial testing of therapeutic approaches in humans.

  2. The jaw of the worm: GTPase-activating protein EAT-17 regulates grinder formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straud, Sarah; Lee, Inhwan; Song, Bomi; Avery, Leon; You, Young-Jai

    2013-09-01

    Constitutive transport of cellular materials is essential for cell survival. Although multiple small GTPase Rab proteins are required for the process, few regulators of Rabs are known. Here we report that EAT-17, a novel GTPase-activating protein (GAP), regulates RAB-6.2 function in grinder formation in Caenorhabditis elegans. We identified EAT-17 as a novel RabGAP that interacts with RAB-6.2, a protein that presumably regulates vesicle trafficking between Golgi, the endoplasmic reticulum, and plasma membrane to form a functional grinder. EAT-17 has a canonical GAP domain that is critical for its function. RNA interference against 25 confirmed and/or predicted RABs in C. elegans shows that RNAi against rab-6.2 produces a phenotype identical to eat-17. A directed yeast two-hybrid screen using EAT-17 as bait and each of the 25 RAB proteins as prey identifies RAB-6.2 as the interacting partner of EAT-17, confirming that RAB-6.2 is a specific substrate of EAT-17. Additionally, deletion mutants of rab-6.2 show grinder defects identical to those of eat-17 loss-of-function mutants, and both RAB-6.2 and EAT-17 are expressed in the terminal bulb of the pharynx where the grinder is located. Collectively, these results suggest that EAT-17 is a specific GTPase-activating protein for RAB-6.2. Based on the conserved function of Rab6 in vesicular transport, we propose that EAT-17 regulates the turnover rate of RAB-6.2 activity in cargo trafficking for grinder formation.

  3. PlexinA2 Forward Signaling through Rap1 GTPases Regulates Dentate Gyrus Development and Schizophrenia-like Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Feng Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Dentate gyrus (DG development requires specification of granule cell (GC progenitors in the hippocampal neuroepithelium, as well as their proliferation and migration into the primordial DG. We identify the Plexin family members Plxna2 and Plxna4 as important regulators of DG development. Distribution of immature GCs is regulated by Sema5A signaling through PlxnA2 and requires a functional PlxnA2 GTPase-activating protein (GAP domain and Rap1 small GTPases. In adult Plxna2−/− but not Plxna2-GAP-deficient mice, the dentate GC layer is severely malformed, neurogenesis is compromised, and mossy fibers form aberrant synaptic boutons within CA3. Behavioral studies with Plxna2−/− mice revealed deficits in associative learning, sociability, and sensorimotor gating—traits commonly observed in neuropsychiatric disorder. Remarkably, while morphological defects are minimal in Plxna2-GAP-deficient brains, defects in fear memory and sensorimotor gating persist. Since allelic variants of human PLXNA2 and RAP1 associate with schizophrenia, our studies identify a biochemical pathway important for brain development and mental health. : Zhao et al. find that Sema5A-PlexinA2 forward signaling through Rap1 GTPases is required for progenitor distribution in the developing mouse dentate gyrus. Adult Plxna2−/−, but not Plxna2-GAP-deficient, mice show defects in dentate morphology, neurogenesis, and mossy fiber connectivity. Plxna2−/− and Plxna2-GAP mice exhibit behavioral defects suggestive of neuropsychiatric illness. Keywords: PlexinA2, semaphoring, Rap1, GAP, dentate gyrus, adult neurogenesis, mossy fiber, fear memory, sensorimotor gating, schizophrenia

  4. Porites white patch syndrome: associated viruses and disease physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, S. A.; Davy, J. E.; Wilson, W. H.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Davy, S. K.

    2015-03-01

    In recent decades, coral reefs worldwide have undergone significant changes in response to various environmental and anthropogenic impacts. Among the numerous causes of reef degradation, coral disease is one factor that is to a large extent still poorly understood. Here, we characterize the physiology of white patch syndrome (WPS), a disease affecting poritid corals on the Great Barrier Reef. WPS manifests as small, generally discrete patches of tissue discolouration. Physiological analysis revealed that chlorophyll a content was significantly lower in lesions than in healthy tissues, while host protein content remained constant, suggesting that host tissue is not affected by WPS. This was confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination, which showed intact host tissue within lesions. TEM also revealed that Symbiodinium cells are lost from the host gastrodermis with no apparent harm caused to the surrounding host tissue. Also present in the electron micrographs were numerous virus-like particles (VLPs), in both coral and Symbiodinium cells. Small (cells from diseased colonies. There was no apparent increase in prokaryotic or eukaryotic microbial abundance in diseased colonies. Taken together, these results suggest that viruses infecting the coral and/or its resident Symbiodinium cells may be the causative agents of WPS.

  5. Rab GTPases and kinesin motors in endosomal trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delevoye, Cédric; Goud, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The endocytic pathway is composed of distinct types of endosomes that vary in shape, function, and molecular composition. In addition, endosomes are highly dynamic structures that continuously receive, sort, and deliver molecules to other organelles. Among organizing machineries that contribute to endosomal functions, Rab GTPases and kinesin motors play critical roles. Rab proteins define the identity of endosomal subdomains by recruiting set of effectors among which kinesins shape and transport membranous carriers along the microtubule network. In this review, we provide detailed protocols from live cell imaging to electron microscopy and biochemical approaches to address how Rab and kinesin proteins cooperate molecularly and functionally within the endocytic pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Spontaneous cell polarization: Feedback control of Cdc42 GTPase breaks cellular symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sophie G

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous polarization without spatial cues, or symmetry breaking, is a fundamental problem of spatial organization in biological systems. This question has been extensively studied using yeast models, which revealed the central role of the small GTPase switch Cdc42. Active Cdc42-GTP forms a coherent patch at the cell cortex, thought to result from amplification of a small initial stochastic inhomogeneity through positive feedback mechanisms, which induces cell polarization. Here, I review and discuss the mechanisms of Cdc42 activity self-amplification and dynamic turnover. A robust Cdc42 patch is formed through the combined effects of Cdc42 activity promoting its own activation and active Cdc42-GTP displaying reduced membrane detachment and lateral diffusion compared to inactive Cdc42-GDP. I argue the role of the actin cytoskeleton in symmetry breaking is not primarily to transport Cdc42 to the active site. Finally, negative feedback and competition mechanisms serve to control the number of polarization sites. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  7. It's not All Doom and Gloom: Prune Belly Syndrome Associated with VACTERL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Karim; Lall, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Prune belly syndrome is a rare abnormality; its association with VACTERL is even rarer. This association has been reported in literature a few times since first reported in 1993 and so far the majority have either been stillbirths or died shortly after birth. We present a case of Prune belly syndrome associated with VACTERL who is now one year old.

  8. Adult Reye-like syndrome associated with serologic evidence of acute parvovirus B19 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio Gonçalves da Costa

    Full Text Available Reye's syndrome is an infrequently diagnosed medical condition affecting mainly children. The etiology, epidemiology and natural history of Reye's syndrome have been cloudily written in footnotes of medical books and exotic papers since the initial description in early 1950s. We report here a case of adult Reye's syndrome associated with serologic evidence of parvovirus B19 infection.

  9. CNS syndromes associated with antibodies against metabotropic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Autoantibodies to Central nervous system (CNS) metabotropic receptors are associated with a growing family of autoimmune brain diseases, including encephalitis, basal ganglia encephalitis, Ophelia syndrome, and cerebellitis. The purpose of this review is to summarize the state of knowledge regarding the target receptors, the neurological autoimmune disorders, and the pathogenic mechanisms. Antibodies to the γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor are associate with limbic encephalitis and severe seizures, often with small cell lung cancers. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) antibodies associate with Ophelia syndrome, a relatively mild form of encephalitis linked to Hodgkin lymphoma. mGluR1 antibodies associate with a form of cerebellar degeneration, and also Hodgkin lymphoma. Antibodies to Homer 3, a protein associated with mGluR1, have also been reported in two patients with cerebellar syndromes. Dopamine-2 receptor antibodies have been reported by one group in children with basal ganglia encephalitis and other disorders. CNS metabotropic receptor antibodies may exert direct inhibitory effects on their target receptors, but the evidence is more limited than with autoantibodies to ionotropic glutamate receptors. In the future, improved recognition of these patients may lead to better outcomes. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of the diseases may uncover novel treatment strategies.

  10. Rab GTPases and the Autophagy Pathway: Bacterial Targets for a Suitable Biogenesis and Trafficking of Their Own Vacuoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Milagros López de Armentia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular process that comprises degradation of damaged organelles, protein aggregates and intracellular pathogens, having an important role in controlling the fate of invading microorganisms. Intracellular pathogens are internalized by professional and non-professional phagocytes, localizing in compartments called phagosomes. To degrade the internalized microorganism, the microbial phagosome matures by fusion events with early and late endosomal compartments and lysosomes, a process that is regulated by Rab GTPases. Interestingly, in order to survive and replicate in the phagosome, some pathogens employ different strategies to manipulate vesicular traffic, inhibiting phagolysosomal biogenesis (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis or surviving in acidic compartments and forming replicative vacuoles (e.g., Coxiella burnetti and Legionella pneumophila. The bacteria described in this review often use secretion systems to control the host’s response and thus disseminate. To date, eight types of secretion systems (Type I to Type VIII are known. Some of these systems are used by bacteria to translocate pathogenic proteins into the host cell and regulate replicative vacuole formation, apoptosis, cytokine responses, and autophagy. Herein, we have focused on how bacteria manipulate small Rab GTPases to control many of these processes. The growing knowledge in this field may facilitate the development of new treatments or contribute to the prevention of these types of bacterial infections.

  11. Rab GTPases and the Autophagy Pathway: Bacterial Targets for a Suitable Biogenesis and Trafficking of Their Own Vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Armentia, María Milagros; Amaya, Celina; Colombo, María Isabel

    2016-03-08

    Autophagy is an intracellular process that comprises degradation of damaged organelles, protein aggregates and intracellular pathogens, having an important role in controlling the fate of invading microorganisms. Intracellular pathogens are internalized by professional and non-professional phagocytes, localizing in compartments called phagosomes. To degrade the internalized microorganism, the microbial phagosome matures by fusion events with early and late endosomal compartments and lysosomes, a process that is regulated by Rab GTPases. Interestingly, in order to survive and replicate in the phagosome, some pathogens employ different strategies to manipulate vesicular traffic, inhibiting phagolysosomal biogenesis (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis) or surviving in acidic compartments and forming replicative vacuoles (e.g., Coxiella burnetti and Legionella pneumophila). The bacteria described in this review often use secretion systems to control the host's response and thus disseminate. To date, eight types of secretion systems (Type I to Type VIII) are known. Some of these systems are used by bacteria to translocate pathogenic proteins into the host cell and regulate replicative vacuole formation, apoptosis, cytokine responses, and autophagy. Herein, we have focused on how bacteria manipulate small Rab GTPases to control many of these processes. The growing knowledge in this field may facilitate the development of new treatments or contribute to the prevention of these types of bacterial infections.

  12. Vesicular Trafficking Defects, Developmental Abnormalities, and Alterations in the Cellular Death Process Occur in Cell Lines that Over-Express Dictyostelium GTPase, Rab2, and Rab2 Mutants

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    Katherine Maringer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Small molecular weight GTPase Rab2 has been shown to be a resident of pre-Golgi intermediates and required for protein transport from the ER to the Golgi complex, however, the function of Rab2 in Dictyostelium has yet to be fully characterized. Using cell lines that over-express DdRab2, as well as cell lines over-expressing constitutively active (CA, and dominant negative (DN forms of the GTPase, we report a functional role in vesicular transport specifically phagocytosis, and endocytosis. Furthermore, Rab2 like other GTPases cycles between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound state. We found that this GTP/GDP cycle for DdRab2 is crucial for normal Dictyostelium development and cell–cell adhesion. Similar to Rab5 and Rab7 in C. elegans, we found that DdRab2 plays a role in programmed cell death, possibly in the phagocytic removal of apoptotic corpses.

  13. Two Rab GTPases play different roles in conidiation, trap formation, stress resistance, and virulence in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuewei; Ma, Ni; Yang, Le; Zheng, Yaqing; Zhen, Zhengyi; Li, Qing; Xie, Meihua; Li, Juan; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Yang, Jinkui

    2018-04-03

    Rab GTPases are the largest group of the small GTPases family, which play a pivotal role in the secretion of proteins. Arthrobotrys oligospora is a representative nematode-trapping fungus that can produce adhesive networks to capture nematodes. In this study, the roles of two Rab GTPases AoRab-7A and AoRab-2 were characterized by gene knockout in the fungus A. oligospora. The disruption of AoRab-7A hindered the mycelial growth in different media, the conidiation of ΔAoRab-7A transformants was almost abolished, and the transcription of four sporulation-related genes (AbaA, FluG, Hyp1, and VosA) was downregulated compared to the wild-type strain (WT). Furthermore, the tolerance of the ΔAoRab-7A mutants to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and H 2 O 2 was also significantly reduced compared to the WT, and the transcription of several genes related to environmental resistance, such as genes for catalase and trehalose synthase, was downregulated. Similarly, the extracellular proteolytic activity was decreased. Importantly, the ΔAoRab-7A mutants were unable to produce traps and capture nematodes. However, the disruption of gene AoRab-2 only affected the conidiation slightly but non-significantly, while other phenotypic traits were unaffected. Moreover, the gene AoRab-7A was also involved in the autophagy induced by nitrogen deprivation in A. oligospora. Our results revealed for the first time that the Rab GTPases are involved in the regulation of mycelial growth, conidiation, trap formation, stress resistance, and pathogenicity in the nematode-trapping fungus A. oligospora.

  14. Bayesian classification of residues associated with protein functional divergence: Arf and Arf-like GTPases

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    Neuwald Andrew F

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain residues within proteins are highly conserved across very distantly related organisms, yet their (presumably critical structural or mechanistic roles are completely unknown. To obtain clues regarding such residues within Arf and Arf-like (Arf/Arl GTPases--which function as on/off switches regulating vesicle trafficking, phospholipid metabolism and cytoskeletal remodeling--I apply a new sampling procedure for comparative sequence analysis, termed multiple category Bayesian Partitioning with Pattern Selection (mcBPPS. Results The mcBPPS sampler classified sequences within the entire P-loop GTPase class into multiple categories by identifying those evolutionarily-divergent residues most likely to be responsible for functional specialization. Here I focus on categories of residues that most distinguish various Arf/Arl GTPases from other GTPases. This identified residues whose specific roles have been previously proposed (and in some cases corroborated experimentally and that thus serve as positive controls, as well as several categories of co-conserved residues whose possible roles are first hinted at here. For example, Arf/Arl/Sar GTPases are most distinguished from other GTPases by a conserved aspartate residue within the phosphate binding loop (P-loop and by co-conserved residues nearby that, together, can form a network of salt-bridge and hydrogen bond interactions centered on the GTPase active site. Residues corresponding to an N-[VI] motif that is conserved within Arf/Arl GTPases may play a role in the interswitch toggle characteristic of the Arf family, whereas other, co-conserved residues may modulate the flexibility of the guanine binding loop. Arl8 GTPases conserve residues that strikingly diverge from those typically found in other Arf/Arl GTPases and that form structural interactions suggestive of a novel interswitch toggle mechanism. Conclusions This analysis suggests specific mutagenesis experiments to

  15. Identification of Rho GTPases implicated in terminal differentiation of muscle cells in ascidia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coisy-Quivy, Marjorie; Sanguesa-Ferrer, Juan; Weill, Mylène; Johnson, David Scott; Donnay, Jean-Marc; Hipskind, Robert; Fort, Philippe; Philips, Alexandre

    2006-10-01

    Members of the Rho GTPase family mediate changes in the actin cytoskeleton and are also implicated in developmental processes, including myogenesis. Nevertheless, a comprehensive analysis of these proteins during myofibrillogenesis has never been performed in any organism. Using the ascidian model to identify the role of Rho GTPases on myofibrillogenesis, we show that transcripts for all Rho GTPases are detected in muscle cells of the embryo. We find that activation of RhoA, TC10 and Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42) disturbs the polarity of muscle cells, whereas that of other Rho GTPases induced cell positioning defects. Moreover, dominant negative version of five Rho GTPases, RhoA, Rac2, RCL2 (Rac- and Cdc42-like 2), TC10 and WRCH (Wnt-1 responsive Cdc42 homologue), impaired the formation of mature myofibrils. Taken together, our results show that several Rho GTPase-dependent pathways are required to control the spatial localization of muscle cells in the embryo and to coordinate myofibril assembly. This stresses the importance of analysing the entire Rho family when studying a new biological process.

  16. Implications of Rho GTPase signaling in glioma cell invasion and tumor progression

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    Shannon Patricia Fortin Ensign

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GB is the most malignant of primary adult brain tumors, characterized by a highly locally-invasive cell population, as well as abundant proliferative cells, neoangiogenesis, and necrosis. Clinical intervention with chemotherapy or radiation may either promote or establish an environment for manifestation of invasive behavior. Understanding the molecular drivers of invasion in the context of glioma progression may be insightful in directing new treatments for patients with GB. Here, we review current knowledge on Rho family GTPases, their aberrant regulation in GB, and their effect on GB cell invasion and tumor progression. Rho GTPases are modulators of cell migration through effects on actin cytoskeleton rearrangement; in non-neoplastic tissue, expression and activation of Rho GTPases are normally under tight regulation. In GB, Rho GTPases are deregulated, often via hyperactivity or overexpression of their activators, Rho GEFs. Downstream effectors of Rho GTPases have been shown to promote invasiveness and, importantly, glioma cell survival. The study of aberrant Rho GTPase signaling in GB is thus an important investigation of cell invasion as well as treatment resistance and disease progression.

  17. Rho GTPases: Novel Players in the Regulation of the DNA Damage Response?

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    Gerhard Fritz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1 belongs to the family of Ras-homologous small GTPases. It is well characterized as a membrane-bound signal transducing molecule that is involved in the regulation of cell motility and adhesion as well as cell cycle progression, mitosis, cell death and gene expression. Rac1 also adjusts cellular responses to genotoxic stress by regulating the activity of stress kinases, including c-Jun-N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK and p38 kinases as well as related transcription factors. Apart from being found on the inner side of the outer cell membrane and in the cytosol, Rac1 has also been detected inside the nucleus. Different lines of evidence indicate that genotoxin-induced DNA damage is able to activate nuclear Rac1. The exact mechanisms involved and the biological consequences, however, are unclear. The data available so far indicate that Rac1 might integrate DNA damage independent and DNA damage dependent cellular stress responses following genotoxin treatment, thereby coordinating mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR that are related to DNA repair, survival and cell death.

  18. The Rab2A GTPase Promotes Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Tumorigenesis via Erk Signaling Activation

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    Man-Li Luo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proline-directed phosphorylation is regulated by the prolyl isomerase Pin1, which plays a fundamental role in driving breast cancer stem-like cells (BCSCs. Rab2A is a small GTPase critical for vesicle trafficking. Here, we show that Pin1 increases Rab2A transcription to promote BCSC expansion and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, Rab2A directly interacts with and prevents dephosphorylation/inactivation of Erk1/2 by the MKP3 phosphatase, resulting in Zeb1 upregulation and β-catenin nuclear translocation. In cancer cells, Rab2A is activated via gene amplification, mutation or Pin1 overexpression. Rab2A overexpression or mutation endows BCSC traits to primary normal human breast epithelial cells, whereas silencing Rab2A potently inhibits the expansion and tumorigenesis of freshly isolated BCSCs. Finally, Rab2A overexpression correlates with poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients. Thus, Pin1/Rab2A/Erk drives BCSC expansion and tumorigenicity, suggesting potential drug targets.

  19. Structural Dynamics Control Allosteric Activation of Cytohesin Family Arf GTPase Exchange Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaby, Andrew W.; Das, Sanchaita; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Irving, Thomas C.; Bilsel, Osman; Lambright, David G.

    2018-01-01

    Membrane dynamic processes including vesicle biogenesis depend on Arf guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) containing a catalytic Sec7 domain and a membrane-targeting module such as a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. The catalytic output of cytohesin family Arf GEFs is controlled by autoinhibitory interactions that impede accessibility of the exchange site in the Sec7 domain. These restraints can be relieved through activator Arf-GTP binding to an allosteric site comprising the PH domain and proximal autoinhibitory elements (Sec7-PH linker and C-terminal helix). Small-angle X-ray scattering and negative-stain electron microscopy were used to investigate the structural organization and conformational dynamics of cytohesin-3 (Grp1) in autoinhibited and active states. The results support a model in which hinge dynamics in the autoinhibited state expose the activator site for Arf-GTP binding, while subsequent C-terminal helix unlatching and repositioning unleash conformational entropy in the Sec7-PH linker to drive exposure of the exchange site.

  20. GTPase ROP2 binds and promotes activation of target of rapamycin, TOR, in response to auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepetilnikov, Mikhail; Makarian, Joelle; Srour, Ola; Geldreich, Angèle; Yang, Zhenbiao; Chicher, Johana; Hammann, Philippe; Ryabova, Lyubov A

    2017-04-03

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) promotes reinitiation at upstream ORFs (uORFs) in genes that play important roles in stem cell regulation and organogenesis in plants. Here, we report that the small GTPase ROP2, if activated by the phytohormone auxin, promotes activation of TOR, and thus translation reinitiation of uORF-containing mRNAs. Plants with high levels of active ROP2, including those expressing constitutively active ROP2 (CA-ROP2), contain high levels of active TOR ROP2 physically interacts with and, when GTP-bound, activates TOR in vitro TOR activation in response to auxin is abolished in ROP-deficient rop2 rop6 ROP4 RNAi plants. GFP-TOR can associate with endosome-like structures in ROP2-overexpressing plants, indicating that endosomes mediate ROP2 effects on TOR activation. CA-ROP2 is efficient in loading uORF-containing mRNAs onto polysomes and stimulates translation in protoplasts, and both processes are sensitive to TOR inhibitor AZD-8055. TOR inactivation abolishes ROP2 regulation of translation reinitiation, but not its effects on cytoskeleton or intracellular trafficking. These findings imply a mode of translation control whereby, as an upstream effector of TOR, ROP2 coordinates TOR function in translation reinitiation pathways in response to auxin. © 2017 The Authors.

  1. NMR derived model of GTPase effector domain (GED self association: relevance to dynamin assembly.

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    Swagata Chakraborty

    Full Text Available Self-association of dynamin to form spiral structures around lipidic vesicles during endocytosis is largely mediated by its 'coiled coil' GTPase Effector Domain (GED, which, in vitro, self-associates into huge helical assemblies. Residue-level structural characterizations of these assemblies and understanding the process of association have remained a challenge. It is also impossible to get folded monomers in the solution phase. In this context, we have developed here a strategy to probe the self-association of GED by first dissociating the assembly using Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO and then systematically monitoring the refolding into helix and concomitant re-association using NMR spectroscopy, as DMSO concentration is progressively reduced. The short segment, Arg109 - Met116, acts as the nucleation site for helix formation and self-association. Hydrophobic and complementary charge interactions on the surfaces drive self-association, as the helices elongate in both the directions resulting in an antiparallel stack. A small N-terminal segment remains floppy in the assembly. Following these and other published results on inter-domain interactions, we have proposed a plausible mode of dynamin self assembly.

  2. Interaction of LRRK2 with kinase and GTPase signaling cascades

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    Joon Y Boon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available LRRK2 is a protein that interacts with a plethora of signaling molecules, but the complexity of LRRK2 function presents a challenge for understanding the role of LRRK2 in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease. Studies of LRRK2 using over-expression in transgenic mice have been disappointing, however studies using invertebrate systems have yielded a much clearer picture, with clear effects of LRRK2 expression, knockdown or deletion in C. elegans and Drosophila on modulation of survival of dopaminergic neurons. Recent studies have begun to focus attention on particular signaling cascades that are a target of LRRK2 function. LRRK2 interacts with members of the MAPK pathway and might regulate the pathway action by acting as a scaffold that directs the location of MAPK pathway activity, without strongly affecting the amount of MAPK pathway activity. Binding to GTPases, GAPs and GEFs are another strong theme in LRRK2 biology, with LRRK2 binding to Rac1, cdc42, rab5, rab7L1, endoA, RGS2, ArfGAP1 and ArhGEF7. All of these molecules appear to feed into a function output for LRRK2 that modulates cytoskeletal outgrowth and vesicular dynamics, including autophagy. These functions likely impact modulation of α-synuclein aggregation and associated toxicity eliciting the disease processes that we term Parkinson’s disease.

  3. A case of Pallister-Killian syndrome associated with West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Miho; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kamiyama, Noriko; Miyamoto, Yusaku

    2007-09-01

    We report the case of a 19-month-old boy with Pallister-Killian syndrome associated with West syndrome. The child was born at term to a healthy mother after an uneventful pregnancy. He was born by cesarean section because of fetal macrosomia. He was observed to have nystagmus, craniofacial dysmorphism, and mental retardation. Intractable epileptic spasms developed 17 months after birth, and electroencephalography revealed a modified hypsarrhythmia. The seizures were uncontrollable with sodium valproate monotherapy. At the age of 19 months, the child was diagnosed with Pallister-Killian syndrome of mosaic tetrasomy 12p by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Combination treatment with high-dose pyridoxal phosphate and sodium valproate eliminated seizures and improved the electroencephalographic abnormalities. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Pallister-Killian syndrome associated with West syndrome.

  4. Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome Like Reactive Hemophagocytic Syndrome Associated with Disseminated Histoplasmosis in a HIV Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Espejo, Sandra M; Olalla-Sierra, Julián; Marí-Jiménez, Pilar; Pereda-Salguero, Teresa; Pérez-Stachowski, Javier; de-la-Torre-Lima, Javier; Del-Arco-Jiménez, Alfonso; Prada-Pardal, José L

    2017-08-01

    We describe an unusual clinical association of disseminated histoplasmosis with reactive hemophagocytic syndrome. We report the case of a new HIV-positive patient with reconstitution inflammatory syndrome like reactive hemophagocytic syndrome associated with disseminated histoplasmosis. We describe the clinical case, the procedures performed, the treatment provided and the patient's evolution. A figure of liver biopsy Grocott's silver methenamine stain that shows lots of uniform ovoid yeasts in portal spaces' macrophages that supports the diagnosis of disseminated histoplasmosis in our case.

  5. Initial therapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated cryptococcosis with fluconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, S D

    1995-03-13

    Published opinion has generally favored amphotericin B over fluconazole as initial therapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated cryptococcosis, although data that support this recommendation are limited. Retrospective review of 30 consecutive patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated cryptococcosis seen at a single institution over a 1-year period and given fluconazole, 400 mg/d, as initial therapy. No patient died within the first 30 days of therapy, and none of the 14 patients who died within 1 year had clinically detectable infection when last seen or at death. Pretreatment blood cultures were positive in 26 of 27 patients; cerebrospinal fluid cryptococcal antigen titer was greater than 1:1024 in 12 of 23 patients; and five of 30 patients presented with altered mental status. The median CD4 count at diagnosis was 0.042 x 10(9)/L (42/microL). Eight of 25 patients who were followed up for more than 30 days relapsed, as evidenced by a positive culture; all relapses were successfully treated with fluconazole, either by reinstitution of therapy or by increase of dosage. This experience supports the use of fluconazole as initial therapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated cryptococcosis.

  6. Unique Structural and Nucleotide Exchange Features of the Rho1 GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica

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    Bosch, Dustin E.; Wittchen, Erika S.; Qiu, Connie; Burridge, Keith; Siderovski, David P. (UNC)

    2012-08-10

    The single-celled human parasite Entamoeba histolytica possesses a dynamic actin cytoskeleton vital for its intestinal and systemic pathogenicity. The E. histolytica genome encodes several Rho family GTPases known to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. EhRho1, the first family member identified, was reported to be insensitive to the Rho GTPase-specific Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, raising the possibility that it may be a misclassified Ras family member. Here, we report the crystal structures of EhRho1 in both active and inactive states. EhRho1 is activated by a conserved switch mechanism, but diverges from mammalian Rho GTPases in lacking a signature Rho insert helix. EhRho1 engages a homolog of mDia, EhFormin1, suggesting a role in mediating serum-stimulated actin reorganization and microtubule formation during mitosis. EhRho1, but not a constitutively active mutant, interacts with a newly identified EhRhoGDI in a prenylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, constitutively active EhRho1 induces actin stress fiber formation in mammalian fibroblasts, thereby identifying it as a functional Rho family GTPase. EhRho1 exhibits a fast rate of nucleotide exchange relative to mammalian Rho GTPases due to a distinctive switch one isoleucine residue reminiscent of the constitutively active F28L mutation in human Cdc42, which for the latter protein, is sufficient for cellular transformation. Nonconserved, nucleotide-interacting residues within EhRho1, revealed by the crystal structure models, were observed to contribute a moderating influence on fast spontaneous nucleotide exchange. Collectively, these observations indicate that EhRho1 is a bona fide member of the Rho GTPase family, albeit with unique structural and functional aspects compared with mammalian Rho GTPases.

  7. A Putative Non-Canonical Ras-Like GTPase from P. falciparum: Chemical Properties and Characterization of the Protein.

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    Annette Kaiser

    Full Text Available During its development the malaria parasite P. falciparum has to adapt to various different environmental contexts. Key cellular mechanisms involving G-protein coupled signal transduction chains are assumed to act at these interfaces. Heterotrimeric G-proteins are absent in Plasmodium. We here describe the first cloning and expression of a putative, non-canonical Ras-like G protein (acronym PfG from Plasmodium. PfG reveals an open reading frame of 2736 bp encoding a protein of 912 amino acids with a theoretical pI of 8.68 and a molecular weight of 108.57 kDa. Transcript levels and expression are significantly increased in the erythrocytic phase in particular during schizont and gametocyte formation. Most notably, PfG has GTP binding capacity and GTPase activity due to an EngA2 domain present in small Ras-like GTPases in a variety of Bacillus species and Mycobacteria. By contrast, plasmodial PfG is divergent from any human alpha-subunit. PfG was expressed in E. coli as a histidine-tagged fusion protein and was stable only for 3.5 hours. Purification was only possible under native conditions by Nickel-chelate chromatography and subsequent separation by Blue Native PAGE. Binding of a fluorescent GTP analogue BODIPY® FL guanosine 5'O-(thiotriphosphate was determined by fluorescence emission. Mastoparan stimulated GTP binding in the presence of Mg2+. GTPase activity was determined colorimetrically. Activity expressed as absolute fluorescence was 50% higher for the human paralogue than the activity of the parasitic enzyme. The PfG protein is expressed in the erythrocytic stages and binds GTP after immunoprecipitation. Immunofluorescence using specific antiserum suggests that PfG localizes to the parasite cytosol. The current data suggest that the putitative, Ras-like G-protein might be involved in a non-canonical signaling pathway in Plasmodium. Research on the function of PfG with respect to pathogenesis and antimalarial chemotherapy is currently

  8. Uncoupling of dynamin polymerization and GTPase activity revealed by the conformation-specific nanobody dynab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Valentina; Sebastian, Rafael; Moutel, Sandrine; Ecard, Jason; Perez, Franck; Roux, Aurélien

    2017-10-12

    Dynamin is a large GTPase that forms a helical collar at the neck of endocytic pits, and catalyzes membrane fission (Schmid and Frolov, 2011; Ferguson and De Camilli, 2012). Dynamin fission reaction is strictly dependent on GTP hydrolysis, but how fission is mediated is still debated (Antonny et al., 2016): GTP energy could be spent in membrane constriction required for fission, or in disassembly of the dynamin polymer to trigger fission. To follow dynamin GTP hydrolysis at endocytic pits, we generated a conformation-specific nanobody called dynab, that binds preferentially to the GTP hydrolytic state of dynamin-1. Dynab allowed us to follow the GTPase activity of dynamin-1 in real-time. We show that in fibroblasts, dynamin GTP hydrolysis occurs as stochastic bursts, which are randomly distributed relatively to the peak of dynamin assembly. Thus, dynamin disassembly is not coupled to GTPase activity, supporting that the GTP energy is primarily spent in constriction.

  9. Palmitoylation of the immunity related GTPase, Irgm1: impact on membrane localization and ability to promote mitochondrial fission.

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    Stanley C Henry

    Full Text Available The Immunity-Related GTPases (IRG are a family of large GTPases that mediate innate immune responses. Irgm1 is particularly critical for immunity to bacteria and protozoa, and for inflammatory homeostasis in the intestine. Although precise functions for Irgm1 have not been identified, prior studies have suggested roles in autophagy/mitophagy, phagosome remodeling, cell motility, and regulating the activity of other IRG proteins. These functions ostensibly hinge on the ability of Irgm1 to localize to intracellular membranes, such as those of the Golgi apparatus and mitochondria. Previously, it has been shown that an amphipathic helix, the αK helix, in the C-terminal portion of the protein partially mediates membrane binding. However, in absence of αK, there is still substantial binding of Irgm1 to cellular membranes, suggesting the presence of other membrane binding motifs. In the current work, an additional membrane localization motif was found in the form of palmitoylation at a cluster of cysteines near the αK. An Irgm1 mutant possessing alanine to cysteine substitutions at these amino acids demonstrated little residual palmitoylation, yet it displayed only a small decrease in localization to the Golgi and mitochondria. In contrast, a mutant containing the palmitoylation mutations in combination with mutations disrupting the amphipathic character of the αK displayed a complete loss of apparent localization to the Golgi and mitochondria, as well as an overall loss of association with cellular membranes in general. Additionally, Irgm1 was found to promote mitochondrial fission, and this function was undermined in Irgm1 mutants lacking the palmitoylation domain, and to a greater extent in those lacking the αK, or the αK and palmitoylation domains combined. Our data suggest that palmitoylation together with the αK helix firmly anchor Irgm1 in the Golgi and mitochondria, thus facilitating function of the protein.

  10. West syndrome associated with administration of a histamine H1 antagonist, oxatomide.

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    Yamashita, Yushiro; Isagai, Takeo; Seki, Yoshitaka; Ohya, Takashi; Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2004-01-01

    We report a 4-month-old female infant who developed West syndrome eleven days after administration of a histamine H1 antagonist, oxatomide, for atopic dermatitis. It has been reported that some histamine H1 antagonists induce seizures in epileptic patients. The age, the interval between oxatomide administration, and the onset of West syndrome and its clinical course were similar to two previously reported 3-month-old infants with West syndrome associated with ketotifen administration. We should be cautious in using the histamine H1 antagonists, oxatomide and ketotifen, in young infants because such agents could potentially disturb the anticonvulsive central histaminergic system.

  11. A confirmed case of toxic shock syndrome associated with the use of a menstrual cup

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Michael A; Bisch, Steve; Arntfield, Shannon; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M

    2015-01-01

    Menstrual cups have been reported to be an acceptable substitute for tampons. These flexible cups have also been reported to provide a sustainable solution to menstrual management, with modest cost savings and no significant health risk. The present article documents the first case of toxic shock syndrome associated with the use of a menstrual cup in a woman 37 years of age, using a menstrual cup for the first time. Toxic shock syndrome and the literature on menstrual cups is reviewed and a p...

  12. A confirmed case of toxic shock syndrome associated with the use of a menstrual cup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael A; Bisch, Steve; Arntfield, Shannon; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M

    2015-01-01

    Menstrual cups have been reported to be an acceptable substitute for tampons. These flexible cups have also been reported to provide a sustainable solution to menstrual management, with modest cost savings and no significant health risk. The present article documents the first case of toxic shock syndrome associated with the use of a menstrual cup in a woman 37 years of age, using a menstrual cup for the first time. Toxic shock syndrome and the literature on menstrual cups is reviewed and a possible mechanism for the development of toxic shock syndrome in the patient is described.

  13. Amphetamine activates Rho GTPase signaling to mediate dopamine transporter internalization and acute behavioral effects of amphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, David S.; Underhill, Suzanne M.; Stolz, Donna B.; Murdoch, Geoffrey H.; Thiels, Edda; Romero, Guillermo; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute amphetamine (AMPH) exposure elevates extracellular dopamine through a variety of mechanisms that include inhibition of dopamine reuptake, depletion of vesicular stores, and facilitation of dopamine efflux across the plasma membrane. Recent work has shown that the DAT substrate AMPH, unlike cocaine and other nontransported blockers, can also stimulate endocytosis of the plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT). Here, we show that when AMPH enters the cytoplasm it rapidly stimulates DAT internalization through a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent process. This effect, which can be observed in transfected cells, cultured dopamine neurons, and midbrain slices, is mediated by activation of the small GTPase RhoA. Inhibition of RhoA activity with C3 exotoxin or a dominant-negative RhoA blocks AMPH-induced DAT internalization. These actions depend on AMPH entry into the cell and are blocked by the DAT inhibitor cocaine. AMPH also stimulates cAMP accumulation and PKA-dependent inactivation of RhoA, thus providing a mechanism whereby PKA- and RhoA-dependent signaling pathways can interact to regulate the timing and robustness of AMPH’s effects on DAT internalization. Consistent with this model, the activation of D1/D5 receptors that couple to PKA in dopamine neurons antagonizes RhoA activation, DAT internalization, and hyperlocomotion observed in mice after AMPH treatment. These observations support the existence of an unanticipated intracellular target that mediates the effects of AMPH on RhoA and cAMP signaling and suggest new pathways to target to disrupt AMPH action. PMID:26553986

  14. Rho GTPase protein Cdc42 is critical for postnatal cartilage development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagahama, Ryo [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Yamada, Atsushi, E-mail: yamadaa@dent.showa-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Tanaka, Junichi [Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Aizawa, Ryo [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Dai [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Kassai, Hidetoshi [Laboratory of Animal Resources, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Matsuo [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Mishima, Kenji [Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Aiba, Atsu [Laboratory of Animal Resources, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Maki, Koutaro [Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Kamijo, Ryutaro [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-02-19

    Cdc42, a small Rho GTPase family member, has been shown to regulate multiple cellular functions in vitro, including actin cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, proliferation, and gene expression. However, its tissue-specific roles in vivo remain largely unknown, especially in postnatal cartilage development, as cartilage-specific Cdc42 inactivated mice die within a few days after birth. In this study, we investigated the physiological functions of Cdc42 during cartilage development after birth using tamoxifen-induced cartilage-specific inactivated Cdc42 conditional knockout (Cdc42 {sup fl/fl}; Col2-CreERT) mice, which were generated by crossing Cdc42 flox mice (Cdc42 {sup fl/fl}) with tamoxifen-induced type II collagen (Col2) Cre transgenic mice using a Cre/loxP system. The gross morphology of the Cdc42 cKO mice was shorter limbs and body, as well as reduced body weight as compared with the controls. In addition, severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes of the long bones, characterized by a shorter proliferating zone (PZ), wider hypertrophic zone (HZ), and loss of columnar organization of proliferating chondrocytes, resulting in delayed endochondral bone formation associated with abnormal bone growth. Our findings demonstrate the importance of Cdc42 for cartilage development during both embryonic and postnatal stages. - Highlights: • Tamoxifen-induced cartilage specific inactivated Cdc42 mutant mice were generated. • Cdc42 mutant mice were shorter limbs and body. • Severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes.

  15. Comprehensive analysis reveals dynamic and evolutionary plasticity of Rab GTPases and membrane traffic in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia J Bright

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellular sophistication is not exclusive to multicellular organisms, and unicellular eukaryotes can resemble differentiated animal cells in their complex network of membrane-bound structures. These comparisons can be illuminated by genome-wide surveys of key gene families. We report a systematic analysis of Rabs in a complex unicellular Ciliate, including gene prediction and phylogenetic clustering, expression profiling based on public data, and Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP tagging. Rabs are monomeric GTPases that regulate membrane traffic. Because Rabs act as compartment-specific determinants, the number of Rabs in an organism reflects intracellular complexity. The Tetrahymena Rab family is similar in size to that in humans and includes both expansions in conserved Rab clades as well as many divergent Rabs. Importantly, more than 90% of Rabs are expressed concurrently in growing cells, while only a small subset appears specialized for other conditions. By localizing most Rabs in living cells, we could assign the majority to specific compartments. These results validated most phylogenetic assignments, but also indicated that some sequence-conserved Rabs were co-opted for novel functions. Our survey uncovered a rare example of a nuclear Rab and substantiated the existence of a previously unrecognized core Rab clade in eukaryotes. Strikingly, several functionally conserved pathways or structures were found to be associated entirely with divergent Rabs. These pathways may have permitted rapid evolution of the associated Rabs or may have arisen independently in diverse lineages and then converged. Thus, characterizing entire gene families can provide insight into the evolutionary flexibility of fundamental cellular pathways.

  16. Rho GTPase protein Cdc42 is critical for postnatal cartilage development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagahama, Ryo; Yamada, Atsushi; Tanaka, Junichi; Aizawa, Ryo; Suzuki, Dai; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Mishima, Kenji; Aiba, Atsu; Maki, Koutaro; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2016-01-01

    Cdc42, a small Rho GTPase family member, has been shown to regulate multiple cellular functions in vitro, including actin cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, proliferation, and gene expression. However, its tissue-specific roles in vivo remain largely unknown, especially in postnatal cartilage development, as cartilage-specific Cdc42 inactivated mice die within a few days after birth. In this study, we investigated the physiological functions of Cdc42 during cartilage development after birth using tamoxifen-induced cartilage-specific inactivated Cdc42 conditional knockout (Cdc42  fl/fl ; Col2-CreERT) mice, which were generated by crossing Cdc42 flox mice (Cdc42  fl/fl ) with tamoxifen-induced type II collagen (Col2) Cre transgenic mice using a Cre/loxP system. The gross morphology of the Cdc42 cKO mice was shorter limbs and body, as well as reduced body weight as compared with the controls. In addition, severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes of the long bones, characterized by a shorter proliferating zone (PZ), wider hypertrophic zone (HZ), and loss of columnar organization of proliferating chondrocytes, resulting in delayed endochondral bone formation associated with abnormal bone growth. Our findings demonstrate the importance of Cdc42 for cartilage development during both embryonic and postnatal stages. - Highlights: • Tamoxifen-induced cartilage specific inactivated Cdc42 mutant mice were generated. • Cdc42 mutant mice were shorter limbs and body. • Severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes.

  17. Visualization of the Activity of Rac1 Small GTPase in a Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, Morihiro; Yu, Jianyong; Tsuchiya, Hiroshi; Saito, Teruyoshi; Oyama, Toshinao; Kawana, Hidetada; Kitagawa, Motoo; Tamaru, Jun-ichi; Harigaya, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    Rho family G proteins including Rac regulate a variety of cellular functions, such as morphology, motility, and gene expression. Here we developed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based analysis in which we could monitor the activity of Rac1. To detect fluorescence resonance energy transfer, yellow fluorescent protein fused Rac1 and cyan fluorescent protein fused Cdc42-Rac1-interaction-binding domain of Pak1 protein were used as intermolecular probes of FRET. The fluorophores were separated with linear unmixing method. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency was measured by acceptor photobleaching assisted assay. With these methods, the Rac1 activity was visualized in a cell. The present findings indicate that this approach is sensitive enough to achieve results similar to those from ratiometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis

  18. Recycling domains in plant cell morphogenesis: small GTPase effectors, plasma membrane signalling and the exocyst

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žárský, Viktor; Potocký, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 2 (2010), s. 723-728 ISSN 0300-5127 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA601110916; GA ČR GP522/09/P299; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06034; GA MŠk ME 841 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : exocyst * NADPH oxidase * phospholipase D Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.989, year: 2010

  19. The small GTPase, Rap1, mediates CD31-induced integrin adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reedquist, K. A.; Ross, E.; Koop, E. A.; Wolthuis, R. M.; Zwartkruis, F. J.; van Kooyk, Y.; Salmon, M.; Buckley, C. D.; Bos, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion is a critical aspect of leukocyte function that is tightly regulated by diverse stimuli, including chemokines, antigen receptors, and adhesion receptors. How cellular signals from CD31 and other adhesion amplifiers are integrated with those from classical

  20. In Situ Evaluation of the Role of the Small GTPase Rac3 in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2003-01-01

    .... We have analyzed these cell lines in vitro prior to in vivo analysis in a nude mouse model. As expected, metastatic cell lines expressing dominant active Rac3 demonstrate reduced migratory and adhesive properties...

  1. The transmembrane adaptor protein NTAL signals to mast cell cytoskeleton via the small GTPase Rho

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tůmová, Magda; Koffer, Anna; Šimíček, Michal; Dráberová, Lubica; Dráber, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 11 (2010), s. 3235-3245 ISSN 0014-2980 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/05/H023; GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA AV ČR KAN200520701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : cell activation * cytoskeleton * mast cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.942, year: 2010

  2. Are Small GTPases Signal Hubs in Sugar-Mediated Induction of Fructan Biosynthesis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema, Tita; Brodmann, David; Diks, Sander H.; Bos, Carina L.; Nagaraj, Vinay; Pieterse, Corne M. J.; Boller, Thomas; Wiemken, Andres; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2009-01-01

    External sugar initiates biosynthesis of the reserve carbohydrate fructan, but the molecular processes mediating this response remain obscure. Previously it was shown that a phosphatase and a general kinase inhibitor hamper fructan accumulation. We use various phosphorylation inhibitors both in

  3. Are small GTPases signal hubs in sugar mediated induction of fructan biosynthesis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema, T.; Brodmann, D.; Diks, S.H.; Bos, C.L.; Nagaraj, V.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Boller, T.; Wiemken, A.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2009-01-01

    External sugar initiates biosynthesis of the reserve carbohydrate fructan, but the molecular processes mediating this response remain obscure. Previously it was shown that a phosphatase and a general kinase inhibitor hamper fructan accumulation. We use various phosphorylation inhibitors both in

  4. Activation of G Proteins by Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Relies on GTPase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Rob J; Thomas, Geraint M H

    2016-01-01

    G proteins are an important family of signalling molecules controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity in what is commonly called an 'activation/inactivation cycle'. The molecular mechanism by which guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse the activation of monomeric G proteins is well-established, however the complete reversibility of this mechanism is often overlooked. Here, we use a theoretical approach to prove that GEFs are unable to positively control G protein systems at steady-state in the absence of GTPase activity. Instead, positive regulation of G proteins must be seen as a product of the competition between guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity--emphasising a central role for GTPase activity beyond merely signal termination. We conclude that a more accurate description of the regulation of G proteins via these processes is as a 'balance/imbalance' mechanism. This result has implications for the understanding of intracellular signalling processes, and for experimental strategies that rely on modulating G protein systems.

