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Sample records for syndrome i304n mutation

  1. A mouse model of the human Fragile X syndrome I304N mutation.

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    Julie B Zang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The mental retardation, autistic features, and behavioral abnormalities characteristic of the Fragile X mental retardation syndrome result from the loss of function of the RNA-binding protein FMRP. The disease is usually caused by a triplet repeat expansion in the 5'UTR of the FMR1 gene. This leads to loss of function through transcriptional gene silencing, pointing to a key function for FMRP, but precluding genetic identification of critical activities within the protein. Moreover, antisense transcripts (FMR4, ASFMR1 in the same locus have been reported to be silenced by the repeat expansion. Missense mutations offer one means of confirming a central role for FMRP in the disease, but to date, only a single such patient has been described. This patient harbors an isoleucine to asparagine mutation (I304N in the second FMRP KH-type RNA-binding domain, however, this single case report was complicated because the patient harbored a superimposed familial liver disease. To address these issues, we have generated a new Fragile X Syndrome mouse model in which the endogenous Fmr1 gene harbors the I304N mutation. These mice phenocopy the symptoms of Fragile X Syndrome in the existing Fmr1-null mouse, as assessed by testicular size, behavioral phenotyping, and electrophysiological assays of synaptic plasticity. I304N FMRP retains some functions, but has specifically lost RNA binding and polyribosome association; moreover, levels of the mutant protein are markedly reduced in the brain specifically at a time when synapses are forming postnatally. These data suggest that loss of FMRP function, particularly in KH2-mediated RNA binding and in synaptic plasticity, play critical roles in pathogenesis of the Fragile X Syndrome and establish a new model for studying the disorder.

  2. Mutation testing in Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, P E; Dawson, M; Dixon, M J

    2002-12-01

    To report on a study where 97 subjects were screened for mutations in the Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) gene TCOF1. Ninety-seven subjects with a clinical diagnosis of TCS were screened for potential mutations in TCOF1, by means of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. In those subjects where potential mutations were detected, sequence analysis was performed to determine the site and type of mutation present. Thirty-six TCS-specific mutations are reported including 27 deletions, six point mutations, two splice junction mutations, and one insertion/deletion. This brings the total number of mutations reported to date to 105. The importance of detection of these mutations is mainly in postnatal diagnosis and genetic counselling. Knowledge of the family specific mutation may also be used in prenatal diagnosis to confirm whether the foetus is affected or not, and give the parents the choice of whether to continue with the pregnancy.

  3. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranecky, V.; Hoischen, A.; Hartmannova, H.; Zaki, M.S.; Chaudhary, A.; Zudaire, E.; Noskova, L.; Baresova, V.; Pristoupilova, A.; Hodanova, K.; Sovova, J.; Hulkova, H.; Piherova, L.; Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Silva, D. De; Senanayake, M.P.; Farrag, S.; Zeman, J.; Martasek, P.; Baxova, A.; Afifi, H.H.; Croix, B. St.; Brunner, H.G.; Temtamy, S.; Kmoch, S.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T

  4. The mutational spectrum in Waardenburg syndrome

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    Read, A.P.; Tassabehji, M.; Liu, X.Z. [and others

    1994-09-01

    101 individuals or families with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) or related abnormalities have been screened for mutations in the PAX3 gene. PAX3 mutations were seen in 19 of 35 individuals or families with features of Type I Waardenburg syndrome. None of the 47 Type 2 WS families showed any PAX3 mutation, nor did any of 19 individuals with other neural crest syndromes or pigmentary disturbances. PAX3 mutations included substitutions of highly conserved amino acids, splice site mutations, nonsense mutations and frameshifting deletions or insertions. One patient (with Type 1 WS, mental retardation and growth retardation) had a chromosomal deletion of 7-8 Mb encompassing the PAX3 gene. Mutations were seen in each of exons 2-6, with a concentration in the 5{prime} part of the paired box (exon 2) and the 3{prime} part of the homeobox (exon 6). There was no evident relation between the molecular change and the clinical manifestations in mutation carriers. We conclude that PAX3 dosage effects very specifically produce dystopia canthorum, the distinguishing feature of Type 1 WS, and variably produce the other features of Type 1 WS depending on genetic background or chance events. Two of the Type 2 families showed linkage to markers from 3p14, the location of the MITF gene. MITF encodes a basic helix-loop-helix-zipper protein which is the homologue of the mouse microphthalmia gene product. It is likely that mutations in MITF cause some but not all Type 2 WS.

  5. Germline KRAS mutations cause Noonan syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubbert, S.; Zenker, M.; Rowe, S.L.; Boll, S.; Klein, C.; Bollag, G.; Burgt, I. van der; Musante, L.; Kalscheuer, V.M.M.; Wehner, L.E.; Nguyen, H.; West, B.; Zhang, K.Y.; Sistermans, E.A.; Rauch, A.; Niemeyer, C.M.; Shannon, K.; Kratz, C.P.

    2006-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (MIM 163950) is characterized by short stature, facial dysmorphism and cardiac defects. Heterozygous mutations in PTPN11, which encodes SHP-2, cause approximately 50% of cases of Noonan syndrome. The SHP-2 phosphatase relays signals from activated receptor complexes to downstream

  6. Sequential acquisition of mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

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    Makishima, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in next-generation sequencing technologies allows us to discover frequent mutations throughout the coding regions of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), potentially providing us with virtually a complete spectrum of driver mutations in this disease. As shown by many study groups these days, such driver mutations are acquired in a gene-specific fashion. For instance, DDX41 mutations are observed in germline cells long before MDS presentation. In blood samples from healthy elderly individuals, somatic DNMT3A and TET2 mutations are detected as age-related clonal hematopoiesis and are believed to be a risk factor for hematological neoplasms. In MDS, mutations of genes such as NRAS and FLT3, designated as Type-1 genes, may be significantly associated with leukemic evolution. Another type (Type-2) of genes, including RUNX1 and GATA2, are related to progression from low-risk to high-risk MDS. Overall, various driver mutations are sequentially acquired in MDS, at a specific time, in either germline cells, normal hematopoietic cells, or clonal MDS cells.

  7. IRF6 mutation screening in non-syndromic orofacial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Koboldt, Daniel C; Kang, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    -syndromic OFCs. About 70% of causal VWS mutations occur in IRF6, a gene that is also associated with non-syndromic OFCs. Screening for IRF6 mutations in apparently non-syndromic cases has been performed in several modestly sized cohorts with mixed results. In this study, we screened 1521 trios with presumed non......-syndromic OFCs to determine the frequency of causal IRF6 mutations. We identified seven likely causal IRF6 mutations, although a posteriori review identified two misdiagnosed VWS families based on the presence of lip pits. We found no evidence for association between rare IRF6 polymorphisms and non......-syndromic OFCs. We combined our results with other similar studies (totaling 2472 families) and conclude that causal IRF6 mutations are found in 0.24–0.44% of apparently non-syndromic OFC families. We suggest that clinical mutation screening for IRF6 be considered for certain family patterns such as families...

  8. Wolfram Syndrome: New Mutations, Different Phenotype

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    Pasquali, Lorenzo; Lugani, Francesca; Perri, Katia; Russo, Chiara; Tallone, Ramona; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Lorini, Renata; d'Annunzio, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Background Wolfram Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness identified by the acronym “DIDMOAD”. The WS gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane protein called Wolframin, which recent evidence suggests may serve as a novel endoplasmic reticulum calcium channel in pancreatic β-cells and neurons. WS is a rare disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1/550.000 children, with a carrier frequency of 1/354. The aim of our study was to determine the genotype of WS patients in order to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation. Methodology/Principal Findings We clinically evaluated 9 young patients from 9 unrelated families (6 males, 3 females). Basic criteria for WS clinical diagnosis were coexistence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy occurring before 15 years of age. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Molecular sequencing revealed 5 heterozygous compound and 3 homozygous mutations. All of them were located in exon 8, except one in exon 4. In one proband only an heterozygous mutation (A684V) was found. Two new variants c.2663 C>A and c.1381 A>C were detected. Conclusions/Significance Our study increases the spectrum of WFS1 mutations with two novel variants. The male patient carrying the compound mutation [c.1060_1062delTTC]+[c.2663 C>A] showed the most severe phenotype: diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy (visual acuity 5/10), deafness with deep auditory bilaterally 8000 Hz, diabetes insipidus associated to reduced volume of posterior pituitary and pons. He died in bed at the age of 13 years. The other patient carrying the compound mutation [c.409_424dup16]+[c.1381 A>C] showed a less severe phenotype (DM, OA). PMID:22238590

  9. Wolfram syndrome: new mutations, different phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Aloi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wolfram Syndrome (WS is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness identified by the acronym "DIDMOAD". The WS gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane protein called Wolframin, which recent evidence suggests may serve as a novel endoplasmic reticulum calcium channel in pancreatic β-cells and neurons. WS is a rare disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1/550.000 children, with a carrier frequency of 1/354. The aim of our study was to determine the genotype of WS patients in order to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We clinically evaluated 9 young patients from 9 unrelated families (6 males, 3 females. Basic criteria for WS clinical diagnosis were coexistence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy occurring before 15 years of age. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Molecular sequencing revealed 5 heterozygous compound and 3 homozygous mutations. All of them were located in exon 8, except one in exon 4. In one proband only an heterozygous mutation (A684V was found. Two new variants c.2663 C>A and c.1381 A>C were detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study increases the spectrum of WFS1 mutations with two novel variants. The male patient carrying the compound mutation [c.1060_1062delTTC]+[c.2663 C>A] showed the most severe phenotype: diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy (visual acuity 5/10, deafness with deep auditory bilaterally 8000 Hz, diabetes insipidus associated to reduced volume of posterior pituitary and pons. He died in bed at the age of 13 years. The other patient carrying the compound mutation [c.409_424dup16]+[c.1381 A>C] showed a less severe phenotype (DM, OA.

  10. Fibrillin mutations in the Marfan syndrome

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    Price, C.E.; Wang, M.; Wang, J.; Godfrey, M. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant heritable disorder of connective tissue manifested by variable and pleiotropic defect in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems. We have recently begun to use intron-specific primers that have become available through the International Marfan Syndrome Consortium to screen for fibrillin mutations in MFS patients. Using the genomic PCR-based approach in addition to RT-PCR methodologies, we have identified several novel mutations. A single base insertion was identified in all affected individuals of one family. The insertion of an {open_quote}A{close_quote} at position 1891 in exon 15 causes a premature stop codon and thus a truncated polypeptide. The truncated protein of 617 amino acids has an expected molecular weight of 63 kD. Metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation studies are in progress. A C{r_arrow}T transition at position 1634 in exon 12 causing a 5th position Cys to Phe substitution in an EGF-like motif was observed in another MFS patient. Finally, we have identified a G{r_arrow}A transition at the +1 position of the donor splice site that causes the deletion of fibrillin exon 32 in a patient with the neonatal form of MFS. Exon 32 is a precursor EGF-like calcium binding motif that is located in a single stretch of 12 similar domains. We had previously identified the skipping of this exon due to an A{r_arrow}T transversion at the -2 position of the consensus acceptor splice site in another patient with neonatal MFS. The reason that the skipping of exon 32 causes a neonatal lethal MFS phenotype is presently unclear. These studies will help elucidate the role of diverse regions of fibrillin.

  11. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients : genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, Katrin; Lee, Lin; Leistritz, Dru F.; Nuernberg, Gudrun; Saha, Bidisha; Hisama, Fuki M.; Eyman, Daniel K.; Lessel, Davor; Nuernberg, Peter; Li, Chumei; Garcia-F-Villalta, Maria J.; Kets, Carolien M.; Schmidtke, Joerg; Cruz, Vitor Tedim; Van den Akker, Peter C.; Boak, Joseph; Peter, Dincy; Compoginis, Goli; Cefle, Kivanc; Ozturk, Sukru; Lopez, Norberto; Wessel, Theda; Poot, Martin; Ippel, P. F.; Groff-Kellermann, Birgit; Hoehn, Holger; Martin, George M.; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among

  12. A restricted spectrum of NRAS mutations causes Noonan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cirstea, Ion C.; Kutsche, Kerstin; Dvorsky, Radovan; Gremer, Lothar; Carta, Claudio; Horn, Denise; Roberts, Amy E.; Lepri, Francesca; Merbitz-Zahradnik, Torsten; Koenig, Rainer; Kratz, Christian P.; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Dentici, Maria L.; Joshi, Victoria A.; Kucherlapati, Raju S.; Mazzanti, Laura; Mundlos, Stefan; Patton, Michael A.; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Rossi, Cesare; Zampino, Giuseppe; Digilio, Cristina; Stuppia, Liborio; Seemanova, Eva; Pennacchio, Len A.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.; Tartaglia, Marco; Zenker, Martin

    Noonan syndrome, a developmental disorder characterized by congenital heart defects, reduced growth, facial dysmorphism and variable cognitive deficits, is caused by constitutional dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Here we report that germline NRAS mutations conferring enhanced

  13. Confirmation that RIPK4 mutations cause not only Bartsocas-Papas syndrome but also CHAND syndrome.

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    Busa, Tiffany; Jeraiby, Mohammed; Clémenson, Alix; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Granados, Viviana; Philip, Nicole; Touraine, Renaud

    2017-11-01

    CHAND syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by curly hair, ankyloblepharon, and nail dysplasia. Only few patients were reported to date. A homozygous RIPK4 mutation was recently identified by homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing in three patients from an expanded consanguineous kindred with a clinical diagnosis of CHAND syndrome. RIPK4 was previously known to be implicated in Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, the autosomal recessive form of popliteal pterygium syndrome. We report here two cases of RIPK4 homozygous mutations in a fetus with severe Bartsocas-Papas syndrome and a patient with CHAND syndrome. The patient with CHAND syndrome harbored the same mutation as the one identified in the family previously reported. We thus confirm the implication of RIPK4 gene in CHAND syndrome in addition to Bartsocas-Papas syndrome and discuss genotype/phenotype correlations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Spliceosome mutations exhibit specific associations with epigenetic modifiers and proto-oncogenes mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Syed A; Smith, Alexander E; Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Kizilors, Aytug; Mohamedali, Azim M; Lea, Nicholas C; Mitsopoulos, Konstantinos; Ford, Kevin; Nasser, Erick; Seidl, Thomas; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2013-07-01

    The recent identification of acquired mutations in key components of the spliceosome machinery strongly implicates abnormalities of mRNA splicing in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes. However, questions remain as to how these aberrations functionally combine with the growing list of mutations in genes involved in epigenetic modification and cell signaling/transcription regulation identified in these diseases. In this study, amplicon sequencing was used to perform a mutation screen in 154 myelodysplastic syndrome patients using a 22-gene panel, including commonly mutated spliceosome components (SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, ZRSR2), and a further 18 genes known to be mutated in myeloid cancers. Sequencing of the 22-gene panel revealed that 76% (n=117) of the patients had mutations in at least one of the genes, with 38% (n=59) having splicing gene mutations and 49% (n=75) patients harboring more than one gene mutation. Interestingly, single and specific epigenetic modifier mutations tended to coexist with SF3B1 and SRSF2 mutations (P<0.03). Furthermore, mutations in SF3B1 and SRSF2 were mutually exclusive to TP53 mutations both at diagnosis and at the time of disease transformation. Moreover, mutations in FLT3, NRAS, RUNX1, CCBL and C-KIT were more likely to co-occur with splicing factor mutations generally (P<0.02), and SRSF2 mutants in particular (P<0.003) and were significantly associated with disease transformation (P<0.02). SF3B1 and TP53 mutations had varying impacts on overall survival with hazard ratios of 0.2 (P<0.03, 95% CI, 0.1-0.8) and 2.1 (P<0.04, 95% CI, 1.1-4.4), respectively. Moreover, patients with splicing factor mutations alone had a better overall survival than those with epigenetic modifier mutations, or cell signaling/transcription regulator mutations with and without coexisting mutations of splicing factor genes, with worsening prognosis (P<0.001). These findings suggest that splicing factor mutations are maintained throughout disease

  15. Dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 cause Cantu syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakalova, M.; Harssel, J.J. van; Terhal, P.A.; Lieshout, S. van; Duran, K.; Renkens, I.; Amor, D.J.; Wilson, L.C.; Kirk, E.P.; Turner, C.L.; Shears, D.; Garcia-Minaur, S.; Lees, M.M.; Ross, A.; Venselaar, H.; Vriend, G.; Takanari, H.; Rook, M.B.; Heyden, M.A. van der; Asselbergs, F.W.; Breur, H.M.; Swinkels, M.E.; Scurr, I.J.; Smithson, S.F.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Smagt, J.J. van der; Nijman, IJ; Kloosterman, W.P.; Haelst, M.M. van; Haaften, G. van; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, distinctive facial features, osteochondrodysplasia and cardiac defects. By using family-based exome sequencing, we identified a de novo mutation in ABCC9. Subsequently, we discovered novel dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 in 14 of the

  16. Dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 cause Cantu syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakalova, M.; van Harssel, J.J.; Terhal, P.A.; van Lieshout, S.; Duran, K.; Renkens, I.; Amor, D.J.; Wilson, L.C.; Kirk, E.P.; Turner, C.L.; Shears, D.; Garcia-Minaur, S.; Lees, M.M.; Ross, A.; Venselaar, H.; Vriend, G.; Takanari, H.; Rook, M.B.; van der Heyden, M.A.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Breur, H.M.; Swinkels, M.E.; Scurr, I.J.; Smithson, S.F.; Knoers, N.V.; van der Smagt, J.J.; Nijman, I.J.; Kloosterman, W.P.; van Haelst, M.M.; van Haaften, G.; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, distinctive facial features, osteochondrodysplasia and cardiac defects. By using family-based exome sequencing, we identified a de novo mutation in ABCC9. Subsequently, we discovered novel dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 in 14 of the

  17. Mutations in RNF216 do not cause 4H syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, N.I.; Bernard, G.

    2015-01-01

    We comment on the recent publication by Ganos et al. [1] classifying a patient with non-specific white matter abnormalities, cerebellar atrophy, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and absent lower median incisors as 4H syndrome. He had mutations in RNF216. Mutations in this gene cause Gordon-Holmes

  18. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Tatton-Brown (Katrina); A. Murray (Anna); S. Hanks (Sandra); J. Douglas (Jenny); R. Armstrong (Ruth); S. Banka (Siddharth); L.M. Bird (Lynne); C.L. Clericuzio (Carol); V. Cormier-Daire (Valerie); T. Cushing (Tom); F. Flinter (Frances); S. Jacquemont (Sébastien); S. Joss (Shelagh); E. Kinning (Esther); S.A. Lynch; A. Magee (Alex); V. Mcconnell (Vivienne); A. Medeira (Ana); K. Ozono (Keiichi); M. Patton (Michael); J. Rankin (Julia); D.J. Shears (Deborah); M.E.H. Simon (Marleen); M. Splitt (M.); V. Strenger (Volker); K.E. Stuurman (Kyra); C. Taylor (Clare); H. Titheradge (Hannah); L. van Maldergem (Lionel); I.K. Temple; T.J. Cole (Trevor); S. Seal (Sheila); N. Rahman (Nazneen)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWeaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with

  19. The mutational spectrum of Lynch syndrome in cyprus.

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    Maria A Loizidou

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer and is caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Mutation carriers have an increased lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer as well as other extracolonic tumours. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the frequency and distribution of mutations in the MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes within a cohort of Cypriot families that fulfilled the revised Bethesda guidelines. The study cohort included 77 patients who fulfilled at least one of the revised Bethesda guidelines. Mutational analysis revealed the presence of 4 pathogenic mutations, 3 in the MLH1 gene and 1 in the MSH2 gene, in 5 unrelated individuals. It is noted that out of the 4 pathogenic mutations detected, one is novel (c.1610delG in exon 14 of the MLH1 and has been detected for the first time in the Cypriot population. Overall, the pathogenic mutation detection rate in our patient cohort was 7%. This percentage is relatively low but could be explained by the fact that the sole criterion for genetic screening was compliance to the revised Bethesda guidelines. Larger numbers of Lynch syndrome families and screening of the two additional predisposition genes, PMS2 and EPCAM, are needed in order to decipher the full spectrum of mutations associated with Lynch syndrome predisposition in Cyprus.

  20. CHD7 mutations in patients initially diagnosed with Kallmann syndrome - the clinical overlap with CHARGE syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongmans, M. C. J.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M. A.; Pitteloud, N.; Ogata, T.; Sato, N.; Claahsen-van der Grinten, H. L.; van der Donk, K.; Seminara, S.; Bergman, J. E. H.; Brunner, H. G.; Crowley, W. F.; Hoefsloot, L. H.

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) is the combination of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia or hyposmia, two features that are also frequently present in CHARGE syndrome. CHARGE syndrome is caused by mutations in the CHD7 gene. We performed analysis of CHD7 in 36 patients with KS and 20 patients with

  1. A nonsense mutation in FMR1 causing fragile X syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Dedic, Alma

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is a common cause of inherited intellectual disability. It is caused by lack of the FMR1 gene product FMRP. The most frequent cause is the expansion of a CGG repeat located in the 5'UTR of FMR1. Alleles with 200 or more repeats become hypermethylated and transcriptionally silent....... Only few patients with intragenic point mutations in FMR1 have been reported and, currently, routine analysis of patients referred for fragile X syndrome includes solely analysis for repeat expansion and methylation status. We identified a substitution in exon 2 of FMR1, c.80C>A, causing a nonsense...... mutation p.Ser27X, in a patient with classical clinical symptoms of fragile X syndrome. The mother who carried the mutation in heterozygous form presented with mild intellectual impairment. We conclude that further studies including western blot and DNA sequence analysis of the FMR1 gene should...

  2. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome: Mutations Uncovered in Lebanese Families

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    Maria Valencia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ellis-van Creveld (EvC syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, short limbs, growth retardation, polydactyly, and ectodermal defects with cardiac anomalies occurring in around 60% of cases. EVC syndrome has been linked to mutations in EVC and EVC2 genes. Case Presentation. We report EvC syndrome in two unrelated Lebanese families both having homozygous mutations in the EVC2 gene, c.2653C>T (p.(Arg885* and c.2012_2015del (p.(Leu671* in exons 15 and 13, respectively, with the latter being reported for the first time. Conclusion. Although EvC has been largely described in the medical literature, clinical features of this syndrome vary. While more research is required to explore other genes involved in EvC, early diagnosis and therapeutic care are important to achieve a better quality of life.

  3. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome: Mutations Uncovered in Lebanese Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Maria; Tabet, Lara; Yazbeck, Nadine; Araj, Alia; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Charaffedine, Khalil; Fares, Farah; Badra, Rebecca; Farra, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, short limbs, growth retardation, polydactyly, and ectodermal defects with cardiac anomalies occurring in around 60% of cases. EVC syndrome has been linked to mutations in EVC and EVC2 genes. Case Presentation. We report EvC syndrome in two unrelated Lebanese families both having homozygous mutations in the EVC2 gene, c.2653C>T (p.(Arg885(*))) and c.2012_2015del (p.(Leu671(*))) in exons 15 and 13, respectively, with the latter being reported for the first time. Conclusion. Although EvC has been largely described in the medical literature, clinical features of this syndrome vary. While more research is required to explore other genes involved in EvC, early diagnosis and therapeutic care are important to achieve a better quality of life.

  4. WDR45 mutations in three male patients with West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Mitsuko; Takano, Kyoko; Tsuyusaki, Yu; Yoshitomi, Shinsaku; Shimono, Masayuki; Aoki, Yoshihiro; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Aida, Noriko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Miyatake, Satoko; Miyake, Noriko; Osaka, Hitoshi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    West syndrome is an early-onset epileptic encephalopathy characterized by clustered spasms with hypsarrhythmia seen on electroencephalogram (EEG). West syndrome is genetically heterogeneous, and its genetic causes have not been fully elucidated. WD Repeat Domain 45 (WDR45) resides on Xp11.23, and encodes a member of the WD repeat protein interacting with phosphoinositides (WIPI) family, which is crucial in the macroautophagy pathway. De novo mutations in WDR45 cause beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. In this study, we performed whole exome sequencing of individuals with West syndrome and identified three WDR45 mutations in three independent males (patients 1, 2 and 3). Two novel mutations occurred de novo (patients 1 and 2) and the remaining mutation detected in a male patient (patient 3) and his affected sister was inherited from the mother, harboring the somatic mutation. The three male patients showed early-onset intractable seizures, profound intellectual disability and developmental delay. Their brain magnetic resonance imaging scans showed cerebral atrophy. We found no evidence of somatic mosaicism in the three male patients. Our findings indicate that hemizygous WDR45 mutations in males lead to severe epileptic encephalopathy.

  5. WFS1/wolframin mutations, Wolfram syndrome, and associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanim, F; Kirk, J; Latif, F; Barrett, T G

    2001-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is the inherited association of juvenile-onset insulin-dependant diabetes mellitus and progressive bilateral optic atrophy. A nuclear gene, WFS1/wolframin, was identified that segregated with disease status and demonstrated an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Mutation analysis of the WFS1 gene in WS patients has identified mutations in 90% of patients. Most were compound heterozygotes with private mutations distributed throughout the gene with no obvious hotspots. The private nature of the mutations in WS patients and the low frequencies make it difficult to determine the biological or clinical relevance of these mutations. Mutation screening in patients with psychiatric disorders or diabetes mellitus has also been performed to test the hypothesis that heterozygous carriers of WFS1 gene mutations are at an increased risk following the observation that WS first-degree relatives have a higher frequency of these disorders. Most studies showed no association, however two missense mutations were identified that demonstrated significant association with psychiatric disorders and diabetes mellitus. Population association studies and functional studies of these variants will need to be performed to confirm these preliminary results. The elucidation of functions and functional pathways for the WFS1 gene product and variants will shed light on the effect of such disparate mutations on gene function and their role in the resulting clinical phenotype in WS and associated disorders. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Angelman Syndrome Due to UBE3A Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Jyotindra Narayan; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Singhi, Pratibha

    2017-12-18

    A 12-y-old boy presented with developmental delay, autism, epilepsy, limb tremors and behavioral problems which posed a diagnostic challenge. Though his clinical profile and electroencephalogram were suggestive of Angelman syndrome, initial genetic tests were unyielding. Exome sequencing revealed a previously unreported mutation of Ubiquitin Protein Ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene, confirming the diagnosis of Angelman syndrome. The case is aimed to sensitize pediatricians about Angelman syndrome and to highlight the role of sequential investigations in establishing the diagnosis.

  7. Cantu syndrome is caused by mutations in ABCC9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bon, B.W.; Gilissen, C.F.H.A.; Grange, D.K.; Hennekam, R.C.; Kayserili, H.; Engels, H.; Reutter, H.; Ostergaard, J.R.; Morava, E.; Tsiakas, K.; Isidor, B.; Le Merrer, M.; Eser, M.; Wieskamp, N.; de Vries, P.; Steehouwer, M.; Veltman, J.A.; Robertson, S.P.; Brunner, H.G.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Hoischen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, neonatal macrosomia, a distinct osteochondrodysplasia, and cardiomegaly. Using an exome-sequencing approach applied to one proband-parent trio and three unrelated single cases, we identified heterozygous mutations in ABCC9

  8. Cantu Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in ABCC9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bon, Bregje W. M.; Gilissen, Christian; Grange, Dorothy K.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Kayserili, Hülya; Engels, Hartmut; Reutter, Heiko; Ostergaard, John R.; Morava, Eva; Tsiakas, Konstantinos; Isidor, Bertrand; Le Merrer, Martine; Eser, Metin; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Vries, Petra; Steehouwer, Marloes; Veltman, Joris A.; Robertson, Stephen P.; Brunner, Han G.; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Hoischen, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, neonatal macrosomia, a distinct osteochondrodysplasia, and cardiomegaly. Using an exome-sequencing approach applied to one proband-parent trio and three unrelated single cases, we identified heterozygous mutations in ABCC9

  9. Dominant de novo DSP mutations cause erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Lynn M; Kam, Chen Y; Hernández-Martín, Angela; Zhou, Jing; Craiglow, Brittany G; Sidbury, Robert; Mathes, Erin F; Maguiness, Sheilagh M; Crumrine, Debra A; Williams, Mary L; Hu, Ronghua; Lifton, Richard P; Elias, Peter M; Green, Kathleen J; Choate, Keith A

    2016-01-15

    Disorders of keratinization (DOK) show marked genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. In most cases, disease is primarily cutaneous, and further clinical evaluation is therefore rarely pursued. We have identified subjects with a novel DOK featuring erythrokeratodermia and initially-asymptomatic, progressive, potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, a finding not previously associated with erythrokeratodermia. We show that de novo missense mutations clustered tightly within a single spectrin repeat of DSP cause this novel cardio-cutaneous disorder, which we term erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy (EKC) syndrome. We demonstrate that DSP mutations in our EKC syndrome subjects affect localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43 in the skin, and result in desmosome aggregation, widening of intercellular spaces, and lipid secretory defects. DSP encodes desmoplakin, a primary component of desmosomes, intercellular adhesion junctions most abundant in the epidermis and heart. Though mutations in DSP are known to cause other disorders, our cohort features the unique clinical finding of severe whole-body erythrokeratodermia, with distinct effects on localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43. These findings add a severe, previously undescribed syndrome featuring erythrokeratodermia and cardiomyopathy to the spectrum of disease caused by mutation in DSP, and identify a specific region of the protein critical to the pathobiology of EKC syndrome and to DSP function in the heart and skin. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Clinical and biological implications of driver mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Gerstung, Moritz; Malcovati, Luca; Tauro, Sudhir; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Yoon, Chris J; Ellis, Peter; Wedge, David C; Pellagatti, Andrea; Shlien, Adam; Groves, Michael John; Forbes, Simon A; Raine, Keiran; Hinton, Jon; Mudie, Laura J; McLaren, Stuart; Hardy, Claire; Latimer, Calli; Della Porta, Matteo G; O'Meara, Sarah; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Galli, Anna; Butler, Adam P; Walldin, Gunilla; Teague, Jon W; Quek, Lynn; Sternberg, Alex; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Cross, Nicholas C P; Green, Anthony R; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Vyas, Paresh; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Bowen, David; Cazzola, Mario; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J

    2013-11-21

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of chronic hematological malignancies characterized by dysplasia, ineffective hematopoiesis and a variable risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Sequencing of MDS genomes has identified mutations in genes implicated in RNA splicing, DNA modification, chromatin regulation, and cell signaling. We sequenced 111 genes across 738 patients with MDS or closely related neoplasms (including chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and MDS-myeloproliferative neoplasms) to explore the role of acquired mutations in MDS biology and clinical phenotype. Seventy-eight percent of patients had 1 or more oncogenic mutations. We identify complex patterns of pairwise association between genes, indicative of epistatic interactions involving components of the spliceosome machinery and epigenetic modifiers. Coupled with inferences on subclonal mutations, these data suggest a hypothesis of genetic "predestination," in which early driver mutations, typically affecting genes involved in RNA splicing, dictate future trajectories of disease evolution with distinct clinical phenotypes. Driver mutations had equivalent prognostic significance, whether clonal or subclonal, and leukemia-free survival deteriorated steadily as numbers of driver mutations increased. Thus, analysis of oncogenic mutations in large, well-characterized cohorts of patients illustrates the interconnections between the cancer genome and disease biology, with considerable potential for clinical application.

  11. Nephropathic Cystinosis Mimicking Bartter Syndrome: a Novel Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Funda; Nalcacioglu, Hulya; Ozaltin, Fatih; Korkmaz, Emine; Yel, Sibel

    2018-01-01

    Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from defective lysosomal transport of cystine due to mutations in the cystinosin lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS) gene. The clinical phenotype of nephropathic cystinosis is characterized by renal tubular Fanconi syndrome and development of end-stage renal disease during the first decade. Although metabolic acidosis is the classically prominent finding of the disease, a few cases may present with hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis mimicking Bartter syndrome. Bartter-like presentation may lead to delay in diagnosis and initiation of specific treatment for cystinosis. We report a case of a 6-year-old girl initially presenting with the features of Bartter syndrome that was diagnosed 2 years later with nephropathic cystinosis and a novel CTNS mutation.

  12. CtIP Mutations Cause Seckel and Jawad Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Qvist

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seckel syndrome is a recessively inherited dwarfism disorder characterized by microcephaly and a unique head profile. Genetically, it constitutes a heterogeneous condition, with several loci mapped (SCKL1-5 but only three disease genes identified: the ATR, CENPJ, and CEP152 genes that control cellular responses to DNA damage. We previously mapped a Seckel syndrome locus to chromosome 18p11.31-q11.2 (SCKL2. Here, we report two mutations in the CtIP (RBBP8 gene within this locus that result in expression of C-terminally truncated forms of CtIP. We propose that these mutations are the molecular cause of the disease observed in the previously described SCKL2 family and in an additional unrelated family diagnosed with a similar form of congenital microcephaly termed Jawad syndrome. While an exonic frameshift mutation was found in the Jawad family, the SCKL2 family carries a splicing mutation that yields a dominant-negative form of CtIP. Further characterization of cell lines derived from the SCKL2 family revealed defective DNA damage induced formation of single-stranded DNA, a critical co-factor for ATR activation. Accordingly, SCKL2 cells present a lowered apoptopic threshold and hypersensitivity to DNA damage. Notably, over-expression of a comparable truncated CtIP variant in non-Seckel cells recapitulates SCKL2 cellular phenotypes in a dose-dependent manner. This work thus identifies CtIP as a disease gene for Seckel and Jawad syndromes and defines a new type of genetic disease mechanism in which a dominant negative mutation yields a recessively inherited disorder.

  13. A patient with Werner syndrome and adiponectin gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Naotake; Hatanaka, Sachiko; Yokote, Koutaro; Kurosawa, Hiroko; Yoshida, Tomohiko; Iwai, Rie; Takahashi, Hidenori; Yoshida, Katsuya; Horie, Atsuya; Sakurai, Kenichi; Yagui, Kazuo; Saito, Yasushi; Yoshida, Shouji

    2007-01-01

    Werner syndrome is a premature aging disease characterized by genomic instability and increased cancer risk. Here, we report a 45-year-old diabetic man as the first Werner syndrome patient found to have an adiponectin gene mutation. Showing graying and loss of hair, skin atrophy, and juvenile cataract, he was diagnosed with Werner syndrome type 4 by molecular analysis. His serum adiponectin concentration was low. In the globular domain of the adiponectin gene, I164T in exon 3 was detected. When we examined effects of pioglitazone (15 mg/day) on serum adiponectin multimer and monomer concentrations using selective assays, the patient's relative percentage increased in adiponectin concentration was almost same as that in the 18 diabetic patients without an adiponectin mutation, but the absolute adiponectin concentration was half of those seen in diabetic patients treated with the same pioglitazone dose who had no adiponectin mutation. The response suggested that pioglitazone treatment might help to prevent future Werner syndrome-related acceleration of atherosclerosis. Present and further clinical relevant to atherosclerosis in this patient should be imformative concerning the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis in the presence of hypoadiponectinemia and insulin resistance.

  14. [Mutation analysis of seven patients with Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ziqi; Zhou, Yongan; Li, Pengli; Zhang, Quanbin; Li, Jiao; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Xiangshao; Feng, Yong

    2016-06-01

    To perform genetic analysis for 7 patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Potential mutation of MITF, PAX3, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes was screened by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Functions of non-synonymous polymorphisms were predicted with PolyPhen2 software. Seven mutations, including c.649-651delAGA (p.R217del), c.72delG (p.G24fs), c.185T>C (p.M62T), c.118C>T (p.Q40X), c.422T>C (p.L141P), c.640C>T (p.R214X) and c.28G>T(p.G43V), were detected in the patients. Among these, four mutations of the PAX3 gene (c.72delG, c.185T>C, c.118C>T and c.128G>T) and one SOX10 gene mutation (c.422T>C) were not reported previously. Three non-synonymous SNPs (c.185T>C, c.128G>T and c.422T>C) were predicted as harmful. Genetic mutations have been detected in all patients with Waardenburg syndrome.

  15. Collagen XVIII Mutation in Knobloch Syndrome with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Vinit B.; Olney, Ann Haskins; Garrett, Penny; Chary, Ajit; Dragan, Ecaterina; Lerner, Gary; Murray, Jeffrey; Bassuk, Alexander G.

    2010-01-01

    Knobloch syndrome (KNO) is caused by mutations in the collagen XIII gene (COL18A1) and patients develop encephalocele and vitreoretinal degeneration. Here we report an El Salvadorian family where two sisters showed features of KNO. One of the siblings also developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. DNA sequencing of COL18A1revealed a homozygous, 2-base pair deletion (c3514-3515delCT) in exon 41, which leads to abnormal collagen XVIII and deficiency of its proteolytic cleavage product endostatin. KNO patients with mutations in COL18A1 may be at risk for endostatin-related conditions including malignancy. PMID:20799329

  16. Mutation screening of Chinese Treacher Collins syndrome patients identified novel TCOF1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Guo, Luo; Li, Chen-Long; Shan, Jing; Xu, Hai-Song; Li, Jie-Ying; Sun, Shan; Hao, Shao-Juan; Jin, Lei; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Tian-Yu

    2018-04-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) (OMIM 154500) is a rare congenital craniofacial disorder with an autosomal dominant manner of inheritance in most cases. To date, three pathogenic genes (TCOF1, POLR1D and POLR1C) have been identified. In this study, we conducted mutational analysis on Chinese TCS patients to reveal a mutational spectrum of known causative genes and show phenotype-genotype data to provide more information for gene counselling and future studies on the pathogenesis of TCS. Twenty-two TCS patients were recruited from two tertiary referral centres, and Sanger sequencing for the coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of TCOF1, POLR1D and POLR1C was performed. For patients without small variants, further copy number variations (CNVs) analysis was conducted using high-density SNP array platforms. The Sanger sequencing overall mutation detection rate was as high as 86.3% (19/22) for our cohort. Fifteen TCOF1 pathogenic variants, including ten novel mutations, were identified in nineteen patients. No causative mutations in POLR1D and POLR1C genes and no CNVs mutations were detected. A suspected autosomal dominant inheritance case that implies germinal mosaicism was described. Our study confirmed that TCOF1 was the main disease-causing gene for the Chinese TCS population and revealed its mutation spectrum. We also addressed the need for more studies of mosaicism in TCS cases, which could explain the mechanism of autosomal dominant inheritance in TCS cases and benefit the prevention of TCS.

  17. Mismatch repair gene mutation spectrum in the Swedish Lynch syndrome population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina; Rohlin, Anna; Aravidis, Christos; Melin, Beatrice; Nordling, Margareta; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Lindblom, Annika; Nilbert, Mef

    2016-11-01

    Lynch syndrome caused by constitutional mismatch‑repair defects is one of the most common hereditary cancer syndromes with a high risk for colorectal, endometrial, ovarian and urothelial cancer. Lynch syndrome is caused by mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes i.e., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. After 20 years of genetic counseling and genetic testing for Lynch syndrome, we have compiled the mutation spectrum in Sweden with the aim to provide a population-based perspective on the contribution from the different MMR genes, the various types of mutations and the influence from founder mutations. Mutation data were collected on a national basis from all laboratories involved in genetic testing. Mutation analyses were performed using mainly Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A total of 201 unique disease-predisposing MMR gene mutations were identified in 369 Lynch syndrome families. These mutations affected MLH1 in 40%, MSH2 in 36%, MSH6 in 18% and PMS2 in 6% of the families. A large variety of mutations were identified with splice site mutations being the most common mutation type in MLH1 and frameshift mutations predominating in MSH2 and MSH6. Large deletions of one or several exons accounted for 21% of the mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 and 22% in PMS2, but were rare (4%) in MSH6. In 66% of the Lynch syndrome families the variants identified were private and the effect from founder mutations was limited and predominantly related to a Finnish founder mutation that accounted for 15% of the families with mutations in MLH1. In conclusion, the Swedish Lynch syndrome mutation spectrum is diverse with private MMR gene mutations in two-thirds of the families, has a significant contribution from internationally recognized mutations and a limited effect from founder mutations.

  18. Polyhydramnios, Transient Antenatal Bartter's Syndrome, and MAGED2 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghmani, Kamel; Beck, Bodo B; Yang, Sung-Sen; Seaayfan, Elie; Wenzel, Andrea; Reusch, Björn; Vitzthum, Helga; Priem, Dario; Demaretz, Sylvie; Bergmann, Klasien; Duin, Leonie K; Göbel, Heike; Mache, Christoph; Thiele, Holger; Bartram, Malte P; Dombret, Carlos; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Benzing, Thomas; Levtchenko, Elena; Seyberth, Hannsjörg W; Klaus, Günter; Yigit, Gökhan; Lin, Shih-Hua; Timmer, Albert; de Koning, Tom J; Scherjon, Sicco A; Schlingmann, Karl P; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; Rinschen, Markus M; de Backer, Olivier; Konrad, Martin; Kömhoff, Martin

    2016-05-12

    Three pregnancies with male offspring in one family were complicated by severe polyhydramnios and prematurity. One fetus died; the other two had transient massive salt-wasting and polyuria reminiscent of antenatal Bartter's syndrome. To uncover the molecular cause of this possibly X-linked disease, we performed whole-exome sequencing of DNA from two members of the index family and targeted gene analysis of other members of this family and of six additional families with affected male fetuses. We also evaluated a series of women with idiopathic polyhydramnios who were pregnant with male fetuses. We performed immunohistochemical analysis, knockdown and overexpression experiments, and protein-protein interaction studies. We identified a mutation in MAGED2 in each of the 13 infants in our analysis who had transient antenatal Bartter's syndrome. MAGED2 encodes melanoma-associated antigen D2 (MAGE-D2) and maps to the X chromosome. We also identified two different MAGED2 mutations in two families with idiopathic polyhydramnios. Four patients died perinatally, and 11 survived. The initial presentation was more severe than in known types of antenatal Bartter's syndrome, as reflected by an earlier onset of polyhydramnios and labor. All symptoms disappeared spontaneously during follow-up in the infants who survived. We showed that MAGE-D2 affects the expression and function of the sodium chloride cotransporters NKCC2 and NCC (key components of salt reabsorption in the distal renal tubule), possibly through adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP signaling and a cytoplasmic heat-shock protein. We found that MAGED2 mutations caused X-linked polyhydramnios with prematurity and a severe but transient form of antenatal Bartter's syndrome. MAGE-D2 is essential for fetal renal salt reabsorption, amniotic fluid homeostasis, and the maintenance of pregnancy. (Funded by the University of Groningen and others.).

  19. Dental agenesis in Kallmann syndrome individuals with FGFR1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Gros, Catherine; Zenaty, Delphine; Bennaceur, Sélim; Leger, Juliane; de Roux, Nicolas

    2010-07-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a rare genetic disorder characterised by central hypogonadism with a lack of sense of smell and in some cases renal aplasia, deafness, syndactyly, cleft lip/palate, and dental agenesis. To date, five genes for KS have been identified: KAL1, located on the X chromosome, and FGFR1, PROKR2, PROK2 and FGF8, which are involved in autosomally transmitted forms of KS. The study characterised the dental ageneses of individuals with KS associated with mutations in the FGFR1 gene. Six individuals displaying dental agenesis were included. Clinical and radiological dental evaluations as well as medical anamneses were carried out. Microdontia, screwdriver-shaped mandibular incisors, thin molar roots, and patterns of dental agenesis in both dentitions were observed. One to nine teeth were missing, most frequently, in descending order, lateral mandibular incisors, second premolars of upper and lower jaws, and lateral maxillary incisors. The pattern of dental agenesis is associated with four new mutations in the FGFR1 gene. Dental agenesis may be a clinical feature of Kallmann syndrome caused by a mutation in the FGFR1 gene. These findings highlight the role that odontologists can play in the early diagnosis and treatment of gonadotropic deficiency.

  20. De Novo Mutations in EBF3 Cause a Neurodevelopmental Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleven, Hannah; Welsh, Seth J; Yu, Jing; Churchill, Mair E A; Wright, Caroline F; Henderson, Alex; Horvath, Rita; Rankin, Julia; Vogt, Julie; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Green, Andrew; King, Mary D; Cox, Helen; Armstrong, Linlea; Lehman, Anna; Nelson, Tanya N; Williams, Jonathan; Clouston, Penny; Hagman, James; Németh, Andrea H

    2017-01-05

    Early B cell factor 3 (EBF3) is an atypical transcription factor that is thought to influence the laminar formation of the cerebral cortex. Here, we report that de novo mutations in EBF3 cause a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome. The mutations were identified in two large-scale sequencing projects: the UK Deciphering Developmental Disorders (DDD) study and the Canadian Clinical Assessment of the Utility of Sequencing and Evaluation as a Service (CAUSES) study. The core phenotype includes moderate to severe intellectual disability, and many individuals exhibit cerebellar ataxia, subtle facial dysmorphism, strabismus, and vesicoureteric reflux, suggesting that EBF3 has a widespread developmental role. Pathogenic de novo variants identified in EBF3 include multiple loss-of-function and missense mutations. Structural modeling suggested that the missense mutations affect DNA binding. Functional analysis of mutant proteins with missense substitutions revealed reduced transcriptional activities and abilities to form heterodimers with wild-type EBF3. We conclude that EBF3, a transcription factor previously unknown to be associated with human disease, is important for brain and other organ development and warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. De novo SOX11 mutations cause Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Koshimizu, Eriko; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Phadke, Shubha; Kou, Ikuyo; Shiina, Masaaki; Suzuki, Toshifumi; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Shintaro; Yamashita, Michiaki; Watanabe, Satoshi; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Kodera, Hirofumi; Miyatake, Satoko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Ikegawa, Shiro; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-06-02

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is a congenital disorder characterized by growth deficiency, intellectual disability, microcephaly, characteristic facial features and hypoplastic nails of the fifth fingers and/or toes. We previously identified mutations in five genes encoding subunits of the BAF complex, in 55% of CSS patients. Here we perform whole-exome sequencing in additional CSS patients, identifying de novo SOX11 mutations in two patients with a mild CSS phenotype. sox11a/b knockdown in zebrafish causes brain abnormalities, potentially explaining the brain phenotype of CSS. SOX11 is the downstream transcriptional factor of the PAX6-BAF complex, highlighting the importance of the BAF complex and SOX11 transcriptional network in brain development.

