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Sample records for syndrome molecular genetic

  1. The molecular genetics of Usher syndrome: Genetics of Usher syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Zm; Riazuddin, S.; Riazuddin, S.; Wilcox, Er

    2003-01-01

    Association of sensorineural deafness and progressive retinitis pigmentosa with and without a vestibular abnormality is the hallmark of Usher syndrome and involves at least 12 loci among three different clinical subtypes. Genes identified for the more commonly inherited loci are USH2A (encoding usherin), MYO7A (encoding myosin VIIa), CDH23 (encoding cadherin 23), PCDH15 (encoding protocadherin 15), USH1C (encoding harmonin), USH3A (encoding clarin 1), and USH1G (encoding SANS). Transcripts fr...

  2. The molecular genetics of Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Z M; Riazuddin, S; Riazuddin, S; Wilcox, E R

    2003-06-01

    Association of sensorineural deafness and progressive retinitis pigmentosa with and without a vestibular abnormality is the hallmark of Usher syndrome and involves at least 12 loci among three different clinical subtypes. Genes identified for the more commonly inherited loci are USH2A (encoding usherin), MYO7A (encoding myosin VIIa), CDH23 (encoding cadherin 23), PCDH15 (encoding protocadherin 15), USH1C (encoding harmonin), USH3A (encoding clarin 1), and USH1G (encoding SANS). Transcripts from all these genes are found in many tissues/cell types other than the inner ear and retina, but all are uniquely critical for retinal and cochlear cell function. Many of these protein products have been demonstrated to have direct interactions with each other and perform an essential role in stereocilia homeostasis.

  3. [Wolfram syndrome: clinical features, molecular genetics of WFS1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuya; Matsunaga, Kimie; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Akiyama, Masaru; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2015-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome(WFS: OMIM 222300) is a rare recessive neuro-endocrine degenerative disorder, known as DIDMOAD(Diabetes Insipidus, early-onset Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness) syndrome. Most affected individuals carry recessive mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene(WFS1). The WFS1 protein is an endoplasmic reticulum(ER) embedded protein, which functions in ER calcium homeostasis and unfolded protein responses. Dysregulation of these cellular processes results in the development of ER stress, leading to apoptosis. In addition, abundantly present WFS1 protein in insulin secretory granules plays a role in the intra-granular acidification. However, the phenotypic pleiomorphism and molecular complexity of this disease limit the understanding of WFS. Here we review clinical features, molecular mechanisms and mutations of WFS1 gene that relate to this syndrome.

  4. Clinical, Molecular, and Genetic Characteristics of PAPA Syndrome: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elisabeth J; Allantaz, Florence; Bennett, Lynda; Zhang, Dongping; Gao, Xiaochong; Wood, Geryl; Kastner, Daniel L; Punaro, Marilynn; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Pascual, Virginia; Wise, Carol A

    2010-01-01

    PAPA syndrome (Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum, and Acne) is an autosomal dominant, hereditary auto-inflammatory disease arising from mutations in the PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 gene on chromosome 15q. These mutations produce a hyper-phosphorylated PSTPIP1 protein and alter its participation in activation of the “inflammasome” involved in interleukin-1 (IL-1β) production. Overproduction of IL-1β is a clear molecular feature of PAPA syndrome. Ongoing research is implicating other biochemical pathways that may be relevant to the distinct pyogenic inflammation of the skin and joints characteristic of this disease. This review summarizes the recent and rapidly accumulating knowledge on these molecular aspects of PAPA syndrome and related disorders. PMID:21532836

  5. Congenital heart disease and genetic syndromes: new insights into molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagni, Giulio; Unolt, Marta; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Baban, Anwar; Versacci, Paolo; Tartaglia, Marco; Baldini, Antonio; Marino, Bruno

    2017-09-01

    Advances in genetics allowed a better definition of the role of specific genetic background in the etiology of syndromic congenital heart defects (CHDs). The identification of a number of disease genes responsible for different syndromes have led to the identification of several transcriptional regulators and signaling transducers and modulators that are critical for heart morphogenesis. Understanding the genetic background of syndromic CHDs allowed a better characterization of the genetic basis of non-syndromic CHDs. In this sense, the well-known association of typical CHDs in Down syndrome, 22q11.2 microdeletion and Noonan syndrome represent paradigms as chromosomal aneuploidy, chromosomal microdeletion and intragenic mutation, respectively. Area covered: For each syndrome the anatomical features, distinctive cardiac phenotype and molecular mechanisms are discussed. Moreover, the authors include recent genetic findings that may shed light on some aspects of still unclear molecular mechanisms of these syndromes. Expert commentary: Further investigations are needed to enhance the translational approach in the field of genetics of CHDs. When there is a well-established definition of genotype-phenotype (reverse medicine) and genotype-prognosis (predictive and personalized medicine) correlations, hopefully preventive medicine will make its way in this field. Subsequently a reduction will be achieved in the morbidity and mortality of children with CHDs.

  6. [Noonan syndrome can be diagnosed clinically and through molecular genetic analyses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Marie Krab; Jelsig, Anne Marie; Andersen, Helle; Brusgaard, Klaus; Ousager, Lilian Bomme; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2015-08-03

    Noonan syndrome is part of the group of RASopathies caused by germ line mutations in genes involved in the RAS/MAPK pathway. There is substantial phenotypic overlap among the RASopathies. Diagnosis of Noonan syndrome is often based on clinical features including dysmorphic facial features, short stature and congenital heart disease. Rapid advances in sequencing technology have made molecular genetic analyses a helpful tool in diagnosing and distinguishing Noonan syndrome from other RASopathies.

  7. Recent discoveries in the molecular genetics of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, C Richard

    2016-07-01

    Lynch syndrome is the inherited predisposition to cancer caused by a germline mutation in a DNA mismatch repair gene. The consequent tumors have a characteristic microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype. Genomic sequencing of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal cancers (CRCs) has demonstrated that these tumors have a substantially greater number of mutations than non-MSI CRCs, and that the target mutations driving tumor behavior are also different from what occurs in sporadic tumors. There are multiple non-Lynch syndrome entities that can create clinical confusion with that disease, including the acquired methylation of MLH1, Lynch-like syndrome, and Familial CRC-Type X. Patients with Lynch syndrome-associated CRCs have a substantially better prognosis, and there is growing evidence that this is due to the generation of immunogenic frameshift peptides as a consequence of defective DNA mismatch repair, and an effective immune response to the tumor.

  8. Molecular genetics of preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jebbink, Jiska; Wolters, Astrid; Fernando, Febilla; Afink, Gijs; van der Post, Joris; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia is characterised by new onset hypertension and proteinuria and is a major obstetrical problem for both mother and foetus. Haemolysis elevated liver enzymes and low platelets (HELLP) syndrome is an obstetrical emergency and most cases occur in the presence of preeclampsia. Preeclampsia

  9. HNPCC (Lynch Syndrome: Differential Diagnosis, Molecular Genetics and Management - a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Henry T

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HNPCC (Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC, wherein it accounts for between 2-7 percent of the total CRC burden. When considering the large number of extracolonic cancers integral to the syndrome, namely carcinoma of the endometrium, ovary, stomach, hepatobiliary system, pancreas, small bowel, brain tumors, and upper uroepithelial tract, these estimates of its frequency are likely to be conservative. The diagnosis is based upon its natural history in concert with a comprehensive cancer family history inclusive of all anatomic sites. In order for surveillance and management to be effective and, indeed, lifesaving, among these high-risk patients, the linchpin to cancer control would be the physician, who must be knowledgeable about hereditary cancer syndromes, their molecular and medical genetics, genetic counseling, and, most importantly, the natural history of the disorders, so that the entirety of this knowledge can be melded to highly-targeted management.

  10. HNPCC (Lynch Syndrome): Differential Diagnosis, Molecular Genetics and Management - a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    HNPCC (Lynch syndrome) is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC), wherein it accounts for between 2-7 percent of the total CRC burden. When considering the large number of extracolonic cancers integral to the syndrome, namely carcinoma of the endometrium, ovary, stomach, hepatobiliary system, pancreas, small bowel, brain tumors, and upper uroepithelial tract, these estimates of its frequency are likely to be conservative. The diagnosis is based upon its natural history in concert with a comprehensive cancer family history inclusive of all anatomic sites. In order for surveillance and management to be effective and, indeed, lifesaving, among these high-risk patients, the linchpin to cancer control would be the physician, who must be knowledgeable about hereditary cancer syndromes, their molecular and medical genetics, genetic counseling, and, most importantly, the natural history of the disorders, so that the entirety of this knowledge can be melded to highly-targeted management.

  11. Molecular genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, D.R.; Krontiris, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    In this chapter the authors review new findings concerning the molecular genetics of malignant melanoma in the context of other information obtained from clinical, epidemiologic, and cytogenetic studies in this malignancy. These new molecular approaches promise to provide a more complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of melanoma, thereby suggesting new methods for its treatment and prevention

  12. Molecular genetics of experimental hypertension and the metabolic syndrome: from gene pathways to new therapies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Kurtz, T. W.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 5 (2007), s. 941-952 ISSN 0194-911X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR8545; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/04/0390; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/06/0028 Grant - others:The Howard Hughes Institute(US) HHMI55005624 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : SHR * CD36 * metabolic syndrome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.194, year: 2007

  13. Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: toward improving early molecular diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Rebeh, Imen; Grati, Mhamed; Bonnet, Crystel; Bouassida, Walid; Hadjamor, Imen; Ayadi, Hammadi; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Petit, Christine; Masmoudi, Saber

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deaf-blindness cases. The most severe form of this syndrome, Usher syndrome type I (USH1), is characterized by profound congenital sensorineural deafness, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six USH1 genes have been identified, MYO7A, CDH23, PCDH15, USH1C, SANS, and CIB2, encoding myosin VIIA, cadherin-23, protocadherin-15, harmonin, scaffold protein containing ankyrin repeats and a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain, and calcium- and integrin-binding member 2, respectively. In the present study, we recruited four Tunisian families with a diagnosis of USH1, together with healthy unrelated controls. Affected members underwent detailed audiologic and ocular examinations. We used the North African Deafness (NADf) chip to search for known North African mutations associated with USH. Then, we selected microsatellite markers covering USH1 known loci to genotype the DNA samples. Finally, we performed DNA sequencing of three known USH1 genes: MYO7A, PCDH15, and USH1C. Four biallelic mutations, all single base changes, were found in the MYO7A, USH1C, and PCDH15 genes. These mutations consist of a previously reported splicing defect c.470+1G>A in MYO7A, three novel variants, including two nonsense (p.Arg3X and p.Arg134X) in USH1C and PCDH15, respectively, and one frameshift (p.Lys615Asnfs*6) in MYO7A. We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied families with USH1 with a variety of mutations, among which three were novel. These novel mutations will be included in the NADf mutation screening chip that will allow a higher diagnosis efficiency of this extremely genetically heterogeneous disease. Ultimately, efficient molecular diagnosis of USH in a patient's early childhood is of utmost importance, allowing better educational and therapeutic management.

  14. The Marfan syndrome genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Pungerčič

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant heritable disorder of connective tissue. It is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene encoding glycoprotein fibrillin-1, a component of microfibrils of extracellular matrix. Patients with Marfan syndrome show wide spectra of clinical signs, primarily on skeletal, cardiovascular and ocular organ systems. Cardiovascular complications (especially aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection are the most common cause of mortality of Marfan syndrome patients. Discovering genotype-phenotype correlations is complicated because of the large number of mutations reported as well as clinical heterogeneity among individuals with the same mutation. Despite the progress in the knowledge of the molecular nature of Marfan syndrome the diagnosis is still based mainly on the clinical features in the different body systems.Conclusions: Early identification of patient with Marfan syndrome is of considerable importance because of appropriate treatment that can greatly improve life expectancy. Unfortunately, despite the improvement of diagnostic methods, medical and surgical therapy, the mortality due to undiagnosed Marfan syndrome is still high. The present article reviews the molecular genetic studies of Marfan syndrome since the discovery of the mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene.

  15. Molecular Genetics of Pigment Dispersion Syndrome and Pigmentary Glaucoma: New Insights into Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahola-Chomiak, Adrian A; Walter, Michael A

    2018-01-01

    We explore the ideas and advances surrounding the genetic basis of pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS) and pigmentary glaucoma (PG). As PG is the leading cause of nontraumatic blindness in young adults and current tailored interventions have proven ineffective, a better understanding of the underlying causes of PDS, PG, and their relationship is essential. Despite PDS being a subclinical disease, a large proportion of patients progress to PG with associated vision loss. Decades of research have supported a genetic component both for PDS and conversion to PG. We review the body of evidence supporting a genetic basis in humans and animal models and reevaluate classical mechanisms of PDS/PG considering this new evidence.

  16. Molecular genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubitschek, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies on the nature and action of lethal and mutagenic lesions in DNA and the mechanisms by which these are produced in bacteria by ionizing radiation or by decay of radioisotopes incorporated in DNA. Studies of radioisotope decay provide the advantages that the original lesion is localized in the genetic material and the immediate physical and chemical changes that occur at decay are known. Specific types of DNA damage were related to characteristic decay properties of several radioisotopes. Incorporated 125 I, for example, induces a double-stranded break in DNA with almost every decay, but causes remarkably little damage of any other kind to the DNA. (U.S.)

  17. Molecular Genetics of Pigment Dispersion Syndrome and Pigmentary Glaucoma: New Insights into Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian A. Lahola-Chomiak

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore the ideas and advances surrounding the genetic basis of pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS and pigmentary glaucoma (PG. As PG is the leading cause of nontraumatic blindness in young adults and current tailored interventions have proven ineffective, a better understanding of the underlying causes of PDS, PG, and their relationship is essential. Despite PDS being a subclinical disease, a large proportion of patients progress to PG with associated vision loss. Decades of research have supported a genetic component both for PDS and conversion to PG. We review the body of evidence supporting a genetic basis in humans and animal models and reevaluate classical mechanisms of PDS/PG considering this new evidence.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Costello syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other genetic conditions, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC syndrome) and Noonan syndrome . In affected infants, it can be difficult to ... These individuals may actually have CFC syndrome or Noonan syndrome , which are caused by mutations in related genes. ...

  19. Clinical and Molecular Features of Laron Syndrome, A Genetic Disorder Protecting from Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Anna; Kołodziej-Rzepa, Marta; Biesaga, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, genetic disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The disease is caused by mutations of the growth hormone (GH) gene, leading to GH/insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF1) signalling pathway defect. Patients with LS have characteristic biochemical features, such as a high serum level of GH and low IGF1 concentration. Laron syndrome was first described by the Israeli physician Zvi Laron in 1966. Globally, around 350 people are affected by this syndrome and there are two large groups living in separate geographic regions: Israel (69 individuals) and Ecuador (90 individuals). They are all characterized by typical appearance such as dwarfism, facial phenotype, obesity and hypogenitalism. Additionally, they suffer from hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and sleep disorders, but surprisingly have a very low cancer risk. Therefore, studies on LS offer a unique opportunity to better understand carcinogenesis and develop new strategies of cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular genetics of Turner syndrome: correlation with clinical phenotype and response to growth hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsezou, A; Hadjiathanasiou, C; Gourgiotis, D; Galla, A; Kavazarakis, E; Pasparaki, A; Kapsetaki, M; Sismani, C; Theodoridis, C; Patsalis, P C; Moschonas, N; Kitsiou, S

    1999-12-01

    To correlate the origin of the retained X in Turner syndrome with phenotype, pre-treatment height and response to recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy, systematic clinical assessment and molecular studies were carried out in 33 Greek children with Turner syndrome and their parents including 18 children with 45,X and 15 with X-mosaicism. Microsatellite markers on X chromosomes (DXS101 and DXS337) revealed that the intact X was paternal (Xp) in 15/30 and maternal (Xm) in 15/30 children, while 3/33 families were non-informative. No significant relationship was found between parental origin of the retained X and birth weight/length/gestational age, blepharoptosis, pterygium colli, webbed neck, low hairline, abnormal ears, lymphoedema, short 4th metacarpal, shield chest, widely spaced nipples, cubitus valgus, pigmented naevi, streak gonads, and cardiovascular/renal anomalies. With regard to the children's pre-treatment height, there was a significant correlation with maternal height and target height in both Xm and Xp groups. No differences were found between Xm and Xp groups and the improvement of growth velocity (GV) during the first and second year of rhGH administration, while for both groups GV significantly improved with rhGH by the end of the first and the second year. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to correlate the parental origin of Turner syndrome with the response to rhGH therapy.

  1. Review of the Lynch syndrome: history, molecular genetics, screening, differential diagnosis, and medicolegal ramifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, HT; Lynch, PM; Lanspa, SJ; Snyder, CL; Lynch, JF; Boland, CR

    2010-01-01

    More than one million patients will manifest colorectal cancer (CRC) this year of which, conservatively, approximately 3% (~30,700 cases) will have Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common hereditary CRC predisposing syndrome. Each case belongs to a family with clinical needs that require genetic counseling, DNA testing for mismatch repair genes (most frequently MLH1 or MSH2) and screening for CRC. Colonoscopy is mandated, given CRC’s proximal occurrence (70–80% proximal to the splenic flexure). Due to its early age of onset (average 45 years of age), colonoscopy needs to start by age 25, and because of its accelerated carcinogenesis, it should be repeated every 1 to 2 years through age 40 and then annually thereafter. Should CRC occur, subtotal colectomy may be necessary, given the marked frequency of synchronous and metachronous CRC. Because 40–60% of female patients will manifest endometrial cancer, tailored management is essential. Additional extracolonic cancers include ovary, stomach, small bowel, pancreas, hepatobiliary tract, upper uroepithelial tract, brain (Turcot variant) and sebaceous adenomas/carcinomas (Muir-Torre variant). LS explains only 10–25% of familial CRC. PMID:19659756

  2. Molecular Population Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. Copyright © 2017 Casillas and Barbadilla.

  3. Spectrum of novel mutations found in Waardenburg syndrome types 1 and 2: implications for molecular genetic diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhardt, Gabriele; Zirn, Birgit; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Wechtenbruch, Juliane; Suckfüll, Markus; Buske, Annegret; Bohring, Axel; Kubisch, Christian; Vogt, Stefanie; Strobl-Wildemann, Gertrud; Greally, Marie; Bartsch, Oliver; Steinberger, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Till date, mutations in the genes PAX3 and MITF have been described in Waardenburg syndrome (WS), which is clinically characterised by congenital hearing loss and pigmentation anomalies. Our study intended to determine the frequency of mutations and deletions in these genes, to assess the clinical phenotype in detail and to identify rational priorities for molecular genetic diagnostics procedures. Design Prospective analysis. Patients 19 Caucasian patients with typical features of WS underwent stepwise investigation of PAX3 and MITF. When point mutations and small insertions/deletions were excluded by direct sequencing, copy number analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect larger deletions and duplications. Clinical data and photographs were collected to facilitate genotype–phenotype analyses. Setting All analyses were performed in a large German laboratory specialised in genetic diagnostics. Results 15 novel and 4 previously published heterozygous mutations in PAX3 and MITF were identified. Of these, six were large deletions or duplications that were only detectable by copy number analysis. All patients with PAX3 mutations had typical phenotype of WS with dystopia canthorum (WS1), whereas patients with MITF gene mutations presented without dystopia canthorum (WS2). In addition, one patient with bilateral hearing loss and blue eyes with iris stroma dysplasia had a de novo missense mutation (p.Arg217Ile) in MITF. MITF 3-bp deletions at amino acid position 217 have previously been described in patients with Tietz syndrome (TS), a clinical entity with hearing loss and generalised hypopigmentation. Conclusions On the basis of these findings, we conclude that sequencing and copy number analysis of both PAX3 and MITF have to be recommended in the routine molecular diagnostic setting for patients, WS1 and WS2. Furthermore, our genotype–phenotype analyses indicate that WS2 and TS correspond to a clinical spectrum

  4. Spectrum of novel mutations found in Waardenburg syndrome types 1 and 2: implications for molecular genetic diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhardt, Gabriele; Zirn, Birgit; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Wechtenbruch, Juliane; Suckfüll, Markus; Buske, Annegret; Bohring, Axel; Kubisch, Christian; Vogt, Stefanie; Strobl-Wildemann, Gertrud; Greally, Marie; Bartsch, Oliver; Steinberger, Daniela

    2013-03-18

    Till date, mutations in the genes PAX3 and MITF have been described in Waardenburg syndrome (WS), which is clinically characterised by congenital hearing loss and pigmentation anomalies. Our study intended to determine the frequency of mutations and deletions in these genes, to assess the clinical phenotype in detail and to identify rational priorities for molecular genetic diagnostics procedures. Prospective analysis. 19 Caucasian patients with typical features of WS underwent stepwise investigation of PAX3 and MITF. When point mutations and small insertions/deletions were excluded by direct sequencing, copy number analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect larger deletions and duplications. Clinical data and photographs were collected to facilitate genotype-phenotype analyses. All analyses were performed in a large German laboratory specialised in genetic diagnostics. 15 novel and 4 previously published heterozygous mutations in PAX3 and MITF were identified. Of these, six were large deletions or duplications that were only detectable by copy number analysis. All patients with PAX3 mutations had typical phenotype of WS with dystopia canthorum (WS1), whereas patients with MITF gene mutations presented without dystopia canthorum (WS2). In addition, one patient with bilateral hearing loss and blue eyes with iris stroma dysplasia had a de novo missense mutation (p.Arg217Ile) in MITF. MITF 3-bp deletions at amino acid position 217 have previously been described in patients with Tietz syndrome (TS), a clinical entity with hearing loss and generalised hypopigmentation. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that sequencing and copy number analysis of both PAX3 and MITF have to be recommended in the routine molecular diagnostic setting for patients, WS1 and WS2. Furthermore, our genotype-phenotype analyses indicate that WS2 and TS correspond to a clinical spectrum that is influenced by MITF mutation type and position.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Waardenburg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Waardenburg syndrome Waardenburg syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Waardenburg syndrome is a group of genetic conditions that can ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: MEGDEL syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Leigh-like syndrome 3-methylglutaconic aciduria with deafness, encephalopathy, and Leigh-like syndrome MEGDHEL syndrome SERAC1 ... Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ...

  7. Clinical, Endocrine, and Molecular Genetic Analysis of a Large Cohort of Saudi Arabian Patients with Laron Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ashwal, Abdullah A; Al-Sagheir, Afaf; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Allam, Rabab; Qari, Alya; Al-Numair, Nouf S; Imtiaz, Faiqa

    2017-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by marked short stature and very low serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels. This study assessed the clinical and endocrine features alongside determining the growth hormone receptor gene (GHR) mutation in Saudi Arabian patients with LS in order to establish whether or not a genotype/phenotype correlation is evident in this large cohort. A total of 40 Saudi Arabian patients with a suspected diagnosis of LS were recruited and subjected to a full clinical and endocrine investigation together with direct sequencing of the coding regions of the GHR gene. GHR mutations were identified in 34 patients from 22 separate nuclear families. All 34 molecularly confirmed patients had the typical clinical and endocrinological manifestations of LS. Eleven different mutations (9 previously unreported) were detected in this cohort of patients, all inherited in an autosomal recessive homozygous form. No genotype/phenotype correlation was apparent. The identification of pathogenic mutations causing LS will be of tremendous use for the molecular diagnosis of patients in Saudi Arabia and the region in general, with respect to prevention of this disease in the forms of future carrier testing, prenatal testing, premarital screening and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Twin infant with lymphatic dysplasia diagnosed with Noonan syndrome by molecular genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Deepan; Somashekar, Santhosh; Navarrete, Cristina; Rodriguez, Maria M

    2014-08-01

    Noonan Syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by short stature, congenital heart defects, developmental delay, dysmorphic facial features and occasional lymphatic dysplasias. The features of Noonan Syndrome change with age and have variable expression. The diagnosis has historically been based on clinical grounds. We describe a child that was born with congenital refractory chylothorax and subcutaneous edema suspected to be secondary to pulmonary lymphangiectasis. The infant died of respiratory failure and anasarca at 80 days. The autopsy confirmed lymphatic dysplasia in lungs and mesentery. The baby had no dysmorphic facial features and was diagnosed postmortem with Noonan syndrome by genomic DNA sequence analysis as he had a heterozygous mutation for G503R in the PTPN11 gene.

  9. Scientific Statement on the Diagnostic Criteria, Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Molecular Genetics of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumesic, Daniel A.; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Marshall, John C.; Laven, Joop S.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous and complex disorder that has both adverse reproductive and metabolic implications for affected women. However, there is generally poor understanding of its etiology. Varying expert-based diagnostic criteria utilize some combination of oligo-ovulation, hyperandrogenism, and the presence of polycystic ovaries. Criteria that require hyperandrogenism tend to identify a more severe reproductive and metabolic phenotype. The phenotype can vary by race and ethnicity, is difficult to define in the perimenarchal and perimenopausal period, and is exacerbated by obesity. The pathophysiology involves abnormal gonadotropin secretion from a reduced hypothalamic feedback response to circulating sex steroids, altered ovarian morphology and functional changes, and disordered insulin action in a variety of target tissues. PCOS clusters in families and both female and male relatives can show stigmata of the syndrome, including metabolic abnormalities. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of candidate regions, although their role in contributing to PCOS is still largely unknown. PMID:26426951

  10. Avoiding pitfalls in molecular genetic testing: case studies of high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization testing in the definitive diagnosis of Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluk, Michael Joseph; An, Yu; James, Philip; Coulter, David; Harris, David; Wu, Bai-Lin; Shen, Yiping

    2011-05-01

    The molecular testing options available for the diagnosis of genetic disorders are numerous and include a variety of different assay platforms. The consultative input of molecular pathologists and cytogeneticists, working closely with the ordering clinicians, is often important for definitive diagnosis. Herein, we describe two patients who had long histories of unexplained signs and symptoms with a high clinical suspicion of an underlying genetic etiology. Initial molecular testing in both cases was negative, but the application of high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization technology lead to definitive diagnosis in both cases. We summarize the clinical findings and molecular testing in each case, discuss the differential diagnoses, and review the clinical and pathological findings of Mowat-Wilson syndrome. This report highlights the importance for those involved in molecular testing to know the nature of the underlying genetic abnormalities associated with the suspected diagnosis, to recognize the limitations of each testing platform, and to persistently pursue repeat testing using high-resolution technologies when indicated. This concept is applicable to both germline and somatic molecular genetic testing. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular genetics in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J B

    1993-12-01

    There has been remarkable progress in the identification of mutations in genes that cause inherited neurological disorders. Abnormalities in the genes for Huntington disease, neurofibromatosis types 1 and 2, one form of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, fragile X syndrome, myotonic dystrophy, Kennedy syndrome, Menkes disease, and several forms of retinitis pigmentosa have been elucidated. Rare disorders of neuronal migration such as Kallmann syndrome, Miller-Dieker syndrome, and Norrie disease have been shown to be due to specific gene defects. Several muscle disorders characterized by abnormal membrane excitability have been defined as mutations of the muscle sodium or chloride channels. These advances provide opportunity for accurate molecular diagnosis of at-risk individuals and are the harbinger of new approaches to therapy of these diseases.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Gorlin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for This Condition basal cell nevus syndrome BCNS Gorlin-Goltz syndrome NBCCS nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome Related Information ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome Health Topic: Skin Cancer Genetic and Rare Diseases ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Vocal Tic Disorder Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome GTS TD Tourette Disorder Tourette's Disease TS Related ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Gilles de la Tourette syndrome Health Topic: Tourette Syndrome Genetic and Rare Diseases ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Testing Registry: Rett syndrome Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (4 links) Boston Children's Hospital GeneReview: MECP2-Related Disorders MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Rett Syndrome RettSyndrome.org: Rett Syndrome Clinics General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Tietz syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... represent a severe form of a disorder called Waardenburg syndrome , which can also be caused by MITF gene ... MITF basic domain: genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg and Tietz syndromes. Eur J Hum Genet. 2012 May;20(5): ...

  16. Genetic Aspects of Nephrotic Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Shivani

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is characterized by severe proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and edema. Depending on response to steroid treatment, patients either have steroid sensitive NS (SSNS) or steroid resistant NS (SRNS). Patients with SRNS often have a poor renal prognosis, focal segmental glomerulos......Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is characterized by severe proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and edema. Depending on response to steroid treatment, patients either have steroid sensitive NS (SSNS) or steroid resistant NS (SRNS). Patients with SRNS often have a poor renal prognosis, focal segmental...... steroid dependence or become frequent relapsers. Repeated courses of corticosteroid treatment often cause significant associated morbidity. Familial occurrence of SSNS is rare and suggests a potential genetic origin. However, very little data on molecular genetics of familial SSNS is available...... SSNS. Study I is the first study to describe the genetic findings in 39 patients with sporadic FSGS and/or SRNS, in a highly selected Danish population. We developed a screening tool (high resolution melting analysis) to search for variants in NPHS1, NPHS2, and INF2 genes. This method was shown...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Griscelli syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tezcan I, Ersoy F, Houdusse A, Fischer A, de Saint Basile G. Griscelli syndrome restricted to hypopigmentation results from a melanophilin defect ( ... N, Bianchi D, Fischer A, Le Deist F, de Saint Basile G. Mutations in RAB27A ... syndrome associated with haemophagocytic syndrome. Nat Genet. 2000 Jun; ...

  18. [Molecular updates on Usher syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, A-F

    2005-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the association of sensorineural hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Usher syndrome is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Three clinical subtypes are defined with respect to vestibular dysfunction and the degree of hearing loss. Type I (USH1) patients have profound hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction from birth. Type II (USH2) is the most frequent and patients tend to have less severe hearing impairment and normal vestibular response. Type III (USH3) is characterized by a progressive loss of hearing and is found more frequently among Finnish patients. Recently, major breakthroughs have been made in the molecular genetics of Usher syndrome as a number of chromosomal loci and causative genes have been identified in each clinical subtype. Twelve loci are known and the corresponding genes have been cloned for six of them. Although their functions are not always clearly established, a common role is emerging for the proteins identified within each subtype. As a result, each subtype could emanate from defects affecting distinct cellular mechanisms.

  19. Molecular genetics of the Usher syndrome in Lebanon: identification of 11 novel protein truncating mutations by whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ramesh; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; El Zir, Elie; Mansour, Ahmad; Megarbane, Andre; Majewski, Jacek; Slim, Rima

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a genetically heterogeneous condition with ten disease-causing genes. The spectrum of genes and mutations causing USH in the Lebanese and Middle Eastern populations has not been described. Consequently, diagnostic approaches designed to screen for previously reported mutations were unlikely to identify the mutations in 11 unrelated families, eight of Lebanese and three of Middle Eastern origins. In addition, six of the ten USH genes consist of more than 20 exons, each, which made mutational analysis by Sanger sequencing of PCR-amplified exons from genomic DNA tedious and costly. The study was aimed at the identification of USH causing genes and mutations in 11 unrelated families with USH type I or II. Whole exome sequencing followed by expanded familial validation by Sanger sequencing. We identified disease-causing mutations in all the analyzed patients in four USH genes, MYO7A, USH2A, GPR98 and CDH23. Eleven of the mutations were novel and protein truncating, including a complex rearrangement in GPR98. Our data highlight the genetic diversity of Usher syndrome in the Lebanese population and the time and cost-effectiveness of whole exome sequencing approach for mutation analysis of genetically heterogeneous conditions caused by large genes.

  20. Molecular genetics of the Usher syndrome in Lebanon: identification of 11 novel protein truncating mutations by whole exome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Reddy

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is a genetically heterogeneous condition with ten disease-causing genes. The spectrum of genes and mutations causing USH in the Lebanese and Middle Eastern populations has not been described. Consequently, diagnostic approaches designed to screen for previously reported mutations were unlikely to identify the mutations in 11 unrelated families, eight of Lebanese and three of Middle Eastern origins. In addition, six of the ten USH genes consist of more than 20 exons, each, which made mutational analysis by Sanger sequencing of PCR-amplified exons from genomic DNA tedious and costly. The study was aimed at the identification of USH causing genes and mutations in 11 unrelated families with USH type I or II.Whole exome sequencing followed by expanded familial validation by Sanger sequencing.We identified disease-causing mutations in all the analyzed patients in four USH genes, MYO7A, USH2A, GPR98 and CDH23. Eleven of the mutations were novel and protein truncating, including a complex rearrangement in GPR98.Our data highlight the genetic diversity of Usher syndrome in the Lebanese population and the time and cost-effectiveness of whole exome sequencing approach for mutation analysis of genetically heterogeneous conditions caused by large genes.

  1. Molecular Genetics of the Usher Syndrome in Lebanon: Identification of 11 Novel Protein Truncating Mutations by Whole Exome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ramesh; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; El Zir, Elie; Mansour, Ahmad; Megarbane, Andre; Majewski, Jacek; Slim, Rima

    2014-01-01

    Background Usher syndrome (USH) is a genetically heterogeneous condition with ten disease-causing genes. The spectrum of genes and mutations causing USH in the Lebanese and Middle Eastern populations has not been described. Consequently, diagnostic approaches designed to screen for previously reported mutations were unlikely to identify the mutations in 11 unrelated families, eight of Lebanese and three of Middle Eastern origins. In addition, six of the ten USH genes consist of more than 20 exons, each, which made mutational analysis by Sanger sequencing of PCR-amplified exons from genomic DNA tedious and costly. The study was aimed at the identification of USH causing genes and mutations in 11 unrelated families with USH type I or II. Methods Whole exome sequencing followed by expanded familial validation by Sanger sequencing. Results We identified disease-causing mutations in all the analyzed patients in four USH genes, MYO7A, USH2A, GPR98 and CDH23. Eleven of the mutations were novel and protein truncating, including a complex rearrangement in GPR98. Conclusion Our data highlight the genetic diversity of Usher syndrome in the Lebanese population and the time and cost-effectiveness of whole exome sequencing approach for mutation analysis of genetically heterogeneous conditions caused by large genes. PMID:25211151

  2. Medulloblastoma: Molecular Genetics and Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Raffel

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a primary brain tumor found in the cerebellum of children. The tumor occurs in association with two inherited cancer syndromes: Turcot syndrome and Gorlin syndrome. Insights into the molecular biology of the tumor have come from looking at alterations in the genes altered in these syndromes, PTC and APC, respectively. Murine models of medulloblastoma have been constructed based on these alterations. Additional murine models that, while mimicking the appearance of the human tumor, seem unrelated to the human tumor's molecular alterations have been made. In this review, the clinical picture, origin, molecular biology, murine models of medulloblastoma are discussed. Although a great deal has been discovered about this tumor, the genetic alterations responsible for tumor development in a majority of patients have yet to be described.

  3. LGMD2D syndrome: the importance of clinical and molecular genetics in patient and family management. Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Khalid M; Abdallah, Atiyeh M

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a seven-year-old female from a consanguineous Saudi family with autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D) most likely caused by a rare SGCA mutation. Histopathological and molecular investigations resulted in the discovery of a homozygous mutation (c.226 C>T (p.L76 F)) in exon 3 of SGCA in the patient. The parents and one sibling were heterozygous carriers, but the mutation was not otherwise detected in 80 ethnic controls from the same geographic area. In silico analysis revealed that the mutation resulted in a functional leucine to phenylalanine alteration that was deleterious to the protein structure. This is only the second reported case of the p.L76F mutation in LGMD, and highlights that molecular genetics analysis is essential to deliver the most appropriate management to the patient and offer the family genetic counseling.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do well on tasks that involve spoken language, music, and learning by repetition (rote memorization). Affected individuals ... Resources (5 links) Disease InfoSearch: Williams syndrome Genetic Science Learning Center, University of Utah MalaCards: williams-beuren ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Muenke syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shanske AL, Jehee FS, Bueno MR, Knightly C, McDonald-McGinn D, Zackai EH, Muenke M. Muenke syndrome ( ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Stormorken syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ichthyosis), headaches, and difficulty with reading and spelling (dyslexia). Related Information What does it mean if a ... new syndrome: thrombocytopathia, muscle fatigue, asplenia, miosis, migraine, dyslexia and ichthyosis. Clin Genet. 1985 Nov;28(5): ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: genitopatellar syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hypoplasia, renal anomalies, facial dysmorphism, and mental retardation GPS Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes ... Kwan A, Schlaubitz S, Barsh GS, Enns GM, Hudgins L. Genitopatellar syndrome: expanding the phenotype and excluding mutations ...

  8. Genetic analysis of the pedigrees and molecular defects of the GH-receptor gene in the Israeli cohort of patients with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevah, Orit; Laron, Zvi

    2006-08-01

    Out of the 63 patients with Laron Syndrome ( LS) followed in our clinic we were able to perform a genetic analysis on 43 patients belonging to 28 families. Twenty-seven patients were Jews, eight were Arabs, one was Druze, and six were Caucasians from countries other then Israel. Consanguinity was found in 11 families. Molecular analysis of the growth hormone receptor gene was performed in 32 patients and 32 family members. From the study of the pedigrees, as well as the GH receptor gene analysis, we confirmed an earlier report from our group that LS is a recessively inherited disease. One patient with a classical phenotype of LS had a non-classical pattern of inheritance: R43X heterozygosity together with a heterozygous polymorphism G168G; a condition which needs further exploration.

  9. Emotion-induced myoclonic absence-like seizures in a patient with inv-dup(15) syndrome: a clinical, EEG, and molecular genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguglia, U; Le Piane, E; Gambardella, A; Messina, D; Russo, C; Sirchia, S M; Porta, G; Quattrone, A

    1999-09-01

    We have described a clinical EEG and molecular genetic study of a 9-year-old boy with inv-dup(15) syndrome in whom seizures were induced by emotionally gratifying stimuli. The reflex seizures began 5-20 s after the onset of repeated cheek-kissing from his mother or after viewing of pleasant or funny events. They were characterized by bilateral discharges involving mainly the temporal regions and evolving into myoclonic absence-like seizures. Nonemotional stimuli, such as a pinch, sucking or rubbing his cheeks, or the sound of the kiss alone, failed to provoke seizures. The seizures were resistant to antiepileptic (AED) treatments. Molecular genetic investigations revealed a correct methylation pattern of the chromosomes 15, and three copies (two maternal and one paternal) of the segment 15q11-q13, including the GABRb3 gene. We hypothesize that an overexpression of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibition accounts for the severe epilepsy that we observed in this patient.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: fragile X syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Fragile X syndrome Fragile X syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Fragile X syndrome is a genetic condition that causes a ...

  11. Molecular genetics made simple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Sh. Kassem

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetics have undoubtedly become an integral part of biomedical science and clinical practice, with important implications in deciphering disease pathogenesis and progression, identifying diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as designing better targeted treatments. The exponential growth of our understanding of different genetic concepts is paralleled by a growing list of genetic terminology that can easily intimidate the unfamiliar reader. Rendering genetics incomprehensible to the clinician however, defeats the very essence of genetic research: its utilization for combating disease and improving quality of life. Herein we attempt to correct this notion by presenting the basic genetic concepts along with their usefulness in the cardiology clinic. Bringing genetics closer to the clinician will enable its harmonious incorporation into clinical care, thus not only restoring our perception of its simple and elegant nature, but importantly ensuring the maximal benefit for our patients.

  12. Molecular genetics made simple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Heba Sh.; Girolami, Francesca; Sanoudou, Despina

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Genetics have undoubtedly become an integral part of biomedical science and clinical practice, with important implications in deciphering disease pathogenesis and progression, identifying diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as designing better targeted treatments. The exponential growth of our understanding of different genetic concepts is paralleled by a growing list of genetic terminology that can easily intimidate the unfamiliar reader. Rendering genetics incomprehensible to the clinician however, defeats the very essence of genetic research: its utilization for combating disease and improving quality of life. Herein we attempt to correct this notion by presenting the basic genetic concepts along with their usefulness in the cardiology clinic. Bringing genetics closer to the clinician will enable its harmonious incorporation into clinical care, thus not only restoring our perception of its simple and elegant nature, but importantly ensuring the maximal benefit for our patients. PMID:25610837

  13. Molecular Analysis of Collagen XVIII Reveals Novel Mutations, Presence of a Third Isoform, and Possible Genetic Heterogeneity in Knobloch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, O. T.; Sertié, A. L.; Der Kaloustian, V. M.; Kok, F.; Carpenter, M.; Murray, J.; Czeizel, A. E.; Kliemann, S. E.; Rosemberg, S.; Monteiro, M.; Olsen, B. R.; Passos-Bueno, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    Knobloch syndrome (KS) is a rare disease characterized by severe ocular alterations, including vitreoretinal degeneration associated with retinal detachment and occipital scalp defect. The responsible gene, COL18A1, has been mapped to 21q22.3, and, on the basis of the analysis of one family, we have demonstrated that a mutation affecting only one of the three COL18A1 isoforms causes this phenotype. We report here the results of the screening of both the entire coding region and the exon-intron boundaries of the COL18A1 gene (which includes 43 exons), in eight unrelated patients with KS. Besides 20 polymorphic changes, we identified 6 different pathogenic changes in both alleles of five unrelated patients with KS (three compound heterozygotes and two homozygotes). All are truncating mutations leading to deficiency of one or all collagen XVIII isoforms and endostatin. We have verified that, in exon 41, the deletion c3514-3515delCT, found in three unrelated alleles, is embedded in different haplotypes, suggesting that this mutation has occurred more than once. In addition, our results provide evidence of nonallelic genetic heterogeneity in KS. We also show that the longest human isoform (NC11-728) is expressed in several tissues (including the human eye) and that lack of either the short variant or all of the collagen XVIII isoforms causes similar phenotypes but that those patients who lack all forms present more-severe ocular alterations. Despite the small sample size, we found low endostatin plasma levels in those patients with mutations leading to deficiency of all isoforms; in addition, it seems that absence of all collagen XVIII isoforms causes predisposition to epilepsy. PMID:12415512

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Lynch syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Changes Variations in the MLH1 , MSH2 , MSH6 , PMS2 , or EPCAM gene increase the risk of developing Lynch syndrome . The MLH1 , MSH2 , MSH6 , and PMS2 genes are involved in the repair of errors ...

  15. Genetic heterogeneity in Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Bronya J B; Savas, Sevtap

    2004-09-15

    Mutations in seven different genes have been associated with Usher syndrome, and an additional four loci have been mapped. The identified genes encode myosin VIIa, harmonin (a PDZ-domain protein), cadherin 23, protocadherin 15, sans (a scaffold-like protein), usherin and clarin. Three clinical types of Usher syndrome have been described: USH1 patients have severe to profound congenital hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and retinal degeneration beginning in childhood, those with USH2 have moderate to severe congenital hearing loss, normal vestibular function, and later onset of retinitis pigmentosa, and USH3 patients have progressive hearing loss, which distinguishes them from the other two types. The shaker-1, waltzer, Ames waltzer, and Jackson shaker mice provide murine models for four of the genetic forms of Usher syndrome. Ongoing studies are enabling early diagnosis of Usher syndrome in children who present with hearing loss, thus providing time to prepare for the onset of visual loss. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of Usher syndrome in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozzi, Diego; Aaspõllu, Anu; Athanasakis, Emmanouil; Berto, Anna; Fabretto, Antonella; Licastro, Danilo; Külm, Maigi; Testa, Francesco; Trevisi, Patrizia; Vahter, Marju; Ziviello, Carmela; Martini, Alessandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Banfi, Sandro; Gasparini, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hearing and vision loss. Usher syndrome is divided into three clinical subclasses (type 1, type 2, and type 3), which differ in terms of the severity and progression of hearing loss and the presence or absence of vestibular symptoms. Usher syndrome is defined by significant genetic heterogeneity, with at least 12 distinct loci described and 9 genes identified. This study aims to provide a molecular epidemiology report of Usher syndrome in Italy. Molecular data have been obtained on 75 unrelated Italian patients using the most up-to date technology available for the screening of Usher syndrome gene mutations, i.e., the genotyping microarray developed by Asper Biotech (Tartu, Estonia), which simultaneously investigates 612 different marker positions using the well established arrayed primer extension methodology (APEX). Using this method, we found that 12% of cases (9 out of 75) harbored homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the gene positions analyzed, whereas 20% (15 out of 75) of the patients were characterized by the presence of only one mutated allele based on the positions analyzed. One patient was found to be compound heterozygous for mutations in two different genes and this represents an example of possible digenic inheritance in Usher syndrome. A total of 66.6% of cases (50 out of 75) were found to be completely negative for the presence of Usher syndrome gene mutations in the detected positions. Mutations detected by the array were confirmed by direct sequencing. These findings highlight the efficacy of the APEX-based genotyping approach in the molecular assessment of Usher patients, suggesting the presence of alleles not yet identified and/or the involvement of additional putative genes that may account for the pathogenesis of Usher syndrome.