  5. The immunity-related GTPase Irga6 dimerizes in a parallel head-to-head fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Kathrin; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Faelber, Katja; Fröhlich, Chris; Howard, Jonathan; Daumke, Oliver

    2016-03-02

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) constitute a powerful cell-autonomous resistance system against several intracellular pathogens. Irga6 is a dynamin-like protein that oligomerizes at the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM) of Toxoplasma gondii leading to its vesiculation. Based on a previous biochemical analysis, it has been proposed that the GTPase domains of Irga6 dimerize in an antiparallel fashion during oligomerization. We determined the crystal structure of an oligomerization-impaired Irga6 mutant bound to a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog. Contrary to the previous model, the structure shows that the GTPase domains dimerize in a parallel fashion. The nucleotides in the center of the interface participate in dimerization by forming symmetric contacts with each other and with the switch I region of the opposing Irga6 molecule. The latter contact appears to activate GTP hydrolysis by stabilizing the position of the catalytic glutamate 106 in switch I close to the active site. Further dimerization contacts involve switch II, the G4 helix and the trans stabilizing loop. The Irga6 structure features a parallel GTPase domain dimer, which appears to be a unifying feature of all dynamin and septin superfamily members. This study contributes important insights into the assembly and catalytic mechanisms of IRG proteins as prerequisite to understand their anti-microbial action.

  6. Rho-family GTPase Cdc42 controls migration of Langerhans cells in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luckashenak, Nancy; Wähe, Anna; Breit, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    and contributions of this cell type. To target the migratory properties of DCs, we generated mice lacking the Rho-family GTPase Cdc42 specifically in DCs. In these animals, the initial seeding of the epidermis with LCs is functional, resulting in slightly reduced Langerhans cell numbers. However, Cdc42-deficient...

  7. The antibiotic micrococcin acts on protein L11 at the ribosomal GTPase centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, B T; Cundliffe, E; Garrett, Roger Antony

    1999-01-01

    -type strain, whereas other mutants carrying single-site substitutions within an 11 amino acid residue segment of the N-terminal domain of L11 grow normally. Protein L11 binds to 23 S rRNA within the ribosomal GTPase centre which regulates GTP hydrolysis on ribosomal factors. Micrococcin binding within the r...

  8. Neuronal Rho GTPase Rac1 elimination confers neuroprotection in a mouse model of permanent ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabiyik, Cansu; Fernandes, Rui; Figueiredo, Francisco Rosário

    2017-01-01

    The Rho GTPase Rac1 is a multifunctional protein involved in distinct pathways ranging from development to pathology. The aim of the present study was to unravel the contribution of neuronal Rac1 in regulating the response to brain injury induced by permanent focal cerebral ischemia (pMCAO). Our ...

  9. Miro's N-Terminal GTPase Domain Is Required for Transport of Mitochondria into Axons and Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Milos; Russo, Gary J.; Wellington, Andrea J.; Sangston, Ryan M.; Gonzalez, Migdalia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamically transported in and out of neuronal processes to maintain neuronal excitability and synaptic function. In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GTPase Miro binds Milton/TRAK adaptor proteins linking microtubule motors to mitochondria. Here we show that Drosophila Miro (dMiro), which has previously been shown to be required for kinesin-driven axonal transport, is also critically required for the dynein-driven distribution of mitochondria into dendrites. In addition, we used the loss-of-function mutations dMiroT25N and dMiroT460N to determine the significance of dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains, respectively. Expression of dMiroT25N in the absence of endogenous dMiro caused premature lethality and arrested development at a pupal stage. dMiroT25N accumulated mitochondria in the soma of larval motor and sensory neurons, and prevented their kinesin-dependent and dynein-dependent distribution into axons and dendrites, respectively. dMiroT25N mutant mitochondria also were severely fragmented and exhibited reduced kinesin and dynein motility in axons. In contrast, dMiroT460N did not impair viability, mitochondrial size, or the distribution of mitochondria. However, dMiroT460N reduced dynein motility during retrograde mitochondrial transport in axons. Finally, we show that substitutions analogous to the constitutively active Ras-G12V mutation in dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains cause neomorphic phenotypic effects that are likely unrelated to the normal function of each GTPase domain. Overall, our analysis indicates that dMiro's N-terminal GTPase domain is critically required for viability, mitochondrial size, and the distribution of mitochondria out of the neuronal soma regardless of the employed motor, likely by promoting the transition from a stationary to a motile state. PMID:25855186

  10. GTPase activity plays a key role in the pathobiology of LRRK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulan Xiong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene are associated with late-onset, autosomal-dominant, familial Parkinson's disease (PD and also contribute to sporadic disease. The LRRK2 gene encodes a large protein with multiple domains, including functional Roc GTPase and protein kinase domains. Mutations in LRRK2 most likely cause disease through a toxic gain-of-function mechanism. The expression of human LRRK2 variants in cultured primary neurons induces toxicity that is dependent on intact GTP binding or kinase activities. However, the mechanism(s underlying LRRK2-induced neuronal toxicity is poorly understood, and the contribution of GTPase and/or kinase activity to LRRK2 pathobiology is not well defined. To explore the pathobiology of LRRK2, we have developed a model of LRRK2 cytotoxicity in the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Protein domain analysis in this model reveals that expression of GTPase domain-containing fragments of human LRRK2 are toxic. LRRK2 toxicity in yeast can be modulated by altering GTPase activity and is closely associated with defects in endocytic vesicular trafficking and autophagy. These truncated LRRK2 variants induce similar toxicity in both yeast and primary neuronal models and cause similar vesicular defects in yeast as full-length LRRK2 causes in primary neurons. The toxicity induced by truncated LRRK2 variants in yeast acts through a mechanism distinct from toxicity induced by human alpha-synuclein. A genome-wide genetic screen identified modifiers of LRRK2-induced toxicity in yeast including components of vesicular trafficking pathways, which can also modulate the trafficking defects caused by expression of truncated LRRK2 variants. Our results provide insight into the basic pathobiology of LRRK2 and suggest that the GTPase domain may contribute to the toxicity of LRRK2. These findings may guide future therapeutic strategies aimed at attenuating LRRK2-mediated neurodegeneration.

  11. Transient altitude-induced compartment syndrome associated with fiberglass casts using waterproof cast padding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadzielski, John; Bae, Donald S

    2013-01-01

    Changes in aircraft cabin pressure and its interplay with a fixed diameter fiberglass cylindrical cast and the closed air cells in waterproof cast padding may cause a transient altitude-induced compartment syndrome. In this case series, 2 patients reported transient compartment syndromes that resolved with aircraft decent. As proof of concept, this work displays photographic and video evidence showing the difference in air cell volume from experimental data in a vacuum chamber as well as real-world volume changes at cruise altitude in a commercial airliner. Transient altitude-induced compartment syndromes associated with fiberglass casts using waterproof cast padding are real and surgeons and patients should be advised of this potentially devastating complication.

  12. New approaches to the treatments of short bowel syndrome-associated intestinal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle B

    2014-01-01

    preceding the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency approval of subcutaneous teduglutide for this orphan condition. RECENT FINDINGS: In a 3-week, phase 2, metabolic balance study, teduglutide increased intestinal wet weight absorption by approximately 700 g/day and reduced fecal...... with the known mechanism of action. SUMMARY: Teduglutide will add incremental benefit to the limited medical treatment armamentarium in SBS patients by maximizing intestinal absorption, decreasing fecal losses, thereby decreasing or even eliminating the need for parenteral support. Future research should target......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Teduglutide, a recombinant analog of human glucagon-like peptide 2, has recently been approved in the US and Europe (Gattex and Revestive, respectively) as the first targeted treatment of short bowel syndrome-associated intestinal failure (SBS-IF). Glucagon-like peptide 2...

  13. A Case of Swyer-James-Macleod Syndrome Associated with Middle Lobe Hypoplasia and Arteriovenous Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Kaplanoglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old female patient presented to the hospital with hearing loss. In the chest radiography obtained before her ear surgery, volume decrease in the right hemithorax, elevation of the right diaphragm, and increase of ventilation in the right lung were detected. At the thorax CT-CT angiography, hypoplasia of the main pulmonary artery and its branches and arteriovenous malformation localized in the middle lobe of the right lung were detected. Thus, diagnosis of Swyer-James-Macleod syndrome associated with right lung middle lobe hypoplasia and arteriovenous malformation was made. This kind of association has not been reported earlier, so we are presenting it in the light of the literature knowledge.

  14. Multivalent adhesion molecule 7 clusters act as signaling platform for host cellular GTPase activation and facilitate epithelial barrier dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenson Lim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an emerging bacterial pathogen which colonizes the gastrointestinal tract and can cause severe enteritis and bacteraemia. During infection, V. parahaemolyticus primarily attaches to the small intestine, where it causes extensive tissue damage and compromises epithelial barrier integrity. We have previously described that Multivalent Adhesion Molecule (MAM 7 contributes to initial attachment of V. parahaemolyticus to epithelial cells. Here we show that the bacterial adhesin, through multivalent interactions between surface-induced adhesin clusters and phosphatidic acid lipids in the host cell membrane, induces activation of the small GTPase RhoA and actin rearrangements in host cells. In infection studies with V. parahaemolyticus we further demonstrate that adhesin-triggered activation of the ROCK/LIMK signaling axis is sufficient to redistribute tight junction proteins, leading to a loss of epithelial barrier function. Taken together, these findings show an unprecedented mechanism by which an adhesin acts as assembly platform for a host cellular signaling pathway, which ultimately facilitates breaching of the epithelial barrier by a bacterial pathogen.

  15. Characterization and Functional Analysis of the Calmodulin-Binding Domain of Rac1 GTPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Chelikani, Prashen; Bhullar, Rajinder P.

    2012-01-01

    Rac1, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, has been shown to promote formation of lamellipodia at the leading edge of motile cells and affect cell migration. We previously demonstrated that calmodulin can bind to a region in the C-terminal of Rac1 and that this interaction is important in the activation of platelet Rac1. Now, we have analyzed amino acid residue(s) in the Rac1-calmodulin binding domain that are essential for the interaction and assessed their functional contribution in Rac1 activation. The results demonstrated that region 151–164 in Rac1 is essential for calmodulin binding. Within the 151–164 region, positively-charged amino acids K153 and R163 were mutated to alanine to study impact on calmodulin binding. Mutant form of Rac1 (K153A) demonstrated significantly reduced binding to calmodulin while the double mutant K153A/R163A demonstrated complete lack of binding to calmodulin. Thrombin or EGF resulted in activation of Rac1 in CHRF-288-11 or HeLa cells respectively and W7 inhibited this activation. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that higher amount of CaM was associated with Rac1 during EGF dependent activation. In cells expressing mutant forms of Rac1 (K153A or K153A/R163A), activation induced by EGF was significantly decreased in comparison to wild type or the R163A forms of Rac1. The lack of Rac1 activation in mutant forms was not due to an inability of GDP-GTP exchange or a change in subcelllular distribution. Moreover, Rac1 activation was decreased in cells where endogenous level of calmodulin was reduced using shRNA knockdown and increased in cells where calmodulin was overexpressed. Docking analysis and modeling demonstrated that K153 in Rac1 interacts with Q41 in calmodulin. These results suggest an important role for calmodulin in the activation of Rac1 and thus, in cytoskeleton reorganization and cell migration. PMID:22905193

  16. Characterization and functional analysis of the calmodulin-binding domain of Rac1 GTPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xu

    Full Text Available Rac1, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, has been shown to promote formation of lamellipodia at the leading edge of motile cells and affect cell migration. We previously demonstrated that calmodulin can bind to a region in the C-terminal of Rac1 and that this interaction is important in the activation of platelet Rac1. Now, we have analyzed amino acid residue(s in the Rac1-calmodulin binding domain that are essential for the interaction and assessed their functional contribution in Rac1 activation. The results demonstrated that region 151-164 in Rac1 is essential for calmodulin binding. Within the 151-164 region, positively-charged amino acids K153 and R163 were mutated to alanine to study impact on calmodulin binding. Mutant form of Rac1 (K153A demonstrated significantly reduced binding to calmodulin while the double mutant K153A/R163A demonstrated complete lack of binding to calmodulin. Thrombin or EGF resulted in activation of Rac1 in CHRF-288-11 or HeLa cells respectively and W7 inhibited this activation. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that higher amount of CaM was associated with Rac1 during EGF dependent activation. In cells expressing mutant forms of Rac1 (K153A or K153A/R163A, activation induced by EGF was significantly decreased in comparison to wild type or the R163A forms of Rac1. The lack of Rac1 activation in mutant forms was not due to an inability of GDP-GTP exchange or a change in subcelllular distribution. Moreover, Rac1 activation was decreased in cells where endogenous level of calmodulin was reduced using shRNA knockdown and increased in cells where calmodulin was overexpressed. Docking analysis and modeling demonstrated that K153 in Rac1 interacts with Q41 in calmodulin. These results suggest an important role for calmodulin in the activation of Rac1 and thus, in cytoskeleton reorganization and cell migration.

  17. NADPH oxidase complex-derived reactive oxygen species, the actin cytoskeleton, and rho GTPases in cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanley, Alanna; Thompson, Kerry; Hynes, Ailish

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Rho GTPases are historically known to be central regulators of actin cytoskeleton reorganization. This affects many processes including cell migration. In addition, members of the Rac subfamily are known to be involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production through...... mediating cytoskeletal reorganization. Critical Issues: The role of the actin cytoskeleton in providing a scaffold for components of the Nox complex needs to be examined in the light of these new advances. During cell migration, Rho GTPases, ROS, and cytoskeletal organization appear to function as a complex...... the regulation of NADPH oxidase (Nox) activity. This review focuses on relationships between Nox-regulated ROS, Rho GTPases, and cytoskeletal reorganization, in the context of cell migration. Recent Advances: It has become clear that ROS participate in the regulation of certain Rho GTPase family members, thus...

  18. Disruption of Toxoplasma gondii Parasitophorous Vacuoles by the Mouse p47-Resistance GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The p47 GTPases are essential for interferon-gamma-induced cell-autonomous immunity against the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, in mice, but the mechanism of resistance is poorly understood. We show that the p47 GTPases, including IIGP1, accumulate at vacuoles containing T. gondii. The accumulation is GTP-dependent and requires live parasites. Vacuolar IIGP1 accumulations undergo a maturation-like process accompanied by vesiculation of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. This culminates in disruption of the parasitophorous vacuole and finally of the parasite itself. Over-expression of IIGP1 leads to accelerated vacuolar disruption whereas a dominant negative form of IIGP1 interferes with interferon-gamma-mediated killing of intracellular parasites. Targeted deletion of the IIGP1 gene results in partial loss of the IFN-gamma-mediated T. gondii growth restriction in mouse astrocytes.

  19. WAVE regulatory complex activation by cooperating GTPases Arf and Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koronakis, Vassilis; Hume, Peter J; Humphreys, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) is a critical element in the control of actin polymerization at the eukaryotic cell membrane, but how WRC is activated remains uncertain. While Rho GTPase Rac1 can bind and activate WRC in vitro, this interaction is of low affinity, suggesting other factors may...... be important. By reconstituting WAVE-dependent actin assembly on membrane-coated beads in mammalian cell extracts, we found that Rac1 was not sufficient to engender bead motility, and we uncovered a key requirement for Arf GTPases. In vitro, Rac1 and Arf1 were individually able to bind weakly to recombinant...... be central components in WAVE signalling, acting directly, alongside Rac1....

  20. Nanofibrillar scaffolds induce preferential activation of Rho GTPases in cerebral cortical astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiryaki, Volkan Mujdat; Ayres, Virginia M; Khan, Adeel A; Ahmed, Ijaz; Shreiber, David I; Meiners, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral cortical astrocyte responses to polyamide nanofibrillar scaffolds versus poly-L-lysine (PLL)-functionalized planar glass, unfunctionalized planar Aclar coverslips, and PLL-functionalized planar Aclar surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy and immunocytochemistry. The physical properties of the cell culture environments were evaluated using contact angle and surface roughness measurements and compared. Astrocyte morphological responses, including filopodia, lamellipodia, and stress fiber formation, and stellation were imaged using atomic force microscopy and phalloidin staining for F-actin. Activation of the corresponding Rho GTPase regulators was investigated using immunolabeling with Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA. Astrocytes cultured on the nanofibrillar scaffolds showed a unique response that included stellation, cell–cell interactions by stellate processes, and evidence of depression of RhoA. The results support the hypothesis that the extracellular environment can trigger preferential activation of members of the Rho GTPase family, with demonstrable morphological consequences for cerebral cortical astrocytes. PMID:22915841

  1. Structure of the ribosomal interacting GTPase YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, C. E. [Division of Structural Biology, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Johnson, C.; Lamb, H. K. [Institute of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Catherine Cookson Building, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lockyer, M. [Arrow Therapeutics Ltd, Britannia House, Trinity Street, Borough, London SE1 1DA (United Kingdom); Charles, I. G. [The Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, The Cruciform Building, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hawkins, A. R. [Institute of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Catherine Cookson Building, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Stammers, D. K., E-mail: daves@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Division of Structural Biology, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the GTPase YjeQ from S. typhimurium is presented and compared with those of orthologues from T. maritima and B. subtilis. The YjeQ class of P-loop GTPases assist in ribosome biogenesis and also bind to the 30S subunit of mature ribosomes. YjeQ ribosomal binding is GTP-dependent and thought to specifically direct protein synthesis, although the nature of the upstream signal causing this event in vivo is as yet unknown. The attenuating effect of YjeQ mutants on bacterial growth in Escherichia coli makes it a potential target for novel antimicrobial agents. In order to further explore the structure and function of YjeQ, the isolation, crystallization and structure determination of YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium (StYjeQ) is reported. Whilst the overall StYjeQ fold is similar to those of the previously reported Thematoga maritima and Bacillus subtilis orthologues, particularly the GTPase domain, there are larger differences in the three OB folds. Although the zinc-finger secondary structure is conserved, significant sequence differences alter the nature of the external surface in each case and may reflect varying signalling pathways. Therefore, it may be easier to develop YjeQ-specific inhibitors that target the N- and C-terminal regions, disrupting the metabolic connectivity rather than the GTPase activity. The availability of coordinates for StYjeQ will provide a significantly improved basis for threading Gram-negative orthologue sequences and in silico compound-screening studies, with the potential for the development of species-selective drugs.

  2. Slit-Robo GTPase-Activating Protein 2 as a metastasis suppressor in osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Marko, Tracy A.; Shamsan, Ghaidan A.; Edwards, Elizabeth N.; Hazelton, Paige E.; Rathe, Susan K.; Cornax, Ingrid; Overn, Paula R.; Varshney, Jyotika; Diessner, Brandon J.; Moriarity, Branden S.; O?Sullivan, M. Gerard; Odde, David J.; Largaespada, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor, with metastatic disease responsible for most treatment failure and patient death. A forward genetic screen utilizing Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis in mice previously identified potential genetic drivers of osteosarcoma metastasis, including Slit-Robo GTPase-Activating Protein 2 (Srgap2). This study evaluates the potential role of SRGAP2 in metastases-associated properties of osteosarcoma cell lines through Srgap2 knockout via the CRISPR/Cas9 n...

  3. Insight into temperature dependence of GTPase activity in human guanylate binding protein-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Rani

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ induced human guanylate binding protein-1(hGBP1 belongs to a family of dynamin related large GTPases. Unlike all other GTPases, hGBP1 hydrolyzes GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP with GMP being the major product at 37°C but GDP became significant when the hydrolysis reaction was carried out at 15°C. The hydrolysis reaction in hGBP1 is believed to involve with a number of catalytic steps. To investigate the effect of temperature in the product formation and on the different catalytic complexes of hGBP1, we carried out temperature dependent GTPase assays, mutational analysis, chemical and thermal denaturation studies. The Arrhenius plot for both GDP and GMP interestingly showed nonlinear behaviour, suggesting that the product formation from the GTP-bound enzyme complex is associated with at least more than one step. The negative activation energy for GDP formation and GTPase assay with external GDP together indicate that GDP formation occurs through the reversible dissociation of GDP-bound enzyme dimer to monomer, which further reversibly dissociates to give the product. Denaturation studies of different catalytic complexes show that unlike other complexes the free energy of GDP-bound hGBP1 decreases significantly at lower temperature. GDP formation is found to be dependent on the free energy of the GDP-bound enzyme complex. The decrease in the free energy of this complex at low temperature compared to at high is the reason for higher GDP formation at low temperature. Thermal denaturation studies also suggest that the difference in the free energy of the GTP-bound enzyme dimer compared to its monomer plays a crucial role in the product formation; higher stability favours GMP but lower favours GDP. Thus, this study provides the first thermodynamic insight into the effect of temperature in the product formation of hGBP1.

  4. The GTPase Rab37 Participates in the Control of Insulin Exocytosis.

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    Sanda Ljubicic

    Full Text Available Rab37 belongs to a subclass of Rab GTPases regulating exocytosis, including also Rab3a and Rab27a. Proteomic studies indicate that Rab37 is associated with insulin-containing large dense core granules of pancreatic β-cells. In agreement with these observations, we detected Rab37 in extracts of β-cell lines and human pancreatic islets and confirmed by confocal microscopy the localization of the GTPase on insulin-containing secretory granules. We found that, as is the case for Rab3a and Rab27a, reduction of Rab37 levels by RNA interference leads to impairment in glucose-induced insulin secretion and to a decrease in the number of granules in close apposition to the plasma membrane. Pull-down experiments revealed that, despite similar functional effects, Rab37 does not interact with known Rab3a or Rab27a effectors and is likely to operate through a different mechanism. Exposure of insulin-secreting cells to proinflammatory cytokines, fatty acids or oxidized low-density lipoproteins, mimicking physiopathological conditions that favor the development of diabetes, resulted in a decrease in Rab37 expression. Our data identify Rab37 as an additional component of the machinery governing exocytosis of β-cells and suggest that impaired expression of this GTPase may contribute to defective insulin release in pre-diabetic and diabetic conditions.

  5. Influence of bacterial toxins on the GTPase activity of transducin from bovine retinal rod outer segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybin, V.O.; Gureeva, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    The action of cholera toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the activator N/sub s/ protein, and pertussis toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the inhibitor N/sub i/ protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, on transducin, the GTP-binding protein of the rod outer segments of the retina, was investigated. It was shown that under the action of pertussis and cholera toxins, the GTPase activity of transducin is inhibited. Pertussin toxin inhibits the GTPase of native retinal rod outer segments by 30-40%, while GTPase of homogeneous transducin produces a 70-80% inhibition. The action of toxins on transducin depends on the presence and nature of the guanylic nucleotide with which incubation is performed. On the basis of the data obtained it is suggested that pertussis toxin interacts with pretransducin and with the transducin-GDP complex, while cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates the transducin-GTP complex and does not act on transducin lacking GTP

  6. Gene targeting implicates Cdc42 GTPase in GPVI and non-GPVI mediated platelet filopodia formation, secretion and aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huzoor Akbar

    Full Text Available Cdc42 and Rac1, members of the Rho family of small GTPases, play critical roles in actin cytoskeleton regulation. We have shown previously that Rac1 is involved in regulation of platelet secretion and aggregation. However, the role of Cdc42 in platelet activation remains controversial. This study was undertaken to better understand the role of Cdc42 in platelet activation.We utilized the Mx-cre;Cdc42(lox/lox inducible mice with transient Cdc42 deletion to investigate the involvement of Cdc42 in platelet function. The Cdc42-deficient mice exhibited a significantly reduced platelet count than the matching Cdc42(+/+ mice. Platelets isolated from Cdc42(-/-, as compared to Cdc42(+/+, mice exhibited (a diminished phosphorylation of PAK1/2, an effector molecule of Cdc42, (b inhibition of filopodia formation on immobilized CRP or fibrinogen, (c inhibition of CRP- or thrombin-induced secretion of ATP and release of P-selectin, (d inhibition of CRP, collagen or thrombin induced platelet aggregation, and (e minimal phosphorylation of Akt upon stimulation with CRP or thrombin. The bleeding times were significantly prolonged in Cdc42(-/- mice compared with Cdc42(+/+ mice.Our data demonstrate that Cdc42 is required for platelet filopodia formation, secretion and aggregation and therefore plays a critical role in platelet mediated hemostasis and thrombosis.

  7. Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Trafficking of NTF2, the Nuclear Import Receptor for the RanGTPase, Is Subjected to Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafe, Shawn C.; Pierce, Jacqueline B.; Mangroo, Dev

    2012-01-01

    NTF2 is a cytosolic protein responsible for nuclear import of Ran, a small Ras-like GTPase involved in a number of critical cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation, chromatin organization during mitosis, reformation of the nuclear envelope following mitosis, and controlling the directionality of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we provide evidence for the first time that translocation of the mammalian NTF2 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm to collect Ran in the GDP form is subjected to regulation. Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import of proteins. Inhibition of the export processes by polysorbitan monolaurate is specific and reversible, and is caused by accumulation of Ran in the cytoplasm because of a block in translocation of NTF2 to the cytoplasm. Nuclear import of Ran and the nuclear export processes are restored in polysorbitan monolaurate treated cells overproducing NTF2. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of a phospho-tyrosine protein and several phospho-threonine proteins was observed in polysorbitan monolaurate treated cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that nucleocytoplasmic translocation of NTF2 is regulated in mammalian cells, and may involve a tyrosine and/or threonine kinase-dependent signal transduction mechanism(s). PMID:22880006

  8. Rap2, but not Rap1 GTPase is expressed in human red blood cells and is involved in vesiculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Fabio; Ciana, Annarita; Pietra, Daniela; Balduini, Cesare; Minetti, Giampaolo; Torti, Mauro

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that Rap1 and Rap2 small GTP-binding proteins are both expressed in human red blood cells (RBCs). In this work, we carefully examined the expression of Rap proteins in leukocytes- and platelets-depleted RBCs, whose purity was established on the basis of the selective expression of the beta2 subunit of the Na+/K+ -ATPase, as verified according to the recently proposed "beta-profiling test" [J.F. Hoffman, A. Wickrema, O. Potapova, M. Milanick, D.R. Yingst, Na pump isoforms in human erythroid progenitor cells and mature erythrocytes, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 99 (2002) 14572-14577]. In pure RBCs preparations, Rap2, but not Rap1 was detected immunologically. RT-PCR analysis of mRNA extracted from highly purified reticulocytes confirmed the expression of Rap2b, but not Rap2a, Rap2c, Rap1a or Rap1b. In RBCs, Rap2 was membrane-associated and was rapidly activated upon treatment with Ca2+/Ca2+ -ionophore. In addition, Rap2 segregated and was selectively enriched into microvesicles released by Ca2+ -activated RBCs, suggesting a possible role for this GTPase in membrane shedding.

  9. C9orf72’s interaction with Rab GTPases - modulation of membrane traffic and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor Luen Tang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in an intron of Chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD. While functional haploinsufficiency of C9orf72 resulting from the mutation may play a role in ALS/FTD, the actual cellular role of the protein has been unclear. Recent findings have now shown that C9orf72 physically and functionally interacts with multiple members of the Rab small GTPases family, consequently exerting important influences on cellular membrane traffic and the process of autophagy. Loss of C9orf72 impairs endocytosis in neuronal cell lines, and attenuated autophagosome formation. Interestingly, C9orf72 could influence autophagy both as part of a Guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF complex, or as a Rab effector that facilitates transport of the Unc-51-like Autophagy Activating Kinase 1 (Ulk1 autophagy initiation complex. The cellular function of C9orf72 is discussed in the light of these recent findings

  10. Hepatic trans-Golgi action coordinated by the GTPase ARFRP1 is crucial for lipoprotein lipidation and assembly[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Deike; Radloff, Katrin; Jaschke, Alexander; Lagerpusch, Merit; Chung, Bomee; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Schürmann, Annette

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a major organ in whole body lipid metabolism and malfunctioning can lead to various diseases including dyslipidemia, fatty liver disease, and type 2 diabetes. Triglycerides and cholesteryl esters are packed in the liver as very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs). Generation of these lipoproteins is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum and further maturation likely occurs in the Golgi. ADP-ribosylation factor-related protein 1 (ARFRP1) is a small trans-Golgi-associated guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that regulates protein sorting and is required for chylomicron lipidation and assembly in the intestine. Here we show that the hepatocyte-specific deletion of Arfrp1 (Arfrp1liv−/−) results in impaired VLDL lipidation leading to reduced plasma triglyceride levels in the fasted state as well as after inhibition of lipoprotein lipase activity by Triton WR-1339. In addition, the concentration of ApoC3 that comprises 40% of protein mass of secreted VLDLs is markedly reduced in the plasma of Arfrp1liv−/− mice but accumulates in the liver accompanied by elevated triglycerides. Fractionation of Arfrp1liv−/− liver homogenates reveals more ApoB48 and a lower concentration of triglycerides in the Golgi compartments than in the corresponding fractions from control livers. In conclusion, ARFRP1 and the Golgi apparatus play an important role in lipoprotein maturation in the liver by influencing lipidation and assembly of proteins to the lipid particles. PMID:24186947

  11. Primary biliary cirrhosis--autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamfil, Cristina; Candrea, Elisabeta; Berki, Emese; Popov, Horațiu I; Radu, Pompilia I; Rednic, Simona

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases may be associated with extrahepatic autoimmune pathology. We report the case of a 52-year old woman who initially presented to the gastroenterology department for extreme fatigue, pale stools, dark urine and pruritus. Laboratory tests showed significant cholestasis and elevation of aminotransferase levels. Immunological tests revealed positive antinuclear (ANA=1:320) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA=1:40) with negative anti-smooth muscle and liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibodies. The biopsy was compatible with overlap syndrome type 1. The patient was commenced on immunosuppressive therapy according to standard of care (azathioprine 50mg, ursodeoxycholic acid and prednisone 0.5mg/kg), with moderate biochemical improvement. She subsequently developed proximal symmetrical weakness and cutaneous involvement and was diagnosed with biopsy-proven dermatomyositis. The immunosuppressive regimen was intensified to 150 mg azathioprine. At the three-month follow-up, her symptoms subsided and aminotransferases and muscle enzymes normalized. Upon further investigation the patient was diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first case of primary biliary cirrhosis - autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

  12. Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome associated with paracoccidioidomycosis Síndrome oculoglandular de Parinaud associada à paracoccidioidomicose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio Gonçalves da COSTA

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The authors report one case of Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome associated with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection. No other medical report of this condition was found in the medical literature available at Index Medicus and Medline. The eye involvement has been rather uncommon in paracoccidioidomycosis and this report emphasizes the possibility of this kind of presentation making it also necessary to include paracoccidioidomycosis among the several known causes of Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome.Os autores relatam um caso de síndrome oculoglandular de Parinaud associada à infecção por Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Nenhum outro relato desta condição foi encontrado na literatura médica disponível pelo Index Medicus e Medline. O envolvimento ocular é incomum na paracoccidioidomicose e este relato enfatiza a possibilidade deste tipo de apresentação, tornando-se necessário incluir a paracoccidioidomicose entre as várias causas conhecidas de síndrome oculoglandular de Parinaud.

  13. Bilateral simultaneous traumatic upper arm compartment syndromes associated with anabolic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturan, Gurhan; Davies, Nev; Williams, Huw; Deo, Sunny

    2013-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome, a surgical emergency, is defined as increased pressure in an osseofascial space. The resulting reduction of capillary perfusion to that compartment requires prompt fasciotomy. Treatment delay has a poor prognosis, and is associated with muscle and nerve ischemia, resultant infarction, and late-onset contractures. We report a case of traumatic bilateral upper limb acute compartment syndrome associated with anabolic steroids, requiring bilateral emergency fasciotomies. A 25-year-old male bodybuilder taking anabolic steroids, with no past medical history, presented to the Emergency Department 25 min after a road traffic accident. Secondary survey confirmed injuries to both upper limbs with no distal neurovascular deficit. Plain radiographs demonstrated bilateral metaphyseal fractures of the distal humeri. Within 2 h of the accident, the patient developed clinical features that were consistent with bilateral upper arm compartment syndrome. Bilateral fasciotomies of both anterior and posterior compartments were performed, confirming clinical suspicion. We suggest consideration of a history of anabolic steroid use when evaluating patients with extremity trauma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Persistent Hiccups—An Unusual Presentation of Bilateral Pheochromocytoma without Syndromic Association: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Aherrao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pheochromocytoma is a rare catecholamine-producing tumor arising from chromaffin tissue in the adrenal medulla, occurring in less than 0.2 percent of patients with hypertension. The mean age at diagnosis is about 40 years. Pheochromocytomas are commonly inherited as features of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 or several other pheochromocytoma-associated syndromes and have variable clinical presentation. Among the presenting symptoms, episodes of palpitations, headaches, and profuse sweating are typical and constitute a classic triad. We report a case of a 17-year-old male patient with rare bilateral pheochromocytoma presenting with persistent hiccups for 4 months and blurring of vision for 1 week, later followed by hypertensive crisis. There was neither family history of pheochromocytoma nor any classic symptoms. Patient was diagnosed with bilateral pheochromocytoma without any syndromic association. But still this patient needs to be followed for future development of medullary carcinoma of thyroid because it could be an initial presentation of MEN 2A/2B/VHL syndromes. Our paper highlights the importance of maintaining a high level of suspicion for persistent hiccups and careful clinical screening for hypertension even in absence of associated syndromes of pheochromocytoma and classical symptoms to achieve prompt diagnosis and to avoid improper management.

  15. Extensive in silico analysis of Mimivirus coded Rab GTPase homolog suggests a possible role in virion membrane biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrutraj eZade

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rab GTPases are the key regulators of intracellular membrane trafficking in eukaryotes. Many viruses and intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved to hijack the host Rab GTPase functions, mainly through activators and effector proteins, for their benefit. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV is one of the largest viruses and belongs to the monophyletic clade of nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV. The inner membrane lining is integral to the APMV virion structure. APMV assembly involves extensive host membrane modifications, like vesicle budding and fusion, leading to the formation of a membrane sheet that is incorporated into the virion. Intriguingly, APMV and all group I members of the Mimiviridae family code for a putative Rab GTPase protein. APMV is the first reported virus to code for a Rab GTPase (encoded by R214 gene. Our thorough in silico analysis of the subfamily specific (SF region of Mimiviridae Rab GTPase sequences suggests that they are related to Rab5, a member of the group II Rab GTPases, of lower eukaryotes. Because of their high divergence from the existing three isoforms, A, B and C of the Rab5-family, we suggest that Mimiviridae Rabs constitute a new isoform, Rab5D. Phylogenetic analysis indicated probable horizontal acquisition from a lower eukaryotic ancestor followed by selection and divergence. Furthermore, interaction network analysis suggests that vps34 (a Class III P13K homolog, coded by APMV L615, Atg-8 and dynamin (host proteins are recruited by APMV Rab GTPase during capsid assembly. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that APMV Rab plays a role in the acquisition of inner membrane during virion assembly.

  16. A stretch of polybasic residues mediates Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein (CdGAP) binding to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate and regulates its GAP activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Fereshteh; Primeau, Martin; Mountassif, Driss; Rouiller, Isabelle; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie

    2012-06-01

    The Rho family of small GTPases are membrane-associated molecular switches involved in the control of a wide range of cellular activities, including cell migration, adhesion, and proliferation. Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein (CdGAP) is a phosphoprotein showing GAP activity toward Rac1 and Cdc42. CdGAP activity is regulated in an adhesion-dependent manner and more recently, we have identified CdGAP as a novel molecular target in signaling and an essential component in the synergistic interaction between TGFβ and Neu/ErbB-2 signaling pathways in breast cancer cells. In this study, we identified a small polybasic region (PBR) preceding the RhoGAP domain that mediates specific binding to negatively charged phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3). In vitro reconstitution of membrane vesicles loaded with prenylated Rac1 demonstrates that the PBR is required for full activation of CdGAP in the presence of PI(3,4,5)P3. In fibroblast cells, the expression of CdGAP protein mutants lacking an intact PBR shows a significant reduced ability of the protein mutants to induce cell rounding or to mediate negative effects on cell spreading. Furthermore, an intact PBR is required for CdGAP to inactivate Rac1 signaling into cells, whereas it is not essential in an in vitro context. Altogether, these studies reveal that specific interaction between negatively charged phospholipid PI(3,4,5)P3 and the stretch of polybasic residues preceding the RhoGAP domain regulates CdGAP activity in vivo and is required for its cellular functions.

  17. Lynch Syndrome Associated Colon Adenocarcinoma Resembling Lymphoma on Fluoro-Deoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparici, Carina Mari; Win, Aung Zaw

    2015-01-01

    The patient was a 46-year-old Asian male diagnosed with lynch syndrome associated colon adenocarcinoma in the right ascending colon. A presurgical staging 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) found increased metabolic activity in the cervical, axillary, mediastinal, supraclavicular, para-aortic and mesenteric lymph nodes. This pattern of metastasis was very unusual for lynch syndrome associated colon adenocarcinoma and the involvement of those lymph nodes resembles the pattern of spread of lymphoma. He underwent right hemicolectomy and he was subsequently treated with 12 cycles of folinic acid (leucovorin), fluorouracil (5-FU), irinotecan. A restaging FDG-PET/CT at the end of the chemotherapy showed interval decrease in size and metabolic activity in the affected lymph nodes. FDG-PET/CT is a useful imaging modality in following-up the treatment response in colon adenocarcinoma

  18. The Clinical and Neurophysiological Features of Epileptic Syndromes Associated with Benign Focal Epileptiform Discharges of Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Ermolaenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign focal epileptiform discharge of childhood (BFEDC is an age-dependent pattern determined in electroencephalograms (EEGs, which is associated with idiopathic benign focal epilepsy (BFE. Studies of BFE revealed symptomatic phenocopies in patients with cerebral struc- tural abnormalities in such conditions as infantile cerebral palsy and malformations. Some arguments against the «benign» nature of BFEDC are presented, since BFEDC may impair various cognitive functions and behavior (e.g., cause epileptic encephalophathies. Objective. To determine the clinical and neurophysiological features of epileptic syndromes associated with prolonged epileptiform activity during sleep in children and adolescents, as well as approaches to rational therapy. Patients and Methods. A total of 1862 children aged 2–18 admitted to the specialized Department of Psychoneurology of the Voronezh Regional Children Clinical Hospital No 1 in 2004–2007, who had epileptic seizures and non-epileptic neurological disorders, were exam- ined. The children underwent assessment of the neurological status, neuropsychological assessment, and video-EEG monitoring. The spike- wave index (SWI was calculated and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain was performed to register the epileptiform activity during sleep. Results and Discussion. It was demonstrated that when ISW of BFEDC patterns is >30%, evolution into epileptic encephalopathy was observed in 66% of patients (including epilepsy with electrical status epilepticus in sleep in 49% of patients and cognitive epileptiform disinte- gration in 17% of patients. The results prove the justification of prescribing antiepileptic drugs to patients with SWI ≥30% even if they have no epileptic seizures. Duo-therapy with valproate and ethosuximide or levetiracetam is most the effective therapy. Further prospective studies for children with BFEDC will give new insight into this area. 

  19. Coupled GTPase and remodelling ATPase activities form a checkpoint for ribosome export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yoshitaka; Granneman, Sander; Thoms, Matthias; Manikas, Rizos-Georgios; Tollervey, David; Hurt, Ed

    2014-01-02

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are assembled by a complex pathway that extends from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm and is powered by many energy-consuming enzymes. Nuclear export is a key, irreversible step in pre-ribosome maturation, but mechanisms underlying the timely acquisition of export competence remain poorly understood. Here we show that a conserved Saccharomyces cerevisiae GTPase Nug2 (also known as Nog2, and as NGP-1, GNL2 or nucleostemin 2 in human) has a key role in the timing of export competence. Nug2 binds the inter-subunit face of maturing, nucleoplasmic pre-60S particles, and the location clashes with the position of Nmd3, a key pre-60S export adaptor. Nug2 and Nmd3 are not present on the same pre-60S particles, with Nug2 binding before Nmd3. Depletion of Nug2 causes premature Nmd3 binding to the pre-60S particles, whereas mutations in the G-domain of Nug2 block Nmd3 recruitment, resulting in severe 60S export defects. Two pre-60S remodelling factors, the Rea1 ATPase and its co-substrate Rsa4, are present on Nug2-associated particles, and both show synthetic lethal interactions with nug2 mutants. Release of Nug2 from pre-60S particles requires both its K(+)-dependent GTPase activity and the remodelling ATPase activity of Rea1. We conclude that Nug2 is a regulatory GTPase that monitors pre-60S maturation, with release from its placeholder site linked to recruitment of the nuclear export machinery.

  20. Antibiotic interactions at the GTPase-associated centre within Escherichia coli 23S rRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egebjerg, J; Douthwaite, S; Garrett, R A

    1989-01-01

    A comprehensive range of chemical reagents and ribonucleases was employed to investigate the interaction of the antibiotics thiostrepton and micrococcin with the ribosomal protein L11-23S RNA complex and with the 50S subunit. Both antibiotics block processes associated with the ribosomal A-site b...... important exception, however, occurred at nucleotide A1067 within a terminal loop where thiostrepton protected the N-1 position while micrococcin rendered it more reactive. This difference correlates with the opposite effects of the two antibiotics on GTPase activity....

  1. The monomeric GTPase RabA2 is required for progression and maintenance of membrane integrity of infection threads during root nodule symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Via, Virginia; Traubenik, Soledad; Rivero, Claudio; Aguilar, O Mario; Zanetti, María Eugenia; Blanco, Flavio Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Progression of the infection canal that conducts rhizobia to the nodule primordium requires a functional Rab GTPase located in Golgi/trans-Golgi that also participate in root hair polar growth. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) symbiotically associates with its partner Rhizobium etli, resulting in the formation of root nitrogen-fixing nodules. Compatible bacteria can reach cortical cells in a tightly regulated infection process, in which the specific recognition of signal molecules is a key step to select the symbiotic partner. In this work, we show that RabA2, a monomeric GTPase from common bean, is required for the progression of the infection canal, referred to as the infection thread (IT), toward the cortical cells. Expression of miss-regulated mutant variants of RabA2 resulted in an increased number of abortive infection events, including bursting of ITs and a reduction in the number of nodules. Nodules formed in these plants were small and contained infected cells with disrupted symbiosome membranes, indicating either early senescence of these cells or defects in the formation of the symbiosome membrane during bacterial release. RabA2 localized to mobile vesicles around the IT, but mutations that affect GTP hydrolysis or GTP/GDP exchange modified this localization. Colocalization of RabA2 with ArfA1 and a Golgi marker indicates that RabA2 localizes in Golgi stacks and the trans-Golgi network. Our results suggest that RabA2 is part of the vesicle transport events required to maintain the integrity of the membrane during IT progression.

  2. Differential regulation of the Rac1 GTPase-activating protein (GAP) BCR during oxygen/glucose deprivation in hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katharine R; Rajgor, Dipen; Hanley, Jonathan G

    2017-12-08

    Brain ischemia causes oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in neurons, triggering a cascade of events leading to synaptic accumulation of glutamate. Excessive activation of glutamate receptors causes excitotoxicity and delayed cell death in vulnerable neurons. Following global cerebral ischemia, hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are more vulnerable to injury than their cortical counterparts, but the mechanisms that underlie this difference are unclear. Signaling via Rho-family small GTPases, their upstream guanine nucleotide exchange factors, and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) is differentially dysregulated in response to OGD/ischemia in hippocampal and cortical neurons. Increased Rac1 activity caused by OGD/ischemia contributes to neuronal death in hippocampal neurons via diverse effects on NADPH oxidase activity and dendritic spine morphology. The Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1 mediates an OGD-induced increase in Rac1 activity in hippocampal neurons; however, the identity of an antagonistic GAP remains elusive. Here we show that the Rac1 GAP breakpoint cluster region (BCR) associates with NMDA receptors (NMDARs) along with Tiam1 and that this protein complex is more abundant in hippocampal compared with cortical neurons. Although total BCR is similar in the two neuronal types, BCR is more active in hippocampal compared with cortical neurons. OGD causes an NMDAR- and Ca 2+ -permeable AMPAR-dependent deactivation of BCR in hippocampal but not cortical neurons. BCR knockdown occludes OGD-induced Rac1 activation in hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, disrupting the Tiam1-NMDAR interaction with a fragment of Tiam1 blocks OGD-induced Tiam1 activation but has no effect on the deactivation of BCR. This work identifies BCR as a critical player in Rac1 regulation during OGD in hippocampal neurons. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Protein disulfide isomerase is required for platelet-derived growth factor-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration, Nox1 NADPH oxidase expression, and RhoGTPase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescatore, Luciana A; Bonatto, Diego; Forti, Fábio L; Sadok, Amine; Kovacic, Hervé; Laurindo, Francisco R M

    2012-08-24

    Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell (VSMC) migration into vessel neointima is a therapeutic target for atherosclerosis and postinjury restenosis. Nox1 NADPH oxidase-derived oxidants synergize with growth factors to support VSMC migration. We previously described the interaction between NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum redox chaperone protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) in many cell types. However, physiological implications, as well as mechanisms of such association, are yet unclear. We show here that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) promoted subcellular redistribution of PDI concomitant to Nox1-dependent reactive oxygen species production and that siRNA-mediated PDI silencing inhibited such reactive oxygen species production, while nearly totally suppressing the increase in Nox1 expression, with no change in Nox4. Furthermore, PDI silencing inhibited PDGF-induced VSMC migration assessed by distinct methods, whereas PDI overexpression increased spontaneous basal VSMC migration. To address possible mechanisms of PDI effects, we searched for PDI interactome by systems biology analysis of physical protein-protein interaction networks, which indicated convergence with small GTPases and their regulator RhoGDI. PDI silencing decreased PDGF-induced Rac1 and RhoA activities, without changing their expression. PDI co-immunoprecipitated with RhoGDI at base line, whereas such association was decreased after PDGF. Also, PDI co-immunoprecipitated with Rac1 and RhoA in a PDGF-independent way and displayed detectable spots of perinuclear co-localization with Rac1 and RhoGDI. Moreover, PDI silencing promoted strong cytoskeletal changes: disorganization of stress fibers, decreased number of focal adhesions, and reduced number of RhoGDI-containing vesicular recycling adhesion structures. Overall, these data suggest that PDI is required to support Nox1/redox and GTPase-dependent VSMC migration.