  2. Multiple arrhythmic syndromes in a newborn, owing to a novel mutation in SCN5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calloe, Kirstine; Schmitt, Nicole; Grubb, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the SCN5A gene have been linked to Brugada syndrome (BrS), conduction disease, Long QT syndrome (LQT3), atrial fibrillation (AF), and to pre- and neonatal ventricular arrhythmias.......Mutations in the SCN5A gene have been linked to Brugada syndrome (BrS), conduction disease, Long QT syndrome (LQT3), atrial fibrillation (AF), and to pre- and neonatal ventricular arrhythmias....

  3. Triple A syndrome: two novel mutations in the AAAS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thümmler, Susanne; Huebner, Angela; Baechler-Sadoul, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Triple A syndrome is a rare disease of autosomal recessive inheritance. It was first described in 1978. The typical triad includes adrenocorticotrophic-hormone-resistant glucocorticoid insufficiency, reduced or absent tearing (alacrima) and achalasia. But clinical symptoms can be extremely heterogeneous and of variable clinically expression. This report describes a 7-year-old boy with a 1 year history of fatigue and muscle weakness. Physical examination showed skin and mucosal hyperpigmentation, and hormonal analysis revealed isolated glucocorticoid function. Medical history was marked by megaoesophagus and achalasia. The absence of tears when crying had been noted since birth. In the presence of the classical triad, triple A syndrome was diagnosed. Clinical diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis of the AAAS gene on chromosome 12q13. The novel compound heterozygous mutation c.1304delA and c.1292-1294delTTCinsA was found.

  4. Review and update of mutations causing Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingault, Véronique; Ente, Dorothée; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Goossens, Michel; Marlin, Sandrine; Bondurand, Nadège

    2010-04-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is characterized by the association of pigmentation abnormalities, including depigmented patches of the skin and hair, vivid blue eyes or heterochromia irides, and sensorineural hearing loss. However, other features such as dystopia canthorum, musculoskeletal abnormalities of the limbs, Hirschsprung disease, or neurological defects are found in subsets of patients and used for the clinical classification of WS. Six genes are involved in this syndrome: PAX3 (encoding the paired box 3 transcription factor), MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor), EDN3 (endothelin 3), EDNRB (endothelin receptor type B), SOX10 (encoding the Sry bOX10 transcription factor), and SNAI2 (snail homolog 2), with different frequencies. In this review we provide an update on all WS genes and set up mutation databases, summarize molecular and functional data available for each of them, and discuss the applications in diagnostics and genetic counseling. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Mutation analysis of the WFS1 gene in seven Danish Wolfram syndrome families; four new mutations identified

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Eiberg, Hans Rudolf Lytchoff; Barrett, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a neuro-degenerative autosomal recessive (AR) disorder (OMIM #222300) caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene on 4p16.1. More than 120 mutations have been identified in WFS1 associated with AR WS, as well as autosomal dominant nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing...

  6. An Atypical Rett Syndrome Phenotype Due to a Novel Missense Mutation in CACNA1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperson, Madison V; Haws, Michael E; Standridge, Shannon M; Gilbert, Donald L

    2018-03-01

    Some typical and atypical Rett syndrome patients lack known genetic mutations. Mutations in the P/Q type calcium channel CACNA1A have been implicated in epileptic encephalopathy, familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia 2, and spinocerebellar ataxia 6, but not Rett syndrome. Patient Description: The authors describe a female patient with developmental regression and a de novo, likely pathogenic mutation in CACNA1A who meets 3 of 4 main criteria (stereotypic hand movements, loss of purposeful hand movements, gait disturbance), and 6 of 11 supportive criteria (impaired sleep, abnormal tone, vasomotor disturbance, scoliosis, growth retardation, and screaming spells) for atypical Rett syndrome. Furthermore, she resembles the early seizure variant of Rett syndrome. Previously, 3 children with similar CACNA1A mutations have been reported, but a Rett syndrome phenotype has not been described. CACNA1A mutations should be considered in children presenting with an atypical Rett syndrome phenotype, specifically, the early seizure variant.

  7. Mutations in epilepsy and intellectual disability genes in patients with features of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Heather E; Tambunan, Dimira; LaCoursiere, Christopher; Goldenberg, Marti; Pinsky, Rebecca; Martin, Emilie; Ho, Eugenia; Khwaja, Omar; Kaufmann, Walter E; Poduri, Annapurna

    2015-09-01

    Rett syndrome and neurodevelopmental disorders with features overlapping this syndrome frequently remain unexplained in patients without clinically identified MECP2 mutations. We recruited a cohort of 11 patients with features of Rett syndrome and negative initial clinical testing for mutations in MECP2. We analyzed their phenotypes to determine whether patients met formal criteria for Rett syndrome, reviewed repeat clinical genetic testing, and performed exome sequencing of the probands. Using 2010 diagnostic criteria, three patients had classical Rett syndrome, including two for whom repeat MECP2 gene testing had identified mutations. In a patient with neonatal onset epilepsy with atypical Rett syndrome, we identified a frameshift deletion in STXBP1. Among seven patients with features of Rett syndrome not fulfilling formal diagnostic criteria, four had suspected pathogenic mutations, one each in MECP2, FOXG1, SCN8A, and IQSEC2. MECP2 mutations are highly correlated with classical Rett syndrome. Genes associated with atypical Rett syndrome, epilepsy, or intellectual disability should be considered in patients with features overlapping with Rett syndrome and negative MECP2 testing. While most of the identified mutations were apparently de novo, the SCN8A variant was inherited from an unaffected parent mosaic for the mutation, which is important to note for counseling regarding recurrence risks. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. De novo mutations in ARID1B associated with both syndromic and non-syndromic short stature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongguo; Yao, RuEn; Wang, Lili; Fan, Yanjie; Huang, Xiaodong; Hirschhorn, Joel; Dauber, Andrew; Shen, Yiping

    2015-09-16

    Human height is a complex trait with a strong genetic basis. Recently, a significant association between rare copy number variations (CNVs) and short stature has been identified, and candidate genes in these rare CNVs are being explored. This study aims to evaluate the association between mutations in ARID1B gene and short stature, both the syndromic and non-syndromic form. Based on a case-control study of whole genome chromosome microarray analysis (CMA), three overlapping CNVs were identified in patients with developmental disorders who exhibited short stature. ARID1B, a causal gene for Coffin Siris syndrome, is the only gene encompassed by all three CNVs. A following retrospective genotype-phenotype analysis based on a literature review confirmed that short stature is a frequent feature in those Coffin-Siris syndrome patients with ARID1B mutations. Mutation screening of ARID1B coding regions was further conducted in a cohort of 48 non-syndromic short stature patients,andfour novel missense variants including two de novo mutations were found. These results suggest that haploinsufficient mutations of ARID1B are associated with syndromic short stature including Coffin-Siris syndrome and intellectual disability, while rare missense variants in ARID1B are associated with non-syndromic short stature. This study supports the notion that mutations in genes related to syndromic short stature may exert milder effect and contribute to short stature in the general population.

  9. RAI1 gene mutations: mechanisms of Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Mariateresa; Amabile, Sonia; Acquaviva, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS; OMIM #182290) is a complex genetic disorder characterized by distinctive physical features, developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and a typical behavioral phenotype. SMS is caused by interstitial 17p11.2 deletions, encompassing multiple genes and including the retinoic acid-induced 1 gene ( RAI1 ), or by mutations in RAI1 itself. About 10% of all the SMS patients, in fact, carry an RAI1 mutation responsible for the phenotype. RAI1 (OMIM *607642) is a dosage-sensitive gene expressed in many tissues and highly conserved among species. Over the years, several studies have demonstrated that RAI1 (or its homologs in animal models) acts as a transcriptional factor implicated in embryonic neurodevelopment, neuronal differentiation, cell growth and cell cycle regulation, bone and skeletal development, lipid and glucose metabolisms, behavioral functions, and circadian activity. Patients with RAI1 pathogenic variants show some phenotypic differences when compared to those carrying the typical deletion. They usually have lower incidence of hypotonia and less cognitive impairment than those with 17p11.2 deletions but more frequently show the behavioral characteristics of the syndrome and overeating issues. These differences reflect the primary pathogenetic role of RAI1 without the pathogenetic contribution of the other genes included in the typical 17p11.2 deletion. The better comprehension of physiological roles of RAI1 , its molecular co-workers and interactors, and its contribution in determining the typical SMS phenotype will certainly open a new path for therapeutic interventions.

  10. Mutation Update for UBE3A variants in Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Fernandes, Priscilla; Zhang, Victor Wei; Ward, Patricia A; Miloslavskaya, Irene; Rhead, William; Rosenbaum, Richard; Gin, Robert; Roa, Benjamin; Fang, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a deficiency of the imprinted and maternally expressed UBE3A gene. Although de novo genetic and epigenetic imprinting defects of UBE3A genomic locus account for majority of Angelman diagnoses, approximately 10% of individuals affected with Angelman syndrome are a result of UBE3A loss-of-function mutations occurring on the expressed maternal chromosome. The variants described in this manuscript represent the analysis of 2,515 patients referred for UBE3A gene sequencing at our institution, along with a comprehensive review of the UBE3A mutation literature. Of these, 267 (10.62%) patients had a report issued for detection of a UBE3A gene nucleotide variant, which in many cases involved family studies resulting in reclassification of variants of unknown clinical significance (VUS). Overall, 111 (4.41%) probands had a nucleotide change classified as pathogenic or strongly favored to be pathogenic, 29 (1.15%) had a VUS, and 126 (5.0%) had a nucleotide change classified as benign or strongly favored to be benign. All variants and their clinical interpretations are submitted to NCBI ClinVar, a freely accessible human variation and phenotype database. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  11. CHD7 mutations in patients initially diagnosed with Kallmann syndrome--the clinical overlap with CHARGE syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongmans, M.C.J.; Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A. van; Pitteloud, N.; Ogata, T.; Sato, N.; Claahsen-van der Grinten, H.L.; Donk, K. van der; Seminara, S.; Bergman, J.E.; Brunner, H.G.; Crowley, W.F.; Hoefsloot, L.H.

    2009-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) is the combination of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia or hyposmia, two features that are also frequently present in CHARGE syndrome. CHARGE syndrome is caused by mutations in the CHD7 gene. We performed analysis of CHD7 in 36 patients with KS and 20 patients with

  12. Angelman Syndrome: Mutations Influence Features in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wen-Hann; Bacino, Carlos A.; Skinner, Steven A.; Anselm, Irina; Barbieri-Welge, Rene; Bauer-Carlin, Astrid; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Bichell, Terry Jo; Gentile, Jennifer K.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Horowitz, Lucia T.; Kothare, Sanjeev V.; Lee, Hye-Seung; Nespeca, Mark P.; Peters, Sarika U.; Sahoo, Trilochan; Sarco, Dean; Waisbren, Susan E.; Bird, Lynne M.

    2012-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a lack of expression of the maternal copy of UBE3A. Although the “classic” features of AS are well described, few large-scale studies have delineated the clinical features in AS. We present baseline data from 92 children with a molecular diagnosis of AS between 5 and 60 months old who are enrolled in the National Institutes of Health Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network Angelman Syndrome Natural History Study from January 2006 to March 2008. Seventy-four percent of participants had deletions, 14% had either uniparental disomy (UPD) or imprinting defects, and 12% had UBE3A mutations. Participants with UPD/imprinting defects were heavier (P = 0.0002), while those with deletions were lighter, than the general population (P < 0.0001). Twenty out of 92 participants were underweight, all of whom had deletions or UBE3A mutations. Eight out of 92 participants (6/13 (46%) with UPD/imprinting defects and 2/11 (18%) with UBE3A mutations) were obese. Seventy-four out of 92 participants (80%) had absolute or relative microcephaly. No participant was macrocephalic. The most common behavioral findings were mouthing behavior (95%), short attention span (92%), ataxic or broad-based gait (88%), history of sleep difficulties (80%), and fascination with water (75%). Frequent, easily provoked laughter was observed in 60%. Clinical seizures were reported in 65% of participants but all electroencephalograms (EEGs) were abnormal. We conclude that the most characteristic feature of AS is the neurobehavioral phenotype, but specific EEG findings are highly sensitive for AS. Obesity is common among those with UPD/imprinting defects. PMID:21204213

  13. RAI1 gene mutations: mechanisms of Smith–Magenis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falco M

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mariateresa Falco,1,* Sonia Amabile,1,* Fabio Acquaviva2 1Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Translational Medical Sciences (DISMET, Section of Pediatric Clinical Genetics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Smith–Magenis syndrome (SMS; OMIM #182290 is a complex genetic disorder characterized by distinctive physical features, developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and a typical behavioral phenotype. SMS is caused by interstitial 17p11.2 deletions, encompassing multiple genes and including the retinoic acid-induced 1 gene (RAI1, or by mutations in RAI1 itself. About 10% of all the SMS patients, in fact, carry an RAI1 mutation responsible for the phenotype. RAI1 (OMIM *607642 is a dosage-sensitive gene expressed in many tissues and highly conserved among species. Over the years, several studies have demonstrated that RAI1 (or its homologs in animal models acts as a transcriptional factor implicated in embryonic neurodevelopment, neuronal differentiation, cell growth and cell cycle regulation, bone and skeletal development, lipid and glucose metabolisms, behavioral functions, and circadian activity. Patients with RAI1 pathogenic variants show some phenotypic differences when compared to those carrying the typical deletion. They usually have lower incidence of hypotonia and less cognitive impairment than those with 17p11.2 deletions but more frequently show the behavioral characteristics of the syndrome and overeating issues. These differences reflect the primary pathogenetic role of RAI1 without the pathogenetic contribution of the other genes included in the typical 17p11.2 deletion. The better comprehension of physiological roles of RAI1, its molecular co-workers and interactors, and its contribution in determining the typical SMS phenotype will certainly open a new path

  14. LEOPARD syndrome in an infant with severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and PTPN11 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganigara Madhusudan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In LEOPARD syndrome, mutations affecting exon 13 of the PTPN11 gene have been correlated with a rapidly progressive severe biventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM. This is a report of early onset severe HCM in an infant with LEOPARD syndrome and an unusual mutation in exon 13, showing genotype-phenotype correlation.

  15. Clinical presentation of Griscelli syndrome type 2 and spectrum of RAB27A mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeths, Marie; Bryceson, Yenan T; Rudd, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 (GS2) is an autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency caused by mutations in RAB27A, clinically characterized by partial albinism and haemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH). We evaluated the frequency of RAB27A mutations in 21 unrelated patients with haemophagocytic syndrom...

  16. Correlation between clinical features and MECP2 gene mutations in patients with Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Megahed

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Mutation screening for MECP2 is a fast and reliable method to diagnose patients clinically suspected to suffer from Rett syndrome or female patients with atypical Rett syndrome features, mental retardation, developmental delay and other neurological abnormalities who do not fit any specific diagnosis. Also, patients with MECP2 mutation presented with a more severe phenotype.

  17. Sex-related hearing impairment in Wolfram syndrome patients identified by inactivating WFS1 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, RJE; Huygen, PLM; van den Ouweland, JMW; Cryns, K; Dikkeschei, LD; Van Camp, G; Cremers, CWRJ

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the audiovestibular profile of 11 Wolfram syndrome patients (4 males, 7 females) from 7 families, with identified WFS1 mutations, and the audiometric profile of 17 related heterozygous carriers of WFS1 mutations. Patients with Wolfram syndrome showed a downsloping audiogram and

  18. Expanded Mutational Spectrum in Cohen Syndrome, Tissue Expression, and Transcript Variants of COH1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifert, Wenke; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Kuehnisch, Jirko; Kahrizi, Kimia; Tzschach, Andreas; Garshasbi, Masoud; Najmabadi, Hossein; Kuss, Andreas Walter; Kress, Wolfram; Laureys, Genevieve; Loeys, Bart; Brilstra, Eva; Mancini, Grazia M. S.; Dollfus, Helene; Dahan, Karin; Apse, Kira; Hennies, Hans Christian; Horn, Denise

    Cohen syndrome is characterised by mental retardation, postnatal microcephaly, facial dysmorphism, pigmentary retinopathy, myopia, and intermittent neutropenia. Mutations in COH1 (VPS13B) have been found in patients with Cohen syndrome from diverse ethnic origins. We have carried out mutation

  19. Sex-related hearing impairment in Wolfram syndrome patients identified by inactivating WFS1 mutations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, R.J.E.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Ouweland, J.M.W. van den; Cryns, K.; Dikkeschei, L.D.; Camp, G. van; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the audiovestibular profile of 11 Wolfram syndrome patients (4 males, 7 females) from 7 families, with identified WFS1 mutations, and the audiometric profile of 17 related heterozygous carriers of WFS1 mutations. Patients with Wolfram syndrome showed a downsloping audiogram and

  20. Ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia, and photophobia syndrome associated with a new mutation in MBTPS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, K; Takeichi, T; Liu, L; Pramanik, R; Lee, J; Akiyama, M; McGrath, J A

    2015-07-01

    Ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome (OMIM 308205) is a rare X-linked genetic disorder. Mutations in MBTPS2 underlie IFAP syndrome, with 19 different mutations reported to date. Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is an allelic disorder that results from a single recurrent mutation, p.Asn508Ser. We report a case from the UK of IFAP syndrome resulting from a new mutation, p.Asn508Thr, emphasizing the significant overlap between IFAP and KFSD at both the molecular and clinical levels. An area of alopecia on the scalp of the proband's mother was also noted, suggesting lyonization. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. STXBP1 mutations cause not only Ohtahara syndrome but also West syndrome--result of Japanese cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Motoko; Oguni, Hirokazu; Liang, Jao-Shwann; Ikeda, Hiroko; Imai, Katsumi; Hirasawa, Kyoko; Imai, Kaoru; Tachikawa, Emiko; Shimojima, Keiko; Osawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2010-12-01

    We performed STXBP1 mutation analyses in 86 patients with various types of epilepsies, including 10 patients with OS, 43 with West syndrome, 2 with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, 12 with symptomatic generalized epilepsy, 14 with symptomatic partial epilepsy, and 5 with other undetermined types of epilepsy. In all patients, the etiology was unknown, but ARX and CDKL5 mutations were negative in all cases. All coding exons of STXBP1 were analyzed by direct-sequencing. Two de novo nucleotide alterations of STXBP1 were identified in two patients with Ohtahara and West syndrome, respectively. No de novo or deleterious mutations in STXBP1 were found in the remaining 84 patients with various types of symptomatic epilepsies. This is the first case report showing that STXBP1 mutations caused West syndrome from the onset of epilepsy. STXBP1 analysis should be considered as an etiology of symptomatic West syndrome without explainable cause. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2010 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Waardenburg syndrome: Novel mutations in a large Brazilian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocángel, Magnolia Astrid Pretell; Melo, Uirá Souto; Alves, Leandro Ucela; Pardono, Eliete; Lourenço, Naila Cristina Vilaça; Marcolino, Humberto Vicente Cezar; Otto, Paulo Alberto; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia

    2018-01-31

    This paper deals with the molecular investigation of Waardenburg syndrome (WS) in a sample of 49 clinically diagnosed probands (most from southeastern Brazil), 24 of them having the type 1 (WS1) variant (10 familial and 14 isolated cases) and 25 being affected by the type 2 (WS2) variant (five familial and 20 isolated cases). Sequential Sanger sequencing of all coding exons of PAX3, MITF, EDN3, EDNRB, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes, followed by CNV detection by MLPA of PAX3, MITF and SOX10 genes in selected cases revealed many novel pathogenic variants. Molecular screening, performed in all patients, revealed 19 causative variants (19/49 = 38.8%), six of them being large whole-exon deletions detected by MLPA, seven (four missense and three nonsense substitutions) resulting from single nucleotide substitutions (SNV), and six representing small indels. A pair of dizygotic affected female twins presented the c.430delC variant in SOX10, but the mutation, imputed to gonadal mosaicism, was not found in their unaffected parents. At least 10 novel causative mutations, described in this paper, were found in this Brazilian sample. Copy-number-variation detected by MLPA identified the causative mutation in 12.2% of our cases, corresponding to 31.6% of all causative mutations. In the majority of cases, the deletions were sporadic, since they were not present in the parents of isolated cases. Our results, as a whole, reinforce the fact that the screening of copy-number-variants by MLPA is a powerful tool to identify the molecular cause in WS patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. STAT3 mutations correlated with hyper-IgE syndrome lead to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Of all the causes identified for the disease hyper-immunoglobulinemia E syndrome (HIES), a homozygous mutation in tyrosine kinase2 (TYK2) and heterozygous mutations in STAT3 are implicated the defects in Jak/STAT signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of HIES. Mutations of STAT3 have been frequently clinically ...

  4. Recurrent and Founder Mutations in the Netherlands: the Long-QT Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, N.; Jongbloed, R.; Postema, P.G.; Nannenberg, E.; Alders, M.; Wilde, A.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective The long-QT syndrome (LQTS) is associated with premature sudden cardiac deaths affecting whole families and is caused by mutations in genes encoding for cardiac proteins. When the same mutation is found in different families (recurrent mutations), this may imply either a

  5. Brief Report:MECP2 Mutations in People without Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Bernhard; Treadwell-Deering, Diane; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Neul, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in "Methyl-CpG-Binding protein 2" ("MECP2") are commonly associated with the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). However, some people with RTT do not have mutations in "MECP2," and interestingly there have been people identified with "MECP2" mutations that do not have the clinical…

  6. STAT3 mutations correlated with hyper-IgE syndrome lead to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-04-28

    Apr 28, 2012 ... Of all the causes identified for the disease hyper-immunoglobulinemia E syndrome (HIES), a homozygous mutation in tyrosine kinase2 (TYK2) and heterozygous mutations in STAT3 are implicated the defects in Jak/STAT signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of HIES. Mutations of STAT3 have been ...

  7. Wolfram syndrome-associated mutations lead to instability and proteasomal degradation of wolframin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Sabine; Bauer, Matthias F

    2006-07-10

    Wolfram syndrome is caused by mutations in WFS1 encoding wolframin, a polytopic membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we investigated the molecular pathomechanisms of four missense and two truncating mutations in WFS1. Expression in COS-7 cells as well as direct analysis of patient cells revealed that WFS1 mutations lead to drastically reduced steady-state levels of wolframin. All mutations resulted in highly unstable proteins which were delivered to proteasomal degradation. No wolframin aggregates were found in patient cells suggesting that Wolfram syndrome is not a disease of protein aggregation. Rather, WFS1 mutations cause loss-of-function by cellular depletion of wolframin.

  8. Mutational Analysis of TCOF1, GSC, and HOXA2 in Patients With Treacher Collins Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Shaojuan; Jin, Lei; Wang, Huijun; Li, Chenlong; Zheng, Fengyun; Ma, Duan; Zhang, Tianyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant craniofacial malformation mainly caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene. Few cases have been observed in the Chinese population. Herein, the authors report the mutational analysis of TCOF1, GSC, and HOXA2 to determine the mutational features of the 3 genes in Chinese patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. Genomic DNA of the patients and their parents was extracted from peripheral blood following a standard protocol. DNA sequencing a...

  9. Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome: Report of a New Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib U Rehman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis caused by germline mutations in the folliculin gene and characterized by facial papules, pulmonary cysts, kidney tumours and recurrent pneumothoraces. Several distinct mutations in the folliculin gene resulting in a truncated protein have been described. The present report describes a new mutation, which has not been reported in individuals with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome but is of a type predicted to cause disease.

  10. De novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1 cause Bohring-Opitz syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoischen, Alexander; van Bon, Bregje W M; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín

    2011-01-01

    Bohring-Opitz syndrome is characterized by severe intellectual disability, distinctive facial features and multiple congenital malformations. We sequenced the exomes of three individuals with Bohring-Opitz syndrome and in each identified heterozygous de novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1, which...... is required for maintenance of both activation and silencing of Hox genes. In total, 7 out of 13 subjects with a Bohring-Opitz phenotype had de novo ASXL1 mutations, suggesting that the syndrome is genetically heterogeneous....

  11. [WT1 mutation as a cause of progressive nephropathy in Frasier syndrome--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewska, Anna; Zoch-Zwierz, Walentyna; Tenderenda, Edyta; Rybi-Szumińska, Agnieszka; Kołodziejczyk, Zbigniew

    2009-06-01

    Frasier syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder featuring progressive glomerulopathy, male pseudohermaphroditism and gonadal dysgenesis. It is caused by mutations in intron 9 of the WT1 gene. Because of its rarity there is limited literature available on the diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. The aim of the study was to present the clinicopathological findings and molecular analysis of phenotypically female adolescent presenting with severe proteinuria and primary amenorrhea. The significance of early recognition of Frasier syndrome and its differentiation from Denys-Drash syndrome was discussed. WT1 mutation analysis should be routinely done in females with steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome.

  12. Two TP53 germline mutations in a classical Li-Fraumeni syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hest, Liselotte P; Ruijs, Mariëlle W G; Wagner, Anja; van der Meer, Conny A; Verhoef, Senno; van't Veer, Laura J; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a combination of tumors including sarcoma, breast cancer, brain tumors, adrenocortical carcinoma and leukemia. Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 are associated with LFS. We present a family with LFS in which initially a novel germline TP53 intron 5 splice site mutation was found. A second germline TP53 mutation, the exon 7 Asn235Ser (704A-->G) mutation, was detected in this family through pre-symptomatic DNA testing. This latter mutation has been reported repeatedly in the literature as a pathogenic mutation involved in LFS. We provide evidence for pathogenicity of the novel intron 5 splice site mutation, whereas this evidence is lacking for the exon 7 Asn235Ser (704A-->G) mutation. Our findings emphasize the importance of performing additional tests in case of germline sequence variants with uncertain functional effects.

  13. The mutational spectrum in Treacher Collins syndrome reveals a predominance of mutations that create a premature-termination codon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, S.J.; Gladwin, A.J.; Dixon, M.J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. The TCS locus has been mapped to human chromosome 5q31.3-32 and the mutated gene identified. In the current investigation, 25 previously undescribed mutations, which are spread throughout the gene, are presented. This brings the total reported to date to 35, which represents a detection rate of 60%. Of the mutations that have been reported to date, all but one result in the introduction of a premature-termination codon into the predicted protein, treacle. Moreover, the mutations are largely family specific, although a common 5-bp deletion in exon 24 (seven different families) and a recurrent splicing mutation in intron 3 (two different families) have been identified. This mutational spectrum supports the hypothesis that TCS results from haploin-sufficiency. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Mutations in the TGF-beta repressor SKI cause Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome with aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doyle, Alexander J.; Doyle, Jefferson J.; Bessling, Seneca L.; Maragh, Samantha; Lindsay, Mark E.; Schepers, Dorien; Gillis, Elisabeth; Mortier, Geert; Homfray, Tessa; Sauls, Kimberly; Norris, Russell A.; Huso, Nicholas D.; Leahy, Dan; Mohr, David W.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Scott, Alan F.; Destrée, Anne; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Arn, Pamela H.; Curry, Cynthia J.; van Laer, Lut; McCallion, Andrew S.; Loeys, Bart L.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS)(1-4). However, the location and character of many of the causal mutations in LDS intuitively

  15. Recessive mutations in PTHR1 cause contrasting skeletal dysplasias in Eiken and Blomstrand syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchatelet, Sabine; Ostergaard, Elsebet; Cortes, Dina

    2005-01-01

    Eiken syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia. We identified a truncation mutation in the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) type 1 receptor (PTHR1) gene as the cause of this syndrome. Eiken syndrome differs from Jansen...

  16. Familial myelodysplastic syndromes, monosomy 7/trisomy 8, and mutator effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserati, Emanuela; Minelli, Antonella; Menna, Giuseppe; Cecchini, Maria Paola; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Rossi, Gabriele; De Filippi, Paola; Lo Curto, Francesco; Danesino, Cesare; Locatelli, Franco; Pasquali, Francesco

    2004-01-15

    A family is reported, in which two sisters presented with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), namely refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEB-t), and refractory anemia (RA). Bone marrow chromosome changes were present in both: trisomy and tetrasomy 8 (with a pericentric inversion of one chromosome 8) in the older sister, and monosomy 7 (with clones with additional trisomies 19 and 21) in the younger one. Molecular data were obtained on the parental chromosome involved in these numerical anomalies, which proved to be of paternal origin in these cases. The observations of this family, and a review of familial cases of MDS/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), led us to consider that they may be divided into two groups: those which arise on the basis of a Mendelian predisposing disorder exerting a mutator effect, often with the acquisition of monosomy 7, and those in which no specific Mendelian predisposing disease is recognized, as the familial monosomy 7 cases and the one reported here. We postulate that in these families an inherited mutator effect is present and that it causes a karyotype instability, which leads to MDS/AML, often through the acquisition of monosomy 7 and trisomy 8.

  17. [Schinzel-Giedion syndrome: a new mutation in SETBP1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-González, V; Domingo-Jiménez, M R; Burglen, L; Ballesta-Martínez, M J; Whalen, S; Piñero-Fernández, J A; Guillén-Navarro, E

    2015-01-01

    Schinzel-Giedion syndrome (SGS) (#MIM 269150) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by very marked craniofacial dysmorphism, multiple congenital anomalies and severe intellectual disability. Most affected patients die in early childhood. SETBP1 was identified as the causative gene, but a limited number of patients with molecular confirmation have been reported to date. The case is reported of a 4 and a half year-old male patient, affected by SGS. SETBP1 sequencing analysis revealed the presence of a non-previously described mutation: c.2608G>T (p.Gly870Cys). The clinical features and differential diagnosis of this rare condition are reviewed. Dysmorphic features are strongly suggestive of SGS. Its clinical recognition is essential to enable an early diagnosis, a proper follow-up, and to provide the family with genetic counseling. To date, this is the seventeenth SGS patient published with SETBP1 mutation, and the first in Spain, helping to widen clinical and molecular knowledge of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. NPHS2 mutations in children with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otukesh, Hasan; Ghazanfari, Behzad; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Bakhshayesh, Masoomeh; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Hoseini, Rozita; Chalian, Majid; Salami, Arezoo; Mehdipor, Leila; Rahiminia, Aysan

    2009-04-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome may be caused by mutations in NPHS1 and NPHS2, which encode nephrin and podocin, respectively. Since the identification of the NPHS2 gene, various investigators have demonstrated that its mutation is an important cause of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. We aimed to evaluate frequency and spectrum of podocin mutations in the Iranian children with steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome. We examined 20 children with steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome referred to Ali Asghar Children's Hospital, in Tehran, Iran. Mutations in the 5th and 7th exons of NPHS2 were assessed. The mutational analysis of NPHS2 was performed by DNA sequencing. The mean age at the onset of proteinuria was 6.4 +/- 3.6 years. None of the children had mutations in the exons 5 or 7. Our study suggests that NPHS2 mutations in exons 5 and 7 are not seen in our children. Therefore, we cannot recommend NPHS2 (exons 5 and 7) mutation for screening in Iranian children with steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome. Other exons of podocin or other podocyte proteins in Iranian children may play a role in pathogenesis of steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome.

  19. Mitchell-Riley Syndrome: A Novel Mutation in RFX6 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Zegre Amorim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel RFX6 homozygous missense mutation was identified in an infant with Mitchell-Riley syndrome. The most common features of Mitchell-Riley syndrome were present, including severe neonatal diabetes associated with annular pancreas, intestinal malrotation, gallbladder agenesis, cholestatic disease, chronic diarrhea, and severe intrauterine growth restriction. Perijejunal tissue similar to pancreatic tissue was found in the submucosa, a finding that has not been previously reported in this syndrome. This case associating RFX6 mutation with structural and functional pancreatic abnormalities reinforces the RFX6 gene role in pancreas development and β-cell function, adding information to the existent mutation databases.

  20. Functional effects of KCNE3 mutation and its role in the development of Brugada syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delpón, Eva; Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Núñez, Lucía

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Brugada Syndrome (BrS), an inherited syndrome associated with a high incidence of sudden cardiac arrest, has been linked to mutations in four different genes leading to a loss of function in sodium and calcium channel activity. Although the transient outward current (I......(to)) is thought to play a prominent role in the expression of the syndrome, mutations in I(to)-related genes have not been identified as yet. METHODS AND RESULTS: One hundred and five probands with BrS were screened for ion channel gene mutations using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP...

  1. Clinical presentation of Griscelli syndrome type 2 and spectrum of RAB27A mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeths, Marie; Bryceson, Yenan T; Rudd, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 (GS2) is an autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency caused by mutations in RAB27A, clinically characterized by partial albinism and haemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH). We evaluated the frequency of RAB27A mutations in 21 unrelated patients with haemophagocytic syndromes...... without mutations in familial HLH (FHL) causing genes or an established diagnosis of GS2. In addition, we report three patients with known GS2. Moreover, neurological involvement and RAB27A mutations in previously published patients with genetically verified GS2 are reviewed....

  2. Mosaicism of a TCOF1 mutation in an individual clinically unaffected with Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoo, Brenda A; McPherson, Elizabeth; Jabs, Ethylin Wang

    2004-04-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) or mandibulofacial dysostosis is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with 60% of its cases arising de novo. Other modes of inheritance such as autosomal recessive, gonadal mosaicism, and chromosomal rearrangement have also been proposed. This syndrome can result from TCOF1 gene mutations. In this study we identified a TCOF1 1408delAG heterozygous mutation in a patient with the clinical diagnosis of TCS. This same mutation was found in the clinically unaffected mother's leukocytes, hair root bulbs, buccal mucosa, urine, and stool. The mother has a clinically unaffected child and the maternal grandparents do not have the mutation. Because the mother has the mutation in cells derived from all three germ layers, we suspected the mutation was nonpenetrant. However, we could not detect the mutation in her skin fibroblasts, suggesting she is mosaic secondary to cell type specific selection. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stattin Eva-Lena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Methods Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT. Results In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52% index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%, whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. Conclusion In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the

  4. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stattin, Eva-Lena; Boström, Ida Maria; Winbo, Annika; Cederquist, Kristina; Jonasson, Jenni; Jonsson, Björn-Anders; Diamant, Ulla-Britt; Jensen, Steen M; Rydberg, Annika; Norberg, Anna

    2012-10-25

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2) for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52%) index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%), whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the mutations and 3 of 36 selected cases (8%) harboured a mutation in the

  5. Rare Noncoding Mutations Extend the Mutational Spectrum in the PGAP3 Subtype of Hyperphosphatasia with Mental Retardation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, Alexej; Awaya, Tomonari; Helbig, Ingo; Afawi, Zaid; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Abu‐Rachma, Jubran; Thompson, Miles D.; Cole, David E.; Skinner, Steve; Annese, Fran; Canham, Natalie; Schweiger, Michal R.; Robinson, Peter N.; Mundlos, Stefan; Kinoshita, Taroh; Munnich, Arnold

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HPMRS or Mabry syndrome is a heterogeneous glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor deficiency that is caused by an impairment of synthesis or maturation of the GPI‐anchor. The expressivity of the clinical features in HPMRS varies from severe syndromic forms with multiple organ malformations to mild nonsyndromic intellectual disability. In about half of the patients with the clinical diagnosis of HPMRS, pathogenic mutations can be identified in the coding region in one of the six genes, one among them is PGAP3. In this work, we describe a screening approach with sequence specific baits for transcripts of genes of the GPI pathway that allows the detection of functionally relevant mutations also including introns and the 5′ and 3′ UTR. By this means, we also identified pathogenic noncoding mutations, which increases the diagnostic yield for HPMRS on the basis of intellectual disability and elevated serum alkaline phosphatase. In eight affected individuals from different ethnicities, we found seven novel pathogenic mutations in PGAP3. Besides five missense mutations, we identified an intronic mutation, c.558‐10G>A, that causes an aberrant splice product and a mutation in the 3′UTR, c.*559C>T, that is associated with substantially lower mRNA levels. We show that our novel screening approach is a useful rapid detection tool for alterations in genes coding for key components of the GPI pathway. PMID:27120253

  6. SOX2 nonsense mutation in a patient clinically diagnosed with non-syndromic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Hirohito; Ishii, Akira; Wada, Yasunori; Kizawa, Junya; Yokoi, Tadashi; Azuma, Noriyuki; Matsubara, Yoichi; Suzuki, Erina; Nakamura, Akie; Narumi, Satoshi; Fukami, Maki

    2017-08-30

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is a genetically heterogeneous condition that occurs either as an isolated disorder or as a component of congenital malformation syndromes. SOX2 is a causative gene of syndromic HH characterized by anophthalmia, microphthalmia, or coloboma and other neurological defects such as epilepsy. To date, the causal relationship between SOX2 abnormalities and non-syndromic HH remains speculative. Here, we identified a nonsense mutation of SOX2 in a male patient clinically diagnosed with non-syndromic HH. The patient had epilepsy but no additional clinical features. Ophthalmological examination revealed no abnormalities except for decreased thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer. Audiometry showed mild sensorineural hearing impairment of both ears. Hormonal evaluation suggested isolated gonadotropin deficiency. Next-generation sequencing-based mutation screening of 13 major causative genes for HH identified a p.Lys35 ∗ mutation in SOX2 and excluded pathogenic mutations in other tested genes. The p.Lys35 ∗ mutation appeared to encode a non-functioning SOX2 protein that lacks 283 of 317 amino acids. The SOX2 mutation was absent in the maternal DNA sample, while a paternal sample was unavailable for sequence analysis. These results expand the clinical consequences of SOX2 haploinsufficiency to include non-syndromic HH. Systematic mutation screening using a next-generation sequencer and detailed evaluation of nonspecific ocular/neurological features may help identify SOX2 mutation-positive individuals among HH patients.

  7. Germinal mosaicism of PAX3 mutation caused Waardenburg syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zong, Ling; Jiang, Hongyan

    2018-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome mutations are most often recurrent or de novo. The rate of familial recurrence is low and families with several affected children are extremely rare. In this study, we aimed to clarify the underlying hereditary cause of Waardenburg syndrome type I in two siblings in a Chinese family, with a mother affected by prelingual mild hearing loss and a father who was negative for clinical symptoms of Waardenburg syndrome and had a normal hearing threshold. Complete characteristic features of the family members were recorded and genetic sequencing and parent-child relationship analyses were performed. The two probands were found to share double mutations in the PAX3/GJB2 genes that caused concurrent hearing loss in Waardenburg syndrome type I. Their mother carried the GJB2 c.109G > A homozygous mutation; however, neither the novel PAX3 c.592delG mutation, nor the Waardenburg syndrome phenotype, was observed in either parent. These previously unreported digenic mutations in PAX3/GJB2 resulted in deafness associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I in this family. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing germinal mosaicism in Waardenburg syndrome. This concept is important because it complicates genetic counseling of this family regarding the risk of recurrence of the mutations in subsequent pregnancies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The genetic basis of long QT and short QT syndromes: a mutation update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Jørgensen, Poul; Schlamowitz, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    are characteristic of LQTS, while SQTS is characterized by shortened QT interval with tall peaked T-waves and a propensity for atrial fibrillation. Both syndromes represent a high risk for syncope and sudden death. LQTS exists as a congenital genetic disease (cLQTS) with more than 700 mutations described in 12 genes......-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS), Andersen syndrome (AS), and Timothy syndrome (TS). The genetics are further complicated by the occurrence of double and triple heterozygotes in LQTS and a considerable number of nonpathogenic rare polymorphisms in the involved genes. SQTS is a very rare condition, caused by mutations...

  9. NPHS1 gene mutations confirm congenital nephrotic syndrome in four Brazilian cases: A novel mutation is described.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaragna, Mara S; Cleto, Thaís Lira; Souza, Marcela Lopes; Lutaif, Anna Cristina G B; de Castro, Luiz Cláudio Gonçalves; Penido, Maria Goretti Moreira Guimarães; Maciel-Guerra, Andréa T; Belangero, Vera M S; Guerra-Junior, Gil; De Mello, Maricilda P

    2016-09-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in NPHS1 gene are a common cause of congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS). The disorder is characterized by massive proteinuria that manifests in utero or in the neonatal period during the first 3 months of life. NPHS1 encodes nephrin, a member of the immunoglobulin family of cell adhesion molecules and the main protein expressed at the renal slit diaphragm. Currently, there are approximately 250 mutations described in the NPHS1 gene distributed among all nephrin domains. The main objective of this study was to perform the analysis of the NPHS1 gene in patients with congenital nephrotic syndrome in order to determine the molecular cause of the disease. Direct sequencing of NPHS1 gene in four children was performed. Each patient was heterozygous for two pathogenic mutations disclosing the molecular cause of the disease in 100% of the cases. We identified six different mutations, consisting of one in-frame deletion, one frameshift, and four missense substitutions. The p.Val736Met mutation that is described here for the first time was considered pathogenic by different mutation predictive algorithms. Regardless of the type of mutation, three patients had a bad outcome and died Despite the small size of the cohort, this study contributed to the increasing number of deleterious mutations in the NPHS1 gene by describing a new mutation. Also, since we identified NPHS1 pathogenic mutations as the cause of the disease in all cases analyzed, it might be a frequent cause of CNS in the South Eastern region of Brazil, although the analysis of a larger sample is required to obtain more indicative epidemiological data. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  10. Cornelia de Lange syndrome with NIPBL mutation and mosaic Turner syndrome in the same individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wierzba Jolanta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by facial dysmorphism, growth and cognitive impairment, limb malformations and multiple organ involvement. Mutations in NIPBL gene account for about 60% of patients with CdLS. This gene encodes a key regulator of the Cohesin complex, which controls sister chromatid segregation during both mitosis and meiosis. Turner syndrome (TS results from the partial or complete absence of one of the X chromosomes, usually associated with congenital lymphedema, short stature, and gonadal dysgenesis. Case presentation Here we report a four-year-old female with CdLS due to a frameshift mutation in the NIPBL gene (c.1445_1448delGAGA, who also had a tissue-specific mosaic 45,X/46,XX karyotype. The patient showed a severe form of CdLS with craniofacial dysmorphism, pre- and post-natal growth delay, cardiovascular abnormalities, hirsutism and severe psychomotor retardation with behavioural problems. She also presented with minor clinical features consistent with TS, including peripheral lymphedema and webbed neck. The NIPBL mutation was present in the two tissues analysed from different embryonic origins (peripheral blood lymphocytes and oral mucosa epithelial cells. However, the percentage of cells with monosomy X was low and variable in tissues. These findings indicate that, ontogenically, the NIPBL mutation may have appeared before the mosaic monosomy X. Conclusions The coexistence in several patients of these two rare disorders raises the issue of whether there is indeed a cause-effect association. The detailed clinical descriptions indicate predominant CdLS phenotype, although additional TS manifestations may appear in adolescence.

  11. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (syndrome cases...... are caused by PMS2. This disparity is primarily due to complications in the study of this gene caused by interference from pseudogene sequences. METHODS: Using a recently developed method for detecting PMS2 specific mutations, we have screened 99 patients who are likely candidates for PMS2 mutations based...... on immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n=61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population...

  12. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florijn, Ralph J; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J J M; Mannens, Marcel M A M; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P; Hardcastle, Alison J; Bergen, Arthur A B

    2006-09-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the Netherlands, by dHPLC and direct sequencing. We identified an unique mutation in each family. Three out of these four mutations were not reported before. We report here the first splice site sequence alteration mutation and three protein truncating mutations. Our results suggest that X-linked cataract and NHS are allelic disorders.

  13. Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome: a case report and review of known mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Clare; Devaney, Deirdre; Fischer, Judith; Lenane, Patricia; Irvine, Alan D

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS; Mendelian Inheritance in Man 608649) is classified as a syndromic autosomal recessive ichthyosis. Here we describe two siblings with IPS and report a recurrent homozygous mutation (c.1430T>A) that is predicted to lead to a p.Val477Asp substitution in fatty acid transport protein 4. This mutation has arisen for the second time in an entirely distinct population from the Scandinavian population where it was first described. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cantú Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in ABCC9

    OpenAIRE

    van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Gilissen, Christian; Grange, Dorothy K.; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Kayserili, Hülya; Engels, Hartmut; Reutter, Heiko; Ostergaard, John R.; Morava, Eva; Tsiakas, Konstantinos; Isidor, Bertrand; Le Merrer, Martine; Eser, Metin; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Vries, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cantú syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, neonatal macrosomia, a distinct osteochondrodysplasia, and cardiomegaly. Using an exome-sequencing approach applied to one proband-parent trio and three unrelated single cases, we identified heterozygous mutations in ABCC9 in all probands. With the inclusion of the remaining cohort of ten individuals with Cantú syndrome, a total of eleven mutations in ABCC9 were found. The de novo occurrence in all six simplex cases...

  15. Identification of three novel NHS mutations in families with Nance-Horan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Kristen M.; Wu, Junhua; Brooks, Simon P.; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Lewis, Richard Alan; Stambolian, Dwight

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) is an infrequent and often overlooked X-linked disorder characterized by dense congenital cataracts, microphthalmia, and dental abnormalities. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the NHS gene, whose function is not known. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency and distribution of NHS gene mutations and compare genotype with Nance-Horan phenotype in five North American NHS families. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from white blood cells f...

  16. Multi-layered mutation in hedgehog-related genes in Gorlin syndrome may affect the phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Onodera

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is a genetic disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance that predisposes the affected individual to a variety of disorders that are attributed largely to heterozygous germline patched1 (PTCH1 mutations. PTCH1 is a hedgehog (Hh receptor as well as a repressor, mutation of which leads to constitutive activation of Hh pathway. Hh pathway encompasses a wide variety of cellular signaling cascades, which involve several molecules; however, no associated genotype-phenotype correlations have been reported. Recently, mutations in Suppressor of fused homolog (SUFU or PTCH2 were reported in patients with Gorlin syndrome. These facts suggest that multi-layered mutations in Hh pathway may contribute to the development of Gorlin syndrome. We demonstrated multiple mutations of Hh-related genes in addition to PTCH1, which possibly act in an additive or multiplicative manner and lead to Gorlin syndrome. High-throughput sequencing was performed to analyze exome sequences in four unrelated Gorlin syndrome patient genomes. Mutations in PTCH1 gene were detected in all four patients. Specific nucleotide variations or frameshift variations of PTCH1 were identified along with the inferred amino acid changes in all patients. We further filtered 84 different genes which are closely related to Hh signaling. Fifty three of these had enough coverage of over ×30. The sequencing results were filtered and compared to reduce the number of sequence variants identified in each of the affected individuals. We discovered three genes, PTCH2, BOC, and WNT9b, with mutations with a predicted functional impact assessed by MutationTaster2 or PolyPhen-2 (Polymorphism Phenotyping v2 analysis. It is noticeable that PTCH2 and BOC are Hh receptor molecules. No significant mutations were observed in SUFU. Multi-layered mutations in Hh pathway may change the activation level of the Hh signals, which may explain the wide phenotypic variability of Gorlin syndrome.