  17. Molecular epidemiology of Usher syndrome in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozzi, Diego; Aaspõllu, Anu; Athanasakis, Emmanouil; Berto, Anna; Fabretto, Antonella; Licastro, Danilo; Külm, Maigi; Testa, Francesco; Trevisi, Patrizia; Vahter, Marju; Ziviello, Carmela; Martini, Alessandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Banfi, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hearing and vision loss. Usher syndrome is divided into three clinical subclasses (type 1, type 2, and type 3), which differ in terms of the severity and progression of hearing loss and the presence or absence of vestibular symptoms. Usher syndrome is defined by significant genetic heterogeneity, with at least 12 distinct loci described and 9 genes identified. This study aims to provide a molecular epidemiology report of Usher syndrome in Italy. Methods Molecular data have been obtained on 75 unrelated Italian patients using the most up-to date technology available for the screening of Usher syndrome gene mutations, i.e., the genotyping microarray developed by Asper Biotech (Tartu, Estonia), which simultaneously investigates 612 different marker positions using the well established arrayed primer extension methodology (APEX). Results Using this method, we found that 12% of cases (9 out of 75) harbored homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the gene positions analyzed, whereas 20% (15 out of 75) of the patients were characterized by the presence of only one mutated allele based on the positions analyzed. One patient was found to be compound heterozygous for mutations in two different genes and this represents an example of possible digenic inheritance in Usher syndrome. A total of 66.6% of cases (50 out of 75) were found to be completely negative for the presence of Usher syndrome gene mutations in the detected positions. Mutations detected by the array were confirmed by direct sequencing. Conclusions These findings highlight the efficacy of the APEX-based genotyping approach in the molecular assessment of Usher patients, suggesting the presence of alleles not yet identified and/or the involvement of additional putative genes that may account for the pathogenesis of Usher syndrome. PMID:21738395

  18. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of fragile X syndrome and other fragile X-associated disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancalana, Valérie; Glaeser, Dieter; McQuaid, Shirley; Steinbach, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Different mutations occurring in the unstable CGG repeat in 5' untranslated region of FMR1 gene are responsible for three fragile X-associated disorders. An expansion of over ∼200 CGG repeats when associated with abnormal methylation and inactivation of the promoter is the mutation termed ‘full mutation' and is responsible for fragile X syndrome (FXS), a neurodevelopmental disorder described as the most common cause of inherited intellectual impairment. The term ‘abnormal methylation' is used here to distinguish the DNA methylation induced by the expanded repeat from the ‘normal methylation' occurring on the inactive X chromosomes in females with normal, premutation, and full mutation alleles. All male and roughly half of the female full mutation carriers have FXS. Another anomaly termed ‘premutation' is characterized by the presence of 55 to ∼200 CGGs without abnormal methylation, and is the cause of two other diseases with incomplete penetrance. One is fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI), which is characterized by a large spectrum of ovarian dysfunction phenotypes and possible early menopause as the end stage. The other is fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), which is a late onset neurodegenerative disorder affecting males and females. Because of the particular pattern and transmission of the CGG repeat, appropriate molecular testing and reporting is very important for the optimal genetic counselling in the three fragile X-associated disorders. Here, we describe best practice guidelines for genetic analysis and reporting in FXS, FXPOI, and FXTAS, including carrier and prenatal testing. PMID:25227148

  19. Avoiding Pitfalls in Molecular Genetic Testing: Case Studies of High-Resolution Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization Testing in the Definitive Diagnosis of Mowat-Wilson Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kluk, Michael Joseph; An, Yu; James, Philip; Coulter, David; Harris, David; Wu, Bai-Lin; Shen, Yiping

    2011-01-01

    The molecular testing options available for the diagnosis of genetic disorders are numerous and include a variety of different assay platforms. The consultative input of molecular pathologists and cytogeneticists, working closely with the ordering clinicians, is often important for definitive diagnosis. Herein, we describe two patients who had long histories of unexplained signs and symptoms with a high clinical suspicion of an underlying genetic etiology. Initial molecular testing in both ca...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: 22q13.3 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related Information How are genetic ... Veltman JA, de Vries BB. Molecular characterisation of patients with subtelomeric 22q ... L, Enns GM, Hoyme HE. Terminal 22q deletion syndrome: a newly recognized cause of ...

  1. Genetics of syndromic and non-syndromic mitral valve prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tourneau, Thierry; Mérot, Jean; Rimbert, Antoine; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Probst, Vincent; Le Marec, Hervé; Levine, Robert A; Schott, Jean-Jacques

    2018-01-19

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common condition that affects 2%-3% of the general population. MVP is thought to include syndromic forms such as Marfan syndrome and non-syndromic MVP, which is the most frequent form. Myxomatous degeneration and fibroelastic deficiency (FED) are regarded as two different forms of non-syndromic MVP. While FED is still considered a degenerative disease associated with ageing, frequent familial clustering has been demonstrated for myxomatous MVP. Familial and genetic studies led to the recognition of reduced penetrance and large phenotypic variability, and to the identification of prodromal or atypical forms as a part of the complex spectrum of the disease. Whereas autosomal dominant mode is the common inheritance pattern, an X linked form of non-syndromic MVP was recognised initially, related to Filamin-A gene, encoding for a cytoskeleton protein involved in mechanotransduction. This identification allowed a comprehensive description of a new subtype of MVP with a unique association of leaflet prolapse and paradoxical restricted motion in diastole. In autosomal dominant forms, three loci have been mapped to chromosomes 16p11-p12, 11p15.4 and 13q31-32. Although deciphering the underlying genetic defects is still a work in progress, DCHS1 mutations have been identified (11p15.4) in typical myxomatous disease, highlighting new molecular pathways and pathophysiological mechanisms leading to the development of MVP. Finally, a large international genome-wide association study demonstrated the implication of frequent variants in MVP development and opened new directions for future research. Hence, this review focuses on phenotypic, genetic and pathophysiological aspects of MVP. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Clinical features and molecular genetic analysis of a boy with Prader-Willi syndrome caused by an imprinting defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, A; Hansen, Claus; Baekgaard, P

    1997-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neuroendocrine disorder caused by a non-functioning paternally derived gene(s) within the chromosome region 15q11-q13. Most cases result from microscopically visible deletions of paternal origin, or maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. In both instances n...

  3. Diagnostic criteria for congenital long QT syndrome in the era of molecular genetics: Do we need a scoring system?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Kääb, Stefan; Van Langen, Irene M.; Tanck, Michael W.T.; Mannens, Marcel M.A.M.; Hinterseer, Martin; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Tan, Hanno L.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: Previously published diagnostic systems, based on ECG analysis and clinical parameters (Schwartz criteria and Keating criteria), have been used to estimate the probability of inherited long QT syndrome (LQTS). Nowadays, a certain diagnosis can often be made by DNA testing. We aimed to

  4. From clinical suspect to molecular confirmation of noonan syndrome; contribution of “best practice” genetic counseling and new technical possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukvic Nenad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome (NS is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by variable expressivity of clinical features such as: postnatal growth reduction, congenital heart disease, characteristic facial dysmorphisms and development delay. In ~75% of all NS cases, germline mutations involving RAS-MAPK signaling pathway genes (PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, SHOC2, MEK1, CBL are causative. We reported a case of 13-year-old girl [born at 36w by CS (BW 3250 g (~95°, BL 48 cm (~75°] referred for genetic counseling due to growth retardation, facial dysmorphisms, development delay and learning disability. After birth she presented frequent vomiting, with failure to thrive and at 5 months of age underwent surgery for intestinal malrotation. Because of short stature, Growth Hormone (GH therapy have been introduced at age of 3yrs up to 11yrs. Negative molecular testing for PTPN11 and SOS1 genes, normal female karyotype and aCGH analysis were observed. Objective examination: H 138 cm, (A; p.Val14Ile has been identified. Even though KRAS mutations are usually associated with NS severe phenotype with cardiac involvement (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, this finding is not present in our patient.

  5. [Molecular-genetic analysis of the genomes of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2 circulating in the area of Russian Federation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakov, A D; Grebennikova, T V; Iuzhakov, A G; Aliper, T I; Nepoklonov, E A

    2014-01-01

    The molecular genetic analysis of the genomes of the virus of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome (VPRRS) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV-2) circulating in the area of the Russian Federation was discussed. The results of this work showed the circulation of the strains of the European genotype VPRRS similar to those found in France and Denmark from 1998 to 2001. The homology of the fragment of one of the genes between the Russian isolates and the vaccine strain Porcilis PRRS (Intervet) was found. It requires further study. The strains representing the North American genotype VPRRS were not found. The PCV-2 genomes fall into three separate goups. One (genotype 2b) is formed by isolates in Malaysia, Brazil, Switzerland, China, Slovakia, UK, USA, isolated during the period from 2004 to the present time. The second group consists of sequences of the viruses isolated in 2000-2012 in Canada, the U.S., China, and South Korea (genotype 2a). The third group is formed by highly pathogenic isolates in 2013 from China (highly pathogenic genotype 2c). The circulation of all three known genotypes of PCV-2: 2a, 2b, and 2c in Russian Federation was demonstrated.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Names for This Condition RSS Silver-Russell dwarfism Silver-Russell syndrome SRS Related Information How are ... M, Begemann M, Elbracht M. Epigenetic and genetic diagnosis of Silver-Russell syndrome. Expert Rev Mol Diagn. ...

  7. Genetic susceptibility and neurotransmitters in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschou, Peristera; Fernandez, Thomas V; Sharp, Frank; Heiman, Gary A; Hoekstra, Pieter J

    2013-01-01

    Family studies have consistently shown that Tourette syndrome (TS) is a familial disorder and twin studies have clearly indicated a genetic contribution in the etiology of TS. Whereas early segregation studies of TS suggested a single-gene autosomal dominant disorder, later studies have pointed to more complex models including additive and multifactorial inheritance and likely interaction with genetic factors. While the exact cellular and molecular base of TS is as yet elusive, neuroanatomical and neurophysiological studies have pointed to the involvement of cortico-striato-thalamocortical circuits and abnormalities in dopamine, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and serotonin neurotransmitter systems, with the most consistent evidence being available for involvement of dopamine-related abnormalities, that is, a reduction in tonic extracellular dopamine levels along with hyperresponsive spike-dependent dopamine release, following stimulation. Genetic and gene expression findings are very much supportive of involvement of these neurotransmitter systems. Moreover, intriguingly, genetic work on a two-generation pedigree has opened new research pointing to a role for histamine, a so far rather neglected neurotransmitter, with the potential of the development of new treatment options. Future studies should be aimed at directly linking neurotransmitter-related genetic and gene expression findings to imaging studies (imaging genetics), which enables a better understanding of the pathways and mechanisms through which the dynamic interplay of genes, brain, and environment shapes the TS phenotype. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetics of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratantonio, Enza; Vicari, Enzo; Pafumi, Carlo; Calogero, Aldo E

    2005-06-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a reproductive system disorder characterized by irregular menses, anovulation, clinical and/or biochemical signs of hyperandrogenism (hirsutism and/or acne), ovarian micropolycystic appearance and metabolic abnormalities, such as hyperinsulinaemia and obesity. The aetiopathogenesis of this syndrome is not well known. Several pathogenetic hypotheses have been proposed to explain the full array of symptoms and signs, but with elusive results. A genetic abnormality causing PCOS is supported by the observation that different members of the same family are often affected, and about half of the sisters of PCOS women have elevated serum testosterone concentrations. Therefore, the presence of gene abnormalities in women with PCOS has been widely explored in the attempt to establish whether their mutations or polymorphisms may cause PCOS. The main genes evaluated are those involved in steroidogenesis, steroid hormone effects, gonadotrophin release regulation and action, insulin secretion and action, and adipose tissue metabolism. Despite the vast body of literature produced, none of the genes evaluated seems to play a key role in PCOS pathogenesis. It is likely that PCOS may represent the final outcome of different, deeply inter-related genetic abnormalities that influence each other and perpetuate the syndrome.

  9. Molecular genetics of craniosynostosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterine; Auerkari, Elza Ibrahim

    2018-03-01

    Tight regulation process and complex interplay occur along the osteogenic interfaces of the cranial sutures in normal growth and development of the skull. Cranial sutures serve as sites of bone growth while maintaining a state of patency to accommodate the developing brain. Cranial sutures are fibro-cellular structures that separate the rigid plates of the skull bones. Premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures leads to a condition known as craniosynostosis. Craniosynostosis is one of the most common craniofacial anomalies with a prevalence of 1 in 2,500 newborns. Several genes have been identified in the pathogenesis of craniosynostosis. Molecular signaling events and the intracellular signal transduction pathways implicated in the suture pathobiology will provide a useful approach for therapeutic targeting.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Antiphospholipid syndrome Antiphospholipid syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... area? Other Names for This Condition anti-phospholipid syndrome antiphospholipid antibody syndrome Hughes syndrome Related Information How are ...

  11. Cytogenic and molecular analyses of 46,XX male syndrome with clinical comparison to other groups with testicular azoospermia of genetic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Han-Sun; Wu, Yi-No; Wu, Chien-Chih; Hwang, Jiann-Loung

    2013-02-01

    XX male is a rare sex chromosomal disorder in infertile men. The purpose of this study was to distinguish the clinical and genetic features of the 46,XX male syndrome from other more frequent, testicular-origin azoospermic causes of male infertility. To study 46,XX male syndrome, we compared clinical and endocrinological parameters to other groups with testicular-origin azoospermia, and to an age-matched group of healthy males and females as normal control. Fluorescent in situ hybridization for detection and localization of the sex-determining region of the Y gene (SRY), array-based comparative genomic hybridization screening, and real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction of FGF9, WT1, NR5A1, and SPRY2 genes were performed in this genetic investigation. Our three patients with 46,XX male syndrome had a much higher follicular-stimulating hormone level, lower body height, lower testosterone level, and ambiguous external genitalia. One of the three patients with 46,XX male syndrome was SRY-negative. A further genetic study, including a comparative genomic hybridization array and real-time polymerase chain reaction, showed a gain of FGF9 copy numbers only in the SRY-negative 46,XX male. The genetic copy number of the FGF9 gene was duplicated in that case compared to the normal female control and was significantly lower than that of the normal male control. No such genomic gain was observed in the case of the two SRY-positive 46,XX males. Similar to clinical manifestations of 46,XX male syndrome, genetic evidence in this study suggests that FGF9 may contribute to sex reversal, but additional confirmation with more cases is still needed. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Molecular-genetic risk assessement of determining angiotensin-converting enzyme hyperactivity in hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildar R. Minniakhmetov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate changes in angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE blood activity and angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism as a possible disease predictor in hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS. Four hundred and nine patients (346 males and 63 females with HFRS serologic confirmation were enrolled in the study. Their age ranged from 15 to 65 years. ACE blood activity was assessed kinetically using the Bühlmann (Switzerland kit. Peripheral blood genomic DNA was isolated by a phenol-chloroform extraction. The genotyping of DNA loci was done using a polymerase chain reaction of DNA synthesis. Statistically, ACE blood activity was significantly higher throughout the entire HFRS course with diverse severity apart from the feverish phase of moderate-to-severe uncomplicated disease forms. *A1166 and *C1166 alleles, *A1166/*A1166 and *C1166/*C1166 genotypes of angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene were not associated with HFRS severity. The results of this study indicate that high ACE activity has not adaptive characteristics due to abnormalities in angiotensin II reception. It is an adequate metabolic response of the body to endotheliotropic virus activity.

  13. Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of a new mutation in children with Wolfram syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qianqian; Qu, Huaiyu; Wei, Shihui

    2013-03-01

    A 12‑year‑old Chinese girl presented with gradual vision loss and insulin‑dependent diabetes mellitus and was suspected to suffer from Wolfram syndrome (WFS). A series of clinical examinations were performed, as well as direct DNA sequencing to screen the entire coding region of the WFS1 gene in the patient's family, including her parents and a brother. Ophthalmological examination revealed counting fingers/10 cm in the right eye and hand motions/10 cm in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopical examination identified bilateral optic atrophy without any signs of diabetic retinopathy. A hearing test was performed and revealed that the hearing ability for high frequency sounds was decreased. Urinary output in 24 h was >5,000 ml. In addition, a base substitution at c.2411T>C (Leu804Pro) in exon 8 was identified which was homozygous with the patient and heterozygous with the healthy parents and the brother. In the present case, a neuroophthalmology consult performed in the early stages of the disease was crucial for early diagnosis. In addition, this case study highlights the importance of performing a hearing test as well as collecting and analyzing 24‑h urine output in patients presenting with juvenile diabetes mellitus patients and optic atrophy without any signs of diabetic retinopathy.

  14. Cognitive and behavioral heterogeneity in genetic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz F.L. Pegoraro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: this study aimed to investigate the cognitive and behavioral profiles, as well as the psychiatric symptoms and disorders in children with three different genetic syndromes with similar sociocultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. METHODS: thirty-four children aged 6 to 16 years, with Williams-Beuren syndrome (n = 10, Prader-Willi syndrome (n = 11, and Fragile X syndrome (n = 13 from the outpatient clinics of Child Psychiatry and Medical Genetics Department were cognitively assessed through the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-III. Afterwards, a full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ, verbal IQ, performance IQ, standard subtest scores, as well as frequency of psychiatric symptoms and disorders were compared among the three syndromes. RESULTS: significant differences were found among the syndromes concerning verbal IQ and verbal and performance subtests. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that vocabulary and comprehension subtest scores were significantly higher in Williams-Beuren syndrome in comparison with Prader-Willi and Fragile X syndromes, and block design and object assembly scores were significantly higher in Prader-Willi syndrome compared with Williams-Beuren and Fragile X syndromes. Additionally, there were significant differences between the syndromes concerning behavioral features and psychiatric symptoms. The Prader-Willi syndrome group presented a higher frequency of hyperphagia and self-injurious behaviors. The Fragile X syndrome group showed a higher frequency of social interaction deficits; such difference nearly reached statistical significance. CONCLUSION: the three genetic syndromes exhibited distinctive cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric patterns.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: van der Woude syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency Van der Woude syndrome is believed to occur in 1 in 35,000 to 1 in 100,000 people, based on data from Europe and Asia. Van der Woude syndrome ...

  16. The molecular genetics of holoprosencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Erich; Muenke, Maximilian

    2010-02-15

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) has captivated the imagination of Man for millennia because its most extreme manifestation, the single-eyed cyclopic newborn infant, brings to mind the fantastical creature Cyclops from Greek mythology. Attempting to understand this common malformation of the forebrain in modern medical terms requires a systematic synthesis of genetic, cytogenetic, and environmental information typical for studies of a complex disorder. However, even with the advances in our understanding of HPE in recent years, there are significant obstacles remaining to fully understand its heterogeneity and extensive variability in phenotype. General lessons learned from HPE will likely be applicable to other malformation syndromes. Here we outline the common, and rare, genetic and environmental influences on this conserved developmental program of forebrain development and illustrate the similarities and differences between these malformations in humans and those of animal models. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Genetics and pathological mechanisms of Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Denise; Liu, Xue Z

    2010-06-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) comprises a group of autosomal recessively inherited disorders characterized by a dual sensory impairment of the audiovestibular and visual systems. Three major clinical subtypes (USH type I, USH type II and USH type III) are distinguished on the basis of the severity of the hearing loss, the presence or absence of vestibular dysfunction and the age of onset of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Since the cloning of the first USH gene (MYO7A) in 1995, there have been remarkable advances in elucidating the genetic basis for this disorder, as evidence for 11 distinct loci have been obtained and genes for 9 of them have been identified. The USH genes encode proteins of different classes and families, including motor proteins, scaffold proteins, cell adhesion molecules and transmembrane receptor proteins. Extensive information has emerged from mouse models and molecular studies regarding pathogenesis of this disorder and the wide phenotypic variation in both audiovestibular and/or visual function. A unifying hypothesis is that the USH proteins are integrated into a protein network that regulates hair bundle morphogenesis in the inner ear. This review addresses genetics and pathological mechanisms of USH. Understanding the molecular basis of phenotypic variation and pathogenesis of USH is important toward discovery of new molecular targets for diagnosis, prevention and treatment of this debilitating disorder.

  18. Genetic epidemiology of Down syndrome in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Manoochehr Shariati

    2005-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common autosomal abnormality and occurs in approximately 1 per 700 live births. Down syndrome accounts for about one third of all moderate and sever mental handicaps in school-aged children. To reveal genetic epidemiology of Down syndrome, 545 karyotypes of referred cases to the author were evaluated. The frequencies of three cytogenetic variants of Down syndrome were trisomy 21 (77.5%), mosaicism (18%) and chromosomal translocation (4.5%). Male to female ratio was 1...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Marfan syndrome Marfan syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Marfan syndrome KidsHealth from Nemours Foundation MalaCards: marfan syndrome Orphanet: Marfan syndrome Your Genes Your Health from Cold Spring ...

  20. Genetic analysis in Bartter syndrome from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pradeep Kumar; Saikia, Bhaskar; Sharma, Rachna; Ankur, Kumar; Khilnani, Praveen; Aggarwal, Vinay Kumar; Cheong, Hae

    2014-10-01

    Bartter syndrome is a group of inherited, salt-losing tubulopathies presenting as hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with normotensive hyperreninemia and hyperaldosteronism. Around 150 cases have been reported in literature till now. Mutations leading to salt losing tubulopathies are not routinely tested in Indian population. The authors have done the genetic analysis for the first time in the Bartter syndrome on two cases from India. First case was antenatal Bartter syndrome presenting with massive polyuria and hyperkalemia. Mutational analysis revealed compound heterozygous mutations in KCNJ1(ROMK) gene [p(Leu220Phe), p(Thr191Pro)]. Second case had a phenotypic presentation of classical Bartter syndrome however, genetic analysis revealed only heterozygous novel mutation in SLC12A gene p(Ala232Thr). Bartter syndrome is a clinical diagnosis and genetic analysis is recommended for prognostication and genetic counseling.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Turner syndrome Turner syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects development in ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Cockayne syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cockayne syndrome type II is also known as cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, and while some ... link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome Educational Resources (8 links) ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Usher syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Usher syndrome Usher syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Usher syndrome is a condition characterized by partial or total ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Bartter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Bartter syndrome Bartter syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Bartter syndrome is a group of very similar kidney disorders ...

  5. Cytogenetics and molecular genetics of Wilms' tumor of childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slater, R. M.; Mannens, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the way in which application of cytogenetic and molecular genetic techniques to the study of Wilms' tumor (WT) of the kidney and the associated congenital disorders, such as sporadic aniridia and the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, has led to identification of two regions on the short arm

  6. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  7. Genetic investigation into ethnic disparity in polycystic ovarian syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuxia; Zhu, Dongyi; Duan, Hongmei

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome is universally the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age. It is characterized by composite clinical phenotypes reflecting the reproductive impact of ovarian dysfunction (androgen excess, oligo-/anovulation, polycystic ovary) and metabolic abnormalities...... more efficient strategies for treatment and prevention of polycystic ovarian syndrome....... to unravel the molecular basis of the interethnic difference in the pathogenesis of the syndrome. It is hoped that identification and characterization of population-specific structural genetic and functional genomic patterns could help to not only deepen our understanding of the aetiology but also develop...

  8. [Wolfram syndrome: clinical and genetic analysis in two sisters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conart, J-B; Maalouf, T; Jonveaux, P; Guerci, B; Angioi, K

    2011-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a severe genetic disorder defined by the association of diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, and diabetes insipidus. Two sisters complained of progressive visual loss. Fundus examination evidenced optic atrophy. Their past medical history revealed diabetes mellitus and deafness since childhood. The association of these symptoms made the diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome possible. It was confirmed by molecular analysis, which evidenced composite WFS1 heterozygous mutations inherited from both their mother and father. Ophthalmologists should be aware of the possibility of Wolfram syndrome when diagnosing optic atrophy in diabetic children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. GENETIC PREDICTORS OF IDIOPATHIC SICK SINUS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Chernova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Published data demonstrating genetic determination of sick sinus syndrome is presented. The definition of this pathology is presented; the main symptoms are described, as well as genes that influence the development of idiopathic sick sinus syndrome, their polymorphisms and role in disorders of the cardiovascular system.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Andersen-Tawil syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ). The signs and symptoms of Andersen-Tawil syndrome ... Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic ... from the Nemours Foundation: Arrhythmias Merck Manual Consumer Version: Long QT Syndrome and Torsades de ...

  11. Genetics of migraine and related syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, Anine Henrike

    2014-01-01

    In this dissertation clinical genetic investigations on migraine, related syndromes and comorbid conditions are described. The first migraine syndrome studied is Familial Hemiplegic Migraine (FHM), a monogenic migraine variant. The clinical spectrum of FHM1-3 and the relation with closely related

  12. Hamartomatous polyps - a clinical and molecular genetic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    the knowledge on clinical course and molecular genetics in patients with HPs and HPS, and to investigate research participants' attitude towards the results of extensive genetic testing. Paper I: In the first paper we investigated the occurrence, anatomic distribution, and other demographics of juvenile polyps...... appearance. Patients with one or a few juvenile polyps are usually not offered clinical follow-up as the polyp(s) are considered not to harbour any malignant potential. Nevertheless, it is important to note that juvenile polyps and HPs are also found in patients with hereditary hamartomatous polyposis......-Jeghers syndrome, and the PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome. Currently, the HPS diagnoses are based on clinical criteria and are often assisted with genetic testing as candidate genes have been described for each syndrome. This thesis is based on six scientific papers. The overall aim of the studies was to expand...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Noonan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growth spurt that results in shortened stature. Most males with Noonan syndrome have undescended testes (cryptorchidism), which may contribute to infertility (inability to father a child) later in life. Females with Noonan syndrome can experience delayed puberty but ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Roberts syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feet are located very close to the body (phocomelia). People with Roberts syndrome may also have abnormal ... may live into adulthood. A condition called SC phocomelia syndrome was originally thought to be distinct from ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Sotos syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene are the primary cause of Sotos syndrome , accounting for up to 90 percent of cases. Other ... Sotos syndrome cases occur in people with no history of the disorder in their family. Most of ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Fraser syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FRAS1 gene mutations are the most common cause, accounting for about half of cases of Fraser syndrome . ... Fras1/Frem family of extracellular matrix proteins: structure, function, and association with Fraser syndrome and the mouse ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Jacobsen syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... compulsive behavior (such as shredding paper), a short attention span, and easy distractibility. Many people with Jacobsen syndrome have been diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Jacobsen syndrome is also ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Troyer syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bork P, Ciccarelli FD, Patton MA, McKusick VA, Crosby AH. SPG20 is mutated in Troyer syndrome, an ... Cross H, Patel H, Patton MA, Valentine A, Crosby AH. Troyer syndrome revisited. A clinical and radiological ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Gitelman syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MJ, Lifton RP, Simon DB; Yale Gitelman's and Bartter's Syndrome Collaborative Study Group. Gitelman's syndrome revisited: an evaluation ... chloride channel gene, CLCNKB, leading to a mixed Bartter-Gitelman phenotype. Pediatr Res. 2000 ... NV, Levtchenko EN. Gitelman syndrome. Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2008 Jul 30;3: ...

  20. RESEARCH NOTE Molecular genetic analysis of consanguineous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    Molecular genetic analysis of consanguineous families with primary microcephaly ... Translational Research Institute, Academic Health System, Hamad Medical ..... bridging the gap between homozygosity mapping and deep sequencing.

  1. Clinical and Molecular Genetic Analysis in Three Children with Wolfram Syndrome: A Novel WFS1 Mutation (c.2534T>A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelmeli, Gamze; Türkkahraman, Doğa; Çürek, Yusuf; Houghton, Jayne; Akçurin, Sema; Bircan, İffet

    2017-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in WFS1 gene. The clinical features include diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus (DM), optic atrophy, deafness, and other variable clinical manifestations. In this paper, we present the clinical and genetic characteristics of 3 WS patients from 3 unrelated Turkish families. Clinical characteristics of the patients and the age of onset of symptoms were quite different in each pedigree. The first two cases developed all symptoms of the disease in their first decade of life. The heterozygous father of case 2 was symptomatic with bilateral deafness. The first ocular finding of one patient (patient 3) was bilateral cataract which was accompanying DM as a first feature of the syndrome. In this patient's family, there were two members with features suggestive of WS. Previously known homozygous mutations, c.460+1G>A in intron 4 and c.1885C>T in exon 8, were identified in these cases. A novel homozygous c.2534T>A mutation was also detected in the exon 8 of WFS1 gene. Because of the rarity and heterogeneity of WS, detection of specific and nonspecific clinical signs including ocular findings and family history in non-autoimmune, insulinopenic diabetes cases should lead to a tentative diagnosis of WS. Genetic testing is required to confirm the diagnosis.

  2. Molecular genetics of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radice, P.; Pierotti, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    In the last two decades, molecular studies have enlightened the complexity of the genetic alterations that occur in breast cancer cells. To date, more than 40 different genes or loci have been found to be altered in breast carcinomas. Although some of these genes, as for example ERBB2, appear to be mutated in a high proportion of cases, their mechanism of action and their role in the different stages of cancer development are still poorly understood. More recently, two major determinants of the inherited predisposition to breast cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been isolated. As a consequence, it is now possible to screen families with a positive history of breast carcinomas for the identification of mutations carriers, in order to address these individuals into adequate programs of cancer surveillance and prevention

  3. Advances in molecular genetic studies of primary dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Ling-yan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dystonias are heterogeneous hyperkinetic movement disorders characterized by involuntary muscle contractions which result in twisting, repetitive movements and abnormal postures. In recent years, there was a great advance in molecular genetic studies of primary dystonia. This paper will review the clinical characteristics and molecular genetic studies of primary dystonia, including early-onset generalized torsion dystonia (DYT1, whispering dysphonia (DYT4, dopa-responsive dystonia (DYT5, mixed-type dystonia (DYT6, paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (DYT10, myoclonus-dystonia syndrome (DYT11, rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (DYT12, adult-onset cervical dystonia (DYT23, craniocervical dystonia (DYT24 and primary torsion dystonia (DYT25.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Jackson-Weiss syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jabs EW, Li X, Scott AF, Meyers G, Chen W, Eccles M, Mao JI, Charnas LR, Jackson CE, Jaye M. Jackson-Weiss and Crouzon syndromes are allelic with mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2. Nat Genet. 1994 Nov;8(3):275-9. Erratum in: Nat Genet 1995 Apr;9(4):451. Citation on PubMed Robin ...

  5. Genetic counseling and cascade genetic testing in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Heather

    2016-07-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of inherited colorectal and endometrial cancers. Individuals with Lynch syndrome have a 10-80 % lifetime risk for colorectal cancer and a 15-60 % lifetime risk for endometrial cancer. Both cancers are preventable through chemoprevention, intensive cancer surveillance, and risk-reducing surgery options. Efforts to identify as many individuals with Lynch syndrome as possible will prevent cancers and save lives. This includes the traditional cancer genetic counseling model whereby individuals with and without cancer are evaluated for a possible Lynch syndrome diagnosis based on their personal and family history of colon polyps and cancers. It also includes universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome whereby all individuals with colorectal or endometrial cancer are screened for tumor features of Lynch syndrome at the time of diagnosis. Those with tumors suspicious for Lynch syndrome are referred for cancer genetic counseling regardless of their family history of cancer. This two approaches must be maximized to attain high patient reach. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, cascade testing among the at-risk relatives of those diagnosed with Lynch syndrome is critically important to maximize the diagnosis of individuals with Lynch syndrome. In fact, the cost-effectiveness of universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome relies entirely on counseling and testing as many at-risk individuals as possible since young unaffected individuals stand to benefit the most from an early diagnosis of Lynch syndrome. This approach must be optimized to achieve high family reach. It will take a concerted effort from patients, clinicians and public health officials to improve current approaches to the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome and the prevention and treatment of Lynch syndrome-associated cancer but these lessons can be applied to other conditions as the ultimate example of personalized medicine.

  6. Periodontal disease in individuals with Down Syndrome: genetic focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lícia Bezerra Cavalcante

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental concepts of etiology, inheritance and clinical characteristics of Down syndrome are used in this review as a basis for submission of studies that focus on periodontal disease in individuals with Down syndrome, since almost 100% of them develop the disease in adult life. It is believed that in association with environmental and cultural factors related to hygiene and disabilities of coordination, the immunological characteristics that are found altered in individuals with Down syndrome, such as deficient neutrophil chemotaxis and reduced number of mature T lymphocytes, may contribute to the greater prevalence and severity of periodontal involvement in patients with Down syndrome. Moreover, the pattern of periodontal destruction observed in individuals with Down syndrome is consistent with aggressive periodontitis, with a predominance of periodontopathogens such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythensis during childhood and adolescence of Down’s syndrome patients. It is possible to note a relationship between the development of molecular techniques and the evolution of knowledge about Down syndrome, for example: identification of the trisomy syndrome by observing only part of chromosome 21 (distal long arm; identification of genes in this trisomic region and the pattern of superexpression (or not of these genes. Moreover, in this review future perspectives are presented with regard to better understanding Down syndrome in the genetic context, which will reflect in more individualized and effective clinical treatments that will provide these patients with a better quality of life.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Moebius syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Educational Resources (5 links) Children's Craniofacial Association: A Guide to Understanding Moebius Syndrome ( ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Kleefstra syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related Information How are genetic ... G, Tzioumi D, Sillence DO, Mowat D. Three patients with terminal deletions within the subtelomeric region of chromosome 9q. ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: PURA syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TJ, Vreeburg M, Rouhl RPW, Stevens SJC, Stegmann APA, Schieving J, Pfundt R, van Dijk K, Smeets ... article on PubMed Central More from Genetics Home Reference Bulletins Genetics Home Reference Celebrates Its 15th Anniversary ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Carpenter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deformed hips, a rounded upper back that also curves to the side ( kyphoscoliosis ), and knees that are ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Winchester syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bones ( osteoporosis ) throughout the skeleton. These abnormalities make bones brittle and more prone to fracture. The bone abnormalities ... information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common in particular ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Gillespie syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... generally become noticeable in early childhood when the individual is learning these skills. People with Gillespie syndrome usually continue ... syndrome is unknown. Only a few dozen affected individuals have been described in the medical ... accounts for about 2 percent of cases of aniridia . ...

  13. The familial hyperchylomicronemia syndrome: New insights into underlying genetic defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamarina-Fojo, S.; Brewer, H.B. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-02-20

    This case history reports the diagnosis of familial hyperchylomicronemia, a rare genetic syndrome inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. It is characterized by severe fasting hypertriglyceridemia and massive accumulations of chylomicrons in plasma. The two major molecular defects in the disease are a deficiency of lipoprotein lipase or of apo C-II. The location of the mutations in the human apolipoprotein (apo) C-II gene are identified.

  14. Investigation of 305 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and 20q deletion for associated cytogenetic and molecular genetic lesions and their prognostic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacher, Ulrike; Haferlach, Torsten; Schnittger, Susanne; Zenger, Melanie; Meggendorfer, Manja; Jeromin, Sabine; Roller, Andreas; Grossmann, Vera; Krauth, Maria-Theresa; Alpermann, Tamara; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    In patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), sole 20q deletion [del(20q)] is a recurrent favourable abnormality. We studied additional molecular and cytogenetic lesions and their prognostic impact in 305 MDS patients with del(20q) (229 males/76 females; 29-90 years). All patients were investigated by cytomorphology and chromosome banding analysis (CBA), subsets by fluorescence in situ hybridization, molecular mutation screening, and array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). By aCGH (n = 30), the minimal common deleted region (CDR) was flanked by PTPRT (20q13·11) and EYA2 (20q13·12). 210 (68·9%) patients had 'early MDS' without blast increase, 95 (31·1%) 'advanced' MDS with blast increase (5-19%). Additional chromosomal abnormalities (ACAs) were detected in 88/305 (28·9%) patients. Patients with advanced MDS more frequently had ACAs (P = 0·003) and had a higher mean number of ACAs (P = 0·020) and of molecular mutations (P = 0·060). Spliceosome mutations were frequent (U2AF1: n = 31/155; 20·0%; SRSF2: n = 31/159; 19·5%; SF3B1mut: n = 8/159; 5·0%). ASXL1mut (25/153; 16·3%) were associated with advanced MDS (P = 0·001). Presence of ≥3 ACAs (P = 0·003) and ASXL1mut (P = 0·002) were associated with worse 2-year survival. In conclusion, the cytogenetic subgroup of MDS with del(20q) has a good prognosis but may be further subclassified by additional cytogenetic and molecular lesions. U2AF1mut is overrepresented in MDS with del(20q), and ASXL1mut is prognostically adverse. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Meckel Syndrome: Genetics, Perinatal Findings, and Differential Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Meckel syndrome (MKS is a lethal, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by occipital encephalocele, bilateral renal cystic dysplasia, hepatic ductal proliferation, fibrosis and cysts, and polydactyly. Genetic heterogeneity of MKS has been established by three reported MKS loci, i.e., MKS1 on 17q23, MKS2 on 11q13, and MKS3 on 8q21.13-q22.1. MKS1 encodes a component of flagellar apparatus basal body proteome, which is associated with ciliary function. MKS3 encodes a seven-transmembrane receptor protein, meckelin. The identification of the MKS3 gene as well as the MKS1 gene enables molecular genetic testing for at-risk families, and allows accurate genetic counseling, carrier testing, and prenatal diagnosis. Pregnancies with MKS fetuses may be associated with an elevated maternal serum α-fetoprotein level and an abnormal screening result in the second-trimester maternal serum screening test. The classic MKS triad of occipital encephalocele, postaxial polydactyly, and bilateral enlarged multicystic kidneys can be diagnosed before the 14th gestational weeks by ultrasonography. However, later in pregnancy, severe oligohydramnios may make the diagnosis of polydactyly and encephalocele difficult. Differential diagnosis for MKS includes autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, trisomy 13, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, hydrolethalus syndrome, Senior-Loken syndrome, Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, and oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1. This article provides an overview of genetics, perinatal findings, and differential diagnosis of MKS. The ciliopathy underlies the pathogenesis of MKS. Prenatal diagnosis of bilateral enlarged multicystic kidneys should alert MKS and prompt a thorough investigation of central nervous system malformations and polydactyly.

  16. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families

    OpenAIRE

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S.; Karimi, Masoud; Silander, Gustav; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Aravidis, Christos; Nilbert, Mef; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, ha...

  17. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management.

  18. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-07-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Barth syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intelligence but often have difficulty performing tasks involving math or visual-spatial skills such as puzzles. Males with Barth syndrome have increased levels of a substance called 3-methylglutaconic acid in ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Clouston syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nakamura M, Farooq M, Fujikawa H, Kibbi AG, Ito M, Dahdah M, Matta M, Diab H, Shimomura Y. GJB6, of which mutations underlie Clouston syndrome, is a potential direct target gene of p63. J Dermatol Sci. 2013 Feb; ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Leigh syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome Overview. 2015 Oct 1. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Larsen syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Larsen syndrome can survive into adulthood and intelligence is unaffected. Related Information What does it mean ... B appears to be important for normal cell growth and division (proliferation) and maturation (differentiation) of chondrocytes ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Alagille syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abnormalities. This combination of heart defects is called tetralogy of Fallot . People with Alagille syndrome may have distinctive facial ... the disorder, such as a heart defect like tetralogy of Fallot, or a characteristic facial appearance. These individuals do ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Down syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called autism spectrum disorders, which affect communication and social interaction. People with Down syndrome often experience a gradual ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development GeneEd National Human Genome Research Institute National ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: CHARGE syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome are often born with an unusually small penis (micropenis) and undescended testes (cryptorchidism). Abnormalities of external genitalia are seen less often in affected females. Puberty can be incomplete or delayed in affected males ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Alport syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. ... is characterized by hematuria. Alport syndrome has autosomal dominant inheritance in about 5 percent of cases. People ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Meckel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when a structure called the neural tube, a layer of cells that ultimately develops into the brain and spinal cord, fails to close completely during the first few weeks of embryonic development. Meckel syndrome can also cause problems with ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Emanuel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Emanuel syndrome include an unusually small head ( microcephaly ), distinctive facial features, and a small lower jaw ( ... MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Cleft Lip and Palate MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Microcephaly MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Preauricular Tag or Pit General Information ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Feingold syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feingold syndrome include an unusually small head size ( microcephaly ), a small jaw ( micrognathia ), a narrow opening of ... Duodenal Atresia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Esophageal Atresia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Microcephaly MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Webbing of the Fingers or Toes ...

  10. Genetic basis of Bartter syndrome in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Beom Hee; Cho, Hee Yeon; Lee, HyunKyung; Han, Kyoung Hee; Kang, Hee Gyung; Ha, Il Soo; Lee, Joo Hoon; Park, Young Seo; Shin, Jae Il; Lee, Dae-Yeol; Kim, Su-Yung; Choi, Yong; Cheong, Hae Il

    2012-04-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) is clinically classified into antenatal or neonatal BS (aBS) and classic BS (cBS) as well as five subtypes based on the underlying mutant gene; SLC12A1 (BS I), KCNJ1 (BS II), CLCNKB (BS III), BSND (BS IV) and CASR (BS V). Clinico-genetic features of a nationwide cohort of 26 Korean children with BS were investigated. The clinical diagnosis was aBS in 8 (30.8%), cBS in 15 (57.7%) and mixed Bartter-Gitelman phenotype in 3 cases (11.5%). Five of eight patients with aBS and all 18 patients with either cBS or mixed Bartter-Gitelman phenotype had CLCNKB mutations. Among the 23 patients (46 alleles) with CLCNKB mutations, p.W610X and large deletions were detected in 25 (54.3%) and 10 (21.7%) alleles, respectively. There was no genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with CLCNKB mutations. Twenty-three (88.5%) of the 26 BS patients involved in this study had CLCNKB mutations. The p.W610X mutation and large deletion were two common types of mutations in CLCNKB. The clinical manifestations of BS III were heterogeneous without a genotype-phenotype correlation, typically manifesting cBS phenotype but also aBS or mixed Bartter-Gitelman phenotypes. The molecular diagnostic steps for patients with BS in our population should be designed taking these peculiar genotype distributions into consideration, and a new more clinically relevant classification including BS and Gitelman syndrome is required.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: ADNP syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if a disorder seems to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and ... It is estimated to account for 0.17 percent of all cases of autism spectrum disorder, making it one of the most common ...

  12. Targeted next generation sequencing for molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparisi, María J; Aller, Elena; Fuster-García, Carla; García-García, Gema; Rodrigo, Regina; Vázquez-Manrique, Rafael P; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Ayuso, Carmen; Roux, Anne-Françoise; Jaijo, Teresa; Millán, José M

    2014-11-18

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease that associates sensorineural hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. To date, 10 genes have been associated with the disease, making its molecular diagnosis based on Sanger sequencing, expensive and time-consuming. Consequently, the aim of the present study was to develop a molecular diagnostics method for Usher syndrome, based on targeted next generation sequencing. A custom HaloPlex panel for Illumina platforms was designed to capture all exons of the 10 known causative Usher syndrome genes (MYO7A, USH1C, CDH23, PCDH15, USH1G, CIB2, USH2A, GPR98, DFNB31 and CLRN1), the two Usher syndrome-related genes (HARS and PDZD7) and the two candidate genes VEZT and MYO15A. A cohort of 44 patients suffering from Usher syndrome was selected for this study. This cohort was divided into two groups: a test group of 11 patients with known mutations and another group of 33 patients with unknown mutations. Forty USH patients were successfully sequenced, 8 USH patients from the test group and 32 patients from the group composed of USH patients without genetic diagnosis. We were able to detect biallelic mutations in one USH gene in 22 out of 32 USH patients (68.75%) and to identify 79.7% of the expected mutated alleles. Fifty-three different mutations were detected. These mutations included 21 missense, 8 nonsense, 9 frameshifts, 9 intronic mutations and 6 large rearrangements. Targeted next generation sequencing allowed us to detect both point mutations and large rearrangements in a single experiment, minimizing the economic cost of the study, increasing the detection ratio of the genetic cause of the disease and improving the genetic diagnosis of Usher syndrome patients.

  13. Advances in genetics. Volume 22: Molecular genetics of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scandalios, J.G.; Caspari, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains the following four chapters: Structural Variation in Mitochondrial DNA; The Structure and Expression of Nuclear Genes in Higher Plants; Chromatin Structure and Gene Regulation in Higher Plants; and The Molecular Genetics of Crown Gall Tumorigenesis

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Liddle syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3. Citation on PubMed Snyder PM, Price MP, McDonald FJ, Adams CM, Volk KA, Zeiher BG, Stokes ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Andermann syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FQ, Mercado A, Siesser WB, George AL Jr, McDonald MP, Bouchard JP, Mathieu J, Delpire E, Rouleau ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Renpenning syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21. Citation on PubMed Tapia VE, Nicolaescu E, McDonald CB, Musi V, Oka T, Inayoshi Y, Satteson ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Miller syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sangiorgi E, Neri G. Limb anomalies: Developmental and evolutionary aspects. Am J Med Genet. 2002 Dec 30; ... genome editing and CRISPR-Cas9? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Alopecia areata ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Joubert syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as Ashkenazi Jewish, French-Canadian, and Hutterite populations. Related Information What information about a genetic condition ... of many types of cells, including brain cells (neurons) and certain cells in the kidneys and liver. ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Kabuki syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also have seizures, an unusually small head size ( microcephaly ), or weak muscle tone (hypotonia). Some have eye ... Syndrome ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (2 links) ...

