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Sample records for syndrome protein modulates

  1. The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-coronavirus 3a protein may function as a modulator of the trafficking properties of the spike protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Yee-Joo

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent publication reported that a tyrosine-dependent sorting signal, present in cytoplasmic tail of the spike protein of most coronaviruses, mediates the intracellular retention of the spike protein. This motif is missing from the spike protein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV, resulting in high level of surface expression of the spike protein when it is expressed on its own in vitro. Presentation of the hypothesis It has been shown that the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus genome contains open reading frames that encode for proteins with no homologue in other coronaviruses. One of them is the 3a protein, which is expressed during infection in vitro and in vivo. The 3a protein, which contains a tyrosine-dependent sorting signal in its cytoplasmic domain, is expressed on the cell surface and can undergo internalization. In addition, 3a can bind to the spike protein and through this interaction, it may be able to cause the spike protein to become internalized, resulting in a decrease in its surface expression. Testing the hypothesis The effects of 3a on the internalization of cell surface spike protein can be examined biochemically and the significance of the interplay between these two viral proteins during viral infection can be studied using reverse genetics methodology. Implication of the hypothesis If this hypothesis is proven, it will indicate that the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus modulates the surface expression of the spike protein via a different mechanism from other coronaviruses. The interaction between 3a and S, which are expressed from separate subgenomic RNA, would be important for controlling the trafficking properties of S. The cell surface expression of S in infected cells significantly impacts viral assembly, viral spread and viral pathogenesis. Modulation by this unique pathway could confer certain advantages during the replication of the severe

  2. Magel2, a Prader-Willi syndrome candidate gene, modulates the activities of circadian rhythm proteins in cultured cells

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    Devos Julia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Magel2 gene is most highly expressed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, where its expression cycles in a circadian pattern comparable to that of clock-controlled genes. Mice lacking the Magel2 gene have hypothalamic dysfunction, including circadian defects that include reduced and fragmented total activity, excessive activity during the subjective day, but they have a normal circadian period. Magel2 is a member of the MAGE family of proteins that have various roles in cellular function, but the specific function of Magel2 is unknown. Methods We used a variety of cell-based assays to determine whether Magel2 modifies the properties of core circadian rhythm proteins. Results Magel2 represses the activity of the Clock:Bmal1 heterodimer in a Per2-luciferase assay. Magel2 interacts with Bmal1 and with Per2 as measured by co-immunoprecipitation in co-transfected cells, and exhibits a subcellular distribution consistent with these interactions when visualized by immunofluorescence. As well, Magel2 induces the redistribution of the subcellular localization of Clock towards the cytoplasm, in contrast to the nucleus-directed effect of Bmal1 on Clock subcellular localization. Conclusion Consistent with the blunted circadian rhythm observed in Magel2-null mice, these data suggest that Magel2 normally promotes negative feedback regulation of the cellular circadian cycle, through interactions with key core circadian rhythm proteins.

  3. Modulation of type I interferon induction by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and degradation of CREB-binding protein by non-structural protein 1 in MARC-145 and HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Oekyung; Sun Yan; Lai, Frances W.; Song Cheng; Yoo, Dongwan

    2010-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an emerged disease of swine characterized by negligible response of type I IFNs and viral persistence. We show that the PRRSV non-structural protein 1 (Nsp1) is the viral component responsible for modulation of IFN response. Nsp1 blocked dsRNA-induced IRF3 and IFN promoter activities. Nsp1 did not block phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 but inhibited IRF3 association with CREB-binding protein (CBP) in the nucleus. While IRF3 was stable, CBP was degraded, and CBP degradation was proteasome-dependent, suggesting that CBP degradation is not due to the protease activity of Nsp1 but an intermediary is involved. Our data suggest that the Nsp1-mediated CBP degradation inhibits the recruitment of CBP for enhanceosome assembly, leading to the block of IFN response. CBP degradation is a novel strategy for viral evasion from the host response, and Nsp1 may form a new class of viral antagonists for IFN modulation.

  4. Positive modulator of bone morphogenic protein-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY; Takahashi, Kazuyuki [Germantown, MD

    2009-01-27

    Compounds of the present invention of formula I and formula II are disclosed in the specification and wherein the compounds are modulators of Bone Morphogenic Protein activity. Compounds are synthetic peptides having a non-growth factor heparin binding region, a linker, and sequences that bind specifically to a receptor for Bone Morphogenic Protein. Uses of compounds of the present invention in the treatment of bone lesions, degenerative joint disease and to enhance bone formation are disclosed.

  5. Positive modulator of bone morphogenic protein-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua; Kazuyuki, Takahashi

    2017-06-06

    Compounds of the present invention of formula I and formula II are disclosed in the specification and wherein the compounds are modulators of Bone Morphogenic Protein activity. Compounds are synthetic peptides having a non-growth factor heparin binding region, a linker, and sequences that bind specifically to a receptor for Bone Morphogenic Protein. Uses of compounds of the present invention in the treatment of bone lesions, degenerative joint disease and to enhance bone formation are disclosed.

  6. Inferring modules from human protein interactome classes

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    Chaurasia Gautam

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of protein-protein interaction networks derived from high-throughput screening approaches and complementary sources is a key topic in systems biology. Although integration of protein interaction data is conventionally performed, the effects of this procedure on the result of network analyses has not been examined yet. In particular, in order to optimize the fusion of heterogeneous interaction datasets, it is crucial to consider not only their degree of coverage and accuracy, but also their mutual dependencies and additional salient features. Results We examined this issue based on the analysis of modules detected by network clustering methods applied to both integrated and individual (disaggregated data sources, which we call interactome classes. Due to class diversity, we deal with variable dependencies of data features arising from structural specificities and biases, but also from possible overlaps. Since highly connected regions of the human interactome may point to potential protein complexes, we have focused on the concept of modularity, and elucidated the detection power of module extraction algorithms by independent validations based on GO, MIPS and KEGG. From the combination of protein interactions with gene expressions, a confidence scoring scheme has been proposed before proceeding via GO with further classification in permanent and transient modules. Conclusions Disaggregated interactomes are shown to be informative for inferring modularity, thus contributing to perform an effective integrative analysis. Validation of the extracted modules by multiple annotation allows for the assessment of confidence measures assigned to the modules in a protein pathway context. Notably, the proposed multilayer confidence scheme can be used for network calibration by enabling a transition from unweighted to weighted interactomes based on biological evidence.

  7. Modulation of protein synthesis by polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Kazuei; Kashiwagi, Keiko

    2015-03-01

    Polyamines are ubiquitous small basic molecules that play important roles in cell growth and viability. Since polyamines mainly exist as a polyamine-RNA complex, we looked for proteins whose synthesis is preferentially stimulated by polyamines at the level of translation, and thus far identified 17 proteins in Escherichia coli and 6 proteins in eukaryotes. The mechanisms of polyamine stimulation of synthesis of these proteins were investigated. In addition, the role of eIF5A, containing hypusine formed from spermidine, on protein synthesis is described. These results clearly indicate that polyamines and eIF5A contribute to cell growth and viability through modulation of protein synthesis. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. Arousal Modulation in Females with Fragile X or Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jane; Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Murphy, Melissa M.; Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    The present study was carried out to examine physiological arousal modulation (heart activity and skin conductance), across baseline and cognitive tasks, in females with fragile X or Turner syndrome and a comparison group of females with neither syndrome. Relative to the comparison group, for whom a greater increase in skin conductance was…

  9. Identification of polycystic ovary syndrome potential drug targets based on pathobiological similarity in the protein-protein interaction network

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hao; He, Yuehan; Li, Wan; Wei, Wenqing; Li, Yiran; Xie, Ruiqiang; Guo, Shanshan; Wang, Yahui; Jiang, Jing; Chen, Binbin; Lv, Junjie; Zhang, Nana; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrinological disorders in reproductive aged women. PCOS and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) are closely linked in multiple levels and possess high pathobiological similarity. Here, we put forward a new computational approach based on the pathobiological similarity to identify PCOS potential drug target modules (PPDT-Modules) and PCOS potential drug targets in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN). From the systems level and biologi...

  10. Protein Carbonylation in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváčková, A.; Štikarová, J.; Kotlín, R.; Chrastinová, L.; Šácha, Pavel; Májek, P.; Čermák, J.; Suttnar, J.; Dyr, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 23 (2015), s. 5232 ISSN 0006-4971. [Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American Society of Hematology /55./. 07.12.2013-10.12.2013, New Orleans] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : protein carbonylation * myelodysplastic syndromes Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  11. Usher syndrome: molecular links of pathogenesis, proteins and pathways.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, H.; Wijk, E. van; Marker, T.; Wolfrum, U.; Roepman, R.

    2006-01-01

    Usher syndrome is the most common form of deaf-blindness. The syndrome is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and to date, eight causative genes have been identified. The proteins encoded by these genes are part of a dynamic protein complex that is present in hair cells of the inner ear

  12. MicroRNA modulation in complex regional pain syndrome

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    Orlova Irina A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant expression of small noncoding RNAs called microRNAs (miRNAs is a common feature of several human diseases. The objective of the study was to identify miRNA modulation in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS a chronic pain condition resulting from dysfunction in the central and/or peripheral nervous systems. Due to a multitude of inciting pathologies, symptoms and treatment conditions, the CRPS patient population is very heterogeneous. Our goal was to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in blood and explore their utility in patient stratification. Methods We profiled miRNAs in whole blood from 41 patients with CRPS and 20 controls using TaqMan low density array cards. Since neurogenic inflammation is known to play a significant role in CRPS we measured inflammatory markers including chemokines, cytokines, and their soluble receptors in blood from the same individuals. Correlation analyses were performed for miRNAs, inflammatory markers and other parameters including disease symptoms, medication, and comorbid conditions. Results Three different groups emerged from miRNA profiling. One group was comprised of 60% of CRPS patients and contained no control subjects. miRNA profiles from the remaining patients were interspersed among control samples in the other two groups. We identified differential expression of 18 miRNAs in CRPS patients. Analysis of inflammatory markers showed that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, interleukin1 receptor antagonist (IL1Ra and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP1 were significantly elevated in CRPS patients. VEGF and IL1Ra showed significant correlation with the patients reported pain levels. Analysis of the patients who were clustered according to their miRNA profile revealed correlations that were not significant in the total patient population. Correlation analysis of miRNAs detected in blood with additional parameters identified miRNAs associated with

  13. Cardiac imaging in RASopathies/mitogen activated protein kinase syndromes

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    Rita Gravino

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available RASopathies include a spectrum of disorders due to dysregulation of RAS/mitogen activated protein kinase pathway that plays an essential role in the control of the cell cycle and differentiation. As a consequence, its dysregulation has profound developmental consequences, in particular cardiac malformations. RASopathies with cardiac features are: Noonan syndrome, multiple lentigines syndrome, cardio-faciocutaneous syndrome, Costello syndrome, neurofibromatosis- 1, Legius syndrome, neurofibromatosis- Noonan syndrome. The former syndromes are associated with a high rate of cardiac involvement (60-85% and 12 genes: PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, KRAS, HRAS, BRAF, MEK1/MAP2K1, MEK2/MAP2K2, NRAS, SHOC2, CBL and SPRED1. Although the majority of these diseases are readily distinguishable in clinical terms, an integrated imaging study of the cardiac condition associated to RASopathies helps to better define risk assessment, surveillance, and management of these patients.

  14. Modulating fracture properties of mixed protein systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersch, C.E.; Laak, I. ter; Linden, E. van der; Venema, P.; Martin, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    To design foods with desired textures it is important to understand structure build-up and breakdown. One can obtain a wide range of structures using mixtures of different structuring ingredients such as for example protein mixtures. Mixed soy protein isolate (SPI)/gelatine gels were analyzed for

  15. Integrated Modules Analysis to Explore the Molecular Mechanisms of Phlegm-Stasis Cementation Syndrome with Ischemic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Ming; Yang, Kuo; Jiang, Li-Jie; Hu, Jing-Qing; Zhou, Xue-Zhong

    2018-01-01

    Background: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) has been the leading cause of death for several decades globally, IHD patients usually hold the symptoms of phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome (PSCS) as significant complications. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of PSCS complicated with IHD have not yet been fully elucidated. Materials and Methods: Network medicine methods were utilized to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of IHD phenotypes. Firstly, high-quality IHD-associated genes from both human curated disease-gene association database and biomedical literatures were integrated. Secondly, the IHD disease modules were obtained by dissecting the protein-protein interaction (PPI) topological modules in the String V9.1 database and the mapping of IHD-associated genes to the PPI topological modules. After that, molecular functional analyses (e.g., Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses) for these IHD disease modules were conducted. Finally, the PSCS syndrome modules were identified by mapping the PSCS related symptom-genes to the IHD disease modules, which were further validated by both pharmacological and physiological evidences derived from published literatures. Results: The total of 1,056 high-quality IHD-associated genes were integrated and evaluated. In addition, eight IHD disease modules (the PPI sub-networks significantly relevant to IHD) were identified, in which two disease modules were relevant to PSCS syndrome (i.e., two PSCS syndrome modules). These two modules had enriched pathways on Toll-like receptor signaling pathway (hsa04620) and Renin-angiotensin system (hsa04614), with the molecular functions of angiotensin maturation (GO:0002003) and response to bacterium (GO:0009617), which had been validated by classical Chinese herbal formulas-related targets, IHD-related drug targets, and the phenotype features derived from human phenotype ontology (HPO) and published biomedical literatures. Conclusion: A network medicine

  16. Integrated Modules Analysis to Explore the Molecular Mechanisms of Phlegm-Stasis Cementation Syndrome with Ischemic Heart Disease

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    Wei-Ming Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ischemic heart disease (IHD has been the leading cause of death for several decades globally, IHD patients usually hold the symptoms of phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome (PSCS as significant complications. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of PSCS complicated with IHD have not yet been fully elucidated.Materials and Methods: Network medicine methods were utilized to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of IHD phenotypes. Firstly, high-quality IHD-associated genes from both human curated disease-gene association database and biomedical literatures were integrated. Secondly, the IHD disease modules were obtained by dissecting the protein-protein interaction (PPI topological modules in the String V9.1 database and the mapping of IHD-associated genes to the PPI topological modules. After that, molecular functional analyses (e.g., Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses for these IHD disease modules were conducted. Finally, the PSCS syndrome modules were identified by mapping the PSCS related symptom-genes to the IHD disease modules, which were further validated by both pharmacological and physiological evidences derived from published literatures.Results: The total of 1,056 high-quality IHD-associated genes were integrated and evaluated. In addition, eight IHD disease modules (the PPI sub-networks significantly relevant to IHD were identified, in which two disease modules were relevant to PSCS syndrome (i.e., two PSCS syndrome modules. These two modules had enriched pathways on Toll-like receptor signaling pathway (hsa04620 and Renin-angiotensin system (hsa04614, with the molecular functions of angiotensin maturation (GO:0002003 and response to bacterium (GO:0009617, which had been validated by classical Chinese herbal formulas-related targets, IHD-related drug targets, and the phenotype features derived from human phenotype ontology (HPO and published biomedical literatures.Conclusion: A network medicine

  17. Integrated Modules Analysis to Explore the Molecular Mechanisms of Phlegm-Stasis Cementation Syndrome with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Ming; Yang, Kuo; Jiang, Li-Jie; Hu, Jing-Qing; Zhou, Xue-Zhong

    2018-01-01

    Background: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) has been the leading cause of death for several decades globally, IHD patients usually hold the symptoms of phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome (PSCS) as significant complications. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of PSCS complicated with IHD have not yet been fully elucidated. Materials and Methods: Network medicine methods were utilized to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of IHD phenotypes. Firstly, high-quality IHD-associated genes from both human curated disease-gene association database and biomedical literatures were integrated. Secondly, the IHD disease modules were obtained by dissecting the protein-protein interaction (PPI) topological modules in the String V9.1 database and the mapping of IHD-associated genes to the PPI topological modules. After that, molecular functional analyses (e.g., Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses) for these IHD disease modules were conducted. Finally, the PSCS syndrome modules were identified by mapping the PSCS related symptom-genes to the IHD disease modules, which were further validated by both pharmacological and physiological evidences derived from published literatures. Results: The total of 1,056 high-quality IHD-associated genes were integrated and evaluated. In addition, eight IHD disease modules (the PPI sub-networks significantly relevant to IHD) were identified, in which two disease modules were relevant to PSCS syndrome (i.e., two PSCS syndrome modules). These two modules had enriched pathways on Toll-like receptor signaling pathway (hsa04620) and Renin-angiotensin system (hsa04614), with the molecular functions of angiotensin maturation (GO:0002003) and response to bacterium (GO:0009617), which had been validated by classical Chinese herbal formulas-related targets, IHD-related drug targets, and the phenotype features derived from human phenotype ontology (HPO) and published biomedical literatures. Conclusion: A network medicine

  18. Retinol-Binding Protein 4 and Insulin Resistance in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchison, Samantha K.; Harrison, Cheryce; Stepto, Nigel; Meyer, Caroline; Teede, Helena J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE?Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an insulin-resistant state with insulin resistance being an established therapeutic target; however, measurement of insulin resistance remains challenging. We aimed to 1) determine serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels (purported to reflect insulin resistance) in women with PCOS and control subjects, 2) examine the relationship of RBP4 to conventional markers of insulin resistance, and 3) examine RBP4 changes with interventions modulating ...

  19. Protein source in a high-protein diet modulates reductions in insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in fa/fa Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Jennifer L; Devassy, Jessay G; Wu, Yinghong; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Aukema, Harold M

    2016-01-01

    High-protein diets are being promoted to reduce insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in metabolic syndrome. Therefore, the effect of protein source in high-protein diets on reducing insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis was examined. Fa/fa Zucker rats were provided normal-protein (15% of energy) casein, high-protein (35% of energy) casein, high-protein soy, or high-protein mixed diets with animal and plant proteins. The high-protein mixed diet reduced area under the curve for insulin during glucose tolerance testing, fasting serum insulin and free fatty acid concentrations, homeostatic model assessment index, insulin to glucose ratio, and pancreatic islet cell area. The high-protein mixed and the high-protein soy diets reduced hepatic lipid concentrations, liver to body weight ratio, and hepatic steatosis rating. These improvements were observed despite no differences in body weight, feed intake, or adiposity among high-protein diet groups. The high-protein casein diet had minimal benefits. A high-protein mixed diet was the most effective for modulating reductions in insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis independent of weight loss, indicating that the source of protein within a high-protein diet is critical for the management of these metabolic syndrome parameters. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  20. Membrane shape modulates transmembrane protein distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimon, Sophie; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Berthaud, Alice; Pinot, Mathieu; Toombes, Gilman E S; Bassereau, Patricia

    2014-01-27

    Although membrane shape varies greatly throughout the cell, the contribution of membrane curvature to transmembrane protein targeting is unknown because of the numerous sorting mechanisms that take place concurrently in cells. To isolate the effect of membrane shape, we used cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) containing either the potassium channel KvAP or the water channel AQP0 to form membrane nanotubes with controlled radii. Whereas the AQP0 concentrations in flat and curved membranes were indistinguishable, KvAP was enriched in the tubes, with greater enrichment in more highly curved membranes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measurements showed that both proteins could freely diffuse through the neck between the tube and GUV, and the effect of each protein on membrane shape and stiffness was characterized using a thermodynamic sorting model. This study establishes the importance of membrane shape for targeting transmembrane proteins and provides a method for determining the effective shape and flexibility of membrane proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Plasma protein haptoglobin modulates renal iron loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagoonee, Sharmila; Gburek, Jakub; Hirsch, Emilio

    2005-01-01

    Haptoglobin is the plasma protein with the highest binding affinity for hemoglobin. The strength of hemoglobin binding and the existence of a specific receptor for the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex in the monocyte/macrophage system clearly suggest that haptoglobin may have a crucial role in heme...... distribution of hemoglobin in haptoglobin-deficient mice resulted in abnormal iron deposits in proximal tubules during aging. Moreover, iron also accumulated in proximal tubules after renal ischemia-reperfusion injury or after an acute plasma heme-protein overload caused by muscle injury, without affecting...... morphological and functional parameters of renal damage. These data demonstrate that haptoglobin crucially prevents glomerular filtration of hemoglobin and, consequently, renal iron loading during aging and following acute plasma heme-protein overload....

  2. Modulation of metabolic syndrome-related inflammation by cocoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yeyi; Lambert, Joshua D

    2013-06-01

    Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L., Sterculiaceae) is a widely consumed food ingredient. Although typically found in high-fat, high-sugar foods such as chocolate, cocoa is rich in polyphenols, methylxanthines, and monounsaturated fatty acids. There is increasing evidence that moderate consumption of cocoa and cocoa-containing foods may have beneficial effects on the health including vasodilatory, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory effects. Polyphenols in cocoa, including monomeric flavanols, as well as polymeric proanthocyanidins, may play a role in these observed beneficial effects. Chronic inflammation represents a potential mechanistic link between obesity and its related pathologies: insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, which comprise the metabolic syndrome. In the present review, we discuss the available data regarding the modulation of metabolic syndrome-related inflammation by cocoa and cocoa-derived compounds. We emphasize studies using laboratory animals or human subjects since such studies often represent the strongest available evidence for biological effects. In vitro studies are included to provide some mechanistic context, but are critically interpreted. Although the available data seem to support the anti-inflammatory effects of cocoa, further studies are needed with regard to the dose-response relationship as well as the underlying mechanisms of action. We hope this review will stimulate further research on cocoa and its anti-inflammatory activities. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Sex hormones in the modulation of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulak, Agata; Taché, Yvette; Larauche, Muriel

    2014-03-14

    Compelling evidence indicates sex and gender differences in epidemiology, symptomatology, pathophysiology, and treatment outcome in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Based on the female predominance as well as the correlation between IBS symptoms and hormonal status, several models have been proposed to examine the role of sex hormones in gastrointestinal (GI) function including differences in GI symptoms expression in distinct phases of the menstrual cycle, in pre- and post-menopausal women, during pregnancy, hormonal treatment or after oophorectomy. Sex hormones may influence peripheral and central regulatory mechanisms of the brain-gut axis involved in the pathophysiology of IBS contributing to the alterations in visceral sensitivity, motility, intestinal barrier function, and immune activation of intestinal mucosa. Sex differences in stress response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and autonomic nervous system, neuroimmune interactions triggered by stress, as well as estrogen interactions with serotonin and corticotropin-releasing factor signaling systems are being increasingly recognized. A concept of "microgenderome" related to the potential role of sex hormone modulation of the gut microbiota is also emerging. Significant differences between IBS female and male patients regarding symptomatology and comorbidity with other chronic pain syndromes and psychiatric disorders, together with differences in efficacy of serotonergic medications in IBS patients confirm the necessity for more sex-tailored therapeutic approach in this disorder.

  4. Deciphering peculiar protein-protein interacting modules in Deinococcus radiodurans

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    Barkallah Insaf

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interactomes of proteins under positive selection from ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria (IRRB might be a part of the answer to the question as to how IRRB, particularly Deinococcus radiodurans R1 (Deira, resist ionizing radiation. Here, using the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP and the Protein Structural Interactome (PSI-base server for PSI map, we have predicted novel interactions of orthologs of the 58 proteins under positive selection in Deira and other IRRB, but which are absent in IRSB. Among these, 18 domains and their interactomes have been identified in DNA checkpoint and repair; kinases pathways; energy and nucleotide metabolisms were the important biological processes that were found to be involved. This finding provides new clues to the cellular pathways that can to be important for ionizing-radiation resistance in Deira.

  5. Xanthophylls as modulators of membrane protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, Alexander V; Johnson, Matthew P

    2010-12-01

    This review discusses the structural aspect of the role of photosynthetic antenna xanthophylls. It argues that xanthophyll hydrophobicity/polarity could explain the reason for xanthophyll variety and help to understand their recently emerging function--control of membrane organization and the work of membrane proteins. The structure of a xanthophyll molecule is discussed in relation to other amphiphilic compounds like lipids, detergents, etc. Xanthophyll composition of membrane proteins, the role of their variety in protein function are discussed using as an example for the major light harvesting antenna complex of photosystem II, LHCII, from higher plants. A new empirical parameter, hydrophobicity parameter (H-parameter), has been introduced as an effective measure of the hydrophobicity of the xanthophyll complement of LHCII from different xanthophyll biosynthesis mutants of Arabidopsis. Photosystem II quantum efficiency was found to correlate well with the H-parameter of LHCII xanthophylls. PSII down-regulation by non-photochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, NPQ, had optimum corresponding to the wild-type xanthophyll composition, where lutein occupies intrinsic sites, L1 and L2. Xanthophyll polarity/hydrophobicity alteration by the activity of the xanthophyll cycle explains the allosteric character of NPQ regulation, memory of illumination history and the hysteretic nature of the relationship between the triggering factor, ΔpH, and the energy dissipation process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pneumonia, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, and Early Immune-Modulator Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Yil Lee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is caused by infectious insults, such as pneumonia from various pathogens or related to other noninfectious events. Clinical and histopathologic characteristics are similar across severely affected patients, suggesting that a common mode of immune reaction may be involved in the immunopathogenesis of ARDS. There may be etiologic substances that have an affinity for respiratory cells and induce lung cell injury in cases of ARDS. These substances originate not only from pathogens, but also from injured host cells. At the molecular level, these substances have various sizes and biochemical characteristics, classifying them as protein substances and non-protein substances. Immune cells and immune proteins may recognize and act on these substances, including pathogenic proteins and peptides, depending upon the size and biochemical properties of the substances (this theory is known as the protein-homeostasis-system hypothesis. The severity or chronicity of ARDS depends on the amount of etiologic substances with corresponding immune reactions, the duration of the appearance of specific immune cells, or the repertoire of specific immune cells that control the substances. Therefore, treatment with early systemic immune modulators (corticosteroids and/or intravenous immunoglobulin as soon as possible may reduce aberrant immune responses in the potential stage of ARDS.

  7. Identification of polycystic ovary syndrome potential drug targets based on pathobiological similarity in the protein-protein interaction network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan; Wei, Wenqing; Li, Yiran; Xie, Ruiqiang; Guo, Shanshan; Wang, Yahui; Jiang, Jing; Chen, Binbin; Lv, Junjie; Zhang, Nana; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrinological disorders in reproductive aged women. PCOS and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) are closely linked in multiple levels and possess high pathobiological similarity. Here, we put forward a new computational approach based on the pathobiological similarity to identify PCOS potential drug target modules (PPDT-Modules) and PCOS potential drug targets in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN). From the systems level and biological background, 1 PPDT-Module and 22 PCOS potential drug targets were identified, 21 of which were verified by literatures to be associated with the pathogenesis of PCOS. 42 drugs targeting to 13 PCOS potential drug targets were investigated experimentally or clinically for PCOS. Evaluated by independent datasets, the whole PPDT-Module and 22 PCOS potential drug targets could not only reveal the drug response, but also distinguish the statuses between normal and disease. Our identified PPDT-Module and PCOS potential drug targets would shed light on the treatment of PCOS. And our approach would provide valuable insights to research on the pathogenesis and drug response of other diseases. PMID:27191267

  8. Usher syndrome: molecular links of pathogenesis, proteins and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Hannie; van Wijk, Erwin; Märker, Tina; Wolfrum, Uwe; Roepman, Ronald

    2006-10-15

    Usher syndrome is the most common form of deaf-blindness. The syndrome is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and to date, eight causative genes have been identified. The proteins encoded by these genes are part of a dynamic protein complex that is present in hair cells of the inner ear and in photoreceptor cells of the retina. The localization of the Usher proteins and the phenotype in animal models indicate that the Usher protein complex is essential in the morphogenesis of the stereocilia bundle in hair cells and in the calycal processes of photoreceptor cells. In addition, the Usher proteins are important in the synaptic processes of both cell types. The association of other proteins with the complex indicates functional links to a number of basic cell-biological processes. Prominently present is the connection to the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, involved in cellular morphology, cell polarity and cell-cell interactions. The Usher protein complex can also be linked to the cadherins/catenins in the adherens junction-associated protein complexes, suggesting a role in cell polarity and tissue organization. A third link can be established to the integrin transmembrane signaling network. The Usher interactome, as outlined in this review, participates in pathways common in inner ear and retina that are disrupted in the Usher syndrome.

  9. Roles of Werner syndrome protein in protection of genome integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Marie L; Ghosh, Avik K; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2010-01-01

    Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is one of a family of five human RecQ helicases implicated in the maintenance of genome stability. The conserved RecQ family also includes RecQ1, Bloom syndrome protein (BLM), RecQ4, and RecQ5 in humans, as well as Sgs1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rqh1...... in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and homologs in Caenorhabditis elegans, Xenopus laevis, and Drosophila melanogaster. Defects in three of the RecQ helicases, RecQ4, BLM, and WRN, cause human pathologies linked with cancer predisposition and premature aging. Mutations in the WRN gene are the causative factor of Werner...

  10. Growing functional modules from a seed protein via integration of protein interaction and gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrakopoulou Konstantina

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays modern biology aims at unravelling the strands of complex biological structures such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. A key concept in the organization of PPI networks is the existence of dense subnetworks (functional modules in them. In recent approaches clustering algorithms were applied at these networks and the resulting subnetworks were evaluated by estimating the coverage of well-established protein complexes they contained. However, most of these algorithms elaborate on an unweighted graph structure which in turn fails to elevate those interactions that would contribute to the construction of biologically more valid and coherent functional modules. Results In the current study, we present a method that corroborates the integration of protein interaction and microarray data via the discovery of biologically valid functional modules. Initially the gene expression information is overlaid as weights onto the PPI network and the enriched PPI graph allows us to exploit its topological aspects, while simultaneously highlights enhanced functional association in specific pairs of proteins. Then we present an algorithm that unveils the functional modules of the weighted graph by expanding a kernel protein set, which originates from a given 'seed' protein used as starting-point. Conclusion The integrated data and the concept of our approach provide reliable functional modules. We give proofs based on yeast data that our method manages to give accurate results in terms both of structural coherency, as well as functional consistency.

  11. NSP-CAS Protein Complexes: Emerging Signaling Modules in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallez, Yann; Mace, Peter D; Pasquale, Elena B; Riedl, Stefan J

    2012-05-01

    The CAS (CRK-associated substrate) family of adaptor proteins comprises 4 members, which share a conserved modular domain structure that enables multiple protein-protein interactions, leading to the assembly of intracellular signaling platforms. Besides their physiological role in signal transduction downstream of a variety of cell surface receptors, CAS proteins are also critical for oncogenic transformation and cancer cell malignancy through associations with a variety of regulatory proteins and downstream effectors. Among the regulatory partners, the 3 recently identified adaptor proteins constituting the NSP (novel SH2-containing protein) family avidly bind to the conserved carboxy-terminal focal adhesion-targeting (FAT) domain of CAS proteins. NSP proteins use an anomalous nucleotide exchange factor domain that lacks catalytic activity to form NSP-CAS signaling modules. Additionally, the NSP SH2 domain can link NSP-CAS signaling assemblies to tyrosine-phosphorylated cell surface receptors. NSP proteins can potentiate CAS function by affecting key CAS attributes such as expression levels, phosphorylation state, and subcellular localization, leading to effects on cell adhesion, migration, and invasion as well as cell growth. The consequences of these activities are well exemplified by the role that members of both families play in promoting breast cancer cell invasiveness and resistance to antiestrogens. In this review, we discuss the intriguing interplay between the NSP and CAS families, with a particular focus on cancer signaling networks.

  12. Multiple proteins of White spot syndrome virus involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The recognition and attachment of virus to its host cell surface is a critical step for viral infection. Recent research revealed that -integrin was involved in White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. In this study, the interaction of -integrin with structure proteins of WSSV and motifs involved in WSSV infection was ...

  13. Distribution in rat tissues of modulator-binding protein of particulate nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobue, K.; Muramoto, Y.; Kakiuchi, S.; Yamazaki, R.

    1979-01-01

    Studies on Ca 2+ -activatable cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase led to the discovery of a protein modulator that is required for the activation of this enzyme by Ca 2+ . Later, this protein has been shown to cause the Ca 2+ -dependent activation of several enzymes that include phosphodiesterase, adenylate cyclase, a protein kinase from muscles, phosphorylase b kinase, actomyosin ATPase, membranous ATPase from erythrocytes and nerve synapses. Thus, modulator protein appears to be an intracellular mediator of actions of Ca 2+ . The present work shows the distribution of this particulate modulator-binding component in rat tissues. This paper also describes the labeling of modulator protein with tritium without deteriorating its biological activities and application of this 3 H-modulator protein to the determination of the Ca ++ dependent binding of modulator protein with membranous protein. This technique proves to be useful in studying enzymes or proteins whose functions are regulated by Ca ++ /modulator protein system. (Auth.)

  14. Modulation of protein properties in living cells using nanobodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhofer, Axel; Helma, Jonas; Schmidthals, Katrin; Frauer, Carina; Cui, Sheng; Karcher, Annette; Pellis, Mireille; Muyldermans, Serge; Casas-Delucchi, Corella S; Cardoso, M Cristina; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Protein conformation is critically linked to function and often controlled by interactions with regulatory factors. Here we report the selection of camelid-derived single-domain antibodies (nanobodies) that modulate the conformation and spectral properties of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). One nanobody could reversibly reduce GFP fluorescence by a factor of 5, whereas its displacement by a second nanobody caused an increase by a factor of 10. Structural analysis of GFP-nanobody complexes revealed that the two nanobodies induce subtle opposing changes in the chromophore environment, leading to altered absorption properties. Unlike conventional antibodies, the small, stable nanobodies are functional in living cells. Nanobody-induced changes were detected by ratio imaging and used to monitor protein expression and subcellular localization as well as translocation events such as the tamoxifen-induced nuclear localization of estrogen receptor. This work demonstrates that protein conformations can be manipulated and studied with nanobodies in living cells.

  15. Modulating nanoparticle superlattice structure using proteins with tunable bond distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, Janet R.; Brodin, Jeffrey D.; Millan, Jaime A.; Lee, Byeongdu; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we investigate the use of proteins with tunable DNA modification distributions to modulate nanoparticle superlattice structure. Using Beta-galactosidase (βgal) as a model system, we have employed the orthogonal chemical reactivities of surface amines and thiols to synthesize protein-DNA conjugates with 36 evenly distributed or 8 specifically positioned oligonucleotides. When assembled into crystalline superlattices with AuNPs, we find that the distribution of DNA modifications modulates the favored structure: βgal with uniformly distributed DNA bonding elements results in body-centered cubic crystals, whereas DNA functionalization of cysteines results in AB 2 packing. We probe the role of protein oligonucleotide number and conjugate size on this observation, which revealed the importance of oligonucleotide distribution and number in this observed assembly behavior. These results indicate that proteins with defined DNA-modification patterns are powerful tools to control the nanoparticle superlattices architecture, and establish the importance of oligonucleotide distribution in the assembly behavior of protein-DNA conjugates.

  16. Molecular tweezers modulate 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, David; Rose, Rolf; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Bartel, Maria; Ramirez-Anguita, Juan Manuel; Dutt, Som; Wilch, Constanze; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Schrader, Thomas; Ottmann, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has recently emerged as a promising way to modulate protein functions, but devising molecules that will interact with a protein in the desired manner is difficult as many competing interactions exist in a biological environment (with solvents, salts or different sites for the target biomolecule). We now show that lysine-specific molecular tweezers bind to a 14-3-3 adapter protein and modulate its interaction with partner proteins. The tweezers inhibit binding between the 14-3-3 protein and two partner proteins—a phosphorylated (C-Raf) protein and an unphosphorylated one (ExoS)—in a concentration-dependent manner. Protein crystallography shows that this effect arises from the binding of the tweezers to a single surface-exposed lysine (Lys214) of the 14-3-3 protein in the proximity of its central channel, which normally binds the partner proteins. A combination of structural analysis and computer simulations provides rules for the tweezers' binding preferences, thus allowing us to predict their influence on this type of protein-protein interactions.

  17. Functional modules by relating protein interaction networks and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, Sabine; Mewes, H W

    2003-11-01

    Genes and proteins are organized on the basis of their particular mutual relations or according to their interactions in cellular and genetic networks. These include metabolic or signaling pathways and protein interaction, regulatory or co-expression networks. Integrating the information from the different types of networks may lead to the notion of a functional network and functional modules. To find these modules, we propose a new technique which is based on collective, multi-body correlations in a genetic network. We calculated the correlation strength of a group of genes (e.g. in the co-expression network) which were identified as members of a module in a different network (e.g. in the protein interaction network) and estimated the probability that this correlation strength was found by chance. Groups of genes with a significant correlation strength in different networks have a high probability that they perform the same function. Here, we propose evaluating the multi-body correlations by applying the superparamagnetic approach. We compare our method to the presently applied mean Pearson correlations and show that our method is more sensitive in revealing functional relationships.

  18. Protein-solvent preferential interactions, protein hydration, and the modulation of biochemical reactions by solvent components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timasheff, Serge N

    2002-07-23

    Solvent additives (cosolvents, osmolytes) modulate biochemical reactions if, during the course of the reaction, there is a change in preferential interactions of solvent components with the reacting system. Preferential interactions can be expressed in terms of preferential binding of the cosolvent or its preferential exclusion (preferential hydration). The driving force is the perturbation by the protein of the chemical potential of the cosolvent. It is shown that the measured change of the amount of water in contact with protein during the course of the reaction modulated by an osmolyte is a change in preferential hydration that is strictly a measure of the cosolvent chemical potential perturbation by the protein in the ternary water-protein-cosolvent system. It is not equal to the change in water of hydration, because water of hydration is a reflection strictly of protein-water forces in a binary system. There is no direct relation between water of preferential hydration and water of hydration.

  19. Molecular imaging of drug-modulated protein-protein interactions in living subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Massoud, Tarik F; Huang, Jing; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2004-03-15

    Networks of protein interactions mediate cellular responses to environmental stimuli and direct the execution of many different cellular functional pathways. Small molecules synthesized within cells or recruited from the external environment mediate many protein interactions. The study of small molecule-mediated interactions of proteins is important to understand abnormal signal transduction pathways in cancer and in drug development and validation. In this study, we used split synthetic renilla luciferase (hRLUC) protein fragment-assisted complementation to evaluate heterodimerization of the human proteins FRB and FKBP12 mediated by the small molecule rapamycin. The concentration of rapamycin required for efficient dimerization and that of its competitive binder ascomycin required for dimerization inhibition were studied in cell lines. The system was dually modulated in cell culture at the transcription level, by controlling nuclear factor kappaB promoter/enhancer elements using tumor necrosis factor alpha, and at the interaction level, by controlling the concentration of the dimerizer rapamycin. The rapamycin-mediated dimerization of FRB and FKBP12 also was studied in living mice by locating, quantifying, and timing the hRLUC complementation-based bioluminescence imaging signal using a cooled charged coupled device camera. This split reporter system can be used to efficiently screen small molecule drugs that modulate protein-protein interactions and also to assess drugs in living animals. Both are essential steps in the preclinical evaluation of candidate pharmaceutical agents targeting protein-protein interactions, including signaling pathways in cancer cells.

  20. Prion protein modulates glucose homeostasis by altering intracellular iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Ajay; Singh, Neena

    2018-04-26

    The prion protein (PrP C ), a mainly neuronal protein, is known to modulate glucose homeostasis in mouse models. We explored the underlying mechanism in mouse models and the human pancreatic β-cell line 1.1B4. We report expression of PrP C on mouse pancreatic β-cells, where it promoted uptake of iron through divalent-metal-transporters. Accordingly, pancreatic iron stores in PrP knockout mice (PrP -/- ) were significantly lower than wild type (PrP +/+ ) controls. Silencing of PrP C in 1.1B4 cells resulted in significant depletion of intracellular (IC) iron, and remarkably, upregulation of glucose transporter GLUT2 and insulin. Iron overloading, on the other hand, resulted in downregulation of GLUT2 and insulin in a PrP C -dependent manner. Similar observations were noted in the brain, liver, and neuroretina of iron overloaded PrP +/+ but not PrP -/- mice, indicating PrP C -mediated modulation of insulin and glucose homeostasis through iron. Peripheral challenge with glucose and insulin revealed blunting of the response in iron-overloaded PrP +/+ relative to PrP -/- mice, suggesting that PrP C -mediated modulation of IC iron influences both secretion and sensitivity of peripheral organs to insulin. These observations have implications for Alzheimer's disease and diabetic retinopathy, known complications of type-2-diabetes associated with brain and ocular iron-dyshomeostasis.

  1. Associations of Dietary Protein and Energy Intakes With Protein-Energy Wasting Syndrome in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddhu, Srinivasan; Wei, Guo; Chen, Xiaorui; Boucher, Robert; Kiani, Rabia; Raj, Dominic; Chonchol, Michel; Greene, Tom; Murtaugh, Maureen A

    2017-09-01

    The associations of dietary protein and/or energy intakes with protein or energy wasting in patients on maintenance hemodialysis are controversial. We examined these in the Hemodialysis (HEMO) Study. In 1487 participants in the HEMO Study, baseline dietary protein intake (grams per kilogram per day) and dietary energy intake (kilocalories per kilograms per day) were related to the presence of the protein-energy wasting (PEW) syndrome at month 12 (defined as the presence of at least 1 criteria in 2 of the 3 categories of low serum chemistry, low body mass, and low muscle mass) in logistic regression models. In additional separate models, protein intake estimated from equilibrated normalized protein catabolic rate (enPCR) was also related to the PEW syndrome. Compared with the lowest quartile, the highest quartile of baseline dietary protein intake was paradoxically associated with increased risk of the PEW syndrome at month 12 (odds ratio [OR]: 4.11; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.79-6.05). This relationship was completely attenuated (OR: 1.35; 95% CI: 0.88-2.06) with adjustment for baseline body weight, which suggested mathematical coupling. Results were similar for dietary energy intake. Compared with the lowest quartile of baseline enPCR, the highest quartile was not associated with the PEW syndrome at 12 months (OR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.54-1.12). These data do not support the use of dietary protein intake or dietary energy intake criteria in the definition of the PEW syndrome in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

  2. Periodic and stochastic thermal modulation of protein folding kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-07-21

    Chemical reactions are usually observed either by relaxation of a bulk sample after applying a sudden external perturbation, or by intrinsic fluctuations of a few molecules. Here we show that the two ideas can be combined to measure protein folding kinetics, either by periodic thermal modulation, or by creating artificial thermal noise that greatly exceeds natural thermal fluctuations. We study the folding reaction of the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase driven by periodic temperature waveforms. As the temperature waveform unfolds and refolds the protein, its fluorescence color changes due to FRET (Förster resonant Energy Transfer) of two donor/acceptor fluorophores labeling the protein. We adapt a simple model of periodically driven kinetics that nicely fits the data at all temperatures and driving frequencies: The phase shifts of the periodic donor and acceptor fluorescence signals as a function of driving frequency reveal reaction rates. We also drive the reaction with stochastic temperature waveforms that produce thermal fluctuations much greater than natural fluctuations in the bulk. Such artificial thermal noise allows the recovery of weak underlying signals due to protein folding kinetics. This opens up the possibility for future detection of a stochastic resonance for protein folding subject to noise with controllable amplitude.

  3. Guanylate kinase domains of the MAGUK family scaffold proteins as specific phospho-protein-binding modules

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jinwei; Shang, Yuan; Xia, Caihao; Wang, Wenning; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUK) family proteins contain an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain, whose function has been elusive. Here, this domain is revealed as a new type of phospho-peptide-binding module, in which the GMP-binding site has evolved to accommodate phospho-serines or -threonines.

  4. C2 Domains as Protein-Protein Interaction Modules in the Ciliary Transition Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Remans

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available RPGR-interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1 is mutated in the eye disease Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA and its structural homolog, RPGRIP1-like (RPGRIP1L, is mutated in many different ciliopathies. Both are multidomain proteins that are predicted to interact with retinitis pigmentosa G-protein regulator (RPGR. RPGR is mutated in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and is located in photoreceptors and primary cilia. We solved the crystal structure of the complex between the RPGR-interacting domain (RID of RPGRIP1 and RPGR and demonstrate that RPGRIP1L binds to RPGR similarly. RPGRIP1 binding to RPGR affects the interaction with PDEδ, the cargo shuttling factor for prenylated ciliary proteins. RPGRIP1-RID is a C2 domain with a canonical β sandwich structure that does not bind Ca2+ and/or phospholipids and thus constitutes a unique type of protein-protein interaction module. Judging from the large number of C2 domains in most of the ciliary transition zone proteins identified thus far, the structure presented here seems to constitute a cilia-specific module that is present in multiprotein transition zone complexes.

  5. Modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 3 by hepatitis C virus core protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, HT; Pham, Long; Kim, JW

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular proteins for its own propagation. In order to identify the cellular factors involved in HCV propagation, we performed protein microarray assays using the HCV core protein as a probe. Of ~9,000 host proteins immobilized in a microarray...... inducers. Binding of HCV core to MAPKAPK3 was confirmed by in vitro pulldown assay and further verified by coimmunoprecipitation assay. HCV core protein interacted with MAPKAPK3 through amino acid residues 41 to 75 of core and the N-terminal half of kinase domain of MAPKAPK3. In addition, both RNA...... increased HCV IRES-mediated translation and MAPKAPK3-dependent HCV IRES activity was further increased by core protein. These data suggest that HCV core may modulate MAPKAPK3 to facilitate its own propagation....

  6. Modulation of P1798 lymphosarcoma proliferation by protein phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michnoff, C.A.H.

    1983-01-01

    The role of protein kinases in modulating cell proliferation was examined. Studies characterized the regulation of cell proliferation by adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate-dependent protein kinase (cA-Pk). Calcium/calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) was isolated and examined as a potential substrate regulated by cA-PK in the rapidly proliferating P1798 lymphosarcoma. Modulation of cell proliferation by cA-PK was characterized by quantitating cell division by [methyl- 3 H] thymidine ([ 3 H]-dT) incorporation into DNA, cAMP accumulations, and activation of cA-PK using P1798 lymphosarcoma cells. Epinephrine and prostaglandin E 1 (PGE 1 ) were demonstrated to suppress [ 3 H]-dT incorporation into DNA, to stimulate cAMP accumulation, and to activate cA-PK with dose-dependency. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent MLCK was partially purified from P1798 lymphosarcoma. P1798 MLCK phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chains (P-LC) from thymus, cardiac and skeletal muscles. One mol [ 32 Pi] was transferred into one mol cardiac or skeletal P-LC by P1798 MLCK. Apparent Km values of 65 μM and 51 μM were determined for ATP and cardiac P-LC, respectively. The apparent molecular weight of P1798 MLCK was 135,000. P1798 MLCK was phosphorylated by cA-PK. Phosphorylated MLCK showed a 41% decrease in calcium-dependent activity. Two additional protein kinases from P1798 lymphosarcoma phosphorylated cardiac and skeletal light chains

  7. Understanding curcumin-induced modulation of protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Basir; Borana, Mohanish S; Chaudhary, Ankur P

    2017-07-01

    Curcumin, a diarylheptanoid compound, found in spice turmeric is known to alter the aggregation of proteins and reduce the toxicity of the aggregates. This review looks at the molecular basis of modulating protein aggregation and toxicity of the aggregates. Foremost, we identify the interaction of curcumin and its derivatives with proteins/peptides and the effect of their interaction on the conformational stability and unfolding/folding pathway(s). The unfolding/folding processes generate partially folded/unfolded intermediate, which serve as aggregation precursor state. Secondly, we discuss the effect of curcumin binding on the kinetics parameters of the aggregation process, which give information about the mechanism of the aggregation inhibition. We describe, in addition, that curcumin can accelerate/promote fibril formation by binding to oligomeric intermediate(s) accumulated in the aggregation pathway. Finally, we discuss the correlation of curcumin-induced monomeric and/or oligomeric precursor states with aggregate structure and toxicity. On the basis of these discussions, we propose a model describing curcumin-induced inhibition/promotion of formation of amyloid-like fibrils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA mismatch repair protein deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts: a novel indicator of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Rish K; Dudley, Beth; Karloski, Eve; Brand, Randall E; O'Callaghan, Neil; Rosty, Christophe; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jenkins, Mark A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; French, Amy J; Lindor, Noralane M; Pai, Reetesh K

    2018-06-08

    Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal carcinoma. However, establishing the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome is challenging, and ancillary studies that distinguish between sporadic DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein deficiency and Lynch syndrome are needed, particularly when germline mutation studies are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine if MMR protein-deficient non-neoplastic intestinal crypts can help distinguish between patients with and without Lynch syndrome. We evaluated the expression of MMR proteins in non-neoplastic intestinal mucosa obtained from colorectal surgical resection specimens from patients with Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma (n = 52) and patients with colorectal carcinoma without evidence of Lynch syndrome (n = 70), including sporadic MMR protein-deficient colorectal carcinoma (n = 30), MMR protein proficient colorectal carcinoma (n = 30), and "Lynch-like" syndrome (n = 10). MMR protein-deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts were identified in 19 of 122 (16%) patients. MMR protein-deficient colonic crypts were identified in 18 of 52 (35%) patients with Lynch syndrome compared to only 1 of 70 (1%) patients without Lynch syndrome (p Lynch-like" syndrome and harbored two MSH2-deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts. MMR protein-deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts were not identified in patients with sporadic MMR protein-deficient or MMR protein proficient colorectal carcinoma. Our findings suggest that MMR protein-deficient colonic crypts are a novel indicator of Lynch syndrome, and evaluation for MMR protein-deficient crypts may be a helpful addition to Lynch syndrome diagnostics.

  9. Anti-thrombin III, Protein C, and Protein S deficiency in acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasnan Ismail

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The final most common pathway for the majority of coronary artery disease is occlusion of a coronary vessel. Under normal conditions, antithrombin III (AT III, protein C, and protein S as an active protein C cofactor, are natural anticoagulants (hemostatic control that balances procoagulant activity (thrombin antithrombin complex balance to prevent thrombosis. If the condition becomes unbalanced, natural anticoagulants and the procoagulants can lead to thrombosis. Thirty subjects with acute coronary syndrome (ACS were studied for the incidence of antithrombin III (AT III, protein C, and protein S deficiencies, and the result were compare to the control group. Among patients with ACS, the frequency of distribution of AT-III with activity < 75% were 23,3% (7 of 30, and only 6,7% ( 2 of 30 in control subject. No one of the 30 control subject have protein C activity deficient, in ACS with activity < 70% were 13,3% (4 of 30. Fifteen out of the 30 (50% control subjects had protein S activity deficiency, while protein S deficiency activity < 70% was found 73.3.% (22 out of 30. On linear regression, the deterministic coefficient of AT-III activity deficiency to the development ACS was 13,25 %, and the deterministic coefficient of protein C activity deficient to the development of ACS was 9,06 %. The cut-off point for AT-III without protein S deficiency expected to contribute to the development of vessel disease was 45%. On discriminant analysis, protein C activity deficiency posed a risk for ACS of 4,5 greater than non deficient subjects, and AT-III activity deficiency posed a risk for ACS of 3,5 times greater than non deficient subjects. On binary logistic regression, protein S activity acted only as a reinforcing factor of AT-III activity deficiency in the development of ACS. Protein C and AT III deficiency can trigger ACS, with determinant coefficients of 9,06% and 13,25% respectively. Low levels of protein C posed a greater risk of

  10. Natural Modulators of Amyloid-Beta Precursor Protein Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease and the primary cause of dementia, with no cure currently available. The pathogenesis of AD is believed to be primarily driven by Aβ, the principal component of senile plaques. Aβ is an ~4 kDa peptide generated from the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) through proteolytic secretases. Natural products, particularly those utilized in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), have a long history alleviating common clinical disorders, including dementia. However, the cell/molecular pathways mediated by these natural products are largely unknown until recently when the underlying molecular mechanisms of the disorders begin to be elucidated. Here, the mechanisms with which natural products modulate the pathogenesis of AD are discussed, in particular, by focusing on their roles in the processing of APP. PMID:22998566

  11. Phosphorylation of the Usher syndrome 1G protein SANS controls Magi2-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauß, Katharina; Knapp, Barbara; Jores, Pia; Roepman, Ronald; Kremer, Hannie; Wijk, Erwin V; Märker, Tina; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2014-08-01

    The human Usher syndrome (USH) is a complex ciliopathy with at least 12 chromosomal loci assigned to three clinical subtypes, USH1-3. The heterogeneous USH proteins are organized into protein networks. Here, we identified Magi2 (membrane-associated guanylate kinase inverted-2) as a new component of the USH protein interactome, binding to the multifunctional scaffold protein SANS (USH1G). We showed that the SANS-Magi2 complex assembly is regulated by the phosphorylation of an internal PDZ-binding motif in the sterile alpha motif domain of SANS by the protein kinase CK2. We affirmed Magi2's role in receptor-mediated, clathrin-dependent endocytosis and showed that phosphorylated SANS tightly regulates Magi2-mediated endocytosis. Specific depletions by RNAi revealed that SANS and Magi2-mediated endocytosis regulates aspects of ciliogenesis. Furthermore, we demonstrated the localization of the SANS-Magi2 complex in the periciliary membrane complex facing the ciliary pocket of retinal photoreceptor cells in situ. Our data suggest that endocytotic processes may not only contribute to photoreceptor cell homeostasis but also counterbalance the periciliary membrane delivery accompanying the exocytosis processes for the cargo vesicle delivery. In USH1G patients, mutations in SANS eliminate Magi2 binding and thereby deregulate endocytosis, lead to defective ciliary transport modules and ultimately disrupt photoreceptor cell function inducing retinal degeneration. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W. Brownjohn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD. We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation. : In this article, Livesey and colleagues perform a phenotypic drug screen in a human stem cell model of Alzheimer's disease. The anthelminthic avermectins are identified as a family of compounds that increase the production of short Aβ peptides over longer more toxic Aβ forms. The effect is analogous to existing γ-secretase modulators, but is independent of the core γ-secretase complex. Keywords: neural stem cells, Alzheimer's disease, phenotypic screening, iPSCs, human neurons, dementia, Down syndrome, amyloid beta, ivermectin, selamectin

  13. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein in bank employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cattafesta M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Monica Cattafesta,1 Nazaré Souza Bissoli,2 Luciane Bresciani Salaroli,1,31Postgraduate Program in Nutrition and Health, 2Postgraduate Program in Physiological Sciences, 3Postgraduate Program in Public Health, Department of Health Integrated Education, Federal University of Espírito Santo, Vitória, Espírito Santo, Brazil Background: The ultrasensitive C-reactive protein (us-CRP is used for the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, but it is not well described as a marker for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MS. Methods: An observational and transversal study of bank employees evaluated anthropometric, hemodynamic, and biochemical data. CRP values were determined using commercial kits from Roche Diagnostics Ltd, and MS criteria were analyzed according to National Cholesterol Education Program’s – Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III. Results: A total of 88 individuals had MS, and 77.3% (n=68 of these showed alterations of us-CRP (P=0.0001, confidence interval [CI] 0.11–0.34. Individuals with MS had higher mean values of us-CRP in global measures (P=0.0001 and stratified by sex (P=0.004 than individuals without the syndrome. This marker exhibited significant differences with varying criteria for MS, such as waist circumference (P=0.0001, triglycerides (P=0.002, and diastolic blood pressure (P=0.007, and the highest levels of us-CRP were found in individuals with more MS criteria. Conclusion: us-CRP was strongly associated with the presence of MS and MS criteria in this group of workers. us-CRP is a useful and effective marker for identifying the development of MS and may be used as a reference in routine care. Keywords: C-reactive protein, bank employees, metabolic syndrome, inflammation mediators, occupational health

  14. Interaction of dengue virus nonstructural protein 5 with Daxx modulates RANTES production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khunchai, Sasiprapa [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Graduate Program in Immunology, Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Junking, Mutita [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Suttitheptumrong, Aroonroong; Yasamut, Umpa [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Graduate Program in Immunology, Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Sawasdee, Nunghathai [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Netsawang, Janjuree [Faculty of Medical Technology, Rangsit University, Bangkok (Thailand); Morchang, Atthapan [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Graduate Program in Immunology, Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Chaowalit, Prapaipit [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Noisakran, Sansanee [Medical Biotechnology Research Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Bangkok (Thailand); Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai, E-mail: grpye@mahidol.ac.th [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); and others

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the first time how DENV NS5 increases RANTES production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DENV NS5 physically interacts with human Daxx. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of NS5 is required for Daxx interaction and RANTES production. -- Abstract: Dengue fever (DF), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS), caused by dengue virus (DENV) infection, are important public health problems in the tropical and subtropical regions. Abnormal hemostasis and plasma leakage are the main patho-physiological changes in DHF/DSS. A remarkably increased production of cytokines, the so called 'cytokine storm', is observed in the patients with DHF/DSS. A complex interaction between DENV proteins and the host immune response contributes to cytokine production. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which DENV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) mediates these responses has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, yeast two-hybrid assay was performed to identify host proteins interacting with DENV NS5 and a death-domain-associate protein (Daxx) was identified. The in vivo relevance of this interaction was suggested by co-immunoprecipitation and nuclear co-localization of these two proteins in HEK293 cells expressing DENV NS5. HEK293 cells expressing DENV NS5-K/A, which were mutated at the nuclear localization sequences (NLS), were created to assess its functional roles in nuclear translocation, Daxx interaction, and cytokine production. In the absence of NLS, DENV NS5 could neither translocate into the nucleus nor interact with Daxx to increase the DHF-associated cytokine, RANTES (CCL5) production. This work demonstrates the interaction between DENV NS5 and Daxx and the role of the interaction on the modulation of RANTES production.

  15. Interaction of dengue virus nonstructural protein 5 with Daxx modulates RANTES production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khunchai, Sasiprapa; Junking, Mutita; Suttitheptumrong, Aroonroong; Yasamut, Umpa; Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Netsawang, Janjuree; Morchang, Atthapan; Chaowalit, Prapaipit; Noisakran, Sansanee; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► For the first time how DENV NS5 increases RANTES production. ► DENV NS5 physically interacts with human Daxx. ► Nuclear localization of NS5 is required for Daxx interaction and RANTES production. -- Abstract: Dengue fever (DF), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS), caused by dengue virus (DENV) infection, are important public health problems in the tropical and subtropical regions. Abnormal hemostasis and plasma leakage are the main patho-physiological changes in DHF/DSS. A remarkably increased production of cytokines, the so called ‘cytokine storm’, is observed in the patients with DHF/DSS. A complex interaction between DENV proteins and the host immune response contributes to cytokine production. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which DENV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) mediates these responses has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, yeast two-hybrid assay was performed to identify host proteins interacting with DENV NS5 and a death-domain-associate protein (Daxx) was identified. The in vivo relevance of this interaction was suggested by co-immunoprecipitation and nuclear co-localization of these two proteins in HEK293 cells expressing DENV NS5. HEK293 cells expressing DENV NS5-K/A, which were mutated at the nuclear localization sequences (NLS), were created to assess its functional roles in nuclear translocation, Daxx interaction, and cytokine production. In the absence of NLS, DENV NS5 could neither translocate into the nucleus nor interact with Daxx to increase the DHF-associated cytokine, RANTES (CCL5) production. This work demonstrates the interaction between DENV NS5 and Daxx and the role of the interaction on the modulation of RANTES production.

  16. Mutations in plasmalemma vesicle-associated protein cause severe syndromic protein-losing enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekaert, Ilse Julia; Becker, Kerstin; Gottschalk, Ingo; Körber, Friederike; Dötsch, Jörg; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Hünseler, Christoph; Cirak, Sebahattin

    2018-04-16

    Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is characterised by gastrointestinal protein leakage due to loss of mucosal integrity or lymphatic abnormalities. PLE can manifest as congenital diarrhoea and should be differentiated from other congenital diarrhoeal disorders. Primary PLEs are genetically heterogeneous and the underlying genetic defects are currently emerging. We report an infant with fatal PLE for whom we aimed to uncover the underlying pathogenic mutation. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the index patient. Variants were classified based on the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guidelines. WES results and our detailed clinical description of the patient were compared with the literature. We discovered a novel homozygous stop mutation (c.988C>T, p.Q330*) in the Plasmalemma Vesicle-Associated Protein ( PLVAP ) gene in a newborn with fatal PLE, facial dysmorphism, and renal, ocular and cardiac anomalies. The Q330* mutation is predicted to result in complete loss of PLVAP protein expression leading to deletion of the diaphragms of endothelial fenestrae, resulting in plasma protein extravasation and PLE. Recently, another single homozygous stop mutation in PLVAP causing lethal PLE in an infant was reported. Our findings validate PLVAP mutations as a cause of syndromic PLE. Prenatal anomalies, severe PLE and syndromic features may guide the diagnosis of this rare disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Interaction between the Cockayne syndrome B and p53 proteins: implications for aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontini, Mattia; Proietti-De-Santis, Luca

    2012-02-01

    The CSB protein plays a role in the transcription coupled repair (TCR) branch of the nucleotide excision repair pathway. CSB is very often found mutated in Cockayne syndrome, a segmental progeroid genetic disease characterized by organ degeneration and growth failure. The tumor suppressor p53 plays a pivotal role in triggering senescence and apoptosis and suppressing tumorigenesis. Although p53 is very important to avoid cancer, its excessive activity can be detrimental for the lifespan of the organism. This is why a network of positive and negative feedback loops, which most likely evolved to fine-tune the activity of this tumor suppressor, modulate its induction and activation. Accordingly, an unbalanced p53 activity gives rise to premature aging or cancer. The physical interaction between CSB and p53 proteins has been known for more than a decade but, despite several hypotheses, nobody has been able to show the functional consequences of this interaction. In this review we resume recent advances towards a more comprehensive understanding of the critical role of this interaction in modulating p53’s levels and activity, therefore helping the system find a reasonable equilibrium between the beneficial and the detrimental effects of its activity. This crosstalk re-establishes the physiological balance towards cell proliferation and survival instead of towards cell death, after stressors of a broad nature. Accordingly, cells bearing mutations in the csb gene are unable to re-establish this physiological balance and to properly respond to some stress stimuli and undergo massive apoptosis.

  18. Developmental expression of Drosophila Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome family proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Mesa, Evelyn; Abreu-Blanco, Maria Teresa; Rosales-Nieves, Alicia E.; Parkhurst, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WASP) family proteins participate in many cellular processes involving rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. To the date, four WASP subfamily members have been described in Drosophila: Wash, WASp, SCAR, and Whamy. Wash, WASp, and SCAR are essential during early Drosophila development where they function in orchestrating cytoplasmic events including membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. A mutant for Whamy has not yet been reported. Results We generated monoclonal antibodies that are specific to Drosophila Wash, WASp, SCAR, and Whamy, and use these to describe their spatial and temporal localization patterns. Consistent with the importance of WASP family proteins in flies, we find that Wash, WASp, SCAR, and Whamy are dynamically expressed throughout oogenesis and embryogenesis. For example, we find that Wash accumulates at the oocyte cortex. WASp is highly expressed in the PNS, while SCAR is the most abundantly expressed in the CNS. Whamy exhibits an asymmetric subcellular localization that overlaps with mitochondria and is highly expressed in muscle. Conclusion All four WASP family members show specific expression patterns, some of which reflect their previously known roles and others revealing new potential functions. The monoclonal antibodies developed offer valuable new tools to investigate how WASP family proteins regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics. PMID:22275148

  19. Modulation of PML protein expression regulates JCV infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparovic, Megan L.; Maginnis, Melissa S.; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Dugan, Aisling S.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2009-01-01

    JC virus (JCV) is a human polyomavirus that infects the majority of the human population worldwide. It is responsible for the fatal demyelinating disease Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy. JCV binds to cells using the serotonin receptor 5-HT 2A R and α(2-6)- or α(2-3)-linked sialic acid. It enters cells using clathrin-dependent endocytosis and traffics to the early endosome and possibly to the endoplasmic reticulum. Viral DNA is then delivered to the nucleus where transcription, replication, and assembly of progeny occur. We found that the early regulatory protein large T antigen accumulates in microdomains in the nucleus adjacent to ND-10 or PML domains. This observation prompted us to explore the role of these domains in JCV infection. We found that a reduction of nuclear PML enhanced virus infection and that an increase in nuclear PML reduced infection. Infection with JCV did not directly modulate nuclear levels of PML but our data indicate that a host response involving interferon beta is likely to restrict virus infection by increasing nuclear PML.

  20. Analysis of hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic hepatic carcinoma via functional modules in a protein-protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Pan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aims to identify protein clusters with potential functional relevance in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and metastatic hepatic carcinoma using network analysis. Materials and Methods: We used human protein interaction data to build a protein-protein interaction network with Cytoscape and then derived functional clusters using MCODE. Combining the gene expression profiles, we calculated the functional scores for the clusters and selected statistically significant clusters. Meanwhile, Gene Ontology was used to assess the functionality of these clusters. Finally, a support vector machine was trained on the gold standard data sets. Results: The differentially expressed genes of HCC were mainly involved in metabolic and signaling processes. We acquired 13 significant modules from the gene expression profiles. The area under the curve value based on the differentially expressed modules were 98.31%, which outweighed the classification with DEGs. Conclusions: Differentially expressed modules are valuable to screen biomarkers combined with functional modules.

  1. Uncoupling proteins, dietary fat and the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warden Craig H

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There has been intense interest in defining the functions of UCP2 and UCP3 during the nine years since the cloning of these UCP1 homologues. Current data suggest that both UCP2 and UCP3 proteins share some features with UCP1, such as the ability to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential, but they also have distinctly different physiological roles. Human genetic studies consistently demonstrate the effect of UCP2 alleles on type-2 diabetes. Less clear is whether UCP2 alleles influence body weight or body mass index (BMI with many studies showing a positive effect while others do not. There is strong evidence that both UCP2 and UCP3 protect against mitochondrial oxidative damage by reducing the production of reactive oxygen species. The evidence that UCP2 protein is a negative regulator of insulin secretion by pancreatic β-cells is also strong: increased UCP2 decreases glucose stimulated insulin secretion ultimately leading to β-cell dysfunction. UCP2 is also neuroprotective, reducing oxidative stress in neurons. UCP3 may also transport fatty acids out of mitochondria thereby protecting the mitochondria from fatty acid anions or peroxides. Current data suggest that UCP2 plays a role in the metabolic syndrome through down-regulation of insulin secretion and development of type-2 diabetes. However, UCP2 may protect against atherosclerosis through reduction of oxidative stress and both UCP2 and UCP3 may protect against obesity. Thus, these UCP1 homologues may both contribute to and protect from the markers of the metabolic syndrome.

  2. Disrupted Module Efficiency of Structural and Functional Brain Connectomes in Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaou Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated disrupted topological organization of brain connectome in multiple sclerosis (MS. However, whether the communication efficiency between different functional systems is affected in the early stage of MS remained largely unknown. In this study, we constructed the structural connectivity (SC and functional connectivity (FC networks in 41 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, 32 MS patients and 35 healthy controls (HC based on diffusion and resting-state functional MRI. To quantify the communication efficiency within and between different functional systems, we proposed two measures called intra- and inter-module efficiency. Based on the module parcellation of functional backbone network, the intra- and inter-module efficiency of SC and FC networks was calculated for each participant. For the SC network, CIS showed decreased inter-module efficiency between the sensory-motor network (SMN, the visual network (VN, the default-mode network (DMN and the fronto-parietal network (FPN compared with HC, while MS showed more widespread decreased module efficiency both within and between modules relative to HC and CIS. For the FC network, no differences were found between CIS and HC, and a decreased inter-module efficiency between SMN and FPN and between VN and FPN was identified in MS, compared with HC and CIS. Moreover, both intra- and inter-module efficiency of SC network were correlated with the disability and cognitive scores in MS. Therefore, our results demonstrated early SC changes between modules in CIS, and more widespread SC alterations and inter-module FC changes were observed in MS, which were further associated with cognitive impairment and physical disability.

  3. Semantic integration to identify overlapping functional modules in protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Murali

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions can enable a better understanding of cellular organization, processes and functions. Functional modules can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of functional module detection algorithms. Results We have developed novel metrics, called semantic similarity and semantic interactivity, which use Gene Ontology (GO annotations to measure the reliability of protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction networks can be converted into a weighted graph representation by assigning the reliability values to each interaction as a weight. We presented a flow-based modularization algorithm to efficiently identify overlapping modules in the weighted interaction networks. The experimental results show that the semantic similarity and semantic interactivity of interacting pairs were positively correlated with functional co-occurrence. The effectiveness of the algorithm for identifying modules was evaluated using functional categories from the MIPS database. We demonstrated that our algorithm had higher accuracy compared to other competing approaches. Conclusion The integration of protein interaction networks with GO annotation data and the capability of detecting overlapping modules substantially improve the accuracy of module identification.

  4. C-Reactive Protein Levels in the Brugada Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimé Bonny

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inflammation in the Brugada syndrome (BrS and its clinical implication have been little studied. Aims. To assess the level of inflammation in BrS patients. Methods. All studied BrS patients underwent blood samples drawn for C-reactive protein (CRP levels at admission, prior to any invasive intervention. Patients with a previous ICD placement were controlled to exclude those with a recent (<14 days shock. We divided subjects into symptomatic (syncope or aborted sudden death and asymptomatic groups. In a multivariable analysis, we adjusted for significant variables (age, CRP ≥ 2 mg/L. Results. Fifty-four subjects were studied (mean age 45 ± 13 years, 49 (91% male. Twenty (37% were symptomatic. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Mean CRP level was 1,4 ± 0,9 mg/L in asymptomatic and 2,4 ± 1,4 mg/L in symptomatic groups (P = .003. In the multivariate model, CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L remained an independent marker for being symptomatic (P = .018; 95% CI: 1.3 to 19.3. Conclusion. Inflammation seems to be more active in symptomatic BrS. C-reactive protein concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L might be associated with the previous symptoms in BrS. The value of inflammation as a risk factor of arrhythmic events in BrS needs to be studied.

  5. Transnodal lymphangiography and post-CT for protein-losing enteropathy in Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Kudo, Takahiro; Endo, Jun; Hashida, Kazunobu; Tachibana, Nao; Murakoshi, Takatsugu; Hasebe, Terumitsu

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome, which is a multiple congenital disorder, may be associated with lymphatic abnormalities. Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) developing in Noonan syndrome is rare. We performed transnodal lymphangiography by directly accessing bilateral inguinal nodes under ultrasound guidance in a 17-year-old female with PLE developing in Noonan syndrome to assess detailed anatomical findings regarding lymphatic vessels. There have been no reports on transnodal lymphangiography for Noonan syndrome. Post-lymphangiographic CT images revealed multiple lymphatic abnormalities and lipiodol extravasation into the duodenum and the proximal jejunum. Transnodal lymphangiography was easy and safe for PLE developing in Noonan syndrome, and post-lymphangiographic CT provided invaluable information.

  6. Food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome caused by rice beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminiti, Lucia; Salzano, Giuseppina; Crisafulli, Giuseppe; Porcaro, Federica; Pajno, Giovanni Battista

    2013-05-14

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is an uncommon and potentially severe non IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy. It is usually caused by cow's milk or soy proteins, but may also be triggered by ingestion of solid foods. The diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical history and symptoms. Management of acute phase requires fluid resuscitation and intravenous steroids administration, but avoidance of offending foods is the only effective therapeutic option.Infant with FPIES presented to our emergency department with vomiting, watery stools, hypothension and metabolic acidosis after ingestion of rice beverage. Intravenous fluids and steroids were administered with good clinical response. Subsequently, a double blind placebo control food challenge (DBPCFC) was performed using rice beverage and hydrolyzed formula (eHF) as placebo. The "rice based formula" induced emesis, diarrhoea and lethargy. Laboratory investigations reveal an increase of absolute count of neutrophils and the presence of faecal eosinophils. The patient was treated with both intravenous hydration and steroids. According to Powell criteria, oral food challenge was considered positive and diagnosis of FPIES induced by rice beverage was made. Patient was discharged at home with the indication to avoid rice and any rice beverage as well as to reintroduce hydrolyzed formula. A case of FPIES induced by rice beverage has never been reported. The present case clearly shows that also beverage containing rice proteins can be responsible of FPIES. For this reason, the use of rice beverage as cow's milk substitute for the treatment of non IgE-mediated food allergy should be avoided.

  7. A Structural Perspective on the Modulation of Protein-Protein Interactions with Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Habibe Cansu; Dogan, Tunca; Tuncbag, Nurcan

    2018-05-31

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are the key components in many cellular processes including signaling pathways, enzymatic reactions and epigenetic regulation. Abnormal interactions of some proteins may be pathogenic and cause various disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Although inhibiting PPIs with small molecules is a challenging task, it gained an increasing interest because of its strong potential for drug discovery and design. The knowledge of the interface as well as the structural and chemical characteristics of the PPIs and their roles in the cellular pathways are necessary for a rational design of small molecules to modulate PPIs. In this study, we review the recent progress in the field and detail the physicochemical properties of PPIs including binding hot spots with a focus on structural methods. Then, we review recent approaches for structural prediction of PPIs. Finally, we revisit the concept of targeting PPIs in a systems biology perspective and we refer to the non-structural approaches, usually employed when the structural information is not present. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. RPGR-containing protein complexes in syndromic and non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-12-31

    Dec 31, 2009 ... ated with syndromic disorders, including Joubert syndrome,. Meckel–Gruber .... Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB), and Midwest Eye Banks and ..... Meindl A., Dry K., Herrmann K., Manson F., Ciccodicola A., Edgar. A. et al.

  9. Adiponectin and C - reactive protein Relationship in the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Relation to Cardiovascular Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shousha, M.A.; Soliman, S.

    2008-01-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common reproductive abnormalities, shares some components of the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. Therefore, PCOS patients may represent the largest group of women at high risk for the development of early-onset cardiovascular disease (CVD) and/or diabetes. The adipokine, adiponectin inhibits vascular inflammation and acts as an endogenous modulator of obesity - linked diseases. High - sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is recently debated as a risk factor and mediator for atherosclerosis. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between adiponectin and hs- CRP in The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and to identify their relation to Cardiovascular Disease. Adiponectin and hs- CRP measurements were undertaken in 90 PCOS patients and 70 body mass index-matched controls with regular menstrual cycles. Whereas 36.8% of the PCOS patients had CRP levels above 5 mg/liter, only 9.6% of the controls exhibited high CRP levels (P < 0.001). The mean ± SD was 5.46 ± 7.0 in the PCOS group vs. 2.04 ± 1.9 mg/liter in the control (P < 0.001). The body mass index, white blood cell count, TSH, glucose, cholesterol, and homocysteine levels were not significantly different between the two groups. CRP levels are elevated in patients with PCOS and may be a marker of early cardiovascular risk in these patients. The plasma adiponectin levels being significantly lower in these patients. These results suggest that elevation of CRP and reduction of adiponectin could emerge as mediators of atherogenesis and insulin resistance. (author)

  10. Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A interacts with primary microcephaly protein ASPM, localizes to centrosomes and regulates chromosome segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Singhmar

    Full Text Available Many proteins associated with the phenotype microcephaly have been localized to the centrosome or linked to it functionally. All the seven autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH proteins localize at the centrosome. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II protein PCNT and Seckel syndrome (also characterized by severe microcephaly protein ATR are also centrosomal proteins. All of the above findings show the importance of centrosomal proteins as the key players in neurogenesis and brain development. However, the exact mechanism as to how the loss-of-function of these proteins leads to microcephaly remains to be elucidated. To gain insight into the function of the most commonly mutated MCPH gene ASPM, we used the yeast two-hybrid technique to screen a human fetal brain cDNA library with an ASPM bait. The analysis identified Angelman syndrome gene product UBE3A as an ASPM interactor. Like ASPM, UBE3A also localizes to the centrosome. The identification of UBE3A as an ASPM interactor is not surprising as more than 80% of Angelman syndrome patients have microcephaly. However, unlike in MCPH, microcephaly is postnatal in Angelman syndrome patients. Our results show that UBE3A is a cell cycle regulated protein and its level peaks in mitosis. The shRNA knockdown of UBE3A in HEK293 cells led to many mitotic abnormalities including chromosome missegregation, abnormal cytokinesis and apoptosis. Thus our study links Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A to ASPM, centrosome and mitosis for the first time. We suggest that a defective chromosome segregation mechanism is responsible for the development of microcephaly in Angelman syndrome.

  11. Regulating the ethylene response of a plant by modulation of F-box proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongwei [Beijing, CN; Ecker, Joseph R [Carlsbad, CA

    2014-01-07

    The relationship between F-box proteins and proteins invovled in the ethylene response in plants is described. In particular, F-box proteins may bind to proteins involved in the ethylene response and target them for degradation by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. The transcription factor EIN3 is a key transcription factor mediating ethylne-regulated gene expression and morphological responses. EIN3 is degraded through a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway mediated by F-box proteins EBF1 and EBF2. The link between F-box proteins and the ethylene response is a key step in modulating or regulating the response of a plant to ethylene. Described herein are transgenic plants having an altered sensitivity to ethylene, and methods for making transgenic plant haing an althered sensitivity to ethylene by modulating the level of activity of F-box proteins. Methods of altering the ethylene response in a plant by modulating the activity or expression of an F-box protein are described. Also described are methods of identifying compounds that modulate the ethylene response in plants by modulating the level of F-box protein expression or activity.

  12. Modulation of the renin-angiotensin system by food protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chibuike

    high fat, high sugar, low fibre diet – is another modifiable risk factor for .... identifying appropriate proteolytic enzymes and food protein raw materials, based on .... consumption of milk protein hydrolysates enriched with the LTPs,. IPP/VPP ...

  13. Modulation of steroidogenesis by vitamin D3 in granulosa cells of the mouse model of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshalizadeh, Shabnam; Amidi, Fardin; Alleyassin, Ashraf; Soleimani, Masoud; Shirazi, Reza; Shabani Nashtaei, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder of women of reproductive age characterized by polycystic ovarian morphology, anovulation or oligomenorrhea, and hyperandrogenism. It is shown that disruption in the steroidogenesis pathway caused by excess androgen in PCOS is a critical element of abnormal folliculogenesis and failure in dominant follicle selection. Vitamin D plays an important role in the regulation of ovulatory dysfunction and can influence genes involved in steroidogenesis in granulosa cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of vitamin D3 on steroidogenic enzyme expression and activities in granulosa cell using a PCOS mouse model. In our study, the PCOS mouse model was developed by the injection of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) for 20 days. The mRNA and protein expression levels of genes involved in steroidogenesis in granulosa cells were compared between polycystic and normal ovaries using real-time PCR and Western blotting assays. Granulosa cells of DHEA-induced PCOS mice were then cultured with and without vitamin D3 and mRNA and protein expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes and serum 17beta-estradiol and progesterone levels were investigated using qRT-PCR, western blot, and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Steroidogenic enzymes including Cyp11a1, StAR, Cyp19a1, and 3β-HSD were upregulated in granulosa cells of PCOS mice when compared to normal mice. Treatment with vitamin D3 decreased mRNA and protein expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes in cultured granulosa cells. Vitamin D3 also decreased aromatase and 3β-HSD activity that leads to decreased 17beta-estradiol and progesterone release. This study suggests that vitamin D3 could modulate the steroidogenesis pathway in granulosa cells of PCOS mice that may lead to improving follicular development and maturation. This is a step towards a possible conceivable treatment for PCOS. AMHR-II: anti-müllerian hormone receptor-II; 3β-HSD: 3

  14. Modulating surface rheology by electrostatic protein/polysaccharide interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, R.A.; Zinoviadou, K.; Vliet, van T.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Jongh, de H.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    There is a large interest in mixed protein/polysaccharide layers at air-water and oil-water interfaces because of their ability to stabilize foams and emulsions. Mixed protein/polysaccharide adsorbed layers at air-water interfaces can be prepared either by adsorption of soluble protein/

  15. Simulation of modulated protein crystal structure and diffraction data in a supercell and in superspace

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lovelace, J.J.; Simone, P.D.; Petříček, Václav; Borgstahl, G.E.O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 69, Part 6 (2013), 1062-1072 ISSN 0907-4449 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : protein crystallograhy * superspace approach * incommensurately modulated structures Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.232, year: 2013

  16. Allosteric modulation of G-protein coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, Tracy A

    2004-01-01

    are believed to activate (agonists) or inhibit (competitive antagonists) receptor signalling by binding the receptor at the same site as the endogenous agonist, the orthosteric site. In contrast, allosteric ligands modulate receptor function by binding to different regions in the receptor, allosteric sites....... In recent years, combinatorial chemistry and high throughput screening have helped identify several allosteric GPCR modulators with novel structures, several of which already have become valuable pharmacological tools and may be candidates for clinical testing in the near future. This mini review outlines...... the current status and perspectives of allosteric modulation of GPCR function with emphasis on the pharmacology of endogenous and synthesised modulators, their receptor interactions and the therapeutic prospects of allosteric ligands compared to orthosteric ligands....

  17. Descending pain modulation in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakiath, Rosemary J; Siddall, Philip J; Kellow, John E; Hush, Julia M; Jones, Mike P; Marcuzzi, Anna; Wrigley, Paul J

    2015-12-10

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder. While abdominal pain is a dominant symptom of IBS, many sufferers also report widespread hypersensitivity and present with other chronic pain conditions. The presence of widespread hypersensitivity and extra-intestinal pain conditions suggests central nervous dysfunction. While central nervous system dysfunction may involve the spinal cord (central sensitisation) and brain, this review will focus on one brain mechanism, descending pain modulation. We will conduct a comprehensive search for the articles indexed in the databases Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Ovid PsycINFO and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial (CENTRAL) from their inception to August 2015, that report on any aspect of descending pain modulation in irritable bowel syndrome. Two independent reviewers will screen studies for eligibility, assess risk of bias and extract relevant data. Results will be tabulated and, if possible, a meta-analysis will be carried out. The systematic review outlined in this protocol aims to summarise current knowledge regarding descending pain modulation in IBS. PROSPERO CRD42015024284.

  18. Regulatory landscape of AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress axis and its modulation by PPARγ activation in high fructose diet-induced metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannizzaro, Luca; Rossoni, Giuseppe; Savi, Federica; Altomare, Alessandra; Marinello, Cristina; Saethang, Thammakorn; Carini, Marina; Payne, D Michael; Pisitkun, Trairak; Aldini, Giancarlo; Leelahavanichkul, Asada

    2017-01-01

    The AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress (AROS) axis is involved in the onset and progression of metabolic syndrome induced by a high-fructose diet (HFD). PPARγ activation is known to modulate metabolic syndrome; however a systems-level investigation looking at the protective effects of PPARγ activation as related to the AROS axis has not been performed. The aim of this work is to simultaneously characterize multiple molecular parameters within the AROS axis, using samples taken from different body fluids and tissues of a rat model of HFD-induced metabolic syndrome, in the presence or absence of a PPARγ agonist, Rosiglitazone (RGZ). Rats were fed with 60% HFD for the first half of the treatment duration (21 days) then continued with either HFD alone or HFD plus RGZ for the second half. Rats receiving HFD alone showed metabolic syndrome manifestations including hypertension, dyslipidemia, increased glucose levels and insulin resistance, as well as abnormal kidney and inflammatory parameters. Systolic blood pressure, plasma triglyceride and glucose levels, plasma creatinine, and albuminuria were significantly improved in the presence of RGZ. The following molecular parameters of the AROS axis were significantly upregulated in our rat model: carboxymethyl lysine (CML) in urine and liver; carboxyethyl lysine (CEL) in urine; advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in plasma; receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in liver and kidney; advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) in plasma; and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) in plasma, liver, and kidney. Conversely, with RGZ administration, the upregulation of AOPP and AGEs in plasma, CML and CEL in urine, RAGE in liver as well as HNE in plasma and liver was significantly counteracted/prevented. Our data demonstrate (i) the systems-level regulatory landscape of HFD-induced metabolic syndrome involving multiple molecular parameters, including HNE, AGEs and their receptor RAGE, and (ii) attenuation of metabolic syndrome by

  19. Natural history of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Yitzhak; Goldberg, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Because of the paucity of reports and variability in the diagnostic criteria utilized, little is known regarding the natural outcome of patients with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES). Data extracted from referenced manuscripts, as well as allergists' unpublished observations from across the globe, were used to form a cohesive opinion regarding its natural outcome. All authors concur that there is a generally high rate of recovery for FPIES. The most common foods causing FPIES are milk and soy. Depending upon which study is analyzed, by the age of 3-5 years, approximately 90% of patients recover from their disease. Recovery from FPIES to solid foods, occurs at a later age, but may reflect a later stage of introduction of the food into the diet. An important clinical outcome, although not common, is a shift from FPIES food hypersensitivity to an IgE-mediated food allergy. This necessitates a change in the oral food challenge protocol, if IgE-mediated sensitization is detected. Over the past several years, there has been an increasing awareness of FPIES. This knowledge should lead to a more timely diagnosis and should reassure parents and practitioners alike regarding its favorable course.

  20. Guanylate kinase domains of the MAGUK family scaffold proteins as specific phospho-protein-binding modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinwei; Shang, Yuan; Xia, Caihao; Wang, Wenning; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie

    2011-11-25

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are a large family of scaffold proteins that play essential roles in tissue developments, cell-cell communications, cell polarity control, and cellular signal transductions. Despite extensive studies over the past two decades, the functions of the signature guanylate kinase domain (GK) of MAGUKs are poorly understood. Here we show that the GK domain of DLG1/SAP97 binds to asymmetric cell division regulatory protein LGN in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The structure of the DLG1 SH3-GK tandem in complex with a phospho-LGN peptide reveals that the GMP-binding site of GK has evolved into a specific pSer/pThr-binding pocket. Residues both N- and C-terminal to the pSer are also critical for the specific binding of the phospho-LGN peptide to GK. We further demonstrate that the previously reported GK domain-mediated interactions of DLGs with other targets, such as GKAP/DLGAP1/SAPAP1 and SPAR, are also phosphorylation dependent. Finally, we provide evidence that other MAGUK GKs also function as phospho-peptide-binding modules. The discovery of the phosphorylation-dependent MAGUK GK/target interactions indicates that MAGUK scaffold-mediated signalling complex organizations are dynamically regulated.

  1. Upper tract urothelial carcinomas: frequency of association with mismatch repair protein loss and lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Holly L; McKenney, Jesse K; Heald, Brandie; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven C; Plesec, Thomas; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Increased risk for upper tract urothelial carcinoma is described in patients with Lynch syndrome, caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes. We aimed to identify the frequency of mismatch repair protein loss in upper tract urothelial carcinoma and its potential for identifying an association with Lynch syndrome. We queried our database to identify upper tract urothelial carcinomas. Patients were cross-referenced for history of colorectal carcinoma or other common Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms to enrich for potential Lynch syndrome cases. Tumor histopathologic characteristics were reviewed and each case was analyzed for loss of mismatch repair proteins, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, by immunohistochemistry. Of 444 patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma, a subset of 215 (encompassing 30 with upper tract urothelial carcinoma and another common Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasm) was analyzed for loss of mismatch repair protein expression. Of 30 patients with Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms, six had documented Lynch syndrome, including two with Muir-Torre syndrome. Mismatch repair protein loss was identified in 7% of total upper tract urothelial carcinomas and 30% of patients with Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms (including all patients with Lynch syndrome/Muir-Torre syndrome). Of patients without history of Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms, 5 of 184 (2.7%) had loss of mismatch repair protein expression. Twelve cases with mismatch repair protein loss demonstrated loss of MSH2 and MSH6, and 2 had isolated loss of MSH6. MLH1 and PMS2 expression were consistently retained. Although increased intratumoral lymphocytes, inverted growth, pushing tumor-stromal interface, and lack of nuclear pleomorphism were more commonly seen in cases with mismatch repair protein loss, only intratumoral lymphocytes and presence of pushing borders were statistically significant. MLH1 and PMS2 testing appear to have little utility in upper tract urothelial

  2. Surface dynamics in allosteric regulation of protein-protein interactions: modulation of calmodulin functions by Ca2+.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Y Kuttner

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the structural basis of protein-protein interactions (PPI is of fundamental importance for understanding the organization and functioning of biological networks and advancing the design of therapeutics which target PPI. Allosteric modulators play an important role in regulating such interactions by binding at site(s orthogonal to the complex interface and altering the protein's propensity for complex formation. In this work, we apply an approach recently developed by us for analyzing protein surfaces based on steered molecular dynamics simulation (SMD to the study of the dynamic properties of functionally distinct conformations of a model protein, calmodulin (CaM, whose ability to interact with target proteins is regulated by the presence of the allosteric modulator Ca(2+. Calmodulin is a regulatory protein that acts as an intracellular Ca(2+ sensor to control a wide variety of cellular processes. We demonstrate that SMD analysis is capable of pinpointing CaM surfaces implicated in the recognition of both the allosteric modulator Ca(2+ and target proteins. Our analysis of changes in the dynamic properties of the CaM backbone elicited by Ca(2+ binding yielded new insights into the molecular mechanism of allosteric regulation of CaM-target interactions.

  3. Presynaptic protein synthesis required for NT-3-induced long-term synaptic modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins elicit both acute and long-term modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity. Previously, we demonstrated that the long-term synaptic modulation requires the endocytosis of neurotrophin-receptor complex, the activation of PI3K and Akt, and mTOR mediated protein synthesis. However, it is unclear whether the long-term synaptic modulation by neurotrophins depends on protein synthesis in pre- or post-synaptic cells. Results Here we have developed an inducible protein translation blocker, in which the kinase domain of protein kinase R (PKR is fused with bacterial gyrase B domain (GyrB-PKR, which could be dimerized upon treatment with a cell permeable drug, coumermycin. By genetically targeting GyrB-PKR to specific cell types, we show that NT-3 induced long-term synaptic modulation requires presynaptic, but not postsynaptic protein synthesis. Conclusions Our results provide mechanistic insights into the cell-specific requirement for protein synthesis in the long-term synaptic modulation by neurotrophins. The GyrB-PKR system may be useful tool to study protein synthesis in a cell-specific manner.

  4. Functional brain asymmetry, attentional modulation, and interhemispheric transfer in boys with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Lundervold, Arvid; Grüner, Renate

    2007-01-01

    on the right ear stimulus in the dichotic listening situation is thought to involve the same prefrontal attentional and executive functions that are involved in the suppression of tics, whereas, performance when focusing attention on the left ear stimulus additionally involves a callosal transfer...... to shift attention normally when instructed to focus on the right ear stimulus. When instructed to focus attention on the left ear stimulus, however, performance deteriorated in the TS group. Correlations with CC area further supported the hypothesized presence of deviant callosal functioning in the TS......We tested the hypothesis that children with Tourette syndrome (TS) would exhibit aberrant brain lateralization compared to a healthy control (HC) group in an attention-modulation version of a verbal dichotic listening task using consonant-vowel syllables. The modulation of attention to focus...

  5. Simplified quantification of urinary protein excretion in children with nephrotic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, G.; Khan, P.A.; Hussain, Z.; Iqbal, M.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the value of single voided random (spot) urinary protein to creatinine ratio in accurately predicting the 24-hour urinary protein excretion in Pakistani pediatric population with nephrotic syndrome. Fifty seven children between 1-18 years with nephrotic syndrome were included. Seventy pairs of spot urine (5 milliliter) and 24-hour urine were collected in different phases of their disease e.g. initial, induction and remission. The protein to creatinine ratio was determined in spot urine samples and total protein content in 24-hour urine samples. The correlation between the ratio and 24-hour urinary protein excreted was determined using Pearson's coefficient (r) linear regression analysis. The protein to creatinine ratio in a spot urine sample was significantly correlated with the 24-hour urinary protein. The correlation coefficient (least square method) was found to be significant (r=0.9444). A random (spot) urinary protein to creatinine ratio of greater than 2 correlated well with the massive proteinuria (i.e. nephrotic syndrome), between 2 to 0.2 indicated glomerulopathy while a ratio of less than 0.2 was suggestive of physiological values. The random spot urinary protein to creatinine ratio can reliably be used to assess the degree of proteinuria in children with nephrotic syndrome and can replace the 24-hour urinary protein excretion/collection. (author)

  6. Optimisation of ultrafiltration of a highly viscous protein solution using spiral-wound modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipnizki, Jens; Casani, S.; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2005-01-01

    The ultrafiltration process of highly viscous protein process water with spiral-wound modules was optimised by analysing the fouling and developing a strategy to reduce it. It was shown that the flux reduction during filtration is mainly caused by the adsorption of proteins on the membrane and no...

  7. Protein conservation and variation suggest mechanisms of cell type-specific modulation of signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin H Schaefer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins and signaling pathways are present in most cell types and tissues and yet perform specialized functions. To elucidate mechanisms by which these ubiquitous pathways are modulated, we overlaid information about cross-cell line protein abundance and variability, and evolutionary conservation onto functional pathway components and topological layers in the pathway hierarchy. We found that the input (receptors and the output (transcription factors layers evolve more rapidly than proteins in the intermediary transmission layer. In contrast, protein expression variability decreases from the input to the output layer. We observed that the differences in protein variability between the input and transmission layer can be attributed to both the network position and the tendency of variable proteins to physically interact with constitutively expressed proteins. Differences in protein expression variability and conservation are also accompanied by the tendency of conserved and constitutively expressed proteins to acquire somatic mutations, while germline mutations tend to occur in cell type-specific proteins. Thus, conserved core proteins in the transmission layer could perform a fundamental role in most cell types and are therefore less tolerant to germline mutations. In summary, we propose that the core signal transmission machinery is largely modulated by a variable input layer through physical protein interactions. We hypothesize that the bow-tie organization of cellular signaling on the level of protein abundance variability contributes to the specificity of the signal response in different cell types.

  8. Dynamic functional modules in co-expressed protein interaction networks of dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyang Yen-Jen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular networks represent the backbone of molecular activity within cells and provide opportunities for understanding the mechanism of diseases. While protein-protein interaction data constitute static network maps, integration of condition-specific co-expression information provides clues to the dynamic features of these networks. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of heart failure. Although previous studies have identified putative biomarkers or therapeutic targets for heart failure, the underlying molecular mechanism of dilated cardiomyopathy remains unclear. Results We developed a network-based comparative analysis approach that integrates protein-protein interactions with gene expression profiles and biological function annotations to reveal dynamic functional modules under different biological states. We found that hub proteins in condition-specific co-expressed protein interaction networks tended to be differentially expressed between biological states. Applying this method to a cohort of heart failure patients, we identified two functional modules that significantly emerged from the interaction networks. The dynamics of these modules between normal and disease states further suggest a potential molecular model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Conclusions We propose a novel framework to analyze the interaction networks in different biological states. It successfully reveals network modules closely related to heart failure; more importantly, these network dynamics provide new insights into the cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. The revealed molecular modules might be used as potential drug targets and provide new directions for heart failure therapy.

  9. Rubella virus capsid protein modulation of viral genomic and subgenomic RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, W.-P.; Frey, Teryl K.

    2005-01-01

    The ratio of the subgenomic (SG) to genome RNA synthesized by rubella virus (RUB) replicons expressing the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (RUBrep/GFP) is substantially higher than the ratio of these species synthesized by RUB (4.3 for RUBrep/GFP vs. 1.3-1.4 for RUB). It was hypothesized that this modulation of the viral RNA synthesis was by one of the virus structural protein genes and it was found that introduction of the capsid (C) protein gene into the replicons as an in-frame fusion with GFP resulted in an increase of genomic RNA production (reducing the SG/genome RNA ratio), confirming the hypothesis and showing that the C gene was the moiety responsible for the modulation effect. The N-terminal one-third of the C gene was required for the effect of be exhibited. A similar phenomenon was not observed with the replicons of Sindbis virus, a related Alphavirus. Interestingly, modulation was not observed when RUBrep/GFP was co-transfected with either other RUBrep or plasmid constructs expressing the C gene, demonstrating that modulation could occur only when the C gene was provided in cis. Mutations that prevented translation of the C protein failed to modulate RNA synthesis, indicating that the C protein was the moiety responsible for modulation; consistent with this conclusion, modulation of RNA synthesis was maintained when synonymous codon mutations were introduced at the 5' end of the C gene that changed the C gene sequence without altering the amino acid sequence of the C protein. These results indicate that C protein translated in proximity of viral replication complexes, possibly from newly synthesized SG RNA, participate in regulating the replication of viral RNA

  10. Nociceptive transmission and modulation via P2X receptors in central pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yung-Hui; Shyu, Bai-Chuang

    2016-05-26

    Painful sensations are some of the most frequent complaints of patients who are admitted to local medical clinics. Persistent pain varies according to its causes, often resulting from local tissue damage or inflammation. Central somatosensory pathway lesions that are not adequately relieved can consequently cause central pain syndrome or central neuropathic pain. Research on the molecular mechanisms that underlie this pathogenesis is important for treating such pain. To date, evidence suggests the involvement of ion channels, including adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-gated cation channel P2X receptors, in central nervous system pain transmission and persistent modulation upon and following the occurrence of neuropathic pain. Several P2X receptor subtypes, including P2X2, P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7, have been shown to play diverse roles in the pathogenesis of central pain including the mediation of fast transmission in the peripheral nervous system and modulation of neuronal activity in the central nervous system. This review article highlights the role of the P2X family of ATP receptors in the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain and pain transmission. We discuss basic research that may be translated to clinical application, suggesting that P2X receptors may be treatment targets for central pain syndrome.

  11. Modulating Protein Adsorption on Oxygen Plasma Modified Polysiloxane Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marletta, G.

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we report the study on the adsorption behaviour of three model globular proteins, Human Serum Albumin, Lactoferrin and Egg Chicken Lysozyme onto both unmodified surfaces of a silicon-based polymer and the corresponding plasma treated surfaces. In particular, thin films of hydrophobic polysiloxane (about 90 degree of static water contact angle, WCA) were converted by oxygen plasma treatment at reduced pressure into very hydrophilic phases of SiOx (WCA less than 5 degree). The kinetics of protein adsorption processes were investigated by QCM-D technique, while the chemical structure and topography of the protein adlayer have been studied by Angular resolved-XPS and AFM respectively. It turned out that Albumin and Lysozyme exhibited the opposite preferential adsorption respectively onto the hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, while Lactoferrin did not exhibit significant differences. The observed protein behaviour are discussed both in terms of surface-dependent parameters, including surface free energy and chemical structure, and in terms of protein-dependent parameters, including charge as well as the average molecular orientation in the adlayers. Finally, some examples of differential adsorption behaviour of the investigated proteins are reported onto nanopatterned polysiloxane surfaces consisting of hydrophobic nanopores surrounded by hydrophilic (plasma-treated) matrix and the reverse

  12. Differential protein modulation in midguts of Aedes aegypti infected with chikungunya and dengue 2 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Tchankouo-Nguetcheu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arthropod borne virus infections cause several emerging and resurgent infectious diseases. Among the diseases caused by arboviruses, dengue and chikungunya are responsible for a high rate of severe human diseases worldwide. The midgut of mosquitoes is the first barrier for pathogen transmission and is a target organ where arboviruses must replicate prior to infecting other organs. A proteomic approach was undertaken to characterize the key virus/vector interactions and host protein modifications that happen in the midgut for viral transmission to eventually take place. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a proteomics differential approach with two-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE, we defined the protein modulations in the midgut of Aedes aegypti that were triggered seven days after an oral infection (7 DPI with dengue 2 (DENV-2 and chikungunya (CHIKV viruses. Gel profile comparisons showed that the level of 18 proteins was modulated by DENV-2 only and 12 proteins were modulated by CHIKV only. Twenty proteins were regulated by both viruses in either similar or different ways. Both viruses caused an increase of proteins involved in the generation of reactive oxygen species, energy production, and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Midgut infection by DENV-2 and CHIKV triggered an antioxidant response. CHIKV infection produced an increase of proteins involved in detoxification. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study constitutes the first analysis of the protein response of Aedes aegypti's midgut infected with viruses belonging to different families. It shows that the differentially regulated proteins in response to viral infection include structural, redox, regulatory proteins, and enzymes for several metabolic pathways. Some of these proteins like antioxidant are probably involved in cell protection. On the other hand, we propose that the modulation of other proteins like transferrin, hsp60 and alpha

  13. Differential protein modulation in midguts of Aedes aegypti infected with chikungunya and dengue 2 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchankouo-Nguetcheu, Stéphane; Khun, Huot; Pincet, Laurence; Roux, Pascal; Bahut, Muriel; Huerre, Michel; Guette, Catherine; Choumet, Valérie

    2010-10-05

    Arthropod borne virus infections cause several emerging and resurgent infectious diseases. Among the diseases caused by arboviruses, dengue and chikungunya are responsible for a high rate of severe human diseases worldwide. The midgut of mosquitoes is the first barrier for pathogen transmission and is a target organ where arboviruses must replicate prior to infecting other organs. A proteomic approach was undertaken to characterize the key virus/vector interactions and host protein modifications that happen in the midgut for viral transmission to eventually take place. Using a proteomics differential approach with two-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), we defined the protein modulations in the midgut of Aedes aegypti that were triggered seven days after an oral infection (7 DPI) with dengue 2 (DENV-2) and chikungunya (CHIKV) viruses. Gel profile comparisons showed that the level of 18 proteins was modulated by DENV-2 only and 12 proteins were modulated by CHIKV only. Twenty proteins were regulated by both viruses in either similar or different ways. Both viruses caused an increase of proteins involved in the generation of reactive oxygen species, energy production, and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Midgut infection by DENV-2 and CHIKV triggered an antioxidant response. CHIKV infection produced an increase of proteins involved in detoxification. Our study constitutes the first analysis of the protein response of Aedes aegypti's midgut infected with viruses belonging to different families. It shows that the differentially regulated proteins in response to viral infection include structural, redox, regulatory proteins, and enzymes for several metabolic pathways. Some of these proteins like antioxidant are probably involved in cell protection. On the other hand, we propose that the modulation of other proteins like transferrin, hsp60 and alpha glucosidase, may favour virus survival, replication and transmission, suggesting a subversion of

  14. Ingestion of Casein in a Milk Matrix Modulates Dietary Protein Digestion and Absorption Kinetics but Does Not Modulate Postprandial Muscle Protein Synthesis in Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Snijders, Tim; Linkens, Armand M A; Hamer, Henrike M; van Kranenburg, Janneau; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-07-01

    The slow digestion and amino acid absorption kinetics of isolated micellar casein have been held responsible for its relatively lower postprandial muscle protein synthetic response compared with rapidly digested proteins such as isolated whey. However, casein is normally consumed within a milk matrix. We hypothesized that protein digestion and absorption kinetics and the subsequent muscle protein synthetic response after micellar casein ingestion are modulated by the milk matrix. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a milk matrix on casein protein digestion and absorption kinetics and postprandial muscle protein synthesis in older men. In a parallel-group design, 32 healthy older men (aged 71 ± 1 y) received a primed continuous infusion of L-[ring-(2)H5]-phenylalanine, L-[ring-3,5-(2)H2]-tyrosine, and L-[1-(13)C]-leucine, and ingested 25 g intrinsically L-[1-(13)C]-phenylalanine and L-[1-(13)C]-leucine labeled casein dissolved in bovine milk serum (Cas+Serum) or water (Cas). Plasma samples and muscle biopsies were collected in the postabsorptive state and for 300 min in the postprandial period to examine whole-body and skeletal muscle protein metabolism. Casein ingestion increased plasma leucine and phenylalanine concentrations and L-[1-(13)C]-phenylalanine enrichments, with a more rapid rise after Cas vs. Cas+Serum. Nonetheless, dietary protein-derived phenylalanine availability did not differ between Cas+Serum (47 ± 2%, mean ± SEM) and Cas (46 ± 3%) when assessed over the 300-min postprandial period (P = 0.80). The milk matrix did not modulate postprandial myofibrillar protein synthesis rates from 0 to 120 min (0.038 ± 0.005 vs. 0.031 ± 0.007%/h) or from 120 to 300 min (0.052 ± 0.004 vs. 0.067 ± 0.005%/h) after Cas+Serum vs. Cas. Similarly, no treatment differences in muscle protein-bound L-[1-(13)C]-phenylalanine enrichments were observed at 120 min (0.003 ± 0.001 vs. 0.002 ± 0.001) or 300 min (0.015 ± 0.002 vs. 0.016 ± 0.002 mole

  15. The RecX protein interacts with the RecA protein and modulates its activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvão, C.W.; Souza, E.M.; Etto, R.M.; Pedrosa, F.O.; Chubatsu, L.S.; Yates, M.G.; Schumacher, J.; Buck, M.; Steffens, M.B.R.

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair is crucial to the survival of all organisms. The bacterial RecA protein is a central component in the SOS response and in recombinational and SOS DNA repairs. The RecX protein has been characterized as a negative modulator of RecA activity in many bacteria. The recA and recX genes of Herbaspirillum seropedicae constitute a single operon, and evidence suggests that RecX participates in SOS repair. In the present study, we show that the H. seropedicae RecX protein (RecX Hs ) can interact with the H. seropedicae RecA protein (RecA Hs ) and that RecA Hs possesses ATP binding, ATP hydrolyzing and DNA strand exchange activities. RecX Hs inhibited 90% of the RecA Hs DNA strand exchange activity even when present in a 50-fold lower molar concentration than RecA Hs . RecA Hs ATP binding was not affected by the addition of RecX, but the ATPase activity was reduced. When RecX Hs was present before the formation of RecA filaments (RecA-ssDNA), inhibition of ATPase activity was substantially reduced and excess ssDNA also partially suppressed this inhibition. The results suggest that the RecX Hs protein negatively modulates the RecA Hs activities by protein-protein interactions and also by DNA-protein interactions

  16. The RecX protein interacts with the RecA protein and modulates its activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvão, C.W. [Departamento de Biologia Estrutural, Molecular e Genética, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Souza, E.M. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Etto, R.M. [Departamento de Biologia Estrutural, Molecular e Genética, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Pedrosa, F.O.; Chubatsu, L.S.; Yates, M.G. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Schumacher, J.; Buck, M. [Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Steffens, M.B.R. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2012-10-15

    DNA repair is crucial to the survival of all organisms. The bacterial RecA protein is a central component in the SOS response and in recombinational and SOS DNA repairs. The RecX protein has been characterized as a negative modulator of RecA activity in many bacteria. The recA and recX genes of Herbaspirillum seropedicae constitute a single operon, and evidence suggests that RecX participates in SOS repair. In the present study, we show that the H. seropedicae RecX protein (RecX{sub Hs}) can interact with the H. seropedicae RecA protein (RecA{sub Hs}) and that RecA{sub Hs} possesses ATP binding, ATP hydrolyzing and DNA strand exchange activities. RecX{sub Hs} inhibited 90% of the RecA{sub Hs} DNA strand exchange activity even when present in a 50-fold lower molar concentration than RecA{sub Hs}. RecA{sub Hs} ATP binding was not affected by the addition of RecX, but the ATPase activity was reduced. When RecX{sub Hs} was present before the formation of RecA filaments (RecA-ssDNA), inhibition of ATPase activity was substantially reduced and excess ssDNA also partially suppressed this inhibition. The results suggest that the RecX{sub Hs} protein negatively modulates the RecA{sub Hs} activities by protein-protein interactions and also by DNA-protein interactions.

  17. The RecX protein interacts with the RecA protein and modulates its activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.W. Galvão

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair is crucial to the survival of all organisms. The bacterial RecA protein is a central component in the SOS response and in recombinational and SOS DNA repairs. The RecX protein has been characterized as a negative modulator of RecA activity in many bacteria. The recA and recX genes of Herbaspirillum seropedicae constitute a single operon, and evidence suggests that RecX participates in SOS repair. In the present study, we show that the H. seropedicae RecX protein (RecX Hs can interact with the H. seropedicaeRecA protein (RecA Hs and that RecA Hs possesses ATP binding, ATP hydrolyzing and DNA strand exchange activities. RecX Hs inhibited 90% of the RecA Hs DNA strand exchange activity even when present in a 50-fold lower molar concentration than RecA Hs. RecA Hs ATP binding was not affected by the addition of RecX, but the ATPase activity was reduced. When RecX Hs was present before the formation of RecA filaments (RecA-ssDNA, inhibition of ATPase activity was substantially reduced and excess ssDNA also partially suppressed this inhibition. The results suggest that the RecX Hs protein negatively modulates the RecA Hs activities by protein-protein interactions and also by DNA-protein interactions.

  18. The RecX protein interacts with the RecA protein and modulates its activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, C W; Souza, E M; Etto, R M; Pedrosa, F O; Chubatsu, L S; Yates, M G; Schumacher, J; Buck, M; Steffens, M B R

    2012-12-01

    DNA repair is crucial to the survival of all organisms. The bacterial RecA protein is a central component in the SOS response and in recombinational and SOS DNA repairs. The RecX protein has been characterized as a negative modulator of RecA activity in many bacteria. The recA and recX genes of Herbaspirillum seropedicae constitute a single operon, and evidence suggests that RecX participates in SOS repair. In the present study, we show that the H. seropedicae RecX protein (RecX Hs) can interact with the H. seropedicaeRecA protein (RecA Hs) and that RecA Hs possesses ATP binding, ATP hydrolyzing and DNA strand exchange activities. RecX Hs inhibited 90% of the RecA Hs DNA strand exchange activity even when present in a 50-fold lower molar concentration than RecA Hs. RecA Hs ATP binding was not affected by the addition of RecX, but the ATPase activity was reduced. When RecX Hs was present before the formation of RecA filaments (RecA-ssDNA), inhibition of ATPase activity was substantially reduced and excess ssDNA also partially suppressed this inhibition. The results suggest that the RecX Hs protein negatively modulates the RecA Hs activities by protein-protein interactions and also by DNA-protein interactions.

  19. Physical interaction between Wilms tumor 1 and p73 proteins modulates their functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharnhorst, V.; Dekker, P.; Eb, van der A.J.; Jochemsen, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    The WT1 gene, which is heterozygously mutated or deleted in congenital anomaly syndromes and homozygously mutated in about 15% of all Wilms tumors, encodes tissue-specific developmental regulators. Through alternative mRNA splicing, four main WT1 protein isoforms are synthesized. All isoforms can

  20. Protein-directed modulation of high-LET hyperthermic radiosensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, P.Y.

    1991-01-01

    A pair of Chinese Hamster Ovary cell lines, the wild-type CHO-SC1, and its temperature-sensitive mutant (CHO-tsH1) was used to examine the importance of protein synthesis in the development of thermotolerance. The classical biphasic thermotolerant survival response to hyperthermia was observed in the SC1 cells after continuous heating at 41.5C to 42.5C, while tsH1 showed no thermotolerance. In separate experiments, each cell line was triggered and challenged at 45C. The heat doses were separated with graded incubaton periods at 35C or 40C for thermotolerance development. SC1 cells expressed thermoresistance, with the synthesis of heat shock proteins, under both incubation conditions. tsH1 cells expressed thermotolerance similar to that seen in the SC1 cells when incubated at 35C, but the survival response with the non-permissive 40C incubation was much reduced in the absence of protein synthesis. The combined effects of heavy-ion radiation and hyperthermia were examined using the same cell system. A mild heat dose of 41.5C was used in conjunction with Neon particle radiation of various high LET values. The cell killing effects were highly dependent on the sequence of application of heat and Neon radiation. Heat applied immediately after Neon irradiation was more cytotoxic to SC1 cells than when heat was applied prior to the irradiation. The ability of cells to synthesize new proteins plays a key role in this sequence-dependent thermal radiosensitization. In the absence of protein synthesis in the tsH1 cells, the high-LET thermal enhancement for cell-killing was unchanged regardless of the sequence. In the presence of protein synthetic activity in the SC1 cells, the thermal enhancement of radiation-induced cell killing was LET-dependent

  1. Infection by chikungunya virus modulates the expression of several proteins in Aedes aegypti salivary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tchankouo-Nguetcheu Stephane

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthropod-borne viral infections cause several emerging and resurging infectious diseases. Among the diseases caused by arboviruses, chikungunya is responsible for a high level of severe human disease worldwide. The salivary glands of mosquitoes are the last barrier before pathogen transmission. Methods We undertook a proteomic approach to characterize the key virus/vector interactions and host protein modifications that occur in the salivary glands that could be responsible for viral transmission by using quantitative two-dimensional electrophoresis. Results We defined the protein modulations in the salivary glands of Aedes aegypti that were triggered 3 and 5 days after an oral infection (3 and 5 DPI with chikungunya virus (CHIKV. Gel profile comparisons showed that CHIKV at 3 DPI modulated the level of 13 proteins, and at 5 DPI 20 proteins. The amount of 10 putatively secreted proteins was regulated at both time points. These proteins were implicated in blood-feeding or in immunity, but many have no known function. CHIKV also modulated the quantity of proteins involved in several metabolic pathways and in cell signalling. Conclusion Our study constitutes the first analysis of the protein response of Aedes aegypti salivary glands infected with CHIKV. We found that the differentially regulated proteins in response to viral infection include structural proteins and enzymes for several metabolic pathways. Some may favour virus survival, replication and transmission, suggesting a subversion of the insect cell metabolism by arboviruses. For example, proteins involved in blood-feeding such as the short D7, an adenosine deaminase and inosine-uridine preferring nucleoside hydrolase, may favour virus transmission by exerting an increased anti-inflammatory effect. This would allow the vector to bite without the bite being detected. Other proteins, like the anti-freeze protein, may support vector protection.

  2. Use of hydrostatic pressure for modulation of protein chemical modification and enzymatic selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Alexey A; Helmy, Roy; Joyce, Leo; Reibarkh, Mikhail; Maust, Mathew; Ren, Sumei; Mergelsberg, Ingrid; Welch, Christopher J

    2016-05-11

    Using hydrostatic pressure to induce protein conformational changes can be a powerful tool for altering the availability of protein reactive sites and for changing the selectivity of enzymatic reactions. Using a pressure apparatus, it has been demonstrated that hydrostatic pressure can be used to modulate the reactivity of lysine residues of the protein ubiquitin with a water-soluble amine-specific homobifunctional coupling agent. Fewer reactive lysine residues were observed when the reaction was carried out under elevated pressure of 3 kbar, consistent with a pressure-induced conformational change of ubiquitin that results in fewer exposed lysine residues. Additionally, modulation of the stereoselectivity of an enzymatic transamination reaction was observed at elevated hydrostatic pressure. In one case, the minor diasteromeric product formed at atmospheric pressure became the major product at elevated pressure. Such pressure-induced alterations of protein reactivity may provide an important new tool for enzymatic reactions and the chemical modification of proteins.

  3. Modulation of the Chromatin Phosphoproteome by the Haspin Protein Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiolica, Alessio; de Medina-Redondo, Maria; Schoof, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    , histone H3 is the only confirmed Haspin substrate. We used a combination of biochemical, pharmacological, and mass spectrometric approaches to study the consequences of Haspin inhibition in mitotic cells. We quantified 3964 phosphorylation sites on chromatin- associated proteins and identified a Haspin...

  4. Nucleocapsid protein VP15 is the basic DNA binding protein of white spot syndrome virus of shrimp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveldt, J.; Vermeesch, A.M.G.; Langenhof, M.; Lang, de A.; Vlak, J.M.; Hulten, van M.C.W.

    2005-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is type species of the genus Whispovirus of the new family Nimaviridae. Despite the elucidation of its genomic sequence, very little is known about the virus as only 6% of its ORFs show homology to known genes. One of the structural virion proteins, VP15, is part of

  5. Usher syndrome protein network functions in the retina and their relation to other retinal ciliopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorusch, Nasrin; Wunderlich, Kirsten; Bauss, Katharina; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    The human Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of combined hereditary deaf-blindness. USH is genetically and clinically heterogeneous: 15 chromosomal loci assigned to 3 clinical types, USH1-3. All USH1 and 2 proteins are organized into protein networks by the scaffold proteins harmonin (USH1C), whirlin (USH2D) and SANS (USH1G). This has contributed essentially to our current understanding of the USH protein function in the eye and the ear and explains why defects in proteins of different families cause very similar phenotypes. Ongoing in depth analyses of USH protein networks in the eye indicated cytoskeletal functions as well as roles in molecular transport processes and ciliary cargo delivery in photoreceptor cells. The analysis of USH protein networks revealed molecular links of USH to other ciliopathies, including non-syndromic inner ear defects and isolated retinal dystrophies but also to kidney diseases and syndromes like the Bardet-Biedl syndrome. These findings provide emerging evidence that USH is a ciliopathy molecularly related to other ciliopathies, which opens an avenue for common therapy strategies to treat these diseases.

  6. Efficient and accurate Greedy Search Methods for mining functional modules in protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jieyue; Li, Chaojun; Ye, Baoliu; Zhong, Wei

    2012-06-25

    Most computational algorithms mainly focus on detecting highly connected subgraphs in PPI networks as protein complexes but ignore their inherent organization. Furthermore, many of these algorithms are computationally expensive. However, recent analysis indicates that experimentally detected protein complexes generally contain Core/attachment structures. In this paper, a Greedy Search Method based on Core-Attachment structure (GSM-CA) is proposed. The GSM-CA method detects densely connected regions in large protein-protein interaction networks based on the edge weight and two criteria for determining core nodes and attachment nodes. The GSM-CA method improves the prediction accuracy compared to other similar module detection approaches, however it is computationally expensive. Many module detection approaches are based on the traditional hierarchical methods, which is also computationally inefficient because the hierarchical tree structure produced by these approaches cannot provide adequate information to identify whether a network belongs to a module structure or not. In order to speed up the computational process, the Greedy Search Method based on Fast Clustering (GSM-FC) is proposed in this work. The edge weight based GSM-FC method uses a greedy procedure to traverse all edges just once to separate the network into the suitable set of modules. The proposed methods are applied to the protein interaction network of S. cerevisiae. Experimental results indicate that many significant functional modules are detected, most of which match the known complexes. Results also demonstrate that the GSM-FC algorithm is faster and more accurate as compared to other competing algorithms. Based on the new edge weight definition, the proposed algorithm takes advantages of the greedy search procedure to separate the network into the suitable set of modules. Experimental analysis shows that the identified modules are statistically significant. The algorithm can reduce the

  7. Altering protein surface charge with chemical modification modulates protein–gold nanoparticle aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamison, Jennifer A.; Bryant, Erika L.; Kadali, Shyam B.; Wong, Michael S.; Colvin, Vicki L.; Matthews, Kathleen S.; Calabretta, Michelle K.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) can interact with a wide range of molecules including proteins. Whereas significant attention has focused on modifying the nanoparticle surface to regulate protein–AuNP assembly or influence the formation of the protein “corona,” modification of the protein surface as a mechanism to modulate protein–AuNP interaction has been less explored. Here, we examine this possibility utilizing three small globular proteins—lysozyme with high isoelectric point (pI) and established interactions with AuNP; α-lactalbumin with similar tertiary fold to lysozyme but low pI; and myoglobin with a different globular fold and an intermediate pI. We first chemically modified these proteins to alter their charged surface functionalities, and thereby shift protein pI, and then applied multiple methods to assess protein–AuNP assembly. At pH values lower than the anticipated pI of the modified protein, AuNP exposure elicits changes in the optical absorbance of the protein–NP solutions and other properties due to aggregate formation. Above the expected pI, however, protein–AuNP interaction is minimal, and both components remain isolated, presumably because both species are negatively charged. These data demonstrate that protein modification provides a powerful tool for modulating whether nanoparticle–protein interactions result in material aggregation. The results also underscore that naturally occurring protein modifications found in vivo may be critical in defining nanoparticle–protein corona compositions.

  8. Modulation of Membrane Protein Lateral Mobility by Polyphosphates and Polyamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Melvin; Koppel, Dennis E.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    1980-03-01

    The lateral mobility of fluorescein-labeled membrane glycoproteins was measured in whole unlysed erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts by the technique of ``fluorescence redistribution after fusion.'' Measurements were made on polyethylene glycol-fused cell pairs in which only one member of the couplet was initially fluorescently labeled. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from the rate of fluorescence redistribution determined from successive scans with a focused laser beam across individual fused pairs. This technique allows for the analysis of diffusion within cell membranes without the possible damaging photochemical events caused by photobleaching. It was found that lateral mobility of erythrocyte proteins can be increased by the addition of polyphosphates (i.e., ATP and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate) and decreased by the addition of organic polyamines (i.e., neomycin and spermine). This control is exerted by these molecules only when they contact the cytoplasmic side of the membrane and is not dependent upon high-energy phosphates. Microviscosity experiments employing diphenylhexatriene demonstrated no changes in membrane lipid state as a function of these reagents. Our results, in conjunction with data on the physical interactions of cytoskeletal proteins, suggest that the diffusion effector molecules alter the lateral mobility of erythrocyte membrane proteins through modifications of interactions in the shell, which is composed of spectrin, actin, and component 4.1.

  9. Ubiquilin 1 modulates amyloid precursor protein trafficking and Abeta secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, Mikko; Lu, Alice; Thomas, Anne V; Romano, Donna M; Kim, Minji; Jones, Phill B; Xie, Zhongcong; Kounnas, Maria Z; Wagner, Steven L; Berezovska, Oksana; Hyman, Bradley T; Tesco, Giuseppina; Bertram, Lars; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2006-10-27

    Ubiquilin 1 (UBQLN1) is a ubiquitin-like protein, which has been shown to play a central role in regulating the proteasomal degradation of various proteins, including the presenilins. We recently reported that DNA variants in UBQLN1 increase the risk for Alzheimer disease, by influencing expression of this gene in brain. Here we present the first assessment of the effects of UBQLN1 on the metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). For this purpose, we employed RNA interference to down-regulate UBQLN1 in a variety of neuronal and non-neuronal cell lines. We demonstrate that down-regulation of UBQLN1 accelerates the maturation and intracellular trafficking of APP, while not interfering with alpha-, beta-, or gamma-secretase levels or activity. UBQLN1 knockdown increased the ratio of APP mature/immature, increased levels of full-length APP on the cell surface, and enhanced the secretion of sAPP (alpha- and beta-forms). Moreover, UBQLN1 knockdown increased levels of secreted Abeta40 and Abeta42. Finally, employing a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay, we show that UBQLN1 and APP come into close proximity in intact cells, independently of the presence of the presenilins. Collectively, our findings suggest that UBQLN1 may normally serve as a cytoplasmic "gatekeeper" that may control APP trafficking from intracellular compartments to the cell surface. These findings suggest that changes in UBQLN1 steady-state levels affect APP trafficking and processing, thereby influencing the generation of Abeta.

  10. Chitin Oligosaccharide Modulates Gut Microbiota and Attenuates High-Fat-Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junping Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota has been proved to be an indispensable link between nutrient excess and metabolic syndrome, and chitin oligosaccharide (NACOS has displayed therapeutic effects on multiple diseases such as cancer and gastritis. In this study, we aim to confirm whether NACOS can ameliorate high-fat diet (HFD-induced metabolic syndrome by rebuilding the structure of the gut microbiota community. Male C57BL/6J mice fed with HFD were treated with NACOS (1 mg/mL in drinking water for five months. The results indicate that NACOS improved glucose metabolic disorder in HFD-fed mice and suppressed mRNA expression of the protein regulators related to lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, adipocyte differentiation, and inflammation in adipose tissues. Additionally, NACOS inhibited the destruction of the gut barrier in HFD-treated mice. Furthermore, 16S ribosome RNA sequencing of fecal samples demonstrates that NACOS promoted the growth of beneficial intestinal bacteria remarkably and decreased the abundance of inflammogenic taxa. In summary, NACOS partly rebuilt the microbial community and improved the metabolic syndrome of HFD-fed mice. These data confirm the preventive effects of NACOS on nutrient excess-related metabolic diseases.

  11. Protein kinase inhibitor peptide (PKI): a family of endogenous neuropeptides that modulate neuronal cAMP-dependent protein kinase function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, George D; Dewey, William L

    2006-02-01

    Signal transduction cascades involving cAMP-dependent protein kinase are highly conserved among a wide variety of organisms. Given the universal nature of this enzyme it is not surprising that cAMP-dependent protein kinase plays a critical role in numerous cellular processes. This is particularly evident in the nervous system where cAMP-dependent protein kinase is involved in neurotransmitter release, gene transcription, and synaptic plasticity. Protein kinase inhibitor peptide (PKI) is an endogenous thermostable peptide that modulates cAMP-dependent protein kinase function. PKI contains two distinct functional domains within its amino acid sequence that allow it to: (1) potently and specifically inhibit the activity of the free catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and (2) export the free catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase from the nucleus. Three distinct PKI isoforms (PKIalpha, PKIbeta, PKIgamma) have been identified and each isoform is expressed in the brain. PKI modulates neuronal synaptic activity, while PKI also is involved in morphogenesis and symmetrical left-right axis formation. In addition, PKI also plays a role in regulating gene expression induced by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Future studies should identify novel physiological functions for endogenous PKI both in the nervous system and throughout the body. Most interesting will be the determination whether functional differences exist between individual PKI isoforms which is an intriguing possibility since these isoforms exhibit: (1) cell-type specific tissue expression patterns, (2) different potencies for the inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and (3) expression patterns that are hormonally, developmentally and cell-cycle regulated. Finally, synthetic peptide analogs of endogenous PKI will continue to be invaluable tools that are used to elucidate the role of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in a variety of cellular processes throughout the nervous

  12. Bidirectional Regulation of Amyloid Precursor Protein-Induced Memory Defects by Nebula/DSCR1: A Protein Upregulated in Alzheimer's Disease and Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jillian L; Zhang, Shixing; Chang, Karen T

    2015-08-12

    Aging individuals with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impaired memory. Memory problems in both DS and AD individuals usually develop slowly and progressively get worse with age, but the cause of this age-dependent memory impairment is not well understood. This study examines the functional interactions between Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) and amyloid-precursor protein (APP), proteins upregulated in both DS and AD, in regulating memory. Using Drosophila as a model, we find that overexpression of nebula (fly homolog of DSCR1) initially protects against APP-induced memory defects by correcting calcineurin and cAMP signaling pathways but accelerates the rate of memory loss and exacerbates mitochondrial dysfunction in older animals. We report that transient upregulation of Nebula/DSCR1 or acute pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin in aged flies protected against APP-induced memory loss. Our data suggest that calcineurin dyshomeostasis underlies age-dependent memory impairments and further imply that chronic Nebula/DSCR1 upregulation may contribute to age-dependent memory impairments in AD in DS. Most Down syndrome (DS) individuals eventually develop Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like dementia, but mechanisms underlying this age-dependent memory impairment remain poorly understood. This study examines Nebula/Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) and amyloid-precursor protein (APP), proteins upregulated in both DS and AD, in regulating memory. We uncover a previously unidentified role for Nebula/DSCR1 in modulating APP-induced memory defects during aging. We show that upregulation of Nebula/DSCR1, an inhibitor of calcineurin, rescues APP-induced memory defects in young flies but enhances memory loss of older flies. Excitingly, transient Nebula/DSCR1 overexpression or calcineurin inhibition in aged flies ameliorates APP-mediated memory problems. These results

  13. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... concentrations in subjects grouped according to the presence of 0-1, 2-3, and > or =4 features of the metabolic syndrome were 1.11, 1.27, and 2.16 mg/l, respectively, with a statistically highly significant trend (P metabolic syndrome...

  14. Positive lysosomal modulation as a unique strategy to treat age-related protein accumulation diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Ben A; Wisniewski, Meagan L; Butler, David

    2012-04-01

    Lysosomes are involved in degrading and recycling cellular ingredients, and their disruption with age may contribute to amyloidogenesis, paired helical filaments (PHFs), and α-synuclein and mutant huntingtin aggregation. Lysosomal cathepsins are upregulated by accumulating proteins and more so by the modulator Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK). Such positive modulators of the lysosomal system have been studied in the well-characterized hippocampal slice model of protein accumulation that exhibits the pathogenic cascade of tau aggregation, tubulin breakdown, microtubule destabilization, transport failure, and synaptic decline. Active cathepsins were upregulated by PADK; Rab proteins were modified as well, indicating enhanced trafficking, whereas lysosome-associated membrane protein and proteasome markers were unchanged. Lysosomal modulation reduced the pre-existing PHF deposits, restored tubulin structure and transport, and recovered synaptic components. Further proof-of-principle studies used Alzheimer disease mouse models. It was recently reported that systemic PADK administration caused dramatic increases in cathepsin B protein and activity levels, whereas neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, α-secretase, and β-secretase were unaffected by PADK. In the transgenic models, PADK treatment resulted in clearance of intracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide and concomitant reduction of extracellular deposits. Production of the less pathogenic Aβ(1-38) peptide corresponded with decreased levels of Aβ(1-42), supporting the lysosome's antiamyloidogenic role through intracellular truncation. Amelioration of synaptic and behavioral deficits also indicates a neuroprotective function of the lysosomal system, identifying lysosomal modulation as an avenue for disease-modifying therapies. From the in vitro and in vivo findings, unique lysosomal modulators represent a minimally invasive, pharmacologically controlled strategy against protein accumulation disorders to enhance

  15. Cooperative DNA Recognition Modulated by an Interplay between Protein-Protein Interactions and DNA-Mediated Allostery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Merino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Highly specific transcriptional regulation depends on the cooperative association of transcription factors into enhanceosomes. Usually, their DNA-binding cooperativity originates from either direct interactions or DNA-mediated allostery. Here, we performed unbiased molecular simulations followed by simulations of protein-DNA unbinding and free energy profiling to study the cooperative DNA recognition by OCT4 and SOX2, key components of enhanceosomes in pluripotent cells. We found that SOX2 influences the orientation and dynamics of the DNA-bound configuration of OCT4. In addition SOX2 modifies the unbinding free energy profiles of both DNA-binding domains of OCT4, the POU specific and POU homeodomain, despite interacting directly only with the first. Thus, we demonstrate that the OCT4-SOX2 cooperativity is modulated by an interplay between protein-protein interactions and DNA-mediated allostery. Further, we estimated the change in OCT4-DNA binding free energy due to the cooperativity with SOX2, observed a good agreement with experimental measurements, and found that SOX2 affects the relative DNA-binding strength of the two OCT4 domains. Based on these findings, we propose that available interaction partners in different biological contexts modulate the DNA exploration routes of multi-domain transcription factors such as OCT4. We consider the OCT4-SOX2 cooperativity as a paradigm of how specificity of transcriptional regulation is achieved through concerted modulation of protein-DNA recognition by different types of interactions.

  16. Complement factor H family proteins in their non-canonical role as modulators of cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józsi, Mihály; Schneider, Andrea E; Kárpáti, Éva; Sándor, Noémi

    2018-01-04

    Complement factor H is a major regulator of the alternative pathway of the complement system. The factor H-related proteins are less characterized, but recent data indicate that they rather promote complement activation. These proteins have some common ligands with factor H and have both overlapping and distinct functions depending on domain composition and the degree of conservation of amino acid sequence. Factor H and some of the factor H-related proteins also appear in a non-canonical function that is beyond their role in the modulation of complement activation. This review covers our current understanding on this emerging role of factor H family proteins in modulating the activation and function of various cells by binding to receptors or receptor ligands. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. TRANSCUTANEOUS ELECTRIC NERVE STIMULATION IN MODULATION OF PAIN OF TENDER POINTS IN SYNDROME FIBROMYALGIA: CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Mara Magalhães Rori

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The Fibromyalgia is a syndrome of pain and chronic diffuse, characterized by the presence of at least 11 of 18 points called anatomically specific tender points, painful on palpation. As the pain diffuse the main symptom of fibromyalgia. The current treatment is focused mainly to the reduction of symptoms. Physiotherapy has animportant role in improving the control of pain. This study aimed to verify the effectiveness of the main TENS of low frequency and high intensity in modulating pain of tender points of patients with fibromyalgia. For this was a case study of patient R. S. S., 38-yearold female carrier of the syndrome of fibromyalgia attended school in the clinic of the Faculty of Integrated Ceará (FISIOFIC. The patient was treated with the TENS-pain Acupuncture points in a total of twelve care and pain assessed before starting treatment and after three attendants. There was a significant reduction in pain intensity at 77.7% of the tender points in the second evaluation and 88.8% of the points in the other assessments. It was concluded that there was a reduction in the pain of tender points of the patient showing the analgesia promoted by TENS, so it should be used as a complementary treatment programs associated with other treatments and also served as a good technique to locate the tender points.

  18. Stability and structure of the membrane protein transporter Ffh is modulated by substrates and lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Marika Ejby; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    the apoprotein. Escherichia coli lipid and DOPG (and to a smaller extent DOPC) increase Ffh's α-helical content, possibly related to Ffh's role in guiding membrane proteins to the membrane. Binding is largely mediated by electrostatic interactions but does not protect Ffh against trypsinolysis. We conclude...... that Ffh is a structurally flexible and dynamic protein whose stability is significantly modulated by the environment. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  19. Targeting HSP90 and monoclonal protein trafficking modulates the unfolded protein response, chaperone regulation and apoptosis in myeloma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Born, E J; Hartman, S V; Holstein, S A

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is characterized by the production of substantial quantities of monoclonal protein. We have previously demonstrated that select inhibitors of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) induce apoptosis of myeloma cells via inhibition of Rab geranylgeranylation, leading to disruption of monoclonal protein trafficking and induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. Heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitors disrupt protein folding and are currently under clinical investigation in myeloma. The effects of combining IBP and HSP90 inhibitors on cell death, monoclonal protein trafficking, the UPR and chaperone regulation were investigated in monoclonal protein-producing cells. An enhanced induction of cell death was observed following treatment with IBP and HSP90 inhibitors, which occurred through both ER stress and non-ER stress pathways. The HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the effects of the IBP inhibitors on intracellular monoclonal protein levels and localization as well as induction of the UPR in myeloma cells. Disparate effects on chaperone expression were observed in myeloma vs amyloid light chain cells. Here we demonstrate that the novel strategy of targeting MP trafficking in concert with HSP90 enhances myeloma cell death via a complex modulation of ER stress, UPR, and cell death pathways

  20. Cucurbit[8]uril templated supramolecular ring structure formation and protein assembly modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaekers, M.; Wijnands, S.P.W.; van Dongen, J.L.J.; Brunsveld, L.; Dankers, P.Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of Phe-Gly-Gly (FGG)-tagged proteins and bivalent FGG-tagged penta(ethylene glycol) as guest molecules with cucurbit[8]uril (Q8) hosts is studied to modulate the supramolecular assembly process. Ring structure formation of the bivalent guest molecule with Q8 leads to enhanced binding

  1. Impact of weight loss and maintenance with ad libitum diets varying in protein and glycemic index content on metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadaki, Angeliki; Linardakis, Manolis; Plada, Maria

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of weight loss and maintenance with diets that varied with regard to protein content and glycemic index (GI) on metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) status.......We investigated the effects of weight loss and maintenance with diets that varied with regard to protein content and glycemic index (GI) on metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) status....

  2. Ceramide-Protein Interactions Modulate Ceramide-Associated Lipotoxic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley M. Walls

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipotoxic cardiomyopathy (LCM is characterized by abnormal myocardial accumulation of lipids, including ceramide; however, the contribution of ceramide to the etiology of LCM is unclear. Here, we investigated the association of ceramide metabolism and ceramide-interacting proteins (CIPs in LCM in the Drosophila heart model. We find that ceramide feeding or ceramide-elevating genetic manipulations are strongly associated with cardiac dilation and defects in contractility. High ceramide-associated LCM is prevented by inhibiting ceramide synthesis, establishing a robust model of direct ceramide-associated LCM, corroborating previous indirect evidence in mammals. We identified several CIPs from mouse heart and Drosophila extracts, including caspase activator Annexin-X, myosin chaperone Unc-45, and lipogenic enzyme FASN1, and remarkably, their cardiac-specific manipulation can prevent LCM. Collectively, these data suggest that high ceramide-associated lipotoxicity is mediated, in part, through altering caspase activation, sarcomeric maintenance, and lipogenesis, thus providing evidence for conserved mechanisms in LCM pathogenesis in mammals.

  3. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar

    2016-01-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant...... in the majority of UHS case subjects. The two enzymes PADI3 and TGM3, responsible for posttranslational protein modifications, and their target structural protein TCHH are all involved in hair shaft formation. Elucidation of the molecular outcomes of the disease-causing mutations by cell culture experiments...... and tridimensional protein models demonstrated clear differences in the structural organization and activity of mutant and wild-type proteins. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed morphological alterations in hair coat of Padi3 knockout mice. All together, these findings elucidate the molecular genetic...

  4. Respiratory reovirus 1/L induction of diffuse alveolar damage: pulmonary fibrosis is not modulated by corticosteroids in acute respiratory distress syndrome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Lucille; Majeski, Elizabeth I; Altman-Hamamdzic, Sanja; Enockson, Candace; Paintlia, Manjeet K; Harley, Russell A; London, Steven D

    2002-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) secondary to an intense host inflammatory response of the lung to a pulmonary or extrapulmonary infectious or noninfectious insult. We have previously described a unique animal model in which CBA/J mice infected with reovirus 1/L develop ARDS. This model recapitulates the histopathological changes observed in human ARDS, which consist of the overlapping phases of exudation, including the formation of hyaline membranes, regeneration, and healing via repair with fibrosis. In this report, we show that the development of DAD in the acute phase of the disease and intraalveolar fibrosis in the late phase of the disease was not modulated by treatment with methylprednisolone (MPS). In the presence or absence of MPS, the majority of cells infiltrating the lungs after reovirus 1/L infection were polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages. A number of key proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines that are observed in the BAL fluid of ARDS patients were also found in the lungs of mice after reovirus 1/L infection and were not modulated by MPS. These include interferon-gamma, interleukin-10, and monocyte chemoattractant protein. The histopathology, cytokine/chemokine expression, and response to corticosteroids in reovirus 1/L-induced ARDS are similar to what is observed in human patients, making this a clinically relevant model.

  5. Simplified Swarm Optimization-Based Function Module Detection in Protein–Protein Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianghan Zheng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics research has become one of the most important topics in the field of life science and natural science. At present, research on protein–protein interaction networks (PPIN mainly focuses on detecting protein complexes or function modules. However, existing approaches are either ineffective or incomplete. In this paper, we investigate detection mechanisms of functional modules in PPIN, including open database, existing detection algorithms, and recent solutions. After that, we describe the proposed approach based on the simplified swarm optimization (SSO algorithm and the knowledge of Gene Ontology (GO. The proposed solution implements the SSO algorithm for clustering proteins with similar function, and imports biological gene ontology knowledge for further identifying function complexes and improving detection accuracy. Furthermore, we use four different categories of species datasets for experiment: fruitfly, mouse, scere, and human. The testing and analysis result show that the proposed solution is feasible, efficient, and could achieve a higher accuracy of prediction than existing approaches.

  6. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... C-reactive protein and TC (R = 0.19), TG (R = 0.29), BMI (R = 0.32), glucose (R = 0.11), and uric acid (R = 0.14) (all P

  7. Effects of Dairy Protein and Fat on the Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Bjørnshave, Ann; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide. Evidence supports a negative relationship between the consumption of dairy products and risk of MetS and T2D. Dairy proteins are known to have a directly beneficial effect on hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia, but a detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms is missing. It has been confirmed by observations that the insulinotropic effect of dairy proteins is associated with t...

  8. Nance-Horan syndrome protein, NHS, associates with epithelial cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shiwani; Ang, Sharyn L; Shaw, Marie; Mackey, David A; Gécz, Jozef; McAvoy, John W; Craig, Jamie E

    2006-06-15

    Nance-Horan syndrome, characterized by congenital cataracts, craniofacial, dental abnormalities and mental disturbances, is an X-linked disorder with significant phenotypic heterogeneity. Affected individuals have mutations in the NHS (Nance-Horan syndrome) gene typically resulting in premature truncation of the protein. This report underlines the complexity of the regulation of the NHS gene that transcribes several isoforms. We demonstrate the differential expression of the two NHS isoforms, NHS-A and NHS-1A, and differences in the subcellular localization of the proteins encoded by these isoforms. This may in part explain the pleiotropic features of the syndrome. We show that the endogenous and exogenous NHS-A isoform localizes to the cell membrane of mammalian cells in a cell-type-dependent manner and that it co-localizes with the tight junction (TJ) protein ZO-1 in the apical aspect of cell membrane in epithelial cells. We also show that the NHS-1A isoform is a cytoplasmic protein. In the developing mammalian lens, we found continuous expression of NHS that became restricted to the lens epithelium in pre- and postnatal lens. Consistent with the in vitro findings, the NHS-A isoform associates with the apical cell membrane in the lens epithelium. This study suggests that disturbances in intercellular contacts underlie cataractogenesis in the Nance-Horan syndrome. NHS is the first gene localized at TJs that has been implicated in congenital cataracts.

  9. Amyloid-related biomarkers and axonal damage proteins in parkinsonian syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Sara; Hjermind, Lena E; Salvesen, Lisette

    2012-01-01

    Clinical differentiation between parkinsonian syndromes (PS) remains a challenge despite well-established clinical diagnostic criteria. Specific diagnostic biomarkers have yet to be identified, though in recent years, studies have been published on the aid of certain brain related proteins (BRP) ...

  10. Circulating adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein, juvenile obesity, and metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krzystek-Korpacka, Malgorzata; Patryn, Eliza; Bednarz-Misa, Iwona; Mierzchala, Magdalena; Hotowy, Katarzyna; Czapinska, Elzbieta; Kustrzeba-Wojcicka, Irena; Gamian, Andrzej; Noczynska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP) links obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) and might be targeted in future therapies. Its utility as a MetS biomarker has been suggested in adults but has not been examined in children/adolescents. Our objectives were to identify metabolic parameters

  11. White spot syndrome virus envelope protein VP28 is involved in the systemic infection of shrimp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M.C.W.; Witteveldt, J.; Snippe, M.; Vlak, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a large DNA virus infecting shrimp and other crustaceans. The virus particles contain at least five major virion proteins, of which three (VP26, VP24, and VP15) are present in the rod-shaped nucleocapsid and two (VP28 and VP19) reside in the envelope. The mode of

  12. Direct interaction of the Usher syndrome 1G protein SANS and myomegalin in the retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overlack, N.; Kilic, D.; Bauss, K.; Marker, T.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Wijk, E. van; Wolfrum, U.

    2011-01-01

    The human Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of combined hereditary deaf-blindness. USH is genetically heterogeneous with at least 11 chromosomal loci assigned to 3 clinical types, USH1-3. We have previously demonstrated that all USH1 and 2 proteins in the eye and the inner ear are

  13. In Vitro Calcite Crystal Morphology Is Modulated by Otoconial Proteins Otolin-1 and Otoconin-90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, K. Trent; Hong, Mina; Lu, Wenfu; Rowley, Christopher W.; Ornitz, David M.; De Yoreo, James J.; Thalmann, Ruediger

    2014-01-01

    Otoconia are formed embryonically and are instrumental in detecting linear acceleration and gravity. Degeneration and fragmentation of otoconia in elderly patients leads to imbalance resulting in higher frequency of falls that are positively correlated with the incidence of bone fractures and death. In this work we investigate the roles otoconial proteins Otolin-1 and Otoconin 90 (OC90) perform in the formation of otoconia. We demonstrate by rotary shadowing and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments that Otolin-1 forms homomeric protein complexes and self-assembled networks supporting the hypothesis that Otolin-1 serves as a scaffold protein of otoconia. Our calcium carbonate crystal growth data demonstrate that Otolin-1 and OC90 modulate in vitro calcite crystal morphology but neither protein is sufficient to produce the shape of otoconia. Coadministration of these proteins produces synergistic effects on crystal morphology that contribute to morphology resembling otoconia. PMID:24748133

  14. Gs protein peptidomimetics as allosteric modulators of the β2-adrenergic receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyhus, Lotte Emilie; Danielsen, Mia; Bengtson, Nina Smidt

    2018-01-01

    A series of Gs protein peptidomimetics were designed and synthesised based on the published X-ray crystal structure of the active state β2-Adrenergic receptor (β2AR) in complex with the Gs protein (PDB 3SN6). We hypothesised that such peptidomimetics may function as allosteric modulators...... that target the intracellular Gs protein binding site of the β2AR. Peptidomimetics were designed to mimic the 15 residue C-Terminal α-helix of the Gs protein and were pre-organised in a helical conformation by (i, i + 4)-stapling using copper catalysed azide alkyne cycloaddition. Linear and stapled...... be able to compete with the native Gs protein for the intracellular binding site to block ISO-induced cAMP formation, but are unable to stabilise an active-like receptor conformation....

  15. Reverse micelles as a tool for probing solvent modulation of protein dynamics: Reverse micelle encapsulated hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Camille J.; Dantsker, David; Heller, Elizabeth R.; Sabat, Joseph E.; Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-08-01

    Hydration waters impact protein dynamics. Dissecting the interplay between hydration waters and dynamics requires a protein that manifests a broad range of dynamics. Proteins in reverse micelles (RMs) have promise as tools to achieve this objective because the water content can be manipulated. Hemoglobin is an appropriate tool with which to probe hydration effects. We describe both a protocol for hemoglobin encapsulation in reverse micelles and a facile method using PEG and cosolvents to manipulate water content. Hydration properties are probed using the water-sensitive fluorescence from Hb bound pyranine and covalently attached Badan. Protein dynamics are probed through ligand recombination traces derived from photodissociated carbonmonoxy hemoglobin on a log scale that exposes the potential role of both α and β solvent fluctuations in modulating protein dynamics. The results open the possibility of probing hydration level phenomena in this system using a combination of NMR and optical probes.

  16. Localization of PDZD7 to the stereocilia ankle-link associates this scaffolding protein with the Usher syndrome protein network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grati, M'hamed; Shin, Jung-Bum; Weston, Michael D; Green, James; Bhat, Manzoor A; Gillespie, Peter G; Kachar, Bechara

    2012-10-10

    Usher syndrome is the leading cause of genetic deaf-blindness. Monoallelic mutations in PDZD7 increase the severity of Usher type II syndrome caused by mutations in USH2A and GPR98, which respectively encode usherin and GPR98. PDZ domain-containing 7 protein (PDZD7) is a paralog of the scaffolding proteins harmonin and whirlin, which are implicated in Usher type 1 and type 2 syndromes. While usherin and GPR98 have been reported to form hair cell stereocilia ankle-links, harmonin localizes to the stereocilia upper tip-link density and whirlin localizes to both tip and ankle-link regions. Here, we used mass spectrometry to show that PDZD7 is expressed in chick stereocilia at a comparable molecular abundance to GPR98. We also show by immunofluorescence and by overexpression of tagged proteins in rat and mouse hair cells that PDZD7 localizes to the ankle-link region, overlapping with usherin, whirlin, and GPR98. Finally, we show in LLC-PK1 cells that cytosolic domains of usherin and GPR98 can bind to both whirlin and PDZD7. These observations are consistent with PDZD7 being a modifier and candidate gene for USH2, and suggest that PDZD7 is a second scaffolding component of the ankle-link complex.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and N-glycosylation modulate expression of WFS1 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Suguru; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Tamura, Akira; Yamada, Takahiro; Takahashi, Rui; Takei, Daisuke; Katagiri, Hideki; Oka, Yoshitomo

    2004-01-01

    Mutations of the WFS1 gene are responsible for two hereditary diseases, Wolfram syndrome and low frequency sensorineural hearing loss. The WFS1 protein is a glycoprotein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane but its function is poorly understood. Herein we show WFS1 mRNA and protein levels in pancreatic islets to be increased with ER-stress inducers, thapsigargin and dithiothreitol. Another ER-stress inducer, the N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin, also raised WFS1 mRNA but not protein levels. Site-directed mutagenesis showed both Asn-663 and Asn-748 to be N-glycosylated in mouse WFS1 protein. The glycosylation-defective WFS1 protein, in which Asn-663 and Asn-748 had been substituted with aspartate, exhibited an increased protein turnover rate. Consistent with this, the WFS1 protein was more rapidly degraded in the presence of tunicamycin. These data indicate that ER-stress and N-glycosylation play important roles in WFS1 expression and stability, and also suggest regulatory roles for this protein in ER-stress induced cell death

  18. The Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxic Function Is Modulated by HIV-1 Accessory Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Barker

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells’ major role in the control of viruses is to eliminate established infected cells. The capacity of NK cells to kill virus-infected cells is dependent on the interactions between ligands on the infected cell and receptors on the NK cell surface. Because of the importance of ligand-receptor interactions in modulating the NK cell cytotoxic response, HIV has developed strategies to regulate various NK cell ligands making the infected cell surprisingly refractory to NK cell lysis. This is perplexing because the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr induces expression of ligands for the NK cell activating receptor, NKG2D. In addition, the accessory protein Nef removes the inhibitory ligands HLA-A and -B. The reason for the ineffective killing by NK cells despite the strong potential to eliminate infected cells is due to HIV-1 Vpu’s ability to down modulate the co-activation ligand, NTB-A, from the cell surface. Down modulation of NTB-A prevents efficient NK cell degranulation. This review will focus on the mechanisms through which the HIV-1 accessory proteins modulate their respective ligands, and its implication for NK cell killing of HIV-infected cells.

  19. Multiple proteins of White spot syndrome virus involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... β-integrin with structure proteins of WSSV and motifs involved in WSSV infection was examined. The results showed ... Introduction. White spot ... denatured conditions and renatured by successive 12 h incu- bations with 6, 4, ...

  20. Early suppression of adipocyte lipid turnover induces immunometabolic modulation in cancer cachexia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Felipe Santos; Sertié, Rogério Antônio Laurato; Franco, Felipe Oliveira; Knobl, Pamela; Neves, Rodrigo Xavier; Andreotti, Sandra; Lima, Fabio Bessa; Guilherme, Adilson; Seelaender, Marilia; Batista, Miguel Luiz

    2017-05-01

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by body weight loss, atrophy of adipose tissue (AT) and systemic inflammation. However, there is limited information regarding the mechanisms of immunometabolic response in AT from cancer cachexia. Male Wistar rats were inoculated with 2 × 10 7 of Walker 256 tumor cells [tumor bearing (TB) rats]. The mesenteric AT (MeAT) was collected on d 0, 4, 7 (early stage), and 14 (cachexia stage) after tumor cell injection. Surgical biopsies for MeAT were obtained from patients who had gastrointestinal cancer with cachexia. Lipolysis showed an early decrease in glycerol release in TB d 4 (TB4) rats in relation to the control, followed by a 6-fold increase in TB14 rats, whereas de novo lipogenesis was markedly lower in the incorporation of glucose into fatty acids in TB14 rats during the development of cachexia. CD11b and CD68 were positive in TB7 and TB14 rats, respectively. In addition, we found cachexia stage results similar to those of animals in MeAT from patients: an increased presence of CD68 + , iNOS2 + , TNFα + , and HSL + cells. In summary, translational analysis of MeAT from patients and an animal model of cancer cachexia enabled us to identify early disruption in Adl turnover and subsequent inflammatory response during the development of cancer cachexia.-Henriques, F. S., Sertié, R. A. L., Franco, F. O., Knobl, P., Neves, R. X., Andreotti, S., Lima, F. B., Guilherme, A., Seelaender, M., Batista, M. L., Jr. Early suppression of adipocyte lipid turnover induces immunometabolic modulation in cancer cachexia syndrome. © FASEB.

  1. Roles of viroplasm-like structures formed by nonstructural protein NSs in infection with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaodong; Qi, Xian; Liang, Mifang; Li, Chuan; Cardona, Carol J; Li, Dexin; Xing, Zheng

    2014-06-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus is an emerging bunyavirus that causes a hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality rate. The virus is likely tick-borne and replicates primarily in hemopoietic cells, which may lead to disregulation of proinflammatory cytokine induction and loss of leukocytes and platelets. The viral genome contains L, M, and S segments encoding a viral RNA polymerase, glycoproteins G(n) and G(c), nucleoprotein (NP), and a nonstructural S segment (NSs) protein. NSs protein is involved in the regulation of host innate immune responses and suppression of IFNβ-promoter activities. In this article, we demonstrate that NSs protein can form viroplasm-like structures (VLSs) in infected and transfected cells. NSs protein molecules interact with one another, interact with NP, and were associated with viral RNA in infected cells, suggesting that NSs protein may be involved in viral replication. Furthermore, we observed that NSs-formed VLS colocalized with lipid droplets and that inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis decreased VLS formation or viral replication in transfected and infected cells. Finally, we have demonstrated that viral dsRNAs were also localized in VLS in infected cells, suggesting that NSs-formed VLS may be implicated in the replication of SFTS bunyavirus. These findings identify a novel function of nonstructural NSs in SFTSV-infected cells where it is a scaffolding component in a VLS functioning as a virus replication factory. This function is in addition to the role of NSs protein in modulating host responses that will broaden our understanding of viral pathogenesis of phleboviruses. © FASEB.

  2. Dose reduction in spiral CT angiography of thoracic outlet syndrome by anatomically adapted tube current modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastora, I.; Remy-Jardin, M.; Remy, J.; Suess, C.; Scherf, C.; Guillot, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dose reduction in spiral CT angiography of the thoracic outlet by on-line tube-current control. Prospectively, 114 patients undergoing spiral CT angiography of the subclavian artery for thoracic outlet arterial syndromes were evaluated with and without tube-current modulation at the same session (scanning parameters for the two successive angiograms, one in the neutral position and one after the postural maneuver): 140 kV; 206 mA; scan time 0.75 s; collimation 3 mm; pitch = (1). The dose reduction system was applied in the neutral position in the first 92 consecutive patients and after postural maneuver in the remaining 22 consecutive patients. Dose reduction and image quality were analyzed in the overall study group (group 1; n = 114). The influence of the arm position was assessed in 44 of the 114 patients (group 2), matched by the transverse diameter of the upper thorax. The mean dose reduction was 33 % in group 1 (range 22-40 %) and 34 % in group 2 (range 26-40 %). In group 2 the only difference in image quality was a significantly higher frequency of graininess on low-dose scans compared with reference scans whatever the patient's arm position, graded as minimal in 38 of the 44 patients (86 %). When the low-dose technique was applied after postural maneuver in group 2: (a) the mean dose reduction was significantly higher (35 vs 32 % in the neutral position; p = 0.006); (b) graininess was less frequent (82 vs 91 % in the neutral position); and (c) the percentage of graininess graded as minimal was significantly higher (83 vs 70 % in the neutral position; p = 0.2027). On-line tube-current modulation enables dose reduction on high-quality, diagnostic spiral CT angiograms of the thoracic outlet and should be applied during data acquisition in the neutral position and after postural maneuver for optimal use. (orig.)

  3. Dose reduction in spiral CT angiography of thoracic outlet syndrome by anatomically adapted tube current modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastora, I.; Remy-Jardin, M.; Remy, J. [Dept. of Radiology, University Center Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Medical Research Group, Lille (France); Suess, C.; Scherf, C. [Siemens Medical Systems, Forcheim (Germany); Guillot, J.P. [Dept. of Radiology, University Center Hospital Calmette, Lille (France)

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dose reduction in spiral CT angiography of the thoracic outlet by on-line tube-current control. Prospectively, 114 patients undergoing spiral CT angiography of the subclavian artery for thoracic outlet arterial syndromes were evaluated with and without tube-current modulation at the same session (scanning parameters for the two successive angiograms, one in the neutral position and one after the postural maneuver): 140 kV; 206 mA; scan time 0.75 s; collimation 3 mm; pitch = (1). The dose reduction system was applied in the neutral position in the first 92 consecutive patients and after postural maneuver in the remaining 22 consecutive patients. Dose reduction and image quality were analyzed in the overall study group (group 1; n = 114). The influence of the arm position was assessed in 44 of the 114 patients (group 2), matched by the transverse diameter of the upper thorax. The mean dose reduction was 33 % in group 1 (range 22-40 %) and 34 % in group 2 (range 26-40 %). In group 2 the only difference in image quality was a significantly higher frequency of graininess on low-dose scans compared with reference scans whatever the patient's arm position, graded as minimal in 38 of the 44 patients (86 %). When the low-dose technique was applied after postural maneuver in group 2: (a) the mean dose reduction was significantly higher (35 vs 32 % in the neutral position; p = 0.006); (b) graininess was less frequent (82 vs 91 % in the neutral position); and (c) the percentage of graininess graded as minimal was significantly higher (83 vs 70 % in the neutral position; p = 0.2027). On-line tube-current modulation enables dose reduction on high-quality, diagnostic spiral CT angiograms of the thoracic outlet and should be applied during data acquisition in the neutral position and after postural maneuver for optimal use. (orig.)

  4. Ciliopathy proteins regulate paracrine signaling by modulating proteasomal degradation of mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangfan P.; Tsai, I-Chun; Morleo, Manuela; Oh, Edwin C.; Leitch, Carmen C.; Massa, Filomena; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Parker, David S.; Finley, Daniel; Zaghloul, Norann A.; Franco, Brunella; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are critical mediators of paracrine signaling; however, it is unknown whether proteins that contribute to ciliopathies converge on multiple paracrine pathways through a common mechanism. Here, we show that loss of cilopathy-associated proteins Bardet-Biedl syndrome 4 (BBS4) or oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1) results in the accumulation of signaling mediators normally targeted for proteasomal degradation. In WT cells, several BBS proteins and OFD1 interacted with proteasomal subunits, and loss of either BBS4 or OFD1 led to depletion of multiple subunits from the centrosomal proteasome. Furthermore, overexpression of proteasomal regulatory components or treatment with proteasomal activators sulforaphane (SFN) and mevalonolactone (MVA) ameliorated signaling defects in cells lacking BBS1, BBS4, and OFD1, in morphant zebrafish embryos, and in induced neurons from Ofd1-deficient mice. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that other proteasome-dependent pathways not known to be associated with ciliopathies are defective in the absence of ciliopathy proteins. We found that loss of BBS1, BBS4, or OFD1 led to decreased NF-κB activity and concomitant IκBβ accumulation and that these defects were ameliorated with SFN treatment. Taken together, our data indicate that basal body proteasomal regulation governs paracrine signaling pathways and suggest that augmenting proteasomal function might benefit ciliopathy patients. PMID:24691443

  5. Morvan's syndrome with anti contactin associated protein like 2 – voltage gated potassium channel antibody presenting with syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjani Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morvan's syndrome is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by triad of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, autonomic dysfunction, and central nervous system symptoms. Antibodies against contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2, a subtype of voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC complex, are found in a significant proportion of patients with Morvan's syndrome and are thought to play a key role in peripheral as well as central clinical manifestations. We report a patient of Morvan's syndrome with positive CASPR2–anti-VGKC antibody having syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone as a cause of persistent hyponatremia.

  6. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Nonstructural Protein 16 Is Necessary for Interferon Resistance and Viral Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menachery, Vineet D.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Dinnon, Kenneth H.; Leist, Sarah R.; Yount, Boyd L.; Graham, Rachel L.; McAnarney, Eileen T.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Cockrell, Adam S.; Debbink, Kari; Sims, Amy C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Baric, Ralph S.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2017-11-15

    ABSTRACT

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) encode a mixture of highly conserved and novel genes, as well as genetic elements necessary for infection and pathogenesis, raising the possibility of common targets for attenuation and therapeutic design. In this study, we focused on highly conserved nonstructural protein 16 (NSP16), a viral 2'O-methyltransferase (2'O-MTase) that encodes critical functions in immune modulation and infection. Using reverse genetics, we disrupted a key motif in the conserved KDKE motif of Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV) NSP16 (D130A) and evaluated the effect on viral infection and pathogenesis. While the absence of 2'O-MTase activity had only a marginal impact on propagation and replication in Vero cells, dNSP16 mutant MERS-CoV demonstrated significant attenuation relative to the control both in primary human airway cell cultures andin vivo. Further examination indicated that dNSP16 mutant MERS-CoV had a type I interferon (IFN)-based attenuation and was partially restored in the absence of molecules of IFN-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats. Importantly, the robust attenuation permitted the use of dNSP16 mutant MERS-CoV as a live attenuated vaccine platform protecting from a challenge with a mouse-adapted MERS-CoV strain. These studies demonstrate the importance of the conserved 2'O-MTase activity for CoV pathogenesis and highlight NSP16 as a conserved universal target for rapid live attenuated vaccine design in an expanding CoV outbreak setting.

    IMPORTANCECoronavirus (CoV) emergence in both humans and livestock represents a significant threat to global public health, as evidenced by the sudden emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV), MERS-CoV, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, and swine delta CoV in the 21st century. These studies describe an approach that

  7. Two Chimeric Regulators of G-protein Signaling (RGS) Proteins Differentially Modulate Soybean Heterotrimeric G-protein Cycle*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Choudhury, Swarup; Westfall, Corey S.; Laborde, John P.; Bisht, Naveen C.; Jez, Joseph M.; Pandey, Sona

    2012-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins and the regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins, which accelerate the inherent GTPase activity of Gα proteins, are common in animals and encoded by large gene families; however, in plants G-protein signaling is thought to be more limited in scope. For example, Arabidopsis thaliana contains one Gα, one Gβ, three Gγ, and one RGS protein. Recent examination of the Glycine max (soybean) genome reveals a larger set of G-protein-related genes and raises the possibility of more intricate G-protein networks than previously observed in plants. Stopped-flow analysis of GTP-binding and GDP/GTP exchange for the four soybean Gα proteins (GmGα1–4) reveals differences in their kinetic properties. The soybean genome encodes two chimeric RGS proteins with an N-terminal seven transmembrane domain and a C-terminal RGS box. Both GmRGS interact with each of the four GmGα and regulate their GTPase activity. The GTPase-accelerating activities of GmRGS1 and -2 differ for each GmGα, suggesting more than one possible rate of the G-protein cycle initiated by each of the Gα proteins. The differential effects of GmRGS1 and GmRGS2 on GmGα1–4 result from a single valine versus alanine difference. The emerging picture suggests complex regulation of the G-protein cycle in soybean and in other plants with expanded G-protein networks. PMID:22474294

  8. The effects of GH and hormone replacement therapy on serum concentrations of mannan-binding lectin, surfactant protein D and vitamin D binding protein in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lauridsen, Anna Lis

    2004-01-01

    function. In the present study we examined whether GH or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in Turner syndrome (TS) influence the serum concentrations of MBL and two other proteins partaking in the innate immune defence, surfactant protein D (SP-D) and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). DESIGN: Study 1...

  9. Nucleation phenomena in protein folding: the modulating role of protein sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travasso, Rui D M; FaIsca, Patricia F N; Gama, Margarida M Telo da

    2007-01-01

    For the vast majority of naturally occurring, small, single-domain proteins, folding is often described as a two-state process that lacks detectable intermediates. This observation has often been rationalized on the basis of a nucleation mechanism for protein folding whose basic premise is the idea that, after completion of a specific set of contacts forming the so-called folding nucleus, the native state is achieved promptly. Here we propose a methodology to identify folding nuclei in small lattice polymers and apply it to the study of protein molecules with a chain length of N = 48. To investigate the extent to which protein topology is a robust determinant of the nucleation mechanism, we compare the nucleation scenario of a native-centric model with that of a sequence-specific model sharing the same native fold. To evaluate the impact of the sequence's finer details in the nucleation mechanism, we consider the folding of two non-homologous sequences. We conclude that, in a sequence-specific model, the folding nucleus is, to some extent, formed by the most stable contacts in the protein and that the less stable linkages in the folding nucleus are solely determined by the fold's topology. We have also found that, independently of the protein sequence, the folding nucleus performs the same 'topological' function. This unifying feature of the nucleation mechanism results from the residues forming the folding nucleus being distributed along the protein chain in a similar and well-defined manner that is determined by the fold's topological features

  10. Treatment of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome with defibrotide, a proposed vascular endothelial cell modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcoglu-O'Ral, Arsinur; Erkan, Doruk; Asherson, Ronald

    2002-09-01

    To define at the molecular level the vascular endothelial cell (VEC) injury characteristics of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) and to report successful therapeutic use of a VEC modulator, defibrotide. We describe a 55-year-old man with primary APS with an intractable prothrombotic state (CAPS) resistant to combined therapy with heparin, warfarin, aspirin, and dipyridamole. Treatment with defibrotide was conducted in the context of an investigational phase II protocol where the dose was regulated and individualized by disease/patient-specific molecular and clinical markers. The patient entered complete remission with defibrotide treatment. During treatment, dose dependent pharmacological actions of defibrotide and key stress markers for VEC injury were identified. Evidence of defibrotide's polypharmacology included downregulation of cytokines, notably tumor necrosis factor-alpha, as the earliest effect, cellular differentiation of VEC, possibly with direct regulatory effect over cellular genes, and the reversal of platelet consumption and prothrombotic state. Von Willebrand antigen levels were used as the sole marker to guide therapy. This case demonstrates effective remission of CAPS with defibrotide treatment. In contrast to theories that CAPS is triggered by ischemic and thrombotic tissue damage, these data present VEC injury as the primary and representative lesion of CAPS. The pathogenesis may involve concurrent impairment of different VEC functions. Achieving remission may require a polypharmacologic approach, represented here by use of defibrotide.

  11. Cockayne Syndrome group B protein stimulates NEIL2 DNA glycosylase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamann, Maria Diget; Hvitby, Christina Poulsen; Popuri, Venkateswarlu

    2014-01-01

    Cockayne Syndrome is a segmental premature aging syndrome, which can be caused by loss of function of the CSB protein. CSB is essential for genome maintenance and has numerous interaction partners with established roles in different DNA repair pathways including transcription coupled nucleotide...... activity on a 5-hydroxyl uracil lesion in a DNA bubble structure substrate in vitro. A novel 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyA) specific incision activity of NEIL2 was also stimulated by CSB. To further elucidate the biological role of the interaction, immunofluorescence studies were performed...

  12. Successful diuretics treatment of protein-losing enteropathy in Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuochi, Tatsuki; Suda, Kenji; Seki, Yoshitaka; Yanagi, Tadahiro; Yoshimoto, Hironaga; Kudo, Yoshiyuki; Iemura, Motofumi; Tanikawa, Ken; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-04-01

    There are few reports on successful high-dose spironolactone treatment of refractory protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) caused by Fontan procedure. We report successful diuretics treatment with spironolactone and furosemide at standard dose, of refractory PLE in a patient with Noonan syndrome and repaired congenital heart disease. This is the first successful application of diuretics treatment in a patient with refractory PLE without Fontan procedure. This case illustrates that diuretics treatment can be the first-line treatment of PLE regardless of the causative physiology, and can be effective in refractory PLE with Noonan syndrome. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  13. Modulation of intracellular protein degradation by SSB1-SIS1 chaperon system in yeast S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, M

    1997-06-09

    In prokaryotes, DnaK-DnaJ chaperon is involved in the protein degradation catalyzed by proteases La and ClpA/B complex as shown in E. coli. To extend this into eukaryotic cells, we examined the effects of hsp70 genes, SSA1 and SSB1, and DnaJ genes, SIS1 and YDJ1, on the growth of proteasome subunit mutants of the yeast S. cerevisiae. The results identified SSB1 and SIS1 as a pair of chaperon genes specifically involved in efficient protein turnover in the yeast, whose overexpression suppressed the growth defects caused by the proteasome mutations. Moreover, a single amino acid substitution in the putative peptide-binding site of SSB1 protein profoundly enhanced the suppression activity, indicating that the activity is mediated by the peptide-binding activity of this chaperon. Thus SSB1, with its partner DnaJ, SIS1, modulates the efficiency of protein turnover through its chaperon activity.

  14. Effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating intestinal hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yanqin; Liu, Ying; Tong, Jingjing; Qian, Wei; Hou, Xiaohua

    2010-06-25

    Trimebutine maleate, which modulates the calcium and potassium channels, relieves abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. However, its effect on postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome is not clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating colonic hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. Mice infected up to 8 weeks with T. spiralis underwent abdominal withdrawal reflex to colorectal distention to evaluate the visceral sensitivity at different time points. Tissues were examined for histopathology scores. Colonic longitudinal muscle strips were prepared in the organ bath under basal condition or to be stimulated by acetylcholine and potassium chloride, and consecutive concentrations of trimebutine maleate were added to the bath to record the strip responses. Significant inflammation was observed in the intestines of the mice infected 2 weeks, and it resolved in 8 weeks after infection. Visceral hyperalgesia and colonic muscle hypercontractility emerged after infection, and trimebutine maleate could effectively reduce the colonic hyperreactivity. Hypercontractility of the colonic muscle stimulated by acetylcholine and high K(+) could be inhibited by trimebutine maleate in solution with Ca(2+), but not in Ca(2+) free solution. Compared with 8-week postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome group, 2-week acute infected strips were much more sensitive to the stimulators and the drug trimebutine maleate. Trimebutine maleate was effective in reducing the colonic muscle hypercontractility of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome mice. The findings may provide evidence for trimebutine maleate to treat postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome patients effectively. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Direct interaction of the Usher syndrome 1G protein SANS and myomegalin in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overlack, Nora; Kilic, Dilek; Bauss, Katharina; Märker, Tina; Kremer, Hannie; van Wijk, Erwin; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2011-10-01

    The human Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of combined hereditary deaf-blindness. USH is genetically heterogeneous with at least 11 chromosomal loci assigned to 3 clinical types, USH1-3. We have previously demonstrated that all USH1 and 2 proteins in the eye and the inner ear are organized into protein networks by scaffold proteins. This has contributed essentially to our current understanding of the function of USH proteins and explains why defects in proteins of different families cause very similar phenotypes. We have previously shown that the USH1G protein SANS (scaffold protein containing ankyrin repeats and SAM domain) contributes to the periciliary protein network in retinal photoreceptor cells. This study aimed to further elucidate the role of SANS by identifying novel interaction partners. In yeast two-hybrid screens of retinal cDNA libraries we identified 30 novel putative interacting proteins binding to the central domain of SANS (CENT). We confirmed the direct binding of the phosphodiesterase 4D interacting protein (PDE4DIP), a Golgi associated protein synonymously named myomegalin, to the CENT domain of SANS by independent assays. Correlative immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses showed a co-localization of SANS and myomegalin in mammalian photoreceptor cells in close association with microtubules. Based on the present results we propose a role of the SANS-myomegalin complex in microtubule-dependent inner segment cargo transport towards the ciliary base of photoreceptor cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The ribosomal protein uL22 modulates the shape of the nascent protein exit tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wekselman, I.; Zimmerman, E.; Davidovich, C.

    2017-01-01

    in the entrance of theribosomal exit tunnel and interferes with the progression of nas-cent chains. Commonly, resistance to erythromycin is acquiredby alterations of rRNA nucleotides that interact with the drug.Mutations in theb-hairpin of ribosomal protein uL22, which israther distal to the erythromycin binding...... to erythromycin binding pocket and increases its flexi-bility. Based on our results, we suggest a feasble mechanism thatexplains how nanscent proteins can be translated when ery-thromycin is bound to the ribosome. Furthermore, our findingssupport recent studies showing that the interactions betweenuL22...

  17. Distribution of Wfs1 protein in the central nervous system of the mouse and its relation to clinical symptoms of the Wolfram syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luuk, H.; Koks, S.; Plaas, M.

    2008-01-01

    enrichment of Wf1 protein in the central extended amygdala and ventral striatum. Prominent Wfs1 expression was seen in the hippocampal CA1 region, parasubiculum, superficial part of the second and third layers of the prefrontal cortex and proisocortical areas, hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory system......, alveus, fimbria, dorsal hippocampal commissure; subiculum, and to a lesser extent in the central sublenticular extended amygdala, compact part of substantia nigra, and ventral tegmental area. The neuroanatomical findings suggest that the lack of Wf1 protein function can be related to several neurological...... and psychiatric symptoms found in Wolfram syndrome. Enrichment of Wfs1 protein in the central extended amygdala suggests a role in the modulation of anxiety and fear Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/20...

  18. Exploring protein structure and dynamics through a project-oriented biochemistry laboratory module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipchock, James M; Ginther, Patrick S; Douglas, Bonnie B; Bird, Kelly E; Patrick Loria, J

    2017-09-01

    Here, we present a 10-week project-oriented laboratory module designed to provide a course-based undergraduate research experience in biochemistry that emphasizes the importance of biomolecular structure and dynamics in enzyme function. This module explores the impact of mutagenesis on an important active site loop for a biomedically-relevant human enzyme, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Over the course of the semester students guide their own mutant of PTP1B from conception to characterization in a cost-effective manner and gain exposure to fundamental techniques in biochemistry, including site-directed DNA mutagenesis, bacterial recombinant protein expression, affinity column purification, protein quantitation, SDS-PAGE, and enzyme kinetics. This project-based approach allows an instructor to simulate a research setting and prepare students for productive research beyond the classroom. Potential modifications to expand or contract this module are also provided. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):403-410, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. The small envelope protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus possesses ion channel protein-like properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Changhee; Yoo, Dongwan

    2006-01-01

    The small envelope (E) protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a hydrophobic 73 amino acid protein encoded in the internal open reading frame (ORF) of the bicistronic mRNA2. As a first step towards understanding the biological role of E protein during PRRSV replication, E gene expression was blocked in a full-length infectious clone by mutating the ATG translational initiation to GTG, such that the full-length mutant genomic clone was unable to synthesize the E protein. DNA transfection of PRRSV-susceptible cells with the E gene knocked-out genomic clone showed the absence of virus infectivity. P129-ΔE-transfected cells however produced virion particles in the culture supernatant, and these particles contained viral genomic RNA, demonstrating that the E protein is essential for PRRSV infection but dispensable for virion assembly. Electron microscopy suggests that the P129-ΔE virions assembled in the absence of E had a similar appearance to the wild-type particles. Strand-specific RT-PCR demonstrated that the E protein-negative, non-infectious P129-ΔE virus particles were able to enter cells but further steps of replication were interrupted. The entry of PRRSV has been suggested to be via receptor-mediated endocytosis, and lysomotropic basic compounds and known ion-channel blocking agents both inhibited PRRSV replication effectively during the uncoating process. The expression of E protein in Escherichia coli-mediated cell growth arrests and increased the membrane permeability. Cross-linking experiments in cells infected with PRRSV or transfected with E gene showed that the E protein was able to form homo-oligomers. Taken together, our data suggest that the PRRSV E protein is likely an ion-channel protein embedded in the viral envelope and facilitates uncoating of virus and release of the genome in the cytoplasm

  20. Domain analyses of Usher syndrome causing Clarin-1 and GPR98 protein models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sehrish Haider; Javed, Muhammad Rizwan; Qasim, Muhammad; Shahzadi, Samar; Jalil, Asma; Rehman, Shahid Ur

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes hearing loss, Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) and vestibular dysfunction. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder which is clinically divided into three types i.e. type I, type II and type III. To date, there are about twelve loci and ten identified genes which are associated with Usher syndrome. A mutation in any of these genes e.g. CDH23, CLRN1, GPR98, MYO7A, PCDH15, USH1C, USH1G, USH2A and DFNB31 can result in Usher syndrome or non-syndromic deafness. These genes provide instructions for making proteins that play important roles in normal hearing, balance and vision. Studies have shown that protein structures of only seven genes have been determined experimentally and there are still three genes whose structures are unavailable. These genes are Clarin-1, GPR98 and Usherin. In the absence of an experimentally determined structure, homology modeling and threading often provide a useful 3D model of a protein. Therefore in the current study Clarin-1 and GPR98 proteins have been analyzed for signal peptide, domains and motifs. Clarin-1 protein was found to be without any signal peptide and consists of prokar lipoprotein domain. Clarin-1 is classified within claudin 2 super family and consists of twelve motifs. Whereas, GPR98 has a 29 amino acids long signal peptide and classified within GPCR family 2 having Concanavalin A-like lectin/glucanase superfamily. It was found to be consists of GPS and G protein receptor F2 domains and twenty nine motifs. Their 3D structures have been predicted using I-TASSER server. The model of Clarin-1 showed only α-helix but no beta sheets while model of GPR98 showed both α-helix and β sheets. The predicted structures were then evaluated and validated by MolProbity and Ramachandran plot. The evaluation of the predicted structures showed 78.9% residues of Clarin-1 and 78.9% residues of GPR98 within favored regions. The findings of present study has resulted in the

  1. The Role of Maternal Dietary Proteins in Development of Metabolic Syndrome in Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Jahan-Mihan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity has been increasing. Pre-natal environment has been suggested as a factor influencing the risk of metabolic syndrome in adulthood. Both observational and experimental studies showed that maternal diet is a major modifier of the development of regulatory systems in the offspring in utero and post-natally. Both protein content and source in maternal diet influence pre- and early post-natal development. High and low protein dams’ diets have detrimental effect on body weight, blood pressure191 and metabolic and intake regulatory systems in the offspring. Moreover, the role of the source of protein in a nutritionally adequate maternal diet in programming of food intake regulatory system, body weight, glucose metabolism and blood pressure in offspring is studied. However, underlying mechanisms are still elusive. The purpose of this review is to examine the current literature related to the role of proteins in maternal diets in development of characteristics of the metabolic syndrome in offspring.

  2. Usher syndrome: animal models, retinal function of Usher proteins, and prospects for gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a deafness-blindness disorder. The blindness occurs from a progressive retinal degeneration that begins after deafness and after the retina has developed. Three clinical subtypes of Usher syndrome have been identified, with mutations in any one of six different genes giving rise to type 1, in any one of three different genes to type 2, and in one identified gene causing Usher type 3. Mutant mice for most of the genes have been studied; while they have clear inner ear defects, retinal phenotypes are relatively mild and have been difficult to characterize. The retinal functions of the Usher proteins are still largely unknown. Protein binding studies have suggested many interactions among the proteins, and a model of interaction among all the proteins in the photoreceptor synapse has been proposed. However this model is not supported by localization data from some laboratories, or the indication of any synaptic phenotype in mutant mice. An earlier suggestion, based on patient pathologies, of Usher protein function in the photoreceptor cilium continues to gain support from immunolocalization and mutant mouse studies, which are consistent with Usher protein interaction in the photoreceptor ciliary/periciliary region. So far, the most characterized Usher protein is myosin VIIa. It is present in the apical RPE and photoreceptor ciliary/periciliary region, where it is required for organelle transport and clearance of opsin from the connecting cilium, respectively. Usher syndrome is amenable to gene replacement therapy, but also has some specific challenges. Progress in this treatment approach has been achieved by correction of mutant phenotypes in Myo7a-null mouse retinas, following lentiviral delivery of MYO7A. PMID:17936325

  3. Brucella Modulates Secretory Trafficking via Multiple Type IV Secretion Effector Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myeni, Sebenzile; Child, Robert; Ng, Tony W.; Kupko, John J.; Wehrly, Tara D.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Knodler, Leigh A.; Celli, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular pathogenic bacterium Brucella generates a replicative vacuole (rBCV) derived from the endoplasmic reticulum via subversion of the host cell secretory pathway. rBCV biogenesis requires the expression of the Type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB, which is thought to translocate effector proteins that modulate membrane trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways. To date, only a few T4SS substrates have been identified, whose molecular functions remain unknown. Here, we used an in silico screen to identify putative T4SS effector candidate proteins using criteria such as limited homology in other bacterial genera, the presence of features similar to known VirB T4SS effectors, GC content and presence of eukaryotic-like motifs. Using β-lactamase and CyaA adenylate cyclase reporter assays, we identified eleven proteins translocated into host cells by Brucella, five in a VirB T4SS-dependent manner, namely BAB1_0678 (BspA), BAB1_0712 (BspB), BAB1_0847 (BspC), BAB1_1671 (BspE) and BAB1_1948 (BspF). A subset of the translocated proteins targeted secretory pathway compartments when ectopically expressed in HeLa cells, and the VirB effectors BspA, BspB and BspF inhibited protein secretion. Brucella infection also impaired host protein secretion in a process requiring BspA, BspB and BspF. Single or combined deletions of bspA, bspB and bspF affected Brucella ability to replicate in macrophages and persist in the liver of infected mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that Brucella modulates secretory trafficking via multiple T4SS effector proteins that likely act coordinately to promote Brucella pathogenesis. PMID:23950720

  4. Production of polyclonal antiserum specific to the 27.5 kDa envelope protein of white spot syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    You, Z.O.; Nadala, E.C.B.; Yang, J.S.; Hulten, van M.C.W.; Loh, P.C.

    2002-01-01

    A truncated version of the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) 27.5 kDa envelope protein was expressed as a histidine tag fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The bacterial expression system allowed the production of up to 10 mg of purified recombinant protein per liter of bacterial culture. Antiserum

  5. Protein-protein interactions in paralogues: Electrostatics modulates specificity on a conserved steric scaffold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Ivanov

    Full Text Available An improved knowledge of protein-protein interactions is essential for better understanding of metabolic and signaling networks, and cellular function. Progress tends to be based on structure determination and predictions using known structures, along with computational methods based on evolutionary information or detailed atomistic descriptions. We hypothesized that for the case of interactions across a common interface, between proteins from a pair of paralogue families or within a family of paralogues, a relatively simple interface description could distinguish between binding and non-binding pairs. Using binding data for several systems, and large-scale comparative modeling based on known template complex structures, it is found that charge-charge interactions (for groups bearing net charge are generally a better discriminant than buried non-polar surface. This is particularly the case for paralogue families that are less divergent, with more reliable comparative modeling. We suggest that electrostatic interactions are major determinants of specificity in such systems, an observation that could be used to predict binding partners.

  6. Protein-protein interactions in paralogues: Electrostatics modulates specificity on a conserved steric scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Stefan M; Cawley, Andrew; Huber, Roland G; Bond, Peter J; Warwicker, Jim

    2017-01-01

    An improved knowledge of protein-protein interactions is essential for better understanding of metabolic and signaling networks, and cellular function. Progress tends to be based on structure determination and predictions using known structures, along with computational methods based on evolutionary information or detailed atomistic descriptions. We hypothesized that for the case of interactions across a common interface, between proteins from a pair of paralogue families or within a family of paralogues, a relatively simple interface description could distinguish between binding and non-binding pairs. Using binding data for several systems, and large-scale comparative modeling based on known template complex structures, it is found that charge-charge interactions (for groups bearing net charge) are generally a better discriminant than buried non-polar surface. This is particularly the case for paralogue families that are less divergent, with more reliable comparative modeling. We suggest that electrostatic interactions are major determinants of specificity in such systems, an observation that could be used to predict binding partners.

  7. Effects of Protein-pheromone Complexation on Correlated Chemical Shift Modulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perazzolo, Chiara; Wist, Julien; Loth, Karine; Poggi, Luisa; Homans, Steve; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    Major urinary protein (MUP) is a pheromone-carrying protein of the lipocalin family. Previous studies by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) show that the affinity of MUP for the pheromone 2-methoxy-3-isobutylpyrazine (IBMP) is mainly driven by enthalpy, with a small unfavourable entropic contribution. Entropic terms can be attributed in part to changes in internal motions of the protein upon binding. Slow internal motions can lead to correlated or anti-correlated modulations of the isotropic chemical shifts of carbonyl C' and amide N nuclei. Correlated chemical shift modulations (CSM/CSM) in MUP have been determined by measuring differences of the transverse relaxation rates of zero- and double-quantum coherences ZQC{C'N} and DQC{C'N}, and by accounting for the effects of correlated fluctuations of dipole-dipole couplings (DD/DD) and chemical shift anisotropies (CSA/CSA). The latter can be predicted from tensor parameters of C' and N nuclei that have been determined in earlier work. The effects of complexation on slow time-scale protein dynamics can be determined by comparing the temperature dependence of the relaxation rates of APO-MUP (i.e., without ligand) and HOLO-MUP (i.e., with IBMP as a ligand)

  8. Effects of Protein-pheromone Complexation on Correlated Chemical Shift Modulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perazzolo, Chiara; Wist, Julien [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques (Switzerland); Loth, Karine; Poggi, Luisa [Ecole Normale Superieure, Departement de chimie, associe au CNRS (France); Homans, Steve [University of Leeds, School of Biochemistry and Microbiology (United Kingdom); Bodenhausen, Geoffrey [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques (Switzerland)], E-mail: Geoffrey.Bodenhausen@ens.fr

    2005-12-15

    Major urinary protein (MUP) is a pheromone-carrying protein of the lipocalin family. Previous studies by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) show that the affinity of MUP for the pheromone 2-methoxy-3-isobutylpyrazine (IBMP) is mainly driven by enthalpy, with a small unfavourable entropic contribution. Entropic terms can be attributed in part to changes in internal motions of the protein upon binding. Slow internal motions can lead to correlated or anti-correlated modulations of the isotropic chemical shifts of carbonyl C' and amide N nuclei. Correlated chemical shift modulations (CSM/CSM) in MUP have been determined by measuring differences of the transverse relaxation rates of zero- and double-quantum coherences ZQC{l_brace}C'N{r_brace} and DQC{l_brace}C'N{r_brace}, and by accounting for the effects of correlated fluctuations of dipole-dipole couplings (DD/DD) and chemical shift anisotropies (CSA/CSA). The latter can be predicted from tensor parameters of C' and N nuclei that have been determined in earlier work. The effects of complexation on slow time-scale protein dynamics can be determined by comparing the temperature dependence of the relaxation rates of APO-MUP (i.e., without ligand) and HOLO-MUP (i.e., with IBMP as a ligand)

  9. KCNQ1 channel modulation by KCNE proteins via the voltage-sensing domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajo, Koichi; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2015-06-15

    The gating of the KCNQ1 potassium channel is drastically regulated by auxiliary subunit KCNE proteins. KCNE1, for example, slows the activation kinetics of KCNQ1 by two orders of magnitude. Like other voltage-gated ion channels, the opening of KCNQ1 is regulated by the voltage-sensing domain (VSD; S1-S4 segments). Although it has been known that KCNE proteins interact with KCNQ1 via the pore domain, some recent reports suggest that the VSD movement may be altered by KCNE. The altered VSD movement of KCNQ1 by KCNE proteins has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis, the scanning cysteine accessibility method (SCAM), voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) and gating charge measurements. These accumulated data support the idea that KCNE proteins interact with the VSDs of KCNQ1 and modulate the gating of the KCNQ1 channel. In this review, we will summarize recent findings and current views of the KCNQ1 modulation by KCNE via the VSD. In this context, we discuss our recent findings that KCNE1 may alter physical interactions between the S4 segment (VSD) and the S5 segment (pore domain) of KCNQ1. Based on these findings from ourselves and others, we propose a hypothetical mechanism for how KCNE1 binding alters the VSD movement and the gating of the channel. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  10. Application of TZERO calibrated modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry to characterize model protein formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badkar, Aniket; Yohannes, Paulos; Banga, Ajay

    2006-02-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using T(ZERO) modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) as a novel technique to characterize protein solutions using lysozyme as a model protein and IgG as a model monoclonal antibody. MDSC involves the application of modulated heating program, along with the standard heating program that enables the separation of overlapping thermal transitions. Although characterization of unfolding transitions for protein solutions requires the application of high sensitive DSC, separation of overlapping transitions like aggregation and other exothermic events may be possible only by use of MDSC. A newer T(ZERO) calibrated MDSC model from TA instruments that has improved sensitivity than previous models was used. MDSC analysis showed total, reversing and non-reversing heat flow signals. Total heat flow signals showed a combination of melting endotherms and overlapping exothermic events. Under the operating conditions used, the melting endotherms were seen in reversing heat flow signal while the exothermic events were seen in non-reversing heat flow signal. This enabled the separation of overlapping thermal transitions, improved data analysis and decreased baseline noise. MDSC was used here for characterization of lysozyme solutions, but its feasibility for characterizing therapeutic protein solutions needs further assessment.

  11. The bromodomain protein LEX-1 acts with TAM-1 to modulate gene expression in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Rong-Jeng; Armstrong, Kristin R; Wang, Xiaodong; Chamberlin, Helen M

    2007-11-01

    In many organisms, repetitive DNA serves as a trigger for gene silencing. However, some gene expression is observed from repetitive genomic regions such as heterochromatin, suggesting mechanisms exist to modulate the silencing effects. From a genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified mutations in two genes important for expression of repetitive sequences: lex-1 and tam-1. Here we show that lex-1 encodes a protein containing an ATPase domain and a bromodomain. LEX-1 is similar to the yeast Yta7 protein, which maintains boundaries between silenced and active chromatin. tam-1 has previously been shown to encode a RING finger/B-box protein that modulates gene expression from repetitive DNA. We find that lex-1, like tam-1, acts as a class B synthetic multivulva (synMuv) gene. However, since lex-1 and tam-1 mutants have normal P granule localization, it suggests they act through a mechanism distinct from other class B synMuvs. We observe intragenic (interallelic) complementation with lex-1 and a genetic interaction between lex-1 and tam-1, data consistent with the idea that the gene products function in the same biological process, perhaps as part of a protein complex. We propose that LEX-1 and TAM-1 function together to influence chromatin structure and to promote expression from repetitive sequences.

  12. Characterization of the ternary Usher syndrome SANS/ush2a/whirlin protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorusch, Nasrin; Bauß, Katharina; Plutniok, Janet; Samanta, Ananya; Knapp, Barbara; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2017-03-15

    The Usher syndrome (USH) is the most common form of inherited deaf-blindness, accompanied by vestibular dysfunction. Due to the heterogeneous manifestation of the clinical symptoms, three USH types (USH1-3) and additional atypical forms are distinguished. USH1 and USH2 proteins have been shown to function together in multiprotein networks in photoreceptor cells and hair cells. Mutations in USH proteins are considered to disrupt distinct USH protein networks and finally lead to the development of USH.To get novel insights into the molecular pathomechanisms underlying USH, we further characterize the periciliary USH protein network in photoreceptor cells. We show the direct interaction between the scaffold protein SANS (USH1G) and the transmembrane adhesion protein ush2a and that both assemble into a ternary USH1/USH2 complex together with the PDZ-domain protein whirlin (USH2D) via mutual interactions. Immunohistochemistry and proximity ligation assays demonstrate co-localization of complex partners and complex formation, respectively, in the periciliary region, the inner segment and at the synapses of rodent and human photoreceptor cells. Protein-protein interaction assays and co-expression of complex partners reveal that pathogenic mutations in USH1G severely affect formation of the SANS/ush2a/whirlin complex. Translational read-through drug treatment, targeting the c.728C > A (p.S243X) nonsense mutation, restored SANS scaffold function. We conclude that USH1 and USH2 proteins function together in higher order protein complexes. The maintenance of USH1/USH2 protein complexes depends on multiple USH1/USH2 protein interactions, which are disrupted by pathogenic mutations in USH1G protein SANS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Membrane proteins bind lipids selectively to modulate their structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Reading, Eamonn; Allison, Timothy M; Ulmschneider, Martin B; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Baldwin, Andrew J; Robinson, Carol V

    2014-06-05

    Previous studies have established that the folding, structure and function of membrane proteins are influenced by their lipid environments and that lipids can bind to specific sites, for example, in potassium channels. Fundamental questions remain however regarding the extent of membrane protein selectivity towards lipids. Here we report a mass spectrometry approach designed to determine the selectivity of lipid binding to membrane protein complexes. We investigate the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and aquaporin Z (AqpZ) and the ammonia channel (AmtB) from Escherichia coli, using ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), which reports gas-phase collision cross-sections. We demonstrate that folded conformations of membrane protein complexes can exist in the gas phase. By resolving lipid-bound states, we then rank bound lipids on the basis of their ability to resist gas phase unfolding and thereby stabilize membrane protein structure. Lipids bind non-selectively and with high avidity to MscL, all imparting comparable stability; however, the highest-ranking lipid is phosphatidylinositol phosphate, in line with its proposed functional role in mechanosensation. AqpZ is also stabilized by many lipids, with cardiolipin imparting the most significant resistance to unfolding. Subsequently, through functional assays we show that cardiolipin modulates AqpZ function. Similar experiments identify AmtB as being highly selective for phosphatidylglycerol, prompting us to obtain an X-ray structure in this lipid membrane-like environment. The 2.3 Å resolution structure, when compared with others obtained without lipid bound, reveals distinct conformational changes that re-position AmtB residues to interact with the lipid bilayer. Our results demonstrate that resistance to unfolding correlates with specific lipid-binding events, enabling a distinction to be made between lipids that merely bind from those that modulate membrane

  14. The effect of milk and milk proteins on risk factors of metabolic syndrome in overweight adolecents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnberg, Karina

    This PhD is based on data from an intervention study with milk and milk proteins conducted in Danish adolescents with overweight. There is a high prevalence of overweight in Danish adolescents. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors related to overweight and believed to increase the risk...... of type-2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Overweight children have higher concentrations of the metabolic syndrome risk factors than normal weight children and the pathological condition underlying cardiovascular diseases, called atherosclerosis, seems to start in childhood. A well...... skimmed milk, whey, casein or water for three months. The background for the intervention is that milk is an important source of protein in the Western diet and epidemiological studies in children have shown that children drinking low amounts of milk have higher concentrations of the metabolic risk...

  15. Overproduction, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Cockayne syndrome protein A in complex with DNA damage-binding protein 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M.; Pannu, Navraj S.

    2011-01-01

    Human Cockayne syndrome protein A has been cocrystallized with human DNA damage-binding protein 1 and data have been collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Cockayne syndrome protein A is one of the main components in mammalian transcription coupled repair. Here, the overproduction, purification and crystallization of human Cockayne syndrome protein A in complex with its interacting partner DNA damage binding protein 1 are reported. The complex was coproduced in insect cells, copurified and crystallized using sitting drops with PEG 3350 and sodium citrate as crystallizing agents. The crystals had unit-cell parameters a = b = 142.03, c = 250.19 Å and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution on beamline ID14-1 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

  16. Dietary Nutrients and Bioactive Substances Modulate Heat Shock Protein (HSP) Expression: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Carolina Soares; Lollo, Pablo Christiano Barboza; Morato, Priscila Neder; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime

    2018-05-28

    Interest in the heat shock proteins (HSPs), as a natural physiological toolkit of living organisms, has ranged from their chaperone function in nascent proteins to the remedial role following cell stress. As part of the defence system, HSPs guarantee cell tolerance against a variety of stressors, including exercise, oxidative stress, hyper and hypothermia, hyper and hypoxia and improper diets. For the past couple of decades, research on functional foods has revealed a number of substances likely to trigger cell protection through mechanisms that involve the induction of HSP expression. This review will summarize the occurrence of the most easily inducible HSPs and describe the effects of dietary proteins, peptides, amino acids, probiotics, high-fat diets and other food-derived substances reported to induce HSP response in animals and humans studies. Future research may clarify the mechanisms and explore the usefulness of this natural alternative of defense and the modulating mechanism of each substance.

  17. Neuroplasticity pathways and protein-interaction networks are modulated by vortioxetine in rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waller, Jessica A.; Nygaard, Sara Holm; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    species and sexes, different brain regions, and in response to distinct routes of administration and regimens. Conclusions: A recurring theme, based on the present study as well as previous findings, is that networks related to synaptic plasticity, synaptic transmission, signal transduction...... and rat in response to distinct treatment regimens and in different brain regions. Furthermore, analysis of complexes of physically-interacting proteins reveal that biomarkers involved in transcriptional regulation, neurodevelopment, neuroplasticity, and endocytosis are modulated by vortioxetine....... A subsequent qPCR study examining the expression of targets in the protein-protein interactome space in response to chronic vortioxetine treatment over a range of doses provides further biological validation that vortioxetine engages neuroplasticity networks. Thus, the same biology is regulated in different...

  18. Integrating Protein Engineering and Bioorthogonal Click Conjugation for Extracellular Vesicle Modulation and Intracellular Delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Wang

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small, cell-secreted vesicles that transfer proteins and genetic information between cells. This intercellular transmission regulates many physiological and pathological processes. Therefore, exosomes have emerged as novel biomarkers for disease diagnosis and as nanocarriers for drug delivery. Here, we report an easy-to-adapt and highly versatile methodology to modulate exosome composition and conjugate exosomes for intracellular delivery. Our strategy combines the metabolic labeling of newly synthesized proteins or glycan/glycoproteins of exosome-secreting cells with active azides and bioorthogonal click conjugation to modify and functionalize the exosomes. The azide-integrated can be conjugated to a variety of small molecules and proteins and can efficiently deliver conjugates into cells. The metabolic engineering of exosomes diversifies the chemistry of exosomes and expands the functions that can be introduced into exosomes, providing novel, powerful tools to study the roles of exosomes in biology and expand the biomedical potential of exosomes.

  19. Altered intracellular localization and mobility of SBDS protein upon mutation in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Orelio

    Full Text Available Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome (SDS is a rare inherited disease caused by mutations in the SBDS gene. Hematopoietic defects, exocrine pancreas dysfunction and short stature are the most prominent clinical features. To gain understanding of the molecular properties of the ubiquitously expressed SBDS protein, we examined its intracellular localization and mobility by live cell imaging techniques. We observed that SBDS full-length protein was localized in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, whereas patient-related truncated SBDS protein isoforms localize predominantly to the nucleus. Also the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking of these patient-related SBDS proteins was disturbed. Further studies with a series of SBDS mutant proteins revealed that three distinct motifs determine the intracellular mobility of SBDS protein. A sumoylation motif in the C-terminal domain, that is lacking in patient SBDS proteins, was found to play a pivotal role in intracellular motility. Our structure-function analyses provide new insight into localization and motility of the SBDS protein, and show that patient-related mutant proteins are altered in their molecular properties, which may contribute to the clinical features observed in SDS patients.

  20. Characterization and interactome study of white spot syndrome virus envelope protein VP11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Jing Liu

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV viral particle consists of three structural layers that surround its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. Here we characterize the WSSV structural protein VP11 (WSSV394, GenBank accession number AF440570, and use an interactome approach to analyze the possible associations between this protein and an array of other WSSV and host proteins. Temporal transcription analysis showed that vp11 is an early gene. Western blot hybridization of the intact viral particles and fractionation of the viral components, and immunoelectron microscopy showed that VP11 is an envelope protein. Membrane topology software predicted VP11 to be a type of transmembrane protein with a highly hydrophobic transmembrane domain at its N-terminal. Based on an immunofluorescence assay performed on VP11-transfected Sf9 cells and a trypsin digestion analysis of the virion, we conclude that, contrary to topology software prediction, the C-terminal of this protein is in fact inside the virion. Yeast two-hybrid screening combined with co-immunoprecipitation assays found that VP11 directly interacted with at least 12 other WSSV structural proteins as well as itself. An oligomerization assay further showed that VP11 could form dimers. VP11 is also the first reported WSSV structural protein to interact with the major nucleocapsid protein VP664.

  1. Expression of SET Protein in the Ovaries of Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Xu Boqun; Dai Xiaonan; Cui YuGui; Gao Lingling; Dai Xue; Chao Gao; Diao Feiyang; Liu Jiayin; Li Gao; Mei Li; Yuan Zhang; Xiang Ma

    2013-01-01

    Background. We previously found that expression of SET gene was up-regulated in polycystic ovaries by using microarray. It suggested that SET may be an attractive candidate regulator involved in the pathophysiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In this study, expression and cellular localization of SET protein were investigated in human polycystic and normal ovaries. Method. Ovarian tissues, six normal ovaries and six polycystic ovaries, were collected during transsexual operation and ...

  2. Nitric oxide modulation in protective role of antidepressants against chronic fatigue syndrome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Garg, Ruchika; Gaur, Vaibhav; Kumar, Puneet

    2011-05-01

    The present study was designed to elucidate the possible nitric oxide (NO) mechanism in the protective effect of antidepressants using mice model of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Male albino laca mice were forced to swim for each 6 min session for 7 days and immobility period was measured on every alternate day (1(st), 3(rd), 5(th), 7(th)). After 7 days various behavioral tests (locomotor, mirror chamber, and plus maze tests for anxiety) were performed and biochemical estimations (lipid peroxidation, nitrite levels, GSH (reduced glutathione), and catalase activity) in mice brain were performed. Animals were pretreated with citalopram (5 and 10 mg/kg) and imipramine (10 and 20 mg/kg) daily for 7 days. The present study showed that continued forced swimming for 7 days caused chronic fatigue-induced anxiety-like behavior as assessed in mirror chamber, plus maze tests, and impairment in locomotor activity followed by oxidative damage (as evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation, nitrite levels, depleted reduced glutathione, and catalase activity) in animals. Seven days pretreatment with citalopram (5 and 10 mg/kg) and imipramine (10 and 20 mg/kg) significantly improved behavioral and biochemical alterations. Further, L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME,5 mg/kg) and methylene blue (MB, 10 mg/kg) pretreatment with citalopram (5 mg/kg) or imipramine (10 mg/kg) potentiated their protective effect. However, l-arginine (100 mg/kg) pretreatment with citalopram (5 mg/kg) or imipramine (10 mg/kg) reversed their protective effect as compared with their effect per se (P < 0.05). The present study suggests that protective effect of citalopram and imipramine might be due to its NO modulation against chronic fatigue induced behavioral and biochemical alterations.

  3. Rac1 modulates G-protein-coupled receptor-induced bronchial smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Kai, Yuki; Sato, Ken; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Chiba, Yohihiko

    2018-01-05

    Increasing evidence suggests a functional role of RhoA/Rho-kinase signalling as a mechanism for smooth muscle contraction; however, little is known regarding the roles of Rac1 and other members of the Rho protein family. This study aimed to examine whether Rac1 modulates bronchial smooth muscle contraction. Ring preparations of bronchi isolated from rats were suspended in an organ bath, and isometric contraction of circular smooth muscle was measured. Immunoblotting was used to examine myosin light chain phosphorylation in bronchial smooth muscle. Our results demonstrated that muscle contractions induced by carbachol (CCh) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) were inhibited by EHT1864, a selective Rac1 inhibitor, and NSC23766, a selective inhibitor of Rac1-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors. Similarly, myosin light chain and myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) at Thr853 phosphorylation induced by contractile agonist were inhibited with Rac1 inhibition. However, contractions induced by high K + , calyculin A (a potent protein phosphatase inhibitor) and K + /PDBu were not inhibited by these Rac1 inhibitors. Interestingly, NaF (a G-protein activator)-induced contractions were inhibited by EHT1864 but not by NSC23766. We next examined the effects of a trans-acting activator of transcription protein transduction domain (PTD) fusion protein with Rac1 (PTD-Rac1) on muscle contraction. The constitutively active form of PTD-Rac1 directly induced force development and contractions were abolished by EHT1864. These results suggest that Rac1, activated by G protein-coupled receptor agonists, such as CCh and ET-1, may induce myosin light chain and MYPT phosphorylation and modulate the contraction of bronchial smooth muscle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Ribosomal Protein uL22 Modulates the Shape of the Protein Exit Tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wekselman, Itai; Zimmerman, Ella; Davidovich, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Erythromycin is a clinically useful antibiotic that binds to an rRNA pocket in the ribosomal exit tunnel. Commonly, resistance to erythromycin is acquired by alterations of rRNA nucleotides that interact with the drug. Mutations in the β hairpin of ribosomal protein uL22, which is rather distal...... of the β hairpin of the mutated uL22 toward the interior of the exit tunnel, triggering a cascade of structural alterations of rRNA nucleotides that propagate to the erythromycin binding pocket. Our findings support recent studies showing that the interactions between uL22 and specific sequences within...