  17. EIF2S3 Mutations Associated with Severe X-Linked Intellectual Disability Syndrome MEHMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopkova, Martina; Hennig, Friederike; Shin, Byung-Sik; Turner, Clesson E; Stanikova, Daniela; Brennerova, Katarina; Stanik, Juraj; Fischer, Ute; Henden, Lyndal; Müller, Ulrich; Steinberger, Daniela; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Bottani, Armand; Kurdiova, Timea; Ukropec, Jozef; Nyitrayova, Olga; Kolnikova, Miriam; Klimes, Iwar; Borck, Guntram; Bahlo, Melanie; Haas, Stefan A; Kim, Joo-Ran; Lotspeich-Cole, Leda E; Gasperikova, Daniela; Dever, Thomas E; Kalscheuer, Vera M

    2017-04-01

    Impairment of translation initiation and its regulation within the integrated stress response (ISR) and related unfolded-protein response has been identified as a cause of several multisystemic syndromes. Here, we link MEHMO syndrome, whose genetic etiology was unknown, to this group of disorders. MEHMO is a rare X-linked syndrome characterized by profound intellectual disability, epilepsy, hypogonadism and hypogenitalism, microcephaly, and obesity. We have identified a C-terminal frameshift mutation (Ile465Serfs) in the EIF2S3 gene in three families with MEHMO syndrome and a novel maternally inherited missense EIF2S3 variant (c.324T>A; p.Ser108Arg) in another male patient with less severe clinical symptoms. The EIF2S3 gene encodes the γ subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2), crucial for initiation of protein synthesis and regulation of the ISR. Studies in patient fibroblasts confirm increased ISR activation due to the Ile465Serfs mutation and functional assays in yeast demonstrate that the Ile465Serfs mutation impairs eIF2γ function to a greater extent than tested missense mutations, consistent with the more severe clinical phenotype of the Ile465Serfs male mutation carriers. Thus, we propose that more severe EIF2S3 mutations cause the full MEHMO phenotype, while less deleterious mutations cause a milder form of the syndrome with only a subset of the symptoms. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  18. Major contribution from recurrent alterations and MSH6 mutations in the Danish Lynch syndrome population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Wikman, Friedrik P; Hansen, Thomas V O

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of mismatch-repair (MMR) gene mutations have been identified in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndrome. This study presents the population-based Danish MMR gene mutation profile, which contains 138 different MMR gene alterations. Among these, 88...... mutations in 164 families are considered pathogenic and an additional 50 variants from 76 families are considered to represent variants of unknown pathogenicity. The different MMR genes contribute to 40% (MSH2), 29% (MLH1), and 22% (MSH6) of the mutations and the Danish population thus shows a considerably......+2_1667_+8TAAATCAdelinsATTT was identified in 14/58 (24%) MLH1 mutant families. The Danish Lynch syndrome population thus demonstrates that MSH6 mutations and recurrent/founder mutations have a larger contribution than previously recognized, which implies that the MSH6 gene should be included in routine diagnostics...

  19. Sudden infant death syndrome in mice with an inherited mutation in RyR2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathur, Nitin; Sood, Subeena; Wang, Sufen; van Oort, Ralph J.; Sarma, Satyam; Li, Na; Skapura, Darlene G.; Bayle, J. Henri; Valderrábano, Miguel; Wehrens, Xander H. T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor gene (RyR2) have been recently identified in victims of sudden infant death syndrome. The aim of this study was to determine whether a gain-of-function mutation in RyR2 increases the propensity to cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death in young

  20. Genetic Testing for Long-QT Syndrome Distinguishing Pathogenic Mutations From Benign Variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapa, Suraj; Tester, David J.; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Harris-Kerr, Carole; Pungliya, Manish S.; Alders, Marielle; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Background-Genetic testing for long-QT syndrome (LQTS) has diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. Hundreds of causative mutations in 12 known LQTS-susceptibility genes have been identified. Genetic testing that includes the 3 most commonly mutated genes is available clinically.

  1. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria

  2. Muir-Torre Syndrome and founder mismatch repair gene mutations: A long gone historical genetic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, G; Manfredini, M; Tomasi, A; Pellacani, G

    2016-09-10

    A "cancer predisposing syndrome" later labeled as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch Syndrome, was firstly described by Warthin, about one century ago. An increased predisposition to the development of multiple familial tumors is described as characteristic of this syndrome where visceral and cutaneous malignancies may appear at an early age namely endometrial, gastric, small bowel, ureteral and renal pelvis, ovarian, hepatobiliary tract, pancreatic, brain (Turcot Syndrome) and sebaceous glands (Muir-Torre Syndrome). The latter, a variant of Lynch Syndrome, is characterized by the presence of sebaceous skin adenomas, carcinomas and/or keratoacanthomas associated with visceral malignancies. Both Lynch Syndrome and Muir-Torre Syndrome have been recognized due to germline mutations in mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. To date, 56 Lynch Syndrome founder mutations dependent on MLH1, MSH2 and, although less frequently found, MSH6 and PMS2 are described. Some of these founder mutations, principally of MSH2 gene, have been described to cause Muir-Torre phenotype and have been traced in large and outbreed Muir-Torre Syndrome families living in different US and European territories. Due to the evidences of highly specific Muir-Torre phenotypes related to the presence of widespread MSH2 founder mutations, preliminary search for these MSH2 common mutations in individuals carrying sebaceous tumors and/or keratoacanthomas, at early age or in association to visceral and familial tumors, permits cost-effective and time-saving diagnostic strategies for Lynch/Muir-Torre Syndromes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. [Common deafness gene mutations of non-syndromic hearing loss in Liaoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying; Wang, Zheng; Yang, Ning; Hui, Lian; Jiang, Xuejun

    2014-08-01

    Investigate common deafness gene mutations in patients with severe and profound non-syndromic hearing loss in Liaoning in order to understand their hereditary etiologies and characteristics at the molecular level. Peripheral blood samples were obtained and the DNA templates were extracted from 128 non-syndromic hearing loss patients who are sporadic in clinics. The deafness gene chip was applied to detect hot-spot deafness gene mutations including GJB2, GJB3, SLC26A4 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA. Deafness etiology questionnaires, pure tone audiometry, auditory brainstem response, tympanometry and temporal bone CT were also applied. Various types of gene locus mutations were seen in 52 of the 128 patients (40.6%); (1) GJB2 gene mutations (n=22) included c. 235 del C homozygous mutation (n=10), c. 235 del C heterozygous mutation (n=5); c. 176_191 del 16 heterozygous mutation (n=l); c 35 del G heterozygous mutation (n=l); c. 235 del C/c. 299_300 del AT mutation (n=l), c. 235 del C/c. 176_191 del 16 mutation (n=l), c. 35 del G/c. 176_191 del 16 mutation (n=l); c. 299_300 del AT/c. 919-2 A>G mutation (n=l), c. 235 del C/c. 919-2 A>G mutation (n=l). (2) SLC26A4 gene mutations (n=30) included c. 919-2 A>G homozygous mutation (n=6), c. 919-2 A>G heterozygous mutation (n=17), c. 2168 A>G homozygous mutation (n=l), c. 2168 A>G heterozygous mutation (n=2), c. 2168 A>G/c. 919-2 A>G mutation (n=2), c. 919-2 A>G/GJB2 c. 235 del C mutation (n=2); (3) No GJB3 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation. Genetic deafness was confirmed at the gene level in 24 cases (18.8%) and 28 patients (21.9%) were diagnosed as carriers of genetic deafness gene mutations. Genetic deafness occupies a large population in deaf community in Liaoning. Molecular genetic screening for these mutations and genetic counseling are effective methods to prevent the occurrence of hereditary hearing loss and provide theoretical guidance.

  4. Isolated NIPBL missense mutations that cause Cornelia de Lange syndrome alter MAU2 interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braunholz, Diana; Hullings, Melanie; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepcion; Fincher, Christopher T.; Mallozzi, Mark B.; Loy, Elizabeth; Albrecht, Melanie; Kaur, Maninder; Limon, Janusz; Rampuria, Abhinav; Clark, Dinah; Kline, Antonie; Dalski, Andreas; Eckhold, Juliane; Tzschach, Andreas; Hennekam, Raoul; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Wierzba, Jolanta; Krantz, Ian D.; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Kaiser, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS; or Brachmann-de Lange syndrome) is a dominantly inherited congenital malformation disorder with features that include characteristic facies, cognitive delays, growth retardation and limb anomalies. Mutations in nearly 60% of CdLS patients have been identified in

  5. Identification of a novel STAT3 mutation in a patient with hyper-IgE syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Trine; Jakobsen, Marianne A; Larsen, Carsten Schade

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe a patient with hyper-IgE syndrome presenting with recurrent staphylococcal abscesses, pneumonia, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, and report the identification of a novel STAT3 mutation at amino acid position 621, which has not previously been described. In addition, we...... review the immunological, infectious, and genetic features of hyper-IgE syndrome....

  6. Audiometric Characteristics of a Dutch Family with a New Mutation in GATA3 Causing HDR Syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beelen, E. van; Leijendeckers, J.M.; Admiraal, R.J.C.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Snik, A.F.M.; Kunst, H.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a Dutch family with a new mutation (c523_528dup) in GATA3 causing HDR syndrome. HDR syndrome is characterised by hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal defects. In this study, we describe the audiometric characteristics of 5 patients from this family. Their hearing impairment

  7. De novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1 cause Bohring-Opitz syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoischen, Alexander; van Bon, Bregje W M; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín

    2011-01-01

    Bohring-Opitz syndrome is characterized by severe intellectual disability, distinctive facial features and multiple congenital malformations. We sequenced the exomes of three individuals with Bohring-Opitz syndrome and in each identified heterozygous de novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1, which...

  8. A Novel MAPT Mutation Causing Corticobasal Syndrome Led by Progressive Apraxia of Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Charles R; Guerreiro, Rita; Thust, Steffi; Fletcher, Phillip; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Fox, Nick C

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a case of corticobasal syndrome led by progressive apraxia of speech, associated with a novel mutation in exon 10 of the MAPT gene. Genetic bases for progressive apraxia of speech and corticobasal syndrome are only rarely described, and have not been described in conjunction.

  9. Two TP53 germline mutations in a classical Li-Fraumeni syndrome family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hest, Liselotte P.; Ruijs, Mariëlle W. G.; Wagner, Anja; van der Meer, Conny A.; Verhoef, Senno; van 't Veer, Laura J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a combination of tumors including sarcoma, breast cancer, brain tumors, adrenocortical carcinoma and leukemia. Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 are associated with LFS.

  10. Identification of a novel FBN1 gene mutation in a large Pakistani family with Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micheal, S.; Khan, M.I.; Akhtar, F.; Weiss, M.M.; Islam, F.; Ali, M.; Qamar, R.; Maugeri, A.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a novel mutation in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene in a large Pakistani family with autosomal dominant Marfan syndrome (MFS). METHODS: Blood samples were collected of 11 family members affected with Marfan syndrome, and DNA was isolated by phenol-extraction. The coding exons of

  11. Noonan syndrome gain-of-function mutations in NRAS cause zebrafish gastrulation defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runtuwene, V.J.; van Eekelen, M.J.L.; Overvoorde, J.; Rehmann, H.; Yntema, H.G.; Nillesen, W.M.; van Haeringen, A.; van der Burgt, I.; Burgering, B.; den Hertog, J.

    2011-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a relatively common developmental disorder that is characterized by reduced growth, wide-set eyes and congenital heart defects. Noonan syndrome is associated with dysregulation of the Ras-mitogen-activated-protein-kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Recently, two mutations in NRAS

  12. A FBN1 mutation association with different phenotypes of Marfan syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yapeng; Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Mingjie; Du, Binbin; Li, Qiaoli; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Yanzhou

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that patients with different FBN1 mutations often present more considerable phenotypic variation compared to different members of the related family carrying a same mutation. The purpose of our study was to identify pathogenic mutation and provide more information about genotype-phenotypic correlations in a large Chinese family with Marfan syndrome. 15 related family members from a Chinese 4-generation pedigree with Marfan syndrome underwent physical, ophthalmologic, radiological and cardiovascular examinations. The propositus has De Bakey III aortic dissection and didn't fulfill the revised Ghent criteria for Marfan syndrome. Nine family members have ectopia lentis and their echocardiogram was normal. Five other family members have no evidence of Marfan syndrome. Genomic DNA was isolated from blood leukocytes. The exome sequencing was employed on the propositus, then the Sanger sequencing was conducted for mutation verification in other 14 participants of this family. The causative mutation in FBN1 discovered in the propositus was a known heterozygous missense mutation, c.1633T>G (p.R545C), in exon 14 (NM 000138). This same mutation was also identified in all 9 ectopia lentis patients and one unaffected 8-year-old girl. However, the same mutation was not discovered in other 4 unaffected family members. Our data enhance the information of genotype-phenotype correlation owing to FBN1 mutations. To our current knowledge, we firstly reported that the same FBN1 mutation, c. 1633C>T (Arg545Cys), was detected simultaneously in three different cardinal phenotypes (ectopia lentis, aortic dissection and unaffected) within one family. The unaffected girl with FBN1 mutation may presumably represent a rare case of nonpenetrance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Recessive mutations in EPG5 cause Vici syndrome, a multisystem disorder with defective autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Cullup, Thomas; Kho, Ay L.; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Brandmeier, Birgit; Smith, Frances; Urry, Zoe; Simpson, Michael A.; Yau, Shu; Bertini, Enrico; McClelland, Verity; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Koelker, Stefan; Koerner, Christian; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Wijburg, Frits A.

    2012-01-01

    Vici syndrome is a recessively inherited multisystem disorder characterized by callosal agenesis, cataracts, cardiomyopathy, combined immunodeficiency and hypopigmentation. To investigate the molecular basis of Vici syndrome, we carried out exome and Sanger sequence analysis in a cohort of 18 patients. We identified recessive mutations in EPG5 (previously KIAA1632), indicating a causative role in Vici syndrome. EPG5 is the human homologue of the metazoan-specific autophagy gene epg-5, encodin...

  14. Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the fibrillin-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elçioglu, N H; Akalin, F; Elçioglu, M; Comeglio, P; Child, A H

    2004-01-01

    Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the Fibrillin-1 gene: We describe a male infant with severe arachnodactyly, hypermobility of the fingers, flexion contractures of elbows, wrists, hips, and knees, microretrognathia, crumpled ears, rockerbottom feet, loose redundant skin, and lens dislocations. Cardiac valve insufficiency and aortic dilatation resulted in cardiac failure, decompensated with digitalisation and death occurred at the age of 4 months. This case represents the severe end of the clinical spectrum of Marfan syndrome, namely neonatal Marfan syndrome. Molecular diagnostic analyses confirmed a de novo exon 25 mutation in the FBN1 gene.

  15. Molecular Basis of DFNB73: Mutations of BSND Can Cause Nonsyndromic Deafness or Bartter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazuddin, Saima; Anwar, Saima; Fischer, Martin; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Khan, Shahid Y.; Janssen, Audrey G.H.; Zafar, Ahmad U.; Scholl, Ute; Husnain, Tayyab; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Friedman, Penelope L.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B.; Fahlke, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    BSND encodes barttin, an accessory subunit of renal and inner ear chloride channels. To date, all mutations of BSND have been shown to cause Bartter syndrome type IV, characterized by significant renal abnormalities and deafness. We identified a BSND mutation (p.I12T) in four kindreds segregating nonsyndromic deafness linked to a 4.04-cM interval on chromosome 1p32.3. The functional consequences of p.I12T differ from BSND mutations that cause renal failure and deafness in Bartter syndrome type IV. p.I12T leaves chloride channel function unaffected and only interferes with chaperone function of barttin in intracellular trafficking. This study provides functional data implicating a hypomorphic allele of BSND as a cause of apparent nonsyndromic deafness. We demonstrate that BSND mutations with different functional consequences are the basis for either syndromic or nonsyndromic deafness. PMID:19646679

  16. Functional assessment of compound mutations in the KCNQ1 and KCNH2 genes associated with long QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Behr, Elijah Raphael; Calloe, Kirstine

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiovascular disorder characterized by prolonged QTc time, syncope, or sudden death caused by torsades de pointes and ventricular fibrillation. We investigated the clinical and electrophysiologic phenotype of individual mutations and the compound mutations...

  17. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome--a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian H; Pedersen, Lisbeth N; Berglund, Agnethe; Jensen, Henrik K; Andersen, Niels H; Gravholt, Claus H

    2013-01-01

    QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc) over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype. Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88) were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%), and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett's (bQTc) and Hodges's formula (hQTc). The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms). Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done. The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0 ± 25.5 ms) compared to controls (390.4 ± 17.8 ms) was prolonged (pTurner syndrome karyotypes (418.2 ± 24.8 vs. 407.6 ± 25.5 ms; p = 0.055). In women with Turner syndrome and a bQTc >432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2) and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2). There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women. NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E.

  18. Very mild features of dysequilibrium syndrome associated with a novel VLDLR missense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micalizzi, Alessia; Moroni, Isabella; Ginevrino, Monia; Biagini, Tommaso; Mazza, Tommaso; Romani, Marta; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-07-01

    Dysequilibrium syndrome (DES) is a non-progressive congenital ataxia characterized by severe intellectual deficit, truncal ataxia and markedly delayed, quadrupedal or absent ambulation. Recessive loss-of-function mutations in the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) gene represent the most common cause of DES. Only two families have been reported harbouring homozygous missense mutations, both with a similarly severe phenotype. We report an Italian girl with very mild DES caused by the novel homozygous VLDLR missense mutation p.(C419Y). This unusually benign phenotype possibly relates to a less disruptive effect of the mutation, falling within a domain (EGF-B) not predicted as crucial for the protein function.

  19. Mutations in PAX3 that cause Waardenburg syndrome type I: Ten new mutations and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, C.T.; Hoth, C.F.; Milunsky, A. [Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-28

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, and pigmentary disturbances, and it represents the most common form of inherited deafness in infants. WS type I is characterized by the presence of dystopia canthorum, while individuals with WS type II have normally-located canthi. WS type III is similar to WS type I but is also characterized by musculoskeletal abnormalities. Defects in the PAX3 gene, a transcription factor expressed during embryonic development, have been shown to cause WS types I and III in several families. In contrast, mutations in PAX3 do not cause WS type II, and linkage of the disease to other chromosomal regions has been demonstrated. We describe 10 additional mutations in the PAX3 gene in families with WS type I. Eight of these mutations are in the region of PAX3, where only one mutation has been previously described. These mutations, together with those previously reported, cover essentially the entire PAX3 gene and represent a wide spectrum of mutations that can cause WS type I. Thus far, all but one of the mutations are private; only one mutation has been reported in two apparently unrelated families. Our analysis thus far demonstrates little correlation between genotype and phenotype; deletions of the entire PAX3 gene result in phenotypes indistinguishable from those associated with single-base substitutions in the paired domain or homeodomain of PAX3. Moreover, two similar mutations in close proximity can result in significantly different phenotypes, WS type I in one family and WS type III in another. 47 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. A novel ICK mutation causes ciliary disruption and lethal endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Machteld M; Bonnard, Carine; Mans, Dorus A; Altunoglu, Umut; Tohari, Sumanty; Ng, Alvin Yu Jin; Eskin, Ascia; Lee, Hane; Rupar, C Anthony; de Wagenaar, Nathalie P; Wu, Ka Man; Lahiry, Piya; Pazour, Gregory J; Nelson, Stanley F; Hegele, Robert A; Roepman, Ronald; Kayserili, Hülya; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Siu, Victoria M; Reversade, Bruno; Arts, Heleen H

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome [MIM:612651] caused by a recessive mutation (p.R272Q) in Intestinal cell kinase (ICK) shows significant clinical overlap with ciliary disorders. Similarities are strongest between ECO syndrome, the Majewski and Mohr-Majewski short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with polydactyly syndromes, and hydrolethalus syndrome. In this study, we present a novel homozygous ICK mutation in a fetus with ECO syndrome and compare the effect of this mutation with the previously reported ICK variant on ciliogenesis and cilium morphology. Through homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a second variant (c.358G > T; p.G120C) in ICK in a Turkish fetus presenting with ECO syndrome. In vitro studies of wild-type and mutant mRFP-ICK (p.G120C and p.R272Q) revealed that, in contrast to the wild-type protein that localizes along the ciliary axoneme and/or is present in the ciliary base, mutant proteins rather enrich in the ciliary tip. In addition, immunocytochemistry revealed a decreased number of cilia in ICK p.R272Q-affected cells. Through identification of a novel ICK mutation, we confirm that disruption of ICK causes ECO syndrome, which clinically overlaps with the spectrum of ciliopathies. Expression of ICK-mutated proteins result in an abnormal ciliary localization compared to wild-type protein. Primary fibroblasts derived from an individual with ECO syndrome display ciliogenesis defects. In aggregate, our findings are consistent with recent reports that show that ICK regulates ciliary biology in vitro and in mice, confirming that ECO syndrome is a severe ciliopathy.

  1. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome and PCWH associated with SOX10 mutations : A case report and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, Johanna B G M; Sival, Deborah A; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Vos, Yvonne J; Meiners, Linda C; Brouwer, Oebele F; van Essen, Anthonie J

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome is a rare congenital disorder with variable clinical expression, characterised by aganglionosis of the rectosigmoid (Hirschsprung disease), and abnormal melanocyte migration, resulting in pigmentary abnormalities and sensorineural deafness (Waardenburg syndrome). Mutations

  2. Lynch Syndrome Caused by Germline PMS2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Brohet, Richard M; Tops, Carli M

    2015-01-01

    years, and there was a significant difference in mean age of CRC between the probands (mean, 47 years; range, 26 to 68 years) and other family members with a PMS2 mutation (mean, 58 years; range, 31 to 86 years; P cancers of the small bowel, ovaries, breast...... families, suggesting the influence of genetic modifiers and lifestyle factors on cancer risks.......PURPOSE: The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. METHODS: Data were collected from 98...

  3. Hyper-immunoglobulin D syndrome with novel mutations in an afebrile infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadmus, Simi D; Green, Reid; Carrasco, Ruy; Levy, Moise L; Diaz, Lucia Z

    2018-03-30

    Hyper-immunoglobulin D syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive autoinflammatory syndrome in which a mevalonate kinase deficiency results due to mutations of the mevalonate kinase gene. We report a case of an Asian male infant who was found to have hyper-immunoglobulin D syndrome in the absence of fever. His skin manifestations included cephalic pustulosis as well recurrent transient and fixed pink plaques and nodules on the face and extremities. Subsequent examination revealed hyper-immunoglobulin D syndrome with two novel allelic mutations in the mevalonate kinase gene: c.895G > A (p.D299N) and c.1168C > T (p.Q390). It is important for dermatologists to recognize the varied cutaneous presentations of hyper-immunoglobulin D syndrome because rapid diagnosis and treatment can significantly affect outcomes. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Identification of four novel mutations of the WFS1 gene in Iranian Wolfram syndrome pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahraman, Martha; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Vakili, Rahim; Hosseini, Sousan; Fardi Golyan, Fatemeh; Ghaemi, Nosrat; Forghanifard, Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance characterized by various clinical manifestations. The related gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane glycoprotein, named wolframin. Genetic analyses demonstrated that mutations in this gene are associated with WS type 1. Our aim in this study was to sequence WFS1 coding region in Iranian Wolfram syndrome pedigrees. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 12 WS patients and their healthy parents. Exons 2-8 and the exon-intron junctions of WFS1 were sequenced. DNA sequences were compared to the reference using Sequencher software. Molecular analysis of WFS1 revealed six different mutations. Four novel and two previously reported mutations were identified. One novel mutation, c.1379_1381del, is predicted to produce an aberrant protein. A second novel mutation, c.1384G > T, encodes a truncated protein. Novel mutation, c.1097-1107dup (11 bp), causes a frameshift which results in a premature stop codon. We screened for the novel missense mutation, c.1010C > T, in 100 control alleles. This mutation was not found in any of the healthy controls. Our study increased the spectrum of WFS1 mutations and supported the role of WFS1 in susceptibility to WS. We hope that these findings open new horizons to future molecular investigations which may help to prevent and treat this devastating disease.

  5. First Japanese case of Pierson syndrome with mutations in LAMB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togawa, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Koichi; Mukaiyama, Hironobu; Hama, Taketsugu; Shima, Yuko; Nakano, Masaru; Fujita, Naoya; Iijima, Kazumoto; Yoshikawa, Norishige

    2013-04-01

    Pierson syndrome (OMIM 609049) is typically characterized by congenital nephritic syndrome and peculiar ocular anomalies with microcoria. It is caused by mutations in LAMB2, which encodes laminin β2. Approximately 50 mutations of LAMB2 from approximately 40 unrelated families have been identified; however, most of them were from Western countries. Although three patients in Asia with mutations of LAMB2 have been reported, they were not typical cases. We report the first Japanese case of Pierson syndrome with proven causative LAMB2 mutations. She presented with congenital nephrotic syndrome and bilateral microcoria at birth, and developed end-stage renal disease at 2 months of age. This is the first report of a typical case from Asia. LAMB2 analysis by direct sequencing revealed the compound heterozygous mutations c.3974_3975insA (p.N1325KfsX1331, maternal, novel) in exon 25 and c.4519C>T (p.Q1507X, paternal) in exon 27. The phenotype due to LAMB2 mutations appears to be similar between different ethnic groups. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  6. c.376G>A mutation in WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome without deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarpour Lima, Behnam; Ghaedi, Hamid; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Jamshidi, Javad; Khorrami, Mehdi; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sohrabifar, Nasim; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Hesami, Omid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Rahimi-Aliabadi, Simin; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Alehabib, Elham; Andarva, Monavvar; Darvish, Hossein; Emamalizadeh, Babak

    2016-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is one of the rare autosomal recessive, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Several other features are observed in patients including deafness, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. A gene called WFS1 is identified on chromosome 4p, responsible for Wolfram syndrome. We investigated a family consisted of parents and 8 children, which 5 of them have been diagnosed for Wolfram syndrome. WFS1 gene in all family members was sequenced for causative mutations. A mutation (c.376G>A, p.A126T) was found in all affected members in homozygous state and in both parents in heterozygous state. The bioinformatics analysis showed the deleterious effects of this nucleotide change on the structure and function of the protein product. As all of the patients in the family showed the homozygote mutation, and parents were both heterozygote, this mutation is probably the cause of the disease. We identified this mutation in homozygous state for the first time as Wolfram syndrome causation. We also showed that this mutation probably doesn't cause deafness in affected individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. [Gene mutation and clinical phenotype analysis of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X H; Ding, W W; Han, L; Liu, X R; Xiao, Y Y; Yang, J; Mo, Y

    2017-10-02

    Objective: To analyze the gene mutations and clinical features of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Method: Determined the mutation domain in five cases diagnosed with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and identified the relationship between the mutant domain and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by searching relevant articles in pubmed database. Result: Three mutant genes (PTPN11 gene in chromosome 12, RIT1 gene in chromosome 1 and RAF1 gene in chromosome 3) in five cases all had been reported to be related to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The reported hypertrophic cardiomyopathy relevant genes MYPN, MYH6 and MYBP3 had also been found in case 1 and 2. Patients with same gene mutation had different clinical manifestations. Both case 4 and 5 had RAF1 mutation (c.770C>T). However, case 4 had special face, low IQ, mild pulmonary artery stenosis, and only mild ventricular hypertrophy. Conclusion: Noonan syndrome is a genetic heterogeneity disease. Our study identified specific gene mutations that could result in Noonan syndrome with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy through molecular biology methods. The results emphasize the importance of gene detection in the management of Noonan syndrome.

  8. Three cases with L1 syndrome and two novel mutations in the L1CAM gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Rosario; Ley-Martos, Miriam; Gutiérrez, Gema; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Felicidad; Arroyo, Diego; Mora-López, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in the L1CAM gene have been identified in the following various X-linked neurological disorders: congenital hydrocephalus; mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, and adducted thumbs (MASA) syndrome; spastic paraplegia; and agenesis of the corpus callosum. These conditions are currently considered different phenotypes of a single entity known as L1 syndrome. We present three families with L1 syndrome. Sequencing of the L1CAM gene allowed the identification of the following mutations involved: a known splicing mutation (c.3531-12G>A) and two novel ones: a missense mutation (c.1754A>C; p.Asp585Ala) and a nonsense mutation (c.3478C>T; p.Gln1160Stop). The number of affected males and carrier females identified in a relatively small population suggests that L1 syndrome may be under-diagnosed. L1 syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intellectual disability or mental retardation in children, especially when other signs such as hydrocephalus or adducted thumbs are present.

  9. Wolfram syndrome in the Polish population: novel mutations and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmyslowska, A; Borowiec, M; Antosik, K; Szalecki, M; Stefanski, A; Iwaniszewska, B; Jedrzejczyk, M; Pietrzak, I; Mlynarski, W

    2011-11-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare form of diabetes mellitus associated with optic atrophy and disorders of different organs (e.g. diabetes insipidus, hearing loss, ataxia, anaemia and many others). This syndrome is caused by recessive mutations in the wolframin gene (WFS1) localized on chromosome 4p16·1. The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutations in WFS1 in a group of Polish patients with suspected Wolfram syndrome. Nine patients with clinical symptoms consistent with Wolfram syndrome (at least diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy) and 22 first-degree relatives were examined. The molecular analysis was carried out by direct sequencing of the exons, the exon-intron junctions, and the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of WFS1. Nine different mutations in WFS1 (five of them novel) were identified in the nine patients. Six patients were homozygous for the following mutations: V412fs, S443R, W539X, V659fs. They developed diabetes at a mean age of 5·2 years. Three patients were compound-heterozygous for the following mutations: S167fs, Q392X, Y513fs, W648X, V779G. They developed diabetes at a mean age of 6·5 years. Mean age of diagnosis of diabetes among the Polish patients was typical for Wolfram syndrome; however, compound-heterozygous patients were slightly older at diabetes onset. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Functional Study of Ectodysplasin-A Mutations Causing Non-Syndromic Tooth Agenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Haochen; Zhao, Hongshan; Zhang, Guozhong; Snead, Malcolm L.; Han, Dong; Feng, Hailan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that ectodysplasin-A (EDA) mutations are associated with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. Indeed, we were the first to report three novel EDA mutations (A259E, R289C and R334H) in sporadic non-syndromic tooth agenesis. We studied the mechanism linking EDA mutations and non-syndromic tooth agenesis in human embryonic kidney 293T cells and mouse ameloblast-derived LS8 cells transfected with mutant isoforms of EDA. The receptor binding capability of the mutant EDA1 protein was impaired in comparison to wild-type EDA1. Although the non-syndromic tooth agenesis-causing EDA1 mutants possessed residual binding capability, the transcriptional activation of the receptor’s downstream target, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), was compromised. We also analyzed the changes of selected genes in other signaling pathways, such as WNT and BMP, after EDA mutation. We found that non-syndromic tooth agenesis-causing EDA1 mutant proteins upregulate BMP4 (bone morphogenetic protein 4) mRNA expression and downregulate WNT10A and WNT10B (wingless-type MMTV integration site family member 10A and 10B) mRNA expression. Our results indicated that non-syndromic tooth agenesis causing EDA mutations (A259E, R289C and R334H) were loss-of-function, and suggested that EDA may regulate the expression of WNT10A, WNT10B and BMP4 via NF-κB during tooth development. The results from our study may help to understand the molecular mechanism linking specific EDA mutations with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. PMID:27144394

  11. Kallmann syndrome: mutations in the genes encoding prokineticin-2 and prokineticin receptor-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Dodé

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome combines anosmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis, and hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency. Loss-of-function mutations in KAL1 and FGFR1 underlie the X chromosome-linked form and an autosomal dominant form of the disease, respectively. Mutations in these genes, however, only account for approximately 20% of all Kallmann syndrome cases. In a cohort of 192 patients we took a candidate gene strategy and identified ten and four different point mutations in the genes encoding the G protein-coupled prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2 and one of its ligands, prokineticin-2 (PROK2, respectively. The mutations in PROK2 were detected in the heterozygous state, whereas PROKR2 mutations were found in the heterozygous, homozygous, or compound heterozygous state. In addition, one of the patients heterozygous for a PROKR2 mutation was also carrying a missense mutation in KAL1, thus indicating a possible digenic inheritance of the disease in this individual. These findings reveal that insufficient prokineticin-signaling through PROKR2 leads to abnormal development of the olfactory system and reproductive axis in man. They also shed new light on the complex genetic transmission of Kallmann syndrome.

  12. Tumor protein 53 mutations and inherited cancer: beyond Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Edenir I; Achatz, Maria Iw; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Olivier, Magali; Hainaut, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Germline TP53 (tumor protein 53) mutations are the molecular basis of a complex cancer predisposition syndrome, the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The present review discusses the diversity of tumor patterns in TP53 mutation carriers, focusing on molecular factors that may explain familial and individual differences, such as genotype/phenotype correlations, genetic modifiers and genetic anticipation. Initially identified 20 years ago, germline TP53 mutations appear to be associated with an extremely diverse range of cancers. Although no other gene has been found in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, recent results show that the functional effects of particular mutations, polymorphisms in TP53 or in regulators such as MDM2 (murine double minute 2), variations in DNA copy number and variations in telomere length, have a strong impact on individual risk and on tumor patterns. Furthermore, recent studies in large cohorts suggest that TP53 germline mutations may occur in up to 1: 5000 individuals. Germline TP53 mutations may be responsible for a large fraction (15-20%) of all inherited cancers. Although mutations are detectable by sequencing, counseling and follow-up remain problematic due to the wide variations in disease presentation. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the predisposition caused by TP53 deficiency may help to develop better, evidence-based and personalized clinical protocols.

  13. Mutation spectrum of MLL2 in a cohort of kabuki syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renieri Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kabuki syndrome (Niikawa-Kuroki syndrome is a rare, multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome characterized by a peculiar face, short stature, skeletal, visceral and dermatoglyphic abnormalities, cardiac anomalies, and immunological defects. Recently mutations in the histone methyl transferase MLL2 gene have been identified as its underlying cause. Methods Genomic DNAs were extracted from 62 index patients clinically diagnosed as affected by Kabuki syndrome. Sanger sequencing was performed to analyze the whole coding region of the MLL2 gene including intron-exon junctions. The putative causal and possible functional effect of each nucleotide variant identified was estimated by in silico prediction tools. Results We identified 45 patients with MLL2 nucleotide variants. 38 out of the 42 variants were never described before. Consistently with previous reports, the majority are nonsense or frameshift mutations predicted to generate a truncated polypeptide. We also identified 3 indel, 7 missense and 3 splice site. Conclusions This study emphasizes the relevance of mutational screening of the MLL2 gene among patients diagnosed with Kabuki syndrome. The identification of a large spectrum of MLL2 mutations possibly offers the opportunity to improve the actual knowledge on the clinical basis of this multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome, design functional studies to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease, establish genotype-phenotype correlations and improve clinical management.

  14. NHS Gene Mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish Families with Nance-Horan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshany, Nadav; Avni, Isaac; Morad, Yair; Weiner, Chen; Einan-Lifshitz, Adi; Pras, Eran

    2017-09-01

    To describe ocular and extraocular abnormalities in two Ashkenazi Jewish families with infantile cataract and X-linked inheritance, and to identify their underlying mutations. Seven affected members were recruited. Medical history, clinical findings, and biometric measurements were recorded. Mutation analysis of the Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) gene was performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified exons. An unusual anterior Y-sutural cataract was documented in the affected male proband. Other clinical features among examined patients included microcorneas, long and narrow faces, and current or previous dental anomalies. A nonsense mutation was identified in each family, including a previously described 742 C>T, p.(Arg248*) mutation in Family A, and a novel mutation 2915 C>A, p.(Ser972*) in Family B. Our study expands the repertoire of NHS mutations and the related phenotype, including newly described anterior Y-sutural cataract and dental findings.

  15. Mutations du gene de la filamine et syndromes malformatifs | Koffi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Filamin is a cytoskeletal protein that occurs in the control of cytoskeleton structure and activity, the modulation of cell shape and migration as well as in the maintaining of cell shape. Mutations in the genes FLNA and FLNB provoke diverse malformative diseases in human. Mutations in the gene FLNA cause four X-Linked ...

  16. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudding Tracy

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1 gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other, resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57% occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident.

  17. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hoa T; Dudding, Tracy; Blanchard, Christopher L; Elsea, Sarah H

    2010-10-08

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC) in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other), resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57%) occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels) and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident.

  18. Cochleosaccular Dysplasia Associated With a Connexin 26 Mutation in Keratitis–Ichthyosis–Deafness Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Andrew J.; Yang, Yandan; Pryor, Shannon P.; Park, Hong-Joon; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Nadol, Joseph B.; Russell, Laura J.; Wasserman, Daniel I.; Richard, Gabriele; Adams, Joe C.; Merchant, Saumil N.

    2007-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to characterize the temporal bone phenotype associated with a mutation of GJB2 (encoding connexin 26). Study Design The authors conducted correlative clinical, molecular genetic, and postmortem histopatho-logic analysis. Methods The study subject was a male infant with keratitis–ichthyosis–deafness (KID) syndrome. We performed a nucleotide sequence analysis of GJB2 and a histopathologic analysis of the temporal bones. Results The subject was heterozygous for G45E, a previously reported KID syndrome mutation of GJB2. The primary inner ear abnormality was dysplasia of the cochlear and saccular neuroepithelium. Conclusions GJB2 mutations can cause deafness in KID syndrome, and possibly in other GJB2 mutant phenotypes, by disrupting cochlear differentiation. PMID:16885744

  19. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome in an Indonesian patient with folliculin gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiyono, Wiwien Heru; Nurwidya, Fariz; Baskoro, Hario; Putra, Andika Chandra

    2016-11-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder that affects the skin, kidney, and lungs. Affected individuals have an increased risk of developing multiple cysts in the lungs and a spontaneous pneumothorax. Germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene have been confirmed as the aetiology of BHD syndrome. A 51-year-old Indonesian female presented with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax, multiple cysts in both lungs, and a renal cyst on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Blood sampling was performed to extract genomic DNA from peripheral blood leucocytes. We identified an aberrant band in the DNA fragment derived from FLCN exon 6. Moreover, direct sequencing of FLCN exon 6 by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) showed a pathogenic mutation, which caused premature termination of folliculin protein translation. This is the first reported case of BHD syndrome in an Indonesian patient confirmed by detection of a FLCN exon 6 mutation.

  20. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome--a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Trolle

    Full Text Available QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype.Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88 were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%, and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett's (bQTc and Hodges's formula (hQTc. The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms. Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done.The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0 ± 25.5 ms compared to controls (390.4 ± 17.8 ms was prolonged (p432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2 and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2.There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women.NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E.

  1. Identification of three novel NHS mutations in families with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kristen M; Wu, Junhua; Brooks, Simon P; Hardcastle, Alison J; Lewis, Richard Alan; Stambolian, Dwight

    2007-03-27

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) is an infrequent and often overlooked X-linked disorder characterized by dense congenital cataracts, microphthalmia, and dental abnormalities. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the NHS gene, whose function is not known. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency and distribution of NHS gene mutations and compare genotype with Nance-Horan phenotype in five North American NHS families. Genomic DNA was isolated from white blood cells from NHS patients and family members. The NHS gene coding region and its splice site donor and acceptor regions were amplified from genomic DNA by PCR, and the amplicons were sequenced directly. We identified three unique NHS coding region mutations in these NHS families. This report extends the number of unique identified NHS mutations to 14.

  2. De novo SHANK3 mutation causes Rett syndrome-like phenotype in a female patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Munetsugu; Ohba, Chihiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder predominantly affecting females. Females with the MECP2 mutations exhibit a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from classical Rett syndrome to asymptomatic carriers. Mutations of genes encoding cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) are also found in early onset RTT variants. Here, we present the first report of a female patient with RTT-like phenotype caused by SHANK3 (SH3 and multiple ankylin repeat domain 3) mutation, indicating that the clinical spectrum of SHANK3 mutations may extend to RTT-like phenotype in addition to (severe) developmental delay, absence of expressive speech, autistic behaviors and intellectual disability. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Nonfamilial Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Exon 5 Novel Mutation in SMAD 4 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amna Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary disorder, characterized by multiple juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. JPS is most frequently caused by mutations in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A genes. Herein, we report a child with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS with a novel mutation in the SMAD4 gene. An 8-year-old boy presented with recurrent rectal bleeding and was found to have multiple polyps in the entire colon. The histology of the resected polyps was consistent with juvenile polyps. Subsequent genetic screening revealed a novel mutation in SMAD4, exon 5 (p.Ser144Stop. To the best of our knowledge, this mutation has not been reported before. Offering genotypic diagnosis for patients with JPS is an important step for strategic plan of management.

  4. Novel mutations in EVC cause aberrant splicing in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lisong; Luo, Chunyan; Ahmed, Mairaj K; Attaie, Ali B; Ye, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate chondrodysplasia, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, dental abnormalities and in a proportion of patients, congenital cardiac malformations. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyers) is another dominantly inherited disorder allelic to EvC syndrome but with milder phenotypes. Both disorders can result from loss-of-function mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene, and phenotypes associated with the two gene mutations are clinically indistinguishable. We present here a clinical and molecular analysis of a Chinese family manifested specific features of EvC syndrome. Sequencing of both EVC and EVC2 identified two novel heterozygous splice site mutations c.384+5G>C in intron 3 and c.1465-1G>A in intron 10 in EVC, which were inherited from mother and father, respectively. In vitro minigene expression assay, RT-PCR and sequencing analysis demonstrated that c.384+5G>C mutation abolished normal splice site and created a new cryptic acceptor site within exon 4, whereas c.1465-1G>A mutation affected consensus splice junction site and resulted in full exon 11 skipping. These two aberrant pre-mRNA splicing processes both produced in-frame abnormal transcripts that possibly led to abolishment of important functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of EVC mutations that cause EvC syndrome in Chinese population. Our data revealed that EVC splice site mutations altered splicing pattern and helped elucidate the pathogenesis of EvC syndrome.

  5. Numerous BAF complex genes are mutated in Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Noriko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-09-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS; OMIM#135900) is a rare congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by intellectual disability, coarse face, hypertrichosis, and absence/hypoplasia of the fifth digits' nails. As the majority of patients are sporadic, an autosomal dominant inheritance model has been postulated. Recently, whole exome sequencing (WES) emerged as a comprehensive analytical method for rare variants. We applied WES on five CSS patients and found two de novo mutations in SMARCB1. SMARCB1 was completely sequenced in 23 CSS patients and the mutations were found in two more patients. As SMARCB1 encodes a subunit of the BAF complex functioning as a chromatin remodeling factor, mutations in 15 other subunit genes may cause CSS and thus were analyzed in 23 CSS patients. We identified heterozygous mutations in either of six genes (SMARCA4, SMARCB1, SMARCA2, SMARCE1, ARID1A, and ARID1B) in 20 out of 23 CSS patients. The patient with a SMARCA2 mutation was re-evaluated and identified as having Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (OMIM#601358), which is similar to but different from CSS. Additionally, 49 more CSS patients were analyzed as a second cohort. Together with the first cohort, 37 out of 71 (22 plus 49) patients were found to have a mutation in either one of five BAF complex genes. Furthermore, two CSS patients were reported to have a PHF6 abnormality, which can also cause Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome (OMIM#301900), an X-linked intellectual disability syndrome with epilepsy and endocrine abnormalities. The current list of mutated genes in CSS is far from being complete and analysis of more patients is required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Comprehensive Mutation Analysis of PMS2 in a Large Cohort of Probands Suspected of Lynch Syndrome or Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Klift, Heleen M.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Drost, Mark; Bik, Elsa C.; Vos, Yvonne J.; Gille, Hans J. J. P.; Redeker, Bert E. J. W.; Tiersma, Yvonne; Zonneveld, José B. M.; García, Encarna Gómez; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Olderode-Berends, Maran J. W.; van Hest, Liselotte P.; van Os, Theo A.; Verhoef, Senno; Wagner, Anja; van Asperen, Christi J.; ten Broeke, Sanne W.; Hes, Frederik J.; de Wind, Niels; Nielsen, Maartje; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Tops, Carli M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Monoallelic PMS2 germline mutations cause 5%-15% of Lynch syndrome, a midlife cancer predisposition, whereas biallelic PMS2 mutations cause approximately 60% of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD), a rare childhood cancer syndrome. Recently improved DNA- and RNA-based strategies are

  7. Comprehensive Mutation Analysis of PMS2 in a Large Cohort of Probands Suspected of Lynch Syndrome or Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency (CMMRD) Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Klift, Heleen M; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Drost, Mark; Bik, Elsa C; Vos, Yvonne J; Gille, Hans J J P; Redeker, Bert E J W; Tiersma, Yvonne; Zonneveld, José B M; García, Encarna Gómez; Letteboer, Tom G W; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; van Hest, Liselotte P; van Os, Theo A; Verhoef, Senno; Wagner, Anja; van Asperen, Christi J; Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Hes, Frederik J; de Wind, Niels; Nielsen, Maartje; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Wijnen, Juul T; Tops, Carli M J

    2016-01-01

    Monoallelic PMS2 germline mutations cause 5-15% of Lynch syndrome, a midlife cancer predisposition, whereas biallelic PMS2 mutations cause approximately 60% of constitutional MMR deficiency (CMMRD), a rare childhood cancer syndrome. Recently improved DNA and RNA-based strategies are applied to

  8. Congenital mydriasis and prune belly syndrome in a child with an ACTA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Michael C; Turan, Kadriye Erkan; Khanna, Cheryl L; Patton, Alice; Kirmani, Salman

    2014-08-01

    We report the association of congenital mydriasis with prune belly syndrome and cerebrovascular anomalies in a 9-year-old boy who was found to have an ACTA2 mutation. This case illustrates the spectrum of systemic malformations that are attributable to mutations in ACTA2 and expands the spectrum of cerebrovascular anomalies that are now known to accompany congenital mydriasis. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel PAX3 mutation in a Japanese boy with Waardenburg syndrome type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yu; Doi, Rieko; Adachi, Kaori; Nanba, Eiji; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hair hypopigmentation, abnormal iris pigmentation, and congenital hearing loss. WS1 is caused by mutations in paired box gene 3 (PAX3). We identified a novel PAX3 mutation (c.1107 C>G, p.Ser369Arg) in a Japanese WS1 patient showing abnormal right iris pigmentation, right-sided congenital hearing loss, synophrys, incomplete left cleft lip, and cryptorchidism. PMID:27081571

  10. Mutation in filamin A causes periventricular heterotopia, developmental regression, and West syndrome in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masruha, Marcelo R; Caboclo, Luis O S F; Carrete, Henrique; Cendes, Iscia L; Rodrigues, Murilo G; Garzon, Eliana; Yacubian, Elza M T; Sakamoto, Américo C; Sheen, Volney; Harney, Megan; Neal, Jason; Hill, R Sean; Bodell, Adria; Walsh, Christopher; Vilanova, Luiz C P

    2006-01-01

    Familial periventricular heterotopia (PH) represents a disorder of neuronal migration resulting in multiple gray-matter nodules along the lateral ventricular walls. Prior studies have shown that mutations in the filamin A (FLNA) gene can cause PH through an X-linked dominant pattern. Heterozygotic female patients usually remain asymptomatic until the second or third decade of life, when they may have predominantly focal seizures, whereas hemizygotic male fetuses typically die in utero. Recent studies have also reported mutations in FLNA in male patients with PH who are cognitively normal. We describe PH in three male siblings with PH due to FLNA, severe developmental regression, and West syndrome. The study includes the three affected brothers and their parents. Video-EEG recordings and magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanning were performed on all individuals. Mutations for FLNA were detected by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on genomic DNA followed by single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis or sequencing. Two of the siblings are monozygotic twins, and all had West syndrome with hypsarrhythmia on EEG. MRI of the brain revealed periventricular nodules of cerebral gray-matter intensity, typical for PH. Mutational analyses demonstrated a cytosine-to-thymidine missense mutation (c. C1286T), resulting in a threonine-to-methionine amino acid substitution in exon 9 of the FLNA gene. The association between PH and West syndrome, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported. Males with PH have been known to harbor FLNA mutations, although uniformly, they either show early lethality or survive and have a normal intellect. The current studies show that FLNA mutations can cause periventricular heterotopia, developmental regression, and West syndrome in male patients, suggesting that this type of FLNA mutation may contribute to severe neurologic deficits.