  20. Genetic Susceptibility and Neurotransmitters in Tourette Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paschou, Peristera; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Sharp, Frank; Heiman, Gary A.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Martino, D; Cavanna, AE

    2013-01-01

    Family studies have consistently shown that Tourette syndrome (TS) is a familial disorder and twin studies have clearly indicated a genetic contribution in the etiology of TS. Whereas early segregation studies of TS suggested a single-gene autosomal dominant disorder, later studies have pointed to

  1. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be something about the ring structure itself that causes epilepsy. Seizures may occur because certain genes on the ... mapping of telomeric 14q32 deletions: search for the cause of seizures. Am J Med Genet A. ... L, Elia M, Vigevano F. Epilepsy in ring 14 chromosome syndrome. Epilepsy Behav. 2012 ...

  2. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  3. The genetic basis of colonic adenomatous polyposis syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talseth-Palmer, Bente A

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common forms of cancer worldwide and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) accounts for approximately 1% of all CRCs. Adenomatous polyposis syndromes can be divided into; familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) - classic FAP and attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis (AFAP), MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), NTHL1-associated polyposis (NAP) and polymerase proofreading-associated polyposis (PPAP). The polyposis syndromes genetics and clinical manifestation of disease varies and cases with clinical diagnosis of FAP might molecularly show a different diagnosis. This review examines different aspects of the adenomatous polyposis syndromes genetics and clinical manifestation of disease; in addition the genotype-phenotype and modifier alleles of FAP will be discussed. New technology has made it possible to diagnose some of the APC mutation negative patients into their respective syndromes. There still remain many molecularly undiagnosed adenomatous polyposis patients indicating that there remain causative genes to be discovered and with today's technology these are expected to be identified in the near future. The knowledge about the role of modifier alleles in FAP will contribute to improved pre-symptomatic diagnosis and treatment. New novel mutations will continually be discovered in genes already associated with disease and new genes will be discovered that are associated with adenomatous polyposis. The search for modifier alleles in FAP should be made a priority.

  4. Protocols in human molecular genetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathew, Christopher G

    1991-01-01

    ... sequences has led to the development of DNA fingerprinting. The application of these techniques to the study of the human genome has culminated in major advances such as the cloning of the cystic fibrosis gene, the construction of genetic linkage maps of each human chromosome, the mapping of many genes responsible for human inherited disorders, genet...

  5. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale. E. Santos, M. Matos, P. Silva, A. M. Figueiras, C. Benito and O. Pinto-Carnide. J. Genet. 95, 273–281. Table 1. RAPD and ISSR primers used in this study. Primer. 5 –3. Primer. 5 –3. RAPDs (Operon). A1. CAGGCCCTTC. C5. CATGACCGCC. A4. AATCGGGCTG. C6.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Chediak-Higashi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 68(2):283-303. Review. Citation on PubMed Kaplan J, De Domenico I, Ward DM. Chediak-Higashi ... 22. Citation on PubMed Ward DM, Shiflett SL, Kaplan J. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: a clinical and molecular ...

  7. Utility of Post-Mortem Genetic Testing in Cases of Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahrouchi, Najim; Raju, Hariharan; Lodder, Elisabeth M.; Papatheodorou, Efstathios; Ware, James S.; Papadakis, Michael; Tadros, Rafik; Cole, Della; Skinner, Jonathan R.; Crawford, Jackie; Love, Donald R.; Pua, Chee J.; Soh, Bee Y.; Bhalshankar, Jaydutt D.; Govind, Risha; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Winkel, Bo G.; van der Werf, Christian; Wijeyeratne, Yanushi D.; Mellor, Greg; Till, Jan; Cohen, Marta C.; Tome-Esteban, Maria; Sharma, Sanjay; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Cook, Stuart A.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Sheppard, Mary N.; Behr, Elijah R.

    2017-01-01

    Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) describes a sudden death with negative autopsy and toxicological analysis. Cardiac genetic disease is a likely etiology. This study investigated the clinical utility and combined yield of post-mortem genetic testing (molecular autopsy) in cases of SADS and

  8. Utility of Post-Mortem Genetic Testing in Cases of Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahrouchi, Najim; Raju, Hariharan; Lodder, Elisabeth M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) describes a sudden death with negative autopsy and toxicological analysis. Cardiac genetic disease is a likely etiology. OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the clinical utility and combined yield of post-mortem genetic testing (molecular autopsy...

  9. Primary cardiac tumors associated with genetic syndromes. A comprehensive review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Elizabeth; Agarwal, Prachi P. [University of Michigan Health System, University Hospital Division of Cardiothoracic Radiology, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mahani, Maryam Ghadimi [University of Michigan Health System, University Hospital Division of Cardiothoracic Radiology, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lu, Jimmy C.; Dorfman, Adam L. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Srinivasan, Ashok [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2018-02-15

    Various cardiac tumors occur in the setting of a genetic syndrome such as myxomas in Carney complex and rhabdomyomas in tuberous sclerosis. Tumor biology can be different in syndromic forms, and on imaging children sometimes demonstrate additional manifestations of the underlying syndrome. We discuss the imaging appearance of cardiac tumors occurring in the framework of a genetic syndrome, the findings that suggest an underlying syndrome, and the impact on management. (orig.)

  10. Primary cardiac tumors associated with genetic syndromes. A comprehensive review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Elizabeth; Agarwal, Prachi P.; Mahani, Maryam Ghadimi; Lu, Jimmy C.; Dorfman, Adam L.; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2018-01-01

    Various cardiac tumors occur in the setting of a genetic syndrome such as myxomas in Carney complex and rhabdomyomas in tuberous sclerosis. Tumor biology can be different in syndromic forms, and on imaging children sometimes demonstrate additional manifestations of the underlying syndrome. We discuss the imaging appearance of cardiac tumors occurring in the framework of a genetic syndrome, the findings that suggest an underlying syndrome, and the impact on management. (orig.)

  11. [Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, a Noonan syndrome related disorder: clinical and molecular findings in 11 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcavilla, Atilano; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Pérez-Aytés, Antonio; Vendrell, Teresa; Pinto, Isabel; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; González-Meneses, Antonio; Aoki, Yoko; Grinberg, Daniel; Ezquieta, Begoña

    2015-01-20

    To describe 11 patients with cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC) and compare them with 130 patients with other RAS-MAPK syndromes (111 Noonan syndrome patients [NS] and 19 patients with LEOPARD syndrome). Clinical data from patients submitted for genetic analysis were collected. Bidirectional sequencing analysis of PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, BRAF, and MAP2K1 focused on exons carrying recurrent mutations, and of all KRAS exons were performed. Six different mutations in BRAF were identified in 9 patients, as well as 2 MAP2K1 mutations. Short stature, developmental delay, language difficulties and ectodermal anomalies were more frequent in CFC patients when compared with other neuro-cardio-faciocutaneous syndromes (P<.05). In at least 2 cases molecular testing helped reconsider the diagnosis. CFC patients showed a rather severe phenotype but at least one patient with BRAF mutation showed no developmental delay, which illustrates the variability of the phenotypic spectrum caused by BRAF mutations. Molecular genetic testing is a valuable tool for differential diagnosis of CFC and NS related disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic alterations in syndromes with oral manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy Anuthama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since Gregor Johan Mendel proposed the law of inheritance, genetics has transcended the field of health and has entered all walks of life in its application. Thus, the gene is the pivoting factor for all happenings revolving around it. Knowledge of gene mapping in various diseases would be a valuable tool in prenatally diagnosing the condition and averting the future disability and stigma for the posterity. This article includes an array of genetically determined conditions in patients seen at our college out-patient department with complete manifestation, partial manifestation and array of manifestations not fitting into a particular syndrome.

  13. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Down syndrome pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu; XU Chen-ming; ZHU Yi-min; DONG Min-yue; QIAN Yu-li; JIN Fan; HUANG He-feng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) conducted for women who had Down syndrome pregnancy previously. Methods: Trisomy 21 was diagnosed by using fluorescence in site hybridization (FISH) before embryo transfer in two women who had Down syndrome pregnancies. Each received one or two PGD cycles respectively. Results:Case 1: one PGD cycle was conducted, two oocytes were fertilized and biopsied. One embryo is of trisomy 21 and the other of monosomy 21. No embryo was transferred. Case 2: two PGD cycles were conducted, in total, sixteen oocytes were fertilized and biopsied. Four embryos were tested to be normal, six of trisomy 21, and one of monosomy 21. Five had no signal. Four normal embryos were transferred but no pregnancy resulted. Conclusion: For couples who had pregnancies with Down syndrome previously, PGD can be considered, and has been shown to be an effective strategy.

  14. Bacteria, genetics and irritable bowel syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Craig, Orla F

    2010-06-01

    EVALUATION OF: Villani AC, Lemire M, Thabane M et al. Genetic risk factors for post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome following a waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis. Gastroenterology 138, 1502-1513 (2010). While the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains to be fully defined, two clinical observations - the occurrence, de novo, of IBS following bacterial gastroenteritis and the history, commonly obtained from IBS patients, of other instances of the syndrome within their families - have instigated investigations, in IBS, of the potential roles, on the one hand, of the gut microbiota and the host response and, on the other hand, of genetic factors. The study reviewed here relates to both of these factors by studying genetic predisposition to postinfective IBS in a large population of individuals who were exposed to a multimicrobial enteric infection, which resulted in a severe outbreak of gastroenteritis and was followed by the development of IBS in over a third. In this detailed study, the investigators identified a number of genes that were linked significantly to the development of postinfectious-IBS in the Toll-like receptor 9, IL-6 and cadherin 1 regions. These genes play important roles in bacterial recognition, the inflammatory response and epithelial integrity, respectively, and provide considerable support for the hypothesis that links IBS onset to disturbances in the microbiota and the host response.

  15. Potential genetic polymorphisms predicting polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Chen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a heterogenous endocrine disorder with typical symptoms of oligomenorrhoea, hyperandrogenism, hirsutism, obesity, insulin resistance and increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Extensive evidence indicates that PCOS is a genetic disease and numerous biochemical pathways have been linked with its pathogenesis. A number of genes from these pathways have been investigated, which include those involved with steroid hormone biosynthesis and metabolism, action of gonadotropin and gonadal hormones, folliculogenesis, obesity and energy regulation, insulin secretion and action and many others. In this review, we summarize the historical and recent findings in genetic polymorphisms of PCOS from the relevant publications and outline some genetic polymorphisms that are potentially associated with the risk of PCOS. This information could uncover candidate genes associating with PCOS, which will be valuable for the development of novel diagnostic and treatment platforms for PCOS patients.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Sjögren-Larsson syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Sjögren-Larsson syndrome Sjögren-Larsson syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All ... FALDH deficiency fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase deficiency ichthyosis oligophrenia syndrome Sjogren-Larsson syndrome SLS Related Information How are genetic ...

  17. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  18. NIH Researchers Find Potential Genetic Cause of Cushing Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017 NIH researchers find potential genetic cause of Cushing syndrome Finding may lead to therapies that prevent pituitary ... mutations in the gene CABLES1 may lead to Cushing syndrome, a rare disorder in which the body overproduces ...

  19. Molecular species identification and population genetics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular genetic techniques, such as DNA barcoding and genotyping, are increasingly being used to assist with the conservation and management of chondrichthyans worldwide. Southern Africa is a shark biodiversity hotspot, with a large number of endemic species. According to the IUCN Red List, a quarter of South ...

  20. A molecular genetic toolbox for Yarrowia lipolytica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredeweg, Erin L.; Pomraning, Kyle R.; Dai, Ziyu

    2017-01-01

    used these tools to build the "Yarrowia lipolytica Cell Atlas," a collection of strains with endogenous fluorescently tagged organelles in the same genetic background, in order to define organelle morphology in live cells. Conclusions: These molecular and isogenetic tools are useful for live assessment...

  1. Molecular markers unravel intraspecific and interspecific genetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Kotwal S., Dhar M. K., Kour B., Raj K. and Kaul S. 2013 Molecular markers unravel intraspecific and interspecific genetic variability in ... of bowel problems including chronic constipation, amoebic ..... while to select parents from accessions, Pov80 and Pov79 ... nology (DBT), Govt. of India, for financial assistance in the form.

  2. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The objective of this study was to quantify the molecular diversity and to determine the genetic relationships amongSecalespp. and among cultivars ofSecale ... Faculty of Sciences, Campo Grande, Lisboa, Portugal; Departamento de Genética, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad Complutense, C/ José Antonio Novais, 12, ...

  3. Molecular genetics in affective illness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendlewicz, J.; Sevy, S.; Mendelbaum, K. (Erasme Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium))

    1993-01-01

    Genetic transmission in manic depressive illness (MDI) has been explored in twins, adoption, association, and linkage studies. The X-linked transmission hypothesis has been tested by using several markers on chromosome X: Xg blood group, color blindness, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), factor IX (hemophilia B), and DNA probes such as DXS15, DXS52, F8C, ST14. The hypothesis of autosomal transmission has been tested by association studies with the O blood group located on chromosome 9, as well as linkage studies on chromosome 6 with the Human Leucocyte Antigens (HLA) haplotypes and on Chromosome 11 with DNA markers for the following genes: D2 dopamine receptor, tyrosinase, C-Harvey-Ras-A (HRAS) oncogene, insuline (ins), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Although linkage studies support the hypothesis of a major locus for the transmission of MDI in the Xq27-28 region, several factors are limiting the results, and are discussed in the present review. 105 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. The Molecular Genetics of von Willebrand Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergül Berber

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative and/or qualitative deficiency of von Willebrand factor (vWF is associated with the most common inherited bleeding disease von Willebrand disease (vWD. vWD is a complex disease with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Incomplete penetrance and variable expression due to genetic and environmental factors contribute to its complexity. vWD also has a complex molecular pathogenesis. Some vWF gene mutations are associated with the affected vWF biosynthesis and multimerization, whereas others are associated with increased clearance and functional impairment. Moreover, in addition to a particular mutation, type O blood may result in the more severe phenotype. The present review aimed to provide a summary of the current literature on the molecular genetics of vWD.

  5. The molecular genetics of von Willebrand disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Ergül

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative and/or qualitative deficiency of von Willebrand factor (vWF) is associated with the most common inherited bleeding disease von Willebrand disease (vWD). vWD is a complex disease with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Incomplete penetrance and variable expression due to genetic and environmental factors contribute to its complexity. vWD also has a complex molecular pathogenesis. Some vWF gene mutations are associated with the affected vWF biosynthesis and multimerization, whereas others are associated with increased clearance and functional impairment. Moreover, in addition to a particular mutation, type O blood may result in the more severe phenotype. The present review aimed to provide a summary of the current literature on the molecular genetics of vWD. None declared.

  6. Molecular genetics of dyslexia: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion-Castillo, Amaia; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E

    2013-11-01

    Dyslexia is a highly heritable learning disorder with a complex underlying genetic architecture. Over the past decade, researchers have pinpointed a number of candidate genes that may contribute to dyslexia susceptibility. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art, describing how studies have moved from mapping potential risk loci, through identification of associated gene variants, to characterization of gene function in cellular and animal model systems. Work thus far has highlighted some intriguing mechanistic pathways, such as neuronal migration, axon guidance, and ciliary biology, but it is clear that we still have much to learn about the molecular networks that are involved. We end the review by highlighting the past, present, and future contributions of the Dutch Dyslexia Programme to studies of genetic factors. In particular, we emphasize the importance of relating genetic information to intermediate neurobiological measures, as well as the value of incorporating longitudinal and developmental data into molecular designs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Cognitive and behavioral heterogeneity in genetic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz F.L. Pegoraro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: this study aimed to investigate the cognitive and behavioral profiles, as well as the psychiatric symptoms and disorders in children with three different genetic syndromes with similar sociocultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Methods: thirty-four children aged 6 to 16 years, with Williams-Beuren syndrome (n = 10, Prader-Willi syndrome (n = 11, and Fragile X syndrome (n = 13 from the outpatient clinics of Child Psychiatry and Medical Genetics Department were cognitively assessed through the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-III. Afterwards, a full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ, verbal IQ, performance IQ, standard subtest scores, as well as frequency of psychiatric symptoms and disorders were compared among the three syndromes. Results: significant differences were found among the syndromes concerning verbal IQ and verbal and performance subtests. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that vocabulary and comprehension subtest scores were significantly higher in Williams-Beuren syndrome in comparison with Prader-Willi and Fragile X syndromes, and block design and object assembly scores were significantly higher in Prader-Willi syndrome compared with Williams-Beuren and Fragile X syndromes. Additionally, there were significant differences between the syndromes concerning behavioral features and psychiatric symptoms. The Prader-Willi syndrome group presented a higher frequency of hyperphagia and self-injurious behaviors. The Fragile X syndrome group showed a higher frequency of social interaction deficits; such difference nearly reached statistical significance. Conclusion: the three genetic syndromes exhibited distinctive cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric patterns. Resumo: Objetivo: investigar o perfil cognitivo e comportamental, sintomas e transtornos psiquiátricos em crianças com três diferentes síndromes genéticas, com antecedentes socioculturais e socioeconômicos semelhantes. Métodos: trinta e quatro

  8. History, genetics, and strategies for cancer prevention in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastrinos, Fay; Stoffel, Elena M

    2014-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the third cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. The majority of CRC cases diagnosed annually are due to sporadic events, but up to 6% are attributed to known monogenic disorders that confer a markedly increased risk for the development of CRC and multiple extracolonic malignancies. Lynch syndrome is the most common inherited CRC syndrome and is associated with mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes, mainly MLH1 and MSH2 but also MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM. Although the risk of CRC and endometrial cancer may approach near 75% and 50%, respectively, in gene mutation carriers, the identification of these individuals and at-risk family members through predictive genetic testing provides opportunities for cancer prevention including specialized cancer screening, intensified surveillance, and/or prophylactic surgeries. This article will provide a review of the major advances in risk assessment, molecular genetics, DNA mutational analyses, and cancer prevention and management made since Lynch syndrome was first described 100 years ago. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. INHERITED PATHOLOGY OF β2-LAMININ (PIERSON SYNDROME: CLINICAL AND GENETIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Yu. Kagan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For the last decade a great successes were attained in the study of molecular bases of glomerular diseases. It was certain that the most frequent reasons of congenital and infantile nephrotic syndrome are mutations in the genes of NPHS1, NPHS2, and WT1. Nevertheless, until now, a number of patients, having combination of early nephrotic syndrome with inherent pathology of other organs, which etiology remains un known. These cases continue to be intensively probed. One of the most important recent achievements in understanding of molecular mechanisms of early nephrotic syndrome is the discovery of mutations of gene of LAMB2, encoding β2 laminin, as the cause of Pearson syndrome (OMIM#609049. In this article the author presents the basic genetic and clinical descriptions of this recently identified pathology. Key words: Pearson syndrome, congenital nephrotic syndrome, β2 laminin, malformation of organ of vision. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:114-117

  10. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis in Marfan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Vlahos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS is a systemic hereditable disorder of the connective tissue with mainly cardiovascular manifestations, such as aortic dilatation and dissection. We describe a case of a 32-year-old Caucasian woman, clinically asymptomatic with MFS who presented for genetic consultation to prevent the transmission of disease to her offspring. She underwent controlled ovarian stimulation (COH, in vitro fertilization (IVF combined with preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD, and a singleton pregnancy with positive fetal heart rate was revealed. At 34 weeks’ gestation she delivered vaginally a healthy premature male infant weighting 2440 gr. The patient remained asymptomatic during pregnancy, delivery, and 3 months postpartum. It is has to be mentioned that the availability of PGD is essential to prevent the transmission of disease to the next generation.

  11. Genetic testing in inherited polyposis syndromes - how and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G H; Payne, S J; Melville, A; Clark, S K

    2014-08-01

    There have been recent advances in genetic testing enabling accurate diagnosis of polyposis syndromes by identifying causative gene mutations, which is essential in the management of individuals with polyposis syndrome and predictive genetic testing of their extended families. There are some similarities in clinical presentation of various polyposis syndromes, which may pose a challenge to diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation of the main polyposis syndromes and the process of genetic testing, including the latest advancement and future of genetic testing. We aim to reiterate the importance of genetic testing in the management of polyposis syndromes, potential pitfalls associated with genetic testing and recommendations for healthcare professionals involved with the care of polyposis patients. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Primary Molecular Disorders and Secondary Biological Adaptations in Bartter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschênes, Georges; Fila, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Bartter syndrome is a hereditary disorder that has been characterized by the association of hypokalemia, alkalosis, and the hypertrophy of the juxtaglomerular complex with secondary hyperaldosteronism and normal blood pressure. By contrast, the genetic causes of Bartter syndrome primarily affect molecular structures directly involved in the sodium reabsorption at the level of the Henle loop. The ensuing urinary sodium wasting and chronic sodium depletion are responsible for the contraction of the extracellular volume, the activation of the renin-aldosterone axis, the secretion of prostaglandins, and the biological adaptations of downstream tubular segments, meaning the distal convoluted tubule and the collecting duct. These secondary biological adaptations lead to hypokalemia and alkalosis, illustrating a close integration of the solutes regulation in the tubular structures. PMID:21941653

  13. Primary Molecular Disorders and Secondary Biological Adaptations in Bartter Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Deschênes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartter syndrome is a hereditary disorder that has been characterized by the association of hypokalemia, alkalosis, and the hypertrophy of the juxtaglomerular complex with secondary hyperaldosteronism and normal blood pressure. By contrast, the genetic causes of Bartter syndrome primarily affect molecular structures directly involved in the sodium reabsorption at the level of the Henle loop. The ensuing urinary sodium wasting and chronic sodium depletion are responsible for the contraction of the extracellular volume, the activation of the renin-aldosterone axis, the secretion of prostaglandins, and the biological adaptations of downstream tubular segments, meaning the distal convoluted tubule and the collecting duct. These secondary biological adaptations lead to hypokalemia and alkalosis, illustrating a close integration of the solutes regulation in the tubular structures.

  14. Molecular genetics of inherited eye disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I M; Sasi, R

    1994-10-01

    In the past 10 y, there have been considerable advances in the mapping, isolation, and characterization of many genes for important ocular conditions: retinitis pigmentosa, Norrie disease, Waardenburg syndrome, choroideremia, aniridia, retinoblastoma, and others. The candidate gene approach has now supplemented classical linkage studies and positional cloning in the investigation of ocular disorders. Developmentally expressed genes and animal models have provided insights as to the etiology of other disorders. With this knowledge at hand, genetic counselling for heritable eye diseases has been greatly improved.

  15. Supporting Children with Genetic Syndromes in the Classroom: The Example of 22q Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Colin; Stedman, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of children are likely to have a known genetic cause for their special educational needs. One such genetic condition is 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS), a genetic syndrome associated with early speech and language difficulties, global and specific cognitive impairments, difficulties with attention and difficulties with…

  16. Guidelines on the use of molecular genetics in reintroduction programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael K. Schwartz

    2005-01-01

    The use of molecular genetics can play a key role in reintroduction efforts. Prior to the introduction of any individuals, molecular genetics can be used to identify the most appropriate source population for the reintroduction, ensure that no relic populations exist in the reintroduction area, and guide captive breeding programs. The use of molecular genetics post-...

  17. Molecular marker systems for Oenothera genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauwolf, Uwe; Golczyk, Hieronim; Meurer, Jörg; Herrmann, Reinhold G; Greiner, Stephan

    2008-11-01

    The genus Oenothera has an outstanding scientific tradition. It has been a model for studying aspects of chromosome evolution and speciation, including the impact of plastid nuclear co-evolution. A large collection of strains analyzed during a century of experimental work and unique genetic possibilities allow the exchange of genetically definable plastids, individual or multiple chromosomes, and/or entire haploid genomes (Renner complexes) between species. However, molecular genetic approaches for the genus are largely lacking. In this study, we describe the development of efficient PCR-based marker systems for both the nuclear genome and the plastome. They allow distinguishing individual chromosomes, Renner complexes, plastomes, and subplastomes. We demonstrate their application by monitoring interspecific exchanges of genomes, chromosome pairs, and/or plastids during crossing programs, e.g., to produce plastome-genome incompatible hybrids. Using an appropriate partial permanent translocation heterozygous hybrid, linkage group 7 of the molecular map could be assigned to chromosome 9.8 of the classical Oenothera map. Finally, we provide the first direct molecular evidence that homologous recombination and free segregation of chromosomes in permanent translocation heterozygous strains is suppressed.

  18. Challenging behavior: Behavioral phenotypes of some genetic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buha Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Challenging behavior in individuals with mental retardation (MR is relatively frequent, and represents a significant obstacle to adaptive skills. The frequency of specific forms and manifestations of challenging behavior can depend on a variety of personal and environmental factors. There are several prominent theoretical models regarding the etiology of challenging behavior and psychopathology in persons with MR: behavioral, developmental, socio-cultural and biological. The biological model emphasizes the physiological, biochemical and genetic factors as the potential source of challenging behavior. The progress in the field of genetics and neuroscience has opened the opportunity to study and discover the neurobiological basis of phenotypic characteristics. Genetic syndromes associated with MR can be followed by a specific set of problems and disorders which constitutes their behavioral phenotype. The aim of this paper was to present challenging behaviors that manifest in the most frequently studied syndromes: Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Williams syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome. The concept of behavioral phenotype implies a higher probability of manifesting specific developmental characteristics and specific behaviors in individuals with a certain genetic syndrome. Although the specific set of (possible problems and disorders is distinctive for the described genetic syndromes, the connection between genetics and behavior should be viewed through probabilistic dimension. The probabilistic concept takes into consideration the possibility of intra-syndrome variability in the occurrence, intensity and time onset of behavioral characteristics, at which the higher variability the lower is the specificity of the genetic syndrome. Identifying the specific pattern of behavior can be most important for the process of early diagnosis and prognosis. In addition, having knowledge about behavioral phenotype can be a landmark in

  19. Usher syndrome: an effective sequencing approach to establish a genetic and clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarduzzi, S; Vozzi, D; Morgan, A; Rubinato, E; D'Eustacchio, A; Osland, T M; Rossi, C; Graziano, C; Castorina, P; Ambrosetti, U; Morgutti, M; Girotto, G

    2015-02-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, sensorineural hearing loss and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and, to date, mutations in 11 genes have been described. This finding makes difficult to get a precise molecular diagnosis and offer patients accurate genetic counselling. To overcome this problem and to increase our knowledge of the molecular basis of Usher syndrome, we designed a targeted resequencing custom panel. In a first validation step a series of 16 Italian patients with known molecular diagnosis were analysed and 31 out of 32 alleles were detected (97% of accuracy). After this step, 31 patients without a molecular diagnosis were enrolled in the study. Three out of them with an uncertain Usher diagnosis were excluded. One causative allele was detected in 24 out 28 patients (86%) while the presence of both causative alleles characterized 19 patients out 28 (68%). Sixteen novel and 27 known alleles were found in the following genes: USH2A (50%), MYO7A (7%), CDH23 (11%), PCDH15 (7%) and USH1G (2%). Overall, on the 44 patients the protocol was able to characterize 74 alleles out of 88 (84%). These results suggest that our panel is an effective approach for the genetic diagnosis of Usher syndrome leading to: 1) an accurate molecular diagnosis, 2) better genetic counselling, 3) more precise molecular epidemiology data fundamental for future interventional plans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [22q11.2DS Syndrome as a Genetic Subtype of Schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Rodríguez, Cindy Katherin; Payán-Gómez, César; Forero-Castro, Ruth Maribel

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is associated with the microdeletion of this chromosomal region, and represents the second most common genetic syndrome after Down's syndrome. In patients with schizophrenia, 22q11.2DS has a prevalence of 2%, and in selected groups can be increased to between 32-53%. To describe the generalities of 22q11.2DS syndrome as a genetic subtype of schizophrenia, its clinical characteristics, molecular genetic aspects, and frequency in different populations. A review was performed from 1967 to 2013 in scientific databases, compiling articles about 22q11.2DS syndrome and its association with schizophrenia. The 22q11.2 DS syndrome has a variable phenotype associated with other genetic syndromes, birth defects in many tissues and organs, and a high rate of psychiatric disorders, particularly schizophrenia. Likewise, it has been identified in clinical populations with schizophrenia selected by the presence of common syndromic characteristics. FISH, qPCR and MLPA techniques, and recently, aCGH and NGS technologies, are being used to diagnose this microdeletion. It is important in clinical practice to remember that people suffering the 22q11.2DS have a high genetic risk for developing schizophrenia, and it is considered that the simultaneous presence of this disease and 22q11.2DS represents a genetic subtype of schizophrenia. There are clear phenotypic criteria, molecular and cytogenetic methods to diagnose this group of patients, and to optimize a multidisciplinary approach in their monitoring. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Genetic of Atopic dermatitis: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shobaili, Hani A.; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Alnomair, Naief; Alobead, Zeiad Abdulaziz; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic multifactorial inflammatory skin disease. The pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, but the disease results from dysfunctions of skin barrier and immune response, where both genetic and environmental factors play a key role. Recent studies demonstrate the substantial evidences that show a strong genetic association with AD. As for example, AD patients have a positive family history and have a concordance rate in twins. Moreover, several candidate genes have now been suspected that play a central role in the genetic background of AD. In last decade advanced procedures similar to genome-wide association (GWA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) have been applied on different population and now it has been clarified that AD is significantly associated with genes of innate/adaptive immune systems, human leukocyte antigens (HLA), cytokines, chemokines, drug-metabolizing genes or various other genes. In this review, we will highlight the recent advancements in the molecular genetics of AD, especially on possible functional relevance of genetic variants discovered to date. PMID:27004062

  2. Molecular analysis for diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and Marfan-associated disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ling-gen; YAO Xiu-ping; ZHANG Lin; HUI Ru-tai; ZHOU Xian-liang

    2011-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a systemic disorder of connective tissue, caused by mutations in the FBN1, TGFBR1 or TGFBR2 genes. This syndrome is characterized by involvement of three major systems, skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular. The continuing improvements in molecular biology and increasing availability of molecular diagnosis in clinical practice allow recognition of Marfan syndrome in patients with incomplete phenotypes. Additionally, molecular analyses could also be used for preimplantation genetic diagnosis. The identification of a mutation allows for early diagnosis, prognosis, genetic counseling, preventive management of carriers and reassurance for unaffected relatives. The importance of knowing in advance the location of the putative family mutation is highlighted by its straightforward application to prenatal and postnatal screening.

  3. Restless legs syndrome in Czech patients with multiple sclerosis: An epidemiological and genetic study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vávrová, J.; Kemlink, D.; Šonka, K.; Havrdová, E.; Horáková, D.; Pardini, Barbara; Müller-Myhsok, B.; Winkelmann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 7 (2012), s. 848-851 ISSN 1389-9457 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8563 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GD309/08/H079; GA MZd(CZ) NT12141 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Secondary restless legs syndrome * Multiple sclerosis * Genetic association study Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.487, year: 2012

  4. Present status of understanding on the genetic etiology of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, S; Reddy, B Mohan

    2008-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age with a prevalence of approximately 7-10% worldwide. PCOS reflects multiple potential aetiologies and variable clinical manifestations. This syndrome is characterized by serious health implications such as diabetes, coronary heart diseases and cancer and also leads to infertility. PCOS can be viewed as a heterogeneous androgen excess disorder with varying degrees of reproductive and metabolic abnormalities determined by the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. In this paper, we have attempted a comprehensive review of primarily molecular genetic studies done so far on PCOS. We have also covered the studies focusing on the environmental factors and impact of ethnicity on the presentation of this syndrome. A large number of studies have been attempted to understand the aetiological mechanisms behind PCOS both at the clinical and molecular genetic levels. In the Indian context, majority of the PCOS studies have been confined to the clinical dimensions. However, a concrete genetic mechanism behind the manifestation of PCOS is yet to be ascertained. Understanding of this complex disorder requires comprehensive studies incorporating relatively larger homogenous samples for genetic analysis and taking into account the ethnicity and the environmental conditions of the population/cohort under study. Research focused on these aspects may provide better understanding on the genetic etiology and the interaction between genes and environment, which may help develop new treatment methods and possible prevention of the syndrome.

  5. Present status of understanding on the genetic etiology of polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasgupta S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age with a prevalence of approximately 7-10% worldwide. PCOS reflects multiple potential aetiologies and variable clinical manifestations. This syndrome is characterized by serious health implications such as diabetes, coronary heart diseases and cancer and also leads to infertility. PCOS can be viewed as a heterogeneous androgen excess disorder with varying degrees of reproductive and metabolic abnormalities determined by the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. In this paper, we have attempted a comprehensive review of primarily molecular genetic studies done so far on PCOS. We have also covered the studies focusing on the environmental factors and impact of ethnicity on the presentation of this syndrome. A large number of studies have been attempted to understand the aetiological mechanisms behind PCOS both at the clinical and molecular genetic levels. In the Indian context, majority of the PCOS studies have been confined to the clinical dimensions. However, a concrete genetic mechanism behind the manifestation of PCOS is yet to be ascertained. Understanding of this complex disorder requires comprehensive studies incorporating relatively larger homogenous samples for genetic analysis and taking into account the ethnicity and the environmental conditions of the population/cohort under study. Research focused on these aspects may provide better understanding on the genetic etiology and the interaction between genes and environment, which may help develop new treatment methods and possible prevention of the syndrome.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by abnormal ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Schinzel-Giedion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome have accumulation of urine in the kidneys (hydronephrosis), which can occur in one or both kidneys. ... Schinzel-Giedion Midface Retraction Syndrome Boston Children's Hospital: Hydronephrosis Disease InfoSearch: Schinzel Giedion syndrome MalaCards: schinzel giedion ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Coffin-Siris syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Coffin-Siris syndrome Coffin-Siris syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Coffin-Siris syndrome is a condition that affects several body ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: acral peeling skin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Acral peeling skin syndrome Acral peeling skin syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Acral peeling skin syndrome is a skin disorder characterized by ...

  10. Molecular and genetic mechanisms of environmental mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubitschek, H.E.; Derstine, P.L.; Griego, V.M.; Matsushita, T.; Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.; Reynolds, P.R.; Webb, R.B.; Williams-Hill, D.

    1981-01-01

    This program is primarily concerned with elucidation of the nature of DNA lesions produced by environmental and energy related mutagens, their mechanisms of action, and their repair. The main focus is on actions of chemical mutagens and electromagnetic radiations. Synergistic interactions between mutagens and the mutational processes that lead to synergism are being investigated. Mutagens are chosen for study on the basis of their potential for analysis of mutation (as genetic probes), for development of procedures for reducing mutational damage, for their potential importance to risk assessment, and for development of improved mutagen testing systems. Bacterial cells are used because of the rapidity and clarity of scientific results that can be obtained, the detailed genetic maps, and the many well-defined mutand strains available. The conventional tools of microbial and molecular genetics are used, along with intercomparison of genetically related strains. Advantage is taken of tcollective dose commitment will result in more attention being paid to potential releases of radionuclides at relatively short times after disposal

  11. Molecular genetic studies of bacteroides fragilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southern, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    This study aimed at providing a means for probing the molecular genetic organization of B.fragilis, particularly those strains where the DNA repair mechanisms had been described. The following routes of investigation were followed: the bacteriocin of B.fragilis BF-1; the investigation of any plasmids which might be discovered, with the aim of constructing a hybrid plasmid which might replicate in both E.coli and B.fragilis; and the preparation of a genetic library which could be screened for Bacteroides genes which might function in E.coli. Should any genes be isolated by screening the library they were to be studied with regard to their expression and regulation in E.coli. The above assays make use of radioactive markers such as 14 C, 35 S, 32 P, and 3 H in the labelling of RNA, plasmids and probes

  12. Genetics and molecular biology of hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, D.

    1994-01-01

    Major strides in the molecular biology of essential hypertension are currently underway. This has tended to obscure the fact that a number of inherited disorders associated with low blood pressure exist and that these diseases may have milder and underrecognized phenotypes that contribute importantly to blood pressure variation in the general population. This review highlights some of the gene products that, if abnormal, could cause hypotension in some individuals. Diseases due to abnormalities in the catecholamine enzymes are discussed in detail. It is likely that genetic abnormalities with hypotensive phenotypes will be as interesting and diverse as those that give rise to hypertensive disorders.

  13. Strengthening molecular genetics and training in craniosynostosis: The need of the hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Mayadhar; Bajpai, Minu; Panda, Shasanka Shekhar; Malhotra, Arun; Samantaray, Jyotish Chandra; Dwivedi, Sada Nanda

    2014-01-01

    Craniosynostosis (CS) is premature fusion of skull. It is divided into two groups: Syndromic craniosynostosis (SCS) and non-syndromic craniosynostosis (NSC). Its incidence in Indian population is 1:1000 live births where as in the USA it is 1:2500 live births. Its incidence varies from country to country. Molecular genetics having great interest and relevance in medical students, faculty, scientist, pediatric neurosurgeon and staff nurses, our objective was to educate the medical students, residents, researchers, clinicians, pediatric neurosurgeon, anesthetists, pediatricians, staff nurses and paramedics. We summarized here including with diagnosis, investigations, surgical therapy, induction therapy, and molecular therapy. Molecular genetics training is needed to know the information regarding development of skull, cranial connective tissue, craniofacial dysplasia, frame work, network of receptors and its etiopathogenesis. The important part is clinically with molecular therapy (MT) how to manage CS in rural sector and metropolitan cities need a special attention. PMID:25288859

  14. Strengthening molecular genetics and training in craniosynostosis: The need of the hour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayadhar Barik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniosynostosis (CS is premature fusion of skull. It is divided into two groups: Syndromic craniosynostosis (SCS and non-syndromic craniosynostosis (NSC. Its incidence in Indian population is 1:1000 live births where as in the USA it is 1:2500 live births. Its incidence varies from country to country. Molecular genetics having great interest and relevance in medical students, faculty, scientist, pediatric neurosurgeon and staff nurses, our objective was to educate the medical students, residents, researchers, clinicians, pediatric neurosurgeon, anesthetists, pediatricians, staff nurses and paramedics. We summarized here including with diagnosis, investigations, surgical therapy, induction therapy, and molecular therapy. Molecular genetics training is needed to know the information regarding development of skull, cranial connective tissue, craniofacial dysplasia, frame work, network of receptors and its etiopathogenesis. The important part is clinically with molecular therapy (MT how to manage CS in rural sector and metropolitan cities need a special attention.

  15. Novel Implications in Molecular Diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Liccardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available About 10% of total colorectal cancers are associated with known Mendelian inheritance, as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP and Lynch syndrome (LS. In these cancer types the clinical manifestations of disease are due to mutations in high-risk alleles, with a penetrance at least of 70%. The LS is associated with germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. However, the mutation detection analysis of these genes does not always provide informative results for genetic counseling of LS patients. Very often, the molecular analysis reveals the presence of variants of unknown significance (VUSs whose interpretation is not easy and requires the combination of different analytical strategies to get a proper assessment of their pathogenicity. In some cases, these VUSs may make a more substantial overall contribution to cancer risk than the well-assessed severe Mendelian variants. Moreover, it could also be possible that the simultaneous presence of these genetic variants in several MMR genes that behave as low risk alleles might contribute in a cooperative manner to increase the risk of hereditary cancer. In this paper, through a review of the recent literature, we have speculated a novel inheritance model in the Lynch syndrome; this could pave the way toward new diagnostic perspectives.

  16. Teaching molecular genetics: Chapter 1--Background principles and methods of molecular biology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2006-01-01

    In this first chapter of the series "Teaching molecular genetics," an introduction to molecular genetics is presented. We describe the structure of DNA and genes and explain in detail the central dogma of molecular biology, that is, the flow of genetic information from DNA via RNA to polypeptide

  17. Implementation of molecular karyotyping in clinical genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Lovrecic

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of technologies for the study of the human genome is an expected step after the discovery and sequencing of the entire human genome. Chromosomal microarrays, which allow us to perform tens of thousands of previously individual experiments simultaneously, are being utilized in all areas of human genetics and genomics. Initially, this was applicable only for research purposes, but in the last few years their clinical diagnostic purposes are becoming more and more relevant. Using molecular karyotyping (also chromosomal microarray, comparative genomic hybridization with microarray, aCGH, one can analyze microdeletions / microduplications in the whole human genome at once. It is a first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test instead of G-banded karyotyping in patients with developmental delay and/or congenital anomalies. Molecular karyotyping is used as a diagnostic test in patients with unexplained developmental delay and/or idiopathic intellectual disability and/or dysmorphic features and/or multiple congenital anomalies (DD/ID/DF/MCA. In addition, the method is used in prenatal diagnostics and in some centres also in preimplantation genetic diagnosis.The aim of this paper is to inform the professional community in the field about this new diagnostic method and its implementation in Slovenia, and to define the clinical situations where the method is appropriate.

  18. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny von Salomé

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, has been suggested in LS. Anticipation is a well-known phenomenon in e.g neurodegenerative diseases and several reports have studied anticipation in heritable cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine whether anticipation can be shown in a nationwide cohort of Swedish LS families referred to the regional departments of clinical genetics in Lund, Stockholm, Linköping, Uppsala and Umeå between the years 1990-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2 families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171, or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years/generation for NREM and hazard ratio of 1.33 for COX-R and PMS2 (7.3 years/generation and hazard ratio of 1.86. The estimated anticipation effects for MLH1

  19. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S; Karimi, Masoud; Silander, Gustav; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Aravidis, Christos; Nilbert, Mef; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina

    2017-10-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, has been suggested in LS. Anticipation is a well-known phenomenon in e.g neurodegenerative diseases and several reports have studied anticipation in heritable cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine whether anticipation can be shown in a nationwide cohort of Swedish LS families referred to the regional departments of clinical genetics in Lund, Stockholm, Linköping, Uppsala and Umeå between the years 1990-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2 families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families) comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM) we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R) estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171), or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years/generation for NREM and hazard ratio of 1.33 for COX-R) and PMS2 (7.3 years/generation and hazard ratio of 1.86). The estimated anticipation effects for MLH1 and MSH6 are

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Ellis-van Creveld syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bone growth that results in very short stature (dwarfism). People with this condition have particularly short forearms ... Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome Encyclopedia: Polydactyly Health Topic: Dwarfism Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  1. Treacher Collins Syndrome; Anesthetic considerations and Molecular Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Sayyadi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Treacher Collins Syndrome (TCS is a rare disease with mandibulofacial dysostosis. The deformities accompanied by this syndrome could cause especial challenges for anesthesiologist. On the other hand Treacher protein is well recognized in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. In this report we want to present a successful management of a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome and also describe new advances in the molecular aspect of this disease.

  2. Molecular Genetic Identification Of Some Flax Mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AMER, I.M.; MOUSTAFA, H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Five flax genotypes (Linum usitatissimum L.) i.e., commercial cultivar Sakha 2, the mother variety Giza 4 and three mutant types induced by gamma rays, were screened for their salinity tolerance in field experiments (salinity concentration was 8600 and 8300 ppm for soil and irrigation water, respectively). Mutation 6 was the most salt tolerant as compared to the other four genotypes.RAPD technique was used to detect some molecular markers associated with salt tolerance in flax (Mut 6), RAPD-PCR results using 12 random primers exhibited 149 amplified fragments; 91.9% of them were polymorphic and twelve molecular markers (8.1%) for salt tolerant (mutant 6) were identified with molecular size ranged from 191 to 4159 bp and only eight primers successes to amplify these specific markers. Concerning the other mutants, Mut 15 and Mut 25 exhibited 4.3% and 16.2% specific markers, respectively. The induced mutants exhibited genetic similarity to the parent variety were about 51%, 58.3% and 61.1% for Mut 25, Mut 6 and Mut 15, respectively. These specific markers (SM) are used for identification of the induced mutations and it is important for new variety registration.

  3. Noonan syndrome-causing genes: Molecular update and an assessment of the mutation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihssane El Bouchikhi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is a common autosomal dominant disorder characterized by short stature, congenital heart disease and facial dysmorphia with an incidence of 1/1000 to 2500 live births. Up to now, several genes have been proven to be involved in the disturbance of the transduction signal through the RAS-MAP Kinase pathway and the manifestation of Noonan syndrome. The first gene described was PTPN11, followed by SOS1, RAF1, KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, MAP2K1, and RIT1, and recently SOS2, LZTR1, and A2ML1, among others. Progressively, the physiopathology and molecular etiology of most signs of Noonan syndrome have been demonstrated, and inheritance patterns as well as genetic counseling have been established. In this review, we summarize the data concerning clinical features frequently observed in Noonan syndrome, and then, we describe the molecular etiology as well as the physiopathology of most Noonan syndrome-causing genes. In the second part of this review, we assess the mutational rate of Noonan syndrome-causing genes reported up to now in most screening studies. This review should give clinicians as well as geneticists a full view of the molecular aspects of Noonan syndrome and the authentic prevalence of the mutational events of its causing-genes. It will also facilitate laying the groundwork for future molecular diagnosis research, and the development of novel treatment strategies.

  4. Molecular characterization and assessment of genetic diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R Madhusudhana

    genetic diversity available at molecular level among a set of phenotypically different ... allele matching and cluster analysis based on unweighted neighbor- joining (Gascuel, 1997) ..... on isozyme data-a simulation study. Theor. Appl. Genet.

  5. Molecular characterization of genetic diversity in some durum wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular characterization of genetic diversity in some durum wheat ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Thus, RAPD offer a potentially simple, rapid and reliable method to evaluate genetic variation and relatedness among ten wheat ...

  6. Genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes of neural tube defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Abdelbasit, Omer B.; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M.; Alhussein, Khalid A.; Miqdad, Abeer M.; Samadi, Abdulmohsen S.; Khalil, Mohammed I.; Al-Mardawi, Elham; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the incidence, and describe the various forms of neural tube defects (NTDs) due to genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes. Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the medical records of newborn infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with NTDs and their mothers spanning 14 years (1996-2009) at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The cases were ascertained by a perinatologist, neonatologist, geneticist, radiologist, and neurologist. The literature was reviewed via a MEDLINE search. Only liveborn babies were included. Permission from the Educational Committee at the Security Forces Hospital was obtained prior to the collection of data. Results: Out of 103 infants with NTDs admitted during this period, 20 (19.4%) were found to have an underlying genetic syndromic, chromosomal and/or other anomalies. There were 5 cases of Meckel-Gruber syndrome, 2 Joubert syndrome, one Waardenburg syndrome, one Walker-Warburg syndrome, 2 chromosomal disorders, 2 caudal regression, one amniotic band disruption sequence, one associated with omphalocele, one with diaphragmatic hernia, and 4 with multiple congenital anomalies. Conclusions: There is a high rate of underlying genetic syndromic and/or chromosomal causes of NTDs in the Saudi Arabian population due to the high consanguinity rate. Identification of such association can lead to more accurate provisions of genetic counseling to the family including preimplantation genetic diagnosis or early termination of pregnancies associated with lethal conditions. PMID:25551112

  7. Genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes of neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z; Abdelbasit, Omer B; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M; Alhussein, Khalid A; Miqdad, Abeer M; Samadi, Abdulmohsen S; Khalil, Mohammed I; Al-Mardawi, Elham; Salih, Mustafa A

    2014-12-01

    To ascertain the incidence, and describe the various forms of neural tube defects (NTDs) due to genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes. We carried out a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the medical records of newborn infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with NTDs and their mothers spanning 14 years (1996-2009) at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The cases were ascertained by a perinatologist, neonatologist, geneticist, radiologist, and neurologist. The literature was reviewed via a MEDLINE search. Only liveborn babies were included. Permission from the Educational Committee at the Security Forces Hospital was obtained prior to the collection of data. Out of 103 infants with NTDs admitted during this period, 20 (19.4%) were found to have an underlying genetic syndromic, chromosomal and/or other anomalies. There were 5 cases of Meckel-Gruber syndrome, 2 Joubert syndrome, one Waardenburg syndrome, one Walker-Warburg syndrome, 2 chromosomal disorders, 2 caudal regression, one amniotic band disruption sequence, one associated with omphalocele, one with diaphragmatic hernia, and 4 with multiple congenital anomalies. There is a high rate of underlying genetic syndromic and/or chromosomal causes of NTDs in the Saudi Arabian population due to the high consanguinity rate. Identification of such association can lead to more accurate provisions of genetic counseling to the family including preimplantation genetic diagnosis or early termination of pregnancies associated with lethal conditions.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Diseases: Kidney Failure: Choosing a Treatment That's Right for You Educational Resources (6 links) Disease InfoSearch: Hemolytic uremic syndrome, atypical MalaCards: genetic atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome Merck Manual Consumer Version: Overview of Anemia Merck Manual Consumer Version: ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: proximal 18q deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... characteristic features. Most cases of proximal 18q deletion syndrome are the result of a new (de novo) deletion and are not inherited from a ... J, Fox PT, Stratton RF, Perry B, Hale DE. Recurrent interstitial deletions of proximal 18q: a new syndrome involving expressive speech delay. Am J Med Genet ...

  10. Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...Include area code) October 2015 Annual Report 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy John... encephalopathy (CTE), but the underlying molecular changes remain unclear. Here, biochemical and genetic studies that deepen our understanding of the

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Lenz microphthalmia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eyeballs that are abnormally small ( microphthalmia ) or absent (anophthalmia), leading to vision loss or blindness. Other eye ... Lenz dysplasia Lenz syndrome MAA MCOPS1 microphthalmia or anophthalmos with associated anomalies microphthalmia, syndromic 1 Related Information ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Floating-Harbor syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patton MA, Hurst J, Donnai D, McKeown CM, Cole T, Goodship J. Floating-Harbor syndrome. J Med ... medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Lyme disease Fibromyalgia White-Sutton syndrome All New & Updated Pages ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Cantú syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 51. Citation on PubMed Grange DK, Lorch SM, Cole PL, Singh GK. Cantu syndrome in a woman ... medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Lyme disease Fibromyalgia White-Sutton syndrome All New & Updated Pages ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: gray platelet syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder, platelet-type, 4 deficient alpha granule syndrome GPS grey platelet syndrome platelet alpha-granule deficiency platelet ... on PubMed Central Kahr WH, Hinckley J, Li L, Schwertz H, Christensen H, Rowley JW, Pluthero FG, ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Androgen insensitivity syndrome is a condition that affects sexual development before birth and during puberty. People with this ... characteristics or signs of both male and female sexual development. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome occurs when the body ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Sturge-Weber syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Registry: Sturge-Weber syndrome Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Sturge-Weber Syndrome Clinic Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: Capillary Vascular Malformations: Port ...

  17. Molecular research on the genetic diversity of Tunisian date palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular research on the genetic diversity of Tunisian date palm ( Phoenix dactylifera L.) using the random amplified microsatellite polymorphism (RAMPO) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) methods.

  18. Molecular Genetic Studies of Some Eye Diseases Affecting the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Molecular Genetic Studies of Some Eye Diseases Affecting the Indian Population. Single gene disorders. Complex eye diseases. Genotype-phenotype correlation. Molecular diagnostics.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In MVA syndrome, growth before birth is slow (intrauterine growth restriction). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at ... InfoSearch: Warburton Anyane Yeboa syndrome KidsHealth from Nemours: Intrauterine Growth Restriction ... mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome 1 MalaCards: ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of disorders that affect connective ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Warsaw breakage syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oostra AB, Stumm M, Zdzienicka MZ, Joenje H, de Winter JP. Warsaw breakage syndrome, a cohesinopathy associated with mutations in the XPD ... Lelij P, Oostra AB, Rooimans MA, Joenje H, de Winter JP. Diagnostic Overlap ... Roberts Syndrome and Warsaw Breakage Syndrome. Anemia. 2010;2010:565268. ...

  2. Nance-Horan syndrome: a contiguous gene syndrome involving deletion of the amelogenin gene? A case report and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, E; Hodgson, S; Lench, N; Roberts, G J

    1995-03-01

    A case of Nance-Horan syndrome in a male is presented, with some features of the condition in his carrier mother and her mother. It is proposed that Nance-Horan syndrome might be a contiguous gene syndrome mapping to chromosome Xp21.2-p22.3. The proband had congenital cataract microphthalmia and dental abnormalities including screwdriver shaped incisors and evidence of enamel pitting hypoplasia. The region Xp21.2-p22.3 also contains the tooth enamel protein gene, amelogenin (AMGX). Using molecular genetic techniques, we have shown that there is no evidence that the AMGX gene is deleted in this case of the Nance-Horan syndrome.

  3. Chondrosarcoma: With Updates on Molecular Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Jung Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma (CHS is a malignant cartilage-forming tumor and usually occurs within the medullary canal of long bones and pelvic bones. Based on the morphologic feature alone, a correct diangosis of CHS may be difficult, Therefore, correlation of radiological and clinicopathological features is mandatory in the diagnosis of CHS. The prognosis of CHS is closely related to histologic grading, however, histologic grading may be subjective with high inter-observer variability. In this paper, we present histologic grading system and clinicopathological and radiological findings of conventional CHS. Subtypes of CHSs, such as dedifferentiated, mesenchymal, and clear cell CHSs are also presented. In addition, we introduce updated cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings to expand our understanding of CHS biology. New markers of cell differentiation, proliferation, and cell signaling might offer important therapeutic and prognostic information in near future.

  4. Cushing's syndrome in childhood: update on genetics, treatment, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya

    2015-02-01

    To provide an update on the genes associated with Cushing's syndrome in children, as well as to familiarize the clinician with recent treatment guidelines and outcome data for children with Cushing's syndrome. The list of genes associated with Cushing's syndrome continues to grow. In addition, treatment for childhood Cushing's syndrome is evolving. As long-term follow-up data on children becomes available, clinicians need to be aware of the issues that require attention. Knowledge of the specific genetic causes of Cushing's syndrome has potential implications for treatment, surveillance, and counseling. Advances in surgical technique, radiation modalities, and medical therapies offer the potential for additional treatment options in Cushing's syndrome. Early identification and management of post-treatment morbidities in children treated for Cushing's syndrome is crucial in order to optimize care.

  5. Molecular genetics of follicular cell thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina D. Yakushina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is the most frequent endocrine malignancy. In the most cases thyroid cancer arises from follicular cells. Diagnosis of the cancer is based on the cytological analysis of fine needle aspiration biopsy of thyroid nodes. But the accuracy of the cytological diagnosis is about 80% that leads to the false positive and false negative cases and wrong strategy of treatment. Identification of genetic and epigenetic markers in the biopsies will allow to improve diagnostic accuracy. This article describes mutations, aberrant DNA methylation and abnormal microRNA expression constituting the core of molecular genetics of follicular cell thyroid cancer. The mutations given in the article includes point mutations, fusions and copy number variation. Besides frequent and well described driver mutations in genes of МАРK, PI3K/Akt and Wnt signaling pathways, as well as TP53 and TERT genes, we introduce here less frequent mutations appeared in the literature during the past two years. In addition the article contains examples of diagnostic panels applying these markers.

  6. Teaching molecular genetics: Chapter 1--Background principles and methods of molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoers, Nine V A M; Monnens, Leo A H

    2006-02-01

    In this first chapter of the series "Teaching molecular genetics," an introduction to molecular genetics is presented. We describe the structure of DNA and genes and explain in detail the central dogma of molecular biology, that is, the flow of genetic information from DNA via RNA to polypeptide (protein). In addition, several basic and frequently used general molecular tools, such as restriction enzymes, Southern blotting, DNA amplification and sequencing are discussed, in order to lay the foundations for the forthcoming chapters.

  7. [Turner syndrome and genetic polymorphism: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovó de Marqui, Alessandra Bernadete

    2015-01-01

    To present the main results of the literature on genetic polymorphisms in Turner Syndrome and their association with the clinical signs and the etiology of this chromosomal disorder. The review was conducted in the PubMed database without any time limit, using the terms Turner syndrome and genetic polymorphism. A total of 116 articles were found, and based on the established inclusion and exclusion criteria 17 were selected for the review. The polymorphisms investigated in patients with Turner Syndrome were associated with growth deficit, causing short stature, low bone mineral density, autoimmunity and cardiac abnormalities, which are frequently found in patients with Turner Syndrome. The role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the etiology of Turner syndrome, i.e., in chromosomal nondisjunction, was also confirmed. Genetic polymorphisms appear to be associated with Turner Syndrome. However, in view of the small number of published studies and their contradictory findings, further studies in different populations are needed in order to clarify the role of genetic variants in the clinical signs and etiology of the Turner Syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterizing genetic syndromes involved in cancer and radiogenic cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unrau, P.; Doerffer, K.

    1998-01-01

    The COG project 2806A (1995), reviewed the On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database of genetic syndromes to identify those syndromes, genes, and DNA sequences implicated in some way in the cancer process, and especially in radiogenic cancer risk. The current report describes a recent update of the survey in light of two years of further progress in the Human Genome project, and is intended to supply a comprehensive list of those genetic syndromes, genes, DNA sequences and map locations that define genes likely to be involved in cancer risk. Of the 8203 syndromes in OMIM in 1997 June, 814 are associated, even if marginally, with cancer. Of the 814 syndromes so linked, 672 have been mapped to a chromosome, and 476 have been mapped to a chromosome and had a DNA sequence associated with their messenger RNA (or cDNA) sequences. In addition, 35 syndromes have sequences not associated with map locations, and the remaining 107 have neither been mapped nor sequenced. We supply the list of the various genetic syndromes sorted by chromosome location and by OMIM descriptor, together with all the associated but unmapped and unsequenced syndromes. (author)

  9. Characterizing genetic syndromes involved in cancer and radiogenic cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrau, P; Doerffer, K

    1998-01-01

    The COG project 2806A (1995), reviewed the On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database of genetic syndromes to identify those syndromes, genes, and DNA sequences implicated in some way in the cancer process, and especially in radiogenic cancer risk. The current report describes a recent update of the survey in light of two years of further progress in the Human Genome project, and is intended to supply a comprehensive list of those genetic syndromes, genes, DNA sequences and map locations that define genes likely to be involved in cancer risk. Of the 8203 syndromes in OMIM in 1997 June, 814 are associated, even if marginally, with cancer. Of the 814 syndromes so linked, 672 have been mapped to a chromosome, and 476 have been mapped to a chromosome and had a DNA sequence associated with their messenger RNA (or cDNA) sequences. In addition, 35 syndromes have sequences not associated with map locations, and the remaining 107 have neither been mapped nor sequenced. We supply the list of the various genetic syndromes sorted by chromosome location and by OMIM descriptor, together with all the associated but unmapped and unsequenced syndromes. (author) 1 tab., 4 figs.

  10. The genetics of pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascaratos, Gerassimos; Shah, Ameet; Garway-Heath, David F

    2013-01-01

    We review the inheritance patterns and recent genetic advances in the study of pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS) and pigmentary glaucoma (PG). Both conditions may result from combinations of mutations in more than one gene or from common variants in many genes, each contributing small effects. We discuss the currently known genetic loci that may be related with PDS/PG in humans, the role of animal models in expanding our understanding of the genetic basis of PDS, the genetic factors underlying the risk for conversion from PDS to PG and the relationship between genetic and environmental--as well as anatomical--risk factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Usher syndrome: molecular links of pathogenesis, proteins and pathways.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, H.; Wijk, E. van; Marker, T.; Wolfrum, U.; Roepman, R.

    2006-01-01

    Usher syndrome is the most common form of deaf-blindness. The syndrome is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and to date, eight causative genes have been identified. The proteins encoded by these genes are part of a dynamic protein complex that is present in hair cells of the inner ear

  12. Genetic Defects Underlie the Non-syndromic Autosomal Recessive Intellectual Disability (NS-ARID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleha Shamim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual disability (ID is a neurodevelopmental disorder which appears frequently as the result of genetic mutations and may be syndromic (S-ID or non-syndromic (NS-ID. ID causes an important economic burden, for patient's family, health systems, and society. Identifying genes that cause S-ID can easily be evaluated due to the clinical symptoms or physical anomalies. However, in the case of NS-ID due to the absence of co-morbid features, the latest molecular genetic techniques can be used to understand the genetic defects that underlie it. Recent studies have shown that non-syndromic autosomal recessive (NS-ARID is extremely heterogeneous and contributes much more than X-linked ID. However, very little is known about the genes and loci involved in NS-ARID relative to X-linked ID, and whose complete genetic etiology remains obscure. In this review article, the known genetic etiology of NS-ARID and possible relationships between genes and the associated molecular pathways of their encoded proteins has been reviewed which will enhance our understanding about the underlying genes and mechanisms in NS-ARID.

  13. Genetic Aspects of Preeclampsia and the HELLP Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Jan Helge; Nagy, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Both preeclampsia and the HELLP syndrome have their origin in the placenta. The aim of this study is to review genetic factors involved in development of preeclampsia and the HELLP syndrome using literature search in PubMed. A familial cohort links chromosomes 2q, 5q, and 13q to preeclampsia. The chromosome 12q is coupled with the HELLP syndrome. The STOX1 gene, the ERAP1 and 2 genes, the syncytin envelope gene, and the −670 Fas receptor polymorphisms are involved in the development of preeclampsia. The ACVR2A gene on chromosome 2q22 is also implicated. The toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) and factor V Leiden mutation participate both in development of preeclampsia and the HELLP syndrome. Carriers of the TT and the CC genotype of the MTHFR C677T polymorphism seem to have an increased risk of the HELLP syndrome. The placental levels of VEGF mRNA are reduced both in women with preeclampsia and in women with the HELLP syndrome. The BclI polymorphism is engaged in development of the HELLP syndrome but not in development of severe preeclampsia. The ACE I/D polymorphism affects uteroplacental and umbilical artery blood flows in women with preeclampsia. In women with preeclampsia and the HELLP syndrome several genes in the placenta are deregulated. Preeclampsia and the HELLP syndrome are multiplex genetic diseases. PMID:24991435

  14. Child Development and Molecular Genetics: 14 Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Fourteen years ago, the first article on molecular genetics was published in this journal: "Child Development, Molecular Genetics, and What to Do With Genes Once They Are Found" (R. Plomin & M. Rutter, 1998). The goal of the article was to outline what developmentalists can do with genes once they are found. These new directions for developmental…

  15. Application of molecular genetic tools for forest pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee-Sook Kim; John Hanna; Amy Ross-Davis; Ned Klopfenstein

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, advances in molecular genetics have provided powerful tools to address critical issues in forest pathology to help promote resilient forests. Although molecular genetic tools are initially applied to understand individual components of forest pathosystems, forest pathosystems involve dynamic interactions among biotic and abiotic components of the...

  16. Cystic fibrosis, molecular genetics for all life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausilia Elce

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most frequent lethal autosomal recessive disorder among Caucasians (incidence: 1:2,500 newborn. In the last two decades CF prognosis considerably improved and many patients well survive into their adulthood. Furthermore, milder CF with a late onset was described. CF is a challenge for laboratory of molecular genetics that greatly contributes to the natural history of the disease since fetal age. Carrier screening and prenatal diagnosis, also by non-invasive analysis of maternal blood fetal DNA, are now available, and many labs offer preimplantation diagnosis. The major criticism in prenatal medicine is the lack of an effective multidisciplinary counseling that helps the couples to plan their reasoned reproductive choice. Most countries offer newborn screening that significantly reduce CF morbidity but different protocols based on blood trypsin, molecular analysis and sweat chloride cause a variable efficiency of the screening programs. Again, laboratory is crucial for CF diagnosis in symptomatic patients: sweat chloride is the diagnostic golden standard, but different methodologies and the lack of quality control in most labs reduce its effectiveness. Molecular analysis contributes to confirm diagnosis in symptomatic subjects; furthermore, it helps to predict the disease outcome on the basis of the mutation (genotype-phenotype correlation and mutations in a myriad of genes, inherited independently by CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, which may modulate the clinical expression of the disease in each single patient (modifier genes. More recently, the search of the CFTR mutations gained a role in selecting CF patients that may benefit from biological therapy based on correctors and potentiators that are effective in patients bearing specific mutations (personalized therapy. All such applications of molecular diagnostics confirm the “uniqueness” of each CF patient, offering to laboratory medicine the

  17. Repint of "Reframing autism as a behavioral syndrome and not a specific mental disorder: Implications of genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordjman, S; Cohen, D; Anderson, G M; Botbol, M; Canitano, R; Coulon, N; Roubertoux, P L

    2018-06-01

    Clinical and molecular genetics have advanced current knowledge on genetic disorders associated with autism. A review of diverse genetic disorders associated with autism is presented and for the first time discussed extensively with regard to possible common underlying mechanisms leading to a similar cognitive-behavioral phenotype of autism. The possible role of interactions between genetic and environmental factors, including epigenetic mechanisms, is in particular examined. Finally, the pertinence of distinguishing non-syndromic autism (isolated autism) from syndromic autism (autism associated with genetic disorders) will be reconsidered. Given the high genetic and etiological heterogeneity of autism, autism can be viewed as a behavioral syndrome related to known genetic disorders (syndromic autism) or currently unknown disorders (apparent non-syndromic autism), rather than a specific categorical mental disorder. It highlights the need to study autism phenotype and developmental trajectory through a multidimensional, non-categorical approach with multivariate analyses within autism spectrum disorder but also across mental disorders, and to conduct systematically clinical genetic examination searching for genetic disorders in all individuals (children but also adults) with autism. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Reframing autism as a behavioral syndrome and not a specific mental disorder: Implications of genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordjman, S; Cohen, D; Coulon, N; Anderson, G M; Botbol, M; Canitano, R; Roubertoux, P L

    2017-01-30

    Clinical and molecular genetics have advanced current knowledge on genetic disorders associated with autism. A review of diverse genetic disorders associated with autism is presented and for the first time discussed extensively with regard to possible common underlying mechanisms leading to a similar cognitive-behavioral phenotype of autism. The possible role of interactions between genetic and environmental factors, including epigenetic mechanisms, is in particular examined. Finally, the pertinence of distinguishing non-syndromic autism (isolated autism) from syndromic autism (autism associated with genetic disorders) will be reconsidered. Given the high genetic and etiological heterogeneity of autism, autism can be viewed as a behavioral syndrome related to known genetic disorders (syndromic autism) or currently unknown disorders (apparent non-syndromic autism), rather than a specific categorical mental disorder. It highlights the need to study autism phenotype and developmental trajectory through a multidimensional, non-categorical approach with multivariate analyses within autism spectrum disorder but also across mental disorders, and to conduct systematically clinical genetic examination searching for genetic disorders in all individuals (children but also adults) with autism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Genetic Causes of Syndromic and Non-Syndromic Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglayan, Ahmet O.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Over the past decade, genetic tests have become available for numerous heritable disorders, especially those whose inheritance follows the Mendelian model. Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) represent a group of developmental disorders with a strong genetic basis. During the past few years, genetic research in ASDs has been successful in…

  20. Circadian rhythms and metabolic syndrome: from experimental genetics to human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Eleonore; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Bass, Joseph

    2010-02-19

    The incidence of the metabolic syndrome represents a spectrum of disorders that continue to increase across the industrialized world. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to metabolic syndrome and recent evidence has emerged to suggest that alterations in circadian systems and sleep participate in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we highlight studies at the intersection of clinical medicine and experimental genetics that pinpoint how perturbations of the internal clock system, and sleep, constitute risk factors for disorders including obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, thrombosis and even inflammation. An exciting aspect of the field has been the integration of behavioral and physiological approaches, and the emerging insight into both neural and peripheral tissues in disease pathogenesis. Consideration of the cell and molecular links between disorders of circadian rhythms and sleep with metabolic syndrome has begun to open new opportunities for mechanism-based therapeutics.

  1. Molecular genetic studies in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vromans, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis five molecular genetic studies on flax ( Linum usitatissimum L.) are described, of which two chapters aim to characterize the genetic structure and the amount of genetic diversity in the primary and secondary gene pool of the crop species. Three chapters describe the development of

  2. Genetics Home Reference: arterial tortuosity syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arteries are fixed, the extra length twists and curves. Other blood vessel abnormalities that may occur in ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: 3-M syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as a rounded upper back that also curves to the side (kyphoscoliosis) or exaggerated curvature of ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: spondylocarpotarsal synostosis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... curved lower back ( lordosis ) and a spine that curves to the side ( scoliosis ). People with spondylocarpotarsal synostosis ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Freeman-Sheldon syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Affected individuals may also have a spine that curves to the side ( scoliosis ). People with Freeman-Sheldon ... Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  6. Genetics of the Meckel Syndrome (Dysencephalia Splanchnocystica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Y. E.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Reported are seven cases in two families of the Meckel syndrome, whose key features are occipital encephalocele, cleft lip and palate, polydactyly, and polycystic kidneys. Evidence supports the hypothesis that the syndrome is a recessively inherited condition, determined by homozygous expression of a single autosomal gene. (Author/KW)

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Loeys-Dietz syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Coucke PJ, Cameron DE, Braverman AC, Byers PH, De Paepe AM, Dietz HC. Aneurysm syndromes caused by mutations in the TGF-beta receptor. ... C, Renard M, Loeys B. The Loeys-Dietz syndrome: an update for the clinician. Curr Opin Cardiol. ... on PubMed van de Laar IM, van der Linde D, Oei EH, ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kravis EM, Zhou L, Rand CM, Weese-Mayer DE. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: PHOX2B mutations and phenotype. Am J Respir Crit ... BA, Leurgans SE, Berry-Kravis EM, Weese-Mayer DE. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: PHOX2B genotype determines risk for sudden death. Pediatr ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Potocki-Lupski syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause the disorder. Most cases of Potocki-Lupski syndrome result from a new (de novo) chromosomal duplication and occur in people with ... or Free article on PubMed Central Treadwell-Deering DE, ... of the Potocki-Lupski syndrome (duplication 17p11.2). J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2010 ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Prader-Willi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused by a phenomenon called genomic imprinting. Most cases of Prader-Willi syndrome (about 70 percent) occur when a segment of ... More about Mutations and Health Inheritance Pattern Most cases of Prader-Willi syndrome are not inherited, particularly those caused by a ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Adams-Oliver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hum Genet. 2014 Mar;22(3):374-8. doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2013.159. Epub 2013 Jul ... Genet. 2012 Aug 10;91(2):391-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.07.005. Citation ... Genet. 2015 Sep 3;97(3):475-82. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.07.015. Epub ...

  12. DataGenno: building a new tool to bridge molecular and clinical genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio F Costa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fabricio F Costa1,2, Luciano S Foly1, Marcelo P Coutinho11DataGenno Interactive Research Ltd., Itaperuna, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Cancer Biology and Epigenomics Program, Children's Memorial Research Center, Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Clinical genetics is one of the most challenging fields in medicine, with thousands of children born every year with congenital defects that have no satisfactory diagnosis. There are more than 6,000 known single-gene disorders that can cause birth defects or diseases in approximately 1 in every 200 births. Clinical and molecular information on genetic diseases and syndromes are widespread in the literature, and there are few databases combining this information. Therefore, it is very challenging for health care professionals and researchers to translate the latest advances in science and medicine into effective clinical interventions and new treatments. In order to overcome this obstacle and promote networking, we are building DataGenno, an online medical and scientific portal. DataGenno has been developed to be a source of information on genetic diseases and syndromes for the needs of all heath care professionals and researchers. Our database will be able to integrate both clinical and molecular aspects of genetic diseases in a fully interactive environment. DataGenno’s system already contains clinical and molecular information for 300 diseases, with approximately 6,000 signs and symptoms of these diseases in a database combined with a search engine. Our main goal is to cover all genetic diseases described to date, providing not only clinical information such as morphological and anatomical features but also the most comprehensive molecular genetics/genomics features and available testing information. We are also developing ways to connect DataGenno’s portal with Electronic Health Records in order to improve the efficiency of patient care. Additionally

  13. Genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome type II.

    OpenAIRE

    Pieke Dahl, S; Kimberling, WJ; Gorin, MB; Weston, MD; Furman, JM; Pikus, A; Moller, C

    1993-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by retinitis pigmentosa and congenital sensorineural hearing loss. A gene for Usher syndrome type II (USH2) has been localised to chromosome 1q32-q41. DNA from a family with four of seven sibs affected with clinical characteristics of Usher syndrome type II was genotyped using markers spanning the 1q32-1q41 region. These included D1S70 and D1S81, which are believed to flank USH2. Genotypic results and subsequent linkage analysis ...

  14. Molecular subtype classification of urothelial carcinoma in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Eriksson, Pontus; Höglund, Mattias; Jönsson, Mats; Sjödahl, Gottfrid; Nilbert, Mef; Liedberg, Fredrik

    2018-05-23

    Lynch syndrome confers an increased risk for urothelial carcinoma (UC). Molecular subtypes may be relevant to prognosis and therapeutic possibilities, but have to date not been defined in Lynch syndrome-associated urothelial cancer. We aimed to provide a molecular description of Lynch syndrome-associated UC. Thus, Lynch syndrome-associated UC of the upper urinary tract and the urinary bladder were identified in the Danish hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) register and were transcriptionally and immunohistochemically profiled and further related to data from 307 sporadic urothelial carcinomas. Whole genome mRNA expression profiles of 41 tumors and immunohistochemical stainings against FGFR3, KRT5, CCNB1, RB1, and CDKN2A (p16) of 37 tumors from Lynch syndrome patients were generated. Pathological data, microsatellite instability, anatomic location, and overall survival data was analyzed and compared with sporadic bladder cancer. The 41 Lynch syndrome-associated UC developed at a mean age of 61 years with 59% women. mRNA expression profiling and immunostaining classified the majority of the Lynch syndrome-associated UC as Urothelial-like tumors with only 20% being Genomically Unstable, Basal/SCC-like or other subtypes. The subtypes were associated with stage, grade, and microsatellite instability. Comparison to larger data sets revealed that Lynch syndrome-associated UC share molecular similarities with sporadic UC. In conclusion, transcriptomic and immunohistochemical profiling identifies a predominance of the Urothelial-like molecular subtype in Lynch syndrome and reveals that the molecular subtypes of sporadic bladder cancer are relevant also within this hereditary, mismatch-repair defective subset. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. Molecular Oncology (2018) © 2018 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The eyes are often absent or severely underdeveloped (anophthalmia), or they may be abnormally small ( microphthalmia ). Usually ... limbs, and eyes. These changes likely underlie the anophthalmia and skeletal malformations of ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome . It ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Bernard-Soulier syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bernard-Soulier syndrome often have heavy or prolonged menstrual periods (menorrhagia). Related Information What does it mean ... in an autosomal recessive pattern , which means both copies of the GP1BA , GP1BB , or GP9 gene in ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflammatory response. Monarch-1 is involved in the inhibition of the inflammatory response. Mutations in the NLRP12 ... cold autoinflammatory syndrome Orphanet: Familial cold urticaria Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) Autoinflammatory Alliance National ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: branchiootorenal/branchiootic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... branchiootorenal spectrum disorders). "Branchio-" refers to the second branchial arch, which is a structure in the developing ... BOR/BO syndrome, abnormal development of the second branchial arch can result in the formation of masses ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saitoh K, Komata M, Katou Y, Clark D, Cole KE, De Baere E, Decroos C, Di Donato ... medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Lyme disease Fibromyalgia White-Sutton syndrome All New & Updated Pages ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ajmg.c.30187. Citation on PubMed Bergemann AD, Cole F, Hirschhorn K. The etiology of Wolf-Hirschhorn ... medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Lyme disease Fibromyalgia White-Sutton syndrome All New & Updated Pages ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Mainzer-Saldino syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The most common rod-cone dystrophy is called retinitis pigmentosa , and the vision problems in Mainzer-Saldino syndrome ... deposits of pigment in the retina from which retinitis pigmentosa gets its name are often not found in ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Aarskog-Scott syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. Evidence suggests that Aarskog-Scott syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive pattern in some families, although ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Manitoba oculotrichoanal syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... opening in the wall of the abdomen (an omphalocele ) that allows the abdominal organs to protrude through ... 2 links) GeneReview: Manitoba Oculotrichoanal Syndrome MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Omphalocele Repair General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Saethre-Chotzen syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Craniosynostosis Information Page Educational Resources (6 links) Boston Children's Hospital Disease InfoSearch: Saethre-Chotzen syndrome Johns Hopkins ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Meier-Gorlin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Microcephaly Information Page Educational Resources (10 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Growth Problems Disease InfoSearch: Meier-Gorlin syndrome ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: triple A syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison's Disease National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Dysautonomia Educational Resources (5 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Achalasia Disease InfoSearch: Achalasia Addisonianism Alacrimia Syndrome ...

  7. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anticipation (ie, an earlier age at onset in successive generations) is linked to repeat expansion in neurodegenerative syndromes, whereas its role in hereditary cancer is unclear. We assessed anticipation in Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer [HNPCC]), in which DNA...... mismatch repair (MMR) defects cause early and accelerated tumor development with a broad tumor spectrum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In the population-based Danish HNPCC registry, 407 MMR gene mutation carriers who had developed cancer associated with Lynch syndrome, were identified. These individuals formed 290....... The effect remained when cancers diagnosed at surveillance were excluded, applied to maternal as well as paternal inheritance, and was independent of the MMR gene mutated. CONCLUSION: The effect from anticipation demonstrated in this large, population-based Lynch syndrome cohort underscores the need...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs. Prolonged seizure episodes known as non-convulsive status epilepticus also appear to be characteristic of ring chromosome ... K, Takahashi Y. Ring chromosome 20 and nonconvulsive status epilepticus. A new epileptic syndrome. Brain. 1997 Jun;120 ( ...

  9. Biochemical and genetic studies on cardiometabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Supriya Simon, A.; Dinesh Roy, D.; Jayapal, V.; Vijayakumar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiometabolic syndrome is one of the major public health issues of this century which describes a cluster of clinical characteristics. Seventy two patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiometabolic syndrome and forty healthy age and sex matched normal controls were selected for this study. Detailed clinical epidemiological and anthropometric characteristics were noted. Lipid profile and Cytokinesis-block micronuclei (CBMN) assay using cytochalasin B were carried out in all the ...

  10. Genetic architecture of plasma adiponectin overlaps with the genetics of metabolic syndrome-related traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Henneman (Peter); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); R.R. Frants (Rune); I.V. Zorkoltseva (Irina); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); M. Frölich (Marijke); B.A. Oostra (Ben); J.A.P. Willems van Dijk (Ko); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - Adiponectin, a hormone secreted by adipose tissue, is of particular interest in metabolic syndrome, because it is inversely correlated with obesity and insulin sensitivity. However, it is not known to what extent the genetics of plasma adiponectin and the genetics of obesity

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease with ichthyosis Triglyceride storage disease with ichthyosis triglyceride storage disease with impaired long-chain fatty acid ... Lipid Metabolism Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ...

  12. Noonan syndrome: a clinical and genetic study of 31 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertola Débora Romeo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome, inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. We studied 31 patients (18 males and 13 females affected by this disorder regarding their clinical and genetic characteristics. The most frequent clinical findings were short stature (71%; craniofacial dysmorphisms, especially hypertelorism, ptosis, downslanting of the palpebral fissures; short or webbed neck (87%; cardiac anomalies (65%, and fetal pads in fingers and toes (70%. After studying the probands' first-degree relatives, we made the diagnosis of Noonan syndrome in more than one family member in three families. Therefore, the majority of our cases were sporadic.

  13. Molecular characterization of a patient presumed to have prader-willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falaleeva, Marina; Sulsona, Carlos R; Zielke, Horst R; Currey, Kathleen M; de la Grange, Pierre; Aslanzadeh, Vahid; Driscoll, Daniel J; Stamm, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is caused by the loss of RNA expression from an imprinted region on chromosome 15 that includes SNRPN, SNORD115, and SNORD116. Currently, there are no mouse models that faithfully reflect the human phenotype and investigations rely on human post-mortem material. During molecular characterization of tissue deposited in a public brain bank from a patient diagnosed with Prader-Willi syndrome, we found RNA expression from SNRPN, SNORD115, and SNORD116 which does not support a genetic diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome. The patient was a female, Caucasian nursing home resident with history of morbid obesity (BMI 56.3) and mental retardation. She died at age of 56 from pulmonary embolism. SNORD115 and SNORD116 are unexpectedly stable in post mortem tissue and can be used for post-mortem diagnosis. Molecular characterization of PWS tissue donors can confirm the diagnosis and identify those patients that have been misdiagnosed.

  14. Molecular subtype classification of urothelial carcinoma in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Eriksson, Pontus; Höglund, Mattias

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome confers an increased risk for urothelial carcinoma (UC). Molecular subtypes may be relevant to prognosis and therapeutic possibilities, but have to date not been defined in Lynch syndrome-associated urothelial cancer. We aimed to provide a molecular description of Lynch syndrome......-associated UC. Thus, Lynch syndrome-associated UC of the upper urinary tract and the urinary bladder were identified in the Danish hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) register and were transcriptionally and immunohistochemically profiled and further related to data from 307 sporadic urothelial...... carcinomas. Whole genome mRNA expression profiles of 41 tumors and immunohistochemical stainings against FGFR3, KRT5, CCNB1, RB1, and CDKN2A (p16) of 37 tumors from Lynch syndrome patients were generated. Pathological data, microsatellite instability, anatomic location, and overall survival data was analyzed...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rare type of ovarian cancer called small cell cancer of the ovary hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT). Related Information What does it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic ... Cancer Institute: Childhood Central Nervous System Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid ...

  16. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD, bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research.

  17. An Update on the Genetics of Usher Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    José M. Millán; Elena Aller; Teresa Jaijo; Fiona Blanco-Kelly; Ascensión Gimenez-Pardo; Carmen Ayuso

    2011-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and is the most common cause underlying deafness and blindness of genetic origin. Clinically, USH is divided into three types. Usher type I (USH1) is the most severe form and is characterized by severe to profound congenital deafness, vestibular areflexia, and prepubertal onset of progressive...

  18. Molecular genetic researches on the radiation genetics of Drosophila in JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'eva, K.P.; Aleksandrova, M.V.; Aleksandrov, I.D.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies of radiation-induced heritable DNA lesions are carried out by the genetic group of Laboratory of nuclear problem in Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The first results of molecular analysis of γ –ray- and neutron-induced vestigial mutations using PCR and sequencing will be presented. (authors)

  19. Genetics Home Reference: 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up of a patient with 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome and the smallest de novo 5q31.2q31.3 deletion involving PURA. Mol Cytogenet. 2015 Nov 14;8:89. doi: 10.1186/s13039-015-0193-9. eCollection 2015. ... 5q31.3 Microdeletion syndrome: clinical and molecular characterization of two further cases. ...

  20. Diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome: Genetic Testing Identifies a Potentially Deadly Hereditary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Lynch Syndrome Follow us A Diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome Genetic testing identifies a potentially deadly hereditary disease ... helped Jack learn what was wrong. Jack had Lynch Syndrome—an inherited disorder. Lynch Syndrome increases the risk ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: aromatase excess syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in females can cause symptoms such as irregular menstrual periods and short stature. Learn more ... pattern, which means a genetic rearrangement involving one copy of the CYP19A1 gene in each cell is ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Pallister-Hall syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manchester DK, Marcelis C, Mazzanti L, McCann E, McDonald MT, Mendelsohn NJ, Moeschler JB, Moghaddam B, Neri ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Potocki-Shaffer syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PubMed Central Montgomery ND, Turcott CM, Tepperberg JH, McDonald MT, Aylsworth AS. A 137-kb deletion within ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E, Santani A, Adam MP, Barnett SS, Ganetzky R, McDonald-McGinn DM, Battaglia D, Bigoni S, Selicorni A, Sorge ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manchester DK, Marcelis C, Mazzanti L, McCann E, McDonald MT, Mendelsohn NJ, Moeschler JB, Moghaddam B, Neri ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... G, Jones MC, Kerstjens-Frederikse WS, Lidral AC, McDonald M, Nelson CC, Witte M, Glover TW. Clinical ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: popliteal pterygium syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E, de Lima RL, Daack-Hirsch S, Sander A, McDonald-McGinn DM, Zackai EH, Lammer EJ, Aylsworth AS, ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: caudal regression syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... umbilical artery: Further support for a caudal regression-sirenomelia spectrum. Am J Med Genet A. 2007 Dec ... AK, Dickinson JE, Bower C. Caudal dysgenesis and sirenomelia-single centre experience suggests common pathogenic basis. Am ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: triple X syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chromosome in only some of their cells. This phenomenon is called 46,XX/47,XXX mosaicism. Learn ... cells contributes to the genetic makeup of a child, the child will have an extra X chromosome ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: 47,XYY syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chromosome in only some of their cells. This phenomenon is called 46,XY/47,XYY mosaicism . Learn ... cells contributes to the genetic makeup of a child, the child will have an extra Y chromosome ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and become legally blind by adolescence or early adulthood. Obesity is another characteristic feature of Bardet-Biedl syndrome . Abnormal weight gain typically begins in early childhood and continues to be an issue throughout life. Complications of obesity can include type ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Peutz-Jeghers syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... high risk of developing cancer during their lifetimes. Cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, cervix, ovary, and breast are among the most ... of cancers in the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Clin Cancer Res. 2006 May 15;12(10):3209-15. ... Martinez-Gimeno M, Carballo M. De novo germline mutation in the serine-threonine kinase ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: polycystic ovary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on PubMed Ünlütürk U, Sezgin E, Yildiz BO. Evolutionary determinants of polycystic ovary syndrome: part 1. Fertil ... genome editing and CRISPR-Cas9? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Alopecia areata ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Schwartz-Jampel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fontaine B, Koenig J, Hantaï D, Gueguen A, Fournier E, Eymard B, Nicole S. Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability with preterminal nerve and neuromuscular junction remodeling is a hallmark of Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. Neuromuscul Disord. 2013 Dec;23(12):998-1009. ...

  15. Shared genetic factors underlie chronic pain syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Zavos, Helena M. S.; Lachance, Genevieve; Hammond, Christopher J.; Williams, Frances M. K.

    Chronic pain syndromes (CPS) are highly prevalent in the general population, and increasingly the evidence points to a common etiological pathway. Using a large cohort of twins (n = 8564) characterized for chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain (CWP), chronic pelvic pain (PP), migraine (MIG), dry

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... opening in the wall of the abdomen (an omphalocele ) that allows the abdominal organs to protrude through ... Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Macroglossia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Omphalocele General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Pitt-Hopkins syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) PITT-HOPKINS SYNDROME Sources for This Page Amiel J, Rio M, de Pontual L, Redon R, Malan V, Boddaert N, Plouin P, Carter NP, Lyonnet S, Munnich A, Colleaux L. Mutations in TCF4, ... a severe epileptic encephalopathy associated with autonomic dysfunction. ...

  18. The molecular genetic basis of age-related macular degeneration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-12-10

    Dec 10, 2009 ... this review, we have provided an overview on the underlying molecular genetic mechanisms in AMD worldwide and highlight ..... eases like diabetes (Scott et al. ...... 2006 Systematic review and meta-analysis of.

  19. A genetic analysis of segregation distortion revealed by molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Journal of Genetics, Vol. 90, No. ... Segregation analysis was based on 64 molecular markers, including 26 .... FHB of RIL populations was controlled by quantitative trait ... The authors acknowledge financial support by the National Basic.

  20. Phenotypic and molecular genetic analysis of Pyruvate Kinase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenotypic and molecular genetic analysis of Pyruvate Kinase deficiency in a Tunisian family. Jaouani Mouna, Hamdi Nadia, Chaouch Leila, Kalai Miniar, Mellouli Fethi, Darragi Imen, Boudriga Imen, Chaouachi Dorra, Bejaoui Mohamed, Abbes Salem ...

  1. Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baylink, David

    2004-01-01

    The primary goal of the proposed work is to apply several state of the art molecular genetic and gene therapy technologies to address fundamental questions in bone biology with a particular emphasis on attempting: l...

  2. Pendred syndrome: evidence for genetic homogeneity and further refinement of linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausden, E; Coyle, B; Armour, J A; Coffey, R; Grossman, A; Fraser, G R; Winter, R M; Pembrey, M E; Kendall-Taylor, P; Stephens, D; Luxon, L M; Phelps, P D; Reardon, W; Trembath, R

    1997-02-01

    Pendred syndrome is the association between congenital sensorineural deafness and goitre. The disorder is characterised by the incomplete discharge of radioiodide from a primed thyroid following perchlorate challenge. However, the molecular basis of the association between hearing loss and a defect in organification of iodide remains unclear. Pendred syndrome is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and has recently been mapped to 7q31 coincident with the non-syndromic deafness locus DFNB4. To define the critical linkage interval for Pendred syndrome we have studied five kindreds, each with members affected by Pendred syndrome. All families support linkage to the chromosome 7 region, defined by the microsatellite markers D7S501-D7S523. Detailed haplotype analysis refines the Pendred syndrome linkage interval to a region flanked by the marker loci D7S501 and D7S525, separated by a genetic distance estimated to be 2.5 cM. As potential candidate genes have as yet not been mapped to this interval, these data will contribute to a positional cloning approach for the identification of the Pendred syndrome gene.

  3. Genetic and epidemiological aspect of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, Annetje Monique de

    2010-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a painful disorder affecting one or more extremities. CRPS is characterized by various combinations of sensory, autonomic and motor disturbances. Genetic factors are suggested to play a role in CRPS, but this has not been extensively studied. Therefore the

  4. NEW MOLECULAR TECHNOLOGIES IN GENETIC DIAGNOSIS OF MALE INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Chernykh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the accelerated development of technologies in the field of molecular genetics and cytogenetics has led to significant opportunities of the research and diagnosis of mutations and variations of the genome. This article provides a brief review of new molecular technology, also as the results of their use in reproductive medicine and their perspectives in the genetic diagnosis of male infertility. 

  5. Endometrial cancer : from a molecular genetic perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Smid-Koopman (Ellen)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe first observations indicative of a role of genetic factors in carcinogenesis were made as early as 1912, when Rous demonstrated that a filterable agent (i.e. virus) could induce cancer in chicken (Rous 1965). In 1914, Boveri postulated a "genetic" theory on carcinogenesis by

  6. Molecular and Genetic Basis of Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakir Mehić

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A person’s reaction to trauma depends on the traumatic situation itself, personality characteristics of the person exposed to trauma, and posttraumatic social environment. Stressor must be extreme event that is extremely dangerous or fatal nature, and which is outside normal human experience [1].Studies investigating psychological consequences of military and civil trauma confirmed the correlation between the nature and intensity of trauma, previous traumatic experience, and psychological consequences. Stress causes the autonomic nervous system hyperactivity. If the stress is extreme or constant symptoms of hyperactivity, increased heart rate, increased respiration, sweating, muscle tension, insomnia and increased anxiety are becoming significant for the prolonging the symptoms of PTSD. Our cells are well adapted to exposure to a mild stress for a short time. In contrast there are potentially serious consequences of exposure to the prolonged stress[2].Various damages arising from the war in Bosnia (1992 - 1995 are almost undetectable, and the consequences for the mental health of the population of Bosnia and Herzegovina are long and painful. It is estimated that in Bosnia and Herzegovina there are 1.75 million people who have some stress-related mental disorders, of which 1 million in the Federation.PTSD may be represented by mutations that must be carried by many genes. There may even be epigenetic reasons for the disorder that have nothing to do with heritable mutations per se. Epigenetic means related to functional changes in the genome that can be regulated by external environmental events that do not involve alterations in the genetic code. One epigenetic mechanism is called “methylation,” a molecular process that affects the activity of a large percentage of genes. Epigenetic investigations say that methylation may be involved in the development of stress regulation in early life[3].A number of longitudinal studies have looked at

  7. Assessing Date Palm Genetic Diversity Using Different Molecular Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atia, Mohamed A M; Sakr, Mahmoud M; Adawy, Sami S

    2017-01-01

    Molecular marker technologies which rely on DNA analysis provide powerful tools to assess biodiversity at different levels, i.e., among and within species. A range of different molecular marker techniques have been developed and extensively applied for detecting variability in date palm at the DNA level. Recently, the employment of gene-targeting molecular marker approaches to study biodiversity and genetic variations in many plant species has increased the attention of researchers interested in date palm to carry out phylogenetic studies using these novel marker systems. Molecular markers are good indicators of genetic distances among accessions, because DNA-based markers are neutral in the face of selection. Here we describe the employment of multidisciplinary molecular marker approaches: amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism, conserved DNA-derived polymorphism (CDDP), intron-targeted amplified polymorphism (ITAP), simple sequence repeats (SSR), and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) to assess genetic diversity in date palm.

  8. Supplementary data: Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in cluster bean. (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) genotypes. Rakesh Pathak, S. K. Singh, Manjit Singh and A. Henry. J. Genet. 89, 243–246. Figure 1. RAPD profile of 1–16 Cyamopsis tetragonoloba genotypes amplified with arbitrary primer OPA-16. Figure 2. RAPD profile of 17–32 ...

  9. Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular evaluation of genetic diversity and association studies in rice. (Oryza sativa L.) C. Vanniarajan, K. K. Vinod and Andy Pereira. J. Genet. 91, 9–19. Table 1. Chromosome-wise distribution of SSR alleles and their number (k), polymorphic information content (PIC) and allele discrimination index (Dm). Chromosome.

  10. Molecular research and genetic engineering of resistance to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reviews the recent research progress on genetic methods of resistance, the status and existing problems, traditional breeding, the main resistance mechanism, molecular markers and genetic engineering of resistance genes. It is hoped that new breeding methods and new varieties resistant to Verticillium wilt will ...

  11. Use of molecular genetics and historical records to reconstruct the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent advances in molecular genetics made the inference of past demographic events through the analysis of gene pools from modern populations possible. The technology uses genetic markers to provide previously unavailable resolution into questions of human evolution, migration and the historical relationship of ...

  12. Molecular Darwinism: The Contingency of Spontaneous Genetic Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Arber, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The availability of spontaneously occurring genetic variants is an important driving force of biological evolution. Largely thanks to experimental investigations by microbial geneticists, we know today that several different molecular mechanisms contribute to the overall genetic variations. These mechanisms can be assigned to three natural strategies to generate genetic variants: 1) local sequence changes, 2) intragenomic reshuffling of DNA segments, and 3) acquisition of a segment of foreign...

  13. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S; Karimi, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have......-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2...... families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families) comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM) we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age...

  14. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anticipation (ie, an earlier age at onset in successive generations) is linked to repeat expansion in neurodegenerative syndromes, whereas its role in hereditary cancer is unclear. We assessed anticipation in Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer [HNPCC]), in which DNA...... parent-child pairs in which age at the first cancer diagnosis was assessed. A paired t-test and a specifically developed bivariate model were used to assess a possible role of anticipation. RESULTS: Both methods revealed anticipation with children developing cancer mean 9.8 years (P ... parents using the paired t-test and 5.5 years (P anticipation with 7.2 years earlier age at onset was identified also in the oldest cohort, in which the children were observed until they were older than 80 years...

  15. Usher syndrome in Puerto Rico: a clinical and genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-Casasnovas, Jaime E; Izquierdo, Natalio J; Millán, Jose M

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate patients with the Usher syn drome in Puerto Rico. Three patients with the Usher syndrome underwent an ophthalmic and audiologic evaluation; and genetic linkage analysis. All patients were legally blind based on visual acuity and visual field results. Two patients had macular edema as shown on Stratus OCT. All patients had moderate hearing loss as part of the syndrome. A patient, and two family members had three mutations leading to protein changes including: p.S4588Y; p.Y4505C; and p.14474M. Phenotypic findings in patients with the Usher syndrome in Puerto Rico are similar to those previously reported. However, to our knowledge, neither these mutations nor OCT findings have been previously described in patients with the syndrome.

  16. Molecular Bases and Phenotypic Determinants of Aromatase Excess Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki Fukami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatase excess syndrome (AEXS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by gynecomastia. This condition is caused by overexpression of CYP19A1 encoding aromatase, and three types of cryptic genomic rearrangement around CYP19A1, that is, duplications, deletions, and inversions, have been identified in AEXS. Duplications appear to have caused CYP19A1 overexpression because of an increased number of physiological promoters, whereas deletions and inversions would have induced wide CYP19A1 expression due to the formation of chimeric genes consisting of a noncoding exon(s of a neighboring gene and CYP19A1 coding exons. Genotype-phenotype analysis implies that phenotypic severity of AEXS is primarily determined by the expression pattern of CYP19A1 and the chimeric genes and by the structural property of the fused exons with a promoter function (i.e., the presence or the absence of a natural translation start codon. These results provide novel information about molecular mechanisms of human genetic disorders and biological function of estrogens.

  17. Comprehensive Molecular Screening in Chinese Usher Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tengyang; Xu, Ke; Ren, Yanfan; Xie, Yue; Zhang, Xiaohui; Tian, Lu; Li, Yang

    2018-03-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) refers to a group of autosomal recessive disorders causing deafness and blindness. The objectives of this study were to determine the mutation spectrum in a cohort of Chinese patients with USH and to describe the clinical features of the patients with mutations. A total of 119 probands who were clinically diagnosed with USH were recruited for genetic analysis. All probands underwent ophthalmic examinations. A combination of molecular screening methods, including targeted next-generation sequencing, Sanger-DNA sequencing, and multiplex ligation probe amplification assay, was used to detect mutations. We found biallelic mutations in 92 probands (77.3%), monoallelic mutations in 5 patients (4.2%), and 1 hemizygous mutation in 1 patient (0.8%), resulting in an overall mutation detection rate of 78.2%. Overall, 132 distinct disease-causing mutations involving seven USH (ABHD12, CDH23, GPR98, MYO7A, PCDH15, USH1C, and USH2A) genes; 5 other retinal degeneration genes (CHM, CNGA1, EYS, PDE6B, and TULP1); and 1 nonsyndromic hearing loss gene (MYO15A) were identified, and 78 were novel. Mutations of MYOA7 were responsible for 60% of USH1 families, followed by PCDH15 (20%) and USH1C (10%). Mutations of USH2A accounted for 67.7% of USH2 families, and mutation c.8559-2A>G was the most frequent one, accounting for 19.1% of the identified USH2A alleles. Our results confirm that the mutation spectrum for each USH gene in Chinese patients differs from those of other populations. The formation of the mutation profile for the Chinese population will enable a precise genetic diagnosis for USH patients in the future.

  18. Micropropagation, genetic engineering, and molecular biology of Populus

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. B. Klopfenstein; Y. W. Chun; M. -S. Kim; M. A. Ahuja; M. C. Dillon; R. C. Carman; L. G. Eskew

    1997-01-01

    Thirty-four Populus biotechnology chapters, written by 85 authors, are comprised in 5 sections: 1) in vitro culture (micropropagation, somatic embryogenesis, protoplasts, somaclonal variation, and germplasm preservation); 2) transformation and foreign gene expression; 3) molecular biology (molecular/genetic characterization); 4) biotic and abiotic resistance (disease,...

  19. Genetic Analysis of 'PAX6-Negative' Individuals with Aniridia or Gillespie Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansari, Morad; Rainger, Jacqueline; Hanson, Isabel M

    2016-01-01

    We report molecular genetic analysis of 42 affected individuals referred with a diagnosis of aniridia who previously screened as negative for intragenic PAX6 mutations. Of these 42, the diagnoses were 31 individuals with aniridia and 11 individuals referred with a diagnosis of Gillespie syndrome......) to PAX6 and one within a gene desert 5' (telomeric) to PITX2. Sequence analysis of the FOXC1 and PITX2 coding regions identified two plausibly pathogenic de novo FOXC1 missense mutations (p.Pro79Thr and p.Leu101Pro). No intragenic mutations were detected in PITX2. FISH mapping in an individual...... with Gillespie-like syndrome with an apparently balanced X;11 reciprocal translocation revealed disruption of a gene at each breakpoint: ARHGAP6 on the X chromosome and PHF21A on chromosome 11. In the other individuals with Gillespie syndrome no mutations were identified in either of these genes, or in HCCS...

  20. Molecular and genetic study of wheat rusts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicholas Le Maitre

    Phylogenetic trees were created for leaf and stem rust pathotypes. Field isolates of ... Key words: Prevalence, microsatellite, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP), phylogeny, Puccinia. INTRODUCTION. Puccinia triticina Eriks ..... Genetic distances and reconstruction phylogenetic trees from microsatellite DNA.

  1. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia clinical and molecular genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letteboer, T.G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber (ROW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by vascular malformations in multiple organ systems. HHT has an age-related penetrance and variable clinical expression. The clinical symptoms are caused by direct

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Koolen-de Vries syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eastern descent, although it is rare in other populations. In the H2 lineage, a 900 kb segment of DNA, which includes the region deleted in most ... Odent S, David V, Andrieux J. Clinical and molecular characterization of 17q21.31 ... Hypersociability in the behavioral phenotype of 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome. Am ...

  3. Molecular and Genetic Basis of Hereditary Connective-Tissue Diseases Accompanied by Frequent Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Yakhyaeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequent bone fractures in infancy require the elimination of a large number (> 100 of genetic disorders. The modern diagnostic method of hereditary diseases characterized by debilitating course is a new generation sequencing. The article presents the results of molecular-genetic study conducted in 18 patients with clinical symptoms of connective tissue disorders. 10 (56% patients had mutations in the genes encoding type I collagen chains, leading to the development of osteogenesis imperfecta, 5 (28% — mutations in IV and V type collagen genes that are responsible for the development of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. 3 (17% patients had mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 protein, deficiency of which is manifested by Marfan syndrome. However, the correlation between patient's phenotype and discovered mutations in the investigated gene is established not in all cases.

  4. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F.; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A.; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S.; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M.; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T.; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A.; Brunner, Han G.; Burke, Christopher J.; Carr, Ian M.; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Chandler, Kate E.; Christen, Hans-Jurgen; Corry, Peter C.; Cowan, Frances M.; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; de Laet, Corinne; de Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D.; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J.; Guet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Hayward, Bruce E.; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P.; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G.; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D.; Kingston, Helen M.; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Kornberg, Andrew J.; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J.; Livingston, John H.; Lourenco, Charles M.; Lyall, E. G. Hermione; Lynch, Sally A.; Lyons, Michael J.; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P.; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B.; Mewasingh, Leena D.; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K.; Ostergaard, John R.; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R. Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M.; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A.; Corcoles, C. Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P.; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B. P.; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L.; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; van Coster, Rudy N. A.; van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L.; Willemsen, Michel A. A.; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J.

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease

  5. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2001); and molecular methods such as amplified fragment length polymorphism ... to the maintenance and rational use of germplasm resources in the improvement of ... study of diversity of ScMATE1 gene in different species of. Secale genus.

  6. Clinicopathologic, Immunohistochemical, and Molecular Features of Histiocytoid Sweet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría-Landa, Victoria; Rodríguez-Pinilla, Socorro María; Santos-Briz, Angel; Rodríguez-Peralto, José Luis; Alegre, Victor; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Kutzner, Heinz; Requena, Luis

    2017-07-01

    Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome is a rare histopathologic variant of Sweet syndrome. The nature of the histiocytoid infiltrate has generated considerable controversy in the literature. The main goal of this study was to conduct a comprehensive overview of the immunohistochemical phenotype of the infiltrate in histiocytoid Sweet syndrome. We also analyze whether this variant of Sweet syndrome is more frequently associated with hematologic malignancies than classic Sweet syndrome. This is a retrospective case series study of the clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of 33 patients with a clinicopathologic diagnosis of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome was conducted in the dermatology departments of 5 university hospitals and a private laboratory of dermatopathology. The clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and follow-up features of 33 patients with histiocytoid Sweet syndrome were analyzed. In some cases, cytogenetic studies of the dermal infiltrate were also performed. We compare our findings with those of the literature. The dermal infiltrate from the 33 study patients (20 female; median age, 49 years; age range, 5-93 years; and 13 male; median age, 42 years; age range, 4-76 years) was mainly composed of myeloperoxidase-positive immature myelomonocytic cells with histiocytoid morphology. No cytogenetic anomalies were found in the infiltrate except in 1 case in which neoplastic cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia were intermingled with the cells of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome. Authentic histiocytes were also found in most cases, with a mature immunoprofile, but they appeared to be a minor component of the infiltrate. Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome was not more frequently related with hematologic malignancies than classic neutrophilic Sweet syndrome. The dermal infiltrate of cutaneous lesions of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome is composed mostly of immature cells of myeloid lineage. This infiltrate should not be interpreted as leukemia cutis.

  7. Silent angels the genetic and clinical aspects of Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dziwota Ewelina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder and, because of some behavioral characteristics, individuals affected by the disease are known as silent angels. Girls with Rett syndrome perform stereotyped movements, they have learning difficulties, their reaction time is prolonged, and they seem alienated in the environment. These children require constant pediatric, neurological and orthopedic care. In the treatment of Rett syndrome physical therapy, music therapy, hydrotherapy, hippotherapy, behavioral methods, speech therapy and diet, are also used. In turn, psychological therapy of the syndrome is based on the sensory integration method, using two or more senses simultaneously. In 80% of cases, the syndrome is related to mutations of the MECP2 gene, located on chromosome X. The pathogenesis of Rett syndrome is caused by the occurrence of a non-functional MeCP2 protein, which is a transcription factor of many genes, i.e. Bdnf, mef2c, Sgk1, Uqcrc1. Abnormal expression of these genes reveals a characteristic disease phenotype. Clinical symptoms relate mainly to the nervous, respiratory, skeletal and gastrointestinal systems. Currently causal treatment is not possible. However, researchers are developing methods by which, perhaps in the near future, it will be possible to eliminate the mutations in the MECP2 gene, and this will give a chance to the patient for normal functioning.

  8. Next generation sequencing for molecular confirmation of hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Manlio F; Cruz-Robles, David; Ines-Real, Selene; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes comprise a wide range of diseases resulting from alteration in cardiac ion channels. Genes involved in these syndromes represent diverse mutations that cause the altered encoding of the diverse proteins constituting these channels, thus affecting directly the currents of the corresponding ions. In the present article we will briefly review how to arrive to a clinical diagnosis and we will present the results of molecular genetic studies made in Mexican subjects attending the SCD Syndromes Clinic of the National Institute of Cardiology of Mexico City. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular genetics of hemophilia A: Clinical perspectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza A.G. Tantawy

    Evaluation of an individual with a suspected bleeding disorder includes: platelet count .... information for genetic counseling of at-risk family members. It is indicated for ... Patients with blood group O and a low von Willebrand antigen level have a ..... [4] Husain N. Carrier analysis for hemophilia A: ideal versus acceptable.

  10. Molecular markers: a potential resource for ginger genetic diversity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nor Asiah; Rafii, M Y; Mahmud, T M M; Hanafi, M M; Miah, Gous

    2016-12-01

    Ginger is an economically important and valuable plant around the world. Ginger is used as a food, spice, condiment, medicine and ornament. There is available information on biochemical aspects of ginger, but few studies have been reported on its molecular aspects. The main objective of this review is to accumulate the available molecular marker information and its application in diverse ginger studies. This review article was prepared by combing material from published articles and our own research. Molecular markers allow the identification and characterization of plant genotypes through direct access to hereditary material. In crop species, molecular markers are applied in different aspects and are useful in breeding programs. In ginger, molecular markers are commonly used to identify genetic variation and classify the relatedness among varieties, accessions, and species. Consequently, it provides important input in determining resourceful management strategies for ginger improvement programs. Alternatively, a molecular marker could function as a harmonizing tool for documenting species. This review highlights the application of molecular markers (isozyme, RAPD, AFLP, SSR, ISSR and others such as RFLP, SCAR, NBS and SNP) in genetic diversity studies of ginger species. Some insights on the advantages of the markers are discussed. The detection of genetic variation among promising cultivars of ginger has significance for ginger improvement programs. This update of recent literature will help researchers and students select the appropriate molecular markers for ginger-related research.

  11. Metabolic syndrome: clinical concept and molecular basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Tohru; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of insulin resistance, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia and is a common basis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the precise mechanism remains to be elucidated, a practical definition is needed. A worldwide definition that considers increased waist circumference as an essential component has been settled. Visceral fat locates upstream of the liver. Free fatty acids and glycerol derived from visceral fat reach the liver and stimulate lipoprotein synthesis and gluconeogenesis, respectively. The adipose tissue produces a variety of bioactive substances conceptualized as 'adipocytokines'. Overproduction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tumor necrosis factor- seems to relate to the thrombotic and inflammatory tendency. On the other hand, adiponectin, which has antiatherogenic and antidiabetic activities, is reduced in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In Japan, the waist circumference criterion based on visceral fat accumulation has been adopted. The concept of this syndrome has been widely publicized, and health promotion programs based on the concept have commenced in various areas of the country. Such 'Adipo-Do-It' movement is an incentive to encourage physical exercise to reduce visceral fat and is a big challenge to prevent life-style-related diseases and CVD.

  12. Genetics of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome-associated tumors: common genetic pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenman, M.; Westerveld, A.; Mannens, M.

    2000-01-01

    A specific subset of solid childhood tumors-Wilms' tumor, adrenocortical carcinoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and hepatoblastoma-is characterized by its association with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Genetic abnormalities found in these tumors affect the same chromosome region (11p15), which has been

  13. Alstr?m Syndrome: Genetics and Clinical Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Jan D; Maffei, Pietro; Collin, Gayle B; Naggert, J?rgen K

    2011-01-01

    Alstr?m syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by cone-rod dystrophy, hearing loss, childhood truncal obesity, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, short stature in adulthood, cardiomyopathy, and progressive pulmonary, hepatic, and renal dysfunction. Symptoms first appear in infancy and progressive development of multi-organ pathology leads to a reduced life expectancy. Variability in age of onset and severity of clinic...

  14. Molecular discrimination and genetic relationships between some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cucurbita pepo ssp. pepo; zucchini group is a widely grown and economically important group belonging to genus Cucurbita, and being one of the easiest groups to cultivate in temperate climate with overwhelming production. Since, RAPD analysis provides a fast and reliable method for molecular characterization and ...

  15. Genetics of asthma: a molecular biologist perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh Balaram; Kumar Amrendra

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Asthma belongs to the category of classical allergic diseases which generally arise due to IgE mediated hypersensitivity to environmental triggers. Since its prevalence is very high in developed or urbanized societies it is also referred to as "disease of civilizations". Due to its increased prevalence among related individuals, it was understood quite long back that it is a genetic disorder. Well designed epidemiological studies reinforced these views. The advent of modern biologica...

  16. Three molecular pathways model colorectal carcinogenesis in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadova, Aysel; Gallon, Richard; Gebert, Johannes; Ballhausen, Alexej; Endris, Volker; Kirchner, Martina; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Burn, John; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Bläker, Hendrik; Kloor, Matthias

    2018-07-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by germline mutations of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. MMR deficiency has long been regarded as a secondary event in the pathogenesis of Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers. Recently, this concept has been challenged by the discovery of MMR-deficient crypt foci in the normal mucosa. We aimed to reconstruct colorectal carcinogenesis in Lynch syndrome by collecting molecular and histology evidence from Lynch syndrome adenomas and carcinomas. We determined the frequency of MMR deficiency in adenomas from Lynch syndrome mutation carriers by immunohistochemistry and by systematic literature analysis. To trace back the pathways of pathogenesis, histological growth patterns and mutational signatures were analyzed in Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers. Literature and immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated MMR deficiency in 491 (76.7%) out of 640 adenomas (95% CI: 73.3% to 79.8%) from Lynch syndrome mutation carriers. Histologically normal MMR-deficient crypts were found directly adjacent to dysplastic adenoma tissue, proving their role as tumor precursors in Lynch syndrome. Accordingly, mutation signature analysis in Lynch colorectal cancers revealed that KRAS and APC mutations commonly occur after the onset of MMR deficiency. Tumors lacking evidence of polypous growth frequently presented with CTNNB1 and TP53 mutations. Our findings demonstrate that Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers can develop through three pathways, with MMR deficiency commonly representing an early and possibly initiating event. This underlines that targeting MMR-deficient cells by chemoprevention or vaccines against MMR deficiency-induced frameshift peptide neoantigens holds promise for tumor prevention in Lynch syndrome. © 2018 UICC.

  17. Molecular and Genetic Determinants of Glioma Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Masui

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A diffusely invasive nature is a major obstacle in treating a malignant brain tumor, “diffuse glioma”, which prevents neurooncologists from surgically removing the tumor cells even in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. Recently updated classification of diffuse gliomas based on distinct genetic and epigenetic features has culminated in a multilayered diagnostic approach to combine histologic phenotypes and molecular genotypes in an integrated diagnosis. However, it is still a work in progress to decipher how the genetic aberrations contribute to the aggressive nature of gliomas including their highly invasive capacity. Here we depict a set of recent discoveries involving molecular genetic determinants of the infiltrating nature of glioma cells, especially focusing on genetic mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase pathways and metabolic reprogramming downstream of common cancer mutations. The specific biology of glioma cell invasion provides an opportunity to explore the genotype-phenotype correlation in cancer and develop novel glioma-specific therapeutic strategies for this devastating disease.

  18. Primer on molecular genetics. DOE Human Genome Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  19. Molecular, metabolic, and genetic control: An introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, John J.; Mackey, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    The living cell is a miniature, self-reproducing, biochemical machine. Like all machines, it has a power supply, a set of working components that carry out its necessary tasks, and control systems that ensure the proper coordination of these tasks. In this Special Issue, we focus on the molecular regulatory systems that control cell metabolism, gene expression, environmental responses, development, and reproduction. As for the control systems in human-engineered machines, these regulatory networks can be described by nonlinear dynamical equations, for example, ordinary differential equations, reaction-diffusion equations, stochastic differential equations, or cellular automata. The articles collected here illustrate (i) a range of theoretical problems presented by modern concepts of cellular regulation, (ii) some strategies for converting molecular mechanisms into dynamical systems, (iii) some useful mathematical tools for analyzing and simulating these systems, and (iv) the sort of results that derive from serious interplay between theory and experiment.

  20. Genetic neuropathology of obsessive psychiatric syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, A E; Deep-Soboslay, A; Tao, R; Hauptman, D T; Kaye, W H; Arango, V; Weinberger, D R; Hyde, T M; Kleinman, J E

    2014-09-02

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are complex psychiatric disorders with shared obsessive features, thought to arise from the interaction of multiple genes of small effect with environmental factors. Potential candidate genes for AN, BN and OCD have been identified through clinical association and neuroimaging studies; however, recent genome-wide association studies of eating disorders (ED) so far have failed to report significant findings. In addition, few, if any, studies have interrogated postmortem brain tissue for evidence of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) associated with candidate genes, which has particular promise as an approach to elucidating molecular mechanisms of association. We therefore selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) based on candidate gene studies for AN, BN and OCD from the literature, and examined the association of these SNPs with gene expression across the lifespan in prefrontal cortex of a nonpsychiatric control cohort (N=268). Several risk-predisposing SNPs were significantly associated with gene expression among control subjects. We then measured gene expression in the prefrontal cortex of cases previously diagnosed with obsessive psychiatric disorders, for example, ED (N=15) and OCD/obsessive-compulsive personality disorder or tics (OCD/OCPD/Tic; N=16), and nonpsychiatric controls (N=102) and identified 6 and 286 genes that were differentially expressed between ED compared with controls and OCD cases compared with controls, respectively (false discovery rate (FDR) <5%). However, none of the clinical risk SNPs were among the eQTLs and none were significantly associated with gene expression within the broad obsessive cohort, suggesting larger sample sizes or other brain regions may be required to identify candidate molecular mechanisms of clinical association in postmortem brain data sets.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: neurofibromatosis type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the NF1 gene are associated with Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome (NFNS). Am J Med Genet A. 2003 May ... mutations represent the major molecular event underlying neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome. Am J Hum Genet. 2005 Dec;77(6): ...

  2. MAJOR MOLECULAR GENETIC DRIVERS IN SPORADIC PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is primarily due to a solitary parathyroid adenoma but multi-gland disease, parathyroid carcinoma, and ectopic parathyroid hormone production can occur. Although primary hyperparathyroidism mostly presents sporadically, strong familial predispositions also exist. Much is known about heritable genetic mutations responsible for these syndromes, including multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 2A, hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome, and familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia. Acquired mutations in common sporadic hyperparathyroidism have also been discovered. Here we focus on the most common and well-established genetic drivers: 1) involvement of the oncogene cyclin D1 in human neoplasia was first established in parathyroid adenomas, followed by recognition of its importance in other tumor types including breast cancer and B-lymphoid malignancy; and 2) somatic mutation of the MEN1 gene, first identified as the source of pathogenic germline mutations in patients with familial endocrinopathies, is found in a substantial fraction of non-familial parathyroid adenomas.

  3. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A; Brunner, Han G; Burke, Christopher J; Carr, Ian M; Carvalho, Daniel R; Chandler, Kate E; Christen, Hans-Jurgen; Corry, Peter C; Cowan, Frances M; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; De Laet, Corinne; De Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G M; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J; Guet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C J; Hayward, Bruce E; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D; Kingston, Helen M; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Kornberg, Andrew J; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J; Livingston, John H; Lourenco, Charles M; Lyall, E G Hermione; Lynch, Sally A; Lyons, Michael J; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B; Mewasingh, Leena D; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K; Ostergaard, John R; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A; Corcoles, C Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B P; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy N A; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S H; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L; Willemsen, Michel A A; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2007-10-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation-positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified.

  4. Molecular genetics of pituitary development in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogoda, Hans-Martin; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

    2007-08-01

    The pituitary gland of vertebrates consists of two major parts, the neurohypophysis (NH) and the adenohypophysis (AH). As a central part of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal system (HHS), it constitutes a functional link between the nervous and the endocrine system to regulate basic body functions, such as growth, metabolism and reproduction. The development of the AH has been intensively studied in mouse, serving as a model for organogenesis and differential cell specification. However, given that the AH is a relatively recent evolutionary advance of the chordate phylum, it is also interesting to understand its development in lower chordate systems. In recent years, the zebrafish has emerged as a powerful lower vertebrate system for developmental studies, being amenable for large-scale genetic approaches, embryological manipulations, and in vivo imaging. Here, we present an overview of current knowledge of the mechanisms and genetic control of pituitary formation during zebrafish development. First, we describe the components of the zebrafish HHS, and the different pituitary cell types and hormones, followed by a description of the different steps of normal pituitary development. The central part of the review deals with the genes found to be essential for zebrafish AH development, accompanied by a description of the corresponding mutant phenotypes. Finally, we discuss future directions, with particular focus on evolutionary aspects, and some novel functional aspects with growing medical and social relevance.

  5. Molecular genetics and epigenetics of CACTA elements

    KAUST Repository

    Fedoroff, Nina V.

    2013-08-21

    The CACTA transposons, so named for a highly conserved motif at element ends, comprise one of the most abundant superfamilies of Class 2 (cut-and-paste) plant transposons. CACTA transposons characteristically include subterminal sequences of several hundred nucleotides containing closely spaced direct and inverted repeats of a short, conserved sequence of 14-15 bp. The Supressor-mutator (Spm) transposon, identified and subjected to detailed genetic analysis by Barbara McClintock, remains the paradigmatic element of the CACTA family. The Spm transposon encodes two proteins required for transposition, the transposase (TnpD) and a regulatory protein (TnpA) that binds to the subterminal repeats. Spm expression is subject to both genetic and epigenetic regulation. The Spm-encoded TnpA serves as an activator of the epigenetically inactivated, methylated Spm, stimulating both transient and heritable activation of the transposon. TnpA also serves as a negative regulator of the demethylated active element promoter and is required, in addition to the TnpD, for transposition. © Springer Science+Business Media, New York 2013.

  6. Molecular and genetic epidemiology of cancer in low- and medium-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and molecular factors can play an important role in an individual's cancer susceptibility and response to carcinogen exposure. Cancer susceptibility and response to carcinogen exposure can be either through inheritance of high penetrance but rare germline mutations that constitute heritable cancer syndromes, or it can be inherited as common genetic variations or polymorphisms that are associated with low to moderate risk for development of cancer. These polymorphisms can interact with environmental exposures and can influence an individual's cancer risk through multiple pathways, including affecting the rate of metabolism of carcinogens or the immune response to these toxins. Thus, these genetic polymorphisms can account for some of the geographical differences seen in cancer prevalence between different populations. This review explores the role of molecular epidemiology in the field of cancer prevention and control in low- and medium-income countries. Using data from Human Genome Project and HapMap Project, genome-wide association studies have been able to identify multiple susceptibility loci for different cancers. The field of genetic and molecular epidemiology has been further revolutionized by the discovery of newer, faster, and more efficient DNA-sequencing technologies including next-generation sequencing. The new DNA-sequencing technologies can play an important role in planning and implementation of cancer prevention and screening strategies. More research is needed in this area, especially in investigating new biomarkers and measuring gene-environment interactions. Copyright © 2014 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic factors and molecular mechanisms in dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ling; Garrett, Qian; Flanagan, Judith; Chakrabarti, Subhabrata; Papas, Eric

    2018-04-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a complex condition with a multifactorial etiology that can be difficult to manage successfully. While external factors are modifiable, treatment success is limited if genetic factors contribute to the disease. The purpose of this review is to compile research describing normal and abnormal ocular surface function on a molecular level, appraise genetic studies involving DED or DED-associated diseases, and introduce the basic methods used for conducting genetic epidemiology studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic Breeding and Diversity of the Genus Passiflora: Progress and Perspectives in Molecular and Genetic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bernard M. Cerqueira-Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the ecological and economic importance of passion fruit (Passiflora spp., molecular markers have only recently been utilized in genetic studies of this genus. In addition, both basic genetic researches related to population studies and pre-breeding programs of passion fruit remain scarce for most Passiflora species. Considering the number of Passiflora species and the increasing use of these species as a resource for ornamental, medicinal, and food purposes, the aims of this review are the following: (i to present the current condition of the passion fruit crop; (ii to quantify the applications and effects of using molecular markers in studies of Passiflora; (iii to present the contributions of genetic engineering for passion fruit culture; and (iv to discuss the progress and perspectives of this research. Thus, the present review aims to summarize and discuss the relationship between historical and current progress on the culture, breeding, and molecular genetics of passion fruit.

  9. Molecular Darwinism: the contingency of spontaneous genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arber, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The availability of spontaneously occurring genetic variants is an important driving force of biological evolution. Largely thanks to experimental investigations by microbial geneticists, we know today that several different molecular mechanisms contribute to the overall genetic variations. These mechanisms can be assigned to three natural strategies to generate genetic variants: 1) local sequence changes, 2) intragenomic reshuffling of DNA segments, and 3) acquisition of a segment of foreign DNA. In these processes, specific gene products are involved in cooperation with different nongenetic elements. Some genetic variations occur fully at random along the DNA filaments, others rather with a statistical reproducibility, although at many possible sites. We have to be aware that evolution in natural ecosystems is of higher complexity than under most laboratory conditions, not at least in view of symbiotic associations and the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer. The encountered contingency of genetic variation can possibly best ensure a long-term persistence of life under steadily changing living conditions.

  10. Fertility and apparent genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupart, Douglas; Win, Aung Ko; Jenkins, Mark; Winship, Ingrid M; Goldberg, Paul; Ramesar, Rajkumar

    2014-09-01

    Genetic anticipation is the phenomenon in which age of onset of an inherited disorder decreases in successive generations. Inconsistent evidence suggests that this occurs in Lynch syndrome. A possible cause for apparent anticipation is fecundity bias, which occurs if the disease adversely affects fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of age of diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) on lifetime fertility in Lynch syndrome, and whether this can falsely create the appearance of genetic anticipation. A computer model simulated age of diagnosis of CRC in hypothetical Lynch syndrome carriers and their offspring. The model assumed similar age distribution of CRC across generations (i.e. that there was no true anticipation). Age distribution of CRC diagnosis, and lifetime fertility rates (grouped by age of diagnosis of CRC) were determined from the Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (ACCFR). Apparent anticipation was calculated by comparing ages of diagnosis of CRC in affected parent-child pairs. A total of 1,088 patients with CRC were identified from the ACCFR. Total lifetime (cohort) fertility was related to age of diagnosis of CRC (correlation coefficient 0.13, P = 0.0001). In the simulation, apparent anticipation was 1.8 ± 0.54 years (P = 0.0044). Observed apparent anticipation in the ACCFR cohort was 4.8 ± 1.73 years (P = 0.0064). There was no difference in apparent anticipation between the simulate d and observed parent-child pairs (P = 0.89). The appearance of genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome can be falsely created due to changes in fertility.

  11. The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, finding the genes causing Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Andrea; Fernandez, Thomas V; King, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet to be clarif......Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet......, it is clear that large patient cohorts and open-access repositories will be essential to further advance the field. To that end, the large multicenter Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study was established. The goal of the TIC Genetics study is to undertake a comprehensive gene...... discovery effort, focusing both on familial genetic variants with large effects within multiply affected pedigrees and on de novo mutations ascertained through the analysis of apparently simplex parent-child trios with non-familial tics. The clinical data and biomaterials (DNA, transformed cell lines, RNA...

  12. Clinical and genetic aspects of Marfan syndrome and familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns the clinical and genetic aspects of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, in particular in Marfan syndrome. It includes the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome. These guidelines contain practical directions for

  13. Molecular Models of Genetic and Organismic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C

    2004-01-01

    In recent studies we showed that the earlier relational theories of organismic sets (Rashevsky,1967), Metabolic-Replication (M,R)-systems (Rosen,1958)and molecular sets (Bartholomay,1968) share a joint foundation that can be studied within a unified categorical framework of functional organismic structures (Baianu,1980. This is possible because all relational theories have a biomolecular basis, that is, complex structures such as genomes, cells,organs and biological organisms are mathematically represented in terms of biomolecular properties and entities,(that are often implicit in their representation axioms. The definition of organismic sets, for example, requires that certain essential quantities be determined from experiment: these are specified by special sets of values of general observables that are derived from physicochemical measurements(Baianu,1970; Baianu,1980; Baianu et al, 2004a.)Such observables are context-dependent and lead directly to natural transformations in categories and Topoi, that are...

  14. Isolation and molecular genetic characterization of a yeast strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The yeast was identified by molecular genetics technique based on sequence analysis of the variable D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA. Subsequent 26S rRNA gene sequencing showed 100% base sequence homology and it was identified as Candida viswanathii. The degradation of PAHs

  15. Molecular markers for genetic diversity and phylogeny research of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brazilian sheep descended from several breeds brought to the New World by Portuguese and Spanish colonists, and they have evolved and adapted to local climatic variations and acquired tolerance or resistance to many diseases. Molecular markers are widely used in analyzing genetic variability, and markers such as ...

  16. Construction of intergeneric conjugal transfer for molecular genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-03-26

    Mar 26, 2014 ... The attB integration site in the S. mobaraensis genome was detected as a single attB ... present study, to promote the molecular genetic study of. S. mobaraensis .... further increase in the number of E. coli donor cells. (≥1.25 × 108) (Choi et .... rational mutagenesis and random mutagenesis. Appl. Microbiol.

  17. Molecular genetics of hemophilia A: Clinical perspectives | Tantawy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the publication of the sequence of the factor VIII (F8) gene in 1984, a large number of mutations that cause hemophilia A have been identified and a significant progress has been made in translating this knowledge for clinical diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Molecular genetic testing is used to determine the ...

  18. Genetic predisposition increases the tic severity, rate of comorbidities, and psychosocial and educational difficulties in children with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysturoy, Absalon Niclas; Skov, Liselotte; Debes, Nanette Mol

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in tic severity, comorbidities, and psychosocial and educational consequences in children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome compared with children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome. A total of 314 children diagnosed with Tourette syndrome participated in this study. Validated diagnostic tools were used to assess tic severity, comorbidities, and cognitive performance. A structured interview was used to evaluate psychosocial and educational consequences related to Tourette syndrome. The children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition present with statistically significant differences in terms of severity of tics, comorbidities, and a range of psychosocial and educational factors compared with the children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition. Professionals need to be aware of genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome, as children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition have more severe symptoms than those children with Tourette syndrome who are without genetic predisposition. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. The molecular genetics of crown gall tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooykaas, P.J.J.; Schilperoort, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The phytopathogenic bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and A. rhizogenes are the causative agents of the widespread plant diseases ''crown gall'' and ''hairy root'' respectively. It is now well established that virulent strains of these bacterial species transfer a piece of bacterial DNA into plant cells, thereby transforming these into tumor cells. In research much attention has been paid to the agrobacteria for several reasons. First is the desire to develop a system for the genetic engineering of plant cells based on the natural system for gene transfer between Agrobacterium species and plant cells. Second, there is a striking resemblance between the etiology of animal cancers and the plant cancer crown gall that was recognized as early as in 1927. This led to basic studies on the process of plant tumor induction and on the recovery of plant cells from the tumorous state. A third important interest lies in crown gall as a disease that is the cause of economically important losses in agriculture an horticulture in Europe, North America, and Austrailia. Research has been aimed at finding means to prevent crown gall and to cure plants of this disease

  20. Adrenogenital syndrome: molecular mechanisms of development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Pishak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available On the long multistage pathway of biosynthesis of steroid hormones from cholesterol to cortisol, testo­sterone and estradiol, due to mutations in genes, there is the deficiency of steroidogenesis enzymes in the adrenal glands: cholesterol desmolase, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17α-hydroxylase, 21-hydroxylase, and enzymes of steroidogenesis in the testis: 17,20-desmolasis, 17β-hydroxystyrol dehydroreductase and others, as well as a complex of widespread congenital diseases of heterogeneous group with autosomal recessive type of inheritance — adrenogenital syndrome (AGS. Deficiency of any of these enzymes or transport proteins leads to partial or complete loss of their activity. Phenotypic manifestations of AGS are quite polymorphic: phenomenon of hypoadrenocorticism; violation of the nature and rates of sexual development; bilateral increasing of adrenal glands; hypercorticotropinemia sensitive to dexamethasone; oligo- or amenorrhea; anovulatory infertility, miscarriage in early pregnancy. Pathogenetic component of these signs is congenital disorder of steroidogenesis caused by 11β-hydroxylase deficiency and symptoms of androgen excess. In AGS, there are distinguished a phenotype and nonclassical forms of steroidogenesis enzyme deficiency. In most cases, both types of diseases occur in persons of both sexes with different course — from mild to severe forms of the disease.

  1. Intelligent DNA-based molecular diagnostics using linked genetic markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, D.K.; Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a knowledge-based system for molecular diagnostics, and its application to fully automated diagnosis of X-linked genetic disorders. Molecular diagnostic information is used in clinical practice for determining genetic risks, such as carrier determination and prenatal diagnosis. Initially, blood samples are obtained from related individuals, and PCR amplification is performed. Linkage-based molecular diagnosis then entails three data analysis steps. First, for every individual, the alleles (i.e., DNA composition) are determined at specified chromosomal locations. Second, the flow of genetic material among the individuals is established. Third, the probability that a given individual is either a carrier of the disease or affected by the disease is determined. The current practice is to perform each of these three steps manually, which is costly, time consuming, labor-intensive, and error-prone. As such, the knowledge-intensive data analysis and interpretation supersede the actual experimentation effort as the major bottleneck in molecular diagnostics. By examining the human problem solving for the task, we have designed and implemented a prototype knowledge-based system capable of fully automating linkage-based molecular diagnostics in X-linked genetic disorders, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Our system uses knowledge-based interpretation of gel electrophoresis images to determine individual DNA marker labels, a constraint satisfaction search for consistent genetic flow among individuals, and a blackboard-style problem solver for risk assessment. We describe the system`s successful diagnosis of DMD carrier and affected individuals from raw clinical data.

  2. Detecting novel genetic mutations in Chinese Usher syndrome families using next-generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ling-Hui; Jin, Xin; Xu, Hai-Wei; Li, Shi-Ying; Yin, Zheng-Qin

    2015-02-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most common cause of combined blindness and deafness inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Molecular diagnosis is of great significance in revealing the molecular pathogenesis and aiding the clinical diagnosis of this disease. However, molecular diagnosis remains a challenge due to high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity in USH. This study explored an approach for detecting disease-causing genetic mutations in candidate genes in five index cases from unrelated USH families based on targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Through systematic data analysis using an established bioinformatics pipeline and segregation analysis, 10 pathogenic mutations in the USH disease genes were identified in the five USH families. Six of these mutations were novel: c.4398G > A and EX38-49del in MYO7A, c.988_989delAT in USH1C, c.15104_15105delCA and c.6875_6876insG in USH2A. All novel variations segregated with the disease phenotypes in their respective families and were absent from ethnically matched control individuals. This study expanded the mutation spectrum of USH and revealed the genotype-phenotype relationships of the novel USH mutations in Chinese patients. Moreover, this study proved that targeted NGS is an accurate and effective method for detecting genetic mutations related to USH. The identification of pathogenic mutations is of great significance for elucidating the underlying pathophysiology of USH.

  3. Molecular genetic studies on irradiated wheat plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, O.M.

    2002-01-01

    Composite genotype(octamer hybrid) was obtained from crossing among eight Egyptian hexaploid wheat cultivars differing in their tolerance to drought stress to produce a genotype, which can economize on the irrigation water requirements or can tolerate drought stress. Gamma irradiation with 10-Krad was used to induce mutations, which could improve drought tolerance for this composite. From eight Egyptian wheat cultivars, two were chosen as drought tolerant and drought sensitive genotypes (G-160 and Sk-61, respectively. They were evaluated along with their F1 and F2 for their relative drought tolerance for some yield-related traits. Bulked segregating analysis developed some RAPD and SSR markers with different primers, which were considered as molecular for drought tolerance in wheat. Hal 2-like gene was introduced into Egyptian wheat cultivar G-164 via micro projectile bombardment. Two putative transgenic plants were successfully detected by leaf painting with the herbicide basta. PCR/ Southern blotting analysis indicated the presence of both/either bar and/or Hal 2-like genes in the genomic background of the two transgenic plants

  4. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messing, Joachim [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2013-05-31

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to

  5. Genetic Rodent Models of Obesity-Associated Ovarian Dysfunction and Subfertility: Insights into Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang-Doran, Isabel; Franks, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy affecting women and a leading cause of female infertility worldwide. Defined clinically by the presence of hyperandrogenemia and oligomenorrhoea, PCOS represents a state of hormonal dysregulation, disrupted ovarian follicle dynamics, and subsequent oligo- or anovulation. The syndrome’s prevalence is attributed, at least partly, to a well-established association with obesity and insulin resistance (IR). Indeed, the presence of severe PCOS in human genetic obesity and IR syndromes supports a causal role for IR in the pathogenesis of PCOS. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this causality, as well as the important role of hyperandrogenemia, remain poorly elucidated. As such, treatment of PCOS is necessarily empirical, focusing on symptom alleviation. The generation of knockout and transgenic rodent models of obesity and IR offers a promising platform in which to address mechanistic questions about reproductive dysfunction in the context of metabolic disease. Similarly, the impact of primary perturbations in rodent gonadotrophin or androgen signaling has been interrogated. However, the insights gained from such models have been limited by the relatively poor fidelity of rodent models to human PCOS. In this mini review, we evaluate the ovarian phenotypes associated with rodent models of obesity and IR, including the extent of endocrine disturbance, ovarian dysmorphology, and subfertility. We compare them to both human PCOS and other animal models of the syndrome (genetic and hormonal), explore reasons for their discordance, and consider the new opportunities that are emerging to better understand and treat this important condition. PMID:27375552

  6. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  7. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  8. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R; Muruaga-Martínez, José S; Vargas-Vázquez, M L Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-10-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hung SI. Recent advances in the genetics and immunology of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrosis. ... 2012 May 29. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central More from Genetics Home Reference ...

  10. New Genetic Susceptibility Factors for Sjögren's Syndrome Revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight on Research Spotlight on Research New Genetic Susceptibility Factors for Sjögren’s Syndrome Revealed By Kirstie Saltsman, ... swallowing and speaking. “The identification of these genetic susceptibility factors opens up new avenues for understanding how ...

  11. Numerical Magnitude Processing Impairments in Genetic Syndromes: A Cross-Syndrome Comparison of Turner and 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankaer, Carmen; Ghesquière, Pol; De Wel, Anke; Swillen, Ann; De Smedt, Bert

    2017-01-01

    Cross-syndrome comparisons offer an important window onto understanding heterogeneity in mathematical learning disabilities or dyscalculia. The present study therefore investigated symbolic numerical magnitude processing in two genetic syndromes that are both characterized by mathematical learning disabilities: Turner syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion…

  12. Hereditary kidney cancer syndromes: Genetic disorders driven by alterations in metabolism and epigenome regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumi, Hisashi; Yao, Masahiro

    2018-03-01

    Although hereditary kidney cancer syndrome accounts for approximately five percent of all kidney cancers, the mechanistic insight into tumor development in these rare conditions has provided the foundation for the development of molecular targeting agents currently used for sporadic kidney cancer. In the late 1980s, the comprehensive study for hereditary kidney cancer syndrome was launched in the National Cancer Institute, USA and the first kidney cancer-associated gene, VHL, was identified through kindred analysis of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome in 1993. Subsequent molecular studies on VHL function have elucidated that the VHL protein is a component of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which provided the basis for the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the HIF-VEGF/PDGF pathway. Recent whole-exome sequencing analysis of sporadic kidney cancer exhibited the recurrent mutations in chromatin remodeling genes and the later study has revealed that several chromatin remodeling genes are altered in kidney cancer kindred at the germline level. To date, more than 10 hereditary kidney cancer syndromes together with each responsible gene have been characterized and most of the causative genes for these genetic disorders are associated with either metabolism or epigenome regulation. In this review article, we describe the molecular mechanisms of how an alteration of each kidney cancer-associated gene leads to renal tumorigenesis as well as denote therapeutic targets elicited by studies on hereditary kidney cancer. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  13. Clinical and Genetic Spectrum of Bartter Syndrome Type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seys, Elsa; Andrini, Olga; Keck, Mathilde; Mansour-Hendili, Lamisse; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Simian, Christophe; Deschenes, Georges; Kwon, Theresa; Bertholet-Thomas, Aurélia; Bobrie, Guillaume; Borde, Jean Sébastien; Bourdat-Michel, Guylhène; Decramer, Stéphane; Cailliez, Mathilde; Krug, Pauline; Cozette, Paul; Delbet, Jean Daniel; Dubourg, Laurence; Chaveau, Dominique; Fila, Marc; Jourde-Chiche, Noémie; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Lavocat, Marie-Pierre; Lemoine, Sandrine; Djeddi, Djamal; Llanas, Brigitte; Louillet, Ferielle; Merieau, Elodie; Mileva, Maria; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Mousson, Christiane; Nobili, François; Novo, Robert; Roussey-Kesler, Gwenaëlle; Vrillon, Isabelle; Walsh, Stephen B; Teulon, Jacques; Blanchard, Anne; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa

    2017-08-01

    Bartter syndrome type 3 is a clinically heterogeneous hereditary salt-losing tubulopathy caused by mutations of the chloride voltage-gated channel Kb gene ( CLCNKB ), which encodes the ClC-Kb chloride channel involved in NaCl reabsorption in the renal tubule. To study phenotype/genotype correlations, we performed genetic analyses by direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and retrospectively analyzed medical charts for 115 patients with CLCNKB mutations. Functional analyses were performed in Xenopus laevis oocytes for eight missense and two nonsense mutations. We detected 60 mutations, including 27 previously unreported mutations. Among patients, 29.5% had a phenotype of ante/neonatal Bartter syndrome (polyhydramnios or diagnosis in the first month of life), 44.5% had classic Bartter syndrome (diagnosis during childhood, hypercalciuria, and/or polyuria), and 26.0% had Gitelman-like syndrome (fortuitous discovery of hypokalemia with hypomagnesemia and/or hypocalciuria in childhood or adulthood). Nine of the ten mutations expressed in vitro decreased or abolished chloride conductance. Severe (large deletions, frameshift, nonsense, and essential splicing) and missense mutations resulting in poor residual conductance were associated with younger age at diagnosis. Electrolyte supplements and indomethacin were used frequently to induce catch-up growth, with few adverse effects. After a median follow-up of 8 (range, 1-41) years in 77 patients, chronic renal failure was detected in 19 patients (25%): one required hemodialysis and four underwent renal transplant. In summary, we report a genotype/phenotype correlation for Bartter syndrome type 3: complete loss-of-function mutations associated with younger age at diagnosis, and CKD was observed in all phenotypes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  14. Genetics of Cd36 and the hypertension metabolic syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Kurtz, T. W.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2002), s. 148-153 ISSN 0270-9295 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA301/00/1636; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A079; GA ČR(CZ) GV204/98/K015 Grant - others:NIHFogarty(US) RO3TW001236 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Cd36 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.176, year: 2002

  15. Genetics of Cd36 and the hypertension metabolic syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Kurtz, W. T.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2002), s. 148-153 ISSN 0270-9295 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV204/98/K015; GA ČR GA301/00/1636; GA MŠk LN00A079 Grant - others:NIHFogarty(US) RO3TW001236 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Cd36 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.176, year: 2002

  16. Genetic diversity of popcorn genotypes using molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resh, F S; Scapim, C A; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S; do Amaral, A T; Ramos, H C C; Vivas, M

    2015-08-19

    In this study, we analyzed dominant molecular markers to estimate the genetic divergence of 26 popcorn genotypes and evaluate whether using various dissimilarity coefficients with these dominant markers influences the results of cluster analysis. Fifteen random amplification of polymorphic DNA primers produced 157 amplified fragments, of which 65 were monomorphic and 92 were polymorphic. To calculate the genetic distances among the 26 genotypes, the complements of the Jaccard, Dice, and Rogers and Tanimoto similarity coefficients were used. A matrix of Dij values (dissimilarity matrix) was constructed, from which the genetic distances among genotypes were represented in a more simplified manner as a dendrogram generated using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average. Clusters determined by molecular analysis generally did not group material from the same parental origin together. The largest genetic distance was between varieties 17 (UNB-2) and 18 (PA-091). In the identification of genotypes with the smallest genetic distance, the 3 coefficients showed no agreement. The 3 dissimilarity coefficients showed no major differences among their grouping patterns because agreement in determining the genotypes with large, medium, and small genetic distances was high. The largest genetic distances were observed for the Rogers and Tanimoto dissimilarity coefficient (0.74), followed by the Jaccard coefficient (0.65) and the Dice coefficient (0.48). The 3 coefficients showed similar estimations for the cophenetic correlation coefficient. Correlations among the matrices generated using the 3 coefficients were positive and had high magnitudes, reflecting strong agreement among the results obtained using the 3 evaluated dissimilarity coefficients.

  17. Congenital heart defects in molecularly proven Kabuki syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilio, Maria Cristina; Gnazzo, Maria; Lepri, Francesca; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Pisaneschi, Elisa; Baban, Anwar; Passarelli, Chiara; Capolino, Rossella; Angioni, Adriano; Novelli, Antonio; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2017-11-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHD) in Kabuki syndrome ranges from 28% to 80%. Between January 2012 and December 2015, 28 patients had a molecularly proven diagnosis of Kabuki syndrome. Pathogenic variants in KMT2D (MLL2) were detected in 27 patients, and in KDM6A gene in one. CHD was diagnosed in 19/27 (70%) patients with KMT2D (MLL2) variant, while the single patient with KDM6A change had a normal heart. The anatomic types among patients with CHD included aortic coarctation (4/19 = 21%) alone or associated with an additional CHD, bicuspid aortic valve (4/19 = 21%) alone or associated with an additional CHD, perimembranous subaortic ventricular septal defect (3/19 = 16%), atrial septal defect ostium secundum type (3/19 = 16%), conotruncal heart defects (3/19 = 16%). Additional CHDs diagnosed in single patients included aortic dilatation with mitral anomaly and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. We also reviewed CHDs in patients with a molecular diagnosis of Kabuki syndrome reported in the literature. In conclusion, a CHD is detected in 70% of patients with KMT2D (MLL2) pathogenic variants, most commonly left-sided obstructive lesions, including multiple left-sided obstructions similar to those observed in the spectrum of the Shone complex, and septal defects. Clinical management of Kabuki syndrome should include echocardiogram at the time of diagnosis, with particular attention to left-sided obstructive lesions and mitral anomalies, and annual monitoring for aortic arch dilatation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. MEGA X: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis across Computing Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Stecher, Glen; Li, Michael; Knyaz, Christina; Tamura, Koichiro

    2018-06-01

    The Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (Mega) software implements many analytical methods and tools for phylogenomics and phylomedicine. Here, we report a transformation of Mega to enable cross-platform use on Microsoft Windows and Linux operating systems. Mega X does not require virtualization or emulation software and provides a uniform user experience across platforms. Mega X has additionally been upgraded to use multiple computing cores for many molecular evolutionary analyses. Mega X is available in two interfaces (graphical and command line) and can be downloaded from www.megasoftware.net free of charge.

  19. Moyamoya disease and syndromes: from genetics to clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guey S

    2015-02-01

    . Revascularization surgery can be indicated, with several techniques. Characteristics of genetic moyamoya syndromes are presented, with a focus on recently reported mutations in BRCC3/MTCP1 and GUCY1A3 genes. Identification of the genes involved in moyamoya disease and several monogenic moyamoya syndromes unraveled different pathways involved in the development of this angiopathy. Studying genes and pathways involved in monogenic moyamoya syndromes may help to give insights into pathophysiological models and discover potential candidates for medical treatment strategies. Keywords: moyamoya disease, moyamoya syndrome, stroke, surgical revascularization, genetics

  20. Molecular profile of the Lynch Syndrome in the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Hiljadnikova-Bajro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent type of hereditary colorectal cancer, the one occurring in the setting of the Lynch syndrome (LS is considered a phenotypic manifestation of a germline defect in the mismatch repair mechanism i.e. in the MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 gene. Aiming towards establishment of a standardized protocol involving molecular analyses for diagnosis of this syndrome and developing a unique national register of families with hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in the Republic of Macedonia, we began a prospective study to reveal the genetic defects among Macedonian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC and identifying families with hereditary CRC. A total of 53 patients fulfilling the revised Bethesda criteria for MSI-genetic testing were compared to 350 patients with sporadic CRC. The results reveal significant differences in age at diagnosis (p=0.03, involvement of microsatellite instability (pG nonsense mutation with a possible founder effect in the Macedonian population, the MLH1 ex.3-12 deletion, as well as the c.244A>G mutation, IVS14- 19A>G and IVS4+65A>C changes in MLH1 without confirmed pathological significance. The observed high frequency (87.5% of the Ile219Val (c.655A>G variant in MLH1 among the LS suspects prompts further analyses to evaluate its involvement in the development of hereditary CRC by itself or as a risk modifying factor among the patients from the Republic of Macedonia.

  1. Pituitary Tumors in Childhood: an update in their diagnosis, treatment and molecular genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Margaret F.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2009-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are rare in childhood and adolescence, with a reported prevalence of up to 1 per million children. Only 2 - 6% of surgically treated pituitary tumors occur in children. Although pituitary tumors in children are almost never malignant and hormonal secretion is rare, these tumors may result in significant morbidity. Tumors within the pituitary fossa are of two types mainly, craniopharyngiomas and adenomas; craniopharyngiomas cause symptoms by compressing normal pituitary, causing hormonal deficiencies and producing mass effects on surrounding tissues and the brain; adenomas produce a variety of hormonal conditions such as hyperprolactinemia, Cushing disease and acromegaly or gigantism. Little is known about the genetic causes of sporadic lesions, which comprise the majority of pituitary tumors, but in children, more frequently than in adults, pituitary tumors may be a manifestation of genetic conditions such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1), Carney complex, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA), and McCune-Albright syndrome. The study of pituitary tumorigenesis in the context of these genetic syndromes has advanced our knowledge of the molecular basis of pituitary tumors and may lead to new therapeutic developments. PMID:18416659

  2. PAX6 aniridia syndrome: clinics, genetics, and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun Taek; Kim, Dae Hee; Kim, Hyuna

    2017-09-01

    Aniridia is a rare and panocular disorder affecting most of the ocular structures which may have significant impact on vision. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical features, genetics, and therapeutic options for this disease and to provide an update of current knowledge and latest research findings. Aside from the ocular features, a variety of associated systemic abnormalities, including hormonal, metabolic, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and neurologic pathologies have been reported in children with aniridia. Although mutations in PAX6 are a major cause of aniridia, genetic defects in nearby genes, such as TRIM44 or ELP4, have also been reported to cause aniridia. Recent improvement in genetic testing technique will help more rapid and precise diagnosis for aniridia. A promising therapeutic approach called nonsense suppression therapy has been introduced and successfully used in an animal model. Aniridia is a challenging disease. The progressive nature of this condition and its potential complications require continuous and life-long ophthalmologic care. Genetic diagnosis for aniridia is important for establishing definitive molecular characterization as well as identifying individuals at high risk for Wilms tumor. Recent advancement in understanding the genetic pathogenesis of this disease offers promise for the approaches to treatment.

  3. Frequency of Usher syndrome in two pediatric populations: Implications for genetic screening of deaf and hard of hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberling, William J; Hildebrand, Michael S; Shearer, A Eliot; Jensen, Maren L; Halder, Jennifer A; Trzupek, Karmen; Cohn, Edward S; Weleber, Richard G; Stone, Edwin M; Smith, Richard J H

    2010-08-01

    Usher syndrome is a major cause of genetic deafness and blindness. The hearing loss is usually congenital and the retinitis pigmentosa is progressive and first noticed in early childhood to the middle teenage years. Its frequency may be underestimated. Newly developed molecular technologies can detect the underlying gene mutation of this disorder early in life providing estimation of its prevalence in at risk pediatric populations and laying a foundation for its incorporation as an adjunct to newborn hearing screening programs. A total of 133 children from two deaf and hard of hearing pediatric populations were genotyped first for GJB2/6 and, if negative, then for Usher syndrome. Children were scored as positive if the test revealed > or =1 pathogenic mutations in any Usher gene. Fifteen children carried pathogenic mutations in one of the Usher genes; the number of deaf and hard of hearing children carrying Usher syndrome mutations was 15/133 (11.3%). The population prevalence was estimated to be 1/6000. Usher syndrome is more prevalent than has been reported before the genome project era. Early diagnosis of Usher syndrome has important positive implications for childhood safety, educational planning, genetic counseling, and treatment. The results demonstrate that DNA testing for Usher syndrome is feasible and may be a useful addition to newborn hearing screening programs.

  4. Enhancing genetic gain in the era of molecular breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunbi; Li, Ping; Zou, Cheng; Lu, Yanli; Xie, Chuanxiao; Zhang, Xuecai; Prasanna, Boddupalli M; Olsen, Michael S

    2017-05-17

    As one of the important concepts in conventional quantitative genetics and breeding, genetic gain can be defined as the amount of increase in performance that is achieved annually through artificial selection. To develop pro ducts that meet the increasing demand of mankind, especially for food and feed, in addition to various industrial uses, breeders are challenged to enhance the potential of genetic gain continuously, at ever higher rates, while they close the gaps that remain between the yield potential in breeders' demonstration trials and the actual yield in farmers' fields. Factors affecting genetic gain include genetic variation available in breeding materials, heritability for traits of interest, selection intensity, and the time required to complete a breeding cycle. Genetic gain can be improved through enhancing the potential and closing the gaps, which has been evolving and complemented with modern breeding techniques and platforms, mainly driven by molecular and genomic tools, combined with improved agronomic practice. Several key strategies are reviewed in this article. Favorable genetic variation can be unlocked and created through molecular and genomic approaches including mutation, gene mapping and discovery, and transgene and genome editing. Estimation of heritability can be improved by refining field experiments through well-controlled and precisely assayed environmental factors or envirotyping, particularly for understanding and controlling spatial heterogeneity at the field level. Selection intensity can be significantly heightened through improvements in the scale and precision of genotyping and phenotyping. The breeding cycle time can be shortened by accelerating breeding procedures through integrated breeding approaches such as marker-assisted selection and doubled haploid development. All the strategies can be integrated with other widely used conventional approaches in breeding programs to enhance genetic gain. More transdisciplinary

  5. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of human microtia via a pig model of HOXA1 syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruimin Qiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microtia is a congenital malformation of the outer ears. Although both genetic and environmental components have been implicated in microtia, the genetic causes of this innate disorder are poorly understood. Pigs have naturally occurring diseases comparable to those in humans, providing exceptional opportunity to dissect the molecular mechanism of human inherited diseases. Here we first demonstrated that a truncating mutation in HOXA1 causes a monogenic disorder of microtia in pigs. We further performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq analysis on affected and healthy pig embryos (day 14.25. We identified a list of 337 differentially expressed genes (DEGs between the normal and mutant samples, shedding light on the transcriptional network involving HOXA1. The DEGs are enriched in biological processes related to cardiovascular system and embryonic development, and neurological, renal and urological diseases. Aberrant expressions of many DEGs have been implicated in human innate deformities corresponding to microtia-associated syndromes. After applying three prioritizing algorithms, we highlighted appealing candidate genes for human microtia from the 337 DEGs. We searched for coding variants of functional significance within six candidate genes in 147 microtia-affected individuals. Of note, we identified one EVC2 non-synonymous mutation (p.Asp1174Asn as a potential disease-implicating variant for a human microtia-associated syndrome. The findings advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human microtia, and provide an interesting example of the characterization of human disease-predisposing variants using pig models.

  6. Molecular Pathogenesis of Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Miyamotoa

    2018-01-01

    Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease and consists of a small percentage of WPW syndrome which exhibits ventricular pre-excitation by development of accessory atrioventricular pathway. A series of mutations in PRKAG2 gene encoding gamma2 subunit of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been identified as the cause of familial WPW syndrome. AMPK is one of the most important metabolic regulators of carbohydrates and lipids in many types of tissues including cardiac and skeletal muscles. Patients and animals with the mutation in PRKAG2 gene exhibit aberrant atrioventricular conduction associated with cardiac glycogen overload. Recent studies have revealed "novel" significance of canonical pathways leading to glycogen synthesis and provided us profound insights into molecular mechanism of the regulation of glycogen metabolism by AMPK. This review focuses on the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of cardiac abnormality due to PRKAG2 mutation and will provide current overviews of the mechanism of glycogen regulation by AMPK. J. Med. Invest. 65:1-8, February, 2018.

  7. Assessing Genetic Variants of Uncertain Significance: The Example of Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Heinen, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, is used as an example. This challenge is addressed by illustrating the importance of combining genetic and functional data in future strategies to assess VUS. The proposed strategies combine clinical genetic, analytical, functional and in silico approaches....

  8. Molecular evaluation of genetic variability of wheat elite breeding material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brbaklić Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of genetic variability of breeding material is essential for yield improvement in wheat cultivars. Modern techniques based on molecular markers application are more efficient and precise in genetic variability evaluation then conventional methods. Variability of 96 wheat cultivars and lines was analyzed using four microsatellite markers (Gwm11, Gwm428, Psp3200, Psp3071. The markers were chosen according to their potential association with important agronomical traits indicated in the literature. Total of 31 alleles were detected with maximum number of alleles (11 in Xgwm11 locus. The highest polymorphism information content (PIC value (0,831 was found in the locus Xpsp3071. The genotypes were grouped into three subpopulations based on their similarity in the analyzed loci. The results have indicated wide genetic variability of the studied material and possibility of its application in further breeding process after validation of marker-trait association. .

  9. Molecular Genetics of Beauveria bassiana Infection of Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Urquiza, A; Keyhani, N O

    2016-01-01

    Research on the insect pathogenic filamentous fungus, Beauveria bassiana has witnessed significant growth in recent years from mainly physiological studies related to its insect biological control potential, to addressing fundamental questions regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms of fungal development and virulence. This has been in part due to a confluence of robust genetic tools and genomic resources for the fungus, and recognition of expanded ecological interactions with which the fungus engages. Beauveria bassiana is a broad host range insect pathogen that has the ability to form intimate symbiotic relationships with plants. Indeed, there is an increasing realization that the latter may be the predominant environmental interaction in which the fungus participates, and that insect parasitism may be an opportunist lifestyle evolved due to the carbon- and nitrogen-rich resources present in insect bodies. Here, we will review progress on the molecular genetics of B. bassiana, which has largely been directed toward identifying genetic pathways involved in stress response and virulence assumed to have practical applications in improving the insect control potential of the fungus. Important strides have also been made in understanding aspects of B. bassiana development. Finally, although increasingly apparent in a number of studies, there is a need for progressing beyond phenotypic mutant characterization to sufficiently investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying B. bassiana's unique and diverse lifestyles as saprophyte, insect pathogen, and plant mutualist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic Analysis for Two Italian Siblings with Usher Syndrome and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Domanico

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive genetic disorders characterized by deafness, retinitis pigmentosa, and sometimes vestibular areflexia. The relationship between Usher syndrome and mental disorders, most commonly a “schizophrenia-like” psychosis, is sometimes described in the literature. The etiology of psychiatric expression of Usher syndrome is still unclear. We reported a case of two natural siblings with congenital hypoacusis, retinitis pigmentosa, and psychiatric symptoms. Clinical features and genetic analysis were also reported. We analyzed possible causes to explain the high prevalence of psychiatric manifestations in Usher syndrome: genetic factors, brain damage, and “stress-related” hypothesis.

  11. Genetic analysis for two italian siblings with usher syndrome and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanico, Daniela; Fragiotta, Serena; Trabucco, Paolo; Nebbioso, Marcella; Vingolo, Enzo Maria

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive genetic disorders characterized by deafness, retinitis pigmentosa, and sometimes vestibular areflexia. The relationship between Usher syndrome and mental disorders, most commonly a "schizophrenia-like" psychosis, is sometimes described in the literature. The etiology of psychiatric expression of Usher syndrome is still unclear. We reported a case of two natural siblings with congenital hypoacusis, retinitis pigmentosa, and psychiatric symptoms. Clinical features and genetic analysis were also reported. We analyzed possible causes to explain the high prevalence of psychiatric manifestations in Usher syndrome: genetic factors, brain damage, and "stress-related" hypothesis.

  12. The molecular genetic architecture of self-employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Loos, Matthijs J H M; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Eklund, Niina; Koellinger, Philipp D; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Ankra-Badu, Georgina A; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Benjamin, Daniel J; Biffar, Reiner; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cesarini, David; Cucca, Francesco; de Geus, Eco J C; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Eiriksdottir, Guðny; Eriksson, Johan; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Höhne, Birgit; Holle, Rolf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Isaacs, Aaron; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johannesson, Magnus; Kaakinen, Marika; Kähönen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Laaksonen, Maarit A; Lahti, Jari; Launer, Lenore J; Lehtimäki, Terho; Loitfelder, Marisa; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Naitza, Silvia; Oostra, Ben A; Perola, Markus; Petrovic, Katja; Quaye, Lydia; Raitakari, Olli; Ripatti, Samuli; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Senft, Andrea; Smith, Albert V; Spector, Timothy D; Surakka, Ida; Svento, Rauli; Terracciano, Antonio; Tikkanen, Emmi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Viikari, Jorma; Völzke, Henry; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wild, Philipp S; Willems, Sara M; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Rooij, Frank J A; Groenen, Patrick J F; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Thurik, A Roy

    2013-01-01

    Economic variables such as income, education, and occupation are known to affect mortality and morbidity, such as cardiovascular disease, and have also been shown to be partly heritable. However, very little is known about which genes influence economic variables, although these genes may have both a direct and an indirect effect on health. We report results from the first large-scale collaboration that studies the molecular genetic architecture of an economic variable-entrepreneurship-that was operationalized using self-employment, a widely-available proxy. Our results suggest that common SNPs when considered jointly explain about half of the narrow-sense heritability of self-employment estimated in twin data (σ(g)(2)/σ(P)(2) = 25%, h(2) = 55%). However, a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies across sixteen studies comprising 50,627 participants did not identify genome-wide significant SNPs. 58 SNPs with pself-employment in an independent sample (p≥0.039). Our results are consistent with a highly polygenic molecular genetic architecture of self-employment, with many genetic variants of small effect. Although self-employment is a multi-faceted, heavily environmentally influenced, and biologically distal trait, our results are similar to those for other genetically complex and biologically more proximate outcomes, such as height, intelligence, personality, and several diseases.

  13. Human fertility, molecular genetics, and natural selection in modern societies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix C Tropf

    Full Text Available Research on genetic influences on human fertility outcomes such as number of children ever born (NEB or the age at first childbirth (AFB has been solely based on twin and family-designs that suffer from problematic assumptions and practical limitations. The current study exploits recent advances in the field of molecular genetics by applying the genomic-relationship-matrix based restricted maximum likelihood (GREML methods to quantify for the first time the extent to which common genetic variants influence the NEB and the AFB of women. Using data from the UK and the Netherlands (N = 6,758, results show significant additive genetic effects on both traits explaining 10% (SE = 5 of the variance in the NEB and 15% (SE = 4 in the AFB. We further find a significant negative genetic correlation between AFB and NEB in the pooled sample of -0.62 (SE = 0.27, p-value = 0.02. This finding implies that individuals with genetic predispositions for an earlier AFB had a reproductive advantage and that natural selection operated not only in historical, but also in contemporary populations. The observed postponement in the AFB across the past century in Europe contrasts with these findings, suggesting an evolutionary override by environmental effects and underscoring that evolutionary predictions in modern human societies are not straight forward. It emphasizes the necessity for an integrative research design from the fields of genetics and social sciences in order to understand and predict fertility outcomes. Finally, our results suggest that we may be able to find genetic variants associated with human fertility when conducting GWAS-meta analyses with sufficient sample size.

  14. Update on the Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics of Chordoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larizza Lidia

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chordoma is a rare mesenchymal tumour of complex biology for which only histologic and immunohistochemical criteria have been defined, but no biomarkers predicting the clinical outcome and response to treatment have yet been recognised. We herein review the interdisciplinary information achieved by epidemiologists, neurosurgeons and basic scientists on chordoma, usually a sporadic tumour, which also includes a small fraction of familial cases. Main focus is on the current knowledge of the genetic alterations which might pinpoint candidate genes and molecular mechanisms shared by sporadic and familiar chordomas. Due to the scarcity of the investigated tumour specimens and the multiple chromosome abnormalities found in tumours with aberrant karyotypes, conventional cytogenetics and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization failed to detect recurrent chordoma-specific chromosomal rearrangements. Genome-wide approaches such as Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH are yet at an initial stage of application and should be implemented using BAC arrays either genome-wide or targeting selected genomic regions, disclosed by Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH studies. An LOH region was shown by a systematic study on a consistent number of chordomas to encompass 1p36, a genomic interval where a candidate gene was suggested to reside. Despite the rarity of multiplex families with chordoma impaired linkage studies, a chordoma locus could be mapped to chromosome 7q33 by positive lod score in three independent families. The role in chordomagenesis of the Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC genes has been proved, but the extent of involvement of TSC1 and TSC2 oncosuppressors in chordoma remains to be assessed. In spite of the scarce knowledge on the genetics and molecular biology of chordoma, recent initiation of clinical trials using molecular-targeted therapy, should validate new molecular targets and predict the efficacy of a given therapy. Comparative genetic and

  15. Diagnostic yield of molecular autopsy in patients with sudden arrhythmic death syndrome using targeted exome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunn, Laurence M; Lopes, Luis R; Syrris, Petros

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The targeted genetic screening of Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome (SADS) probands in a molecular autopsy has a diagnostic yield of up to 35%. Exome sequencing has the potential to improve this yield. The primary aim of this study is to examine the feasibility and diagnostic utility...... of targeted exome screening in SADS victims, utilizing familial clinical screening whenever possible. METHODS AND RESULTS: To determine the feasibility and diagnostic yield of targeted exome sequencing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was isolated from 59 SADS victims (mean age 25 years, range 1-51 years...... previously published rare (0.02-0.5%) candidate mutations-a total yield of 29%. Co-segregation fully confirmed two private SCN5A Na channel mutations. Variants of unknown significance were detected in a further 34% of probands. CONCLUSION: Molecular autopsy using targeted exome sequencing has a relatively...

  16. Genetic predisposition syndromes: when should they be considered in the work-up of MDS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushok, Daria V; Bessler, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by cytopenias, ineffective hematopoiesis, myelodysplasia, and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). While sporadic MDS is primarily a disease of the elderly, MDS in children and young and middle-aged adults is frequently associated with underlying genetic predisposition syndromes. In addition to the classic hereditary bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) such as Fanconi Anemia and Dyskeratosis Congenita, in recent years there has been an increased awareness of non-syndromic familial MDS/AML predisposition syndromes such as those caused by mutations in GATA2, RUNX1, CEBPA, and SRP72 genes. Here, we will discuss the importance of recognizing an underlying genetic predisposition syndrome a patient with MDS, will review clinical scenarios when genetic predisposition should be considered, and will provide a practical overview of the common BMFS and familial MDS/AML syndromes which may be encountered in adult patients with MDS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Reliable prediction of adsorption isotherms via genetic algorithm molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoftiKatooli, L; Shahsavand, A

    2017-01-01

    Conventional molecular simulation techniques such as grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) strictly rely on purely random search inside the simulation box for predicting the adsorption isotherms. This blind search is usually extremely time demanding for providing a faithful approximation of the real isotherm and in some cases may lead to non-optimal solutions. A novel approach is presented in this article which does not use any of the classical steps of the standard GCMC method, such as displacement, insertation, and removal. The new approach is based on the well-known genetic algorithm to find the optimal configuration for adsorption of any adsorbate on a structured adsorbent under prevailing pressure and temperature. The proposed approach considers the molecular simulation problem as a global optimization challenge. A detailed flow chart of our so-called genetic algorithm molecular simulation (GAMS) method is presented, which is entirely different from traditions molecular simulation approaches. Three real case studies (for adsorption of CO 2 and H 2 over various zeolites) are borrowed from literature to clearly illustrate the superior performances of the proposed method over the standard GCMC technique. For the present method, the average absolute values of percentage errors are around 11% (RHO-H 2 ), 5% (CHA-CO 2 ), and 16% (BEA-CO 2 ), while they were about 70%, 15%, and 40% for the standard GCMC technique, respectively.

  18. Empirical Refinements of a Molecular Genetics Learning Progression: The Molecular Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Amber; Kenyon, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This article describes revisions to four of the eight constructs of the Duncan molecular genetics learning progression [Duncan, Rogat, & Yarden, (2009)]. As learning progressions remain hypothetical models until validated by multiple rounds of empirical studies, these revisions are an important step toward validating the progression. Our…

  19. IMAGe syndrome: clinical and genetic implications based on investigations in three Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Fumiko; Hamajima, Takashi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Amano, Naoko; Horikawa, Reiko; Nishimura, Gen; Nakashima, Shinichi; Fuke, Tomoko; Sano, Shinichirou; Fukami, Maki; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2014-05-01

    Arboleda et al. have recently shown that IMAGe (intra-uterine growth restriction, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita and genital abnormalities) syndrome is caused by gain-of-function mutations of maternally expressed gene CDKN1C on chromosome 11p15.5. However, there is no other report describing clinical findings in patients with molecularly studied IMAGe syndrome. Here, we report clinical and molecular findings in Japanese patients. We studied a 46,XX patient aged 8·5 years (case 1) and two 46,XY patients aged 16·5 and 15·0 years (cases 2 and 3). Clinical studies revealed not only IMAGe syndrome-compatible phenotypes in cases 1-3, but also hitherto undescribed findings including relative macrocephaly and apparently normal pituitary-gonadal endocrine function in cases 1-3, familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD)-like adrenal phenotype and the history of oligohydramnios in case 2, and arachnodactyly in case 3. Sequence analysis of CDKN1C, pyrosequencing-based methylation analysis of KvDMR1 and high-density oligonucleotide array comparative genome hybridization analysis for chromosome 11p15.5 were performed, showing an identical de novo and maternally inherited CDKN1C gain-of-function mutation (p.Asp274Asn) in cases 1 and 2, respectively, and no demonstrable abnormality in case 3. The results of cases 1 and 2 with CDKN1C mutation would argue the following: [1] relative macrocephaly is consistent with maternal expression of CDKN1C in most tissues and biparental expression of CDKN1C in the foetal brain; [2] FGD-like phenotype can result from CDKN1C mutation; and [3] genital abnormalities may primarily be ascribed to placental dysfunction. Furthermore, lack of CDKN1C mutation in case 3 implies genetic heterogeneity in IMAGe syndrome. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [Clinical genealogical and molecular genetic study of patients with mental retardation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryshchenko, N V; B'ichkova, A M; Lyvshyts, A B; Kravchenko, S A; Pampukha, V N; Solov'ev, A A; Kucherenko, A M; Tatarskiĭ, P F; Afanas'eva, N A; Dubrovskaia, E V; Patskun, Ie Y; Zymak-Zakutnaia, N O; Nykytchina, T V; Lohysh, S Iu; Lyvshyts, L A

    2012-01-01

    The results of clinical, genealogical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic studies of 113 patients from 96 families with different forms of mental retardation from Ukraine are presented. This study was held as part of the CHERISH project of the 7-th Framework Program. The aim of the project is to improve diagnostics of mental retardation in children in Eastern Europe and Central Asia through detailed analysis of known chromosomal and gene's aberrations and to find the new gene-candidates that cause mental retardation. All patients have normal chromosome number (46XY or 46XX). The cases with fragile-X syndrome were eliminated using molecular genetic methods. Genome rearrangements were found among 28 patients using cytogenetic analysis, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA analysis) ofsubtelomeric regions and array-based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH screening). In 10 cases known pathogenic CNV's were identified, 11 cases are unknown aberrations; their pathogenicity is being determined. The rest cases are known nonpathogenic gene rearrangements. Obtained results show the strong genetic heterogeneity of hereditary forms of mental retardation. The further studies will allow to identificate genes candidates and certain mutations in these genes that may be associated with this pathology.

  1. Genetic analysis of a Chinese family with members affected with Usher syndrome type II and Waardenburg syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueling; Lin, Xiao-Jiang; Tang, Xiangrong; Chai, Yong-Chuan; Yu, De-Hong; Chen, Dong-Ye; Wu, Hao

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic causes of a family presenting with multiple symptoms overlapping Usher syndrome type II (USH2) and Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4). Targeted next-generation sequencing including the exon and flanking intron sequences of 79 deafness genes was performed on the proband. Co-segregation of the disease phenotype and the detected variants were confirmed in all family members by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The affected members of this family had two different recessive disorders, USH2 and WS4. By targeted next-generation sequencing, we identified that USH2 was caused by a novel missense mutation, p.V4907D in GPR98; whereas WS4 due to p.V185M in EDNRB. This is the first report of homozygous p.V185M mutation in EDNRB in patient with WS4. This study reported a Chinese family with multiple independent and overlapping phenotypes. In condition, molecular level analysis was efficient to identify the causative variant p.V4907D in GPR98 and p.V185M in EDNRB, also was helpful to confirm the clinical diagnosis of USH2 and WS4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Homozygous deletion in MYL9 expands the molecular basis of megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Carolina Araujo; Sobreira, Nara; Pugh, Elizabeth; Zhang, Peng; Steel, Gary; Torres, Fábio Rossi; Cavalcanti, Denise Pontes

    2018-05-01

    Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a severe disease characterized by functional obstruction in the urinary and gastrointestinal tract. The molecular basis of this condition started to be defined recently, and the genes related to the syndrome (ACTG2-heterozygous variant in sporadic cases; and MYH11 (myosin heavy chain 11), LMOD1 (leiomodin 1) and MYLK (myosin light chain (MLC) kinase)-autosomal recessive inheritance), encode proteins involved in the smooth muscle contraction, supporting a myopathic basis for the disease. In the present article, we described a family with two affected siblings with MMIHS born to consanguineous parents and the molecular investigation performed to define the genetic etiology. Previous whole exome sequencing of the affected child and parents did not identify a candidate gene for the disease in this family, but now we present a reanalysis of the data that led to the identification of a homozygous deletion encompassing the last exon of MYL9 (myosin regulatory light chain 9) in the affected individual. MYL9 gene encodes a regulatory myosin MLC and the phosphorylation of this protein is a crucial step in the contraction process of smooth muscle cell. Despite the absence of human or animal phenotype related to MYL9, a cause-effect relationship between MYL9 and the MMIHS seems biologically plausible. The present study reveals a strong candidate gene for autosomal recessive forms of MMIHS, expanding the molecular basis of this disease and reinforces the myopathic basis of this condition.

  3. Molecular genetics and livestock selection. Approaches, opportunities and risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Following domestication, livestock were selected both naturally through adaptation to their environments and by man so that they would fulfil a particular use. As selection methods have become more sophisticated, rapid progress has been made in improving those traits that are easily measured. However, selection has also resulted in decreased diversity. In some cases, improved breeds have replaced local breeds, risking the loss of important survival traits. The advent of molecular genetics provides the opportunity to identify the genes that control particular traits by a gene mapping approach. However, as with selection, the early mapping studies focused on traits that are easy to measure. Where molecular genetics can play a valuable role in livestock production is by providing the means to select effectively for traits that are difficult to measure. Identifying the genes underpinning particular traits requires a population in which these traits are segregating. Fortunately, several experimental populations have been created that have allowed a wide range of traits to be studied. Gene mapping work in these populations has shown that the role of particular genes in controlling variation in a given trait can depend on the genetic background. A second finding is that the most favourable alleles for a trait may in fact. be present in animals that perform poorly for the trait. In the long term, knowledge of -the genes controlling particular traits, and the way they interact with the genetic background, will allow introgression between breeds and the assembly of genotypes that are best suited to particular environments, producing animals with the desired characteristics. If used wisely, this approach will maintain genetic diversity while improving performance over a wide range of desired traits. (author)

  4. The Molecular Genetic Architecture of Self-Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Loos, Matthijs J. H. M.; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Eklund, Niina; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Ankra-Badu, Georgina A.; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Biffar, Reiner; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Cesarini, David; Cucca, Francesco; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Eiriksdottir, Guðny; Eriksson, Johan; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Höhne, Birgit; Holle, Rolf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Isaacs, Aaron; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johannesson, Magnus; Kaakinen, Marika; Kähönen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Laaksonen, Maarit A.; Lahti, Jari; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Loitfelder, Marisa; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Naitza, Silvia; Oostra, Ben A.; Perola, Markus; Petrovic, Katja; Quaye, Lydia; Raitakari, Olli; Ripatti, Samuli; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Senft, Andrea; Smith, Albert V.; Spector, Timothy D.; Surakka, Ida; Svento, Rauli; Terracciano, Antonio; Tikkanen, Emmi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Viikari, Jorma; Völzke, Henry; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Wild, Philipp S.; Willems, Sara M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Rooij, Frank J. A.; Groenen, Patrick J. F.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Thurik, A. Roy

    2013-01-01

    Economic variables such as income, education, and occupation are known to affect mortality and morbidity, such as cardiovascular disease, and have also been shown to be partly heritable. However, very little is known about which genes influence economic variables, although these genes may have both a direct and an indirect effect on health. We report results from the first large-scale collaboration that studies the molecular genetic architecture of an economic variable–entrepreneurship–that was operationalized using self-employment, a widely-available proxy. Our results suggest that common SNPs when considered jointly explain about half of the narrow-sense heritability of self-employment estimated in twin data (σg 2/σP 2 = 25%, h 2 = 55%). However, a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies across sixteen studies comprising 50,627 participants did not identify genome-wide significant SNPs. 58 SNPs with pentrepreneurship reveal significant associations. Finally, SNP-based genetic scores that use results from the meta-analysis capture less than 0.2% of the variance in self-employment in an independent sample (p≥0.039). Our results are consistent with a highly polygenic molecular genetic architecture of self-employment, with many genetic variants of small effect. Although self-employment is a multi-faceted, heavily environmentally influenced, and biologically distal trait, our results are similar to those for other genetically complex and biologically more proximate outcomes, such as height, intelligence, personality, and several diseases. PMID:23593239

  5. Genomic DNA Methylation Signatures Enable Concurrent Diagnosis and Clinical Genetic Variant Classification in Neurodevelopmental Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref-Eshghi, Erfan; Rodenhiser, David I; Schenkel, Laila C; Lin, Hanxin; Skinner, Cindy; Ainsworth, Peter; Paré, Guillaume; Hood, Rebecca L; Bulman, Dennis E; Kernohan, Kristin D; Boycott, Kym M; Campeau, Philippe M; Schwartz, Charles; Sadikovic, Bekim

    2018-01-04

    Pediatric developmental syndromes present with systemic, complex, and often overlapping clinical features that are not infrequently a consequence of Mendelian inheritance of mutations in genes involved in DNA methylation, establishment of histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling (the "epigenetic machinery"). The mechanistic cross-talk between histone modification and DNA methylation suggests that these syndromes might be expected to display specific DNA methylation signatures that are a reflection of those primary errors associated with chromatin dysregulation. Given the interrelated functions of these chromatin regulatory proteins, we sought to identify DNA methylation epi-signatures that could provide syndrome-specific biomarkers to complement standard clinical diagnostics. In the present study, we examined peripheral blood samples from a large cohort of individuals encompassing 14 Mendelian disorders displaying mutations in the genes encoding proteins of the epigenetic machinery. We demonstrated that specific but partially overlapping DNA methylation signatures are associated with many of these conditions. The degree of overlap among these epi-signatures is minimal, further suggesting that, consistent with the initial event, the downstream changes are unique to every syndrome. In addition, by combining these epi-signatures, we have demonstrated that a machine learning tool can be built to concurrently screen for multiple syndromes with high sensitivity and specificity, and we highlight the utility of this tool in solving ambiguous case subjects presenting with variants of unknown significance, along with its ability to generate accurate predictions for subjects presenting with the overlapping clinical and molecular features associated with the disruption of the epigenetic machinery. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sudden infant death syndrome and the genetics of inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eFerrante

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Several studies report signs of slight infection prior to death in cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS. Based on this, a hypothesis of an altered immunological homeostasis has been postulated. The cytokines are important cellular mediators that are crucial for infant health by regulating cell activity during the inflammatory process. The pro-inflammatory cytokines favor inflammation; the most important of these are IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IL-18, TNF-α and IFN-γ. These cytokines are controlled by the anti-inflammatory cytokines. This is accomplished by reducing the pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and thus counteracts their biological effect. The major anti-inflammatory cytokines are interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-10, IL-11, and IL-13. The last decade there has been focus on genetic studies within genes that are important for the immune system, for SIDS with a special interest of the genes encoding the cytokines. This is because the cytokine genes are considered to be the genes most likely to explain the vulnerability to infection, and several studies have investigated these genes in an attempt to uncover associations between SIDS and different genetic variants. So far the genes encoding IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α are the most investigated within SIDS research, and several studies indicates associations between specific variants of these genes and SIDS. Taken together this may indicate that in at least a subset of SIDS predisposing genetic variants of the immune genes are involved. However, the immune system and the cytokine network are complex, and more studies are needed in order to better understand the interplay between different genetic variations and how this may contribute to an unfavorable immunological response.

  7. Usher syndrome: molecular links of pathogenesis, proteins and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Hannie; van Wijk, Erwin; Märker, Tina; Wolfrum, Uwe; Roepman, Ronald

    2006-10-15

    Usher syndrome is the most common form of deaf-blindness. The syndrome is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and to date, eight causative genes have been identified. The proteins encoded by these genes are part of a dynamic protein complex that is present in hair cells of the inner ear and in photoreceptor cells of the retina. The localization of the Usher proteins and the phenotype in animal models indicate that the Usher protein complex is essential in the morphogenesis of the stereocilia bundle in hair cells and in the calycal processes of photoreceptor cells. In addition, the Usher proteins are important in the synaptic processes of both cell types. The association of other proteins with the complex indicates functional links to a number of basic cell-biological processes. Prominently present is the connection to the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, involved in cellular morphology, cell polarity and cell-cell interactions. The Usher protein complex can also be linked to the cadherins/catenins in the adherens junction-associated protein complexes, suggesting a role in cell polarity and tissue organization. A third link can be established to the integrin transmembrane signaling network. The Usher interactome, as outlined in this review, participates in pathways common in inner ear and retina that are disrupted in the Usher syndrome.

  8. Gilbert’s Syndrome: Terminology, Epidemiology, Genetics, Pathogenesis (Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Sorokman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the review was the analysis of the literature about the prevalence, etiology, genetics and pathogenesis of Gilbert’s syndrome (GS. The scientific literature regarding GS with the keywords «Gilbert's syndrome», «hyperbilirubinemia», «uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT-1A» using PubMed as a search engine was reviewed. The abstracts of 75 articles, based on investigations held within the last 10 years were analyzed. The criterion for the selection of articles for the study was based on their close relevance to the topic. The results of researches covered in 10 articles and two reports were of the top interest and deep study. In medical litera­ture GS is described under the names of different syndromes: Gilbert’s syndrome, Meulengracht’s syndrome, Gilbert — Meulengracht syndrome, Gilbert — Lereboullet syndrome, and also such as: constitutional hepatic dysfunction, familial nonhemolytic jaundice, Gilbert’s type of hyperbilirubinemia, idiopathic unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia, Crigler — Najjar hyperbilirubinemia, Arias’ type (HBLRCN, hyperbilirubinemia I. GS is a predominantly hereditary unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia associated with the reduced activity of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT-1A in liver, which is encrypted in external resources as ICD-10 — E80.4; OMIM — 143500; DiseasesDB — 5218; MedlinePlus — 000301; eMedici­nemed — 870; MeSHD — 005878. UGT-1A isoforms are found in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6, in the li­ver — UGT1A9, in the esophagus and stomach — UGT1A7, in the esophagus and intestines — UGT1A8, in the esophagus, bile ducts, stomach, intestines — UGT1A10, in kidneys — UGT1A19. The patients with GS have signs of disorders in all phases of metabolism of bilirubin — from its production to excretion: the lack of bilitranslocase which is responsible for the capture of bilirubin from the blood

  9. Genetic association signal near NTN4 in Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschou, Peristera; Yu, Dongmei; Gerber, Gloria; Evans, Patrick; Tsetsos, Fotis; Davis, Lea K.; Karagiannidis, Iordanis; Chaponis, Jonathan; Gamazon, Eric; Mueller-Vahl, Kirsten; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Schloegelhofer, Monika; Stamenkovic, Mara; Hebebrand, Johannes; Noethen, Markus; Nagy, Peter; Barta, Csaba; Tarnok, Zsanett; Rizzo, Renata; Depienne, Christel; Worbe, Yulia; Hartmann, Andreas; Cath, Danielle C.; Budman, Cathy L.; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy; Wolanczyk, Thomas; Singer, Harvey; Chou, I-Ching; Grados, Marco; Posthuma, Danielle; Rouleau, Guy A.; Aschauer, Harald; Freimer, Nelson B.; Pauls, David L.; Cox, Nancy J.; Mathews, Carol A.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.

    2014-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex genetic etiology. Through an international collaboration, we genotyped 42 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)(p<10−3) from the recent TS genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 609 independent cases and 610 ancestry-matched controls. Only rs2060546 on chromosome 12q22 (p=3.3×10−4) remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Meta-analysis with the original GWAS yielded the strongest association to date (p=5.8×10−7). Although its functional significance is unclear, rs2060546 lies closest to NTN4, an axon guidance molecule expressed in developing striatum. Risk score analysis significantly predicted case/control status (p=0.042), suggesting that many of these variants are true TS risk alleles. PMID:25042818

  10. Acral peeling skin syndrome: a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Sasha; Krunic, Aleksandar L; Bulj, Tanja K; Medenica, Maria M; Fong, Kenneth; Arita, Ken; McGrath, John A

    2012-01-01

    Acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS) is a rare, autosomal, recessive genodermatosis characterized by painless spontaneous exfoliation of the skin of the hands and feet at a subcorneal or intracorneal level. It usually presents at birth or appears later in childhood or early adulthood. Some cases result from mutations in the TGM5 gene that encodes transglutaminase 5, which has an important role in cross-linking cornified cell envelope proteins. We report a new APSS pedigree from Jordan that contains at least 10 affected family members, although sequencing of the TGM5 gene failed to disclose any pathogenic mutation(s). On the basis of probable consanguinity, we performed homozygosity mapping and identified areas of homozygosity on chromosomes 1, 6, 10, 13, and 16, although none of the intervals contained genes of clear relevance to cornification. APSS is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder, and this Jordanian pedigree underscores the likelihood of still further heterogeneity. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Molecular genetics: Step by step implementation in maize breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinov Kosana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency in plant breeding is determined primarily by the ability to screen for genetic polymorphism, productivity and yield stability early in program. Dependent on the knowledge about the biochemical bases of the trait and nature of its genetic control, trait could be modified either through mutagenesis of genes controlling it or through the transfer of already existing mutant genes, controlling desired trait to different plant genotypes by classic crossing. Objective of this report is to present partly results on the investigation of the possibilities to apply ionizing radiations (fast neutrons, γ -rays and chemical mutagens (EI, iPMS, EMS, ENU to get maize and wheat mutants with increased amount and improved protein quality. Besides this approach in mutation breeding, results on the very early investigation of biochemical background of opaque -2 mutation including use of coupled cell - free RNA and protein synthesis containing components from both wild and opaque - 2 maize genotypes (chromatin, RNA polymerase, microsomall fraction, protein bodies will be presented. Partial results on opaque - 2 gene incorporation in different genetic background are reviewed. Part of report is dealing with different classes of molecular markers (proteins, RFLP, AFLP, RAPD, and SSR application in maize genome polymorphism investigation. Besides application of different molecular markers classes in the investigation of heterosis phenomena they are useful in biochemical pathway of important traits control determination as well. .

  12. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: review of the genetic and molecular aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira, Viviane Boaventura de

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA is a rare fibrovascular tumor of unknown etiology, with few studies analyzing its pathogenesis. Objective: Reviewing JNA's pathogenesis, emphasizing genetic and molecular aspects. Method: All the relevant articles indexed in PUBMED and LILACS, besides reference book chapters, published between 1959 and 2007 were reviewed. Results: The sex selectivity seen in JNA may be explained by intranuclear accumulation of androgen receptor and beta-catenin, a co-activator which increases the tumor sensitivity to androgynous. The genetic alterations seen in JNA are most frequently located in sexual chromosomes. A number of growth factors seem to be related to the tumor pathogenesis. The insulin-like growth factor II is highly expressed while the vascular endothelial growth factor and the transforming growth factor beta are released by stromal cells and may influence the JNA's growth and vascularization. Conclusion: In spite of the scarce data describing the JNA etiology and pathogenesis, genetic and molecular factors seem to collaborate to the understanding of the disease's many clinical and morphological features. Knowledge regarding these specific issues could contribute for the establishment of potential therapeutic targets in the future.

  13. Molecular genetic identification of some wheat cultivars in the sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekki, I. I; El Amin, H. B.

    2002-01-01

    Four wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars, namely condor, El-Nellene, Wadi El Neil and Debeira were characterized on biochemical and molecular bases. The biochemical ones were protein-banding patterns, using sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and isozymes to identify the biochemical genetic fingerprint of the four cultivars. Water-soluble protein-banding pattern showed no polymorphisms among the tested cultivars. The data from starch gel electrophoresis of enzymes, malate dehydrogenase (MDH), esterase (EST) and acid phosphate (ACPH) showed that the cultivars are monomorphic. Further trials to identify the molecular genetic fingerprints of the studied cultivars were carried out using RAPD-PCR twenty-five primers were tested to perform. RAPD-PCR analysis. From the PCR products, a phylogenetic map, i.e, dendrogram, was constructed for the studied cultivars which depicted tow groups. The first group contained Wadi El Neil and Deberia with 48.4% similarity, and the second group contained Condor and El Neileen with 100% similarity. There was no similarity between Condor and Debeira (100% dissimilarity). Therefor, these data can be used subsequently for genetic engineering research and for wheat breeding programmes in the Sudan.(Author)

  14. Genetics Home Reference: distal 18q deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 18q deletion syndrome chromosome 18q monosomy chromosome 18q- syndrome De Grouchy syndrome del(18q) syndrome monosomy 18q Related Information How ... MS, Tienari PJ, Wirtavuori KO, Valanne LK. 18q-syndrome: brain MRI shows poor differentiation of gray and white matter on ... RL, Hale DE, Rose SR, Leach RJ, Cody JD. The spectrum ...

  15. From Genetics to Epigenetics: New Perspectives in Tourette Syndrome Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaroli, Luca; Vető, Borbála; Arányi, Tamás; Barta, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder marked by the appearance of multiple involuntary motor and vocal tics. TS presents high comorbidity rates with other disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). TS is highly heritable and has a complex polygenic background. However, environmental factors also play a role in the manifestation of symptoms. Different epigenetic mechanisms may represent the link between these two causalities. Epigenetic regulation has been shown to have an impact in the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders, however very little is known about its effects on Tourette Syndrome. This review provides a summary of the recent findings in genetic background of TS, followed by an overview on different epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNAs in the regulation of gene expression. Epigenetic studies in other neurological and psychiatric disorders are discussed along with the TS-related epigenetic findings available in the literature to date. Moreover, we are proposing that some general epigenetic mechanisms seen in other neuropsychiatric disorders may also play a role in the pathogenesis of TS. PMID:27462201

  16. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for Waardenburg syndrome type I and II in Chinese families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Qin, Litao; Li, Tao; Liu, Hongjian; Ma, Lingcao; Li, Wan; Wu, Dong; Wang, Hongdan; Guo, Qiannan; Guo, Liangjie; Liao, Shixiu

    2018-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation. The present study aimed to investigate the underlying molecular pathology and provide a method of prenatal diagnosis of WS in Chinese families. A total of 11 patients with WS from five unrelated Chinese families were enrolled. A thorough clinical examination was performed on all participants. Furthermore, patients with WS underwent screening for mutations in the following genes: Paired box 3 (PAX3), melanogenesis associated transcription factor (MITF), SRY-box 10, snail family transcriptional repressor 2 and endothelin receptor type B using polymerase chain reaction sequencing. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization was used for specific patients whose sequence results were normal. Following identification of the genotype of the probands and their parents, prenatal genetic diagnosis was performed for family 01 and 05. According to the diagnostic criteria for WS, five cases were diagnosed as WS1, while the other six cases were WS2. Genetic analysis revealed three mutations, including a nonsense mutation PAX3 c.583C>T in family 01, a splice-site mutation MITF c.909G>A in family 03 and an in-frame deletion MITF c.649_651delGAA in family 05. To the best of the authors' knowledge the mutations (c.583C>T in PAX3 and c.909G>A in MITF) were reported for the first time in Chinese people. Mutations in the gene of interest were not identified in family 02 and 04. The prenatal genetic testing of the two fetuses was carried out and demonstrated that the two babies were normal. The results of the present study expanded the range of known genetic mutations in China. Identification of genetic mutations in these families provided an efficient way to understand the causes of WS and improved genetic counseling. PMID:29115496

  17. Genetics and aging; the Werner syndrome as a segmental progeroid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G M

    1985-01-01

    The maximum lifespan potential is a constitutional feature of speciation and must be subject to polygenic controls acting both in the domain of development and in the domain of the maintenance of macromolecular integrity. The enormous genetic heterogeneity that characterizes our own species, the complexities of numerous nature-nurture interactions, and the quantitative and qualitative variations of the senescent phenotype that are observed suggest that precise patterns of aging in each of us may be unique. Patterns of aging may also differ sharply among species (for example, semelparous vs. multiparous mammals). Some potential common denominators, however, allow one to identify progeroid syndromes in man that could lead to the elucidation of important pathways of gene action. (The suffix "-oid" means "like"; it does not mean identity.) Unimodal progeroid syndromes (eg., familial dementia of the Alzheimer type, an autosomal dominant) can help us understand the pathogenesis of a particular aspect of the senescent phenotype of man. Segmental progeroid syndromes (eg. the Werner syndrome, an autosomal recessive) may be relevant to multiple aspects of the senescent phenotype. Some results of research on the Werner syndrome may be interpreted as support for "peripheral" as opposed to "central" theories of aging; they are consistent with the view that gene action in the domain of development (adolescence, in this instance) can set the stage for patterns of aging in the adult; they point to the importance of mesenchymal cell populations in the pathogenesis of age-related disorders; finally, they underscore the role of chromosomal instability, especially in the pathogenesis of neoplasia.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: type A insulin resistance syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Type A insulin resistance syndrome Type A insulin resistance syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Type A insulin resistance syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by severe ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Ohdo syndrome, Maat-Kievit-Brunner type

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blepharophimosis-mental retardation syndrome, Maat-Kievit-Brunner type BMRS, MKB type Ohdo syndrome, MKB type X-linked ... D, Brunner H, Bitoun P. Blepharophimosis-mental retardation (BMR) syndromes: A proposed clinical classification of the so- ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome is a developmental disorder that ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Long QT Syndrome and Torsades de Pointes Ventricular Tachycardia Orphanet: Familial long QT syndrome Orphanet: Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome Patient Support ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hearing ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome is a condition characterized by ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a severe disorder that usually begins ...

  5. An Update on the Genetics of Usher Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Millán

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP, and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and is the most common cause underlying deafness and blindness of genetic origin. Clinically, USH is divided into three types. Usher type I (USH1 is the most severe form and is characterized by severe to profound congenital deafness, vestibular areflexia, and prepubertal onset of progressive RP. Type II (USH2 displays moderate to severe hearing loss, absence of vestibular dysfunction, and later onset of retinal degeneration. Type III (USH3 shows progressive postlingual hearing loss, variable onset of RP, and variable vestibular response. To date, five USH1 genes have been identified: MYO7A (USH1B, CDH23 (USH1D, PCDH15 (USH1F, USH1C(USH1C, and USH1G(USH1G. Three genes are involved in USH2, namely, USH2A (USH2A, GPR98 (USH2C, and DFNB31 (USH2D. USH3 is rare except in certain populations, and the gene responsible for this type is USH3A.

  6. An update on the genetics of usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, José M; Aller, Elena; Jaijo, Teresa; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Gimenez-Pardo, Ascensión; Ayuso, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and is the most common cause underlying deafness and blindness of genetic origin. Clinically, USH is divided into three types. Usher type I (USH1) is the most severe form and is characterized by severe to profound congenital deafness, vestibular areflexia, and prepubertal onset of progressive RP. Type II (USH2) displays moderate to severe hearing loss, absence of vestibular dysfunction, and later onset of retinal degeneration. Type III (USH3) shows progressive postlingual hearing loss, variable onset of RP, and variable vestibular response. To date, five USH1 genes have been identified: MYO7A (USH1B), CDH23 (USH1D), PCDH15 (USH1F), USH1C(USH1C), and USH1G(USH1G). Three genes are involved in USH2, namely, USH2A (USH2A), GPR98 (USH2C), and DFNB31 (USH2D). USH3 is rare except in certain populations, and the gene responsible for this type is USH3A.

  7. Classical and molecular genetics of malignant melanoma and dysplastic naevi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traupe, H.; Macher, E.

    1988-01-01

    The authors conclude that the prevailing concept of monogenic autosomaldominant inheritance of dysplastic naevi and familial melanoma is not compatible with the principles of formal (Mendelian) genetics. The concept of polygenic inheritance offers instead a sound basis to explain familial aggregation of dysplastic naevi and melanoma. The various genes involved have not yet been identified at the molecular level. The recent advances made possible by modern DNA technology have given us a new view of carcinogenesis. In human malignant melanoma, chromosomes 1, 6, 7 are of particular interest and oncogenes located on these chromosomes may be involved with the initiation, promotion and progression of melanoma. Carcinogenesis is viewed as a multistep process and even tumour initiation requires the input of at least two independent oncogenes. Molecular genetics thus adds an important argument for the existence of a polygenic predisposition to melanoma. The concept of polygenic inheritance is not restricted to familial melanoma, but implies that all melanomas basically share the same predisposition and are due to similar genetic mechanisms. In some patients an inherited genetic predisposition is of great importance, whereas in others (the majority) environmental factors (e.g. UV-light-induced mutations) will be the cause of initial steps in the malignant transformation. The concept of polygenic inheritance has consequences for the management of our patients. In contrast to simple Mendelian inheritance, the risk for dysplastic naevi and melanoma is not constantly 50%, but increases with the number of family members already affected. Persons belonging to families with more that 2 affected close relatives should be considered at high risk regardless of the dysplastic naevus status. Strict surveillance of this patient group is warranted for melanoma prevention

  8. Molecular genetics of glioblastomas: defining subtypes and understanding the biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Ilana Zalcberg; Golgher, Denise

    2015-02-01

    Despite comprehensive therapy, which includes surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, the prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme is very poor. Diagnosed individuals present an average of 12 to 18 months of life. This article provides an overview of the molecular genetics of these tumors. Despite the overwhelming amount of data available, so far little has been translated into real benefits for the patient. Because this is such a complex topic, the goal is to point out the main alterations in the biological pathways that lead to tumor formation, and how this can contribute to the development of better therapies and clinical care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic counseling for a three-generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II associated with a rare SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Min; Jiang, Hongyan

    2015-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The SOX10 mutation related with Waardenburg syndrome type II is rare in Chinese. This study aimed to uncover the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation family to improve genetic counseling. Complete clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a three-generation Han Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. Targeted genetic counseling was provided to this family. We identified a rare heterozygous dominant mutation c.621C>A (p.Y207X) in SOX10 gene in this family. The premature termination codon occurs in exon 4, 27 residues downstream of the carboxyl end of the high mobility group box. Bioinformatics prediction suggested this variant to be disease-causing, probably due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Useful genetic counseling was given to the family for prenatal guidance. Identification of a rare dominant heterozygous SOX10 mutation c.621C>A in this family provided an efficient way to understand the causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II and improved genetic counseling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-06-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors.

  11. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Garg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/controllers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors.

  12. Testicular germ cell tumors: Molecular genetic and clinicomorphological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Nemtsova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Testicular tumors are the most common form of solid cancer in young men. According to the 2004 WHO classification, testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT may present with different histological types. Embryonic cells of varying grade may be a source of TGCT and the occurrence of this type of tumors is directly related to the formation of a pool of male sex cells and gametogenesis. The paper gives information on mo- lecular stages for the process of formation of male sex cells in health, as well as ways of their impairments leading to TGCT. An investigation of the profiles of gene expression and the spectrum of molecular damages revealed genes responsible for a predisposition to the sporadic and hereditary forms of TGCT. The paper presents the current molecular genetic and clinicomorphological characteristics of TGCT. 

  13. [Clinical classification and genetic mutation study of two pedigrees with type II Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2015-12-01

    To explore the molecular etiology of two pedigrees affected with type II Waardenburg syndrome (WS2) and to provide genetic diagnosis and counseling. Blood samples were collected from the proband and his family members. Following extraction of genomic DNA, the coding sequences of PAX3, MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes were amplified with PCR and subjected to DNA sequencing to detect potential mutations. A heterozygous deletional mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene has been identified in all patients from the first family, while no mutation was found in the other WS2 related genes including PAX3, MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2. The heterozygous deletion mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene probably underlies the disease in the first family. It is expected that other genes may also underlie WS2.

  14. Genetic aspects of hypertension and metabolic disease in the obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riha, R.L.; Diefenbach, K.; Jennum, P.

    2008-01-01

    Though it has long been recognised that there is a hereditary component to the obstructive steep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS), identifying its genetic basis remains elusive. Hypertension and metabolic syndrome, Like OSAHS, are polygenic disorders, physiologically complex and the product...... phenotyping, which has hampered genetic dissection of these diseases; in addition, sleep-disordered breathing has not been factored into most studies dealing with essential hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Genome-wide scans have yielded inconsistent results in all three disorders under discussion...... for the expression of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome in the context of OSAHS. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  15. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, TB; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Lundemose, JB

    2000-01-01

    in the child. This prompted us to investigate these genetic markers of thromboembolic disease in 121 cases of sudden infant death syndrome and in relevant controls, in the expectation of a more frequent occurrence of these markers if thrombosis is an etiological factor in sudden infant death syndrome...... or unknown risk factors for thrombosis as possible etiological factors for sudden infant death syndrome. It is likely that we must continuously employ the exclusion principle on possible etiological causes in genetic material from a large group of victims of sudden infant death syndrome if the phenomenon...

  16. Implication of Gastric Cancer Molecular Genetic Markers in Surgical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsova, Marina V; Strelnikov, Vladimir V; Tanas, Alexander S; Bykov, Igor I; Zaletaev, Dmitry V; Rudenko, Viktoria V; Glukhov, Alexander I; Kchorobrich, Tatiana V; Li, Yi; Tarasov, Vadim V; Barreto, George E; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated aberrant methylation of genes CDH1, RASSF1A, MLH1, N33, DAPK, expression of genes hTERT, MMP7, MMP9, BIRC5 (survivin), PTGS2, and activity of telomerase of 106 gastric tumor samples obtained intra-operatively and 53 gastric tumor samples from the same group of patients obtained endoscopically before surgery. Biopsy specimens obtained from 50 patients with chronic calculous cholecystitis were used as a control group. Together with tissue samples obtained from different sites remote to tumors, a total of 727 samples have been studied. The selected parameters comprise a system of molecular markers that can be used in both diagnostics of gastric cancer and in dynamic monitoring of patients after surgery. Special attention was paid to the use of molecular markers for the diagnostics of malignant process in the material obtained endoscopically since the efficacy of morphological diagnostics in biopsies is compromised by intratumoral heterogeneity, which may prevent reliable identification of tumor cells in the sampling. Our data indicated that certain molecular genetic events provided more sensitive yet specific markers of the tumor. We demonstrated that molecular profiles detected in preoperative biopsies were confirmed by the material obtained intra-operatively. The use of endoscopic material facilitates gastric tumors pre-operative diagnostics, improving early detection of gastric cancer and potential effective treatment strategies.

  17. A review of statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation: looking for an answer in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Gruber, Stephen B; Raymond, Victoria M

    2010-01-01

    the issue of multiplex ascertainment and its effect on the different methods. We then focus on exploring genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome and analyze new data on the age of onset in affected parent-child pairs from families seen at the University of Michigan Cancer Genetics clinic with a mutation...... in one of the three main mismatch repair (MMR) genes. In contrast to the clinic-based population, we re-analyze data on a population-based Lynch syndrome cohort, derived from the Danish HNPCC-register. Both datasets indicate evidence of genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome. We then expand our review...

  18. 76 FR 18227 - Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ...] Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... comment period for the notice announcing a meeting of the Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel (the panel... Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee, and the opening of a public docket to...

  19. Overlap of PIV syndrome, VACTERL and Pallister-Hall syndrome: clinical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoran, C E; Abbott, M; McKusick, V A; Biesecker, L G

    2000-07-01

    The polydactyly, imperforate anus, vertebral anomalies syndrome (PIV, OMIM 174100) was determined as a distinct syndrome by Say and Gerald in 1968 (Say B, Gerald PS. Lancet 1968: 2: 688). We noted that the features of PIV overlap with the VATER association and Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS, OMIM 146510), which includes polydactyly, (central or postaxial), shortened fingers, hypoplastic nails, renal anomalies, imperforate anus, and hypothalamic hamartoma. Truncation mutations in GL13, a zinc finger transcription factor gene, have been shown to cause PHS. We performed a molecular evaluation on a patient diagnosed with PIV, whose mother, grandfather, and maternal aunt had similar malformations. We sequenced the GLI3 gene in the patient to determine if she had a mutation. The patient was found to have a deletion in nucleotides 2188-2207 causing a frameshift mutation that predicts a truncated protein product of the gene. Later clinical studies demonstrated that the patient also has a hypothalamic hamartoma, a finding in PHS. We concluded that this family had atypical PHS and not PIV. This result has prompted us to re-evaluate the PIV literature to see if PIV is a valid entity. Based on these data and our examination of the literature, we conclude that PIV is not a valid diagnostic entity. We conclude that patients diagnosed with PIV should be reclassified as having VACTERL, or PHS, or another syndrome with overlapping malformations.

  20. The molecular genetics of the telomere biology disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuch, Alison A

    2016-08-02

    The importance of telomere function for human health is exemplified by a collection of Mendelian disorders referred to as the telomere biology disorders (TBDs), telomeropathies, or syndromes of telomere shortening. Collectively, the TBDs cover a spectrum of conditions from multisystem disease presenting in infancy to isolated disease presentations in adulthood, most notably idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Eleven genes have been found mutated in the TBDs to date, each of which is linked to some aspect of telomere maintenance. This review summarizes the molecular defects that result from mutations in these genes, highlighting recent advances, including the addition of PARN to the TBD gene family and the discovery of heterozygous mutations in RTEL1 as a cause of familial pulmonary fibrosis.

  1. Plant genetic and molecular responses to water deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Salvi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant productivity is severely affected by unfavourable environmental conditions (biotic and abiotic stresses. Among others, water deficit is the plant stress condition which mostly limits the quality and the quantity of plant products. Tolerance to water deficit is a polygenic trait strictly dependent on the coordinated expression of a large set of genes coding for proteins directly involved in stress-induced protection/repair mechanisms (dehydrins, chaperonins, enzymes for the synthesis of osmoprotectants and detoxifying compounds, and others as well as genes involved in transducing the stress signal and regulating gene expression (transcription factors, kinases, phosphatases. Recently, research activities in the field evolved from the study of single genes directly involved in cellular stress tolerance (functional genes to the identification and characterization of key regulatory genes involved in stress perception and transduction and able to rapidly and efficiently activate the complex gene network involved in the response to stress. The complexity of the events occurring in response to stress have been recently approached by genomics tools; in fact the analysis of transcriptome, proteome and metabolome of a plant tissue/cell in response to stress already allowed to have a global view of the cellular and molecular events occurring in response to water deficit, by the identification of genes activated and co-regulated by the stress conditions and the characterization of new signalling pathways. Moreover the recent application of forward and reverse genetic approaches, trough mutant collection development, screening and characterization, is giving a tremendous impulse to the identification of gene functions with key role in stress tolerance. The integration of data obtained by high-throughput genomic approaches, by means of powerful informatic tools, is allowing nowadays to rapidly identify of major genes/QTLs involved in stress tolerance

  2. The rapid evolution of molecular genetic diagnostics in neuromuscular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Alexander E; Kubisch, Christian

    2017-10-01

    The development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS) has revolutionized molecular genetic diagnostics in monogenic disorders. The present review gives a brief overview of different MPS-based approaches used in clinical diagnostics of neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) and highlights their advantages and limitations. MPS-based approaches like gene panel sequencing, (whole) exome sequencing, (whole) genome sequencing, and RNA sequencing have been used to identify the genetic cause in NMDs. Although gene panel sequencing has evolved as a standard test for heterogeneous diseases, it is still debated, mainly because of financial issues and unsolved problems of variant interpretation, whether genome sequencing (and to a lesser extent also exome sequencing) of single patients can already be regarded as routine diagnostics. However, it has been shown that the inclusion of parents and additional family members often leads to a substantial increase in the diagnostic yield in exome-wide/genome-wide MPS approaches. In addition, MPS-based RNA sequencing just enters the research and diagnostic scene. Next-generation sequencing increasingly enables the detection of the genetic cause in highly heterogeneous diseases like NMDs in an efficient and affordable way. Gene panel sequencing and family-based exome sequencing have been proven as potent and cost-efficient diagnostic tools. Although clinical validation and interpretation of genome sequencing is still challenging, diagnostic RNA sequencing represents a promising tool to bypass some hurdles of diagnostics using genomic DNA.

  3. GENETICS AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND PIG MEAT QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. BULLA

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The main goals in pig breeding have for many years been to improve growth rate, feedconversion and carcass composition. There have been less efforts to improve meat qualityparameters (WHC, pH, tenderness, colour etc. but the main contribution has been areduction of stress susceptibility and PSE meat. Unfortunately, the quantitative geneticapproach has yielded few clues regarding the fundamental genetic changes that accompaniedthe selection of animal for superior carcass attributes. While mapping efforts are makingsignificant major effects on carcass and his quality composition DNA test would be availableto detect some positive or negative alleles. There are clear breed effects on meat quality,which in some cases are fully related to the presence of a single gene with major effect (RYR1,MYF4, H-FABP, LEPR, IGF2. Molecular biology methods provides excellent opportunitiesto improve meat quality in selection schemes within breeds and lines. Selection on majorgenes will not only increase average levels of quality but also decrease variability (ei increaseuniformity. The aim of this paper is to discuss there genetic and non-genetic opportunities.

  4. GENETICS AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND PIG MEAT QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BULLA, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goals in pig breeding have for many years been to improve growth rate, feedconversion and carcass composition. There have been less efforts to improve meat qualityparameters (WHC, pH, tenderness, colour etc. but the main contribution has been areduction of stress susceptibility and PSE meat. Unfortunately, the quantitative geneticapproach has yielded few clues regarding the fundamental genetic changes that accompaniedthe selection of animal for superior carcass attributes. While mapping efforts are makingsignificant major effects on carcass and his quality composition DNA test would be availableto detect some positive or negative alleles. There are clear breed effects on meat quality,which in some cases are fully related to the presence of a single gene with major effect (RYR1,MYF4, H-FABP, LEPR, IGF2. Molecular biology methods provides excellent opportunitiesto improve meat quality in selection schemes within breeds and lines. Selection on majorgenes will not only increase average levels of quality but also decrease variability (ei increaseuniformity. The aim of this paper is to discuss there genetic and non-genetic opportunities.

  5. [Malignant Melanoma - from Classical Histology towards Molecular Genetic Testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryška, A; Horký, O; Berkovcová, J; Tichá, I; Kalinová, M; Matějčková, M; Bóday, Á; Drábek, J; Martínek, P; Šimová, J; Sieglová, K; Vošmiková, H

    Malignant melanoma is - in comparison with other skin tumors - a relatively rare malignant neoplasm with highly aggressive biologic behavior and variable prognosis. Recent data in pathology and molecular diagnostics indicate that malignant melanoma is in fact not a single entity but a group of different neoplasms with variable etiopathogenesis, biologic behavior and prognosis. New therapeutic options using targeted treatment blocking MAPK signaling pathway require testing of BRAF gene mutation status. This helps to select patients with highest probability of benefit from this treatment. This article summarizes information on the correlation of morphological findings with genetic changes, discusses the representation of individual genetic types in various morphological subgroups and deals with the newly proposed genetic classification of melanoma and the current possibilities, pitfalls and challenges in BRAF testing of malignant melanoma. It also describes the current testing situation in the Czech Republic - the methods used, the representation of BRAF mutations in the tested population and the future of testing. It also shows the limitations of the BRAF and MEK targeted treatment concept resulting from the heterogeneity of the tumor population. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to MAPK pathway inhibitors, possibilities of their detection, and issues of combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy are discussed.Key words: malignant melanoma - BRAF - mutation - molecular targeted therapy - tumor microenvironment - tumor heterogeneity This work was supported by projects PROGRES Q40/11, BBMRICZ LM2015089, SVV 260398 and GACR 17-10331S. The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study. The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 28. 3. 2017Accepted: 16. 5. 2017.

  6. Quest for the elusive genetic basis of Tourette syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, P.I. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a fairly common neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of chronic motor and vocal tics that typically have an onset in childhood. The tics usually wax and wane and can even be suppressed. The diagnostic criteria, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., include (i) the presence of motor and one or more vocal tics at some time during the illness, although not necessarily concurrently; (ii) occurrence of tics throughout a period of > 1 year, with no tic-free period of > 3 consecutive mo; (iii) marked distress or significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning; (iv) onset at <18 years of age; and (v) lack of identifiable environmental causes or other contributing medical conditions. Family studies indicate that the tics are not necessarily disabling, but can vary greatly in severity, with the vast majority being mild. The breadth of phenotypic manifestations considered for diagnosis is a subject of debate and controversy, and, consequently, frequency estimates can range from 1/100 to 1/10,000. One school of thought restricts the diagnosis to that described by Gilles de la Tourette in 1885 and does not include any associated psychopathologies. An intermediate school considers only chronic motor and vocal tics and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) within the phenotypic spectrum. A third school of thought suggests that the phenotypic boundaries of TS are broad and include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, OCD, panic disorder, conduct disorder, depression, dyslexia, stuttering, mania, obesity, and alcoholism, in addition to motor and vocal tics. The phenotypic definition of TS continues to evolve and is an important consideration for genetic approaches to the dissection of the syndrome. 14 refs.

  7. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic syndromes with intellectual disability: comparison of adaptive profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nuovo, Santo; Buono, Serafino

    2011-10-30

    The study of distinctive and consistent behaviors in the most common genetic syndromes with intellectual disability is useful to explain abnormalities or associated psychiatric disorders. The behavioral phenotypes revealed outcomes totally or partially specific for each syndrome. The aim of our study was to compare similarities and differences in the adaptive profiles of the five most frequent genetic syndromes, i.e. Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, and Fragile-X syndrome (fully mutated), taking into account the relation with chronological age and the overall IQ level. The research was carried out using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (beside the Wechsler Intelligence scales to obtain IQ) with a sample of 181 persons (107 males and 74 females) showing genetic syndromes and mental retardation. Syndrome-based groups were matched for chronological age and mental age (excluding the Angelman group, presenting with severe mental retardation). Similarities and differences in the adaptive profiles are described, relating them to IQs and maladaptive behaviors. The results might be useful in obtaining a global index of adjustment for the assessment of intellectual disability level as well as for educational guidance and rehabilitative plans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical spectrum and molecular diagnosis of Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients with an imprinting mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, S.; Cassidy, S.B.; Conroy, J.M. [Univ. of Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-20

    Recent studies have identified a new class of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) patients who have biparental inheritance, but neither the typical deletion nor uniparental disomy (UPD) or translocation. However, these patients have uniparental DNA methylation throughout 15q11-q13, and thus appear to have a mutation in the imprinting process for this region. Here we describe detailed clinical findings of five AS imprinting mutation patients (three families) and two PWS imprinting mutation patients (one new family). All these patients have essentially the classical clinical phenotype for the respective syndrome, except that the incidence of microcephaly is lower in imprinting mutation AS patients than in deletion AS patients. Furthermore, imprinting mutation AS and PWS patients do not typically have hypopigmentation, which is commonly found in patients with the usual large deletion. Molecular diagnosis of these cases is initially achieved by DNA methylation analyses of the DN34/ZNF127, PW71 (D15S63), and SNRPN loci. The latter two probes have clear advantages in the simple molecular diagnostic analysis of PWS and AS patients with an imprinting mutation, as has been found for typical deletion or UPD PWS and AS cases. With the recent finding of inherited microdeletions in PWS and AS imprinting mutation families, our studies define a new class of these two syndromes. The clinical and molecular identification of these PWS and AS patients has important genetic counseling consequences. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Non-syndromic sensorineural prelingual deafness: the importance of genetic counseling in demystifying parents' beliefs about the cause of their children's deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fidjy; Paneque, Milena; Reis, Cláudia; Venâncio, Margarida; Sequeiros, Jorge; Saraiva, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    Recent advances in molecular genetics have allowed the determination of the genetic cause of some childhood non-syndromic deafness. In Portugal only a small proportion of families are referred to a clinical genetics service in order to clarify the etiology of the deafness and to provide genetic counseling. Consequently, there are no published studies of the prior beliefs of parents about the causes of hereditary deafness of their children and their genetic knowledge after receipt of genetic counseling. In order to evaluate the impact of genetic counseling, 44 parents of 24 children with the diagnosis of non-syndromic sensorineural prelingual deafness due to mutations in the GJB2 (connexin 26), completed surveys before and after genetic counseling. Before counseling 13.6 % of the parents knew the cause of deafness; at a post-counseling setting this percentage was significantly higher, with 84.1 % of the parents accurately identifying the etiology. No significant differences were found between the answers of mothers and fathers either before or after genetic counseling. Parents' level of education was a significant factor in pre-test knowledge. After genetic counseling 95.5 % of the parents stated that the consultation had met their expectations, 70.5 % remembered correctly the inheritance pattern, and 93.2 % correctly recalled the chance of risk of deafness. These results underline the importance of genetic counseling in demystifying parents' beliefs about the etiology of their children's deafness.

  10. Catecholaminergic systems in stress: structural and molecular genetic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvetnansky, Richard; Sabban, Esther L; Palkovits, Miklos

    2009-04-01

    Stressful stimuli evoke complex endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses that are extremely variable and specific depending on the type and nature of the stressors. We first provide a short overview of physiology, biochemistry, and molecular genetics of sympatho-adrenomedullary, sympatho-neural, and brain catecholaminergic systems. Important processes of catecholamine biosynthesis, storage, release, secretion, uptake, reuptake, degradation, and transporters in acutely or chronically stressed organisms are described. We emphasize the structural variability of catecholamine systems and the molecular genetics of enzymes involved in biosynthesis and degradation of catecholamines and transporters. Characterization of enzyme gene promoters, transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, transcription factors, gene expression and protein translation, as well as different phases of stress-activated transcription and quantitative determination of mRNA levels in stressed organisms are discussed. Data from catecholamine enzyme gene knockout mice are shown. Interaction of catecholaminergic systems with other neurotransmitter and hormonal systems are discussed. We describe the effects of homotypic and heterotypic stressors, adaptation and maladaptation of the organism, and the specificity of stressors (physical, emotional, metabolic, etc.) on activation of catecholaminergic systems at all levels from plasma catecholamines to gene expression of catecholamine enzymes. We also discuss cross-adaptation and the effect of novel heterotypic stressors on organisms adapted to long-term monotypic stressors. The extra-adrenal nonneuronal adrenergic system is described. Stress-related central neuronal regulatory circuits and central organization of responses to various stressors are presented with selected examples of regulatory molecular mechanisms. Data summarized here indicate that catecholaminergic systems are activated in different ways following exposure to distinct

  11. Outcome of genetic evaluation of patients with kidney cancer referred for suspected hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Kelly L; Alanee, Shaheen; Glogowski, Emily A; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Klein, Robert; Russo, Paul; Coleman, Jonathan; Offit, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    To analyze patients with kidney cancer referred for evaluation at a high-volume genetics service at a comprehensive cancer center and identify factors associated with positive tests for hereditary cancer syndromes. A retrospective review of patients referred to the Clinical Genetics Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center was performed, and patients with a personal history of kidney cancer were identified. Patient and disease characteristics were reviewed. In all, 4 variables including age at diagnosis of kidney tumor, presence of syndromic manifestations, family history of kidney cancer, and number of primary malignancies were evaluated for association with positive test results in 2 groups: patients tested for renal cell carcinoma syndromes and Lynch syndrome. Guidance for genetic testing strategy in patients with kidney cancer is provided. Between 1999 and 2012, 120 patients with a history of kidney cancer were evaluated by the Clinical Genetics Service. The mean age at kidney cancer diagnosis was 52 years (interquartile range: 42-63), with 57% being women. A family history of kidney cancer was reported by 39 patients (33%). Time between diagnosis of first cancer and genetic consultation was 5 years in the remaining 23%. Overall, 95 patients were tested for genetic abnormalities with 27 (28%) testing positive. Testing for renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-related syndromes was performed on 43 patients, with 13 testing positive (30%). Lynch syndrome testing was positive in 9 patients (32%) after 28 were tested. In RCC-associated syndromes, young age of diagnosis was associated with positive test results. Conversely, syndromic manifestations and increasing number of primary malignancies were associated with positive Lynch testing. The discovery of inherited kidney cancer syndromes has provided a unique opportunity to identify patients at increased risk for cancer. Factors associated with positive genetic testing are unique to different syndromes. These data

  12. The Noonan Syndrome--A Review of the Clinical and Genetic Features of 27 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Edith; Turner, Gillian

    1973-01-01

    Reviewed were clinical and genetic features of 27 cases of the Noonan Syndrome, a condition with characteristics such as webbing of the neck, short stature, frequent congential heart lesions, and chromosomal irregularities. (DB)

  13. Down syndrome--genetic and nutritional aspects of accompanying disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Dominika; Wyka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the more commonly occurring genetic disorders, where mental retardation is combined with nutritional diseases. It is caused by having a third copy of chromosome 21, and there exist 3 forms; Simple Trisomy 21, Translocation Trisomy and Mosaic Trisomy. Symptoms include intellectual disability/mental retardation, early onset of Alzheimer's disease and the appearance of various phenotypic features such as narrow slanted eyes, flat nose and short stature. In addition, there are other health problems throughout the body, consisting in part of cardiac defects and thyroid function abnormalities along with nutritional disorders (ie. overweight, obesity, hypercholesterolemia and deficiencies of vitamins and minerals). Those suffering DS have widespread body frame abnormalities and impaired brain development and function; the latter leading to impaired intellectual development. Many studies indicate excessive or deficient nutrient uptakes associated with making inappropriate foodstuff choices, food intolerance, (eg. celiac disease) or malabsorption. DS persons with overweight or obesity are linked with a slow metabolic rate, abnormal blood leptin concentrations and exhibit low levels of physical activity. Vitamin B group deficiencies and abnormal blood homocysteine levels decrease the rate of intellectual development in DS cases. Zinc deficiencies result in short stature, thyroid function disorders and an increased appetite caused by excessive supplementation. Scientific advances in the research and diagnosis of DS, as well as preventing any associated conditions, have significantly increased life expectancies of those with this genetic disorder. Early dietary interventions by parents or guardians of DS children afford an opportunity for decreasing the risk or delaying some of the DS associated conditions from appearing, thus beneficially impacting on their quality of life.

  14. Parent stress across molecular subtypes of children with Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miodrag, N; Peters, S

    2015-09-01

    Parenting stress has been consistently reported among parents of children with developmental disabilities. However, to date, no studies have investigated the impact of a molecular subtype of Angelman syndrome (AS) on parent stress, despite distinct phenotypic differences among subtypes. Data for 124 families of children with three subtypes of AS: class I and II deletions (n = 99), imprinting centre defects (IC defects; n = 11) and paternal uniparental disomy (UPD; n = 14) were drawn from the AS Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) database and collected from five research sites across the Unites States. The AS study at the RDCRN gathered health information to understand how the syndrome develops and how to treat it. Parents completed questionnaires on their perceived psychological stress, the severity of children's aberrant behaviour and children's sleep patterns. Children's adaptive functioning and developmental levels were clinically evaluated. Child-related stress reached clinical levels for 40% of parents of children with deletions, 100% for IC defects and 64.3% for UPD. Sleep difficulties were similar and elevated across subtypes. There were no differences between molecular subtypes for overall child and parent-related stress. However, results showed greater isolation and lack of perceived parenting skills for parents of children with UPD compared with deletions. Better overall cognition for children with deletions was significantly related to more child-related stress while their poorer adaptive functioning was associated with more child-related stress. For all three groups, the severity of children's inappropriate behaviour was positively related to different aspects of stress. How parents react to stress depends, in part, on children's AS molecular subtype. Despite falling under the larger umbrella term of AS, it is important to acknowledge the unique aspects associated with children's molecular subtype. Identifying these factors can

  15. Some aspects of molecular diagnostics in Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurzawski Grzegorz

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript is composed of five parts which summarize five publications in succession. Essentially, they are concerned with molecular diagnostics of Lynch syndrome and are based on studies in 238 families. The finding that young age at diagnosis is the key feature in patients with MSH2 and MLH1 mutations (Part 1 has helped to define simple criteria for the preliminary diagnosis of this syndrome. A cheaper method for the detection of mutations has been developed (Part 2 and applied to study the types of mutations and their prevalence in Poland (Part 3 and the Baltic States (Part 4. A specific feature of these mutations, i.e. presence of recurrent mutations in the majority of affected families with mutations, has suggested the feasibility of effective diagnostics with a single test disclosing all of them. An attempt to reveal other causes of familial aggregation of colorectal cancer has ruled out any association with C insertion in the NOD2 gene (Part 5.

  16. Permanent Genetic Resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 December 2012 - 31 January 2013

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mendel, Jan; Urbánková, Soňa; Vyskočilová, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2013), s. 546-549 ISSN 1755-098X Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : genetic database * microsatellite marker loci Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.626, year: 2013

  17. Circadian rhythms and metabolic syndrome: from experimental genetics to human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maury, Eleonore; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Bass, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of the metabolic syndrome represents a spectrum of disorders that continue to increase across the industrialized world. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to metabolic syndrome and recent evidence has emerged to suggest that alterations in circadian systems and sleep participate in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we highlight studies at the intersection of clinical medicine and experimental genetics that pinpoint how perturbations of the internal ...

  18. Genetic Analysis for Two Italian Siblings with Usher Syndrome and Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Domanico; Serena Fragiotta; Paolo Trabucco; Marcella Nebbioso; Enzo Maria Vingolo

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive genetic disorders characterized by deafness, retinitis pigmentosa, and sometimes vestibular areflexia. The relationship between Usher syndrome and mental disorders, most commonly a “schizophrenia-like” psychosis, is sometimes described in the literature. The etiology of psychiatric expression of Usher syndrome is still unclear. We reported a case of two natural siblings with congenital hypoacusis, retinitis pigmentosa, and psychiatric symptoms....

  19. The genetic basis of DOORS syndrome: an exome-sequencing study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campeau, Philippe M.; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Lu, James T.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Kim, Choel; Hori, Mutsuki; Powell, Berkley R.; Stewart, Fiona; Félix, Têmis Maria; van den Ende, Jenneke; Wisniewska, Marzena; Kayserili, Hülya; Rump, Patrick; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Aftimos, Salim; Mey, Antje; Nair, Lal D. V.; Begleiter, Michael L.; de Bie, Isabelle; Meenakshi, Girish; Murray, Mitzi L.; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Golabi, Mahin; Blair, Edward; Male, Alison; Giuliano, Fabienne; Kariminejad, Ariana; Newman, William G.; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S.; Dickerson, Jonathan E.; Kerr, Bronwyn; Banka, Siddharth; Giltay, Jacques C.; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Tostevin, Anna; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Cheung, Sau Wai; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lee, Brendan H.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2014-01-01

    Deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures (DOORS) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of unknown cause. We aimed to identify the genetic basis of this syndrome by sequencing most coding exons in affected individuals. Through a search of available case

  20. The genetic basis of DOORS syndrome : an exome-sequencing study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campeau, Philippe M.; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Lu, James T.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Kim, Choel; Hori, Mutsuki; Powell, Berkley R.; Stewart, Fiona; Felix, Temis Maria; van den Ende, Jenneke; Wisniewska, Marzena; Kayserili, Huelya; Rump, Patrick; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Aftimos, Salim; Mey, Antje; Nair, Lal D. V.; Begleiter, Michael L.; De Bie, Isabelle; Meenakshi, Girish; Murray, Mitzi L.; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Golabi, Mahin; Blair, Edward; Male, Alison; Giuliano, Fabienne; Kariminejad, Ariana; Newman, William G.; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S.; Dickerson, Jonathan E.; Kerr, Bronwyn; Banka, Siddharth; Giltay, Jacques C.; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Tostevin, Anna; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Cheung, Sau Wai; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lee, Brendan H.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    Background Deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures (DOORS) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of unknown cause. We aimed to identify the genetic basis of this syndrome by sequencing most coding exons in affected individuals. Methods Through a search

  1. Genetic testing in Li-Fraumeni Syndrome: uptake and psychosocial consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, C.R.M.; Aaronson, N.K.; Wagner, A.; Sijmons, R.H.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Vriends, A.H.J.T.; Ruijs, M.W.G.; van Os, T.A.M.; Spruijt, L.; Gómez García, E.B.; Kluijt, I.; Nagtegaal, T.; Verhoef, S.; Bleiker, E.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a hereditary cancer syndrome, characterized by a high risk of developing cancer at various sites and ages. To date, limited clinical benefits of genetic testing for LFS have been demonstrated, and there are concerns about the potential adverse psychosocial

  2. An economic evaluation of second-trimester genetic ultrasonography for prenatal detection of down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vintzileos, A M; Ananth, C V; Fisher, A J; Smulian, J C; Day-Salvatore, D; Beazoglou, T; Knuppel, R A

    1998-11-01

    The objective of this study was to perform an economic evaluation of second-trimester genetic ultrasonography for prenatal detection of Down syndrome. More specifically, we sought to determine the following: (1) the diagnostic accuracy requirements (from the cost-benefit point of view) of genetic ultrasonography versus genetic amniocentesis for women at increased risk for fetal Down syndrome and (2) the possible economic impact of second-trimester genetic ultrasonography for the US population on the basis of the ultrasonographic accuracies reported in previously published studies. A cost-benefit equation was developed from the hypothesis that the cost of universal genetic amniocentesis of patients at increased risk for carrying a fetus with Down syndrome should be at least equal to the cost of universal genetic ultrasonography with amniocentesis used only for those with abnormal ultrasonographic results. The main components of the equation included the diagnostic accuracy of genetic ultrasonography (sensitivity and specificity for detecting Down syndrome), the costs of the amniocentesis package and genetic ultrasonography, and the lifetime cost of Down syndrome cases not detected by the genetic ultrasonography. After appropriate manipulation of the equation a graph was constructed, representing the balance between sensitivity and false-positive rate of genetic ultrasonography; this was used to examine the accuracy of previously published studies from the cost-benefit point of view. Sensitivity analyses included individual risks for Down syndrome ranging from 1:261 (risk of a 35-year-old at 18 weeks' gestation) to 1:44 (risk of a 44-year-old at 18 weeks' gestation). This economic evaluation was conducted from the societal perspective. Genetic ultrasonography was found to be economically beneficial only if the overall sensitivity for detecting Down syndrome was >74%. Even then, the cost-benefit ratio depended on the corresponding false-positive rate. Of the 7

  3. Genetics Home Reference: 17q12 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with 17q12 deletion syndrome have delayed development (particularly speech and language delays), intellectual disability, or behavioral or psychiatric disorders. Behavioral and psychiatric conditions that have been reported in people with 17q12 deletion syndrome include autism ...

  4. Clinical and genetic investigation of families with type II Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhou, Jianda; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type II in three families, in order to provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Relevant clinical examinations were conducted on the probands of the three pedigrees. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of paired box 3 (PAX3), microphthalmia‑associated transcription factor (MITF), sex‑determining region Y‑box 10 (SOX10) and snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. The heterozygous mutation, c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 1; however, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (MITF, SNAI2, SOX10 or PAX3) was detected in pedigrees 2 and 3. The heterozygous mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene is therefore considered the disease‑causing mutation in pedigree 1. However, there are novel disease‑causing genes in Waardenburg syndrome type II, which require further research.

  5. [Syndromic hereditary deafness. Usher's syndrome. Oto-neurologic and genetic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinós, C; Pérez-Garrigues, H; Beneyto, M; Vilela, C; Rodrigo, O; Nájera, C

    1999-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder characterized by congenital bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and progressive loss of vision due to retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The prevalence of Usher syndrome is estimated to be 3-4.4 cases per 100.000 people. Several clinical types have been distinguished by age at onset, rate of progression, and severity of symptoms. Type I (USH1) is characterized by a congenital, severe-to-profound deafness and absent vestibular function. Type II (USH2) shows a congenital and moderate-to-severe hearing loss and normal vestibular response. It is also suggested a third type (USH3), clinically similar to USH2, but with progressive hearing loss. Genetic heterogeneity of USH is quite extensive. Up to now, seven different loci responsible for the defect are known: 14q, 11q, 11p, 10q and 21q for USH1; 1q for USH2 and 3q for USH3. Moreover, there are USH1 and USH2 families that fail to show linkage to these candidate regions demonstrating that should exist other loci causing USH, although their ubications are unknown. To date, only two genes involved in the USH pathology are known, although together they are responsibles of about the 80% of total USH cases: myosin VIIA, an unconventional myosin, involved in the USH1b phenotype and a protein similar to the laminina, responsible for the USH2a phenotype.

  6. Genetic basis of prune belly syndrome: screening for HNF1β gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, Candace F; Harrison, Steven M; Dajusta, Daniel; Zhang, Shaohua; Hajarnis, Sachin; Igarashi, Peter; Baker, Linda A

    2012-01-01

    Although the cause of prune belly syndrome is unknown, familial evidence suggests a genetic component. Recently 2 nonfamilial cases of prune belly syndrome with chromosome 17q12 deletions encompassing the HNF1β gene have made this a candidate gene for prune belly syndrome. To date, there has been no large-scale screening of patients with prune belly syndrome for HNF1β mutations. We assessed the role of HNF1β in prune belly syndrome by screening for genomic mutations with functional characterization of any detected mutations. We studied patients with prune belly syndrome who were prospectively enrolled in our Pediatric Genitourinary DNA Repository since 2001. DNA from patient samples was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced for coding and splice regions of the HNF1β gene, and compared to control databases. We performed functional assay testing of the ability of mutant HNF1β to activate a luciferase construct with an HNF1β DNA binding site. From 32 prune belly syndrome probands (30 males, 2 females) HNF1β sequencing detected a missense mutation (V61G) in 1 child with prune belly syndrome. Absent in control databases, V61G was previously reported in 2 patients without prune belly syndrome who had congenital genitourinary anomalies. Functional testing showed similar luciferase activity compared to wild-type HNF1β, suggesting the V61G substitution does not disturb HNF1β function. One genomic HNF1β mutation was detected in 3% of patients with prune belly syndrome but found to be functionally normal. Thus, functionally significant HNF1β mutations are uncommon in prune belly syndrome, despite case reports of HNF1β deletions. Further genetic study is necessary, as identification of the genetic basis of prune belly syndrome may ultimately lead to prevention and improved treatments for this rare but severe syndrome. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Molecular Genetic Basis Explaining Altered Bacterial Behavior in Space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Zea

    Full Text Available Bacteria behave differently in space, as indicated by reports of reduced lag phase, higher final cell counts, enhanced biofilm formation, increased virulence, and reduced susceptibility to antibiotics. These phenomena are theorized, at least in part, to result from reduced mass transport in the local extracellular environment, where movement of molecules consumed and excreted by the cell is limited to diffusion in the absence of gravity-dependent convection. However, to date neither empirical nor computational approaches have been able to provide sufficient evidence to confirm this explanation. Molecular genetic analysis findings, conducted as part of a recent spaceflight investigation, support the proposed model. This investigation indicated an overexpression of genes associated with starvation, the search for alternative energy sources, increased metabolism, enhanced acetate production, and other systematic responses to acidity-all of which can be associated with reduced extracellular mass transport.

  8. A Molecular Genetic Basis Explaining Altered Bacterial Behavior in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Nripesh; Levy, Shawn E.; Stodieck, Louis; Jones, Angela; Shrestha, Shristi; Klaus, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria behave differently in space, as indicated by reports of reduced lag phase, higher final cell counts, enhanced biofilm formation, increased virulence, and reduced susceptibility to antibiotics. These phenomena are theorized, at least in part, to result from reduced mass transport in the local extracellular environment, where movement of molecules consumed and excreted by the cell is limited to diffusion in the absence of gravity-dependent convection. However, to date neither empirical nor computational approaches have been able to provide sufficient evidence to confirm this explanation. Molecular genetic analysis findings, conducted as part of a recent spaceflight investigation, support the proposed model. This investigation indicated an overexpression of genes associated with starvation, the search for alternative energy sources, increased metabolism, enhanced acetate production, and other systematic responses to acidity—all of which can be associated with reduced extracellular mass transport. PMID:27806055

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is a disorder ...

  10. Comprehensive molecular diagnosis of a large cohort of Japanese retinitis pigmentosa and Usher syndrome patients by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Maho; Oishi, Akio; Gotoh, Norimoto; Ogino, Ken; Higasa, Koichiro; Iida, Kei; Makiyama, Yukiko; Morooka, Satoshi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2014-10-16

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a major cause of blindness in developed countries, has multiple causative genes; its prevalence differs by ethnicity. Usher syndrome is the most common form of syndromic RP and is accompanied by hearing impairment. Although molecular diagnosis is challenging, recent technological advances such as targeted high-throughput resequencing are efficient screening tools. We performed comprehensive molecular testing in 329 Japanese RP and Usher syndrome patients by using a custom capture panel that covered the coding exons and exon/intron boundaries of all 193 known inherited eye disease genes combined with Illumina HiSequation 2500. Candidate variants were screened using systematic data analyses, and their potential pathogenicity was assessed according to the frequency of the variants in normal populations, in silico prediction tools, and compatibility with known phenotypes or inheritance patterns. Molecular diagnoses were made in 115/317 RP patients (36.3%) and 6/12 Usher syndrome patients (50%). We identified 104 distinct mutations, including 66 novel mutations. EYS, USH2A, and RHO were common causative genes. In particular, mutations in EYS accounted for 15.0% of the autosomal recessive/simplex RP patients or 10.7% of the entire RP cohort. Among the 189 previously reported mutations detected in the current study, 55 (29.1%) were found commonly in Japanese or other public databases and were excluded from molecular diagnoses. By screening a large cohort of patients, this study catalogued the genetic variations involved in RP and Usher syndrome in a Japanese population and highlighted the different distribution of causative genes among populations. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  11. MODY in Siberia – molecular genetics and clinical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Konstantinovna Ovsyannikova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY has high clinical significance in young patients (no absolute need for exogenous insulin; normoglycaemia in most patients achieved by dieting or taking oral hypoglycaemic agents and their relatives (high probability of first-degree relatives being carriers of mutations, which requires a thorough collection of family history and determination of the parameters of carbohydrate metabolism. Aim. This study aimed was to determine the clinical characteristics of different subtypes of MODY in a Siberian region. Materials and Methods. We performed an examination, biochemical and hormonal blood tests, ultrasound and molecular genetic testing of 20 patients with a clinical diagnosis of MODY. Results. Four subtypes of MODY were verified: MODY2 in 11 patients, MODY3 in two, MODY8 in one and MODY12 in two. Eleven patients (69% exhibited no clinical manifestations of carbohydrate metabolism disorders, and one patient showed weight loss during early stage of the disease. Comorbidities included dyslipidemia, thyroid gland disorders and arterial hypertension. One patient (6% exhibited diabetic nephropathy; two (13%, diabetic retinopathy and three (19%, peripheral neuropathy of lower legs. All patients achieved the target carbohydrate metabolism; the level of C-peptide was within the reference range. Conclusion. Four different subtypes of MODY (2, 3, 8, 12 were diagnosed in the present study, which differed in their clinical characteristics, presence of complications and treatment strategies. Our knowledge of monogenic forms of diabetes is expanding with the development in molecular genetics, but several aspects related to them require further study.

  12. Molecular genetics of early-onset Alzheimer's disease revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Rita; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2016-06-01

    As the discovery of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) genes, APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2, in families with autosomal dominant early-onset AD (EOAD), gene discovery in familial EOAD came more or less to a standstill. Only 5% of EOAD patients are carrying a pathogenic mutation in one of the AD genes or a apolipoprotein E (APOE) risk allele ε4, most of EOAD patients remain unexplained. Here, we aimed at summarizing the current knowledge of EOAD genetics and its role in ongoing approaches to understand the biology of AD and disease symptomatology as well as developing new therapeutics. Next, we explored the possible molecular mechanisms that might underlie the missing genetic etiology of EOAD and discussed how the use of massive parallel sequencing technologies triggered novel gene discoveries. To conclude, we commented on the relevance of reinvestigating EOAD patients as a means to explore potential new avenues for translational research and therapeutic discoveries. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cushing’s syndrome in childhood: update on genetics, treatment, and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an update on the genes associated with Cushing’s syndrome in children, as well as to familiarize the clinician with recent treatment guidelines and outcome data for children with Cushing’s syndrome. Recent findings The list of genes associated with Cushing’s syndrome continues to grow. In addition, treatment for childhood Cushing’s syndrome is evolving. As long-term follow-up data on children becomes available, clinicians need to be aware of the issues that require attention. Summary Knowledge of the specific genetic causes of Cushing’s syndrome has potential implications for treatment, surveillance, and counseling. Advances in surgical technique, radiation modalities, and medical therapies offer the potential for additional treatment options in Cushing’s syndrome. Early identification and management of post-treatment morbidities in children treated for Cushing’s syndrome is crucial in order to optimize care. PMID:25517021

  14. A targeted next-generation sequencing assay for the molecular diagnosis of genetic disorders with orodental involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Megana K; Geoffroy, Véronique; Vicaire, Serge; Jost, Bernard; Dumas, Michael; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Switala, Marzena; Gasse, Barbara; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Paschaki, Marie; Leheup, Bruno; Droz, Dominique; Dalstein, Amelie; Loing, Adeline; Grollemund, Bruno; Muller-Bolla, Michèle; Lopez-Cazaux, Séréna; Minoux, Maryline; Jung, Sophie; Obry, Frédéric; Vogt, Vincent; Davideau, Jean-Luc; Davit-Beal, Tiphaine; Kaiser, Anne-Sophie; Moog, Ute; Richard, Béatrice; Morrier, Jean-Jacques; Duprez, Jean-Pierre; Odent, Sylvie; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Rousset, Monique Marie; Merametdijan, Laure; Toutain, Annick; Joseph, Clara; Giuliano, Fabienne; Dahlet, Jean-Christophe; Courval, Aymeric; El Alloussi, Mustapha; Laouina, Samir; Soskin, Sylvie; Guffon, Nathalie; Dieux, Anne; Doray, Bérénice; Feierabend, Stephanie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Fournier, Benjamin; de la Dure Molla, Muriel; Alembik, Yves; Tardieu, Corinne; Clauss, François; Berdal, Ariane; Stoetzel, Corinne; Manière, Marie Cécile; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Background Orodental diseases include several clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders that can present in isolation or as part of a genetic syndrome. Due to the vast number of genes implicated in these disorders, establishing a molecular diagnosis can be challenging. We aimed to develop a targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay to diagnose mutations and potentially identify novel genes mutated in this group of disorders. Methods We designed an NGS gene panel that targets 585 known and candidate genes in orodental disease. We screened a cohort of 101 unrelated patients without a molecular diagnosis referred to the Reference Centre for Oro-Dental Manifestations of Rare Diseases, Strasbourg, France, for a variety of orodental disorders including isolated and syndromic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), isolated and syndromic selective tooth agenesis (STHAG), isolated and syndromic dentinogenesis imperfecta, isolated dentin dysplasia, otodental dysplasia and primary failure of tooth eruption. Results We discovered 21 novel pathogenic variants and identified the causative mutation in 39 unrelated patients in known genes (overall diagnostic rate: 39%). Among the largest subcohorts of patients with isolated AI (50 unrelated patients) and isolated STHAG (21 unrelated patients), we had a definitive diagnosis in 14 (27%) and 15 cases (71%), respectively. Surprisingly, COL17A1 mutations accounted for the majority of autosomal-dominant AI cases. Conclusions We have developed a novel targeted NGS assay for the efficient molecular diagnosis of a wide variety of orodental diseases. Furthermore, our panel will contribute to better understanding the contribution of these genes to orodental disease. Trial registration numbers NCT01746121 and NCT02397824. PMID:26502894

  15. Introductory guide to the statistics of molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Thalia C; Rijsdijk, Frühling

    2005-10-01

    This introductory guide presents the main two analytical approaches used by molecular geneticists: linkage and association. Traditional linkage and association methods are described, along with more recent advances in methodologies such as those using a variance components approach. New methods are being developed all the time but the core principles of linkage and association remain the same. The basis of linkage is the transmission of a marker along with a disease within families, whereas association is based on the comparison of marker frequencies in case and control groups. It is becoming increasingly clear that effect sizes of individual markers on diseases and traits are likely to be very small. As such, much greater power is needed, and correspondingly greater sample sizes. Although non-replication is still a problem, molecular genetic studies in some areas such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are starting to show greater convergence. Epidemiologists and other researchers with large well-characterized samples will be well placed to use these methods. Inter-disciplinary studies can then ask far more interesting questions such as those relating to developmental, multivariate and gene-environment interaction hypotheses.

  16. Biochemical and molecular genetic studies on some cyanobacterial isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, E.A.R.; Ebrahim, S.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, the isolation and purification of a set of Cyanobacteria strains belonging to genus Oscillatoria was undertaken, followed by the analyses of phylogenetic relationships using different biochemical and molecular genetic techniques (SOS-PAGE and RAPO-PCR). A total of 45 protein bands were observed within the studied Osci/latoria isolates by SOS-PAGE (only three unique bands, eight monomorphic bands and 37 polymorphic bands). On the other hand, extracted ONA from isolates was used to identify the molecular fingerprints. A sum of 94 polymorphic bands was generated by these primers in the Ocsi/laloria genotypes under study. A total of 20 unique bands were identified out of the polymorphic ones. These unique bands were used to discriminate among the studied Ocsi/latoria isolates. Most isolates of Ocsi/latoria genotypes were discriminated by one or more unique bands. Numerical taxonomic using 45 protein attributes of 19 isolates and RAPO markers on five isolates. Two methods -Clustering (UPGMA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were used for these analyses. The similarities and clusters produced between the studied isolates were discussed.

  17. Biochemical and molecular genetic studies on some cyanobacterial isolates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, E A.R. [Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Biology; Ebrahim, S A.A. [Ain Sham University, Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Cytogenetic

    2011-11-15

    In the present study, the isolation and purification of a set of Cyanobacteria strains belonging to genus Oscillatoria was undertaken, followed by the analyses of phylogenetic relationships using different biochemical and molecular genetic techniques (SOS-PAGE and RAPO-PCR). A total of 45 protein bands were observed within the studied Osci/latoria isolates by SOS-PAGE (only three unique bands, eight monomorphic bands and 37 polymorphic bands). On the other hand, extracted ONA from isolates was used to identify the molecular fingerprints. A sum of 94 polymorphic bands was generated by these primers in the Ocsi/laloria genotypes under study. A total of 20 unique bands were identified out of the polymorphic ones. These unique bands were used to discriminate among the studied Ocsi/latoria isolates. Most isolates of Ocsi/latoria genotypes were discriminated by one or more unique bands. Numerical taxonomic using 45 protein attributes of 19 isolates and RAPO markers on five isolates. Two methods -Clustering (UPGMA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were used for these analyses. The similarities and clusters produced between the studied isolates were discussed.

  18. Pathogenesis of Gastric Cancer: Genetics and Molecular Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Ceu; Camargo, M C; Leite, Marina; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Rabkin, Charles S; Machado, José C

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most incident and the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major risk factor for this disease. Gastric cancer is the final outcome of a cascade of events that takes decades to occur and results from the accumulation of multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. These changes are crucial for tumor cells to expedite and sustain the array of pathways involved in the cancer development, such as cell cycle, DNA repair, metabolism, cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interactions, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and immune surveillance. Comprehensive molecular analyses of gastric cancer have disclosed the complex heterogeneity of this disease. In particular, these analyses have confirmed that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive gastric cancer is a distinct entity. The identification of gastric cancer subtypes characterized by recognizable molecular profiles may pave the way for a more personalized clinical management and to the identification of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers for screening, prognosis, prediction of response to treatment, and monitoring of gastric cancer progression.

  19. Genetic HLA Associations in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome With and Without Dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, D.E.; Roelen, D.L.; Verduijn, W.; Haasnoot, G.W.; Huygen, F.J.P.M.; Perez, R.S.G.M.; Claas, F.H.J.; Marinus, J.; van Hilten, J.J.; van den Maagdenberg, A.M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed evidence for a genetic association of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) with dystonia. Involvement of the HLA system suggests that CRPS has a genetic component with perturbed regulation of inflammation and neuroplasticity as

  20. Clinical and genetic features of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Catarina; Forestier, Erik; Klarskov Andersen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although previous studies have shown that DS-ALL differs clinically and genetically from non-DS-ALL, much remains to be elucidated as regards genetic and prognostic factors in DS-ALL. METHODS...

  1. Colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes: Genetic determinism, clinical presentation and recommendations for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buecher, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal adenomatous polyposis constitutes a diverse group of disorders with different modes of inheritance. Molecular diagnosis of this condition has become more complex. In fact, somatic mosaicism for APC mutations now appears to be more frequent than previously thought and rare germline alterations of this gene may be implicated in patients tested negative for "classical" APC mutations (point mutations and large genomic rearrangements). Moreover, the knowledge concerning several aspects of the MUTYH-associated polyposis has improved since its first description in 2002 and germline mutations in new genes have recently been implicated in some cases of unexplained adenomatous polyposis. Genetic testing in probands and their relatives should be conducted in the context of pre- and post-test genetic counseling. The recent advent of New Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques affords the opportunity to rapidly screen patients for a comprehensive panel of colorectal cancer susceptibility genes in a cost-effective fashion. This type of approach will probably replace the classical sequential approach based on clinical presumptive diagnoses in the near future. The risk of colorectal cancer is very high in affected patients in the absence of appropriate care. Clinical management is complex and should be provided in centers with special expertise in these diseases. This review focuses on the various colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes with special attention to more innovative and important aspects. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Improving Molecular Genetic Test Utilization through Order Restriction, Test Review, and Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jacquelyn D; Procop, Gary W; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Wyllie, Robert; Lacbawan, Felicitas L

    2015-05-01

    The ordering of molecular genetic tests by health providers not well trained in genetics may have a variety of untoward effects. These include the selection of inappropriate tests, the ordering of panels when the assessment of individual or fewer genes would be more appropriate, inaccurate result interpretation and inappropriate patient guidance, and significant unwarranted cost expenditure. We sought to improve the utilization of molecular genetic tests by requiring providers without specialty training in genetics to use genetic counselors and molecular genetic pathologists to assist in test selection. We used a genetic and genomic test review process wherein the laboratory-based genetic counselor performed the preanalytic assessment of test orders and test triage. Test indication and clinical findings were evaluated against the test panel composition, methods, and test limitations under the supervision of the molecular genetic pathologist. These test utilization management efforts resulted in a decrease in genetic test ordering and a gross cost savings of $1,531,913 since the inception of these programs in September 2011 through December 2013. The combination of limiting the availability of complex genetic tests and providing guidance regarding appropriate test strategies is an effective way to improve genetic tests, contributing to judicious use of limited health care resources. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of 57 individuals with the Parder-Willi syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.G.; Forrest, K.B.; Miller, L.K. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by hypotonia, early childhood obesity, mental deficiency, hypogonadism and an interstitial deletion of 15q11q13 of paternal origin in 50-70% of patients. The remaining patients have either submicroscopic deletions, maternal disomy or other anomalies of chromosome 15. We have undertaken cytogenetic and molecular genetic studies of 57 individuals presenting with features consistent with PWS (28 males and 29 females; age range of 3 months to 38 years), 25 with recognizable 15q11q13 deletions (44%), 28 with normal appearing chromosomes (49%), and four patients with other chromosome 15 anomalies (7%). High resolution chromosome analysis and PCR amplification were performed utilizing 17 STRs from 15q11q13 region, quantitative Southern hybridization using seven 15q11q13 probes, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using four 15q11q13 probes (4-3R, SNRPN, 3-21, and GABRB3). The cytogenetic deletion was paternal in all PWS families studied but the deletion varied in size in 10 patients. Parental DNA studies from 20 of 28 non-deletion patients showed maternal disomy in 7 patients and biparental inheritance in 13 non-deletion patients. In order to evaluate for submicroscopic deletions, PCR amplification with several loci in the area of the PWS minimal critical region, FISH using SNRPN and quantitative hybridization using a PCR product generated from primers of exons E and H of the SNRPN gene were undertaken on the non-deletion patients. Quantitative hybridization and FISH using SNRPN from 3 of 11 non-deletion patients (excluding maternal disomy cases) showed a submicroscopic deletion. One of these patients also showed a paternal deletion of D15S128 and MN1. We furthur support the use of both cytogenetic and molecular genetic methods for determining the genetic status of PWS patients.

  4. Systems Genetics Reveals the Functional Context of PCOS Loci and Identifies Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Cui, Jinrui; Mengesha, Emebet; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Azziz, Ricardo; Goodarzi, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed 11 independent risk loci for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common disorder in young women characterized by androgen excess and oligomenorrhea. To put these risk loci and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) therein into functional context, we measured DNA methylation and gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies to identify PCOS-specific alterations. Two genes from the LHCGR region, STON1-GTF2A1L and LHCGR, were overexpressed in PCOS. In analysis stratified by obesity, LHCGR was overexpressed only in non-obese PCOS women. Although not differentially expressed in the entire PCOS group, INSR was underexpressed in obese PCOS subjects only. Alterations in gene expression in the LHCGR, RAB5B and INSR regions suggest that SNPs in these loci may be functional and could affect gene expression directly or indirectly via epigenetic alterations. We identified reduced methylation in the LHCGR locus and increased methylation in the INSR locus, changes that are concordant with the altered gene expression profiles. Complex patterns of meQTL and eQTL were identified in these loci, suggesting that local genetic variation plays an important role in gene regulation. We propose that non-obese PCOS women possess significant alterations in LH receptor expression, which drives excess androgen secretion from the ovary. Alternatively, obese women with PCOS possess alterations in insulin receptor expression, with underexpression in metabolic tissues and overexpression in the ovary, resulting in peripheral insulin resistance and excess ovarian androgen production. These studies provide a genetic and molecular basis for the reported clinical heterogeneity of PCOS. PMID:26305227

  5. Systems Genetics Reveals the Functional Context of PCOS Loci and Identifies Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R Jones

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies (GWAS have revealed 11 independent risk loci for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, a common disorder in young women characterized by androgen excess and oligomenorrhea. To put these risk loci and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs therein into functional context, we measured DNA methylation and gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies to identify PCOS-specific alterations. Two genes from the LHCGR region, STON1-GTF2A1L and LHCGR, were overexpressed in PCOS. In analysis stratified by obesity, LHCGR was overexpressed only in non-obese PCOS women. Although not differentially expressed in the entire PCOS group, INSR was underexpressed in obese PCOS subjects only. Alterations in gene expression in the LHCGR, RAB5B and INSR regions suggest that SNPs in these loci may be functional and could affect gene expression directly or indirectly via epigenetic alterations. We identified reduced methylation in the LHCGR locus and increased methylation in the INSR locus, changes that are concordant with the altered gene expression profiles. Complex patterns of meQTL and eQTL were identified in these loci, suggesting that local genetic variation plays an important role in gene regulation. We propose that non-obese PCOS women possess significant alterations in LH receptor expression, which drives excess androgen secretion from the ovary. Alternatively, obese women with PCOS possess alterations in insulin receptor expression, with underexpression in metabolic tissues and overexpression in the ovary, resulting in peripheral insulin resistance and excess ovarian androgen production. These studies provide a genetic and molecular basis for the reported clinical heterogeneity of PCOS.

  6. Systems Genetics Reveals the Functional Context of PCOS Loci and Identifies Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michelle R; Brower, Meredith A; Xu, Ning; Cui, Jinrui; Mengesha, Emebet; Chen, Yii-Der I; Taylor, Kent D; Azziz, Ricardo; Goodarzi, Mark O

    2015-08-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed 11 independent risk loci for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common disorder in young women characterized by androgen excess and oligomenorrhea. To put these risk loci and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) therein into functional context, we measured DNA methylation and gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies to identify PCOS-specific alterations. Two genes from the LHCGR region, STON1-GTF2A1L and LHCGR, were overexpressed in PCOS. In analysis stratified by obesity, LHCGR was overexpressed only in non-obese PCOS women. Although not differentially expressed in the entire PCOS group, INSR was underexpressed in obese PCOS subjects only. Alterations in gene expression in the LHCGR, RAB5B and INSR regions suggest that SNPs in these loci may be functional and could affect gene expression directly or indirectly via epigenetic alterations. We identified reduced methylation in the LHCGR locus and increased methylation in the INSR locus, changes that are concordant with the altered gene expression profiles. Complex patterns of meQTL and eQTL were identified in these loci, suggesting that local genetic variation plays an important role in gene regulation. We propose that non-obese PCOS women possess significant alterations in LH receptor expression, which drives excess androgen secretion from the ovary. Alternatively, obese women with PCOS possess alterations in insulin receptor expression, with underexpression in metabolic tissues and overexpression in the ovary, resulting in peripheral insulin resistance and excess ovarian androgen production. These studies provide a genetic and molecular basis for the reported clinical heterogeneity of PCOS.

  7. Genetic Predisposition Increases the Tic Severity, Rate of Comorbidities, and Psychosocial and Educational Difficulties in Children With Tourette Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eysturoy, Absalon Niclas; Skov, Liselotte; Debes, Nanette Mol

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in tic severity, comorbidities, and psychosocial and educational consequences in children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome compared with children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition...... to Tourette syndrome. A total of 314 children diagnosed with Tourette syndrome participated in this study. Validated diagnostic tools were used to assess tic severity, comorbidities, and cognitive performance. A structured interview was used to evaluate psychosocial and educational consequences related...... to Tourette syndrome. The children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition present with statistically significant differences in terms of severity of tics, comorbidities, and a range of psychosocial and educational factors compared with the children with Tourette syndrome without genetic...

  8. Reward deficiency syndrome: genetic aspects of behavioral disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comings, D E; Blum, K

    2000-01-01

    The dopaminergic and opioidergic reward pathways of the brain are critical for survival since they provide the pleasure drives for eating, love and reproduction; these are called 'natural rewards' and involve the release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and frontal lobes. However, the same release of dopamine and production of sensations of pleasure can be produced by 'unnatural rewards' such as alcohol, cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, nicotine, marijuana, and other drugs, and by compulsive activities such as gambling, eating, and sex, and by risk taking behaviors. Since only a minority of individuals become addicted to these compounds or behaviors, it is reasonable to ask what factors distinguish those who do become addicted from those who do not. It has usually been assumed that these behaviors are entirely voluntary and that environmental factors play the major role; however, since all of these behaviors have a significant genetic component, the presence of one or more variant genes presumably act as risk factors for these behaviors. Since the primary neurotransmitter of the reward pathway is dopamine, genes for dopamine synthesis, degradation, receptors, and transporters are reasonable candidates. However, serotonin, norepinephrine, GABA, opioid, and cannabinoid neurons all modify dopamine metabolism and dopamine neurons. We have proposed that defects in various combinations of the genes for these neurotransmitters result in a Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) and that such individuals are at risk for abuse of the unnatural rewards. Because of its importance, the gene for the [figure: see text] dopamine D2 receptor was a major candidate gene. Studies in the past decade have shown that in various subject groups the Taq I A1 allele of the DRD2 gene is associated with alcoholism, drug abuse, smoking, obesity, compulsive gambling, and several personality traits. A range of other dopamine, opioid, cannabinoid, norepinephrine, and related genes have since been

  9. Genética molecular: avanços e problemas Molecular genetics: advances and problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloi S. Garcia

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo traz a discussão sobre genética molecular em saúde ao campo da saúde pública. Com a revolução produzida pela chegada da engenharia genética, é importante discutir alguns dos avanços e problemas desta tecnologia para a sociedade. Está na hora de se fazer uma avaliação clara e bem informada acerca do que já se conseguiu e do que ainda podemos conseguir através desta tecnologia. A sociedade precisa compreender as implicações éticas e práticas de uma tecnologia capaz de produzir drogas milagrosas, dagnósticos modernos e a cura de todas as doenças. Alguns pontos particularmente delicados pertinentes às questões sociais ligadas à biologia molecular e ao projeto genoma humano são discutidos.This article is an attempt to draw the discussion on molecular genetics in health into the public health domain. Now that the genetic engineering revolution has arrived, it is important to point out the advances and problems this technology poses for society. It is time for a clear, informed assessment of what we have already achieved and may soon achieve using this technology. Clearly, society needs to understand the ethical and practical implications of a technology which can produce miracle drugs and modern diagnoses and cure virtually every disease. Important points from sensitive social issues raised by molecular biology and the human genome project are discussed.

  10. Clinical and genetic characteristics in a group of 45 patients with Turner syndrome (monocentric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bucerzan S

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Simona Bucerzan,1 Diana Miclea,1,2 Radu Popp,2 Camelia Alkhzouz,1 Cecilia Lazea,1 Ioan Victor Pop,2 Paula Grigorescu-Sido1 1Emergency Hospital for Children, “Iuliu Hatieganu” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania; 2Department of Molecular Sciences, “Iuliu Hatieganu” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania Introduction: Recent years have seen a shift in perspective on Turner syndrome, as it is no longer considered a significant disability due to therapeutic advances. The delay of diagnosis and the underdiagnosis are common in Turner syndrome, especially because of the great phenotypic variability and lack of firm diagnostic criteria.Aim: Our first aim was to assess the clinical and the cytogenetic characteristics and growth rate in growth hormone (GH-treated patients as compared to those with spontaneous growth. The second aim was to analyze the Y chromosomal sequences.Materials and methods: We analyzed 45 patients diagnosed with Turner syndrome in Genetic Pathology Centre of Cluj Emergency Children’s Hospital. We carried out a study of the clinical features, the correlations between the karyotype and the phenotype, and we also made a research of Y chromosome sequences.Results: The average age at diagnosis was 8.9±5.4 years. A significant association was observed between the number of external phenotypical abnormalities and internal malformations (r=0.45, particularly the cardiovascular ones (r=0.44. Patients treated with GH showed improvement in growth rate, with final stature significantly better than in untreated patients; benefits following treatment were greater if diagnosis was made before the age of 5 years. Thirteen percent of patients experienced spontaneous and complete puberty, whereas 30% experienced incomplete puberty. Patients with the 45,X genotype had a greater stature deficit and a higher incidence of cardiac malformations, compared with patients with 45,X/46,XX mosaic karyotype. Y

  11. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T B; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Banner, Jytte

    2000-01-01

    in the child. This prompted us to investigate these genetic markers of thromboembolic disease in 121 cases of sudden infant death syndrome and in relevant controls, in the expectation of a more frequent occurrence of these markers if thrombosis is an etiological factor in sudden infant death syndrome......Sudden infant death syndrome or "cot death" has until the late eighties been a significant cause of death in children between the ages of 1 month and 1 year. Approximately two per 1000 children born alive dies of sudden infant death syndrome each year in Western Europe, North America, and Australia....... The vulnerability of the infant brain stem to ischemia has been suggested to be a conceivable cause of sudden infant death syndrome. This is compatible with a hypothesis that genetic risk factors for cerebral thrombosis could cause microinfarction in the brain stem during the first month of life, affecting vital...

  12. The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, finding the genes causing Tourette syndrome : objectives and methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, Andrea; Fernandez, Thomas V.; King, Robert A.; State, Matthew W.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Heiman, Gary A.

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet to be clarified

  13. Genetic Mapping in Papillon-Lefèvre Syndrome: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustubh Suresh Thakare

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Papillon-Lefevre syndrome (PLS is a rare autosomal recessive heterogeneous trait which is characterized by erythematous palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, early-onset periodontitis, and associated calcification of dura mater. The etiology of PLS is multifactorial with genetic, immunological, and microbial factors playing a role in etiopathogenesis. Recently identified genetic defect in PLS has been mapped to chromosome 11q14–q21, which involves mutations of cathepsin C. This paper presents a report of 2 cases of Papillon-lefevre syndrome in which diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and genetic mapping.

  14. The genetic basis of long QT and short QT syndromes: a mutation update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Jørgensen, Poul; Schlamowitz, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Long QT and short QT syndromes (LQTS and SQTS) are cardiac repolarization abnormalities that are characterized by length perturbations of the QT interval as measured on electrocardiogram (ECG). Prolonged QT interval and a propensity for ventricular tachycardia of the torsades de pointes (TdP) type......-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS), Andersen syndrome (AS), and Timothy syndrome (TS). The genetics are further complicated by the occurrence of double and triple heterozygotes in LQTS and a considerable number of nonpathogenic rare polymorphisms in the involved genes. SQTS is a very rare condition, caused by mutations...

  15. Molecular Etiology of Hereditary Single-Side Deafness: Its Association With Pigmentary Disorders and Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Ah Reum; Choi, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Young; Chun, Eun Hi; Oh, Seung-Ha; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-10-01

    Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL)/single-side deafness (SSD) is a frequently encountered disability in children. The etiology of a substantial portion of USNHL/SSD still remains unknown, and genetic causes have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the authors evaluated the heritability of USNHL/SSD.The authors sequentially recruited 50 unrelated children with SSD. For an etiologic diagnosis, we performed a rigorous review on the phenotypes of family members of all children and conducted, if necessary, molecular genetic tests including targeted exome sequencing of 129 deafness genes.Among the 50 SSD children cohort, the authors identify 4 (8%) unrelated SSD probands from 4 families (SH136, SB173, SB177, and SB199) with another hearing impaired family members. Notably, all 4 probands in our cohort with a familial history of SSD also have pigmentary abnormalities such as brown freckles or premature gray hair within first degree relatives, which may indicate that genes whose products are involved with pigmentary disorder could be candidates for heritable SSD. Indeed, SH136 and SB199 turned out to segregate a mutation in MITF and PAX3, respectively, leading to a molecular diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (WS).We report, for the first time in the literature, a significant heritability of pediatric SSD. There is a strong association between the heritability of USNHL/SSD and the pigmentary abnormality, shedding a new light on the understanding of the molecular basis of heritable USNHL/SSD. In case of children with congenital SSD, it would be mandatory to rigorously screen pigmentary abnormalities. WS should also be included in the differential diagnosis of children with USNHL/SSD, especially in a familial form.

  16. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes...

  17. Tracing the origin of 'blue Weimaraner' dogs by molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerding, W M; Schreiber, S; Dekomien, G; Epplen, J T

    2011-04-01

    Weimaraner dogs are defined by light brown coat colour termed grey including several shadings ranging from silver and deer to mouse grey. In contrast, the so-called blue Weimaraners (BW) with lightened black-pigmented coat have been proposed to represent spontaneous revertants in the Weimaraner breed. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of the characteristic grey coat colour versus those of BW, known variation in coat colour genes including TYRP1 and MLPH were analysed in a number of grey and blue dogs. Variations at the B locus cause grey coat colour in Weimaraners via two non-functional TYRP1 copies (bb) including the b(s), b(d) and b(c) alleles. In all BW, at least one functional TYRP1 allele (Bb or BB genotype) was identified. Defined microsatellite alleles in TYRP1 intron 4 are linked to this functional B allele in BW. These alleles were also detected in various other dog breeds, but not in grey Weimaraners. The combination of a dominant trait for blue versus grey together with a specific TYRP1 haplotype in BW suggests that blue coat colour is not the result of spontaneous (back-) mutation in grey Weimaraners. This inference is even emphasized by the presence of a unique Y-chomosomal haplotype in a male offspring of the supposed ancestor of the BW population which - according to pedigree information - carries a copy of the original Y chromosome. Thus, molecular genetic analyses of coat colours combined with Y-chromosomal haplotypes allow tracing the origin of atypical dogs in respective canine populations. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. The clinical and molecular spectrum of androgen insensitivity syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiort, O.; Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Holterhus, P.M.; Nitsche, E.M.; Kruse, K. [Medical Univ. of Luebeck (Germany)

    1996-05-03

    Androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS) are due to end-organ resistance to androgenic steroids in males leading to defective virilization of the external genitalia. The phenotype encompasses a wide array of genital ambiguity and may range from completely female to undervirilized but unequivocally male with infertility. This disorder is caused by mutations of the androgen receptor and is an X-linked recessive trait. We have studied 47 patients with AIS and have characterized the underlying molecular abnormality in the androgen receptor gene. Twenty patients had complete AIS and twenty-seven had partial AIS. Of the latter, 11 were of predominantly female phenotypic appearance and gender was assigned accordingly, while 16 were raised as males. Within the group of complete AIS, two patients had gross deletions within the gene, one had a small deletion, and one had an insertion. In the other patients with complete AIS, as well as all individuals with partial AIS, single nucleotide substitutions within the coding region were detected, each leading to an amino acid alteration. Seven codons were involved in more than one mutation in different cases. In addition, in one patient with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, an elongation of a glutamine-repeat was characterized. We conclude that mutations in the androgen receptor gene may be present throughout the whole coding region. However, our study provides evidence that several mutational hot spots exist. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Molecular biology from bench-to-bedside - which colorectal cancer patients should be referred for genetic counselling and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Dysager, Lars; Lindebjerg, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is associated with deficiency of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. However, most MLH1 deficient tumours are sporadic in origin, and they can be identified if harbouring a BRAF V600E mutation or hypermethylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. The aim of this study...... (PMS2 were negative in 29 cases (10%). DNA quality allowed BRAF analysis in 27 of these with 14 mutations and 13 wild-type. DNA quality allowed methylation analysis in 11 of the 13 BRAF wild-type, and all but one were methylated. Subsequently, Lynch syndrome could...... was to validate our previously suggested clinically applicable strategy based on molecular characteristics for identifying which patients to refer for genetic counselling. The strategy was validated in an unselected cohort of 287 colorectal cancer patients. All tumours were tested for MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6...

  20. Insight into podocyte differentiation from the study of human genetic disease: nail-patella syndrome and transcriptional regulation in podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Roy; Lee, Brendan

    2002-05-01

    In recent years, our understanding of the molecular basis of kidney development has benefited from the study of rare genetic diseases affecting renal function. This has especially been the case with the differentiation of the highly specialized podocyte in the pathogenesis of human disorders and mouse phenotypes affecting the renal filtration barrier. This filtration barrier represents the end product of a complex series of signaling events that produce a tripartite structure consisting of interdigitating podocyte foot processes with intervening slit diaphragms, the glomerular basement membrane, and the fenestrated endothelial cell. Dysregulation of unique cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix proteins in genetic forms of nephrotic syndrome has shown how specific structural proteins contribute to podocyte function and differentiation. However, much less is known about the transcriptional determinants that both specify and maintain this differentiated cell. Our studies of a skeletal malformation syndrome, nail-patella syndrome, have shown how the LIM homeodomain transcription factor, Lmx1b, contributes to transcriptional regulation of glomerular basement membrane collagen expression by podocytes. Moreover, they raise intriguing questions about more global transcriptional regulation of podocyte morphogenesis.