  5. Does protein binding modulate the effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Maillard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAngiotensin II AT 1-receptor antagonists are highly bound to plasma proteins (≥ 99%. With some antagonists, such as DuP-532, the protein binding was such that no efficacy of the drug could be demonstrated clinically. Whether protein binding interferes with the efficacy of other antagonists is not known. We have therefore investigated in vitro how plasma proteins may affect the antagonistic effect of different AT1-receptor antagonists.MethodsA radio-receptor binding assay was used to analyse the interaction between proteins and the ability of various angiotensin II (Ang II antagonists to block AT1-receptors. In addition, the Biacore technology, a new technique which enables the real-time monitoring of binding events between two molecules, was used to evaluate the dissociation rate constants of five AT1-receptor antagonists from human serum albumin.ResultsThe in vitro AT 1-antagonistic effects of different Ang II receptor antagonists were differentially affected by the presence of human plasma, with rightward shifts of the IC50 ranging from one to several orders of magnitude. The importance of the shift correlates with the dissociation rate constants of these drugs from albumin. Our experiments also show that the way that AT1-receptor antagonists bind to proteins differs from one compound to another. These results suggest that the interaction with plasma proteins appears to modulate the efficacy of some Ang II antagonists.ConclusionAlthough the high binding level of Ang II receptor antagonist to plasma proteins appears to be a feature common to this class of compounds, the kinetics and characteristics of this binding is of great importance. With some antagonists, protein binding interferes markedly with their efficacy to block AT1-receptors.

  6. Cysteine regulation of protein function--as exemplified by NMDA-receptor modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Stuart A; Choi, Yun-Beom; Takahashi, Hiroto; Zhang, Dongxian; Li, Weizhong; Godzik, Adam; Bankston, Laurie A

    2002-09-01

    Until recently cysteine residues, especially those located extracellularly, were thought to be important for metal coordination, catalysis and protein structure by forming disulfide bonds - but they were not thought to regulate protein function. However, this is not the case. Crucial cysteine residues can be involved in modulation of protein activity and signaling events via other reactions of their thiol (sulfhydryl; -SH) groups. These reactions can take several forms, such as redox events (chemical reduction or oxidation), chelation of transition metals (chiefly Zn(2+), Mn(2+) and Cu(2+)) or S-nitrosylation [the catalyzed transfer of a nitric oxide (NO) group to a thiol group]. In several cases, these disparate reactions can compete with one another for the same thiol group on a single cysteine residue, forming a molecular switch composed of a latticework of possible redox, NO or Zn(2+) modifications to control protein function. Thiol-mediated regulation of protein function can also involve reactions of cysteine residues that affect ligand binding allosterically. This article reviews the basis for these molecular cysteine switches, drawing on the NMDA receptor as an exemplary protein, and proposes a molecular model for the action of S-nitrosylation based on recently derived crystal structures.

  7. A 3D model of the membrane protein complex formed by the white spot syndrome virus structural proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Shiang Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of white spot disease have had a large negative economic impact on cultured shrimp worldwide. However, the pathogenesis of the causative virus, WSSV (whit spot syndrome virus, is not yet well understood. WSSV is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV virion has three structural layers surrounding its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. In this study, we investigated the protein-protein interactions of the major WSSV structural proteins, including several envelope and tegument proteins that are known to be involved in the infection process. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, we used coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid assays to elucidate and/or confirm all the interactions that occur among the WSSV structural (envelope and tegument proteins VP51A, VP19, VP24, VP26 and VP28. We found that VP51A interacted directly not only with VP26 but also with VP19 and VP24. VP51A, VP19 and VP24 were also shown to have an affinity for self-interaction. Chemical cross-linking assays showed that these three self-interacting proteins could occur as dimers. CONCLUSIONS: From our present results in conjunction with other previously established interactions we construct a 3D model in which VP24 acts as a core protein that directly associates with VP26, VP28, VP38A, VP51A and WSV010 to form a membrane-associated protein complex. VP19 and VP37 are attached to this complex via association with VP51A and VP28, respectively. Through the VP26-VP51C interaction this envelope complex is anchored to the nucleocapsid, which is made of layers of rings formed by VP664. A 3D model of the nucleocapsid and the surrounding outer membrane is presented.

  8. Comparison of Colorimetric Assays with Quantitative Amino Acid Analysis for Protein Quantification of Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA)

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Omar; Maggiore, Luana; Necchi, Francesca; Koeberling, Oliver; MacLennan, Calman A.; Saul, Allan; Gerke, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Genetically induced outer membrane particles from Gram-negative bacteria, called Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA), are being investigated as vaccines. Rapid methods are required for estimating the protein content for in-process assays during production. Since GMMA are complex biological structures containing lipid and polysaccharide as well as protein, protein determinations are not necessarily straightforward. We compared protein quantification by Bradford, Lowry, and Non-Int...

  9. Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile II proteins modulate gene expression of monocytic host cells during infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Edward I

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes acute and chronic disease in humans. Bacterial replication occurs within enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles (PV of eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis and maintenance of which is dependent on C. burnetii protein synthesis. These observations suggest that C. burnetii actively subverts host cell processes, however little is known about the cellular biology mechanisms manipulated by the pathogen during infection. Here, we examined host cell gene expression changes specifically induced by C. burnetii proteins during infection. Results We have identified 36 host cell genes that are specifically regulated when de novo C. burnetii protein synthesis occurs during infection using comparative microarray analysis. Two parallel sets of infected and uninfected THP-1 cells were grown for 48 h followed by the addition of chloramphenicol (CAM to 10 μg/ml in one set. Total RNA was harvested at 72 hpi from all conditions, and microarrays performed using Phalanx Human OneArray™ slides. A total of 784 (mock treated and 901 (CAM treated THP-1 genes were up or down regulated ≥2 fold in the C. burnetii infected vs. uninfected cell sets, respectively. Comparisons between the complementary data sets (using >0 fold, eliminated the common gene expression changes. A stringent comparison (≥2 fold between the separate microarrays revealed 36 host cell genes modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Ontological analysis of these genes identified the innate immune response, cell death and proliferation, vesicle trafficking and development, lipid homeostasis, and cytoskeletal organization as predominant cellular functions modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that C. burnetii proteins actively regulate the expression of specific host cell genes and pathways. This is in addition to host cell genes that respond to the presence of the

  10. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, R F; Linke, K; Teichert, H; Ehrmann, M A

    2008-01-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property

  11. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, R F; Linke, K; Teichert, H; Ehrmann, M A [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Technische Mikrobiologie, Weihenstephaner Steig 16, 85350 Freising (Germany)], E-mail: rudi.vogel@wzw.tum.de

    2008-07-15

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  12. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, R. F.; Linke, K.; Teichert, H.; Ehrmann, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  13. Modulating bacterial and gut mucosal interactions with engineered biofilm matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraj-Thatte, Anna M; Praveschotinunt, Pichet; Nash, Trevor R; Ward, Frederick R; Joshi, Neel S

    2018-02-22

    Extracellular appendages play a significant role in mediating communication between bacteria and their host. Curli fibers are a class of bacterial fimbria that is highly amenable to engineering. We demonstrate the use of engineered curli fibers to rationally program interactions between bacteria and components of the mucosal epithelium. Commensal E. coli strains were engineered to produce recombinant curli fibers fused to the trefoil family of human cytokines. Biofilms formed from these strains bound more mucins than those producing wild-type curli fibers, and modulated mucin rheology as well. When treated with bacteria producing the curli-trefoil fusions mammalian cells behaved identically in terms of their migration behavior as when they were treated with the corresponding soluble trefoil factors. Overall, this demonstrates the potential utility of curli fibers as a scaffold for the display of bioactive domains and an untapped approach to rationally modulating host-microbe interactions using bacterial matrix proteins.

  14. Modulation of Wound Healing and Scar Formation by MG53 Protein-mediated Cell Membrane Repair*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M.; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53−/− mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. PMID:26306047

  15. Ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation is controlled by TOR and modulated by PKA in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Tahmeena; Köhler, Julia R

    2015-10-01

    TOR and PKA signaling pathways control eukaryotic cell growth and proliferation. TOR activity in model fungi, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, responds principally to nutrients, e.g., nitrogen and phosphate sources, which are incorporated into the growing cell mass; PKA signaling responds to the availability of the cells' major energy source, glucose. In the fungal commensal and pathogen, Candida albicans, little is known of how these pathways interact. Here, the signal from phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P-S6) was defined as a surrogate marker for TOR-dependent anabolic activity in C. albicans. Nutritional, pharmacologic and genetic modulation of TOR activity elicited corresponding changes in P-S6 levels. The P-S6 signal corresponded to translational activity of a GFP reporter protein. Contributions of four PKA pathway components to anabolic activation were then examined. In high glucose concentrations, only Tpk2 was required to upregulate P-S6 to physiologic levels, whereas all four tested components were required to downregulate P-S6 in low glucose. TOR was epistatic to PKA components with respect to P-S6. In many host niches inhabited by C. albicans, glucose is scarce, with protein being available as a nitrogen source. We speculate that PKA may modulate TOR-dependent cell growth to a rate sustainable by available energy sources, when monomers of anabolic processes, such as amino acids, are abundant. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. High-Frequency Electrical Modulation of the Superior Ovarian Nerve as a Treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikov, Victor; Sridhar, Arun; Lara, Hernan E

    2018-01-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent ovarian pathology in women, with excessive sympathetic activity in the superior ovarian nerve (SON) playing an important role in inducing the PCOS symptoms in the rats and humans. Our previous studies have shown that surgical transection of the SON can reverse the disease progression, prompting us to explore the effect of the kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC) modulation as a method of reversible non-surgical suppression of the nerve activity in the rodent model of PCOS. 56 animals were randomly allocated to three groups: the Control group ( n = 18), the PCOS group ( n = 15), and the PCOS + KHFAC group ( n = 23). The physiological, anatomical, and biochemical parameters of ovarian function were evaluated during the progression of the experimentally-induced PCOS and during long-term KHFAC modulation applied for 2-3 weeks. The KHFAC modulation has been able to reverse the pathological changes in assessed PCOS parameters, namely the irregular or absent estrous cycling, formation of ovarian cysts, reduction in the number of corpora lutea, and ovarian norepinephrine concentration. The fertility capacity was similar in the PCOS and the PCOS + KHFAC groups, indicating the safety of KHFAC modulation approach. In summary, these results suggest that the KHFAC modulation approach of suppressing the SON activity could become a useful treatment modality for PCOS and potentially other pathological ovarian conditions.

  17. High-Frequency Electrical Modulation of the Superior Ovarian Nerve as a Treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Pikov

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most prevalent ovarian pathology in women, with excessive sympathetic activity in the superior ovarian nerve (SON playing an important role in inducing the PCOS symptoms in the rats and humans. Our previous studies have shown that surgical transection of the SON can reverse the disease progression, prompting us to explore the effect of the kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC modulation as a method of reversible non-surgical suppression of the nerve activity in the rodent model of PCOS. 56 animals were randomly allocated to three groups: the Control group (n = 18, the PCOS group (n = 15, and the PCOS + KHFAC group (n = 23. The physiological, anatomical, and biochemical parameters of ovarian function were evaluated during the progression of the experimentally-induced PCOS and during long-term KHFAC modulation applied for 2–3 weeks. The KHFAC modulation has been able to reverse the pathological changes in assessed PCOS parameters, namely the irregular or absent estrous cycling, formation of ovarian cysts, reduction in the number of corpora lutea, and ovarian norepinephrine concentration. The fertility capacity was similar in the PCOS and the PCOS + KHFAC groups, indicating the safety of KHFAC modulation approach. In summary, these results suggest that the KHFAC modulation approach of suppressing the SON activity could become a useful treatment modality for PCOS and potentially other pathological ovarian conditions.

  18. Effects of inspiratory muscle exercise in the pulmonary function, autonomic modulation, and hemodynamic variables in older women with metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Coelho, Hélio José; Scapini, Kátia Bilhar; de Moraes, Oscar Albuquerque; Mostarda, Cristiano; Ruberti, Olivia Moraes; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Caperuto, Érico Chagas; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of inspiratory muscle exercise (IME) on metabolic and hemodynamic parameters, cardiac autonomic modulation and respiratory function of older women with metabolic syndrome (MS). For this, sixteen older women with MS and 12 aged-matched controls participated of the present study. Two days before and 2 days after the main experiment, fasting blood samples (i.e., total cholesterol, triglycerides and blood glucose), cardiac autonomic modulation (i.e., heart rate variability), and respiratory muscle function were obtained and evaluated. The sessions of physical exercise was based on a IME, which was performed during 7 days. Each session of IME was performed during 20 min, at 30% of maximal static inspiratory pressure. In the results, MS group presented higher levels of triglycerides, blood glucose, and systolic blood pressure when compared to control group. IME was not able to change these variables. However, although MS group showed impaired respiratory muscle strength and function, as well as cardiac autonomic modulation, IME was able to improve these parameters. Thus, the data showed that seven days of IME are capable to improve respiratory function and cardiac autonomic modulation of older women with MS. These results indicate that IME can be a profitable therapy to counteracting the clinical markers of MS, once repeated sessions of acute IME can cause chronical alterations on respiratory function and cardiac autonomic modulation. PMID:28503537

  19. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, ... A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  20. SH2 Domains Serve as Lipid-Binding Modules for pTyr-Signaling Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Jeong; Sheng, Ren; Silkov, Antonina; Jung, Da-Jung; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Xin, Yao; Kim, Hyunjin; Thiagarajan-Rosenkranz, Pallavi; Song, Seohyeon; Yoon, Youngdae; Nam, Wonhee; Kim, Ilshin; Kim, Eui; Lee, Dong-Gyu; Chen, Yong; Singaram, Indira; Wang, Li; Jang, Myoung Ho; Hwang, Cheol-Sang; Honig, Barry; Ryu, Sungho; Lorieau, Justin; Kim, You-Me; Cho, Wonhwa

    2016-04-07

    The Src-homology 2 (SH2) domain is a protein interaction domain that directs myriad phosphotyrosine (pY)-signaling pathways. Genome-wide screening of human SH2 domains reveals that ∼90% of SH2 domains bind plasma membrane lipids and many have high phosphoinositide specificity. They bind lipids using surface cationic patches separate from pY-binding pockets, thus binding lipids and the pY motif independently. The patches form grooves for specific lipid headgroup recognition or flat surfaces for non-specific membrane binding and both types of interaction are important for cellular function and regulation of SH2 domain-containing proteins. Cellular studies with ZAP70 showed that multiple lipids bind its C-terminal SH2 domain in a spatiotemporally specific manner and thereby exert exquisite spatiotemporal control over its protein binding and signaling activities in T cells. Collectively, this study reveals how lipids control SH2 domain-mediated cellular protein-protein interaction networks and suggest a new strategy for therapeutic modulation of pY-signaling pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The CRM domain: an RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1-YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved "GxxG" loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria, that this function has been maintained in extant prokaryotes, and that the domain was recruited to serve as an RNA binding module during the evolution of plant genomes.

  2. Differential Modulation of Transcription Factors and Cytoskeletal Proteins in Prostate Carcinoma Cells by a Bacterial Lactone

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    Senthil R. Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study tested the effect of a bacterial lactone N-(3-oxododecanoyl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL on the cytoskeletal and transcriptional genes and proteins in prostate adenocarcinoma (PA cells (DU145 and LNCaP and prostate small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SCNC PC3 cells including their cellular viability and apoptosis. Our data indicate that cell migration and colony formation were affected in the presence of C12-HSL. C12-HSL induced apoptosis and altered viability of both PA and SCNC cells in a concentration dependent manner as measured by fluorescence and chemiluminescence assays. Compared to PCa cells, noncancerous prostate epithelial cells (RWPE1 were resistant to modification by C12-HSL. Further, the viability of PC3 cells in 3D matrix was suppressed by C12-HSL treatment as detected using calcein AM fluorescence in situ. C12-HSL treatment induced cytoskeletal associated protein expression of vinculin and RhoC, which may have implications in cancer cell motility, adhesion, and metastasis. IQGAP protein expression was reduced in DU145 and RWPE1 cells in the presence of C12-HSL. C12-HSL decreased STAT3 phosphorylation in DU145 cells but increased STAT1 protein phosphorylation in PC3 and LNCaP cells. Overall, these studies indicate that C12-HSL can trigger changes in transcription factors and cytoskeletal proteins and thereby modulate growth and migration properties of PCa cells.

  3. Expression of measles virus nucleoprotein induces apoptosis and modulates diverse functional proteins in cultured mammalian cells.

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    Ashima Bhaskar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Measles virus nucleoprotein (N encapsidates the viral RNA, protects it from endonucleases and forms a virus specific template for transcription and replication. It is the most abundant protein during viral infection. Its C-terminal domain is intrinsically disordered imparting it the flexibility to interact with several cellular and viral partners. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we demonstrate that expression of N within mammalian cells resulted in morphological transitions, nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation and activation of Caspase 3 eventuating into apoptosis. The rapid generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS was involved in the mechanism of cell death. Addition of ascorbic acid (AA or inhibitor of caspase-3 in the extracellular medium partially reversed N induced apoptosis. We also studied the protein profile of cells expressing N protein. MS analysis revealed the differential expression of 25 proteins out of which 11 proteins were up regulated while 14 show signs of down regulation upon N expression. 2DE results were validated by real time and semi quantitative RT-PCR analysis. CONCLUSION: These results show the pro-apoptotic effects of N indicating its possible development as an apoptogenic tool. Our 2DE results present prima facie evidence that the MV nucleoprotein interacts with or causes differential expression of a wide range of cellular factors. At this stage it is not clear as to what the adaptive response of the host cell is and what reflects a strategic modulation exerted by the virus.

  4. Clofazimine modulates the expression of lipid metabolism proteins in Mycobacterium leprae-infected macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degang, Yang; Akama, Takeshi; Hara, Takeshi; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Ishido, Yuko; Gidoh, Masaichi; Makino, Masahiko; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) lives and replicates within macrophages in a foamy, lipid-laden phagosome. The lipids provide essential nutrition for the mycobacteria, and M. leprae infection modulates expression of important host proteins related to lipid metabolism. Thus, M. leprae infection increases the expression of adipophilin/adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) and decreases hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), facilitating the accumulation and maintenance of lipid-rich environments suitable for the intracellular survival of M. leprae. HSL levels are not detectable in skin smear specimens taken from leprosy patients, but re-appear shortly after multidrug therapy (MDT). This study examined the effect of MDT components on host lipid metabolism in vitro, and the outcome of rifampicin, dapsone and clofazimine treatment on ADRP and HSL expression in THP-1 cells. Clofazimine attenuated the mRNA and protein levels of ADRP in M. leprae-infected cells, while those of HSL were increased. Rifampicin and dapsone did not show any significant effects on ADRP and HSL expression levels. A transient increase of interferon (IFN)-β and IFN-γ mRNA was also observed in cells infected with M. leprae and treated with clofazimine. Lipid droplets accumulated by M. leprae-infection were significantly decreased 48 h after clofazimine treatment. Such effects were not evident in cells without M. leprae infection. In clinical samples, ADRP expression was decreased and HSL expression was increased after treatment. These results suggest that clofazimine modulates lipid metabolism in M. leprae-infected macrophages by modulating the expression of ADRP and HSL. It also induces IFN production in M. leprae-infected cells. The resultant decrease in lipid accumulation, increase in lipolysis, and activation of innate immunity may be some of the key actions of clofazimine.

  5. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase modulates the activated phenotype of hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiuri, Alessandra; Bertolani, Cristiana; Guerra, Cristina Tosti; Aleffi, Sara; Galastri, Sara; Trappoliere, Marco; Vizzutti, Francesco; Gelmini, Stefania; Laffi, Giacomo; Pinzani, Massimo; Marra, Fabio

    2008-02-01

    Adiponectin limits the development of liver fibrosis and activates adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is a sensor of the cellular energy status, but its possible modulation of the fibrogenic properties of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) has not been established. In this study, we investigated the role of AMPK activation in the biology of activated human HSCs. A time-dependent activation of AMPK was observed in response to a number of stimuli, including globular adiponectin, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR), or metformin. All these compounds significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated proliferation and migration of human HSCs and reduced the secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. In addition, AICAR limited the secretion of type I procollagen. Knockdown of AMPK by gene silencing increased the mitogenic effects of PDGF, confirming the negative modulation exerted by this pathway on HSCs. AMPK activation did not reduce PDGF-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) or Akt at early time points, whereas a marked inhibition was observed 24 hours after addition of PDGF, reflecting a block in cell cycle progression. In contrast, AICAR blocked short-term phosphorylation of ribosomal S6 kinase (p70(S6K)) and 4E binding protein-1 (4EBP1), 2 downstream effectors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, by PDGF. The ability of interleukin-a (IL-1) to activate nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) was also reduced by AICAR. Activation of AMPK negatively modulates the activated phenotype of HSCs.

  6. Envelope Proteins of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV Interact with Litopenaeus vannamei Peritrophin-Like Protein (LvPT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijun Xie

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV is a major pathogen in shrimp cultures. The interactions between viral proteins and their receptors on the surface of cells in a frontier target tissue are crucial for triggering an infection. In this study, a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H library was constructed using cDNA obtained from the stomach and gut of Litopenaeus vannamei, to ascertain the role of envelope proteins in WSSV infection. For this purpose, VP37 was used as the bait in the Y2H library screening. Forty positive clones were detected after screening. The positive clones were analyzed and discriminated, and two clones belonging to the peritrophin family were subsequently confirmed as genuine positive clones. Sequence analysis revealed that both clones could be considered as the same gene, LV-peritrophin (LvPT. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between LvPT and VP37. Further studies in the Y2H system revealed that LvPT could also interact with other WSSV envelope proteins such as VP32, VP38A, VP39B, and VP41A. The distribution of LvPT in tissues revealed that LvPT was mainly expressed in the stomach than in other tissues. In addition, LvPT was found to be a secretory protein, and its chitin-binding ability was also confirmed.

  7. Cholesteryl ester transfer-protein modulator and inhibitors and their potential for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkai H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hisashi ShinkaiCentral Pharmaceutical Research Institute, JT Inc, Osaka, JapanAbstract: Elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol and lowered high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, raising HDL cholesterol induced by cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP inhibition is an attractive approach for reducing the residual risk of cardiovascular events that persist in many patients receiving low-density LDL cholesterol-lowering therapy with statins. The development of torcetrapib, a CETP inhibitor, was terminated due to its adverse cardiovascular effects. These adverse effects did not influence the mechanism of CETP inhibition, but affected the molecule itself. Therefore a CETP modulator, dalcetrapib, and a CETP inhibitor, anacetrapib, are in Phase III of clinical trials to evaluate their effects on cardiovascular outcomes. In the dal-VESSEL (dalcetrapib Phase IIb endothelial function study and the dal-PLAQUE (safety and efficacy of dalcetrapib on atherosclerotic disease using novel non-invasive multimodality imaging clinical studies, dalcetrapib reduced CETP activity by 50% and increased HDL cholesterol levels by 31% without changing LDL cholesterol levels. Moreover, dalcetrapib was associated with a reduction in carotid vessel-wall inflammation at 6 months, as well as a reduced vessel-wall area at 24 months compared with the placebo. In the DEFINE (determining the efficacy and tolerability of CETP inhibition with anacetrapib clinical study, anacetrapib increased HDL cholesterol levels by 138% and decreased LDL cholesterol levels by 36%. In contrast with torcetrapib, anacetrapib had no adverse cardiovascular effects. The potential of dalcetrapib and anacetrapib in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases will be revealed by two large-scale clinical trials, the dal-OUTCOMES (efficacy and safety of dalcetrapib in patients with recent acute coronary syndrome study and the

  8. Modulation of protein C activation by histones, platelet factor 4, and heparinoids: new insights into activated protein C formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, M Anna; Zhao, Guohua; Zhai, Li; David, George; Marcus, Stephen; Krishnaswamy, Sriram; Poncz, Mortimer

    2014-01-01

    Histones are detrimental in late sepsis. Both activated protein C (aPC) and heparin can reverse their effect. Here, we investigated whether histones can modulate aPC generation in a manner similar to another positively charged molecule, platelet factor 4, and how heparinoids (unfractionated heparin or oxygen-desulfated unfractionated heparin with marked decrease anticoagulant activity) may modulate this effect. We measured in vitro and in vivo effects of histones, platelet factor 4, and heparinoids on aPC formation, activated partial thromboplastin time, and murine survival. In vitro, histones and platelet factor 4 both affect thrombin/thrombomodulin aPC generation following a bell-shaped curve, with a peak of >5-fold enhancement. Heparinoids shift these curves rightward. Murine aPC generation studies after infusions of histones, platelet factor 4, and heparinoids supported the in vitro data. Importantly, although unfractionated heparin and 2-O, 3-O desulfated heparin both reversed the lethality of high-dose histone infusions, only mice treated with 2-O, 3-O desulfated heparin demonstrated corrected activated partial thromboplastin times and had significant levels of aPC. Our data provide a new contextual model of how histones affect aPC generation, and how heparinoid therapy may be beneficial in sepsis. These studies provide new insights into the complex interactions controlling aPC formation and suggest a novel therapeutic interventional strategy.

  9. Interaction between protein kinase C and protein kinase A can modulate transmitter release at the rat neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santafé, M M; Garcia, N; Lanuza, M A; Tomàs, M; Tomàs, J

    2009-02-15

    We used intracellular recording to investigate the functional interaction between protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction cascades in the control of transmitter release in the neuromuscular synapses from adult rats. Our results indicate that: 1) PKA and PKC are independently involved in asynchronous release. 2) Evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release is enhanced with the PKA agonist Sp-8-BrcAMP and the PKC agonist phorbol ester (PMA). 3) PKA has a constitutive role in promoting a component of normal evoked transmitter release because, when the kinase is inhibited with H-89, the release diminishes. However, the PKC inhibitor calphostin C (CaC) does not affect ACh release. 4) PKA regulates neurotransmission without PKC involvement because, after PMA or CaC modulation of the PKC activity, coupling to the ACh release of PKA can normally be stimulated with Sp-8-BrcAMP or inhibited with H-89. 5) After PKA inhibition with H-89, PKC stimulation with PMA (or inhibition with CaC) does not lead to any change in evoked ACh release. However, in PKA-stimulated preparations with Sp-8-BrcAMP, PKC becomes tonically active, thus potentiating a component of release that can now be blocked with CaC. In normal conditions, therefore, PKA was able to modulate ACh release independently of PKC activity, whereas PKA stimulation caused the PKC coupling to evoked release. In contrast, PKA inhibition prevent PKC stimulation (with the phorbol ester) and coupling to ACh output. There was therefore some dependence of PKC on PKA activity in the fine control of the neuromuscular synaptic functionalism and ACh release.

  10. Alanine and proline content modulate global sensitivity to discrete perturbations in disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Romel B; Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew; Whitten, Steven T

    2014-12-01

    Molecular transduction of biological signals is understood primarily in terms of the cooperative structural transitions of protein macromolecules, providing a mechanism through which discrete local structure perturbations affect global macromolecular properties. The recognition that proteins lacking tertiary stability, commonly referred to as intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), mediate key signaling pathways suggests that protein structures without cooperative intramolecular interactions may also have the ability to couple local and global structure changes. Presented here are results from experiments that measured and tested the ability of disordered proteins to couple local changes in structure to global changes in structure. Using the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein as an experimental model, a set of proline (PRO) and alanine (ALA) to glycine (GLY) substitution variants were designed to modulate backbone conformational propensities without introducing non-native intramolecular interactions. The hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) was used to monitor changes in global structure. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the GLY substitutions decreased polyproline II (PP(II)) propensities relative to the wild type, as expected, and fluorescence methods indicated that substitution-induced changes in R(h) were not associated with folding. The experiments showed that changes in local PP(II) structure cause changes in R(h) that are variable and that depend on the intrinsic chain propensities of PRO and ALA residues, demonstrating a mechanism for coupling local and global structure changes. Molecular simulations that model our results were used to extend the analysis to other proteins and illustrate the generality of the observed PRO and alanine effects on the structures of IDPs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Automating tasks in protein structure determination with the clipper python module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicholas, Stuart; Croll, Tristan; Burnley, Tom; Palmer, Colin M; Hoh, Soon Wen; Jenkins, Huw T; Dodson, Eleanor; Cowtan, Kevin; Agirre, Jon

    2018-01-01

    Scripting programming languages provide the fastest means of prototyping complex functionality. Those with a syntax and grammar resembling human language also greatly enhance the maintainability of the produced source code. Furthermore, the combination of a powerful, machine-independent scripting language with binary libraries tailored for each computer architecture allows programs to break free from the tight boundaries of efficiency traditionally associated with scripts. In the present work, we describe how an efficient C++ crystallographic library such as Clipper can be wrapped, adapted and generalized for use in both crystallographic and electron cryo-microscopy applications, scripted with the Python language. We shall also place an emphasis on best practices in automation, illustrating how this can be achieved with this new Python module. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  12. Modulation of Caenorhabditis elegans transcription factor activity by HIM-8 and the related Zinc-Finger ZIM proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongliu; Nelms, Brian L; Sleiman, Sama F; Chamberlin, Helen M; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2007-10-01

    The previously reported negative regulatory activity of HIM-8 on the Sox protein EGL-13 is shared by the HIM-8-related ZIM proteins. Furthermore, mutation of HIM-8 can modulate the effects of substitution mutations in the DNA-binding domains of at least four other transcription factors, suggesting broad regulatory activity by HIM-8.

  13. The heterotrimeric G protein Gβ1 interacts with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 and modulates G protein-coupled receptor signaling in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Subhashree; Khatlani, Tanvir; Nairn, Angus C; Vijayan, K Vinod

    2017-08-11

    Thrombosis is caused by the activation of platelets at the site of ruptured atherosclerotic plaques. This activation involves engagement of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) on platelets that promote their aggregation. Although it is known that protein kinases and phosphatases modulate GPCR signaling, how serine/threonine phosphatases integrate with G protein signaling pathways is less understood. Because the subcellular localization and substrate specificity of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c) is dictated by PP1c-interacting proteins, here we sought to identify new PP1c interactors. GPCRs signal via the canonical heterotrimeric Gα and Gβγ subunits. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we discovered an interaction between PP1cα and the heterotrimeric G protein Gβ 1 subunit. Co-immunoprecipitation studies with epitope-tagged PP1c and Gβ 1 revealed that Gβ 1 interacts with the PP1c α, β, and γ1 isoforms. Purified PP1c bound to recombinant Gβ 1 -GST protein, and PP1c co-immunoprecipitated with Gβ 1 in unstimulated platelets. Thrombin stimulation of platelets induced the dissociation of the PP1c-Gβ 1 complex, which correlated with an association of PP1c with phospholipase C β3 (PLCβ3), along with a concomitant dephosphorylation of the inhibitory Ser 1105 residue in PLCβ3. siRNA-mediated depletion of GNB1 (encoding Gβ 1 ) in murine megakaryocytes reduced protease-activated receptor 4, activating peptide-induced soluble fibrinogen binding. Thrombin-induced aggregation was decreased in PP1cα -/- murine platelets and in human platelets treated with a small-molecule inhibitor of Gβγ. Finally, disruption of PP1c-Gβ 1 complexes with myristoylated Gβ 1 peptides containing the PP1c binding site moderately decreased thrombin-induced human platelet aggregation. These findings suggest that Gβ 1 protein enlists PP1c to modulate GPCR signaling in platelets.

  14. Low Proportion of Dietary Plant Protein among Athletes with Premenstrual Syndrome-Related Performance Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Keiko; Takeda, Takashi

    2018-02-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is psychosomatic disorder that are limited to the late luteal phase in the menstrual cycle. PMS could impair athletic performance. To investigate associations between proportions of dietary plant and animal protein and PMS-related impairment of athletic performance, we surveyed 135 female athletes aged 18-23 years attending Kindai University. Participants belonged to authorized university clubs, all of which have high rankings in Japanese university sports. Participants completed self-administered questionnaires on diet history, demographics, and PMS-related impairment of athletic performance. Total protein, animal protein, and plant protein intake were examined, and the proportion of dietary plant protein was calculated for each participant. We divided athletes into two groups: those without PMS-related impairment of athletic performance (n = 117) and those with PMS-related performance impairment (n = 18). A t-test was used to compare mean values and multivariable adjusted mean values between groups; adjustment variables were energy intake, body mass index, and daily training duration. Total protein intake was not significantly different between the groups. However, athletes whose performance was affected by PMS reported higher intake of animal protein (mean 50.6 g) than athletes whose performance was unaffected by PMS (mean 34.9 g). Plant protein intake was lower among athletes with PMS-related impairment (mean 25.4 g) than among athletes without impairment (mean 26.9 g). The proportion of dietary plant protein was lower among athletes with PMS-related impairment (39.3%) than those without impairment (45.9%). A low proportion of dietary plant protein may cause PMS-related athletic impairment among athletes.

  15. FGF/FGFR Signaling Coordinates Skull Development by Modulating Magnitude of Morphological Integration: Evidence from Apert Syndrome Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Heuzé, Yann; Wang, Yingli; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Aldridge, Kristina; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2011-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor and receptor system (FGF/FGFR) mediates cell communication and pattern formation in many tissue types (e.g., osseous, nervous, vascular). In those craniosynostosis syndromes caused by FGFR1-3 mutations, alteration of signaling in the FGF/FGFR system leads to dysmorphology of the skull, brain and limbs, among other organs. Since this molecular pathway is widely expressed throughout head development, we explore whether and how two specific mutations on Fgfr2 causing Apert syndrome in humans affect the pattern and level of integration between the facial skeleton and the neurocranium using inbred Apert syndrome mouse models Fgfr2+/S252W and Fgfr2+/P253R and their non-mutant littermates at P0. Skull morphological integration (MI), which can reflect developmental interactions among traits by measuring the intensity of statistical associations among them, was assessed using data from microCT images of the skull of Apert syndrome mouse models and 3D geometric morphometric methods. Our results show that mutant Apert syndrome mice share the general pattern of MI with their non-mutant littermates, but the magnitude of integration between and within the facial skeleton and the neurocranium is increased, especially in Fgfr2+/S252W mice. This indicates that although Fgfr2 mutations do not disrupt skull MI, FGF/FGFR signaling is a covariance-generating process in skull development that acts as a global factor modulating the intensity of MI. As this pathway evolved early in vertebrate evolution, it may have played a significant role in establishing the patterns of skull MI and coordinating proper skull development. PMID:22053191

  16. FGF/FGFR signaling coordinates skull development by modulating magnitude of morphological integration: evidence from Apert syndrome mouse models.

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    Neus Martínez-Abadías

    Full Text Available The fibroblast growth factor and receptor system (FGF/FGFR mediates cell communication and pattern formation in many tissue types (e.g., osseous, nervous, vascular. In those craniosynostosis syndromes caused by FGFR1-3 mutations, alteration of signaling in the FGF/FGFR system leads to dysmorphology of the skull, brain and limbs, among other organs. Since this molecular pathway is widely expressed throughout head development, we explore whether and how two specific mutations on Fgfr2 causing Apert syndrome in humans affect the pattern and level of integration between the facial skeleton and the neurocranium using inbred Apert syndrome mouse models Fgfr2(+/S252W and Fgfr2(+/P253R and their non-mutant littermates at P0. Skull morphological integration (MI, which can reflect developmental interactions among traits by measuring the intensity of statistical associations among them, was assessed using data from microCT images of the skull of Apert syndrome mouse models and 3D geometric morphometric methods. Our results show that mutant Apert syndrome mice share the general pattern of MI with their non-mutant littermates, but the magnitude of integration between and within the facial skeleton and the neurocranium is increased, especially in Fgfr2(+/S252W mice. This indicates that although Fgfr2 mutations do not disrupt skull MI, FGF/FGFR signaling is a covariance-generating process in skull development that acts as a global factor modulating the intensity of MI. As this pathway evolved early in vertebrate evolution, it may have played a significant role in establishing the patterns of skull MI and coordinating proper skull development.

  17. Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome Protein SBDS Maintains Human Telomeres by Regulating Telomerase Recruitment

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    Yi Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS is a rare pediatric disease characterized by various systemic disorders, including hematopoietic dysfunction. The mutation of Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS gene has been proposed to be a major causative reason for SDS. Although SBDS patients were reported to have shorter telomere length in granulocytes, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Here we provide data to elucidate the role of SBDS in telomere protection. We demonstrate that SBDS deficiency leads to telomere shortening. We found that overexpression of disease-associated SBDS mutants or knockdown of SBDS hampered the recruitment of telomerase onto telomeres, while the overall reverse transcriptase activity of telomerase remained unaffected. Moreover, we show that SBDS could specifically bind to TPP1 during the S phase of cell cycle, likely functioning as a stabilizer for TPP1-telomerase interaction. Our findings suggest that SBDS is a telomere-protecting protein that participates in regulating telomerase recruitment.

  18. Trace levels of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs) synergize to break tolerance to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verthelyi, Daniela; Wang, Vivian

    2010-12-22

    Therapeutic proteins such as monoclonal antibodies, replacement enzymes and toxins have significantly improved the therapeutic options for multiple diseases, including cancer and inflammatory diseases as well as enzyme deficiencies and inborn errors of metabolism. However, immune responses to these products are frequent and can seriously impact their safety and efficacy. Of the many factors that can impact protein immunogenicity, this study focuses on the role of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs) that could be present despite product purification and whether these impurities can synergize to facilitate an immunogenic response to therapeutic proteins. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and CpG ODN as IIRMIs we showed that trace levels of these impurities synergized to induce IgM, IFNγ, TNFα and IL-6 expression. In vivo, trace levels of these impurities synergized to increase antigen-specific IgG antibodies to ovalbumin. Further, whereas mice treated with human erythropoietin showed a transient increase in hematocrit, those that received human erythropoietin containing low levels of IIRMIs had reduced response to erythropoietin after the 1(st) dose and developed long-lasting anemia following subsequent doses. This suggests that the presence of IIRMIs facilitated a breach in tolerance to the endogenous mouse erythropoietin. Overall, these studies indicate that the risk of enhancing immunogenicity should be considered when establishing acceptance limits of IIRMIs for therapeutic proteins.

  19. Trace levels of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs synergize to break tolerance to therapeutic proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Verthelyi

    Full Text Available Therapeutic proteins such as monoclonal antibodies, replacement enzymes and toxins have significantly improved the therapeutic options for multiple diseases, including cancer and inflammatory diseases as well as enzyme deficiencies and inborn errors of metabolism. However, immune responses to these products are frequent and can seriously impact their safety and efficacy. Of the many factors that can impact protein immunogenicity, this study focuses on the role of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs that could be present despite product purification and whether these impurities can synergize to facilitate an immunogenic response to therapeutic proteins. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS and CpG ODN as IIRMIs we showed that trace levels of these impurities synergized to induce IgM, IFNγ, TNFα and IL-6 expression. In vivo, trace levels of these impurities synergized to increase antigen-specific IgG antibodies to ovalbumin. Further, whereas mice treated with human erythropoietin showed a transient increase in hematocrit, those that received human erythropoietin containing low levels of IIRMIs had reduced response to erythropoietin after the 1(st dose and developed long-lasting anemia following subsequent doses. This suggests that the presence of IIRMIs facilitated a breach in tolerance to the endogenous mouse erythropoietin. Overall, these studies indicate that the risk of enhancing immunogenicity should be considered when establishing acceptance limits of IIRMIs for therapeutic proteins.

  20. Alteration of cardiac glycoside positive inotropic action by modulators of protein synthesis and degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosek, T.M.; Adams, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Numerous membrane bound and cytoplasmic proteins participate in the cardiac expression of the positive inotropic action (PIA) of digitalis glycosides including the Na,K-ATPase (NKA). Exposure of the myocardium to an inhibitor of protein synthesis (cycloheximide, CYC) or of protein degradation (leupeptin, LEU) alters the PIA of ouabain in isolated, paced guinea pig papillary muscles (PM) in opposite ways. In vivo exposure to CYC for 3 hr resulted in a 30% depression of the in vitro PIA of ouabain at 1.7μM compared to control. In vivo exposure to LEU for 1 hr resulted in a 47% enhancement of the in vitro PIA of 1.7μM ouabain. Neither drug had an apparent effect on the ouabain PIA ED50. Neither CYC nor LEU exposure to PM in vitro affect resting or developed tension or the response of skinned PM to calcium. The mechanisms of the PIA alterations by CYC or LEU do not involve a direct effect on the digitalis receptor. Exposure of isolated cardiac sarcolemma enriched in NKA to 10-100μM CYC or LEU did not affect NKA activity or 3 H-ouabain binding. Although direct physicochemical effects of CYC or LEU may be involved in the alterations of the ouabain PIA, it is possible that modulation of the cellular levels or turnover rate of short-lived proteins may affect cardiac regulation of the digitalis PIA

  1. Insulin Stimulates S100B Secretion and These Proteins Antagonistically Modulate Brain Glucose Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; de Souza, Daniela F; Biasibetti, Regina; Bobermin, Larissa D; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Brain metabolism is highly dependent on glucose, which is derived from the blood circulation and metabolized by the astrocytes and other neural cells via several pathways. Glucose uptake in the brain does not involve insulin-dependent glucose transporters; however, this hormone affects the glucose influx to the brain. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of S100B (an astrocyte-derived protein) have been associated with alterations in glucose metabolism; however, there is no evidence whether insulin modulates glucose metabolism and S100B secretion. Herein, we investigated the effect of S100B on glucose metabolism, measuring D-(3)H-glucose incorporation in two preparations, C6 glioma cells and acute hippocampal slices, and we also investigated the effect of insulin on S100B secretion. Our results showed that: (a) S100B at physiological levels decreases glucose uptake, through the multiligand receptor RAGE and mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK signaling, and (b) insulin stimulated S100B secretion via PI3K signaling. Our findings indicate the existence of insulin-S100B modulation of glucose utilization in the brain tissue, and may improve our understanding of glucose metabolism in several conditions such as ketosis, streptozotocin-induced dementia and pharmacological exposure to antipsychotics, situations that lead to changes in insulin signaling and extracellular levels of S100B.

  2. Fringe proteins modulate Notch-ligand cis and trans interactions to specify signaling states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBon, Lauren; Lee, Tom V; Sprinzak, David; Jafar-Nejad, Hamed; Elowitz, Michael B

    2014-09-25

    The Notch signaling pathway consists of multiple types of receptors and ligands, whose interactions can be tuned by Fringe glycosyltransferases. A major challenge is to determine how these components control the specificity and directionality of Notch signaling in developmental contexts. Here, we analyzed same-cell (cis) Notch-ligand interactions for Notch1, Dll1, and Jag1, and their dependence on Fringe protein expression in mammalian cells. We found that Dll1 and Jag1 can cis-inhibit Notch1, and Fringe proteins modulate these interactions in a way that parallels their effects on trans interactions. Fringe similarly modulated Notch-ligand cis interactions during Drosophila development. Based on these and previously identified interactions, we show how the design of the Notch signaling pathway leads to a restricted repertoire of signaling states that promote heterotypic signaling between distinct cell types, providing insight into the design principles of the Notch signaling system, and the specific developmental process of Drosophila dorsal-ventral boundary formation.

  3. Intracellular calcium levels determine differential modulation of allosteric interactions within G protein-coupled receptor heteromers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Aguinaga, David; Moreno, Estefania; Hradsky, Johannes; Reddy, Pasham P; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Mikhaylova, Marina; Kreutz, Michael R; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I; McCormick, Peter J; Ferré, Sergi

    2014-11-20

    The pharmacological significance of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromer is well established and it is being considered as an important target for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and other neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the physiological factors that control its distinctive biochemical properties are still unknown. We demonstrate that different intracellular Ca2+ levels exert a differential modulation of A2AR-D2R heteromer-mediated adenylyl-cyclase and MAPK signaling in striatal cells. This depends on the ability of low and high Ca2+ levels to promote a selective interaction of the heteromer with the neuronal Ca2+-binding proteins NCS-1 and calneuron-1, respectively. These Ca2+-binding proteins differentially modulate allosteric interactions within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, which constitutes a unique cellular device that integrates extracellular (adenosine and dopamine) and intracellular (Ca+2) signals to produce a specific functional response.

  4. The novel protein kinase C epsilon isoform modulates acetylcholine release in the rat neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obis, Teresa; Hurtado, Erica; Nadal, Laura; Tomàs, Marta; Priego, Mercedes; Simon, Anna; Garcia, Neus; Santafe, Manel M; Lanuza, Maria A; Tomàs, Josep

    2015-12-01

    Various protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms contribute to the phosphorylating activity that modulates neurotransmitter release. In previous studies we showed that nPKCε is confined in the presynaptic site of the neuromuscular junction and its presynaptic function is activity-dependent. Furthermore, nPKCε regulates phorbol ester-induced acetylcholine release potentiation, which further indicates that nPKCε is involved in neurotransmission. The present study is designed to examine the nPKCε involvement in transmitter release at the neuromuscular junction. We use the specific nPKCε translocation inhibitor peptide εV1-2 and electrophysiological experiments to investigate the involvement of this isoform in acetylcholine release. We observed that nPKCε membrane translocation is key to the synaptic potentiation of NMJ, being involved in several conditions that upregulate PKC isoforms coupling to acetylcholine (ACh) release (incubation with high Ca(2+), stimulation with phorbol esters and protein kinase A, stimulation with adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, 8-Bromo-, Rp-isomer, sodium salt -Sp-8-BrcAMP-). In all these conditions, preincubation with the nPKCε translocation inhibitor peptide (εV1-2) impairs PKC coupling to acetylcholine release potentiation. In addition, the inhibition of nPKCε translocation and therefore its activity impedes that presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptors and adenosine autoreceptors modulate transmitter secretion. Together, these results point to the importance of nPKCε isoform in the control of acetylcholine release in the neuromuscular junction.

  5. Modulation of SOCS protein expression influences the interferon responsiveness of human melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesinski, Gregory B; Zimmerer, Jason M; Kreiner, Melanie; Trefry, John; Bill, Matthew A; Young, Gregory S; Becknell, Brian; Carson, William E III

    2010-01-01

    Endogenously produced interferons can regulate the growth of melanoma cells and are administered exogenously as therapeutic agents to patients with advanced cancer. We investigated the role of negative regulators of interferon signaling known as suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) in mediating interferon-resistance in human melanoma cells. Basal and interferon-alpha (IFN-α) or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-induced expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins was evaluated by immunoblot analysis in a panel of n = 10 metastatic human melanoma cell lines, in human embryonic melanocytes (HEM), and radial or vertical growth phase melanoma cells. Over-expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins in melanoma cells was achieved using the PINCO retroviral vector, while siRNA were used to inhibit SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression. Tyr 701 -phosphorylated STAT1 (P-STAT1) was measured by intracellular flow cytometry and IFN-stimulated gene expression was measured by Real Time PCR. SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins were expressed at basal levels in melanocytes and in all melanoma cell lines examined. Expression of the SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins was also enhanced following stimulation of a subset of cell lines with IFN-α or IFN-γ. Over-expression of SOCS proteins in melanoma cell lines led to significant inhibition of Tyr 701 -phosphorylated STAT1 (P-STAT1) and gene expression following stimulation with IFN-α (IFIT2, OAS-1, ISG-15) or IFN-γ (IRF1). Conversely, siRNA inhibition of SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression in melanoma cells enhanced their responsiveness to interferon stimulation. These data demonstrate that SOCS proteins are expressed in human melanoma cell lines and their modulation can influence the responsiveness of melanoma cells to IFN-α and IFN-γ

  6. Interplay of atherogenic factors, protein intake and betatrophin levels in obese-metabolic syndrome patients treated with hypocaloric diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crujeiras, A B; Zulet, M A; Abete, I; Amil, M; Carreira, M C; Martínez, J A; Casanueva, F F

    2016-03-01

    The understanding of the potential role of betatrophin in human metabolic disorders is a current challenge. The present research evaluated circulating betatrophin levels in obese patients with metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) features under energy-restricted weight-loss programs and in normal weight in order to establish the putative interplay between the levels of this hormone, diet and metabolic risk factors linked to obesity and associated comorbidities. One hundred forty-three participants were enrolled in the study (95 obese-MetSyn; age 49.5±9.4 years; body mass index (BMI) 35.7±4.5 kg m(-2) and 48 normal weight; age 35.71±8.8 years; BMI 22.9±2.2 kg m(-2)). A nutritional therapy consisting in two hypocaloric strategies (control diet based on the AHA recommendations and the RESMENA (MEtabolic Syndrome REduction in Navarra) diet, a novel dietary program with changes in the macronutrient distribution) was only prescribed to obese-MetSyn participants who were randomly allocated to the dietary strategies. Dietary records, anthropometrical and biochemical variables as well as betatrophin levels were analyzed before (pre-intervention, week 0), at 8 weeks (post-intervention, week 8) and after 4 additional months of self-control period (follow-up, week 24). Betatrophin levels were higher in obese-MetSyn patients than normal-weight subjects (1.24±0.43 vs 0.97±0.69 ng ml(-1), respectively, P=0.012), and levels were positively associated with body composition, metabolic parameters, leptin and irisin in all participants at baseline. Notably, low pre-intervention (week 0) betatrophin levels in obese patients were significantly associated with higher dietary-induced changes in atherogenic risk factors after 8 weeks. Moreover, protein intake, especially proteins from animal sources, was an independent determinant of betatrophin levels after dietary treatment (B=-0.27; P=0.012). Betatrophin is elevated in obese patients with MetSyn features and is associated with

  7. Proteomic identification of altered cerebral proteins in the complex regional pain syndrome animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Park, Zee-Yong; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Pyung Bok

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder. Although the exact pathophysiology of CRPS is not fully understood, central and peripheral mechanisms might be involved in the development of this disorder. To reveal the central mechanism of CRPS, we conducted a proteomic analysis of rat cerebrum using the chronic postischemia pain (CPIP) model, a novel experimental model of CRPS. After generating the CPIP animal model, we performed a proteomic analysis of the rat cerebrum using a multidimensional protein identification technology, and screened the proteins differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups. Results. A total of 155 proteins were differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups: 125 increased and 30 decreased; expressions of proteins related to cell signaling, synaptic plasticity, regulation of cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal formation were increased in the CPIP group. However, proenkephalin A, cereblon, and neuroserpin were decreased in CPIP group. Altered expression of cerebral proteins in the CPIP model indicates cerebral involvement in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Further study is required to elucidate the roles of these proteins in the development and maintenance of CRPS.

  8. Proteomic Identification of Altered Cerebral Proteins in the Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Sahngun Nahm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a rare but debilitating pain disorder. Although the exact pathophysiology of CRPS is not fully understood, central and peripheral mechanisms might be involved in the development of this disorder. To reveal the central mechanism of CRPS, we conducted a proteomic analysis of rat cerebrum using the chronic postischemia pain (CPIP model, a novel experimental model of CRPS. Materials and Methods. After generating the CPIP animal model, we performed a proteomic analysis of the rat cerebrum using a multidimensional protein identification technology, and screened the proteins differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups. Results. A total of 155 proteins were differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups: 125 increased and 30 decreased; expressions of proteins related to cell signaling, synaptic plasticity, regulation of cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal formation were increased in the CPIP group. However, proenkephalin A, cereblon, and neuroserpin were decreased in CPIP group. Conclusion. Altered expression of cerebral proteins in the CPIP model indicates cerebral involvement in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Further study is required to elucidate the roles of these proteins in the development and maintenance of CRPS.

  9. BAG3 down-modulation reduces anaplastic thyroid tumor growth by enhancing proteasome-mediated degradation of BRAF protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappetta, Gennaro; Basile, Anna; Arra, Claudio; Califano, Daniela; Pasquinelli, Rosa; Barbieri, Antonio; De Simone, Veronica; Rea, Domenica; Giudice, Aldo; Pezzullo, Luciano; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; Botti, Gerardo; Losito, Simona; Conforti, Daniela; Turco, Maria Caterina

    2012-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid tumors (ATC) express high levels of BAG3, a member of the BAG family of cochaperone proteins that is involved in regulating cell apoptosis through multiple mechanisms. The objective of the study was the investigation of the influence of B-cell lymphoma-2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) on ATC growth. We investigated the effects of BAG3 down-modulation, obtained by using a specific small interfering RNA, on in vitro and in vivo growth of the human ATC cell line 8505C. Because BRAF protein plays an important role in ATC cell growth, we analyzed the effects of BAG3 down-modulation on BRAF protein levels. Furthermore, by using a proteasome inhibitor, we verified whether BAG3-mediated regulation of BRAF levels involved a proteasome-dependent mechanism. BAG3 down-modulation significantly inhibits ATC growth in vitro and in vivo. BAG3 coimmunoprecipitates with BRAF protein, and its down-modulation results in a significant reduction of BRAF protein levels, which can be reverted by incubation with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. BAG3 protein sustains ATC growth in vitro and in vivo. The underlying molecular mechanism appears to rely on BAG3 binding to BRAF, thus protecting it from proteasome-dependent degradation. These results are in line with the reported ability of BAG3 to interfere with the proteasomal delivery of a number of other client proteins.

  10. The Troyer syndrome (SPG20) protein spartin interacts with Eps15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakowska, Joanna C.; Jenkins, Russell; Pendleton, James; Blackstone, Craig

    2005-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias comprise a group of inherited neurological disorders in which the primary manifestation is spastic weakness of the lower extremities. Troyer syndrome is an autosomal recessive form of spastic paraplegia caused by a frameshift mutation in the spartin (SPG20) gene. Currently, neither the localization nor the functions of the spartin protein are known. In this study, we generated anti-spartin antibodies and found that spartin is both cytosolic and membrane-associated. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach, we screened an adult human brain library for binding partners of spartin. We identified Eps15, a protein known to be involved in endocytosis and the control of cell proliferation. This interaction was confirmed by fusion protein 'pull-down' experiments as well as a cellular redistribution assay. Our results suggest that spartin might be involved in endocytosis, vesicle trafficking, or mitogenic activity, and that impairment in one of these processes may underlie the long axonopathy in patients with Troyer syndrome

  11. Modulation of autonomic activity in neurological conditions: Epilepsy and Tourette syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yoko eNagai

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript considers the central but neglected role of the autonomic nervous system in the expression and control of seizures in epilepsy (small) and tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS). In epilepsy, consideration of autonomic involvement is typically confined to differential diagnoses (e.g., syncope), or in relation to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Investigation is more limited in Tourette Syndrome. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the generation and prevention of e...

  12. Eosinophilic myocarditis due to Churg-Strauss syndrome with markedly elevated eosinophil cationic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Tomoya; Yamaguchi, Koji; Iwase, Takashi; Kadota, Muneyuki; Bando, Mika; Ogasawara, Kozue; Bando, Sachiko; Ise, Takayuki; Niki, Toshiyuki; Ueda, Yuka; Tomita, Noriko; Taketani, Yoshio; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Soeki, Takeshi; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Sata, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman with asthma visited our hospital with increasing dyspnea and new-onset paresthesia and purpura in her legs. Physical examination showed a wheeze, pretibial edema, and surrounding purpura. Chest X-rays showed cardiac decompensation and an electrocardiogram revealed a new ST-T change. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis, hypereosinophilia (10,450/μL), troponin T(+), elevated BNP, and markedly elevated eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) (> 150 ng/mL). Echocardiography revealed diffuse left ventricular hypokinesis (ejection fraction 30%) with increased wall thickness. Coronary angiography was normal. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging implied diffuse myocardial edema and subendocardial late gadolinium enhancement. Skin biopsy of purpura showed superfi cial perivascular dermatitis with remarkable eosinophilic infiltrations. No evidence of drug allergies, parasitic infection, or myeloproliferative disorder was detected. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of eosinophilic myocarditis due to Churg-Strauss syndrome was considered. She was administered prednisolone at a dose of 1 mg/kg, cyclophosphamide, and diuretics. Several markers of eosinophilic myocarditis and heart failure gradually improved, including ECP. She was discharged 30 days later with no cardiac event. Eosinophilic myocarditis is characterized by predominantly eosinophilic infi ltration. Eosinophilic granule proteins, such as ECP and major basic protein, play important roles in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic myocarditis. We experienced a rare case of eosinophilic myocarditis due to Churg-Strauss syndrome. Markedly elevated ECP played an important role in the early diagnosis and subsequent reduction in ECP served as a marker of monitoring. In an asthmatic patient with dyspnea, hypereosinophilia, and vasculitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome with eosinophilic myocarditis should be considered.

  13. Modulation of wound healing and scar formation by MG53 protein-mediated cell membrane repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-10-02

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53(-/-) mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in Australia: A population-based study, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Sam; Frith, Katie; Barnes, Elizabeth H; Campbell, Dianne E

    2017-11-01

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal allergic disorder. Large population-based FPIES studies are lacking. We sought to determine the incidence and clinical characteristics of FPIES in Australian infants. An Australia-wide survey (2012-2014) was undertaken through the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, with monthly notification of new cases of acute FPIES in infants aged less than 24 months by 1400 participating pediatricians. Two hundred thirty infants with FPIES were identified. The incidence of FPIES in Australian infants (disease and FPIES to fruits, vegetables, or both. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Human C-Reactive Protein on Pathogenesis of Features of the Metabolic Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Kajiya, T.; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Šilhavý, Jan; Malínská, H.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Kazdová, L.; Fan, J.; Wang, J.; Kurtz, T. W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2011), s. 731-737 ISSN 0194-911X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NS9759; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08006; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/0290; GA ČR GAP303/10/0505; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110805 Grant - others:EC(XE) HEALTH-F4-2010-241504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : C-reactive protein * metabolic syndrome * transgenic rat Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 6.207, year: 2011

  16. Diagnostic criteria for acute food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome. Is the work in progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli Sopo, S; Bersani, G; Fantacci, C; Romano, A; Monaco, S

    2018-02-15

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a non IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergic disorder. Some diagnostic criteria have been published for acute FPIES. Of course, they are not all the same, so the clinician must choose which ones to adopt for his/her clinical practice. We present here a brief review of these criteria and, through two clinical cases, show how the choice of one or the other can change the diagnostic destiny of a child with suspect FPIES. Copyright © 2018 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Axin and GSK3- control Smad3 protein stability and modulate TGF- signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xing; Ramirez, Alejandro; Waddell, David S; Li, Zhizhong; Liu, Xuedong; Wang, Xiao-Fan

    2008-01-01

    The broad range of biological responses elicited by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in various types of tissues and cells is mainly determined by the expression level and activity of the effector proteins Smad2 and Smad3. It is not fully understood how the baseline properties of Smad3 are regulated, although this molecule is in complex with many other proteins at the steady state. Here we show that nonactivated Smad3, but not Smad2, undergoes proteasome-dependent degradation due to the concerted action of the scaffolding protein Axin and its associated kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK3-beta). Smad3 physically interacts with Axin and GSK3-beta only in the absence of TGF-beta. Reduction in the expression or activity of Axin/GSK3-beta leads to increased Smad3 stability and transcriptional activity without affecting TGF-beta receptors or Smad2, whereas overexpression of these proteins promotes Smad3 basal degradation and desensitizes cells to TGF-beta. Mechanistically, Axin facilitates GSK3-beta-mediated phosphorylation of Smad3 at Thr66, which triggers Smad3 ubiquitination and degradation. Thr66 mutants of Smad3 show altered protein stability and hence transcriptional activity. These results indicate that the steady-state stability of Smad3 is an important determinant of cellular sensitivity to TGF-beta, and suggest a new function of the Axin/GSK3-beta complex in modulating critical TGF-beta/Smad3-regulated processes during development and tumor progression.

  18. Podophyllum hexandrum (Himalayan mayapple) extract provides radioprotection by modulating the expression of proteins associated with apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Sharma, Ashok; Prasad, Jagdish; Sagar, Ravinder; Singh, Surender; Arora, Rajesh; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2005-08-01

    demonstrated that P. hexandrum extract provides protection from gamma-radiation by the modulation of expression of proteins associated with cell death.

  19. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection

  20. Raf kinase inhibitory protein: a signal transduction modulator and metastasis suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovsky, Alexey E; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2008-04-01

    Cells have a multitude of controls to maintain their integrity and prevent random switching from one biological state to another. Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein (RKIP), a member of the phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein (PEBP) family, is representative of a new class of modulators of signaling cascades that function to maintain the "yin yang" or balance of biological systems. RKIP inhibits MAP kinase (Raf-MEK-ERK), G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase and NFkappaB signaling cascades. Because RKIP targets different kinases dependent upon its state of phosphorylation, RKIP also acts to integrate crosstalk initiated by multiple environmental stimuli. Loss or depletion of RKIP results in disruption of the normal cellular stasis and can lead to chromosomal abnormalities and disease states such as cancer. Since RKIP and the PEBP family have been reviewed previously, the goal of this analysis is to provide an update and highlight some of the unique features of RKIP that make it a critical player in the regulation of cellular signaling processes.

  1. A single mutation in the envelope protein modulates flavivirus antigenicity, stability, and pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Goo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The structural flexibility or 'breathing' of the envelope (E protein of flaviviruses allows virions to sample an ensemble of conformations at equilibrium. The molecular basis and functional consequences of virus conformational dynamics are poorly understood. Here, we identified a single mutation at residue 198 (T198F of the West Nile virus (WNV E protein domain I-II hinge that regulates virus breathing. The T198F mutation resulted in a ~70-fold increase in sensitivity to neutralization by a monoclonal antibody targeting a cryptic epitope in the fusion loop. Increased exposure of this otherwise poorly accessible fusion loop epitope was accompanied by reduced virus stability in solution at physiological temperatures. Introduction of a mutation at the analogous residue of dengue virus (DENV, but not Zika virus (ZIKV, E protein also increased accessibility of the cryptic fusion loop epitope and decreased virus stability in solution, suggesting that this residue modulates the structural ensembles sampled by distinct flaviviruses at equilibrium in a context dependent manner. Although the T198F mutation did not substantially impair WNV growth kinetics in vitro, studies in mice revealed attenuation of WNV T198F infection. Overall, our study provides insight into the molecular basis and the in vitro and in vivo consequences of flavivirus breathing.

  2. SUMO-2 and PIAS1 Modulate Insoluble Mutant Huntingtin Protein Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Gire O’Rourke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A key feature in Huntington disease (HD is the accumulation of mutant Huntingtin (HTT protein, which may be regulated by posttranslational modifications. Here, we define the primary sites of SUMO modification in the amino-terminal domain of HTT, show modification downstream of this domain, and demonstrate that HTT is modified by the stress-inducible SUMO-2. A systematic study of E3 SUMO ligases demonstrates that PIAS1 is an E3 SUMO ligase for both HTT SUMO-1 and SUMO-2 modification and that reduction of dPIAS in a mutant HTT Drosophila model is protective. SUMO-2 modification regulates accumulation of insoluble HTT in HeLa cells in a manner that mimics proteasome inhibition and can be modulated by overexpression and acute knockdown of PIAS1. Finally, the accumulation of SUMO-2-modified proteins in the insoluble fraction of HD postmortem striata implicates SUMO-2 modification in the age-related pathogenic accumulation of mutant HTT and other cellular proteins that occurs during HD progression.

  3. Structural Modulation of Phosducin by Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 Protein Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezabkova, Lenka; Kacirova, Miroslava; Sulc, Miroslav; Herman, Petr; Vecer, Jaroslav; Stepanek, Miroslav; Obsilova, Veronika; Obsil, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Phosducin (Pdc), a highly conserved phosphoprotein, plays an important role in the regulation of G protein signaling, transcriptional control, and modulation of blood pressure. Pdc is negatively regulated by phosphorylation followed by binding to the 14-3-3 protein, whose role is still unclear. To gain insight into the role of 14-3-3 in the regulation of Pdc function, we studied structural changes of Pdc induced by phosphorylation and 14-3-3 protein binding using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Our data show that the phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of Pdc at Ser-54 and Ser-73 affects the structure of the whole Pdc molecule. Complex formation with 14-3-3 reduces the flexibility of both the N- and C-terminal domains of phosphorylated Pdc, as determined by time-resolved tryptophan and dansyl fluorescence. Therefore, our data suggest that phosphorylated Pdc undergoes a conformational change when binding to 14-3-3. These changes involve the Gtβγ binding surface within the N-terminal domain of Pdc, and thus could explain the inhibitory effect of 14-3-3 on Pdc function. PMID:23199924

  4. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China); Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott [Department of Medicine and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave., Boston 02115, MA (United States); Peng, Chih-Wen, E-mail: pengcw@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection.

  5. Soy Germ Protein With or Without-Zn Improve Plasma Lipid Profile in Metabolic Syndrome Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIWI PRAMATAMA MARS WIJAYANTI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the effect of soy germ protein on lipid profile of metabolic syndrome (MetS patients. Respondents were 30 women with criteria, i.e. blood glucose level > normal, body mass index > 25 kg/m2, hypertriglyceridemia, low cholesterol-HDL level, 40-65 years old, living in Purwokerto, and signed the informed consent. The project was approved by the ethics committee of the Medical Faculty from Gadjah Mada University-Yogyakarta. Respondents were divided into three randomly chosen groups consisting of ten women each. The first, second, and third groups were treated, respectively, with milk enriched soy germ protein plus Zn, milk enriched soy germ protein (without Zn, and placebo for two months. Blood samples were taken at baseline, one and two months after observation. Two months after observation the groups consuming milk enriched with soy germ protein, both with or without Zn, had their level of cholesterol-total decrease from 215.8 to 180.2 mg/dl (P = 0.03, triglyceride from 240.2 to 162.5 mg/dl (P = 0.02, and LDL from 154.01 to 93.85 mg/dl (P = 0.03. In contrast, HDL increased from 38.91 to 49.49 mg/dl (P = 0.0008. In conclusion, soy germ protein can improve lipid profile, thus it can inhibit atherosclerosis incident.

  6. Expression of SET Protein in the Ovaries of Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boqun, Xu; Xiaonan, Dai; Yugui, Cui; Lingling, Gao; Xue, Dai; Gao, Chao; Feiyang, Diao; Jiayin, Liu; Gao, Li; Li, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Ma, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Background. We previously found that expression of SET gene was up-regulated in polycystic ovaries by using microarray. It suggested that SET may be an attractive candidate regulator involved in the pathophysiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In this study, expression and cellular localization of SET protein were investigated in human polycystic and normal ovaries. Method. Ovarian tissues, six normal ovaries and six polycystic ovaries, were collected during transsexual operation and surgical treatment with the signed consent form. The cellular localization of SET protein was observed by immunohistochemistry. The expression levels of SET protein were analyzed by Western Blot. Result. SET protein was expressed predominantly in the theca cells and oocytes of human ovarian follicles in both PCOS ovarian tissues and normal ovarian tissues. The level of SET protein expression in polycystic ovaries was triple higher than that in normal ovaries (P polycystic ovaries more than that in normal ovaries. Combined with its localization in theca cells, SET may participate in regulating ovarian androgen biosynthesis and the pathophysiology of hyperandrogenism in PCOS.

  7. Prediction of the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of curcumin by module-based protein interaction network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxiong Gan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, the medically active component from Curcuma longa (Turmeric, is widely used to treat inflammatory diseases. Protein interaction network (PIN analysis was used to predict its mechanisms of molecular action. Targets of curcumin were obtained based on ChEMBL and STITCH databases. Protein–protein interactions (PPIs were extracted from the String database. The PIN of curcumin was constructed by Cytoscape and the function modules identified by gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis based on molecular complex detection (MCODE. A PIN of curcumin with 482 nodes and 1688 interactions was constructed, which has scale-free, small world and modular properties. Based on analysis of these function modules, the mechanism of curcumin is proposed. Two modules were found to be intimately associated with inflammation. With function modules analysis, the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin were related to SMAD, ERG and mediation by the TLR family. TLR9 may be a potential target of curcumin to treat inflammation.

  8. Small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein alpha is present in human ovaries but may not be differentially expressed in relation to polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Miriam S; Yang, Xing; Ricciardelli, Carmela; Liang, Xiaoyan; Norman, Robert J; Tilley, Wayne D; Hickey, Theresa E

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the expression and function of small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein alpha (SGTA), an androgen receptor (AR) molecular chaperone, in human ovarian tissues. Examine the effect of SGTA on AR subcellular localization in granulosa tumor cells (KGN) and SGTA expression in ovarian tissues. University-based research laboratory. Archived tissues from premenopausal women and granulosa cells from infertile women receiving assisted reproduction. None. AR subcellular localization and SGTA protein or mRNA levels. SGTA and AR proteins were expressed in the cytoplasm of KGN cells and exposure to androgen stimulated AR nuclear localization. SGTA protein knockdown increased AR nuclear localization at low (0-0.1 nmol/L) but not high (1-10 nmol/L) concentrations of androgen hormone. In ovarian tissues, SGTA was localized to the cytoplasm of granulosa cells at all stages of folliculogenesis and in thecal cells of antral follicles. SGTA protein levels were similar when comparing primordial and primary follicles within core biopsies (n = 40) from women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Likewise, SGTA mRNA levels were not significantly different in granulosa cells from preovulatory follicles after hyperstimulation of women with and without PCOS. SGTA is present in human ovaries and has the potential to modulate AR signalling, but it may not be differentially expressed in PCOS. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship of C-reactive protein, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus: potential role of statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David T

    2005-12-01

    Atherosclerosis and the metabolic derangements of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are all associated with underlying inflammatory processes. C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, has been shown to be a strong independent predictor of vascular events. It adds to cardiovascular disease risk at all levels of low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and Framingham risk scores, and elevated levels are also associated with increasing severity of the metabolic syndrome. The development of a simple, stable, noninvasive test to measure high-sensitivity CRP has provided a clinical tool that may have an important role in the identification and assessment of individuals likely to develop cardiovascular or metabolic disease. The role of CRP in predicting cardiovascular risk is less clear in African Americans, however, than in white populations. Statins and thiazolidinediones are being investigated for their potential role in the prevention and treatment of the inflammatory processes involved in the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. In the future, assessment of CRP levels may contribute importantly to clinical decision-making in reducing cardiovascular risk.

  10. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP1) gene expression is similarly increased in polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Mohamad N; Mongan, Nigel; Seedhouse, Claire; Chapman, Caroline; Deen, Suha; Abu, Jafaru; Atiomo, William

    2017-05-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome have a three-fold higher risk of endometrial cancer. Insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia may be pertinent factors in the pathogenesis of both conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate endometrial sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression in polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial cancer endometrium, and to correlate endometrial sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression with serum lipid profiles. A cross-sectional study was performed at Nottingham University Hospital, UK. A total of 102 women (polycystic ovary syndrome, endometrial cancer and controls; 34 participants in each group) were recruited. Clinical and biochemical assessments were performed before endometrial biopsies were obtained from all participants. Taqman real-time polymerase chain reaction for endometrial sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene and its systemic protein expression were analyzed. The body mass indices of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (29.28 ± 2.91 kg/m 2 ) and controls (28.58 ± 2.62 kg/m 2 ) were not significantly different. Women with endometrial cancer had a higher mean body mass index (32.22 ± 5.70 kg/m 2 ). Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression was significantly increased in polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial cancer endometrium compared with controls (p ovary syndrome, but this was not statistically significant. Similarly, statistically insignificant positive correlations were found between endometrial sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression and body mass index in endometrial cancer (r = 0.643, p = 0.06) and waist-hip ratio (r = 0.096, p = 0.073). Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression was significantly positively correlated with triglyceride in both polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial cancer (p = 0.028 and p = 0.027, respectively). Quantitative serum sterol regulatory element

  11. Glucokinase regulatory protein genetic variant interacts with omega-3 PUFA to influence insulin resistance and inflammation in metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Perez-Martinez

    Full Text Available Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR plays a central role regulating both hepatic triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Fatty acids are key metabolic regulators, which interact with genetic factors and influence glucose metabolism and other metabolic traits. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA have been of considerable interest, due to their potential to reduce metabolic syndrome (MetS risk.To examine whether genetic variability at the GCKR gene locus was associated with the degree of insulin resistance, plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP and n-3 PUFA in MetS subjects.Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, HOMA-B, plasma concentrations of C-peptide, CRP, fatty acid composition and the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism, were determined in a cross-sectional analysis of 379 subjects with MetS participating in the LIPGENE dietary cohort.Among subjects with n-3 PUFA levels below the population median, carriers of the common C/C genotype had higher plasma concentrations of fasting insulin (P = 0.019, C-peptide (P = 0.004, HOMA-IR (P = 0.008 and CRP (P = 0.032 as compared with subjects carrying the minor T-allele (Leu446. In contrast, homozygous C/C carriers with n-3 PUFA levels above the median showed lower plasma concentrations of fasting insulin, peptide C, HOMA-IR and CRP, as compared with individuals with the T-allele.We have demonstrated a significant interaction between the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism and plasma n-3 PUFA levels modulating insulin resistance and inflammatory markers in MetS subjects. Further studies are needed to confirm this gene-diet interaction in the general population and whether targeted dietary recommendations can prevent MetS in genetically susceptible individuals.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00429195.

  12. Potential protein biomarkers for burning mouth syndrome discovered by quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Eoon Hye; Diep, Cynthia; Liu, Tong; Li, Hong; Merrill, Robert; Messadi, Diana; Hu, Shen

    2017-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by severe burning sensation in normal looking oral mucosa. Diagnosis of BMS remains to be a challenge to oral healthcare professionals because the method for definite diagnosis is still uncertain. In this study, a quantitative saliva proteomic analysis was performed in order to identify target proteins in BMS patients' saliva that may be used as biomarkers for simple, non-invasive detection of the disease. By using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to quantify 1130 saliva proteins between BMS patients and healthy control subjects, we found that 50 proteins were significantly changed in the BMS patients when compared to the healthy control subjects ( p ≤ 0.05, 39 up-regulated and 11 down-regulated). Four candidates, alpha-enolase, interleukin-18 (IL-18), kallikrein-13 (KLK13), and cathepsin G, were selected for further validation. Based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurements, three potential biomarkers, alpha-enolase, IL-18, and KLK13, were successfully validated. The fold changes for alpha-enolase, IL-18, and KLK13 were determined as 3.6, 2.9, and 2.2 (burning mouth syndrome vs. control), and corresponding receiver operating characteristic values were determined as 0.78, 0.83, and 0.68, respectively. Our findings indicate that testing of the identified protein biomarkers in saliva might be a valuable clinical tool for BMS detection. Further validation studies of the identified biomarkers or additional candidate biomarkers are needed to achieve a multi-marker prediction model for improved detection of BMS with high sensitivity and specificity.

  13. Protein metabolism in Turner syndrome and the impact of hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Riis, Anne Lene; Møller, Niels; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2007-09-01

    Studies have documented an altered body composition in Turner syndrome (TS). Body fat is increased and muscle mass is decreased. Ovarian failure necessitates substitution with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and HRT induces favourable changes in body composition. It is unknown how HRT affects protein metabolism. To test whether alterations in body composition before and after HRT in TS are a result of altered protein metabolism. We performed a randomized crossover study with active treatment (HRT in TS and oral contraceptives in controls) or no treatment. We studied eight women (age 29.7 +/- 5.6 (mean +/- SD) years) with TS, verified by karyotype, and eight age-matched controls (age 27.3 +/- 4.9 years). All subjects underwent a 3-h study in the postabsorptive state. Protein dynamics of the whole body and of the forearm muscles were measured by an amino acid tracer dilution technique using [(15)N]phenylalanine and [(2)H(4)]tyrosine. Substrate metabolism was examined by indirect calorimetry. Energy expenditure was comparable among TS and controls, and did not change during active treatment. Whole-body phenylalanine and tyrosine fluxes were similar in the untreated situations, and did not change during active treatment. Amino acid degradation and protein synthesis were similar in all situations. Muscle protein breakdown was similar among groups, and was not affected by treatment. Muscle protein synthesis rate and forearm blood flow did not differ among groups or due to treatment. Protein metabolism in TS is comparable to controls, and is not affected by HRT.

  14. Modulation of CRISPR locus transcription by the repeat-binding protein Cbp1 in Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Ling; Kenchappa, Chandra Shekar; Peng, Xu

    2012-01-01

    CRISPR loci are essential components of the adaptive immune system of archaea and bacteria. They consist of long arrays of repeats separated by DNA spacers encoding guide RNAs (crRNA), which target foreign genetic elements. Cbp1 (CRISPR DNA repeat binding protein) binds specifically to the multiple...... direct repeats of CRISPR loci of members of the acidothermophilic, crenarchaeal order Sulfolobales. cbp1 gene deletion from Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A produced a strong reduction in pre-crRNA yields from CRISPR loci but did not inhibit the foreign DNA targeting capacity of the CRISPR/Cas system....... Conversely, overexpression of Cbp1 in S. islandicus generated an increase in pre-crRNA yields while the level of reverse strand transcripts from CRISPR loci remained unchanged. It is proposed that Cbp1 modulates production of longer pre-crRNA transcripts from CRISPR loci. A possible mechanism...

  15. Wolfram Syndrome protein, Miner1, regulates sulphydryl redox status, the unfolded protein response, and Ca2+ homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Sandra E; Andreyev, Alexander Y; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Karisch, Robert; Perkins, Guy; Wall, Estelle A; van der Geer, Peter; Chen, Yi-Fan; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Simon, Melvin I; Neel, Benjamin G; Dixon, Jack E; Murphy, Anne N

    2013-06-01

    Miner1 is a redox-active 2Fe2S cluster protein. Mutations in Miner1 result in Wolfram Syndrome, a metabolic disease associated with diabetes, blindness, deafness, and a shortened lifespan. Embryonic fibroblasts from Miner1(-/-) mice displayed ER stress and showed hallmarks of the unfolded protein response. In addition, loss of Miner1 caused a depletion of ER Ca(2+) stores, a dramatic increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) load, increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, an increase in the GSSG/GSH and NAD(+)/NADH ratios, and an increase in the ADP/ATP ratio consistent with enhanced ATP utilization. Furthermore, mitochondria in fibroblasts lacking Miner1 displayed ultrastructural alterations, such as increased cristae density and punctate morphology, and an increase in O2 consumption. Treatment with the sulphydryl anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine reversed the abnormalities in the Miner1 deficient cells, suggesting that sulphydryl reducing agents should be explored as a treatment for this rare genetic disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd on behalf of EMBO.

  16. Different regions of the newcastle disease virus fusion protein modulate pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Heiden

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease virus (NDV, also designated as Avian paramyxovirus type 1 (APMV-1, is the causative agent of a notifiable disease of poultry but it exhibits different pathogenicity dependent on the virus strain. The molecular basis for this variability is not fully understood. The efficiency of activation of the fusion protein (F is determined by presence or absence of a polybasic amino acid sequence at an internal proteolytic cleavage site which is a major determinant of NDV virulence. However, other determinants of pathogenicity must exist since APMV-1 of high (velogenic, intermediate (mesogenic and low (lentogenic virulence specify a polybasic F cleavage site. We aimed at elucidation of additional virulence determinants by constructing a recombinant virus that consists of a lentogenic NDV Clone 30 backbone and the F protein gene from a mesogenic pigeon paramyxovirus-1 (PPMV-1 isolate with an intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI of 1.1 specifying the polybasic sequence R-R-K-K-R*F motif at the cleavage site. The resulting virus was characterized by an ICPI of 0.6, indicating a lentogenic pathotype. In contrast, alteration of the cleavage site G-R-Q-G-R*L of the lentogenic Clone 30 to R-R-K-K-R*F resulted in a recombinant virus with an ICPI of 1.36 which was higher than that of parental PPMV-1. Substitution of different regions of the F protein of Clone 30 by those of PPMV-1, while maintaining the polybasic amino acid sequence at the F cleavage site, resulted in recombinant viruses with ICPIs ranging from 0.59 to 1.36 suggesting that virulence is modulated by regions of the F protein other than the polybasic cleavage site.

  17. MAP Kinase Cascades Regulate the Cold Response by Modulating ICE1 Protein Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunzhao; Wang, Pengcheng; Si, Tong; Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Wang, Lu; Zayed, Omar; Yu, Zheping; Zhu, Yingfang; Dong, Juan; Tao, W Andy; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2017-12-04

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are important signaling modules that convert environmental stimuli into cellular responses. We show that MPK3, MPK4, and MPK6 are rapidly activated after cold treatment. The mpk3 and mpk6 mutants display increased expression of CBF genes and enhanced freezing tolerance, whereas constitutive activation of the MKK4/5-MPK3/6 cascade in plants causes reduced expression of CBF genes and hypersensitivity to freezing, suggesting that the MKK4/5-MPK3/6 cascade negatively regulates the cold response. MPK3 and MPK6 can phosphorylate ICE1, a basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor that regulates the expression of CBF genes, and the phosphorylation promotes the degradation of ICE1. Interestingly, the MEKK1-MKK2-MPK4 pathway constitutively suppresses MPK3 and MPK6 activities and has a positive role in the cold response. Furthermore, the MAPKKK YDA and two calcium/calmodulin-regulated receptor-like kinases, CRLK1 and CRLK2, negatively modulate the cold activation of MPK3/6. Our results uncover important roles of MAPK cascades in the regulation of plant cold response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A conserved PHD finger protein and endogenous RNAi modulate insulin signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansisidor, Andres R; Cecere, Germano; Hoersch, Sebastian; Jensen, Morten B; Kawli, Trupti; Kennedy, Lisa M; Chavez, Violeta; Tan, Man-Wah; Lieb, Jason D; Grishok, Alla

    2011-09-01

    Insulin signaling has a profound effect on longevity and the oxidative stress resistance of animals. Inhibition of insulin signaling results in the activation of DAF-16/FOXO and SKN-1/Nrf transcription factors and increased animal fitness. By studying the biological functions of the endogenous RNA interference factor RDE-4 and conserved PHD zinc finger protein ZFP-1 (AF10), which regulate overlapping sets of genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified an important role for these factors in the negative modulation of transcription of the insulin/PI3 signaling-dependent kinase PDK-1. Consistently, increased expression of pdk-1 in zfp-1 and rde-4 mutants contributed to their reduced lifespan and sensitivity to oxidative stress and pathogens due to the reduction in the expression of DAF-16 and SKN-1 targets. We found that the function of ZFP-1 in modulating pdk-1 transcription was important for the extended lifespan of the age-1(hx546) reduction-of-function PI3 kinase mutant, since the lifespan of the age-1; zfp-1 double mutant strain was significantly shorter compared to age-1(hx546). We further demonstrate that overexpression of ZFP-1 caused an increased resistance to oxidative stress in a DAF-16-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that epigenetic regulation of key upstream signaling components in signal transduction pathways through chromatin and RNAi may have a large impact on the outcome of signaling and expression of numerous downstream genes.

  19. Modulating the physicochemical and structural properties of gold-functionalized protein nanotubes through thiol surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreño-Fuentes, Liliana; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Palomares, Laura A; Moya, Sergio E; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2014-12-16

    Biomolecules are advantageous scaffolds for the synthesis and ordering of metallic nanoparticles. Rotavirus VP6 nanotubes possess intrinsic affinity to metal ions, a property that has been exploited to synthesize gold nanoparticles over them. The resulting nanobiomaterials have unique properties useful for novel applications. However, the formed nanobiomaterials lack of colloidal stability and flocculate, limiting their functionality. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to synthesize thiol-protected gold nanoparticles over VP6 nanotubes, which resulted in soluble nanobiomaterials. With this strategy, it was possible to modulate the size, colloidal stability, and surface plasmon resonance of the synthesized nanoparticles by controlling the content of the thiolated ligands. Two types of water-soluble ligands were tested, a small linear ligand, sodium 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonate (MPS), and a bulky ligand, 5-mercaptopentyl β-D-glucopyranoside (GlcC5SH). The synthesized nanobiomaterials had a higher stability in suspension, as determined by Z-potential measurements. To the extent of our knowledge, this is the first time that a rational strategy is developed to modulate the particular properties of metal nanoparticles in situ synthesized over a protein bioscaffold through thiol coating, achieving a high spatial and structural organization of nanoparticles in a single integrative hybrid structure.

  20. Inflammatory protein response in CDKL5-Rett syndrome: evidence of a subclinical smouldering inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortelazzo, Alessio; de Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Guerranti, Roberto; Leoncini, Roberto; Armini, Alessandro; Bini, Luca; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene cause a clinical variant of Rett syndrome (CDKL5-RTT). A role for the acute-phase response (APR) is emerging in typical RTT caused by methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene mutations (MECP2-RTT). No information is, to date, available on the inflammatory protein response in CDKL5-RTT. We evaluated, for the first time, the APR protein response in CDKL5-RTT. Protein patterns in albumin- and IgG-depleted plasma proteome from CDKL5-RTT patients were evaluated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/mass spectrometry. The resulting data were related to circulating cytokines and compared to healthy controls or MECP2-RTT patients. The effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) were evaluated. CDKL5-RTT mutations resulted in a subclinical attenuated inflammation, specifically characterized by an overexpression of the complement component C3 and CD5 antigen-like, both strictly related to the inflammatory response. Cytokine dysregulation featuring a bulk increase of anti-inflammatory cytokines, predominantly IL-10, could explain the unchanged erythrocyte sedimentation rate and atypical features of inflammation in CDKL5-RTT. Omega-3 PUFAs were able to counterbalance the pro-inflammatory status. For the first time, we revealed a subclinical smouldering inflammation pattern in CDKL5-RTT consisting in the coexistence of an atypical APR coupled with a dysregulated cytokine response.

  1. Modulation of expression and activity of intestinal multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 by xenobiotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, CONICET, Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Rigalli, Juan Pablo [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, CONICET, Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacoepidemiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Arana, Maite Rocío; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, CONICET, Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Mottino, Aldo Domingo, E-mail: amottino@unr.edu.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, CONICET, Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina)

    2016-07-15

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2) is a transporter that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. In the intestine, it is localized to the apical membrane of the enterocyte and plays a key role in limiting the absorption of xenobiotics incorporated orally. MRP2 may also play a role in systemic clearance of xenobiotics available from the serosal side of the intestine. MRP2 transports a wide range of substrates, mainly organic anions conjugated with glucuronic acid, glutathione and sulfate and its expression can be modulated by xenobiotics at transcriptional- and post-transcriptional levels. Transcriptional regulation is usually mediated by a group of nuclear receptors. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a major member of this group. Relevant drugs described to up-regulate intestinal MRP2 via PXR are rifampicin, spironolactone and carbamazepine, among others. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) was also reported to modulate MRP2 expression, phenobarbital being a typical activator. Dietary compounds, including micronutrients and other natural products, are also capable of regulating intestinal MRP2 expression transcriptionally. We have given them particular attention since the composition of the food ingested daily is not necessarily supervised and may result in interactions with therapeutic drugs. Post-transcriptional regulation of MRP2 activity by xenobiotics, e.g. as a consequence of inhibitory actions, is also described in this review. Unfortunately, only few studies report on drug-drug or nutrient-drug interactions as a consequence of modulation of intestinal MRP2 activity by xenobiotics. Future clinical studies are expected to identify additional interactions resulting in changes in efficacy or safety of therapeutic drugs. - Highlights: • Intestinal MRP2 (ABCC2) expression and activity can be regulated by xenobiotics. • PXR and CAR are major MRP2 modulators through a transcriptional mechanism. • Rifampicin

  2. Disruption of a Ciliary B9 Protein Complex Causes Meckel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, William E.; Robinson, Jon F.; Kneist, Andreas; Sirerol-Piquer, M. Salomé; Frints, Suzanna G.M.; Corbit, Kevin C.; Zaghloul, Norran A.; van Lijnschoten, Gesina; Mulders, Leon; Verver, Dideke E.; Zerres, Klaus; Reed, Randall R.; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Johnson, Colin A.; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Katsanis, Nicholas; Bergmann, Carsten; Reiter, Jeremy F.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly every ciliated organism possesses three B9 domain-containing proteins: MKS1, B9D1, and B9D2. Mutations in human MKS1 cause Meckel syndrome (MKS), a severe ciliopathy characterized by occipital encephalocele, liver ductal plate malformations, polydactyly, and kidney cysts. Mouse mutations in either Mks1 or B9d2 compromise ciliogenesis and result in phenotypes similar to those of MKS. Given the importance of these two B9 proteins to ciliogenesis, we examined the role of the third B9 protein, B9d1. Mice lacking B9d1 displayed polydactyly, kidney cysts, ductal plate malformations, and abnormal patterning of the neural tube, concomitant with compromised ciliogenesis, ciliary protein localization, and Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction. These data prompted us to screen MKS patients for mutations in B9D1 and B9D2. We identified a homozygous c.301A>C (p.Ser101Arg) B9D2 mutation that segregates with MKS, affects an evolutionarily conserved residue, and is absent from controls. Unlike wild-type B9D2 mRNA, the p.Ser101Arg mutation failed to rescue zebrafish phenotypes induced by the suppression of b9d2. With coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric analyses, we found that Mks1, B9d1, and B9d2 interact physically, but that the p.Ser101Arg mutation abrogates the ability of B9d2 to interact with Mks1, further suggesting that the mutation compromises B9d2 function. Our data indicate that B9d1 is required for normal Hh signaling, ciliogenesis, and ciliary protein localization and that B9d1 and B9d2 are essential components of a B9 protein complex, disruption of which causes MKS. PMID:21763481

  3. Long Distance Modulation of Disorder-to-Order Transitions in Protein Allostery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingheng; Custer, Gregory; Beckett, Dorothy; Matysiak, Silvina

    2017-08-29

    Elucidation of the molecular details of allosteric communication between distant sites in a protein is key to understanding and manipulating many biological regulatory processes. Although protein disorder is acknowledged to play an important thermodynamic role in allostery, the molecular mechanisms by which this disorder is harnessed for long distance communication are known for a limited number of systems. Transcription repression by the Escherichia coli biotin repressor, BirA, is allosterically activated by binding of the small molecule effector biotinoyl-5'-AMP. The effector acts by promoting BirA dimerization, which is a prerequisite for sequence-specific binding to the biotin biosynthetic operon operator sequence. A 30 Å distance separates the effector binding and dimerization surfaces in BirA, and previous studies indicate that allostery is mediated, in part, by disorder-to-order transitions on the two coupled sites. In this work, combined experimental and computational methods have been applied to investigate the molecular basis of allosteric communication in BirA. Double-mutant cycle analysis coupled with thermodynamic measurements indicates functional coupling between residues in disordered loops on the two distant surfaces. All atom molecular dynamics simulations reveal that this coupling occurs through long distance reciprocal modulation of the structure and dynamics of disorder-to-order transitions on the two surfaces.

  4. Direct modulation of T-box riboswitch-controlled transcription by protein synthesis inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatopoulou, Vassiliki; Apostolidi, Maria; Li, Shuang; Lamprinou, Katerina; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Zhang, Jinwei; Stathopoulos, Constantinos

    2017-09-29

    Recently, it was discovered that exposure to mainstream antibiotics activate numerous bacterial riboregulators that control antibiotic resistance genes including metabolite-binding riboswitches and other transcription attenuators. However, the effects of commonly used antibiotics, many of which exhibit RNA-binding properties, on the widespread T-box riboswitches, remain unknown. In Staphylococcus aureus, a species-specific glyS T-box controls the supply of glycine for both ribosomal translation and cell wall synthesis, making it a promising target for next-generation antimicrobials. Here, we report that specific protein synthesis inhibitors could either significantly increase T-box-mediated transcription antitermination, while other compounds could suppress it, both in vitro and in vivo. In-line probing of the full-length T-box combined with molecular modelling and docking analyses suggest that the antibiotics that promote transcription antitermination stabilize the T-box:tRNA complex through binding specific positions on stem I and the Staphylococcal-specific stem Sa. By contrast, the antibiotics that attenuate T-box transcription bind to other positions on stem I and do not interact with stem Sa. Taken together, our results reveal that the transcription of essential genes controlled by T-box riboswitches can be directly modulated by commonly used protein synthesis inhibitors. These findings accentuate the regulatory complexities of bacterial response to antimicrobials that involve multiple riboregulators. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex and modulates messenger RNA translational profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Shi, B; Nandi, S

    2006-01-01

    MCT-1 is an oncogene that was initially identified in a human T cell lymphoma and has been shown to induce cell proliferation as well as activate survival-related pathways. MCT-1 contains the PUA domain, a recently described RNA-binding domain that is found in several tRNA and rRNA modification...... enzymes. Here, we established that MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex through its PUA domain and recruits the density-regulated protein (DENR/DRP), containing the SUI1 translation initiation domain. Through the use of microarray analysis on polysome-associated mRNAs, we showed that up......-regulation of MCT-1 was able to modulate the translation profiles of BCL2L2, TFDP1, MRE11A, cyclin D1, and E2F1 mRNAs, despite equivalent levels of mRNAs in the cytoplasm. Our data establish a role for MCT-1 in translational regulation, and support a linkage between translational control and oncogenesis....

  6. HIV-1 accessory proteins VPR and Vif modulate antiviral response by targeting IRF-3 for degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Atsushi; Alce, Tim; Lubyova, Barbora; Ezelle, Heather; Strebel, Klaus; Pitha, Paula M.

    2008-01-01

    The activation of IRF-3 during the early stages of viral infection is critical for the initiation of the antiviral response; however the activation of IRF-3 in HIV-1 infected cells has not yet been characterized. We demonstrate that the early steps of HIV-1 infection do not lead to the activation and nuclear translocation of IRF-3; instead, the relative levels of IRF-3 protein are decreased due to the ubiquitin-associated proteosome degradation. Addressing the molecular mechanism of this effect we show that the degradation is independent of HIV-1 replication and that virion-associated accessory proteins Vif and Vpr can independently degrade IRF-3. The null mutation of these two genes reduced the capacity of the HIV-1 virus to down modulate IRF-3 levels. The degradation was associated with Vif- and Vpr-mediated ubiquitination of IRF-3 and was independent of the activation of IRF-3. N-terminal lysine residues were shown to play a critical role in the Vif- and Vpr-mediated degradation of IRF-3. These data implicate Vif and Vpr in the disruption of the initial antiviral response and point to the need of HIV-1 to circumvent the antiviral response during the very early phase of replication

  7. Lithium blocks ethanol-induced modulation of protein kinases in the developing brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Goutam; Saito, Mitsuo; Mao, Rui-Fen; Wang, Ray; Vadasz, Csaba; Saito, Mariko

    2008-01-01

    Lithium has been shown to be neuroprotective against various insults including ethanol exposure. We previously reported that ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the postnatal day 7 (P7) mice is associated with decreases in phosphorylation levels of Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and alteration in lipid profiles in the brain. Here, P7 mice were injected with ethanol and lithium, and the effects of lithium on ethanol-induced alterations in phosphorylation levels of protein kinases and lipid profiles in the brain were examined. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses showed that lithium significantly blocked ethanol-induced caspase-3 activation and reduction in phosphorylation levels of Akt, GSK-3β, and AMPK. Further, lithium inhibited accumulation of cholesterol ester (ChE) and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) triggered by ethanol in the brain. These results suggest that Akt, GSK-3β, and AMPK are involved in ethanol-induced neurodegeneration and the neuroprotective effects of lithium by modulating both apoptotic and survival pathways

  8. Contribution of a natural polymorphism, protein kinase G, modulates electroconvulsive seizure recovery in D. melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Stephanie P; Risley, Monica G; Miranda, Leonor E; Dawson-Scully, Ken

    2018-05-24

    Drosophila melanogaster is a well-characterized model for neurological disorders and is widely used for investigating causes of altered neuronal excitability leading to seizure-like behavior. One method used to analyze behavioral output of neuronal perturbance is recording the time to locomotor recovery from an electroconvulsive shock. Based on this behavior, we sought to quantify seizure susceptibility in larval D. melanogaster with differences in the enzymatic activity levels of a major protein, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). PKG, encoded by foraging , has two natural allelic variants and has previously been implicated in several important physiological characteristics including: foraging patterns, learning and memory, and environmental stress tolerance. The well-established NO/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway found in the fly, which potentially targets downstream K + channel(s), which ultimately impacts membrane excitability; leading to our hypothesis: altering PKG enzymatic activity modulates time to recovery from an electroconvulsive seizure. Our results show that by both genetically and pharmacologically increasing PKG enzymatic activity, we can decrease the locomotor recovery time from an electroconvulsive seizure in larval D. melanogaster . © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. pH modulates the binding of early growth response protein 1 transcription factor to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikles, David C; Bhat, Vikas; Schuchardt, Brett J; Deegan, Brian J; Seldeen, Kenneth L; McDonald, Caleb B; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-08-01

    The transcription factor early growth response protein (EGR)1 orchestrates a plethora of signaling cascades involved in cellular homeostasis, and its downregulation has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. Herein, using a battery of biophysical tools, we show that the binding of EGR1 to DNA is tightly regulated by solution pH. Importantly, the binding affinity undergoes an enhancement of more than an order of magnitude with an increase in pH from 5 to 8, implying that the deprotonation of an ionizable residue accounts for such behavior. This ionizable residue is identified as His382 by virtue of the fact that its replacement by nonionizable residues abolishes the pH dependence of the binding of EGR1 to DNA. Notably, His382 inserts into the major groove of DNA, and stabilizes the EGR1-DNA interaction via both hydrogen bonding and van der Waals contacts. Remarkably, His382 is mainly conserved across other members of the EGR family, implying that histidine protonation-deprotonation may serve as a molecular switch for modulating the protein-DNA interactions that are central to this family of transcription factors. Collectively, our findings reveal an unexpected but a key step in the molecular recognition of the EGR family of transcription factors, and suggest that they may act as sensors of pH within the intracellular environment. © 2013 FEBS.

  10. Distinct activities of Bartonella henselae type IV secretion effector proteins modulate capillary-like sprout formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidegger, F; Ellner, Y; Guye, P; Rhomberg, T A; Weber, H; Augustin, H G; Dehio, C

    2009-07-01

    The zoonotic pathogen Bartonella henselae (Bh) can lead to vasoproliferative tumour lesions in the skin and inner organs known as bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary peliosis. The knowledge on the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in this pathogen-triggered angiogenic process is confined by the lack of a suitable animal model and a physiologically relevant cell culture model of angiogenesis. Here we employed a three-dimensional in vitro angiogenesis assay of collagen gel-embedded endothelial cell (EC) spheroids to study the angiogenic properties of Bh. Spheroids generated from Bh-infected ECs displayed a high capacity to form sprouts, which represent capillary-like projections into the collagen gel. The VirB/VirD4 type IV secretion system and a subset of its translocated Bartonella effector proteins (Beps) were found to profoundly modulate this Bh-induced sprouting activity. BepA, known to protect ECs from apoptosis, strongly promoted sprout formation. In contrast, BepG, triggering cytoskeletal rearrangements, potently inhibited sprouting. Hence, the here established in vitro model of Bartonella- induced angiogenesis revealed distinct and opposing activities of type IV secretion system effector proteins, which together with a VirB/VirD4-independent effect may control the angiogenic activity of Bh during chronic infection of the vasculature.

  11. Expression, purification and crystallization of two major envelope proteins from white spot syndrome virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Xuhua; Hew, Choy Leong

    2007-01-01

    The crystallization of the N-terminal transmembrane region-truncated VP26 and VP28 of white spot syndrome virus is described. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major virulent pathogen known to infect penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans. VP26 and VP28, two major envelope proteins from WSSV, have been identified and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In order to facilitate purification and crystallization, predicted N-terminal transmembrane regions of approximately 35 amino acids have been truncated from both VP26 and VP28. Truncated VP26 and VP28 and their corresponding SeMet-labelled proteins were purified and the SeMet proteins were crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 were obtained using a reservoir consisting of 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5, 3.0 M sodium chloride and 1%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350, whereas SeMet VP28 was crystallized using a reservoir solution consisting of 25% polyethylene glycol 8000, 0.2 M calcium acetate, 0.1 M Na HEPES pH 7.5 and 1.5%(w/v) 1,2,3-heptanetriol. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 diffract to 2.2 Å resolution and belong to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.92, c = 199.31 Å. SeMet-labelled VP28 crystallizes in space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 105.33, b = 106.71, c = 200.37 Å, and diffracts to 2.0 Å resolution

  12. Expression, purification and crystallization of two major envelope proteins from white spot syndrome virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Xuhua; Hew, Choy Leong, E-mail: dbshewcl@nus.edu.sg [Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

    2007-07-01

    The crystallization of the N-terminal transmembrane region-truncated VP26 and VP28 of white spot syndrome virus is described. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major virulent pathogen known to infect penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans. VP26 and VP28, two major envelope proteins from WSSV, have been identified and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In order to facilitate purification and crystallization, predicted N-terminal transmembrane regions of approximately 35 amino acids have been truncated from both VP26 and VP28. Truncated VP26 and VP28 and their corresponding SeMet-labelled proteins were purified and the SeMet proteins were crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 were obtained using a reservoir consisting of 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5, 3.0 M sodium chloride and 1%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350, whereas SeMet VP28 was crystallized using a reservoir solution consisting of 25% polyethylene glycol 8000, 0.2 M calcium acetate, 0.1 M Na HEPES pH 7.5 and 1.5%(w/v) 1,2,3-heptanetriol. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 diffract to 2.2 Å resolution and belong to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.92, c = 199.31 Å. SeMet-labelled VP28 crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 105.33, b = 106.71, c = 200.37 Å, and diffracts to 2.0 Å resolution.

  13. Peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22 modulates alpha 6 integrin expression in the human endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Jonathan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PMP22, a member of the GAS3 family of tetraspan proteins, is associated with a variety of neurological diseases. Previous studies have shown that PMP22 is expressed in proliferative endometrium, but its function within this tissue is poorly understood. In this study, we first characterized the expression of PMP22 in the human menstrual cycle and began to characterize its function in the endometrium. Methods Using a combination of immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR, we characterized the expression of PMP22 in both proliferative and secretory endometrium. Differences in PMP22 expression between proliferative and secretory endometrium were determined using a Mann-Whitney U test. In order to investigate the influence of PMP22 on α6 integrin expression, cells were created that ectopically overexpressed PMP22 or expressed a siRNA to inhibit its expression. These cells were analyzed for changes in integrins and binding to extracellular matrices. Results In this study, we show that PMP22 expression is higher in proliferative phase than secretory phase. Functionally, we have begun to characterize the functional significance of this expression. Previous studies have suggested a link between PMP22 and α6 integrin, and therefore we asked whether PMP22 could associate or potentially modulate the expression of α6 integrin. Expression of both PMP22 and α6 integrin were detectable in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells, and we show that both proteins can associate and colocalize with each other. To understand if PMP22 directly altered the expression of a6 integrin, we examined cell lines with modulated levels of the protein. Overexpression of PMP22 was sufficient to increase α6 integrin surface expression with a concominant increase in binding to the extracellular matrix laminin, while a reduction in PMP22 suppressed α6 integrin surface expression. Conclusion These findings suggest a physiologic role for PMP22 on the

  14. Peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) modulates alpha 6 integrin expression in the human endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rajiv G; Sudhakar, Deepthi; Hogue, Claire P; Amici, Stephanie; Gordon, Lynn K; Braun, Jonathan; Notterpek, Lucia; Goodglick, Lee; Wadehra, Madhuri

    2011-04-25

    PMP22, a member of the GAS3 family of tetraspan proteins, is associated with a variety of neurological diseases. Previous studies have shown that PMP22 is expressed in proliferative endometrium, but its function within this tissue is poorly understood. In this study, we first characterized the expression of PMP22 in the human menstrual cycle and began to characterize its function in the endometrium. Using a combination of immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR, we characterized the expression of PMP22 in both proliferative and secretory endometrium. Differences in PMP22 expression between proliferative and secretory endometrium were determined using a Mann-Whitney U test. In order to investigate the influence of PMP22 on α6 integrin expression, cells were created that ectopically overexpressed PMP22 or expressed a siRNA to inhibit its expression. These cells were analyzed for changes in integrins and binding to extracellular matrices. In this study, we show that PMP22 expression is higher in proliferative phase than secretory phase. Functionally, we have begun to characterize the functional significance of this expression. Previous studies have suggested a link between PMP22 and α6 integrin, and therefore we asked whether PMP22 could associate or potentially modulate the expression of α6 integrin. Expression of both PMP22 and α6 integrin were detectable in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells, and we show that both proteins can associate and colocalize with each other. To understand if PMP22 directly altered the expression of a6 integrin, we examined cell lines with modulated levels of the protein. Overexpression of PMP22 was sufficient to increase α6 integrin surface expression with a concominant increase in binding to the extracellular matrix laminin, while a reduction in PMP22 suppressed α6 integrin surface expression. These findings suggest a physiologic role for PMP22 on the expression of α6 integrin. We predict that this may be important for the

  15. High-Density Lipoprotein Reduction Differentially Modulates to Classical and Nonclassical Monocyte Subpopulations in Metabolic Syndrome Patients and in LPS-Stimulated Primary Human Monocytes In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Johanna L.; Manjarrez-Reyna, Aaron N.; Gómez-Arauz, Angélica Y.; Leon-Cabrera, Sonia; Bueno-Hernández, Nallely; Islas-Andrade, Sergio

    2018-01-01

    The effect of metabolic syndrome on human monocyte subpopulations has not yet been studied. Our main goal was to examine monocyte subpopulations in metabolic syndrome patients, while also identifying the risk factors that could directly influence these cells. Eighty-six subjects were divided into metabolic syndrome patients and controls. Monocyte subpopulations were quantified by flow cytometry, and interleukin- (IL-) 1β secretion levels were measured by ELISA. Primary human monocytes were cultured in low or elevated concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The nonclassical monocyte (NCM) percentage was significantly increased in metabolic syndrome patients as compared to controls, whereas classical monocytes (CM) were reduced. Among all metabolic syndrome risk factors, HDL reduction exhibited the most important correlation with monocyte subpopulations and then was studied in vitro. Low HDL concentration reduced the CM percentage, whereas it increased the NCM percentage and IL-1β secretion in LPS-treated monocytes. The LPS effect was abolished when monocytes were cultured in elevated HDL concentrations. Concurring with in vitro results, IL-1β serum values significantly increased in metabolic syndrome patients with low HDL levels as compared to metabolic syndrome patients without HDL reduction. Our data demonstrate that HDL directly modulates monocyte subpopulations in metabolic syndrome. PMID:29850624

  16. High-Density Lipoprotein Reduction Differentially Modulates to Classical and Nonclassical Monocyte Subpopulations in Metabolic Syndrome Patients and in LPS-Stimulated Primary Human Monocytes In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna L. Grün

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of metabolic syndrome on human monocyte subpopulations has not yet been studied. Our main goal was to examine monocyte subpopulations in metabolic syndrome patients, while also identifying the risk factors that could directly influence these cells. Eighty-six subjects were divided into metabolic syndrome patients and controls. Monocyte subpopulations were quantified by flow cytometry, and interleukin- (IL- 1β secretion levels were measured by ELISA. Primary human monocytes were cultured in low or elevated concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The nonclassical monocyte (NCM percentage was significantly increased in metabolic syndrome patients as compared to controls, whereas classical monocytes (CM were reduced. Among all metabolic syndrome risk factors, HDL reduction exhibited the most important correlation with monocyte subpopulations and then was studied in vitro. Low HDL concentration reduced the CM percentage, whereas it increased the NCM percentage and IL-1β secretion in LPS-treated monocytes. The LPS effect was abolished when monocytes were cultured in elevated HDL concentrations. Concurring with in vitro results, IL-1β serum values significantly increased in metabolic syndrome patients with low HDL levels as compared to metabolic syndrome patients without HDL reduction. Our data demonstrate that HDL directly modulates monocyte subpopulations in metabolic syndrome.

  17. Modulation of histone deacetylase attenuates naloxone-precipitated opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehni, Ashish K; Singh, Nirmal; Rachamalla, Mahesh; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2012-06-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of selective inhibitors of histone deacetylase and/or N-acetyl-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-al (Ac-DEVD-CHO), a selective interleukin-1β converting enzyme inhibitor, on the development of naloxone-induced opioid withdrawal syndrome both in vitro and in vivo and the effect of histone deacetylase inhibition on histone H3 acetylation in brain. Sub-acute morphine administration followed by a single injection of naloxone (8 mg/kg, i.p.) was used to precipitate opioid withdrawal syndrome in mice. Behavioral observations were made immediately after naloxone treatment. Withdrawal syndrome was quantitatively assessed in terms of withdrawal severity score and frequency of jumping, rearing, fore paw licking and circling. Separately naloxone-induced contraction in morphine-dependent isolated rat ileum was employed as an in vitro model. An isobolographic study design was employed to assess potential synergistic activity between trichostatin A and Ac-DEVD-CHO. Brain histone acetylation status was examined by western blotting. Injection of naloxone precipitated a severe form of abstinence syndrome in morphine-dependent mice along with strong contracture in isolated rat ileum. Administration of tributyrin (1.5, 3 and 6 g/kg, p.o.), trichostatin A (0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg, p.o.) and Ac-DEVD-CHO (0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg, p.o.) markedly and dose dependently attenuated naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal syndrome in vivo as well as in vitro in rat ileum. Trichostatin A was also observed to exert a synergistic interaction with Ac-DEVD-CHO. Western blot analysis revealed that multiple administration with the effective dose of tributyrin or trichostatin A in the in vivo experiments induced hyperacetylation of histone H3 in the mouse brain. Thus, it is proposed that histone deacetylase activation linked mechanism might be involved in the development of opioid dependence and the precipitation of its withdrawal syndrome.

  18. HBV core protein allosteric modulators differentially alter cccDNA biosynthesis from de novo infection and intracellular amplification pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fang; Zhao, Qiong; Cheng, Junjun; Qi, Yonghe; Su, Qing; Wei, Lai; Li, Wenhui; Chang, Jinhong

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein assembles viral pre-genomic (pg) RNA and DNA polymerase into nucleocapsids for reverse transcriptional DNA replication to take place. Several chemotypes of small molecules, including heteroaryldihydropyrimidines (HAPs) and sulfamoylbenzamides (SBAs), have been discovered to allosterically modulate core protein structure and consequentially alter the kinetics and pathway of core protein assembly, resulting in formation of irregularly-shaped core protein aggregates or “empty” capsids devoid of pre-genomic RNA and viral DNA polymerase. Interestingly, in addition to inhibiting nucleocapsid assembly and subsequent viral genome replication, we have now demonstrated that HAPs and SBAs differentially modulate the biosynthesis of covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA from de novo infection and intracellular amplification pathways by inducing disassembly of nucleocapsids derived from virions as well as double-stranded DNA-containing progeny nucleocapsids in the cytoplasm. Specifically, the mistimed cuing of nucleocapsid uncoating prevents cccDNA formation during de novo infection of hepatocytes, while transiently accelerating cccDNA synthesis from cytoplasmic progeny nucleocapsids. Our studies indicate that elongation of positive-stranded DNA induces structural changes of nucleocapsids, which confers ability of mature nucleocapsids to bind CpAMs and triggers its disassembly. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the dual effects of the core protein allosteric modulators on nucleocapsid assembly and disassembly will facilitate the discovery of novel core protein-targeting antiviral agents that can more efficiently suppress cccDNA synthesis and cure chronic hepatitis B. PMID:28945802

  19. HBV core protein allosteric modulators differentially alter cccDNA biosynthesis from de novo infection and intracellular amplification pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fang; Zhao, Qiong; Sheraz, Muhammad; Cheng, Junjun; Qi, Yonghe; Su, Qing; Cuconati, Andrea; Wei, Lai; Du, Yanming; Li, Wenhui; Chang, Jinhong; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2017-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein assembles viral pre-genomic (pg) RNA and DNA polymerase into nucleocapsids for reverse transcriptional DNA replication to take place. Several chemotypes of small molecules, including heteroaryldihydropyrimidines (HAPs) and sulfamoylbenzamides (SBAs), have been discovered to allosterically modulate core protein structure and consequentially alter the kinetics and pathway of core protein assembly, resulting in formation of irregularly-shaped core protein aggregates or "empty" capsids devoid of pre-genomic RNA and viral DNA polymerase. Interestingly, in addition to inhibiting nucleocapsid assembly and subsequent viral genome replication, we have now demonstrated that HAPs and SBAs differentially modulate the biosynthesis of covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA from de novo infection and intracellular amplification pathways by inducing disassembly of nucleocapsids derived from virions as well as double-stranded DNA-containing progeny nucleocapsids in the cytoplasm. Specifically, the mistimed cuing of nucleocapsid uncoating prevents cccDNA formation during de novo infection of hepatocytes, while transiently accelerating cccDNA synthesis from cytoplasmic progeny nucleocapsids. Our studies indicate that elongation of positive-stranded DNA induces structural changes of nucleocapsids, which confers ability of mature nucleocapsids to bind CpAMs and triggers its disassembly. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the dual effects of the core protein allosteric modulators on nucleocapsid assembly and disassembly will facilitate the discovery of novel core protein-targeting antiviral agents that can more efficiently suppress cccDNA synthesis and cure chronic hepatitis B.

  20. HBV core protein allosteric modulators differentially alter cccDNA biosynthesis from de novo infection and intracellular amplification pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Guo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV core protein assembles viral pre-genomic (pg RNA and DNA polymerase into nucleocapsids for reverse transcriptional DNA replication to take place. Several chemotypes of small molecules, including heteroaryldihydropyrimidines (HAPs and sulfamoylbenzamides (SBAs, have been discovered to allosterically modulate core protein structure and consequentially alter the kinetics and pathway of core protein assembly, resulting in formation of irregularly-shaped core protein aggregates or "empty" capsids devoid of pre-genomic RNA and viral DNA polymerase. Interestingly, in addition to inhibiting nucleocapsid assembly and subsequent viral genome replication, we have now demonstrated that HAPs and SBAs differentially modulate the biosynthesis of covalently closed circular (ccc DNA from de novo infection and intracellular amplification pathways by inducing disassembly of nucleocapsids derived from virions as well as double-stranded DNA-containing progeny nucleocapsids in the cytoplasm. Specifically, the mistimed cuing of nucleocapsid uncoating prevents cccDNA formation during de novo infection of hepatocytes, while transiently accelerating cccDNA synthesis from cytoplasmic progeny nucleocapsids. Our studies indicate that elongation of positive-stranded DNA induces structural changes of nucleocapsids, which confers ability of mature nucleocapsids to bind CpAMs and triggers its disassembly. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the dual effects of the core protein allosteric modulators on nucleocapsid assembly and disassembly will facilitate the discovery of novel core protein-targeting antiviral agents that can more efficiently suppress cccDNA synthesis and cure chronic hepatitis B.

  1. Modulation of Protein S-Nitrosylation by Isoprene Emission in Poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzo, Elisa; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Velikova, Violeta; Ghirardo, Andrea; Lindermayr, Christian; Hauck, Stefanie M; Bernhardt, Jörg; Riedel, Katharina; Durner, Jörg; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2016-04-01

    Researchers have been examining the biological function(s) of isoprene in isoprene-emitting (IE) species for two decades. There is overwhelming evidence that leaf-internal isoprene increases the thermotolerance of plants and protects them against oxidative stress, thus mitigating a wide range of abiotic stresses. However, the mechanisms of abiotic stress mitigation by isoprene are still under debate. Here, we assessed the impact of isoprene on the emission of nitric oxide (NO) and the S-nitroso-proteome of IE and non-isoprene-emitting (NE) gray poplar (Populus × canescens) after acute ozone fumigation. The short-term oxidative stress induced a rapid and strong emission of NO in NE compared with IE genotypes. Whereas IE and NE plants exhibited under nonstressful conditions only slight differences in their S-nitrosylation pattern, the in vivo S-nitroso-proteome of the NE genotype was more susceptible to ozone-induced changes compared with the IE plants. The results suggest that the nitrosative pressure (NO burst) is higher in NE plants, underlining the proposed molecular dialogue between isoprene and the free radical NO Proteins belonging to the photosynthetic light and dark reactions, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, protein metabolism, and redox regulation exhibited increased S-nitrosylation in NE samples compared with IE plants upon oxidative stress. Because the posttranslational modification of proteins via S-nitrosylation often impacts enzymatic activities, our data suggest that isoprene indirectly regulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via the control of the S-nitrosylation level of ROS-metabolizing enzymes, thus modulating the extent and velocity at which the ROS and NO signaling molecules are generated within a plant cell. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Modulation of Protein S-Nitrosylation by Isoprene Emission in Poplar1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzo, Elisa; Velikova, Violeta; Ghirardo, Andrea; Lindermayr, Christian; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Riedel, Katharina; Durner, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have been examining the biological function(s) of isoprene in isoprene-emitting (IE) species for two decades. There is overwhelming evidence that leaf-internal isoprene increases the thermotolerance of plants and protects them against oxidative stress, thus mitigating a wide range of abiotic stresses. However, the mechanisms of abiotic stress mitigation by isoprene are still under debate. Here, we assessed the impact of isoprene on the emission of nitric oxide (NO) and the S-nitroso-proteome of IE and non-isoprene-emitting (NE) gray poplar (Populus × canescens) after acute ozone fumigation. The short-term oxidative stress induced a rapid and strong emission of NO in NE compared with IE genotypes. Whereas IE and NE plants exhibited under nonstressful conditions only slight differences in their S-nitrosylation pattern, the in vivo S-nitroso-proteome of the NE genotype was more susceptible to ozone-induced changes compared with the IE plants. The results suggest that the nitrosative pressure (NO burst) is higher in NE plants, underlining the proposed molecular dialogue between isoprene and the free radical NO. Proteins belonging to the photosynthetic light and dark reactions, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, protein metabolism, and redox regulation exhibited increased S-nitrosylation in NE samples compared with IE plants upon oxidative stress. Because the posttranslational modification of proteins via S-nitrosylation often impacts enzymatic activities, our data suggest that isoprene indirectly regulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via the control of the S-nitrosylation level of ROS-metabolizing enzymes, thus modulating the extent and velocity at which the ROS and NO signaling molecules are generated within a plant cell. PMID:26850277

  3. Combined enteral infusion of glutamine, carbohydrates, and antioxidants modulates gut protein metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coëffier, Moïse; Claeyssens, Sophie; Lecleire, Stéphane; Leblond, Jonathan; Coquard, Aude; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Lavoinne, Alain; Ducrotté, Philippe; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Available data suggest that nutrients can affect intestinal protein metabolism, which contributes to the regulation of gut barrier function. We aimed to assess whether an oral nutritional supplement (ONS) containing glutamine (as the dipeptide Ala-Gln), carbohydrates, and antioxidants would modulate duodenal protein metabolism in healthy humans. Thirty healthy control subjects were included and, over a period of 5 h, received by nasogastric tube either saline or ONS providing 11.7 kcal/kg as 0.877 g Ala-Gln/kg, 3.9 g carbohydrates/kg, and antioxidants (29.25 mg vitamin C/kg, 9.75 mg vitamin E/kg, 195 microg beta-carotene/kg, 5.85 mg Se/kg, and 390 microg Zn/kg) or glutamine (0.585 g/kg, 2.34 kcal/kg). Simultaneously, a continuous intravenous infusion of l-[1-(13)C]-leucine was done until endoscopy. Leucine enrichment was assessed by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis, and mucosal fractional synthesis rate was calculated by using intracellular amino acid enrichment as precursor. Mucosal proteolytic pathways were also evaluated. ONS infusion resulted in a doubling increase (P < 0.01) of duodenal fractional synthesis rate and a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in cathepsin D-mediated proteolysis compared with saline, whereas proteasome and Ca(2+)-dependent activities were unaffected. ONS infusion significantly (P < 0.01) decreased duodenal glutathione but not glutathione disulfide concentrations or the ratio of glutathione to glutathione disulfide. Insulinemia increased after ONS infusion, whereas plasma essential amino acids decreased. Infusion of glutamine alone did not reproduce ONS effects. ONS infusion improves duodenal protein balance in healthy humans. Further investigations are needed to study the origin of these effects and to evaluate ONS supply in stressed persons.

  4. Engineered mutations in fibrillin-1 leading to Marfan syndrome act at the protein, cellular and organismal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyer, Karina A; Reinhardt, Dieter P

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are the major components of microfibrils in the extracellular matrix of elastic and non-elastic tissues. They are multi-domain proteins, containing primarily calcium binding epidermal growth factor-like (cbEGF) domains and 8-cysteine/transforming growth factor-beta binding protein-like (TB) domains. Mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene give rise to Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder with clinical complications in the cardiovascular, skeletal, ocular and other organ systems. Here, we review the consequences of engineered Marfan syndrome mutations in fibrillin-1 at the protein, cellular and organismal levels. Representative point mutations associated with Marfan syndrome in affected individuals have been introduced and analyzed in recombinant fibrillin-1 fragments. Those mutations affect fibrillin-1 on a structural and functional level. Mutations which impair folding of cbEGF domains can affect protein trafficking. Protein folding disrupted by some mutations can lead to defective secretion in mutant fibrillin-1 fragments, whereas fragments with other Marfan mutations are secreted normally. Many Marfan mutations render fibrillin-1 more susceptible to proteolysis. There is also evidence that some mutations affect heparin binding. Few mutations have been further analyzed in mouse models. An extensively studied mouse model of Marfan syndrome expresses mouse fibrillin-1 with a missense mutation (p.C1039G). The mice display similar characteristics to human patients with Marfan syndrome. Overall, the analyses of engineered mutations leading to Marfan syndrome provide important insights into the pathogenic molecular mechanisms exerted by mutated fibrillin-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Metabolic syndrome, C-reactive protein and cardiovascular risk in psoriasis patients: a cross-sectional study*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, Renato Soriani; Silva, Daniela Antoniali; Cardili, Renata Nahas; Souza, Cacilda da Silva

    2018-01-01

    Background Psoriasis has been associated with co-morbidities and elevated cardiovascular risk. Objectives To analyze the relationships among metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular risk, C-reactive protein, gender, and Psoriasis severity. Methods In this cross-sectional study, plaque Psoriasis patients (n=90), distributed equally in gender, were analyzed according to: Psoriasis Area and Severity Index, cardiovascular risk determined by the Framingham risk score and global risk assessment, C-reactive protein and metabolic syndrome criteria (NCEPT-ATP III). Results Metabolic syndrome frequency was 43.3% overall, without significance between genders (P=0.14); but women had higher risk for obesity (OR 2.56, 95%CI 1.02-6.41; P=0.04) and systemic arterial hypertension (OR 3.29, 95%CI 1.39-7.81; P=0.006). The increase in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index also increased the risk for metabolic syndrome (OR 1.060, 95%CI 1.006-1.117; P=0.03). Absolute 10-year cardiovascular risk was higher in males (P=0.002), but after global risk assessment, 51.1% patients, 52.2% women, were re-classified as high-intermediate cardiovascular risk; without significance between genders (P=0.83). C-reactive protein level was elevated nearly six-fold overall, higher in metabolic syndrome (P=0.05), systemic arterial hypertension (P=0.004), and high-intermediate 10-year cardiovascular risk patients (Preactive protein patients (t=1.98; P=0.05). Study limitations Restricted sample, hospital-based and representative of a single center and no specification of psoriatic arthritis. Conclusions Psoriasis, metabolic syndrome, systemic arterial hypertension and age share the increase in C-reactive protein, which could implicate in additional burden for increasing the cardiovascular risk and be an alert for effective interventions. PMID:29723366

  6. Structures of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module Bound to MbtH-like Proteins Support a Highly Dynamic Domain Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bradley R.; Drake, Eric J.; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M. (UMM); (HWMRI)

    2016-09-05

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) produce a wide variety of peptide natural products. During synthesis, the multidomain NRPSs act as an assembly line, passing the growing product from one module to the next. Each module generally consists of an integrated peptidyl carrier protein, an amino acid-loading adenylation domain, and a condensation domain that catalyzes peptide bond formation. Some adenylation domains interact with small partner proteins called MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) that enhance solubility or activity. A structure of an MLP bound to an adenylation domain has been previously reported using a truncated adenylation domain, precluding any insight that might be derived from understanding the influence of the MLP on the intact adenylation domain or on the dynamics of the entire NRPS module. Here, we present the structures of the full-length NRPS EntF bound to the MLPs from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These new structures, along with biochemical and bioinformatics support, further elaborate the residues that define the MLP-adenylation domain interface. Additionally, the structures highlight the dynamic behavior of NRPS modules, including the module core formed by the adenylation and condensation domains as well as the orientation of the mobile thioesterase domain.

  7. Dietary modulators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors: implications for the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, Amir J; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2008-01-01

    In its simplest form, obesity is a state characterized by nutrient overabundance leading to hypertrophy of storage cells in white adipose tissue and the deposition of excess lipids into key metabolic regions, such as skeletal muscle and liver. Ever so steadily, this condition begins to manifest itself as progressive insulin resistance and thus ensues a myriad of other chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension, which all fall into the realm of the metabolic syndrome. To offset imbalances in nutrient availability, however, it appears that nature has developed the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), a family of endogenous lipid sensors that adeptly modulate our rates of macronutrient oxidation and regulate the systemic inflammatory response, which itself is tightly linked to the development of obesity-induced chronic disease. By understanding how PPARs alpha, delta and gamma act jointly to maintain metabolic homeostasis and reduce the chronic inflammation associated with obesity, we may one day discover that the machinery needed to defeat obesity and control the devastating consequences of the metabolic syndrome have been with us the entire time.

  8. A pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex modulates androgen receptor-mediated transcription and associates with components of the splicing machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adegbola, Onikepe; Pasternack, Gary R.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein interact. pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein are nuclear receptor transcriptional coregulators: the retinoblastoma protein is a coactivator for androgen receptor, the major regulator of prostate cancer growth, while pp32, which is highly expressed in prostate cancer, is a corepressor of the estrogen receptor. We now show pp32 increases androgen receptor-mediated transcription and the retinoblastoma protein modulates this activity. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identify members of the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex as PSF and nonO/p54nrb, proteins implicated in coordinate regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and splicing. We show that the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex is modulated during TPA-induced K562 differentiation. Present evidence suggests that nuclear receptors assemble multiprotein complexes to coordinately regulate transcription and mRNA processing. Our results suggest that pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein may be part of a multiprotein complex that coordinately regulates nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and mRNA processing

  9. The fragile X protein binds mRNAs involved in cancer progression and modulates metastasis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucá, Rossella; Averna, Michele; Zalfa, Francesca; Vecchi, Manuela; Bianchi, Fabrizio; La Fata, Giorgio; Del Nonno, Franca; Nardacci, Roberta; Bianchi, Marco; Nuciforo, Paolo; Munck, Sebastian; Parrella, Paola; Moura, Rute; Signori, Emanuela; Alston, Robert; Kuchnio, Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Vito Michele; Piacentini, Mauro; De Strooper, Bart; Achsel, Tilmann; Neri, Giovanni; Neven, Patrick; Evans, D Gareth; Carmeliet, Peter; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Bagni, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    The role of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is well established in brain, where its absence leads to the fragile X syndrome (FXS). FMRP is almost ubiquitously expressed, suggesting that, in addition to its effects in brain, it may have fundamental roles in other organs. There is evidence that FMRP expression can be linked to cancer. FMR1 mRNA, encoding FMRP, is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. A decreased risk of cancer has been reported in patients with FXS while a patient-case with FXS showed an unusual decrease of tumour brain invasiveness. However, a role for FMRP in regulating cancer biology, if any, remains unknown. We show here that FMRP and FMR1 mRNA levels correlate with prognostic indicators of aggressive breast cancer, lung metastases probability and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). We establish that FMRP overexpression in murine breast primary tumours enhances lung metastasis while its reduction has the opposite effect regulating cell spreading and invasion. FMRP binds mRNAs involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion including E-cadherin and Vimentin mRNAs, hallmarks of EMT and cancer progression. © 2013 The Authors. Published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd on behalf of EMBO.

  10. The Fragile X Protein binds mRNAs involved in cancer progression and modulates metastasis formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucá, Rossella; Averna, Michele; Zalfa, Francesca; Vecchi, Manuela; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Fata, Giorgio La; Del Nonno, Franca; Nardacci, Roberta; Bianchi, Marco; Nuciforo, Paolo; Munck, Sebastian; Parrella, Paola; Moura, Rute; Signori, Emanuela; Alston, Robert; Kuchnio, Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Vito Michele; Piacentini, Mauro; De Strooper, Bart; Achsel, Tilmann; Neri, Giovanni; Neven, Patrick; Evans, D Gareth; Carmeliet, Peter; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Bagni, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The role of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is well established in brain, where its absence leads to the fragile X syndrome (FXS). FMRP is almost ubiquitously expressed, suggesting that, in addition to its effects in brain, it may have fundamental roles in other organs. There is evidence that FMRP expression can be linked to cancer. FMR1 mRNA, encoding FMRP, is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. A decreased risk of cancer has been reported in patients with FXS while a patient-case with FXS showed an unusual decrease of tumour brain invasiveness. However, a role for FMRP in regulating cancer biology, if any, remains unknown. We show here that FMRP and FMR1 mRNA levels correlate with prognostic indicators of aggressive breast cancer, lung metastases probability and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). We establish that FMRP overexpression in murine breast primary tumours enhances lung metastasis while its reduction has the opposite effect regulating cell spreading and invasion. FMRP binds mRNAs involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion including E-cadherin and Vimentin mRNAs, hallmarks of EMT and cancer progression. PMID:24092663

  11. Interactions between Gut Microbiota, Host Genetics and Diet Modulate the Predisposition to Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussar, Siegfried; Griffin, Nicholas W; Bezy, Olivier; Fujisaka, Shiho; Vienberg, Sara; Softic, Samir; Deng, Luxue; Bry, Lynn; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Kahn, C Ronald

    2015-09-01

    Obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome result from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors, including the gut microbiota. To dissect these interactions, we utilized three commonly used inbred strains of mice-obesity/diabetes-prone C57Bl/6J mice, obesity/diabetes-resistant 129S1/SvImJ from Jackson Laboratory, and obesity-prone but diabetes-resistant 129S6/SvEvTac from Taconic-plus three derivative lines generated by breeding these strains in a new, common environment. Analysis of metabolic parameters and gut microbiota in all strains and their environmentally normalized derivatives revealed strong interactions between microbiota, diet, breeding site, and metabolic phenotype. Strain-dependent and strain-independent correlations were found between specific microbiota and phenotypes, some of which could be transferred to germ-free recipient animals by fecal transplantation. Environmental reprogramming of microbiota resulted in 129S6/SvEvTac becoming obesity resistant. Thus, development of obesity/metabolic syndrome is the result of interactions between gut microbiota, host genetics, and diet. In permissive genetic backgrounds, environmental reprograming of microbiota can ameliorate development of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modulation of intestinal and liver fatty acid-binding proteins in Caco-2 cells by lipids, hormones and cytokines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dube, N.; Delvin, E.; Yotov, W.; Garofalo, C.; Bendayan, M.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Levy, E.

    2001-01-01

    Intestinal and liver fatty acid binding proteins (I- and L-FABP) are thought to play a role in enterocyte fatty acid (FA) trafficking. Their modulation by cell differentiation and various potential effectors was investigated in the human Caco-2 cell line. With the acquisition of enterocytic

  13. Frontotemporal dementia with trans-activation response DNA-binding protein 43 presenting with catatonic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ryohei; Kawakami, Ito; Onaya, Mitsumoto; Higashi, Shinji; Arai, Nobutaka; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Hasegawa, Masato; Arai, Tetsuaki

    2017-11-07

    Catatonia is a clinical syndrome characterized by symptoms such as immobility, mutism, stupor, stereotypy, echophenomena, catalepsy, automatic obedience, posturing, negativism, gegenhalten and ambitendency. This syndrome occurs mostly in mood disorder and schizophrenic patients, and is related to neuronal dysfunction involving the frontal lobe. Some cases of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with catatonia have been reported, but these cases were not examined by autopsy. Here, we report on a FTD case which showed catatonia after the first episode of brief psychotic disorder. At the age of 58, the patient had a sudden onset of disorganized behavior and meaningless speech. Psychotropic drugs were effective for catatonic symptoms. However, after remission apathy, hyperorality, socially inappropriate behavior, hoarding, and an instinctive grasp reaction appeared and persisted. Brain MRI showed significant atrophy of the bilateral fronto-temporal lobes. A neuropathological examination revealed extensive trans-activation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) positive neurocytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites in the brain, including the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and brainstem. Pathological diagnosis was frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP) type C, which was also confirmed by the band pattern of C-terminal fragments of TDP-43 on western blotting of sarkosyl-insoluble fractions extracted from the frozen brain. Dysfunction of the thalamus, globus pallidus, supplementary motor area, amygdala and cingulate cortex have been said to be related to the catatonic syndrome. In this case, these areas were affected, showing abnormal TDP-43-positive structures. Further studies are expected to confirm further clinical - pathological correlations to FTLD. © 2017 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  14. Reduced high-molecular-weight adiponectin and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein are synergistic risk factors for metabolic syndrome in a large-scale middle-aged to elderly population: the Shimanami Health Promoting Program Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabara, Yasuharu; Osawa, Haruhiko; Kawamoto, Ryuichi; Tachibana-Iimori, Rieko; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Nakura, Jun; Miki, Tetsuro; Makino, Hideich; Kohara, Katsuhiko

    2008-03-01

    In Western countries, one of the most important modifiable targets for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases is metabolic syndrome. Adiponectin is an adipose tissue-specific plasma protein that inversely associates with metabolic syndrome. Among several molecular isoforms, high-molecular-weight (HMW) complex is considered the active form. Increased serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentration also associates with metabolic syndrome, and adiponectin could modulate plasma C-reactive protein levels. Here, through cross-sectional investigation, we investigated whether reduced HMW adiponectin and increased hsCRP levels in plasma are synergistically associated with metabolic syndrome. Measurement of HMW complex of adiponectin is one of the novelties of this study. We analyzed 1845 community-dwelling middle-aged to elderly subjects (62+/-13 yr). Plasma HMW adiponectin levels were measured by ELISA. Clinical parameters were obtained from the subjects' personal health records, evaluated at their annual medical check-up. Each component of metabolic syndrome, except for raised blood pressure, showed significantly lower plasma HMW adiponectin concentrations for both men and women (P<0.001). In contrast, plasma hsCRP levels were significantly higher in subjects with metabolic disorders (P<0.001). After adjusting for other confounding factors, HMW adiponectin [log normalized, odds ratio 0.084 (95% confidence interval 0.050-0.142), P<0.001] and hsCRP [3.009 (2.175-4.163), P<0.001] were identified as independent determinants of metabolic syndrome. In addition to the direct associations, we also observed a synergistic effect between these two molecules (F=11.8, P<0.001). Reduced HMW adiponectin and elevated hsCRP are synergistically associated with the accumulation of metabolic disorders. The combination of these markers would be useful for identifying at-risk populations.

  15. D1 dopamine receptor signaling is modulated by the R7 RGS protein EAT-16 and the R7 binding protein RSBP-1 in Caenoerhabditis elegans motor neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khursheed A Wani

    Full Text Available Dopamine signaling modulates voluntary movement and reward-driven behaviors by acting through G protein-coupled receptors in striatal neurons, and defects in dopamine signaling underlie Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Despite the importance of understanding how dopamine modifies the activity of striatal neurons to control basal ganglia output, the molecular mechanisms that control dopamine signaling remain largely unclear. Dopamine signaling also controls locomotion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. To better understand how dopamine acts in the brain we performed a large-scale dsRNA interference screen in C. elegans for genes required for endogenous dopamine signaling and identified six genes (eat-16, rsbp-1, unc-43, flp-1, grk-1, and cat-1 required for dopamine-mediated behavior. We then used a combination of mutant analysis and cell-specific transgenic rescue experiments to investigate the functional interaction between the proteins encoded by two of these genes, eat-16 and rsbp-1, within single cell types and to examine their role in the modulation of dopamine receptor signaling. We found that EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to modulate dopamine signaling and that while they are coexpressed with both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors, they do not modulate D2 receptor signaling. Instead, EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to selectively inhibit D1 dopamine receptor signaling in cholinergic motor neurons to modulate locomotion behavior.

  16. Acyl-CoA-Binding Protein ACBP1 Modulates Sterol Synthesis during Embryogenesis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, An-Shan; Xue, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) and sterols are primary metabolites that exert interrelated functions as structural and signaling lipids. Despite their common syntheses from acetyl-coenzyme A, homeostatic cross talk remains enigmatic. Six Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) acyl-coenzyme A-binding proteins (ACBPs) are involved in FA metabolism. ACBP1 interacts with PHOSPHOLIPASE Dα1 and regulates phospholipid composition. Here, its specific role in the negative modulation of sterol synthesis during embryogenesis is reported. ACBP1, likely in a liganded state, interacts with STEROL C4-METHYL OXIDASE1-1 (SMO1-1), a rate-limiting enzyme in the sterol pathway. Proembryo abortion in the double mutant indicated that the ACBP1-SMO1-1 interaction is synthetic lethal, corroborating with their strong promoter activities in developing ovules. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed quantitative and compositional changes in FAs and sterols upon overexpression or mutation of ACBP1 and/or SMO1-1. Aberrant levels of these metabolites may account for the downstream defect in lipid signaling. GLABRA2 (GL2), encoding a phospholipid/sterol-binding homeodomain transcription factor, was up-regulated in developing seeds of acbp1, smo1-1, and ACBP1+/−smo1-1 in comparison with the wild type. Consistent with the corresponding transcriptional alteration of GL2 targets, high-oil, low-mucilage phenotypes of gl2 were phenocopied in ACBP1+/−smo1-1. Thus, ACBP1 appears to modulate the metabolism of two important lipid classes (FAs and sterols) influencing cellular signaling. PMID:28500265

  17. Acyl-CoA-Binding Protein ACBP1 Modulates Sterol Synthesis during Embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Liao, Pan; Yeung, Edward C; Hsiao, An-Shan; Xue, Yan; Chye, Mee-Len

    2017-07-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) and sterols are primary metabolites that exert interrelated functions as structural and signaling lipids. Despite their common syntheses from acetyl-coenzyme A, homeostatic cross talk remains enigmatic. Six Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) acyl-coenzyme A-binding proteins (ACBPs) are involved in FA metabolism. ACBP1 interacts with PHOSPHOLIPASE Dα1 and regulates phospholipid composition. Here, its specific role in the negative modulation of sterol synthesis during embryogenesis is reported. ACBP1, likely in a liganded state, interacts with STEROL C4-METHYL OXIDASE1-1 (SMO1-1), a rate-limiting enzyme in the sterol pathway. Proembryo abortion in the double mutant indicated that the ACBP1-SMO1-1 interaction is synthetic lethal, corroborating with their strong promoter activities in developing ovules. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed quantitative and compositional changes in FAs and sterols upon overexpression or mutation of ACBP1 and/or SMO1-1 Aberrant levels of these metabolites may account for the downstream defect in lipid signaling. GLABRA2 ( GL2 ), encoding a phospholipid/sterol-binding homeodomain transcription factor, was up-regulated in developing seeds of acbp1 , smo1-1 , and ACBP1 +/- smo1-1 in comparison with the wild type. Consistent with the corresponding transcriptional alteration of GL2 targets, high-oil, low-mucilage phenotypes of gl2 were phenocopied in ACBP1 +/- smo1-1 Thus, ACBP1 appears to modulate the metabolism of two important lipid classes (FAs and sterols) influencing cellular signaling. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Prolonged Adaptation to a Low or High Protein Diet Does Not Modulate Basal Muscle Protein Synthesis Rates - A Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursel, Rick; Martens, Eveline A P; Gonnissen, Hanne K J; Hamer, Henrike M; Senden, Joan M G; van Loon, Luc J C; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2015-01-01

    Based on controlled 36 h experiments a higher dietary protein intake causes a positive protein balance and a negative fat balance. A positive net protein balance may support fat free mass accrual. However, few data are available on the impact of more prolonged changes in habitual protein intake on whole-body protein metabolism and basal muscle protein synthesis rates. To assess changes in whole-body protein turnover and basal muscle protein synthesis rates following 12 weeks of adaptation to a low versus high dietary protein intake. A randomized parallel study was performed in 40 subjects who followed either a high protein (2.4 g protein/kg/d) or low protein (0.4 g protein/kg/d) energy-balanced diet (30/35/35% or 5/60/35% energy from protein/carbohydrate/fat) for a period of 12 weeks. A subgroup of 7 men and 8 women (body mass index: 22.8±2.3 kg/m2, age: 24.3±4.9 y) were selected to evaluate the impact of prolonged adaptation to either a high or low protein intake on whole body protein metabolism and basal muscle protein synthesis rates. After the diet, subjects received continuous infusions with L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine and L-[ring-2H2]tyrosine in an overnight fasted state, with blood samples and muscle biopsies being collected to assess post-absorptive whole-body protein turnover and muscle protein synthesis rates in vivo in humans. After 12 weeks of intervention, whole-body protein balance in the fasted state was more negative in the high protein treatment when compared with the low protein treatment (-4.1±0.5 vs -2.7±0.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;Pprotein breakdown (43.0±4.4 vs 37.8±3.8 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;Psynthesis (38.9±4.2 vs 35.1±3.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;Pprotein group. Basal muscle protein synthesis rates were maintained on a low vs high protein diet (0.042±0.01 vs 0.045±0.01%/h;P = 0.620). In the overnight fasted state, adaptation to a low-protein intake (0.4 g/kg/d) does not result in a more negative whole-body protein balance and

  19. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the signs and symptoms of Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Marfan syndrome is different from Loeys-Dietz syndrome in that the gene mutation which causes Marfan syndrome is in fibrillin-1 (FBN-1), a protein ...

  20. Saliva C-reactive protein as a biomarker of metabolic syndrome in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezayee, Zhian Mahmood Ibrahim; Al-Nimer, Marwan Salih Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP) has been used in the risk assessment of coronary events. Human saliva mirrors the body's health and well-being and is noninvasive, easy to collect, and ideal for third-world countries as well as for large patient screening. This study aimed to screen the saliva CRP qualitatively in patients with diabetes (Type 1 and 2) taking in considerations, the diagnostic criteria of metabolic syndrome. Center for diabetes mellitus, prospective study. A total number of 50 Type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients, 25 Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients, and 25 healthy subjects were recruited from the center for diabetes mellitus. Each patient was assessed clinically, and the anthropometric measures, glycemic status, and lipid profiles were determined. Stimulated salivary flow rate and saliva CRP were determined. All calculations analysis was made using Excel 2003 program for Windows. The results showed that the salivary flow rate in T1D was less than healthy subjects and T2D and CRP was found positive (6 mg/L) in 36% and 56% of patients with T1D and T2D, respectively. Saliva CRP was found to be related to the anthropometric measurement, blood pressure, and glycemic control. We conclude that saliva CRP may be used as a biomarker for metabolic syndrome and its value is obvious in T2D rather than in T1D.

  1. Frank-ter Haar syndrome protein Tks4 regulates epidermal growth factor-dependent cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögel, Gábor; Gujdár, Annamária; Geiszt, Miklós; Lányi, Árpád; Fekete, Anna; Sipeki, Szabolcs; Downward, Julian; Buday, László

    2012-09-07

    Mutations in the SH3PXD2B gene coding for the Tks4 protein are responsible for the autosomal recessive Frank-ter Haar syndrome. Tks4, a substrate of Src tyrosine kinase, is implicated in the regulation of podosome formation. Here, we report a novel role for Tks4 in the EGF signaling pathway. In EGF-treated cells, Tks4 is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with the activated EGF receptor. This association is not direct but requires the presence of Src tyrosine kinase. In addition, treatment of cells with LY294002, an inhibitor of PI 3-kinase, or mutations of the PX domain reduces tyrosine phosphorylation and membrane translocation of Tks4. Furthermore, a PX domain mutant (R43W) Tks4 carrying a reported point mutation in a Frank-ter Haar syndrome patient showed aberrant intracellular expression and reduced phosphoinositide binding. Finally, silencing of Tks4 was shown to markedly inhibit HeLa cell migration in a Boyden chamber assay in response to EGF or serum. Our results therefore reveal a new function for Tks4 in the regulation of growth factor-dependent cell migration.

  2. Protein-energy malnutrition is frequent and precocious in children with cri du chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefranc, Violaine; de Luca, Arnaud; Hankard, Régis

    2016-05-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is poorly reported in cri du chat syndrome (CDCS) (OMIM #123450), a genetic disease that causes developmental delay and global growth retardation. The objective was to determine the nutritional status at different ages in children with CDCS and factors associated with PEM. A questionnaire focused on growth and nutritional care was sent to 190 families. Among 36 analyzable questionnaires, growth and nutritional indices compatible with PEM occurred in 47% of patients: 19% before 6 months of age, 24% between 6-12 months and 34% after 12 months. Eight patients received enteral feeding. Speech therapy for swallowing education was performed more often in malnourished children (63% vs. 22%, P < 0.02). PEM is frequent and occurs early in this disease, requiring closed nutritional monitoring. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike protein delivered by modified vaccinia virus ankara efficiently induces virus-neutralizing antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Song (Fei); R. Fux (Robert); L.B.V. Provacia (Lisette); A. Volz (Asisa); M. Eickmann; S. Becker (Stephan); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); G. Suttera (Gerd)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMiddle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has recently emerged as a causative agent of severe respiratory disease in humans. Here, we constructed recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing full-length MERS-CoV spike (S) protein (MVA-MERS-S). The genetic

  4. Dreng med diarré og svær dehydrering havde food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Pernille; Børresen, Malene Landbo; Dahl, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a rare non-IgE mediated condition. Symptoms of acute FPIES include vomiting, diarrhoea and dehydration. Symptoms are often misread as acute abdomen or sepsis. The condition can be fatal. There are no biomarkers for FPIES, and skin prick test...... confronted with the very ill, dehydrated infant....

  5. TMV-Cg Coat Protein stabilizes DELLA proteins and in turn negatively modulates salicylic acid-mediated defense pathway during Arabidopsis thaliana viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Maria Cecilia; Conti, Gabriela; Zavallo, Diego; Manacorda, Carlos Augusto; Asurmendi, Sebastian

    2014-08-03

    Plant viral infections disturb defense regulatory networks during tissue invasion. Emerging evidence demonstrates that a significant proportion of these alterations are mediated by hormone imbalances. Although the DELLA proteins have been reported to be central players in hormone cross-talk, their role in the modulation of hormone signaling during virus infections remains unknown. This work revealed that TMV-Cg coat protein (CgCP) suppresses the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway without altering defense hormone SA or jasmonic acid (JA) levels in Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, it was observed that the expression of CgCP reduces plant growth and delays the timing of floral transition. Quantitative RT-qPCR analysis of DELLA target genes showed that CgCP alters relative expression of several target genes, indicating that the DELLA proteins mediate transcriptional changes produced by CgCP expression. Analyses by fluorescence confocal microscopy showed that CgCP stabilizes DELLA proteins accumulation in the presence of gibberellic acid (GA) and that the DELLA proteins are also stabilized during TMV-Cg virus infections. Moreover, DELLA proteins negatively modulated defense transcript profiles during TMV-Cg infection. As a result, TMV-Cg accumulation was significantly reduced in the quadruple-DELLA mutant Arabidopsis plants compared to wild type plants. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CgCP negatively regulates the salicylic acid-mediated defense pathway by stabilizing the DELLA proteins during Arabidopsis thaliana viral infection, suggesting that CgCP alters the stability of DELLAs as a mechanism of negative modulation of antiviral defense responses.

  6. Loss of anti-Bax function in Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome-associated prion protein mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Jodoin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we have shown the loss of anti-Bax function in Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (CJD-associated prion protein (PrP mutants that are unable to generate cytosolic PrP (CyPrP. To determine if the anti-Bax function of PrP modulates the manifestation of prion diseases, we further investigated the anti-Bax function of eight familial Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker Syndrome (GSS-associated PrP mutants. These PrP mutants contained their respective methionine ((M or valine ((V at codon 129. All of the mutants lost their ability to prevent Bax-mediated chromatin condensation or DNA fragmentation in primary human neurons. In the breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells, the F198S(V, D202N(V, P102L(V and Q217R(V retained, whereas the P102L(M, P105L(V, Y145stop(M and Q212P(M PrP mutants lost their ability to inhibit Bax-mediated condensed chromatin. The inhibition of Bax-mediated condensed chromatin depended on the ability of the mutants to generate cytosolic PrP. However, except for the P102L(V, none of the mutants significantly inhibited Bax-mediated caspase activation. These results show that the cytosolic PrP generated from the GSS mutants is not as efficient as wild type PrP in inhibiting Bax-mediated cell death. Furthermore, these results indicate that the anti-Bax function is also disrupted in GSS-associated PrP mutants and is not associated with the difference between CJD and GSS.

  7. Modulation of Protein Quality Control and Proteasome to Autophagy Switch in Immortalized Myoblasts from Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Wattin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of proteome integrity is of primary importance in post-mitotic tissues such as muscle cells; thus, protein quality control mechanisms must be carefully regulated to ensure their optimal efficiency, a failure of these processes being associated with various muscular disorders. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is one of the most common and severe forms of muscular dystrophies and is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Protein quality control modulations have been diversely observed in degenerating muscles of patients suffering from DMD or in animal models of the disease. In this study, we investigated whether modulations of protein quality control mechanisms already pre-exist in undifferentiated myoblasts originating from DMD patients. We report for the first time that the absence of dystrophin in human myoblasts is associated with protein aggregation stress characterized by an increase of protein aggregates. This stress is combined with BAG1 to BAG3 switch, NFκB activation and up-regulation of BAG3/HSPB8 complexes that ensure preferential routing of misfolded/aggregated proteins to autophagy rather than to deficient 26S proteasome. In this context, restoration of pre-existing alterations of protein quality control processes might represent an alternative strategy for DMD therapies.

  8. Efficacy of a New Ocular Surface Modulator in Restoring Epithelial Changes in an In Vitro Model of Dry Eye Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabino, Stefano; De Servi, Barbara; Aragona, Salvatore; Manenti, Demetrio; Meloni, Marisa

    2017-03-01

    So far tear substitutes have demonstrated a limited role in restoring ocular surface damage in dry eye syndrome (DES). The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a new ocular surface modulator in an in vitro model of human corneal epithelium (HCE) damaged by severe osmotic stress mirroring the features of dry eye conditions. A reconstructed HCE model challenged by the introduction of sorbitol in the culture medium for 16 h was used to induce an inflammatory pathway and to impair the tight junctions integrity determining a severe modification of the superficial layer ultrastructure. At the end of the overnight stress period in the treated HCE series, 30 μl of the ocular surface modulator (T-LysYal, Sildeha, Switzerland) and of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the control HCE series were applied for 24 h. The following parameters were quantified: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), immunofluorescence analysis of integrin β1 (ITG-β1), mRNA expression of Cyclin D-1 (CCND1), and ITG-β1. In the positive control after the osmotic stress the HCE surface damage was visible at the ultrastructural level with loss of cell-cell interconnections, intercellular matrix destruction, and TEER reduction. After 24 h of treatment with T-LysYal, HCE showed a significant improvement of the ultrastructural morphological organization and increased expression of ITG-β1 at the tissue level when compared to positive and control series. A significant increase of mRNA expression for ITG-β1 and CCND1 was shown in the HA-treated cells compared to T-LysYal. TEER measurement showed a significant reduction in all groups after 16 h without modifications after the treatment period. This study has shown the possibility of a new class of agents denominated ocular surface modulators to restore corneal cells damaged by dry eye conditions. Further in vivo studies are certainly necessary to confirm these results.

  9. PRO40 is a scaffold protein of the cell wall integrity pathway, linking the MAP kinase module to the upstream activator protein kinase C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Teichert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways are crucial signaling instruments in eukaryotes. Most ascomycetes possess three MAPK modules that are involved in key developmental processes like sexual propagation or pathogenesis. However, the regulation of these modules by adapters or scaffolds is largely unknown. Here, we studied the function of the cell wall integrity (CWI MAPK module in the model fungus Sordaria macrospora. Using a forward genetic approach, we found that sterile mutant pro30 has a mutated mik1 gene that encodes the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK of the proposed CWI pathway. We generated single deletion mutants lacking MAPKKK MIK1, MAPK kinase (MAPKK MEK1, or MAPK MAK1 and found them all to be sterile, cell fusion-deficient and highly impaired in vegetative growth and cell wall stress response. By searching for MEK1 interaction partners via tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified previously characterized developmental protein PRO40 as a MEK1 interaction partner. Although fungal PRO40 homologs have been implicated in diverse developmental processes, their molecular function is currently unknown. Extensive affinity purification, mass spectrometry, and yeast two-hybrid experiments showed that PRO40 is able to bind MIK1, MEK1, and the upstream activator protein kinase C (PKC1. We further found that the PRO40 N-terminal disordered region and the central region encompassing a WW interaction domain are sufficient to govern interaction with MEK1. Most importantly, time- and stress-dependent phosphorylation studies showed that PRO40 is required for MAK1 activity. The sum of our results implies that PRO40 is a scaffold protein for the CWI pathway, linking the MAPK module to the upstream activator PKC1. Our data provide important insights into the mechanistic role of a protein that has been implicated in sexual and asexual development, cell fusion, symbiosis, and pathogenicity in different fungal systems.

  10. Interactions between Gut Microbiota, Host Genetics and Diet Modulate the Predisposition to Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ussar, Siegfried; Griffin, Nicholas W.; Bezy, Olivier; Fujisaka, Shiho; Vienberg, Sara; Softic, Samir; Deng, Luxue; Bry, Lynn; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome result from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors, including the gut microbiota. To dissect these interactions, we utilized three commonly-used inbred strains of mice – obesity/diabetes-prone C57Bl/6J mice, obesity/diabetes-resistant 129S1/SvImJ, from Jackson Laboratory and obesity-prone, but diabetes resistant 129S6/SvEvTac from Taconic - plus three derivative lines generated by breeding these strains in a new, common environm...

  11. Mua (HP0868) Is a Nickel-Binding Protein That Modulates Urease Activity in Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Stéphane L.; Maier, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    A novel mechanism aimed at controlling urease expression in Helicobacter pylori in the presence of ample nickel is described. Higher urease activities were observed in an hp0868 mutant (than in the wild type) in cells supplemented with nickel, suggesting that the HP0868 protein (herein named Mua for modulator of urease activity) represses urease activity when nickel concentrations are ample. The increase in urease activity in the Δmua mutant was linked to an increase in urease transcription and synthesis, as shown by quantitative real-time PCR, SDS-PAGE, and immunoblotting against UreAB. Increased urease synthesis was also detected in a Δmua ΔnikR double mutant strain. The Δmua mutant was more sensitive to nickel toxicity but more resistant to acid challenge than was the wild-type strain. Pure Mua protein binds 2 moles of Ni2+ per mole of dimer. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays did not reveal any binding of Mua to the ureA promoter or other selected promoters (nikR, arsRS, 5′ ureB-sRNAp). Previous yeast two-hybrid studies indicated that Mua and RpoD may interact; however, only a weak interaction was detected via cross-linking with pure components and this could not be verified by another approach. There was no significant difference in the intracellular nickel level between wild-type and mua mutant cells. Taken together, our results suggest the HP0868 gene product represses urease transcription when nickel levels are high through an as-yet-uncharacterized mechanism, thus counterbalancing the well-described NikR-mediated activation. PMID:21505055

  12. Odorant binding protein 69a connects social interaction to modulation of social responsiveness in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzur, Assa; Shmueli, Anat; Omesi, Liora; Ryvkin, Julia; Knapp, Jon-Michael; Parnas, Moshe; Davis, Fred P; Shohat-Ophir, Galit

    2018-04-01

    Living in a social environment requires the ability to respond to specific social stimuli and to incorporate information obtained from prior interactions into future ones. One of the mechanisms that facilitates social interaction is pheromone-based communication. In Drosophila melanogaster, the male-specific pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA) elicits different responses in male and female flies, and functions to modulate behavior in a context and experience-dependent manner. Although it is the most studied pheromone in flies, the mechanisms that determine the complexity of the response, its intensity and final output with respect to social context, sex and prior interaction, are still not well understood. Here we explored the functional link between social interaction and pheromone-based communication and discovered an odorant binding protein that links social interaction to sex specific changes in cVA related responses. Odorant binding protein 69a (Obp69a) is expressed in auxiliary cells and secreted into the olfactory sensilla. Its expression is inversely regulated in male and female flies by social interactions: cVA exposure reduces its levels in male flies and increases its levels in female flies. Increasing or decreasing Obp69a levels by genetic means establishes a functional link between Obp69a levels and the extent of male aggression and female receptivity. We show that activation of cVA-sensing neurons is sufficeint to regulate Obp69a levels in the absence of cVA, and requires active neurotransmission between the sensory neuron to the second order olfactory neuron. The cross-talk between sensory neurons and non-neuronal auxiliary cells at the olfactory sensilla, represents an additional component in the machinery that promotes behavioral plasticity to the same sensory stimuli in male and female flies.

  13. Spinal translocator protein (TSPO) modulates pain behavior in rats with CFA-induced monoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernstadt, Hayley; Wang, Shuxing; Lim, Grewo; Mao, Jianren

    2009-08-25

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), is predominantly located in the mitochondrial outer membrane and plays an important role in steroidogenesis, immunomodulation, cell survival and proliferation. Previous studies have shown an increased expression of TSPO centrally in neuropathology, as well as in injured nerves. TSPO has also been implicated in modulation of nociception. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that TSPO is involved in the initiation and maintenance of inflammatory pain using a rat model of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced monoarthritis of the tibio-tarsal joint. Immunohistochemistry was performed using Iba-1 (microglia), NeuN (neurons), anti-Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, GFAP (astrocytes) and anti-PBR (TSPO) on Days 1, 7 and 14 after CFA-induced arthritis. Rats with CFA-induced monoarthritis showed mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia on the ipsilateral hindpaw, which correlated with the increased TSPO expression in ipsilateral laminae I-II on all experimental days. Iba-1 expression in the ipsilateral dorsal horn was also increased on Days 7 and 14. Moreover, TSPO was colocalized with Iba-1, GFAP and NeuN within the spinal cord dorsal horn. The TSPO agonist Ro5-4864, given intrathecally, dose-dependently retarded or prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with CFA-induced monoarthritis. These findings provide evidence that spinal TSPO is involved in the development and maintenance of inflammatory pain behaviors in rats. Thus, spinal TSPO may present a central target as a complementary therapy to reduce inflammatory pain.

  14. Arabidopsis SEIPIN Proteins Modulate Triacylglycerol Accumulation and Influence Lipid Droplet Proliferation[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The lipodystrophy protein SEIPIN is important for lipid droplet (LD) biogenesis in human and yeast cells. In contrast with the single SEIPIN genes in humans and yeast, there are three SEIPIN homologs in Arabidopsis thaliana, designated SEIPIN1, SEIPIN2, and SEIPIN3. Essentially nothing is known about the functions of SEIPIN homologs in plants. Here, a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) SEIPIN deletion mutant strain and a plant (Nicotiana benthamiana) transient expression system were used to test the ability of Arabidopsis SEIPINs to influence LD morphology. In both species, expression of SEIPIN1 promoted accumulation of large-sized lipid droplets, while expression of SEIPIN2 and especially SEIPIN3 promoted small LDs. Arabidopsis SEIPINs increased triacylglycerol levels and altered composition. In tobacco, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized SEIPINs reorganized the normal, reticulated ER structure into discrete ER domains that colocalized with LDs. N-terminal deletions and swapping experiments of SEIPIN1 and 3 revealed that this region of SEIPIN determines LD size. Ectopic overexpression of SEIPIN1 in Arabidopsis resulted in increased numbers of large LDs in leaves, as well as in seeds, and increased seed oil content by up to 10% over wild-type seeds. By contrast, RNAi suppression of SEIPIN1 resulted in smaller seeds and, as a consequence, a reduction in the amount of oil per seed compared with the wild type. Overall, our results indicate that Arabidopsis SEIPINs are part of a conserved LD biogenesis machinery in eukaryotes and that in plants these proteins may have evolved specialized roles in the storage of neutral lipids by differentially modulating the number and sizes of lipid droplets. PMID:26362606

  15. Engineer Medium and Feed for Modulating N-Glycosylation of Recombinant Protein Production in CHO Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2017-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells have become the primary expression system for the production of complex recombinant proteins due to their long-term success in industrial scale production and generating appropriate protein N-glycans similar to that of humans. Control and optimization of protein N-glycosylation is crucial, as the structure of N-glycans can largely influence both biological and physicochemical properties of recombinant proteins. Protein N-glycosylation in CHO cell culture can be controlled and tuned by engineering medium, feed, culture process, as well as genetic elements of the cell. In this chapter, we will focus on how to carry out experiments for N-glycosylation modulation through medium and feed optimization. The workflow and typical methods involved in the experiment process will be presented.

  16. Modulating thrombotic diathesis in hereditary thrombophilia and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: a role for circulating microparticles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campello, Elena; Radu, Claudia M; Spiezia, Luca; Simioni, Paolo

    2017-06-27

    Over the past decades, there have been great advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with inherited and acquired thrombophilia [mainly antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS)]. However, a number of questions remain unanswered. Prognostic markers capable of estimating the individual VTE risk would be of great use. Microparticles (MPs) are sub-micron membrane vesicles constitutively released from the surface of cells after cellular activation and apoptosis. The effects of MPs on thrombogenesis include the exposure of phopshatidylserine and the expression of tissue factor and MPs have been described in clinical studies as possible diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for VTE. This review will provide a novel perspective on the current knowledge and research trends on the possible role of MPs in hereditary thrombophilia and APS. Basically, the published data show that circulating MPs may contribute to the development of VTE in thrombophilic carriers, both in mild and severe states. Moreover, the presence of endothelial-MPs and platelet-MPs has been described in antiphospholipid syndrome and seems to be directly linked to antiphospholipid antibodies and not to other underlying autoimmune disorders or the thrombotic event itself. In conclusion, circulating MPs may constitute an epiphenomenon of thrombophilia itself and could be up-regulated in acute particular conditions, promoting a global prothrombotic state up to the threshold of the clinical relevant thrombotic event.

  17. Modulation of autonomic activity in neurological conditions: Epilepsy and Tourette syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko eNagai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript considers the central but neglected role of the autonomic nervous system in the expression and control of seizures in Epilepsy and tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS. In epilepsy, consideration of autonomic involvement is typically confined to differential diagnoses (e.g. syncope, or in relation to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP. Investigation is more limited in Tourette Syndrome. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the generation and prevention of epileptic seizures is largely overlooked. Emotional stimuli such as anxiety and stress are potent causes of seizures and tic activity in TS, respectively. This manuscript will describe a possible neural mechanism by which afferent autonomic projections linked to cognition and behaviour influence central nervous system thalamo-cortical regulation, which appears to be an important means for controlling both seizure and tic activity. It also summarizes the link between the integrity of the default mode network and autonomic regulation in patients with epilepsy as well as the link between impaired motor control and autonomic regulation in patients with TS. Two neurological conditions; epilepsy and TS were chosen, as seizures and tics represent parameters that can be easily measured to investigate influences of autonomic functions. The EDA biofeedback approach is anticipated

  18. Modulation of autonomic activity in neurological conditions: Epilepsy and Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript considers the central but neglected role of the autonomic nervous system in the expression and control of seizures in epilepsy (small) and tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS). In epilepsy, consideration of autonomic involvement is typically confined to differential diagnoses (e.g., syncope), or in relation to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Investigation is more limited in Tourette Syndrome. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the generation and prevention of epileptic seizures is largely overlooked. Emotional stimuli such as anxiety and stress are potent causes of seizures and tic activity in epilepsy and TS, respectively. This manuscript will describe a possible neural mechanism by which afferent autonomic projections linked to cognition and behavior influence central thalamo-cortical regulation, which appears to be an important means for controlling both seizure and tic activity. It also summarizes the link between the integrity of the default mode network and autonomic regulation in patients with epilepsy as well as the link between impaired motor control and autonomic regulation in patients with TS. Two neurological conditions; epilepsy and TS were chosen, as seizures and tics represent parameters that can be easily measured to investigate influences of autonomic functions. The EDA biofeedback approach is anticipated to gain a strong position within the next generation of treatment for epilepsy, as a non-invasive technique with minimal side effects. This approach also takes advantage of the current practical opportunity to utilize growing digital health technology.

  19. G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channels involved in corticostriatal presynaptic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, David; Mateos, Verónica; Islas, Gustavo; Barral, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    Presynaptic modulation has been associated mainly with calcium channels but recent data suggests that inward rectifier potassium channels (K(IR)) also play a role. In this work we set to characterize the role of presynaptic K(IR) channels in corticostriatal synaptic transmission. We elicited synaptic potentials in striatum by stimulating cortical areas and then determined the synaptic responses of corticostriatal synapsis by using paired pulse ratio (PPR) in the presence and absence of several potassium channel blockers. Unspecific potassium channels blockers Ba(2+) and Cs(+) reduced the PPR, suggesting that these channels are presynaptically located. Further pharmacological characterization showed that application of tertiapin-Q, a specific K(IR)3 channel family blocker, also induced a reduction of PPR, suggesting that K(IR)3 channels are present at corticostriatal terminals. In contrast, exposure to Lq2, a specific K(IR)1.1 inward rectifier potassium channel, did not induce any change in PPR suggesting the absence of these channels in the presynaptic corticostriatal terminals. Our results indicate that K(IR)3 channels are functionally expressed at the corticostriatal synapses, since blockage of these channels result in PPR decrease. Our results also help to explain how synaptic activity may become sensitive to extracellular signals mediated by G-protein coupled receptors. A vast repertoire of receptors may influence neurotransmitter release in an indirect manner through regulation of K(IR)3 channels. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Alzheimer's associated β-amyloid protein inhibits influenza A virus and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell R White

    Full Text Available Accumulation of β-Amyloid (βA is a key pathogenetic factor in Alzheimer's disease; however, the normal function of βA is unknown. Recent studies have shown that βA can inhibit growth of bacteria and fungi. In this paper we show that βA also inhibits replication of seasonal and pandemic strains of H3N2 and H1N1 influenza A virus (IAV in vitro. The 42 amino acid fragment of βA (βA42 had greater activity than the 40 amino acid fragment. Direct incubation of the virus with βA42 was needed to achieve optimal inhibition. Using quantitative PCR assays βA42 was shown to reduce viral uptake by epithelial cells after 45 minutes and to reduce supernatant virus at 24 hours post infection. βA42 caused aggregation of IAV particles as detected by light transmission assays and electron and confocal microscopy. βA42 did not stimulate neutrophil H2O2 production or extracellular trap formation on its own, but it increased both responses stimulated by IAV. In addition, βA42 increased uptake of IAV by neutrophils. βA42 reduced viral protein synthesis in monocytes and reduced IAV-induced interleukin-6 production by these cells. Hence, we demonstrate for the first time that βA has antiviral activity and modulates viral interactions with phagocytes.

  1. Atomic force microscopy-based antibody recognition imaging of proteins in the pathological deposits in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creasey, Rhiannon [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Sharma, Shiwani [School of Medicine, Ophthalmology, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Gibson, Christopher T. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Craig, Jamie E. [School of Medicine, Ophthalmology, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Ebner, Andreas [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler Universitaet Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Becker, Thomas [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, 6845 WA (Australia); Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler Universitaet Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Voelcker, Nicolas H., E-mail: nico.voelcker@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia)

    2011-07-15

    The phenomenon of protein aggregation is of considerable interest to various disciplines, including the field of medicine. A range of disease pathologies are associated with this phenomenon. One of the ocular diseases hallmarked by protein aggregation is the Pseudoexfoliation (PEX) Syndrome. This condition is characterized by the deposition of insoluble proteinaceous material on the anterior human lens capsule. Genomic and proteomic analyses have revealed an association of specific genetic markers and various proteins, respectively, with PEX syndrome. However, the ultrastructure of the protein aggregates is poorly characterized. This study seeks to build capacity to determine the molecular nature of PEX aggregates on human lens capsules in their native state by AFM-based antibody recognition imaging. Lysyl oxidase-Like 1 (LOXL1), a protein identified as a component of PEX aggregates, is detected by an antibody-modified AFM probe. Topographical AFM images and antibody recognition images are obtained using three AFM-based techniques: TREC, phase and force-volume imaging. LOXL1 is found to be present on the lens capsule surface, and is localized around fibrous protein aggregates. Our evaluation shows that TREC imaging is best suited for human tissue imaging and holds significant potential for imaging of human disease tissues in their native state. -- Highlights: {yields} Atomic force microscopy techniques were applied to diseased human tissues. {yields} LOXL1 protein was detected on the small fibers of Pseudoexfoliation deposits. {yields} PicoTREC was the optimum technique for investigating protein aggregates.

  2. Uncovering packaging features of co-regulated modules based on human protein interaction and transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Weiming

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network co-regulated modules are believed to have the functionality of packaging multiple biological entities, and can thus be assumed to coordinate many biological functions in their network neighbouring regions. Results Here, we weighted edges of a human protein interaction network and a transcriptional regulatory network to construct an integrated network, and introduce a probabilistic model and a bipartite graph framework to exploit human co-regulated modules and uncover their specific features in packaging different biological entities (genes, protein complexes or metabolic pathways. Finally, we identified 96 human co-regulated modules based on this method, and evaluate its effectiveness by comparing it with four other methods. Conclusions Dysfunctions in co-regulated interactions often occur in the development of cancer. Therefore, we focussed on an example co-regulated module and found that it could integrate a number of cancer-related genes. This was extended to causal dysfunctions of some complexes maintained by several physically interacting proteins, thus coordinating several metabolic pathways that directly underlie cancer.

  3. Wdpcp, a PCP protein required for ciliogenesis, regulates directional cell migration and cell polarity by direct modulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

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    Cheng Cui

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity (PCP regulates cell alignment required for collective cell movement during embryonic development. This requires PCP/PCP effector proteins, some of which also play essential roles in ciliogenesis, highlighting the long-standing question of the role of the cilium in PCP. Wdpcp, a PCP effector, was recently shown to regulate both ciliogenesis and collective cell movement, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show Wdpcp can regulate PCP by direct modulation of the actin cytoskeleton. These studies were made possible by recovery of a Wdpcp mutant mouse model. Wdpcp-deficient mice exhibit phenotypes reminiscent of Bardet-Biedl/Meckel-Gruber ciliopathy syndromes, including cardiac outflow tract and cochlea defects associated with PCP perturbation. We observed Wdpcp is localized to the transition zone, and in Wdpcp-deficient cells, Sept2, Nphp1, and Mks1 were lost from the transition zone, indicating Wdpcp is required for recruitment of proteins essential for ciliogenesis. Wdpcp is also found in the cytoplasm, where it is localized in the actin cytoskeleton and in focal adhesions. Wdpcp interacts with Sept2 and is colocalized with Sept2 in actin filaments, but in Wdpcp-deficient cells, Sept2 was lost from the actin cytoskeleton, suggesting Wdpcp is required for Sept2 recruitment to actin filaments. Significantly, organization of the actin filaments and focal contacts were markedly changed in Wdpcp-deficient cells. This was associated with decreased membrane ruffling, failure to establish cell polarity, and loss of directional cell migration. These results suggest the PCP defects in Wdpcp mutants are not caused by loss of cilia, but by direct disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Consistent with this, Wdpcp mutant cochlea has normal kinocilia and yet exhibits PCP defects. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that a PCP component required for ciliogenesis can directly modulate the actin

  4. Biogenesis of non-structural protein 1 (nsp1) and nsp1-mediated type I interferon modulation in arteriviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Mingyuan; Kim, Chi Yong [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Rowland, Raymond R.R.; Fang, Ying [Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Kim, Daewoo [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Yoo, Dongwan, E-mail: dyoo@illinois.edu [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Type I interferons (IFNs-α/β) play a key role for the antiviral state of host, and the porcine arterivirus; porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), has been shown to down-regulate the production of IFNs during infection. Non-structural protein (nsp) 1 of PRRSV has been identified as a viral IFN antagonist, and the nsp1α subunit of nsp1 has been shown to degrade the CREB-binding protein (CBP) and to inhibit the formation of enhanceosome thus resulting in the suppression of IFN production. The study was expanded to other member viruses in the family Arteriviridae: equine arteritis virus (EAV), murine lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV), and simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). While PRRSV–nsp1 and LDV–nsp1 were auto-cleaved to produce the nsp1α and nsp1β subunits, EAV–nsp1 remained uncleaved. SHFV–nsp1 was initially predicted to be cleaved to generate three subunits (nsp1α, nsp1β, and nsp1γ), but only two subunits were generated as SHFV–nsp1αβ and SHFV–nsp1γ. The papain-like cysteine protease (PLP) 1α motif in nsp1α remained inactive for SHFV, and only the PLP1β motif of nsp1β was functional to generate SHFV–nsp1γ subunit. All subunits of arterivirus nsp1 were localized in the both nucleus and cytoplasm, but PRRSV–nsp1β, LDV–nsp1β, EAV–nsp1, and SHFV–nsp1γ were predominantly found in the nucleus. All subunits of arterivirus nsp1 contained the IFN suppressive activity and inhibited both interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and NF-κB mediated IFN promoter activities. Similar to PRRSV–nsp1α, CBP degradation was evident in cells expressing LDV–nsp1α and SHFV–nsp1γ, but no such degradation was observed for EAV–nsp1. Regardless of CBP degradation, all subunits of arterivirus nsp1 suppressed the IFN-sensitive response element (ISRE)-promoter activities. Our data show that the nsp1-mediated IFN modulation is a common strategy for all arteriviruses but their mechanism of action may differ

  5. In vivo and in vitro attenuation of naloxone-precipitated experimental opioid withdrawal syndrome by insulin and selective KATP channel modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhat; Sharma, Bhupesh; Gupta, Surbhi; Sharma, B M

    2015-01-01

    Opiate exposure for longer duration develops state of dependence in humans and animals, which is revealed by signs and symptoms of withdrawal precipitated by opioid receptor antagonists. The sudden withdrawal of opioids produces a withdrawal syndrome in opioid-dependent subjects. Insulin and ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel-mediated glucose homeostasis have been shown to modulate morphine withdrawal. Present study has been structured to investigate the role of insulin and pharmacological modulator of KATP channel (gliclazide) in experimental morphine withdrawal syndrome, both invivo and invitro. In this study, naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal syndrome in mice (invivo) as well as in rat ileum (invitro) were utilized to assess opioid withdrawal phenomenon. Morphine withdrawal syndromes like jumping and rearing frequency, forepaw licking, circling, fore paw tremor, wet dog shake, sneezing, overall morphine withdrawal severity (OMWS), serum glucose, brain malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), nitrite/nitrate, and calcium (Ca(+2)) were assessed. Naloxone has significantly increased morphine withdrawal syndrome, both invivo and invitro. Insulin and gliclazide have significantly attenuated, naloxone induced behavioral changes like jumping and rearing frequency, forepaw licking, wet dog shake, sneezing, straightening, circling, OMWS, and various biochemical impairments such as serum glucose, brain MDA, GSH, nitrite/nitrate, and Ca(+2) in morphine-dependent animals (invivo). In vitro, insulin and gliclazide have significantly reduced naloxone-induced contraction in morphine-withdrawn rat ileum preparation. Insulin and gliclazide (KATP channel blocker) have attenuated naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal syndrome, both invivo and invitro. Thus, insulin and KATP channel modulation may provide new avenues for research in morphine withdrawal.

  6. A PTPN11 allele encoding a catalytically impaired SHP2 protein in a patient with a Noonan syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jonathan J; Martinelli, Simone; Pannone, Luca; Lo, Ivan Fai-Man; Shi, Lisong; Edelmann, Lisa; Tartaglia, Marco; Luk, Ho-Ming; Gelb, Bruce D

    2014-09-01

    The RASopathies are a relatively common group of phenotypically similar and genetically related autosomal dominant genetic syndromes caused by missense mutations affecting genes participating in the RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that include Noonan syndrome (NS) and Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML, formerly LEOPARD syndrome). NS and NSML can be difficult to differentiate during infancy, but the presence of multiple lentigines, café au lait spots, and specific cardiac defects facilitate the diagnosis. Furthermore, individual PTPN11 missense mutations are highly specific to each syndrome and engender opposite biochemical alterations on the function of SHP-2, the protein product of that gene. Here, we report on a 5-year-old male with two de novo PTPN11 mutations in cis, c.1471C>T (p.Pro491Ser), and c.1492C>T (p.Arg498Trp), which are associated with NS and NSML, respectively. This boy's phenotype is intermediate between NS and NSML with facial dysmorphism, short stature, mild global developmental delay, pulmonic stenosis, and deafness but absence of café au lait spots or lentigines. The double-mutant SHP-2 was found to be catalytically impaired. This raises the question of whether clinical differences between NS and NSML can be ascribed solely to the relative SHP-2 catalytic activity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Binding specificity and in vivo targets of the EH domain, a novel protein-protein interaction module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Confalonieri, S; Doria, M

    1997-01-01

    EH is a recently identified protein-protein interaction domain found in the signal transducers Eps15 and Eps15R and several other proteins of yeast nematode. We show that EH domains from Eps15 and Eps15R bind in vitro to peptides containing an asparagine-proline-phenylalanine (NPF) motif. Direct...

  8. A calcineurin inhibitory protein overexpressed in Down's syndrome interacts with the product of a ubiquitously expressed transcript

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    H.C.S. Silveira

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The Down's syndrome candidate region 1 (DSCR1 protein, encoded by a gene located in the human chromosome 21, interacts with calcineurin and is overexpressed in Down's syndrome patients. As an approach to clarifying a putative function for this protein, in the present study we used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify DSCR1 partners. The two-hybrid system is a method that allows the identification of protein-protein interactions through reconstitution of the activity of the yeast GAL 4 transcriptional activator. The gene DSCR1 fused to the GAL 4 binding domain (BD was used to screen a human fetal brain cDNA library cloned in fusion with the GAL 4 activation domain (AD. Three positive clones were found and sequence analysis revealed that all the plasmids coded for the ubiquitously expressed transcript (UXT. UXT, which is encoded in human Xp11, is a 157-amino acid protein present in both cytosol and nucleus of the cells. This positive interaction of DSCR1 and UXT was confirmed in vivo by mating the yeast strain AH109 (MATaexpressing AD-UXT with the strain Y187 (MATalpha expressing BD-DSCR1, and in vitro by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. These results may help elucidate a new function for DSCR1 and its participation in Down's syndrome pathogenesis.

  9. Prolonged Adaptation to a Low or High Protein Diet Does Not Modulate Basal Muscle Protein Synthesis Rates - A Substudy.

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    Rick Hursel

    Full Text Available Based on controlled 36 h experiments a higher dietary protein intake causes a positive protein balance and a negative fat balance. A positive net protein balance may support fat free mass accrual. However, few data are available on the impact of more prolonged changes in habitual protein intake on whole-body protein metabolism and basal muscle protein synthesis rates.To assess changes in whole-body protein turnover and basal muscle protein synthesis rates following 12 weeks of adaptation to a low versus high dietary protein intake.A randomized parallel study was performed in 40 subjects who followed either a high protein (2.4 g protein/kg/d or low protein (0.4 g protein/kg/d energy-balanced diet (30/35/35% or 5/60/35% energy from protein/carbohydrate/fat for a period of 12 weeks. A subgroup of 7 men and 8 women (body mass index: 22.8±2.3 kg/m2, age: 24.3±4.9 y were selected to evaluate the impact of prolonged adaptation to either a high or low protein intake on whole body protein metabolism and basal muscle protein synthesis rates. After the diet, subjects received continuous infusions with L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine and L-[ring-2H2]tyrosine in an overnight fasted state, with blood samples and muscle biopsies being collected to assess post-absorptive whole-body protein turnover and muscle protein synthesis rates in vivo in humans.After 12 weeks of intervention, whole-body protein balance in the fasted state was more negative in the high protein treatment when compared with the low protein treatment (-4.1±0.5 vs -2.7±0.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.001. Whole-body protein breakdown (43.0±4.4 vs 37.8±3.8 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.03, synthesis (38.9±4.2 vs 35.1±3.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.01 and phenylalanine hydroxylation rates (4.1±0.6 vs 2.7±0.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.001 were significantly higher in the high vs low protein group. Basal muscle protein synthesis rates were maintained on a low vs high protein diet (0.042

  10. Modulation of LINE-1 and Alu/SVA Retrotransposition by Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome-Related SAMHD1

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    Ke Zhao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Long interspersed elements 1 (LINE-1 occupy at least 17% of the human genome and are its only active autonomous retrotransposons. However, the host factors that regulate LINE-1 retrotransposition are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the Aicardi-Goutières syndrome gene product SAMHD1, recently revealed to be an inhibitor of HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infectivity and neutralized by the viral Vpx protein, is also a potent regulator of LINE-1 and LINE-1-mediated Alu/SVA retrotransposition. We also found that mutant SAMHD1s of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome patients are defective in LINE-1 inhibition. Several domains of SAMHD1 are critical for LINE-1 regulation. SAMHD1 inhibits LINE-1 retrotransposition in dividing cells. An enzymatic active site mutant SAMHD1 maintained substantial anti-LINE-1 activity. SAMHD1 inhibits ORF2p-mediated LINE-1 reverse transcription in isolated LINE-1 ribonucleoproteins by reducing ORF2p level. Thus, SAMHD1 may be a cellular regulator of LINE-1 activity that is conserved in mammals.

  11. Characterization of polyclonal antibodies against nonstructural protein 9 from the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

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    Mengmeng ZHAO,Juanjuan QIAN,Jiexiong XIE,Tiantian CUI,Songling FENG,Guoqiang WANG,Ruining WANG,Guihong ZHANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS is considered to be one of the most important infectious diseases impacting the swine industry and is characterized by reproductive failure in late term gestation in sows and respiratory disease in pigs of all ages. The nonstructural protein 9 gene, Nsp9, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, is generally regarded as fairly conserved when compared to other viral proteins. Antibodies against Nsp9 will be of great importance for the diagnosis and treatment of the causal agent, PRRS virus. A study was undertaken to generate polyclonal antibodies against the immunodominant Nsp9. For this purpose, the Nsp9 was expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently used as an antigen to immunize New Zealand rabbits. Antiserum was identified via an indirect ELISA, and then verified based on the ability to react with both naturally and artificially expressed Nsp9. Results of virus neutralization test showed that this antiserum could not neutralize the PRRSV. Nevertheless, this antiserum as a diagnostic core reagent should prove invaluable for further investigations into the mechanism of PRRS pathogenesis.

  12. Xerophthalmia of Sjogren's Syndrome Diagnosed with Anti-Salivary Gland Protein 1 Antibodies

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    Sahana Vishwanath

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe 2 patients with persistent severe dry eyes, positive Schirmer tests for Sjogren's syndrome (SS but lacking antibodies to either Ro or La. These patients were diagnosed to have SS by detecting antibodies to salivary gland protein 1 (Sp1 and parotid secretory protein (PSP. This report emphasizes the existence of patients with SS who lack antibodies to either Ro or La and may therefore be misdiagnosed. Detection of novel autoantibodies, including antibodies to Sp1 and PSP, are helpful in identifying these patients. Initial presentation may simply be dry eyes. Methods: Two patients who presented to our ophthalmology clinic are described. One of the patients underwent multiple procedures over a period of 10 years for severe xerophthalmia. The other patient had rheumatoid arthritis and xerophthalmia. However, in both patients, chronic xerophthalmia had been considered to be idiopathic because antibodies Ro and La were negative. Further serologic testing revealed antibodies to Sp1 and PSP. Results: Two patients who lacked antibodies to Ro and La but not to Sp1 and PSP were diagnosed as having SS. Conclusion: Patients presenting with unexplained dry eyes may not always show the serology markers in the current criteria for SS, anti-Ro and anti-La. In these cases, investigation for novel, early antibodies to Sp1 and PSP is of importance in the diagnosis of SS.

  13. Severe Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome to Cow’s Milk in Infants

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    Min Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cow’s milk is the most common cause of food-protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical features and treatment outcomes of infants with severe FPIES to cow’s milk. We reviewed all infants ≤12 months of age who were hospitalized and diagnosed with severe FPIES to cow’s milk between 1 January 2011 and 31 August 2014 in a tertiary Children’s Medical Center in China. Patients’ clinical features, feeding patterns, laboratory tests, and treatment outcomes were reviewed. A total of 12 infants met the inclusion criteria. All infants presented with diarrhea, edema, and hypoalbuminemia. Other main clinical manifestations included regurgitation/vomiting, skin rashes, low-grade fever, bloody and/or mucous stools, abdominal distention, and failure to thrive. They had clinical remission with resolution of diarrhea and significant increase of serum albumin after elimination of cow’s milk protein (CMP from the diet. The majority of infants developed tolerance to the CMP challenge test after 12 months of avoidance. In conclusion, we reported the clinical experience of 12 infants with severe FPIES to cow’s milk, which resulted in malnutrition, hypoproteinemia, and failure to thrive. Prompt treatment with CMP-free formula is effective and leads to clinical remission of FPIES in infants.

  14. Neutralization of White Spot Syndrome Virus by Monoclonal Antibodies against Viral Envelope Proteins

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    Hsiu-Hui Shih

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs recognizing envelope proteins of the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV, 6E1 against VP28 and 3E8 against VP19, were applied to demonstrate their neutralizing ability to this virus by using both in vitro and in vivo assays. Mixtures of MAb 6E1 with virus filtrate were inoculated into the primary explant monolayer culture derived from the lymphoid Oka organs of Penaeus monodon. Mab was likely to neutralize the infectivity of virus to monolayer since cytopathic effects were apparently blocked in experiment group. WSSV was titrated using Blue-Cell ELISA and the neutralizing index was calculated to be 6.90 for 6EI and 5.83 for 3E8. Neutralized virus fluids injected intramuscularly into post larvae of P. monodon. The shrimp in the positive control, which were injected with WSSV only showed an increasing mortality and a 100% mortality was reached at day 34, whereas no shrimp died in the negative control. The mortality for 6E1 was 6.7% and for 3E8 was 13.3%. These results suggest that Mabs recognizing the WSSV envelope proteins could neutralize viral infectivity to both cultured cells and shrimp.

  15. Computed tomography after lymphangiography in the diagnosis of intestinal lymphangiectasia with protein-losing enteropathy in Noonan's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keberle, M.; Jenett, M.; Hahn, D.; Moerk, H.; Scheurlen, M.

    2000-01-01

    Noonan's syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that may be associated with abnormalities in the lymphatic drainage. In this case of a 21-year-old man CT after bipedal lymphangiography confirmed the diagnosis of intestinal lymphangiectasy causing protein-losing enteropathy in Noonan's syndrome by showing contrast-enhanced abnormal lymphatic vessels in the mesentery and the intestinal wall. Because of the benefit of diet in case of intestinal involvement, we recommend a thorough documentation of the lymphatic drainage with lymphangiography followed by CT, if clinical signs of lymphatic dysplasia, such as pleural effusions, lymphedema, or hypoproteinemia are present. (orig.)

  16. CP-25 Alleviates Experimental Sjögren's Syndrome Features in NOD/Ltj Mice and Modulates T Lymphocyte Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Fang; Xu, Shixia; Zhang, Pengying; Chen, Xiaoyun; Wu, Yujing; Wang, Chun; Gao, Mei; Si, Min; Wang, Xinming; Heinrich, Korner; Wu, Huaxun; Wei, Wei

    2018-04-17

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune illness of the moisture-producing glands such as salivary glands that is characterized by various immune abnormalities. The aetiology of pSS remains unclear and there is no curative agent. In this study, we investigated the putative therapeutic effects on a NOD/Ltj mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome-like disorders of an ester derivative of paeoniflorin, paeoniflorin-6'O-benzene (termed CP-25). Our study showed that CP-25 alleviated effectively clinical manifestations in NOD/Ltj mice resulting, for example, in increased salivary flow and reduced histopathological scores. Furthermore, CP-25 decreased lymphocyte viability in NOD/Ltj mice and attenuated the infiltration of Th1 cells and Th2 cells into the salivary glands of NOD/Ltj mice. In the spleen on NOD/Ltj mice, CP-25 skewed the ratio of Th17 and regulatory T cells towards regulatory T cells. After treatment, concentrations of anti-La/SSB and IgG antibodies were reduced and the titre of the inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-17A in the serum on NOD/Ltj mice was alleviated. Thus, we define CP-25 as a novel compound that is a potent therapeutic agent for pSS by modulating T lymphocyte subsets. Future studies will validate the use of CP-25 as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pSS. © 2018 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  17. Sex difference in the association of metabolic syndrome with high sensitivity C-reactive protein in a Taiwanese population

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    Lin Wen-Yuan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although sex differences have been reported for associations between components of metabolic syndrome and inflammation, the question of whether there is an effect modification by sex in the association between inflammation and metabolic syndrome has not been investigated in detail. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare associations of high sensitivity C-creative protein (hs-CRP with metabolic syndrome and its components between men and women. Methods A total of 1,305 subjects aged 40 years and over were recruited in 2004 in a metropolitan city in Taiwan. The biochemical indices, such as hs-CRP, fasting glucose levels, lipid profiles, urinary albumin, urinary creatinine and anthropometric indices, were measured. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the American Heart Association and the National Heart, lung and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI definition. The relationship between metabolic syndrome and hs-CRP was examined using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results After adjustment for age and lifestyle factors including smoking, and alcohol intake, elevated concentrations of hs-CRP showed a stronger association with metabolic syndrome in women (odds ratio comparing tertile extremes 4.80 [95% CI: 3.31-6.97] than in men (2.30 [1.65-3.21]. The p value for the sex interaction was 0.002. All components were more strongly associated with metabolic syndrome in women than in men, and all sex interactions were significant except for hypertension. Conclusions Our data suggest that inflammatory processes may be of particular importance in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome in women.

  18. Association of the Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type-3 protein with clathrin

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    Gahl William A

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS is a disorder of lysosome-related organelle biogenesis characterized by oculocutaneous albinism and prolonged bleeding. These clinical findings reflect defects in the formation of melanosomes in melanocytes and dense bodies in platelets. HPS type-3 (HPS-3 results from mutations in the HPS3 gene, which encodes a 1004 amino acid protein of unknown function that contains a predicted clathrin-binding motif (LLDFE at residues 172–176. Results Clathrin was co-immunoprecipitated by HPS3 antibodies from normal but not HPS3 null melanocytes. Normal melanocytes expressing a GFP-HPS3 fusion protein demonstrated partial co-localization of GFP-HPS3 with clathrin following a 20°C temperature block. GFP-HPS3 in which the predicted clathrin-binding domain of HPS3 was mutated (GFP-HPS3-delCBD did not co-localize with clathrin under the same conditions. Immunoelectron microscopy of normal melanocytes expressing GFP-HPS3 showed co-localization of GFP-HPS3 with clathrin, predominantly on small vesicles in the perinuclear region. In contrast, GFP-HPS3-delCBD did not co-localize with clathrin and exhibited a largely cytoplasmic distribution. Conclusion HPS3 associates with clathrin, predominantly on small clathrin-containing vesicles in the perinuclear region. This association most likely occurs directly via a functional clathrin-binding domain in HPS3. These results suggest a role for HPS3 and its protein complex, BLOC-2, in vesicle formation and trafficking.

  19. Proinflammatory proteins in female and male patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome: preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bećarević, Mirjana; Ignjatović, Svetlana

    2016-10-01

    The latest classification criteria for the diagnosis of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, an autoimmune disease characterized by thromboses, miscarriages and presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (Abs)) emphasized that thrombotic manifestations of APS should be without any signs of an inflammatory process. However, atherosclerosis (a chronic inflammatory response to the accumulation of lipoproteins in the walls of arteries) and APS are characterized by some similar features. We evaluated whether proinflammatory proteins were associated with the features of the primary APS (PAPS). PAPS patients without obstetric complications and with impaired lipid profile were included in the study. Antiphospholipid antibodies, TNF-alpha, and apo(a) were determined by ELISA. Complement components and hsCRP were measured by immunonephelometry. Decreased C3c was observed in female patients with increased titers of IgG anti-β2gpI (χ(2) = 3.939, P = 0.047) and in male patients with increased IgM anticardiolipin Abs (χ(2) = 4.286, P = 0.038). Pulmonary emboli were associated with interleukin (IL)-6 in male (χ(2) = 6.519, P = 0.011) and in female (χ(2) = 10.405, P = 0.001) patients. Cerebrovascular insults were associated with LDL-cholesterol (P = 0.05, 95 % CI: 1.003 - 12.739) in female and with apo(a) (P = 0.016, 95 % CI: 0.000-0.003) in male patients. Older female patients had increased LDL-cholesterol levels and frequency of myocardial infarctions. Proinflammatory proteins were associated with features of primary APS. No real gender differences in regard to proinflammatory protein levels were observed. Premenopausal state of female PAPS patients confers lower cardiovascular risk.

  20. Reactive oxygen species modulator 1, a novel protein, combined with carcinoembryonic antigen in differentiating malignant from benign pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianmeng; Zhang, Na; Dong, Jiahui; Sun, Gengyun

    2017-05-01

    The differential diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and benign pleural effusion remains a clinical problem. Reactive oxygen species modulator 1 is a novel protein overexpressed in various human tumors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of joint detection of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 and carcinoembryonic antigen in the differential diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and benign pleural effusion. One hundred two consecutive patients with pleural effusion (including 52 malignant pleural effusion and 50 benign pleural effusion) were registered in this study. Levels of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 and carcinoembryonic antigen were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Results showed that the concentrations of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 both in pleural fluid and serum of patients with malignant pleural effusion were significantly higher than those of benign pleural effusion (both p pleural fluid reactive oxygen species modulator 1 were 61.54% and 82.00%, respectively, with the optimized cutoff value of 589.70 pg/mL. However, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of serum reactive oxygen species modulator 1 were only 41.38% and 86.21%, respectively, with the cutoff value of 27.22 ng/mL, indicating that serum reactive oxygen species modulator 1 may not be a good option in the differential diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and benign pleural effusion. The sensitivity and specificity of pleural fluid carcinoembryonic antigen were 69.23% and 88.00%, respectively, at the cutoff value of 3.05 ng/mL, while serum carcinoembryonic antigen were 80.77% and 72.00% at the cutoff value of 2.60 ng/mL. The sensitivity could be raised to 88.17% in parallel detection of plural fluid reactive oxygen species modulator 1 and carcinoembryonic antigen concentration, and the specificity could be improved to 97.84% in serial detection.

  1. Habituation to low or high protein intake does not modulate basal or postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorissen, Stefan Hm; Horstman, Astrid Mh; Franssen, Rinske; Kouw, Imre Wk; Wall, Benjamin T; Burd, Nicholas A; de Groot, Lisette Cpgm; van Loon, Luc Jc

    2017-02-01

    Muscle mass maintenance is largely regulated by basal muscle protein synthesis rates and the ability to increase muscle protein synthesis after protein ingestion. To our knowledge, no previous studies have evaluated the impact of habituation to either low protein intake (LOW PRO) or high protein intake (HIGH PRO) on the postprandial muscle protein synthetic response. We assessed the impact of LOW PRO compared with HIGH PRO on basal and postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates after the ingestion of 25 g whey protein. Twenty-four healthy, older men [age: 62 ± 1 y; body mass index (in kg/m 2 ): 25.9 ± 0.4 (mean ± SEM)] participated in a parallel-group randomized trial in which they adapted to either a LOW PRO diet (0.7 g · kg -1 · d -1 ; n = 12) or a HIGH PRO diet (1.5 g · kg -1 · d -1 ; n = 12) for 14 d. On day 15, participants received primed continuous l-[ring- 2 H 5 ]-phenylalanine and l-[1- 13 C]-leucine infusions and ingested 25 g intrinsically l-[1- 13 C]-phenylalanine- and l-[1- 13 C]-leucine-labeled whey protein. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were collected to assess muscle protein synthesis rates as well as dietary protein digestion and absorption kinetics. Plasma leucine concentrations and exogenous phenylalanine appearance rates increased after protein ingestion (P 0.05). Plasma exogenous phenylalanine availability over the 5-h postprandial period was greater after LOW PRO than after HIGH PRO (61% ± 1% compared with 56% ± 2%, respectively; P protein synthesis rates increased from 0.031% ± 0.004% compared with 0.039% ± 0.007%/h in the fasted state to 0.062% ± 0.005% compared with 0.057% ± 0.005%/h in the postprandial state after LOW PRO compared with HIGH PRO, respectively (P protein-derived amino acids in the circulation and does not lower basal muscle protein synthesis rates or increase postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates after ingestion of 25 g protein in older men. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT

  2. Characterization of the Drosophila ortholog of the human Usher Syndrome type 1G protein sans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Demontis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Usher syndrome (USH is the most frequent deaf-blindness hereditary disease in humans. Deafness is attributed to the disorganization of stereocilia in the inner ear. USH1, the most severe subtype, is associated with mutations in genes encoding myosin VIIa, harmonin, cadherin 23, protocadherin 15, and sans. Myosin VIIa, harmonin, cadherin 23, and protocadherin 15 physically interact in vitro and localize to stereocilia tips in vivo, indicating that they form functional complexes. Sans, in contrast, localizes to vesicle-like structures beneath the apical membrane of stereocilia-displaying hair cells. How mutations in sans result in deafness and blindness is not well understood. Orthologs of myosin VIIa and protocadherin 15 have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster and their genetic analysis has identified essential roles in auditory perception and microvilli morphogenesis, respectively. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have identified and characterized the Drosophila ortholog of human sans. Drosophila Sans is expressed in tubular organs of the embryo, in lens-secreting cone cells of the adult eye, and in microvilli-displaying follicle cells during oogenesis. Sans mutants are viable, fertile, and mutant follicle cells appear to form microvilli, indicating that Sans is dispensable for fly development and microvilli morphogenesis in the follicle epithelium. In follicle cells, Sans protein localizes, similar to its vertebrate ortholog, to intracellular punctate structures, which we have identified as early endosomes associated with the syntaxin Avalanche. CONCLUSIONS: Our work is consistent with an evolutionary conserved function of Sans in vesicle trafficking. Furthermore it provides a significant basis for further understanding of the role of this Usher syndrome ortholog in development and disease.

  3. Modulation of firing and synaptic transmission of serotonergic neurons by intrinsic G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eMaejima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic neurons project to virtually all regions of the CNS and are consequently involved in many critical physiological functions such as mood, sexual behavior, feeding, sleep/wake cycle, memory, cognition, blood pressure regulation, breathing and reproductive success. Therefore serotonin release and serotonergic neuronal activity have to be precisely controlled and modulated by interacting brain circuits to adapt to specific emotional and environmental states. We will review the current knowledge about G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels involved in the regulation of serotonergic system, how their regulation is modulating the intrinsic activity of serotonergic neurons and its transmitter release and will discuss the latest methods for controlling the modulation of serotonin release and intracellular signaling in serotonergic neurons in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Comparison of colorimetric assays with quantitative amino acid analysis for protein quantification of Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Omar; Maggiore, Luana; Necchi, Francesca; Koeberling, Oliver; MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan; Gerke, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Genetically induced outer membrane particles from Gram-negative bacteria, called Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA), are being investigated as vaccines. Rapid methods are required for estimating the protein content for in-process assays during production. Since GMMA are complex biological structures containing lipid and polysaccharide as well as protein, protein determinations are not necessarily straightforward. We compared protein quantification by Bradford, Lowry, and Non-Interfering assays using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as standard with quantitative amino acid (AA) analysis, the most accurate currently available method for protein quantification. The Lowry assay has the lowest inter- and intra-assay variation and gives the best linearity between protein amount and absorbance. In all three assays, the color yield (optical density per mass of protein) of GMMA was markedly different from that of BSA with a ratio of approximately 4 for the Bradford assay, and highly variable between different GMMA; and approximately 0.7 for the Lowry and Non-Interfering assays, highlighting the need for calibrating the standard used in the colorimetric assay against GMMA quantified by AA analysis. In terms of a combination of ease, reproducibility, and proportionality of protein measurement, and comparability between samples, the Lowry assay was superior to Bradford and Non-Interfering assays for GMMA quantification.

  5. Identification and characterization of the host protein DNAJC14 as a broadly active flavivirus replication modulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Yi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses in the Flavivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family are arthropod-transmitted and contribute to staggering numbers of human infections and significant deaths annually across the globe. To identify cellular factors with antiviral activity against flaviviruses, we screened a cDNA library using an iterative approach. We identified a mammalian Hsp40 chaperone protein (DNAJC14 that when overexpressed was able to mediate protection from yellow fever virus (YFV-induced cell death. Further studies revealed that DNAJC14 inhibits YFV at the step of viral RNA replication. Since replication of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV, a member of the related Pestivirus genus, is also known to be modulated by DNAJC14, we tested the effect of this host factor on diverse Flaviviridae family members. Flaviviruses, including the pathogenic Asibi strain of YFV, Kunjin, and tick-borne Langat virus, as well as a Hepacivirus, hepatitis C virus (HCV, all were inhibited by overexpression of DNAJC14. Mutagenesis showed that both the J-domain and the C-terminal domain, which mediates self-interaction, are required for anti-YFV activity. We found that DNAJC14 does not block YFV nor HCV NS2-3 cleavage, and using non-inhibitory mutants demonstrate that DNAJC14 is recruited to YFV replication complexes. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that endogenous DNAJC14 rearranges during infection and is found in replication complexes identified by dsRNA staining. Interestingly, silencing of endogenous DNAJC14 results in impaired YFV replication suggesting a requirement for DNAJC14 in YFV replication complex assembly. Finally, the antiviral activity of overexpressed DNAJC14 occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner. DNAJC14 overexpression may disrupt the proper stoichiometry resulting in inhibition, which can be overcome upon restoration of the optimal ratios due to the accumulation of viral nonstructural proteins. Our findings, together with previously published work

  6. Pitavastatin Differentially Modulates MicroRNA-Associated Cholesterol Transport Proteins in Macrophages.

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    Haijun Zhang

    Full Text Available There is emerging evidence identifying microRNAs (miRNAs as mediators of statin-induced cholesterol efflux, notably through the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 in macrophages. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, pitavastatin, on macrophage miRNAs in the presence and absence of oxidized-LDL, a hallmark of a pro-atherogenic milieu. Treatment of human THP-1 cells with pitavastatin prevented the oxLDL-mediated suppression of miR-33a, -33b and -758 mRNA in these cells, an effect which was not uniquely attributable to induction of SREBP2. Induction of ABCA1 mRNA and protein by oxLDL was inhibited (30% by pitavastatin, while oxLDL or pitavastatin alone significantly induced and repressed ABCA1 expression, respectively. These findings are consistent with previous reports in macrophages. miRNA profiling was also performed using a miRNA array. We identified specific miRNAs which were up-regulated (122 and down-regulated (107 in THP-1 cells treated with oxLDL plus pitavastatin versus oxLDL alone, indicating distinct regulatory networks in these cells. Moreover, several of the differentially expressed miRNAs identified are functionally associated with cholesterol trafficking (six miRNAs in cells treated with oxLDL versus oxLDL plus pitavastatin. Our findings indicate that pitavastatin can differentially modulate miRNA in the presence of oxLDL; and, our results provide evidence that the net effect on cholesterol homeostasis is mediated by a network of miRNAs.

  7. Kaempferol modulates Angiopoietin-like protein 2 expression to lessen the mastitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hong-Bo; Sui, Guo-Guang; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Sun, Zhi-Liang

    2017-11-22

    Mastitis is inflammation of a breast (or udder). Angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) has been found as a key inflammatory mediator in mastitis. Purpose of this research was to investigate the mechanisms about repressing effect of kaempferol on mastitis. Forty mice were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10): C57BL/6J control mice, untreated murine mastitis, 10 mg/kg kaempferol treated murine mastitis (ip), and 30 mg/kg kaempferol treated murine mastitis (ip). Primary cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMEC) were indiscriminately divided into seven groups including control group, 10 mmol/L vehicle of kaempferol group, 10 μmol/L kaempferol treated group, 20 μg/mL LPS treated group, 1 μmol/L kaempferol plus LPS treated group, 3 μmol/L kaempferol plus LPS treated group, and 10 μmol/L kaempferol plus LPS treated group. In murine mastitis, kaempferol (10 or 30 mg/kg) treatment prevented mastitis development, decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) production, interleukin (IL)-6 level, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentration, and ANGPTL2 expression. In MMEC, kaempferol (1, 3, or 10 μM) reduced MPO production, TNF-α concentration, IL-6 level, and ANGPTL2 expression. The results in present study show that kaempferol modulates the expression of ANGPTL2 to lessen the mastitis in mice. Copyright © 2018 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Plasma protein corona modulates the vascular wall interaction of drug carriers in a material and donor specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Sobczynski

    Full Text Available The nanoscale plasma protein interaction with intravenously injected particulate carrier systems is known to modulate their organ distribution and clearance from the bloodstream. However, the role of this plasma protein interaction in prescribing the adhesion of carriers to the vascular wall remains relatively unknown. Here, we show that the adhesion of vascular-targeted poly(lactide-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA spheres to endothelial cells is significantly inhibited in human blood flow, with up to 90% reduction in adhesion observed relative to adhesion in simple buffer flow, depending on the particle size and the magnitude and pattern of blood flow. This reduced PLGA adhesion in blood flow is linked to the adsorption of certain high molecular weight plasma proteins on PLGA and is donor specific, where large reductions in particle adhesion in blood flow (>80% relative to buffer is seen with ∼60% of unique donor bloods while others exhibit moderate to no reductions. The depletion of high molecular weight immunoglobulins from plasma is shown to successfully restore PLGA vascular wall adhesion. The observed plasma protein effect on PLGA is likely due to material characteristics since the effect is not replicated with polystyrene or silica spheres. These particles effectively adhere to the endothelium at a higher level in blood over buffer flow. Overall, understanding how distinct plasma proteins modulate the vascular wall interaction of vascular-targeted carriers of different material characteristics would allow for the design of highly functional delivery vehicles for the treatment of many serious human diseases.

  9. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts target organ damage in Chinese patients with metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhigang; Nie, Hai; He, Hongbo

    2007-01-01

    with metabolic syndrome. A total of 1082 consecutive patients of Chinese origin were screened for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and target organ damage, including cardiac hypertrophy......Observational studies established high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a risk factor for cardiovascular events in the general population. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between target organ damage and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in a cohort of Chinese patients......, carotid intima-media thickness, and renal impairment, were investigated. The median (25th and 75th percentiles) of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in 619 patients with metabolic syndrome was 2.42 mg/L (0.75 and 3.66 mg/L) compared with 1.13 mg/L (0.51 and 2.46 mg/L) among 463 control subjects (P

  10. Interactions Between Flavonoid-Rich Extracts and Sodium Caseinate Modulate Protein Functionality and Flavonoid Bioaccessibility in Model Food Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elegbede, Jennifer L; Li, Min; Jones, Owen G; Campanella, Osvaldo H; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2018-05-01

    With growing interest in formulating new food products with added protein and flavonoid-rich ingredients for health benefits, direct interactions between these ingredient classes becomes critical in so much as they may impact protein functionality, product quality, and flavonoids bioavailability. In this study, sodium caseinate (SCN)-based model products (foams and emulsions) were formulated with grape seed extract (GSE, rich in galloylated flavonoids) and green tea extract (GTE, rich in nongalloylated flavonoids), respectively, to assess changes in functional properties of SCN and impacts on flavonoid bioaccessibility. Experiments with pure flavonoids suggested that galloylated flavonoids reduced air-water interfacial tension of 0.01% SCN dispersions more significantly than nongalloylated flavonoids at high concentrations (>50 μg/mL). This observation was supported by changes in stability of 5% SCN foam, which showed that foam stability was increased at high levels of GSE (≥50 μg/mL, P < 0.05) but was not affected by GTE. However, flavonoid extracts had modest effects on SCN emulsion. In addition, galloylated flavonoids had higher bioaccessibility in both SCN foam and emulsion. These results suggest that SCN-flavonoid binding interactions can modulate protein functionality leading to difference in performance and flavonoid bioaccessibility of protein-based products. As information on the beneficial health effects of flavonoids expands, it is likely that usage of these ingredients in consumer foods will increase. However, the necessary levels to provide such benefits may exceed those that begin to impact functionality of the macronutrients such as proteins. Flavonoid inclusion within protein matrices may modulate protein functionality in a food system and modify critical consumer traits or delivery of these beneficial plant-derived components. The product matrices utilized in this study offer relevant model systems to evaluate how fortification with flavonoid

  11. Functional brain asymmetry, attentional modulation, and interhemispheric transfer in boys with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Lundervold, Arvid; Grüner, Renate

    2007-01-01

    on the right ear stimulus in the dichotic listening situation is thought to involve the same prefrontal attentional and executive functions that are involved in the suppression of tics, whereas, performance when focusing attention on the left ear stimulus additionally involves a callosal transfer...... to shift attention normally when instructed to focus on the right ear stimulus. When instructed to focus attention on the left ear stimulus, however, performance deteriorated in the TS group. Correlations with CC area further supported the hypothesized presence of deviant callosal functioning in the TS...... of information. In light of presumed disturbances in transfer of information across the corpus callosum, we hypothesized that children with TS would, however, have difficulty modulating the functional lateralization that ensues through a shift of attention to the left side. This hypothesis was tested...

  12. PI3K/AKT signaling modulates transcriptional expression of EWS/FLI1 through specificity protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Chiara; Boro, Aleksandar; Rechfeld, Florian; Lopez-Garcia, Laura A; Gierisch, Maria E; Schäfer, Beat W; Niggli, Felix K

    2015-10-06

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is the second most frequent bone cancer in childhood and is characterized by the presence of the balanced translocation t(11;22)(q24;q12) in more than 85% of cases, generating a dysregulated transcription factor EWS/FLI1. This fusion protein is an essential oncogenic component of ES development which is necessary for tumor cell maintenance and represents an attractive therapeutic target. To search for modulators of EWS/FLI1 activity we screened a library of 153 targeted compounds and identified inhibitors of the PI3K pathway to directly modulate EWS/FLI1 transcription. Surprisingly, treatment of four different ES cell lines with BEZ235 resulted in down regulation of EWS/FLI1 mRNA and protein by ~50% with subsequent modulation of target gene expression. Analysis of the EWS/FLI1 promoter region (-2239/+67) using various deletion constructs identified two 14 bp minimal elements as being important for EWS/FLI1 transcription. We identified SP1 as modulator of EWS/FLI1 gene expression and demonstrated direct binding to one of these regions in the EWS/FLI1 promoter by EMSA and ChIP experiments. These results provide the first insights on the transcriptional regulation of EWS/FLI1, an area that has not been investigated so far, and offer an additional molecular explanation for the known sensitivity of ES cell lines to PI3K inhibition.

  13. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation under a High-Fat Diet Modulates Stomach Protein Expression and Intestinal Microbiota in Adult Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chaplin, Alice; Parra, Pilar; Serra, Francisca; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract constitutes a physiological interface integrating nutrient and microbiota-host metabolism. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) have been reported to contribute to decreased body weight and fat accretion. The modulation by dietary CLA of stomach proteins related to energy homeostasis or microbiota may be involved, although this has not been previously analysed. This is examined in the present study, which aims to underline the potential mechanisms of CLA which contribute...

  14. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Plant Compared with Animal Protein Sources on Features of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalvon-Demersay, Tristan; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila; Arfsten, Judith; Egli, Léonie; Gaudichon, Claire; Karagounis, Leonidas G; Tomé, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Dietary protein may play an important role in the prevention of metabolic dysfunctions. However, the way in which the protein source affects these dysfunctions has not been clearly established. The aim of the current systematic review was to compare the impact of plant- and animal-sourced dietary proteins on several features of metabolic syndrome in humans. The PubMed database was searched for both chronic and acute interventional studies, as well as observational studies, in healthy humans or those with metabolic dysfunctions, in which the impact of animal and plant protein intake was compared while using the following variables: cholesterolemia and triglyceridemia, blood pressure, glucose homeostasis, and body composition. Based on data extraction, we observed that soy protein consumption (with isoflavones), but not soy protein alone (without isoflavones) or other plant proteins (pea and lupine proteins, wheat gluten), leads to a 3% greater decrease in both total and LDL cholesterol compared with animal-sourced protein ingestion, especially in individuals with high fasting cholesterol concentrations. This observation was made when animal proteins were provided as a whole diet rather than given supplementally. Some observational studies reported an inverse association between plant protein intake and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, but this was not confirmed by intervention studies. Moreover, plant protein (wheat gluten, soy protein) intake as part of a mixed meal resulted in a lower postprandial insulin response than did whey. This systematic review provides some evidence that the intake of soy protein associated with isoflavones may prevent the onset of risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, i.e., hypercholesterolemia and hypertension, in humans. However, we were not able to draw any further conclusions from the present work on the positive effects of plant proteins relating to glucose homeostasis and body composition. © 2017 American

  15. Infusion of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. Modulates Oxidative Stress in Patients with Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, María Elena; Zuñiga-Muñoz, Alejandra; Guarner Lans, Verónica; Duran-Hernández, Erendira Janet; Pérez-Torres, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is associated with progressive aortic dilatation, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress that contribute to the early acute dissection of the vessel and can end up in rupture of the aorta and sudden death. Many studies have described that the organic acids from Hibiscus sabdariffa Linne (HSL) calyces increase cellular antioxidant capacity and decrease oxidative stress. Here we evaluate if the antioxidant properties of HSL infusion improve oxidative stress in MFS patients. Activities of extra cellular super oxide dismutase (ECSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GSSG-R), glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO) index, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and ascorbic acid were determined in plasma from MFS patients. Values before and after 3 months of the treatment with 2% HSL infusion were compared in control and MFS subjects. After treatment, there was a significant decrease in ECSOD (p = 0.03), EGPx (p = 0.04), GST (p = 0.03), GSH (p = 0.01), and TAC and ascorbic acid (p = 0.02) but GSSG-R activity (p = 0.04) and LPO (p = 0.02) were increased in MFS patients in comparison to patients receiving the HSL treatment and C subjects. Therefore, the infusion of HSL calyces has antioxidant properties that allow an increase in antioxidant capacity of both the enzymatic and nonenzymatic systems, in the plasma of the MSF patients. PMID:27413258

  16. Abnormal neuronal activity in Tourette syndrome and its modulation using deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelashvili, Michal; Loewenstern, Yocheved

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a common childhood-onset disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics that are typically accompanied by a multitude of comorbid symptoms. Pharmacological treatment options are limited, which has led to the exploration of deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a possible treatment for severe cases. Multiple lines of evidence have linked TS with abnormalities in the motor and limbic cortico-basal ganglia (CBG) pathways. Neurophysiological data have only recently started to slowly accumulate from multiple sources: noninvasive imaging and electrophysiological techniques, invasive electrophysiological recordings in TS patients undergoing DBS implantation surgery, and animal models of the disorder. These converging sources point to system-level physiological changes throughout the CBG pathway, including both general altered baseline neuronal activity patterns and specific tic-related activity. DBS has been applied to different regions along the motor and limbic pathways, primarily to the globus pallidus internus, thalamic nuclei, and nucleus accumbens. In line with the findings that also draw on the more abundant application of DBS to Parkinson's disease, this stimulation is assumed to result in changes in the neuronal firing patterns and the passage of information through the stimulated nuclei. We present an overview of recent experimental findings on abnormal neuronal activity associated with TS and the changes in this activity following DBS. These findings are then discussed in the context of current models of CBG function in the normal state, during TS, and finally in the wider context of DBS in CBG-related disorders. PMID:25925326

  17. Infusion of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. Modulates Oxidative Stress in Patients with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, María Elena; Zuñiga-Muñoz, Alejandra; Guarner Lans, Verónica; Duran-Hernández, Erendira Janet; Pérez-Torres, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is associated with progressive aortic dilatation, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress that contribute to the early acute dissection of the vessel and can end up in rupture of the aorta and sudden death. Many studies have described that the organic acids from Hibiscus sabdariffa Linne (HSL) calyces increase cellular antioxidant capacity and decrease oxidative stress. Here we evaluate if the antioxidant properties of HSL infusion improve oxidative stress in MFS patients. Activities of extra cellular super oxide dismutase (ECSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GSSG-R), glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO) index, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and ascorbic acid were determined in plasma from MFS patients. Values before and after 3 months of the treatment with 2% HSL infusion were compared in control and MFS subjects. After treatment, there was a significant decrease in ECSOD (p = 0.03), EGPx (p = 0.04), GST (p = 0.03), GSH (p = 0.01), and TAC and ascorbic acid (p = 0.02) but GSSG-R activity (p = 0.04) and LPO (p = 0.02) were increased in MFS patients in comparison to patients receiving the HSL treatment and C subjects. Therefore, the infusion of HSL calyces has antioxidant properties that allow an increase in antioxidant capacity of both the enzymatic and nonenzymatic systems, in the plasma of the MSF patients.

  18. Exercise Training positively modulates the Ectonucleotidase Enzymes in Lymphocytes of Metabolic Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, C C; Bagatini, M D; Cardoso, A M; Zanini, D; Abdalla, F H; Baldissarelli, J; Dalenogare, D P; Dos Santos, D L; Schetinger, M R C; Morsch, V M M

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the cardiovascular risk factors as well as ectonucleotidase activities in lymphocytes of metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients before and after an exercise intervention. 20 MetS patients, who performed regular concurrent exercise training for 30 weeks, 3 times/week, were studied. Anthropometric, biochemical, inflammatory and hepatic parameters and hydrolysis of adenine nucleotides and nucleoside in lymphocytes were collected from patients before and after 15 and 30 weeks of the exercise intervention as well as from participants of the control group. An increase in the hydrolysis of ATP and ADP, and a decrease in adenosine deamination in lymphocytes of MetS patients before the exercise intervention were observed (Pexercise training after 30 weeks of intervention. Additionally, exercise training reduced the inflammatory and hepatic markers to baseline levels after 30 weeks of exercise. Our results clearly indicated alteration in ectonucleotidase enzymes in lymphocytes in the MetS, whereas regular exercise training had a protective effect on the enzymatic alterations and on inflammatory and hepatic parameters, especially if it is performed regularly and for a long period. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Hormonal Modulation in Aging Patients with Erectile Dysfunction and Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Campos Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction (ED, metabolic syndrome (MetS, and hypogonadism are closely related, often coexisting in the aging male. Obesity was shown to raise the risk of ED and hypogonadism, as well as other endocrinological disturbances with impact on erectile function. We selected 179 patients referred for ED to our andrology unit, aiming to evaluate gonadotropins and estradiol interplay in context of ED, MetS, and hypogonadism. Patients were stratified into groups in accordance with the presence (or not of MetS and/or hypogonadism. Noticeable differences in total testosterone (TT and free testosterone (FT levels were found between patients with and without MetS. Men with MetS evidenced lower TT circulating levels with an increasing number of MetS parameters, for which hypertriglyceridemia and waist circumference strongly contributed. Regarding the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, patients with hypogonadism did not exhibit raised LH levels. Interestingly, among those with higher LH levels, estradiol values were also increased. Possible explanations for this unexpected profile of estradiol may be the age-related adiposity, other estrogen-raising pathways, or even unknown mechanisms. Estradiol is possibly a molecule with further interactions beyond the currently described. Our results further enlighten this still unclear multidisciplinary and complex subject, raising new investigational opportunities.

  20. Treatment of metabolic syndrome by combination of physical activity and diet needs an optimal protein intake: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutheil, Frédéric; Lac, Gérard; Courteix, Daniel; Doré, Eric; Chapier, Robert; Roszyk, Laurence; Sapin, Vincent; Lesourd, Bruno

    2012-09-17

    The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for protein intake has been set at 1.0-1.3 g/kg/day for senior. To date, no consensus exists on the lower threshold intake (LTI = RDA/1.3) for the protein intake (PI) needed in senior patients ongoing both combined caloric restriction and physical activity treatment for metabolic syndrome. Considering that age, caloric restriction and exercise are three increasing factors of protein need, this study was dedicated to determine the minimal PI in this situation, through the determination of albuminemia that is the blood marker of protein homeostasis. Twenty eight subjects (19 M, 9 F, 61.8 ± 6.5 years, BMI 33.4 ± 4.1 kg/m²) with metabolic syndrome completed a three-week residential programme (Day 0 to Day 21) controlled for nutrition (energy balance of -500 kcal/day) and physical activity (3.5 hours/day). Patients were randomly assigned in two groups: Normal-PI (NPI: 1.0 g/kg/day) and High-PI (HPI: 1.2 g/kg/day). Then, patients returned home and were followed for six months. Albuminemia was measured at D0, D21, D90 and D180. At baseline, PI was spontaneously 1.0 g/kg/day for both groups. Albuminemia was 40.6 g/l for NPI and 40.8 g/l for HPI. A marginal protein under-nutrition appeared in NPI with a decreased albuminemia at D90 below 35 g/l (34.3 versus 41.5 g/l for HPI, p treatment based on restricted diet and exercise in senior people with metabolic syndrome, the lower threshold intake for protein must be set at 1.2 g/kg/day to maintain blood protein homeostasis.

  1. Dauer pheromone and G-protein signaling modulate the coordination of intraflagellar transport kinesin motor proteins in C. elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Burghoorn (Jan); M.P.J. Dekkers (Martijn); S. Rademakers (Suzanne); A.A.W. de Jong (Ton); R. Willemsen (Rob); P. Swoboda (Peter); J. McCafferty (Gert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCilia length and function are dynamically regulated by modulation of intraflagellar transport (IFT). The cilia of C. elegans amphid channel neurons provide an excellent model to study this process, since they use two different kinesins for anterograde transport: kinesin-II and OSM-3

  2. Exploring Protein Structure and Dynamics through a Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipchock, James M.; Ginther, Patrick S.; Douglas, Bonnie B.; Bird, Kelly E.; Loria, J. Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Here, we present a 10-week project-oriented laboratory module designed to provide a course-based undergraduate research experience in biochemistry that emphasizes the importance of biomolecular structure and dynamics in enzyme function. This module explores the impact of mutagenesis on an important active site loop for a biomedically-relevant…

  3. Scaffold protein harmonin (USH1C) provides molecular links between Usher syndrome type 1 and type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiners, Jan; van Wijk, Erwin; Märker, Tina; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Jürgens, Karin; te Brinke, Heleen; Overlack, Nora; Roepman, Ronald; Knipper, Marlies; Kremer, Hannie; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2005-12-15

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of combined deaf-blindness in man. USH is clinically and genetically heterogeneous with at least 11 chromosomal loci assigned to the three USH types (USH1A-G, USH2A-C, USH3A). Although the different USH types exhibit almost the same phenotype in human, the identified USH genes encode for proteins which belong to very different protein classes and families. We and others recently reported that the scaffold protein harmonin (USH1C-gene product) integrates all identified USH1 molecules in a USH1-protein network. Here, we investigated the relationship between the USH2 molecules and this USH1-protein network. We show a molecular interaction between the scaffold protein harmonin (USH1C) and the USH2A protein, VLGR1 (USH2C) and the candidate for USH2B, NBC3. We pinpoint these interactions to interactions between the PDZ1 domain of harmonin and the PDZ-binding motifs at the C-termini of the USH2 proteins and NBC3. We demonstrate that USH2A, VLGR1 and NBC3 are co-expressed with the USH1-protein harmonin in the synaptic terminals of both retinal photoreceptors and inner ear hair cells. In hair cells, these USH proteins are also localized in the signal uptaking stereocilia. Our data indicate that the USH2 proteins and NBC3 are further partners in the supramolecular USH-protein network in the retina and inner ear which shed new light on the function of USH2 proteins and the entire USH-protein network. These findings provide first evidence for a molecular linkage between the pathophysiology in USH1 and USH2. The organization of USH molecules in a mutual 'interactome' related to the disease can explain the common phenotype in USH.

  4. The effects of wet cupping on serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and heat shock protein 27 antibody titers in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Seyed Kazem; Gang, Li Zhi; Saghebi, Seyed Ahmad; Mohammadi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Shabnam; Mohammadi, Ghazaleh; Ferns, Gordan A; Ghanbarzadeh, Majid; Razmgah, Gholamreza Ghayour; Ramazani, Zahra; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Esmaily, Habibollah; Bahrami Taghanaki, Hamidreza; Azizi, Hoda

    2014-08-01

    It has previously been reported that increased level of serum heat shock proteins (Hsps) antibody in patients with metabolic syndrome. It is possible that the expression of Hsp and inflammatory markers can be affected by cupping and traditional Chinese medicine. There is a little data investigating the effects of cupping on markers of inflammation and Hsp proteins, hence, the objective of this study was evaluation of the effects of wet cupping on serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and Hsp27 antibody titers in patients with metabolic syndrome. Serum Hs-CRP and Hsp27 antibody titers were assessed in samples from 126 patients with metabolic syndrome (18-65 years of age) at baseline, and after 6 and 12 weeks after treatment. One hundred and twenty-six patients were randomly divided into the experimental group treated with wet cupping combined with dietary advice, and the control group treated with dietary advice alone using a random number table. Eight patients in case group and five subjects in control groups were excluded from the study. Data were analyzed using SPSS 15.0 software and a repeated measure ANCOVA. Serum hs-CRP titers did not change significantly between groups (p>0.05) and times (p=0.27). The same result was found for Hsp27 titers (p>0.05). Wet-cupping on the interscapular region has no effect on serum hs-CRP and Hsp27 patients with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Possible role of HIWI2 in modulating tight junction proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells through Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Suganya; Palanisamy, Karthikka; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga Pandian; Chidambaram, Subbulakshmi

    2017-03-01

    PIWI subfamily of proteins is shown to be primarily expressed in germline cells. They maintain the genomic integrity by silencing the transposable elements. Although the role of PIWI proteins in germ cells has been documented, their presence and function in somatic cells remains unclear. Intriguingly, we detected all four members of PIWI-like proteins in human ocular tissues and somatic cell lines. When HIWI2 was knocked down in retinal pigment epithelial cells, the typical honeycomb morphology was affected. Further analysis showed that the expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins, CLDN1, and TJP1 were altered in HIWI2 knockdown. Moreover, confocal imaging revealed disrupted TJP1 assembly at the TJ. Previous studies report the role of GSK3β in regulating TJ proteins. Accordingly, phospho-kinase proteome profiler array indicated increased phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3α/β in HIWI2 knockdown, suggesting that HIWI2 might affect TJ proteins through Akt-GSK3α/β signaling axis. Moreover, treating the HIWI2 knockdown cells with wortmannin increased the levels of TJP1 and CLDN1. Taken together, our study demonstrates the presence of PIWI-like proteins in somatic cells and the possible role of HIWI2 in preserving the functional integrity of epithelial cells probably by modulating the phosphorylation status of Akt.

  6. Localization of a region in the fusion protein of avian metapneumovirus that modulates cell-cell fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yongwei; Feng, Kurtis; Yao, Xiangjie; Cai, Hui; Li, Junan; Mirza, Anne M; Iorio, Ronald M; Li, Jianrong

    2012-11-01

    The genus Metapneumovirus within the subfamily Pneumovirinae of the family Paramyxoviridae includes two members, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), causing respiratory tract infections in humans and birds, respectively. Paramyxoviruses enter host cells by fusing the viral envelope with a host cell membrane. Membrane fusion of hMPV appears to be unique, in that fusion of some hMPV strains requires low pH. Here, we show that the fusion (F) proteins of aMPV promote fusion in the absence of the attachment protein and low pH is not required. Furthermore, there are notable differences in cell-cell fusion among aMPV subtypes. Trypsin was required for cell-cell fusion induced by subtype B but not subtypes A and C. The F protein of aMPV subtype A was highly fusogenic, whereas those from subtypes B and C were not. By construction and evaluation of chimeric F proteins composed of domains from the F proteins of subtypes A and B, we localized a region composed of amino acid residues 170 to 338 in the F protein that is responsible for the hyperfusogenic phenotype of the F from subtype A. Further mutagenesis analysis revealed that residues R295, G297, and K323 in this region collectively contributed to the hyperfusogenicity. Taken together, we have identified a region in the aMPV F protein that modulates the extent of membrane fusion. A model for fusion consistent with these data is presented.

  7. Protein kinase A mediates adenosine A2a receptor modulation of neurotransmitter release via synapsin I phosphorylation in cultured cells from medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Joao Paulo Pontes; Almeida, Marina Gomes; Castilho-Martins, Emerson Augusto; Costa, Maisa Aparecida; Fior-Chadi, Debora Rejane

    2014-08-01

    Synaptic transmission is an essential process for neuron physiology. Such process is enabled in part due to modulation of neurotransmitter release. Adenosine is a synaptic modulator of neurotransmitter release in the Central Nervous System, including neurons of medulla oblongata, where several nuclei are involved with neurovegetative reflexes. Adenosine modulates different neurotransmitter systems in medulla oblongata, specially glutamate and noradrenaline in the nucleus tractussolitarii, which are involved in hypotensive responses. However, the intracellular mechanisms involved in this modulation remain unknown. The adenosine A2a receptor modulates neurotransmitter release by activating two cAMP protein effectors, the protein kinase A and the exchange protein activated by cAMP. Therefore, an in vitro approach (cultured cells) was carried out to evaluate modulation of neurotransmission by adenosine A2a receptor and the signaling intracellular pathway involved. Results show that the adenosine A2a receptor agonist, CGS 21680, increases neurotransmitter release, in particular, glutamate and noradrenaline and such response is mediated by protein kinase A activation, which in turn increased synapsin I phosphorylation. This suggests a mechanism of A2aR modulation of neurotransmitter release in cultured cells from medulla oblongata of Wistar rats and suggest that protein kinase A mediates this modulation of neurotransmitter release via synapsin I phosphorylation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Sjögren's syndrome associated with protein losing gastroenteropathy manifested by intestinal lymphangiectasia successfully treated with prednisolone and hydroxychloroquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C-Y; Chien, S-T; Wang, C-C; Chen, I-H; Chiu, H-W; Liu, M-Y; Lin, C-H; Ben, R-J; Tsai, M-K

    2015-12-01

    Protein-losing gastroenteropathy (PLGE), a rare manifestation of primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS), is characterized by profound edema and severe hypoalbuminemia secondary to excessive serum protein loss from the gastrointestinal tract and is clinically indistinguishable from nephrotic syndrome. We report a case of a 30-year-old Taiwanese woman with PLGE-associated SS. In addition to a positive Schirmer's test, she had eye-dryness, thirst, and high levels of anti-SSA antibodies, fulfilling SS criteria. PLGE diagnosis was highly appropriate given the clinical profile of hypoalbuminemia, hypercholesterolemia, pleural effusion, and ascites, with absent cardiac, hepatic, or renal disease. We were unable to perform technetium-99 m-labeled human serum albumin scintigraphy ((99m)Tc-HAS). However, the patient's edema and albumin level improved dramatically in response to a 3-month regime of oral prednisolone followed by oral hydroxychloroquine. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Role of Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome protein in translation machinery and cell chemotaxis: a comparative genomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasieva O

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Olga VasievaInstitute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Fellowship for the Interpretation of Genomes, Burr Ridge, IL, USAAbstract: Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS is linked to a mutation in a single gene. The SBDS proinvolved in RNA metabolism and ribosome-associated functions, but SBDS mutation is primarily linked to a defect in polymorphonuclear leukocytes unable to orient correctly in a spatial gradient of chemoattractants. Results of data mining and comparative genomic approaches undertaken in this study suggest that SBDS protein is also linked to tRNA metabolism and translation initiation. Analysis of crosstalk between translation machinery and cytoskeletal dynamics provides new insights into the cellular chemotactic defects caused by SBDS protein malfunction. The proposed functional interactions provide a new approach to exploit potential targets in the treatment and monitoring of this disease.Keywords: Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome, wybutosine, tRNA, chemotaxis, translation, genomics, gene proximity

  10. Cytokine profile after oral food challenge in infants with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mitsuaki; Ito, Yasunori; Shimomura, Masaki; Morishita, Hideaki; Meguro, Takaaki; Adachi, Yuichi; Seto, Shiro

    2017-07-01

    Although food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is supposed to be caused by inflammation, the role of cytokines has not yet been clarified. To elucidate the role of cytokines in the development of symptoms and abnormal laboratory findings at an oral food challenge (OFC), changes in serum cytokine levels were analyzed for 6 OFCs in 4 patients with FPIES. The result of OFC was judged positive if any gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (vomiting, diarrhea, or bloody stool) were induced. Among 11 cytokines profiled, serum levels of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-5, and IL-8 were clearly increased in all 4 positive OFCs in which elevations of the serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP) and peripheral blood neutrophilia were also seen. The level of serum IL-10 also rose in 2 positive OFCs. Remarkable increases in the serum level of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), IL-6, and IL-12 were observed in a positive OFC where the serum level of CRP rose markedly (6.75 mg/dL). The serum levels of IL-5 were also elevated in 2 negative OFCs. No apparent specific correlations were found between cytokines and GI symptoms. These results suggest that IL-2 and IL-8 are involved in the antigen-specific immune responses in most patients with FPIES. Further studies are needed to elucidate the significance of these cytokine in the pathogenesis of FPIES. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxidant production and SOD1 protein expression in single skeletal myofibers from Down syndrome mice

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    Patrick M. Cowley

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is a genetic condition caused by the triplication of chromosome 21. Persons with DS exhibit pronounced muscle weakness, which also occurs in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. Oxidative stress is thought to be an underlying factor in the development of DS-related pathologies including muscle dysfunction. High-levels of oxidative stress have been attributed to triplication and elevated expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1; a gene located on chromosome 21. The elevated expression of SOD1 is postulated to increase production of hydrogen peroxide and cause oxidative injury and cell death. However, it is unknown whether SOD1 protein expression is associated with greater oxidant production in skeletal muscle from Ts65Dn mice. Thus, our objective was to assess levels of SOD1 expression and oxidant production in skeletal myofibers from the flexor digitorum brevis obtained from Ts65Dn and control mice. Measurements of oxidant production were obtained from myofibers loaded with 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH2-DA in the basal state and following 15 min of stimulated unloaded contraction. Ts65Dn myofibers exhibited a significant decrease in basal DCF emissions (p 0.05. Myofibers from Ts65Dn mice tended to be smaller and myonuclear domain was lower (p < 0.05. In summary, myofibers from Ts65Dn mice exhibited decreased basal DCF emissions that were coupled with elevated protein expression of SOD1. Stimulated contraction in isolated myofibers did not affect DCF emissions in either group. These findings suggest the skeletal muscle dysfunction in the adult Ts65Dn mouse is not associated with skeletal muscle oxidative stress.

  12. Heat shock proteins and chronic fatigue in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bårdsen, Kjetil; Nilsen, Mari Mæland; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Norheim, Katrine Brække; Jonsson, Grete; Omdal, Roald

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue occurs frequently in patients with cancer, neurological diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases, but the biological mechanisms that lead to and regulate fatigue are largely unknown. When the innate immune system is activated, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are produced to protect cells. Some extracellular HSPs appear to recognize cellular targets in the brain, and we hypothesize that fatigue may be generated by specific HSPs signalling through neuronal or glial cells in the central nervous system. From a cohort of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, 20 patients with high and 20 patients with low fatigue were selected. Fatigue was evaluated with a fatigue visual analogue scale. Plasma concentrations of HSP32, HSP60, HSP72 and HSP90α were measured and analysed to determine if there were associations with the level of fatigue. Plasma concentrations of HSP90α were significantly higher in patients with high fatigue compared with those with low fatigue, and there was a tendency to higher concentrations of HSP72 in patients with high fatigue compared with patients with low fatigue. There were no differences in concentrations of HSP32 and HSP60 between the high- and low-fatigue groups. Thus, extracellular HSPs, particularly HSP90α, may signal fatigue in chronic inflammation. This supports the hypothesis that fatigue is generated by cellular defence mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. C-reactive protein level and obesity as cardiovascular risk factors in polycystic ovary syndrome

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    Eda Ülkü Uludağ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the role of C-reactive protein(CRP level elevation and obesity for the increased cardiovasculardisease risk in polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS.Methods: A hundred and nine patients with PCOS and 30age matched healthy volunteers with regular menstrualcycle are involved in the study. PCOS group is furthersubdivided into three subgroups according to the bodymass index (BMI. Subgroups included 54 with BMI30. Blood samplesfor glucose, insulin, uric acid, and CRP were collected inthe morning after overnight fasting (12 hours. Homeostasismodel assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IRwas calculated. Results: Fasting blood glucose, insulin,and HOMA-IR was significantly higher in PCOS group(p=0.02, p=0.01 and p=0.02. CRP level was higher insubgroup with BMI>30. High CRP level in PCOS wasfound to be independent from BMI (p30.When compared with the control group high insulin levelwas the only to be statistically significant in obese PCOSpatients (p=0.005. HOMA-IR was higher in PCOS subgroupwith BMI>30 when compared with controls and thePCOS subgroup with BMI<25 (p<0.001, p= 0.003.Conclusion: Obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and high CRPlevels are seemed to be related and potentiating eachother in PCOS. Struggling with obesity is one of the mostimportant issues for preventive medicine.Key words: PCOS, CRP, obesity, cardiovascular risk

  14. Increased CD69 Expression on Peripheral Eosinophils from Patients with Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Taizo; Matsuda, Yusuke; Toma, Tomoko; Koizumi, Eiko; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is an uncommon, non-IgE-mediated food allergy. We recently described a significant increase in fecal eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN) after ingestion of the causative food. However, little is known about the activation status of circulating eosinophils in patients with an acute FPIES reaction. Surface CD69 expression was assessed by flow cytometry on peripheral eosinophils from 5 patients with FPIES before and after ingestion of the causative food. Fecal EDN was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. No eosinophil activation was observed before ingestion; however, a significant increase in CD69 expression on eosinophils after an acute FIPES reaction was demonstrated in all of the patients. There was no significant change in absolute eosinophil counts in the peripheral blood. The levels of fecal EDN increased on the day after ingestion of the causative food in all patients. These results suggest that circulating eosinophils as well as eosinophils in the intestinal mucosal tissue are activated in acute FPIES reactions and might be associated with systemic immune events in FPIES. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Heart type fatty acid binding protein response and subsequent development of atherosclerosis in insulin resistant polycystic ovary syndrome patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cakir Evrim; Ozbek Mustafa; Sahin Mustafa; Cakal Erman; Gungunes Askin; Ginis Zeynep; Demirci Taner; Delibasi Tuncay

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have higher risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Heart type fatty acid binding protein (HFABP) has been found to be predictive for myocardial ischemia.Wet ested whether HFABP is the predictor for CVD in PCOS patients, who have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods This was a prospective, cross sectional controlled study conducted in a training and research hospital.The study population consisted of 46 reproductiv...

  16. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation under a High-Fat Diet Modulates Stomach Protein Expression and Intestinal Microbiota in Adult Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Chaplin

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract constitutes a physiological interface integrating nutrient and microbiota-host metabolism. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA have been reported to contribute to decreased body weight and fat accretion. The modulation by dietary CLA of stomach proteins related to energy homeostasis or microbiota may be involved, although this has not been previously analysed. This is examined in the present study, which aims to underline the potential mechanisms of CLA which contribute to body weight regulation. Adult mice were fed either a normal fat (NF, 12% kJ content as fat or a high-fat (HF, 43% kJ content as fat diet. In the latter case, half of the animals received daily oral supplementation of CLA. Expression and content of stomach proteins and specific bacterial populations from caecum were analysed. CLA supplementation was associated with an increase in stomach protein expression, and exerted a prebiotic action on both Bacteroidetes/Prevotella and Akkermansia muciniphila. However, CLA supplementation was not able to override the negative effects of HF diet on Bifidobacterium spp., which was decreased in both HF and HF+CLA groups. Our data show that CLA are able to modulate stomach protein expression and exert a prebiotic effect on specific gut bacterial species.

  17. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation under a High-Fat Diet Modulates Stomach Protein Expression and Intestinal Microbiota in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Alice; Parra, Pilar; Serra, Francisca; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract constitutes a physiological interface integrating nutrient and microbiota-host metabolism. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) have been reported to contribute to decreased body weight and fat accretion. The modulation by dietary CLA of stomach proteins related to energy homeostasis or microbiota may be involved, although this has not been previously analysed. This is examined in the present study, which aims to underline the potential mechanisms of CLA which contribute to body weight regulation. Adult mice were fed either a normal fat (NF, 12% kJ content as fat) or a high-fat (HF, 43% kJ content as fat) diet. In the latter case, half of the animals received daily oral supplementation of CLA. Expression and content of stomach proteins and specific bacterial populations from caecum were analysed. CLA supplementation was associated with an increase in stomach protein expression, and exerted a prebiotic action on both Bacteroidetes/Prevotella and Akkermansia muciniphila. However, CLA supplementation was not able to override the negative effects of HF diet on Bifidobacterium spp., which was decreased in both HF and HF+CLA groups. Our data show that CLA are able to modulate stomach protein expression and exert a prebiotic effect on specific gut bacterial species.

  18. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha activates signal transduction in hypothalamus and modulates the expression of pro-inflammatory proteins and orexigenic/anorexigenic neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Maria E; Barbuio, Raquel; Milanski, Marciane; Romanatto, Talita; Barbosa, Helena C; Nadruz, Wilson; Bertolo, Manoel B; Boschero, Antonio C; Saad, Mario J A; Franchini, Kleber G; Velloso, Licio A

    2006-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is known to participate in the wastage syndrome that accompanies cancer and severe infectious diseases. More recently, a role for TNF-alpha in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity has been shown. Much of the regulatory action exerted by TNF-alpha upon the control of energy stores depends on its action on the hypothalamus. In this study, we show that TNF-alpha activates canonical pro-inflammatory signal transduction pathways in the hypothalamus of rats. These signaling events lead to the transcriptional activation of an early responsive gene and to the induction of expression of cytokines and a cytokine responsive protein such as interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, interleukin-10 and suppressor of cytokine signalling-3, respectively. In addition, TNF-alpha induces the expression of neurotransmitters involved in the control of feeding and thermogenesis. Thus, TNF-alpha may act directly in the hypothalamus inducing a pro-inflammatory response and the modulation of expression of neurotransmitters involved in energy homeostasis.

  19. Competition between the DNA unwinding and strand pairing activities of the Werner and Bloom syndrome proteins

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    Orren David K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The premature aging and cancer-prone Werner and Bloom syndromes are caused by defects in the RecQ helicase enzymes WRN and BLM, respectively. Recently, both WRN and BLM (as well as several other RecQ members have been shown to possess a strand annealing activity in addition to the requisite DNA unwinding activity. Since an annealing function would appear to directly oppose the action of a helicase, we have examined in this study the dynamic equilibrium between unwinding and annealing mediated by either WRN or BLM. Results Our investigation into the competition between annealing and unwinding demonstrates that, under standard reaction conditions, WRN- or BLM-mediated annealing can partially or completely mask unwinding as measured in standard helicase assays. Several strategies were employed to suppress the annealing activity so that the actual strength of WRN- or BLM-dependent unwinding could be more accurately assessed. Interestingly, if a DNA oligomer complementary to one strand of the DNA substrate to be unwound is added during the helicase reaction, both WRN and BLM unwinding is enhanced, presumably by preventing protein-mediated re-annealing. This strategy allowed measurement of WRN-catalyzed unwinding of long (80 base pair duplex regions and fully complementary, blunt-ended duplexes, both of which were otherwise quite refractory to the helicase activity of WRN. Similarly, the addition of trap strand stimulated the ability of BLM to unwind long and blunt-ended duplexes. The stimulatory effect of the human replication protein A (hRPA, the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA binding protein on both WRN- and BLM-dependent unwinding was also re-examined in light of its possible role in preventing re-annealing. Our results show that hRPA influences the outcome of WRN and BLM helicase assays by both inhibiting re-annealing and directly promoting unwinding, with the larger contribution from the latter mechanism. Conclusion These

  20. Negative Affectivity, Depression, and Resting Heart Rate Variability (HRV as Possible Moderators of Endogenous Pain Modulation in Functional Somatic Syndromes

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    Maaike Van Den Houte

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have shown that patients with functional somatic syndromes (FSS have, on average, deficient endogenous pain modulation (EPM, as well as elevated levels of negative affectivity (NA and high comorbidity with depression and reduced resting heart rate variability (HRV compared to healthy controls (HC. The goals of this study were (1 to replicate these findings and (2 to investigate the moderating role of NA, depression, and resting HRV in EPM efficiency within a patient group with fibromyalgia and/or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Resting HRV was quantified as the root mean square of successive differences between inter-beat intervals (RMSSD in rest, a vagally mediated time domain measure of HRV.Methods: Seventy-eight patients with fibromyalgia and/or CFS and 33 HC completed a counter-irritation paradigm as a measure of EPM efficiency. Participants rated the painfulness of electrocutaneous stimuli (of individually calibrated intensity on the ankle before (baseline phase, during (counter-irritation phase and after (recovery phase the application of a cold pain stimulus on the forearm. A larger reduction in pain in the counter-irritation phase compared to the baseline phase reflects a more efficient EPM.Results: In contrast to our expectations, there was no difference between pain ratings in the baseline compared to counter-irritation phase for both patients and HC. Therefore, reliable conclusions on the moderating effect of NA, depression, and RMSSD could not be made. Surprisingly, patients reported more pain in the recovery compared to the counter-irritation and baseline phase, while HC did not. This latter effect was more pronounced in patients with comorbid depression, patients who rated the painfulness of the counter-irritation stimulus as high and patients who rated the painfulness of the electrocutaneous stimuli as low. We did not manage to successfully replicate the counter-irritation effect in HC or FSS patients

  1. Human protein status modulates brain reward responses to food cues1–3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffioen-Roose, S.; Smeets, P.A.M.; Heuvel, van den E.M.; Boesveldt, S.; Finlayson, G.; Graaf, de C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Protein is indispensable in the human diet, and its intake appears tightly regulated. The role of sensory attributes of foods in protein intake regulation is far from clear. Objective: We investigated the effect of human protein status on neural responses to different food cues with the

  2. Brassinosteroids Regulate OFP1, a DLT Interacting Protein, to Modulate Plant Architecture and Grain Morphology in Rice

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    Yunhua Xiao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Brassinosteroids (BRs regulate important agronomic traits in rice, including plant height, leaf angle, and grain size. However, the underlying mechanisms remain not fully understood. We previously showed that GSK2, the central negative regulator of BR signaling, targets DLT, the GRAS family protein, to regulate BR responses. Here, we identified Ovate Family Protein 1 (OFP1 as a DLT interacting protein. OFP1 was ubiquitously expressed and the protein was localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Overexpression of OFP1 led to enlarged leaf angles, reduced plant height, and altered grain shape, largely resembled DLT overexpression plants. Genetic analysis showed that the regulation of plant architecture by OFP1 depends on DLT function. In addition, we found OFP1 was greatly induced by BR treatment, and OsBZR1, the critical transcription factor of BR signaling, was physically associated with the OFP1 promoter. Moreover, we showed that gibberellin synthesis was greatly repressed in OFP1 overexpression plants, suggesting OFP1 participates in the inhibition of plant growth by high BR or elevated BR signaling. Furthermore, we revealed that OFP1 directly interacts with GSK2 kinase, and inhibition of the kinase activity significantly promotes OFP1 protein accumulation in plant. Taken together, we identified OFP1 as an additional regulator of BR responses and revealed how BRs promote OFP1 at both transcription and protein levels to modulate plant architecture and grain morphology in rice.

  3. Medium pH in submerged cultivation modulates differences in the intracellular protein profile of Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa-Garzon, Nathália Gonsales; Laure, Hélen Julie; Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria de; Rosa, José César; Cabral, Hamilton

    2017-08-09

    Fusarium oxysporum is a filamentous fungus that damages a wide range of plants and thus causes severe crop losses. In fungal pathogens, the genes and proteins involved in virulence are known to be controlled by environmental pH. Here, we report the influence of culture-medium pH (5, 6, 7, and 8) on the production of degradative enzymes involved in the pathogenesis of F. oxysporum URM 7401 and on the 2D-electrophoresis profile of intracellular proteins in this fungus. F. oxysporum URM 7401 was grown in acidic, neutral, and alkaline culture media in a submerged bioprocess. After 96 hr, the crude extract was processed to enzyme activity assays, while the intracellular proteins were obtained from mycelium and analyzed using 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. We note that the diversity of secreted enzymes was changed quantitatively in different culture-medium pH. Also, the highest accumulated biomass and the intracellular protein profile of F. oxysporum URM 7401 indicate an increase in metabolism in neutral-alkaline conditions. The differential profiles of secreted enzymes and intracellular proteins under the evaluated conditions indicate that the global protein content in F. oxysporum URM 7401 is modulated by extracellular pH.

  4. Induction of macrophage chemotaxis by aortic extracts from patients with Marfan syndrome is related to elastin binding protein.

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    Gao Guo

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of connective tissue with prominent skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular manifestations. Aortic aneurysm and dissection are the major determinants of premature death in untreated patients. In previous work, we showed that extracts of aortic tissues from the mgR mouse model of Marfan syndrome showed increased chemotactic stimulatory activity related to the elastin-binding protein. Aortic samples were collected from 6 patients with Marfan syndrome and 8 with isolated aneurysms of the ascending aorta. Control samples were obtained from 11 organ donors without known vascular or connective tissue diseases. Soluble proteins extracted from the aortic samples of the two patient groups were compared against buffer controls and against the aortic samples from controls with respect to the ability to induce macrophage chemotaxis as measured using a modified Boyden chamber, as well as the reactivity to a monoclonal antibody BA4 against bioactive elastin peptides using ELISA. Samples from Marfan patients displayed a statistically significant increase in chemotactic inductive activity compared to control samples. Additionally, reactivity to BA4 was significantly increased. Similar statistically significant increases were identified for the samples from patients with idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm. There was a significant correlation between the chemotactic index and BA4 reactivity, and the increases in chemotactic activity of extracts from Marfan patients could be inhibited by pretreatment with lactose, VGVAPG peptides, or BA4, which indicates the involvement of EBP in mediating the effects. Our results demonstrate that aortic extracts of patients with Marfan syndrome can elicit macrophage chemotaxis, similar to our previous study on aortic extracts of the mgR mouse model of Marfan syndrome (Guo et al., Circulation 2006; 114:1855-62.

  5. Induction of Macrophage Chemotaxis by Aortic Extracts from Patients with Marfan Syndrome Is Related to Elastin Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Gao; Gehle, Petra; Doelken, Sandra; Martin-Ventura, José Luis; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Hetzer, Roland; Robinson, Peter N.

    2011-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of connective tissue with prominent skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular manifestations. Aortic aneurysm and dissection are the major determinants of premature death in untreated patients. In previous work, we showed that extracts of aortic tissues from the mgR mouse model of Marfan syndrome showed increased chemotactic stimulatory activity related to the elastin-binding protein. Aortic samples were collected from 6 patients with Marfan syndrome and 8 with isolated aneurysms of the ascending aorta. Control samples were obtained from 11 organ donors without known vascular or connective tissue diseases. Soluble proteins extracted from the aortic samples of the two patient groups were compared against buffer controls and against the aortic samples from controls with respect to the ability to induce macrophage chemotaxis as measured using a modified Boyden chamber, as well as the reactivity to a monoclonal antibody BA4 against bioactive elastin peptides using ELISA. Samples from Marfan patients displayed a statistically significant increase in chemotactic inductive activity compared to control samples. Additionally, reactivity to BA4 was significantly increased. Similar statistically significant increases were identified for the samples from patients with idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm. There was a significant correlation between the chemotactic index and BA4 reactivity, and the increases in chemotactic activity of extracts from Marfan patients could be inhibited by pretreatment with lactose, VGVAPG peptides, or BA4, which indicates the involvement of EBP in mediating the effects. Our results demonstrate that aortic extracts of patients with Marfan syndrome can elicit macrophage chemotaxis, similar to our previous study on aortic extracts of the mgR mouse model of Marfan syndrome (Guo et al., Circulation 2006; 114:1855-62). PMID:21647416

  6. Expanding spectrum of contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2) autoimmunity-syndrome of parkinsonism and ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannoth, Sudheeran; Nambiar, Vivek; Gopinath, Siby; Anandakuttan, Anandkumar; Mathai, Annamma; Rajan, Parvathy Kanjiramana

    2018-03-01

    Contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2) antibodies are originally associated with Morvan's syndrome and peripheral nerve hyper excitability. Our objective was to study retrospectively the clinical spectrum of CASPR2 antibody-positive patients in our hospital. This is a retrospective observational study. Patients treated at the Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences from May 2013 to April 2016, who were tested positive for CASPR2 antibodies, were included. A total of 1584 samples were tested in the neuroimmunology laboratory during the study period for voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 (LGI1) and CASPR2 antibodies. Thirty-four were positive for LGI1, 13 were positive for CASPR2, and 7 were for both (total 54-3.4% positivity). Of these 54 cases, 11 were treated in our hospital. Seven were positive for LGI1, three for CASPR2, and one for both. The patient who had both CASPR2 and LGI1 antibody positive had Morvan's syndrome. One patient with CASPR2 had neuromyotonia. The other patient was admitted with status epilepticus with a syndrome of parkinsonism and ataxia. The third patient had encephalopathy and myoclonus with a syndrome of parkinsonism and ataxia. Two of them underwent siddha treatment for other ailments prior to the onset of the disease for other ailments. Our short series shows the expanding spectrum of CASPR2 autoimmunity. Syndrome of parkinsonism and ataxia is an important manifestation of CASPR2 autoimmunity where we can offer a definitive treatment.

  7. Ligand-regulated peptides: a general approach for modulating protein-peptide interactions with small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkowski, Brock F; Miller, Russell A; Belshaw, Peter J

    2005-07-01

    We engineered a novel ligand-regulated peptide (LiRP) system where the binding activity of intracellular peptides is controlled by a cell-permeable small molecule. In the absence of ligand, peptides expressed as fusions in an FKBP-peptide-FRB-GST LiRP scaffold protein are free to interact with target proteins. In the presence of the ligand rapamycin, or the nonimmunosuppressive rapamycin derivative AP23102, the scaffold protein undergoes a conformational change that prevents the interaction of the peptide with the target protein. The modular design of the scaffold enables the creation of LiRPs through rational design or selection from combinatorial peptide libraries. Using these methods, we identified LiRPs that interact with three independent targets: retinoblastoma protein, c-Src, and the AMP-activated protein kinase. The LiRP system should provide a general method to temporally and spatially regulate protein function in cells and organisms.

  8. A Novel Prebiotic Blend Product Prevents Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Mice by Improving Gut Microbiota and Modulating Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder yet it still lacks effective prevention therapies. The aim of this study is to determine whether a novel prebiotic blend (PB composed of fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS, galactooligosaccharide (GOS, inulin and anthocyanins could be effective in preventing the development of IBS. We explored the possible mechanisms both in animal and in cells. Post-infectious IBS models in C57BL/6 mice were established and were pretreated with the PB, PB and probiotic strains 8 weeks in advance of infection. Eight weeks after infection, intestinal tissues were collected for assessing histomorphology, visceral sensitivity, barrier function, pro-inflammatory cytokines expression and proteomics analysis. Fecal samples were also collected for microbiota analysis. The pro-inflammatory cytokines expression in Caco-2 cells were evaluated after co-incubation with PB and Salmonella typhimurium 14028. The results showed that PB significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines both in infected Caco-2 cells and PI-IBS models. The loss of body weight, decreased expression of tight junction protein Occludin (OCLN, and changes of the microbiota composition induced by infections could be greatly improved by PB intervention (p < 0.05. The proteomics analysis revealed that this function was associated with Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ pathway.

  9. Ribosome-dependent ATPase interacts with conserved membrane protein in Escherichia coli to modulate protein synthesis and oxidative phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Babu

    Full Text Available Elongation factor RbbA is required for ATP-dependent deacyl-tRNA release presumably after each peptide bond formation; however, there is no information about the cellular role. Proteomic analysis in Escherichia coli revealed that RbbA reciprocally co-purified with a conserved inner membrane protein of unknown function, YhjD. Both proteins are also physically associated with the 30S ribosome and with members of the lipopolysaccharide transport machinery. Genome-wide genetic screens of rbbA and yhjD deletion mutants revealed aggravating genetic interactions with mutants deficient in the electron transport chain. Cells lacking both rbbA and yhjD exhibited reduced cell division, respiration and global protein synthesis as well as increased sensitivity to antibiotics targeting the ETC and the accuracy of protein synthesis. Our results suggest that RbbA appears to function together with YhjD as part of a regulatory network that impacts bacterial oxidative phosphorylation and translation efficiency.

  10. Proteomic profiles in hyperandrogenic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiti, S; Stigliano, A; Borro, M; Gentile, G; Michienzi, S; Cerquetti, L; Bucci, B; Argese, N; Brunetti, E; Simmaco, M; Toscano, V

    2010-03-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) represent the most common causes of hyperandrogenism. Although the etiopathogeneses of these syndromes are different, they share many clinical and biochemical signs, such as hirsutism, acne, and chronic anovulation. Experimental data have shown that peripheral T-lymphocytes function as molecular sensors, being able to record molecular signals either at staminal and mature cell levels, or hormones at systemic levels. Twenty PCOS women and 10 CAH with 21-hydroxylase deficiency, aged between 18-35 yr, were studied. T-cells purified from all patients and 20 healthy donors have been analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Silver-stained proteomic map of each patient was compared with a control map obtained by pooling protein samples of the 20 healthy subjects. Spots of interest were identified by peptide mass fingerprint. Computer analysis evidenced several peptidic spots significantly modulated in all patients examined. Some proteins were modulated in both syndromes, others only in PCOS or in CAH. These proteins are involved in many physiological processes as the functional state of immune system, the regulation of the cytoskeleton structure, the oxidative stress, the coagulation process, and the insulin resistance. Identification of the physiological function of these proteins could help to understand ethiopathogenetic mechanisms of hyperandrogenic syndromes and its complications.

  11. Protein-Enriched Liquid Preloads Varying in Macronutrient Content Modulate Appetite and Appetite-Regulating Hormones in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougkas, Anestis; Östman, Elin

    2016-03-01

    Dietary protein is considered the most satiating macronutrient, yet there is little evidence on whether the effects observed are attributable to the protein or to the concomitant manipulation of carbohydrates and fat. The aim was to examine the effect of consumption of preloads varying in macronutrient content on appetite, energy intake, and biomarkers of satiety. Using a randomized, within-subjects, 2-level factorial design, 36 adults [mean ± SD age: 27 ± 5 y; body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 24.3 ± 1.6) received a breakfast consisting of 1 of 7 isovolumetric (670 mL) and isoenergetic (2100 kJ) liquid preloads matched for energy density and sensory properties but with different macronutrient composition (levels: 9%, 24%, or 40% of energy from protein combined with a carbohydrate-to-fat ratio of 0.4, 2, or 3.6, respectively). Appetite ratings and blood samples were collected and assessed at baseline and every 30 and 60 min, respectively, until a lunch test meal, which participants consumed ad libitum, was served 3.5 h after breakfast. Prospective consumption was 12% lower after intake of the high-protein (40%)/3.6 carbohydrate:fat preload than after intake of the low-protein (9%)/0.4 carbohydrate:fat preload (P = 0.02) solely because of the increased protein, irrespective of the manipulation of the other macronutrients. Most appetite ratings tended to be suppressed (13%) with increasing protein content of the preloads (P appetite than did carbohydrates and fat. Modulating the nutritional profile of a meal by replacing fat with protein can influence appetite in healthy adults. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01849302. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. The catechin flavonoid reduces proliferation and induces apoptosis of murine lymphoma cells LB02 through modulation of antiapoptotic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Laura Papademetrio

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are products of secondary metabolism of plants. They are present in herbs and trees and also act as natural chemopreventives and anticancer agents. Ligaria cuneifolia (Ruiz & Pav. Tiegh., Loranthaceae, is a hemiparasite species that belongs to Argentine flora. Phytochemical studies have disclosed the presence of quercetin, catechin-4β-ol and pro-anthocyanidine as polyphenolic compounds in the active extracts. We previously demonstrated that ethyl acetate extract was capable of reducing cell proliferation and inducing apoptotic death of lymphoid tumor cells. The aim of the current study is to determine whether or not catechin, isolated from L. cuneifolia extracts can induce leukemia cell death and to determine its effect on the cytoplasmatic proteins that modulate cell survival. Our results show that catechin can reduce proliferation of murine lymphoma cell line LB02. The effect is mediated by apoptosis at concentrations upper to 100 µg/mL. Cell death is related to the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm and a down regulation of survivin and Bcl-2 together with the increase of pro-apoptotic protein Bax. In summary, the current study indicates that catechin present in the extract of L. cuneifolia is in part, responsible for the anti-proliferative activity of whole extracts by induction of ΔΨm disruption and modulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins over expressed in tumor cells. These results give new findings into the potential anticancer and chemopreventive activities of L. cuneifolia.

  13. The catechin flavonoid reduces proliferation and induces apoptosis of murine lymphoma cells LB02 through modulation of antiapoptotic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Laura Papademetrio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are products of secondary metabolism of plants. They are present in herbs and trees and also act as natural chemopreventives and anticancer agents. Ligaria cuneifolia (Ruiz & Pav. Tiegh., Loranthaceae, is a hemiparasite species that belongs to Argentine flora. Phytochemical studies have disclosed the presence of quercetin, catechin-4β-ol and pro-anthocyanidine as polyphenolic compounds in the active extracts. We previously demonstrated that ethyl acetate extract was capable of reducing cell proliferation and inducing apoptotic death of lymphoid tumor cells. The aim of the current study is to determine whether or not catechin, isolated from L. cuneifolia extracts can induce leukemia cell death and to determine its effect on the cytoplasmatic proteins that modulate cell survival. Our results show that catechin can reduce proliferation of murine lymphoma cell line LB02. The effect is mediated by apoptosis at concentrations upper to 100 µg/mL. Cell death is related to the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm and a down regulation of survivin and Bcl-2 together with the increase of pro-apoptotic protein Bax. In summary, the current study indicates that catechin present in the extract of L. cuneifolia is in part, responsible for the anti-proliferative activity of whole extracts by induction of ΔΨm disruption and modulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins over expressed in tumor cells. These results give new findings into the potential anticancer and chemopreventive activities of L. cuneifolia.

  14. The NLR-related protein NWD1 is associated with prostate cancer and modulates androgen receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Ricardo G; Krajewska, Maryla; Ware, Carl F; Gerlic, Motti; Reed, John C

    2014-03-30

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is among the leading causes of cancer-related death in men. Androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays a seminal role in prostate development and homeostasis, and dysregulation of this pathway is intimately linked to prostate cancer pathogenesis and progression. Here, we identify the cytosolic NLR-related protein NWD1 as a novel modulator of AR signaling. We determined that expression of NWD1 becomes elevated during prostate cancer progression, based on analysis of primary tumor specimens. Experiments with cultured cells showed that NWD1 expression is up-regulated by the sex-determining region Y (SRY) family proteins. Gene silencing procedures, in conjunction with transcriptional profiling, showed that NWD1 is required for expression of PDEF (prostate-derived Ets factor), which is known to bind and co-regulate AR. Of note, NWD1 modulates AR protein levels. Depleting NWD1 in PCa cell lines reduces AR levels and suppresses activity of androgen-driven reporter genes. NWD1 knockdown potently suppressed growth of androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells, thus showing its functional importance in an AR-dependent tumor cell model. Proteomic analysis suggested that NWD1 associates with various molecular chaperones commonly related to AR complexes. Altogether, these data suggest a role for tumor-associated over-expression of NWD1 in dysregulation of AR signaling in PCa.

  15. Rat vas deferens SERCA2 is modulated by Ca2+/calmodulin protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, J.B.R.; Muzi-Filho, H.; Valverde, R.H.F.; Quintas, L.E.M.; Noel, F.; Einicker-Lamas, M.; Cunha, V.M.N.

    2013-01-01

    Ca 2+ pumps are important players in smooth muscle contraction. Nevertheless, little information is available about these pumps in the vas deferens. We have determined which subtype of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase isoform (SERCA) is expressed in rat vas deferens (RVD) and its modulation by calmodulin (CaM)-dependent mechanisms. The thapsigargin-sensitive Ca 2+ -ATPase from a membrane fraction containing the highest SERCA levels in the RVD homogenate has the same molecular mass (∼115 kDa) as that of SERCA2 from the rat cerebellum. It has a very high affinity for Ca 2+ (Ca 0.5 = 780 nM) and a low sensitivity to vanadate (IC 50 = 41 µM). These facts indicate that SERCA2 is present in the RVD. Immunoblotting for CaM and Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) showed the expression of these two regulatory proteins. Ca 2+ and CaM increased serine-phosphorylated residues of the 115-kDa protein, indicating the involvement of CaMKII in the regulatory phosphorylation of SERCA2. Phosphorylation is accompanied by an 8-fold increase of thapsigargin-sensitive Ca 2+ accumulation in the lumen of vesicles derived from these membranes. These data establish that SERCA2 in the RVD is modulated by Ca 2+ and CaM, possibly via CaMKII, in a process that results in stimulation of Ca 2+ pumping activity

  16. Klinefelter syndrome comorbidities linked to increased X chromosome gene dosage and altered protein interactome activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belling, Kirstine González-Izarzugaza; Russo, Francesco; Jensen, Anders Boeck

    2017-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) (47,XXY) is the most common male sex chromosome aneuploidy. Diagnosis and clinical supervision remain a challenge due to varying phenotypic presentation and insufficient characterization of the syndrome. Here we combine health data-driven epidemiology and molecular level...

  17. Does C-reactive Protein Add Prognostic Value to GRACE Score in Acute Coronary Syndromes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, Luis Cláudio Lemos, E-mail: lccorreia@terra.com.br; Vasconcelos, Isis; Garcia, Guilherme; Kalil, Felipe; Ferreira, Felipe; Silva, André; Oliveira, Ruan; Carvalhal, Manuela; Freitas, Caio; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia Maria [Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Hospital São Rafael, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    The incremental prognostic value of plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in relation to GRACE score has not been established in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with non-ST segment elevation. To test the hypothesis that CRP measurements at admission increases the prognostic value of GRACE score in patients with ACS. A total of 290 subjects, consecutively admitted for ACS, with plasma material obtained upon admission CRP measurement using a high-sensitivity method (nephelometry) were studied. Cardiovascular outcomes during hospitalization were defined by the combination of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction or nonfatal refractory angina. The incidence of cardiovascular events during hospitalization was 15% (18 deaths, 11 myocardial infarctions, 13 angina episodes) with CRP showing C-statistics of 0.60 (95% CI = 0.51-0.70, p = 0.034) in predicting these outcomes. After adjustment for the GRACE score, elevated CRP (defined as the best cutoff point) tended to be associated with hospital events (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 0.92 to 3.88, p = 0.08). However, the addition of the variable elevated CRP in the GRACE model did not result in significant increase in C-statistics, which ranged from 0.705 to 0.718 (p = 0.46). Similarly, there was no significant reclassification of risk with the addition of CRP in the predictor model (net reclassification = 5.7 %, p = 0.15). Although CRP is associated with hospital outcomes, this inflammatory marker does not increase the prognostic value of the GRACE score.

  18. Serum brain natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein levels in adolescent with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveer, Rüya; Engin-Üstün, Yaprak; Uysal, Sema; Su, Filiz Akın; Sarıaslan, Seval; Gülerman, Cavidan; Mollamahmutoğlu, Leyla

    2012-08-01

    Our primary aim was to investigate whether N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) increases in adolescent with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared with healthy controls and secondary aim was to determine whether metabolic and hormonal differences exist between groups. In this cross-sectional study, 25 adolescent patients with PCOS and 25 normal ovulatory control not suffering from PCOS were involved in the study. Fasting serum NT-proBNP, C-reactive protein (CRP), homocystein, insulin levels and biochemical and hormonal parameters were measured. Serum NT-proBNP was not significantly different in PCOS subjects (0.62 ± 0.80 vs 1.12 ± 1.51 ng/mL, p = 0.154). The mean serum fasting insulin levels (22.64 ± 10.51 vs 13.32 ± 3.97 mIU/mL, p = 0.001) and Homeostasis Model Assessment Insulin-Resistance Index (HOMA-IR) levels (5.16 ± 1.81 vs 2.97 ± 0.89, p = 0.001) were significantly high in the study group. The median serum CRP levels were not significantly different between groups (1 [1-12] vs 1 [1-19] g/dL, p = 0.286). The present study demonstrated that the levels of BNP, CRP and homocystein were not different in PCOS subjects. Serum insulin levels and HOMA-IR were significantly higher in PCOS subjects. Possible serum markers for PCOS-related metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular events, may not present in the adolescent years.

  19. Does C-reactive Protein Add Prognostic Value to GRACE Score in Acute Coronary Syndromes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correia, Luis Cláudio Lemos; Vasconcelos, Isis; Garcia, Guilherme; Kalil, Felipe; Ferreira, Felipe; Silva, André; Oliveira, Ruan; Carvalhal, Manuela; Freitas, Caio; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia Maria

    2014-01-01

    The incremental prognostic value of plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in relation to GRACE score has not been established in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with non-ST segment elevation. To test the hypothesis that CRP measurements at admission increases the prognostic value of GRACE score in patients with ACS. A total of 290 subjects, consecutively admitted for ACS, with plasma material obtained upon admission CRP measurement using a high-sensitivity method (nephelometry) were studied. Cardiovascular outcomes during hospitalization were defined by the combination of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction or nonfatal refractory angina. The incidence of cardiovascular events during hospitalization was 15% (18 deaths, 11 myocardial infarctions, 13 angina episodes) with CRP showing C-statistics of 0.60 (95% CI = 0.51-0.70, p = 0.034) in predicting these outcomes. After adjustment for the GRACE score, elevated CRP (defined as the best cutoff point) tended to be associated with hospital events (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 0.92 to 3.88, p = 0.08). However, the addition of the variable elevated CRP in the GRACE model did not result in significant increase in C-statistics, which ranged from 0.705 to 0.718 (p = 0.46). Similarly, there was no significant reclassification of risk with the addition of CRP in the predictor model (net reclassification = 5.7 %, p = 0.15). Although CRP is associated with hospital outcomes, this inflammatory marker does not increase the prognostic value of the GRACE score

  20. CDKL5, a protein associated with rett syndrome, regulates neuronal morphogenesis via Rac1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Zhu, Yong-Chuan; Yu, Jing; Miao, Sheng; Zheng, Jing; Xu, Li; Zhou, Yang; Li, Dan; Zhang, Chi; Tao, Jiong; Xiong, Zhi-Qi

    2010-09-22

    Mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5), also known as serine/threonine kinase 9 (STK9), have been identified in patients with Rett syndrome (RTT) and X-linked infantile spasm. However, the function of CDKL5 in the brain remains unknown. Here, we report that CDKL5 is a critical regulator of neuronal morphogenesis. We identified a neuron-specific splicing variant of CDKL5 whose expression was markedly induced during postnatal development of the rat brain. Downregulating CDKL5 by RNA interference (RNAi) in cultured cortical neurons inhibited neurite growth and dendritic arborization, whereas overexpressing CDKL5 had opposite effects. Furthermore, knocking down CDKL5 in the rat brain by in utero electroporation resulted in delayed neuronal migration, and severely impaired dendritic arborization. In contrast to its proposed function in the nucleus, we found that CDKL5 regulated dendrite development through a cytoplasmic mechanism. In fibroblasts and in neurons, CDKL5 colocalized and formed a protein complex with Rac1, a critical regulator of actin remodeling and neuronal morphogenesis. Overexpression of Rac1 prevented the inhibition of dendrite growth caused by CDKL5 knockdown, and the growth-promoting effect of ectopically expressed CDKL5 on dendrites was abolished by coexpressing a dominant-negative form of Rac1. Moreover, CDKL5 was required for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced activation of Rac1. Together, these results demonstrate a critical role of CDKL5 in neuronal morphogenesis and identify a Rho GTPase signaling pathway which may contribute to CDKL5-related disorders.

  1. C-reactive protein in patients with Guillain Barré syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetana Vaishnavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: C-reactive protein (CRP is an acute phase reactant, widely used as a biomarker for various infectious and inflammatory conditions. Guillain-Barrι syndrome (GBS is an acute, autoimmune, polyradiculoneuropathy, triggered by infectious agents such as Campylobacter jejuni. GBS is generally precipitated 1-3 weeks following C. jejuni infection which suggests a humoral immunopathogenic mechanism. Aims: Basal CRP levels were estimated in sera of patients with GBS and compared with adequate controls. Settings & Design: The study population was divided into 4 groups: (i GBS group included 45 newly diagnosed GBS patients; (ii Neurological control (NC group comprised of 59 patients with non-paralytic neurological symptoms/disorders; (iii Non-neurological controls (NNC comprised of 43 patients having no neurological symptoms and (iv Healthy controls (HC comprised of 101 healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: CRP was evaluated using slide latex agglutination test (LAT and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done by the Chi-square test. Results: CRP by LAT was positive in 24.4% GBS group, 34% NC group and 44% NNC group. The range of titer in CRP positive samples in the three patient groups (GBS, NC, NNC was at concentration of 0.6 mg/dl to 19.2 mg/dl. Similar results were also obtained by ELISA in the patient groups. None of the HC subjects was positive for detectable levels of CRP. High basal level of CRP was detected in patients with GBS. Conclusion: Autoimmune conditions like GBS can stimulate the production of a high level of inflammation resulting in an increase in the CRP production.

  2. [Relationship between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and obesity/metabolic syndrome in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangfang; Wang, Wenpeng; Teng, Yue; Hou, Dongqing; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Ping; Yan, Yinkun; Mi, Jie

    2014-06-01

    To explore the relationship between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and obesity/metabolic syndrome (MetS) related factors in children. 403 children aged 10-14 and born in Beijing were involved in this study. Height, weight, waist circumference, fat mass percentage (Fat%), blood pressure (BP), hsCRP, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, LDL-C) were observed among these children. hsCRP was transformed with base 10 logarithm (lgCRP). MetS was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation 2007 definition. Associations between MetS related components and hsCRP were tested using partial correlation analysis, analysis of covariance and linear regression models. 1) lgCRP was positively correlated with BMI, waist circumference, Fat%,BP, FPG, LDL-C and TC while negatively correlated with HDL-C. With BMI under control, the relationships disappeared, but LDL-C (r = 0.102). 2) The distributions of lgCRP showed obvious differences in all the metabolic indices, in most groups, respectively. With BMI under control, close relationships between lgCRP and high blood pressure/high TG disappeared and the relationship with MetS weakened. 3) Through linear regression models, factors as waist circumference, BMI, Fat% were the strongest factors related to hsCRP, followed by systolic BP, HDL-C, diastolic BP, TG and LDL-C. With BMI under control, the relationships disappeared, but LDL-C(β = 0.045). hsCRP was correlated with child obesity, lipid metabolism and MetS. Waist circumference was the strongest factors related with hsCRP. Obesity was the strongest and the independent influencing factor of hsCRP.

  3. Polyphenol-enriched berry extracts naturally modulate reactive proteins in model foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lila, Mary Ann; Schneider, Maggie; Devlin, Amy; Plundrich, Nathalie; Laster, Scott; Foegeding, E Allen

    2017-12-13

    Healthy foods like polyphenol-rich berries and high quality edible proteins are in demand in today's functional food marketplace, but it can be difficult to formulate convenient food products with physiologically-relevant amounts of these ingredients and still maintain product quality. In part, this is because proteins can interact with other food ingredients and precipitate destabilizing events, which can disrupt food structure and diminish shelf life. Proteins in foods can also interact with human receptors to provoke adverse consequences such as allergies. When proteins and polyphenols were pre-aggregated into stable colloidal particles prior to use as ingredients, highly palatable food formulations (with reduced astringency of polyphenols) could be prepared, and the overall structural properties of food formulations were significantly improved. All of the nutritive and phytoactive benefits of the proteins and concentrated polyphenols remained highly bioavailable, but the protein molecules in the particle matrix did not self-aggregate into networks or react with other food ingredients. Both the drainage half-life (a marker of structural stability) and the yield stress (resistance to flow) of model foams made with the protein-polyphenol particles were increased in a dose-dependent manner. Of high significance in this complexation process, the reactive allergenic epitopes of certain proteins were effectively blunted by binding with polyphenols, attenuating the allergenicity of the food proteins. Porcine macrophages produced TNF-α proinflammatory cytokine when provoked with whey protein, but, this response was blocked completely when the cells were stimulated with particles that complexed whey protein with cinnamon-derived polyphenols. Cytokine and chemokine production characteristic of allergic reactions were blocked by the polyphenols, allowing for the potential creation of hypoallergenic protein-berry polyphenol enriched foods.

  4. Reverse micelles as a tool for probing solvent modulation of protein dynamics: Reverse micelle encapsulated hemoglobin☆

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, Camille J.; Dantsker, David; Heller, Elizabeth R.; Sabat, Joseph E.; Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Hydration waters impact protein dynamics. Dissecting the interplay between hydration waters and dynamics requires a protein that manifests a broad range of dynamics. Proteins in reverse micelles (RMs) have promise as tools to achieve this objective because the water content can be manipulated. Hemoglobin is an appropriate tool with which to probe hydration effects. We describe both a protocol for hemoglobin encapsulation in reverse micelles and a facile method using PEG and cosolvents to mani...

  5. The Loss of Vacuolar Protein Sorting 11 (vps11) Causes Retinal Pathogenesis in a Vertebrate Model of Syndromic Albinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jennifer L.; Vihtelic, Thomas S.; denDekker, Aaron D.; Willer, Gregory; Luo, Xixia; Murphy, Taylor R.; Gregg, Ronald G.; Hyde, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To establish the zebrafish platinum mutant as a model for studying vision defects caused by syndromic albinism diseases such as Chediak-Higashi syndrome, Griscelli syndrome, and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS). Methods. Bulked segregant analysis and candidate gene sequencing revealed that the zebrafish platinum mutation is a single-nucleotide insertion in the vps11 (vacuolar protein sorting 11) gene. Expression of vps11 was determined by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. Mutants were analyzed for pigmentation defects and retinal disease by histology, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy. Results. Phenocopy and rescue experiments determined that a loss of Vps11 results in the platinum phenotype. Expression of vps11 appeared ubiquitous during zebrafish development, with stronger expression in the developing retina and retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). Zebrafish platinum mutants exhibited reduced pigmentation in the body and RPE; however, melanophore development, migration, and dispersion occurred normally. RPE, photoreceptors, and inner retinal neurons formed normally in zebrafish platinum mutants. However, a gradual loss of RPE, an absence of mature melanosomes, and the subsequent degradation of RPE/photoreceptor interdigitation was observed. Conclusions. These data show that Vps11 is not necessary for normal retinal development or initiation of melanin biosynthesis, but is essential for melanosome maturation and healthy maintenance of the RPE and photoreceptors. PMID:21330665

  6. HuR/ELAVL1 RNA binding protein modulates interleukin-8 induction by muco-active ribotoxin deoxynivalenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Jin; Yang, Hyun; Park, Seong Hwan; Moon, Yuseok

    2009-01-01

    HuR/Elav-like RNA binding protein 1 (ELAVL1) positively regulates mRNA stability of AU-rich elements (ARE)-containing transcript such as pro-inflammatory cytokines. Ribotoxic stresses can trigger the production of pro-inflammatory mediators by enhancing mRNA stability and the transcriptional activity. We investigated the effects of ribotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) on HuR translocation and its involvement in the regulation of the pro-inflammatory interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA stability. Exposure to the muco-active DON induced nuclear export of both endogenous and exogenous HuR RNA binding protein in human intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, the interference with HuR protein production suppressed ribotoxic DON-induced IL-8 secretion and its mRNA stability. Cytoplasmic HuR protein interacted with IL-8 mRNA and the complex stabilization was due to the presence of 3'-untranslated region of the transcript. Partly in terms of IL-8-modulating transcription factors, HuR protein was demonstrated to be positively and negatively associated with DON-induced early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) and activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), respectively. HuR was a critical mechanistic link between ribotoxic stress and the pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and may have a broader functional significance with regard to mucosal insults since ribotoxic stress responses are also produced upon interactions with the diverse environment of gut.

  7. Modulation of telomere binding proteins: a future area of research for skin protection and anti-aging target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, Isabelle; Botto, Jean-Marie; Farra, Claude D; Domloge, Nouha

    2012-06-01

    Telomere shortening is considered as one of the main characteristics of cellular aging by limiting cellular division. Besides the fundamental advances through the discoveries of telomere and telomerase, which were recognized by a Nobel Prize, telomere protection remains an essential area of research. Recently, it was evidenced that studying the cross-talks between the proteins associated with telomere should provide a better understanding of the mechanistic basis for telomere-associated aging phenotypes. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on telomere shortening, telomerase activity, and the essential role of telomere binding proteins in telomere stabilization and telomere-end protection. This review highlights the capacity of telomere binding proteins to limit cellular senescence and to maintain skin tissue homeostasis, which is of key importance to reduce accelerated tissue aging. Future studies addressing telomere protection and limitation of DNA damage response in human skin should include investigations on telomere binding proteins. As little is known about the expression of telomere binding proteins in human skin and modulation of their expression with aging, it remains an interesting field of skin research and a key area for future skin protection and anti-aging developments. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The Arabidopsis CROWDED NUCLEI genes regulate seed germination by modulating degradation of ABI5 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenming; Guan, Chunmei; Feng, Jian; Liang, Yan; Zhan, Ni; Zuo, Jianru; Ren, Bo

    2016-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a vital role in inhibiting seed germination and in post-germination seedling establishment. In the ABA signaling pathway, ABI5, a basic Leu zipper transcription factor, has important functions in the regulation of seed germination. ABI5 protein localizes in nuclear bodies, along with AFP, COP1, and SIZ1, and was degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway. However, the mechanisms of ABI5 nuclear body formation and ABI5 protein degradation remain obscure. In this study, we found that the Arabidopsis CROWDED NUCLEI (CRWN) proteins, predicted nuclear matrix proteins essential for maintenance of nuclear morphology, also participate in ABA-controlled seed germination by regulating the degradation of ABI5 protein. During seed germination, the crwn mutants are hypersensitive to ABA and have higher levels of ABI5 protein compared to wild type. Genetic analysis suggested that CRWNs act upstream of ABI5. The observation that CRWN3 colocalizes with ABI5 in nuclear bodies indicates that CRWNs might participate in ABI5 protein degradation in nuclear bodies. Moreover, we revealed that the extreme C-terminal of CRWN3 protein is necessary for its function in the response to ABA in germination. Our results suggested important roles of CRWNs in ABI5 nuclear body organization and ABI5 protein degradation during seed germination. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  9. Food-cooking processes modulate allergenic properties of hen's egg white proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Feng, Bai-Sui; Kong, Xiaoli; Xu, Hong; Li, Xiumin; Yang, Ping-Chang; Liu, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the allergenicity of food allergens can suppress the clinical symptoms of food allergy. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of processing on the allergenic properties of hen's egg white proteins. Eggs were processed by traditional Chinese cooking, including steaming, water boiling, frying, spicing and tea boiling. The contents of processed egg protein were assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; the allergenicity was evaluated by Western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzyme allergosorbent test inhibition. Circular dichroism spectrum analysis of four major egg allergens from various egg products was performed as well. A mouse model of food allergy was developed to test the allergenicity of processed egg protein in vivo. Protein degradation was significant following tea boiling and spiced-tea boiling. The total allergenic potential of water-boiled egg and fried egg was relatively higher than that of steamed egg, spiced egg and tea-boiled egg. Challenge with proteins from raw egg, water-boiled egg and fried egg induced skewed T-helper 2 pattern responses (Th2 responses) in the intestine of mice sensitized to egg proteins; however, when the mice sensitized to egg proteins were challenged with proteins from steamed egg, spiced egg and tea-boiled egg, respectively, only weak Th2 responses were induced in their intestine. Processing by steaming, spicing, or tea boiling can weaken the allergenicity of egg proteins. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. A haemolytic syndrome associated with the complete absence of red cell membrane protein 4.2 in two Tunisian siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, A; Pothier, B; Marechal, J; Ducluzeau, M T; Morle, L; Alloisio, N; Feo, C; Ben Abdeladhim, A; Fattoum, S; Delaunay, J

    1990-07-01

    We report on the complete absence of protein 4.2 in two Tunisian siblings. The propositus presented with a haemolytic anaemia that evolved in an intermittent fashion until she was cured by splenectomy. Her red cells had a normal morphology, as well as normal deformability upon osmotic gradient ektacytometry. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis failed to reveal any protein 4.2. Using anti-protein 4.2 polyclonal antibodies. Western blots were also unable to detect protein 4.2. Preparation of inside out vesicles resulted in no detectable loss of ankyrin. The propositus's sister presented with a haemolytic anaemia but had not undergone splenectomy; she showed the same biochemical features. The two cases presented of missing protein 4.2 are the first ones to be described outside the Japanese population. Considered as homozygotes for some defect that must alter the protein 4.2 gene itself, they exemplify a unique syndrome pertaining neither to elliptocytosis nor to spherocytosis, at least not closely. The parents, who are first cousins and whom we regarded as heterozygotes, were clinically and morphologically normal; they had a normal content of protein 4.2. Therefore, the 4.2 (-) haemolytic anaemia appears as entirely recessive.

  11. Dengue Virus Non-structural Protein 1 Modulates Infectious Particle Production via Interaction with the Structural Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Scaturro

    Full Text Available Non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is one of the most enigmatic proteins of the Dengue virus (DENV, playing distinct functions in immune evasion, pathogenesis and viral replication. The recently reported crystal structure of DENV NS1 revealed its peculiar three-dimensional fold; however, detailed information on NS1 function at different steps of the viral replication cycle is still missing. By using the recently reported crystal structure, as well as amino acid sequence conservation, as a guide for a comprehensive site-directed mutagenesis study, we discovered that in addition to being essential for RNA replication, DENV NS1 is also critically required for the production of infectious virus particles. Taking advantage of a trans-complementation approach based on fully functional epitope-tagged NS1 variants, we identified previously unreported interactions between NS1 and the structural proteins Envelope (E and precursor Membrane (prM. Interestingly, coimmunoprecipitation revealed an additional association with capsid, arguing that NS1 interacts via the structural glycoproteins with DENV particles. Results obtained with mutations residing either in the NS1 Wing domain or in the β-ladder domain suggest that NS1 might have two distinct functions in the assembly of DENV particles. By using a trans-complementation approach with a C-terminally KDEL-tagged ER-resident NS1, we demonstrate that the secretion of NS1 is dispensable for both RNA replication and infectious particle production. In conclusion, our results provide an extensive genetic map of NS1 determinants essential for viral RNA replication and identify a novel role of NS1 in virion production that is mediated via interaction with the structural proteins. These studies extend the list of NS1 functions and argue for a central role in coordinating replication and assembly/release of infectious DENV particles.

  12. Novel Entropically Driven Conformation-specific Interactions with Tomm34 Protein Modulate Hsp70 Protein Folding and ATPase Activities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Durech, M.; Trčka, F.; Man, Petr; Blackburn, E.A.; Hernychová, L.; Dvořáková, P.; Coufalová, D.; Kavan, Daniel; Vojtěšek, B.; Muller, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 5 (2016), s. 1710-1727 ISSN 1535-9476 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509 EU Projects: Wellcome Trust(CZ) 01527/Z/13/Z Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : HEAT-SHOCK-PROTEIN * MOLECULAR CHAPERONE DNAK * SUBSTRATE-BINDING DOMAIN * INVASIVE BREAST - CANCER Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.540, year: 2016

  13. CHIPMUNK: A Virtual Synthesizable Small-Molecule Library for Medicinal Chemistry, Exploitable for Protein-Protein Interaction Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbeck, Lina; Weigang, Sebastian; Schäfer, Till; Mutzel, Petra; Koch, Oliver

    2018-03-20

    A common issue during drug design and development is the discovery of novel scaffolds for protein targets. On the one hand the chemical space of purchasable compounds is rather limited; on the other hand artificially generated molecules suffer from a grave lack of accessibility in practice. Therefore, we generated a novel virtual library of small molecules which are synthesizable from purchasable educts, called CHIPMUNK (CHemically feasible In silico Public Molecular UNiverse Knowledge base). Altogether, CHIPMUNK covers over 95 million compounds and encompasses regions of the chemical space that are not covered by existing databases. The coverage of CHIPMUNK exceeds the chemical space spanned by the Lipinski rule of five to foster the exploration of novel and difficult target classes. The analysis of the generated property space reveals that CHIPMUNK is well suited for the design of protein-protein interaction inhibitors (PPIIs). Furthermore, a recently developed structural clustering algorithm (StruClus) for big data was used to partition the sub-libraries into meaningful subsets and assist scientists to process the large amount of data. These clustered subsets also contain the target space based on ChEMBL data which was included during clustering. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Gene and process level modulation to overcome the bottlenecks of recombinant proteins expression in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Ashish A; Boro, Bibari; Bharali, Biju; Chakraborty, Shuchishloka; Dasu, V Venkata

    2018-03-28

    Process development involving system metabolic engineering and bioprocess engineering has become one of the major thrust for the development of therapeutic proteins or enzymes. Pichia pastoris has emerged as a prominent host for the production of therapeutic protein or enzymes. Despite of producing high protein titers, various cellular and process level bottlenecks hinders the expression of recombinant proteins in P. pastoris. In the present review, we have summarized the recent developments in the expression of foreign proteins in P. pastoris. Further, we have discussed various cellular engineering strategies which include codon optimization, pathway engineering, signal peptide processing, development of protease deficient strain and glyco-engineered strains for the high yield protein secretion of recombinant protein. Bioprocess development of recombinant proteins in large scale bioreactor including medium optimization, optimum feeding strategy and co-substrate feeding in fed batch as well as continuous cultivation have been described. The recent advances in system and synthetic biology studies including metabolic flux analysis in understanding the phenotypic characteristics of recombinant Pichia and genome editing with CRISPR-CAS system have also been summarized. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Proteins modulation in human skeletal muscle in the early phase of adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigano, A.; Ripamonti, M.; Palma, S. De

    2008-01-01

    High altitude hypoxia is a paraphysiological condition triggering redox status disturbances of cell organization leading, via oxidative stress, to proteins, lipids, and DNA damage. In man, skeletal muscle, after prolonged exposure to hypoxia, undergoes mass reduction and alterations at the cellul......, whereas the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a marker of protein synthesis, was reduced Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  16. Regulating the ethylene response of a plant by modulation of F-box proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongwei; Ecker, Joseph R.

    2010-02-02

    The invention relates to transgenic plants having reduced sensitivity to ethylene as a result of having a recombinant nucleic acid encoding a F-box protein, and a method of producing a transgenic plant with reduced ethylene sensitivity by transforming the plant with a nucleic acid sequence encoding a F-box protein.

  17. Localization of a Region in the Fusion Protein of Avian Metapneumovirus That Modulates Cell-Cell Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yongwei; Feng, Kurtis; Yao, Xiangjie; Cai, Hui; Li, Junan; Mirza, Anne M.; Iorio, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Metapneumovirus within the subfamily Pneumovirinae of the family Paramyxoviridae includes two members, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), causing respiratory tract infections in humans and birds, respectively. Paramyxoviruses enter host cells by fusing the viral envelope with a host cell membrane. Membrane fusion of hMPV appears to be unique, in that fusion of some hMPV strains requires low pH. Here, we show that the fusion (F) proteins of aMPV promote fusion in the absence of the attachment protein and low pH is not required. Furthermore, there are notable differences in cell-cell fusion among aMPV subtypes. Trypsin was required for cell-cell fusion induced by subtype B but not subtypes A and C. The F protein of aMPV subtype A was highly fusogenic, whereas those from subtypes B and C were not. By construction and evaluation of chimeric F proteins composed of domains from the F proteins of subtypes A and B, we localized a region composed of amino acid residues 170 to 338 in the F protein that is responsible for the hyperfusogenic phenotype of the F from subtype A. Further mutagenesis analysis revealed that residues R295, G297, and K323 in this region collectively contributed to the hyperfusogenicity. Taken together, we have identified a region in the aMPV F protein that modulates the extent of membrane fusion. A model for fusion consistent with these data is presented. PMID:22915815

  18. Characteristic proteins in the plasma of postoperative colorectal and liver cancer patients with Yin deficiency of liver-kidney syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qing; Wang, Wenhai; Luo, Yunquan; Cai, Feifei; Lu, Yiyu; Deng, Wanli; Li, Qi; Su, Shibing

    2017-11-28

    Systems biology and bioinformatics provide the feasibility for the basic research associated with "same traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome in different diseases". In this study, the plasma proteins in postoperative colorectal (PCC) and postoperative liver cancer (PLC) patients with YDLKS (Yin deficiency of liver-kidney syndrome) were screened out using iTRAQ combined with LC-MS/MS technology. The results demonstrated that, KNG1, AMBP, SERPING1, etc, were all differentially expressed in both PCC and PLC patients with YDLKS, and associated closely with complement and coagulation cascades pathway. C7 and C2 were another two representative factors involving in former pathway. Further validation showed that, the C7 levels were increased significantly in PLC ( P patients with YDLKS ( P patients with YDLKS ( P patients with YDLKS.

  19. An ultra-HTS process for the identification of small molecule modulators of orphan G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Angela; Banks, Martyn; Spicer, Timothy; Civoli, Francesca; Watson, John

    2003-09-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most successful target proteins for drug discovery research to date. More than 150 orphan GPCRs of potential therapeutic interest have been identified for which no activating ligands or biological functions are known. One of the greatest challenges in the pharmaceutical industry is to link these orphan GPCRs with human diseases. Highly automated parallel approaches that integrate ultra-high throughput and focused screening can be used to identify small molecule modulators of orphan GPCRs. These small molecules can then be employed as pharmacological tools to explore the function of orphan receptors in models of human disease. In this review, we describe methods that utilize powerful ultra-high-throughput screening technologies to identify surrogate ligands of orphan GPCRs.

  20. A Small Ras-like protein Ray/Rab1c modulates the p53-regulating activity of PRPK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yasuhito; Takeuchi, Takashi; Imai, Yoshinori; Murase, Ryuichi; Kamei, Yoshiaki; Fujibuchi, Taketsugu; Matsumoto, Suguru; Ueda, Norifumi; Ogasawara, Masahito; Shigemoto, Kazuhiro; Kito, Katsumi

    2006-01-01

    PRPK phosphorylates serine-15 residue of p53 and enhances transcriptional activity. PRPK possesses a bipartite nuclear localization signal and localizes in nucleus when over-expressed in cells. However, intrinsic PRPK localizes mainly in the cytosol in situ. While studying the mechanisms in the distribution of intrinsic PRPK, we identified a PRPK binding protein, an ubiquitously expressed Small Ras-like GTPase, Rab1c, also named Ray or Rab35. The over-expressed Ray was distributed in the nucleus, cytosol, and cell membrane. Both Ray wild type and GTP-restrictively binding mutant Ray-Q67L, but not guanine nucleotide unstable binding mutant Ray-N120I, partially distributed the over-expressed PRPK to the cytosol and also suppressed the PRPK-induced p53-transcriptional activity profoundly. A Small Ras-like GTPase protein Ray was thus indicated to modulate p53 transcriptional activity of PRPK

  1. Multiple sensory G proteins in the olfactory, gustatory and nociceptive neurons modulate longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lans (Hannes); G. Jansen (Gert)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe life span of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is under control of sensory signals detected by the amphid neurons. In these neurons, C. elegans expresses at least 13 Galpha subunits and a Ggamma subunit, which are involved in the transduction and modulation of sensory signals.

  2. Associations of Protein-Energy Wasting Syndrome Criteria With Body Composition and Mortality in the General and Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease Populations in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddhu, Srinivasan; Chen, Xiaorui; Wei, Guo; Raj, Dominic; Raphael, Kalani L; Boucher, Robert; Chonchol, Michel B; Murtaugh, Maureen A; Greene, Tom

    2017-05-01

    It is unknown whether the criteria used to define Protein-energy wasting (PEW) syndrome in dialysis patients reflect protein or energy wasting in the general and moderate CKD populations. In 11,834 participants in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, individual PEW syndrome criteria and the number of PEW syndrome categories were related to lean body and fat masses (measured by dual-energy absorptiometry) using linear regression in the entire cohort and CKD sub-population. Serum chemistry, body mass and muscle mass PEW criteria tended to be associated with lower lean body and fat masses, but the low dietary protein and energy intake criteria were associated with significantly higher protein and energy stores. When the number of PEW syndrome categories was defined by non-dietary categories alone, there was a monotonic inverse relationship with lean body and fat masses and strong positive relationship with mortality. In contrast, when dietary category alone was present, mean BMI was in the obesity range; additional presence of two non-dietary categories was associated with lower BMI and lower lean body and fat masses. Thus, the association of dietary category plus two additional non-dietary categories with lower protein or energy stores was driven by the presence of the two non-dietary categories. Results were similar in CKD subgroup. Hence, a definition of PEW syndrome without dietary variables has face validity and reflects protein or energy wasting.

  3. A diet containing whey protein, glutamine, and TGFbeta modulates gut protein metabolism during chemotherapy-induced mucositis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhettala, Nabile; Ibrahim, Ayman; Claeyssens, Sophie; Faure, Magali; Le Pessot, Florence; Vuichoud, Jacques; Lavoinne, Alain; Breuillé, Denis; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2010-08-01

    Mucositis, a common side effect of chemotherapy, is characterized by compromised digestive function, barrier integrity and immune competence. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of a specifically designed diet Clinutren Protect (CP), which contains whey proteins, TGFbeta-rich casein, and free glutamine, on mucositis in rats. Mucositis was induced by three consecutive injections (day 0, day 1, day 2) of methotrexate (2.5 mg/kg). Rats had free access to CP or placebo diets from days -7 to 9. In the placebo diet, whey proteins and TGFbeta-rich casein were replaced by TGFbeta-free casein and glutamine by alanine. Intestinal parameters were assessed at day 3 and 9. Values, expressed as mean +/- SEM, were compared using two-way ANOVA. At day 3, villus height was markedly decreased in the placebo (296 +/- 11 microm) and CP groups (360 +/- 10 microm) compared with controls (464 +/- 27 microm), but more markedly in the placebo as compared to CP group. The intestinal damage score was also reduced in the CP compared with the placebo group. Glutathione content increased in the CP compared with the placebo group (2.2 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.7 +/- 0.2 micromol/g tissue). Gut protein metabolism was more affected in the placebo than in the CP group. The fractional synthesis rate was decreased in the placebo group (93.8 +/- 4.9%/day) compared with controls (121.5 +/- 12.1, P < 0.05), but not in the CP group (106.0 +/- 13.1). In addition, at day 9, rats exhibited improved body weight and food intake recovery in the CP compared to the placebo group. Clinutren Protect feeding reduces intestinal injury in the acute phase of methotrexate-induced mucositis in rats and improves recovery.

  4. Circulating matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate protein (MGP) species are refractory to vitamin K treatment in a new case of Keutel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cranenburg, E. C. M.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K. Y.; Bonafe, L.; Crettol, L. Mittaz; Rodiger, L. A.; Dikkers, F. G.; van Essen, A. J.; Superti-Furga, A.; Alexandrakis, E.; Vermeer, C.; Schurgers, L. J.; Laverman, G. D.

    Background and objectives: Matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate protein (MGP), a vitamin K-dependent protein, is recognized as a potent local inhibitor of vascular calcification. Studying patients with Keutel syndrome (KS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from MGP mutations, provides an

  5. Circulating matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate protein (MGP) species are refractory to vitamin K treatment in a new case of Keutel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cranenburg, E. C. M.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K. Y.; Bonafe, L.; Mittaz Crettol, L.; Rödiger, L. A.; Dikkers, F. G.; van Essen, A. J.; Superti-Furga, A.; Alexandrakis, E.; Vermeer, C.; Schurgers, L. J.; Laverman, G. D.

    2011-01-01

    Background and objectives: Matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate protein (MGP), a vitamin K-dependent protein, is recognized as a potent local inhibitor of vascular calcification. Studying patients with Keutel syndrome (KS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from MGP mutations, provides an

  6. Nonstructural 3 Protein of Hepatitis C Virus Modulates the Tribbles Homolog 3/Akt Signaling Pathway for Persistent Viral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Si C.; Pham, Tu M.; Nguyen, Lam N.; Park, Eun-Mee; Lim, Yun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection often causes chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the mechanisms underlying HCV-induced liver pathogenesis are still not fully understood. By transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis, we recently identified host genes that were significantly differentially expressed in cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells. Of these, tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3) was selected for further characterization. TRIB3 was initially identified as a binding partner of protein kinase B (also known as Akt). TRIB3 blocks the phosphorylation of Akt and induces apoptosis under endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress conditions. HCV has been shown to enhance Akt phosphorylation for its own propagation. In the present study, we demonstrated that both mRNA and protein levels of TRIB3 were increased in the context of HCV replication. We further showed that promoter activity of TRIB3 was increased by HCV-induced ER stress. Silencing of TRIB3 resulted in increased RNA and protein levels of HCV, whereas overexpression of TRIB3 decreased HCV replication. By employing an HCV pseudoparticle entry assay, we further showed that TRIB3 was a negative host factor involved in HCV entry. Both in vitro binding and immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that HCV NS3 specifically interacted with TRIB3. Consequently, the association of TRIB3 and Akt was disrupted by HCV NS3, and thus, TRIB3-Akt signaling was impaired in HCV-infected cells. Moreover, HCV modulated TRIB3 to promote extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, activator protein 1 (AP-1) activity, and cell migration. Collectively, these data indicate that HCV exploits the TRIB3-Akt signaling pathway to promote persistent viral infection and may contribute to HCV-mediated pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE TRIB3 is a pseudokinase protein that acts as an adaptor in signaling pathways for important cellular processes. So far, the functional involvement of

  7. Modulation of GDP-fucose level for generating proteins with reduced rate of fucosylation (WO2010141855).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2011-09-01

    The application (WO2010141855) is in the field of glycobiology, and involves the control of the rate of fucosylation of proteins by exogenous factors. It aims at controlling the rate of protein fucosylation with inhibitors (drugs or nucleic acid antagonists) of enzymes involved in the synthesis of GDP-fucose. Mammalian cell lines were cultured in the presence of inhibitors, for example, siRNA. The rates of GDP-fucose in cells and during protein fucosylation were characterized. The level of protein fucosylation decreases rapidly in response to a decrease in GDP-fucose level. The relationship between the rate of fucosylation of proteins and the level of GDP-fucose in a cell is non-linear. Reduction in the rate of protein fucosylation can be achieved with a minimal reduction of the level of GDP-fucose in cells. The paradigm may be used to synthesize proteins and antibodies, with a reduced rate of fucosylation. The application claims that the use of drugs or nucleic acid antagonists that inhibit the enzymes involved in GDP-fucose biosynthesis optimizes the level of GDP-fucose present in cells, and reduces the rate of fucosylation of glycoproteins.

  8. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Human Methyltransferase Modulating Hsp70 Protein Function through Lysine Methylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Magnus E.; Moen, Anders; Bousset, Luc; Egge-Jacobsen, Wolfgang; Kernstock, Stefan; Melki, Ronald; Falnes, Pål Ø.

    2013-01-01

    Hsp70 proteins constitute an evolutionarily conserved protein family of ATP-dependent molecular chaperones involved in a wide range of biological processes. Mammalian Hsp70 proteins are subject to various post-translational modifications, including methylation, but for most of these, a functional role has not been attributed. In this study, we identified the methyltransferase METTL21A as the enzyme responsible for trimethylation of a conserved lysine residue found in several human Hsp70 (HSPA) proteins. This enzyme, denoted by us as HSPA lysine (K) methyltransferase (HSPA-KMT), was found to catalyze trimethylation of various Hsp70 family members both in vitro and in vivo, and the reaction was stimulated by ATP. Furthermore, we show that HSPA-KMT exclusively methylates 70-kDa proteins in mammalian protein extracts, demonstrating that it is a highly specific enzyme. Finally, we show that trimethylation of HSPA8 (Hsc70) has functional consequences, as it alters the affinity of the chaperone for both the monomeric and fibrillar forms of the Parkinson disease-associated protein α-synuclein. PMID:23921388

  9. Modulation of the maladaptive stress response to manage diseases of protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Martino Roth

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of protein folding arise because of the inability of an altered peptide sequence to properly engage protein homeostasis components that direct protein folding and function. To identify global principles of misfolding disease pathology we examined the impact of the local folding environment in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD, Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and cystic fibrosis (CF. Using distinct models, including patient-derived cell lines and primary epithelium, mouse brain tissue, and Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that chronic expression of misfolded proteins not only triggers the sustained activation of the heat shock response (HSR pathway, but that this sustained activation is maladaptive. In diseased cells, maladaptation alters protein structure-function relationships, impacts protein folding in the cytosol, and further exacerbates the disease state. We show that down-regulation of this maladaptive stress response (MSR, through silencing of HSF1, the master regulator of the HSR, restores cellular protein folding and improves the disease phenotype. We propose that restoration of a more physiological proteostatic environment will strongly impact the management and progression of loss-of-function and gain-of-toxic-function phenotypes common in human disease.

  10. Lacrimal proline rich 4 (LPRR4 protein in the tear fluid is a potential biomarker of dry eye syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saijyothi Venkata Aluru

    Full Text Available Dry eye syndrome (DES is a complex, multifactorial, immune-associated disorder of the tear and ocular surface. DES with a high prevalence world over needs identification of potential biomarkers so as to understand not only the disease mechanism but also to identify drug targets. In this study we looked for differentially expressed proteins in tear samples of DES to arrive at characteristic biomarkers. As part of a prospective case-control study, tear specimen were collected using Schirmer strips from 129 dry eye cases and 73 age matched controls. 2D electrophoresis (2DE and Differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE was done to identify differentially expressed proteins. One of the differentially expressed protein in DES is lacrimal proline rich 4 protein (LPRR4. LPRR4 protein expression was quantified by enzyme immune sorbent assay (ELISA. LPRR4 was down regulated significantly in all types of dry eye cases, correlating with the disease severity as measured by clinical investigations. Further characterization of the protein is required to assess its therapeutic potential in DES.

  11. Modulation of gut microbiota during probiotic-mediated attenuation of metabolic syndrome in high fat diet-fed mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Tang, Huang; Zhang, Chenhong; Zhao, Yufeng; Derrien, Muriel; Rocher, Emilie; van-Hylckama Vlieg, Johan ET; Strissel, Katherine; Zhao, Liping; Obin, Martin; Shen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Structural disruption of gut microbiota and associated inflammation are considered important etiological factors in high fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic syndrome (MS). Three candidate probiotic strains, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4270 (LC), L. rhamnosus I-3690 (LR) and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis I-2494 (BA), were individually administered to HFD-fed mice (108 cells day−1) for 12 weeks. Each strain attenuated weight gain and macrophage infiltration into epididymal adipose tissue and markedly improved glucose–insulin homeostasis and hepatic steatosis. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinate analysis based on 454 pyrosequencing of fecal bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed that the probiotic strains shifted the overall structure of the HFD-disrupted gut microbiota toward that of lean mice fed a normal (chow) diet. Redundancy analysis revealed that abundances of 83 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were altered by probiotics. Forty-nine altered OTUs were significantly correlated with one or more host MS parameters and were designated ‘functionally relevant phylotypes'. Thirteen of the 15 functionally relevant OTUs that were negatively correlated with MS phenotypes were promoted, and 26 of the 34 functionally relevant OTUs that were positively correlated with MS were reduced by at least one of the probiotics, but each strain changed a distinct set of functionally relevant OTUs. LC and LR increased cecal acetate but did not affect circulating lipopolysaccharide-binding protein; in contrast, BA did not increase acetate but significantly decreased adipose and hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α gene expression. These results suggest that Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium differentially attenuate obesity comorbidities in part through strain-specific impacts on MS-associated phylotypes of gut microbiota in mice. PMID:24936764

  12. The Orphan G Protein-coupled Receptor Gpr175 (Tpra40) Enhances Hedgehog Signaling by Modulating cAMP Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaskirat; Wen, Xiaohui; Scales, Suzie J

    2015-12-04

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an essential role in vertebrate embryonic tissue patterning of many developing organs. Signaling occurs predominantly in primary cilia and is initiated by the entry of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-like protein Smoothened into cilia and culminates in gene transcription via the Gli family of transcription factors upon their nuclear entry. Here we identify an orphan GPCR, Gpr175 (also known as Tpra1 or Tpra40: transmembrane protein, adipocyte associated 1 or of 40 kDa), which also localizes to primary cilia upon Hh stimulation and positively regulates Hh signaling. Interaction experiments place Gpr175 at the level of PKA and upstream of the Gαi component of heterotrimeric G proteins, which itself localizes to cilia and can modulate Hh signaling. Gpr175 or Gαi1 depletion leads to increases in cellular cAMP levels and in Gli3 processing into its repressor form. Thus we propose that Gpr175 coupled to Gαi1 normally functions to inhibit the production of cAMP by adenylyl cyclase upon Hh stimulation, thus maximizing signaling by turning off PKA activity and hence Gli3 repressor formation. Taken together our data suggest that Gpr175 is a novel positive regulator of the Hh signaling pathway. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. The association of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 with the neuronal Ca2+-binding protein 2 modulates receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Laia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Albergaria, Catarina; Watanabe, Masahiko; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Franco, Rafael; Luján, Rafael; Ciruela, Francisco

    2009-10-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors mediate in part the CNS effects of glutamate. These receptors interact with a large array of intracellular proteins in which the final role is to regulate receptor function. Here, using co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments we showed a close and specific interaction between mGlu(5) receptor and NECAB2 in both transfected human embryonic kidney cells and rat hippocampus. Interestingly, in pull-down experiments increasing concentrations of calcium drastically reduced the ability of these two proteins to interact, suggesting that NECAB2 binds to mGlu(5) receptor in a calcium-regulated manner. Immunoelectron microscopy detection of NECAB2 and mGlu(5) receptor in the rat hippocampal formation indicated that both proteins are codistributed in the same subcellular compartment of pyramidal cells. In addition, the NECAB2/mGlu(5) receptor interaction regulated mGlu(5b)-mediated activation of both inositol phosphate accumulation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Overall, these findings indicate that NECAB2 by its physical interaction with mGlu(5b) receptor modulates receptor function.

  14. Charakterisierung der Interaktion zwischen dem Usher-Syndrom-Protein Harmonin und dem ARPKD-Zystennierenprotein Polyductin

    OpenAIRE

    Mager, Silke

    2010-01-01

    Cilia are hair-like structures that extend from the surface of epithelial cells. Human diseases referred to as ciliopathies arise from defects in cilia function. Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), the most frequent cause of hereditary cystic kidney disease in infancy and childhood, and Usher syndrome, the most frequent hereditary cause for combined deaf-blindness, are two important ciliopathies. Senior-Løken syndrome as another ciliopathy affects both organs, the kidney an...

  15. Structural Modulation of Phosducin by Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 Protein Binding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řežábková, L.; Kacířová, M.; Šulc, Miroslav; Herman, P.; Večeř, J.; Štěpánek, M.; Obšilová, Veronika; Obšil, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 9 (2012), s. 1960-1969 ISSN 0006-3495 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : phosducin * 14-3-3 protein * fluorescence Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.668, year: 2012

  16. Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 Modulates Epithelial Integrity, Heat Shock Protein, and Proinflammatory Cytokine Response in Intestinal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanti Klingspor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics have shown positive effects on gastrointestinal diseases; they have barrier-modulating effects and change the inflammatory response towards pathogens in studies in vitro. The aim of this investigation has been to examine the response of intestinal epithelial cells to Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 (E. faecium, a probiotic positively affecting diarrhea incidence in piglets, and two pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli strains, with specific focus on the probiotic modulation of the response to the pathogenic challenge. Porcine (IPEC-J2 and human (Caco-2 intestinal cells were incubated without bacteria (control, with E. faecium, with enteropathogenic (EPEC or enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC each alone or in combination with E. faecium. The ETEC strain decreased transepithelial resistance (TER and increased IL-8 mRNA and protein expression in both cell lines compared with control cells, an effect that could be prevented by pre- and coincubation with E. faecium. Similar effects were observed for the increased expression of heat shock protein 70 in Caco-2 cells. When the cells were challenged by the EPEC strain, no such pattern of changes could be observed. The reduced decrease in TER and the reduction of the proinflammatory and stress response of enterocytes following pathogenic challenge indicate the protective effect of the probiotic.

  17. Melatonin ameliorates oxidative stress, modulates death receptor pathway proteins, and protects the rat cerebrum against bisphenol-A-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Missiry, Mohamed A; Othman, Azza I; Al-Abdan, Monera A; El-Sayed, Aml A

    2014-12-15

    Epidemiological reports have indicated a correlation between the increasing of bisphenol-A (BPA) levels in the environment and the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, the protective effect of melatonin on oxidative stress and the death receptor apoptotic proteins in the cerebrum of the bisphenol-A-treated rats were examined. Adult male rats were orally administered melatonin (10mg/kg bw) concurrently with BPA (50mg/kg bw) 3 days a week for 6 weeks. BPA exposure resulted in significant elevations of oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased malondialdehyde level and the decreased glutathione level and superoxide dismutase activity in the cerebrum. BPA caused an upregulation of p53 and CD95-Fas and activation of capsases-3 and 8, resulting in cerebral cell apoptosis. Melatonin significantly attenuated the BPA-evoked brain oxidative stress, modulated apoptotic-regulating proteins and protected against apoptosis. These data suggest that melatonin modulated important steps in the death receptor apoptotic pathway which likely related to its redox control properties. Melatonin is a promising pharmacological agent for preventing the potential neurotoxicity of BPA following occupational or environmental exposures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Epididymosomes: transfer of fertility-modulating proteins to the sperm surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    A variety of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked proteins are acquired on spermatozoa from epididymal luminal fluids (ELF) during sperm maturation. These proteins serve roles in immunoprotection and in key steps of fertilization such as capacitation, acrosomal exocytosis and sperm-egg interactions. Their acquisition on sperm cells is mediated both by membrane vesicles (epididymosomes, EP) which were first reported to dock on the sperm surface, and by lipid carriers which facilitate the transfer of proteins associated with the membrane-free fraction of ELF. While the nonvesicular fraction is more efficient, both pathways are dependent on hydrophobic interactions between the GPI-anchor and the external lipid layer of the sperm surface. More recently proteomic and hypothesis-driven studies have shown that EP from several mammals carry transmembrane (TM) proteins, including plasma membrane Ca 2 + -ATPase 4 (PMCA4). Synthesized in the testis, PMCA4 is an essential protein and the major Ca 2 + efflux pump in murine spermatozoa. Delivery of PMCA4 to spermatozoa from bovine and mouse EP during epididymal maturation and in vitro suggests that the docking of EP on the sperm surface precedes fusion, and experimental evidence supports a fusogenic mechanism for TM proteins. Fusion is facilitated by CD9, which generates fusion-competent sites on membranes. On the basis of knowledge of PMCA4's interacting partners a number of TM and membrane-associated proteins have been identified or are predicted to be present, in the epididymosomal cargo deliverable to spermatozoa. These Ca 2 + -dependent proteins, undetected in proteomic studies, play essential roles in sperm motility and fertility, and their detection highlights the usefulness of the hypothesis-driven approach.

  19. Epididymosomes: transfer of fertility-modulating proteins to the sperm surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A Martin-DeLeon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-linked proteins are acquired on spermatozoa from epididymal luminal fluids (ELF during sperm maturation. These proteins serve roles in immunoprotection and in key steps of fertilization such as capacitation, acrosomal exocytosis and sperm-egg interactions. Their acquisition on sperm cells is mediated both by membrane vesicles (epididymosomes, EP which were first reported to dock on the sperm surface, and by lipid carriers which facilitate the transfer of proteins associated with the membrane-free fraction of ELF. While the nonvesicular fraction is more efficient, both pathways are dependent on hydrophobic interactions between the GPI-anchor and the external lipid layer of the sperm surface. More recently proteomic and hypothesis-driven studies have shown that EP from several mammals carry transmembrane (TM proteins, including plasma membrane Ca 2 + -ATPase 4 (PMCA4. Synthesized in the testis, PMCA4 is an essential protein and the major Ca 2 + efflux pump in murine spermatozoa. Delivery of PMCA4 to spermatozoa from bovine and mouse EP during epididymal maturation and in vitro suggests that the docking of EP on the sperm surface precedes fusion, and experimental evidence supports a fusogenic mechanism for TM proteins. Fusion is facilitated by CD9, which generates fusion-competent sites on membranes. On the basis of knowledge of PMCA4′s interacting partners a number of TM and membrane-associated proteins have been identified or are predicted to be present, in the epididymosomal cargo deliverable to spermatozoa. These Ca 2 + -dependent proteins, undetected in proteomic studies, play essential roles in sperm motility and fertility, and their detection highlights the usefulness of the hypothesis-driven approach.

  20. Epididymosomes: transfer of fertility-modulating proteins to the sperm surface

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia A Martin-DeLeon

    2015-01-01

    A variety of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked proteins are acquired on spermatozoa from epididymal luminal fluids (ELF) during sperm maturation. These proteins serve roles in immunoprotection and in key steps of fertilization such as capacitation, acrosomal exocytosis and sperm-egg interactions. Their acquisition on sperm cells is mediated both by membrane vesicles (epididymosomes, EP) which were first reported to dock on the sperm surface, and by lipid carriers which facilitate the ...

  1. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  2. Effect of the protein corona on nanoparticles for modulating cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee YK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Yeon Kyung Lee,1,* Eun-Ju Choi,2,* Thomas J Webster,3 Sang-Hyun Kim,4 Dongwoo Khang1 1Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon, South Korea; 2Division of Sport Science, College of Science and Technology, Konkuk University, Chungju, South Korea; 3Department of Chemical Engineering and Program in Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 4Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Although the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles (NPs is greatly influenced by their interactions with blood proteins, toxic effects resulting from blood interactions are often ignored in the development and use of nanostructured biomaterials for in vivo applications. Protein coronas created during the initial reaction with NPs can determine the subsequent immunological cascade, and protein coronas formed on NPs can either stimulate or mitigate the immune response. Along these lines, the understanding of NP-protein corona formation in terms of physiochemical surface properties of the NPs and NP interactions with the immune system components in blood is an essential step for evaluating NP toxicity for in vivo therapeutics. This article reviews the most recent developments in NP-based protein coronas through the modification of NP surface properties and discusses the associated immune responses. Keywords: nanostructured biomaterials, blood response, cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, protein corona

  3. Sinup, a novel Siaz-interacting nuclear protein, modulates neural plate formation in the zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Hyunju; Won, Minho; Lee, Su-Ui; Kim, Kyoon E.; Huh, Tae-Lin; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Rhee, Myungchull

    2005-01-01

    Siah, the vertebrate homologue of the Drosophila seven in absentia (sina) gene, is well conserved from Drosophila to mammal and involved in ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of various target proteins. To identify cellular proteins interacting with Siah, we screened a zebrafish cDNA library with zebrafish Siah (Siaz) as bait in a yeast two-hybrid assay. We identified a cDNA encoding a novel protein composed of 145 amino acids and termed it as Sinup (Siaz-interacting-nuclear-protein). Sinup is a novel nuclear protein that binds to the highly conserved C-terminal protein-interacting domain of Siaz both in vivo and in vitro. During development, sinup transcripts are abundant from the one-cell stage to the early blastula and then markedly diminished, suggesting sinup largely exists as maternal transcripts. sinup overexpression induced lateral expansion of the neural plate and in consequence caused ectopic expression of otx-2 and hoxb1b during the late gastrula stage. In addition, the lateral/paraxial expression of wnt8 at the onset of gastrulation is suppressed by the forced expression of sinup while the expression levels of various dorso-ventral markers are unaffected. In contrast, interfering with sinup functions using sinup morpholino oligonucleotides gradually diminished the anterior neuroectoderm from the posterior region, and resulted in compete loss of hindbrain at the 3-somites stage. Our report suggests that sinup expression should be tightly regulated during early embryonic development for the proper neural plate formation

  4. Red pitaya juice supplementation ameliorates energy balance homeostasis by modulating obesity-related genes in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Nurul Shazini; Ismail, Patimah; Rahmat, Asmah

    2016-07-26

    Red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) or known as buah naga merah in Malay belongs to the cactus family, Cactaceae. Red pitaya has been shown to give protection against liver damage and may reduce the stiffness of the heart. Besides, the beneficial effects of red pitaya against obesity have been reported; however, the mechanism of this protection is not clear. Therefore, in the present study, we have investigated the red pitaya-targeted genes in obesity using high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome rat model. A total of four groups were tested: corn-starch (CS), corn-starch + red pitaya juice (CRP), high-carbohydrate, high-fat (HCHF) and high-carbohydrate, high-fat + red pitaya juice (HRP). The intervention with 5 % red pitaya juice was continued for 8 weeks after 8 weeks initiation of the diet. Retroperitoneal, epididymal and omental fat pads were collected and weighed. Plasma concentration of IL-6 and TNF-α were measured using commercial kits. Gene expression analysis was conducted using RNA extracted from liver samples. A total of eighty-four genes related to obesity were analyzed using PCR array. The rats fed HCHF-diet for 16 weeks increased body weight, developed excess abdominal fat deposition and down-regulated the expression level of IL-1α, IL-1r1, and Cntfr as compared to the control group. Supplementation of red pitaya juice for 8 weeks increased omental and epididymal fat but no change in retroperitoneal fat was observed. Red pitaya juice reversed the changes in energy balance homeostasis in liver tissues by regulation of the expression levels of Pomc and Insr. The increased protein expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in HCHF group and red pitaya treated rats confirmed the results of gene expression. Collectively, this study revealed the usefulness of this diet-induced rat model and the beneficial effects of red pitaya on energy balance homeostasis by modulating the anorectic, orexigenic and energy expenditure related

  5. Structural Basis for Prereceptor Modulation of Plant Hormones by GH3 Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, Corey S.; Zubieta, Chloe; Herrmann, Jonathan; Kapp, Ulrike; Nanao, Max H.; Jez, Joseph M. (WU); (EMBL); (ESRF)

    2013-04-08

    Acyl acid amido synthetases of the GH3 family act as critical prereceptor modulators of plant hormone action; however, the molecular basis for their hormone selectivity is unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of benzoate-specific Arabidopsis thaliana AtGH3.12/PBS3 and jasmonic acid-specific AtGH3.11/JAR1. These structures, combined with biochemical analysis, define features for the conjugation of amino acids to diverse acyl acid substrates and highlight the importance of conformational changes in the carboxyl-terminal domain for catalysis. We also identify residues forming the acyl acid binding site across the GH3 family and residues critical for amino acid recognition. Our results demonstrate how a highly adaptable three-dimensional scaffold is used for the evolution of promiscuous activity across an enzyme family for modulation of plant signaling molecules.

  6. Complex interplay between the P-glycoprotein multidrug efflux pump and the membrane: its role in modulating protein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Jane Sharom

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance in cancer is linked to expression of the P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter (Pgp, ABCB1, which exports many structurally diverse compounds from cells. Substrates first partition into the bilayer and then interact with a large flexible binding pocket within the transporter’s transmembrane regions. Pgp has been described as a hydrophobic vacuum cleaner or an outwardly-directed drug/lipid flippase. Recent X-ray crystal structures have shed some light on the nature of the drug-binding pocket and suggested routes by which substrates can enter it from the membrane. Detergents have profound effects on Pgp function, and several appear to be substrates. Biochemical and biophysical studies in vitro, some using purified reconstituted protein, have explored the effects of the membrane environment. They have demonstrated that Pgp is involved in a complex relationship with its lipid environment, which modulates the behaviour of its substrates, as well as various functions of the protein, including ATP hydrolysis, drug binding and drug transport. Membrane lipid composition and fluidity, phospholipid headgroup and acyl chain length all influence Pgp function. Recent studies focusing on thermodynamics and kinetics have revealed some important principles governing Pgp-lipid and substrate-lipid interactions, and how these affect drug binding and transport. In some cells, Pgp is associated with cholesterol-rich microdomains which may modulate its functions. The relationship between Pgp and cholesterol remains an open question; however it clearly affects several aspects of its function in addition to substrate-membrane partitioning. The action of Pgp modulators appears to depend on their membrane permeability, and membrane fluidizers and surfactants reverse drug resistance, likely via an indirect mechanism. A detailed understanding of how the membrane affects Pgp substrates and Pgp’s catalytic cycle may lead to new strategies to combat

  7. Module structure of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP may provide bases for its complex role in the visual cycle – structure/function study of Xenopus IRBP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Debashis

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein's (IRBP remarkable module structure may be critical to its role in mediating the transport of all-trans and 11-cis retinol, and 11-cis retinal between rods, cones, RPE and Müller cells during the visual cycle. We isolated cDNAs for Xenopus IRBP, and expressed and purified its individual modules, module combinations, and the full-length polypeptide. Binding of all-trans retinol, 11-cis retinal and 9-(9-anthroyloxy stearic acid were characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy monitoring ligand-fluorescence enhancement, quenching of endogenous protein fluorescence, and energy transfer. Finally, the X-ray crystal structure of module-2 was used to predict the location of the ligand-binding sites, and compare their structures among modules using homology modeling. Results The full-length Xenopus IRBP cDNA codes for a polypeptide of 1,197 amino acid residues beginning with a signal peptide followed by four homologous modules each ~300 amino acid residues in length. Modules 1 and 3 are more closely related to each other than either is to modules 2 and 4. Modules 1 and 4 are most similar to the N- and C-terminal modules of the two module IRBP of teleosts. Our data are consistent with the model that vertebrate IRBPs arose through two genetic duplication events, but that the middle two modules were lost during the evolution of the ray finned fish. The sequence of the expressed full-length IRBP was confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The recombinant full-length Xenopus IRBP bound all-trans retinol and 11-cis retinaldehyde at 3 to 4 sites with Kd's of 0.2 to 0.3 μM, and was active in protecting all-trans retinol from degradation. Module 2 showed selectivity for all-trans retinol over 11-cis retinaldehyde. The binding data are correlated to the results of docking of all-trans-retinol to the crystal structure of Xenopus module 2 suggesting two ligand-binding sites

  8. [Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) in 14 children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahaye, C; Chauveau, A; Kiefer, S; Dumond, P

    2017-04-01

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a particular non-IgE-mediated food allergy, manifested by profuse and repetitive vomiting with hypotonia and lethargy in its acute form. A retrospective descriptive single-center study was conducted. Subjects included in this study were children with acute FPIES who consulted the allergy outpatient clinic of the Nancy Regional University Hospital between November 2013 and June 2016. Among the 14 patients (eight boys and six girls), nine had a history of atopy: a family history for six (42.8%) and a personal history for five (35.7%). Three had chronic FPIES turning into acute FPIES. Cow milk was the most common triggering food (50%), followed by fish (21.4%), mussels (14.3%), wheat (7.1%), egg (7.1%), and poultry (7.1%). The average time from ingestion to symptom onset was 90minutes. The symptoms were typical and diarrhea was not systematic (42.8%). Six children were hospitalized, some of them several times, including once in intensive care for one patient. The treatments established were, in order of frequency: oral or intravenous rehydration, corticosteroids, antihistamines, and antiemetics. Diagnosis time was 7.6 months on average; it was significantly shorter for milk than for solid foods (1.4 vs. 12 months, P-value=0.02), on average after two episodes. Another diagnosis than FPIES was raised at first for five patients (acute gastroenteritis, gastroesophageal reflux, and bowel obstruction caused by bowel volvulus). Allergy tests were initially negative. Two chronic FPIES cases (one milk FPIES and one milk and wheat FPIES) developed an acute FPIES to another food (fish and mussels); one patient changed from an acute fish FPIES to an IgE-mediated phenotype over time. FPIES resolved for four patients: three milk FPIES, on average 15.7 months after the first reaction, and one wheat FPIES, 2.5 years after the first reaction. A child with a white fish FPIES was able to introduce salmon and tuna. FPIES is a

  9. C-reactive protein in antiphospholipid syndrome: relationship with cardiovascular pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Seredavkina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess relationship of high sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP level in pts with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS with clinico-laboratory features and cardiovascular pathology. Material and methods. 206 pts were included. 58 from them had primary APS (PAPS, 72 –systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with APS and 76 – SLE. 29 from 76 pts of the latter group were positive on anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA – SLE with antiphospholipid antibodies (APhL and 47 – low positive or negative on ACA – SLE without APhL. 72 persons without autoimmune diseases were included into control group. CRP (with high sensitivity immuno-nephelometric assay, APhL (with solid phase immuno-enzyme assay, plasma lipids were evaluated, sonography with measurement of intima-media complex (IMC thickness of common carotid arteries, carotid artery bulbs and internal carotid arteries, electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography (EchoCG, Holter ECG monitoring were performed. Results. HsCRP serum level in pts was significantly higher than in control: 2,55 [0,71; 7,04] mg/l (varied from 0,15 to 39,85 vs 0,68 [0,26; 1,97] mg/l (varied from 0,1 to 9,61, p<0,001. Most high hsCRP concentration was found in SLE with APS (p=0,02. HsCRP level in pts with PAPS with history of combined or isolated arterial thrombosis was significantly higher than in pts with SLE and APS having the same localization of thrombosis. HsCRP concentration less than 3 mg/l correlated with duration of postthrombotic period in pts with PAPS. HsCRP level also correlated with triglyceride concentration, body mass index, summated coronary risk and magistral arteries IMC thickness. Conclusion. HsCRP elevation in pts with APS was associated with development of combined and arterial thrombosis as well as with traditional risk factors of atherosclerosis.

  10. Curcumin modulates the inflammatory response and inhibits subsequent fibrosis in a mouse model of viral-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasarala, Sreedevi; Zhang, Fangfang; Liu, Guangliang; Wang, Ruixue; London, Steven D; London, Lucille

    2013-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by diffuse alveolar damage usually secondary to an intense host inflammatory response of the lung to a pulmonary or extrapulmonary infectious or non-infectious insult often leading to the development of intra-alveolar and interstitial fibrosis. Curcumin, the principal curcumoid of the popular Indian spice turmeric, has been demonstrated as an anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in a broad spectrum of diseases. Using our well-established model of reovirus 1/L-induced acute viral pneumonia, which displays many of the characteristics of the human ALI/ARDS, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects of curcumin. Female CBA/J mice were treated with curcumin (50 mg/kg) 5 days prior to intranasal inoculation with 10(7)pfu reovirus 1/L and daily, thereafter. Mice were evaluated for key features associated with ALI/ARDS. Administration of curcumin significantly modulated inflammation and fibrosis, as revealed by histological and biochemical analysis. The expression of IL-6, IL-10, IFNγ, and MCP-1, key chemokines/cytokines implicated in the development of ALI/ARDS, from both the inflammatory infiltrate and whole lung tissue were modulated by curcumin potentially through a reduction in the phosphorylated form of NFκB p65. While the expression of TGFß1 was not modulated by curcumin, TGFß Receptor II, which is required for TGFß signaling, was significantly reduced. In addition, curcumin also significantly inhibited the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and Tenascin-C, key markers of myofibroblast activation. This data strongly supports a role for curcumin in modulating the pathogenesis of viral-induced ALI/ARDS in a pre-clinical model potentially manifested through the alteration of inflammation and myofibroblast differentiation.

  11. Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Modulates Endoglin (CD105) Signaling Pathway for Liver Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young-Chan; Sasaki, Reina; Meyer, Keith; Ray, Ranjit

    2017-11-01

    Endoglin is part of the TGF-β receptor complex and has a crucial role in fibrogenesis and angiogenesis. It is also an important protein for tumor growth, survival, and cancer cell metastasis. In a previous study, we have shown that hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) state and cancer stem-like cell (CSC) properties in human hepatocytes. Our array data suggested that endoglin (CD105) mRNA is significantly upregulated in HCV-associated CSCs. In this study, we have observed increased endoglin expression on the cell surface of an HCV core-expressing hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell line or immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) and activation of its downstream signaling molecules. The status of phospho-SMAD1/5 and the expression of inhibitor of DNA binding protein 1 (ID1) were upregulated in HCV-infected cells or viral core gene-transfected cells. Additionally, we observed upregulation of endoglin/ID1 mRNA expression in chronic HCV patient liver biopsy samples. CSC generation by HCV core protein was dependent on the endoglin signaling pathway using activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) Fc blocking peptide and endoglin small interfering RNA (siRNA). Further, follow-up from in vitro analysis suggested that the antiapoptosis Bcl2 protein, proliferation-related cyclin D1 protein, and CSC-associated Hes1, Notch1, Nanog, and Sox2 proteins are enhanced during infection or ectopic expression of HCV core protein. IMPORTANCE Endoglin plays a crucial role in fibrogenesis and angiogenesis and is an important protein for tumor growth, survival, and cancer cell metastasis. Endoglin enhances ALK1-SMAD1/5 signaling in different cell types, leading to increased proliferation and migration responses. We have observed endoglin expression on the HCV core-expressing cell surface of human hepatocyte origin and activation of phospho-SMAD1/5 and ID1 downstream signaling molecules. ID1 protein plays a role in CSC properties, and we found that

  12. Growth-Phase-Specific Modulation of Cell Morphology and Gene Expression by an Archaeal Histone Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulmage, Keely A; Todor, Horia; Schmid, Amy K

    2015-09-08

    In all three domains of life, organisms use nonspecific DNA-binding proteins to compact and organize the genome as well as to regulate transcription on a global scale. Histone is the primary eukaryotic nucleoprotein, and its evolutionary roots can be traced to the archaea. However, not all archaea use this protein as the primary DNA-packaging component, raising questions regarding the role of histones in archaeal chromatin function. Here, quantitative phenotyping, transcriptomic, and proteomic assays were performed on deletion and overexpression mutants of the sole histone protein of the hypersaline-adapted haloarchaeal model organism Halobacterium salinarum. This protein is highly conserved among all sequenced haloarchaeal species and maintains hallmark residues required for eukaryotic histone functions. Surprisingly, despite this conservation at the sequence level, unlike in other archaea or eukaryotes, H. salinarum histone is required to regulate cell shape but is not necessary for survival. Genome-wide expression changes in histone deletion strains were global, significant but subtle in terms of fold change, bidirectional, and growth phase dependent. Mass spectrometric proteomic identification of proteins from chromatin enrichments yielded levels of histone and putative nucleoid-associated proteins similar to those of transcription factors, consistent with an open and transcriptionally active genome. Taken together, these data suggest that histone in H. salinarum plays a minor role in DNA compaction but important roles in growth-phase-dependent gene expression and regulation of cell shape. Histone function in haloarchaea more closely resembles a regulator of gene expression than a chromatin-organizing protein like canonical eukaryotic histone. Histones comprise the major protein component of eukaryotic chromatin and are required for both genome packaging and global regulation of expression. The current paradigm maintains that archaea whose genes encode

  13. Membrane Stored Curvature Elastic Stress Modulates Recruitment of Maintenance Proteins PspA and Vipp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Christopher; Jovanovic, Goran; Ces, Oscar; Buck, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Phage shock protein A (PspA), which is responsible for maintaining inner membrane integrity under stress in enterobacteria, and vesicle-inducting protein in plastids 1 (Vipp1), which functions for membrane maintenance and thylakoid biogenesis in cyanobacteria and plants, are similar peripheral membrane-binding proteins. Their homologous N-terminal amphipathic helices are required for membrane binding; however, the membrane features recognized and required for expressing their functionalities have remained largely uncharacterized. Rigorously controlled, in vitro methodologies with lipid vesicles and purified proteins were used in this study and provided the first biochemical and biophysical characterizations of membrane binding by PspA and Vipp1. Both proteins are found to sense stored curvature elastic (SCE) stress and anionic lipids within the membrane. PspA has an enhanced sensitivity for SCE stress and a higher affinity for the membrane than Vipp1. These variations in binding may be crucial for some of the proteins' differing roles in vivo. Assays probing the transcriptional regulatory function of PspA in the presence of