  11. Mutation spectrum in South American Lynch syndrome families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Nilbert, Mef; Wernhoff, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome have recently been introduced in several South American countries, though yet not available in the public health care system.......Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome have recently been introduced in several South American countries, though yet not available in the public health care system....

  12. A family with Townes-Brocks syndrome with congenital hypothyroidism and a novel mutation of the SALL1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Ik; Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, Han Wook; Oh, Sung Hee

    2010-12-01

    Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is a rare autosomal dominant congenital disorder caused by mutations in the SALL1 gene. Its signs and symptoms overlap with other genetic syndromes, including VACTERL association, Pendred syndrome, Baller-Gerold syndrome, and cat eye syndrome. Structural vertebral abnormalities, hypoplasia of the thumb, and radial bone abnormalities, which are not usually associated with TBS, help in the differential diagnosis of these syndromes. We report the case of a family whose members were diagnosed with TBS with congenital hypothyroidism and had a novel SALL1 gene mutation.

  13. Mutations affecting components of the SWI/SNF complex cause Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kosho, Tomoki; Imai, Yoko; Hibi-Ko, Yumiko; Kaname, Tadashi; Naritomi, Kenji; Kawame, Hiroshi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Homma, Tomomi; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Hiraki, Yoko; Yamagata, Takanori; Yano, Shoji; Mizuno, Seiji; Sakazume, Satoru; Ishii, Takuma; Nagai, Toshiro; Shiina, Masaaki; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Ohta, Tohru; Niikawa, Norio; Miyatake, Satoko; Okada, Ippei; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Doi, Hiroshi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-03-18

    By exome sequencing, we found de novo SMARCB1 mutations in two of five individuals with typical Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS), a rare autosomal dominant anomaly syndrome. As SMARCB1 encodes a subunit of the SWItch/Sucrose NonFermenting (SWI/SNF) complex, we screened 15 other genes encoding subunits of this complex in 23 individuals with CSS. Twenty affected individuals (87%) each had a germline mutation in one of six SWI/SNF subunit genes, including SMARCB1, SMARCA4, SMARCA2, SMARCE1, ARID1A and ARID1B.

  14. Nonfamilial Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Exon 5 Novel Mutation in SMAD 4 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Amna; Alsaleem, Badr

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary disorder, characterized by multiple juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. JPS is most frequently caused by mutations in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A genes. Herein, we report a child with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) with a novel mutation in the SMAD4 gene. An 8-year-old boy presented with recurrent rectal bleeding and was found to have multiple polyps in the entire colon. ...

  15. Muckle-Wells syndrome in an Indian family associated with NLRP3 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M C Abdulla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muckle - Wells syndrome (MWS is a rare autosomal dominant disease that belongs to a group of hereditary periodic fever syndromes. It is part of the wider spectrum of the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS which has only rarely been described in non-Caucasian individuals. It is characterized by recurrent self-limiting episodes of fever, urticaria, arthralgia, myalgia and conjunctivitis from childhood. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss and amyloidosis are two late complications. MWS is caused by gain of function mutations in the NLRP3 gene, which encodes cryopyrin, a protein involved in regulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines. We report two patients with MWS in an Indian family associated with the p.D303N mutation in the NLRP3 gene. These findings promote awareness of these hereditary periodic fever syndromes as a cause for recurrent fevers from childhood in the Indian population.

  16. Differential effects of FGFR2 mutations on syndactyly and cleft palate in Apert syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaney, S.F.; Oldridge, M.; Wilkie, A.O.M. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Apert syndrome is a distinctive human malformation characterized by craniosynostosis and severe syndactyly of the hands and feet. It is caused by specific missense substitutions involving adjacent amino acids (Ser252Trp or Pro253Arg) in the linker between the second and third extracellular immunoglobulin domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). We have developed a simple PCR assay for these mutations in genomic DNA, based on the creation of novel SfiI and BstUI restriction sites. Analysis of DNA from 70 unrelated patients with Apert syndrome showed that 45 had the Ser252Trp mutation and 25 had the Pro253Arg mutation. Phenotypic differences between these two groups of patients were investigated. Significant differences were found for severity of syndactyly and presence of cleft palate. The syndactyly was more severe with the Pro253Arg mutation, for both the hands and the feet. In contrast, cleft palate was significantly more common in the Ser252Trp patients. No convincing differences were found in the prevalence of other malformations associated with Apert syndrome. We conclude that, although the phenotype attributable to the two mutations is very similar, there are subtle differences. The opposite trends for severity of syndactyly and cleft palate in relation to the two mutations may relate to the varying patterns of temporal and tissue-specific expression of different fibroblast growth factors, the ligands for FGFR2. 54 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Prostate cancer in a male with Holt-Oram syndrome: first clinical association of the TBX5 mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aherne, Noel J

    2013-08-05

    Holt-Oram syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder which is caused by mutations of TBX5 and is characterised by cardiac and skeletal abnormalities. TBX5 is part of the T-box gene family and is thought to upregulate tumour cell proliferation and metastasis when mutated. We report the first clinical case of prostate cancer in an individual with Holt Oram syndrome.

  18. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation...

  19. A novel mitochondrial mutation m.8989G>C associated with neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa - the NARP syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duno, Morten; Wibrand, Flemming; Baggesen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    The archetypal NARP syndrome is almost exclusively associated with the m.8993T>C/G mutation in the sixth subunit of the mitochondrial ATP synthase, whereas other mutations in the MT-ATP6 gene primarily associate with Leigh syndrome or Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). We report a novel ...

  20. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation ...

  1. A novel nonsense mutation in the WFS1 gene causes the Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorian, Shahab; Savad, Shahram; Mohammadi, Davood Shah

    2016-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, which is mostly caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene. The WFS1 gene product, which is called wolframin, is thought to regulate the function of endoplasmic reticulum. The endoplasmic reticulum has a critical role in protein folding and material transportation within the cell or to the surface of the cell. Identification of new mutations in WFS1 gene will unravel the molecular pathology of WS. The aim of this case report study is to describe a novel mutation in exon 4 of the WFS1 gene (c.330C>A) in a 9-year-old boy with WS.

  2. Phenotype and genotype in 52 patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome caused by EP300 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergelot, Patricia; Van Belzen, Martine; Van Gils, Julien; Afenjar, Alexandra; Armour, Christine M; Arveiler, Benoit; Beets, Lex; Burglen, Lydie; Busa, Tiffany; Collet, Marie; Deforges, Julie; de Vries, Bert B A; Dominguez Garrido, Elena; Dorison, Nathalie; Dupont, Juliette; Francannet, Christine; Garciá-Minaúr, Sixto; Gabau Vila, Elisabeth; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Gener Querol, Blanca; Geneviève, David; Gérard, Marion; Gervasini, Cristina Giovanna; Goldenberg, Alice; Josifova, Dragana; Lachlan, Katherine; Maas, Saskia; Maranda, Bruno; Moilanen, Jukka S; Nordgren, Ann; Parent, Philippe; Rankin, Julia; Reardon, Willie; Rio, Marlène; Roume, Joëlle; Shaw, Adam; Smigiel, Robert; Sojo, Amaia; Solomon, Benjamin; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Stumpel, Constance; Suarez, Francisco; Terhal, Paulien; Thomas, Simon; Touraine, Renaud; Verloes, Alain; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Wincent, Josephine; Peters, Dorien J M; Bartsch, Oliver; Larizza, Lidia; Lacombe, Didier; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2016-12-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a developmental disorder characterized by a typical face and distal limbs abnormalities, intellectual disability, and a vast number of other features. Two genes are known to cause RSTS, CREBBP in 60% and EP300 in 8-10% of clinically diagnosed cases. Both paralogs act in chromatin remodeling and encode for transcriptional co-activators interacting with >400 proteins. Up to now 26 individuals with an EP300 mutation have been published. Here, we describe the phenotype and genotype of 42 unpublished RSTS patients carrying EP300 mutations and intragenic deletions and offer an update on another 10 patients. We compare the data to 308 individuals with CREBBP mutations. We demonstrate that EP300 mutations cause a phenotype that typically resembles the classical RSTS phenotype due to CREBBP mutations to a great extent, although most facial signs are less marked with the exception of a low-hanging columella. The limb anomalies are more similar to those in CREBBP mutated individuals except for angulation of thumbs and halluces which is very uncommon in EP300 mutated individuals. The intellectual disability is variable but typically less marked whereas the microcephaly is more common. All types of mutations occur but truncating mutations and small rearrangements are most common (86%). Missense mutations in the HAT domain are associated with a classical RSTS phenotype but otherwise no genotype-phenotype correlation is detected. Pre-eclampsia occurs in 12/52 mothers of EP300 mutated individuals versus in 2/59 mothers of CREBBP mutated individuals, making pregnancy with an EP300 mutated fetus the strongest known predictor for pre-eclampsia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Mutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, J.; Siekierska, A.; Langlois, M.

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures affect 2-4% of all children(1) and have a strong genetic component(2). Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2)(3-5) have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding...... syntaxin-1B(6), that are associated with both febrile seizures and epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing in independent large pedigrees(7,8) identified cosegregating STX1B mutations predicted to cause an early truncation or an in-frame insertion or deletion. Three additional nonsense or missense mutations....... Wild-type human syntaxin-1B but not a mutated protein rescued the effects of stx1b knockdown in zebrafish. Our results thus implicate STX1B and the presynaptic release machinery in fever-associated epilepsy syndromes....

  4. Reversion of a live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine investigated by parallel mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette S.; Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Forsberg, R.

    2001-01-01

    was sequenced and compared with the parental strain of the vaccine virus (VR2332). This revealed five mutations that had occurred independently in all three vaccine-derived field isolates, indicating strong parallel selective pressure on these positions in the vaccine virus when used in swine herds. Two......A live attenuated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) vaccine virus has been shown to revert to virulence under field conditions. In order to identify genetic virulence determinants, ORF1 from the attenuated vaccine virus and three Danish vaccine-derived field isolates...... of these parallel mutations were direct reversions to the parental VR2332 sequence and were situated in a papain-like cysteine protease domain and in the helicase domain. The remaining parallel mutations mig ht be seen as second-site compensatory mutations for one or more of the mutations that accumulated...

  5. Identification and functional analysis of SOX10 missense mutations in different subtypes of Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoui, Asma; Watanabe, Yuli; Touraine, Renaud; Baral, Viviane; Goossens, Michel; Pingault, Veronique; Bondurand, Nadege

    2011-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder characterized by pigmentation defects and sensorineural deafness, classified into four clinical subtypes, WS1-S4. Whereas the absence of additional features characterizes WS2, association with Hirschsprung disease defines WS4. WS is genetically heterogeneous, with six genes already identified, including SOX10. About 50 heterozygous SOX10 mutations have been described in patients presenting with WS2 or WS4, with or without myelination defects of the peripheral and central nervous system (PCWH, Peripheral demyelinating neuropathy-Central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy-Waardenburg syndrome-Hirschsprung disease, or PCW, PCWH without HD). The majority are truncating mutations that most often remove the main functional domains of the protein. Only three missense mutations have been thus far reported. In the present study, novel SOX10 missense mutations were found in 11 patients and were examined for effects on SOX10 characteristics and functions. The mutations were associated with various phenotypes, ranging from WS2 to PCWH. All tested mutations were found to be deleterious. Some mutants presented with partial cytoplasmic redistribution, some lost their DNA-binding and/or transactivation capabilities on various tissue-specific target genes. Intriguingly, several mutants were redistributed in nuclear foci. Whether this phenomenon is a cause or a consequence of mutation-associated pathogenicity remains to be determined, but this observation could help to identify new SOX10 modes of action. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation...... in COL2A1. In 188 probands with the clinical diagnosis of Stickler syndrome, the COL2A1 gene was analyzed by either a mutation scanning technique or bidirectional fluorescent DNA sequencing. The effect of splice site alterations was investigated by analyzing mRNA. Multiplex ligation...... with Stickler syndrome....

  7. Destabilization of CHK2 by a missense mutation associated with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S B; Kim, S H; Bell, D W; Wahrer, D C; Schiripo, T A; Jorczak, M M; Sgroi, D C; Garber, J E; Li, F P; Nichols, K E; Varley, J M; Godwin, A K; Shannon, K M; Harlow, E; Haber, D A

    2001-11-15

    Li Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) is a multicancer phenotype, most commonly associated with germ-line mutations in TP53. In a kindred with LFS without an inherited TP53 mutation, we have previously reported a truncating mutation (1100delC) in CHK2, encoding a kinase that phosphorylates p53 on Ser(20). Here, we describe a CHK2 missense mutation (R145W) in another LFS family. This mutation destabilizes the encoded protein, reducing its half-life from >120 min to 30 min. This effect is abrogated by treatment of cells with a proteosome inhibitor, suggesting that CHK2(R145W) is targeted through this degradation pathway. Both 1100delC and R145W germ-line mutations in CHK2 are associated with loss of the wild-type allele in the corresponding tumor specimens, and neither tumor harbors a somatic TP53 mutation. Our observations support the functional significance of CHK2 mutations in rare cases of LFS and suggest that such mutations may substitute for inactivation of TP53.

  8. A de-novo STXBP1 gene mutation in a patient showing the Rett syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, Romina; Saettini, Francesco; Panzeri, Elena; Arrigoni, Filippo; Bassi, Maria T; Borgatti, Renato

    2015-03-25

    This study reports on a 9-year-old girl who developed West syndrome and showed clinical features fulfilling the main revised diagnostic criteria for typical Rett syndrome (hand washing, severe cognitive impairment with absence of language, ataxic gait, progressive scoliosis and autistic features). Mutation analyses for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5/STK9), ARX and Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) genes were carried out, with negative results. A known de-novo c.1217G>A missense mutation in exon 14 leading to the substitution of a conserved residue, p.R406H in domain3b of the syntaxin-binding protein 1 (STXBP1) gene, was detected. The STXBP1 gene encodes the syntaxin-binding protein 1, a neuron-specific protein involved in synaptic vesicle release at both glutaminergic and GABAergic synapses. This function is also affected by MECP2 gene mutations, which are known to lead to a decrease in glutamate and GABA receptors' density. It is possible to speculate that the impairment in synaptic plasticity represents the pathogenic link between MECP2 and STXBP1 gene mutations. On reviewing the clinical features of the reported patients with the same mutation in the STXBP1 gene, it has been observed that poor eye contact, tremour, dyskinesia, head/hand stereotypies and both cognitive and motor progressive deterioration are common symptoms, although never considered as indicative of a Rett syndrome phenotype. In conclusion, the case described here suggests a relationship between the Rett syndrome and the STXBP1 gene not described so far, making the search for STXBP1 gene mutations advisable in patients with Rett syndrome and early onset of epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Expanding the mutation spectrum in ICF syndrome: Evidence for a gender bias in ICF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boogaard, M L; Thijssen, P E; Aytekin, C; Licciardi, F; Kıykım, A A; Spossito, L; Dalm, V A S H; Driessen, G J; Kersseboom, R; de Vries, F; van Ostaijen-Ten Dam, M M; Ikinciogullari, A; Dogu, F; Oleastro, M; Bailardo, E; Daxinger, L; Nain, E; Baris, S; van Tol, M J D; Weemaes, C; van der Maarel, S M

    2017-10-01

    Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a rare, genetically heterogeneous, autosomal recessive disorder. Patients suffer from recurrent infections caused by reduced levels or absence of serum immunoglobulins. Genetically, 4 subtypes of ICF syndrome have been identified to date: ICF1 (DNMT3B mutations), ICF2 (ZBTB24 mutations), ICF3 (CDCA7 mutations), and ICF4 (HELLS mutations). To study the mutation spectrum in ICF syndrome. Genetic studies were performed in peripheral blood lymphocyte DNA from suspected ICF patients and family members. We describe 7 ICF1 patients and 6 novel missense mutations in DNMT3B, affecting highly conserved residues in the catalytic domain. We also describe 5 new ICF2 patients, one of them carrying a homozygous deletion of the complete ZBTB24 locus. In a meta-analysis of all published ICF cases, we observed a gender bias in ICF2 with 79% male patients. The biallelic deletion of ZBTB24 provides strong support for the hypothesis that most ICF2 patients suffer from a ZBTB24 loss of function mechanism and confirms that complete absence of ZBTB24 is compatible with human life. This is in contrast to the observed early embryonic lethality in mice lacking functional Zbtb24. The observed gender bias seems to be restricted to ICF2 as it is not observed in the ICF1 cohort. Our study expands the mutation spectrum in ICF syndrome and supports that DNMT3B and ZBTB24 are the most common disease genes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Swedish CDKN2A mutation carriers do not present the atypical mole syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kari; Harbst, Katja; Måsbäck, Anna; Jönsson, Göran; Borg, Ake; Olsson, Håkan; Ingvar, Christian

    2010-08-01

    Phenotypic characteristics were examined in melanoma-prone southern Swedish CDKN2A (p16-113insArg/p14ARF-128insSer) mutation families, in relation to the CDKN2A genotype, nevi, clinically atypical nevi (CAN) and melanoma. Individuals from eight melanoma-prone families, with index patients carrying the CDKN2A mutation, were offered skin examinations and genotyping (CDKN2A and MC1R). Ninety-three individuals above 18 years of age participated; 29 invasive melanomas in 16 patients were recorded, all in the 38 verified CDKN2A mutation carriers. Median age at diagnosis was 36 years. Several MC1R variants were observed. A significant correlation to CAN (P=0.01) and red hair colour (P=0.02) could be confirmed in melanoma patients. A positive mutation status (CDKN2A) was correlated to one or more CAN (P=0.007) but neither to blue eyes, red hair colour, heavy freckling nor high number of nevi. For mutation carriers, median total naevus count was 24 and interquartile range was 12-47 (mean 31); whereas for the whole cohort, median total naevus count was 12 and interquartile range was 5-25 (mean 22). No participant fulfilled the atypical mole syndrome phenotype criteria. Melanomas were diagnosed only in mutation carriers, and melanoma diagnosis was statistically correlated to the presence of one or more CAN and red hair colour, supporting the possible synergistic effect of a MC1R mutation on increased risk of melanoma in patients with a CDKN2A mutation. Family history, with verified tumour diagnoses, remains an important clinical tool for finding mutation carriers for referral to clinical geneticists and simultaneous presence of CAN in probable mutation carriers might strengthen this indication. The atypical mole syndrome phenotype was, however, not verified in the studied families and total naevus counts were low.

  11. Variable clinical expressivity of STAT3 mutation in hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome: genetic and clinical studies of six patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolach, Ofir; Kuijpers, Taco; Ben-Ari, Josef; Gavrieli, Ronit; Feinstein-Goren, Neta; Alders, Marielle; Garty, Ben Zion; Wolach, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant Hyper IgE syndrome (AD-HIES) is a rare and complex primary immunodeficiency that affects multiple systems. Mutations in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) gene cause AD-HIES. These mutations have a dominant-negative effect and the presence of such mutations

  12. A connexin 26 mutation causes a syndrome of sensorineural hearing loss and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis (MIM 148350)

    OpenAIRE

    Heathcote, K.; Syrris, P.; Carter, N.; Patton, M.

    2000-01-01

    We report a missense mutation in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) in a family with an autosomal dominant syndrome of hearing loss and hyperkeratosis. The affected family members have high frequency, slowly progressive, bilateral, sensorineural hearing loss and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis. The mutation causes an amino acid substitution (G59A), which may disrupt a reverse turn in the first extracellular loop of connexin 26. Connexin 26 mutations have been reported in syndromes of deafness and palmop...

  13. WS1 gene mutation analysis of Wolfram syndrome in a Chinese patient and a systematic review of literatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guang; Yu, Man-li; Wang, Jia-feng; Gao, Cong-rong; Chen, Zhong-jin

    2010-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare hereditary disease characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. The outcome of this disease is always poor. WFS1 gene mutation is the main cause of this disease. A patient with diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, renal tract disorder, psychiatric abnormality, and cataract was diagnosed with Wolfram syndrome. Mutations in open reading frame (ORF) of WFS1 gene was analyzed by sequencing. Mutations in WFS1 gene was also summarized by a systematic review in Pubmed and Chinese biological and medical database. Sequencing of WFS1 gene in this patient showed a new mutation, 1962G>A, and two other non-sense mutations, 2433A>G and 2565G>A. Systematic review included 219 patients in total and identified 172 WFS1 gene mutations, most of which were located in Exon 8. These mutations in WFS1 gene might be useful in prenatal diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome.

  14. The genetic basis of Brugada syndrome: a mutation update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Jørgensen, Poul; Schlamowitz, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    of inheritance with an average prevalence of 5:10,000 worldwide. Currently, more than 100 mutations in seven genes have been associated with BrS. Loss-of-function mutations in SCN5A, which encodes the alpha-subunit of the Na(v)1.5 sodium ion channel conducting the depolarizing I(Na) current, causes 15-20% of Br......S cases. A few mutations have been described in GPD1L, which encodes glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-1 like protein; CACNA1C, which encodes the alpha-subunit of the Ca(v)1.2 ion channel conducting the depolarizing I(L,Ca) current; CACNB2, which encodes the stimulating beta2-subunit of the Ca(v)1.2 ion...

  15. Molecular basis for the Kallmann syndrome-linked fibroblast growth factor receptor mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, Ryan D.; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Kumar, Thallapuranam K. Suresh, E-mail: sthalla@uark.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural basis of the Kallmann syndrome is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann syndrome mutation (A168S) induces a subtle conformational change(s). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural interactions mediated by beta-sheet G are most perturbed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ligand (FGF)-receptor interaction(s) is completely abolished by Kallmann mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann mutation directly affects the FGF signaling process. -- Abstract: Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a developmental disease that expresses in patients as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. KS is commonly associated with mutations in the extracellular D2 domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). In this study, for the first time, the molecular basis for the FGFR associated KS mutation (A168S) is elucidated using a variety of biophysical experiments, including multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Secondary and tertiary structural analysis using far UV circular dichroism, fluorescence and limited trypsin digestion assays suggest that the KS mutation induces subtle tertiary structure change in the D2 domain of FGFR. Results of isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show the KS mutation causes a 10-fold decrease in heparin binding affinity and also a complete loss in ligand (FGF-1) binding. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N chemical perturbation data suggest that complete loss in the ligand (FGF) binding affinity is triggered by a subtle conformational change that disrupts crucial structural interactions in both the heparin and the FGF binding sites in the D2 domain of FGFR. The novel findings reported in this study are expected to provide valuable clues toward a complete understanding of the other genetic diseases linked to mutations in the FGFR.

  16. Mutation spectrum and risk of colorectal cancer in African American families with Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guindalini, Rodrigo Santa Cruz; Win, Aung Ko; Gulden, Cassandra; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Haile, Robert W.; Raymond, Victoria; Stoffel, Elena; Hall, Michael; Llor, Xavier; Ukaegbu, Chinedu I.; Solomon, Ilana; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Kalady, Matthew; Blanco, Amie; Terdiman, Jonathan; Shuttlesworth, Gladis A.; Lynch, Patrick M.; Hampel, Heather; Lynch, Henry T.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Kupfer, Sonia S.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims African Americans (AAs) have the highest incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the United States (US). Few data are available on genetic and non-genetic risk factors for CRC among AAs. Little is known about cancer risks and mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes in AAs with the most common inherited CRC syndrome, Lynch syndrome. We aimed to characterize phenotype, mutation spectrum, and risk of CRC in AAs with Lynch Syndrome. Methods We performed a retrospective study of AAs with mutations in MMR genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) using databases from 13 US referral centers. We analyzed data on personal and family histories of cancer. Modified segregation analysis conditioned on ascertainment criteria was used to estimate age- and sex-specific CRC cumulative risk studying members of the mutation-carrying families. Results We identified 51 AA families with deleterious mutations that disrupt function of the MMR gene product: 31 in MLH1 (61%), 11 in MSH2 (21%), 3 in MSH6 (6%), and 6 in PMS2 (12%); 8 mutations were detected in more than 1 individual and 11 have not been previously reported. In the 920 members of the 51 families with deleterious mutations, the cumulative risks of CRC at an age of 80 y were estimated to be 36.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.5%–83.9%) for men and 29.7% (95% CI, 8.31%–76.1%) for women. CRC risk was significantly higher among individuals with mutations in MLH1 or MSH2 (hazard ratio, 13.9; 95% CI, 3.44–56.5). Conclusions We estimate the cumulative risk for CRC in AAs with MMR gene mutations to be similar to that of individuals of European descent with Lynch syndrome. Two-thirds of mutations were found in MLH1—some were found in multiple individuals and some have not been previously reported. Differences in the mutation spectrum are likely to reflect the genetic diversity of this population. PMID:26248088

  17. Mutations of the catalytic subunit of RAB3GAP cause Warburg Micro syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aligianis, Irene A; Johnson, Colin A; Gissen, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Warburg Micro syndrome (WARBM1) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by developmental abnormalities of the eye and central nervous system and by microgenitalia. We identified homozygous inactivating mutations in RAB3GAP, encoding RAB3 GTPase activating protein, a key regulator o...... of the Rab3 pathway implicated in exocytic release of neurotransmitters and hormones, in 12 families with Micro syndrome. We hypothesize that the underlying pathogenesis of Micro syndrome is a failure of exocytic release of ocular and neurodevelopmental trophic factors....

  18. Ancient founder mutation is responsible for Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome among diverse ethnicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, Cameron M; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Shah, Nidhi P; Sturm, Amy C; Sadiq, May F; de la Chapelle, Albert; Tanner, Stephan M

    2011-11-13

    Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS) was described just over 50 years ago by Olga Imerslund and Ralph Gräsbeck and colleagues. IGS is caused by specific malabsorption of cobalamin (Cbl) due to bi-allelic mutations in either the cubilin gene (CUBN) or the human amnionless homolog (AMN). Mutations in the two genes are commonly seen in founder populations or in societies with a high degree of consanguineous marriages. One particular mutation in AMN, c.208-2A>G, causing an out-of-frame loss of exon 4 in the mRNA, is responsible for some 15% of IGS cases globally. We present evidence that this founder mutation causes a substantial percentage of cases among diverse ethnicities and that the mutation is as old as human civilization. Partial genotyping indicated a founder event but its presence in diverse peoples of Arabic, Turkish, Jewish, and Hispanic ancestry suggested that the mutation might be recurrent. We therefore studied the flanking sequence spanning 3.5 Mb to elucidate the origin of the haplotype and estimate the age of the mutation using a Bayesian inference method based on observed linkage disequilibrium. The mutation's distribution, the size of the shared haplotype, and estimates of growth rate and carrier frequency indicated that the mutation was a single prehistoric event. Dating back to the ancient Middle East around 11,600 BC, the mutation predates the advent of writing, farming, and the monotheistic religions of the region. This mutation causes over 50% of the IGS cases among Arabic, Turkish, and Sephardic Jewish families, making it a primary target for genetic screening among diverse IGS cases originating from the Middle East. Thus, rare founder mutations may cause a substantial number of cases, even among diverse ethnicities not usually thought to be related.

  19. Brugada syndrome and calcium channel mutation in a patient with congenital deaf mutism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Canpolat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To the best of our knowledge, for the first time in the literature, we described a congenitally deaf-mute patient with Brugada syndrome (BrS in whom a mutation in L-type Ca+2 channel [CACNA1C (Cav1.2α1] was identified.

  20. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers: a qualitative exploration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Vrieling, A.; Murugesu, L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kampman, E.; Hoedjes, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants of

  1. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers : A qualitative exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Annemiek; Vrieling, Alina; Murugesu, Laxsini; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Kampman, Ellen; Hoedjes, Meeke

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants of

  2. Mutations in MCT8 in patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley-Syndrome affecting its cellular distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kersseboom (Simone); G.J. Kremers (Gert-Jan); E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); W. Edward Visser (W.); W. Klootwijk (Willem); R.P. Peeters (Robin); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMonocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a thyroid hormone (TH)-specific transporter. Mutations in the MCT8 gene are associated with Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS), consisting of severe psychomotor retardation and disturbed TH parameters. To study the functional consequences of

  3. Identification of Gene Mutations and Fusion Genes in Patients with Sézary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Aparna; Rabionet, Raquel; Espinet, Blanca; Zapata, Luis; Puiggros, Anna; Melero, Carme; Puig, Anna; Sarria-Trujillo, Yaris; Ossowski, Stephan; Garcia-Muret, Maria P; Estrach, Teresa; Servitje, Octavio; Lopez-Lerma, Ingrid; Gallardo, Fernando; Pujol, Ramon M; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Sézary syndrome is a leukemic form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with an aggressive clinical course. The genetic etiology of the disease is poorly understood, with chromosomal abnormalities and mutations in some genes being involved in the disease. The goal of our study was to understand the genetic basis of the disease by looking for driver gene mutations and fusion genes in 15 erythrodermic patients with circulating Sézary cells, 14 of them fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Sézary syndrome. We have discovered genes that could be involved in the pathogenesis of Sézary syndrome. Some of the genes that are affected by somatic point mutations include ITPR1, ITPR2, DSC1, RIPK2, IL6, and RAG2, with some of them mutated in more than one patient. We observed several somatic copy number variations shared between patients, including deletions and duplications of large segments of chromosome 17. Genes with potential function in the T-cell receptor signaling pathway and tumorigenesis were disrupted in Sézary syndrome patients, for example, CBLB, RASA2, BCL7C, RAMP3, TBRG4, and DAD1. Furthermore, we discovered several fusion events of interest involving RASA2, NFKB2, BCR, FASN, ZEB1, TYK2, and SGMS1. Our work has implications for the development of potential therapeutic approaches for this aggressive disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel PITX2 mutation in non-syndromic oro-dental anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarak, Narin; Theerapanon, Thanakorn; Ittiwut, Chupong; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2017-11-09

    To identify oro-dental characteristics and genetic etiology of a family affected with non-syndromic oro-dental anomalies. Physical and oral features were characterised. DNA was collected from an affected Thai family. Whole exome sequencing was employed to identify the pathogenic variants associated with inherited oro-dental anomalies. The presence of the identified mutation was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. We observed unique oro-dental manifestations including oligodontia, retained primary teeth, taurodont molars, peg-shaped maxillary central incisors, high attached frenum with nodule, and midline diastema in the proband and her mother. Mutation analyses revealed a novel heterozygous frameshift deletion, c.573_574delCA, p.L193QfsX5, in exon 5 of PITX2A in affected family members. The amino acid alterations, localised in the transcriptional activation domain 2 in the C terminus of PITX2, were evolutionarily conserved. Mutations in PITX2 have been associated with autosomal-dominant Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome and non-syndromic eye abnormalities, but never been found to cause isolated oral anomalies. This study for the first time demonstrates that the PITX2 mutation could lead to non-syndromic oro-dental anomalies in humans. We propose that the specific location in the C-terminal domain of PITX2 is exclusively necessary for tooth development. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florijn, Ralph J.; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J. J. M.; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P.; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the

  6. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers: A qualitative exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Vrieling, A.; Murugesu, L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kampman, E.; Hoedjes, M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants of

  7. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Annemiek; Vrieling, Alina; Murugesu, Laxsini; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Kampman, Ellen; Hoedjes, Meeke

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants

  8. Recurrent spontaneous pneumothoraces and bullous emphysema. A novel mutation causing Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Andrew; Coffey, Niamh; Tomiak, Eva; Voduc, Nha

    2016-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHDS) is a rare form of classically cystic lung disease that may present with spontaneous pneumothorax. The associated skin manifestations (fibrofolliculomas) are not always present. This article describes a case of spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to bullous emphysema in an otherwise healthy gentleman caused by a novel mutation in the folliculin (FLCN) gene.

  9. HOXA1 Mutations are Not Commonly Associated with Non-Syndromic Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Hagr, Abdulrahman al; Almomani, Murad O; Azad, Taif Anwar; Alorainy, Ibrahim A; Oystreck, Darren T; Bosley, Thomas M

    2014-07-01

    Homozygous homeobox A1 (HOXA1) mutations cause a spectrum of abnormalities in humans including bilateral profound deafness. This study evaluates the possible role of HOXA1 mutations in familial, non-syndromic sensorineural deafness. Forty-eight unrelated Middle Eastern families with either consanguinity or familial deafness were identified in a large deafness clinic, and the proband from each family was evaluated by chart review, audiogram, neuroimaging, and HOXA1 sequencing. All 48 probands had normal neuro-ophthalmologic and general medical examinations except for refractive errors. All had congenital non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss that was symmetric bilaterally and profound (>90 dBHL) in 33 individuals and varied from 40 to 90 dBHL in the remainder. Thirty-nine of these individuals had neuroimaging studies, all documenting normal internal carotid arteries and normal 6th, 7th, and 8th cranial nerves bilaterally. Of these, 27 had normal internal ear structures with the remaining 12 having mild to modest developmental abnormalities of the cochlea, semicircular canals, and/or vestibular aqueduct. No patient had homozygous HOXA1 mutations. None of these patients with non-syndromic deafness had HOXA1 mutations. None had major inner ear anomalies, obvious cerebrovascular defects, or recognized congenital heart disease. HOXA1 is likely not a common cause of non-syndromic deafness in this Middle Eastern population.

  10. Patched mutations and hairy skin patches: a new sign in Gorlin syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, Louise C.; Ajayi-Obe, Ekundayo; Bernhard, Birgitta; Maas, Saskia M.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the occurrence of discrete patches of unusually long pigmented hair on the skin of three patients with Gorlin syndrome from two unrelated families with confirmed heterozygous mutations in the Patched (PTCH) gene. The PTCH protein is a negative regulator of Hedgehog signaling, and the

  11. [Primary trimethylaminuria or fish odor syndrome. A novel mutation in the first documented case in Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazon Ramos, A.; Gil-Setas, A.; Berrade Zubiri, S.; Bandres Echeverri, T.; Wevers, R.A.; Engelke, U.F.H.; Zschocke, J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Trimethylaminuria or fish odor syndrome is a metabolic disorder characterized by a failure in the oxidation route from trimethylamine (TMA) to trimethylamineN-oxide (TMA-O). Primary trimethylaminuria is an inherited autosomic recessive disease due to mutations in the human

  12. Risks of Less Common Cancers in Proven Mutation Carriers With Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, Christoph; Loeffler, Markus; Steinke, Verena; Rahner, Nils; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Dietmaier, Wolfgang; Schackert, Hans K.; Goergens, Heike; Doeberitz, Magnus von Knebel; Goecke, Timm O.; Schmiegel, Wolff; Buettner, Reinhard; Moeslein, Gabriela; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Garcia, Encarna Gomez; Hes, Frederik J.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Menko, Fred H.; van Os, Theo A. M.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Wagner, Anja; Kluijt, Irma; Propping, Peter; Vasen, Hans F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Patients with Lynch syndrome are at high risk for colon and endometrial cancer, but also at an elevated risk for other less common cancers. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to provide risk estimates for these less common cancers in proven carriers of pathogenic mutations in

  13. Progressive Encephalopathy in Boys with Symptoms of Rett Syndrome and MECP2 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Four young boys with neonatal onset of encephalopathy, a progressive course, and MECP2 mutations are reported from the University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL Symptoms suggestive of Rett syndrome included failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, hypotonia, movement disorder, with myoclonic, dyskinetic, and choreiform patterns, and repetitive face scratching or nose rubbing stereotypies.

  14. Altered intracellular localization and mobility of SBDS protein upon mutation in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orelio, C.; van der Sluis, R.M.; Verkuijlen, P.; Nethe, M.; Hordijk, P.L.; van den Berg, T.K.; Kuijpers, T.W.

    2011-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome (SDS) is a rare inherited disease caused by mutations in the SBDS gene. Hematopoietic defects, exocrine pancreas dysfunction and short stature are the most prominent clinical features. To gain understanding of the molecular properties of the ubiquitously expressed SBDS

  15. Mutation in the KCNQ1 gene leading to the short QT-interval syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellocq, Chloé; van Ginneken, Antoni C. G.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Alders, Mariel; Escande, Denis; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.; Baró, Isabelle; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Background - The electrocardiographic short QT-interval syndrome forms a distinct clinical entity presenting with a high rate of sudden death and exceptionally short QT intervals. The disorder has recently been linked to gain-of-function mutation in KCNH2. The present study demonstrates that this

  16. Senior-Loken syndrome: A novel NPHP5 gene mutation in a family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Makia J Marafie

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... is Senior-Loken syndrome, a hereditary heterogeneous multiorgan disorder, which combines neph- ronophthisis with ... Case report: Here, we are reporting two children from an Arab family with a novel frameshift mutation found in ..... diseases, which are scattered in the Arab world and Middle. East to help ...

  17. Familial Mediterranean fever, Inflammation and Nephrotic Syndrome: Fibrillary Glomerulopathy and the M680I Missense Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semerdjian Ronald J

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by inflammatory serositis (fever, peritonitis, synovitis and pleuritis. The gene locus responsible for FMF was identified in 1992 and localized to the short arm of chromosome 16. In 1997, a specific FMF gene locus, MEFV, was discovered to encode for a protein, pyrin that mediates inflammation. To date, more than forty missense mutations are known to exist. The diversity of mutations identified has provided insight into the variability of clinical presentation and disease progression. Case Report We report an individual heterozygous for the M680I gene mutation with a clinical diagnosis of FMF using the Tel-Hashomer criteria. Subsequently, the patient developed nephrotic syndrome with biopsy-confirmed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN. Further diagnostic studies were unremarkable with clinical workup negative for amyloidosis or other secondary causes of nephrotic syndrome. Discussion Individuals with FMF are at greater risk for developing nephrotic syndrome. The most serious etiology is amyloidosis (AA variant with renal involvement, ultimately progressing to end-stage renal disease. Other known renal diseases in the FMF population include IgA nephropathy, IgM nephropathy, Henoch-Schönlein purpura as well as polyarteritis nodosa. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first association between FMF and the M680I mutation later complicated by nephrotic syndrome and fibrillary glomerulonephritis.

  18. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome – a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian Havmand; Pedersen, Lisbeth Nørum

    Objective: QT interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome (TS). This study set out to explore the presence of known pathogenic long QT (LQT) mutations in TS and to examine the corrected QT interval (QTc) over time and relate the findings to the TS phenotype. Methods...

  19. A series of 38 novel germline and somatic mutations of NIPBL in Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizon, M; Henry, M; Michot, C; Baumann, C; Bazin, A; Bessières, B; Blesson, S; Cordier-Alex, M-P; David, A; Delahaye-Duriez, A; Delezoïde, A-L; Dieux-Coeslier, A; Doco-Fenzy, M; Faivre, L; Goldenberg, A; Layet, V; Loget, P; Marlin, S; Martinovic, J; Odent, S; Pasquier, L; Plessis, G; Prieur, F; Putoux, A; Rio, M; Testard, H; Bonnefont, J-P; Cormier-Daire, V

    2016-05-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a multisystemic developmental disorder mainly related to de novo heterozygous NIPBL mutation. Recently, NIPBL somatic mosaicism has been highlighted through buccal cell DNA study in some patients with a negative molecular analysis on leukocyte DNA. Here, we present a series of 38 patients with a Cornelia de Lange syndrome related to a heterozygous NIPBL mutation identified by Sanger sequencing. The diagnosis was based on the following criteria: (i) intrauterine growth retardation and postnatal short stature, (ii) feeding difficulties and/or gastro-oesophageal reflux, (iii) microcephaly, (iv) intellectual disability, and (v) characteristic facial features. We identified 37 novel NIPBL mutations including 34 in leukocytes and 3 in buccal cells only. All mutations shown to have arisen de novo when parent blood samples were available. The present series confirms the difficulty in predicting the phenotype according to the NIPBL mutation. Until now, somatic mosaicism has been observed for 20 cases which do not seem to be consistently associated with a milder phenotype. Besides, several reports support a postzygotic event for those cases. Considering these elements, we recommend a first-line buccal cell DNA analysis in order to improve gene testing sensitivity in Cornelia de Lange syndrome and genetic counselling. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Mutations in chromatin regulators functionally link Cornelia de Lange syndrome and clinically overlapping phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, Ilaria; Teresa-Rodrigo, María E; Pozojevic, Jelena; Ruiz Gil, Sara; Bader, Ingrid; Braunholz, Diana; Bramswig, Nuria C; Gervasini, Cristina; Larizza, Lidia; Pfeiffer, Lutz; Ozkinay, Ferda; Ramos, Feliciano; Reiz, Benedikt; Rittinger, Olaf; Strom, Tim M; Watrin, Erwan; Wendt, Kerstin; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wollnik, Bernd; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Pié, Juan; Deardorff, Matthew A; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Kaiser, Frank J

    2017-03-01

    The coordinated tissue-specific regulation of gene expression is essential for the proper development of all organisms. Mutations in multiple transcriptional regulators cause a group of neurodevelopmental disorders termed "transcriptomopathies" that share core phenotypical features including growth retardation, developmental delay, intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) belongs to this class of disorders and is caused by mutations in different subunits or regulators of the cohesin complex. Herein, we report on the clinical and molecular characterization of seven patients with features overlapping with CdLS who were found to carry mutations in chromatin regulators previously associated to other neurodevelopmental disorders that are frequently considered in the differential diagnosis of CdLS. The identified mutations affect the methyltransferase-encoding genes KMT2A and SETD5 and different subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. Complementary to this, a patient with Coffin-Siris syndrome was found to carry a missense substitution in NIPBL. Our findings indicate that mutations in a variety of chromatin-associated factors result in overlapping clinical phenotypes, underscoring the genetic heterogeneity that should be considered when assessing the clinical and molecular diagnosis of neurodevelopmental syndromes. It is clear that emerging molecular mechanisms of chromatin dysregulation are central to understanding the pathogenesis of these clinically overlapping genetic disorders.

  1. Novel SCN5A mutation associated with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation due to subclinical Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Jiménez-Jáimez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic ventricular fibrillation can be caused by subclinical channelopathies such as Brugada syndrome. Our objective is to study the clinical behaviour of a new SCN5A mutation found in a woman with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. A 53-year-old woman presented with multiple episodes of ventricular fibrillation, a structurally normal heart and normal baseline electrocardiogram. Genetic testing included KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, KCNE2 and KCNJ2 and identified a mutation in SCN5A (D1816fs/g98747-98748insT. We studied 15 immediate family members by means of electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, flecainide challenge test and genetic study. Eight subjects had the mutation. The flecainide challenge test was positive for Brugada syndrome in two subjects in the case group and none in the control group. The PR and QRS intervals on the baseline electrocardiogram were longer in the case group. The left atrial volume indexed to body surface was higher in the case group, likely due to the fact that two patients with the mutation had atrial fibrillation and none had it in the control group. The D1816fs/g98747-98748insT mutation in SCN5A may be associated with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and Brugada syndrome with a broad phenotypic spectrum and incomplete penetrance. Genetic testing may be useful to identify the etiology of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation in patients with a negative thorough clinical evaluation.

  2. A novel NHS mutation causes Nance-Horan Syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qi; Li, Yunping; Kousar, Rizwana; Guo, Hui; Peng, Fenglan; Zheng, Yu; Yang, Xiaohua; Long, Zhigao; Tian, Runyi; Xia, Kun; Lin, Haiying; Pan, Qian

    2017-01-07

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) (OMIM: 302350) is a rare X-linked developmental disorder characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts, with occasional dental anomalies, characteristic dysmorphic features, brachymetacarpia and mental retardation. Carrier females exhibit similar manifestations that are less severe than in affected males. Here, we report a four-generation Chinese family with multiple affected individuals presenting Nance-Horan Syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing combined with RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing was used to search for a genetic cause underlying the disease phenotype. Whole-exome sequencing identified in all affected individuals of the family a novel donor splicing site mutation (NM_198270: c.1045 + 2T > A) in intron 4 of the gene NHS, which maps to chromosome Xp22.13. The identified mutation results in an RNA processing defect causing a 416-nucleotide addition to exon 4 of the mRNA transcript, likely producing a truncated NHS protein. The donor splicing site mutation NM_198270: c.1045 + 2T > A of the NHS gene is the causative mutation in this Nance-Horan Syndrome family. This research broadens the spectrum of NHS gene mutations, contributing to our understanding of the molecular genetics of NHS.

  3. Functional analysis of Waardenburg syndrome-associated PAX3 and SOX10 mutations: report of a dominant-negative SOX10 mutation in Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Luo, Hunjin; An, Jing; Sun, Lin; Mei, Lingyun; He, Chufeng; Jiang, Lu; Jiang, Wen; Xia, Kun; Li, Jia-Da; Feng, Yong

    2012-03-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder resulting from melanocyte defects, with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and inner ear. WS is classified into four subtypes (WS1-WS4) based on additional symptoms. PAX3 and SOX10 are two transcription factors that can activate the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a critical transcription factor for melanocyte development. Mutations of PAX3 are associated with WS1 and WS3, while mutations of SOX10 cause WS2 and WS4. Recently, we identified some novel WS-associated mutations in PAX3 and SOX10 in a cohort of Chinese WS patients. Here, we further identified an E248fsX30 SOX10 mutation in a family of WS2. We analyzed the subcellular distribution, expression and in vitro activity of two PAX3 mutations (p.H80D, p.H186fsX5) and four SOX10 mutations (p.E248fsX30, p.G37fsX58, p.G38fsX69 and p.R43X). Except H80D PAX3, which retained partial activity, the other mutants were unable to activate MITF promoter. The H80D PAX3 and E248fsX30 SOX10 were localized in the nucleus as wild type (WT) proteins, whereas the other mutant proteins were distributed in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Furthermore, E248fsX30 SOX10 protein retained the DNA-binding activity and showed dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. However, E248fsX30 SOX10 protein seems to decay faster than the WT one, which may underlie the mild WS2 phenotype caused by this mutation.

  4. Variable expressivity of FGF3 mutations associated with deafness and LAMM syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Recessive mutations of fibroblast growth factor 3 (FGF3) can cause LAMM syndrome (OMIM 610706), characterized by fully penetrant complete labyrinthine aplasia, microtia and microdontia. Methods We performed a prospective molecular genetic and clinical study of families segregating hearing loss linked to FGF3 mutations. Ten affected individuals from three large Pakistani families segregating FGF3 mutations were imaged with CT, MRI, or both to detect inner ear abnormalities. We also modeled the three dimensional structure of FGF3 to better understand the structural consequences of the three missense mutations. Results Two families segregated reported mutations (p.R104X and p.R95W) and one family segregated a novel mutation (p.R132GfsX26) of FGF3. All individuals homozygous for p.R104X or p.R132GfsX26 had fully penetrant features of LAMM syndrome. However, recessive p.R95W mutations were associated with nearly normal looking auricles and variable inner ear structural phenotypes, similar to that reported for a Somali family also segregating p.R95W. This suggests that the mild phenotype is not entirely due to genetic background. Molecular modeling result suggests a less drastic effect of p.R95W on FGF3 function compared with known missense mutations detected in fully penetrant LAMM syndrome. Since we detected significant intrafamilial variability of the inner ear structural phenotype in the family segregating p.R95W, we also sequenced FGF10 as a likely candidate for a modifier. However, we did not find any sequence variation, pointing out that a larger sample size will be needed to map and identify a modifier. We also observed a mild to moderate bilateral conductive hearing loss in three carriers of p.R95W, suggesting either a semi-dominant effect of this mutant allele of FGF3, otitis media, or a consequence of genetic background in these three family members. Conclusions We noted a less prominent dental and external ear phenotype in association with the

  5. Variable expressivity of FGF3 mutations associated with deafness and LAMM syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffith Andrew J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recessive mutations of fibroblast growth factor 3 (FGF3 can cause LAMM syndrome (OMIM 610706, characterized by fully penetrant complete labyrinthine aplasia, microtia and microdontia. Methods We performed a prospective molecular genetic and clinical study of families segregating hearing loss linked to FGF3 mutations. Ten affected individuals from three large Pakistani families segregating FGF3 mutations were imaged with CT, MRI, or both to detect inner ear abnormalities. We also modeled the three dimensional structure of FGF3 to better understand the structural consequences of the three missense mutations. Results Two families segregated reported mutations (p.R104X and p.R95W and one family segregated a novel mutation (p.R132GfsX26 of FGF3. All individuals homozygous for p.R104X or p.R132GfsX26 had fully penetrant features of LAMM syndrome. However, recessive p.R95W mutations were associated with nearly normal looking auricles and variable inner ear structural phenotypes, similar to that reported for a Somali family also segregating p.R95W. This suggests that the mild phenotype is not entirely due to genetic background. Molecular modeling result suggests a less drastic effect of p.R95W on FGF3 function compared with known missense mutations detected in fully penetrant LAMM syndrome. Since we detected significant intrafamilial variability of the inner ear structural phenotype in the family segregating p.R95W, we also sequenced FGF10 as a likely candidate for a modifier. However, we did not find any sequence variation, pointing out that a larger sample size will be needed to map and identify a modifier. We also observed a mild to moderate bilateral conductive hearing loss in three carriers of p.R95W, suggesting either a semi-dominant effect of this mutant allele of FGF3, otitis media, or a consequence of genetic background in these three family members. Conclusions We noted a less prominent dental and external ear phenotype in

  6. Hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome due to a BMPR1A mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Riordan, J M

    2010-06-01

    The conditions Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome (JPS) and Hereditary Mixed Polyposis Syndrome (HMPS) are associated with an increased risk of colorectal carcinoma. The genetic mechanisms which explain these conditions have until recently been poorly understood. Recent interest has focused on the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signalling pathway and, in particular, on mutations in the SMAD4 gene. However, not all cases of JPS and HMPS have mutations in SMAD4 and focus has now shifted to other components of the TGF-beta pathway to clarify the genetic mechanisms involved in these conditions. In this report, we describe the significance of a bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1A gene mutation in an Irish family.

  7. A novel heterozygous mutation in the Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Rivas, Juan; Carrión, Diego M; Alonso Y Gregorio, Sergio; Álvarez-Maestro, Mario; Tabernero Gómez, Ángel; Cisneros Ledo, Jesus

    2017-09-01

    Our aim is to present a novel mutation of the Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome. We present a case report of a 70-year-old male with three solid nodulary lesions of 4, 2.6, and 3 cm each in the right kidney, and two lesions of 1.5 and 1.3 cm in the left kidney. Needle biopsy was performed. The pathological analysis of right kidney lesions revealed a renal tumor suggestive of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and medullar tumor with zones that suggested oncocytosis. Genetic test results were positive for a novel heterozygous mutation c.1198G>A; p.V400I in exon 11 of the FLCN gene. In patients presenting with bilateral multifocal renal tumors of oncocytic hybrid histology, Birt- Hogg-Dubé syndrome should be the first diagnosis in mind. The mutation found in this patient has not been previously described in the literature in the context of BHD.

  8. Hypoparathyroidism in a 3-year-old Korean boy with Sotos syndrome and a novel mutation in NSD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wejaphikul, Karn; Cho, Sung Yoon; Huh, Rimm; Kwun, Younghee; Lee, Jieun; Ki, Chang-Seok; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Sotos syndrome is a common genetic overgrowth syndrome caused by a mutation of the NSD1 gene, which is located at chromosome 5q35 and normally encodes a histone methyltransferase protein. The general characteristics of this syndrome include a characteristic facial appearance, developmental delay, and overgrowth, resulting in macrocephaly and tall stature. We describe rhabdomyolysis and hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism in a 3-year-old Korean boy with Sotos syndrome. He was diagnosed with Sotos syndrome based on the typical phenotype and has a heterozygous nonsense mutation (c.4710C>A [p.Cys1570*]) of the NSD1 gene, which causes a premature stop codon and a truncating protein mutation. Hypoparathyroidism has never been described in Sotos syndrome. This report may therefore expand the phenotypic spectrum of this syndrome. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  9. The Role of CHD7 Mutations in Patients with Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism and Kallmann Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Goo; Layman, Lawrence C.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein-7 (CHD7) cause CHARGE syndrome, which includes eye coloboma, heart malformations, atresia of the choanae, retardation of growth/development, genital anomalies, and ear abnormalities. CHARGE syndrome is usually sporadic, but is also autosomal dominant. CHD7 encodes a large protein that participates in chromatin remodeling and transcription. Findings from studies of mouse models employing ENU-mutagenesis or gene-trap methods recapitulate human CHARGE syndrome. CHARGE patients may manifest anosmia and/or hypogonadism, features that overlap with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) and Kallmann syndrome (KS). Similarly, IHH/KS patients may also display partial CHARGE features. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that IHH/KS represents a milder allelic variant of CHARGE syndrome, which has been supported by the identification of heterozygous CHD7 mutations in both normosmic IHH and KS. Developmental expression within the hypothalamus and the presence of human mutations indicate that CHD7 has an important role in puberty and reproduction. PMID:21856375

  10. Fifteen novel FBN1 mutations causing Marfan syndrome detected by heteroduplex analysis of genomic amplicons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijbroek, G.; Sood, S.; McIntosh, I. [John Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1), a component of the extracellular microfibril, cause the Marfan syndrome (MFS). This statement is supported by the observations that the classic Marfan phenotype cosegregates with intragenic and/or flanking marker alleles in all families tested and that a significant number of FBN1 mutations have been identified in affected individuals. We have now devised a method to screen the entire coding sequence and flanking splice junctions of FBN1. On completion for a panel of nine probands with classic MFS, six new mutations were identified that accounted for disease in seven (78%) of nine patients. Nine additional new mutations have been characterized in the early stages of a larger screening project. These 15 mutations were equally distributed throughout the gene and, with one exception, were specific to single families. One-third of mutations created premature termination codons, and 6 of 15 substituted residues with putative significance for calcium finding to epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. Mutations causing severe and rapidly progressive disease that presents in the neonatal period can occur in a larger region of the gene than previously demonstrated, and the nature of the mutation is as important a determinant as its location, in predisposing to this phenotype. 56 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Two Novel Mutations Identified in an African-American Child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, Kerry; Wang, Yanhua; Huizing, Marjan; Sutton, Elie; White, James G.; Gahl, William A.; Moody, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Background. Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, coagulopathy and late-onset, progressive neurological dysfunction. It also has an “accelerated phase” characterized by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The disease is caused by mutations in the CHS1/LYST gene located on chromosome 1, which affects lysosome morphology and function. We report the case of an African-American child with CHS in Case. This 16-month old African-American girl presented with fever and lethargy. The proband had pale skin compared to her parents, with light brown eyes, silvery hair and massive hepatosplenomegaly. Her laboratory evaluation was remarkable for pancytopenia, high serum ferritin and an elevated LDH. Bone marrow aspirate revealed large inclusions in granulocytes and erythrophagocytosis consistent with HLH. Genetic evaluation revealed two novel nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene: c.3622C > T (p.Q1208X) and c.11002G > T (p.E3668X). Conclusions. Our patient is one of the few cases of CHS reported in the African American population. We identified 2 nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene, the first mutation analysis published of an African-American child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome. These two mutations predict a severe phenotype and thus identification of these mutations has an important clinical significance in CHS. PMID:20368792

  12. Two Novel Mutations Identified in an African-American Child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Morrone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, coagulopathy and late-onset, progressive neurological dysfunction. It also has an “accelerated phase” characterized by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH. The disease is caused by mutations in the CHS1/LYST gene located on chromosome 1, which affects lysosome morphology and function. We report the case of an African-American child with CHS in Case. This 16-month old African-American girl presented with fever and lethargy. The proband had pale skin compared to her parents, with light brown eyes, silvery hair and massive hepatosplenomegaly. Her laboratory evaluation was remarkable for pancytopenia, high serum ferritin and an elevated LDH. Bone marrow aspirate revealed large inclusions in granulocytes and erythrophagocytosis consistent with HLH. Genetic evaluation revealed two novel nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene: c.3622C>T (p.Q1208X and c.11002G>T (p.E3668X. Conclusions. Our patient is one of the few cases of CHS reported in the African American population. We identified 2 nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene, the first mutation analysis published of an African-American child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome. These two mutations predict a severe phenotype and thus identification of these mutations has an important clinical significance in CHS.

  13. Tumor suppressor microRNAs are downregulated in myelodysplastic syndrome with spliceosome mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslan, Derya; Garde, Christian; Nygaard, Mette Katrine

    2016-01-01

    Spliceosome mutations are frequently observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, it is largely unknown how these mutations contribute to the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs, which have been implicated in most human cancers due to their role in post tra......- and metabolic pathways. Our data indicate that spliceosome mutations may play an important role in MDS pathophysiology by affecting the expression of tumor suppressor miRNA genes involved in the development and progression of MDS.......Spliceosome mutations are frequently observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, it is largely unknown how these mutations contribute to the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs, which have been implicated in most human cancers due to their role in post...... transcriptional gene regulation. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of spliceosome mutations on the expression of miRNAs in a cohort of 34 MDS patients. In total, the expression of 76 miRNAs, including mirtrons and splice site overlapping miRNAs, was accurately quantified using reverse transcriptase...

  14. Carriage of Mediterranean Fever (MEFV) Mutations in Patients with Postpericardiotomy Syndrome (PPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechtman, Ido-David; Grossman, Chagai; Shinar, Yael; Cohen, Rinat; Nachum, Eyal; Raanani, Ehud; Livneh, Avi; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2017-09-01

    Postpericardiotomy syndrome (PPS) is characterized by pleuro-pericardial inflammation, which occurs in patients undergoing surgical procedures involving the pleura, pericardium, or both. The syndrome is considered to be immune mediated. However, its pathogenesis is not fully understood. It has previously been demonstrated that the Mediterranean Fever (MEFV) gene, which is associated with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), has a role in the activation and expression of several inflammatory diseases. To investigate whether carriage of the MEFV mutation may precipitate PPS or affect its phenotype. The study population included 45 patients who underwent cardiac surgery and developed PPS. The control group was comprised of 41 patients who did not develop PPS. Clinical and demographic data was collected. The severity of PPS was evaluated. Genetic analysis to determine the carriage of one the three most common MEFV gene mutations (M694V, V726A, E148Q) was performed. The carriage rate of MEFV mutations in patients with and without PPS was compared. Association between MEFV mutation carriage and severity of PPS was evaluated. The rate of mutation carriage in the MEFV gene was similar in patients with and without PPS (15.6% in the study groups vs. 29.3% in the control group, P = 0.1937). The rate of mutation carriage in the MEFV gene was significantly lower among patients with severe PPS as compared to patients with mild-moderate PPS (4.8% vs. 25%, P PPS; however, it may affect PPS severity.

  15. [Study of gene mutation and pathogenetic mechanism for a family with Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Liao, Xinbin; Liu, Yalan; He, Chufeng; Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Lu; Feng, Yong; Mei, Lingyun

    2017-08-10

    To explore the pathogenetic mechanism of a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome. Clinical data of the family was collected. Potential mutation of the MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes were screened. Plasmids for wild type (WT) and mutant MITF proteins were constructed to determine their exogenous expression and subcellular distribution by Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. A heterozygous c.763C>T (p.R255X) mutation was detected in exon 8 of the MITF gene in the proband and all other patients from the family. No pathological mutation of the SOX10 and SNAI2 genes was detected. The DNA sequences of plasmids of MITF wild and mutant MITF R255X were confirmed. Both proteins were detected with the expected size. WT MITF protein only localized in the nucleus, whereas R255X protein showed aberrant localization in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm. The c.763C>T mutation of the MITF gene probably underlies the disease in this family. The mutation can affect the subcellular distribution of MITF proteins in vitro, which may shed light on the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome caused by mutations of the MITF gene.

  16. MYD88 L265P mutation contributes to the diagnosis of Bing Neel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Stéphanie; Boyle, Eileen M; Roumier, Christophe; Demarquette, Hélène; Wemeau, Mathieu; Geffroy, Sandrine; Herbaux, Charles; Bertrand, Elisabeth; Hivert, Bénédicte; Terriou, Louis; Verrier, Albert; Pollet, Jean Paul; Maurage, Claude Alain; Onraed, Brigitte; Morschhauser, Franck; Quesnel, Bruno; Duthilleul, Patrick; Preudhomme, Claude; Leleu, Xavier

    2014-11-01

    Bing-Neel syndrome (BNS), a rare neurological syndrome associated with Waldenström macroglobulinaemia (WM), is a direct involvement of the central nervous system by lymphoplasmacytoid cells characterized with an adverse prognostic. The MYD88 L265P mutation has been identified in the vast majority of patients with WM. The diagnosis of BNS is often challenging because of the variety of clinical presentations associated with difficult histological techniques. We hypothesized that identification of MYD88 L265P mutation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) would contribute to the diagnosis of BNS in addition to imaging, flow cytometry and cytology. We identified MYD88 L265P mutation in the CSF and the bone marrow of all cases of BNS using quantitative polymerase chain reaction qPCR and Sanger sequencing. Copy neutral loss of heterozygosity including MYD88 was observed in one case. No mutation of CXCR4, CD79A and CD79B was observed in parallel. We further showed that monitoring the quantitative expression of MYD88 L265P mutation might be a useful molecular tool to monitor response to chemotherapy using qPCR. In conclusion, identification of MYD88 L265P mutation might be a new molecular-based biomarker tool to add to the diagnostic and monitoring armamentarium for BNS. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Novel polymorphisms and lack of mutations in the ACD gene in patients with ACTH resistance syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Catherine E; Hutz, Janna E; Krause, Andrea S; Koehler, Katrin; Metherell, Louise A; Boikos, Sosipatros; Stergiopoulos, Sotirios; Clark, Adrian J L; Stratakis, Constantine A; Huebner, Angela; Hammer, Gary D

    2007-08-01

    ACTH resistance is a feature of several human syndromes with known genetic causes, including familial glucocorticoid deficiency (types 1 and 2) and triple A syndrome. However, many patients with ACTH resistance lack an identifiable genetic aetiology. The human homolog of the Acd gene, mutated in a mouse model of adrenal insufficiency, was sequenced in 25 patients with a clinical diagnosis of familial glucocorticoid deficiency or triple A syndrome. A 3.4 kilobase genomic fragment containing the entire ACD gene was analysed for mutations in all 25 patients. Samples were obtained by three investigators from different institutions. The primary cohort consisted of 25 unrelated patients, primarily of European or Middle Eastern descent, with a clinical diagnosis of either familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD) or triple A syndrome. Patients lacked mutations in other genes known to cause ACTH resistance, including AAAS for patients diagnosed with triple A syndrome and MC2R and MRAP for patients diagnosed with familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Thirty-five additional patients with adrenal disease phenotypes were added to form an expanded cohort of 60 patients. Identification of DNA sequence changes in the ACD gene in the primary cohort and analysis of putative ACD haplotypes in the expanded cohort. No disease-causing mutations were found, but several novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and two putative haplotypes were identified. The overall frequency of SNPs in ACD is low compared to other gene families. No mutations were identified in ACD in this collection of patients with ACTH resistance phenotypes. However, the newly identified SNPs in ACD should be more closely examined for possible links to disease.

  18. A novel Noonan syndrome RAF1 mutation: lethal course in a preterm infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ratola

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is a relatively common and heterogeneous genetic disorder, associated with congenital heart defect in about 50% of the cases. If the defect is not severe, life expectancy is normal. We report a case of Noonan syndrome in a preterm infant with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and lethal outcome associated to acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Adenovirus pneumonia. A novel mutation in the RAF1 gene was identified: c.782C>G (p.Pro261Arg in heterozygosity, not described previously in the literature. Consequently, the common clinical course in this mutation and its respective contribution to the early fatal outcome is unknown. No conclusion can be established regarding genotype/phenotype correlation.

  19. Neonatal Marfan Syndrome: Report of a Case with an Inherited Splicing Mutation outside the Neonatal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gloan, Laurianne; Hauet, Quentin; David, Albert; Hanna, Nadine; Arfeuille, Chloé; Arnaud, Pauline; Boileau, Catherine; Romefort, Bénédicte; Benbrik, Nadir; Gournay, Véronique; Joram, Nicolas; Baron, Olivier; Isidor, Bertrand

    2016-02-01

    We report a child and her mother affected by Marfan syndrome. The child presented with a phenotype of neonatal Marfan syndrome, revealed by acute and refractory heart failure, finally leading to death within the first 4 months of life. Her mother had a common clinical presentation. Genetic analysis revealed an inherited FBN1 mutation. This intronic mutation (c.6163+3_6163+6del), undescribed to date, leads to exon 49 skipping, corresponding to in-frame deletion of 42 amino acids (p.Ile2014_Asp2055del). FBN1 next-generation sequencing did not show any argument for mosaicism. Association in the same family of severe neonatal and classical Marfan syndrome illustrates the intrafamilial phenotype variability.

  20. Engineered mutations in fibrillin-1 leading to Marfan syndrome act at the protein, cellular and organismal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyer, Karina A; Reinhardt, Dieter P

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are the major components of microfibrils in the extracellular matrix of elastic and non-elastic tissues. They are multi-domain proteins, containing primarily calcium binding epidermal growth factor-like (cbEGF) domains and 8-cysteine/transforming growth factor-beta binding protein-like (TB) domains. Mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene give rise to Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder with clinical complications in the cardiovascular, skeletal, ocular and other organ systems. Here, we review the consequences of engineered Marfan syndrome mutations in fibrillin-1 at the protein, cellular and organismal levels. Representative point mutations associated with Marfan syndrome in affected individuals have been introduced and analyzed in recombinant fibrillin-1 fragments. Those mutations affect fibrillin-1 on a structural and functional level. Mutations which impair folding of cbEGF domains can affect protein trafficking. Protein folding disrupted by some mutations can lead to defective secretion in mutant fibrillin-1 fragments, whereas fragments with other Marfan mutations are secreted normally. Many Marfan mutations render fibrillin-1 more susceptible to proteolysis. There is also evidence that some mutations affect heparin binding. Few mutations have been further analyzed in mouse models. An extensively studied mouse model of Marfan syndrome expresses mouse fibrillin-1 with a missense mutation (p.C1039G). The mice display similar characteristics to human patients with Marfan syndrome. Overall, the analyses of engineered mutations leading to Marfan syndrome provide important insights into the pathogenic molecular mechanisms exerted by mutated fibrillin-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Myosin VIIA mutation screening in 189 Usher syndrome type 1 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, M.D.; Kelley, P.M.; Overbeck, L.D. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    Usher syndrome type 1b (USH1B) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital profound hearing loss, vestibular abnormalities, and retinitis pigmentosa. The disorder has recently been shown to be caused by mutations in the myosin VIIa gene (MYO7A) located on 11q14. In the current study, a panel of 189 genetically independent Usher I cases were screened for the presence of mutations in the N-terminal coding portion of the motor domain of MYO7A by heteroduplex analysis of 14 exons. Twenty-three mutations were found segregating with the disease in 20 families. Of the 23 mutations, 13 were unique, and 2 of the 13 unique mutations (Arg212His and Arg212Cys) accounted for the greatest percentage of observed mutant alleles (8/23, 31%). Six of the 13 mutations caused premature stop codons, 6 caused changes in the amino acid sequence of the myosin VIIa protein, and 1 resulted in a splicing defect. Three patients were homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for mutant alleles; these three cases were Tyr333Stop/Tyr333Stop, Arg212His-Arg302His/Arg212His-Arg302His, and IVS13nt-8c{r_arrow}g/ G1u450Gln. All the other USH1B mutations observed were simple heterozygotes, and it is presumed that the mutation on the other allele is present in the unscreened regions of the gene. None of the mutations reported here were observed in 96 unrelated control samples, although several polymorphisms were detected. These results add three patients to a single case reported previously where mutations have been found in both alleles and raises the total number of unique mutations in MYO7A to 16. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. The prevalence of digenic mutations in patients with normosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and Kallmann syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaynor, Samuel D.; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Cappello, Elizabeth M.; Williams, Tiera; Chorich, Lynn P.; Bick, David P.; Sherins, Richard J.; Layman, Lawrence C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of digenic mutations in patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) and Kallmann syndrome (KS). Design Molecular analysis of DNA in IHH/KS patients. Setting Academic medical center. Patient(s) Twenty-four IHH/KS patients with a known mutation (group 1) and 24 IHH/KS patients with no known mutation (group 2). Intervention(s) DNA from IHH/KS patients was subjected to polymerase chain reaction–based DNA sequencing of the 13 most common genes (KAL1, GNRHR, FGFR1, KISS1R, TAC3, TACR3, FGF8, PROKR2, PROK2, CHD7, NELF, GNRH1, and WDR11). Main Outcome Measure(s) The identification of mutations absent in ≥188 ethnically matched controls. Both SIFT (sorting intolerant from tolerant) and conservation among orthologs provided supportive evidence for pathologic roles. Result(s) In group 1, 6 (25%) of 24 IHH/KS patients had a heterozygous mutation in a second gene, and in group 2, 13 (54.2%) of 24 had a mutation in at least one gene, but none had digenic mutations. In group 2, 7 (29.2%) of 24 had a mutation considered sufficient to cause the phenotype. Conclusion(s) When the 13 most common IHH/KS genes are studied, the overall prevalence of digenic gene mutations in IHH/KS was 12.5%. In addition, approximately 30% of patients without a known mutation had a mutation in a single gene. With the current state of knowledge, these findings suggest that most IHH/KS patients have a monogenic etiology. PMID:22035731

  3. The prognostic impact of mutations in spliceosomal genes for myelodysplastic syndrome patients without ring sideroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Min-Gu; Kim, Hye-Ran; Seo, Bo-Young; Lee, Jun Hyung; Choi, Seok-Yong; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in genes that are part of the splicing machinery for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), including MDS without ring sideroblasts (RS), have been widely investigated. The effects of these mutations on clinical outcomes have been diverse and contrasting. We examined a cohort of 129 de novo MDS patients, who did not harbor RS, for mutations affecting three spliceosomal genes (SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2). The mutation rates of SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 were 7.0 %, 7.8 %, and 10.1 %, respectively. Compared with previously reported results, these rates were relatively infrequent. The SRSF2 mutation strongly correlated with old age (P < 0.001), while the mutation status of SF3B1 did not affect overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation. In contrast, MDS patients with mutations in U2AF1 or SRSF2 exhibited inferior PFS. The U2AF1 mutation was associated with inferior OS in low-risk MDS patients (P = 0.035). The SRSF2 mutation was somewhat associated with AML transformation (P = 0.083). Our findings suggest that the frequencies of the SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 splicing gene mutations in MDS without RS were relatively low. We also demonstrated that the U2AF1 and SRSF2 mutations were associated with an unfavorable prognostic impact in MDS patients without RS. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1493-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  4. PITX2 and FOXC1 spectrum of mutations in ocular syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Linda M; Tyler, Rebecca C; Volkmann Kloss, Bethany A; Schilter, Kala F; Levin, Alex V; Lowry, R Brian; Zwijnenburg, Petra J G; Stroh, Eliza; Broeckel, Ulrich; Murray, Jeffrey C; Semina, Elena V

    2012-12-01

    Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) encompasses a broad spectrum of developmental conditions affecting anterior ocular structures and associated with an increased risk for glaucoma. Various systemic anomalies are often observed in ASD conditions such as Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS) and De Hauwere syndrome. We report DNA sequencing and copy number analysis of PITX2 and FOXC1 in 76 patients with syndromic or isolated ASD and related conditions. PITX2 mutations and deletions were found in 24 patients with dental and/or umbilical anomalies seen in all. Seven PITX2-mutant alleles were novel including c.708_730del, the most C-terminal mutation reported to date. A second case of deletion of the distant upstream but not coding region of PITX2 was identified, highlighting the importance of this recently discovered mechanism for ARS. FOXC1 deletions were observed in four cases, three of which demonstrated hearing and/or heart defects, including a patient with De Hauwere syndrome; no nucleotide mutations in FOXC1 were identified. Review of the literature identified several other patients with 6p25 deletions and features of De Hauwere syndrome. The 1.3-Mb deletion of 6p25 presented here defines the critical region for this phenotype and includes the FOXC1, FOXF2, and FOXQ1 genes. In summary, PITX2 or FOXC1 disruptions explained 63% of ARS and 6% of other ASD in our cohort; all affected patients demonstrated additional systemic defects with PITX2 mutations showing a strong association with dental and/or umbilical anomalies and FOXC1 with heart and hearing defects. FOXC1 deletion was also found to be associated with De Hauwere syndrome.

  5. Polyhydramnios, Transient Antenatal Bartter's Syndrome, and MAGED2 Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laghmani, Kamel; Beck, Bodo B.; Yang, Sung-Sen; Seaayfan, Elie; Wenzel, Andrea; Reusch, Bjorn; Vitzthum, Helga; Priem, Dario; Demaretz, Sylvie; Bergmann, Klasien; Duin, Leonie K.; Goebel, Heike; Mache, Christoph; Thiele, Holger; Bartram, Malte P.; Dombret, Carlos; Altmueller, Janine; Nuernberg, Peter; Benzing, Thomas; Levtchenko, Elena; Seyberth, Hannsjoerg W.; Klaus, Guenter; Yigit, Goekhan; Lin, Shih-Hua; Timmer, Albert; de Koning, Tom J.; Scherjon, Sicco; Schlingmann, Karl P.; Bertrand, Mathieu J. M.; Rinschen, Markus M.; de Backer, Olivier; Konrad, Martin; Koemhoff, Martin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Three' pregnancies with male offspring in one family were complicated by severe polyhydramnios and prematurity. One fetus died; the other two had transient massive salt-wasting and polyuria reminiscent of antenatal Bartter's syndrome. METHODS To uncover the molecular cause of this

  6. Angelman syndrome due to a termination codon mutation of the UBE3A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Machado, Jerry; Fang, Ping; Dupuis, Lucie; Faghfoury, Hannaneh; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, mental retardation, seizures, microcephaly, and severe speech delay. It may be caused by deletion of chromosome region 15q11.2 of the maternally inherited chromosome, mutations in the UBE3A gene, uniparental disomy, or imprinting defects. Most patients with this diagnosis have a severe phenotype, and a few have a mild form of the disease. We report a patient with a novel mutation in the UBE3A gene that consists of a deletion of the termination codon (c.2556-*+6del GTAAAACAAA) and results in an elongated protein E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. Our patient has a mild phenotype compared with other patients in general and specifically to patients with UBE3A mutations. He has mild developmental delay, moderate speech delay, and no seizures. Recognition of this genotype-phenotype correlation will allow better genetic counseling to other patients with similar stop codon mutations.

  7. Prevalence and clinical correlates of JAK2 mutations in Down syndrome acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Amos; Rye, Cassia L.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Heerema, Nyla A.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Izraeli, Shai; Plon, Sharon E.; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Rabin, Karen R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Recurrent, prognostically significant chromosomal abnormalities occur in approximately 75% of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but only infrequently in children with Down syndrome (DS) and ALL. Recently, novel somatic activating mutations in Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) were reported in 18% of DS ALL. Here we report identification and clinical correlates of JAK2 mutations in an independent cohort. JAK2 activating mutations occurred in 10 of 53 DS ALL cases (18.9%). Mutations were overrepresented in males (p<0.03), occurred once in association with high hyperdiploidy, and were not significantly correlated with age, initial white blood count, or event-free survival. Our results confirm significance of JAK-STAT pathway activation in DS ALL. PMID:19120350

  8. Treacher Collins syndrome mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae destabilize RNA polymerase I and III complex integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Kopp, Nancy; Jackobel, Ashleigh J; Pannafino, Gianno N; Morocho, Paola A; Xu, Xia; Knutson, Bruce A

    2017-11-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a craniofacial disorder that is characterized by the malformation of the facial bones. Mutations in three genes (TCOF1, POLR1C and POLR1D) involved in RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription account for more than 90% of disease cases. Two of these TCS-associated genes, POLR1C and POLR1D, encode for essential Pol I/III subunits that form a heterodimer necessary for Pol I/III assembly, and many TCS mutations lie along their evolutionarily conserved dimerization interface. Here we elucidate the molecular basis of TCS mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and present a new model for how TCS mutations may disrupt Pol I and III complex integrity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. [Clinical classification and genetic mutation study of two pedigrees with type II Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2015-12-01

    To explore the molecular etiology of two pedigrees affected with type II Waardenburg syndrome (WS2) and to provide genetic diagnosis and counseling. Blood samples were collected from the proband and his family members. Following extraction of genomic DNA, the coding sequences of PAX3, MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes were amplified with PCR and subjected to DNA sequencing to detect potential mutations. A heterozygous deletional mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene has been identified in all patients from the first family, while no mutation was found in the other WS2 related genes including PAX3, MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2. The heterozygous deletion mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene probably underlies the disease in the first family. It is expected that other genes may also underlie WS2.

  10. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type I – a novel AIRE mutation in a North American patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huibregtse, Kelly Egan; Wolfgram, Peter; Winer, Karen K.; Connor, Ellen L.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1), also referred to as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), is a rare autoimmune disease that results from autosomal recessive mutations of the human autoimmune regulatory (AIRE) gene. We present the case of a 17-year-old North American girl of primarily Norwegian descent with a novel AIRE gene mutation causing APS-1. In addition to the classic triad of chronic candidiasis, hypoparathyoidism and autoimmune adrenocortical insufficiency, she also has vitiligo, intestinal malabsorption, autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune hypothyroidism, myositis, myalgias, chronic fatigue, and failure to thrive. Genetic testing revealed heterozygosity for c.20_115de196 and c.967_979del13 mutations in the AIRE gene. The AIRE gene c.20_115de196 mutation has not been previously reported. PMID:24945421

  11. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type I - a novel AIRE mutation in a North American patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huibregtse, Kelly Egan; Wolfgram, Peter; Winer, Karen K; Connor, Ellen L

    2014-11-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1), also referred to as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), is a rare autoimmune disease that results from autosomal recessive mutations of the human autoimmune regulatory (AIRE) gene. We present the case of a 17-year-old North American girl of primarily Norwegian descent with a novel AIRE gene mutation causing APS-1. In addition to the classic triad of chronic candidiasis, hypoparathyoidism and autoimmune adrenocortical insufficiency, she also has vitiligo, intestinal malabsorption, autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune hypothyroidism, myositis, myalgias, chronic fatigue, and failure to thrive. Genetic testing revealed heterozygosity for c.20_115de196 and c.967_979del13 mutations in the AIRE gene. The AIRE gene c.20_115de196 mutation has not been previously reported.

  12. Distinct functional defect of three novel Brugada syndrome related cardiac sodium channel mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juang Jyh-Ming

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Brugada syndrome is characterized by ST segment elevation in the right precodial leads V1-V3 on surface ECG accompanied by episodes of ventricular fibrillation causing syncope or even sudden death. The molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to Brugada syndrome are not yet completely understood. However, SCN5A is the most well known responsible gene that causes Brugada syndrome. Until now, more than a hundred mutations in SCN5A responsible for Brugada syndrome have been described. Functional studies of some of the mutations have been performed and show that a reduction of human cardiac sodium current accounts for the pathogenesis of Brugada syndrome. Here we reported three novel SCN5A mutations identified in patients with Brugada syndrome in Taiwan (p.I848fs, p.R965C, and p.1876insM. Their electrophysiological properties were altered by patch clamp analysis. The p.I848fs mutant generated no sodium current. The p.R965C and p.1876insM mutants produced channels with steady state inactivation shifted to a more negative potential (9.4 mV and 8.5 mV respectively, and slower recovery from inactivation. Besides, the steady state activation of p.1876insM was altered and was shifted to a more positive potential (7.69 mV. In conclusion, the SCN5A channel defect related to Brugada syndrome might be diverse but all resulted in a decrease of sodium current.

  13. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome in two Chinese families with mutations in the FLCN gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaocan; Zhou, Yuan; Peng, Yun; Qiu, Rong; Xia, Kun; Tang, Beisha; Zhuang, Wei; Jiang, Hong

    2018-01-22

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is an autosomal dominant hereditary condition caused by mutations in the folliculin-encoding gene FLCN (NM_144997). It is associated with skin lesions such as fibrofolliculoma, acrochordon and trichodiscoma; pulmonary lesions including spontaneous pneumothorax and pulmonary cysts and renal cancer. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral venous blood samples of the propositi and their family members. Genetic analysis was performed by whole exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing aiming at corresponding exons in FLCN gene to explore the genetic mutations of these two families. In this study, we performed genetic analysis by whole exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing aiming at corresponding exons in FLCN gene to explore the genetic mutations in two Chinese families. Patients from family 1 mostly suffered from pneumothorax and pulmonary cysts, several of whom also mentioned skin lesions or kidney lesions. While in family 2, only thoracic lesions were found in the patients, without any other clinical manifestations. Two FLCN mutations have been identified: One is an insertion mutation (c.1579_1580insA/p.R527Xfs on exon 14) previously reported in three Asian families (one mainland family and two Taiwanese families); while the other is a firstly reviewed mutation in Asian population (c.649C > T / p.Gln217X on exon 7) that ever been detected in a French family. Overall, The detection of these two mutations expands the spectrum of FLCN mutations and will provide insight into genetic diagnosis and counseling of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

  14. Homozygous EDNRB mutation in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Noriko; Mutai, Hideki; Namba, Kazunori; Kaneko, Hiroki; Kosaki, Rika; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2018-04-01

    To examine and expand the genetic spectrum of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1). Clinical features related to Waardenburg syndrome (WS) were examined in a five-year old patient. Mutation analysis of genes related to WS was performed in the proband and her parents. Molecular modeling of EDNRB and the p.R319W mutant was conducted to predict the pathogenicity of the mutation. The proband showed sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis, and dystopia canthorum, fulfilling the clinical criteria of WS1. Genetic analyses revealed that the proband had no mutation in PAX3 which has been known as the cause of WS1, but had a homozygous missense mutation (p.R319W) in endothelin receptor type B (EDNRB) gene. The asymptomatic parents had the mutation in a heterozygote state. This mutation has been previously reported in a heterozygous state in a patient with Hirschsprung's disease unaccompanied by WS, but the patient and her parents did not show any symptoms in gastrointestinal tract. Molecular modeling of EDNRB with the p.R319W mutation demonstrated reduction of the positively charged surface area in this region, which might reduce binding ability of EDNRB to G protein and lead to abnormal signal transduction underlying the WS phenotype. Our findings suggested that autosomal recessive mutation in EDNRB may underlie a part of WS1 with the current diagnostic criteria, and supported that Hirschsprung's disease is a multifactorial genetic disease which requires additional factors. Further molecular analysis is necessary to elucidate the gene interaction and to reappraise the current WS classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Novel and recurrent EVC and EVC2 mutations in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrofacial dyostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Asdia, Maria Cecilia; Torrente, Isabella; Consoli, Federica; Ferese, Rosangela; Magliozzi, Monia; Bernardini, Laura; Guida, Valentina; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; De Luca, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    Ellis van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrofacial dysostosis are allelic disorders caused by mutations in EVC or EVC2 genes. We illustrate the results of direct analysis of whole EVC and EVC2 genes' coding regions in 32 unrelated families with clinical diagnosis of Ellis van Creveld syndrome and in 2 families with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis. We identified mutations in 27/32 (84%) cases with Ellis van Creveld syndrome and 2/2 cases with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis. Of the Ellis van Creveld syndrome cases, 20/27 (74%) had a mutation in EVC and 7/27 (26%) in EVC2 genes. The two subjects with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis had a heterozygous mutation in the last exon of EVC2. In total, we detected 25 independent EVC and 11 independent EVC2 mutations. Nineteen EVC mutations (19/25, 76%) and 4 EVC2 mutations (4/11, 36%) were novel. Also one EVC2 gene mutation found in Weyers acrofacial dysostosis was novel. In 5 unrelated cases with a clinical diagnosis of Ellis van Creveld syndrome, we did not find any mutation in either EVC or EVC2 genes. Current findings expand the Ellis van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrofacial dysostosis mutation spectra, and provide further evidence that the last exon of EVC2 gene is a hot spot for Weyers acrofacial dysostosis mutations. Accordingly, EVC2 exon 22 should be analyzed with priority by mutation screening in individuals with a suspected diagnosis of Weyers acrofacial dysostosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Comprehensive Mutation Analysis of PMS2 in a Large Cohort of Probands Suspected of Lynch Syndrome or Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Klift, Heleen M; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Drost, Mark; Bik, Elsa C; Vos, Yvonne J; Gille, Hans J J P; Redeker, Bert E J W; Tiersma, Yvonne; Zonneveld, José B M; García, Encarna Gómez; Letteboer, Tom G W; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; van Hest, Liselotte P; van Os, Theo A; Verhoef, Senno; Wagner, Anja; van Asperen, Christi J; Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Hes, Frederik J; de Wind, Niels; Nielsen, Maartje; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Wijnen, Juul T; Tops, Carli M J

    2016-11-01

    Monoallelic PMS2 germline mutations cause 5%-15% of Lynch syndrome, a midlife cancer predisposition, whereas biallelic PMS2 mutations cause approximately 60% of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD), a rare childhood cancer syndrome. Recently improved DNA- and RNA-based strategies are applied to overcome problematic PMS2 mutation analysis due to the presence of pseudogenes and frequent gene conversion events. Here, we determined PMS2 mutation detection yield and mutation spectrum in a nationwide cohort of 396 probands. Furthermore, we studied concordance between tumor IHC/MSI (immunohistochemistry/microsatellite instability) profile and mutation carrier state. Overall, we found 52 different pathogenic PMS2 variants explaining 121 Lynch syndrome and nine CMMRD patients. In vitro mismatch repair assays suggested pathogenicity for three missense variants. Ninety-one PMS2 mutation carriers (70%) showed isolated loss of PMS2 in their tumors, for 31 (24%) no or inconclusive IHC was available, and eight carriers (6%) showed discordant IHC (presence of PMS2 or loss of both MLH1 and PMS2). Ten cases with isolated PMS2 loss (10%; 10/97) harbored MLH1 mutations. We confirmed that recently improved mutation analysis provides a high yield of PMS2 mutations in patients with isolated loss of PMS2 expression. Application of universal tumor prescreening methods will however miss some PMS2 germline mutation carriers. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  17. NUP107 mutations in children with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eujin; Ahn, Yo Han; Kang, Hee Gyung; Miyake, Noriko; Tsukaguchi, Hiroyasu; Cheong, Hae Il

    2017-06-01

    NUP107 is a novel gene associated with autosomal recessive steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) in children. The frequency of NUP107 mutations in children with SR-FSGS remains unknown. Nine families with two siblings affected by childhood-onset SRNS or proteinuria were recruited. FSGS was confirmed by a kidney biopsy in at least one affected sibling in all families. Additionally, 69 sporadic pediatric cases with biopsy-proven SR-FSGS who had not responded to any treatment were included. All coding exons with flanking introns of the NUP107 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced. Biallelic NUP107 mutations were detected in four pairs (44.4%) of siblings from the familial cases and three (4.3%) sporadic cases. All affected patients harbored the p.Asp831Ala mutation in one allele and a truncating or abnormal splicing mutation in the other allele. NUP107 mutation-positive patients showed an earlier onset age (39.4 ± 13.1 versus 76.8 ± 50.0 months, P= 0.027) and more rapid progression to end-stage renal disease (at the ages of 58.9 ± 23.4 versus 123.1 ± 62.7 months, P < 0.001) compared with mutation-negative patients. None of the eight mutation-positive cases, who underwent kidney transplantation, showed recurrence of FSGS in the graft kidney, while 35.3% of mutation-negative cases showed recurrence of FSGS. An unexpectedly high incidence of NUP107 mutations was observed in Korean children with SR-FSGS. Initial genetic screening of children with SR-FSGS should include the NUP107 gene, at least in Korea. Further studies are necessary to determine the incidences of NUP107 mutations in other countries. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  18. Homozygous and compound-heterozygous mutations in TGDS cause Catel-Manzke syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmke, Nadja; Caliebe, Almuth; Koenig, Rainer; Kant, Sarina G; Stark, Zornitza; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Hoff, Kirstin; Kawalia, Amit; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Knaus, Alexej; Zhu, Na; Heinrich, Verena; Huber, Celine; Harabula, Izabela; Spielmann, Malte; Horn, Denise; Kornak, Uwe; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter M; Nürnberg, Peter; Siebert, Reiner; Manzke, Hermann; Mundlos, Stefan

    2014-12-04

    Catel-Manzke syndrome is characterized by Pierre Robin sequence and a unique form of bilateral hyperphalangy causing a clinodactyly of the index finger. We describe the identification of homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in TGDS in seven unrelated individuals with typical Catel-Manzke syndrome by exome sequencing. Six different TGDS mutations were detected: c.892A>G (p.Asn298Asp), c.270_271del (p.Lys91Asnfs(∗)22), c.298G>T (p.Ala100Ser), c.294T>G (p.Phe98Leu), c.269A>G (p.Glu90Gly), and c.700T>C (p.Tyr234His), all predicted to be disease causing. By using haplotype reconstruction we showed that the mutation c.298G>T is probably a founder mutation. Due to the spectrum of the amino acid changes, we suggest that loss of function in TGDS is the underlying mechanism of Catel-Manzke syndrome. TGDS (dTDP-D-glucose 4,6-dehydrogenase) is a conserved protein belonging to the SDR family and probably plays a role in nucleotide sugar metabolism. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mutation spectrum and genotype-phenotype correlation in Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannini, Linda; Cucco, Francesco; Quarantotti, Valentina; Krantz, Ian D; Musio, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous developmental disorder. Clinical features include growth retardation, intellectual disability, limb defects, typical facial dysmorphism, and other systemic involvement. The increased understanding of the genetic basis of CdLS has led to diagnostic improvement and expansion of the phenotype. Mutations in five genes (NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and HDAC8), all regulators or structural components of cohesin, have been identified. Approximately 60% of CdLS cases are due to NIPBL mutations, 5% caused by mutations in SMC1A, RAD21, and HDAC8 and one proband was found to carry a mutation in SMC3. To date, 311 CdLS-causing mutations are known including missense, nonsense, small deletions and insertions, splice site mutations, and genomic rearrangements. Phenotypic variability is seen both intra- and intergenically. This article reviews the spectrum of CdLS mutations with a particular emphasis on their correlation to the clinical phenotype. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  20. Two novel NIPBL gene mutations in Chinese patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Libin; Liang, Desheng; Huang, Yanru; Pan, Qian; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-01-25

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominantly inherited developmental disorder characterized by distinctive facial features, mental retardation, and upper limb defects, with the involvement of multiple organs and systems. To date, mutations have been identified in five genes responsible for CdLS: NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and HDAC8. Here, we present a clinical and molecular characterization of five unrelated Chinese patients whose clinical presentation is consistent with that of CdLS. There were no chromosomal abnormalities in the five children. In three patients, DNA sequencing revealed a previously reported frameshift mutation c.2479delA (p.Arg827GlyfsX20), and two novel mutations including a heterozygous mutation c.6272 G>T (p.Cys2091Phe) and a frameshift mutation c.1672delA (p.Thr558LeufsX7) in NIPBL. For the remaining patients, large deletions and/or duplications within the NIPBL gene were excluded as playing a role in the pathogenesis, by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. These findings broaden the mutation spectrum of NIPBL and further our understanding of the diverse and variable effects of NIPBL mutations on CdLS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mutation Spectrum and Genotype–Phenotype Correlation in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannini, Linda; Cucco, Francesco; Quarantotti, Valentina; Krantz, Ian D.; Musio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous developmental disorder. Clinical features include growth retardation, intellectual disability, limb defects, typical facial dysmorphism, and other systemic involvement. The increased understanding of the genetic basis of CdLS has led to diagnostic improvement and expansion of the phenotype. Mutations in five genes (NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and HDAC8), all regulators or structural components of cohesin, have been identified. Approximately 60% of CdLS cases are due to NIPBL mutations, 5% caused by mutations in SMC1A, RAD21, and HDAC8 and one proband was found to carry a mutation in SMC3. To date, 311 CdLS-causing mutations are known including missense, nonsense, small deletions and insertions, splice site mutations, and genomic rearrangements. Phenotypic variability is seen both intra- and intergenically. This article reviews the spectrum of CdLS mutations with a particular emphasis on their correlation to the clinical phenotype. PMID:24038889

  2. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  3. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: novel mutation of the CHS1/LYST gene in 3 Omani patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tamemi, Salem; Al-Zadjali, Shoaib; Al-Ghafri, Fahad; Dennison, David

    2014-05-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare, autosomal, recessive lysosomal disorder with hematological and immunologic abnormalities; however, stem-cell transplantation from a matched or related donor may be curative. Many mutations of the CHS1/LYST gene have been reported to date. We report a novel nonsense mutation of the CHS1/LYST gene in 3 Omani patients. Three patients from 2 different families presented with clinical and laboratory features of CHS and a history of death of a previous sibling because of a severe illness, suggestive of the accelerated phase of CHS. Giant granules were present in the myeloid cell lines. Before the stem-cell transplant, the first patient underwent gene sequencing of all exons of the lysosome trafficking regulator (CHS1/LYST) gene and revealed a nonsense mutation in exon 5 (c.925C>T, p.R309X). Subsequently, upon presentation, the second and third patients' direct gene sequencing of exon 5 revealed the same mutation. We report a nonsense mutation in exon 5 (c.925C>T, p.R309X). This supports the allelic heterogeneity of CHS and is in line with most reported mutation types that lead to a truncated protein. Identification of the mutation type will facilitate timely diagnosis, management, and family counseling for those with affected children in Oman.

  4. A review on non-syndromic tooth agenesis associated with PAX9 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Hasyiqin Fauzi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Tooth agenesis in the reduction of tooth number which includes hypodontia, oligodontia and anodontia is caused by disturbances and gene mutations that occur during odontogenesis. To date, several genetic mutations that unlock the causes of non-syndromic tooth agenesis are being discovered; these have been associated with certain illnesses because tooth development involves the interaction of several genes for tooth epithelium and mesenchyme odontogenesis. Mutation of candidate genes PAX9 and MSX1 have been identified as the main causes of hypodontia and oligodontia; meanwhile, AXIN2 mutation is associated with anodontia. Previous study using animal models reported that PAX9-deficient knockout mice exhibit missing molars due to an arrest of tooth development at the bud stage. PAX9 frameshift, missense and nonsense mutations are reported to be responsible; however, the most severe condition showed by the phenotype is caused by haploinsufficiency. This suggests that PAX9 is dosage-sensitive. Understanding the mechanism of genetic mutations will benefit clinicians and human geneticists in future alternative treatment investigations. Keywords: Hypodontia, Oligodontia, Mutation, PAX9

  5. [SOX10 mutation is relevant to inner ear malformation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G Y; Hao, Q Q; Zhong, L L; Ren, W; Yan, Y; Liu, R Y; Li, J N; Guo, W W; Zhao, H; Yang, S M

    2016-11-07

    Objective: To determine the relevance between the SOX 10 mutation and Waardenburg syndrome (WS) accompanied with inner ear abnormality by analyzing the inner ear imaging results and molecular and genetic results of the WS patients with the SOX 10 mutation. Methods: This study included 36 WS in patients during 2001 and 2015 in the department of otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery, Chinese Peoples's Liberation Army General Hospital. The condition of the inner ear of each patient was assessed by analyzing HRCT scans of the temporal bone and MRI scans of the brain and internal auditory canal. Meanwhile, the possible pathogenic genes of WS, including SOX10, MITF , and PAX 3, were also screened. Patients were divided into two groups according to SOX 10 mutation.The Fisher accuracy test was used to determine statistical difference of inner ear deformation incidence between the two groups. Results: Among all 36 patients, 12 were found to have inner ear abnormality. Most abnormalities were posterior semicircular canal deformations, some accompanied with cochlear deformation and an enlarged vestibule. Among all patients, 9 patients were SOX 10 heterozygous mutation carriers, among which six showed bilateral inner ear abnormality. Fisher accuracy test results suggested a significant correlation between the SOX 10 mutation and inner ear abnormality in WS patients ( P =0.036). Conclusion: This study found that WS patients with the SOX 10 mutation are more likely to have deformed inner ears when compared to WS patients without the SOX 10 mutation.

  6. PYCR2 Mutations cause a lethal syndrome of microcephaly and failure to thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Maha S; Bhat, Gifty; Sultan, Tipu; Issa, Mahmoud; Jung, Hea-Jin; Dikoglu, Esra; Selim, Laila; G Mahmoud, Imam; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-07-01

    A study was undertaken to characterize the clinical features of the newly described hypomyelinating leukodystrophy type 10 with microcephaly. This is an autosomal recessive disorder mapped to chromosome 1q42.12 due to mutations in the PYCR2 gene, encoding an enzyme involved in proline synthesis in mitochondria. From several international clinics, 11 consanguineous families were identified with PYCR2 mutations by whole exome or targeted sequencing, with detailed clinical and radiological phenotyping. Selective mutations from patients were tested for effect on protein function. The characteristic clinical presentation of patients with PYCR2 mutations included failure to thrive, microcephaly, craniofacial dysmorphism, progressive psychomotor disability, hyperkinetic movements, and axial hypotonia with variable appendicular spasticity. Patients did not survive beyond the first decade of life. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed global brain atrophy and white matter T2 hyperintensities. Routine serum metabolic profiles were unremarkable. Both nonsense and missense mutations were identified, which impaired protein multimerization. PYCR2-related syndrome represents a clinically recognizable condition in which PYCR2 mutations lead to protein dysfunction, not detectable on routine biochemical assessments. Mutations predict a poor outcome, probably as a result of impaired mitochondrial function. Ann Neurol 2016;80:59-70. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  7. Missense mutations in the growth hormone receptor dimerization region in Laron syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M.A.; Francke, U. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of Stanford, CA (United States); Geffner, M.E.; Bersch, N. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is an autosomal recessively inherited condition characterized by insensitivity to endogenous and exogenous GH. Affected individuals have severe episodes and other characteristic features. GH receptor gene mutations are present in all affected individuals in whom molecular studies have been reported. The GH receptor is a plasma membrane-spanning protein in which the extracellular domain binds circulating GH and the intracellular domain interacts with the JAK-2 kinase and possibly other intracellular signaling molecules. GH receptor dimerization occurs on GH binding and is thought to be required for normal signal transduction. We have studied the GH receptor genes of four unrelated individuals affected with LS from the United States, Italy, Saudi Arabia, and India. We have identified four different missense mutations that alter consecutive amino acids 152 to 155 in or near the dimerization domain of the GH receptor. One of these mutations, D152H, has been reported previously in Asian LS patients and, in in vitro studies, the mutant receptor was unable to dimerize. This report increases to over 20 the number of different GH receptor gene mutations that have been reported in LS patients and defines the first apparent mutational {open_quotes}hotspot{close_quotes} region in this gene. This cluster of mutations in patients with classic LS phenotype provides additional in vivo evidence that receptor dimerization plays an important role in signaling GH`s growth promoting and metabolic effects. Further in vitro studies of the mutations in this region are in progress.

  8. Spectrum of temporal bone abnormalities in patients with Waardenburg syndrome and SOX10 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmaleh-Bergès, M; Baumann, C; Noël-Pétroff, N; Sekkal, A; Couloigner, V; Devriendt, K; Wilson, M; Marlin, S; Sebag, G; Pingault, V

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome, characterized by deafness and pigmentation abnormalities, is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, consisting of 4 distinct subtypes and involving several genes. SOX10 mutations have been found both in types 2 and 4 Waardenburg syndrome and neurologic variants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate both the full spectrum and relative frequencies of inner ear malformations in these patients. Fifteen patients with Waardenburg syndrome and different SOX10 mutations were studied retrospectively. Imaging was performed between February 2000 and March 2010 for cochlear implant work-up, diagnosis of hearing loss, and/or evaluation of neurologic impairment. Eleven patients had both CT and MR imaging examinations, 3 had MR imaging only, and 1 had CT only. Temporal bone abnormalities were bilateral. The most frequent pattern associated agenesis or hypoplasia of ≥1 semicircular canal, an enlarged vestibule, and a cochlea with a reduced size and occasionally an abnormal shape, but with normal partition in the 13/15 cases that could be analyzed. Three patients lacked a cochlear nerve, bilaterally in 2 patients. In addition, associated abnormalities were found when adequate MR imaging sequences were available: agenesis of the olfactory bulbs (7/8), hypoplastic or absent lacrimal glands (11/14), hypoplastic parotid glands (12/14), and white matter signal anomalies (7/13). In the appropriate clinical context, bilateral agenesis or hypoplasia of the semicircular canals or both, associated with an enlarged vestibule and a cochlear deformity, strongly suggests a diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome linked to a SOX10 mutation.

  9. Wiedemann-Steiner Syndrome With 2 Novel KMT2A Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min Ko, Jung; Cho, Jae So; Yoo, Yongjin; Seo, Jieun; Choi, Murim; Chae, Jong-Hee; Lee, Hye-Ran; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2017-02-01

    Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature, hairy elbows, facial dysmorphism, and developmental delay. It can also be accompanied by musculoskeletal anomalies such as muscular hypotonia and small hands and feet. Mutations in the KMT2A gene have only recently been identified as the cause of Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome; therefore, only 16 patients from 15 families have been described, and new phenotypic features continue to be added. In this report, we describe 2 newly identified patients with Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome who presented with variable severity. One girl exhibited developmental dysplasia of the hip and fibromatosis colli accompanied by other clinical features, including facial dysmorphism, hypertrichosis, patent ductus arteriosus, growth retardation, and borderline intellectual disability. The other patient, a boy, showed severe developmental retardation with automatic self-mutilation, facial dysmorphism, and hypertrichosis at a later age. Exome sequencing analysis of these patients and their parents revealed a de novo nonsense mutation, p.Gln1978*, of KMT2A in the former, and a missense mutation, p.Gly1168Asp, in the latter, which molecularly confirmed the diagnosis of Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome.

  10. A family of oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) with a novel BCOR mutation and genomic rearrangements involving NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yukiko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyamoto, Toshinobu; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Ryoo, Na-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hun; Yu, Young Suk; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-03-01

    Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) is an X-linked dominant disorder associated with male lethality, presenting with congenital cataract, dysmorphic face, dental abnormalities and septal heart defects. Mutations in BCOR (encoding BCL-6-interacting corepressor) cause OFCD. Here, we report on a Korean family with common features of OFCD including bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects in three affected females (mother and two daughters). Through the mutation screening and copy number analysis using genomic microarray, we identified a novel heterozygous mutation, c.888delG, in the BCOR gene and two interstitial microduplications at Xp22.2-22.13 and Xp21.3 in all the three affected females. The BCOR mutation may lead to a premature stop codon (p.N297IfsX80). The duplication at Xp22.2-22.13 involved the NHS gene causative for Nance-Horan syndrome, which is an X-linked disorder showing similar clinical features with OFCD in affected males, and in carrier females with milder presentation. Considering the presence of bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects, which is unique to OFCD, the mutation in BCOR is likely to be the major determinant for the phenotypes in this family.

  11. Identification of a novel mutation in an Indian patient with CAII deficiency syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaprasad C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase II (CAII deficiency syndrome characterized by osteopetrosis (OP, renal tubular acidosis (RTA, and cerebral calcifications is caused by mutations in the carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2 gene. Severity of this disorder varies depending on the nature of the mutation and its effect on the protein. We present here, the clinical and radiographic details along with, results of mutational analysis of the CA2 gene in an individual clinically diagnosed with renal tubular acidosis, osteopetrosis and mental retardation and his family members to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. A novel homozygous deletion mutation c.251delT was seen in the patient resulting in a frameshift and a premature stop codon at amino acid position 90 generating a truncated protein leading to a complete loss of function and a consequential deficiency of the enzyme making this a pathogenic mutation. Confirmation of clinical diagnosis by molecular methods is essential as the clinical features of the CAII deficiency syndrome are similar to other forms of OP but the treatment modalities are different. Genetic confirmation of the diagnosis at an early age leads to the timely institution of therapy improving the growth potential, reduces other complications like fractures, and aids in providing prenatal testing and genetic counseling to the parents planning a pregnancy.

  12. Mutations in plasmalemma vesicle-associated protein cause severe syndromic protein-losing enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekaert, Ilse Julia; Becker, Kerstin; Gottschalk, Ingo; Körber, Friederike; Dötsch, Jörg; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Hünseler, Christoph; Cirak, Sebahattin

    2018-04-16

    Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is characterised by gastrointestinal protein leakage due to loss of mucosal integrity or lymphatic abnormalities. PLE can manifest as congenital diarrhoea and should be differentiated from other congenital diarrhoeal disorders. Primary PLEs are genetically heterogeneous and the underlying genetic defects are currently emerging. We report an infant with fatal PLE for whom we aimed to uncover the underlying pathogenic mutation. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the index patient. Variants were classified based on the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guidelines. WES results and our detailed clinical description of the patient were compared with the literature. We discovered a novel homozygous stop mutation (c.988C>T, p.Q330*) in the Plasmalemma Vesicle-Associated Protein ( PLVAP ) gene in a newborn with fatal PLE, facial dysmorphism, and renal, ocular and cardiac anomalies. The Q330* mutation is predicted to result in complete loss of PLVAP protein expression leading to deletion of the diaphragms of endothelial fenestrae, resulting in plasma protein extravasation and PLE. Recently, another single homozygous stop mutation in PLVAP causing lethal PLE in an infant was reported. Our findings validate PLVAP mutations as a cause of syndromic PLE. Prenatal anomalies, severe PLE and syndromic features may guide the diagnosis of this rare disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. A novel mutation in PAX3 associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun; Luo, Jianfen; Zhang, Fengguo; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Mingming; Ma, Yalin; Xu, Lei; Bai, Xiaohui; Wang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    The novel compound heterozygous mutation in PAX3 was the key genetic reason for WS1 in this family, which was useful to the molecular diagnosis of WS1. Screening the pathogenic mutations in a four generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1). WS1 was diagnosed in a 4-year-old boy according to the Waardenburg syndrome Consortium criteria. The detailed family history revealed four affected members in the family. Routine clinical, audiological examination, and ophthalmologic evaluation were performed on four affected and 10 healthy members in this family. The genetic analysis was conducted, including the targeted next-generation sequencing of 127 known deafness genes combined with Sanger sequencing, TA clone and bioinformatic analysis. A novel compound heterozygous mutation c.[169_170insC;172_174delAAG] (p.His57ProfsX55) was identified in PAX3, which was co-segregated with WS1 in the Chinese family. This mutation was absent in the unaffected family members and 200 ethnicity-matched controls. The phylogenetic analysis and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of Pax3 protein further confirmed that the novel compound heterozygous mutation was pathogenic.

  14. Novel Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 Genes in Mexican Patients with Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel Moreno-Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS is characterized by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer (CRC and extracolonic tumors. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MMR genes in three Mexican patients with LS. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed as a prescreening method to identify absent protein expression. PCR, Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC, and Sanger sequencing complemented the analysis. Results. Two samples showed the absence of nuclear staining for MLH1 and one sample showed loss of nuclear staining for MSH2. The mutations found in MLH1 gene were c.2103+1G>C in intron 18 and compound heterozygous mutants c.1852_1854delAAG (p.K618del and c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A in exon 16. In the MSH2 gene, we identified mutation c.638dupT (p.L213fs in exon 3. Conclusions. This is the first report of mutations in MMR genes in Mexican patients with LS and these appear to be novel.

  15. Novel LRP5 gene mutation in a patient with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Pinheiro, Alice; Levasseur, Régis; Cormier, Catherine; Bonneau, Jessica; Boileau, Catherine; Varret, Mathilde; Abifadel, Marianne; Allanore, Yannick

    2010-03-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by severe juvenile-onset osteoporosis and congenital or early-onset blindness. This serious illness is due to mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) that is a major actor in pathways involved in bone remodelling. Here, we report a novel frameshift mutation identified in a 22 year-old Tunisian boy of a consanguineous family. This patient had low bone mineral density (BMD), experienced multiple fractures during childhood and suffered ocular alterations with blindness. Direct DNA sequencing showed a homozygous 5 base pair insertion in exon 5 of the LRP5 gene. This new mutation is located in the first EGF-like domain and gives rise to a truncated protein of 384 amino acids. The functional significance of this mutation clearly indicates a loss-of-function mutation of the LRP5 gene leading to the observed OPPG phenotype. Rheumatologists must be aware of LRP5 gene that in addition to being a major gene in the mendelian disease that is OPPG syndrome seems to be involved in osteoporosis in the general population through some of its polymorphisms. Copyright 2009 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Waardenburg syndrome type 4: report of two new cases caused by SOX10 mutations in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Raquel M; Núñez-Ramos, Raquel; Enguix-Riego, M Valle; Román-Rodríguez, Francisco José; Galán-Gómez, Enrique; Blesa-Sánchez, Emilio; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Núñez-Núñez, Ramón; Borrego, Salud

    2014-02-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome or Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) is a neurocristopathy characterized by the association of deafness, depigmentation and Hirschsprung disease. Three disease-causing genes have been identified so far for WS4: EDNRB, EDN3, and SOX10. SOX10 mutations, found in 45-55% of WS4 patients, are inherited in autosomal dominant way. In addition, mutations in SOX10 are also responsible for an extended syndrome involving peripheral and central neurological phenotypes, referred to as PCWH (peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leucodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, Hirschsprung disease). Such mutations are mostly private, and a high intra- and inter-familial variability exists. In this report, we present a patient with WS4 and a second with PCWH due to SOX10 mutations supporting again the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of these syndromes. Interestingly, the WS4 family carries an insertion of 19 nucleotides in exon 5 of SOX10, which results in distinct phenotypes along three different generations: hypopigmentation in the maternal grandmother, hearing loss in the mother, and WS4 in the proband. Since mosaicism cannot explain the three different related-WS features observed in this family, we propose as the most plausible explanation the existence of additional molecular events, acting in an additive or multiplicative fashion, in genes or regulatory regions unidentified so far. On the other hand, the PCWH case was due to a de novo deletion in exon 5 of the gene. Efforts should be devoted to unravel the mechanisms underlying the intrafamilial phenotypic variability observed in the families affected, and to identify new genes responsible for the still unsolved WS4 cases. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mutations in a TGF-β ligand, TGFB3, cause syndromic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Gillis, Elisabeth; Morisaki, Hiroko; Verhagen, Judith M A; de Graaf, Bianca M; van de Beek, Gerarda; Gallo, Elena; Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Venselaar, Hanka; Myers, Loretha A; Laga, Steven; Doyle, Alexander J; Oswald, Gretchen; van Cappellen, Gert W A; Yamanaka, Itaru; van der Helm, Robert M; Beverloo, Berna; de Klein, Annelies; Pardo, Luba; Lammens, Martin; Evers, Christina; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dumoulein, Michiel; Timmermans, Janneke; Bruggenwirth, Hennie T; Verheijen, Frans; Rodrigus, Inez; Baynam, Gareth; Kempers, Marlies; Saenen, Johan; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M; Minatoya, Kenji; Matsukawa, Ritsu; Tsukube, Takuro; Kubo, Noriaki; Hofstra, Robert; Goumans, Marie Jose; Bekkers, Jos A; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; van de Laar, Ingrid M B H; Dietz, Harry C; Van Laer, Lut; Morisaki, Takayuki; Wessels, Marja W; Loeys, Bart L

    2015-04-07

    Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed an important contribution of disturbed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. This study sought to discover a novel gene causing syndromic aortic aneurysms in order to unravel the underlying pathogenesis. We combined genome-wide linkage analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate gene Sanger sequencing in a total of 470 index cases with thoracic aortic aneurysms. Extensive cardiological examination, including physical examination, electrocardiography, and transthoracic echocardiography was performed. In adults, imaging of the entire aorta using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was done. Here, we report on 43 patients from 11 families with syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysms caused by TGFB3 mutations. We demonstrate that TGFB3 mutations are associated with significant cardiovascular involvement, including thoracic/abdominal aortic aneurysm and dissection, and mitral valve disease. Other systemic features overlap clinically with Loeys-Dietz, Shprintzen-Goldberg, and Marfan syndromes, including cleft palate, bifid uvula, skeletal overgrowth, cervical spine instability and clubfoot deformity. In line with previous observations in aortic wall tissues of patients with mutations in effectors of TGF-β signaling (TGFBR1/2, SMAD3, and TGFB2), we confirm a paradoxical up-regulation of both canonical and noncanonical TGF-β signaling in association with up-regulation of the expression of TGF-β ligands. Our findings emphasize the broad clinical variability associated with TGFB3 mutations and highlight the importance of early recognition of the disease because of high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  18. Observational cohort study of ventricular arrhythmia in adults with Marfan syndrome caused by FBN1 mutations.

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    Ali Aydin

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is associated with ventricular arrhythmia but risk factors including FBN1 mutation characteristics require elucidation.We performed an observational cohort study of 80 consecutive adults (30 men, 50 women aged 42±15 years with Marfan syndrome caused by FBN1 mutations. We assessed ventricular arrhythmia on baseline ambulatory electrocardiography as >10 premature ventricular complexes per hour (>10 PVC/h, as ventricular couplets (Couplet, or as non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (nsVT, and during 31±18 months of follow-up as ventricular tachycardia (VT events (VTE such as sudden cardiac death (SCD, and sustained ventricular tachycardia (sVT. We identified >10 PVC/h in 28 (35%, Couplet/nsVT in 32 (40%, and VTE in 6 patients (8%, including 3 with SCD (4%. PVC>10/h, Couplet/nsVT, and VTE exhibited increased N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide serum levels(P10/h and Couplet/nsVT also related to increased indexed end-systolic LV diameters (P = .024 and P = .020, to moderate mitral valve regurgitation (P = .018 and P = .003, and to prolonged QTc intervals (P = .001 and P = .006, respectively. Moreover, VTE related to mutations in exons 24-32 (P = .021. Kaplan-Meier analysis corroborated an association of VTE with increased NT-proBNP (P<.001 and with mutations in exons 24-32 (P<.001.Marfan syndrome with causative FBN1 mutations is associated with an increased risk for arrhythmia, and affected persons may require life-long monitoring. Ventricular arrhythmia on electrocardiography, signs of myocardial dysfunction and mutations in exons 24-32 may be risk factors of VTE.

  19. A Novel Fibrillin-1 Gene Mutation Leading to Marfan Syndrome in a Korean Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyo-Kyoung; Nam, Myung-Hyun; Ha, Kee-Soo; Rhie, Young-Jun; Lee, Kee-Hyoung

    2017-03-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by a connective tissue defect. A nine-year-old girl was referred to our pediatric endocrinology clinic for tall stature. Physical examination revealed a lens dislocation with strabismus, high palate, positive wrist and thumb signs, joint hypermobility, and pes planus. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed dilatation of the aortic root. She was diagnosed with Marfan syndrome based on the revised Ghent diagnostic criteria. Molecular investigation identified a heterozygous c.2810G >A variation in the FBN1 gene in the patient, but not in her parents. To our knowledge, this sequence variant has been reported as a polymorphism (rs113602180), but it is the first report identifying it as the genetic cause of Marfan syndrome. We hypothesize that this de novo novel missense FBN1 mutation disrupts fibrillin-1 function and is probably involved in the development of Marfan syndrome in this patient. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  20. A de novo missense mutation of FGFR2 causes facial dysplasia syndrome in Holstein cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; McEvoy, Fintan; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Background Surveillance for bovine genetic diseases in Denmark identified a hitherto unreported congenital syndrome occurring among progeny of a Holstein sire used for artificial breeding. A genetic aetiology due to a dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or a mosaic germline mutation...... was suspected as all recorded cases were progeny of the same sire. Detailed investigations were performed to characterize the syndrome and to reveal its cause. Results Seven malformed calves were submitted examination. All cases shared a common morphology with the most striking lesions being severe facial...... dysplasia and complete prolapse of the eyes. Consequently the syndrome was named facial dysplasia syndrome (FDS). Furthermore, extensive brain malformations, including microencephaly, hydrocephalus, lobation of the cerebral hemispheres and compression of the brain were present. Subsequent data analysis...

  1. Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome and spectrum of PITX2 and FOXC1 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tümer, Zeynep; Bach-Holm, Daniella

    2009-01-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder, which encompasses a range of congential malformations affecting the anterior segment of the eye. ARS shows genetic heterogeneity and mutations of the two genes, PITX2 and FOXC1, are known to be associated with the pathogenesis....... There are several excellent reviews dealing with the complexity of the phenotype and genotype of ARS. In this study, we will attempt to give a brief review of the clinical features and the relevant diagnostic approaches, together with a detailed review of published PITX2 and FOXC1 mutations....

  2. Cantú Syndrome Resulting from Activating Mutation in the KCNJ8 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Paige E.; Reutter, Heiko; Woelfle, Joachim; Engels, Hartmut; Grange, Dorothy K.; van Haaften, Gijs; van Bon, Bregje W.; Hoischen, Alexander; Nichols, Colin G.

    2014-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, composed of inward-rectifying potassium channel subunits (Kir6.1 and Kir6.2, encoded by KCNJ8 and KCNJ11, respectively) and regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR1 and SUR2, encoded by ABCC8 and ABCC9, respectively), couple metabolism to excitability in multiple tissues. Mutations in ABCC9 cause Cantú syndrome, a distinct multi-organ disease, potentially via enhanced KATP channel activity. We screened KCNJ8 in an ABCC9 mutation-negative patient who also...

  3. HELLP Syndrome and Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Associated with Factor V Leiden Mutation during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Ozcan Dag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. The neurological complications of preeclampsia and eclampsia are responsible for a major proportion of the morbidity and mortality for women and their infants alike. Hormonal changes during pregnancy and the puerperium carry an increased risk of venous thromboembolism including cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST. Factor 5 leiden (FVL is a procoagulant mutation associated primarily with venous thrombosis and pregnancy complications. We report a patient with FVL mutation who presented with CVST at 24th week of pregnancy and was diagnosed as HELLP syndrome at 34th week of pregnancy.

  4. [Analysis of clinical characteristics and genetic mutation in a pedigree affected with Chediak-Higashi syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiangang; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Liyu; Sun, Hongli; Yang, Ying

    2018-04-10

    To explore the genetic basis for a pedigree affected with Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS). Clinical data of two CHS patients from the pedigree was collected and analyzed. Targeted next generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing were conducted to detect potential mutation of the LYST gene. Both patients presented immunodeficiency, oculocutaneous albinism, and acidophilic inclusion body on bone marrow and blood smears. A homozygous c.6077_6078insA (p.Tyr2026Terfs) mutation was detected in the LYST gene in both patients. Genetic testing can play an important role in the diagnosis of CHS.

  5. Coffin-Siris syndrome and cardiac anomaly with a novel SOX11 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Ehara, Eiji; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-08-08

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is characterized by growth deficiency, intellectual disability, microcephaly, dysmorphic features, and hypoplastic nails of the fifth fingers and/or toes. Variants in the genes encoding subunits of the BAF complex as well as in SOX11 encoding the transcriptional factor under the control of BAF complex are associated with CSS. We report a new patient with a novel SOX11 mutation. He showed the CSS phenotype and coarctation of the aorta. Sox11 is known to be associated with cardiac outflow development in mouse studies. Therefore, cardiac anomalies might be an important complication in patients with SOX11 mutations. © 2017 Japanese Teratology Society.

  6. Clinical and mutational spectrum of hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belge, Hendrica; Dahan, Karin; Cambier, Jean-François; Benoit, Valérie; Morelle, Johann; Bloch, Julie; Vanhille, Philippe; Pirson, Yves; Demoulin, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    Hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder, secondary to mutations in the GATA-3 gene. Due to its wide range of penetrance and expressivity, the disease may not always be recognized. We herein describe clinical and genetic features of patients with HDR syndrome, highlighting diagnostic clues. Medical records of eight patients from five unrelated families exhibiting GATA-3 mutations were reviewed retrospectively, in conjunction with all previously reported cases. HDR syndrome was diagnosed in eight patients between the ages of 18 and 60 years. Sensorineural deafness was consistently diagnosed, ranging from clinical hearing loss since infancy in seven patients to deafness detected only by audiometry in adulthood in one single patient. Hypoparathyroidism was present in six patients (with hypocalcaemia and inaugural seizures in two out of six). Renal abnormalities observed in six patients were diverse and of dysplastic nature. Three patients displayed nephrotic-range proteinuria and reached end-stage renal disease (ESRD) between the ages of 19 and 61 years, whilst lesions of focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis were histologically demonstrated in one of them. Interestingly, phenotype severity differed significantly between a mother and son within one family. Five new mutations of GATA-3 were identified, including three missense mutations affecting zinc finger motifs [NM_001002295.1: c.856A>G (p.N286D) and c.1017C>G (p.C339W)] or the conserved linker region [c.896G>A (p.R299G)], and two splicing mutations (c.924+4_924+19del and c.1051-2A>G). Review of 115 previously reported cases of GATA-3 mutations showed hypoparathyroidism and deafness in 95% of patients, and renal abnormalities in only 60%. Overall, 10% of patients had reached ESRD. We herein expand the clinical and mutational spectrum of HDR syndrome, illustrating considerable inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic variability. Diagnosis of HDR should be

  7. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies RAI1 Mutation in a Morbidly Obese Child Diagnosed With ROHHAD Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Kristyn M.; Towne, Meghan C.; Brownstein, Catherine A.; James, Philip M.; Crowley, Laura; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Elsea, Sarah H.; Beggs, Alan H.; Picker, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Context: The current obesity epidemic is attributed to complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. However, a limited number of cases, especially those with early-onset severe obesity, are linked to single gene defects. Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is one of the syndromes that presents with abrupt-onset extreme weight gain with an unknown genetic basis. Objective: To identify the underlying genetic etiology in a child with morbid early-onset obesity, hypoventilation, and autonomic and behavioral disturbances who was clinically diagnosed with ROHHAD syndrome. Design/Setting/Intervention: The index patient was evaluated at an academic medical center. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on the proband and his parents. Genetic variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. Results: We identified a novel de novo nonsense mutation, c.3265 C>T (p.R1089X), in the retinoic acid-induced 1 (RAI1) gene in the proband. Mutations in the RAI1 gene are known to cause Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). On further evaluation, his clinical features were not typical of either SMS or ROHHAD syndrome. Conclusions: This study identifies a de novo RAI1 mutation in a child with morbid obesity and a clinical diagnosis of ROHHAD syndrome. Although extreme early-onset obesity, autonomic disturbances, and hypoventilation are present in ROHHAD, several of the clinical findings are consistent with SMS. This case highlights the challenges in the diagnosis of ROHHAD syndrome and its potential overlap with SMS. We also propose RAI1 as a candidate gene for children with morbid obesity. PMID:25781356

  8. Pitt-Hopkins syndrome: report of a case with a TCF4 gene mutation

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    Orsini Alessandro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims We will discuss the clinical and genetic diagnosis of a child with severe psychomotor delay, who at 3 years of age presented with paroxysms of hyperpnea-apnea and seizures unrelated to breathing anomalies. Methods The child underwent genetic (karyotype, FISH telomeres and neuroradiological (cranial CT and MRI tests, which proved to be normal. He came under our clinical observation at 3 years and 5 months of age. Due to severe psychomotor delay and facial dysmorphisms we completed the genetic investigations based on his clinical feature and analysis of the available literature. Results The presence of severe mental retardation associated with anomalous breathing pattern may suggest the Joubert and Rett syndrome, however these were excluded on the basis of clinical and genetic examination. Angelman syndrome, suspected for facial dysmorphisms and absent language, was also excluded because of the presence of a normal pattern of methylation at SNRPN locus. Another possible diagnosis was the Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome (PHS, characterized by severe mental retardation, breathing anomalies (paroxisms of hyperpnea-apnea, dysmorphisms and sometimes epilepsy. Haploinsufficiency of TCF4 gene located at 18q21.2 region has been recently identified as causative of this syndrome. In our patient the research of TCF4 mutation by the Institute of Human Genetics, University Hospital Erlangen (Germany, showed a de novo mutation. Conclusions The diagnosis of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome, an underdiagnosed cause of mental retardation, was based on clinical and genetic findings. Searching for TCF4 mutations is highly recommended when others overlapping syndromes was excluded. At our knowledge our patient is the first italian case of PHS diagnosed at molecular level.

  9. IDH mutations are closely associated with mutations of DNMT3A, ASXL1 and SRSF2 in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and are stable during disease evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Chin; Hou, Hsin-An; Chou, Wen-Chien; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Lai, Yan-Jun; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Huang, Chi-Fei; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Fen-Yu; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Tang, Jih-Luh; Yao, Ming; Huang, Shang-Yi; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Wu, Shang-Ju; Tsay, Woei; Chen, Yao-Chang; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2014-02-01

    Current information about clinical significance of IDH mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), their association with other genetic alterations and the stability during disease progression is limited. In this study, IDH mutations were identified in 4.6% of 477 patients with MDS based on the FAB classification and in 2.2 % of 368 patients based on the 2008 WHO classification. IDH mutations were closely associated with older age, higher platelet counts, and mutations of DNMT3A (36.4% vs. 8.7%, P IDH2 mutation was a poor prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with lower-risk MDS, based on international prognosis scoring system (IPSS), FAB classification, WHO classification, or revised IPSS (all P ≦ 0.001), but not in higher-risk groups. Sequential studies in 151 patients demonstrated that all IDH-mutated patients retained the same mutation during disease evolution while none of the IDH-wild patients acquired a novel mutation during follow-ups. In conclusion, IDH mutation is a useful biomarker for risk stratification of patients with lower-risk MDS. IDH mutations are stable during the clinical course. The mutation, in association with other genetic alterations, may play a role in the development, but not progression of MDS. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Flecainide provocation reveals concealed brugada syndrome in a long QT syndrome family with a novel L1786Q mutation in SCN5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, Jørgen K; Yuan, Lei; Hedley, Paula L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in SCN5A can result in both long QT type 3 (LQT3) and Brugada syndrome (BrS), and a few mutations have been found to have an overlapping phenotype. Long QT syndrome is characterized by prolonged QT interval, and a prerequisite for a BrS diagnosis is ST elevation in the right...... precordial leads of the electrocardiogram. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a Danish family suffering from long QT syndrome, a novel missense mutation in SCN5A, changing a leucine residue into a glutamine residue at position 1786 (L1786Q), was found to be present in heterozygous form co-segregating with prolonged QT......, a negative shift in inactivation properties and a positive shift in activation properties, compatible with BrS. Furthermore, the sustained (I(Na,late)) tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current was found to be drastically increased, explaining the association between the mutation and LQT syndrome. CONCLUSIONS...

  11. Parotid Sebaceous Carcinoma in Patient with Muir Torre Syndrome, Caused by MSH2 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantan, Iyer Vishwas; Di Palma, Silvana; Smith, C E T; McCoombe, A

    2016-09-01

    Sebaceous carcinoma of parotid gland are extremely rare with only 29 cases reported so far. The development of parotid sebaceous carcinoma in association with mutation in the mismatch repair gene that causes Muir Torre Syndrome (MTS), a subset of Lynch Syndrome, is still unclear. This study describes such a case and reviews the literature to see if an association between parotid sebaceous carcinoma and multiple visceral malignancies seen in Lynch Syndrome has ever been described. MTS represents a small subset of the Hereditary Non Polyposis Colorectal Carcinoma family, thought to be a subtype of Lynch Syndrome, where patients are prone to develop multiple visceral cancers involving gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract along with sebaceous and non-sebaceous tumours of the skin. MTS is a rare hereditary, autosomal dominant cancer syndrome caused by Microsatellite Instability and defect in DNA mismatch repair protein. The germline mutation involves mostly hMSH2 and hMLH1 genes. In MTS the skin of the head and neck area with the periocular region in particular, is affected but sebaceous carcinomas of the parotid associated with visceral malignancies has not yet been reported in literature. Here we report an index case of sebaceous carcinoma of parotid gland in a patient with MTS.

  12. Mutation inactivation of Nijmegen breakage syndrome gene (NBS1 in hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS with NBS1 germ-line mutation is a human autosomal recessive disease characterized by genomic instability and enhanced cancer predisposition. The NBS1 gene codes for a protein, Nbs1(p95/Nibrin, involved in the processing/repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a complex and heterogeneous tumor with several genomic alterations. Recent studies have shown that heterozygous NBS1 mice exhibited a higher incidence of HCC than did wild-type mice. The objective of the present study is to assess whether NBS1 mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of human primary liver cancer, including HBV-associated HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC. Eight missense NBS1 mutations were identified in six of 64 (9.4% HCCs and two of 18 (11.1% ICCs, whereas only one synonymous mutation was found in 89 control cases of cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis B. Analysis of the functional consequences of the identified NBS1 mutations in Mre11-binding domain showed loss of nuclear localization of Nbs1 partner Mre11, one of the hallmarks for Nbs1 deficiency, in one HCC and two ICCs with NBS1 mutations. Moreover, seven of the eight tumors with NBS1 mutations had at least one genetic alteration in the TP53 pathway, including TP53 mutation, MDM2 amplification, p14ARF homozygous deletion and promoter methylation, implying a synergistic effect of Nbs1 disruption and p53 inactivation. Our findings provide novel insight on the molecular pathogenesis of primary liver cancer characterized by mutation inactivation of NBS1, a DNA repair associated gene.

  13. Atrial arrhythmogenicity of KCNJ2 mutations in short QT syndrome: Insights from virtual human atria

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Harchi, Aziza; Hancox, Jules C.

    2017-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in KCNJ2-encoded Kir2.1 channels underlie variant 3 (SQT3) of the short QT syndrome, which is associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). Using biophysically-detailed human atria computer models, this study investigated the mechanistic link between SQT3 mutations and atrial arrhythmogenesis, and potential ion channel targets for treatment of SQT3. A contemporary model of the human atrial action potential (AP) was modified to recapitulate functional changes in IK1 due to heterozygous and homozygous forms of the D172N and E299V Kir2.1 mutations. Wild-type (WT) and mutant formulations were incorporated into multi-scale homogeneous and heterogeneous tissue models. Effects of mutations on AP duration (APD), conduction velocity (CV), effective refractory period (ERP), tissue excitation threshold and their rate-dependence, as well as the wavelength of re-entry (WL) were quantified. The D172N and E299V Kir2.1 mutations produced distinct effects on IK1 and APD shortening. Both mutations decreased WL for re-entry through a reduction in ERP and CV. Stability of re-entrant excitation waves in 2D and 3D tissue models was mediated by changes to tissue excitability and dispersion of APD in mutation conditions. Combined block of IK1 and IKr was effective in terminating re-entry associated with heterozygous D172N conditions, whereas IKr block alone may be a safer alternative for the E299V mutation. Combined inhibition of IKr and IKur produced a synergistic anti-arrhythmic effect in both forms of SQT3. In conclusion, this study provides mechanistic insights into atrial proarrhythmia with SQT3 Kir2.1 mutations and highlights possible pharmacological strategies for management of SQT3-linked AF. PMID:28609477

  14. Mutations in STAT3 and diagnostic guidelines for hyper-IgE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woellner, Cristina; Gertz, E Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Lagos, Macarena; Perro, Mario; Glocker, Erik-Oliver; Pietrogrande, Maria C; Cossu, Fausto; Franco, José L; Matamoros, Nuria; Pietrucha, Barbara; Heropolitańska-Pliszka, Edyta; Yeganeh, Mehdi; Moin, Mostafa; Español, Teresa; Ehl, Stephan; Gennery, Andrew R; Abinun, Mario; Breborowicz, Anna; Niehues, Tim; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Junker, Anne; Turvey, Stuart E; Plebani, Alessandro; Sánchez, Berta; Garty, Ben-Zion; Pignata, Claudio; Cancrini, Caterina; Litzman, Jiri; Sanal, Ozden; Baumann, Ulrich; Bacchetta, Rosa; Hsu, Amy P; Davis, Joie N; Hammarström, Lennart; Davies, E Graham; Eren, Efrem; Arkwright, Peter D; Moilanen, Jukka S; Viemann, Dorothee; Khan, Sujoy; Maródi, László; Cant, Andrew J; Freeman, Alexandra F; Puck, Jennifer M; Holland, Steven M; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2010-02-01

    The hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by infections of the lung and skin, elevated serum IgE, and involvement of the soft and bony tissues. Recently, HIES has been associated with heterozygous dominant-negative mutations in the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and severe reductions of T(H)17 cells. To determine whether there is a correlation between the genotype and the phenotype of patients with HIES and to establish diagnostic criteria to distinguish between STAT3 mutated and STAT3 wild-type patients. We collected clinical data, determined T(H)17 cell numbers, and sequenced STAT3 in 100 patients with a strong clinical suspicion of HIES and serum IgE >1000 IU/mL. We explored diagnostic criteria by using a machine-learning approach to identify which features best predict a STAT3 mutation. In 64 patients, we identified 31 different STAT3 mutations, 18 of which were novel. These included mutations at splice sites and outside the previously implicated DNA-binding and Src homology 2 domains. A combination of 5 clinical features predicted STAT3 mutations with 85% accuracy. T(H)17 cells were profoundly reduced in patients harboring STAT3 mutations, whereas 10 of 13 patients without mutations had low (1000IU/mL plus a weighted score of clinical features >30 based on recurrent pneumonia, newborn rash, pathologic bone fractures, characteristic face, and high palate. Probable: These characteristics plus lack of T(H)17 cells or a family history for definitive HIES. Definitive: These characteristics plus a dominant-negative heterozygous mutation in STAT3. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Single ABCA3 Mutations Increase Risk for Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Daniel J.; DePass, Kelcey; Heins, Hillary; Druley, Todd E.; Mitra, Robi D.; An, Ping; Zhang, Qunyuan; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Cole, F. Sessions; Hamvas, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) due to pulmonary surfactant deficiency is heritable, but common variants do not fully explain disease heritability. METHODS: Using next-generation, pooled sequencing of race-stratified DNA samples from infants ≥34 weeks’ gestation with and without RDS (n = 513) and from a Missouri population-based cohort (n = 1066), we scanned all exons of 5 surfactant-associated genes and used in silico algorithms to identify functional mutations. We validated each mutation with an independent genotyping platform and compared race-stratified, collapsed frequencies of rare mutations by gene to investigate disease associations and estimate attributable risk. RESULTS: Single ABCA3 mutations were overrepresented among European-descent RDS infants (14.3% of RDS vs 3.7% of non-RDS; P = .002) but were not statistically overrepresented among African-descent RDS infants (4.5% of RDS vs 1.5% of non-RDS; P = .23). In the Missouri population-based cohort, 3.6% of European-descent and 1.5% of African-descent infants carried a single ABCA3 mutation. We found no mutations among the RDS infants and no evidence of contribution to population-based disease burden for SFTPC, CHPT1, LPCAT1, or PCYT1B. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to lethal neonatal RDS resulting from homozygous or compound heterozygous ABCA3 mutations, single ABCA3 mutations are overrepresented among European-descent infants ≥34 weeks’ gestation with RDS and account for ∼10.9% of the attributable risk among term and late preterm infants. Although ABCA3 mutations are individually rare, they are collectively common among European- and African-descent individuals in the general population. PMID:23166334

  16. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is associated with a novel G984R COL3A1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yao; Wei, Shijie; Hu, Shijun; Chen, Jinlan; Tan, Zhiping; Yang, Yifeng

    2015-07-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disease. Mutations in COL3A1 have been identified to underlie this disease; however, to the best of our knowledge, no COL3A1 mutations have been reported in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV patients with an ascending aortic aneurysm. In order to develop further understanding of COL3A1 mutations, an Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV patient diagnosed with an ascending aortic aneurysm and a familial history of sudden mortality was analyzed. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood of the patient and his family members. All coding exons of eight aneurysm-related genes (FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR 2, MYH11, ACTA2, SLC2A10, NOTCH1 and COL3A1) were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were sequenced with the ABI 3100 Genetic Analyzer, and a mutation was predicted and identified using Polyphen-2, SIFT and Mutation Taster. The novel mutation was identified as c.2950G>A in COL3A1, which results in p.G984R. All three programs predicted this mutation to be deleterous to the protein function. The novel mutation identified in this study is potentially responsible for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV in this patient, and expands the spectrum of COL3A1 mutations.

  17. Novel compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations in Moroccan families with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Bakhchane

    Full Text Available The MYO7A gene encodes a protein belonging to the unconventional myosin super family. Mutations within MYO7A can lead to either non syndromic hearing loss or to the Usher syndrome type 1B (USH1B. Here, we report the results of genetic analyses performed on Moroccan families with autosomal recessive non syndromic hearing loss that identified two families with compound heterozygous MYO7A mutations. Five mutations (c.6025delG, c.6229T>A, c.3500T>A, c.5617C>T and c.4487C>A were identified in these families, the latter presenting two differently affected branches. Multiple bioinformatics programs and molecular modelling predicted the pathogenic effect of these mutations. In conclusion, the absence of vestibular and retinal symptom in the affected patients suggests that these families have the isolated non-syndromic hearing loss DFNB2 (nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss presentation, instead of USH1B.

  18. A new mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase as a cause of HUPRA syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Henry; Martín-Hernández, Elena; Delmiro, Aitor; García-Silva, María Teresa; Quijada-Fraile, Pilar; Muley, Rafael; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2013-09-13

    HUPRA syndrome is a rare mitochondrial disease characterized by hyperuricemia, pulmonary hypertension, renal failure in infancy and alkalosis. This syndrome was previously described in three patients with a homozygous mutation c.1169A > G (p.D390G) in SARS2, encoding the mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase. Here we report the clinical and genetic findings in a girl and her brother. Both patients were clinically diagnosed with the HUPRA syndrome. Analysis of the pedigree identified a new homozygous mutation c.1205G > A (p.R402H) in SARS2 gene. This mutation is very rare in the population and it is located at the C-terminal globular domain of the homodimeric enzyme very close to p.D390G. Several data support that p.R402H mutation in SARS2 is a new cause of HUPRA syndrome.

  19. KCNQ1 mutations associated with Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome and autosomal recessive Romano-Ward syndrome in India-expanding the spectrum of long QT syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Bijal; Puri, Ratna D; Namboodiri, Narayanan; Nair, Mohan; Sharma, Deepak; Movva, Sireesha; Saxena, Renu; Bohora, Shomu; Aggarwal, Neeraj; Vora, Amit; Kumar, Jatinder; Singh, Tarandeep; Verma, Ishwar C

    2016-06-01

    Long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1) is the most common type of all Long QT syndromes (LQTS) and occurs due to mutations in KCNQ1. Biallelic mutations with deafness is called Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) and without deafness is autosomal recessive Romano-Ward syndrome (AR RWS). In this prospective study, we report biallelic mutations in KCNQ1 in Indian patients with LQT1 syndrome. Forty patients with a clinical diagnosis of LQT1 syndrome were referred for molecular testing. Of these, 18 were excluded from the analysis as they did not fulfill the inclusion criteria of broad T wave ECG pattern of the study. Direct sequencing of KCNQ1 was performed in 22 unrelated probands, parents and at-risk family members. Mutations were identified in 17 patients, of which seven had heterozygous mutations and were excluded in this analysis. Biallelic mutations were identified in 10 patients. Five of 10 patients did not have deafness and were categorized as AR RWS, the rest being JLNS. Eight mutations identified in this study have not been reported in the literature and predicted to be pathogenic by in silico analysis. We hypothesize that the homozygous biallelic mutations identified in 67% of families was due to endogamous marriages in the absence of consanguinity. This study presents biallelic gene mutations in KCNQ1 in Asian Indian patients with AR JLNS and RWS. It adds to the scant worldwide literature of mutation studies in AR RWS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Mutation analysis of GJB2 gene and prenatal diagnosis in a non-syndromic deafness family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hua CHEN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To identify the pathogenic gene in a non-syndromic deafness family, provide an accurate genetic consultation and early intervention for deaf family to reduce the incidence of congenital deafness. Methods Mutation analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction followed by DNA sequencing of coding region of GJB2 gene. The fetal DNA was extracted from the amniotic fluid cells by amniocentesis at 20 weeks during pregnancy. The genotype of the fetus was characterized for predicting the status of hearing. Results Complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp were detected in the proband of the family, heterozygous mutation 176-191del16bp was detected in the father, and 235delC was detected in the mother. Fetus carried 235delC heterozygous mutation inherited from his mother. Conclusions The proband's hearing loss is resulted from the complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp in GJB2 gene. Fetus is a heterozygous mutation 235delC carrier. Prenatal diagnosis for deafness assisted by genetic test can provide efficient guidance about offspring's hearing condition, and prevent another deaf-mute member from birth. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.07.09

  1. Autosomal recessive mutations in THOC6 cause intellectual disability: syndrome delineation requiring forward and reverse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, J S; Huang, L; Thevenon, J; Kariminedjad, A; Beaulieu, C L; Masurel-Paulet, A; Najmabadi, H; Fattahi, Z; Beheshtian, M; Tonekaboni, S H; Tang, S; Helbig, K L; Alcaraz, W; Rivière, J-B; Faivre, L; Innes, A M; Lebel, R R; Boycott, K M

    2017-01-01

    THOC6 is a part of the THO complex, which is involved in coordinating mRNA processing with export. The THO complex interacts with additional components to form the larger TREX complex (transcription export complex). Previously, a homozygous missense mutation in THOC6 in the Hutterite population was reported in association with syndromic intellectual disability. Using exome sequencing, we identified three unrelated patients with bi-allelic mutations in THOC6 associated with intellectual disability and additional clinical features. Two of the patients were compound heterozygous for a stop and a missense mutation, and the third was homozygous for a missense mutation; the missense mutations were predicted to be pathogenic by in silico analysis and modeling. Clinical features of the three newly identified patients and those previously reported are reviewed; intellectual disability is moderate to severe, and malformations are variable including renal and heart defects, cleft palate, microcephaly, and corpus callosum dysgenesis. Facial features are variable and include tall forehead, short upslanting palpebral fissures +/- deep set eyes, and a long nose with overhanging columella. These subtle facial features render the diagnosis difficult to make in isolation with certainty. Our results expand the mutational and clinical spectrum of this rare disease, confirm that THOC6 is an intellectual disability causing gene, while providing insight into the importance of the THO complex in neurodevelopment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. EDNRB mutations cause Waardenburg syndrome type II in the heterozygous state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Sarah; Bondurand, Nadege; Faubert, Emmanuelle; Poisson, Sylvain; Lecerf, Laure; Nitschke, Patrick; Deggouj, Naima; Loundon, Natalie; Jonard, Laurence; David, Albert; Sznajer, Yves; Blanchet, Patricia; Marlin, Sandrine; Pingault, Veronique

    2017-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation anomalies. The clinical definition of four WS types is based on additional features due to defects in structures mostly arising from the neural crest, with type I and type II being the most frequent. While type I is tightly associated to PAX3 mutations, WS type II (WS2) remains partly enigmatic with mutations in known genes (MITF, SOX10) accounting for only 30% of the cases. We performed exome sequencing in a WS2 index case and identified a heterozygous missense variation in EDNRB. Interestingly, homozygous (and very rare heterozygous) EDNRB mutations are already described in type IV WS (i.e., in association with Hirschsprung disease [HD]) and heterozygous mutations in isolated HD. Screening of a WS2 cohort led to the identification of an overall of six heterozygous EDNRB variations. Clinical phenotypes, pedigrees and molecular segregation investigations unraveled a dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. In parallel, cellular and functional studies showed that each of the mutations impairs the subcellular localization of the receptor or induces a defective downstream signaling pathway. Based on our results, we now estimate EDNRB mutations to be responsible for 5%-6% of WS2. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. TET2 mutations predict response to hypomethylating agents in myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejar, Rafael; Lord, Allegra; Stevenson, Kristen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Pérez-Ladaga, Albert; Zaneveld, Jacques; Wang, Hui; Caughey, Bennett; Stojanov, Petar; Getz, Gad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop; Chen, Rui; Stone, Richard M; Neuberg, Donna; Steensma, David P; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2014-10-23

    Only a minority of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients respond to hypomethylating agents (HMAs), but strong predictors of response are unknown. We sequenced 40 recurrently mutated myeloid malignancy genes in tumor DNA from 213 MDS patients collected before treatment with azacitidine (AZA) or decitabine (DEC). Mutations were examined for association with response and overall survival. The overall response rate of 47% was not different between agents. Clonal TET2 mutations predicted response (odds ratio [OR] 1.99, P = .036) when subclones unlikely to be detected by Sanger sequencing (allele fraction Response rates were highest in the subset of TET2 mutant patients without clonal ASXL1 mutations (OR 3.65, P = .009). Mutations of TP53 (hazard ratio [HR] 2.01, P = .002) and PTPN11 (HR 3.26, P = .006) were associated with shorter overall survival but not drug response. Murine-competitive bone marrow transplantation followed by treatment with AZA demonstrated that Tet2-null cells have an engraftment advantage over Tet2-WT cells. AZA significantly decreased this advantage for Tet2-null cells (P = .002) but not Tet2-WT cells (P = .212). Overall, Tet2 loss appears to sensitize cells to treatment with AZA in vivo, and TET2 mutations can identify patients more likely to respond to HMAs. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. Functional Cathepsin C mutations cause different Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Barbara; Görgens, Heike; Schacher, Beate; Puklo, Magda; Eickholz, Peter; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schackert, Hans Konrad

    2008-04-01

    The autosomal-recessive Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) is characterized by severe aggressive periodontitis, combined with palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, and is caused by mutations in the Cathepsin C (CTSC) gene. This study aimed to identify CTSC mutations in different PLS phenotypes, including atypical forms and isolated pre-pubertal aggressive periodontitis (PAP). Thirteen families with different phenotypes were analysed by direct sequencing of the entire coding region and the regulatory regions of CTSC. The function of novel mutations was tested with enzyme activity measurements. In 11 of 13 families, 12 different pathogenic CTSC mutations were found in 10 typical PLS patients, three atypical cases and one PAP patient. Out of four novel mutations, three result in protein truncation and are thus considered to be pathogenic. The homozygous c.854C>T nucleotide exchange (p.P285L) was associated with an almost complete loss of enzyme activity. The observed phenotypic heterogeneity could not be associated with specific genotypes. The phenotypic variability of the PLS associated with an identical genetic background may reflect the influence of additional genetic or environmental factors on disease characteristics. CTSC mutation analyses should be considered for differential diagnosis in all children suffering from severe aggressive periodontitis.

  5. Identification of a novel WFS1 homozygous nonsense mutation in Jordanian children with Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodoor, Khaldon; Batiha, Osama; Abu-Awad, Ayman; Al-Sarihin, Khaldon; Ziad, Haya; Jarun, Yousef; Abu-Sheikha, Aya; Abu Jalboush, Sara; Alibrahim, Khoulod S

    2016-09-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presentation of early onset type I diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy with later onset diabetes insipidus and deafness. WFS1 gene was identified on chromosome 4p16.1 as the gene responsible for WS disease given that most of the WS patients were found to carry mutations in this gene. This study was carried out to investigate the molecular spectrum of WFS1 gene in Jordanian families. Molecular and clinical characterization was performed on five WS patients from two unrelated Jordanian families. Our data indicated that WS patients of the first family harbored two deletion mutations (V415del and F247fs) located in exon 8 and exon 7 respectively, with a compound heterozygous pattern of inheritance; while in the second family, we identified a novel nonsense mutation (W185X) located in exon 5 in the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain with a homozygous pattern of inheritance. This mutation can be considered as loss of function mutation since the resulting truncated protein lost both the transmembrane domain and the C-terminal domain. Additionally, the W185X mutation lies within the CaM binding domain in wolframin protein which is thought to have a role in the regulation of wolframin function in response to calcium levels.

  6. Recessive TBC1D24 Mutations Are Frequent in Moroccan Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss Pedigrees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Bakhchane

    Full Text Available Mutations in the TBC1D24 gene are responsible for four neurological presentations: infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile myoclonic epilepsy, DOORS (deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation and seizures and NSHL (non-syndromic hearing loss. For the latter, two recessive (DFNB86 and one dominant (DFNA65 mutations have so far been identified in consanguineous Pakistani and European/Chinese families, respectively. Here we report the results of a genetic study performed on a large Moroccan cohort of deaf patients that identified three families with compound heterozygote mutations in TBC1D24. Four novel mutations were identified, among which, one c.641G>A (p.Arg214His was present in the three families, and has a frequency of 2% in control Moroccan population with normal hearing, suggesting that it acts as an hypomorphic variant leading to restricted deafness when combined with another recessive severe mutation. Altogether, our results show that mutations in TBC1D24 gene are a frequent cause (>2% of NSHL in Morocco, and that due to its possible compound heterozygote recessive transmission, this gene should be further considered and screened in other deaf cohorts.

  7. SETBP1 mutations as a biomarker for myelodysplasia /myeloproliferative neoplasm overlap syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Linder, Katherine; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Liu, Delong

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplasia (MDS) /myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) overlap syndrome has been described since the 2001 WHO classification as disorders that have both proliferative and dysplastic changes simultaneously. Specific disorders include chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), BCR-ABL negative atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) and unclassifiable MDS/MPN (MPN/MDS-U). Recurrent gene mutations in these conditions have been described. Among them, SETBP1...

  8. Sick sinus syndrome, progressive cardiac conduction disease, atrial flutter and ventricular tachycardia caused by a novel SCN5A mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders G; Liang, Bo; Jespersen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the cardiac sodium channel encoded by the gene SCN5A can result in a wide array of phenotypes. We report a case of a young male with a novel SCN5A mutation (R121W) afflicted by sick sinus syndrome, progressive cardiac conduction disorder, atrial flutter and ventricular tachycardia. His...... father carried the same mutation, but had a milder phenotype, presenting with progressive cardiac conduction later in life. The mutation was found to result in a loss-of-function in the sodium current. In conclusion, the same SCN5A mutation can result in a wide array of clinical phenotypes and perhaps...

  9. A novel 5' ATRX mutation with splicing consequences in acquired alpha thalassemia-myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Maria E; Thurmes, Paul J; Hoyer, James D; Steensma, David P

    2005-11-01

    Acquired alpha thalassemia (hemoglobin H (HbH) disease) is a rare complication of neoplastic chronic myeloid disorders, especially myelodysplastic syndrome. Acquired HbH has recently been associated with mutations in an X-linked gene, ATRX, previously linked to inherited ATR-X syndrome (alpha thalassemia-retardation-X linked). A Swiss man with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia complicated by various autoimmune disorders and by strikingly microcytic, hypochromic anemia was analyzed for the presence of acquired HbH. After HbH detection, we sought an underlying genetic cause. We used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography to screen for an ATRX mutation, and measured ATRX expression by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The patient had 50% HbH-containing cells on supravital staining. Marrow karyotype and the alpha globin cluster were normal. A clonally-restricted ATRX point mutation was detected in the conserved splice donor motif in intron 4 (IVS 4 +2 T-->C). Plasmid vector cloning of patient ATRX cDNA demonstrated both exon 4 skipping and partial intron retention with activation of a cryptic splice site, both outcomes resulting in frameshifts with premature stop codon generation in exon 5 and near-decimation of ATRX expression in myeloid cells. Normal exon 6 alternative splicing was retained. Intronic ATRX mutations with splicing consequences, uncommon in inherited ATR-X syndrome because of their devastating effect on expression of functional protein, should be routinely sought when undertaking molecular analysis of acquired HbH disease. Detection of an acquired ATRX mutation can help support clonality in karyotypically normal ambiguous myeloid disorders with HbH.

  10. Cornelia de Lange syndrome due to mosaic NIPBL mutation: antenatal presentation with sacrococcygeal teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banait, Nishant; Fenton, Alan; Splitt, Miranda

    2015-08-14

    A male infant at 36 weeks gestation was born by section. At 20 weeks of gestation, congenital diaphragmatic hernia and sacrococcygeal teratoma had been seen on ultrasound. At birth, the infant had features suggestive of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). He remained hypoxic despite aggressive ventilatory manoeuvres and was palliated. At postmortem, the lungs were hypoplastic. In CdLS, mutations in NIPBL are found in around 50% of cases. Mutation analysis, including multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification of the NIPBL gene from the DNA extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes was negative, but microarray comparative genomic hybridisation on DNA from skin fibroblast showed a 0.13Mb deletion on chromosome 5p13. The deleted region includes exons 42-47 of the NIPBL gene. It is important to perform NIBPL mutation analysis on DNA from more than one tissue when testing for CdLS. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  11. Pathological hemichannels associated with human Cx26 mutations causing Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levit, Noah A.; Mese, Gulistan; Basaly, Mena-George R.; White, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    Connexin (Cx) proteins form intercellular gap junction channels by first assembling into single membrane hemichannels that then dock to connect the cytoplasm of two adjacent cells. Gap junctions are highly specialized structures that allow the direct passage of small molecules between cells to maintain tissue homeostasis. Functional activity of nonjunctional hemichannels has now been shown in several experimental systems. Hemichannels may constitute an important diffusional exchange pathway with the extracellular space, but the extent of their normal physiological role is currently unknown. Aberrant hemichannel activity has been linked to mutations of connexin proteins involved in genetic diseases. Here, we review a proposed role for hemichannels in the pathogenesis of Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness (KID) syndrome associated with connexin26 (Cx26) mutations. Continued functional evaluation of mutated hemichannels linked to human hereditary disorders may provide additional insights into the mechanisms governing their regulation in normal physiology and dysregulation in disease. PMID:21933663

  12. Coffin-Siris syndrome: phenotypic evolution of a novel SMARCA4 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Michael; du Souich, Christèle; Cheung, Helen Wing-Hong; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2014-07-01

    Coffin-Siris Syndrome (CSS) is an intellectual disability disorder caused by mutation of components of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. We describe the evolution of the phenotypic features for a male patient with CSS from birth to age 7 years and 9 months and by review of reported CSS patients, we expand the phenotype to include neonatal and infantile hypertonia and upper airway obstruction. The propositus had a novel de novo heterozygous missense mutation in exon 17 of SMARCA4 (NM_001128849.1:c.2434C>T (NP_001122321.1:p.Leu812Phe)). This is the first reported mutation within motif Ia of the SMARCA4 SNF2 domain. In summary, SMARCA4-associated CSS is a pleiotropic disorder in which the pathognomic clinical features evolve and for which the few reported individuals do not demonstrate a clear genotype-phenotype correlation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Inherited germline ATRX mutation in two brothers with ATR-X syndrome and osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianling; Quindipan, Catherine; Parham, David; Shen, Lishuang; Ruble, David; Bootwalla, Moiz; Maglinte, Dennis T; Gai, Xiaowu; Saitta, Sulagna C; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Mascarenhas, Leo

    2017-05-01

    We report a family in which two brothers had an undiagnosed genetic disorder comprised of dysmorphic features, microcephaly, severe intellectual disability (non-verbal), mild anemia, and cryptorchidism. Both developed osteosarcoma. Trio exome sequencing (using blood samples from the younger brother and both parents) was performed and a nonsense NM_000489.4:c.7156C>T (p.Arg2386*) mutation in the ATRX gene was identified in the proband (hemizygous) and in the mother's peripheral blood DNA (heterozygous). The mother is healthy, does not exhibit any clinical manifestations of ATR-X syndrome and there was no family history of cancer. The same hemizygous pathogenic variant was confirmed in the affected older brother's skin tissue by subsequent Sanger sequencing. Chromosomal microarray studies of both brothers' osteosarcomas revealed complex copy number alterations consistent with the clinical diagnosis of osteosarcoma. Recently, somatic mutations in the ATRX gene have been observed as recurrent alterations in both osteosarcoma and brain tumors. However, it is unclear if there is any association between osteosarcoma and germline ATRX mutations, specifically in patients with constitutional ATR-X syndrome. This is the first report of osteosarcoma diagnosed in two males with ATR-X syndrome, suggesting a potential increased risk for cancer in patients with this disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome - report of two cases with two new mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rato, Margarida; Monteiro, Ana Filipe; Parente, Joana; Aranha, João; Tavares, Ermelindo

    2017-03-31

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by cutaneous fibrofolliculomas and/or trichodiscomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal tumors. However, its clinical expression is highly variable. This syndrome is caused by germline mutations in the folliculin gene ( FLCN ) on chromosome 17p11.2. Two men, 60 and 39-year-old, presented with a several year history of asymptomatic whitish papules scattered over the face and neck. Skin biopsies revealed fibrofolliculomas. The clinical diagnosis of BHDS was corroborated by identification of new heterozygotic mutations in FLCN gene, in exon 6 (C.573_574delinsT) and in exon 9 (c.1015C>T), respectively. Computed tomography scan of the thorax and abdomen showed pulmonary cysts with no suspicious kidneys lesions, and, in the case of the second patient, a mass in left adrenal gland. Laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was performed and histopathological examination was compatible with a malignant perivascular epithelioid cell tumor. The presence of multiple fibrofolliculomas should raise the suspicion of BHDS. Patients with this syndrome, regardless of the detected mutation, should be carefully monitored to ensure that potentially serious disease-related conditions can be detected early.

  15. Multiple Hereditary Infundibulocystic Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Associated With a Germline SUFU Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Joshua M; Oh, Dennis H; Sanborn, J Zachary; Pincus, Laura; McCalmont, Timothy H; Cho, Raymond J

    2016-03-01

    Multiple hereditary infundibulocystic basal cell carcinoma syndrome (MHIBCC) is a rare genodermatosis in which numerous indolent, well-differentiated basal cell carcinomas develop primarily on the face and genitals, without other features characteristic of basal cell nevus syndrome. The cause is unknown. The purpose of the study was to identify a genetic basis for the syndrome and a mechanism by which the associated tumors develop. Whole-exome sequencing of 5 tumors and a normal buccal mucosal sample from a patient with MHIBCC was performed. A conserved splice-site mutation in 1 copy of the suppressor of fused gene (SUFU) was identified in all tumor and normal tissue samples. Additional distinct deletions of the trans SUFU allele were identified in all tumor samples, none of which were present in the normal sample. A germline SUFU mutation was present in a patient with MHIBCC, and additional acquired SUFU mutations underlie the development of infundibulocystic basal cell carcinomas. The downstream location of the SUFU gene within the sonic hedgehog pathway may explain why its loss is associated with relatively well-differentiated tumors and suggests that MHIBCC will not respond to therapeutic strategies, such as smoothened inhibitors, that target upstream components of this pathway.

  16. Isolated NIBPL missense mutations that cause Cornelia de Lange syndrome alter MAU2 interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunholz, Diana; Hullings, Melanie; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepcion; Fincher, Christopher T; Mallozzi, Mark B; Loy, Elizabeth; Albrecht, Melanie; Kaur, Maninder; Limon, Janusz; Rampuria, Abhinav; Clark, Dinah; Kline, Antonie; Dalski, Andreas; Eckhold, Juliane; Tzschach, Andreas; Hennekam, Raoul; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Wierzba, Jolanta; Krantz, Ian D; Deardorff, Matthew A; Kaiser, Frank J

    2012-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS; or Brachmann-de Lange syndrome) is a dominantly inherited congenital malformation disorder with features that include characteristic facies, cognitive delays, growth retardation and limb anomalies. Mutations in nearly 60% of CdLS patients have been identified in NIPBL, which encodes a regulator of the sister chromatid cohesion complex. NIPBL, also known as delangin, is a homolog of yeast and amphibian Scc2 and C. elegans PQN-85. Although the exact mechanism of NIPBL function in sister chromatid cohesion is unclear, in vivo yeast and C. elegans experiments and in vitro vertebrate cell experiments have demonstrated that NIPBL/Scc2 functionally interacts with the MAU2/Scc4 protein to initiate loading of cohesin onto chromatin. To test the significance of this model in the clinical setting of CdLS, we fine-mapped the NIBPL–MAU2 interaction domain and tested the functional significance of missense mutations and variants in NIPBL and MAU2 identified in these minimal domains in a cohort of patients with CdLS. We demonstrate that specific novel mutations at the N-terminus of the MAU2-interacting domain of NIBPL result in markedly reduced MAU2 binding, although we appreciate no consistent clinical difference in the small group of patients with these mutations. These data suggest that factors in addition to MAU2 are essential in determining the clinical features and severity of CdLS. PMID:21934712

  17. Multiple arrhythmic syndromes in a newborn, owing to a novel mutation in SCN5A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calloe, Kirstine; Schmitt, Nicole; Grubb, Soren; Pfeiffer, Ryan; David, Jens-Peter; Kanter, Ronald; Cordeiro, Jonathan M.; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Background Mutations in the SCN5A gene have been linked to Brugada syndrome (BrS), conduction disease, Long QT syndrome (LQT3), atrial fibrillation (AF), and to pre- and neonatal ventricular arrhythmias. Objective The objective of this study is to characterize a novel mutation in Nav1.5 found in a newborn with fetal chaotic atrial tachycardia, postpartum intraventricular conduction delay, and QT interval prolongation. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated and all exons and intron borders of 15 ion-channel genes were sequenced, revealing a novel missense mutation (Q270K) in SCN5A. Nav1.5 wild type (WT) and Q270K were expressed in CHO-K1 with and without the Navβ1 subunit. Results Patch-clamp analysis showed ~40% reduction in peak sodium channel current (INa) density for Q270K compared with WT. Fast and slow decay of INa were significantly slower in Q270K. Steady-state activation and inactivation of Q270K channels were shifted to positive potentials, and window current was increased. The tetrodotoxin-sensitive late INa was increased almost 3-fold compared with WT channels. Ranolazine reduced late INa in WT and Q270K channels, while exerting minimal effects on peak INa. Conclusion The Q270K mutation in SCN5A reduces peak INa while augmenting late INa, and may thus underlie the development of atrial tachycardia, intraventricular conduction delay, and QT interval prolongation in an infant. PMID:21895525

  18. Mutational Analysis of TCOF1, GSC, and HOXA2 in Patients With Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shaojuan; Jin, Lei; Wang, Huijun; Li, Chenlong; Zheng, Fengyun; Ma, Duan; Zhang, Tianyu

    2016-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant craniofacial malformation mainly caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene. Few cases have been observed in the Chinese population. Herein, the authors report the mutational analysis of TCOF1, GSC, and HOXA2 to determine the mutational features of the 3 genes in Chinese patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. Genomic DNA of the patients and their parents was extracted from peripheral blood following a standard protocol. DNA sequencing analysis was performed on all exons and the exon-intron borders of TCOF1, GSC, and HOXA2 in addition to the 1200-bp upstream of TCOF1. Four novel single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected in TCOF1, one of which was in the promoter region. Mutations in GSC and HOXA2 were not found in the 3 patients. Our results suggest the possibility of genetic heterogeneity or different mechanisms leading to the disease. Further functional study of the alteration is necessary to obtain more definitive information.

  19. Adherence to Mediterranean Diet and Metabolic Syndrome in BRCA Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Eleonora; Manoukian, Siranoush; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Oliverio, Andreina; Rovera, Francesca; Iula, Giovanna; Morelli, Daniele; Peissel, Bernard; Azzolini, Jacopo; Roveda, Eliana; Pasanisi, Patrizia

    2018-03-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with higher breast cancer (BC) penetrance in BRCA mutation carriers. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), an insulin resistance syndrome, can be reversed by adhering to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet). In a dietary intervention trial on BRCA mutation carriers, we evaluated adherence to the MedDiet, and the association with the MetS, by analyzing data from the Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS). BRCA mutation carriers, with or without BC, aged 18 to 70 years, were eligible for the trial. After the baseline examinations, women were randomized to a dietary intervention or to a control group. Both groups completed the MEDAS at baseline and at the end of the dietary intervention. A total of 163 women completed the 6 months of dietary intervention. Compared with controls, the women in the intervention group significantly reduced their consumption of red meat ( P BRCA mutation carriers in the intervention group experienced greater improvement in their MedDiet and MetS parameters.

  20. Novel frameshift mutation in the KCNQ1 gene responsible for Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Amirian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Jervell and Lange–Nielsen syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes. The disease is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and long QT syndrome. Methods: Here we present a 3.5-year-old female patient, an offspring of consanguineous marriage, who had a history of recurrent syncope and congenital sensorineural deafness. The patient and the family members were screened for mutations in KCNQ1 gene by linkage analysis and DNA sequencing. Results: DNA sequencing showed a c.1532_1534delG (p. A512Pfs*81 mutation in the KCNQ1 gene in homozygous form. The results of short tandem repeat (STR markers showed that the disease in the family is linked to the KCNQ1 gene. The mutation was confirmed in the parents in heterozygous form. Conclusion: This is the first report of this variant in KCNQ1 gene in an Iranian family. The data of this study could be used for early diagnosis of the condition in the family and genetic counseling.

  1. Mutations in C5ORF42 cause Joubert syndrome in the French Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, Myriam; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Hamdan, Fadi F; Ospina, Luis H; Patry, Lysanne; Labuda, Damian; Massicotte, Christine; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Capo-Chichi, José-Mario; Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; Samuels, Mark E; Boycott, Kym M; Shevell, Michael I; Laframboise, Rachel; Désilets, Valérie; Maranda, Bruno; Rouleau, Guy A; Majewski, Jacek; Michaud, Jacques L

    2012-04-06

    Joubert syndrome (JBTS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a distinctive mid-hindbrain malformation, developmental delay with hypotonia, ocular-motor apraxia, and breathing abnormalities. Although JBTS was first described more than 40 years ago in French Canadian siblings, the causal mutations have not yet been identified in this family nor in most French Canadian individuals subsequently described. We ascertained a cluster of 16 JBTS-affected individuals from 11 families living in the Lower St. Lawrence region. SNP genotyping excluded the presence of a common homozygous mutation that would explain the clustering of these individuals. Exome sequencing performed on 15 subjects showed that nine affected individuals from seven families (including the original JBTS family) carried rare compound-heterozygous mutations in C5ORF42. Two missense variants (c.4006C>T [p.Arg1336Trp] and c.4690G>A [p.Ala1564Thr]) and a splicing mutation (c.7400+1G>A), which causes exon skipping, were found in multiple subjects that were not known to be related, whereas three other truncating mutations (c.6407del [p.Pro2136Hisfs*31], c.4804C>T [p.Arg1602*], and c.7477C>T [p.Arg2493*]) were identified in single individuals. None of the unaffected first-degree relatives were compound heterozygous for these mutations. Moreover, none of the six putative mutations were detected among 477 French Canadian controls. Our data suggest that mutations in C5ORF42 explain a large portion of French Canadian individuals with JBTS. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. TP53 mutations in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes with del(5q) predict disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jädersten, Martin; Saft, Leonie; Smith, Alexander; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Pomplun, Sabine; Göhring, Gudrun; Hedlund, Anette; Hast, Robert; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Porwit, Anna; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2011-05-20

    To determine the frequency of TP53 mutations and the level of p53 protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with del(5q) and to assess their impact on disease progression. Pre- and postprogression bone marrow (BM) samples from 55 consecutive patients with International Prognostic Scoring System low risk (n = 32) or intermediate-1 risk (n = 23) were studied by next-generation sequencing of TP53. IHC for p53 was performed on 148 sequential BM samples. TP53 mutations with a median clone size of 11% (range, 1% to 54%) were detected in 10 patients (18%) already at an early phase of the disease. Mutations were equally common in low-risk and intermediate-1-risk patients and were associated with evolution to acute myeloid leukemia (5 of 10 v 7 of 45; P = .045). Nine of 10 patients carrying mutations showed more than 2% BM progenitors with strong p53 staining. The probability of a complete cytogenetic response to lenalidomide was lower in mutated patients (0 of 7 v 12 of 24; P = .024). By using sensitive deep-sequencing technology, we demonstrated that TP53 mutated populations may occur at an early disease stage in almost a fifth of low-risk MDS patients with del(5q). Importantly, mutations were present years before disease progression and were associated with an increased risk of leukemic evolution. TP53 mutations could not be predicted by common clinical features but were associated with p53 overexpression. Our findings indicate a previously unrecognized heterogeneity of the disease which may significantly affect clinical decision making.

  3. De novo dominant mutation of SOX10 gene in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Liu, Min; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zou, Wenting; Jiang, Hongyan

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The condition is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigment disturbances of the hair, skin, and iris. The de novo mutation in the SOX10 gene, responsible for Waardenburg syndrome type II, is rarely seen. The present study aimed to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese family. Clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. A novel SOX10 heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation was identified. Heterozygosity was not observed in the parents and sister of the proband, indicating that the mutation has arisen de novo. The novel frameshift mutation, located in exon 3 of the SOX10 gene, disrupted normal amino acid coding from Leu87, leading to premature termination at nucleotide 396 (TGA). The high mobility group domain of SOX10 was inferred to be partially impaired. The novel heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation in the SOX10 gene was considered to be the cause of Waardenburg syndrome in the proband. The clinical and genetic characterization of this family would help elucidate the genetic heterogeneity of SOX10 in Waardenburg syndrome type II. Moreover, the de novo pattern expanded the mutation data of SOX10. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamics of ASXL1 mutation and other associated genetic alterations during disease progression in patients with primary myelodysplastic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T-C; Hou, H-A; Chou, W-C; Tang, J-L; Kuo, Y-Y; Chen, C-Y; Tseng, M-H; Huang, C-F; Lai, Y-J; Chiang, Y-C; Lee, F-Y; Liu, M-C; Liu, C-W; Liu, C-Y; Yao, M; Huang, S-Y; Ko, B-S; Hsu, S-C; Wu, S-J; Tsay, W; Chen, Y-C; Tien, H-F

    2014-01-01

    Recently, mutations of the additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1) gene were identified in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but the interaction of this mutation with other genetic alterations and its dynamic changes during disease progression remain to be determined. In this study, ASXL1 mutations were identified in 106 (22.7%) of the 466 patients with primary MDS based on the French-American-British (FAB) classification and 62 (17.1%) of the 362 patients based on the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. ASXL1 mutation was closely associated with trisomy 8 and mutations of RUNX1, EZH2, IDH, NRAS, JAK2, SETBP1 and SRSF2, but was negatively associated with SF3B1 mutation. Most ASXL1-mutated patients (85%) had concurrent other gene mutations at diagnosis. ASXL1 mutation was an independent poor prognostic factor for survival. Sequential studies showed that the original ASXL1 mutation remained unchanged at disease progression in all 32 ASXL1-mutated patients but were frequently accompanied with acquisition of mutations of other genes, including RUNX1, NRAS, KRAS, SF3B1, SETBP1 and chromosomal evolution. On the other side, among the 80 ASXL1-wild patients, only one acquired ASXL1 mutation at leukemia transformation. In conclusion, ASXL1 mutations in association with other genetic alterations may have a role in the development of MDS but contribute little to disease progression

  5. The molecular basis of variable phenotypic severity among common missense mutations causing Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyla; Selfridge, Jim; Lagger, Sabine; Connelly, John; De Sousa, Dina; Kerr, Alastair; Webb, Shaun; Guy, Jacky; Merusi, Cara; Koerner, Martha V; Bird, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, which encodes a chromosomal protein that binds to methylated DNA. Mouse models mirror the human disorder and therefore allow investigation of phenotypes at a molecular level. We describe an Mecp2 allelic series representing the three most common missense Rett syndrome (RTT) mutations, including first reports of Mecp2[R133C] and Mecp2[T158M] knock-in mice, in addition to Mecp2[R306C] mutant mice. Together these three alleles comprise ∼25% of all RTT mutations in humans, but they vary significantly in average severity. This spectrum is mimicked in the mouse models; R133C being least severe, T158M most severe and R306C of intermediate severity. Both R133C and T158M mutations cause compound phenotypes at the molecular level, combining compromised DNA binding with reduced stability, the destabilizing effect of T158M being more severe. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that the R133C mutation exclusively abolishes binding to hydroxymethylated DNA, as interactions with DNA containing methyl-CG, methyl-CA and hydroxymethyl-CA are all reduced in vivo. We find that MeCP2[T158M] is significantly less stable than MeCP2[R133C], which may account for the divergent clinical impact of the mutations. Overall, this allelic series recapitulates human RTT severity, reveals compound molecular aetiologies and provides a valuable resource in the search for personalized therapeutic interventions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Mutations in two nonhomologous genes in a head-to-head configuration cause Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Perez, V.L.; Tompson, S.W.; Blair, H.J.; Espinoza-Valdez, C.; Lapunzina, P.; Silva, E.O.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Gibbs, J.L.; Young, I.D.; Wright, M.J.; Goodship, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia. Elsewhere, we described mutations in EVC in patients with this condition (Ruiz-Perez et al. 2000). We now report that mutations in EVC2 also cause EvC. These two genes lie in a head-to-head configuration that is conserved

  7. De novo CCND2 mutations leading to stabilization of cyclin D2 cause megalencephaly-polymicrogyria-polydactyly-hydrocephalus syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Mirzaa (Ghayda); D.A. Parry (David); N.K. Fry; K.A. Giamanco (Kristin); J.A. Schwartzentruber (Jeremy); M. Vanstone (Megan); C.V. Logan (Clare); N. Roberts (Nicola); C.A. Johnson (Colin); S. Singh (Shawn); S.S. Kholmanskikh (Stanislav); C. Adams (Carissa); R.D. Hodge (Rebecca); R.F. Hevner (Robert); D.T. Bonthron (David); K.P.J. Braun (Kees P.); L. Faivre (Laurence); J.-B. Riviere; C. St-Onge (Christina); K.W. Gripp (Karen); G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia); K. Pang (Ki); E. Sweeney (Elizabeth); H. van Esch (Hilde); N.E. Verbeek (Nienke); D. Wieczorek (Dagmar); M. Steinraths (Michelle); J. Majewski (Jacek); K.M. Boycott (Kym); D.T. Pilz (Daniela); M.E. Ross (M Elizabeth); W.B. Dobyns (William); E. Sheridan (Eamonn); J. Friedman; S. Michaud; F. Bernier (Francois); M. Brudno (M.); B. Fernandez (B.); A. Knoppers (Annelies); J. Samuels (Jonathan); S.W. Scherer (Stephen)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractActivating mutations in genes encoding phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway components cause megalencephaly-polymicrogyria-polydactyly- hydrocephalus syndrome (MPPH, OMIM 603387). Here we report that individuals with MPPH lacking upstream PI3K-AKT pathway mutations carry de

  8. Impact Of Mutation-derived Antigens In Immune Recognition Of Hematological Malignancies, Specifically Myeloid Dysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saini, Sunil Kumar; Dorfmüller, S.; Bjerregaard, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Mutation-derived neoepitopes have been suggested as a major component for immune recognition of solid tumors with a high mutational load, e.g. Melanoma and Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of myeloid neoplasms characterized by increasing...

  9. Further insights into the allan-herndon-dudley syndrome: Clinical and functional characterization of a novel MCT8 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armour, C.M. (Christine M.); S. Kersseboom (Simone); Yoon, G. (Grace); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Mutations in the thyroid hormone (TH) transporter MCT8 have been identified as the cause for Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS), characterized by severe psychomotor retardation and altered TH serum levels. Here we report a novel MCT8 mutation identified in 4 generations of

  10. Evidence that WT1 mutations in Denys-Drash syndrome patients may act in a dominant-negative fashion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Little, M. H.; Williamson, K. A.; Mannens, M.; Kelsey, A.; Gosden, C.; Hastie, N. D.; van Heyningen, V.

    1993-01-01

    The triad of nephropathy, partial gonadal dysgenesis and Wilms' tumour (WT) is known as Denys-Drash syndrome (DDS). The WT predisposition gene WT1, which plays a vital role in both genital and renal development, is known to be mutated in DDS patients. The WT1 mutations in these patients are

  11. Impact Of Mutation-derived Antigens In Immune Recognition Of Hematological Malignancies, Specifically Myeloid Dysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saini, Sunil Kumar; Dorfmüller, S.; Bjerregaard, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Mutation-derived neoepitopes have been suggested as a major component for immune recognition of solid tumors with a high mutational load, e.g. Melanoma and Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of myeloid neoplasms characterized by increasing...... to the generation of tumor-specific neoepitopes....

  12. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (... are caused by PMS2. This disparity is primarily due to complications in the study of this gene caused by interference from pseudogene sequences. METHODS: Using a recently developed method for detecting PMS2 specific mutations, we have screened 99 patients who are likely candidates for PMS2 mutations based...

  13. Neonatal Lethal Costello Syndrome and Unusual Dinucleotide Deletion/Insertion Mutations in HRAS Predicting p.Gly12Val

    OpenAIRE

    Burkitt-Wright, Emma MM; Bradley, Lisa; Shorto, Jennifer; McConnell, Vivienne PM; Gannon, Caroline; Firth, Helen V; Park, Soo-Mi; D'Amore, Angela; Munyard, Paul F; Turnpenny, Peter D; Charlton, Amanda; Wilson, Meredith; Kerr, Bronwyn

    2012-01-01

    De novo heterozygous mutations in HRAS cause Costello syndrome (CS), a condition with high mortality and morbidity in infancy and early childhood due to cardiac, respiratory, and muscular complications. HRAS mutations predicting p.Gly12Val, p.Gly12Asp, and p.Gly12Cys substitutions have been associated with severe, lethal, CS. We report on molecular, clinical, and pathological findings in patients with mutations predicting HRAS p.Gly12Val that were identified in our clinical molecular genetic ...

  14. Waardenburg Syndrome: description of two novel mutations in the PAX3 gene, one of which incompletely penetrant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliete Pardono

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe two different novel mutations in the PAX3 gene, detected in two families with cases of Waardenburg syndrome type I (WSI. The missense mutation detected in one family involved a single substitution in exon 2 (c.142 G > T and was present both in the affected individual and in his clinically normal father. The mutation found in the second family consisted of a deletion of 13 bases, c.764-776del(TTACCCTGACATT, in exon 5.

  15. MKS1 mutations cause Joubert syndrome with agenesis of the corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Ingrid; Decker, E; Mayr, J A; Lunzer, V; Koch, J; Boltshauser, E; Sperl, W; Pietsch, P; Ertl-Wagner, B; Bolz, H; Bergmann, C; Rittinger, O

    2016-08-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy characterized by episodic hyperpnea and apnea, hypotonia, ataxia, cognitive impairment and ocular motor apraxia. The "molar tooth sign" is pathognomonic of this condition. Mutations in the MKS1 gene are a major cause of Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS), the most common form of syndromic neural tube defects, frequently resulting in perinatal lethality. We present the phenotype and genotype of a child with severe JS and agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). In our patient, a next generation sequencing (NGS) approach revealed the following two variants of the MKS1 gene: first, a novel missense variant [ c.240G > T (p.Trp80Cys)], which affects a residue that is evolutionarily highly conserved in mammals and ciliates; second, a 29 bp deletion in intron 15 [c.1408-35_1408-7del29], a founder mutation, which in a homozygous state constitutes the major cause of MKS in Finland. We review the MKS1-variants in all of the eleven JS patients reported to date and compare these patients to our case. To our knowledge, this is the first patient with Joubert syndrome and agenesis of the corpus callosum where a potentially causal genotype is provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Muir-Torre Syndrome: A Case Associated with an Infrequent Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Alexandra; Feser, Christina; Grekin, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by the presence of at least one sebaceous gland neoplasm, associated with an underlying visceral malignancy. Muir-Torre syndrome is believed to be a subtype of Lynch Syndrome. Affected individuals are found to have germline mutations predominantly in DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2, and much less frequently, MLH1. The authors report the case of a 55-year-old woman presenting with multiple cutaneous neoplasms including sebaceoma, basal cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma; personal history of colorectal and endometrial cancer; and family history of colorectal cancer; found to have a deletion at mismatch repair gene MLH1. It is important to recognize the role of these less common gene deletions in producing the Muir-Torre syndrome phenotype, and consider the correlation of cutaneous manifestations with internal disease. The authors discuss the clinical presentation of Muir-Torre syndrome, methods of diagnosis, and the importance of regular medical surveillance to detect and prevent disease progression in Muir-Torre syndrome patients and their family members.

  17. Prenatal diagnosis and a donor splice site mutation in fibrillin in a family with Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, M.; Vandemark, N.; Wang, M.; Han, J.; Rao, V.H. (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha (United States)); Velinov, M.; Tsipouras, P. (Univ. of Connecticut Health Sciences Center, Farmington (United States)); Wargowski, D.; Becker, J.; Robertson, W.; Droste, S. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The Marfan syndrome, an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder, is manifested by abnormalities in the cardiovascular, skeletal, and ocular systems. Recently, fibrillin, an elastic-associated microfibrillar glycoprotein, has been linked to the Marfan syndrome, and fibrillin mutations in affected individuals have been documented. In this study, genetic linkage analysis with fibrillin-specific markers was used to establish the prenatal diagnosis in an 11-wk-gestation fetus in a four-generation Marfan kindred. At birth, skeletal changes suggestive of the Marfan syndrome were observed. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification of the fibrillin gene mRNA detected a deletion of 123 bp in one allele in affected relatives. This deletion corresponds to an exon encoding an epidermal growth factor-like motif. Examination of genomic DNA showed a G[yields]C transversion at the +1 consensus donor splice site. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  18. A case of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIA with a novel PLOD1 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Ayşe; Kurtgoz, Serkan; Dursun, Siar; Bozkurt, Gokay

    2014-10-01

    The kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder characterized by soft extensible skin, laxity of joints, severe muscle hypotonia at birth, and kyphoscoliosis. We describe a 3-year-old girl with the kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome whose parents were cousins. She was born with breech presentation by vaginal delivery at term after a normal pregnancy. At birth she manifested hypotonia and congenital kyphosis. On the second postnatal day, subdural and intraparenchymal hemorrhages were detected by magnetic resonance imaging. During follow-up at 18 months of age, strabismus, umbilical hernia, kyphoscoliosis, joint laxity, bilateral hip dislocation, muscular hypotonia, and motor developmental delay. The cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormal signal related to previous hemorrhage. Metabolic investigations and neuromuscular evaluation were normal, excluding other possible explanations of hypotonia. An analysis of urinary cross-links demonstrated an increase in the lysyl-pyridinoline to hydroxylysyl-pyridinoline ratio, suggesting the diagnosis of kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Molecular analysis of the PLOD1 gene revealed that she had a novel homozygous p.Pro622Argfs*3 (c. 1863_1864dupCG) mutation in exon 17 that is expected to cause complete loss of the enzyme lysyl hydroxylase 1 and to cause kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We describe a child with the kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with a novel mutation of the PLOD1 gene. Our observations suggest that vascular lesions in the neonatal period may be a rare additional clinical feature of kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Treacher Collins syndrome may result from insertions, deletions or splicing mutations, which introduce a termination codon into the gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, A. J.; Dixon, J.; Loftus, S. K.; Edwards, S.; Wasmuth, J. J.; Hennekam, R. C.; Dixon, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. Recently, the Treacher Collins syndrome gene (TCOF1) has been positionally cloned and a series of five mutations within the coding sequence

  20. EEC syndrome, Arg227Gln TP63 mutation and micturition difficulties: Is there a genotype-phenotype correlation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maclean, K.; Holme, S.A.; Gilmour, E.; Taylor, M.; Scheffer, H.; Graf, N.; Smith, G.H.; Onikul, E.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Moss, C.; Ades, L.C.

    2007-01-01

    We report on two unrelated families with EEC syndrome (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate), each with an Arg227Gln TP63 gene mutation, where the phenotype overlapped extensively with the allelic disorder, limb-mammary syndrome (LMS). Features common to both families were an

  1. Clinical Variability in a Family with an Ectodermal Dysplasia Syndrome and a Nonsense Mutation in the TP63 Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenkraft, A.; Pode-Shakked, B.; Goldstein, N.; Shpirer, Z.; Bokhoven, H. van; Anikster, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TP63 gene have been associated with a variety of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, among which the clinically overlapping Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal defects-Cleft lip/palate (AEC) and the Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes. We report a multiplex nonconsanguineous family of Ashkenazi-Jewish

  2. NKX2-1 mutations in brain-lung-thyroid syndrome: a case series of four patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shetty, Vinutha B.; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Lamont, Phillipa; Bikker, Hennie; Choong, Catherine S. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-lung-thyroid syndrome (BLTS) characterized by congenital hypothyroidism, respiratory distress syndrome, and benign hereditary chorea is caused by thyroid transcription factor 1 (NKX2-1/TTF1) mutations. We report the clinical and molecular characteristics of four cases presenting with primary

  3. Novel mutations of TCOF1 gene in European patients with Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Chiara; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Gambardella, Stefano; Sangiuolo, Federica; Novelli, Giuseppe

    2011-09-27

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is one of the most severe autosomal dominant congenital disorders of craniofacial development and shows variable phenotypic expression. TCS is extremely rare, occurring with an incidence of 1 in 50.000 live births. The TCS distinguishing characteristics are represented by down slanting palpebral fissures, coloboma of the eyelid, micrognathia, microtia and other deformity of the ears, hypoplastic zygomatic arches, and macrostomia. Conductive hearing loss and cleft palate are often present. TCS results from mutations in the TCOF1 gene located on chromosome 5, which encodes a serine/alanine-rich nucleolar phospho-protein called Treacle. However, alterations in the TCOF1 gene have been implicated in only 81-93% of TCS cases. In this study, the entire coding regions of the TCOF1 gene, including newly described exons 6A and 16A, were sequenced in 46 unrelated subjects suspected of TCS clinical indication. Fifteen mutations were reported, including twelve novel and three already described in 14 sporadic patients and in 3 familial cases. Moreover, seven novel polymorphisms were also described. Most of the mutations characterised were microdeletions spanning one or more nucleotides, in addition to an insertion of one nucleotide in exon 18 and a stop mutation. The deletions and the insertion described cause a premature termination of translation, resulting in a truncated protein. This study confirms that almost all the TCOF1 pathogenic mutations fall in the coding region and lead to an aberrant protein.

  4. Novel mutations of TCOF1 gene in European patients with treacher Collins syndrome

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    Rinaldi Fabrizio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is one of the most severe autosomal dominant congenital disorders of craniofacial development and shows variable phenotypic expression. TCS is extremely rare, occurring with an incidence of 1 in 50.000 live births. The TCS distinguishing characteristics are represented by down slanting palpebral fissures, coloboma of the eyelid, micrognathia, microtia and other deformity of the ears, hypoplastic zygomatic arches, and macrostomia. Conductive hearing loss and cleft palate are often present. TCS results from mutations in the TCOF1 gene located on chromosome 5, which encodes a serine/alanine-rich nucleolar phospho-protein called Treacle. However, alterations in the TCOF1 gene have been implicated in only 81-93% of TCS cases. Methods In this study, the entire coding regions of the TCOF1 gene, including newly described exons 6A and 16A, were sequenced in 46 unrelated subjects suspected of TCS clinical indication. Results Fifteen mutations were reported, including twelve novel and three already described in 14 sporadic patients and in 3 familial cases. Moreover, seven novel polymorphisms were also described. Most of the mutations characterised were microdeletions spanning one or more nucleotides, in addition to an insertion of one nucleotide in exon 18 and a stop mutation. The deletions and the insertion described cause a premature termination of translation, resulting in a truncated protein. Conclusion This study confirms that almost all the TCOF1 pathogenic mutations fall in the coding region and lead to an aberrant protein.

  5. Birt-Hogg-Dube Syndrome with a Novel Mutation in the FLCN Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Gulsum; Yılmaz Demirci, Nilgun; Turktas, Haluk; Ergun, Mehmet Ali

    2017-10-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHDS) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by hair follicle hamartomas, kidney tumors, and spontaneous pneumothorax; its cause is a heterozygous mutation in the FLCN gene. Colorectal polyps and carcinoma have also been reported in BHDS. FLCN mutations can be detected in patients with isolated primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP), so PSP may present as part of BHDS. The aim of this report is to enhance awareness that patients presenting with spontaneous PSP should be evaluated for FLCN mutations. A 44-year-old woman with PSP and her parents were analyzed for FLCN mutations. One of the patient's paternal aunts had a PSP and two of her paternal aunts had colon cancer diagnosed at early ages. A novel in-frame deletion in the FLCN gene, c.932_933delCT (P311Rfs*78), was detected in the proband and in her unaffected father. We recommend that molecular analysis of the FLCN gene be performed in patients with PSP and their families, and that mutation carriers be examined for kidney and colon tumors.

  6. [PAX3 gene mutation analysis for two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ families and their prenatal diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y; Liu, N; Kong, X D; Yan, J; Qin, Z B; Wang, B

    2016-12-07

    Objective: To analyze the mutations of PAX3 gene in two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ (WS1) pedigrees and make prenatal diagnosis for the high-risk 18-week-old fetus. Methods: PAX3 gene was first analyzed by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA) for detecting pathogenic mutation of the probands of the two pedigrees. The mutations were confirmed by MLPA and Sanger in parents and unrelated healthy individuals.Prenatal genetic diagnosis for the high-risk fetus was performed by amniotic fluid cell after genotyping. Results: A heterozygous PAX3 gene gross deletion (E7 deletion) was identified in all patients from WS1-01 family, and not found in 20 healthy individuals.Prenatal diagnosis in WS1-01 family indicated that the fetus was normal. Molecular studies identified a novel deletion mutation c. 1385_1386delCT within the PAX3 gene in all affected WS1-02 family members, but in none of the unaffected relatives and 200 healthy individuals. Conclusions: PAX3 gene mutation is etiological for two WS1 families. Sanger sequencing plus MLPA is effective and accurate for making gene diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis.

  7. Characterization of a novel founder MSH6 mutation causing Lynch syndrome in the French Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellsagué, E; Liu, J; Volenik, A; Giroux, S; Gagné, R; Maranda, B; Roussel-Jobin, A; Latreille, J; Laframboise, R; Palma, L; Kasprzak, L; Marcus, V A; Breguet, M; Nolet, S; El-Haffaf, Z; Australie, K; Gologan, A; Aleynikova, O; Oros-Klein, K; Greenwood, C; Mes-Masson, A M; Provencher, D; Tischkowitz, M; Chong, G; Rousseau, F; Foulkes, W D

    2015-06-01

    We identified an MSH6 mutation (c.10C>T, p.Gln4*) causing Lynch syndrome (LS) in 11 French Canadian (FC) families from the Canadian province of Quebec. We aimed to investigate the molecular and clinical implications of this mutation among FC carriers and to assess its putative founder origin. We studied 11 probands and 27 family members. Additionally 6433 newborns, 187 colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 381 endometrial cancer (EC) cases and 179 additional controls, all of them from Quebec, were used. Found in approximately 1 of 400 newborns, the mutation is one of the most common LS mutations described. We have found that this mutation confers a greater risk for EC than for CRC, both in the 11 studied families and in the unselected cases: EC [odds ratio (OR) = 7.5, p French settlers. Application of the results of this study could significantly improve the molecular testing and clinical management of LS families in Quebec. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Cathepsin C gene 5'-untranslated region mutation in papillon-lefèvre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosem, Rok; Debeljak, Maruša; Repič Lampret, Barbka; Kansky, Aleksej; Battelino, Tadej; Trebušak Podkrajšek, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma together with a severe form of generalized aggressive periodontitis and associated with mutations in cathepsin C gene (CTSC). To investigate the clinical and mutational characteristics of 6 PLS patients from 4 unrelated Slovenian families. CTSC mutational and functional analyses were performed. In all patients, a novel homozygous substitution, c.-55C>A, in the CTSC 5'-untranslated region (UTR) was detected on genomic DNA level and confirmed by mRNA analysis, resulting in the almost complete loss of CTSC mRNA expression and CTSC activity. In silico analysis revealed the potential of the mutation to disrupt putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) for AP-2 and Sp families of transcription factors. Identification of a novel CTSC 5'-UTR mutation together with a severe reduction of CTSC mRNA expression and virtually nonexistent CTSC activity was suggestive of a novel mechanism of TFBS dysfunction associated with PLS. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. A novel STXBP1 mutation causes typical Rett syndrome in a Japanese girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuge, Kotaro; Iwama, Kazuhiro; Yonee, Chihiro; Matsufuji, Mayumi; Sano, Nozomi; Saikusa, Tomoko; Yae, Yukako; Yamashita, Yushiro; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2018-03-12

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder mostly caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2); however, mutations in various other genes may lead to RTT-like phenotypes. Here, we report the first case of a Japanese girl with RTT caused by a novel syntaxin-binding protein 1 (STXBP1) frameshift mutation (c.60delG, p.Lys21Argfs*16). She showed epilepsy at one year of age, regression of acquired psychomotor abilities thereafter, and exhibited stereotypic hand and limb movements at 3 years of age. Her epilepsy onset was earlier than is typical for RTT patients. However, she fully met the 2010 diagnostic criteria of typical RTT. STXBP1 mutations cause early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE), various intractable epilepsies, and neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the case described here presented a unique clinical presentation of typical RTT without EIEE and a novel STXBP1 mutation. Copyright © 2018 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cataract as a phenotypic marker for a mutation in WFS1, the Wolfram syndrome gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titah, Salah Mohamed Cherif; Meunier, Isabelle; Blanchet, Catherine; Lopez, Severine; Rondouin, Gerard; Lenaers, Guy; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Reynier, Pascal; Paquis-Flucklinger, Veronique; Hamel, Christian P

    2012-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) or diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness (DIDMOAD) (OMIM 222300) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy as the 2 major criteria, followed later in life by deafness, diabetes insipidus, and various signs of neurologic impairment. The presence of a cataract has been variably mentioned in WS. Two members of a family had thorough ophthalmic examination and their DNA was screened for mutations in mitochondrial DNA, WFS1, OPA1, and OPA3 genes. We report a patient who first had surgery for bilateral cataract at age 5 and who subsequently presented typical signs of WS, i.e., diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy with reduced visual acuity at 20/400 on both eyes at age 22, and mild deafness. The patient was found to be a compound heterozygote for 2 truncating mutations in WFS1, the major WS gene. She carried the previously reported c.1231_1233 delCT and a novel c.2431_2465dup35 mutation. She also was heterozygote for a novel OPA1 sequence variant, c.929A>G in exon 9, whose pathogenicity remains uncertain. The patient's mother was a heterozygous carrier of the c.2431_2465dup35 mutation. She did not have diabetes mellitus or optic atrophy but had bilateral polar cataract. She did not carry the OPA1 sequence variant. Cataract could be a marker for the WFS1 heterozygosity in this family, namely the c.2431_2465dup35 mutation.

  11. A Turkish family with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome caused by a novel ALDH3A2 mutation

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    Faruk Incecik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS is an inherited neurocutaneous disorder caused by mutations in the aldehyde dehydrogenase family 3 member A2 (ALDH3A2 gene that encodes fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase. Affected patients display ichthyosis, mental retardation, and spastic diplegia. More than 70 mutations in ALDH3A2 have been discovered in SLS patients. We diagnosed two brothers age of 12 and 20 years with characteristic features of this rare syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed demyelinating disease in both of them. We described a novel homozygous, c. 835 T > A (p.Y279N mutation in exon 6 in two patients.

  12. Clinical characteristics and STK11 gene mutations in Chinese children with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiheng; Miao, Shijian; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Ping; Wu, Bingbing; Wu, Jie; Huang, Ying

    2015-11-25

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disease characterized by gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyps and mucocutaneous melanin spots. Germline mutation of the serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11) gene are responsible for PJS. In this study, we investigated the clinical characteristics and molecular basis of the disease in Chinese children with PJS. Thirteen children diagnosed with PJS in our hospital were enrolled in this study from 2011 to 2015, and their clinical data on polyp characteristics, intussusceptions events, family histories, etc. were described. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole-blood samples from each subject, and the entire coding sequence of the STK11 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by direct sequencing. The median age at the onset of symptoms was 2 years and 4 months. To date, these children have undergone 40 endoscopy screenings, 17 laparotomies and 9 intussusceptions. Polyps were found in the stomach, duodenum, small bowel, colon and rectum, with large polyps found in 7 children. Mutations were found in eleven children, including seven novel mutations (c.481het_dupA, c.943_944het_delCCinsG, c.397het_delG, c.862 + 1G > G/A, c.348_349het_delGT, and c.803_804het_delGGinsC and c.121_139de l19insTT) and four previously reported mutations (c.658C > C/T, c.890G > G/A, c.1062 C > C/G, and c.290 + 1G > G/A). One PJS patient did not have any STK11 mutations. The polyps caused significant clinical consequences in children with PJS, and mutations of the STK11 gene are generally the cause of PJS in Chinese children. This study expands the spectrum of known STK11 gene mutations.

  13. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: description of two novel homozygous missense mutations causing divergent clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Guiu, Isabel; Antón, Ana I; García-Barberá, Nuria; Navarro-Fernández, José; Martínez, Constantino; Fuster, Jose L; Couselo, Jose M; Ortuño, Francisco J; Vicente, Vicente; Rivera, Jose; Lozano, Maria L

    2014-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease resulting from mutations in the LYST/CHS1 gene, which encodes for a 429 kDa protein, CHS1/LYST, that regulates vesicle trafficking and determines the size of lysosomes and other organelles. To date, 60 different mutations have been characterized, and a reasonably straightforward phenotype-genotype correlation has been suggested. We describe two patients on opposite ends of the CHS clinical spectrum with novel missense mutations. We characterized these patients in terms of their mutations, protein localization and expression, mRNA stability, and electrostatic potential. Patient 1 is the first report of a severe early-onset CHS with a homozygous missense mutation (c.11362 G>A, p.G3725R) in the LYST/CHS1 gene. This molecular change results in a reduction at the CHS1 protein level, not due to an mRNA effect, but maybe a consequence of both, a change in the structure of the protein and most likely attributable to the remarkable serious perturbation in the electrostatic potential. Patient 2, who exhibited the adolescence form of the disease, was found to be homozygous for a novel missense mutation c.961 T>C, p.C258R, which seemed to have minor effect on the structure of the CHS1/LYST protein. Reexamining accepted premises of missense mutant alleles being reported among patients with clinically mild forms of the disorder should be carried out, and attempts to link genotype and clinical phenotype require identifying the actual molecular effect of the mutation. Early and accurate diagnosis of the severity of the disease is extremely important to early differentiate patients who would benefit from premature enrollment into a transplantation protocol. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Molecular and biochemical characterisation of a novel mutation in POLG associated with Alpers syndrome

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    Chardot Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA polymerase γ (POLG is the only known mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA polymerase. It mediates mtDNA replication and base excision repair. Mutations in the POLG gene lead to reduction of functional mtDNA (mtDNA depletion and/or deletions and are therefore predicted to result in defective oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Many mutations map to the polymerase and exonuclease domains of the enzyme and produce a broad clinical spectrum. The most frequent mutation p.A467T is localised in the linker region between these domains. In compound heterozygote patients the p.A467T mutation has been described to be associated amongst others with fatal childhood encephalopathy. These patients have a poorer survival rate compared to homozygotes. Methods mtDNA content in various tissues (fibroblasts, muscle and liver was quantified using quantitative PCR (qPCR. OXPHOS activities in the same tissues were assessed using spectrophotometric methods and catalytic stain of BN-PAGE. Results We characterise a novel splice site mutation in POLG found in trans with the p.A467T mutation in a 3.5 years old boy with valproic acid induced acute liver failure (Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome. These mutations result in a tissue specific depletion of the mtDNA which correlates with the OXPHOS-activities. Conclusions mtDNA depletion can be expressed in a high tissue-specific manner and confirms the need to analyse primary tissue. Furthermore, POLG analysis optimises clinical management in the early stages of disease and reinforces the need for its evaluation before starting valproic acid treatment.

  15. A common CHRNE mutation in Brazilian patients with congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estephan, Eduardo de Paula; Sobreira, Cláudia Ferreira da Rosa; Dos Santos, André Clériston José; Tomaselli, Pedro José; Marques, Wilson; Ortega, Roberta Paiva Magalhães; Costa, Marcela Câmara Machado; da Silva, André Macedo Serafim; Mendonça, Rodrigo Holanda; Caldas, Vitor Marques; Zambon, Antonio Alberto; Abath Neto, Osório; Marchiori, Paulo Eurípedes; Heise, Carlos Otto; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Töpf, Ana; Lochmüller, Hanns; Zanoteli, Edmar

    2018-01-30

    The most common causes of congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are CHRNE mutations, and some pathogenic allelic variants in this gene are especially frequent in certain ethnic groups. In the southern region of Brazil, a study found the c.130dupG CHRNE mutation in up to 33% of families with CMS. Here, we aimed to verify the frequency of this mutation among individuals with CMS in a larger cohort of CMS patients from different areas of Brazil and to characterize clinical features of these patients. Eighty-four patients with CMS, from 72 families, were clinically evaluated and submitted to direct sequencing of the exon 2 of CHRNE. The c.130dupG mutation was found in 32 patients (23 families), with 26 patients (19 families, 26.3%) in homozygosis, confirming its high prevalence in different regions of Brazil. Among the homozygous patients, the following characteristics were frequent: onset of symptoms before 2 years of age (92.3%), little functional restriction (92.3%), fluctuating symptoms (100%), ocular muscle impairment (96.1%), ptosis (100%), limb weakness (88.4%), response to pyridostigmine (100%), facial involvement (77%), and bulbar symptoms (70.8%). The pretest probability of finding at least one allele harbouring the c.130dupG mutation was 38.1%. Selecting only patients with impaired eye movement together with limb weakness and improvement with pyridostigmine, the probability increases to 72.2%. This clinical pre-selection of patients is likely a useful tool for regions where CHRNE mutations have a founder effect. In conclusion, the CHRNE mutation c.130dupG leads to fairly benign natural course of the disease with relative homogeneity.

  16. PAX3 mutations and clinical characteristics in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Li, Shiqiang; Xiao, Xueshan; Wang, Panfeng; Guo, Xiangming

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To detect paired box gene 3 (PAX3) mutations and associated phenotypes in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1). Methods Five unrelated families with suspected WS1 were selected from our Genomic DNA Repository for Hereditary Eye Diseases. The coding and adjacent intronic regions of PAX3 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the amplicons were then analyzed by cycle sequencing. Variations detected were further evaluated in available family members as well as one hundred controls with heteroduplex-single strand conformational polymorphism (heteroduplex-SSCP) analysis and/or clone sequencing. Results Three novel and two known mutations in PAX3 were detected in five patients, respectively: c.567_586+17del (p.Asp189_Gln505delinsGluGlyGlyAlaLeuAlaGly), c.456_459dupTTCC (p.Ile154PhefsX162), c.795_800delCTGGTT (p.Trp266_Phe267del), c.799T>A (p.Phe267Ile), and c.667C>T (p.Arg223X). Two novel mutations proved to be de novo as their parents did not carry the mutations. All five patients with PAX3 mutations had dystopia canthorum and different iris color and fundi between their two eyes. However, none had white forelock, skin hypopigmentation, and deafness. Conclusions Our findings expand the frequency and spectrum of PAX3 mutations and ethnic-related phenotypes in Chinese patients with WS1. De novo mutations in PAX3 have not been reported before. PMID:20664692

  17. Episodic tremors representing cortical myoclonus are characteristic in Angelman syndrome due to UBE3A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masahide; Saito, Yoshiaki; Honda, Ryoko; Saito, Takashi; Sugai, Kenji; Matsuda, Yuko; Miyatake, Chiharu; Takeshita, Eri; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Komaki, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sasaki, Masayuki; Uto, Chieko; Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Motoki, Takahiro; Saitoh, Shinji

    2015-02-01

    Neurological manifestations including psychomotor developmental delay and epilepsy in patients with Angelman syndrome caused by ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) mutations has been considered similar but is relatively milder than that in patients with deletion-type Angelman syndrome. This makes the diagnosis of the former subgroup often difficult. We here characterized epilepsy, specifically the types of tremulous movement, in 4 patients (age, 3-38years) with Angelman syndrome caused by UBE3A mutations. Ictal electroencephalography was used to record episodic tremors in all study patients. Jerk-locked averaging was performed using digital electroencephalography and surface electromyogram data from patients who were monitored for 24h. All patients had tremors in the limbs, head, and trunk, which resulted in 2 patients falling backward. These tremors lasted several seconds, and could emerge in clusters for hours in older patients. In addition, the tremors coincided with 7-8Hz rhythmic activity with a frontocentral predominance, diffuse spike-wave bursts, or no apparent change on electroencephalography. In 2 patients, these tremors were confirmed as cortical myoclonus using jerk-locked averaging. The other seizure types were isolated generalized myoclonus and tonic seizures. None of the patients experienced atypical absence seizures. Levetiracetam therapy was effective in controlling the myoclonic events in 2 of the 3 patients. Semirhythmic myoclonus is common in patients with Angelman syndrome caused by UBE3A mutations, and such myoclonic events are often life disabling. The preserved expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor subunit genes located proximal to UBE3A might explain the low prevalence of absence seizures in this population. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical Auditory Phenotypes Associated with GATA3 Gene Mutations in Familial Hypoparathyroidism-deafness-renal Dysplasia Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Lin, Qiong-Fen; Wang, Hong-Yang; Guan, Jing; Lan, Lan; Xie, Lin-Yi; Yu, Lan; Yang, Ju; Zhao, Cui; Liang, Jin-Long; Zhou, Han-Lin; Yang, Huan-Ming; Xiong, Wen-Ping; Zhang, Qiu-Jing; Wang, Da-Yong; Wang, Qiu-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hypoparathyroidism-deafness-renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder primarily caused by haploinsufficiency of GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3) gene mutations, and hearing loss is the most frequent phenotypic feature. This study aimed at identifying the causative gene mutation for a three-generation Chinese family with HDR syndrome and analyzing auditory phenotypes in all familial HDR syndrome cases. Methods: Three affected family members underwent otologic examinations, biochemistry tests, and other clinical evaluations. Targeted genes capture combining next-generation sequencing was performed within the family. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the causative mutation. The auditory phenotypes of all reported familial HDR syndrome cases analyzed were provided. Results: In Chinese family 7121, a heterozygous nonsense mutation c.826C>T (p.R276*) was identified in GATA3. All the three affected members suffered from sensorineural deafness and hypocalcemia; however, renal dysplasia only appeared in the youngest patient. Furthermore, an overview of thirty HDR syndrome families with corresponding GATA3 mutations revealed that hearing impairment occurred earlier in the younger generation in at least nine familial cases (30%) and two thirds of them were found to carry premature stop mutations. Conclusions: This study highlights the phenotypic heterogeneity of HDR and points to a possible genetic anticipation in patients with HDR, which needs to be further investigated. PMID:28303854

  19. Brugada syndrome with a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene: A case report from Bangladesh

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    Md. Zahidus Sayeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is an inherited cardiac arrhythmia that follows autosomal dominant transmission and can cause sudden death. We report a case of Brugada syndrome in a 55-year-old male patient presented with recurrent palpitation, atypical chest pain and presyncope. ECG changes were consistent with type 1 Brugada. Gene analysis revealed a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene with a genetic variation of D785N and a nucleotide change at 2353G-A. One of his children also had the same mutation. To our knowledge this is the first genetically proved case of Brugada syndrome in Bangladesh.

  20. Mutations in PURA cause profound neonatal hypotonia, seizures, and encephalopathy in 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Seema R; Zhang, Jing; Schaaf, Christian P; Brown, Chester W; Magoulas, Pilar; Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Wierenga, Klaas J; Bartholomew, Dennis; Fong, Chin-To; Barbaro-Dieber, Tina; Kukolich, Mary K; Burrage, Lindsay C; Austin, Elise; Keller, Kory; Pastore, Matthew; Fernandez, Fabio; Lotze, Timothy; Wilfong, Angus; Purcarin, Gabriela; Zhu, Wenmiao; Craigen, William J; McGuire, Marianne; Jain, Mahim; Cooney, Erin; Azamian, Mahshid; Bainbridge, Matthew N; Muzny, Donna M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Person, Richard E; Niu, Zhiyv; Eng, Christine M; Lupski, James R; Gibbs, Richard A; Beaudet, Arthur L; Yang, Yaping; Wang, Meng C; Xia, Fan

    2014-11-06

    5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by neonatal hypotonia, encephalopathy with or without epilepsy, and severe developmental delay, and the minimal critical deletion interval harbors three genes. We describe 11 individuals with clinical features of 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome and de novo mutations in PURA, encoding transcriptional activator protein Pur-α, within the critical region. These data implicate causative PURA mutations responsible for the severe neurological phenotypes observed in this syndrome. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical spectrum and molecular diagnosis of Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients with an imprinting mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, S.; Cassidy, S.B.; Conroy, J.M. [Univ. of Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-20

    Recent studies have identified a new class of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) patients who have biparental inheritance, but neither the typical deletion nor uniparental disomy (UPD) or translocation. However, these patients have uniparental DNA methylation throughout 15q11-q13, and thus appear to have a mutation in the imprinting process for this region. Here we describe detailed clinical findings of five AS imprinting mutation patients (three families) and two PWS imprinting mutation patients (one new family). All these patients have essentially the classical clinical phenotype for the respective syndrome, except that the incidence of microcephaly is lower in imprinting mutation AS patients than in deletion AS patients. Furthermore, imprinting mutation AS and PWS patients do not typically have hypopigmentation, which is commonly found in patients with the usual large deletion. Molecular diagnosis of these cases is initially achieved by DNA methylation analyses of the DN34/ZNF127, PW71 (D15S63), and SNRPN loci. The latter two probes have clear advantages in the simple molecular diagnostic analysis of PWS and AS patients with an imprinting mutation, as has been found for typical deletion or UPD PWS and AS cases. With the recent finding of inherited microdeletions in PWS and AS imprinting mutation families, our studies define a new class of these two syndromes. The clinical and molecular identification of these PWS and AS patients has important genetic counseling consequences. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Mapping and exome sequencing identifies a mutation in the IARS gene as the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takashi; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Watanabe, Daisaku; Watanabe, Toshio; Takasuga, Akiko; Sugimoto, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We identified an IARS (isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase) c.235G>C (p.Val79Leu) substitution as the causative mutation for neonatal weakness with intrauterine growth retardation (perinatal weak calf syndrome). In Japanese Black cattle, the syndrome was frequently found in calves sired by Bull A. Hence, we employed homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis. In order to identify the perinatal weak calf syndrome locus in a 4.04-Mb region of BTA 8, we analysed a paternal half-sibling family with a BovineSNP50 BeadChip and microsatellites. In this critical region, we performed exome sequencing to identify a causative mutation. Three variants were detected as possible candidates for causative mutations that were predicted to disrupt the protein function, including a G>C (p.Val79Leu) mutation in IARS c.235. The IARS c.235G>C mutation was not a homozygous risk allele in the 36 healthy offspring of Bull A. Moreover, the IARS Val79 residue and its flanking regions were evolutionarily and highly conserved. The IARS mutant (Leu79) had decreased aminoacylation activity. Additionally, the homozygous mutation was not found in any of 1526 healthy cattle. Therefore, we concluded that the IARS c.235G>C mutation was the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

  3. [Sebaceous gland tumor with a rare gene mutation within a tumor syndrome: Muir-Torre syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, E; Sommer, F; Geiger, K D; Pillunat, L E

    2014-04-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant subtype of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma and is characterized by the simultaneous occurrence of sebaceous gland neoplasms with visceral and urogenital malignancies. This article describes the case of a 72-year-old patient who was referred to our clinic for removal of an upper eyelid tumor, showing the course from the clinical findings to the rare diagnosis of Muir-Torre syndrome.

  4. Novel PSTPIP1 gene mutation in a patient with pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindwall, Elvira; Singla, Shikha; Davis, William E; Quinet, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease that usually presents in childhood with recurrent sterile arthritis. As the child ages into puberty, cutaneous features develop and arthritis subsides. We report the case of a now 25-year-old male patient with PAPA syndrome with the E250K mutation in PSTPIP1. We also present a systematic literature review of other PAPA cases. We conducted a literature search of PubMed using the following search terms: E250K mutation, PSTPIP1, and PAPA. PAPA syndrome is caused by mutations on chromosome 15q affecting the proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 1 (PSTPIP1) gene, also known as CD2-binding protein 1 (CD2BP1). The reported cases of PAPA syndrome currently in the literature involve mutations in A230T and E250Q. One case of a novel E250K mutation has been reported, which presented with a different phenotype to previously described cases of PAPA syndrome. With variation present between disease presentations from case to case, it is possible that the spectrum of PAPA syndrome is wider than currently thought. Further research is needed which may uncover an as-yet undiscovered genetic abnormality linking these interrelated diseases together. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel mutation in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) in a child with clinical and histological features of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Tranebjaerg, L; Esberg, G

    2011-01-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare congenital ectodermal disorder, caused by heterozygous missense mutation in GJB2, encoding the gap junction protein connexin 26. The commonest mutation is the p.Asp50Asn mutation, and only a few other mutations have been described to date....

  6. Clinical Expression and New SPINK5 Splicing Defects in Netherton Syndrome : Unmasking a Frequent Founder Synonymous Mutation and Unconventional Intronic Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Lacaze-Buzy, Laetitia; Furio, Laetitia; Tron, Elodie; Valari, Manthoula; Van der Wier, Gerda; Bodemer, Christine; Bygum, Anette; Bursztejn, Anne-Claire; Gaitanis, George; Paradisi, Mauro; Stratigos, Alexander; Weibel, Lisa; Deraison, Celine; Hovnanian, Alain

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a severe skin disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in SPINK5 (serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5) encoding the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI (lympho-epithelial Kazal type-related inhibitor). Here, we disclose new SPINK5 defects in 12 patients, who presented a

  7. A de novo missense mutation of FGFR2 causes facial dysplasia syndrome in Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; McEvoy, Fintan J; Heegaard, Steffen; Charlier, Carole; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord

    2017-08-02

    Surveillance for bovine genetic diseases in Denmark identified a hitherto unreported congenital syndrome occurring among progeny of a Holstein sire used for artificial breeding. A genetic aetiology due to a dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or a mosaic germline mutation was suspected as all recorded cases were progeny of the same sire. Detailed investigations were performed to characterize the syndrome and to reveal its cause. Seven malformed calves were submitted examination. All cases shared a common morphology with the most striking lesions being severe facial dysplasia and complete prolapse of the eyes. Consequently the syndrome was named facial dysplasia syndrome (FDS). Furthermore, extensive brain malformations, including microencephaly, hydrocephalus, lobation of the cerebral hemispheres and compression of the brain were present. Subsequent data analysis of progeny of the sire revealed that around 0.5% of his offspring suffered from FDS. High density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping data of the seven cases and their parents were used to map the defect in the bovine genome. Significant genetic linkage was obtained for three regions, including chromosome 26 where whole genome sequencing of a case-parent trio revealed two de novo variants perfectly associated with the disease: an intronic SNP in the DMBT1 gene and a single non-synonymous variant in the FGFR2 gene. This FGFR2 missense variant (c.927G>T) affects a gene encoding a member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor family, where amino acid sequence is highly conserved between members and across species. It is predicted to change an evolutionary conserved tryptophan into a cysteine residue (p.Trp309Cys). Both variant alleles were proven to result from de novo mutation events in the germline of the sire. FDS is a novel genetic disorder of Holstein cattle. Mutations in the human FGFR2 gene are associated with various dominant inherited craniofacial dysostosis syndromes. Given

  8. Imprinting mutations suggested by abnormal DNA methylation patterns in familial angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, A. (Freie Universitaet, Berlin (Germany)); Dittrich, B.; Buiting, K.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Horsthemke, B. (Institut fuer Humangenetik, Essen (United Kingdom)); Greger, V.; Lalande, M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Anvret, M. (Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1994-05-01

    The D15S9 and D15S63 loci in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region on chromosome 15 are subject to parent-of-origin-specific DNA methylation. The authors have found two Prader-Willi syndrome families in which the patients carry a maternal methylation imprint on the paternal chromosome. In one of these families, the patients have a small deletion encompassing the gene for the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N, which maps 130 kb telomeric to D15S63. Furthermore, they have identified a pair of nondeletion Angelman syndrome sibs and two isolated Angelman syndrome patients who carry a paternal methylation imprint on the maternal chromosome. These Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients may have a defect in the imprinting process in 15q11-13. The authors propose a model in which a cis-acting mutation prevents the resetting of the imprinting signal in the germ line and thus disturbs the expression of imprinted genes in this region. 39 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Quinidine therapy for West syndrome with KCNTI mutation: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Masataka; Kuki, Ichiro; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Okazaki, Shin; Kim, Kiyohiro; Hattori, Yuka; Tsuji, Hitomi; Nukui, Megumi; Inoue, Takeshi; Yoshida, Yoko; Uda, Takehiro; Kimura, Sadami; Mogami, Yukiko; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-01-01

    The KCNT1 gene encodes the sodium-dependent potassium channel, with quinidine being a partial antagonist of the KCNT1 channel. Gain-of-function KCNT1 mutations cause early onset epileptic encephalopathies including migrating partial seizures of infancy (MPSI). At 5months of age, our patient presented with epileptic spasms and hypsarrhythmia by electroencephalogram. Psychomotor retardation was observed from early infancy. The patient was diagnosed with West syndrome. Consequently, various anti-epileptic drugs, adrenocorticotropic hormone therapy (twice), and ketogenic diet therapy were tried. However, the epileptic spasms were intractable. Whole exome sequencing identified a KCNT1 mutation (c.1955G>T; p.G652V). At 2years and 6months, the patient had daily epileptic spasms despite valproate and lamotrigine treatment, and was therefore admitted for quinidine therapy. With quinidine therapy, decreased epileptic spasms and decreased epileptiform paroxysmal activity were observed by interictal EEG. Regarding development, babbling, responsiveness, oral feeding and muscle tone were ameliorated. Only transient diarrhea was observed as an adverse effect. Thus, quinidine therapy should be attempted in patients with West syndrome caused by KCNT1 mutations, as reported for MPSI. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Case of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere Syndrome Due To a Novel Mutation in Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatraman Thulasi BA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by motor, sensory, and cranial neuronopathies, associated with mutations in SLC52A2 and SLC52A3 genes that code for human riboflavin transporters RFVT2 and RFVT3, respectively. The authors describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl with Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome and a novel homozygous mutation c.1156T>C in the SLC52A3 gene, who presented at the age of 2.5 years with progressive brain stem dysfunction including ptosis, facial weakness, hearing loss, dysphagia, anarthria with bilateral vocal cord paralysis, and ataxic gait. She subsequently developed respiratory failure requiring tracheostomy and worsening dysphagia necessitating a gastrostomy. Following riboflavin supplementation, resolution of facial diplegia and ataxia, improvements in ptosis, and bulbar function including vocalization and respiration were noted. However, her sensorineural hearing loss remained unchanged. Similar to other cases of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome, our patient responded favorably to early riboflavin supplementation with significant but not complete neurologic recovery.

  11. A novel mutation in a mother and a son with Aarskog-Scott syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altıncık, Ayça; Kaname, Tadashi; Demir, Korcan; Böber, Ece

    2013-01-01

    Aarskog-Scott syndrome, also termed as faciogenital dysplasia, is an X-linked disorder consisting of short stature, craniofacial dysmorphism, shawl scrotum, cryptorchidism, and interdigital webbing. Cardiac and central nervous system abnormalities and behavioral disorders can also be detected. The gene responsible for the syndrome is called FGD1, located at Xp11.21. A 7-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital due to short stature. He was born to non-consanguineous parents after an uneventful term pregnancy. Orchiopexy for bilateral cryptorchidism was performed when he was 2 years old. At physical examination, his height was under 3 percentile, and he had broad nasal bridge, hypertelorism, wide philtrum, brachydactyly, and interdigital webbing. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography revealed normal findings. An eye examination showed amblyopia and astigmatism. The mother had short stature and interdigital webbing as well. Mutational analyses revealed a novel mutation (c.308-2G), hemizygous in the boy and heterozygous in the mother. Aarskog syndrome (faciogenital dysplasia) should be kept in mind in children with short stature and interdigital webbing.

  12. A novel silent deletion, an insertion mutation and a nonsense mutation in the TCOF1 gene found in two Chinese cases of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Yin, Xiao-Juan; Han, Tao; Peng, Wei; Wu, Hong-Lin; Liu, Xin; Feng, Zhi-Chun

    2014-12-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is the most common and well-known craniofacial disorder caused by mutations in the genes involved in pre-rRNA transcription, which include the TCOF1 gene. This study explored the role of TCOF1 mutations in Chinese patients with TCS. Mutational analysis of the TCOF1 gene was performed in three patients using polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Among these three patients, two additional TCOF1 variations, a novel 18 bp deletion and a novel 1 bp insertion mutation, were found in patient 1, together with a novel nonsense mutation (p.Ser476X) and a previously reported 4 bp deletion (c.1872_1875delTGAG) in other patients. Pedigree analysis allowed for prediction of the character of the mutation, which was either pathological or not. The 18 bp deletion of six amino acids, Ser-Asp-Ser-Glu-Glu-Glu (798*803), which was located in the CKII phosphorylation site of treacle, seemed relatively benign for TCS. By contrast, another novel mutation of c.1072_1073insC (p.Gln358ProfsX23) was a frameshift mutation and expected to result in a premature stop codon. This study provides insights into the functional domain of treacle and illustrates the importance of clinical and family TCS screening for the interpretation of novel sequence alterations.

  13. Characterization of N-terminally mutated cardiac Na+ channels associated with long QT syndrome 3 and Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eGütter

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding the cardiac voltage-gated Na+ channel hNav1.5, can result in life-threatening arrhythmias including long QT syndrome 3 (LQT3 and Brugada syndrome (BrS. Numerous mutant hNav1.5 channels have been characterized upon heterologous expression and patch-clamp recordings during the last decade. These studies revealed functionally important regions in hNav1.5 and provided insight into gain-of-function or loss-of-function channel defects underlying LQT3 or BrS, respectively. The N-terminal region of hNav1.5, however, has not yet been investigated in detail, although several mutations were reported in the literature. In the present study we investigated three mutant channels, previously associated with LQT3 (G9V, R18W, V125L, and six mutant channels, associated with BrS (R18Q, R27H, G35S, V95I, R104Q, K126E. We applied both the two-microelectrode voltage clamp technique, using cRNA-injected Xenopus oocytes, and the whole-cell patch clamp technique using transfected HEK293 cells. Surprisingly, four out of the nine mutations did not affect channel properties. Gain-of-function, as typically observed in LQT3 mutant channels, was observed only in R18W and V125L, whereas loss-of-function, frequently found in BrS mutants, was found only in R27H, R104Q, and K126E. Our results indicate that the hNav1.5 N-terminus plays an important role for channel kinetics and stability. At the same time, we suggest that additional mechanisms, as e.g. disturbed interactions of the Na+ channel N-terminus with other proteins, contribute to severe clinical phenotypes.

  14. [Description of a new TP53 gene germline mutation in a family with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Genetic counselling to healthy mutation carriers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmaña, Judith; Nomdedéu, Josep; Díez, Orland; Sabaté, Josep Maria; Balil, Anna; Pericay, Carles; López López, Juan José; Brunet, Joan; Baiget, Montse; Alonso, Carmen

    2002-10-19

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by early-onset breast cancer, soft-tissue sarcomas and osteosarcomas, acute leukemia, adrenocortical neoplasms and central nervous system tumors. Germline mutations in gene TP53 are identified in a percentage of affected families. Eight families with aggregation of childhood sarcomas, brain tumors, breast cancers in pre-menopausal women, and renal tumors were screened for TP53 germ-line mutations. SSCP and posterior direct sequencing were performed for genetic analysis. We also report a previously undescribed family with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome carrying a germline mutation. Seven families fulfilled so-called Li-Fraumeni like criteria and one fulfilled classical criteria. A new germ-line mutation in codon 238 at exon 7 of the gene TP53 was identified in the family fulfilling classical criteria. This mutation has not been previously reported. The clinical heterogeneity as well as the molecular complexity and consequences of mutation analysis and genetic counseling make it necessary to develop protocols in this area. A multidisciplinary approach is needed; this approach should be coordinated by a Familial Cancer Genetic Counseling Unit.

  15. Beneficial Outcome of Losartan Therapy Depends on Type of FBN1 Mutation in Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Romy; den Hartog, Alexander W; Radonic, Teodora; Micha, Dimitra; Maugeri, Alessandra; van Dijk, Fleur S; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; Groenink, Maarten; Mulder, Barbara J M; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; de Waard, Vivian; Pals, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that losartan reduces aortic dilatation in patients with Marfan syndrome. However, treatment response is highly variable. This study investigates losartan effectiveness in genetically classified subgroups. In this predefined substudy of COMPARE, Marfan patients were randomized to daily receive losartan 100 mg or no losartan. Aortic root dimensions were measured by MRI at baseline and after 3 years. FBN1 mutations were classified based on fibrillin-1 protein effect into (1) haploinsufficiency, decreased amount of normal fibrillin-1, or (2) dominant negative, normal fibrillin-1 abundance with mutant fibrillin-1 incorporated in the matrix. A pathogenic FBN1 mutation was found in 117 patients, of whom 79 patients were positive for a dominant negative mutation (67.5%) and 38 for a mutation causing haploinsufficiency (32.5%). Baseline characteristics between treatment groups were similar. Overall, losartan significantly reduced aortic root dilatation rate (no losartan, 1.3±1.5 mm/3 years, n=59 versus losartan, 0.8±1.4 mm/3 years, n=58; P=0.009). However, losartan reduced only aortic root dilatation rate in haploinsufficient patients (no losartan, 1.8±1.5 mm/3 years, n=21 versus losartan 0.5±0.8 mm/3 years, n=17; P=0.001) and not in dominant negative patients (no losartan, 1.2±1.7 mm/3 years, n=38 versus losartan 0.8±1.3 mm/3 years, n=41; P=0.197). Marfan patients with haploinsufficient FBN1 mutations seem to be more responsive to losartan therapy for inhibition of aortic root dilatation rate compared with dominant negative patients. Additional treatment strategies are needed in Marfan patients with dominant negative FBN1 mutations. http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/index.asp; Unique Identifier: NTR1423. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Detection of Folliculin Gene Mutations in Two Chinese Families with Birt-Hogg-Dube Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHD, OMIM#135150 is a rare disease in clinic; it is characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts with an increased risk of recurrent pneumothorax, renal cysts, and renal neoplasms. Previous studies have demonstrated that variants in folliculin (FLCN, NM_144997 are mainly responsible for this disease. In this research, we enrolled two BHD families and applied direct sequencing of FLCN to explore the genetic lesions in them. Two FLCN mutations were identified: one is a novel deletion variant (c.668delA/p.N223TfsX19, while the other is a previously reported insertion mutation (c.1579_1580insA/p.R527QfsX75. And the pathogenicity of both variants was confirmed by cosegregation assay. Bioinformatics analysis showed that c.668delA may lead to functional haploinsufficiency of FLCN because mRNA carrying this mutation exhibits a faster degradation rate comparing to the wild type. Real-time qPCR also confirmed that the mRNA level of FLCN expression in the proband was decreased significantly compared with the controls, which may disrupt the mTOR pathway and lead to BHD. The insertion mutation (c.1579_1580insA was predicted to cause a prolonged amino acid sequence of FLCN. The present identification of two mutations not only further supports the important role of tumor suppressor FLCN in BHD and primary spontaneous pneumothorax, but also expands the spectrum of FLCN mutations and will provide insight into genetic diagnosis and counseling of families with BHD.

  17. [NPHS2 Mutation analysis study in children with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azocar, Marta; Vega, Álvaro; