WorldWideScience

Sample records for syndrome protein functions

  1. Fragile X syndrome: From protein function to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagni, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A

    2013-11-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading monogenic cause of intellectual disability and autism. The FMR1 gene contains a CGG repeat present in the 5'-untranslated region which can be unstable upon transmission to the next generation. The repeat is up to 55 CGGs long in the normal population. In patients with fragile X syndrome (FXS), a repeat length exceeding 200 CGGs generally leads to methylation of the repeat and the promoter region, which is accompanied by silencing of the FMR1 gene. The disease is a result of lack of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein leading to severe symptoms, including intellectual disability, hyperactivity, and autistic-like behavior. The FMR1 protein (FMRP) has a number of functions. The translational dysregulation of a subset of mRNAs targeted by FMRP is probably the major contribution to FXS. FMRP is also involved in mRNA transport to synapses where protein synthesis occurs. For some FMRP-bound mRNAs, FMRP is a direct modulator of mRNA stability either by sustaining or preventing mRNA decay. Increased knowledge about the role of FMRP has led to the identification of potential treatments for fragile X syndrome that were often tested first in the different animal models. This review gives an overview about the present knowledge of the function of FMRP and the therapeutic strategies in mouse and man. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Three functionally diverged major White Spot Syndrome Virus structural proteins evolved by gene duplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M.C.W.; Goldbach, R.W.; Vlak, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is an invertebrate virus causing considerable mortality in penaeid shrimp. The oval-to-bacilliform shaped virions, isolated from infected Penaeus monodon, contain four major proteins: VP28, VP26, VP24 and VP19 (28, 26, 24 and 19 kDa, respectively). VP26 and VP24 are

  3. Urothelial Functional Protein and Sensory Receptors in Patients With Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome With and Without Hunner's Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the urothelium function and sensory receptors difference between interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) patients with or without Hunner's lesion. Fourteen female IC/BPS patients with Hunner's lesion (Hunner IC) and 14 age-matched IC/BPS patients without Hunner's lesions (non-Hunner IC) were enrolled. Bladder mucosa biopsies were obtained. Bladder inflammation, eosinophil infiltration, and urothelial denudation were graded on a 4-point scale after staining with hematoxylin and eosin. Adhesive protein E-cadherin, tryptase, and zonula occuldens-1 in the bladder tissues were assessed with immunofluorescence staining. Urothelial muscarinic receptors M2, M3, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and purinergic receptor P2X3 were evaluated by Western blotting. Hunner IC patients had a significantly higher mean visual analog scale pain score and smaller cystometric bladder capacity than non-Hunner IC patients. The Hunner IC bladder specimens showed more severe or moderate eosinophilic infiltration and urothelial denudation than the non-Hunner IC bladder specimens did. The E-cadherin expression was significantly lower, and eNOS expression was significantly higher in the Hunner IC bladder samples than in the non-Hunner IC samples. The other functional proteins or sensory receptors did not differ between groups. Bladder inflammation and urothelial cell adhesion defects were more severe in the Hunner IC than that in the non-Hunner IC patients. eNOS was significantly higher in the Hunner IC than in the non-Hunner IC bladder samples, suggesting that eNOS expression difference may implicate different pathogenesis in 2 types of IC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-coronavirus 3a protein may function as a modulator of the trafficking properties of the spike protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Yee-Joo

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent publication reported that a tyrosine-dependent sorting signal, present in cytoplasmic tail of the spike protein of most coronaviruses, mediates the intracellular retention of the spike protein. This motif is missing from the spike protein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV, resulting in high level of surface expression of the spike protein when it is expressed on its own in vitro. Presentation of the hypothesis It has been shown that the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus genome contains open reading frames that encode for proteins with no homologue in other coronaviruses. One of them is the 3a protein, which is expressed during infection in vitro and in vivo. The 3a protein, which contains a tyrosine-dependent sorting signal in its cytoplasmic domain, is expressed on the cell surface and can undergo internalization. In addition, 3a can bind to the spike protein and through this interaction, it may be able to cause the spike protein to become internalized, resulting in a decrease in its surface expression. Testing the hypothesis The effects of 3a on the internalization of cell surface spike protein can be examined biochemically and the significance of the interplay between these two viral proteins during viral infection can be studied using reverse genetics methodology. Implication of the hypothesis If this hypothesis is proven, it will indicate that the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus modulates the surface expression of the spike protein via a different mechanism from other coronaviruses. The interaction between 3a and S, which are expressed from separate subgenomic RNA, would be important for controlling the trafficking properties of S. The cell surface expression of S in infected cells significantly impacts viral assembly, viral spread and viral pathogenesis. Modulation by this unique pathway could confer certain advantages during the replication of the severe

  5. Single-Nucleotide Mutations in Reveal Novel Functions and Regulatory Mechanisms of the Fragile X Syndrome Protein FMRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A. Suhl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is a monogenic disorder and a common cause of intellectual disability. Despite nearly 25 years of research on FMR1, the gene underlying the syndrome, very few pathological mutations other than the typical CGG-repeat expansion have been reported. This is in contrast to other X-linked, monogenic, intellectual disability disorders, such as Rett syndrome, where many point mutations have been validated as causative of the disorder. As technology has improved and significantly driven down the cost of sequencing, allowing for whole genes to be sequenced with relative ease, in-depth sequencing studies on FMR1 have recently been performed. These studies have led to the identification of novel variants in FMR1 , where some of which have been functionally evaluated and are likely pathogenic. In this review, we discuss recently identified FMR1 variants, the ways these novel variants cause dysfunction, and how they reveal new regulatory mechanisms and functionalities of the gene.

  6. The Nance-Horan syndrome protein encodes a functional WAVE homology domain (WHD) and is important for co-ordinating actin remodelling and maintaining cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Simon P; Coccia, Margherita; Tang, Hao R; Kanuga, Naheed; Machesky, Laura M; Bailly, Maryse; Cheetham, Michael E; Hardcastle, Alison J

    2010-06-15

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked developmental disorder, characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphism and mental retardation. Null mutations in a novel gene, NHS, cause the syndrome. The NHS gene appears to have multiple isoforms as a result of alternative transcription, but a cellular function for the NHS protein has yet to be defined. We describe NHS as a founder member of a new protein family (NHS, NHSL1 and NHSL2). Here, we demonstrate that NHS is a novel regulator of actin remodelling and cell morphology. NHS localizes to sites of cell-cell contact, the leading edge of lamellipodia and focal adhesions. The N-terminus of isoforms NHS-A and NHS-1A, implicated in the pathogenesis of NHS, have a functional WAVE homology domain that interacts with the Abi protein family, haematopoietic stem/progenitor cell protein 300 (HSPC300), Nap1 and Sra1. NHS knockdown resulted in the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. We show that NHS controls cell morphology by maintaining the integrity of the circumferential actin ring and controlling lamellipod formation. NHS knockdown led to a striking increase in cell spreading. Conversely, ectopic overexpression of NHS inhibited lamellipod formation. Remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton and localized actin polymerization into branched actin filaments at the plasma membrane are essential for mediating changes in cell shape, migration and cell contact. Our data identify NHS as a new regulator of actin remodelling. We suggest that NHS orchestrates actin regulatory protein function in response to signalling events during development.

  7. The Meckel syndrome- associated protein MKS1 functionally interacts with components of the BBSome and IFT complexes to mediate ciliary trafficking and hedgehog signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Goetz

    Full Text Available The importance of primary cilia in human health is underscored by the link between ciliary dysfunction and a group of primarily recessive genetic disorders with overlapping clinical features, now known as ciliopathies. Many of the proteins encoded by ciliopathy-associated genes are components of a handful of multi-protein complexes important for the transport of cargo to the basal body and/or into the cilium. A key question is whether different complexes cooperate in cilia formation, and whether they participate in cilium assembly in conjunction with intraflagellar transport (IFT proteins. To examine how ciliopathy protein complexes might function together, we have analyzed double mutants of an allele of the Meckel syndrome (MKS complex protein MKS1 and the BBSome protein BBS4. We find that Mks1; Bbs4 double mutant mouse embryos exhibit exacerbated defects in Hedgehog (Hh dependent patterning compared to either single mutant, and die by E14.5. Cells from double mutant embryos exhibit a defect in the trafficking of ARL13B, a ciliary membrane protein, resulting in disrupted ciliary structure and signaling. We also examined the relationship between the MKS complex and IFT proteins by analyzing double mutant between Mks1 and a hypomorphic allele of the IFTB component Ift172. Despite each single mutant surviving until around birth, Mks1; Ift172avc1 double mutants die at mid-gestation, and exhibit a dramatic failure of cilia formation. We also find that Mks1 interacts genetically with an allele of Dync2h1, the IFT retrograde motor. Thus, we have demonstrated that the MKS transition zone complex cooperates with the BBSome to mediate trafficking of specific trans-membrane receptors to the cilium. Moreover, the genetic interaction of Mks1 with components of IFT machinery suggests that the transition zone complex facilitates IFT to promote cilium assembly and structure.

  8. Functional neuroimaging in Tourette syndrome:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debes, Nanette Marinette Monique Mol; Preel, Marie; Skov, Liselotte

    2017-01-01

    The most recent functional neuroimaging studies on Tourette syndrome (TS) are reviewed in this paper. Although it can be difficult to compare functional neuroimaging studies due to differences in methods, differences in age of the included subjects, and differences in the extent to which...

  9. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

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    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  10. Low-carbohydrate/high-protein diet improves diastolic cardiac function and the metabolic syndrome in overweight-obese patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. von Bibra

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: These data indicate, that a low-glycaemic/high-protein but not a low-fat/high-carbohydrate nutrition modulates diastolic dysfunction in overweight T2D patients, improves insulin resistance and may prevent or delay the onset of diabetic cardiomyopathy and the metabolic syndrome.

  11. Melanoma development in relation to non-functional p16/INK4A protein and dysplastic naevus syndrome in Swedish melanoma kindreds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, J; Linder, S; Platz, A; Hansson, J

    1999-02-01

    The CDKN2A gene encodes the cell cycle inhibitor p16/ INK4A, which is involved in familial cutaneous melanoma. We have studied five Swedish familial melanoma kindreds characterized by germline mutations in CDKN2A and dysplastic naevus syndrome (DNS). We found significant correlations between germline CDKN2A mutations and melanoma and between DNS phenotype and melanoma, respectively. There was also a correlation between mutation status and the presence of DNS. In CDKN2A mutation carriers, all cases of early-onset melanoma occurred in DNS individuals, and the mean age at melanoma diagnosis was significantly lower in individuals with DNS than in those without a confirmed DNS phenotype. In one family where the proband had a P48L mutation in CDKN2A exon 1, the DNS phenotype was studied in detail. In vitro binding experiments established that the P48L mutant protein does not bind to cdk4 or cdk6 and thus is functionally abnormal. Furthermore, we demonstrated loss of heterozygosity at markers on chromosome 9p flanking the CDKN2A locus in a primary melanoma and a metastasis from the proband. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that germline CDKN2A mutations and DNS both contribute to the predisposition to melanoma and may lead to the development of early-onset melanoma when present in the same individual.

  12. Functional aspects of protein flexibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Olsen, Johan G; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2009-01-01

    . The thermodynamics involved are reviewed, and examples of structure-function studies involving experimentally determined flexibility descriptions are presented. While much remains to be understood about protein flexibility, it is clear that it is encoded within their amino acid sequence and should be viewed......Proteins are dynamic entities, and they possess an inherent flexibility that allows them to function through molecular interactions within the cell, among cells and even between organisms. Appreciation of the non-static nature of proteins is emerging, but to describe and incorporate...... this into an intuitive perception of protein function is challenging. Flexibility is of overwhelming importance for protein function, and the changes in protein structure during interactions with binding partners can be dramatic. The present review addresses protein flexibility, focusing on protein-ligand interactions...

  13. Protein Carbonylation in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváčková, A.; Štikarová, J.; Kotlín, R.; Chrastinová, L.; Šácha, Pavel; Májek, P.; Čermák, J.; Suttnar, J.; Dyr, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 23 (2015), s. 5232 ISSN 0006-4971. [Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American Society of Hematology /55./. 07.12.2013-10.12.2013, New Orleans] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : protein carbonylation * myelodysplastic syndromes Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  14. Sneddon syndrome associated with Protein S deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refah Sayin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sneddon syndrome (SS is rare, arterio-occlusive disorder characterized by generalized livedo racemosa of the skin and various central nervous symptoms due to occlusion of medium-sized arteries of unknown. Seizure, cognitive impairment, hypertension, and history of repetitive miscarriages are the other symptoms seen in this disease. Livedo racemosa involves persisting irreversible skin lesions red or blue in color with irregular margins. Usually, SS occurs in women of childbearing age. Protein S deficiency is an inherited or acquired disorder associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. We present a 33-year-old woman with SS with diffuse livedo racemosa, recurrent cerebrovascular diseases, migraine-type headache, sinus vein thrombosis, and protein S deficiency. Protein S deficiency and with Sneddon syndrome rarely encountered in the literature.

  15. Protein stability, flexibility and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Olsen, Johan G; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2011-01-01

    Proteins rely on flexibility to respond to environmental changes, ligand binding and chemical modifications. Potentially, a perturbation that changes the flexibility of a protein may interfere with its function. Millions of mutations have been performed on thousands of proteins in quests...... for a delineation of the molecular details of their function. Several of these mutations interfered with the binding of a specific ligand with a concomitant effect on the stability of the protein scaffold. It has been ambiguous and not straightforward to recognize if any relationships exist between the stability...... of a protein and the affinity for its ligand. In this review, we present examples of proteins where changes in stability results in changes in affinity and of proteins where stability and affinity are uncorrelated. We discuss the possibility for a relationship between stability and binding. From the data...

  16. Identification of two auto-cleavage products of nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1) in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infected cells: nsp1 function as interferon antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.; Lawson, S.; Sun, Z.; Zhou, X.; Guan, X.; Christopher-Hennings, J.; Nelson, E.A.; Fang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nsp1 is predicted to be auto-cleaved from the replicase polyprotein into nsp1α and nsp1β subunits. In infected cells, we detected the actual existence of nsp1α and nsp1β. Cleavage sites between nsp1α/nsp1β and nsp1β/nsp2 were identified by protein microsequencing analysis. Time course study showed that nsp1α and nsp1β mainly localize into the cell nucleus after 10 h post infection. Further analysis revealed that both proteins dramatically inhibited IFN-β expression. The nsp1β was observed to significantly inhibit expression from an interferon-stimulated response element promoter after Sendai virus infection or interferon treatment. It was further determined to inhibit nuclear translocation of STAT1 in the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. These results demonstrated that nsp1β has ability to inhibit both interferon synthesis and signaling, while nsp1α alone strongly inhibits interferon synthesis. These findings provide important insights into mechanisms of nsp1 in PRRSV pathogenesis and its impact in vaccine development.

  17. Requirement of fatty acid transport protein 4 for development, maturation, and function of sebaceous glands in a mouse model of ichthyosis prematurity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meei-Hua; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2013-02-08

    Fatty acid transport protein 4 (FATP4) is one of a family of six transmembrane proteins that facilitate long- and very long-chain fatty acid uptake. FATP4 is expressed in several tissues, including skin. Mutations in human SLC27A4, which encodes FATP4, cause ichthyosis prematurity syndrome, characterized by a thick desquamating epidermis and premature birth. Mice lacking FATP4, which genetically model the human disease, are born with tight, thick skin and a defective skin barrier; they die neonatally due to dehydration and restricted movements. Both the skin phenotype and the lethality are rescued by transgene expression of FATP4 in suprabasal keratinocytes. Sebaceous glands in Fatp4 null skin grafted onto nude mice were found to be dystrophic and enwrapped by thick layers of epithelial cells. Consistent with these results, transgene-rescued Fatp4 null mice showed a subnormal level of FATP4 expression in sebocytes and exhibited abnormal development of both sebaceous glands and meibomian glands, specialized sebaceous glands of the eyelids. Sebum from these mice contained a reduced level of type II diester wax, a major mouse sebum lipid species, and showed perturbations in mass spectrometric profiles of diester wax and cholesteryl ester species. In addition, these mice showed an impaired ability to repel water and regulate body temperature after water immersion. Taken together, our results suggest that FATP4 plays crucial roles in the development and maturation of both sebaceous and meibomian glands, as well as in the formation and composition of sebum, likely by regulating the trafficking of fatty acids necessary for proper synthesis of sebum lipids.

  18. Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A interacts with primary microcephaly protein ASPM, localizes to centrosomes and regulates chromosome segregation.

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    Pooja Singhmar

    Full Text Available Many proteins associated with the phenotype microcephaly have been localized to the centrosome or linked to it functionally. All the seven autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH proteins localize at the centrosome. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II protein PCNT and Seckel syndrome (also characterized by severe microcephaly protein ATR are also centrosomal proteins. All of the above findings show the importance of centrosomal proteins as the key players in neurogenesis and brain development. However, the exact mechanism as to how the loss-of-function of these proteins leads to microcephaly remains to be elucidated. To gain insight into the function of the most commonly mutated MCPH gene ASPM, we used the yeast two-hybrid technique to screen a human fetal brain cDNA library with an ASPM bait. The analysis identified Angelman syndrome gene product UBE3A as an ASPM interactor. Like ASPM, UBE3A also localizes to the centrosome. The identification of UBE3A as an ASPM interactor is not surprising as more than 80% of Angelman syndrome patients have microcephaly. However, unlike in MCPH, microcephaly is postnatal in Angelman syndrome patients. Our results show that UBE3A is a cell cycle regulated protein and its level peaks in mitosis. The shRNA knockdown of UBE3A in HEK293 cells led to many mitotic abnormalities including chromosome missegregation, abnormal cytokinesis and apoptosis. Thus our study links Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A to ASPM, centrosome and mitosis for the first time. We suggest that a defective chromosome segregation mechanism is responsible for the development of microcephaly in Angelman syndrome.

  19. Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A interacts with primary microcephaly protein ASPM, localizes to centrosomes and regulates chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhmar, Pooja; Kumar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Many proteins associated with the phenotype microcephaly have been localized to the centrosome or linked to it functionally. All the seven autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) proteins localize at the centrosome. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II protein PCNT and Seckel syndrome (also characterized by severe microcephaly) protein ATR are also centrosomal proteins. All of the above findings show the importance of centrosomal proteins as the key players in neurogenesis and brain development. However, the exact mechanism as to how the loss-of-function of these proteins leads to microcephaly remains to be elucidated. To gain insight into the function of the most commonly mutated MCPH gene ASPM, we used the yeast two-hybrid technique to screen a human fetal brain cDNA library with an ASPM bait. The analysis identified Angelman syndrome gene product UBE3A as an ASPM interactor. Like ASPM, UBE3A also localizes to the centrosome. The identification of UBE3A as an ASPM interactor is not surprising as more than 80% of Angelman syndrome patients have microcephaly. However, unlike in MCPH, microcephaly is postnatal in Angelman syndrome patients. Our results show that UBE3A is a cell cycle regulated protein and its level peaks in mitosis. The shRNA knockdown of UBE3A in HEK293 cells led to many mitotic abnormalities including chromosome missegregation, abnormal cytokinesis and apoptosis. Thus our study links Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A to ASPM, centrosome and mitosis for the first time. We suggest that a defective chromosome segregation mechanism is responsible for the development of microcephaly in Angelman syndrome.

  20. Vaccinia virus Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Mysteries of the smallpox vaccine. 141. Viral mimicry. Viral mimicry of the complement system. 249. Viral molecules. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional pro- tein and a potential wonder drug. 265. Viral pneumonia. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): an old virus jumping into a new host or a new ...

  1. Rett syndrome: disruption of epigenetic control of postnatal neurological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohodich, Amy E; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-10-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in the X-linked gene Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) cause a devastating pediatric neurological disorder called Rett syndrome. In males, these mutations typically result in severe neonatal encephalopathy and early lethality. On the other hand, owing to expression of the normal allele in ∼50% of cells, females do not suffer encephalopathy but instead develop Rett syndrome. Typically females with Rett syndrome exhibit a delayed onset of neurologic dysfunction that manifests around the child's first birthday and progresses over the next few years. Features of this disorder include loss of acquired language and motor skills, intellectual impairment and hand stereotypies. The developmental regression observed in patients with Rett syndrome arises from altered neuronal function and is not the result of neurodegeneration. Maintenance of an appropriate level of MeCP2 appears integral to the function of healthy neurons as patients with increased levels of MeCP2, owing to duplication of the Xq28 region encompassing the MECP2 locus, also present with intellectual disability and progressive neurologic symptoms. Despite major efforts over the past two decades to elucidate the molecular functions of MeCP2, the mechanisms underlying the delayed appearance of symptoms remain unclear. In this review, we will highlight recent findings that have expanded our knowledge of MeCP2's functions, and we will discuss how epigenetic regulation, chromatin organization and circuit dynamics may contribute to the postnatal onset of Rett syndrome. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Intestinal protein leakage in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, K; Lindner, C; Frieling, T; Niederau, C; Reinauer, H; Häussinger, D

    1997-09-01

    Body wasting, protein catabolism, and hypoalbuminemia are complicating features of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Given their multifactorial causes, the contributing role of intestinal protein loss has not yet been fully elucidated. To quantify enteric protein leakage, determination of fecal alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) excretion has been established as an accurate and reliable endogenous marker. We estimated AAT concentration by standard immune nephelometry in duplicate random stool samples of 49 patients with AIDS, and we compared it to that of 43 patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease and to 34 healthy controls. When compared with healthy persons, patients with AIDS had increased fecal AAT excretion regardless of current opportunistic intestinal infections and fecal AAT excretion similar to that of patients with quiescent chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The ratio of fecal and serum AAT concentration was not different between AIDS patients and healthy controls, although it was consistently increased in those with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Significant intestinal protein leakage occurs in patients with AIDS, probably due to primary impairment of gut permeability. Enteric protein loss may be an important feature of human immunodeficiency virus-associated enteropathy with altered mucosal barrier function.

  3. Neuropsychological function in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Como, P G

    2001-01-01

    The accumulated body of scientific evidence regarding intellectual function, presence of learning disorders, and specific neuropsychological deficits in TS suggests that difficulties in these areas are present in a significant percentage of patients with TS. Despite the numerous methodological shortcomings of past neuropsychological studies of TS, relatively robust and consistent findings have emerged. The literature to date has suggested that intellectual ability is normally distributed in TS. Whether or not individuals with TS have significant discrepancies between their verbal and nonverbal abilities remains unclear. The prevalence of learning disabilities in TS has been reported to be similar to the base rates reported for the general population, although there is evidence to suggest that the prevalence of LDs in children with TS may actually be lower and specific for difficulties in math and written language. Specific cognitive deficits in TS consist of visuomotor integration problems, impaired fine motor skill, and executive dysfunction. The presence of comorbid conditions, notably ADHD and OCD, appears to significantly increase the likelihood that an individual with TS will also have learning problems or some demonstrable cognitive impairment. The presence of a learning disability, specific academic deficiency, or cognitive deficit may pose a greater obstacle for persons with TS than the tic disorder itself. This is particularly salient for children with TS, who may be at a higher risk for poor school performance and academic failure. The psychosocial impact of these problems is also far-reaching. Given the recent emphasis on the early detection of academic and learning problems, it would seem prudent that children with TS who are suspected of having neuropsychological difficulties be evaluated as soon as possible. There are numerous educational interventions and accommodations available to children with LDs and/or specific academic weaknesses that can work

  4. The Membrane Protein of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Functions as a Novel Cytosolic Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern To Promote Beta Interferon Induction via a Toll-Like-Receptor-Related TRAF3-Independent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of the intracellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs reside in either the endolysosome or the cytoplasm to sense pathogen-derived RNAs, DNAs, or synthetic analogs of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA, such as poly(I:C. However, it remains elusive whether or not a pathogen-derived protein can function as a cytosolic pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP. In this study, we demonstrate that delivering the membrane gene of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV into HEK293T, HEK293ET, and immobilized murine bone marrow-derived macrophage (J2-Mφ cells significantly upregulates beta interferon (IFN-β production. Both NF-κB and TBK1-IRF3 signaling cascades are activated by M gene products. M protein rather than M mRNA is responsible for M-mediated IFN-β induction that is preferentially associated with the activation of the Toll-like receptor (TLR adaptor proteins MyD88, TIRAP, and TICAM2 but not the RIG-I signaling cascade. Blocking the secretion of M protein by brefeldin A (BFA failed to reverse the M-mediated IFN-β induction. The antagonist of both TLR2 and TLR4 did not impede M-mediated IFN-β induction, indicating that the driving force for the activation of IFN-β production was generated from inside the cells. Inhibition of TRAF3 expression by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA did not prevent M-mediated IFN-β induction. SARS-CoV pseudovirus could induce IFN-β production in an M rather than M(V68A dependent manner, since the valine-to-alanine alteration at residue 68 in M protein markedly inhibited IFN-β production. Overall, our study indicates for the first time that a pathogen-derived protein is able to function as a cytosolic PAMP to stimulate type I interferon production by activating a noncanonical TLR signaling cascade in a TRAF3-independent manner.

  5. Renal Fanconi syndrome with ultrastructural defects in lysinuric protein intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benninga, M. A.; Lilien, M.; de Koning, T. J.; Duran, M.; Versteegh, F. G. A.; Goldschmeding, R.; Poll-The, B. T.

    2007-01-01

    Renal Fanconi syndrome developed rapidly in a 3-year-old Moroccan girl with established lysinuric protein intolerance. She was hospitalized because of lowered consciousness, uncoordinated movements and hepatosplenomegaly after a febrile period. Laboratory investigations revealed plasma ammonia 270

  6. The effects of GH and hormone replacement therapy on serum concentrations of mannan-binding lectin, surfactant protein D and vitamin D binding protein in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lauridsen, Anna Lis

    2004-01-01

    function. In the present study we examined whether GH or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in Turner syndrome (TS) influence the serum concentrations of MBL and two other proteins partaking in the innate immune defence, surfactant protein D (SP-D) and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). DESIGN: Study 1...

  7. Intellectual, behavioral, and emotional functioning in children with syndromic craniosynostosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maliepaard, M.; Mathijssen, I.M.J.; Oosterlaan, J.; Okkerse, J.M.E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine intellectual, behavioral, and emotional functioning of children who have syndromic craniosynostosis and to explore differences between diagnostic subgroups. METHODS: A national sample of children who have syndromic craniosynostosis participated in this study. Intellectual,

  8. Functional neuroimaging in Tourette syndrome: recent perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debes NM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanette Mol Debes, Marie Préel, Liselotte Skov Pediatric Department, Tourette Clinic, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, DenmarkAbstract: The most recent functional neuroimaging studies on Tourette syndrome (TS are reviewed in this paper. Although it can be difficult to compare functional neuroimaging studies due to differences in methods, differences in age of the included subjects, and differences in the extent to which the presence of comorbidity, medical treatment, and severity of tics are considered in the various studies; most studies show that the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit seems to be involved in the generation of tics. Changes in this circuit seem to be correlated with tic severity. Correlations have been found between the presence of tics and hypermetabolism in various brain regions. Abnormalities of GABAergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic neurotransmission in patients with TS have been suggested. During tic suppression, increased activity in the inferior frontal gyrus is seen. The premotor cortex might be involved in inhibition of motor control in subjects with TS. The right anterior insula is suggested to be a part of the urge–tic network. Several studies have shown altered motor network activations and sensorimotor gating deficits in subjects with TS. In future studies, inclusion of more well-defined subjects and further examination of premonitory urge and tic suppression is needed in order to increase the knowledge about the pathophysiology and treatment possibilities of TS. Keywords: functional neuroimaging, Tourette syndrome

  9. Turner syndrome: neuroimaging findings: structural and functional.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullaney, Ronan

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of Turner syndrome can advance our understanding of the X chromosome in brain development, and the modulatory influence of endocrine factors. There is increasing evidence from neuroimaging studies that TX individuals have significant differences in the anatomy, function, and metabolism of a number of brain regions; including the parietal lobe; cerebellum, amygdala, hippocampus; and basal ganglia; and perhaps differences in "connectivity" between frontal and parieto-occipital regions. Finally, there is preliminary evidence that genomic imprinting, sex hormones and growth hormone have significant modulatory effects on brain maturation in TS.

  10. Analysis of peripheral amyloid precursor protein in Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Craig A; Wink, Logan K; Baindu, Bayon; Ray, Balmiki; Schaefer, Tori L; Pedapati, Ernest V; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2016-09-01

    Angelman Syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder associated with significant developmental and communication delays, high risk for epilepsy, motor dysfunction, and a characteristic behavioral profile. While Angelman Syndrome is known to be associated with the loss of maternal expression of the ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A gene, the molecular sequelae of this loss remain to be fully understood. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is involved in neuronal development and APP dysregulation has been implicated in the pathophysiology of other developmental disorders including fragile X syndrome and idiopathic autism. APP dysregulation has been noted in preclinical model of chromosome 15q13 duplication, a disorder whose genetic abnormality results in duplication of the region that is epigenetically silenced in Angelman Syndrome. In this duplication model, APP levels have been shown to be significantly reduced leading to the hypothesis that enhanced ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A expression may be associated with this phenomena. We tested the hypothesis that ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A regulates APP protein levels by comparing peripheral APP and APP derivative levels in humans with Angelman Syndrome to those with neurotypical development. We report that APP total, APP alpha (sAPPα) and A Beta 40 and 42 are elevated in the plasma of humans with Angelman Syndrome compared to neurotypical matched human samples. Additionally, we found that elevations in APP total and sAPPα correlated positively with peripheral brain derived neurotrophic factor levels previously reported in this same patient cohort. Our pilot report on APP protein levels in Angelman Syndrome warrants additional exploration and may provide a molecular target of treatment for the disorder. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Functional Foods Containing Whey Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whey proteins, modified whey proteins, and whey components are useful as nutrients or supplements for health maintenance. Extrusion modified whey proteins can easily fit into new products such as beverages, confectionery items (e.g., candies), convenience foods, desserts, baked goods, sauces, and in...

  12. S100B protein, glia and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passel, R. van; Schlooz, W.A.; Lamers, K.J.B.; Lemmens, W.A.J.G.; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Activated glial cells play an important role in a variety of neurological disorders. This study examines S100B protein levels in the serum of patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, as potential marker for glial cell function. Two groups of children were examined: 61 reference patients and 33

  13. Distinctive Pattern of Behavioral Functioning in Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Jane A.; Feldman, Maurice A.

    1999-01-01

    A study compared 27 participants with Angelman syndrome to clinical and community participants (n=948) with developmental disabilities of mixed etiology to determine whether Angelman syndrome is associated with a distinctive patterns of behavioral functioning. Those with Angelman syndrome had significantly lower scores on measures of irritability…

  14. Usher proteins in inner ear structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zubair M; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-11-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a neurosensory disorder affecting both hearing and vision in humans. Linkage studies of families of USH patients, studies in animals, and characterization of purified proteins have provided insight into the molecular mechanisms of hearing. To date, 11 USH proteins have been identified, and evidence suggests that all of them are crucial for the function of the mechanosensory cells of the inner ear, the hair cells. Most USH proteins are localized to the stereocilia of the hair cells, where mechano-electrical transduction (MET) of sound-induced vibrations occurs. Therefore, elucidation of the functions of USH proteins in the stereocilia is a prerequisite to understanding the exact mechanisms of MET.

  15. Uncoupling proteins, dietary fat and the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warden Craig H

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There has been intense interest in defining the functions of UCP2 and UCP3 during the nine years since the cloning of these UCP1 homologues. Current data suggest that both UCP2 and UCP3 proteins share some features with UCP1, such as the ability to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential, but they also have distinctly different physiological roles. Human genetic studies consistently demonstrate the effect of UCP2 alleles on type-2 diabetes. Less clear is whether UCP2 alleles influence body weight or body mass index (BMI with many studies showing a positive effect while others do not. There is strong evidence that both UCP2 and UCP3 protect against mitochondrial oxidative damage by reducing the production of reactive oxygen species. The evidence that UCP2 protein is a negative regulator of insulin secretion by pancreatic β-cells is also strong: increased UCP2 decreases glucose stimulated insulin secretion ultimately leading to β-cell dysfunction. UCP2 is also neuroprotective, reducing oxidative stress in neurons. UCP3 may also transport fatty acids out of mitochondria thereby protecting the mitochondria from fatty acid anions or peroxides. Current data suggest that UCP2 plays a role in the metabolic syndrome through down-regulation of insulin secretion and development of type-2 diabetes. However, UCP2 may protect against atherosclerosis through reduction of oxidative stress and both UCP2 and UCP3 may protect against obesity. Thus, these UCP1 homologues may both contribute to and protect from the markers of the metabolic syndrome.

  16. Topology-function conservation in protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Darren; Yaveroğlu, Ömer Nebil; Malod-Dognin, Noël; Stojmirovic, Aleksandar; Pržulj, Nataša

    2015-05-15

    Proteins underlay the functioning of a cell and the wiring of proteins in protein-protein interaction network (PIN) relates to their biological functions. Proteins with similar wiring in the PIN (topology around them) have been shown to have similar functions. This property has been successfully exploited for predicting protein functions. Topological similarity is also used to guide network alignment algorithms that find similarly wired proteins between PINs of different species; these similarities are used to transfer annotation across PINs, e.g. from model organisms to human. To refine these functional predictions and annotation transfers, we need to gain insight into the variability of the topology-function relationships. For example, a function may be significantly associated with specific topologies, while another function may be weakly associated with several different topologies. Also, the topology-function relationships may differ between different species. To improve our understanding of topology-function relationships and of their conservation among species, we develop a statistical framework that is built upon canonical correlation analysis. Using the graphlet degrees to represent the wiring around proteins in PINs and gene ontology (GO) annotations to describe their functions, our framework: (i) characterizes statistically significant topology-function relationships in a given species, and (ii) uncovers the functions that have conserved topology in PINs of different species, which we term topologically orthologous functions. We apply our framework to PINs of yeast and human, identifying seven biological process and two cellular component GO terms to be topologically orthologous for the two organisms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. Roles of Werner syndrome protein in protection of genome integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Marie L; Ghosh, Avik K; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2010-01-01

    Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is one of a family of five human RecQ helicases implicated in the maintenance of genome stability. The conserved RecQ family also includes RecQ1, Bloom syndrome protein (BLM), RecQ4, and RecQ5 in humans, as well as Sgs1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rqh1...... in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and homologs in Caenorhabditis elegans, Xenopus laevis, and Drosophila melanogaster. Defects in three of the RecQ helicases, RecQ4, BLM, and WRN, cause human pathologies linked with cancer predisposition and premature aging. Mutations in the WRN gene are the causative factor of Werner...

  18. Protein kinase substrate identification on functional protein arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Fang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, kinases have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for a number of different diseases, and numerous high throughput screening efforts in the pharmaceutical community are directed towards discovery of compounds that regulate kinase function. The emerging utility of systems biology approaches has necessitated the development of multiplex tools suitable for proteomic-scale experiments to replace lower throughput technologies such as mass spectroscopy for the study of protein phosphorylation. Recently, a new approach for identifying substrates of protein kinases has applied the miniaturized format of functional protein arrays to characterize phosphorylation for thousands of candidate protein substrates in a single experiment. This method involves the addition of protein kinases in solution to arrays of immobilized proteins to identify substrates using highly sensitive radioactive detection and hit identification algorithms. Results To date, the factors required for optimal performance of protein array-based kinase substrate identification have not been described. In the current study, we have carried out a detailed characterization of the protein array-based method for kinase substrate identification, including an examination of the effects of time, buffer compositions, and protein concentration on the results. The protein array approach was compared to standard solution-based assays for assessing substrate phosphorylation, and a correlation of greater than 80% was observed. The results presented here demonstrate how novel substrates for protein kinases can be quickly identified from arrays containing thousands of human proteins to provide new clues to protein kinase function. In addition, a pooling-deconvolution strategy was developed and applied that enhances characterization of specific kinase-substrate relationships and decreases reagent consumption. Conclusion Functional protein microarrays are an

  19. Origins of Protein Functions in Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Burchard; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis and in vitro evolution of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions yet, important clues have been uncovered. In one example (Keefe and Szostak, 2001), novel ATP binding proteins were identified that appear to be unrelated in both sequence and structure to any known ATP binding proteins. One of these proteins was subsequently redesigned computationally to bind GTP through introducing several mutations that introduce targeted structural changes to the protein, improve its binding to guanine and prevent water from accessing the active center. This study facilitates further investigations of individual evolutionary steps that lead to a change of function in primordial proteins. In a second study (Seelig and Szostak, 2007), novel enzymes were generated that can join two pieces of RNA in a reaction for which no natural enzymes are known

  20. Cognitive functions, epileptic syndromes and antiepileptic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo R. M. Bittencourt

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive function of patients on monotherapy specific for their epileptic syndrome has been studied infrequently. We evaluated 7 patients with symptomatic localised epilepsies (SEL on phenytoin aged 30±12 (mean±standard deviation years, 8 with idiopathic generalised epilepsies on sodium valproate aged 18±4 years, 16 with SEL on carbamazepine aged 28±11 years, and 35 healthy controls aged 27±11 years. All subjects were of normal intelligence, educated appropriately to age, and led productive lives in the community. Two of the patients on carbamazepine and one on valproate had less than five partial, absence or myoclonic seizures monthly, the remaining were controlled. Carbamazepine serum concentrations were 12±5 ug/ml, phenytoin were 23±7, and valproate were 62±23 (mean±sd. Tests included immediate recall and recognition for pictures, Stroop test, delayed recall and recognition of pictures. Patients on phenytoin and valproate performed significantly worse than controls on immediate recall, and patients on carbamazepine performed significantly worse than controls in Stroop test (p<0,01. The results indicate relatively minor effects of the epileptic syndromes and of phenytoin, carbamazepine and valproate on cognition of patients with controlled epilepsy leading productive lives in the community. We conclude that the cognitive deficit found in chronic epileptic patients on polytherapeutic drug regimen must be multifactorial, and that future studies need to control for all possible variables in order to achieve meaningul results.

  1. Executive function in adolescents with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, S; Jerman, O; Dal Pont, E; Alberti, A; Vianello, R

    2010-04-01

    The present work is aimed at analysing executive function (EF) in adolescents with Down Syndrome (DS). So far, EF has been analysed mainly in adults with DS, showing a pattern of impairment. However, less is known about children and adolescents with this syndrome. Studying adolescents with DS might help us better understand whether performances on EF tasks of individuals with DS are determined by age or by Alzheimer disease, as some studies suggest, or whether their performances are directly related to DS cognitive profile. A battery of EF tasks assessing set shifting, planning/problem-solving, working memory, inhibition/perseveration and fluency, as well as a tasks assessing sustained attention has been administered to a group of 15 adolescents with DS and 15 typically developing children matched for mental age. All EF tasks were selected from previous studies with individuals with intellectual disabilities or from developmental literature and are thought to be useful for the samples considered. The present results revealed that the group of individuals with DS performed at a significantly lower level on tasks assessing set shifting, planning/problem-solving, working memory and inhibition/perseveration, but not on the tasks assessing fluency. In addition, individuals with DS demonstrated a greater number of errors and less strategy use for the sustained attention task. The results suggest a broad impairment in EF in adolescents with DS, and are consistent with several similar studies conducted with adults with DS. We assume that EF deficit is a characteristic of DS.

  2. Year 2 Report: Protein Function Prediction Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C E

    2012-04-27

    Upon completion of our second year of development in a 3-year development cycle, we have completed a prototype protein structure-function annotation and function prediction system: Protein Function Prediction (PFP) platform (v.0.5). We have met our milestones for Years 1 and 2 and are positioned to continue development in completion of our original statement of work, or a reasonable modification thereof, in service to DTRA Programs involved in diagnostics and medical countermeasures research and development. The PFP platform is a multi-scale computational modeling system for protein structure-function annotation and function prediction. As of this writing, PFP is the only existing fully automated, high-throughput, multi-scale modeling, whole-proteome annotation platform, and represents a significant advance in the field of genome annotation (Fig. 1). PFP modules perform protein functional annotations at the sequence, systems biology, protein structure, and atomistic levels of biological complexity (Fig. 2). Because these approaches provide orthogonal means of characterizing proteins and suggesting protein function, PFP processing maximizes the protein functional information that can currently be gained by computational means. Comprehensive annotation of pathogen genomes is essential for bio-defense applications in pathogen characterization, threat assessment, and medical countermeasure design and development in that it can short-cut the time and effort required to select and characterize protein biomarkers.

  3. Predicting protein function from biomedical text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Kamal; Yoo, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    We propose a classifier system called PFPBT that predicts the functions of un-annotated proteins. PFPBT assigns an un-annotated protein p the functional category of annotated proteins that are semantically similar to p. Each protein p is represented by a vector of weights. Each weight reflects the significance of a molecule m in the biomedical abstracts associated with p. That is, each weight quantifies the likelihood of the association between m and p. This is because all proteins bind to other molecules, which are highly predictive of the functions of the proteins. Let S be the set of proteins that is semantically similar to an un-annotated protein p. p is annotated with the functional category f, if its occurrence probability in abstracts associated with S whose functional category is f is statistically significantly different than its occurrences in abstracts associated with S that belong to all other functional categories. PFPBT automatically extracts each co-occurrence of a protein-molecule pair that represents semantic relationship between the pair. We present novel semantic rules based on the syntactic structures of sentences for identifying the semantic relationships between each co-occurrence of a protein-molecule pair in a sentence. We evaluated PFPBT by comparing it experimentally with two systems. Results showed improvement.

  4. Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome: pitfalls in the diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibas, George V; Tsabouri, Sophia; Makris, Michael; Priftis, Kostas N

    2014-11-01

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) represents the severe end of the spectrum of gastrointestinal food hypersensitivity; its acute episodes can culminate in severe dehydration and hypovolemic shock, and its chronic form entails considerable morbidity associated with feeding difficulty and failure to thrive. Nevertheless, awareness for this syndrome remains rather low. Many factors hamper the establishment of FPIES diagnosis. Such factors pertain to the pathophysiological mechanism of the syndrome, causal food proteins, clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, differential diagnosis considerations, and prevailing perceptions which may require critical appraisal. Throughout this review, we will present and discuss these issues and put the focus on factors that could lead to under-diagnosis of FPIES, cause numerous acute episodes, and substantially increase the diseases morbidity and financial burden. We will also address other issues that are clinically relevant to FPIES. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Respiratory function in the prune-belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, C H; MacLusky, I B; Geary, D F

    1993-01-01

    Respiratory function was evaluated in 11 patients with prune-belly syndrome. Nine had evidence of gas trapping and six of restrictive lung disease. These abnormalities of lung function appear to be secondary to the musculoskeletal disorder associated with prune-belly syndrome rather than parenchymal lung disease. PMID:8503677

  6. Respiratory function in the prune-belly syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Crompton, C H; MacLusky, I B; Geary, D F

    1993-01-01

    Respiratory function was evaluated in 11 patients with prune-belly syndrome. Nine had evidence of gas trapping and six of restrictive lung disease. These abnormalities of lung function appear to be secondary to the musculoskeletal disorder associated with prune-belly syndrome rather than parenchymal lung disease.

  7. Multiple proteins of White spot syndrome virus involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The recognition and attachment of virus to its host cell surface is a critical step for viral infection. Recent research revealed that -integrin was involved in White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. In this study, the interaction of -integrin with structure proteins of WSSV and motifs involved in WSSV infection was ...

  8. Effect of metabolic syndrome on mitsugumin 53 expression and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Ma

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia that increases the individual's likelihood of developing cardiovascular diseases. Patients inflicted with metabolic disorders also suffer from tissue repair defect. Mitsugumin 53 (MG53 is a protein essential to cellular membrane repair. It facilitates the nucleation of intracellular vesicles to sites of membrane disruption to create repair patches, contributing to the regenerative capacity of skeletal and cardiac muscle tissues upon injury. Since individuals suffering from metabolic syndrome possess tissue regeneration deficiency and MG53 plays a crucial role in restoring membrane integrity, we studied MG53 activity in mice models exhibiting metabolic disorders induced by a 6 month high-fat diet (HFD feeding. Western blotting showed that MG53 expression is not altered within the skeletal and cardiac muscles of mice with metabolic syndrome. Rather, we found that MG53 levels in blood circulation were actually reduced. This data directly contradicts findings presented by Song et. al that indict MG53 as a causative factor for metabolic syndrome (Nature 494, 375-379. The diminished MG53 serum level observed may contribute to the inadequate tissue repair aptitude exhibited by diabetic patients. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analyses reveal that skeletal muscle fibers of mice with metabolic disorders experience localization of subcellular MG53 around mitochondria. This clustering may represent an adaptive response to oxidative stress resulting from HFD feeding and may implicate MG53 as a guardian to protect damaged mitochondria. Therapeutic approaches that elevate MG53 expression in serum circulation may be a novel method to treat the degenerative tissue repair function of diabetic patients.

  9. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    molecule and potential drug. [Jha P and Kotwal G J 2003 Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a potential wonder drug; J. Biosci. 28 265–271]. 1. Introduction. The pathogen-host interaction is a dynamic phenomenon which involves generation of defense mechanism by host and its evasion by ...

  10. Multifarious Functions of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jenna K; Broadie, Kendal

    2017-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), a heritable intellectual and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), results from the loss of Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). This neurodevelopmental disease state exhibits neural circuit hyperconnectivity and hyperexcitability. Canonically, FMRP functions as an mRNA-binding translation suppressor, but recent findings have enormously expanded its proposed roles. Although connections between burgeoning FMRP functions remain unknown, recent advances have extended understanding of its involvement in RNA, channel, and protein binding that modulate calcium signaling, activity-dependent critical period development, and the excitation-inhibition (E/I) neural circuitry balance. In this review, we contextualize 3 years of FXS model research. Future directions extrapolated from recent advances focus on discovering links between FMRP roles to determine whether FMRP has a multitude of unrelated functions or whether combinatorial mechanisms can explain its multifaceted existence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inferring protein function by domain context similarities in protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhirong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing projects generate massive amounts of sequence data but there are still many proteins whose functions remain unknown. The availability of large scale protein-protein interaction data sets makes it possible to develop new function prediction methods based on protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. Although several existing methods combine multiple information resources, there is no study that integrates protein domain information and PPI networks to predict protein functions. Results The domain context similarity can be a useful index to predict protein function similarity. The prediction accuracy of our method in yeast is between 63%-67%, which outperforms the other methods in terms of ROC curves. Conclusion This paper presents a novel protein function prediction method that combines protein domain composition information and PPI networks. Performance evaluations show that this method outperforms existing methods.

  12. Cockayne Syndrome group B protein stimulates NEIL2 DNA glycosylase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamann, Maria Diget; Hvitby, Christina Poulsen; Popuri, Venkateswarlu

    2014-01-01

    Cockayne Syndrome is a segmental premature aging syndrome, which can be caused by loss of function of the CSB protein. CSB is essential for genome maintenance and has numerous interaction partners with established roles in different DNA repair pathways including transcription coupled nucleotide...... activity on a 5-hydroxyl uracil lesion in a DNA bubble structure substrate in vitro. A novel 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyA) specific incision activity of NEIL2 was also stimulated by CSB. To further elucidate the biological role of the interaction, immunofluorescence studies were performed...

  13. Functions of intrinsic disorder in transmembrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2017-01-01

    mechanisms. (3) Trafficking of membrane proteins. (4) Transient membrane associations. (5) Post-translational modifications most notably phosphorylation and (6) disorder-linked isoform dependent function. We finish the review by discussing the future challenges facing the membrane protein community regarding......Intrinsic disorder is common in integral membrane proteins, particularly in the intracellular domains. Despite this observation, these domains are not always recognized as being disordered. In this review, we will discuss the biological functions of intrinsically disordered regions of membrane...... proteins, and address why the flexibility afforded by disorder is mechanistically important. Intrinsically disordered regions are present in many common classes of membrane proteins including ion channels and transporters; G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases and cytokine...

  14. Intricate knots in proteins: Function and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Virnau

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Our investigation of knotted structures in the Protein Data Bank reveals the most complicated knot discovered to date. We suggest that the occurrence of this knot in a human ubiquitin hydrolase might be related to the role of the enzyme in protein degradation. While knots are usually preserved among homologues, we also identify an exception in a transcarbamylase. This allows us to exemplify the function of knots in proteins and to suggest how they may have been created.

  15. Abdominal syndromes and functional ability in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kay, L; Avlund, K

    1994-01-01

    by an occupational therapist who evaluated their functional ability. Among the survivors, 94% participated in a follow-up study five years later. Functional ability was registered on validated scales constructed for its measurement in a normal elderly population. It was found that both syndromes occurred more often...... that abdominal syndromes are associated to functional ability, suggesting that there is a diffuse disorder affecting both smooth and striated muscles....

  16. Accessing Autonomic Function Can Early Screen Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Meng; Li, Mian; Yang, Zhi; Xu, Min; Xu, Yu; Lu, Jieli; Chen, Yuhong; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang; Bi, Yufang

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome is time-consuming and invasive. Convenient instruments that do not require laboratory or physical investigation would be useful in early screening individuals at high risk of metabolic syndrome. Examination of the autonomic function can be taken as a directly reference and screening indicator for predicting metabolic syndrome. Methodology and Principal Findings The EZSCAN test, as an efficient and noninvasive technology, can access autonomic function through measuring electrochemical skin conductance. In this study, we used EZSCAN value to evaluate autonomic function and to detect metabolic syndrome in 5,887 participants aged 40 years or older. The EZSCAN test diagnostic accuracy was analyzed by receiver operating characteristic curves. Among the 5,815 participants in the final analysis, 2,541 were diagnosed as metabolic syndrome and the overall prevalence was 43.7%. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased with the elevated EZSCAN risk level (p for trend metabolic syndrome components (p for trend metabolic syndrome after the multiple adjustments. The area under the curve of the EZSCAN test was 0.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61–0.64) for predicting metabolic syndrome. The optimal operating point for the EZSCAN value to detect a high risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome was 30 in this study, while the sensitivity and specificity were 71.2% and 46.7%, respectively. Conclusions and Significance In conclusion, although less sensitive and accurate when compared with the clinical definition of metabolic syndrome, we found that the EZSCAN test is a good and simple screening technique for early predicting metabolic syndrome. PMID:22916265

  17. Accessing autonomic function can early screen metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome is time-consuming and invasive. Convenient instruments that do not require laboratory or physical investigation would be useful in early screening individuals at high risk of metabolic syndrome. Examination of the autonomic function can be taken as a directly reference and screening indicator for predicting metabolic syndrome. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The EZSCAN test, as an efficient and noninvasive technology, can access autonomic function through measuring electrochemical skin conductance. In this study, we used EZSCAN value to evaluate autonomic function and to detect metabolic syndrome in 5,887 participants aged 40 years or older. The EZSCAN test diagnostic accuracy was analyzed by receiver operating characteristic curves. Among the 5,815 participants in the final analysis, 2,541 were diagnosed as metabolic syndrome and the overall prevalence was 43.7%. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased with the elevated EZSCAN risk level (p for trend <0.0001. Moreover, EZSCAN value was associated with an increase in the number of metabolic syndrome components (p for trend <0.0001. Compared with the no risk group (EZSCAN value 0-24, participants at the high risk group (EZSCAN value: 50-100 had a 2.35 fold increased risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome after the multiple adjustments. The area under the curve of the EZSCAN test was 0.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61-0.64 for predicting metabolic syndrome. The optimal operating point for the EZSCAN value to detect a high risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome was 30 in this study, while the sensitivity and specificity were 71.2% and 46.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, although less sensitive and accurate when compared with the clinical definition of metabolic syndrome, we found that the EZSCAN test is a good and simple screening technique for early predicting metabolic syndrome.

  18. Architectures and Functional Coverage of Protein-Protein Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Gursoy, Attila; Guney, Emre; Nussinov, Ruth; Keskin, Ozlem

    2008-01-01

    The diverse range of cellular functions is performed by a limited number of protein folds existing in nature. One may similarly expect that cellular functional diversity would be covered by a limited number of protein-protein interface architectures. Here, we present 8205 interface clusters, each representing unique interface architecture. This dataset of protein-protein interfaces is analyzed and compared with older datasets. We observe that the number of both biological and crystal interfaces increase significantly compared to the number of PDB entries. Further, we find that the number of distinct interface architectures grows at a much faster rate than the number of folds and is yet to level off. We further analyze the growth trend of the functional coverage by constructing functional interaction networks from interfaces. The functional coverage is also found to steadily increase. Interestingly, we also observe that despite the diversity of interface architectures, some are more favorable and frequently used, and of particular interest, those are the ones which are also preferred in single chains. PMID:18620705

  19. Associations of Dietary Protein and Energy Intakes With Protein-Energy Wasting Syndrome in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddhu, Srinivasan; Wei, Guo; Chen, Xiaorui; Boucher, Robert; Kiani, Rabia; Raj, Dominic; Chonchol, Michel; Greene, Tom; Murtaugh, Maureen A

    2017-09-01

    The associations of dietary protein and/or energy intakes with protein or energy wasting in patients on maintenance hemodialysis are controversial. We examined these in the Hemodialysis (HEMO) Study. In 1487 participants in the HEMO Study, baseline dietary protein intake (grams per kilogram per day) and dietary energy intake (kilocalories per kilograms per day) were related to the presence of the protein-energy wasting (PEW) syndrome at month 12 (defined as the presence of at least 1 criteria in 2 of the 3 categories of low serum chemistry, low body mass, and low muscle mass) in logistic regression models. In additional separate models, protein intake estimated from equilibrated normalized protein catabolic rate (enPCR) was also related to the PEW syndrome. Compared with the lowest quartile, the highest quartile of baseline dietary protein intake was paradoxically associated with increased risk of the PEW syndrome at month 12 (odds ratio [OR]: 4.11; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.79-6.05). This relationship was completely attenuated (OR: 1.35; 95% CI: 0.88-2.06) with adjustment for baseline body weight, which suggested mathematical coupling. Results were similar for dietary energy intake. Compared with the lowest quartile of baseline enPCR, the highest quartile was not associated with the PEW syndrome at 12 months (OR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.54-1.12). These data do not support the use of dietary protein intake or dietary energy intake criteria in the definition of the PEW syndrome in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

  20. Hantaviral proteins: structure, functions and role in hantavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musalwa eMuyangwa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses are the members of the family Bunyaviridae that are naturally maintained in the populations of small mammals, mostly rodents. Most of these viruses can easily infect humans through contact with aerosols or dust generated by contaminated animal waste products. Depending on the particular hantavirus involved, human infection could result in either Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS or in Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome (HCPS. In the past few years, clinical cases of the hantavirus caused diseases have been on the rise. Understanding structure of the hantavirus genome and the functions of the key viral proteins is critical for the therapeutic agents’ research. This paper gives a brief overview of the current knowledge on the structure and properties of the hantavirus nucleoprotein and the glycoproteins.

  1. Functional Importance of Mobile Ribosomal Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chun Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the dynamic motions and peptidyl transferase activity seem to be embedded in the rRNAs, the ribosome contains more than 50 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins, whose functions remain largely elusive. Also, the precise forms of some of these r-proteins, as being part of the ribosome, are not structurally solved due to their high flexibility, which hinders the efforts in their functional elucidation. Owing to recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy, single-molecule techniques, and theoretical modeling, much has been learned about the dynamics of these r-proteins. Surprisingly, allosteric regulations have been found in between spatially separated components as distant as those in the opposite sides of the ribosome. Here, we focus on the functional roles and intricate regulations of the mobile L1 and L12 stalks and L9 and S1 proteins. Conformational flexibility also enables versatile functions for r-proteins beyond translation. The arrangement of r-proteins may be under evolutionary pressure that fine-tunes mass distributions for optimal structural dynamics and catalytic activity of the ribosome.

  2. Annual Costs of Care for Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Functional Abdominal Pain, and Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekman, Daniël R.; Rutten, Juliette M. T. M.; Vlieger, Arine M.; Benninga, Marc A.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.

    2015-01-01

    To estimate annual medical and nonmedical costs of care for children diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or functional abdominal pain (syndrome; FAP/FAPS). Baseline data from children with IBS or FAP/FAPS who were included in a multicenter trial (NTR2725) in The Netherlands were analyzed.

  3. Brief Report: Contrasting Profiles of Everyday Executive Functioning in Smith-Magenis Syndrome and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Lucy; Oliver, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Everyday executive function (EF) was examined in Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), associated with high risk of behaviour disorder, and Down syndrome (DS), associated with relatively low risk of behaviour disorder. Caregivers of 13 children with SMS and 17 with DS rated everyday EF using the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive…

  4. Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Svendsen, Pernille Maj; Skovbro, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Objective Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with skeletal muscle insulin resistance, which has been linked to decreased mitochondrial function. We measured mitochondrial respiration in lean and obese women with and without PCOS using high-resolution respirometry. Methods Hyperinsul...

  5. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    cytokine receptors is a common immune evasion strategy adopted by large DNA viruses like poxviruses. Poxviruses encode soluble proteins that are secreted from infected cells and function as soluble IFNγ receptor (IFNγR) which blocks IFN-γ activity. Poxviruses express four vTNFRs, which have different properties.

  6. Protein-protein interaction network-based detection of functionally similar proteins within species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Baoxing; Wang, Fen; Guo, Yang; Sang, Qing; Liu, Min; Li, Dengyun; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Deli

    2012-07-01

    Although functionally similar proteins across species have been widely studied, functionally similar proteins within species showing low sequence similarity have not been examined in detail. Identification of these proteins is of significant importance for understanding biological functions, evolution of protein families, progression of co-evolution, and convergent evolution and others which cannot be obtained by detection of functionally similar proteins across species. Here, we explored a method of detecting functionally similar proteins within species based on graph theory. After denoting protein-protein interaction networks using graphs, we split the graphs into subgraphs using the 1-hop method. Proteins with functional similarities in a species were detected using a method of modified shortest path to compare these subgraphs and to find the eligible optimal results. Using seven protein-protein interaction networks and this method, some functionally similar proteins with low sequence similarity that cannot detected by sequence alignment were identified. By analyzing the results, we found that, sometimes, it is difficult to separate homologous from convergent evolution. Evaluation of the performance of our method by gene ontology term overlap showed that the precision of our method was excellent. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Protein function prediction using neighbor relativity in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Sobhan; Rahgozar, Masoud; Rahimi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    There is a large gap between the number of discovered proteins and the number of functionally annotated ones. Due to the high cost of determining protein function by wet-lab research, function prediction has become a major task for computational biology and bioinformatics. Some researches utilize the proteins interaction information to predict function for un-annotated proteins. In this paper, we propose a novel approach called "Neighbor Relativity Coefficient" (NRC) based on interaction network topology which estimates the functional similarity between two proteins. NRC is calculated for each pair of proteins based on their graph-based features including distance, common neighbors and the number of paths between them. In order to ascribe function to an un-annotated protein, NRC estimates a weight for each neighbor to transfer its annotation to the unknown protein. Finally, the unknown protein will be annotated by the top score transferred functions. We also investigate the effect of using different coefficients for various types of functions. The proposed method has been evaluated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens interaction networks. The performance analysis demonstrates that NRC yields better results in comparison with previous protein function prediction approaches that utilize interaction network. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicting protein structure classes from function predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, I.; Rahnenfuhrer, J.; de Lichtenberg, Ulrik

    2004-01-01

    membership. Even for structural families of small size, family members receive significantly higher scores. For some examples, we show that the relevant functional features identified by this method are biologically meaningful. The proposed approach can be used to improve existing sequence......We introduce a new approach to using the information contained in sequence-to-function prediction data in order to recognize protein template classes, a critical step in predicting protein structure. The data on which our method is based comprise probabilities of functional categories; for given...... query sequences these probabilities are obtained by a neural net that has previously been trained on a variety of functionally important features. On a training set of sequences we assess the relevance of individual functional categories for identifying a given structural family. Using a combination...

  9. [Glucose transporter protein type 1 (GLUT-1) deficiency syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm-Pettersen, Anette; Selmer, Kaja Kristine; Nakken, Karl O

    2011-05-06

    Glucose is the brain's main source of energy. To pass the blood-brain barrier, glucose transporter protein type 1 (GLUT-1) is essential. Mutations in the SLC2A1 gene which codes for GLUT-1 may therefore compromise the supply of glucose to the brain. The aim of this review is to describe the clinical consequences of such mutations, with special emphasis on GLUT-1 encephalopathy. This review is based on a non-systematic literature search in PubMed and the authors' experience within the field. Epileptic or epilepsy-like are usually the first symptom in children with the GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome. Later on these children suffer delayed psychomotor development, microcephaly, ataxia, spasticity or movement disorders. EEG abnormalities may develop. GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome should be suspected in children with epilepsy-like seizures and delayed development combined with a low content of glucose in spinal fluid. The diagnosis is confirmed by genetic testing. Treatment is a ketogenic diet, as ketone bodies pass the blood-brain barrier using other transport proteins than GLUT-1. GLUT-1-deficiency syndrome is a rare metabolic encephalopathy which is not well known and probably underdiagnosed. An early diagnosis and early start of a ketogenic diet may give these children a normal or nearly normal life.

  10. Incorporating functional inter-relationships into protein function prediction algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Vipin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional classification schemes (e.g. the Gene Ontology that serve as the basis for annotation efforts in several organisms are often the source of gold standard information for computational efforts at supervised protein function prediction. While successful function prediction algorithms have been developed, few previous efforts have utilized more than the protein-to-functional class label information provided by such knowledge bases. For instance, the Gene Ontology not only captures protein annotations to a set of functional classes, but it also arranges these classes in a DAG-based hierarchy that captures rich inter-relationships between different classes. These inter-relationships present both opportunities, such as the potential for additional training examples for small classes from larger related classes, and challenges, such as a harder to learn distinction between similar GO terms, for standard classification-based approaches. Results We propose a method to enhance the performance of classification-based protein function prediction algorithms by addressing the issue of using these interrelationships between functional classes constituting functional classification schemes. Using a standard measure for evaluating the semantic similarity between nodes in an ontology, we quantify and incorporate these inter-relationships into the k-nearest neighbor classifier. We present experiments on several large genomic data sets, each of which is used for the modeling and prediction of over hundred classes from the GO Biological Process ontology. The results show that this incorporation produces more accurate predictions for a large number of the functional classes considered, and also that the classes benefitted most by this approach are those containing the fewest members. In addition, we show how our proposed framework can be used for integrating information from the entire GO hierarchy for improving the accuracy of

  11. KCC2 rescues functional deficits in human neurons derived from patients with Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xin; Kim, Julie; Zhou, Li; Wengert, Eric; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Zheng; Carromeu, Cassiano; Muotri, Alysson R; Marchetto, Maria C N; Gage, Fred H; Chen, Gong

    2016-01-19

    Rett syndrome is a severe form of autism spectrum disorder, mainly caused by mutations of a single gene methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) on the X chromosome. Patients with Rett syndrome exhibit a period of normal development followed by regression of brain function and the emergence of autistic behaviors. However, the mechanism behind the delayed onset of symptoms is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter2 (KCC2) is a critical downstream gene target of MeCP2. We found that human neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with Rett syndrome showed a significant deficit in KCC2 expression and consequently a delayed GABA functional switch from excitation to inhibition. Interestingly, overexpression of KCC2 in MeCP2-deficient neurons rescued GABA functional deficits, suggesting an important role of KCC2 in Rett syndrome. We further identified that RE1-silencing transcriptional factor, REST, a neuronal gene repressor, mediates the MeCP2 regulation of KCC2. Because KCC2 is a slow onset molecule with expression level reaching maximum later in development, the functional deficit of KCC2 may offer an explanation for the delayed onset of Rett symptoms. Our studies suggest that restoring KCC2 function in Rett neurons may lead to a potential treatment for Rett syndrome.

  12. Testicular dysgenesis syndrome and Leydig cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, U.N.; Jorgensen, N.; Rajpert-De, Meyts E.

    2008-01-01

    Fertility among human beings appear to be on the decline in many Western countries, and part of the explanation may be decreasing male fecundity. A hypothesis has been put forward that decreasing semen quality may be associated with a testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS), a spectrum of disorders...

  13. The structure and function of endophilin proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, Ole; Brodin, Lennart; Jung, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Members of the BAR domain protein superfamily are essential elements of cellular traffic. Endophilins are among the best studied BAR domain proteins. They have a prominent function in synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE), receptor trafficking and apoptosis, and in other processes that require remod...... remodeling of the membrane structure. Here, we discuss the role of endophilins in these processes and summarize novel insights into the molecular aspects of endophilin function. Also, we discuss phosphorylation of endophilins and how this and other mechanisms may contribute to disease....

  14. Functionality of system components: Conservation of protein function in protein feature space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Ussery, David; Brunak, Søren

    2003-01-01

    Many protein features useful for prediction of protein function can be predicted from sequence, including posttranslational modifications, subcellular localization, and physical/chemical properties. We show here that such protein features are more conserved among orthologs than paralogs, indicating...... they are crucial for protein function and thus subject to selective pressure. This means that a function prediction method based on sequence-derived features may be able to discriminate between proteins with different function even when they have highly similar structure. Also, such a method is likely to perform...... well on organisms other than the one on which it was trained. We evaluate the performance of such a method, ProtFun, which relies on protein features as its sole input, and show that the method gives similar performance for most eukaryotes and performs much better than anticipated on archaea...

  15. Functionality of system components: Conservation of protein function in protein feature space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Ussery, David; Brunak, Søren

    2003-01-01

    well on organisms other than the one on which it was trained. We evaluate the performance of such a method, ProtFun, which relies on protein features as its sole input, and show that the method gives similar performance for most eukaryotes and performs much better than anticipated on archaea......Many protein features useful for prediction of protein function can be predicted from sequence, including posttranslational modifications, subcellular localization, and physical/chemical properties. We show here that such protein features are more conserved among orthologs than paralogs, indicating...... they are crucial for protein function and thus subject to selective pressure. This means that a function prediction method based on sequence-derived features may be able to discriminate between proteins with different function even when they have highly similar structure. Also, such a method is likely to perform...

  16. Differential diagnosis of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchi, Alessandro; Claps, Alessia; Dahdah, Lamia; Brindisi, Giulia; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Martelli, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    To assess all the possible differential diagnosis of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES), both in acute and chronic presentation, reviewing the data reported in published studies. There is an increase of reported cases of FPIES in recent years. As the disease presents with nonspecific symptoms, it can be misunderstood in many ways. The differential diagnosis includes, in acute presentations, the following: sepsis, other infectious diseases, acute gastrointestinal episodes, surgical emergencies, food allergies. In its chronic forms, FPIES may mimic malabsorption syndromes, metabolic disorders, primary immunodeficiencies, neurological conditions, coagulation defects, and other types of non-IgE-mediated food allergy. A thorough clinical evaluation, including symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings, is necessary to lead the clinicians toward the diagnosis of FPIES. The major reason for delayed diagnosis appears to be the lack of knowledge of the disease.

  17. Proteins with Novel Structure, Function and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a small enzyme that ligates two RNA fragments with the rate of 10(exp 6) above background was evolved in vitro (Seelig and Szostak, Nature 448:828-831, 2007). This enzyme does not resemble any contemporary protein (Chao et al., Nature Chem. Biol. 9:81-83, 2013). It consists of a dynamic, catalytic loop, a small, rigid core containing two zinc ions coordinated by neighboring amino acids, and two highly flexible tails that might be unimportant for protein function. In contrast to other proteins, this enzyme does not contain ordered secondary structure elements, such as alpha-helix or beta-sheet. The loop is kept together by just two interactions of a charged residue and a histidine with a zinc ion, which they coordinate on the opposite side of the loop. Such structure appears to be very fragile. Surprisingly, computer simulations indicate otherwise. As the coordinating, charged residue is mutated to alanine, another, nearby charged residue takes its place, thus keeping the structure nearly intact. If this residue is also substituted by alanine a salt bridge involving two other, charged residues on the opposite sides of the loop keeps the loop in place. These adjustments are facilitated by high flexibility of the protein. Computational predictions have been confirmed experimentally, as both mutants retain full activity and overall structure. These results challenge our notions about what is required for protein activity and about the relationship between protein dynamics, stability and robustness. We hypothesize that small, highly dynamic proteins could be both active and fault tolerant in ways that many other proteins are not, i.e. they can adjust to retain their structure and activity even if subjected to mutations in structurally critical regions. This opens the doors for designing proteins with novel functions, structures and dynamics that have not been yet considered.

  18. Enterovirus A71 Proteins: Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Yuan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71 infection has grown to become a serious threat to global public health. It is one of the major causes of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD in infants and young children. EV-A71 can also infect the central nervous system (CNS and induce diverse neurological complications, such as brainstem encephalitis, aseptic meningitis, and acute flaccid paralysis, or even death. Viral proteins play a crucial role in EV-A71 infection. Many recent studies have discussed the structure and function of EV-A71 proteins, and the findings reported will definitely aid the development of vaccines and therapeutic approaches. This article reviews the progress in the research on the structure and function of EV-A71 proteins. Available literature can provide a basis for studying the pathogenesis of EV-A71 infection in detail.

  19. Functional Classification of Immune Regulatory Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, Rotem [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Ramagopal, Udupi A. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Nathenson, Stanley G. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Almo, Steven C. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Fiser, Andras [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Members of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control innate and adaptive immunity and are prime targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and malignancies. We describe a computational method, termed the Brotherhood algorithm, which utilizes intermediate sequence information to classify proteins into functionally related families. This approach identifies functional relationships within the IgSF and predicts additional receptor-ligand interactions. As a specific example, we examine the nectin/nectin-like family of cell adhesion and signaling proteins and propose receptor-ligand interactions within this family. We were guided by the Brotherhood approach and present the high-resolution structural characterization of a homophilic interaction involving the class-I MHC-restricted T-cell-associated molecule, which we now classify as a nectin-like family member. The Brotherhood algorithm is likely to have a significant impact on structural immunology by identifying those proteins and complexes for which structural characterization will be particularly informative.

  20. Leucocyte Function in Protein Deficiency States

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total proteins and serum albumin levels were correlated in each group, according to the following: (i) the total leucocyte count; (ii) the number of cells containing NBT; and (Ui) the number of cells ... show no increase in leucocyte count; however. their leucocytes ... could find no deficiency in intracellular leucocyte function ...

  1. Anti-thrombin III, Protein C, and Protein S deficiency in acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasnan Ismail

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The final most common pathway for the majority of coronary artery disease is occlusion of a coronary vessel. Under normal conditions, antithrombin III (AT III, protein C, and protein S as an active protein C cofactor, are natural anticoagulants (hemostatic control that balances procoagulant activity (thrombin antithrombin complex balance to prevent thrombosis. If the condition becomes unbalanced, natural anticoagulants and the procoagulants can lead to thrombosis. Thirty subjects with acute coronary syndrome (ACS were studied for the incidence of antithrombin III (AT III, protein C, and protein S deficiencies, and the result were compare to the control group. Among patients with ACS, the frequency of distribution of AT-III with activity < 75% were 23,3% (7 of 30, and only 6,7% ( 2 of 30 in control subject. No one of the 30 control subject have protein C activity deficient, in ACS with activity < 70% were 13,3% (4 of 30. Fifteen out of the 30 (50% control subjects had protein S activity deficiency, while protein S deficiency activity < 70% was found 73.3.% (22 out of 30. On linear regression, the deterministic coefficient of AT-III activity deficiency to the development ACS was 13,25 %, and the deterministic coefficient of protein C activity deficient to the development of ACS was 9,06 %. The cut-off point for AT-III without protein S deficiency expected to contribute to the development of vessel disease was 45%. On discriminant analysis, protein C activity deficiency posed a risk for ACS of 4,5 greater than non deficient subjects, and AT-III activity deficiency posed a risk for ACS of 3,5 times greater than non deficient subjects. On binary logistic regression, protein S activity acted only as a reinforcing factor of AT-III activity deficiency in the development of ACS. Protein C and AT III deficiency can trigger ACS, with determinant coefficients of 9,06% and 13,25% respectively. Low levels of protein C posed a greater risk of

  2. Adaptive Functioning in Williams Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawn, Gabrielle; Porter, Melanie

    2018-01-01

    Literature on the level of adaptive functioning and relative strengths and weaknesses in functioning of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) was reviewed. The electronic databases PsycINFO, PubMed, Expanded Academic, Web of Science, Scopus and ProQuest were searched electronically for relevant articles and dissertations using the search terms…

  3. Altered intracellular localization and mobility of SBDS protein upon mutation in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orelio, Claudia; van der Sluis, Renée M; Verkuijlen, Paul; Nethe, Micha; Hordijk, Peter L; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2011-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome (SDS) is a rare inherited disease caused by mutations in the SBDS gene. Hematopoietic defects, exocrine pancreas dysfunction and short stature are the most prominent clinical features. To gain understanding of the molecular properties of the ubiquitously expressed SBDS protein, we examined its intracellular localization and mobility by live cell imaging techniques. We observed that SBDS full-length protein was localized in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, whereas patient-related truncated SBDS protein isoforms localize predominantly to the nucleus. Also the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking of these patient-related SBDS proteins was disturbed. Further studies with a series of SBDS mutant proteins revealed that three distinct motifs determine the intracellular mobility of SBDS protein. A sumoylation motif in the C-terminal domain, that is lacking in patient SBDS proteins, was found to play a pivotal role in intracellular motility. Our structure-function analyses provide new insight into localization and motility of the SBDS protein, and show that patient-related mutant proteins are altered in their molecular properties, which may contribute to the clinical features observed in SDS patients.

  4. Altered intracellular localization and mobility of SBDS protein upon mutation in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Orelio

    Full Text Available Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome (SDS is a rare inherited disease caused by mutations in the SBDS gene. Hematopoietic defects, exocrine pancreas dysfunction and short stature are the most prominent clinical features. To gain understanding of the molecular properties of the ubiquitously expressed SBDS protein, we examined its intracellular localization and mobility by live cell imaging techniques. We observed that SBDS full-length protein was localized in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, whereas patient-related truncated SBDS protein isoforms localize predominantly to the nucleus. Also the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking of these patient-related SBDS proteins was disturbed. Further studies with a series of SBDS mutant proteins revealed that three distinct motifs determine the intracellular mobility of SBDS protein. A sumoylation motif in the C-terminal domain, that is lacking in patient SBDS proteins, was found to play a pivotal role in intracellular motility. Our structure-function analyses provide new insight into localization and motility of the SBDS protein, and show that patient-related mutant proteins are altered in their molecular properties, which may contribute to the clinical features observed in SDS patients.

  5. Functional Study of Ectodysplasin-A Mutations Causing Non-Syndromic Tooth Agenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Haochen; Zhao, Hongshan; Zhang, Guozhong; Snead, Malcolm L.; Han, Dong; Feng, Hailan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that ectodysplasin-A (EDA) mutations are associated with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. Indeed, we were the first to report three novel EDA mutations (A259E, R289C and R334H) in sporadic non-syndromic tooth agenesis. We studied the mechanism linking EDA mutations and non-syndromic tooth agenesis in human embryonic kidney 293T cells and mouse ameloblast-derived LS8 cells transfected with mutant isoforms of EDA. The receptor binding capability of the mutant EDA1 protein was impaired in comparison to wild-type EDA1. Although the non-syndromic tooth agenesis-causing EDA1 mutants possessed residual binding capability, the transcriptional activation of the receptor’s downstream target, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), was compromised. We also analyzed the changes of selected genes in other signaling pathways, such as WNT and BMP, after EDA mutation. We found that non-syndromic tooth agenesis-causing EDA1 mutant proteins upregulate BMP4 (bone morphogenetic protein 4) mRNA expression and downregulate WNT10A and WNT10B (wingless-type MMTV integration site family member 10A and 10B) mRNA expression. Our results indicated that non-syndromic tooth agenesis causing EDA mutations (A259E, R289C and R334H) were loss-of-function, and suggested that EDA may regulate the expression of WNT10A, WNT10B and BMP4 via NF-κB during tooth development. The results from our study may help to understand the molecular mechanism linking specific EDA mutations with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. PMID:27144394

  6. Tet protein function during Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    Full Text Available The TET (Ten-eleven translocation 1, 2 and 3 proteins have been shown to function as DNA hydroxymethylases in vertebrates and their requirements have been documented extensively. Recently, the Tet proteins have been shown to also hydroxylate 5-methylcytosine in RNA. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmrC is enriched in messenger RNA but the function of this modification has yet to be elucidated. Because Cytosine methylation in DNA is barely detectable in Drosophila, it serves as an ideal model to study the biological function of 5hmrC. Here, we characterized the temporal and spatial expression and requirement of Tet throughout Drosophila development. We show that Tet is essential for viability as Tet complete loss-of-function animals die at the late pupal stage. Tet is highly expressed in neuronal tissues and at more moderate levels in somatic muscle precursors in embryos and larvae. Depletion of Tet in muscle precursors at early embryonic stages leads to defects in larval locomotion and late pupal lethality. Although Tet knock-down in neuronal tissue does not cause lethality, it is essential for neuronal function during development through its affects upon locomotion in larvae and the circadian rhythm of adult flies. Further, we report the function of Tet in ovarian morphogenesis. Together, our findings provide basic insights into the biological function of Tet in Drosophila, and may illuminate observed neuronal and muscle phenotypes observed in vertebrates.

  7. Mutations in the Treacher Collins syndrome gene lead to mislocalization of the nucleolar protein treacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, K L; Dixon, J; Dixon, M J

    1998-10-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. The TCS gene ( TCOF1 ), which is localized to chromosome 5q32-q33.1, recently has been identified by positional cloning. Analysis of TCOF1 revealed that the majority of TCS mutations result in the creation of a premature termination codon. The function of the predicted protein, treacle, is unknown, although indirect evidence from database analyses suggests that it may function as a shuttling nucleolar phosphoprotein. In the current study, we provide the first direct evidence that treacle is a nucleolar protein. An antibody generated against treacle shows that it localizes to the nucleolus. Fusion proteins tagged to a green fluorescent protein reporter were shown to localize to different compartments of the cell when putative nuclear localization signals were deleted. Parallel experiments using conserved regions of the murine homologue of TCOF1 confirmed these results. Site-directed mutagenesis has been used to recreate mutations observed in individuals with TCS. The resulting truncated proteins are mislocalized within the cell, which further supports the hypothesis that an integral part of treacle's function involves shuttling between the nucleolus and the cytoplasm. TCS is, therefore, the first Mendelian disorder resulting from mutations which lead to aberrant expression of a nucleolar protein.

  8. [Pulmonary function in children after neonatal meconium aspiration syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemal, N; Ben Ammar, H; Masmoudi, K; Rguaieg, R; Trigui, L; Ben Hmad, A; Kannou, M; Hmida, N; Gargouri, A; Zouari, N; Rekik, A

    2008-02-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome is a disease of the newborn mature or post mature. The acute pulmonary consequences can be extremely severe. In the few studies of the long-term pulmonary sequelae, it seems that certain children surviving meconium aspiration syndrome keep an obstructive syndrome. The aim of our study was to assess long term respiratory residual damage from meconium aspiration syndrome. During a seven-year period going from 1994 to 2000, we reviewed the files of children hospitalized in neonatology department of Sfax for meconium aspiration syndrome. The children who were convoked (group M: n=27), underwent spirometry, followed by an exercise stress. An age matched control group (group C: n=23) of healthy children was investigated in the same way. The group M comprised 15 boys and 12 girls aged four to 11, an average of 7+/-1.9 years. With the study of the respiratory function, we did not find an obstructive syndrome. Spirometry revealed a total pulmonary capacity in an average of 133+/-55.65% of theoretical (group M) versus 105.5+/-27.96% of theoretical (group C) (Pmeconium aspiration syndrome tend to develop alveolar hyperinflation and airway hyperreactivity to exercise.

  9. Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (Snap-25) gene Polymorphism frequency in fibromyalgia syndrome and relationship with clinical symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Balkarli, Ayse; Sengül, Cem; Tepeli, Emre; Balkarli, Huseyin; Cobankara, Veli

    2014-01-01

    Background SNAP-25 protein is contributory to plasma membrane and synaptic vesicle fusions that are critical points in neurotransmission. SNAP-25 gene is associated with behavioral symptoms, personality and psychological disorders. In addition, SNAP-25 protein can be related to different neurotransmitter functions due to its association with vesicle membrane transition and fusion. This is important because neurologic, cognitive, and psychologic disorders in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) can be ...

  10. Fragile X Mental Retardation Syndrome: Structure of the KH1-KH2 Domains of Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valverde,R.; Poznyakova, I.; Kajander, T.; Venkatraman, J.; Regan, L.

    2007-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation in humans, with an estimated prevalence of about 1 in 4000 males. Although several observations indicate that the absence of functional Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) is the underlying basis of Fragile X syndrome, the structure and function of FMRP are currently unknown. Here, we present an X-ray crystal structure of the tandem KH domains of human FMRP, which reveals the relative orientation of the KH1 and KH2 domains and the location of residue Ile304, whose mutation to Asn is associated with a particularly severe incidence of Fragile X syndrome. We show that the Ile304Asn mutation both perturbs the structure and destabilizes the protein.

  11. Functional Dynamics and Proton Transfer in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Steven

    2014-03-01

    Internal proton transfer between an enzyme and substrate is a common feature of many enzyme mechanisms. Likewise, internal proton transfer between the chromophore of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and amino acids on the inside of the beta barrel are important both in the ground and excited state. I will discuss an interesting connection between the proton transfer dynamics in GFP and those in an enzyme, ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), bound to substrate analogs. In both cases there is a tug of war between the protein and bound substrate analog or chromophore that depends on their affinities for a proton and which can be tuned either by changing the substrate/chromophore or the protein. This can be observed in the ground state by optical methods (absorption and IR) as well as by nmr, or in the excited state by time-resolved fluorescence or visible pump-IR probe measurements. In both cases the proton dynamics have important functional consequences.

  12. Mutations in plasmalemma vesicle-associated protein cause severe syndromic protein-losing enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekaert, Ilse Julia; Becker, Kerstin; Gottschalk, Ingo; Körber, Friederike; Dötsch, Jörg; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Hünseler, Christoph; Cirak, Sebahattin

    2018-04-16

    Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is characterised by gastrointestinal protein leakage due to loss of mucosal integrity or lymphatic abnormalities. PLE can manifest as congenital diarrhoea and should be differentiated from other congenital diarrhoeal disorders. Primary PLEs are genetically heterogeneous and the underlying genetic defects are currently emerging. We report an infant with fatal PLE for whom we aimed to uncover the underlying pathogenic mutation. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the index patient. Variants were classified based on the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guidelines. WES results and our detailed clinical description of the patient were compared with the literature. We discovered a novel homozygous stop mutation (c.988C>T, p.Q330*) in the Plasmalemma Vesicle-Associated Protein ( PLVAP ) gene in a newborn with fatal PLE, facial dysmorphism, and renal, ocular and cardiac anomalies. The Q330* mutation is predicted to result in complete loss of PLVAP protein expression leading to deletion of the diaphragms of endothelial fenestrae, resulting in plasma protein extravasation and PLE. Recently, another single homozygous stop mutation in PLVAP causing lethal PLE in an infant was reported. Our findings validate PLVAP mutations as a cause of syndromic PLE. Prenatal anomalies, severe PLE and syndromic features may guide the diagnosis of this rare disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome Protein SBDS Maintains Human Telomeres by Regulating Telomerase Recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS is a rare pediatric disease characterized by various systemic disorders, including hematopoietic dysfunction. The mutation of Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS gene has been proposed to be a major causative reason for SDS. Although SBDS patients were reported to have shorter telomere length in granulocytes, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Here we provide data to elucidate the role of SBDS in telomere protection. We demonstrate that SBDS deficiency leads to telomere shortening. We found that overexpression of disease-associated SBDS mutants or knockdown of SBDS hampered the recruitment of telomerase onto telomeres, while the overall reverse transcriptase activity of telomerase remained unaffected. Moreover, we show that SBDS could specifically bind to TPP1 during the S phase of cell cycle, likely functioning as a stabilizer for TPP1-telomerase interaction. Our findings suggest that SBDS is a telomere-protecting protein that participates in regulating telomerase recruitment.

  14. Correlation between Oxidative Stress and Thyroid Function in Patients with Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita U. Sawant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The present study is to look for a correlation between oxidative stress and thyroid function in patients with the nephrotic syndrome in the remission phase as well as in a persistent proteinuric state. Introduction. Nephrotic syndrome is a form of chronic kidney disease due to which blood loses protein through the urine. We wanted to know if there was an increased loss of thyroid hormones in urine affecting thyroid function. Methods. 60 patients with nephrotic syndrome and 20 healthy non-proteinuric individuals as control subjects were enrolled in the study. We measured their serum tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Estimation of lipid peroxidation (LPx catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and Glutathione peroxidase (GPx were carried out by standard methods. Results. TSH was elevated in the nephrotic patients compared to controls, while TT4 and TT3 were significantly lower in the patients than in controls. Lipid Peroxidation and GPx were significantly higher in the nephrotic syndrome patients than in the controls, while SOD and catalase were significantly lower than in patients than in the control subjects. Conclusion. Nephrotic patients can lose significant amounts of thyroid hormones along with protein in urine, which can affect thyroid status, but this is reversible on remission.

  15. A reduced functionality of Gi proteins as a possible cause of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, N; Ghelardini, C; Zoppi, M; Bene, E D; Raimondi, L; Beneforti, E; Bartolini, A

    2001-10-01

    The etiopathogenesis of fibromyalgia (FM), a syndrome characterized by widespread pain and hyperalgesia, is still unknown. Since the involvement of Gi proteins in the modulation of pain perception has been widely established, the aim of the present study was to determine whether an altered functionality of the Gi proteins occurred in patients with FM. Patients with FM and other painful diseases such as neuropathic pain, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and osteoarthritis, used as reference painful pathologies, were included in the study. The functionality, evaluated as capability to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity, and the level of expression of Gi proteins were investigated in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Patients with FM showed a hypofunctionality of the Gi protein system. In contrast, unaltered Gi protein functionality was observed in patients with neuropathic pain, RA, and osteoarthritis. Patients with FM also showed basal cAMP levels higher than controls. The reduced activity of Gi proteins seems to be unrelated to a reduction of protein levels since only a slight reduction (about 20-30%) of the Gi3alpha subunit was observed. Gi protein hypofunctionality is the first biochemical alteration observed in FM that could be involved in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. In the complete absence of laboratory diagnostic tests, the determination of an increase in cAMP basal levels in lymphocytes, together with the assessment of a Gi protein hypofunctionality after adenylyl cyclase stimulation, may lead to the biochemical identification of patients with FM.

  16. The functional properties, modification and utilization of whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Venter

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein has an excellent nutritional value and exhibits a functional potential. In comparison with certain other food proteins, the whey protein content of essential amino acids is extremely favourable for human consumption. Depending on the heat-treatment history thereof, soluble whey proteins with utilizable functional properties, apart from high biological value, true digestibility, protein efficiency ratio and nett protein utilization, can be recovered. Various technological and chemical recovery processes have been designed. Chemically and enzymatically modified whey protein is manufactured to obtain technological and functional advantages. The important functional properties of whey proteins, namely hydration, gelation, emulsifying and foaming properties, are reviewed.

  17. Functional Communication Training in Rett Syndrome: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byiers, Breanne J.; Dimian, Adele; Symons, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is associated with a range of serious neurodevelopmental consequences including severe communicative impairments. Currently, no evidence-based communication interventions exist for the population (Sigafoos et al., 2009). The purpose of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of functional assessment (FA) and…

  18. Turner Syndrome: Neuroimaging Findings--Structural and Functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Ronan; Murphy, Declan

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of Turner syndrome can advance our understanding of the X chromosome in brain development, and the modulatory influence of endocrine factors. There is increasing evidence from neuroimaging studies that TX individuals have significant differences in the anatomy, function, and metabolism of a number of brain regions; including…

  19. HIV-related ocular microangiopathic syndrome and cognitive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, S A; Perro, C; Klauss, V; Naber, D; Kronawitter, U; Bogner, J R; Goebel, F D; Lund, O E; Hippius, H

    1993-03-01

    Ocular microangiopathic syndrome is found frequently in patients with AIDS or severe HIV infection. Symptoms of this microvascular syndrome can include cotton-wool spots, hemorrhages, and Roth's spots. The clinical and functional significance of HIV-related ocular microangiopathic syndrome has not been clarified as yet. The objective of this study was to evaluate a possible association between HIV-related ocular microangiopathic syndrome and cognitive functioning. Thirty-seven patients infected with HIV (24 with AIDS) underwent ophthalmological and neuropsychological examination. HIV-related ocular microangiopathic syndrome was measured by counting the number of cotton-wool spots in both eyes. Neuropsychological examination included five standardized tests, with the first three primarily measuring function of short-term memory; these tests were as follows: the Auditory-Verbal Learning Test, the Benton Test, the Stroop Colour Word Test, the Trail-Making Part B test, and the Vocabulary for Measuring Premorbid Intelligence test. HIV-related ocular microangiopathic syndrome was found in 15 patients with AIDS (62.5%), and in one patient, staged Walter Reed 5. In 10 patients, one eye was affected (mean count of cotton-wool spots 1.5). In six patients, both eyes were affected (mean count of cotton-wool spots 7.0). Univariate correlations between the number of cotton-wool spots in both eyes and test scores were as follows: Auditory-Verbal Learning Test: 0.56 (p < 0.001); Benton Test: 0.51 (p < 0.001); Stroop Colour and Word: 0.50 (p < 0.001); Trail-Making Part B: 0.15 (not significant); Vocabulary for Measuring Premorbid Intelligence: -0.05 (not significant). Multiple correlation between the test scores and the number of cotton-wool spots was 0.70 (p < 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Surfactant protein-B 121ins2 heterozygosity, reduced pulmonary function, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækvad-Hansen, Marie; Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary surfactant protein-B deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes fatal respiratory distress syndrome in newborns. Seventy percent of the cases of hereditary surfactant protein-B deficiency are caused by homozygosity for the 121ins2 mutation in the surfactant protein-B gen....... Individuals heterozygous for this mutation have partial absence of surfactant protein-B and could be at risk of lung disease when exposed to additional risk factors for impaired surfactant function such as tobacco smoking....

  1. Altered functional brain networks in Prader–Willi syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Heng; Qiu, Siyou; Tian, Jie; Wen, Xiaotong; Miller, Jennifer L.; von Deneen, Karen M.; Zhou, Zhenyu; Gold, Mark S.; Liu, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic imprinting disorder characterized mainly by hyperphagia and early childhood obesity. Previous functional neuroimaging studies used visual stimuli to examine abnormal activities in the eating-related neural circuitry of patients with PWS. It was found that patients with PWS exhibited both excessive hunger and hyperphagia consistently, even in situations without any food stimulation. In the present study, we employed resting-state functional MRI techniqu...

  2. Immunomodulation of enteric neural function in irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    O’Malley, Dervla

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder which is characterised by symptoms such as bloating, altered bowel habit and visceral pain. It’s generally accepted that miscommunication between the brain and gut underlies the changes in motility, absorpto-secretory function and pain sensitivity associated with IBS. However, partly due to the lack of disease-defining biomarkers, understanding the aetiology of this complex and multifactorial disease remains elusi...

  3. Envelope protein requirements for the assembly of infectious virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissink, E.H.J.; Kroese, M.V.; Wijk, van H.A.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Meulenberg, J.J.; Rottier, P.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) contain six membrane proteins: the major proteins GP5 and M and the minor proteins GP2a, E, GP3, and GP4. Here, we studied the envelope protein requirements for PRRSV particle formation and infectivity using full-length cDNA

  4. Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Filip Holst; Pedersen, Christina Gravgaard; Jensen, Majbritt Lykke

    Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.......Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome....

  5. The skin function: a factor of anti-metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shi-Sheng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The body’s total antioxidant capacity represents a sum of the antioxidant capacity of various tissues/organs. A decrease in the body’s antioxidant capacity may induce oxidative stress and subsequent metabolic syndrome, a clustering of risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The skin, the largest organ of the body, is one of the major components of the body’s total antioxidant defense system, primarily through its xenobiotic/drug biotransformation system, reactive oxygen species-scavenging system, and sweat glands- and sebaceous glands-mediated excretion system. Notably, unlike other contributors, the skin contribution is variable, depending on lifestyles and ambient temperature or seasonal variations. Emerging evidence suggests that decreased skin’s antioxidant and excretory functions (e.g., due to sedentary lifestyles and low ambient temperature may increase the risk for metabolic syndrome. This review focuses on the relationship between the variability of skin-mediated detoxification and elimination of exogenous and endogenous toxic substances and the development of metabolic syndrome. The potential role of sebum secretion in lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and its impact on metabolic syndrome, and the association between skin disorders (acanthosis nigricans, acne, and burn and metabolic syndrome are also discussed.

  6. C-Reactive Protein Levels in the Brugada Syndrome

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    Aimé Bonny

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inflammation in the Brugada syndrome (BrS and its clinical implication have been little studied. Aims. To assess the level of inflammation in BrS patients. Methods. All studied BrS patients underwent blood samples drawn for C-reactive protein (CRP levels at admission, prior to any invasive intervention. Patients with a previous ICD placement were controlled to exclude those with a recent (<14 days shock. We divided subjects into symptomatic (syncope or aborted sudden death and asymptomatic groups. In a multivariable analysis, we adjusted for significant variables (age, CRP ≥ 2 mg/L. Results. Fifty-four subjects were studied (mean age 45 ± 13 years, 49 (91% male. Twenty (37% were symptomatic. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Mean CRP level was 1,4 ± 0,9 mg/L in asymptomatic and 2,4 ± 1,4 mg/L in symptomatic groups (P = .003. In the multivariate model, CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L remained an independent marker for being symptomatic (P = .018; 95% CI: 1.3 to 19.3. Conclusion. Inflammation seems to be more active in symptomatic BrS. C-reactive protein concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L might be associated with the previous symptoms in BrS. The value of inflammation as a risk factor of arrhythmic events in BrS needs to be studied.

  7. Engineered mutations in fibrillin-1 leading to Marfan syndrome act at the protein, cellular and organismal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyer, Karina A; Reinhardt, Dieter P

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are the major components of microfibrils in the extracellular matrix of elastic and non-elastic tissues. They are multi-domain proteins, containing primarily calcium binding epidermal growth factor-like (cbEGF) domains and 8-cysteine/transforming growth factor-beta binding protein-like (TB) domains. Mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene give rise to Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder with clinical complications in the cardiovascular, skeletal, ocular and other organ systems. Here, we review the consequences of engineered Marfan syndrome mutations in fibrillin-1 at the protein, cellular and organismal levels. Representative point mutations associated with Marfan syndrome in affected individuals have been introduced and analyzed in recombinant fibrillin-1 fragments. Those mutations affect fibrillin-1 on a structural and functional level. Mutations which impair folding of cbEGF domains can affect protein trafficking. Protein folding disrupted by some mutations can lead to defective secretion in mutant fibrillin-1 fragments, whereas fragments with other Marfan mutations are secreted normally. Many Marfan mutations render fibrillin-1 more susceptible to proteolysis. There is also evidence that some mutations affect heparin binding. Few mutations have been further analyzed in mouse models. An extensively studied mouse model of Marfan syndrome expresses mouse fibrillin-1 with a missense mutation (p.C1039G). The mice display similar characteristics to human patients with Marfan syndrome. Overall, the analyses of engineered mutations leading to Marfan syndrome provide important insights into the pathogenic molecular mechanisms exerted by mutated fibrillin-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. UTILIZATION OF PLANT PROTEINS IN FUNCTIONAL NUTRITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Kulakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of functional food products technology is considered to be a prospect way for creating new food products. Such products are known to be popular among consumers. Utilization of plant proteins allows to widen and improve food assortment and quality. The article represents a review of plant proteins utilization in production of functional food. For optimization of flour confectionery chemical composition the authors utilized a method of receipts modeling. Simulation of combined products is based on the principles of food combinatorics and aims to create recipes of new types of food products on basis of methods of mathematical optimization by reasonable selection of the basic raw materials, ingredients, food additives and dietary supplements, totality of which ensures formation desired organoleptic, physical and chemical properties product as well as a predetermined level of food, biological and energy value. Modeling process of combined products recipes includes the following three stages: preparation of input data for the design, formalization requirements for the composition and properties of raw ingredients and quality final product, process modeling; product design with desired structural properties.

  9. Nutritional and functional properties of whey proteins concentrate and isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Herceg

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein fractions represent 18 - 20 % of total milk nitrogen content. Nutritional value in addition to diverse physico - chemical and functional properties make whey proteins highly suitable for application in foodstuffs. In the most cases, whey proteins are used because of their functional properties. Whey proteins possess favourable functional characteristics such as gelling, water binding, emulsification and foaming ability. Due to application of new process techniques (membrane fractionation techniques, it is possible to produce various whey - protein based products. The most important products based on the whey proteins are whey protein concentrates (WPC and whey protein isolates (WPI. The aim of this paper was to give comprehensive review of nutritional and functional properties of the most common used whey proteins (whey protein concentrate - WPC and whey protein isolate - WPI in the food industry.

  10. Engineering Escherichia coli for Functional Expression of Membrane Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Franz Y; Poolman, Bert

    2015-01-01

    A major bottleneck in the characterization of membrane proteins is low yield of functional protein in recombinant expression. Microorganisms are widely used for recombinant protein production, because of ease of cultivation and high protein yield. However, the target proteins do not always obtain

  11. A calcineurin inhibitory protein overexpressed in Down's syndrome interacts with the product of a ubiquitously expressed transcript

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.C.S. Silveira

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The Down's syndrome candidate region 1 (DSCR1 protein, encoded by a gene located in the human chromosome 21, interacts with calcineurin and is overexpressed in Down's syndrome patients. As an approach to clarifying a putative function for this protein, in the present study we used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify DSCR1 partners. The two-hybrid system is a method that allows the identification of protein-protein interactions through reconstitution of the activity of the yeast GAL 4 transcriptional activator. The gene DSCR1 fused to the GAL 4 binding domain (BD was used to screen a human fetal brain cDNA library cloned in fusion with the GAL 4 activation domain (AD. Three positive clones were found and sequence analysis revealed that all the plasmids coded for the ubiquitously expressed transcript (UXT. UXT, which is encoded in human Xp11, is a 157-amino acid protein present in both cytosol and nucleus of the cells. This positive interaction of DSCR1 and UXT was confirmed in vivo by mating the yeast strain AH109 (MATaexpressing AD-UXT with the strain Y187 (MATalpha expressing BD-DSCR1, and in vitro by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. These results may help elucidate a new function for DSCR1 and its participation in Down's syndrome pathogenesis.

  12. Food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome caused by rice beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminiti, Lucia; Salzano, Giuseppina; Crisafulli, Giuseppe; Porcaro, Federica; Pajno, Giovanni Battista

    2013-05-14

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is an uncommon and potentially severe non IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy. It is usually caused by cow's milk or soy proteins, but may also be triggered by ingestion of solid foods. The diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical history and symptoms. Management of acute phase requires fluid resuscitation and intravenous steroids administration, but avoidance of offending foods is the only effective therapeutic option.Infant with FPIES presented to our emergency department with vomiting, watery stools, hypothension and metabolic acidosis after ingestion of rice beverage. Intravenous fluids and steroids were administered with good clinical response. Subsequently, a double blind placebo control food challenge (DBPCFC) was performed using rice beverage and hydrolyzed formula (eHF) as placebo. The "rice based formula" induced emesis, diarrhoea and lethargy. Laboratory investigations reveal an increase of absolute count of neutrophils and the presence of faecal eosinophils. The patient was treated with both intravenous hydration and steroids. According to Powell criteria, oral food challenge was considered positive and diagnosis of FPIES induced by rice beverage was made. Patient was discharged at home with the indication to avoid rice and any rice beverage as well as to reintroduce hydrolyzed formula. A case of FPIES induced by rice beverage has never been reported. The present case clearly shows that also beverage containing rice proteins can be responsible of FPIES. For this reason, the use of rice beverage as cow's milk substitute for the treatment of non IgE-mediated food allergy should be avoided.

  13. Impact of Overactive Bladder Syndrome on Female Sexual Function

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    Serdar Toksöz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of female sexual dysfunction includes psychological, physiological and iatrogenic causes. Physiological and iatrogenic causes are abdominal surgery, menopause, smoking, spinal cord injuries and some antipsychotic, antihypertensive, and antidepressant drugs. When assessing sexual function, sexual function questionnaires, such as the Female Sexual Function Index, and the Sexual Function Questionnaire are used. The prevalence of female sexual dysfunction is 43% and it has been reported to increase depending on menopause and age. Estrogen, estrogen + testosterone and tibolone, PDE5, apomorphine, bupropion and flibanserin are used in the treatment of female sexual dysfunction. Overactive bladder is a disease affecting the quality of life and is characterized by urgency, frequency, nocturia and urge incontinence with especially filling phase of the bladder resulting from loss of detrusor muscle inhibition. The prevalence of overactive bladder in women in the United States has been reported to be 16.9%. Lower urinary tract symptoms and overactive bladder syndrome are not known how to cause female sexual dysfunction. Menopause and partner status were the most important predictors for female sexual dysfunction. It has been reported that overactive bladder syndrome and urinary incontinence provide prediction of development of female sexual dysfunction. Shame, fear of incontinence, and urinary incontinence as well as urge sensation during sexual intercourse in individuals with overactive bladder syndrome have been reported to be the main factors causing female sexual dysfunction. Pathophysiological relationship between the two disorders has not been elucidated and further clinical and experimental studies are needed in this regard.

  14. In silico Structural and Functional Annotation of Mycoplasma genitalium Hypothetical Protein MG_377

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    Sudip Paul

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma genitalium, a Gram-positive sexually transmitted pathogen, has been associated with urethritis in men and several inflammatory reproductive tract syndromes in women including cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and infertility. The complete sequence of the M. genitalium G37 genome revealed that it consists of 94 hypothetical proteins with unknown function in addition to functional proteins. In the present study, the MG_377 hypothetical protein of M. genitalium was selected for analyzing and modeling by different bioinformatics tools and databases. According to primary and secondary structure analyses, MG_377 is a stable hydrophilic protein containing a significant proportion of α-helices; besides, it is a cytoplasmic protein based on subcellular localization predictions. Homology modeling method was applied to generate its 3D structure using SWISS-MODEL server where the template PDB 1ZXJ with 84.4% sequence identity with the hypothetical protein was exploited. Several evaluations of quality assessment and validation parameters specified the generated protein model as reliable with fairly good quality. Functional genomics analysis carried out by InterProScan, Pfam and NCBI-CDD suggested that the hypothetical protein may contain Trigger factor/SurA domain. Moreover, comparative genomics analysis recommended MG_377 as a non-homologous protein essential for the organism. Further experimental validation would help to identify the actual function of MG_377 as well as to confirm the utility of the protein as drug targets.

  15. Functional abdominal pain syndrome treated with Korean medication

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    Chang-Gue Son

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old female patient with chronic and stubborn abdominal pain had been hospitalized five times in three Western hospitals, but no effects were observed. No abnormalities were found in blood tests, gastrointestinal endoscopy, sonogram, and computed tomography of the abdomen, except mild paralytic ileus. The patient decided to rely on Korean medicine as an inpatient. She was diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome, and her symptom differentiation was the “Yang deficiency of spleen and kidney.” A herbal drug, Hwangikyeji-tang, along with moxibustion and acupuncture, was given to the patient. Abdominal pain and related symptoms were reduced radically within 16 days of treatment. This report shows a therapeutic potential of Korean medicine-based treatment for functional abdominal pain syndrome.

  16. Examine of Thyroid Function in Pediatric Nephrotic Syndrome; Tehran-Iran

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    Niloofar Hajizadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In children with nephrotic syndrome, it is probable to determine a hypothyroid state because of thyroxine (T4, tri-iodothyronine (T3 and thyroid-binding globulin loss in presence of proteinuria. Objectives: To examine thyroid function in pediatric cases of nephrotic syndrome. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, from march 2010 to march 2012, thyroid function tests were performed in 104 patients referred to the nephrology department of children’s medical center, because of nephrotic  syndrome. Collected data analyzed with SPSS Statistics 17 and pResults: Sixty one cases identified as hypothyroid patients and were treated with supplementary levothyroxine. There were 41 (67.2% males and 20 (32.8% females with the mean age of 3.72±3.35 years. Our patients showed lowered T3 (68.3% and T4 (64.4% in comparison with normal values. Median TSH (Thyroid-stimulating hormone was 11.65±6.71 Micu/ml and 2.82±0.82 in the hypothyroid and euthyroid patients respectively. In all, TSH was negatively correlated with the total urinary protein content . Conclusions: According to this study, the occurrence of hypothyroidism in any child with nephrotic syndrome needs to be mentioned. It is proposed to systematically search hypothyroidism by measuring TSH and free T4 in these patients particularly when proteinuria is prolonged.

  17. Autonomic nervous system function in young children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have been reported to have alterations in autonomic nervous system function as measured by vagal activity via heart rate variability. Whether the same is true for children is unknown. We compared young children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal...

  18. Elevation of tau protein levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of children with West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hirofumi; Matsushige, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Shunji; Abe, Arisa; Iida, Yasunori; Inoue, Teruaki; Ichiyama, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    West syndrome is an epileptic encephalopathy with a poor developmental outcome. Tau protein levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are reported to be markers of axonal damage and neurodegeneration. This study aimed to investigate axonal damage and the effects of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy on axons in West syndrome, as measured by tau protein levels in CSF. Tau protein levels in CSF before and after ACTH therapy were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 26 children with West syndrome. Of these 26 children, 18 were symptomatic, and 8 had a cryptogenic form of West syndrome. A group of 41 unaffected children was included in the study as a control group. The levels of tau protein in CSF were significantly higher in children with West syndrome than in the control group, and these levels remained high after ACTH therapy. ACTH therapy was effective for 20 of the 26 children with West syndrome, and their CSF tau protein levels were significantly higher after ACTH therapy than before therapy. Our results suggest that axonal damage occurs in West syndrome, as judged by tau protein levels in CSF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Age exacerbates abnormal protein expression in a mouse model of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Md Mahiuddin; Block, Aaron; Tong, Suhong; Davisson, Muriel T; Gardiner, Katheleen J

    2017-09-01

    The Ts65Dn is a popular mouse model of Down syndrome (DS). It displays DS-relevant features of learning/memory deficits and age-related loss of functional markers in basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. Here we describe protein expression abnormalities in brain regions of 12-month-old male Ts65Dn mice. We show that the magnitudes of abnormalities of human chromosome 21 and non-human chromosome 21 orthologous proteins are greater at 12 months than at ∼6 months. Age-related exacerbations involve the number of components affected in the mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway, the levels of components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease. Among brain regions, the number of abnormalities in cerebellum decreased while the number in cortex greatly increased with age. The Ts65Dn is being used in preclinical evaluations of drugs for cognition in DS. Most commonly, drug evaluations are tested in ∼4- to 6-month-old mice. Data on age-related changes in magnitude and specificity of protein perturbations can be used to understand the molecular basis of changes in cognitive ability and to predict potential age-related specificities in drug efficacies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An Indirect Examination of the Function of Problem Behavior Associated with Fragile X Syndrome and Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langthorne, Paul; McGill, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) are associated with a number of specific topographies of problem behavior. Very few studies have examined the function served by problem behavior in these groups. Using the Questions About Behavioral Function scale Matson and Vollmer (User's guide: questions about behavioral function…

  1. Reye's syndrome: salicylate and mitochondrial monoamine oxidase function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraj, B.A.; Caplan, D.; Lolies, P.

    1986-01-01

    It has been suggested that aspirin is somehow linked with the onset of Reye's syndrome (RS). A general feature of Reye's syndrome is severe impairment of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) function. The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of salicylate on platelet mitochondrial MAO activity in three groups: group A (healthy children, n = 21) and group C (healthy adults, n = 10). Platelet MAO was measured by radio-enzymatic technique with 14 C-tyramine as a substrate. The results showed that salicyclate (10 mM) had a 20 to 60 percent inhibitory effect on platelet MAO function in only 1, 3 and 2 of the subjects in group A, B and C. Furthermore, there was an association between low enzyme activity and salicylate MAO inhibitory effect in these subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that salicylate may induce deterioration in mitochondrial function in susceptible individuals and that the assessment of salicylate MAO inhibitory effect may identify those who may be at risk to develop aspirin poisoning and Reye's syndrome

  2. Tumor protein 53 mutations and inherited cancer: beyond Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Edenir I; Achatz, Maria Iw; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Olivier, Magali; Hainaut, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Germline TP53 (tumor protein 53) mutations are the molecular basis of a complex cancer predisposition syndrome, the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The present review discusses the diversity of tumor patterns in TP53 mutation carriers, focusing on molecular factors that may explain familial and individual differences, such as genotype/phenotype correlations, genetic modifiers and genetic anticipation. Initially identified 20 years ago, germline TP53 mutations appear to be associated with an extremely diverse range of cancers. Although no other gene has been found in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, recent results show that the functional effects of particular mutations, polymorphisms in TP53 or in regulators such as MDM2 (murine double minute 2), variations in DNA copy number and variations in telomere length, have a strong impact on individual risk and on tumor patterns. Furthermore, recent studies in large cohorts suggest that TP53 germline mutations may occur in up to 1: 5000 individuals. Germline TP53 mutations may be responsible for a large fraction (15-20%) of all inherited cancers. Although mutations are detectable by sequencing, counseling and follow-up remain problematic due to the wide variations in disease presentation. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the predisposition caused by TP53 deficiency may help to develop better, evidence-based and personalized clinical protocols.

  3. Role of Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome protein in translation machinery and cell chemotaxis: a comparative genomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasieva O

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Olga VasievaInstitute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Fellowship for the Interpretation of Genomes, Burr Ridge, IL, USAAbstract: Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS is linked to a mutation in a single gene. The SBDS proinvolved in RNA metabolism and ribosome-associated functions, but SBDS mutation is primarily linked to a defect in polymorphonuclear leukocytes unable to orient correctly in a spatial gradient of chemoattractants. Results of data mining and comparative genomic approaches undertaken in this study suggest that SBDS protein is also linked to tRNA metabolism and translation initiation. Analysis of crosstalk between translation machinery and cytoskeletal dynamics provides new insights into the cellular chemotactic defects caused by SBDS protein malfunction. The proposed functional interactions provide a new approach to exploit potential targets in the treatment and monitoring of this disease.Keywords: Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome, wybutosine, tRNA, chemotaxis, translation, genomics, gene proximity

  4. Nutritional and functional properties of whey proteins concentrate and isolate

    OpenAIRE

    Zoran Herceg; Anet Režek

    2006-01-01

    Whey protein fractions represent 18 - 20 % of total milk nitrogen content. Nutritional value in addition to diverse physico - chemical and functional properties make whey proteins highly suitable for application in foodstuffs. In the most cases, whey proteins are used because of their functional properties. Whey proteins possess favourable functional characteristics such as gelling, water binding, emulsification and foaming ability. Due to application of new process techniques (membrane fract...

  5. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome: evaluation of thyroid function in sick patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Joanne E; Brent, Gregory A

    2002-03-01

    Altered thyroid function tests as a consequence of illness have been recognized for many years, yet the cause and clinical implications remains uncertain. The routine testing of thyroid function in hospitalized patients should be discouraged, as the results are less predictive of primary thyroid disease than in ambulatory patients. Clinicians should be aware of the methods used for thyroid function testing, as the effect of illness on thyroid function varies among the different tests. The most commonly used free T4 assays likely are influenced significantly by nonthyroidal illness. Advances in understanding the basic mechanisms of thyroid hormone metabolism and thyroid hormone action have given insights into the changes in thyroid function tests as a consequence of nonthyroidal illness. In the future, thyroid hormone receptor isoform-specific agonists and antagonists may allow for more specific treatment of select patients with nonthyroidal illness syndrome.

  6. Functionalization of protein crystals with metal ions, complexes and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Satoshi; Maity, Basudev; Ueno, Takafumi

    2018-04-01

    Self-assembled proteins have specific functions in biology. With inspiration provided by natural protein systems, several artificial protein assemblies have been constructed via site-specific mutations or metal coordination, which have important applications in catalysis, material and bio-supramolecular chemistry. Similar to natural protein assemblies, protein crystals have been recognized as protein assemblies formed of densely-packed monomeric proteins. Protein crystals can be functionalized with metal ions, metal complexes or nanoparticles via soaking, co-crystallization, creating new metal binding sites by site-specific mutations. The field of protein crystal engineering with metal coordination is relatively new and has gained considerable attention for developing solid biomaterials as well as structural investigations of enzymatic reactions, growth of nanoparticles and catalysis. This review highlights recent and significant research on functionalization of protein crystals with metal coordination and future prospects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Examining the Function of Problem Behavior in Fragile X Syndrome: Preliminary Experimental Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langthorne, Paul; McGill, Peter; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lang, Russell; Machalicek, Wendy; Chan, Jeffrey Michael; Rispoli, Mandy

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited cause of intellectual and developmental disability. The influence of environmental variables on behaviors associated with the syndrome has received only scant attention. The current study explored the function served by problem behavior in fragile X syndrome by using experimental functional analysis…

  8. Upper tract urothelial carcinomas: frequency of association with mismatch repair protein loss and lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Holly L; McKenney, Jesse K; Heald, Brandie; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven C; Plesec, Thomas; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Increased risk for upper tract urothelial carcinoma is described in patients with Lynch syndrome, caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes. We aimed to identify the frequency of mismatch repair protein loss in upper tract urothelial carcinoma and its potential for identifying an association with Lynch syndrome. We queried our database to identify upper tract urothelial carcinomas. Patients were cross-referenced for history of colorectal carcinoma or other common Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms to enrich for potential Lynch syndrome cases. Tumor histopathologic characteristics were reviewed and each case was analyzed for loss of mismatch repair proteins, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, by immunohistochemistry. Of 444 patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma, a subset of 215 (encompassing 30 with upper tract urothelial carcinoma and another common Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasm) was analyzed for loss of mismatch repair protein expression. Of 30 patients with Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms, six had documented Lynch syndrome, including two with Muir-Torre syndrome. Mismatch repair protein loss was identified in 7% of total upper tract urothelial carcinomas and 30% of patients with Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms (including all patients with Lynch syndrome/Muir-Torre syndrome). Of patients without history of Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms, 5 of 184 (2.7%) had loss of mismatch repair protein expression. Twelve cases with mismatch repair protein loss demonstrated loss of MSH2 and MSH6, and 2 had isolated loss of MSH6. MLH1 and PMS2 expression were consistently retained. Although increased intratumoral lymphocytes, inverted growth, pushing tumor-stromal interface, and lack of nuclear pleomorphism were more commonly seen in cases with mismatch repair protein loss, only intratumoral lymphocytes and presence of pushing borders were statistically significant. MLH1 and PMS2 testing appear to have little utility in upper tract urothelial

  9. Sexual function status in women with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köseoğlu, Nalan; Köseoğlu, Hikmet; Itil, Oya; Oztura, Ibrahim; Baklan, Bariş; Ikiz, Ahmet Omer; Esen, Ahmet Adil

    2007-09-01

    Several co-morbid diseases have been shown to affect sexual functions in both genders. In the literature, sexual function status in men with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been studied; however, sexual functions in women with OSAS have not yet been studied. In this prospective study, we aimed to determine sexual function status in women with OSAS and its relationship with the disease parameters of OSAS. Women, who were diagnosed with OSAS with polysomnography performed in the sleep center of our university hospital, formed the study population. Women with any genital deformity, postmenopausal women, and women without a regular partner were excluded from the study. General demographic properties, medical histories, polysomnography parameters, and frequency of intercourse per month were noted for each patient. Patients completed the Sexual Function Questionnaire Version 2 (SFQ-V2) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The patients were grouped as mild, moderate, and severe OSAS according to the level of respiratory disturbance index (RDI). Scores of sexual function domains were determined from SFQ, and their relationships with parameters of polysomnography and demographics were studied. Twenty-five patients were included in the study. Mean age was 48.1 +/- 2.7 years. All were married with a mean marriage duration of 25.6 +/- 3.3 years. Mean frequency of intercourse per month was 3.3 +/- 1.8. All domains of sexual functions except pain and enjoyment significantly decreased with increasing severity of OSAS. When we controlled for factors of age and co-morbid diseases, correlation analyses showed significant negative correlation between levels of RDI and all domains of sexual functions except pain and enjoyment (P < 0.05). Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome negatively impacts sexual function in women independent of age and associated co-morbid diseases.