  4. Regulation of Rac1 GTPase activity by quinine through G-protein and bitter taste receptor T2R4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Crystal; Jaggupilli, Appalaraju; Chelikani, Prashen; Bhullar, Rajinder P

    2017-02-01

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family of small GTPases and regulates actin cytoskeleton reorganization. T2R4 is a bitter taste receptor belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor family of proteins. In addition to mediating bitter taste perception from the tongue, T2R4s are found in extra-oral tissues, e.g., nasal epithelium, airways, brain, testis suggesting a much broader physiological function for these receptors. Anti-malarial drug and a bitter tasting compound, quinine, is a known agonist for T2R4, whereas BCML (Nα,Nα-Bis(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine) acts as an inverse agonist. Using western blot and Ca ++ mobilization assays, the effects of quinine on Rac1 activity in HEK293T cells stably expressing T2R4/Gα 16/44 , T2R4, or Gα 16/44 and transiently transfected with HA-Rac1 were investigated. Quinine treatment caused a significant reduction in the amount of active Rac1, whereas in the presence of BCML, quinine failed to cause any significant change in active Rac1. No significant change in Rac1 activity was observed in BAPTA-AM plus quinine-treated Gα 16/44 cells, suggesting possibility of a pathway in addition to the canonical Ca ++ -dependent pathway. A noticeable role for Gα 16/44 independent of T2R4 is observed in quinine-mediated Rac1 inactivation. Further, a significant difference in quinine-induced Ca ++ response in T2R4/Gα 16/44 or T2R4 cells was observed validating the partial role of calcium and importance of Gα 16/44 . This study is the first to show an inhibitory downstream action of a T2R4 agonist on Rac1 function. Further investigation will help in better understanding the downstream signal transduction network of T2R4 and its extra-oral physiological roles.

  5. Rho GTPase activity modulates paramyxovirus fusion protein-mediated cell-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schowalter, Rachel M.; Wurth, Mark A.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur; Moncman, Carole L.; McCann, Richard O.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2006-01-01

    The paramyxovirus fusion protein (F) promotes fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane of target cells as well as cell-cell fusion. The plasma membrane is closely associated with the actin cytoskeleton, but the role of actin dynamics in paramyxovirus F-mediated membrane fusion is unclear. We examined cell-cell fusion promoted by two different paramyxovirus F proteins in three cell types in the presence of constitutively active Rho family GTPases, major cellular coordinators of actin dynamics. Reporter gene and syncytia assays demonstrated that expression of either Rac1 V12 or Cdc42 V12 could increase cell-cell fusion promoted by the Hendra or SV5 glycoproteins, though the effect was dependent on the cell type expressing the viral glycoproteins. In contrast, RhoA L63 decreased cell-cell fusion promoted by Hendra glycoproteins but had little affect on SV5 F-mediated fusion. Also, data suggested that GTPase activation in the viral glycoprotein-containing cell was primarily responsible for changes in fusion. Additionally, we found that activated Cdc42 promoted nuclear rearrangement in syncytia

  6. GTPase-activating protein oligophrenin 1 is a new partner of multifunctional adapter protein intersectin 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasman S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Intersectin 1 (ITSN1 is a multifunctional adaptor protein which is involved in endocytosis, exocytosis and cellular signaling and it is also associated with such pathologies as Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of this study was to identify new ITSN1 protein partners which are implicated in membrane trafficking. Methods. In silico analysis by Scansite online resource had identified a GTPase activating protein oligophrenin 1 (OPHN1 as a potential partner of ITSN1 SH3A domain. GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation were used to prove complex formation between ITSN1 and OPHN1. Subcellular protein localization was determined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results. We have shown that brain-specific and ubiquitously expressed SH3A domain isoforms of ITSN1 interact with OPHN1. ITSN1 and OPHN1 form complexes in both resting and stimulated to exocytosis PC12 cell line. Conclusions. GTPase activating protein OPHN1 and adaptor protein ITSN1 interact in PC12 cell line independently of exocytosis stimulation.

  7. The Rho-GTPase binding protein IQGAP2 is required for the glomerular filtration barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Yuya; Lindenmeyer, Maja T; Auberger, Ines; Ziegler, Urs; Segerer, Stephan; Cohen, Clemens D; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Loffing, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Podocyte dysfunction impairs the size selectivity of the glomerular filter, leading to proteinuria, hypoalbuminuria, and edema, clinically defined as nephrotic syndrome. Hereditary forms of nephrotic syndrome are linked to mutations in podocyte-specific genes. To identify genes contributing to podocyte dysfunction in acquired nephrotic syndrome, we studied human glomerular gene expression data sets for glomerular-enriched gene transcripts differentially regulated between pretransplant biopsy samples and biopsies from patients with nephrotic syndrome. Candidate genes were screened by in situ hybridization for expression in the zebrafish pronephros, an easy-to-use in vivo assay system to assess podocyte function. One glomerulus-enriched product was the Rho-GTPase binding protein, IQGAP2. Immunohistochemistry found a strong presence of IQGAP2 in normal human and zebrafish podocytes. In zebrafish larvae, morpholino-based knockdown of iqgap2 caused a mild foot process effacement of zebrafish podocytes and a cystic dilation of the urinary space of Bowman's capsule upon onset of urinary filtration. Moreover, the glomerulus of zebrafish morphants showed a glomerular permeability for injected high-molecular-weight dextrans, indicating an impaired size selectivity of the glomerular filter. Thus, IQGAP2 is a Rho-GTPase binding protein, highly abundant in human and zebrafish podocytes, which controls normal podocyte structure and function as evidenced in the zebrafish pronephros.

  8. GTPases Rho distribution in intraepithelial and invasive neoplasias of the uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibúrcio, M Gomes Salles; Pinheiro, N M; Carboni, S de Sales Costa Moreira; Rocha, L P; Adad, S J; Maluf, P J; Murta, E F Cândido; Crema, V O

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the distribution of GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and Cdc42 in cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) and invasive neoplasias of the uterine cervix. samples of neoplastic lesions of the uterine cervix of 44 patients were classified in: CIN I (n = 10), CIN II (n = 10), CIN III (n = 09), and invasive carcinoma (n = 15). Antibodies anti-RhoA, anti-RhoB, and anti-Cdc42 were used and staining was classified as: negative, mild, moderate, and intense positive. When compared with dysplastic cells, superficial cells showed: higher expression of RhoB in CIN I (p = 0.0018), and lower expression of Cdc42 in CIN I (p = 0.0225). The authors observed higher expression of RhoA (p = 0.0002) and RhoB (p = 0.0046) in CIN dysplastic cells when compared with invasive carcinoma cells. GTPases Rho may be involved with the regulation of biological processes, important to the progression of cervical neoplasias. Probably, RhoA is important for maintenance of cell differentiation and RhoB protects cells from malignant cervical neoplasia.

  9. Identification and function of 11 Rab GTPases in giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Ren, Qian

    2015-03-01

    Rab GTPases, members of the Ras-like GTPase superfamily, are central elements in endocytic membrane trafficking. However, little is known of the Rab genes in the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. In this study, 11 Rab genes were identified from M. rosenbergii. All MrRabs have a RAB domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these 11 MrRabs were divided into different groups. The MrRab genes were ubiquitously expressed in heart, hemocytes, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestines. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that the MrRab genes were significantly upregulated by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in the prawns, indicating that MrRabs might play an important role in innate immune response against WSSV. Moreover, after challenge with Vibrio parahaemolyticus, the expression levels of all MrRabs in the hepatopancreas were also upregulated, which might indicated the involvement of MrRabs in prawns antibacterial immunity. In all, these preliminary results showed that MrRabs were involved in innate immunity of M. rosenbergii. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Extensive molecular tinkering in the evolution of the membrane attachment mode of the Rheb GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záhonová, Kristína; Petrželková, Romana; Valach, Matus; Yazaki, Euki; Tikhonenkov, Denis V; Butenko, Anzhelika; Janouškovec, Jan; Hrdá, Štěpánka; Klimeš, Vladimír; Burger, Gertraud; Inagaki, Yuji; Keeling, Patrick J; Hampl, Vladimír; Flegontov, Pavel; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Eliáš, Marek

    2018-03-27

    Rheb is a conserved and widespread Ras-like GTPase involved in cell growth regulation mediated by the (m)TORC1 kinase complex and implicated in tumourigenesis in humans. Rheb function depends on its association with membranes via prenylated C-terminus, a mechanism shared with many other eukaryotic GTPases. Strikingly, our analysis of a phylogenetically rich sample of Rheb sequences revealed that in multiple lineages this canonical and ancestral membrane attachment mode has been variously altered. The modifications include: (1) accretion to the N-terminus of two different phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate-binding domains, PX in Cryptista (the fusion being the first proposed synapomorphy of this clade), and FYVE in Euglenozoa and the related undescribed flagellate SRT308; (2) acquisition of lipidic modifications of the N-terminal region, namely myristoylation and/or S-palmitoylation in seven different protist lineages; (3) acquisition of S-palmitoylation in the hypervariable C-terminal region of Rheb in apusomonads, convergently to some other Ras family proteins; (4) replacement of the C-terminal prenylation motif with four transmembrane segments in a novel Rheb paralog in the SAR clade; (5) loss of an evident C-terminal membrane attachment mechanism in Tremellomycetes and some Rheb paralogs of Euglenozoa. Rheb evolution is thus surprisingly dynamic and presents a spectacular example of molecular tinkering.

  11. Síndrome de Sweet asociado a neoplasias Sweet's syndrome associated with neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Franco

    2006-10-01

    : idiopathic, parainflammatory, paraneoplastic, drug-induced, and pregnancy-related. Twenty percent of cases are associated with malignancies; 85% out of them involve hematologic alignancies and the remaining 15%, solid tumors. A series of seven cases of Sweet's syndrome associated with neoplasms which were diagnosed from 2002 to 2006 is presented. Six cases were related to oncohematologic diseases and one to solid tumors. These results highlight the importance of the diagnosis of the syndrome, since it may predict tumor relapse or underlying disease progression. The timely use of diagnostic and treatment methods may improve the quality of life of these patients. The fact that oncology patients take multiple medications (a colony-stimulating factor which may be associated with the onset of this entity must also be considered in excluding possible causes.

  12. Production of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated retrovirus in human and nonhuman cells transfected with an infectious molecular clone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, A.; Gendelman, H.E.; Koenig, S.; Folks, T.; Willey, R.; Rabson, A.; Martin, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors considered an infectious molecular clone of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated retrovirus. Upon transfection, this clone directed the production of infectious virus particles in a wide variety of cells in addition to human T4 cells. The progeny, infectious virions, were synthesized in mouse, mink, monkey, and several human non-T cell lines, indicating the absence of any intracellular obstacle to viral RNA or protein production or assembly. During the course of these studies, a human colon carcinoma cell line, exquisitely sensitive to DNA transfection, was identified

  13. Tandem duplications of a degenerated GTP-binding domain at the origin of GTPase receptors Toc159 and thylakoidal SRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Torres, Jorge; Maldonado, Monica Alexandra Arias; Chomilier, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of some nuclear encoded proteins that translocate proteins across the chloroplast envelope remains unknown. Therefore, sequences of GTPase proteins constituting the Arabidopsis thaliana translocon at the outer membrane of chloroplast (atToc) complexes were analyzed by means of HCA. In particular, atToc159 and related proteins (atToc132, atToc120, and atToc90) do not have proven homologues of prokaryotic or eukaryotic ancestry. We established that the three domains commonly referred to as A, G, and M originate from the GTPase G domain, tandemly repeated, and probably evolving toward an unstructured conformation in the case of the A domain. It resulted from this study a putative common ancestor for these proteins and a new domain definition, in particular the splitting of A into three domains (A1, A2, and A3), has been proposed. The family of Toc159, previously containing A. thaliana and Pisum sativum, has been extended to Medicago truncatula and Populus trichocarpa and it has been revised for Oryza sativa. They have also been compared to GTPase subunits involved in the cpSRP system. A distant homology has been revealed among Toc and cpSRP GTP-hydrolyzing proteins of A. thaliana, and repetitions of a GTPase domain were also found in cpSRP protein receptors, by means of HCA analysis

  14. Affecting long-term fear memory formation through optical control of Rac1 GTPase and PAK activity in lateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Aniruddha; Dines, Monica; Alapin, Jessica M; Lamprecht, Raphael

    2017-10-24

    Fear conditioning, a behavioral model for studying fear-related disorders, is believed to be formed by alterations of synaptic efficacy mediated by changes in synaptic transmission and neuronal morphology in lateral amygdala (LA). Rac GTPase and its downstream effector p21-activated kinase (PAK) are involved in such key neuronal functions. Here we show that optical activation of Rac1 GTPase using photoactivatable form of Rac1 (PA-Rac1) in amygdala led to phosphorylation of PAK and inhibition of long-term but not short-term auditory fear conditioning memory formation. Activation of PA-Rac1 in LA one day after fear conditioning had no effect on long-term fear memory tested 24 hrs after PA-Rac1 activation. Inhibition of PAK in LA by microinjection of the PAK inhibitor IPA-3 30 minutes before fear conditioning enhanced long-term but not short-term fear memory formation. Our results demonstrate that photoactivation of Rac1 GTPase in lateral amygdala impairs fear memory formation. Moreover, Rac1 effector PAK activity during fear conditioning constrains the formation of fear memory in LA. Thus, Rac GTPase and PAK proteins may serve as targets for treatment of fear and anxiety disorders.

  15. cpRAS: a novel circularly permuted RAS-like GTPase domain with a highly scattered phylogenetic distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novotny Marian

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent systematic survey suggested that the YRG (or YawG/YlqF family with the G4-G5-G1-G2-G3 order of the conserved GTPase motifs represents the only possible circularly permuted variation of the canonical GTPase structure. Here we show that a different circularly permuted GTPase domain actually does exist, conforming to the pattern G3-G4-G5-G1-G2. The domain, dubbed cpRAS, is a variant of RAS family GTPases and occurs in two types of larger proteins, either inserted into a region homologous to a bacterial group of proteins classified as COG2373 and potentially related to the alpha-2-macroglobulin family (so far a single protein in Dictyostelium or in combination with a von Willebrand factor type A (VWA domain. For the latter protein type, which was found in a few metazoans and several distantly related protists, existence in the common ancestor of opisthokonts, Amoebozoa and excavates followed by at least eight independent losses may be inferred. Our findings thus bring further evidence for the importance of parallel reduction of ancestral complexity in the eukaryotic evolution. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Lakshminarayan Iyer and Fyodor Kondrashov. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  16. The Arf GTPase-activating protein family is exploited by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to invade nonphagocytic host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Anthony C; Humphreys, Daniel; Brooks, Andrew B E; Hume, Peter J; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2015-02-10

    To establish intracellular infections, Salmonella bacteria trigger host cell membrane ruffling and invasion by subverting cellular Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that activate Arf1 and Arf6 GTPases by promoting GTP binding. A family of cellular Arf GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) can downregulate Arf signaling by stimulating GTP hydrolysis, but whether they do this during infection is unknown. Here, we uncovered a remarkable role for distinct Arf GAP family members in Salmonella invasion. The Arf6 GAPs ACAP1 and ADAP1 and the Arf1 GAP ASAP1 localized at Salmonella-induced ruffles, which was not the case for the plasma membrane-localized Arf6 GAPs ARAP3 and GIT1 or the Golgi-associated Arf1 GAP1. Surprisingly, we found that loss of ACAP1, ADAP1, or ASAP1 impaired Salmonella invasion, revealing that GAPs cannot be considered mere terminators of cytoskeleton remodeling. Salmonella invasion was restored in Arf GAP-depleted cells by expressing fast-cycling Arf derivatives, demonstrating that Arf GTP/GDP cycles facilitate Salmonella invasion. Consistent with this view, both constitutively active and dominant-negative Arf derivatives that cannot undergo GTP/GDP cycles inhibited invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Arf GEFs and GAPs colocalize at invading Salmonella and collaborate to drive Arf1-dependent pathogen invasion. This study revealed that Salmonella bacteria exploit a remarkable interplay between Arf GEFs and GAPs to direct cycles of Arf GTPase activation and inactivation. These cycles drive Salmonella cytoskeleton remodeling and enable intracellular infections. To initiate infections, the Salmonella bacterial pathogen remodels the mammalian actin cytoskeleton and invades host cells by subverting host Arf GEFs that activate Arf1 and Arf6 GTPases. Cellular Arf GAPs deactivate Arf GTPases and negatively regulate cell processes, but whether they target Arfs during infection is unknown. Here, we uncovered an important role for the Arf GAP

  17. The tRNA-modifying function of MnmE is controlled by post-hydrolysis steps of its GTPase cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Silvia; Villarroya, Magda; Medina, Milagros; Armengod, M.-Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    MnmE is a homodimeric multi-domain GTPase involved in tRNA modification. This protein differs from Ras-like GTPases in its low affinity for guanine nucleotides and mechanism of activation, which occurs by a cis, nucleotide- and potassium-dependent dimerization of its G-domains. Moreover, MnmE requires GTP hydrolysis to be functionally active. However, how GTP hydrolysis drives tRNA modification and how the MnmE GTPase cycle is regulated remains unresolved. Here, the kinetics of the MnmE GTPase cycle was studied under single-turnover conditions using stopped- and quench-flow techniques. We found that the G-domain dissociation is the rate-limiting step of the overall reaction. Mutational analysis and fast kinetics assays revealed that GTP hydrolysis, G-domain dissociation and Pi release can be uncoupled and that G-domain dissociation is directly responsible for the ‘ON’ state of MnmE. Thus, MnmE provides a new paradigm of how the ON/OFF cycling of GTPases may regulate a cellular process. We also demonstrate that the MnmE GTPase cycle is negatively controlled by the reaction products GDP and Pi. This feedback mechanism may prevent inefficacious GTP hydrolysis in vivo. We propose a biological model whereby a conformational change triggered by tRNA binding is required to remove product inhibition and initiate a new GTPase/tRNA-modification cycle. PMID:23630314

  18. Rac1 GTPase activates the WAVE regulatory complex through two distinct binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautigam, Chad A; Xing, Wenmin; Yang, Sheng; Henry, Lisa; Doolittle, Lynda K; Walz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The Rho GTPase Rac1 activates the WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) to drive Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization, which underpins diverse cellular processes. Here we report the structure of a WRC-Rac1 complex determined by cryo-electron microscopy. Surprisingly, Rac1 is not located at the binding site on the Sra1 subunit of the WRC previously identified by mutagenesis and biochemical data. Rather, it binds to a distinct, conserved site on the opposite end of Sra1. Biophysical and biochemical data on WRC mutants confirm that Rac1 binds to both sites, with the newly identified site having higher affinity and both sites required for WRC activation. Our data reveal that the WRC is activated by simultaneous engagement of two Rac1 molecules, suggesting a mechanism by which cells may sense the density of active Rac1 at membranes to precisely control actin assembly. PMID:28949297

  19. Control of Homeostasis and Dendritic Cell Survival by the GTPase RhoA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuai; Dislich, Bastian; Brakebusch, Cord H

    2015-01-01

    Tissues accommodate defined numbers of dendritic cells (DCs) in highly specific niches where different intrinsic and environmental stimuli control DC life span and numbers. DC homeostasis in tissues is important, because experimental changes in DC numbers influence immunity and tolerance toward...... various immune catastrophes and inflammation. However, the precise molecular mechanisms regulating DC life span and homeostasis are unclear. We report that the GTPase RhoA controls homeostatic proliferation, cytokinesis, survival, and turnover of cDCs. Deletion of RhoA strongly decreased the numbers of CD...... findings identify RhoA as a central regulator of DC homeostasis, and its deletion decreases DC numbers below critical thresholds for immune protection and homeostasis, causing aberrant compensatory DC proliferation....

  20. Quantification of local morphodynamics and local GTPase activity by edge evolution tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Tsukada

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Advances in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy have enabled us to directly observe dynamic cellular phenomena. Although the techniques themselves have promoted the understanding of dynamic cellular functions, the vast number of images acquired has generated a need for automated processing tools to extract statistical information. A problem underlying the analysis of time-lapse cell images is the lack of rigorous methods to extract morphodynamic properties. Here, we propose an algorithm called edge evolution tracking (EET to quantify the relationship between local morphological changes and local fluorescence intensities around a cell edge using time-lapse microscopy images. This algorithm enables us to trace the local edge extension and contraction by defining subdivided edges and their corresponding positions in successive frames. Thus, this algorithm enables the investigation of cross-correlations between local morphological changes and local intensity of fluorescent signals by considering the time shifts. By applying EET to fluorescence resonance energy transfer images of the Rho-family GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA, we examined the cross-correlation between the local area difference and GTPase activity. The calculated correlations changed with time-shifts as expected, but surprisingly, the peak of the correlation coefficients appeared with a 6-8 min time shift of morphological changes and preceded the Rac1 or Cdc42 activities. Our method enables the quantification of the dynamics of local morphological change and local protein activity and statistical investigation of the relationship between them by considering time shifts in the relationship. Thus, this algorithm extends the value of time-lapse imaging data to better understand dynamics of cellular function.

  1. Manipulation of behavioral decline in Caenorhabditis elegans with the Rag GTPase raga-1.

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    Matthew A Schreiber

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal aging leads to an inexorable decline in motor performance, contributing to medical morbidity and decreased quality of life. While much has been discovered about genetic determinants of lifespan, less is known about modifiers of age-related behavioral decline and whether new gene targets may be found which extend vigorous activity, with or without extending lifespan. Using Caenorhabditis elegans, we have developed a model of declining neuromuscular function and conducted a screen for increased behavioral activity in aged animals. In this model, behavioral function suffers from profound reductions in locomotory frequency, but coordination is strikingly preserved until very old age. By screening for enhancers of locomotion at advanced ages we identified the ras-related Rag GTPase raga-1 as a novel modifier of behavioral aging. raga-1 loss of function mutants showed vigorous swimming late in life. Genetic manipulations revealed that a gain of function raga-1 curtailed behavioral vitality and shortened lifespan, while a dominant negative raga-1 lengthened lifespan. Dietary restriction results indicated that a raga-1 mutant is relatively protected from the life-shortening effects of highly concentrated food, while RNAi experiments suggested that raga-1 acts in the highly conserved target of rapamycin (TOR pathway in C. elegans. Rag GTPases were recently shown to mediate nutrient-dependent activation of TOR. This is the first demonstration of their dramatic effects on behavior and aging. This work indicates that novel modulators of behavioral function can be identified in screens, with implications for future study of the clinical amelioration of age-related decline.

  2. A KRAS GTPase K104Q Mutant Retains Downstream Signaling by Offsetting Defects in Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guowei; Kistler, Samantha; George, Samuel D; Kuhlmann, Nora; Garvey, Leslie; Huynh, Minh; Bagni, Rachel K; Lammers, Michael; Der, Channing J; Campbell, Sharon L

    2017-03-17

    The KRAS GTPase plays a critical role in the control of cellular growth. The activity of KRAS is regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), and also post-translational modification. Lysine 104 in KRAS can be modified by ubiquitylation and acetylation, but the role of this residue in intrinsic KRAS function has not been well characterized. We find that lysine 104 is important for GEF recognition, because mutations at this position impaired GEF-mediated nucleotide exchange. Because the KRAS K104Q mutant has recently been employed as an acetylation mimetic, we conducted a series of studies to evaluate its in vitro and cell-based properties. Herein, we found that KRAS K104Q exhibited defects in both GEF-mediated exchange and GAP-mediated GTP hydrolysis, consistent with NMR-detected structural perturbations in localized regions of KRAS important for recognition of these regulatory proteins. Despite the partial defect in both GEF and GAP regulation, KRAS K104Q did not alter steady-state GTP-bound levels or the ability of the oncogenic KRAS G12V mutant to cause morphologic transformation of NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts and of WT KRAS to rescue the growth defect of mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in all Ras genes. We conclude that the KRAS K104Q mutant retains both WT and mutant KRAS function, probably due to offsetting defects in recognition of factors that up-regulate (GEF) and down-regulate (GAP) RAS activity. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced neurite remodeling in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells implicates the Cdc42 GTPase and is independent of Ras-ERK pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleaume, Celine; Eychene, Alain; Harnois, Thomas; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Constantin, Bruno; Caigneaux, Evelyne; Muller, Jean-Marc; Philippe, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is known to regulate proliferation or differentiation in normal and tumoral cells. SH-SY5Y is a differentiated cell subclone derived from the SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cell line and possess all the components for an autocrine action of VIP. In the present study, we investigated the morphological changes and intracellular signaling pathways occurring upon VIP treatment of SH-SY5Y cells. VIP induced an early remodeling of cell projections: a branched neurite network spread out and prominent varicosities developed along neurites. Although activated by VIP, the Ras/ERK pathway was not required for the remodeling process. In contrast, pull-down experiments revealed a strong Cdc42 activation by VIP while expression of a dominant-negative Cdc42 prevented the VIP-induced neurite changes, suggesting an important role for this small GTPase in the process. These data provide the first evidence for a regulation of the activity of Rho family GTPases by VIP and bring new insights in the signaling pathways implicated in neurite remodeling process induced by VIP in neuroblastoma cells

  4. Expression and cytoprotective activity of the small GTPase RhoB induced by the Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C; Roggenkamp, Dennis; May, Martin

    2013-01-01

    B expression, based on the inactivation of Rho/Ras proteins. In this study, we report on a long lasting expression of RhoB in cultured cells upon activation of Rho proteins by the cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) from Escherichia coli. The observations of this study highlight a new pathway involving Rac1...... without any signs of cell death. In conclusion, the cytoprotective RhoB response is not only evoked by bacterial protein toxins inactivating Rho/Ras proteins but also by the Rac1-activating toxin CNF1....

  5. Single-molecule tracking of small GTPase Rac1 uncovers spatial regulation of membrane translocation and mechanism for polarized signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sulagna; Yin, Taofei; Yang, Qingfen; Zhang, Jingqiao; Wu, Yi I.; Yu, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Polarized Rac1 signaling is a hallmark of many cellular functions, including cell adhesion, motility, and cell division. The two steps of Rac1 activation are its translocation to the plasma membrane and the exchange of nucleotide from GDP to GTP. It is, however, unclear whether these two processes are regulated independent of each other and what their respective roles are in polarization of Rac1 signaling. We designed a single-particle tracking (SPT) method to quantitatively analyze the kinetics of Rac1 membrane translocation in living cells. We found that the rate of Rac1 translocation was significantly elevated in protrusions during cell spreading on collagen. Furthermore, combining FRET sensor imaging with SPT measurements in the same cell, the recruitment of Rac1 was found to be polarized to an extent similar to that of the nucleotide exchange process. Statistical analysis of single-molecule trajectories and optogenetic manipulation of membrane lipids revealed that Rac1 membrane translocation precedes nucleotide exchange, and is governed primarily by interactions with phospholipids, particularly PI(3,4,5)P3, instead of protein factors. Overall, the study highlights the significance of membrane translocation in spatial Rac1 signaling, which is in addition to the traditional view focusing primarily on GEF distribution and exchange reaction. PMID:25561548

  6. A central role for the small GTPase Rac1 in hippocampal plasticity and spatial learning and memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haditsch, Ursula; Leone, Dino P; Farinelli, Mélissa

    2009-01-01

    in excitatory neurons in the forebrain in vivo not only affects spine structure, but also impairs synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus with consequent defects in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning. Furthermore, Rac1 mutants display deficits in working/episodic-like memory in the delayed matching...

  7. Defect in the GTPase activating protein (GAP) function of eIF5 causes repression of GCN4 translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony A, Charles; Alone, Pankaj V

    2017-05-13

    In eukaryotes, the eIF5 protein plays an important role in translation start site selection by providing the GAP (GTPase activating protein) function. However, in yeast translation initiation fidelity defective eIF5 G31R mutant causes preferential utilization of UUG as initiation codon and is termed as Suppressor of initiation codon (Sui - ) phenotype due to its hyper GTPase activity. The eIF5 G31R mutant dominantly represses GCN4 expression and confers sensitivity to 3-Amino-1,2,4-Trizole (3AT) induced starvation. The down-regulation of the GCN4 expression (Gcn - phenotype) in the eIF5 G31R mutant was not because of leaky scanning defects; rather was due to the utilization of upUUG initiation codons at the 5' regulatory region present between uORF1 and the main GCN4 ORF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rac1 GTPase regulates 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 and fibrotic remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavall, Daniel; Schuster, Pia; Jacobs, Nadine; Kazakov, Andrey; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2017-05-05

    The aim of the study was to characterize the role of Rac1 GTPase for the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR)-mediated pro-fibrotic remodeling. Transgenic mice with cardiac overexpression of constitutively active Rac1 (RacET) develop an age-dependent phenotype with atrial dilatation, fibrosis, and atrial fibrillation. Expression of MR was similar in RacET and WT mice. The expression of 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) was age-dependently up-regulated in the atria and the left ventricles of RacET mice on mRNA and protein levels. Statin treatment inhibiting Rac1 geranylgeranylation reduced 11β-HSD2 up-regulation. Samples of human left atrial myocardium showed a positive correlation between Rac1 activity and 11β-HSD2 expression ( r = 0.7169). Immunoprecipitation showed enhanced Rac1-bound 11β-HSD2 relative to Rac1 expression in RacET mice that was diminished with statin treatment. Both basal and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced NADPH oxidase activity were increased in RacET and correlated positively with 11β-HSD2 expression ( r = 0.788 and r = 0.843, respectively). In cultured H9c2 cardiomyocytes, Rac1 activation with l-buthionine sulfoximine increased; Rac1 inhibition with NSC23766 decreased 11β-HSD2 mRNA and protein expression. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) up-regulation induced by aldosterone was prevented with NSC23766. Cardiomyocyte transfection with 11β-HSD2 siRNA abolished the aldosterone-induced CTGF up-regulation. Aldosterone-stimulated MR nuclear translocation was blocked by the 11β-HSD2 inhibitor carbenoxolone. In cardiac fibroblasts, nuclear MR translocation induced by aldosterone was inhibited with NSC23766 and spironolactone. NSC23766 prevented the aldosterone-induced proliferation and migration of cardiac fibroblasts and the up-regulation of CTGF and fibronectin. In conclusion, Rac1 GTPase regulates 11β-HSD2 expression, MR activation, and MR-mediated pro-fibrotic signaling. © 2017 by The American Society for

  9. Mammalian knock out cells reveal prominent roles for atlastin GTPases in ER network morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Guohua; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Renvoisé, Benoît; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Park, Seong Hee; Blackstone, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Atlastins are large, membrane-bound GTPases that participate in the fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules to generate the polygonal ER network in eukaryotes. They also regulate lipid droplet size and inhibit bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, though mechanisms remain unclear. Humans have three atlastins (ATL1, ATL2, and ATL3), and ATL1 and ATL3 are mutated in autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia and hereditary sensory neuropathies. Cellular investigations of atlastin orthologs in most yeast, plants, flies and worms are facilitated by the presence of a single or predominant isoform, but loss-of-function studies in mammalian cells are complicated by multiple, broadly-expressed paralogs. We have generated mouse NIH-3T3 cells lacking all three mammalian atlastins (Atl1/2/3) using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout (KO). ER morphology is markedly disrupted in these triple KO cells, with prominent impairment in formation of three-way ER tubule junctions. This phenotype can be rescued by expression of distant orthologs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sey1p) and Arabidopsis (ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE3) as well as any one of the three human atlastins. Minimal, if any, changes are observed in the morphology of mitochondria and the Golgi apparatus. Alterations in BMP signaling and increased sensitivity to ER stress are also noted, though effects appear more modest. Finally, atlastins appear required for the proper differentiation of NIH-3T3 cells into an adipocyte-like phenotype. These findings have important implications for the pathogenesis of hereditary spastic paraplegias and sensory neuropathies associated with atlastin mutations. - Highlights: • NIH-3T3 cells lacking all three atlastin paralogs were generated using CRISPR/Cas9. • Cells lacking all atlastin GTPases exhibit far fewer 3-way ER tubule junctions. • ER morphology defects in atlastin knockout cells are rescued by distant plant and yeast orthologs. • Atlastin knock out cells also

  10. Mammalian knock out cells reveal prominent roles for atlastin GTPases in ER network morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Guohua; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Renvoisé, Benoît; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Park, Seong Hee; Blackstone, Craig, E-mail: blackstc@ninds.nih.gov

    2016-11-15

    Atlastins are large, membrane-bound GTPases that participate in the fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules to generate the polygonal ER network in eukaryotes. They also regulate lipid droplet size and inhibit bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, though mechanisms remain unclear. Humans have three atlastins (ATL1, ATL2, and ATL3), and ATL1 and ATL3 are mutated in autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia and hereditary sensory neuropathies. Cellular investigations of atlastin orthologs in most yeast, plants, flies and worms are facilitated by the presence of a single or predominant isoform, but loss-of-function studies in mammalian cells are complicated by multiple, broadly-expressed paralogs. We have generated mouse NIH-3T3 cells lacking all three mammalian atlastins (Atl1/2/3) using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout (KO). ER morphology is markedly disrupted in these triple KO cells, with prominent impairment in formation of three-way ER tubule junctions. This phenotype can be rescued by expression of distant orthologs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sey1p) and Arabidopsis (ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE3) as well as any one of the three human atlastins. Minimal, if any, changes are observed in the morphology of mitochondria and the Golgi apparatus. Alterations in BMP signaling and increased sensitivity to ER stress are also noted, though effects appear more modest. Finally, atlastins appear required for the proper differentiation of NIH-3T3 cells into an adipocyte-like phenotype. These findings have important implications for the pathogenesis of hereditary spastic paraplegias and sensory neuropathies associated with atlastin mutations. - Highlights: • NIH-3T3 cells lacking all three atlastin paralogs were generated using CRISPR/Cas9. • Cells lacking all atlastin GTPases exhibit far fewer 3-way ER tubule junctions. • ER morphology defects in atlastin knockout cells are rescued by distant plant and yeast orthologs. • Atlastin knock out cells also

  11. The Adaptor Protein and Arf GTPase-activating Protein Cat-1/Git-1 Is Required for Cellular Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sungsoo M.; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Cat-1/Git-1 is a multifunctional protein that acts as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Arf GTPases, as well as serves as a scaffold for a number of different signaling proteins. Cat-1 is best known for its role in regulating cell shape and promoting cell migration. However, whether Cat-1 might also contribute to cellular transformation is currently unknown. Here we show that ∼95% of cervical tumor samples examined overexpress Cat-1, suggesting that the up-regulation of Cat-1 expression is a frequent occurrence in this type of cancer. We demonstrate further that knocking down Cat-1 from NIH3T3 fibroblasts expressing an activated form of Cdc42 (Cdc42 F28L), or from the human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell line, inhibits the ability of these cells to form colonies in soft agar, an in vitro measure of tumorgenicity. The requirement for Cat-1 when assaying the anchorage-independent growth of transformed fibroblasts and HeLa cells is dependent on its ability to bind paxillin, while being negatively impacted by its Arf-GAP activity. Moreover, the co-expression of Cat-1 and an activated form of Arf6 in fibroblasts was sufficient to induce their transformation. These findings highlight novel roles for Cat-1 and its interactions with the Arf GTPases and paxillin in oncogenic transformation. PMID:22807447

  12. Vibrio cholerae T3SS effector VopE modulates mitochondrial dynamics and innate immune signaling by targeting Miro GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masato; Danilchanka, Olga; Mekalanos, John J

    2014-11-12

    The cellular surveillance-activated detoxification and defenses (cSADD) theory postulates the presence of host surveillance mechanisms that monitor the integrity of common cellular processes and components targeted by pathogen effectors. Being organelles essential for multiple cellular processes, including innate immune responses, mitochondria represent an attractive target for pathogens. We describe a Vibrio cholerae Type 3 secretion system effector VopE that localizes to mitochondria during infection and acts as a specific GTPase-activating protein to interfere with the function of mitochondrial Rho GTPases Miro1 and Miro2. Miro GTPases modulate mitochondrial dynamics and interfering with this functionality effectively blocks innate immune responses that presumably require mitochondria as signaling platforms. Our data indicate that interference with mitochondrial dynamics may be an unappreciated strategy that pathogens use to block host innate immune responses that would otherwise control these bacterial infections. VopE might represent a bacterial effector that targets the cSADD surveillance response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulatory properties of statins and rho gtpases prenylation inhibitiors to stimulate melanoma immunogenicity and promote anti-melanoma immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Pich, Christine; Teiti, Iotefa; Tilkin-Mariame, Anne Françoise

    2017-02-15

    Melanoma is a highly lethal cutaneous tumor, killing affected patients through development of multiple poorly immunogenic metastases. Suboptimal activation of immune system by melanoma cells is often due to molecular modifications occurring during tumor progression that prevent efficient recognition of melanoma cells by immune effectors. Statins are HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, which block the mevalonate synthesis pathway, used by millions of people as hypocholesterolemic agents in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. They are also known to inhibit Rho GTPase activation and Rho dependent signaling pathways. Rho GTPases are regarded as molecular switches that regulate a wide spectrum of cellular functions and their dysfunction has been characterized in various oncogenic process notably in melanoma progression. Moreover, these molecules can modulate the immune response. Since 10 years we have demonstrated that Statins and other Rho GTPases inhibitors are critical regulators of molecules involved in adaptive and innate anti-melanoma immune response. In this review we summarize our major observations demonstrating that these pharmacological agents stimulate melanoma immunogenicity and suggest a potential use of these molecules to promote anti-melanoma immune response. © 2016 UICC.

  14. Chlamydia abortus YhbZ, a truncated Obg family GTPase, associates with the Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkinghorne, Adam; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    The stringent stress response is vital for bacterial survival under adverse environmental conditions. Obligate intracellular Chlamydia lack key stringent response proteins, but nevertheless can interrupt the cell cycle and enter stasis or persistence upon amino acid starvation. A possible key protein retained is YhbZ, a homologue of the ObgE guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) superfamily connecting the stringent stress response to ribosome maturation. Curiously, chlamydial YhbZ lacks the ObgE C-terminal domain thought to be essential for binding the large ribosomal subunit. We expressed recombinant Chlamydia abortus YhbZ and showed it to be a functional GTPase, with similar activity to other Obg GTPase family members. As Chlamydia are resistant to genetic manipulation, we performed heterologous expression and gradient centrifugation experiments in Escherichia coli and found that, despite the missing C-terminal domain, C. abortus YhbZ co-fractionates with the E. coli 50S large ribosomal subunit. In addition, overexpression of chlamydial YhbZ in E. coli leads to growth defects and elongation, as reported for other Obg members. YhbZ did not complement an E. coli obgE temperature-sensitive mutant, indicating the C-terminal acidic domain may have an additional role. This data supports a role for YhbZ linking the chlamydial stress response to ribosome function and cellular growth. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Secretory pathway-dependent localization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rho GTPase-activating protein Rgd1p at growth sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèbvre, Fabien; Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Hugues, Michel; Crouzet, Marc; Vieillemard, Aurélie; McCusker, Derek; Thoraval, Didier; Doignon, François

    2012-05-01

    Establishment and maintenance of cell polarity in eukaryotes depends upon the regulation of Rho GTPases. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) Rgd1p stimulates the GTPase activities of Rho3p and Rho4p, which are involved in bud growth and cytokinesis, respectively. Consistent with the distribution of Rho3p and Rho4p, Rgd1p is found mostly in areas of polarized growth during cell cycle progression. Rgd1p was mislocalized in mutants specifically altered for Golgi apparatus-based phosphatidylinositol 4-P [PtdIns(4)P] synthesis and for PtdIns(4,5)P(2) production at the plasma membrane. Analysis of Rgd1p distribution in different membrane-trafficking mutants suggested that Rgd1p was delivered to growth sites via the secretory pathway. Rgd1p may associate with post-Golgi vesicles by binding to PtdIns(4)P and then be transported by secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane. In agreement, we show that Rgd1p coimmunoprecipitated and localized with markers specific to secretory vesicles and cofractionated with a plasma membrane marker. Moreover, in vivo imaging revealed that Rgd1p was transported in an anterograde manner from the mother cell to the daughter cell in a vectoral manner. Our data indicate that secretory vesicles are involved in the delivery of RhoGAP Rgd1p to the bud tip and bud neck.

  16. Rab5 GTPase controls chromosome alignment through Lamin disassembly and relocation of the NuMA-like protein Mud to the poles during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capalbo, Luisa; D'Avino, Pier Paolo; Archambault, Vincent; Glover, David M

    2011-10-18

    The small GTPase Rab5 is a conserved regulator of membrane trafficking; it regulates the formation of early endosomes, their transport along microtubules, and the fusion to the target organelles. Although several members of the endocytic pathway were recently implicated in spindle organization, it is unclear whether Rab5 has any role during mitosis. Here, we describe that Rab5 is required for proper chromosome alignment during Drosophila mitoses. We also found that Rab5 associated in vivo with nuclear Lamin and mushroom body defect (Mud), the Drosophila counterpart of nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA). Consistent with this finding, Rab5 was required for the disassembly of the nuclear envelope at mitotic entry and the accumulation of Mud at the spindle poles. Furthermore, Mud depletion caused chromosome misalignment defects that resembled the defects of Rab5 RNAi cells, and double-knockdown experiments indicated that the two proteins function in a linear pathway. Our results indicate a role for Rab5 in mitosis and reinforce the emerging view of the contributions made by cell membrane dynamics to spindle function.

  17. Binding of the GTPase Sar1 to a Lipid Membrane Monolayer: Insertion and Orientation Studied by Infrared Reflection–Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schwieger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Membrane-interacting proteins are polyphilic polymers that engage in dynamic protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions while undergoing changes in conformation, orientation and binding interfaces. Predicting the sites of interactions between such polypeptides and phospholipid membranes is still a challenge. One example is the small eukaryotic GTPase Sar1, which functions in phospholipid bilayer remodeling and vesicle formation as part of the multimeric coat protein complex (COPII. The membrane interaction of Sar1 is strongly dependent on its N-terminal 23 amino acids. By monolayer adsorption experiments and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS, we elucidate the role of lipids in inducing the amphipathicity of this N-terminal stretch, which inserts into the monolayer as an amphipathic helix (AH. The AH inserting angle is determined and is consistent with the philicities and spatial distribution of the amino acid monomers. Using an advanced method of IRRAS data evaluation, the orientation of Sar1 with respect to the lipid layer prior to the recruitment of further COPII proteins is determined. The result indicates that only a slight reorientation of the membrane-bound Sar1 is needed to allow coat assembly. The time-course of the IRRAS analysis corroborates a role of slow GTP hydrolysis in Sar1 desorption from the membrane.

  18. Assessing the Influence of Mutation on GTPase Transition States by Using X-ray Crystallography,19F NMR, and DFT Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi; Molt, Robert W; Pellegrini, Erika; Cliff, Matthew J; Bowler, Matthew W; Richards, Nigel G J; Blackburn, G Michael; Waltho, Jonathan P

    2017-08-07

    We report X-ray crystallographic and 19 F NMR studies of the G-protein RhoA complexed with MgF 3 - , GDP, and RhoGAP, which has the mutation Arg85'Ala. When combined with DFT calculations, these data permit the identification of changes in transition state (TS) properties. The X-ray data show how Tyr34 maintains solvent exclusion and the core H-bond network in the active site by relocating to replace the missing Arg85' sidechain. The 19 F NMR data show deshielding effects that indicate the main function of Arg85' is electronic polarization of the transferring phosphoryl group, primarily mediated by H-bonding to O 3G and thence to P G . DFT calculations identify electron-density redistribution and pinpoint why the TS for guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis is higher in energy when RhoA is complexed with RhoGAP Arg85'Ala relative to wild-type (WT) RhoGAP. This study demonstrates that 19 F NMR measurements, in combination with X-ray crystallography and DFT calculations, can reliably dissect the response of small GTPases to site-specific modifications. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  19. A Bacterial Pathogen Targets a Host Rab-Family GTPase Defense Pathway with a GAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, Stefania; Gao, Xiang; Hannemann, Sebastian; Lara-Tejero, María; Galán, Jorge E

    2016-02-10

    Cell-autonomous defense mechanisms are potent strategies that protect individual cells against intracellular pathogens. The Rab-family GTPase Rab32 was previously shown to restrict the intracellular human pathogen Salmonella Typhi, but its potential broader role in antimicrobial defense remains unknown. We show that Rab32 represents a general cell-autonomous, antimicrobial defense that is counteracted by two Salmonella effectors. Mice lacking Rab-32 or its nucleotide exchange factor BLOC-3 are permissive to S. Typhi infection and exhibit increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium. S. Typhimurium counters this defense pathway by delivering two type III secretion effectors, SopD2, a Rab32 GAP, and GtgE, a specific Rab32 protease. An S. Typhimurium mutant strain lacking these two effectors exhibits markedly reduced virulence, which is fully restored in BLOC-3-deficient mice. These results demonstrate that a cell-autonomous, Rab32-dependent host defense pathway plays a central role in the defense against vacuolar pathogens and describe a mechanism evolved by a bacterial pathogen to counter it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. RIT1 GTPase Regulates Sox2 Transcriptional Activity and Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Sajad; Cai, Weikang; Andres, Douglas A

    2017-02-10

    Adult neurogenesis, the process of generating mature neurons from neuronal progenitor cells, makes critical contributions to neural circuitry and brain function in both healthy and disease states. Neurogenesis is a highly regulated process in which diverse environmental and physiological stimuli are relayed to resident neural stem cell populations to control the transcription of genes involved in self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing neurogenesis is necessary for the development of translational strategies to harness this process for neuronal repair. Here we report that the Ras-related GTPase RIT1 serves to control the sequential proliferation and differentiation of adult hippocampal neural progenitor cells, with in vivo expression of active RIT1 driving robust adult neurogenesis. Gene expression profiling analysis demonstrates increased expression of a specific set of transcription factors known to govern adult neurogenesis in response to active RIT1 expression in the hippocampus, including sex-determining region Y-related HMG box 2 (Sox2), a well established regulator of stem cell self-renewal and neurogenesis. In adult hippocampal neuronal precursor cells, RIT1 controls an Akt-dependent signaling cascade, resulting in the stabilization and transcriptional activation of phosphorylated Sox2. This study supports a role for RIT1 in relaying niche-derived signals to neural/stem progenitor cells to control transcription of genes involved in self-renewal and differentiation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Dab2IP GTPase activating protein regulates dendrite development and synapse number in cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhong Qiao

    Full Text Available DOC-2/DAB-2 interacting protein (Dab2IP is a GTPase activating protein that binds to Disabled-1, a cytosolic adapter protein involved in Reelin signaling and brain development. Dab2IP regulates PI3K-AKT signaling and is associated with metastatic prostate cancer, abdominal aortic aneurysms and coronary heart disease. To date, the physiological function of Dab2IP in the nervous system, where it is highly expressed, is relatively unknown. In this study, we generated a mouse model with a targeted disruption of Dab2IP using a retrovirus gene trap strategy. Unlike reeler mice, Dab2IP knock-down mice did not exhibit severe ataxia or cerebellar hypoplasia. However, Dab2IP deficiency produced a number of cerebellar abnormalities such as a delay in the development of Purkinje cell (PC dendrites, a decrease in the parallel fiber synaptic marker VGluT1, and an increase in the climbing fiber synaptic marker VGluT2. These findings demonstrate for the first time that Dab2IP plays an important role in dendrite development and regulates the number of synapses in the cerebellum.