  10. Pharmacological Bypass of Cockayne Syndrome B Function in Neuronal Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuming Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by growth abnormalities, premature aging, and photosensitivity. Mutation of Cockayne syndrome B (CSB affects neuronal gene expression and differentiation, so we attempted to bypass its function by expressing downstream target genes. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of Synaptotagmin 9 (SYT9, a key component of the machinery controlling neurotrophin release, bypasses the need for CSB in neuritogenesis. Importantly, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a neurotrophin implicated in neuronal differentiation and synaptic modulation, and pharmacological mimics such as 7,8-dihydroxyflavone and amitriptyline can compensate for CSB deficiency in cell models of neuronal differentiation as well. SYT9 and BDNF are downregulated in CS patient brain tissue, further indicating that sub-optimal neurotrophin signaling underlies neurological defects in CS. In addition to shedding light on cellular mechanisms underlying CS and pointing to future avenues for pharmacological intervention, these data suggest an important role for SYT9 in neuronal differentiation.

  11. Sjoegren's syndrome. A functional scintigraphic study of salivary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrago, J.P.; Rain, J.D.; Rocher, F.; Vigneron, N.; Pecking, A.; Najean, Y.

    1984-01-01

    One-hundred and twenty patients with sicca syndrome, connective tissue disease or chronic graft-versus-host disease were investigated in the Saint-Louis Hospital Department of Nuclear Medicine. Technetium scanning of the salivary glands was performed in all patients. The results of the scintigraphic study were closely correlated with clinical and histological data in patients with Sjoegren's syndrome. This method, which accurately quantifies the salivary function without danger nor discomfort to the patients, has a number of advantages: (a) it is sensitive enough to detect minimal salivary gland dysfunction; (b) it differentiates between parotid gland and submandibular gland involvement demonstrates assymetry in pathological processes; (c) it helps in following up patients with Sjoegren's disease and in assessing the results of immunosuppressive or anti-inflammatory treatment [fr

  12. Functional foods as potential therapeutic options for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L; Poudyal, H; Panchal, S K

    2015-11-01

    Obesity as part of metabolic syndrome is a major lifestyle disorder throughout the world. Current drug treatments for obesity produce small and usually unsustainable decreases in body weight with the risk of major adverse effects. Surgery has been the only treatment producing successful long-term weight loss. As a different but complementary approach, lifestyle modification including the use of functional foods could produce a reliable decrease in obesity with decreased comorbidities. Functional foods may include fruits such as berries, vegetables, fibre-enriched grains and beverages such as tea and coffee. Although health improvements continue to be reported for these functional foods in rodent studies, further evidence showing the translation of these results into humans is required. Thus, the concept that these fruits and vegetables will act as functional foods in humans to reduce obesity and thereby improve health remains intuitive and possible rather than proven. © 2015 World Obesity.

  13. Determining and comparing protein function in Bacterial genome sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla

    annotation of genes – the descriptions assigned to genes that describe the likely function of the encoded proteins. This process is limited by several factors, including the definition of a function which can be more or less specific as well as how many genes can actually be assigned a function based...... of proteins were clustered based on sequence domains so that each group represented a protein function. Each function was then modeled using Arti- ficial Neural Networks (ANN) and the model was evaluated based on its ability to identify true positives and negatives, that is proteins with or without...... the function of the model. The models were used to annotate a number of proteins without functional annotations and predicted functions for 98% of the genes. Evaluation of the precision of the method was performed, using data from the Critical Assessment of Functional Annotation (CAFA) project, and correct...

  14. CYFIP family proteins between autism and intellectual disability: links with Fragile X syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eBardoni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual disability (ID and autism spectrum disorders (ADS have in common alterations in some brain circuits and brain abnormalities, such as synaptic transmission and dendritic spines morphology. Recent studies have indicated a differential expression for specific categories of genes as a cause for both types of disease, while an increasing number of genes is recognized to produce both disorders. An example is the Fragile X Mental retardation gene, FMR1, whose silencing causes the Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of intellectual disability and autism, also characterized by physical hallmarks. FMRP, the protein encoded by FMR1, is an RNA-binding protein with an important role in translational control. Among the interactors of FMRP, CYFIP1/2 proteins are good candidates for intellectual disability and autism, on the bases of their genetic implication and functional properties, even if the precise functional significance of the CYFIP/FMRP interaction is not understood yet. CYFIP1 and CYFIP2 represent a link between Rac1, the Wave complex and FMRP, favoring the cross talk between actin polymerization and translational control

  15. Simplified quantification of urinary protein excretion in children with nephrotic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, G.; Khan, P.A.; Hussain, Z.; Iqbal, M.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the value of single voided random (spot) urinary protein to creatinine ratio in accurately predicting the 24-hour urinary protein excretion in Pakistani pediatric population with nephrotic syndrome. Fifty seven children between 1-18 years with nephrotic syndrome were included. Seventy pairs of spot urine (5 milliliter) and 24-hour urine were collected in different phases of their disease e.g. initial, induction and remission. The protein to creatinine ratio was determined in spot urine samples and total protein content in 24-hour urine samples. The correlation between the ratio and 24-hour urinary protein excreted was determined using Pearson's coefficient (r) linear regression analysis. The protein to creatinine ratio in a spot urine sample was significantly correlated with the 24-hour urinary protein. The correlation coefficient (least square method) was found to be significant (r=0.9444). A random (spot) urinary protein to creatinine ratio of greater than 2 correlated well with the massive proteinuria (i.e. nephrotic syndrome), between 2 to 0.2 indicated glomerulopathy while a ratio of less than 0.2 was suggestive of physiological values. The random spot urinary protein to creatinine ratio can reliably be used to assess the degree of proteinuria in children with nephrotic syndrome and can replace the 24-hour urinary protein excretion/collection. (author)

  16. COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR RATIONAL DESIGN OF PROTEINS WITH NOVEL FUNCTIONALITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar Tiwari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins are the most multifaceted macromolecules in living systems and have various important functions, including structural, catalytic, sensory, and regulatory functions. Rational design of enzymes is a great challenge to our understanding of protein structure and physical chemistry and has numerous potential applications. Protein design algorithms have been applied to design or engineer proteins that fold, fold faster, catalyze, catalyze faster, signal, and adopt preferred conformational states. The field of de novo protein design, although only a few decades old, is beginning to produce exciting results. Developments in this field are already having a significant impact on biotechnology and chemical biology. The application of powerful computational methods for functional protein designing has recently succeeded at engineering target activities. Here, we review recently reported de novo functional proteins that were developed using various protein design approaches, including rational design, computational optimization, and selection from combinatorial libraries, highlighting recent advances and successes.

  17. Functional analysis of thermostable proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akerboom, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Thermostable proteins can resist temperature stress whilst keeping their integrity and functionality. In many cases, thermostable proteins originate from hyperthermophilic microorganisms that thrive in extreme environments. These systems are generally located close to geothermal (volcanic) activity,

  18. Developing optimal non-linear scoring function for protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changyu; Li, Xiang; Liang, Jie

    2004-11-22

    Motivation. Protein design aims to identify sequences compatible with a given protein fold but incompatible to any alternative folds. To select the correct sequences and to guide the search process, a design scoring function is critically important. Such a scoring function should be able to characterize the global fitness landscape of many proteins simultaneously. To find optimal design scoring functions, we introduce two geometric views and propose a formulation using a mixture of non-linear Gaussian kernel functions. We aim to solve a simplified protein sequence design problem. Our goal is to distinguish each native sequence for a major portion of representative protein structures from a large number of alternative decoy sequences, each a fragment from proteins of different folds. Our scoring function discriminates perfectly a set of 440 native proteins from 14 million sequence decoys. We show that no linear scoring function can succeed in this task. In a blind test of unrelated proteins, our scoring function misclassfies only 13 native proteins out of 194. This compares favorably with about three-four times more misclassifications when optimal linear functions reported in the literature are used. We also discuss how to develop protein folding scoring function.

  19. The profile of social functioning in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Næss, Kari-Anne B; Nygaard, Egil; Ostad, Johanne; Dolva, Anne-Stine; Lyster, Solveig-Alma Halaas

    2017-06-01

    Practitioners and researchers have asserted for decades that social functioning is a strength in children with Down syndrome (DS). Nevertheless, some studies have concluded that children with DS may be at greater risk of impaired social functioning compared to typically developing controls. This cross-sectional study explores the profile of social functioning (social capabilities and social problems) in six-year-old children with DS, compares it with that of typically developing children and reveals possible differences in predictors between groups. Parental reports and clinical tests were utilized. The children with DS had generally weaker social capabilities compared to nonverbal mental age-matched controls, but no significant differences were found for social interactive play, community functioning and prosocial behaviour. No significant differences in predictors for social capabilities between the groups were found. The children with DS had more social problems than the typically developing controls with a similar chronological age and those with a similar nonverbal mental age, but no significant differences in emotional symptoms were found between the children with DS and either comparison group. Vocabulary was a more important predictor of social problems in the children with DS than in the typically developing control groups. Interventions for children with DS should strongly focus on integrating vocabulary skills and social functioning starting at an early age. Implications for Rehabilitation Children with Down syndrome need help and support in social functioning. Systematic training to optimize social capabilities and to prevent social problems should be prioritized. Structured and explicit learning of words important for social interaction with peers and for conflict solutions should be emphasized. Integrated interventions focusing on social functioning and vocabulary should begin in preschool to prepare children for participation in mainstream education.

  20. Probabilistic protein function prediction from heterogeneous genome-wide data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Nariai

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Dramatic improvements in high throughput sequencing technologies have led to a staggering growth in the number of predicted genes. However, a large fraction of these newly discovered genes do not have a functional assignment. Fortunately, a variety of novel high-throughput genome-wide functional screening technologies provide important clues that shed light on gene function. The integration of heterogeneous data to predict protein function has been shown to improve the accuracy of automated gene annotation systems. In this paper, we propose and evaluate a probabilistic approach for protein function prediction that integrates protein-protein interaction (PPI data, gene expression data, protein motif information, mutant phenotype data, and protein localization data. First, functional linkage graphs are constructed from PPI data and gene expression data, in which an edge between nodes (proteins represents evidence for functional similarity. The assumption here is that graph neighbors are more likely to share protein function, compared to proteins that are not neighbors. The functional linkage graph model is then used in concert with protein domain, mutant phenotype and protein localization data to produce a functional prediction. Our method is applied to the functional prediction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, using Gene Ontology (GO terms as the basis of our annotation. In a cross validation study we show that the integrated model increases recall by 18%, compared to using PPI data alone at the 50% precision. We also show that the integrated predictor is significantly better than each individual predictor. However, the observed improvement vs. PPI depends on both the new source of data and the functional category to be predicted. Surprisingly, in some contexts integration hurts overall prediction accuracy. Lastly, we provide a comprehensive assignment of putative GO terms to 463 proteins that currently have no assigned function.

  1. Temporomandibular disorders and functional somatic syndromes: Deliberations for the dentist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Suma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is an umbrella term for a collection of disorders affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and associated tissues. TMD is not a rare pathology for the dentist. The most common presenting symptom is pain, which causes the patient seek immediate treatment. Management is dictated by the cause. The most ′famed′ causes include trauma, inflammation, aging, parafunctional habits, infections, neoplasms, and stress; and these are always considered in the differential diagnosis of TMJ pain. There are some less ′famed′ causes of TMD, which are characterized by increased pain sensitivity due to psychosocial factors; these include myofascial pain syndrome and functional somatic syndromes (FSS such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. They present with chronic pain, fatigue, disability, and impairment in ability to perform daily activities. A non-systematic search in the English literature revealed numerous studies describing the occurrence of TMD in these conditions, along with few other oral manifestations. TMD has been even considered to be a part of the FSS by some. In these patients, TMD remains a recurring problem, and adequate management cannot be achieved by traditional treatment protocols. Awareness of these conditions, with correct diagnosis and modification of management protocols accordingly, may resolve this problem.

  2. [Executive function deficits in ADHD and Asperger syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloscia, Claudio; Baglioni, Valentina; Alessandrelli, Riccardo; Rosa, Caterina; Guerini, Rossella; Aceti, Franca; Pasini, Augusto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the executive functioning of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder combined subtype (ADHD-C) and Asperger syndrome (AS) compared to a control group. A sample of 79 children (28 ADHD-C; 24 AS; 27 subjects with typical development) was tested on a wide range of tasks related to major domains of executive functioning: inhibition response (prepotent and interference), visual working memory, planning and cognitive flexibility. Patients with AS showed deficits on visual working memory and cognitive flexibility. ADHD-C children were impaired on inhibition control (prepotent response) but also showed deficits on working memory and cognitive flexibility. The only executive functioning measure that differentiated ADHD from AS was inhibition of prepotent response and a more high deficit in cognitive flexibility and working memory in AS compared to ADHD-C. This study confirms recent evidence about the identification of specific executive profiles in these disorders. Other studies are warranted to evaluate the presence and specifity of a dysexecutive syndrome in ADHD and AS in a larger sample with girls.

  3. Disruption of a Ciliary B9 Protein Complex Causes Meckel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, William E.; Robinson, Jon F.; Kneist, Andreas; Sirerol-Piquer, M. Salomé; Frints, Suzanna G.M.; Corbit, Kevin C.; Zaghloul, Norran A.; van Lijnschoten, Gesina; Mulders, Leon; Verver, Dideke E.; Zerres, Klaus; Reed, Randall R.; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Johnson, Colin A.; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Katsanis, Nicholas; Bergmann, Carsten; Reiter, Jeremy F.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly every ciliated organism possesses three B9 domain-containing proteins: MKS1, B9D1, and B9D2. Mutations in human MKS1 cause Meckel syndrome (MKS), a severe ciliopathy characterized by occipital encephalocele, liver ductal plate malformations, polydactyly, and kidney cysts. Mouse mutations in either Mks1 or B9d2 compromise ciliogenesis and result in phenotypes similar to those of MKS. Given the importance of these two B9 proteins to ciliogenesis, we examined the role of the third B9 protein, B9d1. Mice lacking B9d1 displayed polydactyly, kidney cysts, ductal plate malformations, and abnormal patterning of the neural tube, concomitant with compromised ciliogenesis, ciliary protein localization, and Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction. These data prompted us to screen MKS patients for mutations in B9D1 and B9D2. We identified a homozygous c.301A>C (p.Ser101Arg) B9D2 mutation that segregates with MKS, affects an evolutionarily conserved residue, and is absent from controls. Unlike wild-type B9D2 mRNA, the p.Ser101Arg mutation failed to rescue zebrafish phenotypes induced by the suppression of b9d2. With coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric analyses, we found that Mks1, B9d1, and B9d2 interact physically, but that the p.Ser101Arg mutation abrogates the ability of B9d2 to interact with Mks1, further suggesting that the mutation compromises B9d2 function. Our data indicate that B9d1 is required for normal Hh signaling, ciliogenesis, and ciliary protein localization and that B9d1 and B9d2 are essential components of a B9 protein complex, disruption of which causes MKS. PMID:21763481

  4. Random heteropolymers preserve protein function in foreign environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panganiban, Brian; Qiao, Baofu; Jiang, Tao; DelRe, Christopher; Obadia, Mona M.; Nguyen, Trung Dac; Smith, Anton A. A.; Hall, Aaron; Sit, Izaac; Crosby, Marquise G.; Dennis, Patrick B.; Drockenmuller, Eric; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Xu, Ting

    2018-03-01

    The successful incorporation of active proteins into synthetic polymers could lead to a new class of materials with functions found only in living systems. However, proteins rarely function under the conditions suitable for polymer processing. On the basis of an analysis of trends in protein sequences and characteristic chemical patterns on protein surfaces, we designed four-monomer random heteropolymers to mimic intrinsically disordered proteins for protein solubilization and stabilization in non-native environments. The heteropolymers, with optimized composition and statistical monomer distribution, enable cell-free synthesis of membrane proteins with proper protein folding for transport and enzyme-containing plastics for toxin bioremediation. Controlling the statistical monomer distribution in a heteropolymer, rather than the specific monomer sequence, affords a new strategy to interface with biological systems for protein-based biomaterials.

  5. Cloning and characterization of functional keratinassociated protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) 5-4 which belongs to keratin-associated protein (KRTAP) type 5 family has two major groups: high/ultrahigh cysteine (HS) and high glycine-tyrosine (HGT). Based on bioinformatic prediction, we experimentally cloned a fragment containingan open reading frame of 1849 bp from maize, ...

  6. Design and functionality of dense protein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saglam, D.

    2012-01-01

    Food products that contain high levels of protein can help to control food intake and to maintain a healthy body weight due to their strong satiating properties. They are also beneficial in the nutrition of elderly and commonly used in medical nutrition. Preparation of food products at high protein

  7. Vitamin D and functional arterial parameters in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadonienė, Jolanta; Čypienė, Alma; Rinkūnienė, Egidija; Badarienė, Jolita; Burca, Jelizaveta; Sakaitė, Ieva; Kalinauskaitė, Goda; Kumpauskaitė, Vaiva; Laucevičius, Aleksandras

    2016-09-01

    Our cross sectional study aimed to identify the relation between vitamin D level and functional arterial parameters in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome. 100 postmenopausal women at age 50-65 with diagnosed metabolic syndrome were included in this study. Laboratory tests were performed to determine lipid profile, serum glucose, creatinine, C-reactive protein, serum levels of 25(OH) D, ionized calcium and urine albumin/creatinine ratio. Also non-invasive assessment of arterial function (arterial stiffness, flow-mediated dilatation and carotid artery ultrasound examinations) was performed. The mean vitamin D blood concentration was 47.4±16.9nmol/l. The prevalence of modest insufficiency and deficiency of vitamin D was 62%. Vitamin D concentration in samples assembled from January to March was significantly lower than concentration levels from September to November. No significant relationship was observed between vitamin D and endothelial function, arterial stiffness, carotid intima-media thickness. Week negative correlation was stated between mean arterial pressure and 25(OH) D concentration (p=0.04). A positive correlation was found between high density lipoprotein cholesterol and vitamin 25(OH) D (r=0.3, pcreatinine ratio and C-reactive protein blood concentrations were found. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome is high. No relation was found between vitamin D levels and parameters that indicate atherosclerotic vascular lesions. Nevertheless our study revealed the relation between concentrations of vitamin D and mean blood pressure and high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  8. Lack of the mitochondrial protein acylglycerol kinase causes Sengers syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayr, J.A.; Haack, T.B.; Graf, E.; Zimmermann, F.A.; Wieland, T.; Haberberger, B.; Superti-Furga, A.; Kirschner, J.; Steinmann, B.; Baumgartner, M.R.; Moroni, I.; Lamantea, E.; Zeviani, M.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Smeitink, J.; Strom, T.M.; Meitinger, T.; Sperl, W.; Prokisch, H.

    2012-01-01

    Exome sequencing of an individual with congenital cataracts, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, skeletal myopathy, and lactic acidosis, all typical symptoms of Sengers syndrome, discovered two nonsense mutations in the gene encoding mitochondrial acylglycerol kinase (AGK). Mutation screening of AGK in

  9. Current concepts on the functional somatic syndromes and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni, Francesco; Salvetti, Giovanni; Manfredini, Daniele; Bosco, Mario

    2007-01-01

    The importance of psychosocial factors in the etiopathogenesis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) has led to the hypothesis that these disorders may be part of a wider group of somatoform disorders, the functional somatic syndromes (FSS). Types of studies reviewed. The present paper is an overview summarizing the current concepts on the TMD-FSS relationship. A non-systematic search in the Medline database identified peer-reviewed papers on the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the complex groups of disorders labelled functional somatic syndromes, focusing on the common features to temporomandibular disorders patients. Literature data suggest that FSS and TMD share many etiopathogenetic and epidemiological features, both groups of disorders having a multifactorial etiopathogenesis and needing a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment. Psychosocial characteristics of patients seem to have many similarities and the prevalence of Axis I psychiatric disorders is elevated. The majority of studies focused on the relationship between TMD and fibromyalgia (FM), due to the high rate of orofacial involvement related to FM. Clinical implications. The presence of common features between TMD and FSS patient may suggest the need for changes in the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to TMD patients, with the introduction of treatment protocols which also address the psychosocial impairment accompanying TMD symptoms, in order to overcome the limits of traditional therapies.

  10. Sexual Functioning among Married Iranian Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Bazarganipour

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to assess sexual functioning among women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS in Iran. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted to ascertain factors related to sexual functioning in 300 PCOS patients attending to the private practice centers in Kashan, Isfahan Province, Iran, from May to October 2012. The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI was used to measure sexual functioning. Moreover, the socio-demographic details and clinical information of PCOS including obesity, hirsutism, acne, menstrual cycle disturbances, infertility and endocrine profile were recorded for each patient. Results: Overall the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction (FSD was 16.6%. In particular patients indicated poorer sexual functioning for the desire (48.3% and the arousal (44.7% subscales. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggested patients with lower educational level (OR: 2.94; 95% CI: 1.46-5.92 and irregular menstrual status (OR: 4.61; 95% CI: 1.93-11 were more likely to report sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: The findings suggest that desire and arousal were the most prevalent sexual disorders reported in this patient population. In addition, findings suggested that women with limited or no formal education and a history of menstrual irregularities were the most likely to report female sexual dysfunction. Further investigations are needed to examine female sexual functioning among women with PCOS, to educate their health care providers, and to develop therapeutic interventions.

  11. Emergence of Complexity in Protein Functions and Metabolic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andzej

    2009-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences and subsequently subjecting them to in vitro evolution. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions, important clues have been uncovered. Considerable progress has been also achieved in understanding the origins of membrane proteins. We will address this issue in the example of ion channels - proteins that mediate transport of ions across cell walls. Remarkably, despite overall complexity of these proteins in contemporary cells, their structural motifs are quite simple, with -helices being most common. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and simple, natural channels, I will show that, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during

  12. From stress to functional syndromes: an internist's point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucini, Daniela; Pagani, Massimo

    2012-06-01

    In this brief review we address schematically the relationship between two emerging issues in clinical medicine: stress and functional syndromes. It is becoming increasingly clear that they demand a multidimensional approach, considering simultaneously elements of behavioral therapy with traditional pharmacological treatment, guided by a better physiopathological understanding including autonomic assessment. New techniques, based on innovative analysis of continuous segments of electrocardiogram and non invasive arterial pressure recordings capable to extract hidden oscillations, provide quantitative indices of sympathetic and vagal modulation of the cardiovascular system. This more complete diagnostic process facilitates explanation of symptoms and reassurance of patients, based on functional evidence. The described clinical approach implies in addition an active collaboration of patients requiring the implementation of a creative alliance. Physical exercise, eating habits and muscular-mental relaxation are combined with pharmacological tools as needed. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Regulation, Signaling, and Physiological Functions of G-Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Alegre, Kamela O; Dey, Raja; Huang, Xin-Yun

    2016-09-25

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins) mainly relay the information from G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) on the plasma membrane to the inside of cells to regulate various biochemical functions. Depending on the targeted cell types, tissues, and organs, these signals modulate diverse physiological functions. The basic schemes of heterotrimeric G-proteins have been outlined. In this review, we briefly summarize what is known about the regulation, signaling, and physiological functions of G-proteins. We then focus on a few less explored areas such as the regulation of G-proteins by non-GPCRs and the physiological functions of G-proteins that cannot be easily explained by the known G-protein signaling pathways. There are new signaling pathways and physiological functions for G-proteins to be discovered and further interrogated. With the advancements in structural and computational biological techniques, we are closer to having a better understanding of how G-proteins are regulated and of the specificity of G-protein interactions with their regulators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Production of functional protein hydrolysates from Egyptian breeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of functional protein hydrolysates from Egyptian breeds of soybean and lupin seeds. AA khalil, SS Mohamed, FS Taha, EN Karlsson. Abstract. Enzymatic hydrolysis is an agro-processing aid that can be utilized in order to improve nutritional quality of protein extracts from many sources. In this study, protein ...

  15. Protein mechanics: a route from structure to function

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Why do proteins have such varied and complicated structures and how are these structures related to the functions that each protein must perform? Almost 50 years after the first protein structures were solved (Kendrew et al 1958; Perutz 1960), these questions are still very much part of molecular biology. While structures ...

  16. EFFECT OF DANCE EXERCISE ON COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME: A PILOT STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Sang-Wook Song; Seo-Jin Park; Jung-hyoun Cho; Sung-Goo Kang; Hyun-Kook Lim; Yu-Bae Ahn; Minjeong Kim; Se-Hong Kim

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The purpose of this prospective pilot study was to examine the effects of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome. The participants included 38 elderly metabolic syndrome patients with normal cognitive function (26 exercise group and 12 control group). The exercise group performed dance exercise twice a week for 6 months. Cognitive function was assessed in all participants...

  17. Frank-ter Haar syndrome protein Tks4 regulates epidermal growth factor-dependent cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögel, Gábor; Gujdár, Annamária; Geiszt, Miklós; Lányi, Árpád; Fekete, Anna; Sipeki, Szabolcs; Downward, Julian; Buday, László

    2012-09-07

    Mutations in the SH3PXD2B gene coding for the Tks4 protein are responsible for the autosomal recessive Frank-ter Haar syndrome. Tks4, a substrate of Src tyrosine kinase, is implicated in the regulation of podosome formation. Here, we report a novel role for Tks4 in the EGF signaling pathway. In EGF-treated cells, Tks4 is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with the activated EGF receptor. This association is not direct but requires the presence of Src tyrosine kinase. In addition, treatment of cells with LY294002, an inhibitor of PI 3-kinase, or mutations of the PX domain reduces tyrosine phosphorylation and membrane translocation of Tks4. Furthermore, a PX domain mutant (R43W) Tks4 carrying a reported point mutation in a Frank-ter Haar syndrome patient showed aberrant intracellular expression and reduced phosphoinositide binding. Finally, silencing of Tks4 was shown to markedly inhibit HeLa cell migration in a Boyden chamber assay in response to EGF or serum. Our results therefore reveal a new function for Tks4 in the regulation of growth factor-dependent cell migration.

  18. Recombinant protein-based assays for detection of antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike and nucleocapsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Lia M; Miao, Congrong; Harcourt, Jennifer L; Montgomery, Joel M; Le, Mai Quynh; Dryga, Sergey A; Kamrud, Kurt I; Rivers, Bryan; Babcock, Gregory J; Oliver, Jennifer Betts; Comer, James A; Reynolds, Mary; Uyeki, Timothy M; Bausch, Daniel; Ksiazek, Thomas; Thomas, William; Alterson, Harold; Smith, Jonathan; Ambrosino, Donna M; Anderson, Larry J

    2007-03-01

    Recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) nucleocapsid and spike protein-based immunoglobulin G immunoassays were developed and evaluated. Our assays demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to the SARS coronavirus in sera collected from patients as late as 2 years postonset of symptoms. These assays will be useful not only for routine SARS coronavirus diagnostics but also for epidemiological and antibody kinetic studies.

  19. Nucleocapsid protein VP15 is the basic DNA binding protein of white spot syndrome virus of shrimp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveldt, J.; Vermeesch, A.M.G.; Langenhof, M.; Lang, de A.; Vlak, J.M.; Hulten, van M.C.W.

    2005-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is type species of the genus Whispovirus of the new family Nimaviridae. Despite the elucidation of its genomic sequence, very little is known about the virus as only 6% of its ORFs show homology to known genes. One of the structural virion proteins, VP15, is part of

  20. Quantitative protein localization signatures reveal an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Laksameethanasan, Danai; Tung, Yi-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST), an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to elucidate protein

  1. Alkylation damage by lipid electrophiles targets functional protein systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codreanu, Simona G; Ullery, Jody C; Zhu, Jing; Tallman, Keri A; Beavers, William N; Porter, Ned A; Marnett, Lawrence J; Zhang, Bing; Liebler, Daniel C

    2014-03-01

    Protein alkylation by reactive electrophiles contributes to chemical toxicities and oxidative stress, but the functional impact of alkylation damage across proteomes is poorly understood. We used Click chemistry and shotgun proteomics to profile the accumulation of proteome damage in human cells treated with lipid electrophile probes. Protein target profiles revealed three damage susceptibility classes, as well as proteins that were highly resistant to alkylation. Damage occurred selectively across functional protein interaction networks, with the most highly alkylation-susceptible proteins mapping to networks involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Proteins with lower damage susceptibility mapped to networks involved in protein synthesis and turnover and were alkylated only at electrophile concentrations that caused significant toxicity. Hierarchical susceptibility of proteome systems to alkylation may allow cells to survive sublethal damage while protecting critical cell functions.

  2. Alkylation Damage by Lipid Electrophiles Targets Functional Protein Systems*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codreanu, Simona G.; Ullery, Jody C.; Zhu, Jing; Tallman, Keri A.; Beavers, William N.; Porter, Ned A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Zhang, Bing; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Protein alkylation by reactive electrophiles contributes to chemical toxicities and oxidative stress, but the functional impact of alkylation damage across proteomes is poorly understood. We used Click chemistry and shotgun proteomics to profile the accumulation of proteome damage in human cells treated with lipid electrophile probes. Protein target profiles revealed three damage susceptibility classes, as well as proteins that were highly resistant to alkylation. Damage occurred selectively across functional protein interaction networks, with the most highly alkylation-susceptible proteins mapping to networks involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Proteins with lower damage susceptibility mapped to networks involved in protein synthesis and turnover and were alkylated only at electrophile concentrations that caused significant toxicity. Hierarchical susceptibility of proteome systems to alkylation may allow cells to survive sublethal damage while protecting critical cell functions. PMID:24429493

  3. A large-scale evaluation of computational protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radivojac, Predrag; Clark, Wyatt T; Oron, Tal Ronnen; Schnoes, Alexandra M; Wittkop, Tobias; Sokolov, Artem; Graim, Kiley; Funk, Christopher; Verspoor, Karin; Ben-Hur, Asa; Pandey, Gaurav; Yunes, Jeffrey M; Talwalkar, Ameet S; Repo, Susanna; Souza, Michael L; Piovesan, Damiano; Casadio, Rita; Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Jianlin; Fang, Hai; Gough, Julian; Koskinen, Patrik; Törönen, Petri; Nokso-Koivisto, Jussi; Holm, Liisa; Cozzetto, Domenico; Buchan, Daniel W A; Bryson, Kevin; Jones, David T; Limaye, Bhakti; Inamdar, Harshal; Datta, Avik; Manjari, Sunitha K; Joshi, Rajendra; Chitale, Meghana; Kihara, Daisuke; Lisewski, Andreas M; Erdin, Serkan; Venner, Eric; Lichtarge, Olivier; Rentzsch, Robert; Yang, Haixuan; Romero, Alfonso E; Bhat, Prajwal; Paccanaro, Alberto; Hamp, Tobias; Kaßner, Rebecca; Seemayer, Stefan; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schaefer, Christian; Achten, Dominik; Auer, Florian; Boehm, Ariane; Braun, Tatjana; Hecht, Maximilian; Heron, Mark; Hönigschmid, Peter; Hopf, Thomas A; Kaufmann, Stefanie; Kiening, Michael; Krompass, Denis; Landerer, Cedric; Mahlich, Yannick; Roos, Manfred; Björne, Jari; Salakoski, Tapio; Wong, Andrew; Shatkay, Hagit; Gatzmann, Fanny; Sommer, Ingolf; Wass, Mark N; Sternberg, Michael J E; Škunca, Nives; Supek, Fran; Bošnjak, Matko; Panov, Panče; Džeroski, Sašo; Šmuc, Tomislav; Kourmpetis, Yiannis A I; van Dijk, Aalt D J; ter Braak, Cajo J F; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Gong, Qingtian; Dong, Xinran; Tian, Weidong; Falda, Marco; Fontana, Paolo; Lavezzo, Enrico; Di Camillo, Barbara; Toppo, Stefano; Lan, Liang; Djuric, Nemanja; Guo, Yuhong; Vucetic, Slobodan; Bairoch, Amos; Linial, Michal; Babbitt, Patricia C; Brenner, Steven E; Orengo, Christine; Rost, Burkhard; Mooney, Sean D; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-03-01

    Automated annotation of protein function is challenging. As the number of sequenced genomes rapidly grows, the overwhelming majority of protein products can only be annotated computationally. If computational predictions are to be relied upon, it is crucial that the accuracy of these methods be high. Here we report the results from the first large-scale community-based critical assessment of protein function annotation (CAFA) experiment. Fifty-four methods representing the state of the art for protein function prediction were evaluated on a target set of 866 proteins from 11 organisms. Two findings stand out: (i) today's best protein function prediction algorithms substantially outperform widely used first-generation methods, with large gains on all types of targets; and (ii) although the top methods perform well enough to guide experiments, there is considerable need for improvement of currently available tools.

  4. Supraclavicular scalenectomy for thoracic outlet syndrome--functional outcomes assessed using the DASH scoring system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Glynn, Ronan W

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate supraclavicular scalenectomy ± cervical rib excision for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS), employing Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scoring for functional assessment post-decompression.

  5. Small-molecule control of protein function through Staudinger reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ji; Liu, Qingyang; Morihiro, Kunihiko; Deiters, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Using small molecules to control the function of proteins in live cells with complete specificity is highly desirable, but challenging. Here we report a small-molecule switch that can be used to control protein activity. The approach uses a phosphine-mediated Staudinger reduction to activate protein function. Genetic encoding of an ortho-azidobenzyloxycarbonyl amino acid using a pyrrolysyl transfer RNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair in mammalian cells enables the site-specific introduction of a small-molecule-removable protecting group into the protein of interest. Strategic placement of this group renders the protein inactive until deprotection through a bioorthogonal Staudinger reduction delivers the active wild-type protein. This developed methodology was applied to the conditional control of several cellular processes, including bioluminescence (luciferase), fluorescence (enhanced green fluorescent protein), protein translocation (nuclear localization sequence), DNA recombination (Cre) and gene editing (Cas9).

  6. Prediction of protein function and pathways in the genome era.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabaldon, T.; Huynen, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The growing number of completely sequenced genomes adds new dimensions to the use of sequence analysis to predict protein function. Compared with the classical knowledge transfer from one protein to a similar sequence (homology-based function prediction), knowledge about the corresponding genes in

  7. Liver Function Status in some Nigerian Children with Protein Energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To ascertain functional status of the liver in Nigeria Children with Protein energy malnutrition. Materials and Methods: Liver function tests were performed on a total of 88 children with protein energy malnutrition (PEM). These were compared with 22 apparently well-nourished children who served as controls.

  8. The contact activation proteins: a structure/function overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, J. C.; McMullen, B. A.; Bouma, B. N.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, extensive knowledge has been obtained on the structure/function relationships of blood coagulation proteins. In this overview, we present recent developments on the structure/function relationships of the contact activation proteins: factor XII, high molecular weight kininogen,

  9. BLANNOTATOR: enhanced homology-based function prediction of bacterial proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankainen Matti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated function prediction has played a central role in determining the biological functions of bacterial proteins. Typically, protein function annotation relies on homology, and function is inferred from other proteins with similar sequences. This approach has become popular in bacterial genomics because it is one of the few methods that is practical for large datasets and because it does not require additional functional genomics experiments. However, the existing solutions produce erroneous predictions in many cases, especially when query sequences have low levels of identity with the annotated source protein. This problem has created a pressing need for improvements in homology-based annotation. Results We present an automated method for the functional annotation of bacterial protein sequences. Based on sequence similarity searches, BLANNOTATOR accurately annotates query sequences with one-line summary descriptions of protein function. It groups sequences identified by BLAST into subsets according to their annotation and bases its prediction on a set of sequences with consistent functional information. We show the results of BLANNOTATOR's performance in sets of bacterial proteins with known functions. We simulated the annotation process for 3090 SWISS-PROT proteins using a database in its state preceding the functional characterisation of the query protein. For this dataset, our method outperformed the five others that we tested, and the improved performance was maintained even in the absence of highly related sequence hits. We further demonstrate the value of our tool by analysing the putative proteome of Lactobacillus crispatus strain ST1. Conclusions BLANNOTATOR is an accurate method for bacterial protein function prediction. It is practical for genome-scale data and does not require pre-existing sequence clustering; thus, this method suits the needs of bacterial genome and metagenome researchers. The method and a

  10. Perspectives on hand function in girls and women with Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Jenny; Parkinson, Stephanie; Ranelli, Sonia; Leonard, Helen; Diener, Pamela; Lotan, Meir

    2014-06-01

    Rett syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder that is usually associated with a mutation on the X-linked MECP2 gene. Hand function is particularly affected and we discuss theoretical and practical perspectives for optimising hand function in Rett syndrome. We reviewed the literature pertaining to hand function and stereotypies in Rett syndrome and developed a toolkit for their assessment and treatment. There is little published information on management of hand function in Rett syndrome. We suggest assessment and treatment strategies based on available literature, clinical experience and grounded in theories of motor control and motor learning. Additional studies are needed to determine the best treatments for hand function in Rett syndrome. Meanwhile, clinical needs can be addressed by supplementing the evidence base with an understanding of the complexities of Rett syndrome, clinical experience, environmental enrichment animal studies and theories of motor control and motor learning.

  11. Membrane Protein Production in Lactococcus lactis for Functional Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigneurin-Berny, Daphne; King, Martin S; Sautron, Emiline; Moyet, Lucas; Catty, Patrice; André, François; Rolland, Norbert; Kunji, Edmund R S; Frelet-Barrand, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Due to their unique properties, expression and study of membrane proteins in heterologous systems remains difficult. Among the bacterial systems available, the Gram-positive lactic bacterium, Lactococcus lactis, traditionally used in food fermentations, is nowadays widely used for large-scale production and functional characterization of bacterial and eukaryotic membrane proteins. The aim of this chapter is to describe the different possibilities for the functional characterization of peripheral or intrinsic membrane proteins expressed in Lactococcus lactis.

  12. Structure and Function Study of HIV and Influenza Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuang

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and influenza virus are membrane-enveloped viruses causing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and flu. The initial step of HIV and influenza virus infection is fusion between viral and host cell membrane catalyzed by the viral fusion protein gp41 and hemagglutinin (HA) respectively. However, the structure of gp41 and HA as well as the infection mechanism are still not fully understood. This work addresses (1) full length gp41 ectodomain and TM domain structure and function and (2) IFP membrane location and IFP-membrane interaction. My studies of gp41 protein and IFP can provide better understanding of the membrane fusion mechanism and may aid development of anti-viral therapeutics and vaccine. The full length ectodomain and transmembrane domain of gp41 and shorter constructs were expressed, purified and solubilized at physiology conditions. The constructs adopt overall alpha helical structure in SDS and DPC detergents, and showed hyperthermostability with Tm > 90 °C. The oligomeric states of these proteins vary in different detergent buffer: predominant trimer for all constructs and some hexamer fraction for HM and HM_TM protein in SDS at pH 7.4; and mixtures of monomer, trimer, and higher-order oligomer protein in DPC at pH 4.0 and 7.4. Substantial protein-induced vesicle fusion was observed, including fusion of neutral vesicles at neutral pH, which are the conditions similar HIV/cell fusion. Vesicle fusion by a gp41 ectodomain construct has rarely been observed under these conditions, and is aided by inclusion of both the FP and TM, and by protein which is predominantly trimer rather than monomer. Current data was integrated with existing data, and a structural model was proposed. Secondary structure and conformation of IFP is a helix-turn-helix structure in membrane. However, there has been arguments about the IFP membrane location. 13C-2H REDOR solid-state NMR is used to solve this problem. The IFP adopts major alpha

  13. Annual Costs of Care for Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Functional Abdominal Pain, and Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekman, Daniël R; Rutten, Juliette M T M; Vlieger, Arine M; Benninga, Marc A; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W

    2015-11-01

    To estimate annual medical and nonmedical costs of care for children diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or functional abdominal pain (syndrome; FAP/FAPS). Baseline data from children with IBS or FAP/FAPS who were included in a multicenter trial (NTR2725) in The Netherlands were analyzed. Patients' parents completed a questionnaire concerning usage of healthcare resources, travel costs, out-of-pocket expenses, productivity loss of parents, and supportive measures at school. Use of abdominal pain related prescription medication was derived from case reports forms. Total annual costs per patient were calculated as the sum of direct and indirect medical and nonmedical costs. Costs of initial diagnostic investigations were not included. A total of 258 children, mean age 13.4 years (±5.5), were included, and 183 (70.9%) were female. Total annual costs per patient were estimated to be €2512.31. Inpatient and outpatient healthcare use were major cost drivers, accounting for 22.5% and 35.2% of total annual costs, respectively. Parental productivity loss accounted for 22.2% of total annual costs. No difference was found in total costs between children with IBS or FAP/FAPS. Pediatric abdominal pain related functional gastrointestinal disorders impose a large economic burden on patients' families and healthcare systems. More than one-half of total annual costs of IBS and FAP/FAPS consist of inpatient and outpatient healthcare use. Netherlands Trial Registry: NTR2725. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Functionalization of whey proteins by reactive supercritical fluid extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanitta Ruttarattanamongkol

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein, a by-product from cheese-making, is often used in a variety of food formulations due to its unsurpassednutritional quality and inherent functional properties. However, the possibilities for the improvement and upgrading of wheyprotein utilization still need to be explored. Reactive supercritical fluid extrusion (SCFX is a novel technique that has beenrecently reported to successfully functionalize commercially available whey proteins into a product with enhanced functionalproperties. The specific goal of this review is to provide fundamental understanding of the reinforcement mechanism andprocessing of protein functionalization by reactive SCFX process. The superimposed extrusion variables and their interactionmechanism affect the physico-chemical properties of whey proteins. By understanding the structure, functional properties andprocessing relationships of such materials, the rational design criteria for novel functionalized proteins could be developedand effectively utilized in food systems.

  15. A survey of computational intelligence techniques in protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Arvind Kumar; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    During the past, there was a massive growth of knowledge of unknown proteins with the advancement of high throughput microarray technologies. Protein function prediction is the most challenging problem in bioinformatics. In the past, the homology based approaches were used to predict the protein function, but they failed when a new protein was different from the previous one. Therefore, to alleviate the problems associated with homology based traditional approaches, numerous computational intelligence techniques have been proposed in the recent past. This paper presents a state-of-the-art comprehensive review of various computational intelligence techniques for protein function predictions using sequence, structure, protein-protein interaction network, and gene expression data used in wide areas of applications such as prediction of DNA and RNA binding sites, subcellular localization, enzyme functions, signal peptides, catalytic residues, nuclear/G-protein coupled receptors, membrane proteins, and pathway analysis from gene expression datasets. This paper also summarizes the result obtained by many researchers to solve these problems by using computational intelligence techniques with appropriate datasets to improve the prediction performance. The summary shows that ensemble classifiers and integration of multiple heterogeneous data are useful for protein function prediction.

  16. Analysis of Sebaceous Neoplasms for DNA Mismatch Repair Proteins in Muir-Torre Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollinger, Tess H; Kieliszak, Christopher R; Logemann, Nicholas; Gratrix, Max L

    2017-01-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome is a rare genodermatosis inherited most frequently in an autosomal dominant fashion. Current criteria for its diagnosis include at least one sebaceous tumor and an underlying visceral malignancy. Muir-Torre syndrome is strongly associated with a germline mutation in DNA mismatch repair genes. We report two patients with a history of colorectal carcinoma who presented with sebaceous neoplasms on the face and trunk. Immunohistochemical staining of the sebaceous neoplasms demonstrated absence of mismatch repair proteins MSH2 and MSH6. Genetic studies confirmed deletions in the MSH2 gene, and a diagnosis of Lynch syndrome was made. Immunohistochemical staining for mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 may aid in the diagnosis of Muir-Torre syndrome in cases where there is high suspicion. Genetic testing is an important final step in the confirmation of Muir-Torre syndrome.

  17. The S100 proteins in epidermis: Topology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniak, Wiesława; Graczyk-Jarzynka, Agnieszka

    2015-12-01

    S100 proteins are small calcium binding proteins encoded by genes located in the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC). Differently to other proteins encoded by EDC genes, which are indispensable for normal epidermal differentiation, the role of S100 proteins in the epidermis remains largely unknown. Particular S100 proteins differ in their distribution in epidermal layers, skin appendages, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. Taking into account that each epidermal component consists of specialized cells with well-defined functions, such differential distribution may be indicative of the function of a given S100 protein. We used this criterion together with the survey of the current experimental data pertinent to epidermis to provide a fairly comprehensive view on the possible function of individual S100 proteins in this tissue. S100 proteins are differently expressed and, despite extensive structural homology, perform diverse functions in the epidermis. Certain S100 proteins probably ensure constant epidermal renewal and support wound healing while others act in epidermal differentiation or have a protective role. As their expression is differently affected in various skin pathologies, particular S100 proteins could be valuable diagnostic markers. S100 proteins seem to be important although not yet fully recognized epidermal constituents. Better understanding of their role in the epidermis might be helpful in designing therapies to various skin diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of probiotic supplementation on pancreatic β-cell function and c-reactive protein in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaz Shoaei

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: A 8-week multispecies probiotics supplementation had nonsignificantly beneficial effect on pancreatic b-cell function and CRP in PCOS patients. After adjustment for some covariates, serum insulin changes were significantly different between groups.

  19. Speech, language, and hearing function in twins with Alport syndrome: A seven-year retrospective case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kaipa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Alport syndrome is an X-linked syndrome that results in nephritis, renal failure, sensorineural hearing loss, and eye deficits. As a result of sensorineural hearing loss, these individuals are likely to experience difficulties in the area of speech and language. While studies in the past have examined the speech and language characteristics of children with syndromic sensorineural hearing loss, to our knowledge there are no previous studies to have documented the speech and language characteristics of these children on a long-term basis. The current study addresses this limitation by reporting speech, language, hearing, and function of twin brothers with X-linked Alport syndrome across a seven-year period. Information was collected by examining the medical records of the participants as well as through a verbal interview with the participants' guardian. Results revealed that the participants' hearing abilities gradually deteriorated over the seven-year period which affected their speech and language development as well. The kidney function tests revealed significant presence of hematuria (blood in the urine as well as proteinuria (protein in the urine suggesting chronic kidney dysfunction. This longitudinal study demonstrates the functional relationship between the kidneys and the cochlea, although they appear to be independent of one another. As individuals with Alport syndrome exhibit systemic complications, interdisciplinary collaboration is essential among health care providers including audiologists, speech-language pathologists, nephrologists, and ophthalmologist to promote evidence-based practice.

  20. Protein Carbonylation and Adipocyte Mitochondrial Function*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jessica M.; Hahn, Wendy S.; Stone, Matthew D.; Inda, Jacob J.; Droullard, David J.; Kuzmicic, Jovan P.; Donoghue, Margaret A.; Long, Eric K.; Armien, Anibal G.; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar; Griffin, Timothy J.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonylation is the covalent, non-reversible modification of the side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues by lipid peroxidation end products such as 4-hydroxy- and 4-oxononenal. In adipose tissue the effects of such modifications are associated with increased oxidative stress and metabolic dysregulation centered on mitochondrial energy metabolism. To address the role of protein carbonylation in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction, quantitative proteomics was employed to identify specific targets of carbonylation in GSTA4-silenced or overexpressing 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GSTA4-silenced adipocytes displayed elevated carbonylation of several key mitochondrial proteins including the phosphate carrier protein, NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 and 3, translocase of inner mitochondrial membrane 50, and valyl-tRNA synthetase. Elevated protein carbonylation is accompanied by diminished complex I activity, impaired respiration, increased superoxide production, and a reduction in membrane potential without changes in mitochondrial number, area, or density. Silencing of the phosphate carrier or NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 or 3 in 3T3-L1 cells results in decreased basal and maximal respiration. These results suggest that protein carbonylation plays a major instigating role in cytokine-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and may be linked to the development of insulin resistance in the adipocyte. PMID:22822087

  1. Protein carbonylation and adipocyte mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jessica M; Hahn, Wendy S; Stone, Matthew D; Inda, Jacob J; Droullard, David J; Kuzmicic, Jovan P; Donoghue, Margaret A; Long, Eric K; Armien, Anibal G; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar; Griffin, Timothy J; Bernlohr, David A

    2012-09-21

    Carbonylation is the covalent, non-reversible modification of the side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues by lipid peroxidation end products such as 4-hydroxy- and 4-oxononenal. In adipose tissue the effects of such modifications are associated with increased oxidative stress and metabolic dysregulation centered on mitochondrial energy metabolism. To address the role of protein carbonylation in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction, quantitative proteomics was employed to identify specific targets of carbonylation in GSTA4-silenced or overexpressing 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GSTA4-silenced adipocytes displayed elevated carbonylation of several key mitochondrial proteins including the phosphate carrier protein, NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 and 3, translocase of inner mitochondrial membrane 50, and valyl-tRNA synthetase. Elevated protein carbonylation is accompanied by diminished complex I activity, impaired respiration, increased superoxide production, and a reduction in membrane potential without changes in mitochondrial number, area, or density. Silencing of the phosphate carrier or NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 or 3 in 3T3-L1 cells results in decreased basal and maximal respiration. These results suggest that protein carbonylation plays a major instigating role in cytokine-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and may be linked to the development of insulin resistance in the adipocyte.

  2. Relation of albumin/creatinine ratio to C-reactive protein and to the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Adrian W; Seshadri, Niranjan; Pearce, Gregory L; Sachar, Ravish; Hoogwerf, Byron J; Sprecher, Dennis L

    2003-09-01

    We hypothesized that the association of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) with urinary albumin excretion (UAE) is predominately mediated through its correlation with the metabolic syndrome. Serum CRP and urine albumin:creatinine ratios (ACR) from 720 preventive cardiology patients were analyzed to estimate age- and gender-adjusted relative risk of high CRP and metabolic syndrome for high ACR. These data demonstrate that CRP independently predicts the presence of UAE, a marker of endothelial dysfunction.

  3. Dynamical properties and functions of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Miyazawa, Tatsuo

    1982-01-01

    The advantages of nuclear magnetic resonance analyses for studying conformations and dynamical properties of protein molecules in aqueous solution are reviewed. For erabutoxin b, a short neurotoxin, and for α-cobratoxin, a long neurotoxin, th e local environments and proximity relations of amino acid residues have been elucidated. The conformations of these molecules in neutral aqueous solution are different, in part, from those in crystal. From the analyses of the deuterium exchange rates of amide protons, the long neurotoxins are found to be less flexible than short neurotoxins, corresponding to the lower dissociation/association rates of long toxins for acetylcholin receptor proteins. (author)

  4. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... concentrations in subjects grouped according to the presence of 0-1, 2-3, and > or =4 features of the metabolic syndrome were 1.11, 1.27, and 2.16 mg/l, respectively, with a statistically highly significant trend (P metabolic syndrome...

  5. Expression and diagnostic use of recombinant M protein of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Frölichová

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix M protein combined with nucleocapsid N protein could be a promising combination of virus antigens for diagnosing the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome. The goal of this work was to express the recombinant M protein of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Escherichia coli cells and compare its serological reactivity with the N protein of the virus. The gene coding for the M protein was cloned into the pDest17 vector. The resulting protein was purified by metalochelating affinity chromatography. Recombinant M protein was applied as an antigen in immunoblot test and compared on a panel of porcine sera with N protein based IDEXX test. Of 120 examined samples, the majority (78.3% gave identical results using both compared tests. From the group of discrepant results, IDEXX test identified considerably more positive sera (17.5% than M protein based test (4.2%. The main contribution of the work is finding that although IDEXX test proved to be more sensitive than M protein based test, 4.2% of sera would escape detection by serological test based on N protein. Further development and purification of the M protein for the use in Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay format test could increase the performance of serological testing.

  6. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In addition to binding complement, VCP also binds to heparin. These two binding abilities can take place simultaneously and contribute to its many function and to its potential use in several inflammatory diseases, e.g. Alzheimer's disease (AD), CNS injury, xenotransplantation, etc. making it a truly fascinating molecule and ...

  7. Automated functional classification of experimental and predicted protein structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samudrala Ram

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins that are similar in sequence or structure may perform different functions in nature. In such cases, function cannot be inferred from sequence or structural similarity. Results We analyzed experimental structures belonging to the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP database and showed that about half of them belong to multi-functional fold families for which protein similarity alone is not adequate to assign function. We also analyzed predicted structures from the LiveBench and the PDB-CAFASP experiments and showed that accurate homology-based functional assignments cannot be achieved approximately one third of the time, when the protein is a member of a multi-functional fold family. We then conducted extended performance evaluation and comparisons on both experimental and predicted structures using our Functional Signatures from Structural Alignments (FSSA algorithm that we previously developed to handle the problem of classifying proteins belonging to multi-functional fold families. Conclusion The results indicate that the FSSA algorithm has better accuracy when compared to homology-based approaches for functional classification of both experimental and predicted protein structures, in part due to its use of local, as opposed to global, information for classifying function. The FSSA algorithm has also been implemented as a webserver and is available at http://protinfo.compbio.washington.edu/fssa.

  8. Non-structural protein 2 of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus: a crucial protein in viral pathogenesis, immunity and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Xue; Song, Ni; Chen, Li-Zhi; Cheng, Shi-Peng; Wu, Hua; Wen, Yong-Jun

    2013-08-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a swine disease of significant economic importance that causes reproductive and respiratory problems in pigs. The replicase non-structural protein 2 (Nsp2) of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is recognized as the most variable region within the PRRSV genome. This review discusses the molecular characteristics and biological and immunological functions of the PRRSV Nsp2 and its involvement in the virus's pathogenesis. The role of Nsp2 in cell and tissue tropism, replication and growth, and variation and pathogenicity of PRRSV and the differences in virulence among different strains are described in the present review. Nsp2 is an ideal marker for monitoring genetic variation and for developing differential diagnostic tests. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Predictors of global left ventricular function in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Branislava Aleksa; Tadic, Marijana Vaso; Simic, Dragan Vojislav

    2011-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) represents a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that act synergistically. The aim of this study was to determine which parameters were independently associated with the global left ventricular (LV) function in subjects with MS estimated with the Tei index. The study included 234 subjects with MS and 96 controls adjusted by age. MS was defined by the presence of three or more of ATP- NCEP III criteria. All subjects underwent laboratory blood tests and two-dimensional, pulsed and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Appropriate tissue Doppler time intervals for the estimation of the Tei index were also assessed. The Tei index was increased in subjects with MS (0.35 ± 0.05 vs 0.49 ± 0.10, p < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis of the clinical parameters showed that systolic blood pressure (β= 0.289, p < 0.001), fasting glucose (β= 0.205, p = 0.009), LV mass index (β= 0.301, p < 0.001), E/e'(septal) (β= 0.267, p < 0.001), and e'(septal) (β= -0.176, p = 0.011) were independently associated with the global left ventricular function estimated by Tei index. MS has a significant impact on LV global function. Systolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, LV mass index, E/e'(septal), and e'(septal) were independently associated with the LV global function.

  10. Immunomodulation of enteric neural function in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Dervla

    2015-06-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder which is characterised by symptoms such as bloating, altered bowel habit and visceral pain. It's generally accepted that miscommunication between the brain and gut underlies the changes in motility, absorpto-secretory function and pain sensitivity associated with IBS. However, partly due to the lack of disease-defining biomarkers, understanding the aetiology of this complex and multifactorial disease remains elusive. Anecdotally, IBS patients have noted that periods of stress can result in symptom flares and many patients exhibit co-morbid stress-related mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. However, in addition to psychosocial stressors, infection-related stress has also been linked with the initiation, persistence and severity of symptom flares. Indeed, prior gastrointestinal infection is one of the strongest predictors of developing IBS. Despite a lack of overt morphological inflammation, the importance of immune factors in the pathophysiology of IBS is gaining acceptance. Subtle changes in the numbers of mucosal immune cell infiltrates and elevated levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines have been reproducibly demonstrated in IBS populations. Moreover, these immune mediators directly affect neural signalling. An exciting new area of research is the role of luminal microbiota in the modulation of neuro-immune signalling, resulting in local changes in gastrointestinal function and alterations in central neural functioning. Progress in this area has begun to unravel some of the complexities of neuroimmune and neuroendocrine interactions and how these molecular exchanges contribute to GI dysfunction.

  11. Effect of Nasal CPAP on SIRT1 and Endothelial Function in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Ji; Liaw, Shwu-Fang; Lin, Ching-Chi; Chiu, Chung-Hsin; Lin, Mei-Wei; Chang, Feng-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a histone/protein deacetylase, has been implicated in aging, metabolism, and stress resistance. SIRT1 regulates endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase, restores NO availability, and is involved in different aspects of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate any abnormalities with regard to SIRT1 protein level in the blood, SIRT1 activity, and impaired endothelial function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We also investigated whether or not OSAS patients who received nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment showed improvements in the levels of SIRT1. Thirty-five patients with moderately severe to severe OSAS who requested nasal CPAP treatment and 20 healthy controls were prospectively enrolled. The SIRT1 protein levels in blood and its activity, and the serum levels of nitric oxide derivative (NO x ) were assessed. All subjects participated in sleep studies, which were repeated 3 months after nasal CPAP treatment in the patients with OSAS. In the patients with OSAS, the level of SIRT1 in the blood, its activity, and that of NO x was lower than those of normal subjects before nasal CPAP treatment. After nasal CPAP treatment, the level of SIRT1 in the blood and its activity increased from 0.55 ± 0.32 pg/μg of total protein and 3085.53 ± 1071.57 arbitrary fluorescence units (AFUs)/μg of total protein to 1.13 ± 0.43 pg/μg of total protein and 5344.65 ± 1579.71 AFUs/μg of total protein. The serum levels of NO x in the patients with OSAS increased from 16.36 ± 5.78 to 25.94 ± 5.17 µM. Successful treatment for OSAS with nasal CPAP can restore blood levels of the SIRT1 protein and its activity and serum levels of NO x .

  12. Functional characterization of Angptl4 protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenstein, L.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Elevated plasma triglycerides (TG) are increasingly recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis. A new adipocytokine was discovered by several groups which is referred to as Angptl4 (Angiopoietin-like protein 4). Angptl4 was recently identified as a major determinant of plasma TG

  13. Molecular and functional characterization of MICAL proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Since their original identification in 2002, MICAL proteins have been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes including axon guidance, tight junction formation, spinal cord injury and cancer. MICALs mediate cell signaling via their unusual N-terminal monooxygenase (MO) domain

  14. Functional differences in yeast protein disulfide isomerases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Westphal, V; Tachibana, C

    2001-01-01

    PDI1 is the essential gene encoding protein disulfide isomerase in yeast. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, however, contains four other nonessential genes with homology to PDI1: MPD1, MPD2, EUG1, and EPS1. We have investigated the effects of simultaneous deletions of these genes. In several...

  15. Design and functionality of dense protein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saglam, D.

    2012-01-01

    Food products that contain high levels of protein can help to control food intake and to maintain a healthy body weight due to their strong satiating properties. They are also beneficial in the nutrition of elderly and commonly used in medical nutrition. Preparation of food products at high

  16. Studying Membrane Protein Structure and Function Using Nanodiscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, Pie

    The structure and dynamic of membrane proteins can provide valuable information about general functions, diseases and effects of various drugs. Studying membrane proteins are a challenge as an amphiphilic environment is necessary to stabilise the protein in a functionally and structurally relevant...... form. This is most typically achieved through the use of detergent based reconstitution systems. However, time and again such systems fail to provide a suitable environment causing aggregation and inactivation. Nanodiscs are self-assembled lipoproteins containing two membrane scaffold proteins...... and a lipid bilayer in defined nanometer size, which can act as a stabiliser for membrane proteins. This enables both functional and structural investigation of membrane proteins in a detergent free environment which is closer to the native situation. Understanding the self-assembly of nanodiscs is important...

  17. Development of baked and extruded functional foods from metabolic syndrome specific ingredient mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglani, Neetu; Bains, Kiran; Kaur, Harpreet

    2015-09-01

    The study was aimed to develop baked and extruded functional foods from Metabolic Syndrome (MS) specific designed ingredient mixes with optimum amino acid makeup using key food ingredients with functional properties such as whole cereals, legumes, skimmed milk powder, along with flaxseeds and fenugreek seeds. Two cereals viz. barley and oats and four pulses viz. mung bean, cowpea, bengal gram and soybean were blended in different proportions in order to balance the limiting amino acid lysine in the wheat flour. Three products namely bread, extruded snack and noodles prepared from twenty five ingredient mixes. Six ingredient mixes of breads and four ingredient mixes each of extruded snack and noodles specifically designed for MS patients were organoleptically at par with control wheat flour products. The acceptable products had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher lysine, crude protein, ash and fibre and low carbohydrates in compare control whole wheat flour products, hence appropriate for MS patients.

  18. The Structure and Function of Non-Collagenous Bone Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Magnus; McQuillan, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The research done under the cooperative research agreement for the project titled 'The structure and function of non-collagenous bone proteins' represented the first phase of an ongoing program to define the structural and functional relationships of the principal noncollagenous proteins in bone. An ultimate goal of this research is to enable design and execution of useful pharmacological compounds that will have a beneficial effect in treatment of osteoporosis, both land-based and induced by long-duration space travel. The goals of the now complete first phase were as follows: 1. Establish and/or develop powerful recombinant protein expression systems; 2. Develop and refine isolation and purification of recombinant proteins; 3. Express wild-type non-collagenous bone proteins; 4. Express site-specific mutant proteins and domains of wild-type proteins to enhance likelihood of crystal formation for subsequent solution of structure.

  19. A step towards a new delimitation of functional somatic syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Schröder, Andreas; Fink, Per

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The current delimitation of functional somatic syndromes (FSS) is inconsistent. We aimed to investigate somatic symptom profiles in the general adult population to contribute to a new, data-driven delimitation of FSS. METHODS: Information on 31 self-reported somatic symptoms used...... with sex, age, chronic disease, self-perceived health, symptom impact, self-reported FSS, and BDS case-status. RESULTS: Eight symptom profiles were identified. The largest profile had no symptoms (49% of the population). Three profiles were characterized by a few, specific symptoms: muscle and joint pain...... identified eight symptom profiles characterized by specific combinations of symptoms. Four of these had multiple symptoms from several bodily systems showing large overlap with BDS, possibly indicating subtypes of FSS. The profiles contribute to a new delimitation of FSS by illustrating the importance...

  20. Neutrophil Function in 8 Cases of Papillon-Lefevre Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Lotfazar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Papillon Lefevre syndrome (PLS is a rate autosomal recessive disorder, which is characterized by palmar- plantar hyperkeratosis and rapid periodontal destruction of primary and permanent dentitions.Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the peripheral blood neutrophil function including random locomotion, chemotaxis and oxidative mechanism of killing in a group of patients with PLS.Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from 8 PLS patients and 92 healthy control subjects. PMN mobility was measured by a modification of the micromethod of Addison and Babbage. Latex-Stimulated NBT reduction test described by Park et al was followed. Data were analyzed by Mann Whitney U test.Results: The chemotactic activity in the PLS group was significantly lower than control group (89.5±21.6 vs 113±16 mm, P0.05.Conclusion: The present study indicated an impaired neutrophil chemotaxis in PLS patients.

  1. Noonan syndrome gain-of-function mutations in NRAS cause zebrafish gastrulation defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runtuwene, V.J.; van Eekelen, M.J.L.; Overvoorde, J.; Rehmann, H.; Yntema, H.G.; Nillesen, W.M.; van Haeringen, A.; van der Burgt, I.; Burgering, B.; den Hertog, J.

    2011-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a relatively common developmental disorder that is characterized by reduced growth, wide-set eyes and congenital heart defects. Noonan syndrome is associated with dysregulation of the Ras-mitogen-activated-protein-kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Recently, two mutations in NRAS

  2. AVID: An integrative framework for discovering functional relationships among proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keating Amy E

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determining the functions of uncharacterized proteins is one of the most pressing problems in the post-genomic era. Large scale protein-protein interaction assays, global mRNA expression analyses and systematic protein localization studies provide experimental information that can be used for this purpose. The data from such experiments contain many false positives and false negatives, but can be processed using computational methods to provide reliable information about protein-protein relationships and protein function. An outstanding and important goal is to predict detailed functional annotation for all uncharacterized proteins that is reliable enough to effectively guide experiments. Results We present AVID, a computational method that uses a multi-stage learning framework to integrate experimental results with sequence information, generating networks reflecting functional similarities among proteins. We illustrate use of the networks by making predictions of detailed Gene Ontology (GO annotations in three categories: molecular function, biological process, and cellular component. Applied to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, AVID provides 37,451 pair-wise functional linkages between 4,191 proteins. These relationships are ~65–78% accurate, as assessed by cross-validation testing. Assignments of highly detailed functional descriptors to proteins, based on the networks, are estimated to be ~67% accurate for GO categories describing molecular function and cellular component and ~52% accurate for terms describing biological process. The predictions cover 1,490 proteins with no previous annotation in GO and also assign more detailed functions to many proteins annotated only with less descriptive terms. Predictions made by AVID are largely distinct from those made by other methods. Out of 37,451 predicted pair-wise relationships, the greatest number shared in common with another method is 3,413. Conclusion AVID provides

  3. ESG: extended similarity group method for automated protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitale, Meghana; Hawkins, Troy; Park, Changsoon; Kihara, Daisuke

    2009-07-15

    Importance of accurate automatic protein function prediction is ever increasing in the face of a large number of newly sequenced genomes and proteomics data that are awaiting biological interpretation. Conventional methods have focused on high sequence similarity-based annotation transfer which relies on the concept of homology. However, many cases have been reported that simple transfer of function from top hits of a homology search causes erroneous annotation. New methods are required to handle the sequence similarity in a more robust way to combine together signals from strongly and weakly similar proteins for effectively predicting function for unknown proteins with high reliability. We present the extended similarity group (ESG) method, which performs iterative sequence database searches and annotates a query sequence with Gene Ontology terms. Each annotation is assigned with probability based on its relative similarity score with the multiple-level neighbors in the protein similarity graph. We will depict how the statistical framework of ESG improves the prediction accuracy by iteratively taking into account the neighborhood of query protein in the sequence similarity space. ESG outperforms conventional PSI-BLAST and the protein function prediction (PFP) algorithm. It is found that the iterative search is effective in capturing multiple-domains in a query protein, enabling accurately predicting several functions which originate from different domains. ESG web server is available for automated protein function prediction at http://dragon.bio.purdue.edu/ESG/.

  4. Association of the Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type-3 protein with clathrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gahl William A

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS is a disorder of lysosome-related organelle biogenesis characterized by oculocutaneous albinism and prolonged bleeding. These clinical findings reflect defects in the formation of melanosomes in melanocytes and dense bodies in platelets. HPS type-3 (HPS-3 results from mutations in the HPS3 gene, which encodes a 1004 amino acid protein of unknown function that contains a predicted clathrin-binding motif (LLDFE at residues 172–176. Results Clathrin was co-immunoprecipitated by HPS3 antibodies from normal but not HPS3 null melanocytes. Normal melanocytes expressing a GFP-HPS3 fusion protein demonstrated partial co-localization of GFP-HPS3 with clathrin following a 20°C temperature block. GFP-HPS3 in which the predicted clathrin-binding domain of HPS3 was mutated (GFP-HPS3-delCBD did not co-localize with clathrin under the same conditions. Immunoelectron microscopy of normal melanocytes expressing GFP-HPS3 showed co-localization of GFP-HPS3 with clathrin, predominantly on small vesicles in the perinuclear region. In contrast, GFP-HPS3-delCBD did not co-localize with clathrin and exhibited a largely cytoplasmic distribution. Conclusion HPS3 associates with clathrin, predominantly on small clathrin-containing vesicles in the perinuclear region. This association most likely occurs directly via a functional clathrin-binding domain in HPS3. These results suggest a role for HPS3 and its protein complex, BLOC-2, in vesicle formation and trafficking.

  5. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-10-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  6. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Merabet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA, we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  7. Function and structure of GFP-like proteins in the protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wayne J-H; Alvarez, Samuel; Leroux, Ivan E; Shahid, Ramza S; Samma, Alex A; Peshkepija, Paola; Morgan, Alicia L; Mulcahy, Shawn; Zimmer, Marc

    2011-04-01

    The RCSB protein databank contains 266 crystal structures of green fluorescent proteins (GFP) and GFP-like proteins. This is the first systematic analysis of all the GFP-like structures in the pdb. We have used the pdb to examine the function of fluorescent proteins (FP) in nature, aspects of excited state proton transfer (ESPT) in FPs, deformation from planarity of the chromophore and chromophore maturation. The conclusions reached in this review are that (1) The lid residues are highly conserved, particularly those on the "top" of the β-barrel. They are important to the function of GFP-like proteins, perhaps in protecting the chromophore or in β-barrel formation. (2) The primary/ancestral function of GFP-like proteins may well be to aid in light induced electron transfer. (3) The structural prerequisites for light activated proton pumps exist in many structures and it's possible that like bioluminescence, proton pumps are secondary functions of GFP-like proteins. (4) In most GFP-like proteins the protein matrix exerts a significant strain on planar chromophores forcing most GFP-like proteins to adopt non-planar chromophores. These chromophoric deviations from planarity play an important role in determining the fluorescence quantum yield. (5) The chemospatial characteristics of the chromophore cavity determine the isomerization state of the chromophore. The cavities of highlighter proteins that can undergo cis/trans isomerization have chemospatial properties that are common to both cis and trans GFP-like proteins.

  8. Effects of protein separation conditions on the functional and thermal properties of canola protein isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manamperi, Wajira A R; Wiesenborn, Dennis P; Chang, Sam K C; Pryor, Scott W

    2011-04-01

    Canola meal protein isolates were prepared from defatted canola meal flour using alkaline solubilization and acid precipitation. A central composite design was used to model 2nd-order response surfaces for the protein yield and the functional properties of protein isolates. The solubilization pH and precipitation pH were used as design factors. The models showed that the protein yield and functional properties of isolates, such as water absorption and fat absorption, were sensitive to both solubilization pH and precipitation pH, whereas the emulsification was sensitive to only solubilization pH. Gel electrophoresis analysis of protein fractions gave evidence to the compositional changes between proteins isolated under different conditions. Differences in glass transition temperatures suggest that proteins tend to be more denatured when solubilized at highly alkaline conditions. These conformational and compositional changes due to different protein separation conditions have contributed to the changes in functional properties of protein isolates.   Protein isolation conditions may be determined primarily through optimization of total protein yield. Improvements in protein functional properties may be achieved with a relatively small sacrifice in yield by altering isolation conditions.

  9. Improving protein function prediction methods with integrated literature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabow Aaron P

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determining the function of uncharacterized proteins is a major challenge in the post-genomic era due to the problem's complexity and scale. Identifying a protein's function contributes to an understanding of its role in the involved pathways, its suitability as a drug target, and its potential for protein modifications. Several graph-theoretic approaches predict unidentified functions of proteins by using the functional annotations of better-characterized proteins in protein-protein interaction networks. We systematically consider the use of literature co-occurrence data, introduce a new method for quantifying the reliability of co-occurrence and test how performance differs across species. We also quantify changes in performance as the prediction algorithms annotate with increased specificity. Results We find that including information on the co-occurrence of proteins within an abstract greatly boosts performance in the Functional Flow graph-theoretic function prediction algorithm in yeast, fly and worm. This increase in performance is not simply due to the presence of additional edges since supplementing protein-protein interactions with co-occurrence data outperforms supplementing with a comparably-sized genetic interaction dataset. Through the combination of protein-protein interactions and co-occurrence data, the neighborhood around unknown proteins is quickly connected to well-characterized nodes which global prediction algorithms can exploit. Our method for quantifying co-occurrence reliability shows superior performance to the other methods, particularly at threshold values around 10% which yield the best trade off between coverage and accuracy. In contrast, the traditional way of asserting co-occurrence when at least one abstract mentions both proteins proves to be the worst method for generating co-occurrence data, introducing too many false positives. Annotating the functions with greater specificity is harder

  10. Characterization of the Drosophila ortholog of the human Usher Syndrome type 1G protein sans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Demontis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Usher syndrome (USH is the most frequent deaf-blindness hereditary disease in humans. Deafness is attributed to the disorganization of stereocilia in the inner ear. USH1, the most severe subtype, is associated with mutations in genes encoding myosin VIIa, harmonin, cadherin 23, protocadherin 15, and sans. Myosin VIIa, harmonin, cadherin 23, and protocadherin 15 physically interact in vitro and localize to stereocilia tips in vivo, indicating that they form functional complexes. Sans, in contrast, localizes to vesicle-like structures beneath the apical membrane of stereocilia-displaying hair cells. How mutations in sans result in deafness and blindness is not well understood. Orthologs of myosin VIIa and protocadherin 15 have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster and their genetic analysis has identified essential roles in auditory perception and microvilli morphogenesis, respectively. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have identified and characterized the Drosophila ortholog of human sans. Drosophila Sans is expressed in tubular organs of the embryo, in lens-secreting cone cells of the adult eye, and in microvilli-displaying follicle cells during oogenesis. Sans mutants are viable, fertile, and mutant follicle cells appear to form microvilli, indicating that Sans is dispensable for fly development and microvilli morphogenesis in the follicle epithelium. In follicle cells, Sans protein localizes, similar to its vertebrate ortholog, to intracellular punctate structures, which we have identified as early endosomes associated with the syntaxin Avalanche. CONCLUSIONS: Our work is consistent with an evolutionary conserved function of Sans in vesicle trafficking. Furthermore it provides a significant basis for further understanding of the role of this Usher syndrome ortholog in development and disease.

  11. A functional network module for Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girirajan, S; Truong, H T; Blanchard, C L; Elsea, S H

    2009-04-01

    Disorders with overlapping diagnostic features are grouped into a network module. Based on phenotypic similarities or differential diagnoses, it is possible to identify functional pathways leading to individual features. We generated a Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS)-specific network module utilizing patient clinical data, text mining from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, and in vitro functional analysis. We tested our module by functional studies based on a hypothesis that RAI1 acts through phenotype-specific pathways involving several downstream genes, which are altered due to RAI1 haploinsufficiency. A preliminary genome-wide gene expression study was performed using microarrays on RAI1 haploinsufficient cells created by RNAi-based approximately 50% knockdown of RAI1 in HEK293T cells. The top dysregulated genes were involved in growth signaling and insulin sensitivity, neuronal differentiation, lipid biosynthesis and fat mobilization, circadian activity, behavior, renal, cardiovascular and skeletal development, gene expression, and cell-cycle regulation and recombination, reflecting the spectrum of clinical features observed in SMS. Validation using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction confirmed the gene expression profile of 75% of the selected genes analyzed in both HEK293T RAI1 knockdown cells and SMS lymphoblastoid cell lines. Overall, these data support a method for identifying genes and pathways responsible for individual clinical features in a complex disorder such as SMS.

  12. Aberrant ocular architecture and function in patients with Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Cristin; Zitzmann, Michael; Eter, Nicole; Kliesch, Sabine; Wistuba, Joachim; Alnawaiseh, Maged; Heiduschka, Peter

    2017-10-13

    Klinefelter Syndrome (KS), the most common chromosomal disorder in men (47,XXY), is associated with numerous comorbidities. Based on a number of isolated case reports, we performed the first systematic and comprehensive evaluation of eye health in KS patients with a focus on ocular structure and vascularization. Twenty-one KS patients and 26 male and 38 female controls underwent a variety of non-invasive examinations investigating ocular morphology (examination of retinal thickness, optic nerve head, and cornea) and function (visual field testing and quantification of ocular vessel density by optical coherence tomography angiography). In comparison to healthy controls, KS patients exhibited a smaller foveal avascular zone and a decreased retinal thickness due to a drastically thinner outer nuclear layer. The cornea of KS patients showed a decreased peripheral thickness and volume. In perimetry evaluation, KS patients required brighter stimuli and gave more irregular values. KS patients show an ocular phenotype including morphological and functional features, which is very likely caused by the supernumerary X chromosome. Thus, KS should not be limited to infertility, endocrine dysfunction, neurocognitive and psychosocial comorbidities. Defining an aberrant ocular morphology and function, awareness for possible eye problems should be raised.

  13. A Functional Assay for Sick Sinus Syndrome Genetic Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanchau J. Jou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Congenital Sick Sinus Syndrome (SSS is a disorder associated with sudden cardiac death due to severe bradycardia and prolonged pauses. Mutations in HCN4, the gene encoding inward Na+/K+ current (If, have been described as a cause of congenital SSS. The objective of this study is to develop an SSS model in embryonic zebrafish, and use zebrafish as a moderate-throughput assay to functionally characterize HCN4 variants. Methods: To determine the function of hcn4 in zebrafish, embryos were either bathed in the If -specific blocker (ZD-7288, or endogenous hcn4 expression was knocked down using splice-blocking morpholinos. To assess whether the zebrafish model discriminates benign from pathogenic variants, we tested four HCN4 mutations known to cause human SSS and four variants of unknown significance (VUS. Results: Pharmacological blockade and knockdown of hcn4 in zebrafish phenocopied human SSS, displaying bradycardia and cardiac pauses in intact embryos and explanted hearts. The zebrafish assay correctly identified all disease-causing variants. Of the VUS, the assay predicted 2 as benign and 2 as hypomorphic variants. Conclusions: We conclude that our embryonic zebrafish assay is a novel and effective tool to functionally characterize human HCN4 variants, which can be translated into important clinical prognostic information.

  14. The Pathogenesis of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS): The Hypothesis of PCOS as Functional Ovarian Hyperandrogenism Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Robert L; Ehrmann, David A

    2016-10-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) was hypothesized to result from functional ovarian hyperandrogenism (FOH) due to dysregulation of androgen secretion in 1989-1995. Subsequent studies have supported and amplified this hypothesis. When defined as otherwise unexplained hyperandrogenic oligoanovulation, two-thirds of PCOS cases have functionally typical FOH, characterized by 17-hydroxyprogesterone hyperresponsiveness to gonadotropin stimulation. Two-thirds of the remaining PCOS have FOH detectable by testosterone elevation after suppression of adrenal androgen production. About 3% of PCOS have a related isolated functional adrenal hyperandrogenism. The remaining PCOS cases are mild and lack evidence of steroid secretory abnormalities; most of these are obese, which we postulate to account for their atypical PCOS. Approximately half of normal women with polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) have subclinical FOH-related steroidogenic defects. Theca cells from polycystic ovaries of classic PCOS patients in long-term culture have an intrinsic steroidogenic dysregulation that can account for the steroidogenic abnormalities typical of FOH. These cells overexpress most steroidogenic enzymes, particularly cytochrome P450c17. Overexpression of a protein identified by genome-wide association screening, differentially expressed in normal and neoplastic development 1A.V2, in normal theca cells has reproduced this PCOS phenotype in vitro. A metabolic syndrome of obesity-related and/or intrinsic insulin resistance occurs in about half of PCOS patients, and the compensatory hyperinsulinism has tissue-selective effects, which include aggravation of hyperandrogenism. PCOS seems to arise as a complex trait that results from the interaction of diverse genetic and environmental factors. Heritable factors include PCOM, hyperandrogenemia, insulin resistance, and insulin secretory defects. Environmental factors include prenatal androgen exposure and poor fetal growth, whereas acquired obesity

  15. Text mining improves prediction of protein functional sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin M Verspoor

    Full Text Available We present an approach that integrates protein structure analysis and text mining for protein functional site prediction, called LEAP-FS (Literature Enhanced Automated Prediction of Functional Sites. The structure analysis was carried out using Dynamics Perturbation Analysis (DPA, which predicts functional sites at control points where interactions greatly perturb protein vibrations. The text mining extracts mentions of residues in the literature, and predicts that residues mentioned are functionally important. We assessed the significance of each of these methods by analyzing their performance in finding known functional sites (specifically, small-molecule binding sites and catalytic sites in about 100,000 publicly available protein structures. The DPA predictions recapitulated many of the functional site annotations and preferentially recovered binding sites annotated as biologically relevant vs. those annotated as potentially spurious. The text-based predictions were also substantially supported by the functional site annotations: compared to other residues, residues mentioned in text were roughly six times more likely to be found in a functional site. The overlap of predictions with annotations improved when the text-based and structure-based methods agreed. Our analysis also yielded new high-quality predictions of many functional site residues that were not catalogued in the curated data sources we inspected. We conclude that both DPA and text mining independently provide valuable high-throughput protein functional site predictions, and that integrating the two methods using LEAP-FS further improves the quality of these predictions.

  16. Text mining improves prediction of protein functional sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verspoor, Karin M; Cohn, Judith D; Ravikumar, Komandur E; Wall, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach that integrates protein structure analysis and text mining for protein functional site prediction, called LEAP-FS (Literature Enhanced Automated Prediction of Functional Sites). The structure analysis was carried out using Dynamics Perturbation Analysis (DPA), which predicts functional sites at control points where interactions greatly perturb protein vibrations. The text mining extracts mentions of residues in the literature, and predicts that residues mentioned are functionally important. We assessed the significance of each of these methods by analyzing their performance in finding known functional sites (specifically, small-molecule binding sites and catalytic sites) in about 100,000 publicly available protein structures. The DPA predictions recapitulated many of the functional site annotations and preferentially recovered binding sites annotated as biologically relevant vs. those annotated as potentially spurious. The text-based predictions were also substantially supported by the functional site annotations: compared to other residues, residues mentioned in text were roughly six times more likely to be found in a functional site. The overlap of predictions with annotations improved when the text-based and structure-based methods agreed. Our analysis also yielded new high-quality predictions of many functional site residues that were not catalogued in the curated data sources we inspected. We conclude that both DPA and text mining independently provide valuable high-throughput protein functional site predictions, and that integrating the two methods using LEAP-FS further improves the quality of these predictions.

  17. Text Mining Improves Prediction of Protein Functional Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Judith D.; Ravikumar, Komandur E.

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach that integrates protein structure analysis and text mining for protein functional site prediction, called LEAP-FS (Literature Enhanced Automated Prediction of Functional Sites). The structure analysis was carried out using Dynamics Perturbation Analysis (DPA), which predicts functional sites at control points where interactions greatly perturb protein vibrations. The text mining extracts mentions of residues in the literature, and predicts that residues mentioned are functionally important. We assessed the significance of each of these methods by analyzing their performance in finding known functional sites (specifically, small-molecule binding sites and catalytic sites) in about 100,000 publicly available protein structures. The DPA predictions recapitulated many of the functional site annotations and preferentially recovered binding sites annotated as biologically relevant vs. those annotated as potentially spurious. The text-based predictions were also substantially supported by the functional site annotations: compared to other residues, residues mentioned in text were roughly six times more likely to be found in a functional site. The overlap of predictions with annotations improved when the text-based and structure-based methods agreed. Our analysis also yielded new high-quality predictions of many functional site residues that were not catalogued in the curated data sources we inspected. We conclude that both DPA and text mining independently provide valuable high-throughput protein functional site predictions, and that integrating the two methods using LEAP-FS further improves the quality of these predictions. PMID:22393388

  18. Expressional and functional studies of Wolframin, the gene function deficient in Wolfram syndrome, in mice and patient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrook, Christine; Fritz, Eberhard; Weiher, Hans

    2005-01-01

    Wolfram Syndrome is an autosomal recessive degenerative disorder of the neuroendocrine system. Diabetes mellitus is its lead symptom. Patients show mutations in the wolframin (WFS1) gene coding for a hydrophobic transmembrane protein of 890 amino acids. This protein was preliminarily localised in the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) in cells of mice and rats. Mice lacking the WFS1 gene display degeneration of pancreatic beta-cells following induction of ER stress. We here used antibodies against substructures of the wolframin protein in order to analyse its expression and localisation. Expression was detected in both pancreatic beta-cells and the limbic system of mice. Using the rat insulinoma cell line RIN 5AH and fractionated mouse brain tissue, we confirmed wolframin localisation to the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression profiling on patient's primary fibroblasts revealed down-regulation of the diabetes associated plasma membrane glycoprotein (PC-1) gene, and up-regulation of fibulin-3, a gene connected to senescence. However, cell proliferation was indistinguishable from non-mutated cells. In contrast to data obtained on murine pancreatic islets, we found no increased apoptosis following induction of ER stress but rather by staurosporine treatment in the absence of WFS1 function. This indicates a new role of WFS1 deficiency in programmed cell death.

  19. Protein Function Prediction Based on Sequence and Structure Information

    KAUST Repository

    Smaili, Fatima Z.

    2016-05-25

    The number of available protein sequences in public databases is increasing exponentially. However, a significant fraction of these sequences lack functional annotation which is essential to our understanding of how biological systems and processes operate. In this master thesis project, we worked on inferring protein functions based on the primary protein sequence. In the approach we follow, 3D models are first constructed using I-TASSER. Functions are then deduced by structurally matching these predicted models, using global and local similarities, through three independent enzyme commission (EC) and gene ontology (GO) function libraries. The method was tested on 250 “hard” proteins, which lack homologous templates in both structure and function libraries. The results show that this method outperforms the conventional prediction methods based on sequence similarity or threading. Additionally, our method could be improved even further by incorporating protein-protein interaction information. Overall, the method we use provides an efficient approach for automated functional annotation of non-homologous proteins, starting from their sequence.

  20. Targeting functional motifs of a protein family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadola, Pradeep; Deo, Nivedita

    2016-10-01

    The structural organization of a protein family is investigated by devising a method based on the random matrix theory (RMT), which uses the physiochemical properties of the amino acid with multiple sequence alignment. A graphical method to represent protein sequences using physiochemical properties is devised that gives a fast, easy, and informative way of comparing the evolutionary distances between protein sequences. A correlation matrix associated with each property is calculated, where the noise reduction and information filtering is done using RMT involving an ensemble of Wishart matrices. The analysis of the eigenvalue statistics of the correlation matrix for the β -lactamase family shows the universal features as observed in the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE). The property-based approach captures the short- as well as the long-range correlation (approximately following GOE) between the eigenvalues, whereas the previous approach (treating amino acids as characters) gives the usual short-range correlations, while the long-range correlations are the same as that of an uncorrelated series. The distribution of the eigenvector components for the eigenvalues outside the bulk (RMT bound) deviates significantly from RMT observations and contains important information about the system. The information content of each eigenvector of the correlation matrix is quantified by introducing an entropic estimate, which shows that for the β -lactamase family the smallest eigenvectors (low eigenmodes) are highly localized as well as informative. These small eigenvectors when processed gives clusters involving positions that have well-defined biological and structural importance matching with experiments. The approach is crucial for the recognition of structural motifs as shown in β -lactamase (and other families) and selectively identifies the important positions for targets to deactivate (activate) the enzymatic actions.

  1. Impact of weight loss and maintenance with ad libitum diets varying in protein and glycemic index content on metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadaki, Angeliki; Linardakis, Manolis; Plada, Maria

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of weight loss and maintenance with diets that varied with regard to protein content and glycemic index (GI) on metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) status.......We investigated the effects of weight loss and maintenance with diets that varied with regard to protein content and glycemic index (GI) on metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) status....

  2. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... C-reactive protein and TC (R = 0.19), TG (R = 0.29), BMI (R = 0.32), glucose (R = 0.11), and uric acid (R = 0.14) (all P protein and HDL cholesterol (R = 0.13, P protein...

  3. GPCR-interacting proteins (GIPs): nature and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockaert, J; Roussignol, G; Bécamel, C; Gavarini, S; Joubert, L; Dumuis, A; Fagni, L; Marin, P

    2004-11-01

    The simplistic idea that seven transmembrane receptors are single monomeric proteins that interact with heterotrimeric G-proteins after agonist binding is definitively out of date. Indeed, GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) are part of multiprotein networks organized around scaffolding proteins. These GIPs (GPCR-interacting proteins) are either transmembrane or cytosolic proteins. Proteomic approaches can be used to get global pictures of these 'receptosomes'. This approach allowed us to identify direct but also indirect binding partners of serotonin receptors. GIPs are involved in a wide range of functions including control of the targeting, trafficking and signalling of GPCRs. One of them, Shank, which is a secondary and tertiary partner of metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors, respectively, can induce the formation of a whole functional glutamate 'receptosome' and the structure to which it is associated, the dendritic spine.

  4. Classification of sequence signatures: a guide to Hox protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Samir; Hudry, Bruno; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Graba, Yacine

    2009-05-01

    Hox proteins are part of the conserved superfamily of homeodomain-containing transcription factors and play fundamental roles in shaping animal body plans in development and evolution. However, molecular mechanisms underlying their diverse and specific biological functions remain largely enigmatic. Here, we have analyzed Hox sequences from the main evolutionary branches of the Bilateria group. We have found that four classes of Hox protein signatures exist, which together provide sufficient support to explain how different Hox proteins differ in their control and function. The homeodomain and its surrounding sequences accumulate nearly all signatures, constituting an extended module where most of the information distinguishing Hox proteins is concentrated. Only a small fraction of these signatures has been investigated at the functional level, but these show that approaches relying on Hox protein alterations still have a large potential for deciphering molecular mechanisms of Hox differential control.

  5. A functional protein retention and release multilayer with high stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Kun; An, Qi; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-04-01

    Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by varying the number of capping layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the protein-loaded interfacial layers could not only be used to construct catalytic-active interfaces, but also be integrated as the power-generating unit to propel a macroscopic floating device.Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by

  6. Structural and Function Prediction of Musa acuminata subsp. Malaccensis Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anum Munir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypothetical proteins (HPs are the proteins whose presence has been anticipated, yet in vivo function has not been built up. Illustrating the structural and functional privileged insights of these HPs might likewise prompt a superior comprehension of the protein-protein associations or networks in diverse types of life. Bananas (Musa acuminata spp., including sweet and cooking types, are giant perennial monocotyledonous herbs of the order Zingiberales, a sister grouped to the all-around considered Poales, which incorporate oats. Bananas are crucial for nourishment security in numerous tropical and subtropical nations and the most prominent organic product in industrialized nations. In the present study, the hypothetical protein of M. acuminata (Banana was chosen for analysis and modeling by distinctive bioinformatics apparatuses and databases. As indicated by primary and secondary structure analysis, XP_009393594.1 is a stable hydrophobic protein containing a noteworthy extent of α-helices; Homology modeling was done utilizing SWISS-MODEL server where the templates identity with XP_009393594.1 protein was less which demonstrated novelty of our protein. Ab initio strategy was conducted to produce its 3D structure. A few evaluations of quality assessment and validation parameters determined the generated protein model as stable with genuinely great quality. Functional analysis was completed by ProtFun 2.2, and KEGG (KAAS, recommended that the hypothetical protein is a transcription factor with cytoplasmic domain as zinc finger. The protein was observed to be vital for translation process, involved in metabolism, signaling and cellular processes, genetic information processing and Zinc ion binding. It is suggested that further test approval would help to anticipate the structures and functions of other uncharacterized proteins of different plants and living being.

  7. Sex differences in protein expression in the mouse brain and their perturbations in a model of Down syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Block, Aaron; Ahmed, Md. Mahiuddin; Dhanasekaran, A. Ranjitha; Tong, Suhong; Gardiner, Katheleen J.

    2015-01-01

    Background While many sex differences in structure and function of the mammalian brain have been described, the molecular correlates of these differences are not broadly known. Also unknown is how sex differences at the protein level are perturbed by mutations that lead to intellectual disability (ID). Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of ID and is due to trisomy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) and the resulting increased expression of Hsa21-encoded genes. The Dp(10)1Yey mous...

  8. A Splice Variant of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome 5 (BBS5 Protein that Is Selectively Expressed in Retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan N Bolch

    Full Text Available Bardet-Biedl syndrome is a complex ciliopathy that usually manifests with some form of retinal degeneration, amongst other ciliary-related deficiencies. One of the genetic causes of this syndrome results from a defect in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome 5 (BBS5 protein. BBS5 is one component of the BBSome, a complex of proteins that regulates the protein composition in cilia. In this study, we identify a smaller molecular mass form of BBS5 as a variant formed by alternative splicing and show that expression of this splice variant is restricted to the retina.Reverse transcription PCR from RNA was used to isolate and identify potential alternative transcripts of Bbs5. A peptide unique to the C-terminus of the BBS5 splice variant was synthesized and used to prepare antibodies that selectively recognized the BBS5 splice variant. These antibodies were used on immunoblots of tissue extracts to determine the extent of expression of the alternative transcript and on tissue slices to determine the localization of expressed protein. Pull-down of fluorescently labeled arrestin1 by immunoprecipitation of the BBS5 splice variant was performed to assess functional interaction between the two proteins.PCR from mouse retinal cDNA using Bbs5-specific primers amplified a unique cDNA that was shown to be a splice variant of BBS5 resulting from the use of cryptic splicing sites in Intron 7. The resulting transcript codes for a truncated form of the BBS5 protein with a unique 24 amino acid C-terminus, and predicted 26.5 kD molecular mass. PCR screening of RNA isolated from various ciliated tissues and immunoblots of protein extracts from these same tissues showed that this splice variant was expressed in retina, but not brain, heart, kidney, or testes. Quantitative PCR showed that the splice variant transcript is 8.9-fold (+/- 1.1-fold less abundant than the full-length transcript. In the retina, the splice variant of BBS5 appears to be most abundant in the connecting cilium

  9. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar

    2016-01-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant...... in the majority of UHS case subjects. The two enzymes PADI3 and TGM3, responsible for posttranslational protein modifications, and their target structural protein TCHH are all involved in hair shaft formation. Elucidation of the molecular outcomes of the disease-causing mutations by cell culture experiments...... and tridimensional protein models demonstrated clear differences in the structural organization and activity of mutant and wild-type proteins. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed morphological alterations in hair coat of Padi3 knockout mice. All together, these findings elucidate the molecular genetic...

  10. Identification and functional analysis of SOX10 missense mutations in different subtypes of Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoui, Asma; Watanabe, Yuli; Touraine, Renaud; Baral, Viviane; Goossens, Michel; Pingault, Veronique; Bondurand, Nadege

    2011-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder characterized by pigmentation defects and sensorineural deafness, classified into four clinical subtypes, WS1-S4. Whereas the absence of additional features characterizes WS2, association with Hirschsprung disease defines WS4. WS is genetically heterogeneous, with six genes already identified, including SOX10. About 50 heterozygous SOX10 mutations have been described in patients presenting with WS2 or WS4, with or without myelination defects of the peripheral and central nervous system (PCWH, Peripheral demyelinating neuropathy-Central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy-Waardenburg syndrome-Hirschsprung disease, or PCW, PCWH without HD). The majority are truncating mutations that most often remove the main functional domains of the protein. Only three missense mutations have been thus far reported. In the present study, novel SOX10 missense mutations were found in 11 patients and were examined for effects on SOX10 characteristics and functions. The mutations were associated with various phenotypes, ranging from WS2 to PCWH. All tested mutations were found to be deleterious. Some mutants presented with partial cytoplasmic redistribution, some lost their DNA-binding and/or transactivation capabilities on various tissue-specific target genes. Intriguingly, several mutants were redistributed in nuclear foci. Whether this phenomenon is a cause or a consequence of mutation-associated pathogenicity remains to be determined, but this observation could help to identify new SOX10 modes of action. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Randomised controlled trial of colostrum to improve intestinal function in patients with short bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Pernille; Sangild, Per Torp; Aunsholt, L.

    2012-01-01

    Colostrum is rich in immunoregulatory, antimicrobial and trophic components supporting intestinal development and function in newborns. We assessed whether bovine colostrum could enhance intestinal adaptation and function in adult short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients.......Colostrum is rich in immunoregulatory, antimicrobial and trophic components supporting intestinal development and function in newborns. We assessed whether bovine colostrum could enhance intestinal adaptation and function in adult short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients....

  12. Prediction of human protein function according to Gene Ontology categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Gupta, Ramneek; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    developed a method for prediction of protein function for a subset of classes from the Gene Ontology classification scheme. This subset includes several pharmaceutically interesting categories-transcription factors, receptors, ion channels, stress and immune response proteins, hormones and growth factors...

  13. Preparation of functional lupine protein fractions by dry separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrom, P.J.M.; Berghout, J.A.M.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2014-01-01

    Lupine protein concentrate is a promising ingredient that can be obtained by a combination of milling and air classification, generally called dry fractionation. This is a more sustainable route than conventional wet extraction and delivers a protein concentrate with native functional properties.

  14. Jatropha seed protein functional properties for technical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lestari, D.; Mulder, W.J.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Jatropha press cake, by-product after oil expression from Jatropha seeds, contains 24–28% protein on dry basis. Objectives of this research were to investigate functional properties, such as solubility, emulsifying, foaming, film forming, and adhesive properties, of Jatropha press cake proteins and

  15. Dry fractionation for production of functional pea protein concentrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrom, P.J.M.; Vissers, A.M.; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2013-01-01

    Dry milling in combination with air classification was evaluated as an alternative to conventional wet extraction of protein from yellow field peas (Pisum sativum). Major advantages of dry fractionation are retention of native functionality of proteins and its lower energy and water use. Peas were

  16. Regulation of Cellular and Molecular Functions by Protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    critical role in the regulation of many cellular functions. Phosphorylation of proteins is carried out by a group of enzymes known as protein kinases which transfer terminal phosphate of. ATP (sometimes GTP) to the hydroxyl group of amino acids - serine, threonine and tyrosine. Phosphate group on these three hydroxy amino ...

  17. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome wasting, functional performance, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubenoff, R

    2000-09-01

    Unintentional loss of weight and lean body mass (wasting) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Patients with AIDS wasting (AW) often experience reductions in lean body mass, muscle strength, and the ability to perform functions of daily living. Dependence on assistance with activities of daily living may be associated with a lower quality of life (QOL) and higher risk of mortality. These factors suggest that slowing or reversing the loss of lean body mass in AW can improve well-being. Nutritional support or appetite stimulants in the absence of exercise therapy or growth hormone supplementation can increase fat without improving body composition, whereas appropriate exercise programs, androgen therapy, and recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy may increase lean body mass in patients with AW. Resistance exercise programs can increase muscle strength and lean body mass. In addition, both resistance and endurance (aerobic) exercise augment endogenous growth hormone levels, decrease depression, enhance self-esteem, and may improve immune response. Randomized, double-blind trials have shown that rhGH therapy increases total body weight, lean body mass, exercise capacity, and QOL. In summary, interventions that improve exercise capacity and functional performance may enhance QOL in patients with AW and may reduce mortality in this group.

  18. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... C-reactive protein and TC (R = 0.19), TG (R = 0.29), BMI (R = 0.32), glucose (R = 0.11), and uric acid (R = 0.14) (all P

  19. Treacher Collins syndrome TCOF1 protein cooperates with NBS1 in the DNA damage response

    OpenAIRE

    Ciccia, Alberto; Huang, Jen-Wei; Izhar, Lior; Sowa, Mathew E.; Harper, J. Wade; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) maintains genomic integrity following DNA damage to prevent cancer and developmental disorders. The DDR operates in part through controlling localization of factors to chromatin. Here, we detail an interaction between the DDR protein NBS1 and TCOF1, a nucleolar protein mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome that regulates ribosomal DNA transcription. We show that NBS1 relocalizes to nucleoli after DNA damage in a manner dependent on TCOF1 and independent on the NBS...

  20. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in Fenneropenaeus chinensis hemocytes upon white spot syndrome virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available To elucidate molecular responses of shrimp hemocytes to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV infection, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was applied to investigate differentially expressed proteins in hemocytes of Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis at 24 h post infection (hpi. Approximately 580 protein spots were detected in hemocytes of healthy and WSSV-infected shrimps. Quantitative intensity analysis revealed 26 protein spots were significantly up-regulated, and 19 spots were significantly down-regulated. By mass spectrometry, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO 1, cytosolic MnSOD, triosephosphate isomerase, tubulin alpha-1 chain, microtubule-actin cross-linking factor 1, nuclear receptor E75 protein, vacuolar ATP synthase subunit B L form, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, arginine kinase, etc., amounting to 33 differentially modulated proteins were identified successfully. According to Gene Ontology annotation, the identified proteins were classified into nine categories, consisting of immune related proteins, stimulus response proteins, proteins involved in glucose metabolic process, cytoskeleton proteins, DNA or protein binding proteins, proteins involved in steroid hormone mediated signal pathway, ATP synthases, proteins involved in transmembrane transport and ungrouped proteins. Meanwhile, the expression profiles of three up-regulated proteins (SUMO, heat shock protein 70, and arginine kinase and one down-regulated protein (prophenoloxidase were further analyzed by real-time RT-PCR at the transcription level after WSSV infection. The results showed that SUMO and heat shock protein 70 were significantly up-regulated at each sampling time point, while arginine kinase was significantly up-regulated at 12 and 24 hpi. In contrast, prophenoloxidase was significantly down-regulated at each sampling time point. The results of this work provided preliminary data on proteins in shrimp hemocytes involved in WSSV infection.

  1. Assessment of protein set coherence using functional annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carazo Jose M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of large-scale experimental datasets frequently produces one or more sets of proteins that are subsequently mined for functional interpretation and validation. To this end, a number of computational methods have been devised that rely on the analysis of functional annotations. Although current methods provide valuable information (e.g. significantly enriched annotations, pairwise functional similarities, they do not specifically measure the degree of homogeneity of a protein set. Results In this work we present a method that scores the degree of functional homogeneity, or coherence, of a set of proteins on the basis of the global similarity of their functional annotations. The method uses statistical hypothesis testing to assess the significance of the set in the context of the functional space of a reference set. As such, it can be used as a first step in the validation of sets expected to be homogeneous prior to further functional interpretation. Conclusion We evaluate our method by analysing known biologically relevant sets as well as random ones. The known relevant sets comprise macromolecular complexes, cellular components and pathways described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which are mostly significantly coherent. Finally, we illustrate the usefulness of our approach for validating 'functional modules' obtained from computational analysis of protein-protein interaction networks. Matlab code and supplementary data are available at http://www.cnb.csic.es/~monica/coherence/

  2. Structural and Functional Annotation of Hypothetical Proteins of O139

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saiful Islam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries threat of cholera is a significant health concern whenever water purification and sewage disposal systems are inadequate. Vibrio cholerae is one of the responsible bacteria involved in cholera disease. The complete genome sequence of V. cholerae deciphers the presence of various genes and hypothetical proteins whose function are not yet understood. Hence analyzing and annotating the structure and function of hypothetical proteins is important for understanding the V. cholerae. V. cholerae O139 is the most common and pathogenic bacterial strain among various V. cholerae strains. In this study sequence of six hypothetical proteins of V. cholerae O139 has been annotated from NCBI. Various computational tools and databases have been used to determine domain family, protein-protein interaction, solubility of protein, ligand binding sites etc. The three dimensional structure of two proteins were modeled and their ligand binding sites were identified. We have found domains and families of only one protein. The analysis revealed that these proteins might have antibiotic resistance activity, DNA breaking-rejoining activity, integrase enzyme activity, restriction endonuclease, etc. Structural prediction of these proteins and detection of binding sites from this study would indicate a potential target aiding docking studies for therapeutic designing against cholera.

  3. Functionally relevant domains of the prion protein identified in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Baumann

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The prion consists essentially of PrP(Sc, a misfolded and aggregated conformer of the cellular protein PrP(C. Whereas PrP(C deficient mice are clinically healthy, expression of PrP(C variants lacking its central domain (PrP(DeltaCD, or of the PrP-related protein Dpl, induces lethal neurodegenerative syndromes which are repressed by full-length PrP. Here we tested the structural basis of these syndromes by grafting the amino terminus of PrP(C (residues 1-134, or its central domain (residues 90-134, onto Dpl. Further, we constructed a soluble variant of the neurotoxic PrP(DeltaCD mutant that lacks its glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI membrane anchor. Each of these modifications abrogated the pathogenicity of Dpl and PrP(DeltaCD in transgenic mice. The PrP-Dpl chimeric molecules, but not anchorless PrP(DeltaCD, ameliorated the disease of mice expressing truncated PrP variants. We conclude that the amino proximal domain of PrP exerts a neurotrophic effect even when grafted onto a distantly related protein, and that GPI-linked membrane anchoring is necessary for both beneficial and deleterious effects of PrP and its variants.

  4. Using PFP and ESG Protein Function Prediction Web Servers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qing; McGraw, Joshua; Khan, Ishita; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating biological function of proteins is a fundamental problem in molecular biology and bioinformatics. Conventionally, protein function is annotated based on homology using sequence similarity search tools such as BLAST and FASTA. These methods perform well when obvious homologs exist for a query sequence; however, they will not provide any functional information otherwise. As a result, the functions of many genes in newly sequenced genomes are left unknown, which await functional interpretation. Here, we introduce two webservers for function prediction methods, which effectively use distantly related sequences to improve function annotation coverage and accuracy: Protein Function Prediction (PFP) and Extended Similarity Group (ESG). These two methods have been tested extensively in various benchmark studies and ranked among the top in community-based assessments for computational function annotation, including Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA) in 2010-2011 (CAFA1) and 2013-2014 (CAFA2). Both servers are equipped with user-friendly visualizations of predicted GO terms, which provide intuitive illustrations of relationships of predicted GO terms. In addition to PFP and ESG, we also introduce NaviGO, a server for the interactive analysis of GO annotations of proteins. All the servers are available at http://kiharalab.org/software.php .

  5. Restless Legs Syndrome and Cognitive Function: A Population-based Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rist, Pamela M; Elbaz, Alexis; Dufouil, Carole; Tzourio, Christophe; Kurth, Tobias

    2015-09-01

    Restless legs syndrome has been speculated to be linked to cognitive impairment through vascular risk factors or through its effect on sleep deprivation. Previous studies on the association between restless legs syndrome and cognitive function have been inconclusive. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the association between restless legs syndrome and cognitive function using data from a large population-based study of elderly individuals residing in France. We used information from 2070 individuals from the Dijon, France center of the Three-City study who had available information on restless legs syndrome and cognitive functioning measures. Restless legs syndrome was assessed using the 4 minimal diagnostic criteria of the International Restless Legs Study Group. During the same wave in which restless legs syndrome status was assessed, cognitive functions also were assessed using 4 tests: Isaacs' test of verbal/category fluency, the Benton Visual Retention Test, the Trail Making Test B, and the Mini-Mental State Examination. We created a summary global cognitive score by summing the z scores for the 4 tests and used analysis of covariance to explore the association between restless legs syndrome and cognitive function. We did not observe any statistically significant differences in any cognitive z-score between those with restless legs syndrome and those without restless legs syndrome. The mean global z-score after multivariate adjustment was -0.003 (SE 0.173) for those with restless legs syndrome and -0.007 (SE 0.129) for those without restless legs syndrome (P-value = .98). Data from this large, population-based study do not suggest that restless legs syndrome is associated with prevalent cognitive deficits in elderly individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. C-terminal fluorescent labeling impairs functionality of DNA mismatch repair proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Brieger

    Full Text Available The human DNA mismatch repair (MMR process is crucial to maintain the integrity of the genome and requires many different proteins which interact perfectly and coordinated. Germline mutations in MMR genes are responsible for the development of the hereditary form of colorectal cancer called Lynch syndrome. Various mutations mainly in two MMR proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, have been identified so far, whereas 55% are detected within MLH1, the essential component of the heterodimer MutLα (MLH1 and PMS2. Most of those MLH1 variants are pathogenic but the relevance of missense mutations often remains unclear. Many different recombinant systems are applied to filter out disease-associated proteins whereby fluorescent tagged proteins are frequently used. However, dye labeling might have deleterious effects on MutLα's functionality. Therefore, we analyzed the consequences of N- and C-terminal fluorescent labeling on expression level, cellular localization and MMR activity of MutLα. Besides significant influence of GFP- or Red-fusion on protein expression we detected incorrect shuttling of single expressed C-terminal GFP-tagged PMS2 into the nucleus and found that C-terminal dye labeling impaired MMR function of MutLα. In contrast, N-terminal tagged MutLαs retained correct functionality and can be recommended both for the analysis of cellular localization and MMR efficiency.

  7. Nance-Horan syndrome protein, NHS, associates with epithelial cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shiwani; Ang, Sharyn L; Shaw, Marie; Mackey, David A; Gécz, Jozef; McAvoy, John W; Craig, Jamie E

    2006-06-15

    Nance-Horan syndrome, characterized by congenital cataracts, craniofacial, dental abnormalities and mental disturbances, is an X-linked disorder with significant phenotypic heterogeneity. Affected individuals have mutations in the NHS (Nance-Horan syndrome) gene typically resulting in premature truncation of the protein. This report underlines the complexity of the regulation of the NHS gene that transcribes several isoforms. We demonstrate the differential expression of the two NHS isoforms, NHS-A and NHS-1A, and differences in the subcellular localization of the proteins encoded by these isoforms. This may in part explain the pleiotropic features of the syndrome. We show that the endogenous and exogenous NHS-A isoform localizes to the cell membrane of mammalian cells in a cell-type-dependent manner and that it co-localizes with the tight junction (TJ) protein ZO-1 in the apical aspect of cell membrane in epithelial cells. We also show that the NHS-1A isoform is a cytoplasmic protein. In the developing mammalian lens, we found continuous expression of NHS that became restricted to the lens epithelium in pre- and postnatal lens. Consistent with the in vitro findings, the NHS-A isoform associates with the apical cell membrane in the lens epithelium. This study suggests that disturbances in intercellular contacts underlie cataractogenesis in the Nance-Horan syndrome. NHS is the first gene localized at TJs that has been implicated in congenital cataracts.

  8. Circulating adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein, juvenile obesity, and metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krzystek-Korpacka, Malgorzata; Patryn, Eliza; Bednarz-Misa, Iwona; Mierzchala, Magdalena; Hotowy, Katarzyna; Czapinska, Elzbieta; Kustrzeba-Wojcicka, Irena; Gamian, Andrzej; Noczynska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP) links obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) and might be targeted in future therapies. Its utility as a MetS biomarker has been suggested in adults but has not been examined in children/adolescents. Our objectives were to identify metabolic parameters

  9. Effects of black raspberry on lipid profiles and vascular endothelial function in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Han Saem; Hong, Soon Jun; Lee, Tae-Bum; Kwon, Ji-Wung; Jeong, Jong Tae; Joo, Hyung Joon; Park, Jae Hyoung; Ahn, Chul-Min; Yu, Cheol Woong; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-10-01

    Black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) has been known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. However, short-term effects of black raspberry on lipid profiles and vascular endothelial function have not been investigated in patients with metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome (n = 77) were prospectively randomized into a group with black raspberry (n = 39, 750 mg/day) and a placebo group (n = 38) during a 12-week follow-up. Lipid profiles, brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (baFMD), and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α, C-reactive protein, adiponectin, sICAM-1, and sVCAM-1 were measured at the baseline and at the 12-week follow-up. Decreases from the baseline in the total cholesterol level (-22.8 ± 30.4 mg/dL vs. -1.9 ± 31.8 mg/dL, p raspberry than in the placebo group. Increases in baFMD at the 12-week follow-up were significantly greater in the group with black raspberry than in the placebo group (0.33 ± 0.44 mm vs. 0.10 ± 0.35 mm, p raspberry. The use of black raspberry significantly decreased serum total cholesterol level and inflammatory cytokines, thereby improving vascular endothelial function in patients with metabolic syndrome during the 12-week follow-up. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Protein domain recurrence and order can enhance prediction of protein functions

    KAUST Repository

    Abdel Messih, Mario A.

    2012-09-07

    Motivation: Burgeoning sequencing technologies have generated massive amounts of genomic and proteomic data. Annotating the functions of proteins identified in this data has become a big and crucial problem. Various computational methods have been developed to infer the protein functions based on either the sequences or domains of proteins. The existing methods, however, ignore the recurrence and the order of the protein domains in this function inference. Results: We developed two new methods to infer protein functions based on protein domain recurrence and domain order. Our first method, DRDO, calculates the posterior probability of the Gene Ontology terms based on domain recurrence and domain order information, whereas our second method, DRDO-NB, relies on the nave Bayes methodology using the same domain architecture information. Our large-scale benchmark comparisons show strong improvements in the accuracy of the protein function inference achieved by our new methods, demonstrating that domain recurrence and order can provide important information for inference of protein functions. The Author(s) 2012. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Sphingolipids in the function of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafurulla, Mohammad; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest and most diverse protein family in mammals and are involved in information transfer across cellular membranes. GPCRs are known to regulate multiple physiological functions and therefore represent major drug targets in all clinical areas. The fact that GPCRs are integral membrane proteins raises the possibility of their interaction with functionally important membrane lipids such as sphingolipids. Sphingolipids are essential membrane components and are recognized as diverse and dynamic regulators of a multitude of cellular processes. Interaction with sphingolipids could lead to modulation of GPCR structure and function. In this review, we highlight the role of sphingolipids in the function of GPCRs with specific examples. A comprehensive understanding of molecular events involved in GPCR-lipid interaction would provide better insight into GPCR function in health and disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolic and functional connectivity changes in mal de debarquement syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Hee Cha

    Full Text Available Individuals with mal de debarquement syndrome (MdDS experience a chronic illusion of self-motion triggered by prolonged exposure to passive motion, such as from sea or air travel. The experience is one of rocking dizziness similar to when the individual was originally on the motion trigger such as a boat or airplane. MdDS represents a prolonged version of a normal phenomenon familiar to most individuals but which persists for months or years in others. It represents a natural example of the neuroplasticity of motion adaptation. However, the localization of where that motion adaptation occurs is unknown. Our goal was to localize metabolic and functional connectivity changes associated with persistent MdDS.Twenty subjects with MdDS lasting a median duration of 17.5 months were compared to 20 normal controls with (18F FDG PET and resting state fMRI. Resting state metabolism and functional connectivity were calculated using age, grey matter volume, and mood and anxiety scores as nuisance covariates.MdDS subjects showed increased metabolism in the left entorhinal cortex and amygdala (z>3.3. Areas of relative hypometabolism included the left superior medial gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, right amygdala, right insula, and clusters in the left superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyri. MdDS subjects showed increased connectivity between the entorhinal cortex/amygdala cluster and posterior visual and vestibular processing areas including middle temporal gyrus, motion sensitive area MT/V5, superior parietal lobule, and primary visual cortex, while showing decreased connectivity to multiple prefrontal areas.These data show an association between resting state metabolic activity and functional connectivity between the entorhinal cortex and amygdala in a human disorder of abnormal motion perception. We propose a model for how these biological substrates can allow a limited period of motion exposure to lead to chronic perceptions of self-motion.

  13. CATH FunFHMMer web server: protein functional annotations using functional family assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sayoni; Sillitoe, Ian; Lee, David; Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Ward, John; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-07-01

    The widening function annotation gap in protein databases and the increasing number and diversity of the proteins being sequenced presents new challenges to protein function prediction methods. Multidomain proteins complicate the protein sequence-structure-function relationship further as new combinations of domains can expand the functional repertoire, creating new proteins and functions. Here, we present the FunFHMMer web server, which provides Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for query protein sequences based on the functional classification of the domain-based CATH-Gene3D resource. Our server also provides valuable information for the prediction of functional sites. The predictive power of FunFHMMer has been validated on a set of 95 proteins where FunFHMMer performs better than BLAST, Pfam and CDD. Recent validation by an independent international competition ranks FunFHMMer as one of the top function prediction methods in predicting GO annotations for both the Biological Process and Molecular Function Ontology. The FunFHMMer web server is available at http://www.cathdb.info/search/by_funfhmmer. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Growing functional modules from a seed protein via integration of protein interaction and gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrakopoulou Konstantina

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays modern biology aims at unravelling the strands of complex biological structures such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. A key concept in the organization of PPI networks is the existence of dense subnetworks (functional modules in them. In recent approaches clustering algorithms were applied at these networks and the resulting subnetworks were evaluated by estimating the coverage of well-established protein complexes they contained. However, most of these algorithms elaborate on an unweighted graph structure which in turn fails to elevate those interactions that would contribute to the construction of biologically more valid and coherent functional modules. Results In the current study, we present a method that corroborates the integration of protein interaction and microarray data via the discovery of biologically valid functional modules. Initially the gene expression information is overlaid as weights onto the PPI network and the enriched PPI graph allows us to exploit its topological aspects, while simultaneously highlights enhanced functional association in specific pairs of proteins. Then we present an algorithm that unveils the functional modules of the weighted graph by expanding a kernel protein set, which originates from a given 'seed' protein used as starting-point. Conclusion The integrated data and the concept of our approach provide reliable functional modules. We give proofs based on yeast data that our method manages to give accurate results in terms both of structural coherency, as well as functional consistency.

  15. High functioning male with fragile X syndrome and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuta, Kirin; Schneider, Andrea; Gane, Louise; Polussa, Jonathan; Woodruff, Bryan; Pretto, Dalyir; Hagerman, Randi; Tassone, Flora

    2015-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) affects individuals with more than 200 CGG repeats (full mutation) in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Those born with FXS experience cognitive and social impairments, developmental delays, and some features of autism spectrum disorders. Carriers of a premutation (55-200 CGG repeats) are generally not severely affected early in life; however, are at high risk of developing the late onset neurodegenerative disorder, Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS), or Fragile X-associated Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (FXPOI), and may have other medical conditions such as developmental delay, autism spectrum disorders, hypertension, anxiety, and immune-mediated disorders. Here we present a case of a 58-year-old man with a borderline IQ, average memory skills, and executive function deficits. He met criteria for multiple psychiatric diagnoses and presented with tremor and ataxia, meeting criteria for FXTAS. Molecular testing unveiled a completely unmethylated FMR1 full mutation in peripheral blood mononucleated cells with elevated FMR1 mRNA and premutation alleles of different sizes in two other tissues (primary fibroblasts and sperm), indicating the presence of allele instability based on both inter- and intra-tissue mosaicism. The observation of FXTAS in this case of a full mutation mosaic man suggests that the pathogenic mechanism underlying this disorder is not observed exclusively in premutation carriers as it was originally thought. The concomitant presence of features of FXS and late onset neurological deterioration with probable FXTAS likely result from a combined molecular pathology of elevated FMR1 mRNA levels, a molecular hallmark of FXTAS and low FMRP expression that leads to FXS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Predictors of a functional somatic syndrome diagnosis in patients with persistent functional somatic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingma, Eva M; de Jonge, Peter; Ormel, Johan; Rosmalen, Judith G M

    2013-06-01

    Functional somatic syndromes (FSS) are characterized by the existence of multiple persistent functional somatic symptoms. Not many patients fulfilling the criteria for an FSS, receive a formal diagnosis, and it is unknown which factors explain this discrepancy. Patients that tend to worry and patients that gather more health information may have an increased chance of an FSS diagnosis. We hypothesized that high intelligence and high neuroticism increase the probability of an FSS diagnosis in patients with persistent functional somatic symptoms. This study aims to investigate patient factors that might be important in the process of syndrome labeling. Our study was performed in a large, representative population cohort (n = 976) in Groningen, The Netherlands, and included two assessment waves. Intelligence was measured using the General Aptitude Test Battery version B 1002-B. Neuroticism was measured using the 12-item neuroticism scale of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised. Functional somatic symptoms were measured with the somatization section of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Current FSS diagnosis was assessed with a questionnaire. We performed multivariable logistic regression analyses including sum scores of neuroticism, intelligence scores, sex, number of functional somatic symptoms, and age as potential predictors of having an FSS diagnosis. From the 976 participants that completed measurements at follow-up, 289 (26.4 %) participants reported at least one persistent functional somatic symptom, and these subjects were included in the main analyses (38.4 % males, mean age of 55.2 years (SD = 10.7), 36-82 years). High numbers of functional somatic symptoms ((OR) = 1.320; 95 % (CI) = 1.097-1.588), female sex (OR = 9.068; 95 % CI = 4.061-20.251), and high intelligence (OR = 1.402; 95 % CI = 1.001-1.963) were associated with an FSS diagnosis, while age (OR = 0.989; 95 % CI = 960-1.019) and

  17. Artificial membranes for membrane protein purification, functionality and structure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Mayuriben J; Lousa, Carine De Marcos; Muench, Stephen P; Goldman, Adrian; Postis, Vincent L G

    2016-06-15

    Membrane proteins represent one of the most important targets for pharmaceutical companies. Unfortunately, technical limitations have long been a major hindrance in our understanding of the function and structure of such proteins. Recent years have seen the refinement of classical approaches and the emergence of new technologies that have resulted in a significant step forward in the field of membrane protein research. This review summarizes some of the current techniques used for studying membrane proteins, with overall advantages and drawbacks for each method. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Lipid Bilayer Composition Affects Transmembrane Protein Orientation and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie D. Hickey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm membranes change in structure and composition upon ejaculation to undergo capacitation, a molecular transformation which enables spermatozoa to undergo the acrosome reaction and be capable of fertilization. Changes to the membrane environment including lipid composition, specifically lipid microdomains, may be responsible for enabling capacitation. To study the effect of lipid environment on proteins, liposomes were created using lipids extracted from bull sperm membranes, with or without a protein (Na+ K+-ATPase or -amylase. Protein incorporation, function, and orientation were determined. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET confirmed protein inclusion in the lipid bilayer, and protein function was confirmed using a colourometric assay of phosphate production from ATP cleavage. In the native lipid liposomes, ATPase was oriented with the subunit facing the outer leaflet, while changing the lipid composition to 50% native lipids and 50% exogenous lipids significantly altered this orientation of Na+ K+-ATPase within the membranes.

  19. HOMOCYSTEINE AND KIDNEY'S FUNCTIONAL STATUS OF THE CHILDREN WITH THE NEPHROTIC SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.T. Faizova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors presented the data on the homo cysteine serum concentration in the children with nephrotic syndrome. They established the high rate of hyper homo cysteinemia in the nephritic syndrome, but the degree of the homocysteine concentration increase is largely due to the kidney's functional status rather than the activity of the disease. They also discuss the pathogenetic role of hyper homo cysteinemia in the event of the chronic nephritic pathology.Key words: homo cysteine, nephrotic syndrome, children.

  20. Integration of latex protein sequence data provides comprehensive functional overview of latex proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won Kyong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Chu, Hyosub; Park, Sang-Ho; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2014-03-01

    The laticiferous system is one of the most important conduit systems in higher plants, which produces a milky-like sap known as latex. Latex contains diverse secondary metabolites with various ecological functions. To obtain a comprehensive overview of the latex proteome, we integrated available latex proteins sequences and constructed a comprehensive dataset composed of 1,208 non-redundant latex proteins from 20 various latex-bearing plants. The results of functional analyses revealed that latex proteins are involved in various biological processes, including transcription, translation, protein degradation and the plant response to environmental stimuli. The results of the comparative analysis showed that the functions of the latex proteins are similar to those of phloem, suggesting the functional conservation of plant vascular proteins. The presence of latex proteins in mitochondria and plastids suggests the production of diverse secondary metabolites. Furthermore, using a BLAST search, we identified 854 homologous latex proteins in eight plant species, including three latex-bearing plants, such as papaya, caster bean and cassava, suggesting that latex proteins were newly evolved in vascular plants. Taken together, this study is the largest and most comprehensive in silico analysis of the latex proteome. The results obtained here provide useful resources and information for characterizing the evolution of the latex proteome.

  1. Automatic annotation of protein motif function with Gene Ontology terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishnan Vanathi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conserved protein sequence motifs are short stretches of amino acid sequence patterns that potentially encode the function of proteins. Several sequence pattern searching algorithms and programs exist foridentifying candidate protein motifs at the whole genome level. However, amuch needed and importanttask is to determine the functions of the newly identified protein motifs. The Gene Ontology (GO project is an endeavor to annotate the function of genes or protein sequences with terms from a dynamic, controlled vocabulary and these annotations serve well as a knowledge base. Results This paperpresents methods to mine the GO knowledge base and use the association between the GO terms assigned to a sequence and the motifs matched by the same sequence as evidence for predicting the functions of novel protein motifs automatically. The task of assigning GO terms to protein motifsis viewed as both a binary classification and information retrieval problem, where PROSITE motifs are used as samples for mode training and functional prediction. The mutual information of a motif and aGO term association isfound to be a very useful feature. We take advantageof the known motifs to train a logistic regression classifier, which allows us to combine mutual information with other frequency-based features and obtain a probability of correctassociation. The trained logistic regression model has intuitively meaningful and logically plausible parameter values, and performs very well empirically according to our evaluation criteria. Conclusions In this research, different methods for automatic annotation of protein motifs have been investigated. Empirical result demonstrated that the methods have a great potential for detecting and augmenting information about thefunctions of newly discovered candidate protein motifs.

  2. Growth, development and social functioning of individuals with Down syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gameren-Oosterom, Hillegonda Bertine Matthea van

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, four studies on children and adolescents with Down syndrome are described. The first study showed that the number of live births of children with Down syndrome in the Netherlands remained stable over the period 1997-2007 on 14.6 per 10,000 births. Of these, 85% were live born. In

  3. Thyroid function in adult Nigerians with metabolic syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: metabolic syndrome and thyroid dysfunction are two common disorders encountered in the metabolic clinic. Recently, there has been increased interest in the association between the two disorders because of the similarities between symptoms of hypothyroidism and components of the metabolic syndrome.

  4. Experimental Functional Analysis of Aggression in Children with Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Rachel; Shaw, Rebecca; Burrow, Caroline; Horsler, Kate; Allen, Debbie; Oliver, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Background: Kinship theory suggests that genomic imprinting could account for phenotypic behaviors that increase (in the case of Angelman syndrome) or decrease (for Prader-Willi syndrome) the drive to access social resources (adult contact) depending on the imprinting parent-of-origin. Difficult to manage behaviors, such as aggression that is…

  5. Analysis of substructural variation in families of enzymatic proteins with applications to protein function prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fofanov Viacheslav Y

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural variations caused by a wide range of physico-chemical and biological sources directly influence the function of a protein. For enzymatic proteins, the structure and chemistry of the catalytic binding site residues can be loosely defined as a substructure of the protein. Comparative analysis of drug-receptor substructures across and within species has been used for lead evaluation. Substructure-level similarity between the binding sites of functionally similar proteins has also been used to identify instances of convergent evolution among proteins. In functionally homologous protein families, shared chemistry and geometry at catalytic sites provide a common, local point of comparison among proteins that may differ significantly at the sequence, fold, or domain topology levels. Results This paper describes two key results that can be used separately or in combination for protein function analysis. The Family-wise Analysis of SubStructural Templates (FASST method uses all-against-all substructure comparison to determine Substructural Clusters (SCs. SCs characterize the binding site substructural variation within a protein family. In this paper we focus on examples of automatically determined SCs that can be linked to phylogenetic distance between family members, segregation by conformation, and organization by homology among convergent protein lineages. The Motif Ensemble Statistical Hypothesis (MESH framework constructs a representative motif for each protein cluster among the SCs determined by FASST to build motif ensembles that are shown through a series of function prediction experiments to improve the function prediction power of existing motifs. Conclusions FASST contributes a critical feedback and assessment step to existing binding site substructure identification methods and can be used for the thorough investigation of structure-function relationships. The application of MESH allows for an automated

  6. Prediction of Functional Outcome in Axonal Guillain-Barre Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Eun Jung; Kim, Dae Yul; Chang, Min Cheol; Ko, Eun Jae

    2016-06-01

    To identify the factors that could predict the functional outcome in patients with the axonal type of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS). Two hundred and two GBS patients admitted to our university hospital between 2003 and 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. We defined a good outcome as being "able to walk independently at 1 month after onset" and a poor outcome as being "unable to walk independently at 1 month after onset". We evaluated the factors that differed between the good and poor outcome groups. Twenty-four patients were classified into the acute motor axonal neuropathy type. There was a statistically significant difference between the good and poor outcome groups in terms of the GBS disability score at admission, and GBS disability score and Medical Research Council sum score at 1 month after admission. In an electrophysiologic analysis, the good outcome group showed greater amplitude of median, ulnar, deep peroneal, and posterior tibial nerve compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) and greater amplitude of median, ulnar, and superficial peroneal sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) than the poor outcome group. A lower GBS disability score at admission, high amplitude of median, ulnar, deep peroneal, and posterior tibial CMAPs, and high amplitude of median, ulnar, and superficial peroneal SNAPs were associated with being able to walk at 1 month in patients with axonal GBS.

  7. Structural and functional properties of hemp seed protein products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malomo, Sunday A; He, Rong; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2014-08-01

    The effects of pH and protein concentration on some structural and functional properties of hemp seed protein isolate (HPI, 84.15% protein content) and defatted hemp seed protein meal (HPM, 44.32% protein content) were determined. The HPI had minimum protein solubility (PS) at pH 4.0, which increased as pH was decreased or increased. In contrast, the HPM had minimum PS at pH 3.0, which increased at higher pH values. Gel electrophoresis showed that some of the high molecular weight proteins (>45 kDa) present in HPM were not well extracted by the alkali and were absent or present in low ratio in the HPI polypeptide profile. The amino acid composition showed that the isolation process increased the Arg/Lys ratio of HPI (5.52%) when compared to HPM (3.35%). Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism data indicate that the HPI proteins had a well-defined structure at pH 3.0, which was lost as pH value increased. The differences in structural conformation of HPI at different pH values were reflected as better foaming capacity at pH 3.0 when compared to pH 5.0, 7.0, and 9.0. At 10 and 25 mg/mL protein concentrations, emulsions formed by the HPM had smaller oil droplet sizes (higher quality), when compared to the HPI-formed emulsions. In contrast at 50 mg/mL protein concentration, the HPI-formed emulsions had smaller oil droplet sizes (except at pH 3.0). We conclude that the functional properties of hemp seed protein products are dependent on structural conformations as well as protein concentration and pH. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. JAFA: a protein function annotation meta-server

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedberg, Iddo; Harder, Tim; Godzik, Adam

    2006-01-01

    With the high number of sequences and structures streaming in from genomic projects, there is a need for more powerful and sophisticated annotation tools. Most problematic of the annotation efforts is predicting gene and protein function. Over the past few years there has been considerable progress...... Annotations, or JAFA server. JAFA queries several function prediction servers with a protein sequence and assembles the returned predictions in a legible, non-redundant format. In this manner, JAFA combines the predictions of several servers to provide a comprehensive view of what are the predicted functions...

  9. Down syndrome: Cognitive and behavioral functioning across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, Julie; Pulsifer, Margaret; Seligsohn, Karen; Skotko, Brian; Schwartz, Alison

    2015-06-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) commonly possess unique neurocognitive and neurobehavioral profiles that emerge within specific developmental periods. These profiles are distinct relative to others with similar intellectual disability (ID) and reflect underlying neuroanatomic findings, providing support for a distinctive phenotypic profile. This review updates what is known about the cognitive and behavioral phenotypes associated with DS across the lifespan. In early childhood, mild deviations from neurotypically developing trajectories emerge. By school-age, delays become pronounced. Nonverbal skills remain on trajectory for mental age, whereas verbal deficits emerge and persist. Nonverbal learning and memory are strengths relative to verbal skills. Expressive language is delayed relative to comprehension. Aspects of language skills continue to develop throughout adolescence, although language skills remain compromised in adulthood. Deficits in attention/executive functions are present in childhood and become more pronounced with age. Characteristic features associated with DS (cheerful, social nature) are personality assets. Children are at a lower risk for psychopathology compared to other children with ID; families report lower levels of stress and a more positive outlook. In youth, externalizing behaviors may be problematic, whereas a shift toward internalizing behaviors emerges with maturity. Changes in emotional/behavioral functioning in adulthood are typically associated with neurodegeneration and individuals with DS are higher risk for dementia of the Alzheimer's type. Individuals with DS possess many unique strengths and weaknesses that should be appreciated as they develop across the lifespan. Awareness of this profile by professionals and caregivers can promote early detection and support cognitive and behavioral development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Multiple proteins of White spot syndrome virus involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... of LvInt was assayed by SDS-PAGE. 2.2 SDS-PAGE and Western blot assay. Expression cultures were subjected to 12% SDS-PAGE anal- ysis according to the method of Laemmli (1970). For West- ern blotting, the separated proteins were then transferred to a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane.

  11. RPGR-containing protein complexes in syndromic and non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-12-31

    Dec 31, 2009 ... 2Neurobiology-Neurodegeneration and Repair laboratory (N-NRL), National Eye Institute,. National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD ... According to the current model of IFT, protein and membrane cargo are ..... most human RPGR mutations were hypothesized to have a null phenotype in males; however, ...

  12. Phytochemicals perturb membranes and promiscuously alter protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Thakur, Pratima; Herold, Karl F; Hobart, E Ashley; Ramsey, Nicole B; Periole, Xavier; de Jong, Djurre H; Zwama, Martijn; Yilmaz, Duygu; Hall, Katherine; Maretzky, Thorsten; Hemmings, Hugh C; Blobel, Carl; Marrink, Siewert J; Koçer, Armağan; Sack, Jon T; Andersen, Olaf S

    2014-08-15

    A wide variety of phytochemicals are consumed for their perceived health benefits. Many of these phytochemicals have been found to alter numerous cell functions, but the mechanisms underlying their biological activity tend to be poorly understood. Phenolic phytochemicals are particularly promiscuous modifiers of membrane protein function, suggesting that some of their actions may be due to a common, membrane bilayer-mediated mechanism. To test whether bilayer perturbation may underlie this diversity of actions, we examined five bioactive phenols reported to have medicinal value: capsaicin from chili peppers, curcumin from turmeric, EGCG from green tea, genistein from soybeans, and resveratrol from grapes. We find that each of these widely consumed phytochemicals alters lipid bilayer properties and the function of diverse membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these phytochemicals modify bilayer properties by localizing to the bilayer/solution interface. Bilayer-modifying propensity was verified using a gramicidin-based assay, and indiscriminate modulation of membrane protein function was demonstrated using four proteins: membrane-anchored metalloproteases, mechanosensitive ion channels, and voltage-dependent potassium and sodium channels. Each protein exhibited similar responses to multiple phytochemicals, consistent with a common, bilayer-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that many effects of amphiphilic phytochemicals are due to cell membrane perturbations, rather than specific protein binding.

  13. Renal function evaluation in an adult female with cat-eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinghieri, G; Triolo, O; Stella, N C; Gemelli, M; Musolino, R; Monardo, P; Savica, V

    1994-01-01

    Cat-eye syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly involving the kidney. It is rarely reported in literature, while renal function has never been studied up to now. Shown here are the morphofunctional renal alterations observed in a female patient affected by cat-eye syndrome.

  14. Truncated SALL1 Impedes Primary Cilia Function in Townes-Brocks Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozal-Basterra, Laura; Martín-Ruíz, Itziar; Pirone, Lucia

    2018-01-01

    Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is characterized by a spectrum of malformations in the digits, ears, and kidneys. These anomalies overlap those seen in a growing number of ciliopathies, which are genetic syndromes linked to defects in the formation or function of the primary cilia. TBS is caused...

  15. Successful diuretics treatment of protein-losing enteropathy in Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuochi, Tatsuki; Suda, Kenji; Seki, Yoshitaka; Yanagi, Tadahiro; Yoshimoto, Hironaga; Kudo, Yoshiyuki; Iemura, Motofumi; Tanikawa, Ken; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-04-01

    There are few reports on successful high-dose spironolactone treatment of refractory protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) caused by Fontan procedure. We report successful diuretics treatment with spironolactone and furosemide at standard dose, of refractory PLE in a patient with Noonan syndrome and repaired congenital heart disease. This is the first successful application of diuretics treatment in a patient with refractory PLE without Fontan procedure. This case illustrates that diuretics treatment can be the first-line treatment of PLE regardless of the causative physiology, and can be effective in refractory PLE with Noonan syndrome. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  16. Structure and function of nanoparticle-protein conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubin-Tam, M-E; Hamad-Schifferli, K

    2008-01-01

    Conjugation of proteins to nanoparticles has numerous applications in sensing, imaging, delivery, catalysis, therapy and control of protein structure and activity. Therefore, characterizing the nanoparticle-protein interface is of great importance. A variety of covalent and non-covalent linking chemistries have been reported for nanoparticle attachment. Site-specific labeling is desirable in order to control the protein orientation on the nanoparticle, which is crucial in many applications such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer. We evaluate methods for successful site-specific attachment. Typically, a specific protein residue is linked directly to the nanoparticle core or to the ligand. As conjugation often affects the protein structure and function, techniques to probe structure and activity are assessed. We also examine how molecular dynamics simulations of conjugates would complete those experimental techniques in order to provide atomistic details on the effect of nanoparticle attachment. Characterization studies of nanoparticle-protein complexes show that the structure and function are influenced by the chemistry of the nanoparticle ligand, the nanoparticle size, the nanoparticle material, the stoichiometry of the conjugates, the labeling site on the protein and the nature of the linkage (covalent versus non-covalent)

  17. A proteomics strategy to elucidate functional protein-protein interactions applied to EGF signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blagoev, B.; Kratchmarova, I.; Ong, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics can reveal protein-protein interactions on a large scale, but it has been difficult to separate background binding from functionally important interactions and still preserve weak binders. To investigate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, we em...

  18. Functional analysis of picornavirus 2B proteins: effects on calcium homeostasis and intracellular protein trafficking.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.S. de; Mattia, F.P. de; Dommelen, M.M.T.; Lanke, K.H.W.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van

    2008-01-01

    The family Picornaviridae consists of a large group of plus-strand RNA viruses that share a similar genome organization. The nomenclature of the picornavirus proteins is based on their position in the viral RNA genome but does not necessarily imply a conserved function of proteins of different

  19. Profiling Proteins in the Hypothalamus and Hippocampus of a Rat Model of Premenstrual Syndrome Irritability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Sheng; Wei, Xia; Wu, Jibiao

    2017-01-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) refers to several physical and mental symptoms (such as irritability) commonly encountered in clinical gynaecology. The incidence of PMS has been increasing, attracting greater attention from medical fields. However, PMS pathogenesis remains unclear. This study employed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) for proteomic map analysis of the hypothalamus and hippocampus of rat models of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) irritability. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF-MS) was used to identify proteins possibly related with PMS irritability. Baixiangdan, a traditional Chinese medicine effective against PMS irritability, was used in the rat model to study putative target proteins of this medicine. The hypothalamus and hippocampus of each group modelling PMS displayed the following features: decreased expression of Ulip2, tubulin beta chain 15, α actin, and interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein; increased expression of kappa-B motif-binding phosphoprotein; decreased expression of hydrolase at the end of ubiquitin carboxy, albumin, and aldolase protein; and increased expression of M2 pyruvate kinase, panthenol-cytochrome C reductase core protein I, and calcium-binding protein. Contrasting with previous studies, the current study identified new proteins related to PMS irritability. Our findings contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of PMS irritability and could provide a reference point for further studies. PMID:28255462

  20. Profiling Proteins in the Hypothalamus and Hippocampus of a Rat Model of Premenstrual Syndrome Irritability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingqi Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Premenstrual syndrome (PMS refers to several physical and mental symptoms (such as irritability commonly encountered in clinical gynaecology. The incidence of PMS has been increasing, attracting greater attention from medical fields. However, PMS pathogenesis remains unclear. This study employed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE for proteomic map analysis of the hypothalamus and hippocampus of rat models of premenstrual syndrome (PMS irritability. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF-MS was used to identify proteins possibly related with PMS irritability. Baixiangdan, a traditional Chinese medicine effective against PMS irritability, was used in the rat model to study putative target proteins of this medicine. The hypothalamus and hippocampus of each group modelling PMS displayed the following features: decreased expression of Ulip2, tubulin beta chain 15, α actin, and interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein; increased expression of kappa-B motif-binding phosphoprotein; decreased expression of hydrolase at the end of ubiquitin carboxy, albumin, and aldolase protein; and increased expression of M2 pyruvate kinase, panthenol-cytochrome C reductase core protein I, and calcium-binding protein. Contrasting with previous studies, the current study identified new proteins related to PMS irritability. Our findings contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of PMS irritability and could provide a reference point for further studies.

  1. Quantitation of proteinuria in nephrotic syndrome by spot urine protein creatinine ratio estimation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, A; Kumar, R; Chaterjee, A; Ghosh, J K; Basu, K

    2009-01-01

    In Nephrotic Syndrome the amount of protein excretion is a reflection of activity of disease. Quantitative measurement of proteinuria by a 24-hour urine collection has been the accepted method of evaluation. Recent studies have shown that calculation of protein/creatinine ratio in a spot urine sample correlates well with the 24-hour urine protein (24-HUP) excretion. A study was conducted to compare the accuracy of a spot urinary protein/creatinine ratio (P/C ratio) and urinary dipstick with the 24-hour urine protein. Fifty two samples from 26 patients of nephrotic syndrome were collected. This included a 24-hour urine sample followed by the next voided random spot sample. The protein/creatinine ratio was calculated and dipstick was performed on the spot sample. This was compared with the 24-hour urine protein excretion. The correlation between the three samples was statistically highly significant (pprotein/creatinine ratio in Indian children was also estimated on 50 normal children admitted in the ward without any renal diseases calculated to be 0.053 (SE of mean+/-0.003).

  2. Distinguishing between biochemical and cellular function: Are there peptide signatures for cellular function of proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shruti; Bhattacharyya, Kausik; Bakshi, Rachit; Narang, Ankita; Brahmachari, Vani

    2017-04-01

    The genome annotation and identification of gene function depends on conserved biochemical activity. However, in the cell, proteins with the same biochemical function can participate in different cellular pathways and cannot complement one another. Similarly, two proteins of very different biochemical functions are put in the same class of cellular function; for example, the classification of a gene as an oncogene or a tumour suppressor gene is not related to its biochemical function, but is related to its cellular function. We have taken an approach to identify peptide signatures for cellular function in proteins with known biochemical function. ATPases as a test case, we classified ATPases (2360 proteins) and kinases (517 proteins) from the human genome into different cellular function categories such as transcriptional, replicative, and chromatin remodelling proteins. Using publicly available tool, MEME, we identify peptide signatures shared among the members of a given category but not between cellular functional categories; for example, no motif sharing is seen between chromatin remodelling and transporter ATPases, similarly between receptor Serine/Threonine Kinase and Receptor Tyrosine Kinase. There are motifs shared within each category with significant E value and high occurrence. This concept of signature for cellular function was applied to developmental regulators, the polycomb and trithorax proteins which led to the prediction of the role of INO80, a chromatin remodelling protein, in development. This has been experimentally validated earlier for its role in homeotic gene regulation and its interaction with regulatory complexes like the Polycomb and Trithorax complex. Proteins 2017; 85:682-693. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Specific protein homeostatic functions of small heat-shock proteins increase lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Michel J; Carra, Serena; Kanon, Bart; Bosveld, Floris; Klauke, Karin; Sibon, Ody C M; Kampinga, Harm H

    2016-04-01

    During aging, oxidized, misfolded, and aggregated proteins accumulate in cells, while the capacity to deal with protein damage declines severely. To cope with the toxicity of damaged proteins, cells rely on protein quality control networks, in particular proteins belonging to the family of heat-shock proteins (HSPs). As safeguards of the cellular proteome, HSPs assist in protein folding and prevent accumulation of damaged, misfolded proteins. Here, we compared the capacity of all Drosophila melanogaster small HSP family members for their ability to assist in refolding stress-denatured substrates and/or to prevent aggregation of disease-associated misfolded proteins. We identified CG14207 as a novel and potent small HSP member that exclusively assisted in HSP70-dependent refolding of stress-denatured proteins. Furthermore, we report that HSP67BC, which has no role in protein refolding, was the most effective small HSP preventing toxic protein aggregation in an HSP70-independent manner. Importantly, overexpression of both CG14207 and HSP67BC in Drosophila leads to a mild increase in lifespan, demonstrating that increased levels of functionally diverse small HSPs can promote longevity in vivo. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Depressive mood and quality of life in functional gastrointestinal disorders: differences between functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome and overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heon-Jeong; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Jin, Choon Jo; Kang, Seung-Gul; Yoon, Hiejin; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the differences in depressive mood and quality of life in patients with between functional dyspepsia (FD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and FD-IBS overlap as diagnosed based on Rome III criteria. The subjects completed a questionnaire based on Rome III criteria, the Beck Depressive Inventory (BDI) including Cognitive Depression Index (CDI) for depressive mood evaluation and the 36-item Short Form general health survey (SF-36) for quality of life assessment. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy were performed to exclude organic disease. Of 279 subjects, 70 and 124 subjects were diagnosed as FD and IBS, respectively. FD-IBS overlap patients (n=42) and FD alone patients (n=28) showed higher BDI scores than normal subjects (n=127) (PIBS alone patients (n=82) did not show difference (P=.17). All the SF-36 subscores of the FD-IBS overlap patients were significantly lower than normal subjects (Pmood was significantly related to FD and FD-IBS overlap but not to IBS based on Rome III criteria. FD-IBS overlap patients have worse quality of life than FD-alone and IBS-alone patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Yellow Mealworm Protein for Food Purposes - Extraction and Functional Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhao

    Full Text Available A protocol for extraction of yellow mealworm larvae proteins was established, conditions were evaluated and the resulting protein extract was characterised. The freeze-dried yellow mealworm larvae contained around 33% fat, 51% crude protein and 43% true protein on a dry matter basis. The true protein content of the protein extract was about 75%, with an extraction rate of 70% under optimised extraction conditions using 0.25 M NaOH, a NaOH solution:ethanol defatted worm ratio of 15:1 mL/g, 40°C for 1 h and extraction twice. The protein extract was a good source of essential amino acids. The lowest protein solubility in distilled water solution was found between pH 4 and 5, and increased with either increasing or decreasing pH. Lower solubility was observed in 0.5 M NaCl solution compared with distilled water. The rheological tests indicated that temperature, sample concentration, addition of salt and enzyme, incubation time and pH alterations influenced the elastic modulus of yellow mealworm protein extract (YMPE. These results demonstrate that the functional properties of YMPE can be modified for different food applications.

  6. Characterisation and functional properties of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) seed proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Ali Abas; Sogi, Dalbir Singh; Singh, Preeti; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Shivhare, Uma S

    2011-01-15

    People in developing countries depend largely on non-conventional protein sources to augment the availability of proteins in their diets. Watermelon seed meal is reported to contain an adequate amount of nutritional proteins that could be extracted for use as nutritional ingredients in food products. Osborne classification showed that globulin was the major protein (≥500 g kg (-1)) present in watermelon seed meal, followed by albumin and glutelin. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the polypeptides had low molecular weights ranging from 35 to 47 kDa. Isoelectric focusing revealed that the isoelectric point of most proteins was in the acidic range 4-6. These proteins are rich in aspartic acid, glutamic acid and serine. An increase in pH (5-9) significantly (P watermelon protein fractions respectively, while surface hydrophobicity ranged from 126.4 to 173.2 and from 125.8 to 169.3 respectively. The foaming and emulsifying properties of albumin were better than those of the other proteins studied. The good nutritional and functional properties of watermelon seed meal proteins suggest their potential use in food formulations. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Optimizing high performance computing workflow for protein functional annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanberry, Larissa; Rekepalli, Bhanu; Liu, Yuan; Giblock, Paul; Higdon, Roger; Montague, Elizabeth; Broomall, William; Kolker, Natali; Kolker, Eugene

    2014-09-10

    Functional annotation of newly sequenced genomes is one of the major challenges in modern biology. With modern sequencing technologies, the protein sequence universe is rapidly expanding. Newly sequenced bacterial genomes alone contain over 7.5 million proteins. The rate of data generation has far surpassed that of protein annotation. The volume of protein data makes manual curation infeasible, whereas a high compute cost limits the utility of existing automated approaches. In this work, we present an improved and optmized automated workflow to enable large-scale protein annotation. The workflow uses high performance computing architectures and a low complexity classification algorithm to assign proteins into existing clusters of orthologous groups of proteins. On the basis of the Position-Specific Iterative Basic Local Alignment Search Tool the algorithm ensures at least 80% specificity and sensitivity of the resulting classifications. The workflow utilizes highly scalable parallel applications for classification and sequence alignment. Using Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment supercomputers, the workflow processed 1,200,000 newly sequenced bacterial proteins. With the rapid expansion of the protein sequence universe, the proposed workflow will enable scientists to annotate big genome data.

  8. Yellow Mealworm Protein for Food Purposes - Extraction and Functional Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue; Vázquez-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Johansson, Daniel P.; Landberg, Rikard; Langton, Maud

    2016-01-01

    A protocol for extraction of yellow mealworm larvae proteins was established, conditions were evaluated and the resulting protein extract was characterised. The freeze-dried yellow mealworm larvae contained around 33% fat, 51% crude protein and 43% true protein on a dry matter basis. The true protein content of the protein extract was about 75%, with an extraction rate of 70% under optimised extraction conditions using 0.25 M NaOH, a NaOH solution:ethanol defatted worm ratio of 15:1 mL/g, 40°C for 1 h and extraction twice. The protein extract was a good source of essential amino acids. The lowest protein solubility in distilled water solution was found between pH 4 and 5, and increased with either increasing or decreasing pH. Lower solubility was observed in 0.5 M NaCl solution compared with distilled water. The rheological tests indicated that temperature, sample concentration, addition of salt and enzyme, incubation time and pH alterations influenced the elastic modulus of yellow mealworm protein extract (YMPE). These results demonstrate that the functional properties of YMPE can be modified for different food applications. PMID:26840533

  9. Functionally specified protein signatures distinctive for each of the different blue copper proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anishetty Sharmila

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins having similar functions from different sources can be identified by the occurrence in their sequences, a conserved cluster of amino acids referred to as pattern, motif, signature or fingerprint. The wide usage of protein sequence analysis in par with the growth of databases signifies the importance of using patterns or signatures to retrieve out related sequences. Blue copper proteins are found in the electron transport chain of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The signatures already existing in the databases like the type 1 copper blue, multiple copper oxidase, cyt b/b6, photosystem 1 psaA&B, psaG&K, and reiske iron sulphur protein are not specified signatures for blue copper proteins as the name itself suggests. Most profile and motif databases strive to classify protein sequences into a broad spectrum of protein families. This work describes the signatures designed based on the copper metal binding motifs in blue copper proteins. The common feature in all blue copper proteins is a trigonal planar arrangement of two nitrogen ligands [each from histidine] and one sulphur containing thiolate ligand [from cysteine], with strong interactions between the copper center and these ligands. Results Sequences that share such conserved motifs are crucial to the structure or function of the protein and this could provide a signature of family membership. The blue copper proteins chosen for the study were plantacyanin, plastocyanin, cucumber basic protein, stellacyanin, dicyanin, umecyanin, uclacyanin, cusacyanin, rusticyanin, sulfocyanin, halocyanin, azurin, pseudoazurin, amicyanin and nitrite reductase which were identified in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. ClustalW analysis of the protein sequences of each of the blue copper proteins was the basis for designing protein signatures or peptides. The protein signatures and peptides identified in this study were designed involving the active site region involving the amino acids

  10. Executive Functions and Prader-Willi Syndrome: Global Deficit Linked with Intellectual Level and Syndrome-Specific Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalère, Johann; Postal, Virginie; Jauregui, Joseba; Copet, Pierre; Laurier, Virginie; Thuilleaux, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to support the growing evidence suggesting that Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) might present with an impairment of executive functions (EFs) and to investigate whether this impairment is specific to patients with PWS or due to their intellectual disability (ID). Six tasks were administered to assess EFs (inhibition,…

  11. The small envelope protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus possesses ion channel protein-like properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Changhee; Yoo, Dongwan

    2006-01-01

    The small envelope (E) protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a hydrophobic 73 amino acid protein encoded in the internal open reading frame (ORF) of the bicistronic mRNA2. As a first step towards understanding the biological role of E protein during PRRSV replication, E gene expression was blocked in a full-length infectious clone by mutating the ATG translational initiation to GTG, such that the full-length mutant genomic clone was unable to synthesize the E protein. DNA transfection of PRRSV-susceptible cells with the E gene knocked-out genomic clone showed the absence of virus infectivity. P129-ΔE-transfected cells however produced virion particles in the culture supernatant, and these particles contained viral genomic RNA, demonstrating that the E protein is essential for PRRSV infection but dispensable for virion assembly. Electron microscopy suggests that the P129-ΔE virions assembled in the absence of E had a similar appearance to the wild-type particles. Strand-specific RT-PCR demonstrated that the E protein-negative, non-infectious P129-ΔE virus particles were able to enter cells but further steps of replication were interrupted. The entry of PRRSV has been suggested to be via receptor-mediated endocytosis, and lysomotropic basic compounds and known ion-channel blocking agents both inhibited PRRSV replication effectively during the uncoating process. The expression of E protein in Escherichia coli-mediated cell growth arrests and increased the membrane permeability. Cross-linking experiments in cells infected with PRRSV or transfected with E gene showed that the E protein was able to form homo-oligomers. Taken together, our data suggest that the PRRSV E protein is likely an ion-channel protein embedded in the viral envelope and facilitates uncoating of virus and release of the genome in the cytoplasm

  12. β-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Sánchez-Guillén, María Del Carmen; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Leon-Chavez, Bertha Alicia; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Islas-Andrade, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Aims The clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome does not find any parameters to evaluate the insulin sensitivity (IS) or β-cell function. The evaluation of these parameters would detect early risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between β-cell function and presence of metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects. Material and methods This study is part of the Mexican Survey on the Prevention of Diabetes (MexDiab Study) with headquarters in the city of Puebla, Mexico. The study comprised of 444 subjects of both genders, aged between 18 and 60 years and allocated into two study groups: (1) control group of individuals at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome and (2) group composed of subjects with metabolic syndrome and diagnosed according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Defection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical assessments were carried out. Results Average age of the subjects in the control group (n = 254) was 35.7 ± 11.5 years and 42.0 ± 10.7 years for subjects in the metabolic syndrome group (n = 190). Subjects at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome showed decreased IS, increased insulin resistance (IR), and altered β-cell function. Individuals with metabolic syndrome showed a high prevalence (P ≤ 0.05) of family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This group also showed a significant metabolic imbalance with glucose and insulin levels and lipid profile outside the ranges considered safe to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease and T2D. Conclusion The main finding in this study was the detection of altered β-cell function, decreased IS, an increased IR in subjects at metabolic balance, and the progressive deterioration of β-cell function and IS in subjects with metabolic syndrome as the number of features of metabolic syndrome increases

  13. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Nonstructural Protein 16 Is Necessary for Interferon Resistance and Viral Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menachery, Vineet D.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Dinnon, Kenneth H.; Leist, Sarah R.; Yount, Boyd L.; Graham, Rachel L.; McAnarney, Eileen T.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Cockrell, Adam S.; Debbink, Kari; Sims, Amy C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Baric, Ralph S.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2017-11-15

    ABSTRACT

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) encode a mixture of highly conserved and novel genes, as well as genetic elements necessary for infection and pathogenesis, raising the possibility of common targets for attenuation and therapeutic design. In this study, we focused on highly conserved nonstructural protein 16 (NSP16), a viral 2'O-methyltransferase (2'O-MTase) that encodes critical functions in immune modulation and infection. Using reverse genetics, we disrupted a key motif in the conserved KDKE motif of Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV) NSP16 (D130A) and evaluated the effect on viral infection and pathogenesis. While the absence of 2'O-MTase activity had only a marginal impact on propagation and replication in Vero cells, dNSP16 mutant MERS-CoV demonstrated significant attenuation relative to the control both in primary human airway cell cultures andin vivo. Further examination indicated that dNSP16 mutant MERS-CoV had a type I interferon (IFN)-based attenuation and was partially restored in the absence of molecules of IFN-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats. Importantly, the robust attenuation permitted the use of dNSP16 mutant MERS-CoV as a live attenuated vaccine platform protecting from a challenge with a mouse-adapted MERS-CoV strain. These studies demonstrate the importance of the conserved 2'O-MTase activity for CoV pathogenesis and highlight NSP16 as a conserved universal target for rapid live attenuated vaccine design in an expanding CoV outbreak setting.

    IMPORTANCECoronavirus (CoV) emergence in both humans and livestock represents a significant threat to global public health, as evidenced by the sudden emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV), MERS-CoV, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, and swine delta CoV in the 21st century. These studies describe an approach that

  14. Prosthodontic Rehabilitation of Patient with Anterior Hyper Function Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Korunoska-Stevkovska

    2017-12-01

    CONCLUSION: Anterior hyperfunction syndrome with its high incidence is a disease with the need of interdisciplinary therapy approach. Fast diagnosis, thorough clinical examination using all available diagnostic tools, and choosing the right treatment is very challenging.

  15. The Role of Maternal Dietary Proteins in Development of Metabolic Syndrome in Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Jahan-Mihan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity has been increasing. Pre-natal environment has been suggested as a factor influencing the risk of metabolic syndrome in adulthood. Both observational and experimental studies showed that maternal diet is a major modifier of the development of regulatory systems in the offspring in utero and post-natally. Both protein content and source in maternal diet influence pre- and early post-natal development. High and low protein dams’ diets have detrimental effect on body weight, blood pressure191 and metabolic and intake regulatory systems in the offspring. Moreover, the role of the source of protein in a nutritionally adequate maternal diet in programming of food intake regulatory system, body weight, glucose metabolism and blood pressure in offspring is studied. However, underlying mechanisms are still elusive. The purpose of this review is to examine the current literature related to the role of proteins in maternal diets in development of characteristics of the metabolic syndrome in offspring.

  16. The regulatory function of social referencing in preschoolers with Down syndrome or Williams syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurman Angela John

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important developmental task is to learn to recognize another person as a source of information and to utilize this information as a method of learning about the surrounding world. This socially guided form of learning, referred to as social referencing, is critical for the development of children’s understanding of other people, themselves and their surrounding world. In the present project, the regulatory function of social referencing was examined in two genetic disorders that are characterized by differing patterns of socio-cognitive development: Down syndrome (DS and Williams syndrome (WS. Methods Participants were 20 children with DS and 20 children with WS aged 42 to 71 months, matched on chronological age and gender. Each child participated in four studies: one study in which we examined performance in a social referencing paradigm and three studies in which we considered performance on tasks designed to tap each of three component abilities (initiating eye contact, gaze following and emotional responsivity important for success in social referencing. Results The majority of children in both groups demonstrated positive behavioral responses regarding the stimulus in the Social Referencing task when the adult communicated a joyful message but did not regulate their own behavior in accordance with the adult’s expression of fear. Between-group differences were observed in both conditions, with most differences indicating more advanced socio-communicative competence for children with DS than for children with WS even though the overall intellectual abilities and receptive language abilities of the children with WS were significantly higher than were those of the children with DS. The results of follow-up studies indicated that children with DS were more likely to initiate eye contact (unsolicited and to follow another person’s gaze in triadic situations than were children with WS. Neither group regulated their

  17. Functional Characteristics of Milk Protein Concentrates and Their Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluko, Hankie; Liu, Lu; Lv, Jia-Ping; Zhang, Shu-Wen

    2016-05-18

    A major deterrent to the usage of milk protein concentrate (MPC), a high-protein milk product with increasing demand as a food and sports drink ingredient, has been its poor functional characteristics when compared with other milk protein products such as whey protein concentrate and sodium caseinates. This review discusses the recent research on functional properties of MPC, focusing on factors that may contribute to the poor functional characteristics before, during, and after production. Current research, methods employed, and new understanding on the causes of poor solubility of MPC at mild temperatures (about 20°C) has been presented, including loss of solubility during storage as these areas have received unprecedented attention over the past decade, and also affects other useful functional properties of MPC, such as emulsifying properties, gelation, and foaming. Processing methods, which include heat treatment, high-pressure application, microwave heating, ultrasound application, and enzyme and salts modification, have been used or have potential to modify or improve the functional properties of MPCs. Future research on the effects of these processing methods on the functional properties, including effects of enzyme hydrolysis on bitterness and bioactivity, has also been discussed.

  18. Optimization of functionalization conditions for protein analysis by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo-Hernández, María, E-mail: maria.arroyo@ctb.upm.es [Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Daza, Rafael; Pérez-Rigueiro, Jose; Elices, Manuel; Nieto-Márquez, Jorge; Guinea, Gustavo V. [Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Highest fluorescence is obtained for central conditions. • Largest primary amine contribution is obtained for central conditions. • RMS roughness is smaller than 1 nm for all functional films. • Selected deposition conditions lead to proper RMS and functionality values. • LDH proteins adsorbed on AVS-films were observed by AFM. - Abstract: Activated vapor silanization (AVS) is used to functionalize silicon surfaces through deposition of amine-containing thin films. AVS combines vapor silanization and chemical vapor deposition techniques and allows the properties of the functionalized layers (thickness, amine concentration and topography) to be controlled by tuning the deposition conditions. An accurate characterization is performed to correlate the deposition conditions and functional-film properties. In particular, it is shown that smooth surfaces with a sufficient surface density of amine groups may be obtained with this technique. These surfaces are suitable for the study of proteins with atomic force microscopy.

  19. Pancreatic function and morphology in Sjögren's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, Pia; Fallentin, Eva Marie; Larsen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is considered to be a universal exocrinopathy most likely based on autoimmune mechanisms. The degree of exocrine involvement in SS with the exception of salivary and lachrymal glands is, however, not yet established.......Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is considered to be a universal exocrinopathy most likely based on autoimmune mechanisms. The degree of exocrine involvement in SS with the exception of salivary and lachrymal glands is, however, not yet established....

  20. Competition between the DNA unwinding and strand pairing activities of the Werner and Bloom syndrome proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orren David K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The premature aging and cancer-prone Werner and Bloom syndromes are caused by defects in the RecQ helicase enzymes WRN and BLM, respectively. Recently, both WRN and BLM (as well as several other RecQ members have been shown to possess a strand annealing activity in addition to the requisite DNA unwinding activity. Since an annealing function would appear to directly oppose the action of a helicase, we have examined in this study the dynamic equilibrium between unwinding and annealing mediated by either WRN or BLM. Results Our investigation into the competition between annealing and unwinding demonstrates that, under standard reaction conditions, WRN- or BLM-mediated annealing can partially or completely mask unwinding as measured in standard helicase assays. Several strategies were employed to suppress the annealing activity so that the actual strength of WRN- or BLM-dependent unwinding could be more accurately assessed. Interestingly, if a DNA oligomer complementary to one strand of the DNA substrate to be unwound is added during the helicase reaction, both WRN and BLM unwinding is enhanced, presumably by preventing protein-mediated re-annealing. This strategy allowed measurement of WRN-catalyzed unwinding of long (80 base pair duplex regions and fully complementary, blunt-ended duplexes, both of which were otherwise quite refractory to the helicase activity of WRN. Similarly, the addition of trap strand stimulated the ability of BLM to unwind long and blunt-ended duplexes. The stimulatory effect of the human replication protein A (hRPA, the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA binding protein on both WRN- and BLM-dependent unwinding was also re-examined in light of its possible role in preventing re-annealing. Our results show that hRPA influences the outcome of WRN and BLM helicase assays by both inhibiting re-annealing and directly promoting unwinding, with the larger contribution from the latter mechanism. Conclusion These

  1. Multienzyme Modification of Hemp Protein for Functional Peptides Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional foods and nutraceuticals are of special importance, particularly for their impact on human health and prevention of certain chronic diseases. Consequently, the production and properties of bioactive peptides have received an increasing scientific interest over past few years. Present work intends to compare the competence of metalloendopeptidases (“Protease N” and “Protease A” with papain for getting functional peptides from hemp seed meal, which is an obligatory waste of hemp fiber production industry. As a measure of the functional potential hemp protein hydrolysates were analyzed for their antiradical properties in DPPH system. “Protease N” modified protein hydrolysate exhibited comparatively superior radical scavenging activity in DPPH system. Overall findings represent the importance of “Protease N,” as endopeptidase in getting peptides of good antiradical properties from various protein sources.

  2. Diversity and functions of protein glycosylation in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walski, Tomasz; De Schutter, Kristof; Van Damme, Els J M; Smagghe, Guy

    2017-04-01

    The majority of proteins is modified with carbohydrate structures. This modification, called glycosylation, was shown to be crucial for protein folding, stability and subcellular location, as well as protein-protein interactions, recognition and signaling. Protein glycosylation is involved in multiple physiological processes, including embryonic development, growth, circadian rhythms, cell attachment as well as maintenance of organ structure, immunity and fertility. Although the general principles of glycosylation are similar among eukaryotic organisms, insects synthesize a distinct repertoire of glycan structures compared to plants and vertebrates. Consequently, a number of unique insect glycans mediate functions specific to this class of invertebrates. For instance, the core α1,3-fucosylation of N-glycans is absent in vertebrates, while in insects this modification is crucial for the development of wings and the nervous system. At present, most of the data on insect glycobiology comes from research in Drosophila. Yet, progressively more information on the glycan structures and the importance of glycosylation in other insects like beetles, caterpillars, aphids and bees is becoming available. This review gives a summary of the current knowledge and recent progress related to glycan diversity and function(s) of protein glycosylation in insects. We focus on N- and O-glycosylation, their synthesis, physiological role(s), as well as the molecular and biochemical basis of these processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional conservation study of polarity protein Crumbs intracellular domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qi-ping; Cao, Hao-wei; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Dan-dan; Huang, Juan

    2017-01-20

    The transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) plays key roles in the establishing and maintaining cell apical-basal polarity in epithelial cells by determining the apical plasma membrane identity. Although its intracellular domain contains only 37 amino acids, it is absolutely essential for its function. In Drosophila, mutations in this intracellular domain result in severe defects in epithelial polarity and abnormal embryonic development. The intracellular domain of Crb shows high homology across species from Drosophila to Mus musculus and Homo sapiens. However, the intracellular domains of the two Crb proteins in C. elegans are rather divergent from those of Drosophila and mammals, raising the question on whether the function of the intracellular domain of the Crb protein is conserved in C. elegans. Using genomic engineering approach, we replaced the intracellular domain of the Drosophila Crb with that of C. elegans Crb2 (CeCrb2), which has extremely low homology with those from the Crb proteins of Drosophila and mammals. Surprisingly, substituting the intracellular domain of Drosophila Crb with that of CeCrb2 did not cause any abnormalities in development of the Drosophila embryo, in terms of expression and localization of Crb and other polarity proteins and apical-basal polarity in embryonic epithelial cells. Our results support the notion that despite their extensive sequence variations, all functionally critical amino acid residues and motifs of the intercellular domain of Crb proteins are fully conserved between Drosophila and C. elegans.

  4. RACK1, A Multifaceted Scaffolding Protein: Structure and Function

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adams, David R

    2011-10-06

    Abstract The Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a member of the tryptophan-aspartate repeat (WD-repeat) family of proteins and shares significant homology to the β subunit of G-proteins (Gβ). RACK1 adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller structure which facilitates protein binding. RACK1 has a significant role to play in shuttling proteins around the cell, anchoring proteins at particular locations and in stabilising protein activity. It interacts with the ribosomal machinery, with several cell surface receptors and with proteins in the nucleus. As a result, RACK1 is a key mediator of various pathways and contributes to numerous aspects of cellular function. Here, we discuss RACK1 gene and structure and its role in specific signaling pathways, and address how posttranslational modifications facilitate subcellular location and translocation of RACK1. This review condenses several recent studies suggesting a role for RACK1 in physiological processes such as development, cell migration, central nervous system (CN) function and circadian rhythm as well as reviewing the role of RACK1 in disease.

  5. Mung bean proteins and peptides: nutritional, functional and bioactive properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yi-Shen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To date, no extensive literature review exists regarding potential uses of mung bean proteins and peptides. As mung bean has long been widely used as a food source, early studies evaluated mung bean nutritional value against the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO/the World Health Organization (WHO amino acids dietary recommendations. The comparison demonstrated mung bean to be a good protein source, except for deficiencies in sulphur-containing amino acids, methionine and cysteine. Methionine and cysteine residues have been introduced into the 8S globulin through protein engineering technology. Subsequently, purified mung bean proteins and peptides have facilitated the study of their structural and functional properties. Two main types of extraction methods have been reported for isolation of proteins and peptides from mung bean flours, permitting sequencing of major proteins present in mung bean, including albumins and globulins (notably 8S globulin. However, the sequence for albumin deposited in the UniProt database differs from other sequences reported in the literature. Meanwhile, a limited number of reports have revealed other useful bioactivities for proteins and hydrolysed peptides, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity, anti-fungal activity and trypsin inhibitory activity. Consequently, several mung bean hydrolysed peptides have served as effective food additives to prevent proteolysis during storage. Ultimately, further research will reveal other nutritional, functional and bioactive properties of mung bean for uses in diverse applications.

  6. Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome with worsening cardiac function caused by pleiotropic rearrangement of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauch, Gabriele; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Schmidt, Klaus G; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2002-06-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a usually fatal disorder that involves the hematopoietic system, exocrine pancreas, liver, kidneys, and often presents clinically with failure to thrive. We report a 5-year-old patient who developed, in addition to the typical features of Pearson syndrome, worsening cardiac function, mainly affecting the left ventricle. The latter finding is particularly interesting because cardiac involvement has not yet been regarded as a major feature of Pearson syndrome. The diagnosis was proved by the finding of so far undescribed pleioplasmatic rearrangement of mitochondrial (mt)DNA (loss of 5,630 bp, 70% deleted and duplicated mtDNA) in blood cells. Our report demonstrates that patients with Pearson syndrome may also have impaired cardiac function. Thus, Pearson syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with left ventricular dysfunction of unknown origin and other clinical findings suggestive of a mitochondrial disease. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. SM30 protein function during sea urchin larval spicule formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Fred; Killian, Christopher E; Croker, Lindsay; Hamilton, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    A central issue in better understanding the process of biomineralization is to elucidate the function of occluded matrix proteins present in mineralized tissues. A potent approach to addressing this issue utilizes specific inhibitors of expression of known genes. Application of antisense oligonucleotides that specifically suppress translation of a given mRNA are capable of causing aberrant biomineralization, thereby revealing, at least in part, a likely function of the protein and gene under investigation. We have applied this approach to study the possible function(s) of the SM30 family of proteins, which are found in spicules, teeth, spines, and tests of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus as well as other euechinoid sea urchins. It is possible using the anti-SM30 morpholino-oligonucleotides (MO's) to reduce the level of these proteins to very low levels, yet the development of skeletal spicules in the embryo shows little or no aberration. This surprising result requires re-thinking about the role of these, and possibly other occluded matrix proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Functionality of alternative protein in gluten-free product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deora, Navneet Singh; Deswal, Aastha; Mishra, Hari Niwas

    2015-07-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated disease triggered in genetically susceptible individuals by ingested gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and other closely related cereal grains. The current treatment for celiac disease is life-long adherence to a strict gluten-exclusion diet. The replacement of gluten presents a significant technological challenge, as it is an essential structure-building protein, which is necessary for formulating high-quality baked goods. A major limitation in the production of gluten-free products is the lack of protein functionality in non-wheat cereals. Additionally, commercial gluten-free mixes usually contain only carbohydrates, which may significantly limit the amount of protein in the diet. In the recent past, various approaches are attempted to incorporate protein-based ingredients and to modify the functional properties for gluten-free product development. This review aims to the highlight functionality of the alternative protein-based ingredients, which can be utilized for gluten-free product development both functionally as well as nutritionally. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Terlipressin improves renal function in patients with cirrhosis and ascites without hepatorenal syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Aleksander; Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens H

    2007-01-01

    Patients with advanced cirrhosis and ascites are characterized by circulatory dysfunction with splanchnic vasodilatation and renal vasoconstriction, which often lead to ascites. The vasoconstrictor terlipressin improves renal function in hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). The aim of this study...

  10. Accumulation of the PX domain mutant Frank-ter Haar syndrome protein Tks4 in aggresomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ádám, Csaba; Fekete, Anna; Bőgel, Gábor; Németh, Zsuzsanna; Tőkési, Natália; Ovádi, Judit; Liliom, Károly; Pesti, Szabolcs; Geiszt, Miklós; Buday, László

    2015-07-17

    Cells deploy quality control mechanisms to remove damaged or misfolded proteins. Recently, we have reported that a mutation (R43W) in the Frank-ter Haar syndrome protein Tks4 resulted in aberrant intracellular localization. Here we demonstrate that the accumulation of Tks4(R43W) depends on the intact microtubule network. Detergent-insoluble Tks4 mutant colocalizes with the centrosome and its aggregate is encaged by the intermediate filament protein vimentin. Both the microtubule inhibitor nocodazole and the histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A inhibit markedly the aggresome formation in cells expressing Tks4(R43W). Finally, pretreatment of cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 markedly increases the level of aggresomes formed by Tks4(R43W). Furthermore, two additional mutant Tks4 proteins (Tks4(1-48) or Tks4(1-341)) have been investigated. Whereas the shorter Tks4 mutant, Tks4(1-48), shows no expression at all, the longer Tks4 truncation mutant accumulates in the nuclei of the cells. Our results suggest that misfolded Frank-ter Haar syndrome protein Tks4(R43W) is transported via the microtubule system to the aggresomes. Lack of expression of Tks4(1-48) or aberrant intracellular expressions of Tks4(R43W) and Tks4(1-341) strongly suggest that these mutations result in dysfunctional proteins which are not capable of operating properly, leading to the development of FTHS.

  11. Dissociation of activated protein C functions by elimination of protein S cofactor enhancement.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, Shona

    2008-11-07

    Activated protein C (APC) plays a critical anticoagulant role in vivo by inactivating procoagulant factor Va and factor VIIIa and thus down-regulating thrombin generation. In addition, APC bound to the endothelial cell protein C receptor can initiate protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1)-mediated cytoprotective signaling. Protein S constitutes a critical cofactor for the anticoagulant function of APC but is not known to be involved in regulating APC-mediated protective PAR-1 signaling. In this study we utilized a site-directed mutagenesis strategy to characterize a putative protein S binding region within the APC Gla domain. Three single amino acid substitutions within the APC Gla domain (D35T, D36A, and A39V) were found to mildly impair protein S-dependent anticoagulant activity (<2-fold) but retained entirely normal cytoprotective activity. However, a single amino acid substitution (L38D) ablated the ability of protein S to function as a cofactor for this APC variant. Consequently, in assays of protein S-dependent factor Va proteolysis using purified proteins or in the plasma milieu, APC-L38D variant exhibited minimal residual anticoagulant activity compared with wild type APC. Despite the location of Leu-38 in the Gla domain, APC-L38D interacted normally with endothelial cell protein C receptor and retained its ability to trigger PAR-1 mediated cytoprotective signaling in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild type APC. Consequently, elimination of protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function represents a novel and effective strategy by which to separate the anticoagulant and cytoprotective functions of APC for potential therapeutic gain.

  12. Intestinal cell kinase, a protein associated with endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome, is a key regulator of cilia length and Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Heejung; Song, Jieun; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Hankyu; Kim, Hong-Kyung; Eggenschwiller, Jonathan T; Bok, Jinwoong; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2014-06-10

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome is a recessive genetic disorder associated with multiple congenital defects in endocrine, cerebral, and skeletal systems that is caused by a missense mutation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase-like intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene. In algae and invertebrates, ICK homologs are involved in flagellar formation and ciliogenesis, respectively. However, it is not clear whether this role of ICK is conserved in mammals and how a lack of functional ICK results in the characteristic phenotypes of human ECO syndrome. Here, we generated Ick knockout mice to elucidate the precise role of ICK in mammalian development and to examine the pathological mechanisms of ECO syndrome. Ick null mouse embryos displayed cleft palate, hydrocephalus, polydactyly, and delayed skeletal development, closely resembling ECO syndrome phenotypes. In cultured cells, down-regulation of Ick or overexpression of kinase-dead or ECO syndrome mutant ICK resulted in an elongation of primary cilia and abnormal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Wild-type ICK proteins were generally localized in the proximal region of cilia near the basal bodies, whereas kinase-dead ICK mutant proteins accumulated in the distal part of bulged ciliary tips. Consistent with these observations in cultured cells, Ick knockout mouse embryos displayed elongated cilia and reduced Shh signaling during limb digit patterning. Taken together, these results indicate that ICK plays a crucial role in controlling ciliary length and that ciliary defects caused by a lack of functional ICK leads to abnormal Shh signaling, resulting in congenital disorders such as ECO syndrome.

  13. The Biased G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Agonism Bridges the Gap between the Insulin Receptor and the Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liauchonak, Iryna; Dawoud, Fady; Riat, Yatin; Sambi, Manpreet; Jain, Justin; Kalaydina, Regina-Veronicka; Mendonza, Nicole; Bajwa, Komal

    2018-01-01

    Insulin signaling, as mediated through the insulin receptor (IR), plays a critical role in metabolism. Aberrations in this signaling cascade lead to several pathologies, the majority of which are classified under the umbrella term “metabolic syndrome”. Although many of these pathologies are associated with insulin resistance, the exact mechanisms are not well understood. One area of current interest is the possibility of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) influencing or regulating IR signaling. This concept is particularly significant, because GPCRs have been shown to participate in cross-talk with the IR. More importantly, GPCR signaling has also been shown to preferentially regulate specific downstream signaling targets through GPCR agonist bias. A novel study recently demonstrated that this GPCR-biased agonism influences the activity of the IR without the presence of insulin. Although GPCR-IR cross-talk has previously been established, the notion that GPCRs can regulate the activation of the IR is particularly significant in relation to metabolic syndrome and other pathologies that develop as a result of alterations in IR signaling. As such, we aim to provide an overview of the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the IR within metabolic syndrome and its related pathologies, including cardiovascular health, gut microflora composition, gastrointestinal tract functioning, polycystic ovarian syndrome, pancreatic cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, we propose that the GPCR-biased agonism may perhaps mediate some of the downstream signaling effects that further exacerbate these diseases for which the mechanisms are currently not well understood. PMID:29462993

  14. Inferring the Functions of Proteins from the Interrelationships between Functional Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Kamal

    2018-01-01

    This study proposes a new method to determine the functions of an unannotated protein. The proteins and amino acid residues mentioned in biomedical texts associated with an unannotated protein can be considered as characteristics terms for , which are highly predictive of the potential functions of . Similarly, proteins and amino acid residues mentioned in biomedical texts associated with proteins annotated with a functional category can be considered as characteristics terms of . We introduce in this paper an information extraction system called IFP_IFC that predicts the functions of an unannotated protein by representing and each functional category by a vector of weights. Each weight reflects the degree of association between a characteristic term and (or a characteristic term and ). First, IFP_IFC constructs a network, whose nodes represent the different functional categories, and its edges the interrelationships between the nodes. Then, it determines the functions of by employing random walks with restarts on the mentioned network. The walker is the vector of . Finally, is assigned to the functional categories of the nodes in the network that are visited most by the walker. We evaluated the quality of IFP_IFC by comparing it experimentally with two other systems. Results showed marked improvement.

  15. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Autoantibodies Are Potential Early Indicators of Cardiac Dysfunction and Patient Outcome in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Lynch, IVPhD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The degradation and release of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C upon cardiac damage may stimulate an inflammatory response and autoantibody (AAb production. We determined whether the presence of cMyBP-C-AAbs associated with adverse cardiac function in cardiovascular disease patients. Importantly, cMyBP-C-AAbs were significantly detected in acute coronary syndrome patient sera upon arrival to the emergency department, particularly in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients. Patients positive for cMyBP-C-AAbs had reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and elevated levels of clinical biomarkers of myocardial infarction. We conclude that cMyBP-C-AAbs may serve as early predictive indicators of deteriorating cardiac function and patient outcome in acute coronary syndrome patients prior to the infarction. Key Words: acute myocardial infarction, autoantibodies, cardiac myosin binding protein-c, cardiomyopathy

  16. A COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOURAL GROUP TREATMENT IMPROVED WORK ABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH SEVERE FUNCTIONAL SOMATIC SYNDROMES

    OpenAIRE

    Schröder, Andreas; Ørnbøl, Eva; Jensen, Jens Søndergaard; Fink, Per

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Functional somatic syndromes (FSS) such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel and chronic fatigue syndrome often disrupt employment and may lead to long-term dependence on social benefits and permanently reduced work ability. Cognitive-behavioural treatments (CBT) relief symptoms and improve functioning in FSS, but their effect on work ability is unclear. The aim of this study was to estimate the long-term effect of group CBT on work ability in patients with severe FSS. Methods: 120 Pa...

  17. Arabidopsis thaliana mTERF proteins: evolution and functional classification

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    Tatjana eKleine

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Organellar gene expression (OGE is crucial for plant development, photosynthesis and respiration, but our understanding of the mechanisms that control it is still relatively poor. Thus, OGE requires various nucleus-encoded proteins that promote transcription, splicing, trimming and editing of organellar RNAs, and regulate translation. In metazoans, proteins of the mitochondrial Transcription tERmination Factor (mTERF family interact with the mitochondrial chromosome and regulate transcriptional initiation and termination. Sequencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome led to the identification of a diversified MTERF gene family but, in contrast to mammalian mTERFs, knowledge about the function of these proteins in photosynthetic organisms is scarce. In this hypothesis article, I show that tandem duplications and one block duplication contributed to the large number of MTERF genes in A. thaliana, and propose that the expansion of the family is related to the evolution of land plants. The MTERF genes - especially the duplicated genes - display a number of distinct mRNA accumulation patterns, suggesting functional diversification of mTERF proteins to increase adaptability to environmental changes. Indeed, hypothetical functions for the different mTERF proteins can be predicted using co-expression analysis and gene ontology annotations. On this basis, mTERF proteins can be sorted into five groups. Members of the chloroplast and chloroplast-associated clusters are principally involved in chloroplast gene expression, embryogenesis and protein catabolism, while representatives of the mitochondrial cluster seem to participate in DNA and RNA metabolism in that organelle. Moreover, members of the mitochondrion-associated cluster and the low expression group may act in the nucleus and/or the cytosol. As proteins involved in OGE and presumably nuclear gene expression, mTERFs are ideal candidates for the coordination of the expression of organelle and nuclear

  18. SitesIdentify: a protein functional site prediction tool

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    Doig Andrew J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of protein structures being deposited in the Protein Data Bank surpasses the capacity to experimentally characterise them and therefore computational methods to analyse these structures have become increasingly important. Identifying the region of the protein most likely to be involved in function is useful in order to gain information about its potential role. There are many available approaches to predict functional site, but many are not made available via a publicly-accessible application. Results Here we present a functional site prediction tool (SitesIdentify, based on combining sequence conservation information with geometry-based cleft identification, that is freely available via a web-server. We have shown that SitesIdentify compares favourably to other functional site prediction tools in a comparison of seven methods on a non-redundant set of 237 enzymes with annotated active sites. Conclusion SitesIdentify is able to produce comparable accuracy in predicting functional sites to its closest available counterpart, but in addition achieves improved accuracy for proteins with few characterised homologues. SitesIdentify is available via a webserver at http://www.manchester.ac.uk/bioinformatics/sitesidentify/

  19. Intracellular Localization, Interactions and Functions of Capsicum Chlorosis Virus Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widana Gamage, Shirani M K; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2017-01-01

    Tospoviruses are among the most devastating viruses of horticultural and field crops. Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) has emerged as an important pathogen of capsicum and tomato in Australia and South-east Asia. Present knowledge about CaCV protein functions in host cells is lacking. We determined intracellular localization and interactions of CaCV proteins by live plant cell imaging to gain insight into the associations of viral proteins during infection. Proteins were transiently expressed as fusions to autofluorescent proteins in leaf epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana and capsicum. All viral proteins localized at least partially in the cell periphery suggestive of cytoplasmic replication and assembly of CaCV. Nucleocapsid (N) and non-structural movement (NSm) proteins localized exclusively in the cell periphery, while non-structural suppressor of silencing (NSs) protein and Gc and Gn glycoproteins accumulated in both the cell periphery and the nucleus. Nuclear localization of CaCV Gn and NSs is unique among tospoviruses. We validated nuclear localization of NSs by immunofluorescence in protoplasts. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation showed self-interactions of CaCV N, NSs and NSm, and heterotypic interactions of N with NSs and Gn. All interactions occurred in the cytoplasm, except NSs self-interaction was exclusively nuclear. Interactions of a tospoviral NSs protein with itself and with N had not been reported previously. Functionally, CaCV NSs showed strong local and systemic RNA silencing suppressor activity and appears to delay short-distance spread of silencing signal. Cell-to-cell movement activity of NSm was demonstrated by trans -complementation of a movement-defective tobamovirus replicon. CaCV NSm localized at plasmodesmata and its transient expression led to the formation of tubular structures that protruded from protoplasts. The D 155 residue in the 30K-like movement protein-specific LxD/N 50-70 G motif of NSm was critical for

  20. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

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    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  1. Molecular and Neural Functions of Rai1, the Causal Gene for Smith-Magenis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Hsiang; Guenthner, Casey J; Xu, Jin; Nguyen, Tiffany; Schwarz, Lindsay A; Wilkinson, Alex W; Gozani, Or; Chang, Howard Y; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Luo, Liqun

    2016-10-19

    Haploinsufficiency of Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1) causes Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), which is associated with diverse neurodevelopmental and behavioral symptoms as well as obesity. RAI1 encodes a nuclear protein but little is known about its molecular function or the cell types responsible for SMS symptoms. Using genetically engineered mice, we found that Rai1 preferentially occupies DNA regions near active promoters and promotes the expression of a group of genes involved in circuit assembly and neuronal communication. Behavioral analyses demonstrated that pan-neural loss of Rai1 causes deficits in motor function, learning, and food intake. These SMS-like phenotypes are produced by loss of Rai1 function in distinct neuronal types: Rai1 loss in inhibitory neurons or subcortical glutamatergic neurons causes learning deficits, while Rai1 loss in Sim1 + or SF1 + cells causes obesity. By integrating molecular and organismal analyses, our study suggests potential therapeutic avenues for a complex neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of milk and milk proteins on risk factors of metabolic syndrome in overweight adolecents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnberg, Karina

    This PhD is based on data from an intervention study with milk and milk proteins conducted in Danish adolescents with overweight. There is a high prevalence of overweight in Danish adolescents. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors related to overweight and believed to increase the risk...... of type-2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Overweight children have higher concentrations of the metabolic syndrome risk factors than normal weight children and the pathological condition underlying cardiovascular diseases, called atherosclerosis, seems to start in childhood. A well...... skimmed milk, whey, casein or water for three months. The background for the intervention is that milk is an important source of protein in the Western diet and epidemiological studies in children have shown that children drinking low amounts of milk have higher concentrations of the metabolic risk...

  3. Functional module identification in protein interaction networks by interaction patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijie; Qian, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying functional modules in protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks may shed light on cellular functional organization and thereafter underlying cellular mechanisms. Many existing module identification algorithms aim to detect densely connected groups of proteins as potential modules. However, based on this simple topological criterion of ‘higher than expected connectivity’, those algorithms may miss biologically meaningful modules of functional significance, in which proteins have similar interaction patterns to other proteins in networks but may not be densely connected to each other. A few blockmodel module identification algorithms have been proposed to address the problem but the lack of global optimum guarantee and the prohibitive computational complexity have been the bottleneck of their applications in real-world large-scale PPI networks. Results: In this article, we propose a novel optimization formulation LCP2 (low two-hop conductance sets) using the concept of Markov random walk on graphs, which enables simultaneous identification of both dense and sparse modules based on protein interaction patterns in given networks through searching for LCP2 by random walk. A spectral approximate algorithm SLCP2 is derived to identify non-overlapping functional modules. Based on a bottom-up greedy strategy, we further extend LCP2 to a new algorithm (greedy algorithm for LCP2) GLCP2 to identify overlapping functional modules. We compare SLCP2 and GLCP2 with a range of state-of-the-art algorithms on synthetic networks and real-world PPI networks. The performance evaluation based on several criteria with respect to protein complex prediction, high level Gene Ontology term prediction and especially sparse module detection, has demonstrated that our algorithms based on searching for LCP2 outperform all other compared algorithms. Availability and implementation: All data and code are available at http://www.cse.usf.edu/∼xqian/fmi/slcp2hop

  4. Effect of Danshen injection on the vascular endothelial function and renal function in patients with pregnancy induced hypertension syndrome

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    Jun-Qing Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of Danshen injection on the vascular endothelial function and renal function in patients with pregnancy induced hypertension syndrome (PIH. Methods: A total of 100 patients with PIH who were admitted in our hospital from May, 2015 to May, 2016 were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group. The patients in the control group were given blood pressure reduction, diuresis, spasmolysis, sedation, magnesium sulfate, and comprehensive nursing intervention. On this basis, the patients in the observation group were given additional Danshen injection (20 mL + 5% glucose (250 mL, ivdrip, 1 time/d. After 10 d treatment, the efficacy was evaluated. The peripheral venous blood before and after treatment in the two groups was collected. The radioimmunoassay was used to detect ET-1. ELISA was used to detect Hcy. The immunoturbidimetry was used to detect vWF. The radioimmunoassay was used to detect BUN, Scr, UA, and β2-MG. The standard sphygmomanometer was used to monitor the blood pressure and MAP was calculated. The biuret colorimetry was used to determine 24 h Upro. Results: The reduced degree of ET-1, Hcy, and vWF after treatment in the observation group was significantly superior to that in the control group. The reduced degree of BUN, Scr, UA, and β2-MG after treatment in the observation group was significantly superior to that in the control group. The reduced degree of MPA and 24 h Upro after treatment in the observation group was significantly superior to that in the control group. Conclusions: Routine treatments, comprehensive nursing intervention, and Danshen injection in the treatment of PIH can effectively improve the vascular endothelial function and renal function in order to reduce the blood pressure and alleviate the urine protein.

  5. Analysing the eosinophil cationic protein - a clue to the function of the eosinophil granulocyte

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    Bishop-Bailey David

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Eosinophil granulocytes reside in respiratory mucosa including lungs, in the gastro-intestinal tract, and in lymphocyte associated organs, the thymus, lymph nodes and the spleen. In parasitic infections, atopic diseases such as atopic dermatitis and asthma, the numbers of the circulating eosinophils are frequently elevated. In conditions such as Hypereosinophilic Syndrome (HES circulating eosinophil levels are even further raised. Although, eosinophils were identified more than hundred years ago, their roles in homeostasis and in disease still remain unclear. The most prominent feature of the eosinophils are their large secondary granules, each containing four basic proteins, the best known being the eosinophil cationic protein (ECP. This protein has been developed as a marker for eosinophilic disease and quantified in biological fluids including serum, bronchoalveolar lavage and nasal secretions. Elevated ECP levels are found in T helper lymphocyte type 2 (atopic diseases such as allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis but also occasionally in other diseases such as bacterial sinusitis. ECP is a ribonuclease which has been attributed with cytotoxic, neurotoxic, fibrosis promoting and immune-regulatory functions. ECP regulates mucosal and immune cells and may directly act against helminth, bacterial and viral infections. The levels of ECP measured in disease in combination with the catalogue of known functions of the protein and its polymorphisms presented here will build a foundation for further speculations of the role of ECP, and ultimately the role of the eosinophil.

  6. Mycolactone activation of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins underpins Buruli ulcer formation

    OpenAIRE

    Guenin-Mace, Laure; Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Romet-Lemonne, Guillaume; Hong, Hui; Leadlay, Peter F.; Danckaert, Anne; Ruf, Marie-Therese; Mostowy, Serge; Zurzolo, Chiara; Bousso, Philippe; Chretien, Fabrice; Carlier, Marie-France; Demangel, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Mycolactone is a diffusible lipid secreted by the human pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans, which induces the formation of open skin lesions referred to as Buruli ulcers. Here, we show that mycolactone operates by hijacking the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family of actin-nucleating factors. By disrupting WASP autoinhibition, mycolactone leads to uncontrolled activation of ARP2/3-mediated assembly of actin in the cytoplasm. In epithelial cells, mycolactone-induced stimulation of ARP2/...

  7. Regulation of thrombosis and vascular function by protein methionine oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Sean X.; Stevens, Jeff W.

    2015-01-01

    Redox biology is fundamental to both normal cellular homeostasis and pathological states associated with excessive oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species function not only as signaling molecules but also as redox regulators of protein function. In the vascular system, redox reactions help regulate key physiologic responses such as cell adhesion, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, angiogenesis, inflammatory gene expression, and apoptosis. During pathologic states, altered redox balance can cause vascular cell dysfunction and affect the equilibrium between procoagulant and anticoagulant systems, contributing to thrombotic vascular disease. This review focuses on the emerging role of a specific reversible redox reaction, protein methionine oxidation, in vascular disease and thrombosis. A growing number of cardiovascular and hemostatic proteins are recognized to undergo reversible methionine oxidation, in which methionine residues are posttranslationally oxidized to methionine sulfoxide. Protein methionine oxidation can be reversed by the action of stereospecific enzymes known as methionine sulfoxide reductases. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a prototypical methionine redox sensor that responds to changes in the intracellular redox state via reversible oxidation of tandem methionine residues in its regulatory domain. Several other proteins with oxidation-sensitive methionine residues, including apolipoprotein A-I, thrombomodulin, and von Willebrand factor, may contribute to vascular disease and thrombosis. PMID:25900980

  8. From Protein Structure to Function via Single Crystal Optical Spectroscopy

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    Luca eRonda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The more than 100.000 protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography provide a wealth of information for the characterization of biological processes at the molecular level. However, several crystallographic artifacts, including conformational selection, crystallization conditions and radiation damages, may affect the quality and the interpretation of the electron density map, thus limiting the relevance of structure determinations. Moreover, for most of these structures no functional data have been obtained in the crystalline state, thus posing serious questions on their validity in the inference for protein mechanisms. In order to solve these issues, spectroscopic methods have been applied for the determination of equilibrium and kinetic properties of proteins in the crystalline state. These methods are UV-vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, IR, EPR, Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Some of these approaches have been implemented with on-line instruments at X-ray synchrotron beamlines. Here, we provide an overview of investigations predominantly carried out in our laboratory by single crystal polarized absorption UV-vis microspectrophotometry, the most applied technique for the functional characterization of proteins in the crystalline state. Studies on hemoglobins, pyridoxal 5’-phosphate dependent enzymes and green fluorescent protein in the crystalline state have addressed key biological issues, leading to either straightforward structure-function correlations or limitations to structure-based mechanisms.

  9. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF RICE PROTEIN CONCENTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kolpakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally rice and products of its processing are used to cook porridge, pilaf, lettuce, confectionery, fish, dairy and meat products. At the same time new ways of its processing with releasing of protein products for more effective using, including the use of a glutenfree diet, are developing. The task of this study was a comparative research of nutrition and biological value and functional properties of protein and protein-calcium concentrates produced from rice flour milled from white and brown rice. The traditional and special methods were used. Concentrates were isolated with enzyme preparations of xylanase and amylolytic activity with the next dissolution of protein in diluted hydrochloric acid. Concentrates differed in the content of mineral substances (calcium, zinc, iron and other elements, amino acids and functional properties. The values of the functional properties and indicators of the nutritional value of concentrates from white rice show the advisability of their using in food products, including gluten-free products prepared on the basis of the emulsion and foam systems, and concentrates from brown rice in food products prepared on the basis of using of the emulsion systems. Protein concentrates of brown rice have a low foaming capacity and there is no foam stability at all.

  10. Functional assessment of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome and cancers of breast, colon, and prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Somnath; Pruitt, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    Ever since the first report that mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) causes Rett syndrome (RTT), a severe neurological disorder in females world-wide, there has been a keen interest to gain a comprehensive understanding of this protein. While the classical model associated with MeCP2 function suggests its role in gene suppression via recruitment of co-repressor complexes and histone deacetylases to methylated CpG-sites, recent discoveries have brought to light its role in transcription activation, modulation of RNA splicing, and chromatin compaction. Various post-translational modifications (PTMs) of MeCP2 further increase its functional versatility. Involvement of MeCP2 in pathologies other than RTT, such as tumorigenesis however, remains poorly explored and understood. This review provides a survey of the literature implicating MeCP2 in breast, colon and prostate cancer.

  11. Impaired Na+/K+-ATPase Function in Patients with Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) is abundantly expressed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells, which is necessary for tight junction formation. The tight junction is an urothelial barrier between urine and the underlying bladder. Impairment of tight junctions allows migration of urinary solutes in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS). We evaluated NKA expression and activity in bladder samples from patients with IC/PBS. The study group consisted of 85 patients with IC/PBS, and the control group consisted of 20 volunteers. Bladder biopsies were taken from both groups. We determined the expression and distribution of NKA using NKA activity assays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescent staining. The protein levels and activity of NKA in the study group were significantly lower than the control group (1.08 ± 0.06 vs. 2.39 ± 0.29 and 0.60 ± 0.04 vs. 1.81 ± 0.18 µmol ADP/mg protein/hour, respectively; P < 0.05). Additionally, immunofluorescent staining for detection of CK7, a marker of the bladder urothelium, predominantly colocalized with NKA in patients in the study group. Our results demonstrated the expression and activity of NKA were decreased in bladder biopsies of patients with IC/PBS. These findings suggest that NKA function is impaired in the bladders from patients with IC/PBS. PMID:26839484

  12. Impaired Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Function in Patients with Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jane-Dar; Yang, Wen-Kai; Lee, Ming-Huei

    2016-02-01

    Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) is abundantly expressed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells, which is necessary for tight junction formation. The tight junction is an urothelial barrier between urine and the underlying bladder. Impairment of tight junctions allows migration of urinary solutes in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS). We evaluated NKA expression and activity in bladder samples from patients with IC/PBS. The study group consisted of 85 patients with IC/PBS, and the control group consisted of 20 volunteers. Bladder biopsies were taken from both groups. We determined the expression and distribution of NKA using NKA activity assays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescent staining. The protein levels and activity of NKA in the study group were significantly lower than the control group (1.08 ± 0.06 vs. 2.39 ± 0.29 and 0.60 ± 0.04 vs. 1.81 ± 0.18 µmol ADP/mg protein/hour, respectively; P < 0.05). Additionally, immunofluorescent staining for detection of CK7, a marker of the bladder urothelium, predominantly colocalized with NKA in patients in the study group. Our results demonstrated the expression and activity of NKA were decreased in bladder biopsies of patients with IC/PBS. These findings suggest that NKA function is impaired in the bladders from patients with IC/PBS.

  13. ABHD5/CGI-58, the Chanarin-Dorfman Syndrome Protein, Mobilises Lipid Stores for Hepatitis C Virus Production.

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    Gabrielle Vieyres

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV particles closely mimic human very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL to evade humoral immunity and to facilitate cell entry. However, the principles that govern HCV association with VLDL components are poorly defined. Using an siRNA screen, we identified ABHD5 (α/β hydrolase domain containing protein 5, also known as CGI-58 as a new host factor promoting both virus assembly and release. ABHD5 associated with lipid droplets and triggered their hydrolysis. Importantly, ABHD5 Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome mutants responsible for a rare lipid storage disorder in humans were mislocalised, and unable to consume lipid droplets or support HCV production. Additional ABHD5 mutagenesis revealed a novel tribasic motif that does not influence subcellular localization but determines both ABHD5 lipolytic and proviral properties. These results indicate that HCV taps into the lipid droplet triglyceride reservoir usurping ABHD5 lipase cofactor function. They also suggest that the resulting lipid flux, normally devoted to VLDL synthesis, also participates in the assembly and release of the HCV lipo-viro-particle. Altogether, our study provides the first association between the Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome protein and an infectious disease and sheds light on the hepatic manifestations of this rare genetic disorder as well as on HCV morphogenesis.

  14. Optimization algorithms for functional deimmunization of therapeutic proteins

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    Griswold Karl E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop protein therapeutics from exogenous sources, it is necessary to mitigate the risks of eliciting an anti-biotherapeutic immune response. A key aspect of the response is the recognition and surface display by antigen-presenting cells of epitopes, short peptide fragments derived from the foreign protein. Thus, developing minimal-epitope variants represents a powerful approach to deimmunizing protein therapeutics. Critically, mutations selected to reduce immunogenicity must not interfere with the protein's therapeutic activity. Results This paper develops methods to improve the likelihood of simultaneously reducing the anti-biotherapeutic immune response while maintaining therapeutic activity. A dynamic programming approach identifies optimal and near-optimal sets of conservative point mutations to minimize the occurrence of predicted T-cell epitopes in a target protein. In contrast with existing methods, those described here integrate analysis of immunogenicity and stability/activity, are broadly applicable to any protein class, guarantee global optimality, and provide sufficient flexibility for users to limit the total number of mutations and target MHC alleles of interest. The input is simply the primary amino acid sequence of the therapeutic candidate, although crystal structures and protein family sequence alignments may also be input when available. The output is a scored list of sets of point mutations predicted to reduce the protein's immunogenicity while maintaining structure and function. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in a number of case study applications, showing that, in general, our best variants are predicted to be better than those produced by previous deimmunization efforts in terms of either immunogenicity or stability, or both factors. Conclusions By developing global optimization algorithms leveraging well-established immunogenicity and stability prediction techniques, we provide

  15. Optimization algorithms for functional deimmunization of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Andrew S; Zheng, Wei; Griswold, Karl E; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2010-04-09

    To develop protein therapeutics from exogenous sources, it is necessary to mitigate the risks of eliciting an anti-biotherapeutic immune response. A key aspect of the response is the recognition and surface display by antigen-presenting cells of epitopes, short peptide fragments derived from the foreign protein. Thus, developing minimal-epitope variants represents a powerful approach to deimmunizing protein therapeutics. Critically, mutations selected to reduce immunogenicity must not interfere with the protein's therapeutic activity. This paper develops methods to improve the likelihood of simultaneously reducing the anti-biotherapeutic immune response while maintaining therapeutic activity. A dynamic programming approach identifies optimal and near-optimal sets of conservative point mutations to minimize the occurrence of predicted T-cell epitopes in a target protein. In contrast with existing methods, those described here integrate analysis of immunogenicity and stability/activity, are broadly applicable to any protein class, guarantee global optimality, and provide sufficient flexibility for users to limit the total number of mutations and target MHC alleles of interest. The input is simply the primary amino acid sequence of the therapeutic candidate, although crystal structures and protein family sequence alignments may also be input when available. The output is a scored list of sets of point mutations predicted to reduce the protein's immunogenicity while maintaining structure and function. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in a number of case study applications, showing that, in general, our best variants are predicted to be better than those produced by previous deimmunization efforts in terms of either immunogenicity or stability, or both factors. By developing global optimization algorithms leveraging well-established immunogenicity and stability prediction techniques, we provide the protein engineer with a mechanism for exploring the

  16. Structuring detergents for extracting and stabilizing functional membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Matar-Merheb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Membrane proteins are privileged pharmaceutical targets for which the development of structure-based drug design is challenging. One underlying reason is the fact that detergents do not stabilize membrane domains as efficiently as natural lipids in membranes, often leading to a partial to complete loss of activity/stability during protein extraction and purification and preventing crystallization in an active conformation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anionic calix[4]arene based detergents (C4Cn, n=1-12 were designed to structure the membrane domains through hydrophobic interactions and a network of salt bridges with the basic residues found at the cytosol-membrane interface of membrane proteins. These compounds behave as surfactants, forming micelles of 5-24 nm, with the critical micellar concentration (CMC being as expected sensitive to pH ranging from 0.05 to 1.5 mM. Both by 1H NMR titration and Surface Tension titration experiments, the interaction of these molecules with the basic amino acids was confirmed. They extract membrane proteins from different origins behaving as mild detergents, leading to partial extraction in some cases. They also retain protein functionality, as shown for BmrA (Bacillus multidrug resistance ATP protein, a membrane multidrug-transporting ATPase, which is particularly sensitive to detergent extraction. These new detergents allow BmrA to bind daunorubicin with a Kd of 12 µM, a value similar to that observed after purification using dodecyl maltoside (DDM. They preserve the ATPase activity of BmrA (which resets the protein to its initial state after drug efflux much more efficiently than SDS (sodium dodecyl sulphate, FC12 (Foscholine 12 or DDM. They also maintain in a functional state the C4Cn-extracted protein upon detergent exchange with FC12. Finally, they promote 3D-crystallization of the membrane protein. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These compounds seem promising to extract in a functional state

  17. Examining the function of problem behavior in fragile X syndrome: preliminary experimental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langthorne, Paul; McGill, Peter; O'Reilly, Mark F; Lang, Russell; Machalicek, Wendy; Chan, Jeffrey Michael; Rispoli, Mandy

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited cause of intellectual and developmental disability. The influence of environmental variables on behaviors associated with the syndrome has received only scant attention. The current study explored the function served by problem behavior in fragile X syndrome by using experimental functional analysis methodology with 8 children with fragile X. No child met criteria for attention-maintained problem behavior, 5 children met criteria for escape-maintained problem behavior, and 4 children met criteria for tangible-maintained problem behavior. Results are discussed and compared with previous findings on the function of problem behavior in fragile X syndrome, and implications for intervention are discussed. It is noted that the external validity of these findings is limited by the small sample size.

  18. Protein networks as logic functions in development and cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Dutkowski

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Many biological and clinical outcomes are based not on single proteins, but on modules of proteins embedded in protein networks. A fundamental question is how the proteins within each module contribute to the overall module activity. Here, we study the modules underlying three representative biological programs related to tissue development, breast cancer metastasis, or progression of brain cancer, respectively. For each case we apply a new method, called Network-Guided Forests, to identify predictive modules together with logic functions which tie the activity of each module to the activity of its component genes. The resulting modules implement a diverse repertoire of decision logic which cannot be captured using the simple approximations suggested in previous work such as gene summation or subtraction. We show that in cancer, certain combinations of oncogenes and tumor suppressors exert competing forces on the system, suggesting that medical genetics should move beyond cataloguing individual cancer genes to cataloguing their combinatorial logic.

  19. A Bioinformatic Approach to Inter Functional Interactions within Protein Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-23

    cell division genes in Eubacteria, and ribosomal genes in Eubacteria and Eukaryotic organelles. Genetica 2000, 108(1):1-7. 9. Altschul SF, Gish W...functional domains of serpin proteins. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 2005. 22: 1627-1634. 3. Codoner, F.M. & M.A. Fares, Why should we care about

  20. New factors influencing G protein coupled receptors' system functions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New factors such as the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) surrounding's chemical environment, cell membrane constituents, the existent gap junction, endogenous receptor affinity status and animal species have been shown to influence the GPCR physiology and variations of those factors can modify the functions of the ...

  1. Sampling Protein Form and Function with the Atomic Force Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baclayon, Marian; Roos, Wouter H.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    To study the structure, function, and interactions of proteins, a plethora of techniques is available. Many techniques sample such parameters in non-physiological environments (e. g. in air, ice, or vacuum). Atomic force microscopy (AFM), however, is a powerful biophysical technique that can probe

  2. Functional protein networks unifying limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrée, Antoine de

    2011-01-01

    Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD) is a rare progressive heterogeneous disorder that can be caused by mutations in at least 21 different genes. These genes are often widely expressed and encode proteins with highly differing functions. And yet mutations in all of them give rise to a similar

  3. From protein interactions to functional annotation: graph alignment in Herpes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Michal; Lassig, M.; Berg, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 90 (2008), e-e ISSN 1752-0509 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : graph alignment * functional annotation * protein orthology Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.706, year: 2008

  4. Glucoamylase: structure/function relationships, and protein engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, J; Sigurskjold, B W; Christensen, U

    2000-01-01

    fundamental structure/function relationships in the binding and catalytic mechanisms. In parallel, issues of relevance for application have been pursued using protein engineering to improve the industrial properties. The present review focuses on recent findings on the catalytic site, mechanism of action......, substrate recognition, the linker region, the multidomain architecture, the engineering of specificity and stability, and roles of individual substrate binding subsites....

  5. The structure and function of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Kobilka, Brian K

    2009-01-01

    -protein structure and biology. Great progress has been made over the past three decades in understanding diverse GPCRs, from pharmacology to functional characterization in vivo. Recent high-resolution structural studies have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms of GPCR activation and constitutive...

  6. Structure function relations in PDZ-domain-containing proteins ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G P Manjunath

    2017-12-30

    Dec 30, 2017 ... cost to the organism by the appearance of functionally redundant ... fashion, making them both robust as well as highly responsive to the ...... Trends Cell Biol. 10. 32–38. Basdevant N, Weinstein H and Ceruso M 2006 Thermodynamic basis for promiscuity and selectivity in protein–protein interac- tions: PDZ ...

  7. A surprising role for conformational entropy in protein function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wand, A. Joshua; Moorman, Veronica R.; Harpole, Kyle W.

    2014-01-01

    Formation of high-affinity complexes is critical for the majority of enzymatic reactions involving proteins. The creation of the family of Michaelis and other intermediate complexes during catalysis clearly involves a complicated manifold of interactions that are diverse and complex. Indeed, computing the energetics of interactions between proteins and small molecule ligands using molecular structure alone remains a grand challenge. One of the most difficult contributions to the free energy of protein-ligand complexes to experimentally access is that due to changes in protein conformational entropy. Fortunately, recent advances in solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation methods have enabled the use of measures-of-motion between conformational states of a protein as a proxy for conformational entropy. This review briefly summarizes the experimental approaches currently employed to characterize fast internal motion in proteins, how this information is used to gain insight into conformational entropy, what has been learned and what the future may hold for this emerging view of protein function. PMID:23478875

  8. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng (Texas-HSC); (OKLU)

    2010-06-15

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface.

  9. Deficiency in origin licensing proteins impairs cilia formation: implications for the aetiology of Meier-Gorlin syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Stiff

    Full Text Available Mutations in ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6, which encode proteins required for DNA replication origin licensing, cause Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS, a disorder conferring microcephaly, primordial dwarfism, underdeveloped ears, and skeletal abnormalities. Mutations in ATR, which also functions during replication, can cause Seckel syndrome, a clinically related disorder. These findings suggest that impaired DNA replication could underlie the developmental defects characteristic of these disorders. Here, we show that although origin licensing capacity is impaired in all patient cells with mutations in origin licensing component proteins, this does not correlate with the rate of progression through S phase. Thus, the replicative capacity in MGS patient cells does not correlate with clinical manifestation. However, ORC1-deficient cells from MGS patients and siRNA-mediated depletion of origin licensing proteins also have impaired centrosome and centriole copy number. As a novel and unexpected finding, we show that they also display a striking defect in the rate of formation of primary cilia. We demonstrate that this impacts sonic hedgehog signalling in ORC1-deficient primary fibroblasts. Additionally, reduced growth factor-dependent signaling via primary cilia affects the kinetics of cell cycle progression following cell cycle exit and re-entry, highlighting an unexpected mechanism whereby origin licensing components can influence cell cycle progression. Finally, using a cell-based model, we show that defects in cilia function impair chondroinduction. Our findings raise the possibility that a reduced efficiency in forming cilia could contribute to the clinical features of MGS, particularly the bone development abnormalities, and could provide a new dimension for considering developmental impacts of licensing deficiency.

  10. Dietary Exercise as a Novel Strategy for the Prevention and Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome: Effects on Skeletal Muscle Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Aoi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A sedentary lifestyle can cause metabolic syndrome to develop. Metabolic syndrome is associated with metabolic function in the skeletal muscle, a major consumer of nutrients. Dietary exercise, along with an adequate diet, is reported to be one of the major preventive therapies for metabolic syndrome; exercise improves the metabolic capacity of muscles and prevents the loss of muscle mass. Epidemiological studies have shown that physical activity reduces the risk of various common diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer; it also helps in reducing visceral adipose tissue. In addition, laboratory studies have demonstrated the mechanisms underlying the benefits of single-bout and regular exercise. Exercise regulates the expression/activity of proteins associated with metabolic and anabolic signaling in muscle, leading to a change in phenotype. The extent of these changes depends on the intensity, the duration, and the frequency of the exercise. The effect of exercise is also partly due to a decrease in inflammation, which has been shown to be closely related to the development of various diseases. Furthermore, it has been suggested that several phytochemicals contained in natural foods can improve nutrient metabolism and prevent protein degradation in the muscle.

  11. Automated Quantitative Assessment of Proteins' Biological Function in Protein Knowledge Bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Mayr

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary protein sequence data are archived in databases together with information regarding corresponding biological functions. In this respect, UniProt/Swiss-Prot is currently the most comprehensive collection and it is routinely cross-examined when trying to unravel the biological role of hypothetical proteins. Bioscientists frequently extract single entries and further evaluate those on a subjective basis. In lieu of a standardized procedure for scoring the existing knowledge regarding individual proteins, we here report about a computer-assisted method, which we applied to score the present knowledge about any given Swiss-Prot entry. Applying this quantitative score allows the comparison of proteins with respect to their sequence yet highlights the comprehension of functional data. pfs analysis may be also applied for quality control of individual entries or for database management in order to rank entry listings.

  12. Automated quantitative assessment of proteins' biological function in protein knowledge bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Gabriele; Lepperdinger, Günter; Lackner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Primary protein sequence data are archived in databases together with information regarding corresponding biological functions. In this respect, UniProt/Swiss-Prot is currently the most comprehensive collection and it is routinely cross-examined when trying to unravel the biological role of hypothetical proteins. Bioscientists frequently extract single entries and further evaluate those on a subjective basis. In lieu of a standardized procedure for scoring the existing knowledge regarding individual proteins, we here report about a computer-assisted method, which we applied to score the present knowledge about any given Swiss-Prot entry. Applying this quantitative score allows the comparison of proteins with respect to their sequence yet highlights the comprehension of functional data. pfs analysis may be also applied for quality control of individual entries or for database management in order to rank entry listings.

  13. Improved protein model quality assessments by changing the target function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uziela, Karolis; Menéndez Hurtado, David; Shu, Nanjiang; Wallner, Björn; Elofsson, Arne

    2018-03-09

    Protein modeling quality is an important part of protein structure prediction. We have for more than a decade developed a set of methods for this problem. We have used various types of description of the protein and different machine learning methodologies. However, common to all these methods has been the target function used for training. The target function in ProQ describes the local quality of a residue in a protein model. In all versions of ProQ the target function has been the S-score. However, other quality estimation functions also exist, which can be divided into superposition- and contact-based methods. The superposition-based methods, such as S-score, are based on a rigid body superposition of a protein model and the native structure, while the contact-based methods compare the local environment of each residue. Here, we examine the effects of retraining our latest predictor, ProQ3D, using identical inputs but different target functions. We find that the contact-based methods are easier to predict and that predictors trained on these measures provide some advantages when it comes to identifying the best model. One possible reason for this is that contact based methods are better at estimating the quality of multi-domain targets. However, training on the S-score gives the best correlation with the GDT_TS score, which is commonly used in CASP to score the global model quality. To take the advantage of both of these features we provide an updated version of ProQ3D that predicts local and global model quality estimates based on different quality estimates. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doorbar, John, E-mail: jdoorba@nimr.mrc.ac.uk

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1{sup ∧}E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein′s flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1{sup ∧}E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1{sup ∧}E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1{sup

  15. Automatically extracting functionally equivalent proteins from SwissProt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Andrew CR

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a frequent need to obtain sets of functionally equivalent homologous proteins (FEPs from different species. While it is usually the case that orthology implies functional equivalence, this is not always true; therefore datasets of orthologous proteins are not appropriate. The information relevant to extracting FEPs is contained in databanks such as UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and a manual analysis of these data allow FEPs to be extracted on a one-off basis. However there has been no resource allowing the easy, automatic extraction of groups of FEPs – for example, all instances of protein C. We have developed FOSTA, an automatically generated database of FEPs annotated as having the same function in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot which can be used for large-scale analysis. The method builds a candidate list of homologues and filters out functionally diverged proteins on the basis of functional annotations using a simple text mining approach. Results Large scale evaluation of our FEP extraction method is difficult as there is no gold-standard dataset against which the method can be benchmarked. However, a manual analysis of five protein families confirmed a high level of performance. A more extensive comparison with two manually verified functional equivalence datasets also demonstrated very good performance. Conclusion In summary, FOSTA provides an automated analysis of annotations in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot to enable groups of proteins already annotated as functionally equivalent, to be extracted. Our results demonstrate that the vast majority of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot functional annotations are of high quality, and that FOSTA can interpret annotations successfully. Where FOSTA is not successful, we are able to highlight inconsistencies in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot annotation. Most of these would have presented equal difficulties for manual interpretation of annotations. We discuss limitations and possible future extensions to FOSTA, and

  16. Protein dynamics associated with failed and rescued learning in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mahiuddin Ahmed

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is caused by an extra copy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21. Although it is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability (ID, there are, as yet, no effective pharmacotherapies. The Ts65Dn mouse model of DS is trisomic for orthologs of ∼55% of Hsa21 classical protein coding genes. These mice display many features relevant to those seen in DS, including deficits in learning and memory (L/M tasks requiring a functional hippocampus. Recently, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine, was shown to rescue performance of the Ts65Dn in several L/M tasks. These studies, however, have not been accompanied by molecular analyses. In previous work, we described changes in protein expression induced in hippocampus and cortex in control mice after exposure to context fear conditioning (CFC, with and without memantine treatment. Here, we extend this analysis to Ts65Dn mice, measuring levels of 85 proteins/protein modifications, including components of MAP kinase and MTOR pathways, and subunits of NMDA receptors, in cortex and hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice after failed learning in CFC and after learning was rescued by memantine. We show that, compared with wild type littermate controls, (i of the dynamic responses seen in control mice in normal learning, >40% also occur in Ts65Dn in failed learning or are compensated by baseline abnormalities, and thus are considered necessary but not sufficient for successful learning, and (ii treatment with memantine does not in general normalize the initial protein levels but instead induces direct and indirect responses in approximately half the proteins measured and results in normalization of the endpoint protein levels. Together, these datasets provide a first view of the complexities associated with pharmacological rescue of learning in the Ts65Dn. Extending such studies to additional drugs and mouse models of DS will aid in identifying pharmacotherapies for effective

  17. [Hyper-IgE syndrome. Lessons from function and defects of STAT-3 or DOCK-8].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara-Montiel, Julio César; Vega-Torres, Brittany Itzel

    2016-01-01

    In the classification of primary immunodeficiencies, hyper-IgE syndrome, identified with OMIM code # 147060 in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man catalog, belongs to the group of syndromes associated with combined immunodeficiencies. It is characterized by elevated levels of IgE, eosinophilia, recurrent skin abscesses, pneumonia, lung parenchyma lesions, recurrent infections, rashes in newborns, eczema, sinusitis, otitis, and mucocutaneous candidiasis. Hyper-IgE syndrome can be transmitted by autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive modes of inheritance. Hyper-IgE syndrome in its dominant form includes non-immunological manifestations like characteristic facies, pathological dentition, scoliosis, bone disorders, and joint hyperextensibility. The reported cause of the dominant form is the loss of function of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT-3, with MIM # 102582). Mutations in dedicator of cytokines 8 (DOCK-8) is the most common cause of the autosomal recessive form of hyper-IgE syndrome.

  18. Assessment of immune function in Down syndrome patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ekram Abdel-Salam

    2013-06-21

    Jun 21, 2013 ... Abstract In Down syndrome (DS), trisomy 21 leads to overexpression of gene coding for specific enzymes. This overexpression translates ... chromosome 21, referred to as trisomy 21 (Ts21). Chromo- some 21 contains 303 genes ... from activated antigen presenting cells [13]. TNF-a is an early and potent ...

  19. Assessment of Smell Function in Syndromic Craniosynostosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Casey; Attlmayr, Bernhard; Dalton, Lucy; Upile, Navdeep; Xie, Carol; De, Su

    2016-09-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as premature fusion of the cranial suture lines and is part of a syndrome in 15% to 40% of the patients. There is limited literature available regarding these children's ability to smell. Most of them will undergo numerous surgical procedures, some of which may alter their sense of smell, potentially leading to significant social as well as safety implications. Ethical approval was obtained for this pilot study. Children with syndromic craniosynostosis were recruited and underwent anterior rhinoscopy, prior to performing a smell test utilizing the Sensonic pediatric Smell wheel. The results were compared to an age-matched control group. Eight children with syndromic craniosynostosis participated in the study. Of a possible total score of 11, their mean average score was 6.6 and the median was 6. In comparison, the mean average score for the control group was 7.5 and the median was 7. Although the study group was small, this pilot study demonstrates that children with syndromic craniosynostosis have a similar ability to identify smells to an age-matched cohort. Further research can now be undertaken to see whether or not midface advancement procedures affect these children's sense of smell.

  20. Symbolic Functioning and Language Development in Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'toole, Ciara; Chiat, Shula

    2006-01-01

    Background: Understanding the relationship between preverbal skills and language development has important implications for identifying communication delay/disorders and for early childhood intervention. In the case of children with Down syndrome, it is well established that symbolic play is associated with the emergence of language. However, the…

  1. Assessment of immune function in Down syndrome patients | Abdel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Down syndrome (DS), trisomy 21 leads to overexpression of gene coding for specific enzymes. This overexpression translates directly into biochemical aberrations that affect multiple interacting metabolic pathways which culminates in cellular dysfunction and contributes to the unique pathogenesis of DS. The aim of this ...

  2. Assessing olfactory functions in patients with Barth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibattista, Michele; Lobasso, Simona; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Corcelli, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Barth syndrome is a rare X-linked disease affecting less than 200 individuals worldwide. Several comorbidities have been associated with the pathology and, among those, cardiac myopathy and neutropenia are the most life threatening. The appropriate nutritive support is important to sustain the everyday life of Barth syndrome patients given the chronic fatigue they experience. Since they often prefer salty and fried food, and avoid vegetables and fruits, their eating habit and food preferences do not always provide the proper amount of vitamins and amino acids. It has been indeed reported that Barth syndrome patients have altered taste sensitivity. As olfaction also contributes to food consumption and flavor perception, we decided to investigate their olfactory abilities using the "Sniffin' sticks' extended test". We found no significant difference in any of the tested olfactory abilities between the group of Barth syndrome patients and the healthy controls. In summary, altered food preference of Barth boys could not be easily explained with an altered olfactory perception.

  3. Assessing olfactory functions in patients with Barth syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Dibattista

    Full Text Available Barth syndrome is a rare X-linked disease affecting less than 200 individuals worldwide. Several comorbidities have been associated with the pathology and, among those, cardiac myopathy and neutropenia are the most life threatening. The appropriate nutritive support is important to sustain the everyday life of Barth syndrome patients given the chronic fatigue they experience. Since they often prefer salty and fried food, and avoid vegetables and fruits, their eating habit and food preferences do not always provide the proper amount of vitamins and amino acids. It has been indeed reported that Barth syndrome patients have altered taste sensitivity. As olfaction also contributes to food consumption and flavor perception, we decided to investigate their olfactory abilities using the "Sniffin' sticks' extended test". We found no significant difference in any of the tested olfactory abilities between the group of Barth syndrome patients and the healthy controls. In summary, altered food preference of Barth boys could not be easily explained with an altered olfactory perception.

  4. The Interplay between Anxiety and Social Functioning in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Hanley, Mary; Kirk, Hannah; Clark, Fiona; Little, Katie; Fleck, Ruth; Janes, Emily; Kelso, Linzi; O'Kane, Fionnuala; Cole-Fletcher, Rachel; Allday, Marianne Hvistendahl; Hocking, Darren; Cornish, Kim; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2014-01-01

    The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) has been associated with an atypical social profile of hyper-sociability and heightened social sensitivity across the developmental spectrum. In addition, previous research suggests that both children and adults with WS have a predisposition towards anxiety. The current research aimed to explore…

  5. Cognitive Ability and Everyday Functioning in Women with Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Jennifer; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of 23 Turner syndrome (TUS) women with 23 women with constitutional short stature (CSS) found significant group differences for Performance and Full Scale IQ, largely due to TUS women's deficits in spatial and mathematical ability. TUS individuals had significantly lower educational and occupational attainment than CSS controls but did…

  6. Properties and Functions of the Dengue Virus Capsid Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, Laura A; Gamarnik, Andrea V

    2016-09-29

    Dengue virus affects hundreds of millions of people each year around the world, causing a tremendous social and economic impact on affected countries. The aim of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the functions, structure, and interactions of the viral capsid protein. The primary role of capsid is to package the viral genome. There are two processes linked to this function: the recruitment of the viral RNA during assembly and the release of the genome during infection. Although particle assembly takes place on endoplasmic reticulum membranes, capsid localizes in nucleoli and lipid droplets. Why capsid accumulates in these locations during infection remains unknown. In this review, we describe available data and discuss new ideas on dengue virus capsid functions and interactions. We believe that a deeper understanding of how the capsid protein works during infection will create opportunities for novel antiviral strategies, which are urgently needed to control dengue virus infections.

  7. Down syndrome critical region 2 protein inhibits the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β in HEK293 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hae Jin; Park, Joongkyu; Seo, Su Ryeon; Kim, Jongsun; Paik, Seung R.; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2008-01-01

    Down syndrome is mainly caused by a trisomy of chromosome 21. The Down syndrome critical region 2 (DSCR2) gene is located within a part of chromosome 21, the Down syndrome critical region (DSCR). To investigate the function of DSCR2, we sought to identify DSCR2-interacting proteins using yeast two-hybrid assays. A human fetal brain cDNA library was screened, and DSCR2 was found to interact with a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β, (PPARβ). A co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that DSCR2 physically interacts with PPARβ in mammalian HEK293 cells. DSCR2 also inhibited the ligand-induced transcriptional activity of PPARβ. Furthermore, PPARβ also decreased the solubility of DSCR2, which increased levels of insoluble DSCR2

  8. Computational design of receptor and sensor proteins with novel functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looger, Loren L.; Dwyer, Mary A.; Smith, James J.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2003-05-01

    The formation of complexes between proteins and ligands is fundamental to biological processes at the molecular level. Manipulation of molecular recognition between ligands and proteins is therefore important for basic biological studies and has many biotechnological applications, including the construction of enzymes, biosensors, genetic circuits, signal transduction pathways and chiral separations. The systematic manipulation of binding sites remains a major challenge. Computational design offers enormous generality for engineering protein structure and function. Here we present a structure-based computational method that can drastically redesign protein ligand-binding specificities. This method was used to construct soluble receptors that bind trinitrotoluene, L-lactate or serotonin with high selectivity and affinity. These engineered receptors can function as biosensors for their new ligands; we also incorporated them into synthetic bacterial signal transduction pathways, regulating gene expression in response to extracellular trinitrotoluene or L-lactate. The use of various ligands and proteins shows that a high degree of control over biomolecular recognition has been established computationally. The biological and biosensing activities of the designed receptors illustrate potential applications of computational design.

  9. Analysis of Amyloid Precursor Protein function in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Kretzschmar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Amyloid precursor protein (APP has mainly been investigated in connection with its role in Alzheimer’s disease due to its cleavage resulting in the production of the Aβ peptides that accumulate in the plaques characteristic for this disease. However, APP is an evolutionary conserved protein that is not only found in humans but also in many other species, including Drosophila, suggesting an important physiological function. Besides Aβ, several other fragments are produced by the cleavage of APP; large secreted fragments derived from the N-terminus and a small intracellular C-terminal fragment. Although these fragments have received much less attention than Aβ, a picture about their function is finally emerging. In contrast to mammals, which express three APP family members, Drosophila expresses only one APP protein called Amyloid Precursor Protein-like or APPL. Therefore APPL functions can be studied in flies without the complication that other APP family members may have redundant functions. Flies lacking APPL are viable but show defects in neuronal outgrowth in the central and peripheral nervous system in addition to synaptic changes. Furthermore, APPL has been connected with axonal transport functions. In the adult nervous system, APPL, and more specifically its secreted fragments, can protect neurons from degeneration. APPL cleavage also prevents glial death. Lastly, APPL was found to be involved in behavioural deficits and in regulating sleep/activity patterns. This review, will describe the role of APPL in neuronal development and maintenance and briefly touch on its emerging function in circadian rhythms while an accompanying review will focus on its role in learning and memory formation.

  10. Improved Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein Hydrolysates in Food Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeewanthi, Renda Kankanamge Chaturika; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the enhanced functional characteristics of enzymatic hydrolysates of whey proteins (WPHs) in food applications compared to intact whey proteins (WPs). WPs are applied in foods as whey protein concentrates (WPCs), whey protein isolates (WPIs), and WPHs. WPs are byproducts of cheese production, used in a wide range of food applications due to their nutritional validity, functional activities, and cost effectiveness. Enzymatic hydrolysis yields improved functional and nutritional benefits in contrast to heat denaturation or native applications. WPHs improve solubility over a wide range of pH, create viscosity through water binding, and promote cohesion, adhesion, and elasticity. WPHs form stronger but more flexible edible films than WPC or WPI. WPHs enhance emulsification, bind fat, and facilitate whipping, compared to intact WPs. Extensive hydrolyzed WPHs with proper heat applications are the best emulsifiers and addition of polysaccharides improves the emulsification ability of WPHs. Also, WPHs improve the sensorial properties like color, flavor, and texture but impart a bitter taste in case where extensive hydrolysis (degree of hydrolysis greater than 8%). It is important to consider the type of enzyme, hydrolysis conditions, and WPHs production method based on the nature of food application. PMID:26761849

  11. Sexual function in infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Michael P; Legro, Richard S; Coutifaris, Christos; Alvero, Ruben; Robinson, Randal D; Casson, Peter A; Christman, Gregory M; Huang, Hao; Hansen, Karl R; Baker, Valerie; Usadi, Rebecca; Seungdamrong, Aimee; Bates, G Wright; Rosen, R Mitchell; Schlaff, William; Haisenleder, Daniel; Krawetz, Stephen A; Barnhart, Kurt; Trussell, J C; Santoro, Nanette; Eisenberg, Esther; Zhang, Heping

    2017-08-01

    While female sexual dysfunction is a frequent occurrence, characteristics in infertile women are not well delineated. Furthermore, the impact of infertility etiology on the characteristics in women with differing androgen levels observed in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility has not been assessed. The objective of the study was to determine the characteristics of sexual dysfunction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility. A secondary data analysis was performed on 2 of Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Cooperative Reproductive Medicine Networks clinical trials: Pregnancy in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Study II and Assessment of Multiple Intrauterine Gestations From Ovarian Stimulation. Both protocols assessed female sexual function using the Female Sexual Function Inventory and the Female Sexual Distress Scale. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome had higher weight and body mass index than women with unexplained infertility (each P polycystic ovary syndrome. The mean Female Sexual Function Inventory total score increased slightly as the free androgen index increased, mainly as a result of the desire subscore. This association was more pronounced in the women with unexplained infertility. Reproductive-age women with infertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility, despite phenotypic and biochemical differences in androgenic manifestations, do not manifest clinically significant differences in sexual function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  13. Fast dynamics perturbation analysis for prediction of protein functional sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn Judith D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a fast version of the dynamics perturbation analysis (DPA algorithm to predict functional sites in protein structures. The original DPA algorithm finds regions in proteins where interactions cause a large change in the protein conformational distribution, as measured using the relative entropy Dx. Such regions are associated with functional sites. Results The Fast DPA algorithm, which accelerates DPA calculations, is motivated by an empirical observation that Dx in a normal-modes model is highly correlated with an entropic term that only depends on the eigenvalues of the normal modes. The eigenvalues are accurately estimated using first-order perturbation theory, resulting in a N-fold reduction in the overall computational requirements of the algorithm, where N is the number of residues in the protein. The performance of the original and Fast DPA algorithms was compared using protein structures from a standard small-molecule docking test set. For nominal implementations of each algorithm, top-ranked Fast DPA predictions overlapped the true binding site 94% of the time, compared to 87% of the time for original DPA. In addition, per-protein recall statistics (fraction of binding-site residues that are among predicted residues were slightly better for Fast DPA. On the other hand, per-protein precision statistics (fraction of predicted residues that are among binding-site residues were slightly better using original DPA. Overall, the performance of Fast DPA in predicting ligand-binding-site residues was comparable to that of the original DPA algorithm. Conclusion Compared to the original DPA algorithm, the decreased run time with comparable performance makes Fast DPA well-suited for implementation on a web server and for high-throughput analysis.

  14. The DNA repair endonuclease XPG interacts directly and functionally with the WRN helicase defective in Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trego, Kelly S.; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Davalos, Albert R.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Finger, L. David; Ng, Cliff; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Yannone, Steven M.; Tainer, John A.; Campisi, Judith; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2011-04-20

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG incision defects result in the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, whereas truncating mutations of XPG cause the severe postnatal progeroid developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. We show that XPG interacts directly with WRN protein, which is defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, and that the two proteins undergo similar sub-nuclear redistribution in S-phase and co-localize in nuclear foci. The co-localization was observed in mid- to late-S-phase, when WRN moves from nucleoli to nuclear foci that have been shown to contain protein markers of both stalled replication forks and telomeric proteins. We mapped the interaction between XPG and WRN to the C-terminal domains of each and show that interaction with the C-terminal domain of XPG strongly stimulates WRN helicase activity. WRN also possesses a competing DNA single-strand annealing activity that, combined with unwinding, has been shown to coordinate regression of model replication forks to form Holliday junction/chicken foot intermediate structures. We tested whether XPG stimulated WRN annealing activity and found that XPG itself has intrinsic strand annealing activity that requires the unstructured R- and C-terminal domains, but not the conserved catalytic core or endonuclease activity. Annealing by XPG is cooperative, rather than additive, with WRN annealing. Taken together, our results suggest a novel function for XPG in S-phase that is at least in part carried out coordinately with WRN, and which may contribute to the severity of the phenotypes that occur upon loss of XPG.

  15. Clustering of protein domains for functional and evolutionary studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Paul F

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of protein family members defined by DNA sequencing is usually much larger than those characterised experimentally. This paper describes a method to divide protein families into subtypes purely on sequence criteria. Comparison with experimental data allows an independent test of the quality of the clustering. Results An evolutionary split statistic is calculated for each column in a protein multiple sequence alignment; the statistic has a larger value when a column is better described by an evolutionary model that assumes clustering around two or more amino acids rather than a single amino acid. The user selects columns (typically the top ranked columns to construct a motif. The motif is used to divide the family into subtypes using a stochastic optimization procedure related to the deterministic annealing EM algorithm (DAEM, which yields a specificity score showing how well each family member is assigned to a subtype. The clustering obtained is not strongly dependent on the number of amino acids chosen for the motif. The robustness of this method was demonstrated using six well characterized protein families: nucleotidyl cyclase, protein kinase, dehydrogenase, two polyketide synthase domains and small heat shock proteins. Phylogenetic trees did not allow accurate clustering for three of the six families. Conclusion The method clustered the families into functional subtypes with an accuracy of 90 to 100%. False assignments usually had a low specificity score.

  16. Preparation, characterization and functional properties of flax seed protein isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Pratibha; Dowling, Kim; McKnight, Stafford; Barrow, Colin J; Wang, Bo; Adhikari, Benu

    2016-04-15

    Flaxseed protein isolate (FPI) was extracted from flaxseeds, and its amino acid composition and functional properties (solubility, thermal stability, emulsifying properties and electrostatic charge density, water holding and fat absorption capacities) were determined. The highest purity of FPI (90.6%) was achieved by extraction at 60°C. FPI had a low lysine to arginine ratio of 0.25, which is desired in heart-healthy foods and infant formulas. The denaturation temperature of FPI was 105°C. FPI had the highest emulsion activity index (375.51 m(2)/g), highest emulsion stability index (179.5 h) and zeta potential (-67.4 mV) when compared to those of other commonly used proteins, such as sodium caseinate (SC), whey protein isolate (WPI), gelatin (Gel) and soy protein isolate (SPI). The average emulsion droplet size of emulsions stabilized by these proteins was in the order SCproteins. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional genomic analysis of cassava proteins with TIR domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman Reyna, Veronica; Lopez, Camilo

    2012-01-01

    Proteins containing a TIR domain (toll interleukin receptor) are involved in plant and animal immunity. The aim of this work was to carry out an overall genomic analysis of cassava proteins with a TIR domain and discern their possible role in resistance to cassava bacterial blight. In total 46 proteins with a TIR domain were identified in the cassava proteome and were classed in four categories according the presence or absence of other domains: TIR (T), TIR -NB (TN), TIR - lRR (TL) and TIR - NB - lRR (TNL). 56.6 % of these 46 proteins have TIR, NB and lRR domains. Using multiple alignments it was possible to demonstrate that not all cassava TIR domains contain the AE region, involved in dimerization and activation of immune responses. Three of the four proteins categories (T, TNL and TN) presented a higher number of synonymous substitutions suggesting that they are not involved in recognition process. two TIR domains not presenting the ae region were analyzed by yeast two hybrid assays and by agro-infiltration, finding that both are able to form homo and heterodimers, but they do not trigger defense responses. With this study it was possible to conclude that TIR domains can function as adaptors in the signal transduction with other resistance proteins. In addition, it became clear that not always the AE region is important for TIR dimerization but it seems necessary to activate defense responses signals.

  18. Effects of metabolic syndrome on the functional outcomes of corticosteroid injection for De Quervain tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Y H; Noh, J H; Gong, H S; Baek, G H

    2017-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of medical conditions that arise from insulin resistance and abnormal adipose deposition and function. In patients with metabolic syndrome and De Quervain tenosynovitis this might affect the outcome of treatment by local corticosteroid injection. A total of 64 consecutive patients with De Quervain tenosynovitis and metabolic syndrome treated with corticosteroid injection were age- and sex-matched with 64 control patients without metabolic syndrome. The response to treatment, including visual analogue scale score for pain, objective findings consistent with De Quervain tenosynovitis (tenderness at first dorsal compartment, Finkelstein test result), and Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score were assessed at 6, 12, and 24 weeks follow-up. Treatment failure was defined as persistence of symptoms or surgical intervention. Prior to treatment, patients with metabolic syndrome had mean initial pain visual analogue scale and Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores similar to those in the control group. The proportion of treatment failure in the metabolic syndrome group (43%) was significantly higher than that in the control group (20%) at 6 months follow-up. The pain visual analogue scale scores in the metabolic syndrome group were higher than the scores in the control group at the 12- and 24-week follow-ups. The Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores of the metabolic syndrome group were higher (more severe symptoms) than those of the control group at the 12- and 24-week follow-ups. Although considerable improvements in symptom severity and hand function will likely occur in patients with metabolic syndrome, corticosteroid injection for De Quervain tenosynovitis is not as effective in these patients compared with age- and sex-matched controls in terms of functional outcomes and treatment failure. III.

  19. Trimeric transmembrane domain interactions in paramyxovirus fusion proteins: roles in protein folding, stability, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Smith, Stacy E; Carter, James R; Webb, Stacy R; Gibson, Kathleen M; Hellman, Lance M; Fried, Michael G; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2013-12-13

    Paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins promote membrane fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membranes, a critical early step in viral infection. Although mutational analyses have indicated that transmembrane (TM) domain residues can affect folding or function of viral fusion proteins, direct analysis of TM-TM interactions has proved challenging. To directly assess TM interactions, the oligomeric state of purified chimeric proteins containing the Staphylococcal nuclease (SN) protein linked to the TM segments from three paramyxovirus F proteins was analyzed by sedimentation equilibrium analysis in detergent and buffer conditions that allowed density matching. A monomer-trimer equilibrium best fit was found for all three SN-TM constructs tested, and similar fits were obtained with peptides corresponding to just the TM region of two different paramyxovirus F proteins. These findings demonstrate for the first time that class I viral fusion protein TM domains can self-associate as trimeric complexes in the absence of the rest of the protein. Glycine residues have been implicated in TM helix interactions, so the effect of mutations at Hendra F Gly-508 was assessed in the context of the whole F protein. Mutations G508I or G508L resulted in decreased cell surface expression of the fusogenic form, consistent with decreased stability of the prefusion form of the protein. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis of TM domains containing these mutations gave higher relative association constants, suggesting altered TM-TM interactions. Overall, these results suggest that trimeric TM interactions are important driving forces for protein folding, stability and membrane fusion promotion.

  20. Functional assessment of allelic variants in the SLC26A4 gene involved in Pendred syndrome and nonsyndromic EVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, Alejandra; Dossena, Silvia; Rodighiero, Simona; Gandía, Marta; Bottà, Guido; Meyer, Giuliano; Moreno, Felipe; Nofziger, Charity; Hernández-Chico, Concepción; Paulmichl, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Pendred syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, with malformations of the inner ear, ranging from enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) to Mondini malformation, and deficient iodide organification in the thyroid gland. Nonsyndromic EVA (ns-EVA) is a separate type of sensorineural hearing loss showing normal thyroid function. Both Pendred syndrome and ns-EVA seem to be linked to the malfunction of pendrin (SLC26A4), a membrane transporter able to exchange anions between the cytosol and extracellular fluid. In the past, the pathogenicity of SLC26A4 missense mutations were assumed if the mutations fulfilled two criteria: low incidence of the mutation in the control population and substitution of evolutionary conserved amino acids. Here we show that these criteria are insufficient to make meaningful predictions about the effect of these SLC26A4 variants on the pendrin-induced ion transport. Furthermore, we functionally characterized 10 missense mutations within the SLC26A4 ORF, and consistently found that on the protein level, an addition or omission of a proline or a charged amino acid in the SLC26A4 sequence is detrimental to its function. These types of changes may be adequate for predicting SLC26A4 functionality in the absence of direct functional tests. PMID:19017801

  1. Functional effects of KCNE3 mutation and its role in the development of Brugada syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delpón, Eva; Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Núñez, Lucía

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Brugada Syndrome (BrS), an inherited syndrome associated with a high incidence of sudden cardiac arrest, has been linked to mutations in four different genes leading to a loss of function in sodium and calcium channel activity. Although the transient outward current (I......(to)) is thought to play a prominent role in the expression of the syndrome, mutations in I(to)-related genes have not been identified as yet. METHODS AND RESULTS: One hundred and five probands with BrS were screened for ion channel gene mutations using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP...

  2. Prebiotic Alternatives to Proteins: Structure and Function of Hyperbranched Polyesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamajanov, Irena; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Cody, George D.

    2015-06-01

    Proteins are responsible multiple biological functions, such as ligand binding, catalysis, and ion channeling. This functionality is enabled by proteins' three-dimensional structures that require long polypeptides. Since plausibly prebiotic synthesis of functional polypeptides has proven challenging in the laboratory, we propose that these functions may have been initially performed by alternative macromolecular constructs, namely hyperbranched polymers (HBPs), during early stages of chemical evolution. HBPs can be straightforwardly synthesized in one-pot processes, possess globular structures determined by their architecture as opposed to folding in proteins, and have documented ligand binding and catalytic properties. Our initial study focuses on glycerol-citric acid HBPs synthesized via moderate heating in the dry state. The polymerization products consisted of a mixture of isomeric structures of varying molar mass as evidenced by NMR, mass spectrometry and size-exclusion chromatography. Addition of divalent cations during polymerization resulted in increased incorporation of citric acid into the HBPs and the possible formation of cation-oligomer complexes. The chelating properties of citric acid govern the makeup of the resulting polymer, turning the polymerization system into a rudimentary smart material.

  3. Prediction of functional sites in proteins using conserved functional group analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innis, C Axel; Anand, A Prem; Sowdhamini, R

    2004-04-02

    A detailed knowledge of a protein's functional site is an absolute prerequisite for understanding its mode of action at the molecular level. However, the rapid pace at which sequence and structural information is being accumulated for proteins greatly exceeds our ability to determine their biochemical roles experimentally. As a result, computational methods are required which allow for the efficient processing of the evolutionary information contained in this wealth of data, in particular that related to the nature and location of functionally important sites and residues. The method presented here, referred to as conserved functional group (CFG) analysis, relies on a simplified representation of the chemical groups found in amino acid side-chains to identify functional sites from a single protein structure and a number of its sequence homologues. We show that CFG analysis can fully or partially predict the location of functional sites in approximately 96% of the 470 cases tested and that, unlike other methods available, it is able to tolerate wide variations in sequence identity. In addition, we discuss its potential in a structural genomics context, where automation, scalability and efficiency are critical, and an increasing number of protein structures are determined with no prior knowledge of function. This is exemplified by our analysis of the hypothetical protein Ydde_Ecoli, whose structure was recently solved by members of the North East Structural Genomics consortium. Although the proposed active site for this protein needs to be validated experimentally, this example illustrates the scope of CFG analysis as a general tool for the identification of residues likely to play an important role in a protein's biochemical function. Thus, our method offers a convenient solution to rapidly and automatically process the vast amounts of data that are beginning to emerge from structural genomics projects.

  4. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  5. Aesthetic and functional management of a patient with Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexton Antony Johns

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a syndrome of multiple congenital anomalies. The genetic and molecular bases of these lesions are not clear. It is divided into three types based on the severity of the anomaly. Dental findings revealed contracted maxilla, malaligned teeth, multiple impacted and missing teeth. This article describes the successful management of upper central incisor with lateral opening in the apical third on the mesial surface of the root along with aesthetic and functional rehabilitation.

  6. Functional and technological properties of camel milk proteins: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hailu, Yonas; Hansen, Egon Bech; Seifu, Eyassu

    2016-01-01

    This review summarises current knowledge on camel milk proteins, with focus on significant peculiarities in protein composition and molecular properties. Camel milk is traditionally consumed as a fresh or naturally fermented product. Within the last couple of years, an increasing quantity is being...... in relation to dairy processing. In addition to the technological properties, there are also implications for human nutrition and camel milk proteins are of interest for applications in infant foods, for food preservation and in functional foods. Proposed health benefits include inhibition of the angiotensin...... converting enzyme, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties as well as an antidiabetogenic effect. Detailed investigations on foaming, gelation and solubility as well as technological consequences of processing should be investigated further for the improvement of camel milk utilisation in the near future....

  7. Systemic Inflammation and Lung Function Impairment in Morbidly Obese Subjects with the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid van Huisstede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity and asthma are associated. There is a relationship between lung function impairment and the metabolic syndrome. Whether this relationship also exists in the morbidly obese patients is still unknown. Hypothesis. Low-grade systemic inflammation associated with the metabolic syndrome causes inflammation in the lungs and, hence, lung function impairment. Methods. This is cross-sectional study of morbidly obese patients undergoing preoperative screening for bariatric surgery. Metabolic syndrome was assessed according to the revised NCEP-ATP III criteria. Results. A total of 452 patients were included. Patients with the metabolic syndrome (n=293 had significantly higher blood monocyte (mean 5.3 versus 4.9, P=0.044 and eosinophil percentages (median 1.0 versus 0.8, P=0.002, while the total leukocyte count did not differ between the groups. The FEV1/FVC ratio was significantly lower in patients with the metabolic syndrome (76.7% versus 78.2%, P=0.032. Blood eosinophils were associated with FEV1/FVC ratio (adj. B −0.113, P=0.018. Conclusion. Although the difference in FEV1/FVC ratio between the groups is relatively small, in this cross-sectional study, and its clinical relevance may be limited, these data indicate that the presence of the metabolic syndrome may influence lung function impairment, through the induction of relative eosinophilia.

  8. Low Proportion of Dietary Plant Protein among Athletes with Premenstrual Syndrome-Related Performance Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Keiko; Takeda, Takashi

    2018-02-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is psychosomatic disorder that are limited to the late luteal phase in the menstrual cycle. PMS could impair athletic performance. To investigate associations between proportions of dietary plant and animal protein and PMS-related impairment of athletic performance, we surveyed 135 female athletes aged 18-23 years attending Kindai University. Participants belonged to authorized university clubs, all of which have high rankings in Japanese university sports. Participants completed self-administered questionnaires on diet history, demographics, and PMS-related impairment of athletic performance. Total protein, animal protein, and plant protein intake were examined, and the proportion of dietary plant protein was calculated for each participant. We divided athletes into two groups: those without PMS-related impairment of athletic performance (n = 117) and those with PMS-related performance impairment (n = 18). A t-test was used to compare mean values and multivariable adjusted mean values between groups; adjustment variables were energy intake, body mass index, and daily training duration. Total protein intake was not significantly different between the groups. However, athletes whose performance was affected by PMS reported higher intake of animal protein (mean 50.6 g) than athletes whose performance was unaffected by PMS (mean 34.9 g). Plant protein intake was lower among athletes with PMS-related impairment (mean 25.4 g) than among athletes without impairment (mean 26.9 g). The proportion of dietary plant protein was lower among athletes with PMS-related impairment (39.3%) than those without impairment (45.9%). A low proportion of dietary plant protein may cause PMS-related athletic impairment among athletes.

  9. Production of Lupinus angustifolius protein hydrolysates with improved functional properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millán, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein hydrolysates wer e obtained from lupin flour and from the purified globulin α -conglutin, and their functional properties were studied. Hydrolysis with alcalase for 60 minutes yielded degrees of hydrolysis ranging from 4 % to 11 % for lupin flour, and from 4 % to 13% for α -conglutin. Protein solubility, oil absorption, foam capacity and stability, emulsifying activity, and emulsion stability of hydrolysates with 6% degree of hydrolysis were determined and compared with the properties of the original flour. The protein hydrolysates showed better functional properties than the original proteins. Most importantly, the solubility of the α -conglutin and L. angustifolius flour hydrolysates was increased by 43 % and 52 %, respectively. Thus, lupin seed protein hydrolysates have improved functional properties and could be used in the elaboration of a variety of products such as breads, cakes, and salad dressings.Se obtuvieron hidrolizados proteicos de la harina del altramuz y de la globulina α - conglutina purificada y se estudiaron sus propiedades funcionales. La hidrólisis con alcalasa durante 60 minutos produjo hidrolizados con grados de hidrólisis entre el 4 % y el 11 % para la harina y entre el 4 % y el 13 % para la α - conglutina. Se estudió en un hidrolizado con un 6 % de grado de hidrólisis la solubilidad proteica, absorción de aceite, capacidad y estabilidad espumante y actividad y estabilidad emulsificante. Los hidrolizados proteicos mostraron mejores propiedades funcionales que las proteínas originales. Más aún, la solubilidad de los hidrolizados de α - conglutina y la harina se incrementó en un 43 % y 52 % respectivamente. Así pues, hidrolizados de proteínas de semilla de lupino presentan mejores propiedades funcionales y podrían usarse en la elaboración de productos como pan, dulces, salsas o cremas.

  10. Cockayne syndrome group B protein promotes mitochondrial DNA stability by supporting the DNA repair association with the mitochondrial membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamann, Maria Diget; Sorensen, Martin M; Hvitby, Christina Poulsen

    2010-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human premature aging disorder associated with severe developmental deficiencies and neurodegeneration, and phenotypically it resembles some mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diseases. Most patients belong to complementation group B, and the CS group B (CSB) protein plays a role...... in genomic maintenance and transcriptome regulation. By immunocytochemistry, mitochondrial fractionation, and Western blotting, we demonstrate that CSB localizes to mitochondria in different types of cells, with increased mitochondrial distribution following menadione-induced oxidative stress. Moreover, our...... association of the BER activities with the mitochondrial inner membrane, suggesting that CSB may participate in the anchoring of the DNA repair complex. Increased mutation frequency in mtDNA of CSB-deficient cells demonstrates functional significance of the presence of CSB in the mitochondria. The results...

  11. EFFECT OF DANCE EXERCISE ON COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME: A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Wook Song

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The purpose of this prospective pilot study was to examine the effects of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome. The participants included 38 elderly metabolic syndrome patients with normal cognitive function (26 exercise group and 12 control group. The exercise group performed dance exercise twice a week for 6 months. Cognitive function was assessed in all participants using the Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's disease (CERAD-K. Repeated-measures ANCOVA was used to assess the effect of dance exercise on cognitive function and cardiometabolic risk factors. Compared with the control group, the exercise group significantly improved in verbal fluency (p = 0.048, word list delayed recall (p = 0.038, word list recognition (p = 0.007, and total CERAD-K score (p = 0.037. However, no significance difference was found in body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, and HDL cholesterol between groups over the 6-month period. In the present study, six months of dance exercise improved cognitive function in older adults with metabolic syndrome. Thus, dance exercise may reduce the risk for cognitive disorders in elderly people with metabolic syndrome.

  12. Copper and the Prion Protein: Methods, Structures, Function, and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2007-05-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) arise from conversion of the membrane-bound prion protein from PrPC to PrPSc. Examples of the TSEs include mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, scrapie in goats and sheep, and kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Although the precise function of PrPC in healthy tissues is not known, recent research demonstrates that it binds Cu(II) in an unusual and highly conserved region of the protein termed the octarepeat domain. This review describes recent connections between copper and PrPC, with an emphasis on the electron paramagnetic resonance elucidation of the specific copper-binding sites, insights into PrPC function, and emerging connections between copper and prion disease.

  13. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for the production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional culturing process responsive to shear stress uses a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-.alpha.-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D.sub.3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating an in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  14. Intracellular transport proteins: classification, structure and function of kinesins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Chudy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Correct cell functioning, division and morphogenesis rely on efficient intracellular transport. Apart from dyneins and myosins, kinesins are the main proteins responsible for intracellular movement. Kinesins are a large, diverse group of motor proteins, which based on phylogenetic similarity were classified into fourteen families. Among these families, due to the location of their motor domains, three groups have been characterized: N-, C- and M-kinesin. As molecular motors, kinesins transport various molecules and vesicles mainly towards the microtubule plus end (from the cell body participating in anterograde transport, although there are also kinesins involved in retrograde transport (C-kinesins. Kinesins are also involved in spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and spermatogenesis. Because of their great importance for the correct functioning of cells, mutations in kinesin coding genes may lead to such neurodegenerative diseases as dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  15. Functional and technological properties of camel milk proteins: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailu, Yonas; Hansen, Egon Bech; Seifu, Eyassu; Eshetu, Mitiku; Ipsen, Richard; Kappeler, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    This review summarises current knowledge on camel milk proteins, with focus on significant peculiarities in protein composition and molecular properties. Camel milk is traditionally consumed as a fresh or naturally fermented product. Within the last couple of years, an increasing quantity is being processed in dairy plants, and a number of consumer products have been marketed. A better understanding of the technological and functional properties, as required for product improvement, has been gained in the past years. Absence of the whey protein β-LG and a low proportion of к-casein cause differences in relation to dairy processing. In addition to the technological properties, there are also implications for human nutrition and camel milk proteins are of interest for applications in infant foods, for food preservation and in functional foods. Proposed health benefits include inhibition of the angiotensin converting enzyme, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties as well as an antidiabetogenic effect. Detailed investigations on foaming, gelation and solubility as well as technological consequences of processing should be investigated further for the improvement of camel milk utilisation in the near future.

  16. High protein adsorptive capacity of amino acid-functionalized hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wing-Hin; Loo, Ching-Yee; Zavgorodniy, Alexander V; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2013-03-01

    Charged functional groups present on the surface of biomaterials play an important role to regulate the affinity and attachment of macromolecules, including proteins, on the surface of biomaterials. In this study, the protein adsorptive capacity of hydroxyapatite (HA) was regulated by introducing different amino acids during the precipitation of HA. After incubation of HA samples in 5000 μg/mL lysozyme solution at pH 7.4 for 24 h, unmodified HA adsorbed 0.886 mg/m(2) of lysozyme while amino acid-functionalized HA (AA-HA) particles demonstrated higher adsorption capacity ranging from 1.090 to 1.680 mg/m(2). Incorporation of amino acids with longer side chain lengths decreased the crystallinity and increased the negative value of the surface charge of HA particles. The specific surface areas were significantly increased in the presence of amino acids. Protein loading capacity onto AA-HA was further enhanced by regulating the pH of working solution whereby the protein adsorption rate increased with decreasing the pH, while reverse trend obtained in unmodified HA. The study demonstrated that the amount of adsorbed lysozyme onto AA-HA particles was correlated with the particles' surface charges. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Functional properties of tropical banded cricket (Gryllodes sigillatus) protein hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Felicia G; Jones, Owen G; O'Haire, Marguerite E; Liceaga, Andrea M

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the benefits of entomophagy have been widely discussed. Due to western cultures' reluctance, entomophagy practices are leaning more towards incorporating insects into food products. In this study, whole crickets (Gryllodes sigillatus) were hydrolyzed with alcalase at 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0% (w/w) for 30, 60, and 90min. Degree of hydrolysis (DH), amino acid composition, solubility, emulsion and foaming properties were evaluated. Hydrolysis produced peptides with 26-52% DH compared to the control containing no enzyme (5% DH). Protein solubility of hydrolysates improved (p30% soluble protein at pH 3 and 7 and 50-90% at alkaline pH, compared with the control. Emulsion activity index ranged from 7 to 32m 2 /g, while foamability ranged from 100 to 155% for all hydrolysates. These improved functional properties demonstrate the potential to develop cricket protein hydrolysates as a source of functional alternative protein in food ingredient formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Network approaches to the functional analysis of microbial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, J S; James, K; Wipat, A

    2011-01-01

    Large amounts of detailed biological data have been generated over the past few decades. Much of these data is freely available in over 1000 online databases; an enticing, but frustrating resource for microbiologists interested in a systems-level view of the structure and function of microbial cells. The frustration engendered by the need to trawl manually through hundreds of databases in order to accumulate information about a gene, protein, pathway, or organism of interest can be alleviated by the use of computational data integration to generated network views of the system of interest. Biological networks can be constructed from a single type of data, such as protein-protein binding information, or from data generated by multiple experimental approaches. In an integrated network, nodes usually represent genes or gene products, while edges represent some form of interaction between the nodes. Edges between nodes may be weighted to represent the probability that the edge exists in vivo. Networks may also be enriched with ontological annotations, facilitating both visual browsing and computational analysis via web service interfaces. In this review, we describe the construction, analysis of both single-data source and integrated networks, and their application to the inference of protein function in microbes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Measuring School Functioning in Students with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollit, Michelle; Politis, Jennifer; Knight, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    Background: It is often surmised that school functioning is significantly impacted in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS); however, how this phenomenon manifests itself has rarely been characterized. Methods: This systematic review synthesized and critically appraised methods, constructs, and instruments used to assess school functioning in students…

  20. Cognitive, Linguistic and Adaptive Functioning in Williams Syndrome: Trajectories from Early to Middle Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, Patricia; Elison, Sarah; Udwin, Orlee; Stinton, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little is known about trajectories of cognitive functioning as individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) move though adulthood. Method: The present study investigated cognitive, linguistic and adaptive functioning in adults with WS aged 19-55 years, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal approaches. Results: Data from the…

  1. Effects of Detraining on Anthropometry, Aerobic Capacity and Functional Ability in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, P. H.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Structured exercise has shown to improve parameters of functional fitness in adults with Down syndrome (DS). However, few, if any, continue to exercise after exercise intervention studies. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of detraining on anthropometry, aerobic capacity and functional ability of…

  2. Children with High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome: Can We Differentiate Their Cognitive Profiles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planche, Pascale; Lemonnier, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether children with high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger's syndrome (AS) can be differentiated from each other and from typically developing children on their cognitive profiles. The present study included a total of 45 participants: children with autism (high-functioning autism or Asperger's…

  3. Social Competence Intervention for Youth with Asperger Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism: An Initial Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichter, Janine P.; Herzog, Melissa J.; Visovsky, Karen; Schmidt, Carla; Randolph, Jena; Schultz, Tia; Gage, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with high functioning autism (HFA) or Asperger Syndrome (AS) exhibit difficulties in the knowledge or correct performance of social skills. This subgroup's social difficulties appear to be associated with deficits in three social cognition processes: theory of mind, emotion recognition and executive functioning. The current study…

  4. Fc-receptor function in minimal change nephrotic syndrome of childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davin, J. C.; Foidart, J. B.; Mahieu, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    This study was undertaken to establish whether the Fc-receptor function of circulating monocytes (CM) and/or of splenic macrophages (SM) is modified during the course of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) of childhood. The Fc-receptor function of SM was ascertained by measuring the spleen to

  5. The Rett Syndrome Complex: Communicative Functions in Relation to Developmental Level and Autistic Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Annika Dahlgren; Ehlers, Stephan; Hagberg, Bengt; Gillberg, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    Communicative functions, overall developmental level, and autistic features were studied in eight females (ages 11-36) with Rett Syndrome. Low levels of communicative abilities and overall functioning were demonstrated, and joint attention behaviors and expression of communicative intent were rare. Six subjects, however, showed clear examples of…

  6. The functional significance of the autolysis loop in protein C and activated protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Likui; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2005-07-01

    The autolysis loop of activated protein C (APC) is five residues longer than the autolysis loop of other vitamin K-dependent coagulation proteases. To investigate the role of this loop in the zymogenic and anticoagulant properties of the molecule, a protein C mutant was constructed in which the autolysis loop of the protein was replaced with the corresponding loop of factor X. The protein C mutant was activated by thrombin with approximately 5-fold higher rate in the presence of Ca2+. Both kinetics and direct binding studies revealed that the Ca2+ affinity of the mutant has been impaired approximately 3-fold. The result of a factor Va degradation assay revealed that the anticoagulant function of the mutant has been improved 4-5-fold in the absence but not in the presence of protein S. The improvement was due to a better recognition of both the P1-Arg506 and P1-Arg306 cleavage sites by the mutant protease. However, the plasma half-life of the mutant was markedly shortened due to faster inactivation by plasma serpins. These results suggest that the autolysis loop of protein C is critical for the Ca(2+)-dependence of activation by thrombin. Moreover, a longer autolysis loop in APC is not optimal for interaction with factor Va in the absence of protein S, but it contributes to the lack of serpin reactivity and longer half-life of the protease in plasma.

  7. Functional Modification of Thioether Groups in Peptides, Polypeptides, and Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Timothy J

    2017-03-15

    Recent developments in the modification of methionine and other thioether-containing residues in peptides, polypeptides, and proteins are reviewed. Properties and potential applications of the resulting functionalized products are also discussed. While much of this work is focused on natural Met residues, modifications at other side-chain residues have also emerged as new thioether-containing amino acids have been incorporated into peptidic materials. Functional modification of thioether-containing amino acids has many advantages and is a complementary methodology to the widely utilized methods for modification at cysteine residues.

  8. Methods of reconstitution to investigate membrane protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Ruth; Iqbal, Shagufta; Callaghan, Richard

    2018-02-16

    Membrane proteins are notoriously difficult to investigate in isolation. The focus of this chapter is the key step following extraction and purification of membrane proteins; namely reconstitution. The process of reconstitution re-inserts proteins into a lipid bilayer that partly resembles their native environment. This native environment is vital to the stability of membrane proteins, ensuring that they undergo vital conformational transitions and maintain optimal interaction with their substrates. Reconstitution may take many forms and these have been classified into two broad categories. Symmetric systems enable unfettered access to both sides of a bilayer. Compartment containing systems contain a lumen and are ideally suited to measurement of transport processes. The investigator is encouraged to ascertain what aspects of protein function will be undertaken and to apply the most advantageous reconstitution system or systems. It is important to note that the process of reconstitution is not subject to defined protocols and requires empirical optimisation to specific targets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Organizers and activators: Cytosolic Nox proteins impacting on vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Katrin; Weissmann, Norbert; Brandes, Ralf P

    2017-08-01

    NADPH oxidases of the Nox family are important enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cardiovascular system. Of the 7 members of the Nox family, at least three depend for their activation on specific cytosolic proteins. These are p47phox and its homologue NoxO1 and p67phox and its homologue NoxA1. Also the Rho-GTPase Rac is important but as this protein has many additional functions, it will not be covered here. The Nox1 enzyme is preferentially activated by the combination of NoxO1 with NoxA1, whereas Nox2 gains highest activity with p47phox together with p67phox. As p47phox, different to NoxO1 contains an auto inhibitory region it has to be phosphorylated prior to complex formation. In the cardio-vascular system, all cytosolic Nox proteins are expressed but the evidence for their contribution to ROS production is not well established. Most data have been collected for p47phox, whereas NoxA1 has basically not yet been studied. In this article the specific aspects of cytosolic Nox proteins in the cardiovascular system with respect to Nox activation, their expression and their importance will be reviewed. Finally, it will be discussed whether cytosolic Nox proteins are suitable pharmacological targets to tamper with vascular ROS production. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Methanococcus maripaludis: an archaeon with multiple functional MCM proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Alison D; Chong, James P J

    2009-02-01

    There are a large number of proteins involved in the control of eukaryotic DNA replication, which act together to ensure DNA is replicated only once every cell cycle. Key proteins involved in the initiation and elongation phases of DNA replication include the MCM (minchromosome maintenance) proteins, MCM2-MCM7, a family of six related proteins believed to act as the replicative helicase. Genome sequencing has revealed that the archaea possess a simplified set of eukaryotic replication homologues. The complexity of the DNA replication machinery in eukaryotes has led to a number of archaeal species being adapted as model organisms for the study of the DNA replication process. Most archaea sequenced to date possess a single MCM homologue that forms a hexameric complex. Recombinant MCMs from several archaea have been used in the biochemical characterization of the protein, revealing that the MCM complex has ATPase, DNA-binding and -unwinding activities. Unusually, the genome of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis contains four MCM homologues, all of which contain the conserved motifs required for function. The availability of a wide range of genetic tools for the manipulation of M. maripaludis and the relative ease of growth of this organism in the laboratory makes it a good potential model for studying the role of multiple MCMs in DNA replication.

  11. Minor snake venom proteins: Structure, function and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini-França, Johara; Cologna, Camila Takeno; Pucca, Manuela Berto; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Anjolette, Fernando Antonio Pino; Cordeiro, Francielle Almeida; Wiezel, Gisele Adriano; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro-Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Shibao, Priscila Yumi Tanaka; Ferreira, Isabela Gobbo; de Oliveira, Isadora Sousa; Cardoso, Iara Aimê; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2017-04-01

    Snake venoms present a great diversity of pharmacologically active compounds that may be applied as research and biotechnological tools, as well as in drug development and diagnostic tests for certain diseases. The most abundant toxins have been extensively studied in the last decades and some of them have already been used for different purposes. Nevertheless, most of the minor snake venom protein classes remain poorly explored, even presenting potential application in diverse areas. The main difficulty in studying these proteins lies on the impossibility of obtaining sufficient amounts of them for a comprehensive investigation. The advent of more sensitive techniques in the last few years allowed the discovery of new venom components and the in-depth study of some already known minor proteins. This review summarizes information regarding some structural and functional aspects of low abundant snake venom proteins classes, such as growth factors, hyaluronidases, cysteine-rich secretory proteins, nucleases and nucleotidases, cobra venom factors, vespryns, protease inhibitors, antimicrobial peptides, among others. Some potential applications of these molecules are discussed herein in order to encourage researchers to explore the full venom repertoire and to discover new molecules or applications for the already known venom components. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Developmentally distinct MYB genes encode functionally equivalent proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-05-01

    The duplication and divergence of developmental control genes is thought to have driven morphological diversification during the evolution of multicellular organisms. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship between two paralogous MYB transcription factor genes, WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABROUS1 (GL1), in Arabidopsis. The WER and GL1 genes specify distinct cell types and exhibit non-overlapping expression patterns during Arabidopsis development. Nevertheless, reciprocal complementation experiments with a series of gene fusions showed that WER and GL1 encode functionally equivalent proteins, and their unique roles in plant development are entirely due to differences in their cis-regulatory sequences. Similar experiments with a distantly related MYB gene (MYB2) showed that its product cannot functionally substitute for WER or GL1. Furthermore, an analysis of the WER and GL1 proteins shows that conserved sequences correspond to specific functional domains. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the MYB gene family in Arabidopsis, and, more generally, they demonstrate that novel developmental gene function may arise solely by the modification of cis-regulatory sequences.

  13. Reduced Abundance and Subverted Functions of Proteins in Prion-Like Diseases: Gained Functions Fascinate but Lost Functions Affect Aetiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Phuoc, Kim; Leighton, Patricia L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Prions have served as pathfinders that reveal many aspects of proteostasis in neurons. The recent realization that several prominent neurodegenerative diseases spread via a prion-like mechanism illuminates new possibilities for diagnostics and therapeutics. Thus, key proteins in Alzheimer Disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), including amyloid-β precursor protein, Tau and superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), spread to adjacent cells in their misfolded aggregated forms and exhibit template-directed misfolding to induce further misfolding, disruptions to proteostasis and toxicity. Here we invert this comparison to ask what these prion-like diseases can teach us about the broad prion disease class, especially regarding the loss of these key proteins’ function(s) as they misfold and aggregate. We also consider whether functional amyloids might reveal a role for subverted protein function in neurodegenerative disease. Our synthesis identifies SOD1 as an exemplar of protein functions being lost during prion-like protein misfolding, because SOD1 is inherently unstable and loses function in its misfolded disease-associated form. This has under-appreciated parallels amongst the canonical prion diseases, wherein the normally folded prion protein, PrPC, is reduced in abundance in fatal familial insomnia patients and during the preclinical phase in animal models, apparently via proteostatic mechanisms. Thus while template-directed misfolding and infectious properties represent gain-of-function that fascinates proteostasis researchers and defines (is required for) the prion(-like) diseases, loss and subversion of the functions attributed to hallmark proteins in neurodegenerative disease needs to be integrated into design towards effective therapeutics. We propose experiments to uniquely test these ideas. PMID:29064456

  14. Heat-induced whey protein gels: protein-protein interactions and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havea, Palatasa; Watkinson, Philip; Kuhn-Sherlock, Barbara

    2009-02-25

    Heat-induced gelation (80 degrees C for 30 min or 85 degrees C for 60 min) of whey protein concentrate (WPC) solutions was studied using small deformation dynamic rheology, small and large deformation compression, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The WPC solutions (15% w/w, pH 6.9) were prepared by dispersing WPC powder in water (control), 1% (w/w) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) solution at a protein/NEM molar ratio of 1:1 or in 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) solution. PAGE analyses showed that the heat treatment of control solutions contained both disulfide and non-covalent linkages between denatured protein molecules. Only disulfide linkages were formed in heated SDS-WPC solutions, whereas only non-covalent linkages were formed in DTT-WPC and NEM-WPC solutions during heating. In heated NEM-WPC solutions, the pre-existing disulfide linkages remained unaltered. Small deformation rheology measurements showed that the storage modulus (G') values, compared with those of the control WPC gels (approximately 14000 Pa), were 3 times less for the SDS-WPC gels (approximately 4000 Pa), double for the NEM-WPC gels (approximately 24000 Pa), and even higher for the DTT-WPC gels (approximately 30000 Pa). Compression tests suggested that the rubberiness (fracture strain) of the WPC gels increased as the degree of disulfide linkages within the gels increased, whereas the stiffness (modulus) of the gels increased as the degree of non-covalent associations among the denatured protein molecules increased.

  15. From Protein Sequence to Protein Function via Multi-Label Linear Discriminant Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Yan, Lin; Huang, Heng; Ding, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Sequence describes the primary structure of a protein, which contains important structural, characteristic, and genetic information and thereby motivates many sequence-based computational approaches to infer protein function. Among them, feature-base approaches attract increased attention because they make prediction from a set of transformed and more biologically meaningful sequence features. However, original features extracted from sequence are usually of high dimensionality and often compromised by irrelevant patterns, therefore dimension reduction is necessary prior to classification for efficient and effective protein function prediction. A protein usually performs several different functions within an organism, which makes protein function prediction a multi-label classification problem. In machine learning, multi-label classification deals with problems where each object may belong to more than one class. As a well-known feature reduction method, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) has been successfully applied in many practical applications. It, however, by nature is designed for single-label classification, in which each object can belong to exactly one class. Because directly applying LDA in multi-label classification causes ambiguity when computing scatters matrices, we apply a new Multi-label Linear Discriminant Analysis (MLDA) approach to address this problem and meanwhile preserve powerful classification capability inherited from classical LDA. We further extend MLDA by l 1 -normalization to overcome the problem of over-counting data points with multiple labels. In addition, we incorporate biological network data using Laplacian embedding into our method, and assess the reliability of predicted putative functions. Extensive empirical evaluations demonstrate promising results of our methods.

  16. Advanced oxidation protein products are more related to metabolic syndrome components than biomarkers of lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Danielle; Simão, Andréa Name Colado; Dichi, Isaias

    2015-09-01

    Although advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been reported as the most appropriate parameter for determination of oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a direct comparison between protein and lipid peroxidation has not been performed yet. The aim of this study was to compare protein peroxidation with lipid peroxidation measured by 2 different methodologies (tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence and ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange assay). The hypothesis of this study was that AOPPs would be more related to MetS than to oxidative markers of lipid peroxidation. This cross-sectional study evaluated 76 patients with MetS and 20 healthy subjects. Prooxidant-antioxidant index (PAI) assessed as AOPP/total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter ratio progressively increased (P protein (r = 0.275, P protein (r = 0.278, P protein peroxidation determined by AOPPs, and especially by PAI, is more related to MetS components than lipid peroxidation. In addition, PAI progressively increased with the number of MetS components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular pathogenesis of Spondylocheirodysplastic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by mutant ZIP13 proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Hojyo, Shintaro; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Kano, Hiroki; Miyai, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Mariko; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Kambe, Taiho; Ohashi, Wakana; Kim, Kyu-Han; Seo, Juyeon; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Hwang, Daehee; Fukunaka, Ayako; Fujitani, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Ikegawa, Shiro; Lee, Tae Ryong; Fukada, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    The zinc transporter protein ZIP13 plays critical roles in bone, tooth, and connective tissue development, and its dysfunction is responsible for the spondylocheirodysplastic form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (SCD-EDS, OMIM 612350). Here, we report the molecular pathogenic mechanism of SCD-EDS caused by two different mutant ZIP13 proteins found in human patients: ZIP13G64D, in which Gly at amino acid position 64 is replaced by Asp, and ZIP13ΔFLA, which contains a deletion of Phe-Leu-Ala. We demonstrated that both the ZIP13G64D and ZIP13ΔFLA protein levels are decreased by degradation via the valosin-containing protein (VCP)-linked ubiquitin proteasome pathway. The inhibition of degradation pathways rescued the protein expression levels, resulting in improved intracellular Zn homeostasis. Our findings uncover the pathogenic mechanisms elicited by mutant ZIP13 proteins. Further elucidation of these degradation processes may lead to novel therapeutic targets for SCD-EDS. PMID:25007800

  18. Acute coronary syndrome and acute kidney injury: role of inflammation in worsening renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Hernández, Jorge; Springall, Rashidi; Sánchez-Muñoz, Fausto; Arana-Martinez, Julio-C; González-Pacheco, Héctor; Bojalil, Rafael

    2017-07-26

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), a common complication of acute coronary syndromes (ACS), is associated with higher mortality and longer hospital stays. The role of cytokines and other mediators is unknown in AKI induced by an ACS (ACS-AKI), leading to several unanswered questions. The worsening of renal function is usually seen as a dichotomous phenomenon instead of a dynamic change, so evaluating changes of the renal function in time may provide valuable information in the ACS-AKI setting. The aim of this study was to explore inflammatory factors associated to de novo kidney injury induced by de novo cardiac injury secondary to ACS. One hundred four consecutive patients with ACS were initially included on the time of admission to the Coronary Unit of the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología in Mexico City, from February to May 2016, before any invasive procedure, imaging study, diuretic or anti-platelet therapy. White blood count, hemoglobin, NT-ProBNP, troponin I, C-reactive protein, albumin, glucose, Na + , K + , blood urea nitrogen (BUN), total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides, creatinine (Cr), endothelin-1 (ET-1), leukotriene-B4, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1, resolvin-D1 (RvD1), lipoxin-A4 (LXA4), interleukin-1β, -6, -8, and -10 were measured. We finally enrolled 78 patients, and subsequently we identified 15 patients with ACS-AKI. Correlations were obtained by a Spearman rank test. Low-rank regression, splines regressions, and also protein-protein/chemical interactions and pathways analyses networks were performed. Positive correlations of ΔCr were found with BUN, admission Cr, GRACE score, IL-1β, IL-6, NT-ProBNP and age, and negative correlations with systolic blood pressure, mean-BP, diastolic-BP and LxA4. In the regression analyses IL-10 and RvD1 had positive non-linear associations with ΔCr. ET-1 had also a positive association. Significant non-linear associations were seen with NT-proBNP, admission Cr, BUN

  19. Gene therapy restores auditory and vestibular function in a mouse model of Usher syndrome type 1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bifeng; Askew, Charles; Galvin, Alice; Heman-Ackah, Selena; Asai, Yukako; Indzhykulian, Artur A; Jodelka, Francine M; Hastings, Michelle L; Lentz, Jennifer J; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Holt, Jeffrey R; Géléoc, Gwenaëlle S

    2017-03-01

    Because there are currently no biological treatments for hearing loss, we sought to advance gene therapy approaches to treat genetic deafness. We focused on Usher syndrome, a devastating genetic disorder that causes blindness, balance disorders and profound deafness, and studied a knock-in mouse model, Ush1c c.216G>A, for Usher syndrome type IC (USH1C). As restoration of complex auditory and balance function is likely to require gene delivery systems that target auditory and vestibular sensory cells with high efficiency, we delivered wild-type Ush1c into the inner ear of Ush1c c.216G>A mice using a synthetic adeno-associated viral vector, Anc80L65, shown to transduce 80-90% of sensory hair cells. We demonstrate recovery of gene and protein expression, restoration of sensory cell function, rescue of complex auditory function and recovery of hearing and balance behavior to near wild-type levels. The data represent unprecedented recovery of inner ear function and suggest that biological therapies to treat deafness may be suitable for translation to humans with genetic inner ear disorders.

  20. Effects of a functional COMT polymorphism on brain anatomy and cognitive function in adults with velo-cardio-facial syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amelsvoort, T.; Zinkstok, J.; Figee, M.; Daly, E.; Morris, R.; Owen, M. J.; Murphy, K. C.; de Haan, L.; Linszen, D. H.; Glaser, B.; Murphy, D. G. M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is associated with deletions at chromosome 22q11, abnormalities in brain anatomy and function, and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Thus it is assumed that one or more genes within the deleted region are crucial to brain development. However, relatively

  1. Posttranslational Protein Modification in the Salivary Glands of Sjögren’s Syndrome Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Herrera-Esparza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated posttranslational reactions in the salivary glands of patients with Sjögren’s syndrome. We analysed the biopsies of primary Sjögren’s patients using immunohistochemistry and a tag-purified anticyclic citrullinated protein (CCP antibody to detect citrullinated peptides, and the presence of peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2 was assessed simultaneously. The present work demonstrated the weak presence of the PAD2 enzyme in some normal salivary glands, although PAD2 expression was increased considerably in Sjögren’s patients. The presence of citrullinated proteins was also detected in the salivary tissues of Sjögren’s patients, which strongly supports the in situ posttranslational modification of proteins in this setting. Furthermore, the mutual expression of CCP and PAD2 suggests that this posttranslational modification is enzyme dependent. In conclusion, patients with Sjögren’s syndrome expressed the catalytic machinery to produce posttranslational reactions that may result in autoantigen triggering.

  2. Functional and cellular characterization of human Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1) mutations associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Encina, Carolina A; Canales, Cesar P; Cao, Lei; Molina, Jessica; Kairath, Pamela; Young, Juan I; Walz, Katherina

    2010-08-25

    Smith-Magenis Syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome in which the dosage sensitive gene has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1). Little is known about the function of human RAI1. We generated the full-length cDNA of the wild type protein and five mutated forms: RAI1-HA 2687delC, RAI1-HA 3103delC, RAI1 R960X, RAI1-HA Q1562R, and RAI1-HA S1808N. Four of them have been previously associated with SMS clinical phenotype. Molecular weight, subcellular localization and transcription factor activity of the wild type and mutant forms were studied by western blot, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays respectively. The wild type protein and the two missense mutations presented a higher molecular weight than expected, localized to the nucleus and activated transcription of a reporter gene. The frameshift mutations generated a truncated polypeptide with transcription factor activity but abnormal subcellular localization, and the same was true for the 1-960aa N-terminal half of RAI1. Two different C-terminal halves of the RAI1 protein (1038aa-end and 1229aa-end) were able to localize into the nucleus but had no transactivation activity. Our results indicate that transcription factor activity and subcellular localization signals reside in two separate domains of the protein and both are essential for the correct functionality of RAI1. The pathogenic outcome of some of the mutated forms can be explained by the dissociation of these two domains.

  3. Functional and cellular characterization of human Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1 mutations associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmona-Mora Paulina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smith-Magenis Syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome in which the dosage sensitive gene has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1. Little is known about the function of human RAI1. Results We generated the full-length cDNA of the wild type protein and five mutated forms: RAI1-HA 2687delC, RAI1-HA 3103delC, RAI1 R960X, RAI1-HA Q1562R, and RAI1-HA S1808N. Four of them have been previously associated with SMS clinical phenotype. Molecular weight, subcellular localization and transcription factor activity of the wild type and mutant forms were studied by western blot, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays respectively. The wild type protein and the two missense mutations presented a higher molecular weight than expected, localized to the nucleus and activated transcription of a reporter gene. The frameshift mutations generated a truncated polypeptide with transcription factor activity but abnormal subcellular localization, and the same was true for the 1-960aa N-terminal half of RAI1. Two different C-terminal halves of the RAI1 protein (1038aa-end and 1229aa-end were able to localize into the nucleus but had no transactivation activity. Conclusion Our results indicate that transcription factor activity and subcellular localization signals reside in two separate domains of the protein and both are essential for the correct functionality of RAI1. The pathogenic outcome of some of the mutated forms can be explained by the dissociation of these two domains.

  4. Comparison of functional properties of 34% and 80% whey protein and milk serum protein concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, P J; Vardhanabhuti, B; Yong, Y H; Laundon, T; Barbano, D M; Foegeding, E A

    2013-09-01

    This study compared the functional properties of serum protein concentrate (SPC) with whey protein concentrate (WPC) made from the same milk and with commercial WPC. The experimental SPC and WPC were produced at 34% or 80% protein from the same lot of milk. Protein contents of WPC and SPC were comparable; however, fat content was much lower in SPC compared with WPC and commercial WPC. The effect of drying methods (freeze vs. spray drying) was studied for 34% WPC and SPC. Few differences due to drying method were found in turbidity and gelation; however, drying method made a large difference in foam formation for WPC but not SPC. Between pH 3 and 7, SPC was found to have lower turbidity than WPC; however, protein solubility was similar between SPC and WPC. Foaming and gelation properties of SPC were better than those of WPC. Differences in functional properties may be explained by differences in composition and extent of denaturation or aggregation. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Exopolysaccharides modify functional properties of whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, G; Hassan, A N; Metzger, L

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this research was to produce whey protein concentrate (WPC) with modified functionality using exopolysaccharide- (EPS) producing cultures. Two different EPS-producing cultures, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris JFR and Streptococcus thermophilus, producing EPS1 and EPS2 respectively, were used in this study. One EPS-nonproducing commercial cheese culture (DVS 850; Chr. Hansen, Milwaukee, WI) was used as the control. Reconstituted sweet whey powder was used in this study to eliminate variations from fresh whey. Cultures grown overnight in reconstituted WPC (10% wt/vol) were added, directly or after overnight cooling (cooled EPS), at 2% (wt/vol) to 6% (wt/wt) solution of reconstituted whey. Whey was then high-temperature, short-time pasteurized at 75 °C for 35s and ultrafiltered to a volume reduction factor of 5. Ultrafiltered whey (retentate) was spray dried at inlet and outlet air temperatures of 200 and 90 °C, respectively, to obtain WPC. In general, the solubility of WPC was higher at pH 7 than at pH 3. Whey protein concentrate containing EPS2 exhibited higher protein solubility than did WPC containing no EPS. Also, the presence of EPS in WPC decreased protein denaturation. The emulsifying ability of WPC containing EPS was higher than that in control. Addition of EPS to WPC significantly enhanced its gelling ability. Foam overrun and hydrophobicity of WPC were not affected by addition of EPS. In conclusion, data obtained from this study show that EPS modify WPC functionality. The extent of modification depends on the type of EPS. Cooling of culture containing EPS before its addition to whey further reduced WPC protein denaturation and increased its solubility at pH 7 and gel hardness. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Enzymatic functionalization of a nanobody using protein insertion technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasson, O; Rhazi, N; Jacquin, O; Freichels, A; Jérôme, C; Ruth, N; Galleni, M; Filée, P; Vandevenne, M

    2015-10-01

    Antibody-based products constitute one of the most attractive biological molecules for diagnostic, medical imagery and therapeutic purposes with very few side effects. Their development has become a major priority of biotech and pharmaceutical industries. Recently, a growing number of modified antibody-based products have emerged including fragments, multi-specific and conjugate antibodies. In this study, using protein engineering, we have functionalized the anti-hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) camelid VHH antibody fragment (cAb-Lys3), by insertion into a solvent-exposed loop of the Bacillus licheniformis β-lactamase BlaP. We showed that the generated hybrid protein conserved its enzymatic activity while the displayed nanobody retains its ability to inhibit HEWL with a nanomolar affinity range. Then, we successfully implemented the functionalized cAb-Lys3 in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, potentiometric biosensor and drug screening assays. The hybrid protein was also expressed on the surface of phage particles and, in this context, was able to interact specifically with HEWL while the β-lactamase activity was used to monitor phage interactions. Finally, using thrombin-cleavage sites surrounding the permissive insertion site in the β-lactamase, we reported an expression system in which the nanobody can be easily separated from its carrier protein. Altogether, our study shows that insertion into the BlaP β-lactamase constitutes a suitable technology to functionalize nanobodies and allows the creation of versatile tools that can be used in innovative biotechnological assays. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Evaluation of uric acid levels, thyroid function, and anthropometric parameters in Japanese children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niegawa, Tomomi; Takitani, Kimitaka; Takaya, Ryuzo; Ishiro, Manabu; Kuroyanagi, Yuichi; Okasora, Keisuke; Minami, Yukako; Matsuda, Takuya; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2017-09-01

    Down syndrome, caused by trisomy 21, is characterized by congenital abnormalities as well as mental retardation. From the neonatal stage through adolescence, patients with Down syndrome often have several complications. Thus, it is important to attain knowledge of the prevalence of these comorbidities in children with Down syndrome. We, therefore, evaluated the biochemical data, thyroid function, and anthropometric parameters, and analyzed the association among them in Japanese children and early adolescents with Down syndrome. There was no difference in the prevalence of obesity and overweight between boys and girls. The level of uric acid was higher in boys than in girls. Moreover, the prevalence of hyperuricemia was also higher in boys than in girls (approximately 32% and 10%, respectively). The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism in children with Down syndrome was approximately 20%, with no significant sex differences. The levels of uric acid and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate were positively associated with age, while the levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone and free thyroxine had a negative association with age. Overall, children with Down syndrome, exhibit a higher incidence of hyperuricemia. Therefore, uric acid levels, as well as thyroid function, from childhood to early adulthood should be monitored in this patient cohort.

  8. Functional deficits in carpal tunnel syndrome reflect reorganization of primary somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yumi; Kettner, Norman; Holden, Jameson; Lee, Jeungchan; Kim, Jieun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Im, Jaehyun; Libby, Alexandra; Mezzacappa, Pia; Morse, Leslie R; Park, Kyungmo; Audette, Joseph; Tommerdahl, Mark; Napadow, Vitaly

    2014-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome, a median nerve entrapment neuropathy, is characterized by sensorimotor deficits. Recent reports have shown that this syndrome is also characterized by functional and structural neuroplasticity in the primary somatosensory cortex of the brain. However, the linkage between this neuroplasticity and the functional deficits in carpal tunnel syndrome is unknown. Sixty-three subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome aged 20-60 years and 28 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were evaluated with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T while vibrotactile stimulation was delivered to median nerve innervated (second and third) and ulnar nerve innervated (fifth) digits. For each subject, the interdigit cortical separation distance for each digit's contralateral primary somatosensory cortex representation was assessed. We also evaluated fine motor skill performance using a previously validated psychomotor performance test (maximum voluntary contraction and visuomotor pinch/release testing) and tactile discrimination capacity using a four-finger forced choice response test. These biobehavioural and clinical metrics were evaluated and correlated with the second/third interdigit cortical separation distance. Compared with healthy control subjects, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated reduced second/third interdigit cortical separation distance (P somatosensory cortex, corroborating our previous preliminary multi-modal neuroimaging findings. For psychomotor performance testing, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated reduced maximum voluntary contraction pinch strength (P somatosensory cortex was associated with worse symptomatology (particularly paraesthesia), reduced fine motor skill performance, and worse sensory discrimination accuracy for median nerve innervated digits. In conclusion, primary somatosensory cortex neuroplasticity for median nerve innervated digits in carpal tunnel syndrome is indeed

  9. Loss of Angelman Syndrome Protein E6AP Disrupts a Novel Antagonistic Estrogen-Retinoic Acid Transcriptional Crosstalk in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hokayem, Jimmy; Weeber, Edwin; Nawaz, Zafar

    2018-01-31

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a complex genetic disorder that affects the nervous system. AS affects an estimated 1 in 12,000 to 20,000 individuals. Characteristic features of AS includes developmental delay or intellectual disability, severe speech impairment, seizures, small head size (microcephaly), and problems with movement and balance (ataxia). AS individuals usually have microdeletion of the maternal copy of 15q11.2-15q13 region of chromosome 15. The E6-associated protein (E6AP, an E3 ubiquitin protein ligase enzyme) is encoded by the gene UBE3A, which is located in this region, and it has been shown that deregulation of E6AP gives rise to AS and neuropathology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) (e.g., autism and Rett syndromes). We have shown that E6AP also acts as a coactivator of the estrogen receptor (ER). ER is a ligand-induced transcription factor that exerts potent and wide-ranging effects on the developing brain. Furthermore, the expression pattern of ER in the brain overlaps with that of E6AP. Up till now, all the published studies have examined the role of the ubiquitin-protein ligase activity of E6AP in the development of AS, and it is not known what role the newly discovered coactivation functions of E6AP and ER plays in the pathology of AS. Here, we demonstrate that E6AP and ER co-immunoprecipitate and are in the same protein complex in neuronal cells (Neuro2a). In addition, both colocalize in nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of the mouse hippocampal neurons and Neuro2a cells. Moreover, we identified a novel E6AP and ER direct transcriptional regulation of a gene Cyp26b1 known to be involved in learning and memory processes. This transcriptional regulation involves recruitment of E6AP and ER to a newly discovered functional estrogen response element (ERE) located at the Cyp26b1 gene promoter and is associated with transcription permissive epigenetic events leading to increase of active transcription of the gene in neurons upon estrogen

  10. FACETS: multi-faceted functional decomposition of protein interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Boon-Siew; Bhowmick, Sourav S.; Forbes Dewey, C.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: The availability of large-scale curated protein interaction datasets has given rise to the opportunity to investigate higher level organization and modularity within the protein–protein interaction (PPI) network using graph theoretic analysis. Despite the recent progress, systems level analysis of high-throughput PPIs remains a daunting task because of the amount of data they present. In this article, we propose a novel PPI network decomposition algorithm called FACETS in order to make sense of the deluge of interaction data using Gene Ontology (GO) annotations. FACETS finds not just a single functional decomposition of the PPI network, but a multi-faceted atlas of functional decompositions that portray alternative perspectives of the functional landscape of the underlying PPI network. Each facet in the atlas represents a distinct interpretation of how the network can be functionally decomposed and organized. Our algorithm maximizes interpretative value of the atlas by optimizing inter-facet orthogonality and intra-facet cluster modularity. Results: We tested our algorithm on the global networks from IntAct, and compared it with gold standard datasets from MIPS and KEGG. We demonstrated the performance of FACETS. We also performed a case study that illustrates the utility of our approach. Contact: seah0097@ntu.edu.sg or assourav@ntu.edu.sg Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at the Bioinformatics online. Availability: Our software is available freely for non-commercial purposes from: http://www.cais.ntu.edu.sg/∼assourav/Facets/ PMID:22908217

  11. Urine retinol-binding protein 4: a functional biomarker of the proximal renal tubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norden, Anthony G W; Lapsley, Marta; Unwin, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of retinol-binding protein 4 in urine (uRBP4) is arguably the most sensitive biomarker for loss of function of the human proximal renal tubule. Megalin- and cubilin-receptor-mediated endocytosis normally absorbs > 99% of the approximately 1.5 g/24 h of protein filtered by the renal glomerulus. When this fails there is "tubular proteinuria," comprising uRBP4, albumin, and many other proteins and peptides. This tubular proteinuria is a consistent feature of the renal Fanconi syndrome (FS) and measurement of uRBP4 appears to be an excellent screening test for FS. FS occurs in rare inherited renal diseases including cystinosis, Dent disease, Lowe syndrome, and autosomal dominant FS. Acquired FS occurs in paraproteinemias, tubulointerstitial renal disease, oncogenic osteomalacia, Chinese herbs nephropathy, and Balkan endemic nephropathy. Though poorly understood, FS may be associated with HIV disease and antiretroviral treatment; cadmium poisoning may cause FS. In addition to FS, uRBP4 measurement has a different role: the early detection of acute kidney injury. Urine RBP4 comprises several isoforms, including intact plasma RBP4, MW 21.07 kDa, and C-terminal truncated forms, des-L- and des-LL-RBP4, also probably plasma derived. In FS, uRBP4 levels are about 104-fold above the upper limit of normal and small increments are frequently seen in carriers of some inherited forms of FS and in acquired disease. The very high levels in disease, frequent assay nonlinearity, lack of defined calibrants, and multiple uRBP4 isoforms make accurate assay challenging; top-down mass spectrometry has brought advances. Assays for uRBP4 with defined molecular targets allowing good interlaboratory comparisons are needed.

  12. Effects of Human C-Reactive Protein on Pathogenesis of Features of the Metabolic Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Kajiya, T.; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Šilhavý, Jan; Malínská, H.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Kazdová, L.; Fan, J.; Wang, J.; Kurtz, T. W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2011), s. 731-737 ISSN 0194-911X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NS9759; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08006; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/0290; GA ČR GAP303/10/0505; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110805 Grant - others:EC(XE) HEALTH-F4-2010-241504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : C-reactive protein * metabolic syndrome * transgenic rat Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 6.207, year: 2011

  13. Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in Australia: A population-based study, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Sam; Frith, Katie; Barnes, Elizabeth H; Campbell, Dianne E

    2017-11-01

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal allergic disorder. Large population-based FPIES studies are lacking. We sought to determine the incidence and clinical characteristics of FPIES in Australian infants. An Australia-wide survey (2012-2014) was undertaken through the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, with monthly notification of new cases of acute FPIES in infants aged less than 24 months by 1400 participating pediatricians. Two hundred thirty infants with FPIES were identified. The incidence of FPIES in Australian infants (disease and FPIES to fruits, vegetables, or both. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Compromised Structure and Function of HDAC8 Mutants Identified in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a multiple congenital anomaly disorder resulting from mutations in genes that encode the core components of the cohesin complex, SMC1A, SMC3, and RAD21, or two of its regulatory proteins, NIPBL and HDAC8. HDAC8 is the human SMC3 lysine deacetylase required for cohesin recycling in the cell cycle. To date, 16 different missense mutations in HDAC8 have recently been identified in children diagnosed with CdLS. To understand the molecular effects of these mutations in causing CdLS and overlapping phenotypes, we have fully characterized the structure and function of five HDAC8 mutants: C153F, A188T, I243N, T311M, and H334R. X-ray crystal structures reveal that each mutation causes local structural changes that compromise catalysis and/or thermostability. For example, the C153F mutation triggers conformational changes that block acetate product release channels, resulting in only 2% residual catalytic activity. In contrast, the H334R mutation causes structural changes in a polypeptide loop distant from the active site and results in 91% residual activity, but the thermostability of this mutant is significantly compromised. Strikingly, the catalytic activity of these mutants can be partially or fully rescued in vitro by the HDAC8 activator N-(phenylcarbamothioyl)benzamide. These results suggest that HDAC8 activators might be useful leads in the search for new therapeutic strategies in managing CdLS. PMID:25075551

  15. Physical and functional interactions between Werner syndrome helicase and mismatch-repair initiation factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saydam, Nurten; Kanagaraj, Radhakrishnan; Dietschy, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    is poorly understood. Here we show that WRN physically interacts with the MSH2/MSH6 (MutSalpha), MSH2/MSH3 (MutSbeta) and MLH1/PMS2 (MutLalpha) heterodimers that are involved in the initiation of mismatch repair (MMR) and the rejection of homeologous recombination. MutSalpha and MutSbeta can strongly......Werner syndrome (WS) is a severe recessive disorder characterized by premature aging, cancer predisposition and genomic instability. The gene mutated in WS encodes a bi-functional enzyme called WRN that acts as a RecQ-type DNA helicase and a 3'-5' exonuclease, but its exact role in DNA metabolism...... stimulate the helicase activity of WRN specifically on forked DNA structures with a 3'-single-stranded arm. The stimulatory effect of MutSalpha on WRN-mediated unwinding is enhanced by a G/T mismatch in the DNA duplex ahead of the fork. The MutLalpha protein known to bind to the MutS alpha...

  16. Physical and functional interactions between Werner syndrome helicase and mismatch-repair initiation factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saydam, Nurten; Kanagaraj, Radhakrishnan; Dietschy, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a severe recessive disorder characterized by premature aging, cancer predisposition and genomic instability. The gene mutated in WS encodes a bi-functional enzyme called WRN that acts as a RecQ-type DNA helicase and a 3'-5' exonuclease, but its exact role in DNA metabolism...... stimulate the helicase activity of WRN specifically on forked DNA structures with a 3'-single-stranded arm. The stimulatory effect of MutSalpha on WRN-mediated unwinding is enhanced by a G/T mismatch in the DNA duplex ahead of the fork. The MutLalpha protein known to bind to the MutS alpha......-heteroduplex complexes has no effect on WRN-mediated DNA unwinding stimulated by MutSalpha, nor does it affect DNA unwinding by WRN alone. Our data are consistent with results of genetic experiments in yeast suggesting that MMR factors act in conjunction with a RecQ-type helicase to reject recombination between...

  17. Functional Cathepsin C mutations cause different Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Barbara; Görgens, Heike; Schacher, Beate; Puklo, Magda; Eickholz, Peter; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schackert, Hans Konrad

    2008-04-01

    The autosomal-recessive Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) is characterized by severe aggressive periodontitis, combined with palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, and is caused by mutations in the Cathepsin C (CTSC) gene. This study aimed to identify CTSC mutations in different PLS phenotypes, including atypical forms and isolated pre-pubertal aggressive periodontitis (PAP). Thirteen families with different phenotypes were analysed by direct sequencing of the entire coding region and the regulatory regions of CTSC. The function of novel mutations was tested with enzyme activity measurements. In 11 of 13 families, 12 different pathogenic CTSC mutations were found in 10 typical PLS patients, three atypical cases and one PAP patient. Out of four novel mutations, three result in protein truncation and are thus considered to be pathogenic. The homozygous c.854C>T nucleotide exchange (p.P285L) was associated with an almost complete loss of enzyme activity. The observed phenotypic heterogeneity could not be associated with specific genotypes. The phenotypic variability of the PLS associated with an identical genetic background may reflect the influence of additional genetic or environmental factors on disease characteristics. CTSC mutation analyses should be considered for differential diagnosis in all children suffering from severe aggressive periodontitis.

  18. Evidence of a generalized defect of acinar cell function in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormon, Michael O; Ip, Wan F; Ellis, Lynda; Schibli, Susanne; Rommens, Johanna M; Durie, Peter R

    2010-07-01

    : Because the acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas in patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) are severely depleted, we hypothesized that a similar deficiency may be present in acinar cells of the parotid gland. : We determined serum pancreatic isoamylase and parotid amylase activities in 16 patients with SDS, 13 healthy controls, and 13 disease controls (cystic fibrosis or fibrosing pancreatitis). Parotid amylase and electrolyte concentrations were measured in stimulated parotid gland secretions. Starch digestion was assessed by breath hydrogen testing in patients with SDS (with and without enzyme supplements) and healthy controls. : Serum pancreatic and parotid isoamylase values were lower in the patients with SDS than in the healthy controls (P gland amylase concentration (units per milligram of protein) in patients with SDS was lower than that in the healthy controls (P = 0.04), whereas the disease controls were comparable to the healthy subjects (P = 0.09). Secreted parotid chloride concentration was inversely correlated with amylase concentration in the patients with SDS (P = 0.01), but no correlation was seen in the healthy controls or disease controls. When patients with SDS ingested starch without enzyme supplementation, their breath hydrogen excretion was significantly higher than that in the healthy controls (P = 0.009). Following starch ingestion with enzymes, breath hydrogen in the patients with SDS was lower (P functional abnormality of exocrine acinar cells.

  19. Liposome-based Formulation for Intracellular Delivery of Functional Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Chatin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular delivery of biologically active protein represents an important emerging strategy for both fundamental and therapeutic applications. Here, we optimized in vitro delivery of two functional proteins, the β-galactosidase (β-gal enzyme and the anti-cytokeratin8 (K8 antibody, using liposome-based formulation. The guanidinium-cholesterol cationic lipid bis (guanidinium-tren-cholesterol (BGTC (bis (guanidinium-tren-cholesterol combined to the colipid dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE (dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine was shown to efficiently deliver the β-gal intracellularly without compromising its activity. The lipid/protein molar ratio, protein amount, and culture medium were demonstrated to be key parameters affecting delivery efficiency. The protein itself is an essential factor requiring selection of the appropriate cationic lipid as illustrated by low K8 binding activity of the anti-K8 antibody using guanidinium-based liposome. Optimization of various lipids led to the identification of the aminoglycoside lipid dioleyl succinyl paromomycin (DOSP associated with the imidazole-based helper lipid MM27 as a potent delivery system for K8 antibody, achieving delivery in 67% of HeLa cells. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy showed that the structure of supramolecular assemblies BGTC:DOPE/β-gal and DOSP:MM27/K8 were different depending on liposome types and lipid/protein molar ratio. Finally, we observed that K8 treatment with DOSP:MM27/K8 rescues the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-dependent chloride efflux in F508del-CFTR expressing cells, providing a new tool for the study of channelopathies.

  20. Protein denaturation and functional properties of Lenient Steam Injection heat treated whey protein concentrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickow, Jonatan Ahrens; Kaufmann, Niels; Wiking, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) was heat treated by use of the novel heat treatment method of Lenient Steam Injection (LSI) to elucidate new functional properties in relation to heat-induced gelation of heat treated WPC. Denaturation was measured by both DSC and FPLC, and the results of the two...... methods were highly correlated. Temperatures of up to 90 °C were applicable using LSI, whereas only 68 °C could be reached by plate heat exchange before coagulation/fouling. Denaturation of whey proteins increased with increasing heat treatment temperature up to a degree of 30–35% denaturation at 90 °C...

  1. Executive Functions in Intellectual Disabilities: A Comparison between Williams Syndrome and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Floriana; Varuzza, Cristiana; Menghini, Deny; Addona, Francesca; Gianesini, Tiziana; Vicari, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Executive functions are a set of high cognitive abilities that control and regulate other functions and behaviors and are crucial for successful adaptation. Deficits in executive functions are frequently described in developmental disorders, which are characterized by disadaptive behavior. However, executive functions are not widely examined in…

  2. Shoulder function, pain and health related quality of life in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Elise Christine; Reiten, Helle Sundnes; Løvaas, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate shoulder function, pain and Health-Related Quality of life (HRQoL) among adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), compared with the general population (controls). Method In a cross-sectional study using postal survey...

  3. Math Achievement, Numerical Processing, and Executive Functions in Girls with Turner Syndrome: Do Girls with Turner Syndrome Have Math Learning Disability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Hanich, Laurie B.

    2010-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a common genetic disorder associated with select deficits in executive functions, working memory and mathematics. In Study 1, we examined growth trajectories of skills in these areas, from grades 1 to 6, among girls with or without Turner syndrome. Rates of growth and performance levels at 6th grade, on an untimed math…

  4. Antigenic structure of the nucleocapsid protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, S K; Nelson, E A; Yoo, D

    1998-11-01

    A collection of 12 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus was used to study the antigenic structure of the virus nucleocapsid protein (N). The full-length N gene, encoded by open reading frame 7, was cloned from the Canadian PRRS virus, PA-8. Deletions were introduced into the N gene to produce a series of nine overlapping protein fragments ranging in length from 25 to 112 amino acids. The individual truncated genes were cloned as glutathione S-transferase fusions into a eukaryotic expression vector downstream of the T7 RNA polymerase promoter. HeLa cells infected with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing T7 RNA polymerase were transfected with plasmid DNA encoding the N protein fragments, and the antigenicity of the synthesized proteins was analyzed by immunoprecipitation. Based on the immunoreactivities of the N protein deletion mutants with the panel of N-specific MAbs, five domains of antigenic importance were identified. MAbs SDOW17, SR30, and 5H2.3B12.1C9 each identified independent domains defined by amino acids 30 to 52, 69 to 123, and 37 to 52, respectively. Seven of the MAbs tested specifically recognized the local protein conformation formed in part by the amino acid residues 52 to 69. Furthermore, deletion of 11 amino acids from the carboxy terminus of the nucleocapsid protein disrupted the epitope configuration recognized by all of the conformation-dependent MAbs, suggesting that the carboxy-terminal region plays an important role in maintaining local protein conformation.

  5. Physiological and pathological functions of the prion protein homologue Dpl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Axel

    2003-01-01

    A misfolded version of the prion protein PrP(C), known as PrP(Sc), is the major component of scrapie infectivity, the pathological agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The Prnp gene that encodes the cellular PrP(C) protein was cloned almost 20 years ago, but remained without sequence or structural relatives for over a decade. Only recently a novel protein, named Doppel (Dpl), was identified, which shares significant biochemical and structural homology with PrP(C). When overexpressed, Dpl is neurotoxic and causes a neurological disease. Strikingly, Dpl neurotoxicity is counteracted and prevented by PrP(C). In contrast to its homologue PrP(C), Dpl is dispensable for prion disease progression and for the generation of PrP(Sc), but Dpl appears to have an essential function in male spermatogenesis. Although Dpl research is still in its infancy, the discovery of Dpl has already solved some enigmas of prion biology and an understanding of its physiological function is emerging.

  6. Growth hormone receptor/binding protein: physiology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herington, A C; Ymer, S I; Stevenson, J L; Roupas, P

    1994-07-01

    Soluble truncated forms of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) are present in the circulation of many species and are also produced by many tissues/cell types. The major high-affinity forms of these GH-binding proteins (GHBP) are derived by alternative splicing of GHR mRNA in rodents, but probably by proteolytic cleavage in other species. Questions still remain with respect to the origins, native molecular form(s), physiology, and function of the GHBPs, however. The observation that GH induces dimerization of the soluble GHBP and membrane GHR, and that dimerization of GHR appears to be critical for GH bioactivity suggests that the presentation of GH to target cells, in an unbound form or as a monomeric or dimeric complex with GHBP, may have significant implications for the ability of GH to activate specific postreceptor signaling pathways (tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, G-protein pathways) known to be utilized by GH for its diverse biological effects. This minireview addresses some of these aspects and highlights several new questions which have arisen as a result of recent advances in our understanding of the structure, function, and signaling mechanisms of the membrane bound GHR.

  7. Growth hormone receptor/binding protein: Physiology and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herington, A.C.; Ymer, S.I.; Stevenson, J.L.; Roupas, P. [Royal Children`s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Soluble truncated forms of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) are present in the circulation of many species and are also produced by many tissues/cell types. The major high-affinity forms of these GH-binding proteins (GHBP) are derived by alternative splicing of GHR mRNA in rodents, but probably by proteolytic cleavage in other species. Questions still remain with respect to the origins, native molecular forms(s), physiology, and function of the GHBPs, however. The observation that GH induces dimerization of the soluble GHBP and a membrane GHR, and that dimerization of GHR appears to be critical for GH bioactivity suggests that the presentation of GH to target cells, in an unbound form or as a monomeric or dimeric complex with GHBP, may have significant implications for the ability of GH to activate specific postreceptor signaling pathways (tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, G-protein pathways) known to be utilized by GH for its diverse biological effects. This minireview addresses some of these aspects and highlights several new questions which have arisen as a result of recent advances in our understanding of the structure, function, and signaling mechanisms of the membrane bound GHR. 43 refs.

  8. SNAP-25, a known presynaptic protein with emerging postsynaptic functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia eAntonucci

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of synaptic specializations is their dependence on highly organized complexes of proteins that interact with each other. The loss or modification of key synaptic proteins directly affects the properties of such networks, ultimately impacting synaptic function. SNAP-25 is a component of the SNARE complex, which is central to synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and, by directly interacting with different calcium channels subunits, it negatively modulates neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels, thus regulating intracellular calcium dynamics. The SNAP-25 gene has been associated with distinct brain diseases, including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, indicating that the protein may act as a shared biological substrate among different synaptopathies. The mechanisms by which alterations in SNAP-25 may concur to these psychiatric diseases are still undefined, although alterations in neurotransmitter release have been indicated as potential causative processes. This review summarizes recent work showing that SNAP-25 not only controls exo/endocytic processes at the presynaptic terminal, but also regulates postsynaptic receptor trafficking, spine morphogenesis and plasticity, thus opening the possibility that SNAP-25 defects may contribute to psychiatric diseases by impacting not only presynaptic but also postsynaptic functions.

  9. Function of E-protein dimers expressed in catfish lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikima, Jun-ichi; Lennard Richard, Mara L.; Wilson, Melanie R.; Miller, Norman W.; Warr, Gregory W.

    2007-01-01

    E-proteins are essential class I bHLH transcription factors that play a role in lymphocyte development. In catfish lymphocytes the predominant E-proteins expressed are CFEB (a homologue of HEB) and E2A1, which both strongly drive transcription. In this study the role of homodimerization versus heterodimerization in the function of these catfish E-proteins was addressed through the use of expression constructs encoding forced dimers. Constructs expressing homo- and heterodimers were transfected into catfish B cells and shown to drive transcription from the catfish IGH enhancer. Expression from an artificial promoter containing a trimer of μE5 motifs clearly demonstrated that the homodimer of E2A1 drove transcription more strongly (by a factor of 10–25) than the CFEB homodimer in catfish B and T cells, while the heterodimer showed intermediate levels of transcriptional activation. Both CFEB1 and E2A1 proteins dimerized in vitro, and the heterodimer CFEB1-E2A1 was shown to bind the canonical μE5 motif. PMID:17870169

  10. Functional properties of proteins isolated from industrially produced sunflower meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petia Ivanova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein isolate 1 (PI1 and protein isolate 2 (PI2 were prepared from industrially produced sunflower meal by using isoelectric and ethanol precipitation respectively. The water absorption capacity of PI1 was 6 times higher than that of PI2 and was significantly reduced by the presence of 0.03 M and 0.25 M NaCl. Oil absorption capacity of both protein isolates was not influenced by NaCl supplementation. Foam capacity of PI1 and PI2 was pH-dependent. While the foam capacity of both isolates was improved by either 0.03 M or 0.25 M NaCl, the foam stability was negatively influenced by the addition of NaCl at all pH values with except for pH 4. Emulsifying activity of PI1 and PI2 was lowest at pH 4. The emulsions exhibited relatively high stability (> 90% under all studied conditions. Knowledge of the influence of pH and boundary concentrations of NaCl on the functionality of sunflower meal protein isolates could be beneficial for their future potential application in food industry.

  11. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  12. Outer membrane protein functions as integrator of protein import and DNA inheritance in mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Sandro; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Týč, Jiří; Vaughan, Sue; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are one of the earliest diverging eukaryotes that have fully functional mitochondria. pATOM36 is a trypanosomatid-specific essential mitochondrial outer membrane protein that has been implicated in protein import. Changes in the mitochondrial proteome induced by ablation of pATOM36 and in vitro assays show that pATOM36 is required for the assembly of the archaic translocase of the outer membrane (ATOM), the functional analog of the TOM complex in other organisms. Reciprocal pull-down experiments and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrate that a fraction of pATOM36 interacts and colocalizes with TAC65, a previously uncharacterized essential component of the tripartite attachment complex (TAC). The TAC links the single-unit mitochondrial genome to the basal body of the flagellum and mediates the segregation of the replicated mitochondrial genomes. RNAi experiments show that pATOM36, in line with its dual localization, is not only essential for ATOM complex assembly but also for segregation of the replicated mitochondrial genomes. However, the two functions are distinct, as a truncated version of pATOM36 lacking the 75 C-terminal amino acids can rescue kinetoplast DNA missegregation but not the lack of ATOM complex assembly. Thus, pATOM36 has a dual function and integrates mitochondrial protein import with mitochondrial DNA inheritance. PMID:27436903

  13. Soy Germ Protein With or Without-Zn Improve Plasma Lipid Profile in Metabolic Syndrome Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERY WINARSI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the effect of soy germ protein on lipid profile of metabolic syndrome (MetS patients. Respondents were 30 women with criteria, i.e. blood glucose level > normal, body mass index > 25 kg/m2, hypertriglyceridemia, low cholesterol-HDL level, 40-65 years old, living in Purwokerto, and signed the informed consent. The project was approved by the ethics committee of the Medical Faculty from Gadjah Mada University-Yogyakarta. Respondents were divided into three randomly chosen groups consisting of ten women each. The first, second, and third groups were treated, respectively, with milk enriched soy germ protein plus Zn, milk enriched soy germ protein (without Zn, and placebo for two months. Blood samples were taken at baseline, one and two months after observation. Two months after observation the groups consuming milk enriched with soy germ protein, both with or without Zn, had their level of cholesterol-total decrease from 215.8 to 180.2 mg/dl (P = 0.03, triglyceride from 240.2 to 162.5 mg/dl (P = 0.02, and LDL from 154.01 to 93.85 mg/dl (P = 0.03. In contrast, HDL increased from 38.91 to 49.49 mg/dl (P = 0.0008. In conclusion, soy germ protein can improve lipid profile, thus it can inhibit atherosclerosis incident.

  14. Renal function and metabolic syndrome components on cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Kuo-Liong; Hsu, Hsiu-Ching; Lee, Yuan-Teh; Chen, Ming-Fong

    2008-04-01

    Impaired renal function and metabolic syndrome have been associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We investigated their roles in CVD and all-cause death among ethnic Chinese population. We followed up a cohort of 11429 men and 7472 women aged 20 years and older for an average 4.9 years (median: 3.5, inter-quartile range: 2.7-7.9) from the tertiary hospital health check-up population. CVD death rates increased when the quintiles of each variable progressed. Metabolic syndrome was a significant predictor for CVD death, with relative risk of up to 4.68. In the multivariate adjusted model that included metabolic syndrome, quintiles of serum creatinine concentrations, estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and uric acids were significantly associated CVD death, with the highest relative risk of creatinine concentration (11.22, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.43-51.7, P for trend: creatinine concentrations and estimated GFR had the higher areas under ROC curves of CVD death (0.76, 95% CI: 0.71-0.80 for creatinine and 0.76, 95% CI: 0.72-0.81 for estimated GFR). The two marker models showed that metabolic syndrome and impaired renal function had the most significant roles in predicting CVD deaths; the multivariate relative risk was 30.6 (95% CI: 3.7-254, P: 0.002) in participants with the highest creatinine and presence of metabolic syndrome compared with those with the lowest and absence of metabolic syndrome. Impaired renal function and metabolic syndrome are important risk factors for CVD and all-cause deaths among ethnic Chinese.

  15. Identification and characterization of wolframin, the product of the wolfram syndrome gene (WFS1), as a novel calmodulin-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurimoto, Saki; Hatano, Naoya; Tsuchiya, Mitsumasa; Kato, Kiyohito; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2009-05-12

    To search for calmodulin (CaM) targets, we performed affinity chromatography purification of a rat brain extract using CaM fused with GST as the affinity ligand. Proteomic analysis was then carried out to identify CaM-binding proteins. In addition to identifying 36 known CaM-binding proteins, including CaM kinases, calcineurin, nNOS, the IP(3) receptor, and Ca(2+)-ATPase, we identified an ER transmembrane protein, wolframin [the product of the Wolfram syndrome gene (WFS1)] as interacting. A CaM overlay and an immunoprecipitation assay revealed that wolframin is capable of binding the Ca(2+)/CaM complex in vitro and in transfected cells. Surface plasmon resonance analysis and zero-length cross-linking showed that the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (residues 2-285) of wolframin binds to an equimolar unit of CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner with a K(D) for CaM of 0.15 muM. Various truncation and deletion mutants showed that the Ca(2+)/CaM binding region in wolframin is located from Glu90 to Trp186. Furthermore, we demonstrated that three mutations (Ala127Thr, Ala134Thr, and Arg178Pro) associated with Wolfram syndrome completely abolished CaM binding of wolframin. This observation may indicate that CaM binding is important for wolframin function and that impairment of this interaction by mutation contributes to the pathology seen in Wolfram syndrome.

  16. Expression of a Nitric Oxide Synthesizing Protein in Arterial Endothelial Cells in Response to Different Anti-Anginal Agents Used in Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Sarbashri; Jana, Pradipta; Girish, G V; Sinha, Asru K; Maiti, Smarajit

    2017-01-01

    Organic "nitro" compounds such as nitroglycerine, isosorbide dinitrate are useful in the control of chest pain in acute coronary syndrome. But the mechanism of it in pain regulation remains speculative. Here, increase of NO production was investigated by the possible regulation of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) function from goat arterial endothelial cells. This protein was purified and sequence wise characterized as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) in response to different nitro compounds. The NO generating protein was isolated from arterial endothelial cells and prepared to homogeneity. NO was determined by methemoglobin method. Protein sequence was analyzed by (µLC/MS/MS). A protein of Mr. ~57 kDa was isolated and found to be activated by not only "nitro" compounds but also by acetyl salicylic acid, insulin and glucose. The global BLAST of the protein sequence showed a significant alignment of the protein sequence with PDI. This protein trivially called pluri activator stimulated endothelial NOS (PLASENOS). The enzyme was stimulated by the above-mentioned activators in the presence of Ca2+. Lineweaver-Burk plot of this NOS like activities were demonstrated with its specific substrate l-arginine as Vmax = 5(nmol NO/mg of protein/hr) and Km≈ 0.5µM by the above activators. The enzyme activity was inhibited by the l-NAME, the specific inhibitor of NOS. The organic nitro compounds, acetyl salicylic acid, insulin and glucose were found to activate PLASENOS in the arterial endothelial cells for a continuous supply of NO to control the chest pain in acute coronary syndrome. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Designing sequence to control protein function in an EF-hand protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunick, Christopher G; Nelson, Melanie R; Mangahas, Sheryll; Hunter, Michael J; Sheehan, Jonathan H; Mizoue, Laura S; Bunick, Gerard J; Chazin, Walter J

    2004-05-19

    The extent of conformational change that calcium binding induces in EF-hand proteins is a key biochemical property specifying Ca(2+) sensor versus signal modulator function. To understand how differences in amino acid sequence lead to differences in the response to Ca(2+) binding, comparative analyses of sequence and structures, combined with model building, were used to develop hypotheses about which amino acid residues control Ca(2+)-induced conformational changes. These results were used to generate a first design of calbindomodulin (CBM-1), a calbindin D(9k) re-engineered with 15 mutations to respond to Ca(2+) binding with a conformational change similar to that of calmodulin. The gene for CBM-1 was synthesized, and the protein was expressed and purified. Remarkably, this protein did not exhibit any non-native-like molten globule properties despite the large number of mutations and the nonconservative nature of some of them. Ca(2+)-induced changes in CD intensity and in the binding of the hydrophobic probe, ANS, implied that CBM-1 does undergo Ca(2+) sensorlike conformational changes. The X-ray crystal structure of Ca(2+)-CBM-1 determined at 1.44 A resolution reveals the anticipated increase in hydrophobic surface area relative to the wild-type protein. A nascent calmodulin-like hydrophobic docking surface was also found, though it is occluded by the inter-EF-hand loop. The results from this first calbindomodulin design are discussed in terms of progress toward understanding the relationships between amino acid sequence, protein structure, and protein function for EF-hand CaBPs, as well as the additional mutations for the next CBM design.

  18. Home-Based Hypnotherapy Self-exercises vs Individual Hypnotherapy With a Therapist for Treatment of Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Functional Abdominal Pain, or Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Juliette M. T. M.; Vlieger, Arine M.; Frankenhuis, Carla; George, Elvira K.; Groeneweg, Michael; Norbruis, Obbe F.; Tjon A ten, Walther; van Wering, Herbert M.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Merkus, Maruschka P.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Individual gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT) is effective in pediatric irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional abdominal pain or functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAP[S]). It is, however, unavailable to many children. To compare the effectiveness of HT by means of home-based self-exercises

  19. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Méchin, Marie-Claire; Wolf, Sabrina; Romano, Maria Teresa; Valentin, Frederic; Wiegmann, Henning; Huchenq, Anne; Kandil, Rima; Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Kilic, Arzu; George, Susannah; Ralser, Damian J; Bergner, Stefan; Ferguson, David J P; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Wehner, Maria; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Swan, Daniel; Houniet, Darren; Büchner, Aline; Weibel, Lisa; Wagner, Nicola; Grimalt, Ramon; Bygum, Anette; Serre, Guy; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Sprecher, Eli; Schoch, Susanne; Oji, Vinzenz; Hamm, Henning; Farrant, Paul; Simon, Michel; Betz, Regina C

    2016-12-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant to being combed flat. Until now, both simplex and familial UHS-affected case subjects with autosomal-dominant as well as -recessive inheritance have been reported. However, none of these case subjects were linked to a molecular genetic cause. Here, we report the identification of UHS-causative mutations located in the three genes PADI3 (peptidylarginine deiminase 3), TGM3 (transglutaminase 3), and TCHH (trichohyalin) in a total of 11 children. All of these individuals carry homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in one of these three genes, indicating an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern in the majority of UHS case subjects. The two enzymes PADI3 and TGM3, responsible for posttranslational protein modifications, and their target structural protein TCHH are all involved in hair shaft formation. Elucidation of the molecular outcomes of the disease-causing mutations by cell culture experiments and tridimensional protein models demonstrated clear differences in the structural organization and activity of mutant and wild-type proteins. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed morphological alterations in hair coat of Padi3 knockout mice. All together, these findings elucidate the molecular genetic causes of UHS and shed light on its pathophysiology and hair physiology in general. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Interaction between nanoparticles and cytokine proteins: impact on protein and particle functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David M.; Dickson, Claire; Duncan, Paul; Al-Attili, Furat; Stone, Vicki

    2010-05-01

    There is increased use of nanomaterials in many applications due to their unique properties, such as their high surface area and surface reactivity. However, the potential health effects to workers, consumers and the environment exposed to nanoparticles (NPs) is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether NPs which may enter the body could adsorb proteins and whether this interaction affects both the particle and the protein function. The cytokines IL-8 and TNF-α were adsorbed significantly more by 14 nm carbon black (CB) compared with a similar dose of 260 nm CB. Uncoated 14 nm CB particles produced a significant increase in intracellular calcium [Ca2 + ]i which was greater than a similar mass dose of 260 nm CB. The 260 nm CB produced an increase in ICAM-1 expression in A549 epithelial cells at a comparable dose of 14 nm CB, and after coating with TNF-α 260 nm CB produced significantly more ICAM-1 expression compared with control cells. TNF-α bound to 14 nm CB induced a level of ICAM-1 expression that was no greater than the control level, suggesting that the TNF-α activity may be inhibited. These results suggest that NP-protein interaction results both in a decrease in protein function and particle activity in the cellular assays tested and this is currently being investigated.

  1. Maximizing the functional lifetime of Protein A resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jennifer; Siva, Sethu; Caple, Ryan; Ghose, Sanchayita; Gronke, Rob

    2017-05-01

    Protein A chromatography is currently the industry gold-standard for monoclonal antibody and Fc-fusion protein purification. The high cost of Protein A, however, makes resin lifetime and resin reuse an important factor for process economics. Typical resin lifetime studies performed in the industry usually examine the effect of resin re-use on binding capacity, yield, and product quality without answering the fundamental question of what is causing the decrease in performance. A two part mechanistic study was conducted in an attempt to decouple the effect of the two possible factors (resin hydrolysis and/or degradation vs. resin fouling) on column performance over lifetime of the most commonly used alkali-stable Protein A resins (MabSelect SuRe and MabSelect SuRe LX). The change in binding capacity as a function of sodium hydroxide concentration (rate of hydrolysis), temperature, and stabilizing additives was examined. Additionally, resin extraction studies and product cycling studies were conducted to determine cleaning effectiveness (resin fouling) of various cleaning strategies. Sodium hydroxide-based cleaning solutions were shown to be more effective at preventing resin fouling. Conversely, cold temperature and the use of stabilizing additives in conjunction with sodium hydroxide were found to be beneficial in minimizing the rate of Protein A ligand hydrolysis. An effective and robust cleaning strategy is presented here to maximize resin lifetime and thereby the number of column cycles for future manufacturing processes. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:708-715, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  2. Functional limitations in functional somatic syndromes and well-defined medical diseases : Results from the general population cohort LifeLines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joustra, Monica L.; Janssens, Karin A.M.; Bültmann, Ute; Rosmalen, Judith G.M.

    Objective: Functional somatic syndromes (FSS), defined as physical syndromes without known underlying organic pathology, are sometimes regarded as less serious conditions than well-defined medical diseases (MD). The aims of this study were to evaluate functional limitations in FSS, and to compare

  3. Functional autoantibodies targeting G protein-coupled receptors in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Marques, Otavio; Riemekasten, Gabriela

    2017-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest and most diverse family of integral membrane proteins that participate in different physiological processes such as the regulation of the nervous and immune systems. Besides the endogenous ligands of GPCRs, functional autoantibodies are also able to bind GPCRs to trigger or block intracellular signalling pathways, resulting in agonistic or antagonistic effects, respectively. In this Review, the effects of functional GPCR-targeting autoantibodies on the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatic diseases, are discussed. Autoantibodies targeting β1 and β2 adrenergic receptors, which are expressed by cardiac and airway smooth muscle cells, respectively, have an important role in the development of asthma and cardiovascular diseases. In addition, high levels of autoantibodies against the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 as well as those targeting endothelin receptor type A and type 1 angiotensin II receptor have several implications in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases such as Sjögren syndrome and systemic sclerosis. Expanding the knowledge of the pathophysiological roles of autoantibodies against GPCRs will shed light on the biology of these receptors and open avenues for new therapeutic approaches.

  4. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wallach

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs. Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc. contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner.

  5. Wolfram Syndrome protein, Miner1, regulates sulphydryl redox status, the unfolded protein response, and Ca2+ homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Sandra E; Andreyev, Alexander Y; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Karisch, Robert; Perkins, Guy; Wall, Estelle A; van der Geer, Peter; Chen, Yi-Fan; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Simon, Melvin I; Neel, Benjamin G; Dixon, Jack E; Murphy, Anne N

    2013-06-01

    Miner1 is a redox-active 2Fe2S cluster protein. Mutations in Miner1 result in Wolfram Syndrome, a metabolic disease associated with diabetes, blindness, deafness, and a shortened lifespan. Embryonic fibroblasts from Miner1(-/-) mice displayed ER stress and showed hallmarks of the unfolded protein response. In addition, loss of Miner1 caused a depletion of ER Ca(2+) stores, a dramatic increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) load, increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, an increase in the GSSG/GSH and NAD(+)/NADH ratios, and an increase in the ADP/ATP ratio consistent with enhanced ATP utilization. Furthermore, mitochondria in fibroblasts lacking Miner1 displayed ultrastructural alterations, such as increased cristae density and punctate morphology, and an increase in O2 consumption. Treatment with the sulphydryl anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine reversed the abnormalities in the Miner1 deficient cells, suggesting that sulphydryl reducing agents should be explored as a treatment for this rare genetic disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd on behalf of EMBO.

  6. Plant lipid transfer proteins : Evolution, expression and function

    OpenAIRE

    Edstam, Monika

    2013-01-01

    The plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are known for the ability to transfer different lipids in vitro, but their in vivo functions have not yet been elucidated. They seem to play a role in the defense against biotic and abiotic stresses; the gene expression of nsLTPs is often upregulated when exposed to stresses. Further, two different nsLTPs have been shown to affect the lipid composition of the plant cuticle, a structure acting as a protective barrier. However, more eviden...

  7. Structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  8. Protein kinase CK2 structure-function relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Meggio, F; Pinna, L A

    1994-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 subunits alpha and beta were expressed either separately or together in a bacterial expression system (pT7-7/BL21(DE3)) and purified to homogeneity. After mixing the subunits, a CK2 holoenzyme (alpha 2 beta 2) was spontaneously reconstituted, which displays identical features...... inactivated through urea, protease, and heat treatment. In contrast, the holoenzyme, either reconstituted or native, is much more stable when similar negative insults prevail. The beta subunit has at least three functions: (a) it is necessary for maximum activity of the enzyme under physiological salt...

  9. A Hydrophobic Pocket in the Active Site of Glycolytic Aldolase Mediates Interactions with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St-Jean,M.; Izard, T.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aldolase plays essential catalytic roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, aldolase is a highly abundant protein that is remarkably promiscuous in its interactions with other cellular proteins. In particular, aldolase binds to highly acidic amino acid sequences, including the C-terminus of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor. Here we report the crystal structure of tetrameric rabbit muscle aldolase in complex with a C-terminal peptide of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Aldolase recognizes a short, 4-residue DEWD motif (residues 498-501), which adopts a loose hairpin turn that folds about the central aromatic residue, enabling its tryptophan side chain to fit into a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of aldolase. The flanking acidic residues in this binding motif provide further interactions with conserved aldolase active site residues, Arg-42 and Arg-303, aligning their side chains and forming the sides of the hydrophobic pocket. The binding of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein to aldolase precludes intramolecular interactions of its C-terminus with its active site, and is competitive with substrate as well as with binding by actin and cortactin. Finally, based on this structure a novel naphthol phosphate-based inhibitor of aldolase was identified and its structure in complex with aldolase demonstrated mimicry of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-aldolase interaction. The data support a model whereby aldolase exists in distinct forms that regulate glycolysis or actin dynamics.

  10. Cost Function Network-based Design of Protein-Protein Interactions: predicting changes in binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viricel, Clément; de Givry, Simon; Schiex, Thomas; Barbe, Sophie

    2018-02-20

    Accurate and economic methods to predict change in protein binding free energy upon mutation are imperative to accelerate the design of proteins for a wide range of applications. Free energy is defined by enthalpic and entropic contributions. Following the recent progresses of Artificial Intelligence-based algorithms for guaranteed NP-hard energy optimization and partition function computation, it becomes possible to quickly compute minimum energy conformations and to reliably estimate the entropic contribution of side-chains in the change of free energy of large protein interfaces. Using guaranteed Cost Function Network algorithms, Rosetta energy functions and Dunbrack's rotamer library, we developed and assessed EasyE and JayZ, two methods for binding affinity estimation that ignore or include conformational entropic contributions on a large benchmark of binding affinity experimental measures. If both approaches outperform most established tools, we observe that side-chain conformational entropy brings little or no improvement on most systems but becomes crucial in some rare cases. as open-source Python/C ++ code at sourcesup.renater.fr/projects/easy-jayz. thomas.schiex@inra.fr and sophie.barbe@insa-toulouse.fr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. Ankyrin Repeat Domain 1 Protein: A Functionally Pleiotropic Protein with Cardiac Biomarker Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha S. M. Ling

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ankyrin repeat domain 1 (ANKRD1 protein is a cardiac-specific stress-response protein that is part of the muscle ankyrin repeat protein family. ANKRD1 is functionally pleiotropic, playing pivotal roles in transcriptional regulation, sarcomere assembly and mechano-sensing in the heart. Importantly, cardiac ANKRD1 has been shown to be highly induced in various cardiomyopathies and in heart failure, although it is still unclear what impact this may have on the pathophysiology of heart failure. This review aims at highlighting the known properties, functions and regulation of ANKRD1, with focus on the underlying mechanisms that may be involved. The current views on the actions of ANKRD1 in cardiovascular disease and its utility as a candidate cardiac biomarker with diagnostic and/or prognostic potential are also discussed. More studies of ANKRD1 are warranted to obtain deeper functional insights into this molecule to allow assessment of its potential clinical applications as a diagnostic or prognostic marker and/or as a possible therapeutic target.

  12. An exon 53 frameshift mutation in CUBN abrogates cubam function and causes Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, John C; Hemker, Shelby L; Venta, Patrick J; Fitzgerald, Caitlin A; Outerbridge, Catherine A; Myers, Sherry L; Giger, Urs

    2013-08-01

    Cobalamin malabsorption accompanied by selective proteinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder known as Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome in humans and was previously described in dogs due to amnionless (AMN) mutations. The resultant vitamin B12 deficiency causes dyshematopoiesis, lethargy, failure to thrive, and life-threatening metabolic disruption in the juvenile period. We studied 3 kindreds of border collies with cobalamin malabsorption and mapped the disease locus in affected dogs to a 2.9Mb region of homozygosity on canine chromosome 2. The region included CUBN, the locus encoding cubilin, a peripheral membrane protein that in concert with AMN forms the functional intrinsic factor-cobalamin receptor expressed in ileum and a multi-ligand receptor in renal proximal tubules. Cobalamin malabsorption and proteinuria comprising CUBN ligands were demonstrated by radiolabeled cobalamin uptake studies and SDS-PAGE, respectively. CUBN mRNA and protein expression were reduced ~10 fold and ~20 fold, respectively, in both ileum and kidney of affected dogs. DNA sequencing demonstrated a single base deletion in exon 53 predicting a translational frameshift and early termination codon likely triggering nonsense mediated mRNA decay. The mutant allele segregated with the disease in the border collie kindred. The border collie disorder indicates that a CUBN mutation far C-terminal from the intrinsic factor-cobalamin binding site can abrogate receptor expression and cause Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Neuroprotective Functions of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Lovas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β proteins are multifunctional cytokines whose neural functions are increasingly recognized. The machinery of TGF-β signaling, including the serine kinase type transmembrane receptors, is present in the central nervous system. However, the 3 mammalian TGF-β subtypes have distinct distributions in the brain suggesting different neural functions. Evidence of their involvement in the development and plasticity of the nervous system as well as their functions in peripheral organs suggested that they also exhibit neuroprotective functions. Indeed, TGF-β expression is induced following a variety of types of brain tissue injury. The neuroprotective function of TGF-βs is most established following brain ischemia. Damage in experimental animal models of global and focal ischemia was shown to be attenuated by TGF-βs. In addition, support for their neuroprotective actions following trauma, sclerosis multiplex, neurodegenerative diseases, infections, and brain tumors is also accumulating. The review will also describe the potential mechanisms of neuroprotection exerted by TGF-βs including anti-inflammatory, -apoptotic, -excitotoxic actions as well as the promotion of scar formation, angiogenesis, and neuroregeneration. The participation of these mechanisms in the neuroprotective effects of TGF-βs during different brain lesions will also be discussed.

  14. The Neuroprotective Functions of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Vincze, Csilla; Pál, Gabriella; Lovas, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) proteins are multifunctional cytokines whose neural functions are increasingly recognized. The machinery of TGF-β signaling, including the serine kinase type transmembrane receptors, is present in the central nervous system. However, the 3 mammalian TGF-β subtypes have distinct distributions in the brain suggesting different neural functions. Evidence of their involvement in the development and plasticity of the nervous system as well as their functions in peripheral organs suggested that they also exhibit neuroprotective functions. Indeed, TGF-β expression is induced following a variety of types of brain tissue injury. The neuroprotective function of TGF-βs is most established following brain ischemia. Damage in experimental animal models of global and focal ischemia was shown to be attenuated by TGF-βs. In addition, support for their neuroprotective actions following trauma, sclerosis multiplex, neurodegenerative diseases, infections, and brain tumors is also accumulating. The review will also describe the potential mechanisms of neuroprotection exerted by TGF-βs including anti-inflammatory, -apoptotic, -excitotoxic actions as well as the promotion of scar formation, angiogenesis, and neuroregeneration. The participation of these mechanisms in the neuroprotective effects of TGF-βs during different brain lesions will also be discussed. PMID:22942700

  15. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts target organ damage in Chinese patients with metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhigang; Nie, Hai; He, Hongbo

    2007-01-01

    with metabolic syndrome. A total of 1082 consecutive patients of Chinese origin were screened for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and target organ damage, including cardiac hypertrophy......, carotid intima-media thickness, and renal impairment, were investigated. The median (25th and 75th percentiles) of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in 619 patients with metabolic syndrome was 2.42 mg/L (0.75 and 3.66 mg/L) compared with 1.13 mg/L (0.51 and 2.46 mg/L) among 463 control subjects (P ...). There was a progressive increase in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level with the number of components of the metabolic syndrome. Stratification of patients with metabolic syndrome into 3 groups according to their high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations (3.0 mg/L) showed that the subjects...

  16. Functional properties and sensory testing of whey protein concentrate sweetened with rebaudioside A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Gimenez MILANI

    2016-02-01

    , triglycerides and total cholesterol, and improved body weight gain of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Conclusion: Whey protein concentrate with substantial content of protein (above 70% and low lactose was obtained through the membrane separation processes. The addition of rebaudioside A at the concentration of 26 mg/100 g rebaudioside A proved to be as sweet as sucralose with satisfactory sensory testing, which indicates that this is a non-caloric natural sweetener that can replace artificial sweeteners. The product (whey protein concentrate sweetened with rebaudioside A presented important functional properties and reduced the metabolic disorders caused by the syndrome.

  17. Caregiver Report of Executive Functioning in a Population-Based Sample of Young Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy Raitano; Fidler, Deborah J.; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey; Daunhauer, Lisa; Robinson, Cordelia; Hepburn, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    The current study describes everyday executive function (EF) profiles in young children with Down syndrome. Caregivers of children with Down syndrome (n = 26; chronological ages = 4-10 years; mental ages = 2-4 years) completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Preschool (BRIEF-P; G. A. Gioia, K. A. Espy, & P. K. Isquith, 2003), a…

  18. The construction of an amino acid network for understanding protein structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenying; Zhou, Jianhong; Sun, Maomin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang; Shen, Bairong

    2014-06-01

    Amino acid networks (AANs) are undirected networks consisting of amino acid residues and their interactions in three-dimensional protein structures. The analysis of AANs provides novel insight into protein science, and several common amino acid network properties have revealed diverse classes of proteins. In this review, we first summarize methods for the construction and characterization of AANs. We then compare software tools for the construction and analysis of AANs. Finally, we review the application of AANs for understanding protein structure and function, including the identification of functional residues, the prediction of protein folding, analyzing protein stability and protein-protein interactions, and for understanding communication within and between proteins.

  19. Systematic Identification of Machine-Learning Models Aimed to Classify Critical Residues for Protein Function from Protein Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Corral, Ricardo; Beltrán, Jesús A; Brizuela, Carlos A; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2017-10-09

    Protein structure and protein function should be related, yet the nature of this relationship remains unsolved. Mapping the critical residues for protein function with protein structure features represents an opportunity to explore this relationship, yet two important limitations have precluded a proper analysis of the structure-function relationship of proteins: (i) the lack of a formal definition of what critical residues are and (ii) the lack of a systematic evaluation of methods and protein structure features. To address this problem, here we introduce an index to quantify the protein-function criticality of a residue based on experimental data and a strategy aimed to optimize both, descriptors of protein structure (physicochemical and centrality descriptors) and machine learning algorithms, to minimize the error in the classification of critical residues. We observed that both physicochemical and centrality descriptors of residues effectively relate protein structure and protein function, and that physicochemical descriptors better describe critical residues. We also show that critical residues are better classified when residue criticality is considered as a binary attribute (i.e., residues are considered critical or not critical). Using this binary annotation for critical residues 8 models rendered accurate and non-overlapping classification of critical residues, confirming the multi-factorial character of the structure-function relationship of proteins.

  20. Intracellular Localization of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Protein: Absence of Nucleolar Accumulation during Infection and after Expression as a Recombinant Protein in Vero Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rowland, Raymond R. R.; Chauhan, Vinita; Fang, Ying; Pekosz, Andrew; Kerrigan, Maureen; Burton, Miriam D.

    2005-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of several members within the order Nidovirales localizes to the nucleolus during infection and after transfection of cells with N genes. However, confocal microscopy of N protein localization in Vero cells infected with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) or transfected with the SARS-CoV N gene failed to show the presence of N in the nucleoplasm or nucleolus. Amino acids 369 to 389, which contain putative nuclear localization signal (NLS)...

  1. The topology of the bacterial co-conserved protein network and its implications for predicting protein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Sonia M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions networks are most often generated from physical protein-protein interaction data. Co-conservation, also known as phylogenetic profiles, is an alternative source of information for generating protein interaction networks. Co-conservation methods generate interaction networks among proteins that are gained or lost together through evolution. Co-conservation is a particularly useful technique in the compact bacteria genomes. Prior studies in yeast suggest that the topology of protein-protein interaction networks generated from physical interaction assays can offer important insight into protein function. Here, we hypothesize that in bacteria, the topology of protein interaction networks derived via co-conservation information could similarly improve methods for predicting protein function. Since the topology of bacteria co-conservation protein-protein interaction networks has not previously been studied in depth, we first perform such an analysis for co-conservation networks in E. coli K12. Next, we demonstrate one way in which network connectivity measures and global and local function distribution can be exploited to predict protein function for previously uncharacterized proteins. Results Our results showed, like most biological networks, our bacteria co-conserved protein-protein interaction networks had scale-free topologies. Our results indicated that some properties of the physical yeast interaction network hold in our bacteria co-conservation networks, such as high connectivity for essential proteins. However, the high connectivity among protein complexes in the yeast physical network was not seen in the co-conservation network which uses all bacteria as the reference set. We found that the distribution of node connectivity varied by functional category and could be informative for function prediction. By integrating of functional information from different annotation sources and using the

  2. Low-carbohydrate, high-protein, high-fat diet alters small peripheral artery reactivity in metabolic syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Jordi; Kones, Richard; Ferré, Raimon; Plana, Núria; Girona, Josefa; Aragonés, Gemma; Ibarretxe, Daiana; Heras, Mercedes; Masana, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Low carbohydrate diets have become increasingly popular for weight loss. Although they may improve some metabolic markers, particularly in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) or metabolic syndrome (MS), their net effect on vascular function remains unclear. Evaluate the relation between dietary macronutrient composition and the small artery reactive hyperaemia index (saRHI), a marker of small artery vascular function, in a cohort of MS patients. This cross-sectional study included 160 MS patients. Diet was evaluated by a 3-day food-intake register and reduced to a novel low-carbohydrate diet score (LCDS). Physical examination, demographic, biochemical and anthropometry parameters were recorded, and saRHI was measured in each patient. Individuals in the lowest LCDS quartile (Q1; 45% carbohydrate, 19% protein, 31% fat) had higher saRHI values than those in the top quartile (Q4; 30% carbohydrate, 25% protein, 43% fat) (1.84±0.42 vs. 1.55±0.25, P=.012). These results were similar in T2D patients (Q1=1.779±0.311 vs. Q4=1.618±0.352, P=.011) and also in all of the MS components, except for low HDLc. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that individuals in the highest LCDS quartile, that is, consuming less carbohydrates, had a significantly negative coefficient of saRHI which was independent of confounders (HR: -0.747; 95%CI: 0.201, 0.882; P=.029). These data suggest that a dietary pattern characterized by a low amount of carbohydrate, but reciprocally higher amounts of fat and protein, is associated with poorer vascular reactivity in patients with MS and T2D. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Communication in Individuals with Rett Syndrome: an Assessment of Forms and Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didden, H.C.M.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Smeets, E.E.J.; Green, V.A.; Lang, R.; Lancioni, G.E.; Curfs, L.M.G.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study we assessed the forms and functions of prelinguistic communicative behaviors for 120 children and adults with Rett syndrome using the Inventory of Potential Communicative Acts (IPCA) (Sigafoos et al. Communication Disorders Quarterly 21:77-86, 2000a). Informants completed the

  4. Narrative Discourse in Adults with High-Functioning Autism or Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Livia; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Wheelwright, Sally; van der Lely, Heather K. J.

    2008-01-01

    We report a study comparing the narrative abilities of 12 adults with high-functioning autism (HFA) or Asperger Syndrome (AS) versus 12 matched controls. The study focuses on the use of referential expressions (temporal expressions and anaphoric pronouns) during a story-telling task. The aim was to assess pragmatics skills in people with HFA/AS in…

  5. The Strange Stories Test: A Replication with High-Functioning Adults with Autism or Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliffe, Therese; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    1999-01-01

    Individuals with either high-functioning autism (N=17) or Asperger Syndrome (N=17) were tested with Happe's Strange Stories Test, which assesses the ability to interpret a nonliteral statement. Compared to normal controls, both groups had greater difficulty providing contextually appropriate mental state answers, with the autistic group having the…

  6. Do Adults with High Functioning Autism or Asperger Syndrome Differ in Empathy and Emotion Recognition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Charlotte B.; Allison, Carrie; Lai, Meng-Chuan; Cassidy, Sarah; Langdon, Peter E.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined whether adults with high functioning autism (HFA) showed greater difficulties in (1) their self-reported ability to empathise with others and/or (2) their ability to read mental states in others' eyes than adults with Asperger syndrome (AS). The Empathy Quotient (EQ) and "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" Test…

  7. Sleep Patterns of School-Age Children with Asperger Syndrome or High-Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allik, Hiie; Larsson, Jan-Olov; Smedje, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Sleep patterns of 32 school-age children with Asperger syndrome (AS) and high-functioning autism (HFA) were compared to those of 32 typically developing age- and gender-matched children, using parent survey and one week of diary and actigraphic monitoring. Parents of children with AS/HFA more commonly reported that their children had difficulty…

  8. Thyroid function and metabolic syndrome in the population-based LifeLines cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wouters, Hanneke J C M; Slagter, Sandra N; van Waateringe, Robert P; Muller Kobold, Anneke C; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Links, Thera P; van der Klauw, Melanie M

    2017-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a combination of unfavourable health factors which includes abdominal obesity, dyslipidaemia, elevated blood pressure and impaired fasting glucose. Earlier studies have reported a relationship between thyroid function and some MetS components or suggested

  9. Pragmatic inferences in high-functioning adults with autism and Asperger syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnacker, J.; Hagoort, P.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Teunisse, J.P.W.M.; Geurts, B.

    2009-01-01

    Although people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often have severe problems with pragmatic aspects of language, little is known about their pragmatic reasoning. We carried out a behavioral study on high-functioning adults with autistic disorder (n = 11) and Asperger syndrome (n = 17) and matched

  10. Pragmatic Inferences in High-Functioning Adults with Autism and Asperger Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnacker, J.; Hagoort, P.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Teunisse, J.P.W.M.; Geurts, L.B.W.

    2009-01-01

    Although people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often have severe problems with pragmatic aspects of language, little is known about their pragmatic reasoning. We carried out a behavioral study on high-functioning adults with autistic disorder (n = 11) and Asperger syndrome (n = 17) and matched

  11. Social Skills Training for Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Jeanie; Strulovitch, Jack; Tagalakis, Vicki; Meng, Linyan; Fombonne, Eric

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of a social skills training group for adolescents with Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autism (AS/HFA) was evaluated. Parents of six groups of adolescents (n = 46, 61% male, mean age 14.6) completed questionnaires immediately before and after the 12-week group. Parents and adolescents were surveyed regarding their…

  12. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cognitive Processing in Young Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacola, Lisa M.; Byars, Anna W.; Chalfonte-Evans, Melinda; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Hickey, Fran; Patterson, Bonnie; Hotze, Stephanie; Vannest, Jennifer; Chiu, Chung-Yiu; Holland, Scott K.; Schapiro, Mark B.

    2011-01-01

    The authors used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural activation during a semantic-classification/object-recognition task in 13 persons with Down syndrome and 12 typically developing control participants (age range = 12-26 years). A comparison between groups suggested atypical patterns of brain activation for the…

  13. Executive Function and Academic Achievement in Primary-Grade Students with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, E.; Fidler, D. J.; Daunhauer, L.; Gerlach-McDonald, B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Executive function (EF) plays a critical role in academic outcomes in typically developing children, but the contribution of EF to academic performance in Down syndrome (DS) is less well understood. This study evaluated differences in early academic foundations between primary school aged children with DS and non-verbal mental-age…

  14. Sjogren-Larsson syndrome : motor performance and everyday functioning in 17 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoog, Judith; Fuijkschot, Joris; Willemsen, Michel; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Rotteveel, Jan; Gorter, Jan Willem

    Sjogren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is an autosomal recessive neurometabolic disorder characterized by spasticity, learning disability, and ichthyosis. To our knowledge, there is no detailed report in the literature concerning the functional consequences of SLS. Therefore, we performed a cross-sectional

  15. Functional analysis of insistence on sameness in an 11-year old boy with Asperger syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ollington, N.; Green, V.A.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lancioni, G.E.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the functional properties of insistence on sameness associated with autism spectrum disorders. Method: An 11-year-old boy with Asperger syndrome was observed during play where scenarios (mistakes, misplaced items, interrupted activity) were created to correspond with

  16. Neuropsychological Functioning in Children with Tourette Syndrome with and without Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Landeros-Weisenberger, Angeli; Scahill, Lawrence; Leckman, James F.; Schultz, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Neuropsychological functioning in children with Tourette syndrome (TS) has been characterized by subtle deficits in response inhibition, visual-motor integration, and fine-motor coordination. The association of these deficits with the tics of the TS versus co-occurring attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has not been well…

  17. Hypnotherapy for children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieger, Arine M.; Menko-Frankenhuis, Carla; Wolfkamp, Simone C. S.; Tromp, Ellen; Benninga, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are highly prevalent in childhood. A substantial proportion of patients continues to experience long-lasting symptoms. Gut-directed hypnotherapy (HT) has been shown to be highly effective in the treatment of adult

  18. Impaired microvascular reactivity and endothelial function in patients with Cushing's syndrome: Influence of arterial hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prázný, M.; Ježková, J.; Horová, E.; Lazárová, V.; Hána, V.; Kvasnička, J.; Pecen, Ladislav; Marek, J.; Škrha, J.; Kršek, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2008), s. 13-22 ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Cushing’s syndrome * vascular reactivity * endothelial function * oxidative stress * laser Doppler flowmetry Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  19. Mathematical Ability of Students with Asperger Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism : A Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsu-Min; Lin, Yueh-Hsien

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews studies investigating cognitive ability and academic achievement of students with Asperger syndrome (AS) and high-functioning autism (HFA). Particular emphasis is placed on the mathematical ability of people with AS/HFA. A preliminary analysis of empirical data is presented. Findings indicate that: (1) the majority of…

  20. Teaching Organizational Skills to Children with High Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorminy, Kimberly Powers; Luscre, Deanna; Gast, David L.

    2009-01-01

    A multiple baseline design across participants was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a file box system plus self-monitoring on the organizational skills of four fourth and fifth grade students with high functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger's Syndrome (AS). Instruction took place in general education classrooms and consisted of teaching…