  2. Sprouty regulates cell migration by inhibiting the activation of Rac1 GTPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppleton, Helen M.; Edwin, Francis; Jaggar, Laura; Ray, Ramesh; Johnson, Leonard R.; Patel, Tarun B.

    2004-01-01

    Sprouty (SPRY) protein negatively modulates fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor actions. We showed that human SPRY2 inhibits cell growth and migration in response to serum and several growth factors. Using rat intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cells, we investigated the involvement of the Rho family of GTPases, RhoA, Rac1, and cdc42 in SPRY2-mediated inhibition of cell migration and proliferation. The ability of TAT-tagged SPRY2 to inhibit proliferation and migration of IEC-6 cells transfected with constitutively active mutants of RhoA(G14V), Rac1(G12V), and cdc42 (F28L) was determined. Constitutively active RhoA(G14V), Rac1(G12V), or cdc42(F28L) did not protect cells from the anti-proliferative actions of TAT-SPRY2. The ability of TAT-hSPRY2 to inhibit migration was not altered by of RhoA(G14V) and cdc42(F28L). However, Rac1(G12V) obliterated the ability of SPRY2 to inhibit cell autonomous or serum-induced migration. Also, the activation of endogenous Rac1 was attenuated by TAT-SPRY2. Thus, SPRY2 mediates its anti-migratory actions by inhibiting Rac1 activation

  3. ABP1 and ROP6 GTPase signaling regulate clathrin-mediated endocytosis in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Naramoto, Satoshi; Robert, Stéphanie; Tejos, Ricardo; Löfke, Christian; Lin, Deshu; Yang, Zhenbiao; Friml, Jiří

    2012-07-24

    The dynamic spatial and temporal distribution of the crucial plant signaling molecule auxin is achieved by feedback coordination of auxin signaling and intercellular auxin transport pathways. Developmental roles of auxin have been attributed predominantly to its effect on transcription; however, an alternative pathway involving AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) has been proposed to regulate clathrin-mediated endocytosis in roots and Rho-like GTPase (ROP)-dependent pavement cell interdigitation in leaves. In this study, we show that ROP6 and its downstream effector RIC1 regulate clathrin association with the plasma membrane for clathrin-mediated endocytosis, as well as for its feedback regulation by auxin. Genetic analysis revealed that ROP6/RIC1 acts downstream of ABP1 to regulate endocytosis. This signaling circuit is also involved in the feedback regulation of PIN-FORMED 1 (PIN1) and PIN2 auxin transporters activity (via its constitutive endocytosis) and corresponding auxin transport-mediated processes, including root gravitropism and leave vascular tissue patterning. Our findings suggest that the signaling module auxin-ABP1-ROP6/RIC1-clathrin-PIN1/PIN2 is a shared component of the feedback regulation of auxin transport during both root and aerial development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Conserved Role for Atlastin GTPases in Regulating Lipid Droplet Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin W. Klemm

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Lipid droplets (LDs are the major fat storage organelles in eukaryotic cells, but how their size is regulated is unknown. Using genetic screens in C. elegans for LD morphology defects in intestinal cells, we found that mutations in atlastin, a GTPase required for homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes, cause not only ER morphology defects, but also a reduction in LD size. Similar results were obtained after depletion of atlastin or expression of a dominant-negative mutant, whereas overexpression of atlastin had the opposite effect. Atlastin depletion in Drosophila fat bodies also reduced LD size and decreased triglycerides in whole animals, sensitizing them to starvation. In mammalian cells, co-overexpression of atlastin-1 and REEP1, a paralog of the ER tubule-shaping protein DP1/REEP5, generates large LDs. The effect of atlastin-1 on LD size correlates with its activity to promote membrane fusion in vitro. Our results indicate that atlastin-mediated fusion of ER membranes is important for LD size regulation.

  5. Phosphoproteomics reveals that Parkinson's disease kinase LRRK2 regulates a subset of Rab GTPases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Martin; Tonelli, Francesca; Ito, Genta; Davies, Paul; Trost, Matthias; Vetter, Melanie; Wachter, Stefanie; Lorentzen, Esben; Duddy, Graham; Wilson, Stephen; Baptista, Marco AS; Fiske, Brian K; Fell, Matthew J; Morrow, John A; Reith, Alastair D; Alessi, Dario R; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Park8, encoding for the multidomain Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein, comprise the predominant genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). G2019S, the most common amino acid substitution activates the kinase two- to threefold. This has motivated the development of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors; however, poor consensus on physiological LRRK2 substrates has hampered clinical development of such therapeutics. We employ a combination of phosphoproteomics, genetics, and pharmacology to unambiguously identify a subset of Rab GTPases as key LRRK2 substrates. LRRK2 directly phosphorylates these both in vivo and in vitro on an evolutionary conserved residue in the switch II domain. Pathogenic LRRK2 variants mapping to different functional domains increase phosphorylation of Rabs and this strongly decreases their affinity to regulatory proteins including Rab GDP dissociation inhibitors (GDIs). Our findings uncover a key class of bona-fide LRRK2 substrates and a novel regulatory mechanism of Rabs that connects them to PD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12813.001 PMID:26824392

  6. Maize ROP2 GTPase provides a competitive advantage to the male gametophyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, K M; Vejlupkova, Z; Meeley, R B; Fowler, J E

    2003-12-01

    Rop GTPases have been implicated in the regulation of plant signal transduction and cell morphogenesis. To explore ROP2 function in maize, we isolated five Mutator transposon insertions (rop2::Mu alleles). Transmission frequency through the male gametophyte, but not the female, was lower than expected in three of the rop2::Mu mutants. These three alleles formed an allelic series on the basis of the relative transmission rate of each when crossed as trans-heterozygotes. A dramatic reduction in the level of ROP2-mRNA in pollen was associated with the three alleles causing a transmission defect, whereas a rop2::Mu allele that did not result in a defect had wild-type transcript levels, thus confirming that mutation of rop2 causes the mutant phenotype. These data strongly support a role for rop2 in male gametophyte function, perhaps surprisingly, given the expression in pollen of the nearly identical duplicate gene rop9. However, the transmission defect was apparent only when a rop2::Mu heterozygote was used as the pollen donor or when a mixture of wild-type and homozygous mutant pollen was used. Thus, mutant pollen is at a competitive disadvantage compared to wild-type pollen, although mutant pollen grains lacked an obvious cellular defect. Our data demonstrate the importance in vivo of a specific Rop, rop2, in the male gametophyte.

  7. Mechanisms underlying acquired von Willebrand syndrome associated with an IgM paraprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerhofer, M; Haushofer, A; Kyrle, P A; Chott, A; Müllner, C; Quehenberger, P; Worel, N; Traby, L; Eichinger, S

    2009-09-01

    Acquired von Willebrand (vW) syndrome is a rare bleeding disorder which is frequently associated with immunological, malignant or cardiovascular disorders. The underlying pathomechanisms, particularly in patients with IgM monoclonal gammopathies, often remain unknown. We report a patient with indolent small B-cell lymphoma (immunocytoma) and plasmacytic differentiation with an IgM kappa paraprotein who was admitted with retroperitoneal haematoma. Medical history and coagulation testing were consistent with acquired vW syndrome. vW immunohistochemistry showed normal cytoplasmic labelling of endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, whereas the lymphomatous infiltrate was negative. Acquired vW syndrome due to adsorption of vW factor on malignant cells was thus excluded. In the multimeric analysis, all multimers were present similar to that in type 1 vW syndrome, but the triplet structures were blurred. The bands on serum immunofixation electrophoresis were also atypically broadened, which suggested complex formation between the IgM and vW factor. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that the 176-kDa proteolytic fragment of vW factor co-precipitated with the IgM paraprotein in the patient but not in the controls, suggesting a specific interaction between vW factor and the paraprotein in the patient. The patient required surgery and was successfully managed by chemotherapy consisting of rituximab and fludarabin as well as plasma exchange.

  8. Mild aerobic exercise blocks elastin fiber fragmentation and aortic dilatation in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome associated aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Christine; Nielsen, Cory; Alex, Ramona; Cooper, Kimbal; Farney, Michael; Gaufin, Douglas; Cui, Jason Z; van Breemen, Cornelis; Broderick, Tom L; Vallejo-Elias, Johana; Esfandiarei, Mitra

    2017-07-01

    Regular low-impact physical activity is generally allowed in patients with Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. However, being above average in height encourages young adults with this syndrome to engage in high-intensity contact sports, which unfortunately increases the risk for aortic aneurysm and rupture, the leading cause of death in Marfan syndrome. In this study, we investigated the effects of voluntary (cage-wheel) or forced (treadmill) aerobic exercise at different intensities on aortic function and structure in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome. Four-week-old Marfan and wild-type mice were subjected to voluntary and forced exercise regimens or sedentary lifestyle for 5 mo. Thoracic aortic tissue was isolated and subjected to structural and functional studies. Our data showed that exercise improved aortic wall structure and function in Marfan mice and that the beneficial effect was biphasic, with an optimum at low intensity exercise (55-65% V̇o 2max ) and tapering off at a higher intensity of exercise (85% V̇o 2max ). The mechanism underlying the reduced elastin fragmentation in Marfan mice involved reduction of the expression of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 within the aortic wall. These findings present the first evidence of potential beneficial effects of mild exercise on the structural integrity of the aortic wall in Marfan syndrome associated aneurysm. Our finding that moderate, but not strenuous, exercise protects aortic structure and function in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome could have important implications for the medical care of young Marfan patients. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The present study provides conclusive scientific evidence that daily exercise can improve aortic health in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome associated aortic aneurysm, and it establishes the threshold for the exercise intensity beyond which exercise may not be as protective. These findings establish a platform

  9. IQ-domain GTPase-activating protein 1 promotes the malignant phenotype of invasive ductal breast carcinoma via canonical Wnt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huan-Yu; Han, Yang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Lian-He; Zheng, Xiao-Ying; Du, Jiang; Wu, Guang-Ping; Wang, En-Hua

    2017-06-01

    IQ-domain GTPase-activating protein 1 is a scaffolding protein with multidomain which plays a role in modulating dishevelled (Dvl) nuclear translocation in canonical Wnt pathway. However, the biological function and mechanism of IQ-domain GTPase-activating protein 1 in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) remain unknown. In this study, we found that IQ-domain GTPase-activating protein 1 expression was elevated in invasive ductal carcinoma, which was positively correlated with tumor grade, lymphatic metastasis, and poor prognosis. Coexpression of IQ-domain GTPase-activating protein 1 and Dvl in the nucleus and cytoplasm of invasive ductal carcinoma was significantly correlated but not in the membrane. Postoperative survival in the patients with their coexpression in the nucleus and cytoplasm was obviously lower than that without coexpression. The positive expression rates of c-myc and cyclin D1 were significantly higher in the patients with nuclear coexpression of Dvl and IQ-domain GTPase-activating protein 1 than that with cytoplasmic coexpression, correlating with poor prognosis. IQ-domain GTPase-activating protein 1 significantly enhanced cell proliferation and invasion in invasive ductal carcinoma cell lines by interacting with Dvl in cytoplasm to promote Dvl nuclear translocation so as to upregulate the expression of c-myc and cyclin D1. Collectively, our data suggest that IQ-domain GTPase-activating protein 1 may promote the malignant phenotype of invasive ductal carcinoma via canonical Wnt signaling, and it could be used as a potential prognostic biomarker for breast cancer patients.

  10. Calf Compartment Syndrome associated with the Use of an Intra-osseous Line in an Adult Patient: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhotra R

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a lower limb compartment syndrome associated with the use of an intra-osseous line inserted into the proximal tibia in an adult patient. An unconscious 59-year old male with multiple injuries presented to our Emergency Department after a road traffic accident. Bilateral proximal tibial intra osseous-lines were inserted due to poor venous access. After resuscitation his left leg was noted to be tense and swollen with absent pulses. Acute compartment syndrome was diagnosed both clinically and with compartment pressure measurement. Two incision fasciotomy on his left lower leg was performed. Intra osseous-lines in the proximal tibia are increasingly used in adult patients in the pre-hospital setting by paramedics and emergency physicians. Their use, along with the possible complications of these devices, such as the development of compartment syndrome or osteomyelitis leading to amputation, is well reported in the paediatric literature. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been any previous reports of complications in the adult patient. We present a case of lower leg compartment syndrome developing from the use of an intra-osseous line in the proximal tibia in an adult patient. With the increasing use of intra-osseous lines in adult patients, clinicians should be aware of the possibility of developing compartment syndrome which may lead to disability or amputation in severe cases.

  11. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Congenital Cardiac Defects and Ophthalmologic Changes - Systematization for Diagnosis in the Clinical Practice

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    Priscila H. A. Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Numerous genetic syndromes associated with heart disease and ocular manifestations have been described. However, a compilation and a summarization of these syndromes for better consultation and comparison have not been performed yet. Objective: The objective of this work is to systematize available evidence in the literature on different syndromes that may cause congenital heart diseases associated with ocular changes, focusing on the types of anatomical and functional changes. Method: A systematic search was performed on Medline electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Lilacs of articles published until January 2016. Eligibility criteria were case reports or review articles that evaluated the association of ophthalmic and cardiac abnormalities in genetic syndrome patients younger than 18 years. Results: The most frequent genetic syndromes were: Down Syndrome, Velo-cardio-facial / DiGeorge Syndrome, Charge Syndrome and Noonan Syndrome. The most associated cardiac malformations with ocular findings were interatrial communication (77.4%, interventricular communication (51.6%, patent ductus arteriosus (35.4%, pulmonary artery stenosis (25.8% and tetralogy of Fallot (22.5%. Conclusion: Due to their clinical variability, congenital cardiac malformations may progress asymptomatically to heart defects associated with high morbidity and mortality. For this reason, the identification of extra-cardiac characteristics that may somehow contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or reveal its severity is of great relevance.

  12. Hemihypertrophy and primary small intestinal lymphangiectasia in incontinentia pigmenti achromians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyaz, A; Riyaz, Najeeba; Anoop, P; Chandni, B; Noushad, K

    2004-10-01

    A rare occurrence of primary small intestinal lymphangiectasia in an 8-year-old girl with incontinentia pigmenti achromians is reported. In addition, she had right sided hemihypertrophy. Though intestinal lymphangiectasia is known to have a few syndromic associations, its co-existence in a child with incontinentia pigmenti achromians has not yet been reported in the literature. Hemihypertrophy is also extremely rare in the latter and only very few instances of an association between the two have been documented previously.

  13. Neuronal Rho GTPase Rac1 elimination confers neuroprotection in a mouse model of permanent ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabiyik, Cansu; Fernandes, Rui; Figueiredo, Francisco Rosário; Socodato, Renato; Brakebusch, Cord; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Relvas, João Bettencourt; Santos, Sofia Duque

    2017-09-28

    The Rho GTPase Rac1 is a multifunctional protein involved in distinct pathways ranging from development to pathology. The aim of the present study was to unravel the contribution of neuronal Rac1 in regulating the response to brain injury induced by permanent focal cerebral ischemia (pMCAO). Our results show that pMCAO significantly increased total Rac1 levels in wild type mice, mainly through rising nuclear Rac1, while a reduction in Rac1 activation was observed. Such changes preceded cell death induced by excitotoxic stress. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 in primary neuronal cortical cells prevented the increase in oxidative stress induced after overactivation of glutamate receptors. However, this was not sufficient to prevent the associated neuronal cell death. In contrast, RNAi-mediated knock down of Rac1 in primary cortical neurons prevented cell death elicited by glutamate excitotoxicity and decreased the activity of NADPH oxidase. To test whether in vivo down regulation of neuronal Rac1 was neuroprotective after pMCAO, we used tamoxifen-inducible neuron-specific conditional Rac1-knockout mice. We observed a significant 50% decrease in brain infarct volume of knockout mice and a concomitant increase in HIF-1α expression compared to littermate control mice, demonstrating that ablation of Rac1 in neurons is neuroprotective. Transmission electron microscopy performed in the ischemic brain showed that lysosomes in the infarct of Rac1- knockout mice were preserved at similar levels to those of non-infarcted tissue, while littermate mice displayed a decrease in the number of lysosomes, further corroborating the notion that Rac1 ablation in neurons is neuroprotective. Our results demonstrate that Rac1 plays important roles in the ischemic pathological cascade and that modulation of its levels is of therapeutic interest. © 2017 International Society of Neuropathology.

  14. Identification and Characterization of a Chloroplast-Targeted Obg GTPase in Dendrobium officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji; Deng, Feng; Deng, Mengsheng; Han, Jincheng; Chen, Jianbin; Wang, Li; Yan, Shen; Tong, Kai; Liu, Fan; Tian, Mengliang

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial homologous chloroplast-targeted Obg GTPases (ObgCs) belong to the plant-typical Obg group, which is involved in diverse physiological processes during chloroplast development. However, the evolutionarily conserved function of ObgC in plants remains elusive and requires further investigation. In this study, we identified DoObgC from an epiphytic plant Dendrobium officinale and demonstrated the characteristics of DoObgC. Sequence analysis indicated that DoObgC is highly conserved with other plant ObgCs, which contain the chloroplast transit peptide (cTP), Obg fold, G domain, and OCT regions. The C terminus of DoObgC lacking the chloroplast-targeting cTP region, DoObgC Δ1-160 , showed strong similarity to ObgE and other bacterial Obgs. Overexpression of DoObgC Δ1-160 in Escherichia coli caused slow cell growth and an increased number of elongated cells. This phenotype was consistent with the phenotype of cells overexpressing ObgE. Furthermore, the expression of recombinant DoObgC Δ1-160 enhanced the cell persistence of E. coli to streptomycin. Results of transient expression assays revealed that DoObgC was localized to chloroplasts. Moreover, we demonstrated that DoObgC could rescue the embryotic lethal phenotype of the Arabidopsis obgc-t mutant, suggesting that DoObgC is a functional homolog to Arabidopsis AtObgC in D. officinale. Gene expression profiles showed that DoObgC was expressed in leaf-specific and light-dependent patterns and that DoObgC responded to wounding treatments. Our previous and present studies reveal that ObgC has an evolutionarily conserved role in ribosome biogenesis to adapt chloroplast development to the environment.

  15. Contrasting patterns in the evolution of the Rab GTPase family in Archaeplastida

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    Romana Petrželková

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rab GTPases are a vast group of proteins serving a role of master regulators in membrane trafficking in eukaryotes. Previous studies delineated some 23 Rab and Rab-like paralogs ancestral for eukaryotes and mapped their current phylogenetic distribution, but the analyses relied on a limited sampling of the eukaryotic diversity. Taking advantage of the recent growth of genome and transcriptome resources for phylogenetically diverse plants and algae, we reanalyzed the evolution of the Rab family in eukaryotes with the primary plastid, collectively constituting the presumably monophyletic supergroup Archaeplastida. Our most important novel findings are as follows: (i the ancestral set of Rabs in Archaeplastida included not only the paralogs Rab1, Rab2, Rab5, Rab6, Rab7, Rab8, Rab11, Rab18, Rab23, Rab24, Rab28, IFT27, and RTW (=Rabl2, as suggested previously, but also Rab14 and Rab34, because Rab14 exists in glaucophytes and Rab34 is present in glaucophytes and some green algae; (ii except in embryophytes, Rab gene duplications have been rare in Archaeplastida. Most notable is the independent emergence of divergent, possibly functionally novel, in-paralogs of Rab1 and Rab11 in several archaeplastidial lineages; (iii recurrent gene losses have been a significant factor shaping Rab gene complements in archaeplastidial species; for example, the Rab21 paralog was lost at least six times independently within Archaeplastida, once in the lineage leading to the “core” eudicots; (iv while the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa has retained the highest number of ancestral Rab paralogs among all archaeplastidial species studied so far, rhodophytes underwent an extreme reduction of the Rab gene set along their stem lineage, resulting in only six paralogs (Rab1, Rab2, Rab6, Rab7, Rab11, and Rab18 present in modern red algae. Especially notable is the absence of Rab5, a virtually universal paralog essential for the endocytic pathway, suggesting that endocytosis

  16. Yersinia outer protein YopE affects the actin cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium discoideum through targeting of multiple Rho family GTPases

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vlahou, Georgia

    2009-07-14

    Abstract Background All human pathogenic Yersinia species share a virulence-associated type III secretion system that translocates Yersinia effector proteins into host cells to counteract infection-induced signaling responses and prevent phagocytosis. Dictyostelium discoideum has been recently used to study the effects of bacterial virulence factors produced by internalized pathogens. In this study we explored the potential of Dictyostelium as model organism for analyzing the effects of ectopically expressed Yersinia outer proteins (Yops). Results The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis virulence factors YopE, YopH, YopM and YopJ were expressed de novo within Dictyostelium and their effects on growth in axenic medium and on bacterial lawns were analyzed. No severe effect was observed for YopH, YopJ and YopM, but expression of YopE, which is a GTPase activating protein for Rho GTPases, was found to be highly detrimental. GFP-tagged YopE expressing cells had less conspicuous cortical actin accumulation and decreased amounts of F-actin. The actin polymerization response upon cAMP stimulation was impaired, although chemotaxis was unaffected. YopE also caused reduced uptake of yeast particles. These alterations are probably due to impaired Rac1 activation. We also found that YopE predominantly associates with intracellular membranes including the Golgi apparatus and inhibits the function of moderately overexpressed RacH. Conclusion The phenotype elicited by YopE in Dictyostelium can be explained, at least in part, by inactivation of one or more Rho family GTPases. It further demonstrates that the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be used as an efficient and easy-to-handle model organism in order to analyze the function of a translocated GAP protein of a human pathogen.

  17. Phosphorylation of mouse immunity-related GTPase (IRG resistance proteins is an evasion strategy for virulent Toxoplasma gondii.

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    Tobias Steinfeldt

    Full Text Available Virulence of complex pathogens in mammals is generally determined by multiple components of the pathogen interacting with the functional complexity and multiple layering of the mammalian immune system. It is most unusual for the resistance of a mammalian host to be overcome by the defeat of a single defence mechanism. In this study we uncover and analyse just such a case at the molecular level, involving the widespread intracellular protozoan pathogen Toxoplasma gondii and one of its most important natural hosts, the house mouse (Mus musculus. Natural polymorphism in virulence of Eurasian T. gondii strains for mice has been correlated in genetic screens with the expression of polymorphic rhoptry kinases (ROP kinases secreted into the host cell during infection. We show that the molecular targets of the virulent allelic form of ROP18 kinase are members of a family of cellular GTPases, the interferon-inducible IRG (immunity-related GTPase proteins, known from earlier work to be essential resistance factors in mice against avirulent strains of T. gondii. Virulent T. gondii strain ROP18 kinase phosphorylates several mouse IRG proteins. We show that the parasite kinase phosphorylates host Irga6 at two threonines in the nucleotide-binding domain, biochemically inactivating the GTPase and inhibiting its accumulation and action at the T. gondii parasitophorous vacuole membrane. Our analysis identifies the conformationally active switch I region of the GTP-binding site as an Achilles' heel of the IRG protein pathogen-resistance mechanism. The polymorphism of ROP18 in natural T. gondii populations indicates the existence of a dynamic, rapidly evolving ecological relationship between parasite virulence factors and host resistance factors. This system should be unusually fruitful for analysis at both ecological and molecular levels since both T. gondii and the mouse are widespread and abundant in the wild and are well-established model species with

  18. Immobilized metal affinity cryogel-based high-throughput platform for screening bioprocess and chromatographic parameters of His6-GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Joyita; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-04-01

    Among various tools of product monitoring, chromatography is of vital importance as it also extends to the purification of product. Immobilized metal affinity cryogel (Cu(II)-iminodiacetic acid- and Ni(II)-nitrilotriacetic acid-polyacrylamide) minicolumns (diameter 8 mm, height 4 mm, void volume 250 μl) were inserted in open-ended 96-well plate and different chromatographic parameters and bioprocess conditions were analysed. The platform was first validated with lysozyme. Optimum binding of lysozyme (∼90%) was achieved when 50 μg of protein in 20 mM Tris, pH 8.0 was applied to the minicolumns with maximum recovery (∼90%) upon elution with 300 mM imidazole. Thereafter, the platform was screened for chromatographic conditions of His 6 -GTPase. Since cryogels have large pore size, they can easily process non-clarified samples containing debris and particulate matters. The bound enzymes on the gel retain its activity and therefore can be assayed on-column by adding substrate and then displacing the product. Highest binding of His 6 -GTPase was achieved when 50 μl of non-clarified cell lysate was applied to the cryogel and subsequently washed with 50 mM Tris, 150 mM NaCl, 5 mM MgCl 2 , 10 mM imidazole, pH 8.0 with dynamic and static binding capacities of ∼1.5 and 3 activity units. Maximum recovery was obtained upon elution with 300 mM imidazole with a purification fold of ∼10; the purity was also analysed by SDS-PAGE. The platform showed reproducible results which were validated by Bland-Altman plot. The minicolumn was also scaled up for chromatographic capture and recovery of His 6 -GTPase. The bioprocess conditions were monitored which displayed that optimum production of His 6 -GTPase was attained by induction with 200 μM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside at 25 °C for 12 h. It was concluded that immobilized metal affinity cryogel-based platform can be successfully used as a high-throughput platform for screening of bioprocess and

  19. Increased diacylglycerol kinase ζ expression in human metastatic colon cancer cells augments Rho GTPase activity and contributes to enhanced invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Kun; Mulatz, Kirk; Ard, Ryan; Nguyen, Thanh; Gee, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    Unraveling the signaling pathways responsible for the establishment of a metastatic phenotype in carcinoma cells is critically important for understanding the pathology of cancer. The acquisition of cell motility is a key property of metastatic tumor cells and is a prerequisite for invasion. Rho GTPases regulate actin cytoskeleton reorganization and the cellular responses required for cell motility and invasion. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ (DGKζ), an enzyme that phosphorylates diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid, regulates the activity of the Rho GTPases Rac1 and RhoA. DGKζ mRNA is highly expressed in several different colon cancer cell lines, as well as in colon cancer tissue relative to normal colonic epithelium, and thus may contribute to the metastatic process. To investigate potential roles of DGKζ in cancer metastasis, a cellular, isogenic model of human colorectal cancer metastatic transition was used. DGKζ protein levels, Rac1 and RhoA activity, and PAK phosphorylation were measured in the non-metastatic SW480 adenocarcinoma cell line and its highly metastatic variant, the SW620 line. The effect of DGKζ silencing on Rho GTPase activity and invasion through Matrigel-coated Transwell inserts was studied in SW620 cells. Invasiveness was also measured in PC-3 prostate cancer and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells depleted of DGKζ. DGKζ protein levels were elevated approximately 3-fold in SW620 cells compared to SW480 cells. There was a concomitant increase in active Rac1 in SW620 cells, as well as substantial increases in the expression and phosphorylation of the Rac1 effector PAK1. Similarly, RhoA activity and expression were increased in SW620 cells. Knockdown of DGKζ expression in SW620 cells by shRNA-mediated silencing significantly reduced Rac1 and RhoA activity and attenuated the invasiveness of SW620 cells in vitro. DGKζ silencing in highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and PC-3 prostate cancer cells also significantly attenuated

  20. Mechanistic studies of the inhibition of MutT dGTPase by the carcinogenic metal Ni(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D W; Nelson, V C; Fivash, M J; Kasprzak, K S

    1996-12-01

    Promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) levels are increased in DNA of animals exposed to carcinogenic metals, such as Ni(II). Besides being generated directly in genomic DNA, 8-oxo-dG may be incorporated there from 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP), a product of oxidative damage to the nucleotide pool. The Escherichia coli dGTPase MutT, and analogous dGTPases in rats and humans, have been suggested as a defense against such incorporation because they hydrolyze 8-oxo-dGTP to 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-monophosphate (8-oxo-dGMP). MutT and its mammalian counterparts are Mg(II)-dependent enzymes. Ni(II), in turn, is known to interact antagonistically with Mg(II) in biological systems. Thus, we hypothesized that Ni(II) might inhibit the activity of MutT. As an initial examination of this hypothesis, we conducted enzyme kinetic studies of MutT to determine the effect of Ni(II) on MutT activity and the mechanisms involved. As found, Ni(II) inhibited MutT in a concentration-dependent manner when either dGTP or 8-oxo-dGTP was the nucleotide substrate. Ni(II) was determined to be an uncompetitive inhibitor of MutT with respect to Mg(II) when dGTP was the substrate, with apparent Ki of 1.2 mM Ni(II), and a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to Mg(II) when 8-oxo-dGTP was the substrate, with apparent Ki of 0.9 mM Ni(II). Hence, the two metal cations did not compete with each other for binding at the MutT active site. This makes it difficult to predict Ni(II) effects on 8-oxo-dGTPases of other species. However, based upon the amino acid sequences of human and rat MutT-like dGTPases, their capacity for Ni(II) binding should be greater than that of MutT. Whether this could lead to stronger inhibition of those enzymes by Ni(II), or not, remains to be investigated.

  1. Dynamic innate immune responses of human bronchial epithelial cells to severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus infection.

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    Tomoki Yoshikawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human lung epithelial cells are likely among the first targets to encounter invading severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV. Not only can these cells support the growth of SARS-CoV infection, but they are also capable of secreting inflammatory cytokines to initiate and, eventually, aggravate host innate inflammatory responses, causing detrimental immune-mediated pathology within the lungs. Thus, a comprehensive evaluation of the complex epithelial signaling to SARS-CoV is crucial for paving the way to better understand SARS pathogenesis. Based on microarray-based functional genomics, we report here the global gene response of 2B4 cells, a cloned bronchial epithelial cell line derived from Calu-3 cells. Specifically, we found a temporal and spatial activation of nuclear factor (NFkappaB, activator protein (AP-1, and interferon regulatory factor (IRF-3/7 in infected 2B4 cells at 12-, 24-, and 48-hrs post infection (p.i., resulting in the activation of many antiviral genes, including interferon (IFN-beta, -lambdas, inflammatory mediators, and many IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs. We also showed, for the first time, that IFN-beta and IFN-lambdas were capable of exerting previously unrecognized, non-redundant, and complementary abilities to limit SARS-CoV replication, even though their expression could not be detected in infected 2B4 bronchial epithelial cells until 48 hrs p.i. Collectively, our results highlight the mechanics of the sequential events of antiviral signaling pathway/s triggered by SARS-CoV in bronchial epithelial cells and identify novel cellular targets for future studies, aiming at advancing strategies against SARS.

  2. Thrombospondin-derived peptide attenuates Sjögren's syndrome-associated ocular surface inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Ruiz, L; Mir, F A; Turpie, B; Masli, S

    2017-04-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is the second most common rheumatic disease in which autoimmune response targets exocrine glands (salivary and lacrimal glands) result in clinical symptoms of dry mouth and dry eye. Inflammation of the lacrimal gland induces tear abnormalities that contribute to the inflammation of the ocular surface, which includes ocular mucosa. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) plays a critical regulatory role in the ocular mucosa and as such TSP-1 -/- mice develop spontaneously chronic ocular surface inflammation associated with Sjögren's syndrome. The autoimmune pathology is also accompanied by a peripheral imbalance in regulatory (T reg ) and inflammatory Th17 effectors. In this study, we demonstrate an in-vitro effect of a CD47-binding TSP-derived peptide in the induction of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-secreting forkhead box protein 2 (Foxp3 + ) T regs from activated CD4 + CD25 - T cells and the inhibition of pathogenic T helper type 17 (Th17)-promoting interleukin (IL)-23 derived from antigen-presenting cells. The in-vivo administration of this peptide promotes Foxp3 + T reg induction and inhibition of Th17 development. Consistent with these results, topical administration of CD47-binding TSP peptide, both before and after the onset of the disease, attenuates clinical symptoms of SS-associated dry eye in TSP-1 -/- mice. Augmented expression of Foxp3 detected in the draining lymph nodes of TSP peptide -treated mice compared to those treated with control peptide suggests the ability of TSP peptide to restore peripheral immune imbalance. Thus, our results suggest that TSP-derived peptide attenuates Sjögren's syndrome-associated dry eye and autoimmune inflammation by preventing Th17 development while promoting the induction of T regs . Collectively, our data identify TSP-derived peptide as a novel therapeutic option to treat autoimmune diseases. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  3. Disruption of the Toxoplasma gondii parasitophorous vacuole by IFNgamma-inducible immunity-related GTPases (IRG proteins triggers necrotic cell death.

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    Yang O Zhao

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is a natural intracellular protozoal pathogen of mice and other small mammals. After infection, the parasite replicates freely in many cell types (tachyzoite stage before undergoing a phase transition and encysting in brain and muscle (bradyzoite stage. In the mouse, early immune resistance to the tachyzoite stage is mediated by the family of interferon-inducible immunity-related GTPases (IRG proteins, but little is known of the nature of this resistance. We reported earlier that IRG proteins accumulate on intracellular vacuoles containing the pathogen, and that the vacuolar membrane subsequently ruptures. In this report, live-cell imaging microscopy has been used to follow this process and its consequences in real time. We show that the rupture of the vacuole is inevitably followed by death of the intracellular parasite, shown by its permeability to cytosolic protein markers. Death of the parasite is followed by the death of the infected cell. The death of the cell has features of pyronecrosis, including membrane permeabilisation and release of the inflammatory protein, HMGB1, but caspase-1 cleavage is not detected. This sequence of events occurs on a large scale only following infection of IFNgamma-induced cells with an avirulent strain of T. gondii, and is reduced by expression of a dominant negative mutant IRG protein. Cells infected by virulent strains rarely undergo necrosis. We did not find autophagy to play any role in the key steps leading to the death of the parasite. We conclude that IRG proteins resist infection by avirulent T. gondii by a novel mechanism involving disruption of the vacuolar membrane, which in turn ultimately leads to the necrotic death of the infected cell.

  4. The Microtubule-Associated Protein MAP18 Affects ROP2 GTPase Activity during Root Hair Growth1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Erfang; Zheng, Mingzhi; Zhang, Yan; Yuan, Ming; Fu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Establishment and maintenance of the polar site are important for root hair tip growth. We previously reported that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN18 (MAP18) functions in controlling the direction of pollen tube growth and root hair elongation. Additionally, the Rop GTPase ROP2 was reported as a positive regulator of both root hair initiation and tip growth in Arabidopsis. Both loss of function of ROP2 and knockdown of MAP18 lead to a decrease in root hair length, whereas overexpression of either MAP18 or ROP2 causes multiple tips or a branching hair phenotype. However, it is unclear whether MAP18 and ROP2 coordinately regulate root hair growth. In this study, we demonstrate that MAP18 and ROP2 interact genetically and functionally. MAP18 interacts physically with ROP2 in vitro and in vivo and preferentially binds to the inactive form of the ROP2 protein. MAP18 promotes ROP2 activity during root hair tip growth. Further investigation revealed that MAP18 competes with RhoGTPase GDP DISSOCIATION INHIBITOR1/SUPERCENTIPEDE1 for binding to ROP2, in turn affecting the localization of active ROP2 in the plasma membrane of the root hair tip. These results reveal a novel function of MAP18 in the regulation of ROP2 activation during root hair growth. PMID:28314794

  5. Inositol kinase and its product accelerate wound healing by modulating calcium levels, Rho GTPases, and F-actin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Ximena; Li, Jingjing; Lea, Robert; Dubaissi, Eamon; Papalopulu, Nancy; Amaya, Enrique

    2013-07-02

    Wound healing is essential for survival. We took advantage of the Xenopus embryo, which exhibits remarkable capacities to repair wounds quickly and efficiently, to investigate the mechanisms responsible for wound healing. Previous work has shown that injury triggers a rapid calcium response, followed by the activation of Ras homolog (Rho) family guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), which regulate the formation and contraction of an F-actin purse string around the wound margin. How these processes are coordinated following wounding remained unclear. Here we show that inositol-trisphosphate 3-kinase B (Itpkb) via its enzymatic product inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (InsP4) plays an essential role during wound healing by modulating the activity of Rho family GTPases and F-actin ring assembly. Furthermore, we show that Itpkb and InsP4 modulate the speed of the calcium wave, which propagates from the site of injury into neighboring uninjured cells. Strikingly, both overexpression of itpkb and exogenous application of InsP4 accelerate the speed of wound closure, a finding that has potential implications in our quest to find treatments that improve wound healing in patients with acute or chronic wounds.

  6. Potential involvement of drought-induced Ran GTPase CLRan1 in root growth enhancement in a xerophyte wild watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Kinya; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Kajikawa, Masataka; Hanada, Kouhei; Kosaka, Rina; Kato, Atsushi; Katoh, Akira; Nanasato, Yoshihiko; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Yokota, Akiho

    2016-10-01

    Enhanced root growth is known as the survival strategy of plants under drought. Previous proteome analysis in drought-resistant wild watermelon has shown that Ran GTPase, an essential regulator of cell division and proliferation, was induced in the roots under drought. In this study, two cDNAs were isolated from wild watermelon, CLRan1 and CLRan2, which showed a high degree of structural similarity with those of other plant Ran GTPases. Quantitative RT-PCR and promoter-GUS assays suggested that CLRan1 was expressed mainly in the root apex and lateral root primordia, whereas CLRan2 was more broadly expressed in other part of the roots. Immunoblotting analysis confirmed that the abundance of CLRan proteins was elevated in the root apex region under drought stress. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing CLRan1 showed enhanced primary root growth, and the growth was maintained under osmotic stress, indicating that CLRan1 functions as a positive factor for maintaining root growth under stress conditions.

  7. RAC1 GTP-ase signals Wnt-beta-catenin pathway mediated integrin-directed metastasis-associated tumor cell phenotypes in triple negative breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Pradip; Carlson, Jennifer H; Jepperson, Tyler; Willis, Scooter; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Dey, Nandini

    2017-01-10

    The acquisition of integrin-directed metastasis-associated (ID-MA) phenotypes by Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) cells is caused by an upregulation of the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway (WP). We reported that WP is one of the salient genetic features of TNBC. RAC-GTPases, small G-proteins which transduce signals from cell surface proteins including integrins, have been implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis by their role in essential cellular functions like motility. The collective percentage of alteration(s) in RAC1 in ER+ve BC was lower as compared to ER-ve BC (35% vs 57%) (brca/tcga/pub2015). High expression of RAC1 was associated with poor outcome for RFS with HR=1.48 [CI: 1.15-1.9] p=0.0019 in the Hungarian ER-veBC cohort. Here we examined how WP signals are transduced via RAC1 in the context of ID-MA phenotypes in TNBC. Using pharmacological agents (sulindac sulfide), genetic tools (beta-catenin siRNA), WP modulators (Wnt-C59, XAV939), RAC1 inhibitors (NSC23766, W56) and WP stimulations (LWnt3ACM, Wnt3A recombinant) in a panel of 6-7 TNBC cell lines, we studied fibronectin-directed (1) migration, (2) matrigel invasion, (3) RAC1 and Cdc42 activation, (4) actin dynamics (confocal microscopy) and (5) podia-parameters. An attenuation of WP, which (a) decreased cellular levels of beta-catenin, as well as its nuclear active-form, (b) decreased fibronectin-induced migration, (c) decreased invasion, (d) altered actin dynamics and (e) decreased podia-parameters was successful in blocking fibronectin-mediated RAC1/Cdc42 activity. Both Wnt-antagonists and RAC1 inhibitors blocked fibronectin-induced RAC1 activation and inhibited the fibronectin-induced ID-MA phenotypes following specific WP stimulation by LWnt3ACM as well as Wnt3A recombinant protein. To test a direct involvement of RAC1-activation in WP-mediated ID-MA phenotypes, we stimulated brain-metastasis specific MDA-MB231BR cells with LWnt3ACM. LWnt3ACM-stimulated fibronectin-directed migration was blocked by

  8. Site-directed mutagenesis of Arg58 and Asp86 of elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli: effects on the GTPase reaction and aminoacyl-tRNA binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli was mutated separately at positions Asp86 and Arg58, in order to shed light both on the GTPase mechanism of elongation factor Tu and on the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA. In addition, the binding of guanine nucleotides was investigated by determination...

  9. Coxiella burnetii Phagocytosis Is Regulated by GTPases of the Rho Family and the RhoA Effectors mDia1 and ROCK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina P Salinas

    Full Text Available The GTPases belonging to the Rho family control the actin cytoskeleton rearrangements needed for particle internalization during phagocytosis. ROCK and mDia1 are downstream effectors of RhoA, a GTPase involved in that process. Coxiella burnetii, the etiologic agent of Q fever, is internalized by the host´s cells in an actin-dependent manner. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism involved in this process has been poorly characterized. This work analyzes the role of different GTPases of the Rho family and some downstream effectors in the internalization of C. burnetii by phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. The internalization of C. burnetii into HeLa and RAW cells was significantly inhibited when the cells were treated with Clostridium difficile Toxin B which irreversibly inactivates members of the Rho family. In addition, the internalization was reduced in HeLa cells that overexpressed the dominant negative mutants of RhoA, Rac1 or Cdc42 or that were knocked down for the Rho GTPases. The pharmacological inhibition or the knocking down of ROCK diminished bacterium internalization. Moreover, C. burnetii was less efficiently internalized in HeLa cells overexpressing mDia1-N1, a dominant negative mutant of mDia1, while the overexpression of the constitutively active mutant mDia1-ΔN3 increased bacteria uptake. Interestingly, when HeLa and RAW cells were infected, RhoA, Rac1 and mDia1 were recruited to membrane cell fractions. Our results suggest that the GTPases of the Rho family play an important role in C. burnetii phagocytosis in both HeLa and RAW cells. Additionally, we present evidence that ROCK and mDia1, which are downstream effectors of RhoA, are involved in that process.

  10. The Era GTPase recognizes the GAUCACCUCC sequence and binds helix 45 near the 3; end of 16S rRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua (NCI)

    2012-03-26

    Era, composed of a GTPase domain and a K homology domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It is required for the maturation of 16S rRNA and assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. We showed previously that the protein recognizes nine nucleotides (1531{sup AUCACCUCC}1539) near the 3{prime} end of 16S rRNA, and that this recognition stimulates GTP-hydrolyzing activity of Era. In all three kingdoms of life, the 1530{sup GAUCA}1534 sequence and helix 45 (h45) (nucleotides 1506-1529) are highly conserved. It has been shown that the 1530{sup GA}1531 to 1530{sup AG}1531 double mutation severely affects the viability of bacteria. However, whether Era interacts with G1530 and/or h45 and whether such interactions (if any) contribute to the stimulation of Era's GTPase activity were not known. Here, we report two RNA structures that contain nucleotides 1506-1542 (RNA301), one in complex with Era and GDPNP (GNP), a nonhydrolysable GTP-analogue, and the other in complex with Era, GNP, and the KsgA methyltransferase. The structures show that Era recognizes 10 nucleotides, including G1530, and that Era also binds h45. Moreover, GTPase assay experiments show that G1530 does not stimulate Era's GTPase activity. Rather, A1531 and A1534 are most important for stimulation and h45 further contributes to the stimulation. Although G1530 does not contribute to the intrinsic GTPase activity of Era, its interaction with Era is important for binding and is essential for the protein to function, leading to the discovery of a new cold-sensitive phenotype of Era.

  11. Involvement of Chromatin Remodeling Genes and the Rho GTPases RhoB and CDC42 in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Nicolai Skovbjerg; Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Bartuma, Katarina

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ovarian clear cell carcinomas (OCCCs) constitute a rare ovarian cancer subtype with distinct clinical features, but may nonetheless be difficult to distinguish morphologically from other subtypes. There is limited knowledge of genetic events driving OCCC tumorigenesis beyondARID1A, which...... and ultimately improve patient outcome. METHODS: Gene expression profiling of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue from a cohort of the major ovarian cancer subtypes (cohort 1;n = 67) was performed using whole-genome cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (WG-DASL) bead arrays...... ovarian cancer subtypes. However, overexpression ofERBB2was not reflected by HER2 amplification or protein overexpression in the OCCC validation cohort. In addition, Rho GTPase-dependent actin organization may also play a role in OCCC pathogenesis and warrants further investigation. The distinct...

  12. VPS9a activates the Rab5 GTPase ARA7 to confer distinct pre- and postinvasive plant innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Eggert; Jürgens, Gerd; Thordal-Christensen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Plant innate immunity can effectively prevent the proliferation of filamentous pathogens. Papilla formation at the site of attack is essential for preinvasive immunity; in postinvasive immunity, the encasement of pathogen structures inside host cells can hamper disease. Whereas papillae are highly...... (Blumeria graminis f. sp hordei) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Surprisingly, VPS9a acts in addition to two previously well-described innate immunity components and thus represents an additional step in the regulation of how plants resist pathogens. We found VPS9a to be important for delivering membrane material...... dependent on transcytosis of premade material, little is known about encasement formation. Here, we show that endosome-associated VPS9a, the conserved guanine-nucleotide exchange factor activating Rab5 GTPases, is required for both pre- and postinvasive immunity against a nonadapted powdery mildew fungus...

  13. Ran GTPase protein promotes human pancreatic cancer proliferation by deregulating the expression of Survivin and cell cycle proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Lin [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Department of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710038 (China); Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xiaodi; Sun, Yi; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Hongwei; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Jinfeng; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Fan, Daiming, E-mail: daimingfan@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Guo, Xuegang, E-mail: xuegangguo@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Overexpression of Ran in pancreatic cancer was correlated with histological grade. •Downregulation of Ran could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. •The effects were mediated by cell cycle proteins, Survivin and cleaved Caspase-3. -- Abstract: Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase family, has important roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we detected Ran expression in pancreatic cancer and explored its potential role on tumour progression. Overexpressed Ran in pancreatic cancer tissues was found highly correlated with the histological grade. Downregulation of Ran led to significant suppression of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase and induction of apoptosis. In vivo studies also validated that result. Further studies revealed that those effects were at least partly mediated by the downregulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4, phospho-Rb and Survivin proteins and up regulation of cleaved Caspase-3.

  14. Ran GTPase protein promotes human pancreatic cancer proliferation by deregulating the expression of Survivin and cell cycle proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Lin; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xiaodi; Sun, Yi; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Hongwei; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Jinfeng; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming; Guo, Xuegang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Overexpression of Ran in pancreatic cancer was correlated with histological grade. •Downregulation of Ran could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. •The effects were mediated by cell cycle proteins, Survivin and cleaved Caspase-3. -- Abstract: Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase family, has important roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we detected Ran expression in pancreatic cancer and explored its potential role on tumour progression. Overexpressed Ran in pancreatic cancer tissues was found highly correlated with the histological grade. Downregulation of Ran led to significant suppression of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase and induction of apoptosis. In vivo studies also validated that result. Further studies revealed that those effects were at least partly mediated by the downregulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4, phospho-Rb and Survivin proteins and up regulation of cleaved Caspase-3

  15. RAB10 Interacts with the Male Germ Cell-Specific GTPase-Activating Protein during Mammalian Spermiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hung Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to recent estimates, 2%–15% of couples are sterile, and approximately half of the infertility cases are attributed to male reproductive factors. However, the reasons remain undefined in approximately 25% of male infertility cases, and most infertility cases exhibit spermatogenic defects. Numerous genes involved in spermatogenesis still remain unknown. We previously identified Male Germ Cells Rab GTPase-Activating Proteins (MGCRABGAPs through cDNA microarray analysis of human testicular tissues with spermatogenic defects. MGCRABGAP contains a conserved RABGAP catalytic domain, TBC (Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16. RABGAP family proteins regulate cellular function (e.g., cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicular trafficking, and cell migration by inactivating RAB proteins. MGCRABGAP is a male germ cell-specific protein expressed in elongating and elongated spermatids during mammalian spermiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to identify proteins that interact with MGCRABGAP during mammalian spermiogenesis using a proteomic approach. We found that MGCRABGAP exhibited GTPase-activating bioability, and several MGCRABGAP interactors, possible substrates (e.g., RAB10, RAB5C, and RAP1, were identified using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP and nano liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (nano LC-MS/MS. We confirmed the binding ability between RAB10 and MGCRABGAP via co-IP. Additionally, MGCRABGAP–RAB10 complexes were specifically colocalized in the manchette structure, a critical structure for the formation of spermatid heads, and were slightly expressed at the midpiece of mature spermatozoa. Based on these results, we propose that MGCRABGAP is involved in mammalian spermiogenesis by modulating RAB10.

  16. Genome - wide identification, molecular characterization and expression analysis of the rop gtpase family in pepper (capsicum annum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, D.; Li, M.; He, S.

    2015-01-01

    ROP/RAC GTPases is a plant-specific subfamily of Rho GTPases that plays a versatile role in the regulation of plant growth, development, in hormone signal transduction and response to the environment. Prior to the present study, only one Rop gene in pepper has been described. However, with the recent release of the draft genome sequence of pepper allowes us to conduct a genome wide search to identify how many Rop family members existed in pepper genome. We carried out bioinformatics analysis to establish the conserved as well as divergent regions on the protein sequences, phylogenetically analysis and the corresponding result shows that, CaROPs could be distributed into four groups as described in the literature for their homologs in Arabidopsis. To understand the function of nine Rop genes in pepper, we accordingly studied the tissue, fruit development and ripening expression patterns of CaRop genes by obtained RNA-seq data from public database. From our analysis, we realized that the expression of CaRop genes shows no total tissue or developmental specific expression. Furthermore, gene expression profiles of CaRop in response to environment stresses and hormone treatment, such as inoculated with Ralstonia solanacearum, by heat stress as well as treated with four phytohormones respectively and evaluated with real time RT-PCR. The potential involvement of specific CaRop genes in growth, fruit development, ripening, environment stresses as well as hormone responses discussed and may lay the foundation for future functional analysis to unravel their biological roles. (author)

  17. Lovastatin enhances ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity and cell surface expression in endothelial cells: implication of rho-family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, S; Laouari, D; Essig, M; Runembert, I; Trugnan, G; Michel, J B; Friedlander, G

    2002-03-08

    Extracellular adenosine production by the GPI-anchored Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase (Ecto-5'-Nu) plays an important role in the cardiovascular system, notably in defense against hypoxia. It has been previously suggested that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (HRIs) could potentiate the hypoxic stimulation of Ecto-5'Nu in myocardial ischemia. In order to elucidate the mechanism of Ecto-5'-Nu stimulation by HRIs, Ecto-5'-Nu activity and expression were determined in an aortic endothelial cell line (SVAREC) incubated with lovastatin. Lovastatin enhanced Ecto-5'-Nu activity in a dose-dependent manner. This increase was not supported by de novo synthesis of the enzyme because neither the mRNA content nor the total amount of the protein were modified by lovastatin. By contrast, lovastatin enhanced cell surface expression of Ecto-5'-Nu and decreased endocytosis of Ecto-5'-Nu, as evidenced by immunostaining. This effect appeared unrelated to modifications of cholesterol content or Ecto-5'-Nu association with detergent-resistant membranes. The effect of lovastatin was reversed by mevalonate, the substrate of HMG-CoA reductase, by its isoprenoid derivative, geranyl-geranyl pyrophosphate, and by cytotoxic necrotizing factor, an activator of Rho-GTPases. Stimulation of Ecto-5'-Nu by lovastatin enhanced the inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by endothelial cells. In conclusion, lovastatin enhances Ecto-5'-Nu activity and membrane expression in endothelial cells. This effect seems independent of lowering cholesterol content but could be supported by an inhibition of Ecto-5'-Nu endocytosis through a decrease of Rho-GTPases isoprenylation.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc42p GTPase Is Involved in Preventing the Recurrence of Bud Emergence during the Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Tamara J.; Johnson, Douglas I.

    2000-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc42p GTPase interacts with multiple regulators and downstream effectors through an ∼25-amino-acid effector domain. Four effector domain mutations, Y32K, F37A, D38E, and Y40C, were introduced into Cdc42p and characterized for their effects on these interactions. Each mutant protein showed differential interactions with a number of downstream effectors and regulators and various levels of functionality. Specifically, Cdc42D38Ep showed reduced interactions with the Cla4p p21-activated protein kinase and the Bem3p GTPase-activating protein and cdc42D38E was the only mutant allele able to complement the Δcdc42 null mutant. However, the mutant protein was only partially functional, as indicated by a temperature-dependent multibudded phenotype seen in conjunction with defects in both septin ring localization and activation of the Swe1p-dependent morphogenetic checkpoint. Further analysis of this mutant suggested that the multiple buds emerged consecutively with a premature termination of bud enlargement preceding the appearance of the next bud. Cortical actin, the septin ring, Cla4p-green fluorescent protein (GFP), and GFP-Cdc24p all predominantly localized to one bud at a time per multibudded cell. These data suggest that Cdc42D38Ep triggers a morphogenetic defect post-bud emergence, leading to cessation of bud growth and reorganization of the budding machinery to another random budding site, indicating that Cdc42p is involved in prevention of the initiation of supernumerary buds during the cell cycle. PMID:11046150

  19. Early stages of functional diversification in the Rab GTPase gene family revealed by genomic and localization studies in Paramecium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Lydia J; Gout, Jean-Francois; Lynch, Michael

    2017-04-15

    New gene functions arise within existing gene families as a result of gene duplication and subsequent diversification. To gain insight into the steps that led to the functional diversification of paralogues, we tracked duplicate retention patterns, expression-level divergence, and subcellular markers of functional diversification in the Rab GTPase gene family in three Paramecium aurelia species. After whole-genome duplication, Rab GTPase duplicates are more highly retained than other genes in the genome but appear to be diverging more rapidly in expression levels, consistent with early steps in functional diversification. However, by localizing specific Rab proteins in Paramecium cells, we found that paralogues from the two most recent whole-genome duplications had virtually identical localization patterns, and that less closely related paralogues showed evidence of both conservation and diversification. The functionally conserved paralogues appear to target to compartments associated with both endocytic and phagocytic recycling functions, confirming evolutionary and functional links between the two pathways in a divergent eukaryotic lineage. Because the functionally diversifying paralogues are still closely related to and derived from a clade of functionally conserved Rab11 genes, we were able to pinpoint three specific amino acid residues that may be driving the change in the localization and thus the function in these proteins. © 2017 Bright et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. SCISSOR?Spinal Cord Injury Study on Small molecule-derived Rho inhibition: a clinical study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, Marcel A; Liebscher, Thomas; Watzlawick, Ralf; Martus, Peter; Laufer, Stefan; Blex, Christian; Schindler, Ralf; Jungehulsing, Gerhard J; Kn?ppel, Sven; Kreutztr?ger, Martin; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Niedeggen, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The approved analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen and indometacin block the small GTPase RhoA, a key enzyme that impedes axonal sprouting after axonal damage. Inhibition of the Rho pathway in a central nervous system-effective manner requires higher dosages compared with orthodox cyclooxygenase-blocking effects. Preclinical studies on spinal cord injury (SCI) imply improved motor recovery after ibuprofen/indometacin-mediated Rho inhibition. This has been reassessed by ...

  1. Supporting Role for GTPase Rab27a in Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication through a Novel miR-122-Mediated Effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Chun Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The small GTPase Rab27a has been shown to control membrane trafficking and microvesicle transport pathways, in particular the secretion of exosomes. In the liver, high expression of Rab27a correlates with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. We discovered that low abundance of Rab27a resulted in decreased hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA and protein abundances in virus-infected cells. Curiously, both cell-associated and extracellular virus yield decreased in Rab27a depleted cells, suggesting that reduced exosome secretion did not cause the observed effect. Instead, Rab27a enhanced viral RNA replication by a mechanism that involves the liver-specific microRNA miR-122. Rab27a surrounded lipid droplets and was enriched in membrane fractions that harbor viral replication proteins, suggesting a supporting role for Rab27a in viral gene expression. Curiously, Rab27a depletion decreased the abundance of miR-122, whereas overexpression of miR-122 in Rab27a-depleted cells rescued HCV RNA abundance. Because intracellular HCV RNA abundance is enhanced by the binding of two miR-122 molecules to the extreme 5' end of the HCV RNA genome, the diminished amounts of miR-122 in Rab27a-depleted cells could have caused destabilization of HCV RNA. However, the abundance of HCV RNA carrying mutations on both miR-122-binding sites and whose stability was supported by ectopically expressed miR-122 mimetics with compensatory mutations also decreased in Rab27a-depleted cells. This result indicates that the effect of Rab27a depletion on HCV RNA abundance does not depend on the formation of 5' terminal HCV/miR-122 RNA complexes, but that miR-122 has a Rab27a-dependent function in the HCV lifecycle, likely the downregulation of a cellular inhibitor of HCV gene expression. These findings suggest that the absence of miR-122 results in a vulnerability not only to exoribonucleases that attack the viral genome, but also to upregulation of one more cellular factor that inhibit

  2. Vitreous-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements via the Rac1 GTPase-dependent signaling pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xionggao; Wei, Yantao; Ma, Haizhi; Zhang, Shaochong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Vitreous induces morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements in RPE cells. ► Rac1 is activated in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. ► Rac inhibition prevents morphological changes in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. ► Rac inhibition suppresses cytoskeletal rearrangements in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. ► The vitreous-induced effects are mediated by a Rac1 GTPase/LIMK1/cofilin pathway. -- Abstract: Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is mainly caused by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration, invasion, proliferation and transformation into fibroblast-like cells that produce the extracellular matrix (ECM). The vitreous humor is known to play an important role in PVR. An epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) of human RPE cells induced by 25% vitreous treatment has been linked to stimulation of the mesenchymal phenotype, migration and invasion. Here, we characterized the effects of the vitreous on the cell morphology and cytoskeleton in human RPE cells. The signaling pathway that mediates these effects was investigated. Serum-starved RPE cells were incubated with 25% vitreous, and the morphological changes were examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Filamentous actin (F-actin) was examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, Smad2/3, LIM kinase (LIMK) 1 and cofilin was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Vitreous treatment induced cytoskeletal rearrangements, activated Rac1 and enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and Smad2/3. When the cells were treated with a Rac activation-specific inhibitor, the cytoskeletal rearrangements were prevented, and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was blocked. Vitreous treatment also enhanced the phosphorylation of LIMK1 and cofilin and the Rac inhibitor blocked this effect. We propose that vitreous-transformed human RPE cells undergo cytoskeletal rearrangements via Rac1 GTPase-dependent pathways that modulate LIMK1 and

  3. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    Abstract Introduction The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. Methods MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. Results JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF-6

  4. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and beta1-integrin, we examined activation of the beta1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the beta1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of beta1-integrin and its binding partners alphaV- and alpha5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between

  5. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF

  6. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Shear stress increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated β-catenin nuclear localization. •Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA displayed distinct dynamic activity patterns under flow. •Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, regulate shear stress-driven TCF/LEF activation. •Cytoskeleton did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activation. -- Abstract: Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm 2 ) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate

  7. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Yokota, Hiroki [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Na, Sungsoo, E-mail: sungna@iupui.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Shear stress increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated β-catenin nuclear localization. •Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA displayed distinct dynamic activity patterns under flow. •Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, regulate shear stress-driven TCF/LEF activation. •Cytoskeleton did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activation. -- Abstract: Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm{sup 2}) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate

  8. Vitreous-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements via the Rac1 GTPase-dependent signaling pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xionggao [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Ophthalmology, Hainan Medical College, Haikou (China); Wei, Yantao; Ma, Haizhi [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Shaochong, E-mail: zhshaochong@163.com [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vitreous induces morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac1 is activated in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition prevents morphological changes in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition suppresses cytoskeletal rearrangements in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The vitreous-induced effects are mediated by a Rac1 GTPase/LIMK1/cofilin pathway. -- Abstract: Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is mainly caused by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration, invasion, proliferation and transformation into fibroblast-like cells that produce the extracellular matrix (ECM). The vitreous humor is known to play an important role in PVR. An epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) of human RPE cells induced by 25% vitreous treatment has been linked to stimulation of the mesenchymal phenotype, migration and invasion. Here, we characterized the effects of the vitreous on the cell morphology and cytoskeleton in human RPE cells. The signaling pathway that mediates these effects was investigated. Serum-starved RPE cells were incubated with 25% vitreous, and the morphological changes were examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Filamentous actin (F-actin) was examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, Smad2/3, LIM kinase (LIMK) 1 and cofilin was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Vitreous treatment induced cytoskeletal rearrangements, activated Rac1 and enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and Smad2/3. When the cells were treated with a Rac activation-specific inhibitor, the cytoskeletal rearrangements were prevented, and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was blocked. Vitreous treatment also enhanced the phosphorylation of LIMK1 and cofilin and the Rac inhibitor blocked this effect. We propose that vitreous

  9. The Msb3/Gyp3 GAP controls the activity of the Rab GTPases Vps21 and Ypt7 at endosomes and vacuoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, Jens; Barr, Francis A.; Ungermann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Fusion of organelles in the endomembrane system depends on Rab GTPases that interact with tethering factors before lipid bilayer mixing. In yeast, the Rab5 GTPase Vps21 controls fusion and membrane dynamics between early and late endosomes. Here we identify Msb3/Gyp3 as a specific Vps21 GTPase-activating protein (GAP). Loss of Msb3 results in an accumulation of Vps21 and one of its effectors Vps8, a subunit of the CORVET complex, at the vacuole membrane in vivo. In agreement, Msb3 forms a specific transition complex with Vps21, has the highest activity of all recombinant GAPs for Vps21 in vitro, and is found at vacuoles despite its predominant localization to bud tips and bud necks at the plasma membrane. Surprisingly, Msb3 also inhibits vacuole fusion, which can be rescued by the Ypt7 GDP–GTP exchange factor (GEF), the Mon1–Ccz1 complex. Consistently, msb3∆ vacuoles fuse more efficiently than wild-type vacuoles in vitro, suggesting that GAP can also act on Ypt7. Our data indicate that GAPs such as Msb3 can act on multiple substrates in vivo at both ends of a trafficking pathway. This ensures specificity of the subsequent GEF-mediated activation of the Rab that initiates the next transport event. PMID:22593206

  10. Rac1 GTPase Promotes Interaction of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell with Niche and Participates in Leukemia Initiation and Maintenance in Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuying; Li, Huan; Li, Shouyun; Yu, Jing; Wang, Min; Xing, Haiyan; Tang, Kejing; Tian, Zheng; Rao, Qing; Wang, Jianxiang

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) with their niche is critical for HSPC function. The interaction also plays an important role in the multistep process of leukemogenesis. Rac1 GTPase has been found to be highly expressed and activated in leukemia patients. Here, by forced expression of constitutively active form of Rac1 (Rac1-V12) in HSPCs, we demonstrate that active Rac1 promotes interaction of HSPC with niche. We then established an active Rac1 associated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model by expression of Rac1-V12 cooperated with AML1-ETO9a (AE9a) in mouse HSPCs. Compared with AE9a alone, Rac1-V12 cooperated with AE9a (AER) drives an AML with a short latency, demonstrating that activation of Rac1 GTPase in mice promotes AML development. The mechanism of this AML promotion is by a better homing and lodging of leukemia cells in niche, which further enhancing their colony formation, quiescence and preventing leukemia cells from apoptosis. Further study showed that an inhibitor targeting activated Rac1 can increase the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents to leukemia cells. This study provides evidence that activation of Rac1 promotes leukemia development through enhancing leukemia cells' homing and retention in niche, and suggests that inhibition of Rac1 GTPase could be an effective way of eliminating AML cells. Stem Cells 2016;34:1730-1741. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  11. Angelman syndrome-associated ubiquitin ligase UBE3A/E6AP mutants interfere with the proteolytic activity of the proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaić, V; Banks, L

    2015-01-29

    Angelman syndrome, a severe neurodevelopmental disease, occurs primarily due to genetic defects, which cause lack of expression or mutations in the wild-type E6AP/UBE3A protein. A proportion of the Angelman syndrome patients bear UBE3A point mutations, which do not interfere with the expression of the full-length protein, however, these individuals still develop physiological conditions of the disease. Interestingly, most of these mutations are catalytically defective, thereby indicating the importance of UBE3A enzymatic activity role in the Angelman syndrome pathology. In this study, we show that Angelman syndrome-associated mutants interact strongly with the proteasome via the S5a proteasomal subunit, resulting in an overall inhibitory effect on the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Our results suggest that mutated catalytically inactive forms of UBE3A may cause defects in overall proteasome function, which could have an important role in the Angelman syndrome pathology.

  12. Structurally Distinct Bacterial TBC-like GAPs Link Arf GTPase to Rab1 Inactivation to Counteract Host Defenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Na; Zhu, Yongqun; Lu, Qiuhe; Hu, Liyan; Zheng, Yuqing; Shao, Feng (NIBS-China); (Zhejiang)

    2012-10-10

    Rab GTPases are frequent targets of vacuole-living bacterial pathogens for appropriate trafficking of the vacuole. Here we discover that bacterial effectors including VirA from nonvacuole Shigella flexneri and EspG from extracellular Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) harbor TBC-like dual-finger motifs and exhibits potent RabGAP activities. Specific inactivation of Rab1 by VirA/EspG disrupts ER-to-Golgi trafficking. S. flexneri intracellular persistence requires VirA TBC-like GAP activity that mediates bacterial escape from autophagy-mediated host defense. Rab1 inactivation by EspG severely blocks host secretory pathway, resulting in inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from infected cells. Crystal structures of VirA/EspG-Rab1-GDP-aluminum fluoride complexes highlight TBC-like catalytic role for the arginine and glutamine finger residues and reveal a 3D architecture distinct from that of the TBC domain. Structure of Arf6-EspG-Rab1 ternary complex illustrates a pathogenic signaling complex that rewires host Arf signaling to Rab1 inactivation. Structural distinctions of VirA/EspG further predict a possible extensive presence of TBC-like RabGAP effectors in counteracting various host defenses.

  13. Structural basis for the recruitment and activation of the Legionella phospholipase VipD by the host GTPase Rab5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, María; Gaspar, Andrew H.; Pallara, Chiara; Rojas, Adriana Lucely; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Machner, Matthias P.; Hierro, Aitor

    2014-01-01

    A challenge for microbial pathogens is to assure that their translocated effector proteins target only the correct host cell compartment during infection. The Legionella pneumophila effector vacuolar protein sorting inhibitor protein D (VipD) localizes to early endosomal membranes and alters their lipid and protein composition, thereby protecting the pathogen from endosomal fusion. This process requires the phospholipase A1 (PLA1) activity of VipD that is triggered specifically on VipD binding to the host cell GTPase Rab5, a key regulator of endosomes. Here, we present the crystal structure of VipD in complex with constitutively active Rab5 and reveal the molecular mechanism underlying PLA1 activation. An active site-obstructing loop that originates from the C-terminal domain of VipD is repositioned on Rab5 binding, thereby exposing the catalytic pocket within the N-terminal PLA1 domain. Substitution of amino acid residues located within the VipD–Rab5 interface prevented Rab5 binding and PLA1 activation and caused a failure of VipD mutant proteins to target to Rab5-enriched endosomal structures within cells. Experimental and computational analyses confirmed an extended VipD-binding interface on Rab5, explaining why this L. pneumophila effector can compete with cellular ligands for Rab5 binding. Together, our data explain how the catalytic activity of a microbial effector can be precisely linked to its subcellular localization. PMID:25114243

  14. Cross-talk between Rho and Rac GTPases drives deterministic exploration of cellular shape space and morphological heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailem, Heba; Bousgouni, Vicky; Cooper, Sam; Bakal, Chris

    2014-01-22

    One goal of cell biology is to understand how cells adopt different shapes in response to varying environmental and cellular conditions. Achieving a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between cell shape and environment requires a systems-level understanding of the signalling networks that respond to external cues and regulate the cytoskeleton. Classical biochemical and genetic approaches have identified thousands of individual components that contribute to cell shape, but it remains difficult to predict how cell shape is generated by the activity of these components using bottom-up approaches because of the complex nature of their interactions in space and time. Here, we describe the regulation of cellular shape by signalling systems using a top-down approach. We first exploit the shape diversity generated by systematic RNAi screening and comprehensively define the shape space a migratory cell explores. We suggest a simple Boolean model involving the activation of Rac and Rho GTPases in two compartments to explain the basis for all cell shapes in the dataset. Critically, we also generate a probabilistic graphical model to show how cells explore this space in a deterministic, rather than a stochastic, fashion. We validate the predictions made by our model using live-cell imaging. Our work explains how cross-talk between Rho and Rac can generate different cell shapes, and thus morphological heterogeneity, in genetically identical populations.

  15. The atypical Rho GTPase RhoD is a regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and directed cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, Magdalena; Reis, Katarina; Heldin, Johan; Kreuger, Johan; Aspenström, Pontus

    2017-01-01

    RhoD belongs to the Rho GTPases, a protein family responsible for the regulation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton, and, consequently, many cellular processes like cell migration, cell division and vesicle trafficking. Here, we demonstrate that the actin cytoskeleton is dynamically regulated by increased or decreased protein levels of RhoD. Ectopic expression of RhoD has previously been shown to give an intertwined weave of actin filaments. We show that this RhoD-dependent effect is detected in several cell types and results in a less dynamic actin filament system. In contrast, RhoD depletion leads to increased actin filament-containing structures, such as cortical actin, stress fibers and edge ruffles. Moreover, vital cellular functions such as cell migration and proliferation are defective when RhoD is silenced. Taken together, we present data suggesting that RhoD is an important component in the control of actin dynamics and directed cell migration. - Highlights: • Increased RhoD expression leads to loss of actin structures, e.g. stress fibers and gives rise to decreased actin dynamics. • RhoD knockdown induces various actin-containing structures such as edge ruffles, stress fibers and cortical actin, in a cell-type specific manner. • RhoD induces specific actin rearrangements depending on its subcellular localization. • RhoD knockdown has effects on cellular processes, such as directed cell migration and proliferation.

  16. Inhibition of the RhoA GTPase Activity Increases Sensitivity of Melanoma Cells to UV Radiation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinha, Gisele; Osaki, Juliana Harumi; Costa, Erico Tosoni; Forti, Fabio Luis

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the main cause of DNA damage to melanocytes and development of melanoma, one of the most lethal human cancers, which leads to metastasis due to uncontrolled cell proliferation and migration. These phenotypes are mediated by RhoA, a GTPase overexpressed or overactivated in highly aggressive metastatic tumors that plays regulatory roles in cell cycle progression and cytoskeleton remodeling. This work explores whether the effects of UV on DNA damage, motility, proliferation, and survival of human metastatic melanoma cells are mediated by the RhoA pathway. Mutant cells expressing dominant-negative (MeWo-RhoA-N19) or constitutively active RhoA (MeWo-RhoA-V14) were generated and subjected to UV radiation. A slight reduction in migration and invasion was observed in MeWo and MeWo-RhoA-V14 cells but not in MeWo-RhoA-N19 cells, which presented inefficient motility and invasiveness associated with stress fibers fragmentation. Proliferation and survival of RhoA-deficient cells were drastically reduced by UV compared to cells displaying normal or high RhoA activity, suggesting increased sensitivity to UV. Loss of RhoA activity also caused less efficient DNA repair, with elevated levels of DNA lesions such as strand breaks and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Thus, RhoA mediates genomic stability and represents a potential target for sensitizing metastatic tumors to genotoxic agents. PMID:26823948

  17. Sar1-GTPase-dependent ER exit of KATP channels revealed by a mutation causing congenital hyperinsulinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taneja, Tarvinder K; Mankouri, Jamel; Karnik, Rucha

    2009-01-01

    The ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel controls insulin secretion by coupling glucose metabolism to excitability of the pancreatic beta-cell membrane. The channel comprises four subunits each of Kir6.2 and the sulphonylurea receptor (SUR1), encoded by KCNJ11 and ABCC8, respectively. Mutations...... caused by one such mutation in Kir6.2, E282K. The study led to the discovery that Kir6.2 contains a di-acidic ER exit signal, (280)DLE(282), which promotes concentration of the channel into COPII-enriched ER exit sites prior to ER export via a process that requires Sar1-GTPase. The E282K mutation...... abrogates the exit signal, and thereby prevents the ER export and surface expression of the channel. When co-expressed, the mutant subunit was able to associate with the wild-type Kir6.2 and form functional channels. Thus unlike most mutations, the E282K mutation does not cause protein mis-folding. Since...

  18. Expression and intracellular localization of TBC1D9, a Rab GTPase-accelerating protein, in mouse testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yutaka; Asano, Atsushi; Hosaka, Yoshinao; Takeuchi, Takashi; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Yamano, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Membrane trafficking in male germ cells contributes to their development via cell morphological changes and acrosome formation. TBC family proteins work as Rab GTPase accelerating proteins (GAPs), which negatively regulate Rab proteins, to mediate membrane trafficking. In this study, we analyzed the expression of a Rab GAP, TBC1D9, in mouse organs and the intracellular localization of the gene products. Tbc1d9 showed abundant expression in adult mice testis. We found that the Tbc1d9 mRNA was expressed in primary and secondary spermatocytes, and that the TBC1D9 protein was expressed in spermatocytes and round spermatids. In 293T cells, TBC1D9-GFP proteins were localized in the endosome and Golgi apparatus. Compartments that were positive for the constitutive active mutants of Rab7 and Rab9 were also positive for TBC1D9 isoform 1. In addition, TBC1D9 proteins were associated with Rab7 and Rab9, respectively. These results indicate that TBC1D9 is expressed mainly in spermatocytes, and suggest that TBC1D9 regulates membrane trafficking pathways related to Rab9- or Rab7-positive vesicles.

  19. The atypical Rho GTPase RhoD is a regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and directed cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Magdalena; Reis, Katarina [Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Heldin, Johan [Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala SE-751 22 Uppsala (Sweden); Kreuger, Johan [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Aspenström, Pontus, E-mail: pontus.aspenstrom@ki.se [Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-03-15

    RhoD belongs to the Rho GTPases, a protein family responsible for the regulation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton, and, consequently, many cellular processes like cell migration, cell division and vesicle trafficking. Here, we demonstrate that the actin cytoskeleton is dynamically regulated by increased or decreased protein levels of RhoD. Ectopic expression of RhoD has previously been shown to give an intertwined weave of actin filaments. We show that this RhoD-dependent effect is detected in several cell types and results in a less dynamic actin filament system. In contrast, RhoD depletion leads to increased actin filament-containing structures, such as cortical actin, stress fibers and edge ruffles. Moreover, vital cellular functions such as cell migration and proliferation are defective when RhoD is silenced. Taken together, we present data suggesting that RhoD is an important component in the control of actin dynamics and directed cell migration. - Highlights: • Increased RhoD expression leads to loss of actin structures, e.g. stress fibers and gives rise to decreased actin dynamics. • RhoD knockdown induces various actin-containing structures such as edge ruffles, stress fibers and cortical actin, in a cell-type specific manner. • RhoD induces specific actin rearrangements depending on its subcellular localization. • RhoD knockdown has effects on cellular processes, such as directed cell migration and proliferation.

  20. Genetic analysis of Chinese families reveals a novel truncation allele of the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Hu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To make comprehensive molecular diagnosis for retinitis pigmentosa (RP patients in a consanguineous Han Chinese family using next generation sequencing based Capture-NGS screen technology. METHODS: A five-generation Han Chinese family diagnosed as non-syndromic X-linked recessive RP (XLRP was recruited, including four affected males, four obligate female carriers and eleven unaffected family members. Capture-NGS was performed using a custom designed capture panel covers 163 known retinal disease genes including 47 RP genes, followed by the validation of detected mutation using Sanger sequencing in all recruited family members. RESULTS: Capture-NGS in one affected 47-year-old male reveals a novel mutation, c.2417_2418insG:p.E806fs, in exon ORF15 of RP GTPase regulator (RPGR gene results in a frameshift change that results in a premature stop codon and a truncated protein product. The mutation was further validated in three of four affected males and two of four female carriers but not in the other unaffected family members. CONCLUSION: We have identified a novel mutation, c.2417_2418insG:p.E806fs, in a Han Chinese family with XLRP. Our findings expand the mutation spectrum of RPGR and the phenotypic spectrum of XLRP in Han Chinese families, and confirms Capture-NGS could be an effective and economic approach for the comprehensive molecular diagnosis of RP.

  1. Small Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Pemberton (Steven)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThe term “Open Data” often goes hand in hand with the term “Big Data”, where large data sets get released allowing for analysis, but the Cinderella of the Open Data ball is Small Data, small amounts of data, nonetheless possibly essential, that are too small to be put in some database or

  2. Small Data

    OpenAIRE

    Pemberton, Steven

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThe term “Open Data” often goes hand in hand with the term “Big Data”, where large data sets get released allowing for analysis, but the Cinderella of the Open Data ball is Small Data, small amounts of data, nonetheless possibly essential, that are too small to be put in some database or online dataset to be put to use. RDFa is a technology that allows Cinderella to go to the ball.

  3. FilGAP, a Rac-specific Rho GTPase-activating protein, is a novel prognostic factor for follicular lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Hashimura, Miki; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Ohta, Yasutaka; Saegusa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    FilGAP, a Rho GTPase-activating protein (GAP), acts as a mediator of Rho/ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase)-dependent amoeboid movement, and its knockdown results in Rac-driven mesenchymal morphology. Herein, we focus on the possible roles of FilGAP expression in normal and malignant lymphocytes. Eighty-three cases of follicular lymphoma (FL), 84 of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and 25 of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), as well as 10 of normal lymph nodes, were immunohistochemically investigated. In normal lymph nodes, FilGAP immunoreactivity was significantly higher in lymphocytes in the mantle zone as compared to those in the germinal center and paracortical areas. In contrast, the expression levels of both cytoplasmic and perinuclear Rac1 were significantly lower in the germinal center as compared to paracortical regions, suggesting that changes in the FilGAP/Rac axis may occur in B-cell lineages. In malignant lymphomas, FilGAP expression was significantly higher in B-cell lymphomas than PTCL, and the immunohistochemical scores were positively correlated with cytoplasmic Rac1 scores in FL and DLBCL, but not in PTCL. Patients with FL and germinal center B-cell-like (GCB)-type DLBCL showing high FilGAP scores had poor overall survival rates as compared to the low-score patients. Moreover, multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that a high FilGAP score was a significant and independent unfavorable prognostic factor in FL, but not in DLBCL. In conclusion, FilGAP may contribute to change in cell motility of B-lymphocytes. In addition, its expression appears to be useful for predicting the behavior of B-cell lymphoma, in particular FL

  4. A rhodanine derivative CCR-11 inhibits bacterial proliferation by inhibiting the assembly and GTPase activity of FtsZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Parminder; Jindal, Bhavya; Surolia, Avadhesha; Panda, Dulal

    2012-07-10

    A perturbation of FtsZ assembly dynamics has been shown to inhibit bacterial cytokinesis. In this study, the antibacterial activity of 151 rhodanine compounds was assayed using Bacillus subtilis cells. Of 151 compounds, eight strongly inhibited bacterial proliferation at 2 μM. Subsequently, we used the elongation of B. subtilis cells as a secondary screen to identify potential FtsZ-targeted antibacterial agents. We found that three compounds significantly increased bacterial cell length. One of the three compounds, namely, CCR-11 [(E)-2-thioxo-5-({[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]furan-2-yl}methylene)thiazolidin-4-one], inhibited the assembly and GTPase activity of FtsZ in vitro. CCR-11 bound to FtsZ with a dissociation constant of 1.5 ± 0.3 μM. A docking analysis indicated that CCR-11 may bind to FtsZ in a cavity adjacent to the T7 loop and that short halogen-oxygen, H-bonding, and hydrophobic interactions might be important for the binding of CCR-11 with FtsZ. CCR-11 inhibited the proliferation of B. subtilis cells with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 1.2 ± 0.2 μM and a minimal inhibitory concentration of 3 μM. It also potently inhibited proliferation of Mycobacterium smegmatis cells. Further, CCR-11 perturbed Z-ring formation in B. subtilis cells; however, it neither visibly affected nucleoid segregation nor altered the membrane integrity of the cells. CCR-11 inhibited HeLa cell proliferation with an IC(50) value of 18.1 ± 0.2 μM (∼15 × IC(50) of B. subtilis cell proliferation). The results suggested that CCR-11 inhibits bacterial cytokinesis by inhibiting FtsZ assembly, and it can be used as a lead molecule to develop FtsZ-targeted antibacterial agents.

  5. Arf3p GTPase is a key regulator of Bud2p activation for invasive growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jia-Wei; Lee, Fang-Jen S

    2013-08-01

    The regulation and signaling pathways involved in the invasive growth of yeast have been studied extensively because of their general applicability to fungal pathogenesis. Bud2p, which functions as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Bud1p/Rsr1p, is required for appropriate budding patterns and filamentous growth. The regulatory mechanisms leading to Bud2p activation, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we report that ADP-ribosylation factor 3p (Arf3p) acts as a regulator of Bud2p activation during invasive growth. Arf3p binds directly to the N-terminal region of Bud2p and promotes its GAP activity both in vitro and in vivo. Genetic analysis shows that deletion of BUD1 suppresses the defect of invasive growth in arf3Δ or bud2Δ cells. Lack of Arf3p, like that of Bud2p, causes the intracellular accumulation of Bud1p-GTP. The Arf3p-Bud2p interaction is important for invasive growth and facilitates the Bud2p-Bud1p association in vivo. Finally, we show that under glucose depletion-induced invasion conditions in yeast, more Arf3p is activated to the GTP-bound state, and the activation is independent of Arf3p guanine nucleotide-exchange factor Yel1p. Thus we demonstrate that a novel spatial activation of Arf3p plays a role in regulating Bud2p activation during glucose depletion-induced invasive growth.

  6. Anti-radiation vaccine: Immunologically-based Prophylaxis of Acute Toxic Radiation Syndromes Associated with Long-term Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Jones, Jeffrey; Casey, Rachael C.

    2007-01-01

    Protecting crew from ionizing radiation is a key life sciences problem for long-duration space missions. The three major sources/types of radiation are found in space: galactic cosmic rays, trapped Van Allen belt radiation, and solar particle events. All present varying degrees of hazard to crews; however, exposure to high doses of any of these types of radiation ultimately induce both acute and long-term biological effects. High doses of space radiation can lead to the development of toxicity associated with the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) which could have significant mission impact, and even render the crew incapable of performing flight duties. The creation of efficient radiation protection technologies is considered an important target in space radiobiology, immunology, biochemistry and pharmacology. Two major mechanisms of cellular, organelle, and molecular destruction as a result of radiation exposure have been identified: 1) damage induced directly by incident radiation on the macromolecules they encounter and 2) radiolysis of water and generation of secondary free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which induce chemical bond breakage, molecular substitutions, and damage to biological molecules and membranes. Free-radical scavengers and antioxidants, which neutralize the damaging activities of ROS, are effective in reducing the impact of small to moderate doses of radiation. In the case of high doses of radiation, antioxidants alone may be inadequate as a radioprotective therapy. However, it remains a valuable component of a more holistic strategy of prophylaxis and therapy. High doses of radiation directly damage biological molecules and modify chemical bond, resulting in the main pathological processes that drive the development of acute radiation syndromes (ARS). Which of two types of radiation-induced cellular lethality that ultimately develops, apoptosis or necrosis, depends on the spectrum of incident radiation, dose, dose rate, and

  7. Rapid activation of Rac GTPase in living cells by force is independent of Src.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh-Chuin Poh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that mechanical forces are crucial in regulating functions of every tissue and organ in a human body. However, it remains unclear how mechanical forces are transduced into biochemical activities and biological responses at the cellular and molecular level. Using the magnetic twisting cytometry technique, we applied local mechanical stresses to living human airway smooth muscle cells with a magnetic bead bound to the cell surface via transmembrane adhesion molecule integrins. The temporal and spatial activation of Rac, a small guanosine triphosphatase, was quantified using a fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET method that measures changes in Rac activity in response to mechanical stresses by quantifying intensity ratios of ECFP (enhanced cyan fluorescent protein as a donor and YPet (a variant yellow fluorescent protein as an acceptor of the Rac biosensor. The applied stress induced rapid activation (less than 300 ms of Rac at the cell periphery. In contrast, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF induced Rac activation at a much later time (>30 sec. There was no stress-induced Rac activation when a mutant form of the Rac biosensor (RacN17 was transfected or when the magnetic bead was coated with transferrin or with poly-L-lysine. It is known that PDGF-induced Rac activation depends on Src activity. Surprisingly, pre-treatment of the cells with specific Src inhibitor PP1 or knocking-out Src gene had no effects on stress-induced Rac activation. In addition, eliminating lipid rafts through extraction of cholesterol from the plasma membrane did not prevent stress-induced Rac activation, suggesting a raft-independent mechanism in governing the Rac activation upon mechanical stimulation. Further evidence indicates that Rac activation by stress depends on the magnitudes of the applied stress and cytoskeletal integrity. Our results suggest that Rac activation by mechanical forces is rapid, direct and does not depend on Src

  8. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4BWT-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4BWT-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding. PMID:26453300

  9. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-11-27

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4B(WT)-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4B(WT)-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Acetylsalicylic acid regulates overexpressed small GTPase RhoA in vascular smooth muscle cells through prevention of new synthesis and enhancement of protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-Bo; Fu, Zhi-Xuan; Ruan, Shu-Qin; Hu, Shen-Jiang; Li, Xia

    2012-04-01

    RhoA has been shown to play a major role in vascular processes and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is known to exert a cytoprotective effect via multiple mechanisms. In the present study, we aimed at investigating the effect of aspirin on RhoA expression under a stress state in rat VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) and the underlying mechanisms. The expression of iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) and iNOS activity as well as NO concentration was significantly promoted by LPS (lipopolysaccharide) accompanying the elevation of RhoA expression, which was blocked by the addition of the iNOS inhibitor L-NIL [L-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine dihydrochloride]. Aspirin (30 μM) significantly attenuated the elevation of RhoA, while indomethacin and salicylate had no similar effect. The sGC (soluble guanylate cyclase) inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one) showed the same effect as aspirin in down-regulating RhoA but was reversed by the addition of the cGMP analogue 8-Br-PET-cGMP (β-phenyl-1,N2-ethano-8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate). 8-Br-PET-cGMP solely enhanced the RhoA expression that was abrogated by preincubation with aspirin. Degradation analysis indicated that aspirin enhanced the protein degradation rate of RhoA and GDP-bound RhoA seemed to be more susceptible to aspirin-enhanced degradation compared with the GTP-bound form. Our results indicate that aspirin attenuates the LPS-induced overexpression of RhoA both by inhibiting new synthesis and accelerating protein degradation, which may help elucidate the multiple beneficial effects of aspirin.

  11. Unraveling the molecular mechanism of interactions of the Rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 with the scaffolding protein IQGAP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, E Sila; Jang, Hyunbum; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem; Li, Zhigang; Sacks, David B; Nussinov, Ruth

    2018-03-09

    IQ motif-containing GTPase-activating proteins (IQGAPs) are scaffolding proteins playing central roles in cell-cell adhesion, polarity, and motility. The Rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1, in their GTP-bound active forms, interact with all three human IQGAPs. The IQGAP-Cdc42 interaction promotes metastasis by enhancing actin polymerization. However, despite their high sequence identity, Cdc42 and Rac1 differ in their interactions with IQGAP. Two Cdc42 molecules can bind to the Ex-domain and the RasGAP site of the GTPase-activating protein (GAP)-related domain (GRD) of IQGAP and promote IQGAP dimerization. Only one Rac1 molecule might bind to the RasGAP site of GRD and may not facilitate the dimerization, and the exact mechanism of Cdc42 and Rac1 binding to IQGAP is unclear. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, site-directed mutagenesis, and Western blotting, we unraveled the detailed mechanisms of Cdc42 and Rac1 interactions with IQGAP2. We observed that Cdc42 binding to the Ex-domain of GRD of IQGAP2 (GRD2) releases the Ex-domain at the C-terminal region of GRD2, facilitating IQGAP2 dimerization. Cdc42 binding to the Ex-domain promoted allosteric changes in the RasGAP site, providing a binding site for the second Cdc42 in the RasGAP site. Of note, the Cdc42 "insert loop" was important for the interaction of the first Cdc42 with the Ex-domain. By contrast, differences in Rac1 insert-loop sequence and structure precluded its interaction with the Ex-domain. Rac1 could bind only to the RasGAP site of apo-GRD2 and could not facilitate IQGAP2 dimerization. Our detailed mechanistic insights help decipher how Cdc42 can stimulate actin polymerization in metastasis.

  12. Responses of three very large inducible GTPases to bacterial and white spot syndrome virus challenges in the giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Jin, Min; Yin, Shaowu; Ding, Zhengfeng; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2016-04-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines secreted by cells in response to invasion by pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria, parasites, or tumor cells. Very large inducible GTPases (VLIG) are the latest IFN-inducible GTPase family to be discovered and are the largest known GTPases of any species. However, VLIG proteins from invertebrates have yet to be characterized. In this study, three forms of VLIGs designated as MrVLIG1, MrVLIG2, and MrVLIG3 were cloned from the giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. MrVLIG1 has a 5445 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding an 1814-amino acid protein. The complete nucleotide sequence of MrVLIG2 cDNA is 7055 bp long consisting of a 5757 bp ORF encoding a protein with 1918 amino acids. The full length of the MrVLIG3 gene consists of 5511 bp with a 3909 bp ORF encoding a peptide with 1302 amino acids. BLASTP and phylogenetic tree analyses showed that the three MrVLIGs are clustered into one subgroup and, together with other vertebrate VLIGs, into a branch. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that the mRNAs of the three MrVLIGs were widely expressed in almost all detected tissues, including the hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine, with the highest expression in the hepatopancreas. They were also detected in the intestine but with relatively low expression levels. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the mRNA transcripts of the MrVLIGs in the hepatopancreas were significantly expressed at various time points after infection with Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus. In summary, the three isoforms of VLIG genes participate in the innate immune response of the shrimps to bacterial and viral infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Colonic fermentation of polyphenols from Chilean currants (Ribes spp.) and its effect on antioxidant capacity and metabolic syndrome-associated enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Edwards, Alberto; Jiménez-Aspee, Felipe; Theoduloz, Cristina; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2018-08-30

    The Chilean wild currants Ribes magellanicum and R. punctatum are a good source of polyphenols. Polyphenolic-enriched extracts (PEEs) from both species were submitted to in vitro colonic fermentation to assess the changes in phenolic composition, antioxidant capacity and inhibition of metabolic syndrome-associated enzymes. The phenolic profiles of the fermented samples showed significant changes after 24 h incubation. Nine metabolites, derived from the microbial fermentation, were tentatively identified, including dihydrocaffeic acid, dihydrocaffeoyl-, dihydroferuloylquinic acid, 1-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenyl)propan-2-ol (3,4-diHPP-2-ol), among others. The content of anthocyanins and hydroxycinnamic acids was most affected by simulated colonic conditions, with a loss of 71-92% and 90-100% after 24 h incubation, respectively. The highest antioxidant capacity values (ORAC) were reached after 8 h incubation. The inhibitory activity against the enzyme α-glucosidase was maintained after the fermentation process. Our results show that simulated colonic fermentation exerts significant changes on the polyphenolic composition of these berries, modifying their health-promoting properties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Small hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, K.; Tung, T.

    1995-01-01

    A small hydro plant in Canada is defined as any project between 1 MW and 15 MW but the international standard is 10 MW. The global market for small hydro development was considered good. There are some 1000 to 2000 MW of generating capacity being added each year. In Canada, growth potential is considered small, primarily in remote areas, but significant growth is anticipated in Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia. Canada with its expertise in engineering, manufacturing and development is considered to have a good chance to take advantage of these growing markets

  15. Small Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attention and educational advantages, which generally raise her self-esteem. Children in small families, especially first and only ... be for you both to accept the increasing definition of personality that needs to occur as she ...

  16. The Mitochondrial GTPase Gem1 Contributes to the Cell Wall Stress Response and Invasive Growth of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Koch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of mitochondria with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER are crucial for maintaining proper mitochondrial morphology, function and dynamics. This enables cells to utilize their mitochondria optimally for energy production and anabolism, and it further provides for metabolic control over developmental decisions. In fungi, a key mechanism by which ER and mitochondria interact is via a membrane tether, the protein complex ERMES (ER-Mitochondria Encounter Structure. In the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mitochondrial GTPase Gem1 interacts with ERMES, and it has been proposed to regulate its activity. Here we report on the first characterization of Gem1 in a human fungal pathogen. We show that in Candida albicans Gem1 has a dominant role in ensuring proper mitochondrial morphology, and our data is consistent with Gem1 working with ERMES in this role. Mitochondrial respiration and steady state cellular phospholipid homeostasis are not impacted by inactivation of GEM1 in C. albicans. There are two major virulence-related consequences of disrupting mitochondrial morphology by GEM1 inactivation: C. albicans becomes hypersusceptible to cell wall stress, and is unable to grow invasively. In the gem1Δ/Δ mutant, it is specifically the invasive capacity of hyphae that is compromised, not the ability to transition from yeast to hyphal morphology, and this phenotype is shared with ERMES mutants. As a consequence of the hyphal invasion defect, the gem1Δ/Δ mutant is drastically hypovirulent in the worm infection model. Activation of the mitogen activated protein (MAP kinase Cek1 is reduced in the gem1Δ/Δ mutant, and this function could explain both the susceptibility to cell wall stress and lack of invasive growth. This result establishes a new, respiration-independent mechanism of mitochondrial control over stress signaling and hyphal functions in C. albicans. We propose that ER-mitochondria interactions and the ER

  17. Involvement of Chromatin Remodeling Genes and the Rho GTPases RhoB and CDC42 in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai Skovbjerg Arildsen

    2017-05-01

    genetically heterogeneous, but harbor frequent alterations in chromatin remodeling genes. Overexpression of TFAP2A and ERBB2 was observed on the mRNA level in relation to other ovarian cancer subtypes. However, overexpression of ERBB2 was not reflected by HER2 amplification or protein overexpression in the OCCC validation cohort. In addition, Rho GTPase-dependent actin organization may also play a role in OCCC pathogenesis and warrants further investigation. The distinct biological features of OCCC discovered here may provide a basis for novel targeted treatment strategies.

  18. Functional studies of TcRjl, a novel GTPase of Trypanosoma cruzi, reveals phenotypes related with MAPK activation during parasite differentiation and after heterologous expression in Drosophila model system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis Monteiro dos-Santos, Guilherme Rodrigo; Fontenele, Marcio Ribeiro; Dias, Felipe de Almeida; Oliveira, Pedro Lagerblad de; Nepomuceno-Silva, José Luciano

    2015-01-01

    The life cycle of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi comprises rounds of proliferative cycles and differentiation in distinct host environments. Ras GTPases are molecular switches that play pivotal regulatory functions in cell fate. Rjl is a novel GTPase with unknown function. Herein we show that TcRjl blocks in vivo cell differentiation. The forced expression of TcRjl leads to changes in the overall tyrosine protein phosphorylation profile of parasites. TcRjl expressing parasites sustained DNA synthesis regardless the external stimuli for differentiation. Heterologous expression in the Drosophila melanogaster genetic system strongly suggests a role from TcRjl protein in RTK-dependent pathways and MAPK activation.

  19. Functional studies of TcRjl, a novel GTPase of Trypanosoma cruzi, reveals phenotypes related with MAPK activation during parasite differentiation and after heterologous expression in Drosophila model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis Monteiro dos-Santos, Guilherme Rodrigo [Laboratório de Parasitologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, CCS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Fontenele, Marcio Ribeiro [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular do Desenvolvimento Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, CCS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Dias, Felipe de Almeida [Laboratório de Bioquímica de Artrópodes Hematófagos, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, CCS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Oliveira, Pedro Lagerblad de [Laboratório de Bioquímica de Artrópodes Hematófagos, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, CCS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Entomologia Molecular (INCT-EM) (Brazil); Nepomuceno-Silva, José Luciano [Laboratório Integrado de Bioquímica Hatisaburo Masuda, NUPEM/UFRJ, Pólo Barreto, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Campus Macaé, Macaé (Brazil); and others

    2015-11-06

    The life cycle of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi comprises rounds of proliferative cycles and differentiation in distinct host environments. Ras GTPases are molecular switches that play pivotal regulatory functions in cell fate. Rjl is a novel GTPase with unknown function. Herein we show that TcRjl blocks in vivo cell differentiation. The forced expression of TcRjl leads to changes in the overall tyrosine protein phosphorylation profile of parasites. TcRjl expressing parasites sustained DNA synthesis regardless the external stimuli for differentiation. Heterologous expression in the Drosophila melanogaster genetic system strongly suggests a role from TcRjl protein in RTK-dependent pathways and MAPK activation.

  20. Retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Francesco; Blasi, Sara; Sgueglia, Monica; Polichetti, Paolo; Tromba, Luciana; Berni, Alberto

    2007-07-09

    Extremely rare cases of paraneoplastic syndromes or ectopic production of proteins associated with liposarcoma are reported in literature. Production of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor, alpha-fetoprotein, paraneoplastic pemphigus and leucocytosis, Acrokeratosis paraneoplastica (Bazex's syndrome) are reported. The present report describes a case of retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis. Our search in the English literature of such a kind of association did not reveal any case reported. A 74 year male patient was admitted to our hospital because of the presence of an abdominal mass in right iliac fossa. He also complained of a two-year history of psoriasiform eruptions. The CT scan showed a retroperitoneal pelvic mass. Therefore surgical resection of the tumor was performed. After surgery, the skin eruptions disappeared completely in seven days and so a diagnosis of parapsoriasis syndrome was done. Parallel disappearing of skin eruptions after surgery, typical clinical picture and not specific histology of the cutaneous lesions suggest the diagnosis of small plaque parapsoriasis. Therefore we propose to add Small Plaque Parapsoriasis to the list of paraneoplastic syndromes associated to liposarcoma.

  1. Retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polichetti Paolo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extremely rare cases of paraneoplastic syndromes or ectopic production of proteins associated with liposarcoma are reported in literature. Production of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor, alpha-fetoprotein, paraneoplastic pemphigus and leucocytosis, Acrokeratosis paraneoplastica (Bazex's syndrome are reported. The present report describes a case of retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis. Our search in the English literature of such a kind of association did not reveal any case reported. Case presentation A 74 year male patient was admitted to our hospital because of the presence of an abdominal mass in right iliac fossa. He also complained of a two-year history of psoriasiform eruptions. The CT scan showed a retroperitoneal pelvic mass. Therefore surgical resection of the tumor was performed. After surgery, the skin eruptions disappeared completely in seven days and so a diagnosis of parapsoriasis syndrome was done. Conclusion Parallel disappearing of skin eruptions after surgery, typical clinical picture and not specific histology of the cutaneous lesions suggest the diagnosis of small plaque parapsoriasis. Therefore we propose to add Small Plaque Parapsoriasis to the list of paraneoplastic syndromes associated to liposarcoma.

  2. Rickettsia parkeri invasion of diverse host cells involves an Arp2/3 complex, WAVE complex and Rho-family GTPase-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Shawna C O; Serio, Alisa W; Welch, Matthew D

    2012-04-01

    Rickettsiae are obligate intracellular pathogens that are transmitted to humans by arthropod vectors and cause diseases such as spotted fever and typhus. Although rickettsiae require the host cell actin cytoskeleton for invasion, the cytoskeletal proteins that mediate this process have not been completely described. To identify the host factors important during cell invasion by Rickettsia parkeri, a member of the spotted fever group (SFG), we performed an RNAi screen targeting 105 proteins in Drosophila melanogaster S2R+ cells. The screen identified 21 core proteins important for invasion, including the GTPases Rac1 and Rac2, the WAVE nucleation-promoting factor complex and the Arp2/3 complex. In mammalian cells, including endothelial cells, the natural targets of R. parkeri, the Arp2/3 complex was also crucial for invasion, while requirements for WAVE2 as well as Rho GTPases depended on the particular cell type. We propose that R. parkeri invades S2R+ arthropod cells through a primary pathway leading to actin nucleation, whereas invasion of mammalian endothelial cells occurs via redundant pathways that converge on the host Arp2/3 complex. Our results reveal a key role for the WAVE and Arp2/3 complexes, as well as a higher degree of variation than previously appreciated in actin nucleation pathways activated during Rickettsia invasion. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. SYD-1C, UNC-40 (DCC) and SAX-3 (Robo) Function Interdependently to Promote Axon Guidance by Regulating the MIG-2 GTPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Taru, Hidenori; Jin, Yishi; Quinn, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    During development, axons must integrate directional information encoded by multiple guidance cues and their receptors. Axon guidance receptors, such as UNC-40 (DCC) and SAX-3 (Robo), can function individually or combinatorially with other guidance receptors to regulate downstream effectors. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that mediate combinatorial guidance receptor signaling. Here, we show that UNC-40, SAX-3 and the SYD-1 RhoGAP-like protein function interdependently to regulate the MIG-2 (Rac) GTPase in the HSN axon of C. elegans. We find that SYD-1 mediates an UNC-6 (netrin) independent UNC-40 activity to promote ventral axon guidance. Genetic analysis suggests that SYD-1 function in axon guidance requires both UNC-40 and SAX-3 activity. Moreover, the cytoplasmic domains of UNC-40 and SAX-3 bind to SYD-1 and SYD-1 binds to and negatively regulates the MIG-2 (Rac) GTPase. We also find that the function of SYD-1 in axon guidance is mediated by its phylogenetically conserved C isoform, indicating that the role of SYD-1 in guidance is distinct from its previously described roles in synaptogenesis and axonal specification. Our observations reveal a molecular mechanism that can allow two guidance receptors to function interdependently to regulate a common downstream effector, providing a potential means for the integration of guidance signals. PMID:25876065

  4. The identification of protein domains that mediate functional interactions between Rab-GTPases and RabGAPs using 3D protein modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davie JJ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Jeremiah J Davie, Silviu L Faitar Department of Biology and Mathematics, School of Arts, Sciences, and Education, D’Youville College, Buffalo, NY, USA Abstract: Currently, time-consuming serial in vitro experimentation involving immunocytochemistry or radiolabeled materials is required to identify which of the numerous Rab-GTPases (Rab and Rab-GTPase activating proteins (RabGAP are capable of functional interactions. These interactions are essential for numerous cellular functions, and in silico methods of reducing in vitro trial and error would accelerate the pace of research in cell biology. We have utilized a combination of three-dimensional protein modeling and protein bioinformatics to identify domains present in Rab proteins that are predictive of their functional interaction with a specific RabGAP. The RabF2 and RabSF1 domains appear to play functional roles in mediating the interaction between Rabs and RabGAPs. Moreover, the RabSF1 domain can be used to make in silico predictions of functional Rab/RabGAP pairs. This method is expected to be a broadly applicable tool for predicting protein–protein interactions where existing crystal structures for homologs of the proteins of interest are available. Keywords: GTP hydrolysis, Rab proteins, RabGAPs, protein–protein interactions, structural informatics, computational biology, Evi5, Evi5L

  5. Prader-Willi Syndrome Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Chapter Contact Us International Membership Blog Shopping Bag Shop PWSA (USA) Archive Events Find a ... With our many On The Move Walks and online fundraisers such as eWalk, we have something available ...

  6. Nephrotic syndrome associated with meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P P Zachariah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old man presented with recurrent frontal meningioma and nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy could not be done in view of the rapid neurological deterioration. The patient underwent surgical resection of the tumor. Within 4 weeks, the edema decreased, serum albumin improved, and proteinuria decreased spontaneously. At three months of followup, the patient had attained complete remission of nephrotic state.

  7. Alagille Syndrome Associated with Xerophthalmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elad Moisseiev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the occurrence of xerophthalmia and keratomalacia in a patient with Alagille syndrome. Methods: The patient's record and relevant literature were reviewed. Results: A 3-year-old boy with Alagille syndrome was examined at our institution due to severe bilateral ocular irritation. A corneal ulcer and keratomalacia were found in the right eye and severe dryness with corneal opacification was found in the left eye. He was treated with topical fortified antibiotics in the right eye, followed by amniotic membrane transplantation. Due to his systemic condition, characterized by severe cholestasis and intestinal malabsorption, a suspicion of vitamin A deficiency was raised and was later confirmed in serum analysis. Conclusion: This is the first report of xerophthalmia in a patient with Alagille syndrome. Vitamin A deficiency leading to xerophthalmia is common in developing countries; however, its occurrence in the West is rare, leading to a reduced awareness of this disorder amongst clinicians. Unusual eating habits, intestinal malabsorption and liver disease are possible causes for such a deficiency. The purpose of this case report is to raise awareness to the possibility of vitamin A deficiency in children with keratopathy, especially when associated with these disorders.

  8. Alagille Syndrome Associated with Xerophthalmia

    OpenAIRE

    Moisseiev, Elad; Cohen, Shlomi; Dotan, Gad

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the occurrence of xerophthalmia and keratomalacia in a patient with Alagille syndrome. Methods: The patient's record and relevant literature were reviewed. Results: A 3-year-old boy with Alagille syndrome was examined at our institution due to severe bilateral ocular irritation. A corneal ulcer and keratomalacia were found in the right eye and severe dryness with corneal opacification was found in the left eye. He was treated with topical fortified antibiotics in the right ...

  9. The Native Fruit Geoffroea decorticans from Arid Northern Chile: Phenolic Composition, Antioxidant Activities and In Vitro Inhibition of Pro-Inflammatory and Metabolic Syndrome-Associated Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Jiménez-Aspee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The native tree Geoffroea decorticans (chañar grows in the arid lands of northern Chile. It has been used as a food plant since prehistoric times. Phenolic-enriched extracts (PEEs of Chilean chañar fruits were assessed for their chemical composition, antioxidant properties and inhibition of pro-inflammatory and metabolic syndrome-associated enzymes. Phenolic profiles were determined by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS. The PEEs of G. decorticans showed a strong effect towards the enzymes COX-1/COX-2, with inhibition percentages ranging from inactive to 92.1% and inactive to 76.0% at 50 µg PEE/mL, respectively. The IC50 values of the PEEs towards lipoxygenase and phospholipase A2 inhibitory activity were between 43.6–96.8 and 98.9–156.0 μg PEE/mL, respectively. Samples inhibited α-glucosidase (IC50 0.8–7.3 μg PEE/mL and lipase (9.9 to >100 μg PEE/mL. However, samples did not inhibit α-amylase. The HPLC-DAD-MS analysis of the PEEs allowed the tentative identification of 53 compounds, mainly flavonol glycosides and procyanidins. The procyanidin content of the Chilean G. decorticans pulp was positively correlated with the antioxidant activity and the inhibition of the enzyme α-glucosidase. These results indicate that the Chilean chañar fruit contains bioactive polyphenols with functional properties.

  10. Adam Small

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    oudste dogter (MOOC 29304). Jan Small (vroeër: Jan Dampies) het ek as Oupa Jan geken en Fatimah was vir my Ouma Tiema. Uncle erken ruiterlik sy ma se sterk invloed op sy verbeelding en lewensbenadering, soos hy dit ietwat enigmaties gestel het: 'My skryfwerk lê iewers.' In sy huldeblyk,. “Onaf gedig”, wat hy tydens ...

  11. The Yersinia enterocolitica type 3 secretion system (T3SS) as toolbox for studying the cell biological effects of bacterial Rho GTPase modulating T3SS effector proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölke, Stefan; Ackermann, Nikolaus; Heesemann, Jürgen

    2011-09-01

    The bacterial effector proteins IpgB(1) and IpgB(2) of Shigella and Map of Escherichia coli activate the Rho GTPases Rac1, RhoA and Cdc42, respectively, whereas YopE and YopT of Yersinia inhibit these Rho family GTPases. We established a Yersinia toolbox which allows to study the cellular effects of these effectors in different combinations in the context of Yersinia type 3 secretion system (Ysc)-T3SS-mediated injection into HeLa cells. For this purpose hybrid proteins were constructed by fusion of YopE with the effector protein of interest. As expected, injected hybrid proteins induced membrane ruffles and Yersinia uptake for IpgB(1) , stress fibres for IpgB(2) and microspikes for Map. By co-infection experiments we could demonstrate (i) IpgB(2) -mediated and ROCK-dependent inhibition of IpgB(1) -mediated Rac1 effects, (ii) YopT-mediated suppression of IpgB(1) -induced Yersinia invasion and (iii) failure of YopE-mediated suppression of IpgB(1) -induced Yersinia invasion, presumably due to preferential inhibition of RhoG by YopE GAP function. By infecting polarized MDCK cells we could demonstrate that Map or IpgB(1) but not IpgB(2) affects cell monolayer integrity. In summary, the Yersinia toolbox is suitable to study cellular effects of effector proteins of diverse bacterial species separately or in combination in the context of bacterial T3SS-mediated injection. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. The Role of RhoA, RhoB and RhoC GTPases in Cell Morphology, Proliferation and Migration in Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV Infected Glioblastoma Cells

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    Melpomeni Tseliou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Rho GTPases are crucial regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking and cell signaling and their importance in cell migration and invasion is well- established. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a widespread pathogen responsible for generally asymptomatic and persistent infections in healthy people. Recent evidence indicates that HCMV gene products are expressed in over 90% of malignant type glioblastomas (GBM. In addition, the HCMV Immediate Early-1 protein (IE1 is expressed in >90% of tumors analyzed. Methods: RhoA, RhoB and RhoC were individually depleted in U373MG glioblastoma cells as well as U373MG cells stably expressing the HCMV IE1 protein (named U373MG-IE1 cells shRNA lentivirus vectors. Cell proliferation assays, migration as well as wound-healing assays were performed in uninfected and HCMV-infected cells. Results: The depletion of RhoA, RhoB and RhoC protein resulted in significant alterations in the morphology of the uninfected cells, which were further enhanced by the cytopathic effect caused by HCMV. Furthermore, in the absence or presence of HCMV, the knockdown of RhoB and RhoC proteins decreased the proliferation rate of the parental and the IE1-expressing glioblastoma cells, whereas the knockdown of RhoA protein in the HCMV infected cell lines restored their proliferation rate. In addition, wound healing assays in U373MG cells revealed that depletion of RhoA, RhoB and RhoC differentially reduced their migration rate, even in the presence or the absence of HCMV. Conclusion: Collectively, these data show for the first time a differential implication of Rho GTPases in morphology, proliferation rate and motility of human glioblastoma cells during HCMV infection, further supporting an oncomodulatory role of HCMV depending on the Rho isoforms' state.

  13. Small Composers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgersen, Sven-Erik; Bruun, Peter; Tjagvad, Mette

    2018-01-01

    The present chapter discusses roles and responsibilities of the collaborating partners in a creative music workshop called Small Composers. The aim is to be attentive to a number of potential alterations implicated by the collaborating partners’ different backgrounds. The following questions guided...... the study: What expectations do the class teacher and the professional musicians have to the creative practice, i.e. to the collaboration and to the musical outcome? To which extent do the collaborating partners share a common understanding of the aim, content and method of the workshop? How do the roles...... and responsibilities of the collaborating partners become visible through the practice? How do the professional identities of the teacher and the musicians become visible and what are the implications for the workshop as a musical community of practice?...

  14. Small talk

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    Ryszard Przybylski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The poem Small talk conjures up a communicative situation in which the main character, a newcomer from Poland, answers conventional questions related to their country. Bearing in mind the fact that this poem is set during a military dictatorship, superficial interest in his homeland may trigger a feeling of impatience. This is at least the impression formed if we adopt the perspective defined within the romantic tradition, and when taking into account the conventional poetry of martial law in Poland. Nevertheless, Barańczak retains an ironic distance towards such communicative situations and, as a consequence, does not create poetry that meets most readersʼ expectations. His poetic imperative for verbal art to be the expression of mistrust remains valid.

  15. Small Composers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgersen, Sven-Erik; Bruun, Peter; Tjagvad, Mette

    2018-01-01

    The present chapter discusses roles and responsibilities of the collaborating partners in a creative music workshop called Small Composers. The aim is to be attentive to a number of potential alterations implicated by the collaborating partners’ different backgrounds. The following questions guid...... and responsibilities of the collaborating partners become visible through the practice? How do the professional identities of the teacher and the musicians become visible and what are the implications for the workshop as a musical community of practice?...... the study: What expectations do the class teacher and the professional musicians have to the creative practice, i.e. to the collaboration and to the musical outcome? To which extent do the collaborating partners share a common understanding of the aim, content and method of the workshop? How do the roles...

  16. Hipodoncia y hueso navicular accesorio: una interesante asociación sindrómica Hypodontia and accessory navicular bone: an interesting syndromic association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Cantín

    2012-09-01

    the teeth 1.7, 2.7, 2.8, 3.8 and 4.8; and the presence of an accessory navicular bone in the left foot. It is interesting to suggest that this rare association, with clear dominant autosomal inheritance, might exist; since the dental agenesis and the presence of accessory navicular bone have similar prevalence, which could point to a new syndromic association probably related to the lack of PAX9.

  17. Small Sar Satellite Using Small Standard Bus

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, Kiyonobu; Fujimura, Takashi; Ogawa, Toshiaki; Kimura, Tsunekazu

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a new small SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) satellite that follows the small optical sensor satellite, ASNARO. USEF, NEDO and NEC are developing ASNARO satellite, which is a small LEO satellite (total mass

  18. Rho GTPasas como blancos terapéuticos relevantes en cáncer y otras enfermedades humanas Rho GTPases as therapeutic targets in cancer and other human diseases

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    Pablo Lorenzano Menna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Las Rho GTPasas son una familia de proteínas clave en la transmisión de señales provenientes del exterior celular hacia efectores intracelulares tanto citoplasmáticos como nucleares. En los últimos año ha habido un desarrollo vertiginoso de múltiples herramientas genéticas y farmacológicas, lo que ha permitido establecer de manera mucho más precisa las funciones específicas de estas proteínas. El objetivo de la presente revisión es hacer foco en las múltiples funciones celulares reguladas por las Rho GTPasas, describiendo en detalle el mecanismo molecular involucrado. Se discute además la participación de estas proteínas en diversas enfermedades humanas haciendo énfasis en su vinculación con el cáncer. Por último, se hace una actualización detallada sobre las estrategias terapéuticas en experimentación que tienen a las Rho GTPasas como blancos moleculares.Rho GTPases are a key protein family controlling the transduction of external signals to cytoplasmatic and nuclear effectors. In the last few years, the development of genetic and pharmacological tools has allowed a more precise definition of the specific roles of Rho GTPases. The aim of this review is to describe the cellular functions regulated by these proteins with focus on the molecular mechanism involved. We also address the role of Rho GTPases in the development of different human diseases such as cancer. Finally, we describe different experimental therapeutic strategies with Rho GTPases as molecular targets.

  19. Wheat TaRab7 GTPase is part of the signaling pathway in responses to stripe rust and abiotic stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furong Liu

    Full Text Available Small GTP-binding proteins function as regulators of specific intercellular fundamental biological processes. In this study, a small GTP-binding protein Rab7 gene, designated as TaRab7, was identified and characterized from a cDNA library of wheat leaves infected with Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst the wheat stripe rust pathogen. The gene was predicted to encode a protein of 206 amino acids, with a molecular mass of 23.13 KDa and an isoeletric point (pI of 5.13. Further analysis revealed the presence of a conserved signature that is characteristic of Rab7, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that TaRab7 has the highest similarity to a small GTP binding protein gene (BdRab7-like from Brachypodium distachyon. Quantitative real-time PCR assays revealed that the expression of TaRab7 was higher in the early stage of the incompatible interactions between wheat and Pst than in the compatible interaction, and the transcription level of TaRab7 was also highly induced by environmental stress stimuli. Furthermore, knocking down TaRab7 expression by virus induced gene silencing enhanced the susceptibility of wheat cv. Suwon 11 to an avirulent race CYR23. These results imply that TaRab7 plays an important role in the early stage of wheat-stripe rust fungus interaction and in stress tolerance.

  20. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...

  1. Saponins extracted from by-product of Asparagus officinalis L. suppress tumour cell migration and invasion through targeting Rho GTPase signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieqiong; Liu, Yali; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhang, Wen; Pang, Xiufeng

    2013-04-01

    The inedible bottom part (~30-40%) of asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) spears is usually discarded as waste. However, since this by-product has been reported to be rich in many bioactive phytochemicals, it might be utilisable as a supplement in foods or natural drugs for its therapeutic effects. In this study it was identifed that saponins from old stems of asparagus (SSA) exerted potential inhibitory activity on tumour growth and metastasis. SSA suppressed cell viability of breast, colon and pancreatic cancers in a concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 809.42 to 1829.96 µg mL(-1). However, SSA was more functional in blocking cell migration and invasion as compared with its cytotoxic effect, with an effective inhibitory concentration of 400 µg mL(-1). A mechanistic study showed that SSA markedly increased the activities of Cdc42 and Rac1 and decreased the activity of RhoA in cancer cells. SSA inhibits tumour cell motility through modulating the Rho GTPase signalling pathway, suggesting a promising use of SSA as a supplement in healthcare foods and natural drugs for cancer prevention and treatment. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Hippocampal spine-associated Rap-specific GTPase-activating protein induces enhancement of learning and memory in postnatally hypoxia-exposed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X-J; Chen, X-Q; Weng, J; Zhang, H-Y; Pak, D T; Luo, J-H; Du, J-Z

    2009-08-18

    Spine-associated Rap-specific GTPase-activating protein (SPAR) is a postsynaptic protein that forms a complex with postsynaptic density (PSD)-95 and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), and morphologically regulates dendritic spines. Mild intermittent hypoxia (IH, 16.0% O(2), 4 h/day for 4 weeks) is known to markedly enhance spatial learning and memory in postnatal developing mice. Here, we report that this effect is correlated with persistent increases in SPAR expression as well as long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus of IH-exposed mice. Furthermore, an infusion of SPAR antisense oligonucleotides into the dorsal hippocampus disrupted elevation of SPAR expression, preventing enhanced hippocampal LTP in IH-exposed developing mice and also reducing LTP in normoxic mice, without altering basal synaptic transmission. In SPAR antisense-treated mice, acquisition of the Morris water maze spatial learning task was impaired, as was memory retention in probe trails following training. This study provides the first evidence that SPAR is functionally required for synaptic plasticity and contributes to the IH-induced enhancement of spatial learning and memory in postnatal developing mice.

  3. The Rho-GTPase effector ROCK regulates meiotic maturation of the bovine oocyte via myosin light chain phosphorylation and cofilin phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Rim; Xu, Yong-Nan; Jo, Yu-Jin; Namgoong, Suk; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2015-11-01

    Oocyte meiosis involves a unique asymmetric division involving spindle movement from the central cytoplasm to the cortex, followed by polar body extrusion. ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector involved in various cellular functions in somatic cells as well as oocyte meiosis. ROCK was previously shown to promote actin organization by phosphorylating several downstream targets, including LIM domain kinase (LIMK), phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin), and myosin light chain (MLC). In this study, we investigated the roles of ROCK and MLC during bovine oocyte meiosis. We found that ROCK was localized around the nucleus at the oocyte's germinal-vesicle (GV) stage, but spreads to the rest of the cytoplasm in later developmental stages. On the other hand, phosphorylated MLC (p-MLC) localized at the cortex, and its abundance decreased by the metaphase-II stage. Disrupting ROCK activity, via RNAi or the chemical inhibitor Y-27632, blocked both cell cycle progression and polar body extrusion. ROCK inhibition also resulted in decreased cortical actin, p-cofilin, and p-MLC levels. Similar to the phenotype associated with inhibition of ROCK activity, inhibition of MLC kinase by the chemical inhibitor ML-7 caused defects in polar body extrusion. Collectively, our results suggest that the ROCK/MLC/actomyosin as well as ROCK/LIMK/cofilin pathways regulate meiotic spindle migration and cytokinesis during bovine oocyte maturation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Identification of the GTPase-activating protein DEP domain containing 1B (DEPDC1B) as a transcriptional target of Pitx2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Jimenez-Cowell, Kevin; Mold, Alexander J; Sollecito, Christopher C; Lombana, Nicholas; Jiao, Meng; Wei, Qize

    2015-04-10

    Pitx2 is a bicoid-related homeobox transcription factor implicated in regulating left-right patterning and organogenesis. However, only a limited number of Pitx2 downstream target genes have been identified and characterized. Here we demonstrate that Pitx2 is a transcriptional repressor of DEP domain containing 1B (DEPDC1B). The first intron of the human and mouse DEP domain containing 1B genes contains multiple consensus DNA-binding sites for Pitx2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Pitx2, along with histone deacetylase 1, was recruited to the first intron of Depdc1b. In contrast, RNAi-mediated depletion of Pitx2 not only enhanced the acetylation of histone H4 in the first intron of Depdc1b, but also increased the protein level of Depdc1b. Luciferase reporter assays also showed that Pitx2 could repress the transcriptional activity mediated by the first intron of human DEPDC1B. The GAP domain of DEPDC1B interacted with nucleotide-bound forms of RAC1 in vitro. In addition, exogenous expression of DEPDC1B suppressed RAC1 activation and interfered with actin polymerization induced by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor TRIO. Moreover, DEPDC1B interacted with various signaling molecules such as U2af2, Erh, and Salm. We propose that Pitx2-mediated repression of Depdc1b expression contributes to the regulation of multiple molecular pathways, such as Rho GTPase signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Solution structure of the cytohesin-1 (B2–1) Sec7 domain and its interaction with the GTPase ADP ribosylation factor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Stephen F.; Schnuchel, Arndt; Wang, Hong; Olejniczak, Edward T.; Meadows, Robert P.; Lipsky, Brian P.; Harris, Edith A. S.; Staunton, Donald E.; Fesik, Stephen W.

    1998-01-01

    Cytohesin-1 (B2–1) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for human ADP ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases, which are important for vesicular protein trafficking and coatamer assembly in the cell. Cytohesin-1 also has been reported to promote cellular adhesion via binding to the β2 integrin cytoplasmic domain. The solution structure of the Sec7 domain of cytohesin-1, which is responsible for both the protein’s guanine nucleotide exchange factor function and β2 integrin binding, was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The structure consists of 10 α-helices that form a unique tertiary fold. The binding between the Sec7 domain and a soluble, truncated version of human Arf-1 was investigated by examining 1H-15N and 1H-13C chemical shift changes between the native protein and the Sec7/Arf-1 complex. We show that the binding to Arf-1 occurs through a large surface on the C-terminal subdomain that is composed of both hydrophobic and polar residues. Structure-based mutational analysis of the cytohesin-1 Sec7 domain has been used to identify residues important for binding to Arf and for mediating nucleotide exchange. Investigations into the interaction between the Sec7 domain and the β2 integrin cytoplasmic domain suggest that the two proteins do not interact in the solution phase. PMID:9653114

  6. PTP-PEST targets a novel tyrosine site in p120 catenin to control epithelial cell motility and Rho GTPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Rosario; Jeng, Yowjiun; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana; Rengifo-Cam, William; Honkus, Krysta; Anastasiadis, Panos Z; Sastry, Sarita K

    2014-02-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is implicated in regulating the adherens junction protein, p120 catenin (p120), however, the mechanisms are not well defined. Here, we show, using substrate trapping, that p120 is a direct target of the protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP-PEST, in epithelial cells. Stable shRNA knockdown of PTP-PEST in colon carcinoma cells results in an increased cytosolic pool of p120 concomitant with its enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation and decreased association with E-cadherin. Consistent with this, PTP-PEST knockdown cells exhibit increased motility, enhanced Rac1 and decreased RhoA activity on a collagen substrate. Furthermore, p120 localization is enhanced at actin-rich protrusions and lamellipodia and has an increased association with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, VAV2, and cortactin. Exchange factor activity of VAV2 is enhanced by PTP-PEST knockdown whereas overexpression of a VAV2 C-terminal domain or DH domain mutant blocks cell motility. Analysis of point mutations identified tyrosine 335 in the N-terminal domain of p120 as the site of PTP-PEST dephosphorylation. A Y335F mutant of p120 failed to induce the 'p120 phenotype', interact with VAV2, stimulate cell motility or activate Rac1. Together, these data suggest that PTP-PEST affects epithelial cell motility by controlling the distribution and phosphorylation of p120 and its availability to control Rho GTPase activity.

  7. CdGAP/ARHGAP31, a Cdc42/Rac1 GTPase regulator, is critical for vascular development and VEGF-mediated angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Christine; DeGeer, Jonathan; Fournier, Patrick; Duquette, Philippe M.; Luangrath, Vilayphone; Ishii, Hidetaka; Karimzadeh, Fereshteh; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Royal, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the CdGAP/ARHGAP31 gene, which encodes a GTPase-activating protein for Rac1 and Cdc42, have been reported causative in the Adams-Oliver developmental syndrome often associated with vascular defects. However, despite its abundant expression in endothelial cells, CdGAP function in the vasculature remains unknown. Here, we show that vascular development is impaired in CdGAP-deficient mouse embryos at E15.5. This is associated with superficial vessel defects and subcutaneous edema, resulting in 44% embryonic/perinatal lethality. VEGF-driven angiogenesis is defective in CdGAP−/− mice, showing reduced capillary sprouting from aortic ring explants. Similarly, VEGF-dependent endothelial cell migration and capillary formation are inhibited upon CdGAP knockdown. Mechanistically, CdGAP associates with VEGF receptor-2 and controls VEGF-dependent signaling. Consequently, CdGAP depletion results in impaired VEGF-mediated Rac1 activation and reduced phosphorylation of critical intracellular mediators including Gab1, Akt, PLCγ and SHP2. These findings are the first to demonstrate the importance of CdGAP in embryonic vascular development and VEGF-induced signaling, and highlight CdGAP as a potential therapeutic target to treat pathological angiogenesis and vascular dysfunction. PMID:27270835

  8. PTP-PEST targets a novel tyrosine site in p120 catenin to control epithelial cell motility and Rho GTPase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Rosario; Jeng, Yowjiun; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana; Rengifo-Cam, William; Honkus, Krysta; Anastasiadis, Panos Z.; Sastry, Sarita K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tyrosine phosphorylation is implicated in regulating the adherens junction protein, p120 catenin (p120), however, the mechanisms are not well defined. Here, we show, using substrate trapping, that p120 is a direct target of the protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP-PEST, in epithelial cells. Stable shRNA knockdown of PTP-PEST in colon carcinoma cells results in an increased cytosolic pool of p120 concomitant with its enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation and decreased association with E-cadherin. Consistent with this, PTP-PEST knockdown cells exhibit increased motility, enhanced Rac1 and decreased RhoA activity on a collagen substrate. Furthermore, p120 localization is enhanced at actin-rich protrusions and lamellipodia and has an increased association with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, VAV2, and cortactin. Exchange factor activity of VAV2 is enhanced by PTP-PEST knockdown whereas overexpression of a VAV2 C-terminal domain or DH domain mutant blocks cell motility. Analysis of point mutations identified tyrosine 335 in the N-terminal domain of p120 as the site of PTP-PEST dephosphorylation. A Y335F mutant of p120 failed to induce the ‘p120 phenotype’, interact with VAV2, stimulate cell motility or activate Rac1. Together, these data suggest that PTP-PEST affects epithelial cell motility by controlling the distribution and phosphorylation of p120 and its availability to control Rho GTPase activity. PMID:24284071

  9. A Barley ROP GTPase ACTIVATING PROTEIN Associates with Microtubules and Regulates Entry of the Barley Powdery Mildew Fungus into Leaf Epidermal Cells[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefle, Caroline; Huesmann, Christina; Schultheiss, Holger; Börnke, Frederik; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the function of host factors involved in disease susceptibility. The barley (Hordeum vulgare) ROP (RHO of plants) G-protein RACB is required for full susceptibility of the leaf epidermis to invasion by the biotrophic fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp hordei. Stable transgenic knockdown of RACB reduced the ability of barley to accommodate haustoria of B. graminis in intact epidermal leaf cells and to form hairs on the root epidermis, suggesting that RACB is a common element of root hair outgrowth and ingrowth of haustoria in leaf epidermal cells. We further identified a barley MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED ROP-GTPASE ACTIVATING PROTEIN (MAGAP1) interacting with RACB in yeast and in planta. Fluorescent MAGAP1 decorated cortical microtubules and was recruited by activated RACB to the cell periphery. Under fungal attack, MAGAP1-labeled microtubules built a polarized network at sites of successful defense. By contrast, microtubules loosened where the fungus succeeded in penetration. Genetic evidence suggests a function of MAGAP1 in limiting susceptibility to penetration by B. graminis. Additionally, MAGAP1 influenced the polar organization of cortical microtubules. These results add to our understanding of how intact plant cells accommodate fungal infection structures and suggest that RACB and MAGAP1 might be antagonistic players in cytoskeleton organization for fungal entry. PMID:21685259

  10. Association of fat mass and obesity-associated and retinitis pigmentosa guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) regulator-interacting protein-1 like polymorphisms with body mass index in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Boyu; Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jianhua; Ji, Jue; Shen, Jingyi; Xu, Yufeng; Zhao, Yingying; Liu, Danping; Shen, Yinhuan; Zhang, Weijie; Shen, Jiawei; Wang, Yonggang; Shi, Yongyong

    2018-04-14

    Body mass index (BMI) is the most commonly used quantitative measure of adiposity. It is a kind of complex genetic diseases which are caused by multiple susceptibility genes. The first intron of fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) has been widely discovered to be associated with BMI. Retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator-interacting protein-1 like (RPGRIP1L) is located in the upstream region of FTO and has been proved to be linked with obesity through functional tests. We carried out a genetic association analysis to figure out the role of the FTO gene and the RPGRIP1L gene in BMI. A quantitative traits study with 6,102 Chinese female samples, adjusted for age, was performed during our project. Among the twelve SNPs, rs1421085, rs1558902, rs17817449, rs8050136, rs9939609, rs7202296, rs56137030, rs9930506 and rs12149832 in the FTO gene were significantly associated with BMI after Bonferroni correction. Meanwhile, rs9934800 in the RPGRIP1L gene showed significance with BMI before Bonferroni correction, but this association was eliminated after Bonferroni correction. Our results suggested that genetic variants in the FTO gene were strongly associated with BMI in Chinese women, which may serve as targets of pharmaceutical research and development concerning BMI. Meanwhile, we didn't found the significant association between RPGRIP1L and BMI in Chinese women.

  11. Escherichia coli α-hemolysin counteracts the anti-virulence innate immune response triggered by the Rho GTPase activating toxin CNF1 during bacteremia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamady Diabate

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The detection of the activities of pathogen-encoded virulence factors by the innate immune system has emerged as a new paradigm of pathogen recognition. Much remains to be determined with regard to the molecular and cellular components contributing to this defense mechanism in mammals and importance during infection. Here, we reveal the central role of the IL-1β signaling axis and Gr1+ cells in controlling the Escherichia coli burden in the blood in response to the sensing of the Rho GTPase-activating toxin CNF1. Consistently, this innate immune response is abrogated in caspase-1/11-impaired mice or following the treatment of infected mice with an IL-1β antagonist. In vitro experiments further revealed the synergistic effects of CNF1 and LPS in promoting the maturation/secretion of IL-1β and establishing the roles of Rac, ASC and caspase-1 in this pathway. Furthermore, we found that the α-hemolysin toxin inhibits IL-1β secretion without affecting the recruitment of Gr1+ cells. Here, we report the first example of anti-virulence-triggered immunity counteracted by a pore-forming toxin during bacteremia.

  12. The GTPase Gem and its partner Kif9 are required for chromosome alignment, spindle length control, and mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrieu, Guillaume; Quaranta, Muriel; Leprince, Corinne; Hatzoglou, Anastassia

    2012-12-01

    Within the Ras superfamily, Gem is a small GTP-binding protein that plays a role in regulating Ca(2+) channels and cytoskeletal remodeling in interphase cells. Here, we report for the first time that Gem is a spindle-associated protein and is required for proper mitotic progression. Functionally, loss of Gem leads to misaligned chromosomes and prometaphase delay. On the basis of different experimental approaches, we demonstrate that loss of Gem by RNA interference induces spindle elongation, while its enforced expression results in spindle shortening. The spindle length phenotype is generated through deregulation of spindle dynamics on Gem depletion and requires the expression of its downstream effector, the kinesin Kif9. Loss of Kif9 induces spindle abnormalities similar to those observed when Gem expression is repressed by siRNA. We further identify Kif9 as a new regulator of spindle dynamics. Kif9 depletion increases the steady-state levels of spindle α-tubulin by increasing the rate of microtubule polymerization. Overall, this study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which Gem contributes to the mitotic progression by maintaining correct spindle length through the kinesin Kif9.

  13. Anatomy of an energy-coupling mechanism--the interlocking catalytic cycles of the ATP sulfurylase-GTPase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meihao; Leyh, Thomas S

    2005-10-25

    ATP sulfurylase, from Escherichia coli K-12, conformationally couples the rates and chemical potentials of the two reactions that it catalyzes, GTP hydrolysis and activated sulfate synthesis. The enzyme is rare among such coupling systems in that it links the potentials of small-molecule chemistries to one another, rather than to vectorial motion. The pre-steady-state stages of the catalytic cycle of ATP sulfurylase were studied using tools capable of distinguishing between enzyme-bound and solution-phase product for each of the four products of the enzyme. The study reveals that the two chemistries are linked at multiple points in the reaction coordinate. Linking begins with an isomerization prior to chemistry that initiates an ordered cleavage of the beta,gamma and alpha,beta bonds of GTP and ATP, respectively; the rates of these three sequential events increase successively, causing them to appear simultaneous. Linking is again seen in the late stages of the catalytic cycle: product release is ordered with P(i) departing prior to either GDP or PP(i). Release rate constants are determined for each product and used to construct a quantitative model of the mechanism that accurately predicts the behavior of this complex system.

  14. Impaired function of the blood-testis barrier during aging is preceded by a decline in cell adhesion proteins and GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catriona Paul

    Full Text Available With increasing age comes many changes in the testis, including germ cell loss. Cell junctions in the testis tether both seminiferous epithelial and germ cells together and assist in the formation of the blood-testis barrier (BTB, which limits transport of biomolecules, ions and electrolytes from the basal to the adluminal compartment and protects post-meiotic germ cells. We hypothesize that as male rats age the proteins involved in forming the junctions decrease and that this alters the ability of the BTB to protect the germ cells. Pachytene spermatocytes were isolated from Brown Norway rat testes at 4 (young and 18 (aged months of age using STA-PUT velocity sedimentation technique. RNA was extracted and gene expression was assessed using Affymetrix rat 230 2.0 whole rat genome microarrays. Microarray data were confirmed by q-RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blotting. Of the genes that were significantly decreased by at least 1.5 fold, 70 were involved in cell adhesion; of these, at least 20 are known to be specifically involved in junction dynamics within the seminiferous epithelium. The mRNA and protein levels of Jam2, Ocln, cdh2 (N-cadherin, ctnna (α-catenin, and cldn11 (involved in adherens junctions, among others, were decreased by approximately 50% in aged spermatocytes. In addition, the GTPases Rac1 and cdc42, involved in the recruitment of cadherins to the adherens junctions, were similarly decreased. It is therefore not surprising that with lower expression of these proteins that the BTB becomes diminished with age. We saw, using a FITC tracer, a gradual collapse of the BTB between 18 and 24 months. This provides the opportunity for harmful substances and immune cells to cross the BTB and cause the disruption of spermatogenesis that is observed with increasing age.

  15. The RhoU/Wrch1 Rho GTPase gene is a common transcriptional target of both the gp130/STAT3 and Wnt-1 pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHIAVONE, Davide; DEWILDE, Sarah; VALLANIA, Francesco; TURKSON, James; CUNTO, Ferdinando DI; POLI, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) is a transcription factor activated by cytokines, growth factors and oncogenes, whose activity is required for cell survival/proliferation of a wide variety of primary tumours and tumour cell lines. Prominent among its multiple effects on tumour cells is the stimulation of cell migration and metastasis, whose functional mechanisms are however not completely characterized. RhoU/Wrch1 (Wnt-responsive Cdc42 homologue) is an atypical Rho GTPase thought to be constitutively bound to GTP. RhoU was first identified as a Wnt-1-inducible mRNA and subsequently shown to act on the actin cytoskeleton by stimulating filopodia formation and stress fibre dissolution. It was in addition recently shown to localize to focal adhesions and to Src-induced podosomes and enhance cell migration. RhoU overexpression in mammary epithelial cells stimulates quiescent cells to re-enter the cell cycle and morphologically phenocopies Wnt-1-dependent transformation. In the present study we show that Wnt-1-mediated RhoU induction occurs at the transcriptional level. Moreover, we demonstrate that RhoU can also be induced by gp130 cytokines via STAT3, and we identify two functional STAT3-binding sites on the mouse RhoU promoter. RhoU induction by Wnt-1 is independent of β-catenin, but does not involve STAT3. Rather, it is mediated by the Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway through the activation of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase). Both the so-called non-canonical Wnt pathway and STAT3 are therefore able to induce RhoU, which in turn may be involved in mediating their effects on cell migration. PMID:19397496

  16. Mutations in circularly permuted GTPase family genes AtNOA1/RIF1/SVR10 and BPG2 suppress var2-mediated leaf variegation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yafei; Zhao, Jun; An, Rui; Zhang, Juan; Liang, Shuang; Shao, Jingxia; Liu, Xiayan; An, Lijun; Yu, Fei

    2016-03-01

    Leaf variegation mutants constitute a unique group of chloroplast development mutants and are ideal genetic materials to dissect the regulation of chloroplast development. We have utilized the Arabidopsis yellow variegated (var2) mutant and genetic suppressor analysis to probe the mechanisms of chloroplast development. Here we report the isolation of a new var2 suppressor locus SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION (SVR10). Genetic mapping and molecular complementation indicated that SVR10 encodes a circularly permuted GTPase that has been reported as Arabidopsis thaliana NITRIC OXIDE ASSOCIATED 1 (AtNOA1) and RESISTANT TO INHIBITION BY FOSMIDOMYCIN 1 (RIF1). Biochemical evidence showed that SVR10/AtNOA1/RIF1 likely localizes to the chloroplast stroma. We further demonstrate that the mutant of a close homologue of SVR10/AtNOA1/RIF1, BRASSINAZOLE INSENSITIVE PALE GREEN 2 (BPG2), can also suppress var2 leaf variegation. Mutants of SVR10 and BPG2 are impaired in photosynthesis and the accumulation of chloroplast proteins. Interestingly, two-dimensional blue native gel analysis showed that mutants of SVR10 and BPG2 display defects in the assembly of thylakoid membrane complexes including reduced levels of major photosynthetic complexes and the abnormal accumulation of a chlorophyll-protein supercomplex containing photosystem I. Taken together, our findings suggest that SVR10 and BPG2 are functionally related with VAR2, likely through their potential roles in regulating chloroplast protein homeostasis, and both SVR10 and BPG2 are required for efficient thylakoid protein complex assembly and photosynthesis.

  17. Dexras1 a unique ras-GTPase interacts with NMDA receptor activity and provides a novel dissociation between anxiety, working memory and sensory gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, G C; Lin, R E; Chen, Y; Brookshire, B R; White, R S; Lucki, I; Siegel, S J; Kim, S F

    2016-05-13

    Dexras1 is a novel GTPase that acts at a confluence of signaling mechanisms associated with psychiatric and neurological disease including NMDA receptors, NOS1AP and nNOS. Recent work has shown that Dexras1 mediates iron trafficking and NMDA-dependent neurodegeneration but a role for Dexras1 in normal brain function or psychiatric disease has not been studied. To test for such a role, mice with germline knockout (KO) of Dexras1 were assayed for behavioral abnormalities as well as changes in NMDA receptor subunit protein expression. Because Dexras1 is up-regulated during stress or by dexamethasone treatment, we included measures associated with emotion including anxiety and depression. Baseline anxiety-like measures (open field and zero maze) were not altered, nor were depression-like behavior (tail suspension). Measures of memory function yielded mixed results, with no changes in episodic memory (novel object recognition) but a significant decrement on working memory (T-maze). Alternatively, there was an increase in pre-pulse inhibition (PPI), without concomitant changes in either startle amplitude or locomotor activity. PPI data are consistent with the direction of change seen following exposure to dopamine D2 antagonists. An examination of NMDA subunit expression levels revealed an increased expression of the NR2A subunit, contrary to previous studies demonstrating down-regulation of the receptor following antipsychotic exposure (Schmitt et al., 2003) and up-regulation after exposure to isolation rearing (Turnock-Jones et al., 2009). These findings suggest a potential role for Dexras1 in modulating a selective subset of psychiatric symptoms, possibly via its interaction with NMDARs and/or other disease-related binding-partners. Furthermore, data suggest that modulating Dexras1 activity has contrasting effects on emotional, sensory and cognitive domains. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ras GTPase-like protein MglA, a controller of bacterial social-motility in Myxobacteria, has evolved to control bacterial predation by Bdellovibrio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Milner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invade Gram-negative bacteria in a predatory process requiring Type IV pili (T4P at a single invasive pole, and also glide on surfaces to locate prey. Ras-like G-protein MglA, working with MglB and RomR in the deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, regulates adventurous gliding and T4P-mediated social motility at both M. xanthus cell poles. Our bioinformatic analyses suggested that the GTPase activating protein (GAP-encoding gene mglB was lost in Bdellovibrio, but critical residues for MglA(Bd GTP-binding are conserved. Deletion of mglA(Bd abolished prey-invasion, but not gliding, and reduced T4P formation. MglA(Bd interacted with a previously uncharacterised tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domain protein Bd2492, which we show localises at the single invasive pole and is required for predation. Bd2492 and RomR also interacted with cyclic-di-GMP-binding receptor CdgA, required for rapid prey-invasion. Bd2492, RomR(Bd and CdgA localize to the invasive pole and may facilitate MglA-docking. Bd2492 was encoded from an operon encoding a TamAB-like secretion system. The TamA protein and RomR were found, by gene deletion tests, to be essential for viability in both predatory and non-predatory modes. Control proteins, which regulate bipolar T4P-mediated social motility in swarming groups of deltaproteobacteria, have adapted in evolution to regulate the anti-social process of unipolar prey-invasion in the "lone-hunter" Bdellovibrio. Thus GTP-binding proteins and cyclic-di-GMP inputs combine at a regulatory hub, turning on prey-invasion and allowing invasion and killing of bacterial pathogens and consequent predatory growth of Bdellovibrio.

  19. Induction of human microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 by activated oncogene RhoA GTPase in A549 human epithelial cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hye Jin [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong-Hyung [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Do, Kee Hun [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); An, Tae Jin; Ahn, Young Sup; Park, Chung Berm [Department of Herbal Crop Research, NIHHS, RDA, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Yuseok, E-mail: moon@pnu.edu [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Medical Research Institute and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-30

    Highlights: {yields} As a target of oncogene RhoA-linked signal, a prostaglandin metabolism is assessed. {yields} RhoA activation increases PGE{sub 2} levels and its metabolic enzyme mPGES-1. {yields} RhoA-activated NF-{kappa}B and EGR-1 are positively involved in mPGES-1 induction. -- Abstract: Oncogenic RhoA GTPase has been investigated as a mediator of pro-inflammatory responses and aggressive carcinogenesis. Among the various targets of RhoA-linked signals, pro-inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), a major prostaglandin metabolite, was assessed in epithelial cancer cells. RhoA activation increased PGE{sub 2} levels and gene expression of the rate-limiting PGE{sub 2} producing enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1). In particular, human mPGES-1 was induced by RhoA via transcriptional activation in control and interleukin (IL)-1{beta}-activated cancer cells. To address the involvement of potent signaling pathways in RhoA-activated mPGES-1 induction, various signaling inhibitors were screened for their effects on mPGES-1 promoter activity. RhoA activation enhanced basal and IL-1{beta}-mediated phosphorylated nuclear factor-{kappa}B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 proteins, all of which were positively involved in RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1. As one potent down-stream transcription factor of ERK1/2 signals, early growth response gene 1 product also mediated RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1 by enhancing transcriptional activity. Since oncogene-triggered PGE{sub 2} production is a critical modulator of epithelial tumor cells, RhoA-associated mPGES-1 represents a promising chemo-preventive or therapeutic target for epithelial inflammation and its associated cancers.

  20. Benzyl isothiocyanate suppresses pancreatic tumor angiogenesis and invasion by inhibiting HIF-α/VEGF/Rho-GTPases: pivotal role of STAT-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Reddy Boreddy

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have shown that benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC suppresses pancreatic tumor growth by inhibiting STAT-3; however, the exact mechanism of tumor growth suppression was not clear. Here we evaluated the effects and mechanism of BITC on pancreatic tumor angiogenesis. Our results reveal that BITC significantly inhibits neovasularization on rat aorta and Chicken-Chorioallantoic membrane. Furthermore, BITC blocks the migration and invasion of BxPC-3 and PanC-1 pancreatic cancer cells in a dose dependant manner. Moreover, secretion of VEGF and MMP-2 in normoxic and hypoxic BxPC-3 and PanC-1 cells was significantly suppressed by BITC. Both VEGF and MMP-2 play a critical role in angiogenesis and metastasis. Our results reveal that BITC significantly suppresses the phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 (Tyr-1175, and expression of HIF-α. Rho-GTPases, which are regulated by VEGF play a crucial role in pancreatic cancer progression. BITC treatment reduced the expression of RhoC whereas up-regulated the expression of tumor suppressor RhoB. STAT-3 over-expression or IL-6 treatment significantly induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression; however, BITC substantially suppressed STAT-3 as well as STAT-3-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression. Finally, in vivo tumor growth and matrigel-plug assay show reduced tumor growth and substantial reduction of hemoglobin content in the matrigel plugs and tumors of mice treated orally with 12 µmol BITC, indicating reduced tumor angiogenesis. Immunoblotting of BITC treated tumors show reduced expression of STAT-3 phosphorylation (Tyr-705, HIF-α, VEGFR-2, VEGF, MMP-2, CD31 and RhoC. Taken together, our results suggest that BITC suppresses pancreatic tumor growth by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis through STAT-3-dependant pathway.

  1. Deletion of Rac1GTPase in the Myeloid Lineage Protects against Inflammation-Mediated Kidney Injury in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Nagase

    Full Text Available Macrophage-mediated inflammation has been implicated in various kidney diseases. We previously reported that Rac1, a Rho family small GTP-binding protein, was overactivated in several chronic kidney disease models, and that Rac1 inhibitors ameliorated renal injury, in part via inhibition of inflammation, but the detailed mechanisms have not been clarified. In the present study, we examined whether Rac1 in macrophages effects cytokine production and the inflammatory mechanisms contributing to kidney derangement. Myeloid-selective Rac1 flox control (M-Rac1 FC and knockout (M-Rac1 KO mice were generated using the cre-loxP system. Renal function under basal conditions did not differ between M-Rac1 FC and KO mice. Accordingly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS-evoked kidney injury model was created. LPS elevated blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, enhanced expressions of kidney injury biomarkers, Kim-1 and Ngal, and promoted tubular injury in M-Rac1 FC mice. By contrast, deletion of myeloid Rac1 almost completely prevented the LPS-mediated renal impairment. LPS triggered a marked induction of macrophage-derived inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNFα, in M-Rac1 FC mice, which was accompanied by Rac1 activation, stimulation of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase, and reactive oxygen species overproduction. These changes were inhibited in M-Rac1 KO mice. LPS evoked F4/80-positive macrophages accumulation in the kidney, which was not affected by myeloid Rac1 deficiency. We further tested the role of Rac1 signaling in cytokine production using macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Exposure to LPS increased IL-6 and TNFα mRNA expression. The LPS-driven cytokine induction was dose-dependently blocked by the Rac1 inhibitor EHT1864, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium, and NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. In conclusion, genetic ablation of Rac1 in the myeloid lineage protected against LPS-induced renal inflammation and injury, by

  2. Small Scale Organic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, V.; Crist, DeLanson R.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using small scale experimentation in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Describes small scale filtration techniques as an example of a semi-micro method applied to small quantities of material. (MLH)

  3. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  4. Discovery and characterization of small molecule Rac1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnst, Jamie L; Hein, Ashley L; Taylor, Margaret A; Palermo, Nick Y; Contreras, Jacob I; Sonawane, Yogesh A; Wahl, Andrew O; Ouellette, Michel M; Natarajan, Amarnath; Yan, Ying

    2017-05-23

    Aberrant activation of Rho GTPase Rac1 has been observed in various tumor types, including pancreatic cancer. Rac1 activates multiple signaling pathways that lead to uncontrolled proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Thus, inhibition of Rac1 activity is a viable therapeutic strategy for proliferative disorders such as cancer. Here we identified small molecule inhibitors that target the nucleotide-binding site of Rac1 through in silico screening. Follow up in vitro studies demonstrated that two compounds blocked active Rac1 from binding to its effector PAK1. Fluorescence polarization studies indicate that these compounds target the nucleotide-binding site of Rac1. In cells, both compounds blocked Rac1 binding to its effector PAK1 following EGF-induced Rac1 activation in a dose-dependent manner, while showing no inhibition of the closely related Cdc42 and RhoA activity. Furthermore, functional studies indicate that both compounds reduced cell proliferation and migration in a dose-dependent manner in multiple pancreatic cancer cell lines. Additionally, the two compounds suppressed the clonogenic survival of pancreatic cancer cells, while they had no effect on the survival of normal pancreatic ductal cells. These compounds do not share the core structure of the known Rac1 inhibitors and could serve as additional lead compounds to target pancreatic cancers with high Rac1 activity.

  5. Sensitivity of Escherichia coli (MutT) and human (MTH1) 8-oxo-dGTPases to in vitro inhibition by the carcinogenic metals, nickel(II), copper(II), cobalt(II) and cadmium(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D W; Yakushiji, H; Nakabeppu, Y; Sekiguchi, M; Fivash, M J; Kasprzak, K S

    1997-09-01

    The toxicity of Ni(II), Co(II) and Cu(II) in animals, and that of Cd(II) in cultured cells, has been associated with generation of the promutagenic lesion 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoguanine) in DNA, among other effects. One possible source of this base may be 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP), a product of oxidative damage to the nucleotide pool, from which it is incorporated into DNA. To promote such incorporation, the metals would have to inhibit specific cellular 8-oxo-dGTPases that eliminate 8-oxo-dGTP from the nucleotide pool. The present study was designed to test such inhibition in vitro on 8-oxo-dGTPases from two different species, the human MTH1 protein and Escherichia coli MutT protein. In the presence of Mg(II), the natural activator of 8-oxo-dGTPases, all four metals were found to inhibit both enzymes. For MTH1, the IC50 values (+/- SE; n = 3-4) were 17 +/- 2 microM for Cu(II), 30 +/- 8 microM for Cd(II), 376 +/- 71 microM for Co(II) and 801 +/- 97 microM for Ni(II). For MutT, they were 60 +/- 6 microM for Cd(II), 102 +/- 8 microM for Cu(II), 1461 +/- 96 microM for Ni(II) and 8788 +/- 1003 microM for Co(II). Thus, Cu(II) and Cd(II) emerged as much stronger inhibitors than Ni(II) and Co(II), and MTH1 appeared to be generally more sensitive to metal inhibition than MutT. Interestingly, in the absence of Mg(II), the activity of the enzymes could be restored by Co(II) to 73% of that with Mg(II) alone for MutT, and 34% for MTH1, the other metals being much less or non-effective. The difference in sensitivity to metal inhibition between the two enzymes may reflect the differences in the amino acid ligands, especially the cysteine ligand, outside their evolutionarily conserved Mg(II)-binding active sites, which might indicate predominantly non-competitive or uncompetitive mechanism of the inhibition. The overall results suggest that inhibition of 8-oxo-dGTPases may be involved in the mechanisms of induction of the 8

  6. Systems with small dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Braginsky, V B; Panov, V I

    1985-01-01

    Introduction ; mechanical oscillators with small dissipation ; electromagnetic resonators with small dissipation ; high-quality electromagnetic resonators in physical experiments ; mechanical oscillators in physical experiments

  7. Small Business Size Standards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Certain government programs, such as SBA loan programs and contracting opportunities, are reserved for small business concerns. In order to qualify, businesses must...

  8. p115 RhoGEF activates the Rac1 GTPase signaling cascade in MCP1 chemokine-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nikhlesh K; Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2017-08-25

    Although the involvement of Rho proteins in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases is well studied, little is known about the role of their upstream regulators, the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs). Here, we sought to identify the RhoGEFs involved in monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1)-induced vascular wall remodeling. We found that, among the RhoGEFs tested, MCP1 induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p115 RhoGEF but not of PDZ RhoGEF or leukemia-associated RhoGEF in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Moreover, p115 RhoGEF inhibition suppressed MCP1-induced HASMC migration and proliferation. Consistent with these observations, balloon injury (BI) induced p115 RhoGEF tyrosine phosphorylation in rat common carotid arteries, and siRNA-mediated down-regulation of its levels substantially attenuated BI-induced smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation, resulting in reduced neointima formation. Furthermore, depletion of p115 RhoGEF levels also abrogated MCP1- or BI-induced Rac1-NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-PKN1-CDK4-PAK1 signaling, which, as we reported previously, is involved in vascular wall remodeling. Our findings also show that protein kinase N1 (PKN1) downstream of Rac1-cyclin D1/CDK6 and upstream of CDK4-PAK1 in the p115 RhoGEF-Rac1-NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-PKN1-CDK4-PAK1 signaling axis is involved in the modulation of vascular wall remodeling. Of note, we also observed that CCR2-G i/o -Fyn signaling mediates MCP1-induced p115 RhoGEF and Rac1 GTPase activation. These findings suggest that p115 RhoGEF is critical for MCP1-induced HASMC migration and proliferation in vitro and for injury-induced neointima formation in vivo by modulating Rac1-NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-PKN1-CDK4-PAK1 signaling. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Induction of cell scattering by expression of beta1 integrins in beta1-deficient epithelial cells requires activation of members of the rho family of GTPases and downregulation of cadherin and catenin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimond, C; van Der Flier, A; van Delft, S

    1999-01-01

    beta1 prevented the disruption of intercellular adhesions and cell scattering. In addition, using biochemical activity assays for Rho-like GTPases, we show that the expression of beta1A, beta1D, or IL2R-beta1A in GE11 or GD25 cells triggers activation of both RhoA and Rac1, but not of Cdc42. Moreover......, dominant negative Rac1 (N17Rac1) inhibited the disruption of cell-cell adhesions when expressed before beta1. However, all three GTPases might be involved in the morphological transition, since expression of either N19RhoA, N17Rac1, or N17Cdc42 reversed cell scattering and partially restored cadherin......-based adhesions in GE11-beta1A cells. Our results indicate that beta1 integrins regulate the polarity and motility of epithelial cells by the induction of intracellular molecular events involving a downregulation of alpha-catenin function and the activation of the Rho-like G proteins Rac1 and RhoA....

  10. The Arabidopsis gene DIG6 encodes a large 60S subunit nuclear export GTPase 1 that is involved in ribosome biogenesis and affects multiple auxin-regulated development processes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Huayan

    2015-08-13

    The circularly permuted GTPase large subunit GTPase 1 (LSG1) is involved in the maturation step of the 60S ribosome and is essential for cell viability in yeast. Here, an Arabidopsis mutant dig6 (drought inhibited growth of lateral roots) was isolated. The mutant exhibited multiple auxin-related phenotypes, which included reduced lateral root number, altered leaf veins, and shorter roots. Genetic mapping combined with next-generation DNA sequencing identified that the mutation occurred in AtLSG1-2. This gene was highly expressed in regions of auxin accumulation. Ribosome profiling revealed that a loss of function of AtLSG1-2 led to decreased levels of monosomes, further demonstrating its role in ribosome biogenesis. Quantitative proteomics showed that the expression of certain proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis was differentially regulated, indicating that ribosome biogenesis processes were impaired in the mutant. Further investigations showed that an AtLSG1-2 deficiency caused the alteration of auxin distribution, response, and transport in plants. It is concluded that AtLSG1-2 is integral to ribosome biogenesis, consequently affecting auxin homeostasis and plant development.

  11. STOOKE SMALL BODIES MAPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Stooke Small Bodies Map collection contains maps of small solar system bodies in various projections, with and without latitude/longiude grids. The maps are...

  12. Gender Segregation Small Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth R Troske; William J Carrington

    1992-01-01

    This paper studies interfirm gender segregation in a unique sample of small employers. We focus on small firms because previous research on interfirm segregation has studied only large firms and because it is easier to link the demographic characteristics of employers and employees in small firms. This latter feature permits an assessment of the role of employer discrimination in creating gender segregation. Our first finding is that interfirm segregation is prevalent among small employers. I...

  13. Regulation of Gβγi-dependent PLC-β3 activity in smooth muscle: inhibitory phosphorylation of PLC-β3 by PKA and PKG and stimulatory phosphorylation of Gαi-GTPase-activating protein RGS2 by PKG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalli, Ancy D; Kumar, Divya P; Al-Shboul, Othman; Mahavadi, Sunila; Kuemmerle, John F; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2014-11-01

    In gastrointestinal smooth muscle, agonists that bind to Gi-coupled receptors activate preferentially PLC-β3 via Gβγ to stimulate phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and generate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) leading to IP3-dependent Ca(2+) release and muscle contraction. In the present study, we identified the mechanism of inhibition of PLC-β3-dependent PI hydrolysis by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA), an adenosine A1 receptor agonist, caused an increase in PI hydrolysis in a concentration-dependent fashion; stimulation was blocked by expression of the carboxyl-terminal sequence of GRK2(495-689), a Gβγ-scavenging peptide, or Gαi minigene but not Gαq minigene. Isoproterenol and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) induced phosphorylation of PLC-β3 and inhibited CPA-induced PI hydrolysis, Ca(2+) release, and muscle contraction. The effect of isoproterenol on all three responses was inhibited by PKA inhibitor, myristoylated PKI, or AKAP inhibitor, Ht-31, whereas the effect of GSNO was selectively inhibited by PKG inhibitor, Rp-cGMPS. GSNO, but not isoproterenol, also phosphorylated Gαi-GTPase-activating protein, RGS2, and enhanced association of Gαi3-GTP and RGS2. The effect of GSNO on PI hydrolysis was partly reversed in cells (i) expressing constitutively active GTPase-resistant Gαi mutant (Q204L), (ii) phosphorylation-site-deficient RGS2 mutant (S46A/S64A), or (iii) siRNA for RGS2. We conclude that PKA and PKG inhibit Gβγi-dependent PLC-β3 activity by direct phosphorylation of PLC-β3. PKG, but not PKA, also inhibits PI hydrolysis indirectly by a mechanism involving phosphorylation of RGS2 and its association with Gαi-GTP. This allows RGS2 to accelerate Gαi-GTPase activity, enhance Gαβγi trimer formation, and inhibit Gβγi-dependent PLC-β3 activity.

  14. [Burnout syndrome associated factors in gynecologists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer-Morales, Yusvisaret; Prince-Vélez, Roberto; Searcy-Bernal, Roberto

    2007-07-01

    To determine risk factors associated to Burnout Syndrome in medical gynecologist staff who works at the Gynecology-pediatrics with Family Medicine Hospital number 31 of the IMSS at Mexicali city, Baja California. A cross sectional study was performed in 27 gynecologists (100% of the total gynecologist that works at that particular hospital). A validated survey instrument developed by Maslach was applied to them in order to identify the presence of the syndrome and a general questionnaire including sociodemographic information was also applied to the doctors. The statistical analysis was both descriptive and inferential including chi square, Student t and logistic regression. 74.1% of the doctors who showed signs of Burnout Syndrome were males and 25.9% were females. The average doctors age of the group who developed Burnout was 44.81 +/- 6.11 years. The mean time in years of work for the doctors with the syndrome was 15.56 +/- 7.11 years. Only one doctor was divorced and she presented Burnout Syndrome, on the other hand, 62.5% of the married doctors showed evidence of Burnout Syndrome (p > 0.05). The general prevalence was 59.2%. Of those who showed signs of burnout, 87.5% presented it in low degree, 6.2% presented moderate degree, 6.2% presented high burnout degree. Out of all the organizational factors type, none resulted significative. The prevalence of the reported syndrome is apparently high when compared to the medical anesthesiology staff of the same hospital; however this difference is not statistically significative. In the unvaried and multivariate analyses, no organizational factor shows significance as a potential risk. It is necessary to consider psychological support to the affected doctors and to value the organization of the service, looking for an administrative reengineering.

  15. Primary Sjogren's syndrome associated with inappropriate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-03-30

    Mar 30, 1990 ... ethanol, paracetamol, barbiturates and benzodiazepines were negative. An ECG, chest radiography, blood gas analysis, thyroid function tests and the cortisol level were norm~ and screening for porphyrin in urine and stool was negative. Computed tomography of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid.

  16. Sneddon syndrome associated with Protein S deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refah Sayin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sneddon syndrome (SS is rare, arterio-occlusive disorder characterized by generalized livedo racemosa of the skin and various central nervous symptoms due to occlusion of medium-sized arteries of unknown. Seizure, cognitive impairment, hypertension, and history of repetitive miscarriages are the other symptoms seen in this disease. Livedo racemosa involves persisting irreversible skin lesions red or blue in color with irregular margins. Usually, SS occurs in women of childbearing age. Protein S deficiency is an inherited or acquired disorder associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. We present a 33-year-old woman with SS with diffuse livedo racemosa, recurrent cerebrovascular diseases, migraine-type headache, sinus vein thrombosis, and protein S deficiency. Protein S deficiency and with Sneddon syndrome rarely encountered in the literature.

  17. Poland's syndrome associated with chronic granulocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, R; Afonso, E; Benedito, M; Maricato, L

    1991-10-01

    Poland's syndrome has been sporadically associated with haematological neoplasms, namely acute lymphoblastic and myeloblastic leukaemias and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The authors present the case of a child in whom this syndrome coexists with a Philadelphia negative, chronic granulocytic leukaemia, which has only required one course of treatment with busulphan in two and a half years of follow-up.

  18. Syndromes Associated with Sexually Transmitted Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Chernesky

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Excellent technologies have been developed to identify the specific microbial agents of chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, herpes, chancroid, trichomoniasis, human papillomavirus and HIV infection. However, it is also crucial to recognize syndromes that may be caused by one or more sexually transmitted pathogens. When laboratory services are lacking or are inadequate to provide timely results to enable appropriate treatment, some patients must be managed and treated syndromically. Most Canadian laboratories should be able to provide diagnostic services to determine the etiology of syndromes such as cervicitis, urethritis, pelvic inflammatory disease, prostatitis, genital ulcers, sexually transmitted infection (STI-related enteric infections, epididymitis, hepatitis, ophthalmia neonatorum, vulvovaginitis and vaginosis.

  19. Restless legs syndrome associated with major diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Richard; Högl, Birgit; Paulus, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Recent publications on both the genetics and environmental factors of restless legs syndrome (RLS) defined as a clinical disorder suggest that overlapping genetic risk factors may play a role in primary (idiopathic) and secondary (symptomatic) RLS. Following a systematic literature search of RLS associated with comorbidities, we identified an increased prevalence of RLS only in iron deficiency and kidney disease. In cardiovascular disease, arterial hypertension, diabetes, migraine, and Parkinson disease, the methodology of studies was poor, but an association might be possible. There is insufficient evidence for conditions such as anemia (without iron deficiency), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, multiple sclerosis, headache, stroke, narcolepsy, and ataxias. Based on possible gene–microenvironmental interaction, the classifications primary and secondary RLS may suggest an inappropriate causal relation. We recognize that in some conditions, treatment of the underlying disease should be achieved as far as possible to reduce or eliminate RLS symptoms. RLS might be seen as a continuous spectrum with a major genetic contribution at one end and a major environmental or comorbid disease contribution at the other. PMID:26944272

  20. Asperger Syndrome: Associated Psychiatric and Medical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2002-01-01

    This article explores the association of medical and psychiatric conditions with Asperger syndrome, based mainly on publications from the last two decades. It examines comorbidity of Asperger syndrome with mood disorders, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, tic disorders, violence and aggression,…

  1. Carmi syndrome associated with gastric perforation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here, we report a case of Carmi syndrome in a neonate who presented with an uncommon complication of gastric perforation. Ann Pediatr Surg 9:122–123 c 2013 Annals of. Pediatric ... Here, we report these three uncommon conditions, that is, CPA and EB ... membrane resulting from minor mechanical friction or trauma.

  2. Hemophagocytic Syndrome Associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Koike

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp sometimes causes immunological complications in children. We present a rare case of hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS caused by Mp in a previously healthy 7-year-old Japanese girl. A chest radiograph obtained to evaluate the source of her fever showed infiltration in the lower right lung with mild splenomegaly. We could diagnose the patient with HPS on the basis of the hemophagocytic-lymphohistiocytosis- (HLH 2004 criteria. She met the criteria for fever, splenomegaly, neutrophil count (265 mg/dL, and ferritin level (>500 ng/mL. Furthermore, a peripheral blood smear showed an increased number of monocytes/macrophages with erythrophagocytosis. Treatment with clarithromycin and prednisolone, which was initiated soon after the diagnosis, was successful. Mp infection might partly progress to HPS in certain conditions. Clinicians should be aware of HPS caused by Mp and start appropriate treatment as soon as possible if the disease is suspected.

  3. Plasma exchange in Goodpasture syndrome associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Good pasture syndrome (GPS) has been paid much attention recently for the dangerous illnessand high mortality. Objective: To investigate the efficiency of plasma exchange (PE) to treat Goodpasture syndrome (GPS) in children associated with Turner's syndrome. Method: We report a case of a 15 year old ...

  4. Vena cava superior syndrome associated with sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurm, K.; Walz, M.; Reidemeister, J.C.; Donhuijsen, K.

    1988-01-01

    We report the first observation of clinical manifestations of vena cava superior syndrome (VCSS) associated with sarcoidosis. Twenty-four years after the first signs of the disease had been noted, mediastinal lymphomas penetrating the wall of the vena cava superior caused complete obstruction. It is most unusual for the vessel wall to be destroyed in this way, which explains why VCSS is often missed in sarcoidosis. The obstructed vessel was resected and successfully replaced by a Gore-Tex prosthesis. The importance of VCSS for the differential diagnosis is pointed out. Two further peculiarities are the simultaneous occurrence of elevated intraocular pressure and VCSS, and the familial incidence. (orig.) [de

  5. Psychiatric syndromes associated with atypical chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Chest pain often indicates coronary disease, but in 25% of patients there is no evidence of ischemic heart disease using standard diagnostic tests. Beside that, cardiologic examinations are repeated several times for months. If other medical causes could not be found, there is a possibility that chest pain is a symptom of psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of psychiatric syndromes, increased somatization, anxiety, stress life events exposure and characteristic of chest pain expression in persons with atypical chest pain and coronary patients, as well as to define predictive parameters for atypical chest pain. Method. We compared 30 patients with atypical chest pain (E group to 30 coronary patients (K group, after cardiological and psychiatric evaluation. We have applied: Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, The Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90 R, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Holms-Rahe Scale of stress life events (H-R, Questionnaire for pain expression Pain-O-Meter (POM. Significant differences between groups and predictive value of the parameters for atypical chest pain were determined. Results. The E group participants compared to the group K were younger (33.4 ± 5.4 : 48.3 ± 6,4 years, p < 0.001, had a moderate anxiety level (20.4 ± 11.9 : 9.6 ± 3.8, p < 0.001, panic and somatiform disorders were present in the half of the E group, as well as eleveted somatization score (SOM ≥ 63 -50% : 10%, p < 0.01 and a higher H-R score level (102.0 ± 52.2 : 46.5 ± 55.0, p < 0.001. Pain was mild, accompanied with panic. The half of the E group subjects had somatoform and panic disorders. Conclusion. Somatoform and panic disorders are associated with atypical chest pain. Pain expression is mild, accompained with panic. Predictive factors for atypical chest pain are: age under 40, anxiety level > 20, somatization ≥ 63, presence of panic and somatoform disorders, H-R score > 102, and a lack of positive diagnostic test of coronary disease. Defining of these parameters could be useful for early psychiatric evaluation of persons with atypical chest pain.

  6. Primary Sjogren's syndrome associated with inappropriate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A patient in whom primary Sjogren's syndrome and inappropriate antiduretic hormone secretion were associated is reported. This is the first report of such an association. The possible pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed and vasculitis proposed as the underlying pathogenetic mechanism.

  7. Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome associated with Sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio Porto Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Parinaud oculoglandular syndrome is a rare eye disease caused by different etiologic agents, including bacteria, viruses and fungi. It is characterized by a granulomatous conjunctivitis, accompanied by adjacent preauricular lymphadenopathy and can bring consequences if not treated promptly. We present a case of Parinaud oculoglandular syndrome caused by Sporothrix schenckii from the sporotrichosis epidemic in its zoonotic form occurring in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  8. Fragile X syndrome associated with tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Susanne A; Robertson, Mary M; Rizzo, Renata; Turk, Jeremy; Bhatia, Kailash P; Orth, Michael

    2008-06-15

    Movement disorders other than late onset tremor-ataxia in association with fragile X syndrome, the most common identifiable cause of inherited mental retardation, seem to be rare. Here we describe five male patients from three unrelated families with fragile X syndrome that presented with motor and phonic tics. Clinically, 4 patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria for Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) while 1 patient would have been diagnosed with an adult onset tic disorder. However, in all patients onset of tics was considerably later than in typical GTS. Three patients had atypical tics and two patients reported waxing and waning of tic intensity over time. Four of the 5 patients showed clinical signs typical of fragile X syndrome, in particular dysmorphic features, learning difficulties and speech and language problems that required special treatment. All patients had co-morbidities common to both GTS and fragile X syndrome. We suggest considering fragile X syndrome in GTS complicated by co-morbidity with late onset of atypical tics, in particular when learning disability and dysmorphic features are present. (c) 2008 Movement Disorder Society

  9. Posterior Reversible Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Pazopanib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Foerster

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old female patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma under third-line treatment with pazopanib for 8 weeks suddenly developed severe headaches, grand mal seizures and paresis of the left arm in combination with gait instability as well as nausea and vomiting during her vacation abroad. The emergency physician measured systolic blood pressure values over 300 mm Hg and suspected a stroke. The CT imaging without contrast agent in a local hospital did not show any pathologic findings despite bone metastases. The colleagues suspected cerebral metastases or meningeosis carcinomatosa and referred the patient to our department for further diagnostics and treatment planning. An MRI scan ruled out the suspected cerebral metastases or meningeosis carcinomatosa, but showed signs of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS in the form of band-like hyperintensities as a sign of cytotoxic edema in the gray and white matter of the left parietal lobe. The patient then reported that similar blood pressure values had been measured shortly after the start of a first-line therapy with sunitinib, so that we discontinued the current treatment with pazopanib. Within 6 days the neurologic symptoms vanished and the patient was discharged. An intermittent hypertension persisted. A follow-up MRI 3 weeks later showed an RPLS-typical cortical infarction in the affected area. RPLS should be considered as the actual reason for neurologic findings in hypertensive patients with known metastatic cancers under tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

  10. Genetic syndromes associated with overgrowth in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Min Ko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Overgrowth syndromes comprise a diverse group of conditions with unique clinical, behavioral and molecular genetic features. While considerable overlap in presentation sometimes exists, advances in identification of the precise etiology of specific overgrowth disorders continue to improve clinicians' ability to make an accurate diagnosis. Among them, this paper introduces two classic genetic overgrowth syndromes: Sotos syndrome and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Historically, the diagnosis was based entirely on clinical findings. However, it is now understood that Sotos syndrome is caused by a variety of molecular genetic alterations resulting in haploinsufficiency of the NSD1 gene at chromosome 5q35 and that Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is caused by heterogeneous abnormalities in the imprinting of a number of growth regulatory genes within chromosome 11p15 in the majority of cases. Interestingly, the 11p15 imprinting region is also associated with Russell-Silver syndrome which is a typical growth retardation syndrome. Opposite epigenetic alterations in 11p15 result in opposite clinical features shown in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Russell-Silver syndrome. Although the exact functions of the causing genes have not yet been completely understood, these overgrowth syndromes can be good models to clarify the complex basis of human growth and help to develop better-directed therapies in the future.

  11. [Neurological syndromes associated with homocystein dismetabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokov, E A; Leonova, S F

    2006-01-01

    The article summarizes the results of clinical, neurological, and laboratory examination of patients with hyperhomocysteinemia. The data obtained suggest the existence of common pathobiochemical mechanisms of homocystein, cholesterol, and myelin dysmetabolism. The authors demonstrate that neurological manifestations of hyperhomocysteinemia are associated with the processes of demyelinization in the central and peripheral nervous systems.

  12. Goodpasture's syndrome associated with pulmonary eosinophilic vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komadina, K H; Houk, R W; Vicks, S L; Desrosier, K F; Ridley, D J; Boswell, R N

    1988-08-01

    Lung hemorrhage and antiglomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibody mediated nephritis define Goodpasture's syndrome. We present the case of a 19-year-old Caucasian woman with unique clinical findings of Goodpasture's syndrome. Our patient initially presented with leukocytoclastic vasculitis of the skin followed by the development of nephritis and lung hemorrhage. An open lung biopsy done prior to diagnosing anti-GBM antibody disease demonstrated an intense eosinophilic vasculitis. Skin vasculitis has only been rarely reported, and to our knowledge this is the first reported case of pulmonary eosinophilic vasculitis associated with Goodpasture's syndrome.

  13. A Hypereosinophilic Syndrome Associated with HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    mucosa of patients with coeliac disease . J Exp Med 1992; 175: 293 29. Enockihara H, Kajitani H, Nagashima S, et al. Interleukin-5 activity in sera...exhibited clinical and histopathologic similarities to the idiopathic hypereominophilic syndrome as well as acute graft -versus -host disease . A serum...MD **** Paul M Benson LTC MC USA * and the Military Medical Consortium for Applied Retroviral Research * Department of Bacterial Diseases Walter Reed

  14. Toxic metabolic syndrome associated with HAART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B

    2006-01-01

    (HAART) may encounter the HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS), which attenuates patient compliance to this treatment. HALS is characterised by impaired glucose and lipid metabolism and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This review depicts the metabolic abnormalities associated...... with HAART by describing the key cell and organ systems that are involved, emphasising the role of insulin resistance. An opinion on the remedies available to treat the metabolic abnormalities and phenotype of HALS is provided....

  15. Hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with paraquat intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ha Nee; Bae, Eun Jin; Hwang, Kyungo; Kang, Yeojin; Yun, Seongeun; Cho, Hyun Seop; Chang, Se-Ho; Park, Dong Jun

    2014-06-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old patient with paraquat intoxication resulting in the requirement for hemoperfusion, hemodialysis, and plasma exchange. His initial serum paraquat level was 0.24 µg/mL (0.0-0.1 µg/mL). Activated charcoal (50 g) was administered orally, and high-dose N-acetylcysteine (150 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. In addition, immediate 4 h hemoperfusion was also performed for three consecutive days after admission. Hemodialysis was started on the 4th day after admission because of uremia. On the 9th day after admission, laboratory findings demonstrated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS): microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA), thrombocytopenia, elevated reticulocyte count, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Plasma exchange was performed three times consecutively. Anemia and thrombocytopenia were improved, and LDH was normalized after plasma exchange. Urine output increased to 2240 mL/day on the 18th day after admission, and hemodialysis was discontinued. He is currently being observed at our follow-up clinic without renal impairment or pulmonary dysfunction for 1.5 years since discharge. We should suspect paraquat-associated HUS when thrombocytopenia and anemia are maintained for a long time after paraquat intoxication. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Mosaic Turner syndrome associated with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sook Young; Park, Joo Won; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jun, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jeong Seop; Lee, Ji Eun

    2014-03-01

    Turner syndrome is a sex-chromosome disorder; occurring in 1 in 2,500 female births. There are sporadic few case reports of concomitant Turner syndrome with schizophrenia worldwide. Most Turner females had a 45,X monosomy, whereas the majority of comorbidity between Turner syndrome and schizophrenia had a mosaic karyotype (45,X/46,XX). We present a case of a 21-year-old woman with Turner syndrome, mosaic karyotype (45,X/46,XX), showing mental retardation, hypothyroidism, and schizophrenia. HOPA gene within Xq13 is related to mental retardation, hypothyroidism, and schizophrenia. Our case may be a potential clue which supports the hypothesis for involvement of genes on X chromosome in development of schizophrenia. Further studies including comorbid cases reports are need in order to discern the cause of schizophrenia in patients having Turner syndrome.

  17. Validity and reliability of the Spanish version of the DN4 (Douleur Neuropathique 4 questions questionnaire for differential diagnosis of pain syndromes associated to a neuropathic or somatic component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouhassira Didier

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study assesses the validity and reliability of the Spanish version of DN4 questionnaire as a tool for differential diagnosis of pain syndromes associated to a neuropathic (NP or somatic component (non-neuropathic pain, NNP. Methods A study was conducted consisting of two phases: cultural adaptation into the Spanish language by means of conceptual equivalence, including forward and backward translations in duplicate and cognitive debriefing, and testing of psychometric properties in patients with NP (peripheral, central and mixed and NNP. The analysis of psychometric properties included reliability (internal consistency, inter-rater agreement and test-retest reliability and validity (ROC curve analysis, agreement with the reference diagnosis and determination of sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values in different subsamples according to type of NP. Results A sample of 164 subjects (99 women, 60.4%; age: 60.4 ± 16.0 years, 94 (57.3% with NP (36 with peripheral, 32 with central, and 26 with mixed pain and 70 with NNP was enrolled. The questionnaire was reliable [Cronbach's alpha coefficient: 0.71, inter-rater agreement coefficient: 0.80 (0.71–0.89, and test-retest intra-class correlation coefficient: 0.95 (0.92–0.97] and valid for a cut-off value ≥ 4 points, which was the best value to discriminate between NP and NNP subjects. Discussion This study, representing the first validation of the DN4 questionnaire into another language different than the original, not only supported its high discriminatory value for identification of neuropathic pain, but also provided supplemental psychometric validation (i.e. test-retest reliability, influence of educational level and pain intensity and showed its validity in mixed pain syndromes.

  18. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  19. Small Quantum Structures with Small State Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navara, Mirko

    2008-01-01

    We summarize and extend results about “small” quantum structures with small dimensions of state spaces. These constructions have contributed to the theory of orthomodular lattices. More general quantum structures (orthomodular posets, orthoalgebras, and effect algebras) admit sometimes simplifications, but there are problems where no progress has been achieved.

  20. Small Vessel Security Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    ...), narcotics, aliens, and other contraband, and other criminals. Small vessels have also been successfully employed overseas by terrorists to deliver Waterborne Improvised Explosive Devices (WBIEDs...

  1. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  2. Small Wastewater Systems Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small communities face barriers to building and maintaining effective wastewater treatment services, challenges include financial/economic limitations, lack of managerial training and geographic isolation/remoteness.

  3. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... all of an organ that contains cancer. The resection may include the small intestine and nearby organs (if the cancer has spread). The doctor may remove the section of the small intestine that contains cancer and perform an anastomosis (joining the cut ends of the intestine together). ...

  4. Small School Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll E. Bronson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative ethnographic case study explored the evolution of a public urban high school in its 3rd year of small school reform. The study focused on how the high school proceeded from its initial concept, moving to a small school program, and emerging as a new small high school. Data collection included interviews, observations, and document review to develop a case study of one small high school sharing a multiplex building. The first key finding, “Too Many Pieces, Not Enough Glue,” revealed that the school had too many new programs starting at once and they lacked a clear understanding of their concept and vision for their new small school, training on the Montessori philosophies, teaching and learning in small schools, and how to operate within a teacher-cooperative model. The second key finding, “A Continuous Struggle,” revealed that the shared building space presented problems for teachers and students. District policies remain unchanged, resulting in staff and students resorting to activist approaches to get things done. These findings offer small school reform leaders suggestions for developing and sustaining a small school culture and cohesion despite the pressures to revert back to top-down, comprehensive high school norms.

  5. Industrial Education. "Small Engines".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Part of a series of curriculum guides dealing with industrial education in junior high schools, this guide provides the student with information and manipulative experiences on small gasoline engines. Included are sections on shop adjustment, safety, small engines, internal combustion, engine construction, four stroke engines, two stroke engines,…

  6. Small Business Tax Regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, Fatih; Coolidge, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Simplified tax regimes for micro and small enterprises in developing countries are intended to facilitate voluntary tax compliance. However, survey evidence suggests that small business taxation based on simplified bookkeeping or turnover is sometimes perceived as too complex for microenterprises in countries with high illiteracy levels. Very simple fixed tax regimes not requiring any book...

  7. Epitope mapping and biological function analysis of antibodies produced by immunization of mice with an inactivated Chinese isolate of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Te-hui W.; Wang, Shixia; Sakhatskyy, Pavlo V.; Mboudoudjeck, Innocent; Lawrence, John M.; Huang Song; Coley, Scott; Yang Baoan; Li Jiaming; Zhu Qingyu; Lu Shan

    2005-01-01

    Inactivated severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has been tested as a candidate vaccine against the re-emergence of SARS. In order to understand the efficacy and safety of this approach, it is important to know the antibody specificities generated with inactivated SARS-CoV. In the current study, a panel of twelve monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was established by immunizing Balb/c mice with the inactivated BJ01 strain of SARS-CoV isolated from the lung tissue of a SARS-infected Chinese patient. These mAbs could recognize SARS-CoV-infected cells by immunofluorescence analysis (IFA). Seven of them were mapped to the specific segments of recombinant spike (S) protein: six on S1 subunit (aa 12-798) and one on S2 subunit (aa 797-1192). High neutralizing titers against SARS-CoV were detected with two mAbs (1A5 and 2C5) targeting at a subdomain of S protein (aa 310-535), consistent with the previous report that this segment of S protein contains the major neutralizing domain. Some of these S-specific mAbs were able to recognize cleaved products of S protein in SARS-CoV-infected Vero E6 cells. None of the remaining five mAbs could recognize either of the recombinant S, N, M, or E antigens by ELISA. This study demonstrated that the inactivated SARS-CoV was able to preserve the immunogenicity of S protein including its major neutralizing domain. The relative ease with which these mAbs were generated against SARS-CoV virions further supports that subunit vaccination with S constructs may also be able to protect animals and perhaps humans. It is somewhat unexpected that no N-specific mAbs were identified albeit anti-N IgG was easily identified in SARS-CoV-infected patients. The availability of this panel of mAbs also provided potentially useful agents with applications in therapy, diagnosis, and basic research of SARS-CoV

  8. SmallSat Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropulos, Dolores; Bittner, David; Murawski, Robert; Golden, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The SmallSat has an unrealized potential in both the private industry and in the federal government. Currently over 70 companies, 50 universities and 17 governmental agencies are involved in SmallSat research and development. In 1994, the U.S. Army Missile and Defense mapped the moon using smallSat imagery. Since then Smart Phones have introduced this imagery to the people of the world as diverse industries watched this trend. The deployment cost of smallSats is also greatly reduced compared to traditional satellites due to the fact that multiple units can be deployed in a single mission. Imaging payloads have become more sophisticated, smaller and lighter. In addition, the growth of small technology obtained from private industries has led to the more widespread use of smallSats. This includes greater revisit rates in imagery, significantly lower costs, the ability to update technology more frequently and the ability to decrease vulnerability of enemy attacks. The popularity of smallSats show a changing mentality in this fast paced world of tomorrow. What impact has this created on the NASA communication networks now and in future years? In this project, we are developing the SmallSat Relational Database which can support a simulation of smallSats within the NASA SCaN Compatability Environment for Networks and Integrated Communications (SCENIC) Modeling and Simulation Lab. The NASA Space Communications and Networks (SCaN) Program can use this modeling to project required network support needs in the next 10 to 15 years. The SmallSat Rational Database could model smallSats just as the other SCaN databases model the more traditional larger satellites, with a few exceptions. One being that the smallSat Database is designed to be built-to-order. The SmallSat database holds various hardware configurations that can be used to model a smallSat. It will require significant effort to develop as the research material can only be populated by hand to obtain the unique data

  9. Wind: small is beautiful

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, E. de

    2005-01-01

    The small wind sector (0.5-100 kW) is often overlooked but could provide decentralised energy systems. Small wind turbines have been used for homes, farms and small businesses for over 80 years (e.g. in the USA and the Netherlands), receiving a boost in the 1970s and 1980s following the 1973 oil crisis when a new generation of turbines entered the European and US markets. Bergey Windpower and Southwest Windpower from the USA are the market leaders in this sector in terms of sales volume but are still classed as medium-sized enterprises. Small turbines have the disadvantage of higher costs compared with large turbines due to higher manufacturing costs, technical factors associated with the tendency to use small turbines on relatively short towers, small production runs and a failure to keep up with the latest design developments such as cost-effective state-of-the-art frequency converters. Most small turbines are horizontal axis turbines, though vertical axis turbines are produced by some manufacturers. Examples of the systems available from European suppliers are described

  10. 78 FR 11745 - Small Business Size Regulations, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ..., Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program... Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. DATES: Effective February...

  11. Small scale optics

    CERN Document Server

    Yupapin, Preecha

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of light in small scale optics or nano/micro optical devices has shown promising results, which can be used for basic and applied research, especially in nanoelectronics. Small Scale Optics presents the use of optical nonlinear behaviors for spins, antennae, and whispering gallery modes within micro/nano devices and circuits, which can be used in many applications. This book proposes a new design for a small scale optical device-a microring resonator device. Most chapters are based on the proposed device, which uses a configuration know as a PANDA ring resonator. Analytical and nu

  12. Small - Display Cartography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Flemming; Hvas, Anders; Münster-Swendsen, Jørgen

    This report comprises the work carried out in the work-package of small display cartography. The work-package has aimed at creating a general framework for the small-display cartography. A solid framework facilitates an increased use of spatial data in mobile devices - thus enabling, together...... Service Communication and finally, Part IV: Concluding remarks and topics for further research on small-display cartography. Part II includes a separate Appendix D consisting of a cartographic design specification. Part III includes a separate Appendix C consisting of a schema specification, a separate...

  13. Small satellite product assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demontlivault, J.; Cadelec, Jacques

    1993-01-01

    In order to increase the interest in small satellites, their cost must be reduced; reducing product assurance costs induced by quality requirements is a major objective. For a logical approach, small satellites are classified in three main categories: satellites for experimental operations with a short lifetime, operational satellites manufactured in small mass with long lifetime requirements, operational satellites (long lifetime required), of which only a few models are produced. The various requirements as regards the product assurance are examined for each satellite category: general requirements for space approach, reliability, electronic components, materials and processes, quality assurance, documentation, tests, and management. Ideal product assurance system integrates quality teams and engineering teams.

  14. Lightweight Small Arms Technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spiegel, Kori; Shipley, Paul

    2006-01-01

    .... The Lightweight Small Arms Technologies program was established to address this critical issue. The goals of the program prioritize weight reduction over any other characteristic, while balancing the requirements of lethality, reliability, and cost...

  15. The Power of Small

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 12. The Power of Small: Championing the Underdogs of Modern Medicine. Suvasini Ramaswamy Anirban Mitra. General Article Volume 20 Issue 12 December 2015 pp 1136-1153 ...

  16. Small Satellite Transporter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary objective is to determine whether this small satellite transporter is capable of transporting at least four 6U CubeSats is possible for a given set of...

  17. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgical procedures that create a loop of small intestine where excess bacteria can grow. An example is a Billroth II type of stomach removal ( gastrectomy ). Some cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  18. Small-x physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, A.H. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    After a brief review of the kinematics of deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering, the parton model is described. Small-x behavior coming from DGLAP evolution and from BFKL evolution is discussed, and the two types of evolution are contrasted and compared. Then a more detailed discussion of BFKL dynamics is given. The phenomenology of small-x physics is discussed with an emphasis on ways in which BFKL dynamics may be discussed and measured. 45 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Small - Display Cartography

    OpenAIRE

    Nissen, Flemming; Hvas, Anders; Münster-Swendsen, Jørgen; Brodersen, Lars

    2003-01-01

    This report comprises the work carried out in the work-package of small display cartography. The work-package has aimed at creating a general framework for the small-display cartography. A solid framework facilitates an increased use of spatial data in mobile devices - thus enabling, together with the rapidly evolving positioning techniques, a new category of position-dependent, map-based services to be introduced. The report consists of the following parts: Part I: Categorization of handheld...

  20. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    These proceedings of the IAEA-sponsored meeting held in Nice, France 10-11 October, 1988, contain the manuscripts of the 21 reports dealing with research using small tokamaks. The purpose of this meeting was to highlight some of the achievements of small tokamaks and alternative magnetic confinement concepts and assess the suitability of starting new programs, particularly in developing countries. Papers presented were either review papers, or were detailed descriptions of particular experiments or concepts. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Small test SDHW systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejen, Niels Kristian

    1999-01-01

    Three small test SDHW systems was tested in a laboratory test facility.The three SDHW systems where all based on the low flow principe and a mantle tank but the design of the systems where different.......Three small test SDHW systems was tested in a laboratory test facility.The three SDHW systems where all based on the low flow principe and a mantle tank but the design of the systems where different....

  2. Small wind turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Vélez Castellano, Didier

    2010-01-01

    The main objective is to develop a project on installing a small wind turbine at the University of Glyndwr in Wrexham Wales. Today are immersed in a world seeking clean energy for reduce greenhouse gases because this problem is becoming a global reality. So installing a small wind turbine at the university would provide large quantity of clean energy to supply a workshop and also reduce the expulsion of CO2 into the atmosphere. The main characteristic of the turbine under...

  3. Small woodland ownership management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert J. Childs

    1977-01-01

    Small woodlot ownerships are a commodity on the real estate market which have cycled through a supply and demand curve on a somewhat irregular basis. In order to have some understanding of what it is we are talking about, it is necessary to define what a small woodlot is, and where it may be found. In size these parcels can range from ten acres to fifteen acres on up...

  4. How small is a small cloud?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Koren

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The interplay between clouds and aerosols and their contribution to the radiation budget is one of the largest uncertainties of climate change. Most work to date has separated cloudy and cloud-free areas in order to evaluate the individual radiative forcing of aerosols, clouds, and aerosol effects on clouds.

    Here we examine the size distribution and the optical properties of small, sparse cumulus clouds and the associated optical properties of what is considered a cloud-free atmosphere within the cloud field. We show that any separation between clouds and cloud free atmosphere will incur errors in the calculated radiative forcing.

    The nature of small cumulus cloud size distributions suggests that at any resolution, a significant fraction of the clouds are missed, and their optical properties are relegated to the apparent cloud-free optical properties. At the same time, the cloudy portion incorporates significant contribution from non-cloudy pixels.

    We show that the largest contribution to the total cloud reflectance comes from the smallest clouds and that the spatial resolution changes the apparent energy flux of a broken cloudy scene. When changing the resolution from 30 m to 1 km (Landsat to MODIS the average "cloud-free" reflectance at 1.65 μm increases from 0.0095 to 0.0115 (>20%, the cloud reflectance decreases from 0.13 to 0.066 (~50%, and the cloud coverage doubles, resulting in an important impact on climate forcing estimations. The apparent aerosol forcing is on the order of 0.5 to 1 Wm−2 per cloud field.

  5. Small intestine and microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Paul D

    2011-03-01

    To highlight the recent studies which have enhanced our appreciation of the composition of the microbiota in the human small intestine and its relevance to the health of the host. In the past number of years, the composition of the microorganisms present in our small intestines has been the subject of greater scrutiny than ever before. These investigations have been possible as a consequence of the development and utilization of new molecular tools which have revolutionized the field of microbial ecology and have focused predominantly on the small intestinal microbiota associated with pediatric celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and pouchitis. The impact of invasive procedures, such as small bowel transplant, ileostomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis, on the ileal microbiota has also been investigated. The ever greater appreciation of the link between the small intestinal microbiota and the health status of the host has the potential to lead to the development of new strategies to alter this microbiota in a targeted way to prevent or treat specific disorders.

  6. Small intestine diverticuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomakov, P.; Risov, A.

    1991-01-01

    The routine method of contrast matter passage applied to 850 patients with different gastrointestinal diseases proved inefficient to detect any small-intestinal diverticuli. The following modiffications of the method have been tested in order to improve the diagnostic possibilities of the X-ray: study at short intervals, assisted passage, enteroclysm, pharmacodynamic impact, retrograde filling of the ileum by irrigoscopy. Twelve diverticuli of the small-intestinal loops were identified: 5 Meckel's diverticuli, 2 solitary of which one of the therminal ileum, 2 double diverticuli and 1 multiple diverticulosis of the jejunum. The results show that the short interval X-ray examination of the small intestines is the method of choice for identifying local changes in them. The solitary diverticuli are not casuistic scarcity, its occurrence is about 0.5% at purposeful X-ray investigation. The assisted passage method is proposed as a method of choice for detection of the Meckel's diverticulum. 5 figs., 3 tabs. 18 refs

  7. Small public private partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2009-01-01

    businesses and represent operable units for the clients and citizens. Cases are focused within education and healthcare. The analysis suggests that another type of economy apparently is in play. It is thus characteristic within education projects in UK that the largest portion of small PPPs are of a size......Public Private Partnerships (PPP) are frequently mobilized as a purchasing form suitable for large infrastructure projects. And it is commonly assumed that transaction costs linked to the establishment of PPP make them prohibitive in small sizes. In a Danish context this has been safeguarded...... by the authorities, which recommend sizes over 13,5 million € (100 million DKr). PPP is here understood as Design, Build, Finance and Operate projects. The paper shows, when looking at Germany, Italy and United Kingdom, that small PPP (below 13,5 million €) are widespread in two investigated countries; United...

  8. Small Intestinal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections.

  9. NADPH oxidase is internalized by clathrin-coated pits and localizes to a Rab27A/B GTPase-regulated secretory compartment in activated macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlerskov, Patrick; Christensen, Dan Ploug; Beyaie, David

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report that activation of different types of tissue macrophages, including microglia, by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or GM-CSF stimulation correlates with the quantitative redistribution of NADPH oxidase (cyt b(558)) from the plasma membrane to an intracellular stimulus-responsive storage...... compartment. Cryo-immunogold labeling of gp91(phox) and CeCl(3) cytochemistry showed the presence of gp91(phox) and oxidant production in numerous small (...

  10. Síndrome de ativação macrofágica associada com artrite idiopática juvenil sistêmica Macrophage activation syndrome associated with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Artur A. Silva

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever as características da síndrome de ativação macrofágica associada a artrite idiopática juvenil. DESCRIÇÃO DOS CASOS: Foram analisados retrospectivamente os prontuários de 462 pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil. Destes, sete (1,5% pacientes desenvolveram síndrome de ativação macrofágica; todos tinham a forma sistêmica da doença. A mediana de idade de início da artrite idiopática juvenil foi de 3 anos e 10 meses, e a mediana do tempo de duração da artrite idiopática juvenil antes da síndrome de ativação macrofágica foi de 8 anos e 4 meses. Todos os pacientes apresentaram febre, icterícia, hepatoesplenomegalia, sangramentos, pancitopenia e elevação das enzimas hepáticas e dos tempos de coagulação e bilirrubina direta. Três casos apresentaram infecções associadas e um caso desenvolveu a síndrome de ativação macrofágica 2 semanas após a introdução de sulfasalazina. Três pacientes morreram. Proliferação macrofágica e hemofagocitose foram evidenciadas em cinco. A terapêutica da síndrome de ativação macrofágica incluiu pulsoterapia com metilprednisolona em todos, ciclosporina em três, plasmaférese em dois e gamaglobulina endovenosa em dois. COMENTÁRIOS: A síndrome de ativação macrofágica é uma complicação da artrite idiopática juvenil sistêmica com alta morbidade e mortalidade.OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of macrophage activation syndrome associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. DESCRIPTION: This is a retrospective study involving 462 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Seven (1.5% of those patients suffered from systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis and developed macrophage activation syndrome. The median age of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis onset was 3 years and 10 months and the median duration of juvenile idiopathic arthritis before macrophage activation syndrome was 8 years and 4 months. All of them presented with fever

  11. Small hydro in Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jonker Klunne, W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available the gold mines at Pilgrim?s Rest in South Africa were powered by two 6kW hydro turbines as early as 1892, complemented by a 45kW turbine in 1894 to power the first electrical railway. In several African countries church missions built small hydro... that feed in to the national grid as this ensures a steady income stream for the enterprise. Several African countries have established renewable energy feed-in tariffs (Kenya, South Africa and Uganda) that do support the establishment of small scale...

  12. Small finance banks: Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayadev M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A recent innovation in the Indian banking structure has been the formation of a new banking institution—small finance banks (SFBs. These banks are expected to penetrate into financial inclusion by providing basic banking and credit services with a differentiated banking model to the larger population. In this context the new SFBs have multiple challenges in coming out with a new, differentiated business model. The challenges include building low cost liability portfolio, technology management, and balancing the regulatory compliances. This paper also presents the top of mind views of three senior executives of new small finance banks.

  13. Small hydroelectric engineering practice

    CERN Document Server

    Leyland, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Small Hydroelectric Engineering Practice is a comprehensive reference book covering all aspects of identifying, building, and operating hydroelectric schemes between 500 kW and 50 MW. In this range of outputs there are many options for all aspects of the scheme and it is very important that the best options are chosen.As small hydroelectric schemes are usually built against a limited budget it is extremely important that the concept design is optimum and every component is designed to maximise the benefi t and minimise the cost. As operating costs are often a high proportion of the income it i

  14. Small Column Ion Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huff, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) leverages a suite of technologies developed by DOE across the complex to achieve lifecycle savings. Technologies are applicable to multiple sites. Early testing supported multiple sites. Balance of SRS SCIX testing supports SRS deployment. A forma Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) was performed and selected Small Column Ion Exchange columns containing Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) in a 2-column lead/lag configuration. SEE considered use of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF). Advantages of approach at SRS include: (1) no new buildings, (2) low volume of Cs waste in solid form compared to aqueous strip effluent; and availability of downstream processing facilities for immediate processing of spent resin.

  15. How Small are Small Stars Really?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-01

    VLT Interferometer Measures the Size of Proxima Centauri and Other Nearby Stars [1] Summary At a distance of only 4.2 light-years, Proxima Centauri is the nearest star to the Sun currently known [2]. It is visible as an 11-magnitude object in the southern constellation of Centaurus and is the faintest member of a triple system, together with Alpha Centauri , the brightest (double) star in this constellation. Proxima Centauri is a very-low-mass star, in fact barely massive enough to burn hydrogen to helium in its interior. It is about seven times smaller than the Sun, and the surface temperature is "only" about 3000 degrees, about half of that of our own star. Consequently, it is also much fainter - the intrinsic brightness is only 1/150th of that of our Sun. Low-mass stars are very interesting objects , also because the physical conditions in their interiors have much in common with those of giant planets, like Jupiter in our solar system. A determination of the sizes of the smallest stars has been impossible until now because of their general faintness and lack of adequate instrumentation. However, astronomers have long been keen to move forward in this direction, since such measurements would provide indirect, crucial information about the behaviour of matter under extreme conditions. When the first observations with the VLT Interferometer (VLTI), combining the light from two of the 8.2-m VLT Unit Telescopes (ANTU and MELIPAL), were made one year ago ( ESO PR 23/01 ), interferometric measurements were also obtained of Proxima Centauri . They formed part of the VLTI commissioning and the data were soon released to the ESO community, cf. the special website. Now, an international team of astronomers from Switzerland, France and ESO/Chile has successfully analysed these observations by means of newly developed, advanced software. For the first time ever, they obtained a highly accurate measurement of the size of such a small star . Three other small stars were also

  16. On small clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardes, N.

    1984-01-01

    A discussion is presented of zero-point motion effects on the binding energy of a small cluster of identical particles interacting through short range attractive-repulsive forces. The model is appropriate to a discussion of both Van der Waals as well as nuclear forces. (Author) [pt

  17. Small Public Library Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlmutter, Jane; Nelson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Anyone at the helm of a small public library knows that every little detail counts. But juggling the responsibilities that are part and parcel of the job is far from easy. Finally, here's a handbook that includes everything administrators need to keep a handle on library operations, freeing them up to streamline and improve how the organization…

  18. Small rover exploration capabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salotti, J.; Laithier, C.; Machut, B.; van Marie, A.; Bruneau, A.; Groemer, G.; Foing, B.H.

    2015-01-01

    For a human mission to the Moon or Mars, an important question is to determine the best strategy for the choice of surface vehicles. Recent studies suggest that the first missions to Mars will be strongly constrained and that only small unpressurized vehicles will be available. We analyze the

  19. Small Open Reading Frames

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    small ORFs and presence of their stable peptide products. Further, examples of biologically active peptides with ... enormous growth in whole genome sequencing. Hence today, genome sequence. Recently, ORFs ... Similarly, during the embryo development of zebrafish, 58 aa long toddler polypeptide produced by a short ...

  20. Small Windmills in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H.

    1980-01-01

    The report describes a project for small windmills funded by the Ministry of Energy. The test plant is described and a survey of Danish windmills is presented. Some requirements for windmills are mentioned and regulations governing the interface between grid-connected windmills and the electric u...

  1. Radiotherapy in small countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Michael B; Zubizarreta, Eduardo H; Polo Rubio, J Alfredo

    2017-10-01

    To examine the availability of radiotherapy in small countries. A small country was defined as a country with a population less than one million persons. The economic status of each country was defined using the World Bank Classification. The number of cancers in each country was obtained from GLOBOCAN 2012. The number of cancer cases with an indication or radiotherapy was calculated using the CCORE model. There were 41 countries with a population of under 1 million; 15 were classified as High Income, 15 Upper Middle Income, 10 Lower Middle Income and one Low Income. 28 countries were islands. Populations ranged from 799 (Holy See) to 886450 (Fiji) and the total number of cancer cases occurring in small countries was 21,043 (range by country from 4 to 2476). Overall the total number of radiotherapy cases in small countries was 10982 (range by country from 2 to 1239). Radiotherapy was available in all HIC islands with 80 or more new cases of cancer in 2012 but was not available in any LMIC island. Fiji was the only LMIC island with a large radiotherapy caseload. Similar caseloads in non-island LMIC all had radiotherapy services. Most non-island HIC did not have radiotherapy services presumably because of the easy access to radiotherapy in neighbouring countries. There are no radiotherapy services in any LMIC islands. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Small bowel resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ileostomy and your diet Ileostomy - caring for your stoma Ileostomy - changing your pouch Ileostomy - discharge Ileostomy - what to ask your doctor Low-fiber diet Preventing falls Small bowel resection - discharge Surgical wound care - open Types of ileostomy Ulcerative colitis - discharge When ...

  3. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This document consists of a collection of papers presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Research Using Small Tokamaks. It contains 22 papers on a wide variety of research aspects, including diagnostics, design, transport, equilibrium, stability, and confinement. Some of these papers are devoted to other concepts (stellarators, compact tori). Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Small Business Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Under an Army Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, Symbiotics, Inc. developed a software system that permits users to upgrade products from standalone applications so they can communicate in a distributed computing environment. Under a subsequent NASA SBIR grant, Symbiotics added additional tools to the SOCIAL product to enable NASA to coordinate conventional systems for planning Shuttle launch support operations. Using SOCIAL, data may be shared among applications in a computer network even when the applications are written in different programming languages. The product was introduced to the commercial market in 1993 and is used to monitor and control equipment for operation support and to integrate financial networks. The SBIR program was established to increase small business participation in federal R&D activities and to transfer government research to industry. InQuisiX is a reuse library providing high performance classification, cataloging, searching, browsing, retrieval and synthesis capabilities. These form the foundation for software reuse, producing higher quality software at lower cost and in less time. Software Productivity Solutions, Inc. developed the technology under Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects funded by NASA and the Army and is marketing InQuisiX in conjunction with Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). The SBIR program was established to increase small business participation in federal R&D activities and to transfer government research to industry.

  5. Small angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sanjay

    1982-01-01

    The technique of small angle neutron scattering was first used in Germany less than two decades ago. Since then it has developed very rapidly, and today it is regarded as one of the most powerful techniques in materials, chemical and biological research. During the last decade the combination of high flux reactors and sophisticated instrumentation has revolutionized the technique. This paper endeavours to present a brief but comprehensive review of small angle scattering of neutrons and its applications in solid state research. The domain in which small angle neutron scattering is particularly useful is delineated and some of the methods used in the analysis of data are discussed with special emphasis on recent developments. Typical small angle neutron scattering cameras are described. Finally some experimental results on heterogeneities in metallic systems (both static and dynamic studies), radiation damage in materials, superconductivity, magnetic materials and the technologically very important area of non-destructive testing are reviewed in order to illustrate the wide range of applicability of this technique to problems in solid state research. (author)

  6. Small hydroelectric power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgesen, Boerre

    2002-01-01

    Small hydroelectric power plants are power plants of 1 - 10 MW. For a supplier, this is an unnatural limit. A more natural limit involves compact engine design and simplified control system. The article discusses most of the engine and electrotechnical aspects in the development, construction and operation of such a plant

  7. Deburring small intersecting holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-08-01

    Deburring intersecting holes is one of the most difficult deburring tasks faced by many industries. Only 14 of the 37 major deburring processes are applicable to most intersecting hole applications. Only five of these are normally applicable to small or miniature holes. Basic process capabilities and techniques used as a function of hole sizes and intersection depths are summarized.

  8. Imaging the small bowel.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-03-01

    Radiologic investigations continue to play a pivotal role in the diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the small intestine despite enhancement of capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy. Imaging techniques continue to evolve and new techniques in MRI in particular, are being developed.

  9. Small hydrogen liquefier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airoldi, V.J.T.; Corat, E.J.; Minucci, M.A.S.; Leite, V.S.F.O.

    1986-09-01

    In this work the deign and construction of a small hydrogen liquefier (two liters per hour maximum production) is described. The isenthalpic expansion process is used, because its construction is simple and it is generally cheaper to operate. A comparison with other liquefier processes, and considerations about their basic theory are also presented. (author) [pt

  10. Small Open Reading Frames

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are conserved across diverse species, and the functional char- acterization of their peptides reveals their critical role in a broad spectrum of regulatory mechanisms. Further analy- sis of small ORFs is likely throw light on many exciting, un- explored regulatory mechanisms in different developmental stages and tissue types.

  11. Non–SCF-type F-box protein Roy1/Ymr258c interacts with a Rab5-like GTPase Ypt52 and inhibits Ypt52 function

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yuan; Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Kotera, Michiko; Kanada, Akira; Nishimura, Takashi; Kishi, Tsutomu; Mimura, Satoru; Kamura, Takumi

    2011-01-01

    Skp1/Cul1/F-box (SCF)–type F-box proteins are a component of the Cullin-RING SCF ubiquitin E3 ligase, which is involved in numerous cellular processes. However, the function of non–SCF-type F-box proteins remains largely unknown. The Rab5-like small guanosine 5′-triphosphatase Vps21/Ypt51 is a key regulator of intracellular transportation; however, deletion of its isoforms, Ypt52 and Ypt53, results in only a modest inhibition of intracellular trafficking. The function of these proteins theref...

  12. Induction of cell scattering by expression of beta1 integrins in beta1-deficient epithelial cells requires activation of members of the rho family of GTPases and downregulation of cadherin and catenin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimond, C; van Der Flier, A; van Delft, S

    1999-01-01

    Adhesion receptors, which connect cells to each other and to the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), play a crucial role in the control of tissue structure and of morphogenesis. In this work, we have studied how intercellular adhesion molecules and beta1 integrins influence each other using two......-catenin protein levels accompanied by their redistribution from the cytoskeleton-associated fraction to the detergent-soluble fraction. Regulation of alpha-catenin protein levels by beta1 integrins is likely to play a role in the morphological transition, since overexpression of alpha-catenin in GE11 cells before...... beta1 prevented the disruption of intercellular adhesions and cell scattering. In addition, using biochemical activity assays for Rho-like GTPases, we show that the expression of beta1A, beta1D, or IL2R-beta1A in GE11 or GD25 cells triggers activation of both RhoA and Rac1, but not of Cdc42. Moreover...

  13. Small Engine & Accessory Test Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Small Engine and Accessories Test Area (SEATA) facilitates testaircraft starting and auxiliary power systems, small engines and accessories. The SEATA consists...

  14. Small steps for hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicke, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The government in Peru has decided to utilise its gas reserves and restrict hydro to relatively small schemes. A number of reasons for the decision are given. In 1997, the Shell-Mobile-Bechtel-COSAPI consortium was formed and agreements were signed regarding exploiting Gas de Camisea. The country's energy needs to 2010 are being assessed. It is likely that by 2001 the whole of south Peru will be receiving gas from Camisea. The Peru situation is discussed under the headings of (i) existing capacity, (ii) growing demands, (iii) a history of hydro in Peru, (iv) electrification and SHP and (v) outlook. The future for Peru's electric energy development is bright. While most of its new power capacity will come from natural gas, the small hydros also have a part to play. A stronger commitment of national and regional political authorities to consider supplies outside the big cities is said to be needed. (UK)

  15. Small reactor operating mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, V.G.

    1997-01-01

    There is a potential need for small reactors in the future for applications such as district heating, electricity production at remote sites, and desalination. Nuclear power can provide these at low cost and with insignificant pollution. The economies required by the small scale application, and/or the remote location, require a review of the size and location of the operating staff. Current concepts range all the way from reactors which are fully automatic, and need no local attention for days or weeks, to those with reduced local staff. In general the less dependent a reactor is on local human intervention, the greater its dependence on intrinsic safety features such as passive decay heat removal, low-stored energy and limited reactivity speed and depth in the control systems. A case study of the design and licensing of the SLOWPOKE Energy System heating reactor is presented. (author)

  16. Small Business Innovations (Photodetector)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Epitaxx, Inc. of Princeton, NJ, developed the Epitaxx Near Infrared Room Temperature Indium-Gallium-Arsenide (InGaAs) Photodetector based on their Goddard Space Flight Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract work to develop a linear detector array for satellite imaging applications using InGaAs alloys that didn't need to be cooled to (difficult and expensive) cryogenic temperatures. The photodetectors can be used for remote sensing, fiber optic and laser position-sensing applications.

  17. Small Business Innovations (MISER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Lightwave Electronics Corporation, Mountain View, CA, developed the Series 120 and 122 non-planner diode pumped ring lasers based on a low noise ring laser with voltage tuning that they delivered to Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The voltage tuning feature allows "phase-locking" the lasers, making them "electronic," similar to radio and microwave electronic oscillators. The Series 120 and 122 can be applied to fiber sensing, coherent communications and laser radar.

  18. Big Data, Small Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlovina, Inna; van der Laan, Mark J; Hubbard, Alan

    2017-05-20

    Multiple comparisons and small sample size, common characteristics of many types of "Big Data" including those that are produced by genomic studies, present specific challenges that affect reliability of inference. Use of multiple testing procedures necessitates calculation of very small tail probabilities of a test statistic distribution. Results based on large deviation theory provide a formal condition that is necessary to guarantee error rate control given practical sample sizes, linking the number of tests and the sample size; this condition, however, is rarely satisfied. Using methods that are based on Edgeworth expansions (relying especially on the work of Peter Hall), we explore the impact of departures of sampling distributions from typical assumptions on actual error rates. Our investigation illustrates how far the actual error rates can be from the declared nominal levels, suggesting potentially wide-spread problems with error rate control, specifically excessive false positives. This is an important factor that contributes to "reproducibility crisis". We also review some other commonly used methods (such as permutation and methods based on finite sampling inequalities) in their application to multiple testing/small sample data. We point out that Edgeworth expansions, providing higher order approximations to the sampling distribution, offer a promising direction for data analysis that could improve reliability of studies relying on large numbers of comparisons with modest sample sizes.

  19. Involvement of the actin cytoskeleton and p21rho-family GTPases in the pathogenesis of the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Godbold

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that infection with the enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills more than 50,000 people a year. Central to the pathogenesis of this organism is its ability to directly lyse host cells and cause tissue destruction. Amebic lesions show evidence of cell lysis, tissue necrosis, and damage to the extracellular matrix. The specific molecular mechanisms by which these events are initiated, transmitted, and effected are just beginning to be uncovered. In this article we review what is known about host cell adherence and contact-dependent cytolysis. We cover the involvement of the actin cytoskeleton and small GTP-binding proteins of the p21rho-family in the process of cell killing and phagocytosis, and also look at how amebic interactions with molecules of the extracellular matrix contribute to its cytopathic effects.

  20. Ecology in Small Aquatic Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel René

    Small ecosystems are many-fold more abundant than their larger counterparts. Both on regional and global scale small lakes outnumber medium and large lakes and account for a much larger surface area. Small streams are also far more common than rivers. Despite their abundance small ecosystems are ...

  1. The small library manager's handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Graves, Alice

    2014-01-01

    The Small Library Manager's Handbook is for librarians working in all types of small libraries. It covers the everyday nuts-and-bolts operations that all librarians must perform. This handbook, written by experts who are small librarians themselves, will help all small librarians to do multiple jobs at the same time.

  2. The Small Mars System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantino, E.; Grassi, M.; Pasolini, P.; Causa, F.; Molfese, C.; Aurigemma, R.; Cimminiello, N.; de la Torre, D.; Dell'Aversana, P.; Esposito, F.; Gramiccia, L.; Paudice, F.; Punzo, F.; Roma, I.; Savino, R.; Zuppardi, G.

    2017-08-01

    The Small Mars System is a proposed mission to Mars. Funded by the European Space Agency, the project has successfully completed Phase 0. The contractor is ALI S.c.a.r.l., and the study team includes the University of Naples ;Federico II;, the Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte and the Space Studies Institute of Catalonia. The objectives of the mission are both technological and scientific, and will be achieved by delivering a small Mars lander carrying a dust particle analyser and an aerial drone. The former shall perform in situ measurements of the size distribution and abundance of dust particles suspended in the Martian atmosphere, whereas the latter shall demonstrate low-altitude flight in the rarefied planetary environment. The mission-enabling technology is an innovative umbrella-like heat shield, known as IRENE, developed and patented by ALI. The mission is also a technological demonstration of the shield in the upper atmosphere of Mars. The core characteristics of SMS are the low cost (120 M€) and the small size (320 kg of wet mass at launch, 110 kg at landing), features which stand out with respect to previous Mars landers. To comply with them is extremely challenging at all levels, and sets strict requirements on the choice of the materials, the sizing of payloads and subsystems, their arrangement inside the spacecraft and the launcher's selection. In this contribution, the mission and system concept and design are illustrated and discussed. Special emphasis is given to the innovative features and to the challenges faced in the development of the work.

  3. Regulating Cdc42 and Its Signaling Pathways in Cancer: Small Molecules and MicroRNA as New Treatment Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xing-Hua; Lv, Lin-Chen; Duan, Jing; Wu, Ye-Meng; He, Shu-Jin; Hu, Zhen-Zhen; Xiong, Li-Xia

    2018-03-29

    Despite great improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of neoplasms, metastatic disease is still the leading cause of death in cancer patients, with mortality rates still rising. Given this background, new ways to treat cancer will be important for development of improved cancer control strategies. Cdc42 is a member of the Rho GTPase family and plays an important role in cell-to-cell adhesion, formation of cytoskeletal structures, and cell cycle regulation. It thus influences cellular proliferation, transformation, and homeostasis, as well as the cellular migration and invasion processes underlying tumor formation. Cdc42 acts as a collection point for signal transduction and regulates multiple signaling pathways. Moreover, recent studies show that in most human cancers Cdc42 is abnormally expressed and promoting neoplastic growth and metastasis. Regarding possible new treatments for cancer, miRNA and small molecules targeting Cdc42 and related pathways have been recently found to be effective on cancer. In this review, we analyze the newly recognized regulation mechanisms for Cdc42 and Cdc42-related signal pathways, and particularly new treatments using small molecules and miRNAs to inhibit the abnormal overexpression of Cdc42 that may slow down the metastasis process, improve cancer therapy and lead to novel strategies for development of antineoplastic drugs.

  4. Small Business Innovations (Cryostat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    General Pneumatics Corporation, Scottsdale, AZ, developed an anti- clogging cryostat that liquifies gases by expansion for high pressure through a nozzle to produce cryorefrigeration based on their Kennedy Space Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) work to develop a Joule-Thomson (JT) expansion valve that is less susceptible to clogging by particles or condensed contaminants in the flow than a non-contaminating compressor in a closed cycle Linde-Hampson cryocooler used to generate cryogenic cooling for infrared sensors, super conductors, supercooled electronics and cryosurgery.

  5. Small Business Innovations (Helicopters)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The amount of engine power required for a helicopter to hover is an important, but difficult, consideration in helicopter design. The EHPIC program model produces converged, freely distorted wake geometries that generate accurate analysis of wake-induced downwash, allowing good predictions of rotor thrust and power requirements. Continuum Dynamics, Inc., the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) company that developed EHPIC, also produces RotorCRAFT, a program for analysis of aerodynamic loading of helicopter blades in forward flight. Both helicopter codes have been licensed to commercial manufacturers.

  6. Small radioisotope powered batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myatt, J.

    1975-06-01

    Various methods of converting the large amounts of energy stored in radioisotopes are described. These are based on:- (a) the Seebeck effect; (b) thermionic emission of electrons from a hot body; (c) the Stirling Cycle; and (d) radiovoltaic charge separation in 'p-n' junctions. Small generators in the range 0 to 100 W(e) developed using these effects are described and typical applications for each of these systems are given. These include data collection and transmission from remote sites, implantable medical devices, lighthouses, radio beacons, and space power supplies. (author)

  7. Small circuits for cryptography.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torgerson, Mark Dolan; Draelos, Timothy John; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Miller, Russell D.; Anderson, William Erik

    2005-10-01

    This report examines a number of hardware circuit design issues associated with implementing certain functions in FPGA and ASIC technologies. Here we show circuit designs for AES and SHA-1 that have an extremely small hardware footprint, yet show reasonably good performance characteristics as compared to the state of the art designs found in the literature. Our AES performance numbers are fueled by an optimized composite field S-box design for the Stratix chipset. Our SHA-1 designs use register packing and feedback functionalities of the Stratix LE, which reduce the logic element usage by as much as 72% as compared to other SHA-1 designs.

  8. Neutron small angle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibel, K.

    1975-01-01

    The neutron small-angle scattering system at the High-Flux Reactor in Grenoble consists of three major parts: the supply of cold neutrons via bent neutron guides; the small angle camera D11; and the data handling facilities. The camera D11 has an overall length of 80 m. The effective length of the camera is variable. The length of the collimator before the fixed sample position can be reduced by movable neutron guides; the secondary flight path of 40 m full length contains detector sites in various positions. Thus, a large domain of momentum transfers can be exploited. Scattering angles between 5.10 -4 and 0.5 rad and neutron wavelengths from 0.2 to 2.0 nm are available with the same instrument and the same relative resolution. A large-area position-sensitive detector is used which allows simultaneous recording of intensities scattered into different angles; it is a multiwire proportional chamber. 3808 elements of 1 cm 2 are arranged in a two-dimensional matrix. Future development comprises an increase of the limit in the count rate due to the electronic interface between the detector and on-line computer, actually at 5.10 4 per sec. by one order of magnitude

  9. 77 FR 30227 - Small Business Size Regulations, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... Business Size Regulations, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology... eligibility for the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR... Investment and Innovation at [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Information On...

  10. Synergism between the GTPase activities of EF-Tu.GTP and EF-G.GTP on empty ribosomes. Elongation factors as stimulators of the ribosomal oscillation between two conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesters, J R; Potapov, A P; de Graaf, J M; Kraal, B

    1994-10-07

    A remarkable positive cooperativity between the GTPase activities of EF-Tu and EF-G on empty ribosomes from Escherichia coli has been discovered. This cooperativity implies a decrease of the corresponding apparent KM values of the empty ribosome for either elongation factor: from more than 10 microM to 0.5 microM for EF-Tu.GTP by the addition of 0.25 microM EF-G and from 0.7 microM to 0.5 microM for EF-G.GTP by the addition of 3 microM EF-Tu. In a further analysis of this phenomenon, the effects of various specific antibiotics were studied: thiostrepton, fusidic acid, tetracycline, pulvomycin and kirromycin appeared to inhibit the synergistic effect, whereas streptomycin was found to stimulate it. Even in the present minimal system the ribosomes respond to the above-mentioned antibiotics in a way surprisingly similar to that in the coupled system with mRNA and tRNAs. The cooperativity seems not to be due to a simultaneous binding of the two elongation factors to the ribosome as revealed by studying the effects of fusidic acid and kirromycin, and by band-shift experiments by means of gel electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions. Our experimental data and the kinetic analysis of alternative models provide evidence that EF-Tu.GTP and EF-G.GTP interact sequentially with empty ribosomes that oscillate between two different conformations, one for each elongation factor. Apparently, ribosomes have an intrinsic property for oscillation as normally observed during protein synthesis with a frequency paced by the events of tRNA binding and translocation.

  11. Loss of the interferon-γ-inducible regulatory immunity-related GTPase (IRG), Irgm1, causes activation of effector IRG proteins on lysosomes, damaging lysosomal function and predicting the dramatic susceptibility of Irgm1-deficient mice to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric-Biresev, Jelena; Hunn, Julia P; Krut, Oleg; Helms, J Bernd; Martens, Sascha; Howard, Jonathan C

    2016-04-20

    The interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-inducible immunity-related GTPase (IRG), Irgm1, plays an essential role in restraining activation of the IRG pathogen resistance system. However, the loss of Irgm1 in mice also causes a dramatic but unexplained susceptibility phenotype upon infection with a variety of pathogens, including many not normally controlled by the IRG system. This phenotype is associated with lymphopenia, hemopoietic collapse, and death of the mouse. We show that the three regulatory IRG proteins (GMS sub-family), including Irgm1, each of which localizes to distinct sets of endocellular membranes, play an important role during the cellular response to IFN-γ, each protecting specific membranes from off-target activation of effector IRG proteins (GKS sub-family). In the absence of Irgm1, which is localized mainly at lysosomal and Golgi membranes, activated GKS proteins load onto lysosomes, and are associated with reduced lysosomal acidity and failure to process autophagosomes. Another GMS protein, Irgm3, is localized to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes; in the Irgm3-deficient mouse, activated GKS proteins are found at the ER. The Irgm3-deficient mouse does not show the drastic phenotype of the Irgm1 mouse. In the Irgm1/Irgm3 double knock-out mouse, activated GKS proteins associate with lipid droplets, but not with lysosomes, and the Irgm1/Irgm3(-/-) does not have the generalized immunodeficiency phenotype expected from its Irgm1 deficiency. The membrane targeting properties of the three GMS proteins to specific endocellular membranes prevent accumulation of activated GKS protein effectors on the corresponding membranes and thus enable GKS proteins to distinguish organellar cellular membranes from the membranes of pathogen vacuoles. Our data suggest that the generalized lymphomyeloid collapse that occurs in Irgm1(-/-) mice upon infection with a variety of pathogens may be due to lysosomal damage caused by off-target activation of GKS proteins on lysosomal

  12. The Arabidopsis Rho of Plants GTPase AtROP6 Functions in Developmental and Pathogen Response Pathways1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poraty-Gavra, Limor; Zimmermann, Philip; Haigis, Sabine; Bednarek, Paweł; Hazak, Ora; Stelmakh, Oksana Rogovoy; Sadot, Einat; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2013-01-01

    How plants coordinate developmental processes and environmental stress responses is a pressing question. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Rho of Plants6 (AtROP6) integrates developmental and pathogen response signaling. AtROP6 expression is induced by auxin and detected in the root meristem, lateral root initials, and leaf hydathodes. Plants expressing a dominant negative AtROP6 (rop6DN) under the regulation of its endogenous promoter are small and have multiple inflorescence stems, twisted leaves, deformed leaf epidermis pavement cells, and differentially organized cytoskeleton. Microarray analyses of rop6DN plants revealed that major changes in gene expression are associated with constitutive salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defense responses. In agreement, their free and total SA levels resembled those of wild-type plants inoculated with a virulent powdery mildew pathogen. The constitutive SA-associated response in rop6DN was suppressed in mutant backgrounds defective in SA signaling (nonexpresser of PR genes1 [npr1]) or biosynthesis (salicylic acid induction deficient2 [sid2]). However, the rop6DN npr1 and rop6DN sid2 double mutants retained the aberrant developmental phenotypes, indicating that the constitutive SA response can be uncoupled from ROP function(s) in development. rop6DN plants exhibited enhanced preinvasive defense responses to a host-adapted virulent powdery mildew fungus but were impaired in preinvasive defenses upon inoculation with a nonadapted powdery mildew. The host-adapted powdery mildew had a reduced reproductive fitness on rop6DN plants, which was retained in mutant backgrounds defective in SA biosynthesis or signaling. Our findings indicate that both the morphological aberrations and altered sensitivity to powdery mildews of rop6DN plants result from perturbations that are independent from the SA-associated response. These perturbations uncouple SA-dependent defense signaling from disease resistance execution. PMID

  13. Non–SCF-type F-box protein Roy1/Ymr258c interacts with a Rab5-like GTPase Ypt52 and inhibits Ypt52 function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Kotera, Michiko; Kanada, Akira; Nishimura, Takashi; Kishi, Tsutomu; Mimura, Satoru; Kamura, Takumi

    2011-01-01

    Skp1/Cul1/F-box (SCF)–type F-box proteins are a component of the Cullin-RING SCF ubiquitin E3 ligase, which is involved in numerous cellular processes. However, the function of non–SCF-type F-box proteins remains largely unknown. The Rab5-like small guanosine 5′-triphosphatase Vps21/Ypt51 is a key regulator of intracellular transportation; however, deletion of its isoforms, Ypt52 and Ypt53, results in only a modest inhibition of intracellular trafficking. The function of these proteins therefore remains largely elusive. Here we analyze the role of a previously uncharacterized non–SCF-type F-box protein, Roy1/Ymr258c, in cell growth and intracellular transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Roy1 binds to Ypt52 under physiological conditions, and Skp1 is indispensable for the association of Roy1 with Ypt52. The vps21Δ yeast cells exhibit severe deficiencies in cell growth and intracellular trafficking, whereas simultaneous deletion of roy1 alleviates the defects caused by deletion of vps21. However, additional disruption of ypt52 in roy1Δvps21Δ cells largely suppresses the cell growth and trafficking observed in roy1Δvps21Δ cells. We demonstrate that Roy1 interacts with guanosine 5′-diphosphate–bound and nucleotide-free Ypt52 and thereby inhibits the formation of guanosine 5′-triphosphate–bound, active Ypt52. These results thus indicate that Roy1 negatively modulates cell viability and intracellular transport by suppressing Ypt52. PMID:21389113

  14. Non-SCF-type F-box protein Roy1/Ymr258c interacts with a Rab5-like GTPase Ypt52 and inhibits Ypt52 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Kotera, Michiko; Kanada, Akira; Nishimura, Takashi; Kishi, Tsutomu; Mimura, Satoru; Kamura, Takumi

    2011-05-01

    Skp1/Cul1/F-box (SCF)-type F-box proteins are a component of the Cullin-RING SCF ubiquitin E3 ligase, which is involved in numerous cellular processes. However, the function of non-SCF-type F-box proteins remains largely unknown. The Rab5-like small guanosine 5'-triphosphatase Vps21/Ypt51 is a key regulator of intracellular transportation; however, deletion of its isoforms, Ypt52 and Ypt53, results in only a modest inhibition of intracellular trafficking. The function of these proteins therefore remains largely elusive. Here we analyze the role of a previously uncharacterized non-SCF-type F-box protein, Roy1/Ymr258c, in cell growth and intracellular transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Roy1 binds to Ypt52 under physiological conditions, and Skp1 is indispensable for the association of Roy1 with Ypt52. The vps21Δ yeast cells exhibit severe deficiencies in cell growth and intracellular trafficking, whereas simultaneous deletion of roy1 alleviates the defects caused by deletion of vps21. However, additional disruption of ypt52 in roy1Δvps21Δ cells largely suppresses the cell growth and trafficking observed in roy1Δvps21Δ cells. We demonstrate that Roy1 interacts with guanosine 5'-diphosphate-bound and nucleotide-free Ypt52 and thereby inhibits the formation of guanosine 5'-triphosphate-bound, active Ypt52. These results thus indicate that Roy1 negatively modulates cell viability and intracellular transport by suppressing Ypt52.

  15. Problems of Small Debris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Zelentsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the exploration of outer space (as of 1/1 2011 6853 was launched spacecraft (SC are successful 6264, representing 95% of the total number of starts. The most intensively exploited space Russia (USSR (3701 starts, 94% successful, USA (2774 starts, 90% successful, China (234 starts, 96% successful and India (89 starts, 90% successful. A small part of running the spacecraft returned to Earth (manned spacecraft and transport, and the rest remained in orbit. Some of them are descended from orbit and burned up in the atmosphere, the rest remained in the OCP and turned into space debris (SD.The composition of the Cabinet is diverse: finish the job spacecraft; boosters and the last stage of launch vehicles left in orbit after SC injection; technological waste arising during the opening drop-down structures and fragments of the destroyed spacecraft. The resulting explosion orbital SD forms ellipsoidal region which orbits blasted object. Then, as a result of precession, is the distribution of objects in orbit explosion exploding spacecraft.The whole Cabinet is divided into two factions: the observed (larger than 100 mm and not observed (less than 100 mm. Observed debris katalogalizirovan and 0.2% of the total number of SD, there was no SD is the bulk - 99.8%.SC meeting working with a fragment observed SD predictable and due to changes in altitude spacecraft avoids a possible meeting. Contact spacecraft with large fragment lead to disaster (which took place at a meeting of the Russian communications satellite "Cosmos-2251" and the American machine "Iridium". Meeting with small SD is not predictable, especially if it was formed by an explosion or collision fragments together. Orbit that KM is not predictable, and the speed can be up to 10 km / s. Meeting with small particle SD no less dangerous for the spacecraft. The impact speed of spacecraft with space debris particles can reach up to 10 ... 15 km / s at such speeds the breakdown probability thin

  16. Small Wind Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simoes, Marcelo; Farret, Felix Alberto; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    devices, and a centralized distribution control. In order to establish a small wind energy system it is important to observe the following: (i) Attending the energy requirements of the actual or future consumers; (ii) Establishing civil liabilities in case of accidents and financial losses due to shortage...... or low quality of energy; (iii) Negotiating collective conditions to interconnect the microgrid with the public network or with other sources of energy that is independent of wind resources; (iv) Establishing a performance criteria of power quality and reliability to end-users, in order to reduce costs...... and guaranteeing an acceptable energy supply. This paper discuss how performance is affected by local conditions and random nature of the wind, power demand profiles, turbine related factors, and presents the technical issues for implementing a self-excited induction generator system, or a permanent magnet based...

  17. Small Business Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to Kennedy Space Center, EIC Laboratories invented a Raman Spectrograph with fiber optic sampling for space applications such as sensing hazardous fuel vapors and making on-board rapid analyses of chemicals and minerals. Raman spectroscopy is a laser-based measurement technique that provides through a unique vibrational spectrum a molecular 'fingerprint,' and can function in aqueous environments. EIC combined optical fiber technology with Raman methods to develop sensors that can be operated at a distance from the spectrographic analysis instruments and the laser excitation source. EIC refined and commercialized the technology to create the Fiber Optic Raman Spectrograph and the RamanProbe. Commercial applications range from process control to monitoring hazardous materials.

  18. [Is allastrim small pox?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiexeira, L A

    2000-01-01

    Between 1910 and 1913, two renowned physicians in the city of Sao Paulo found themselves engaged in a scientific controversy regarding the classification of a disease then assailing the state. Antonio Carini, director of the Instituto Pasteur de Sao Paulo, believed the illness to be small pox, while Emilio Ribas, director of the Servico Sanitario, claimed it was allastrim, or milk pox. The controversy started in the Sociedade de Medicina e Cirurgia but later migrated to other forums and came to incorporate other figures as well. This presentation and discussion of the polemic is meant as a contribution to our understanding of the process by which a scientific consensus is constructed and solidified within the field of the biomedical sciences.

  19. Small angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasannacharya, B.A.; Goyal, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is one of the most popular neutron scattering technique both for the basic research and as a tool in the hands of applied scientist. SANS is used for studying the structure of a material on a length scale of 10 - 1000 A. SANS is a diffraction experiment that involves scattering of a monocromatic beam of neutrons in order to obtain structural information about macromolecules and heterogeneities. This paper will discuss the design of SANS spectrometers with a special emphasis on the instruments which are better suited for medium flux reactors. The design of several different types of SANS spectrometers will be given. The optimization procedures and appropriate modifications to suit the budget and the space will be discussed. As an example, the design of a SANS spectrometer at CIRUS reactor Trombay will be given. (author)

  20. Small dose... big poison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitberg, George; Oakley, Ed

    2010-11-01

    It is not possible to identify all toxic substances in a single journal article. However, there are some exposures that in small doses are potentially fatal. Many of these exposures are particularly toxic to children. Using data from poison control centres, it is possible to recognise this group of exposures. This article provides information to assist the general practitioner to identify potential toxic substance exposures in children. In this article the authors report the signs and symptoms of toxic exposures and identify the time of onset. Where clear recommendations on the period of observation and known fatal dose are available, these are provided. We do not discuss management or disposition, and advise readers to contact the Poison Information Service or a toxicologist for this advice.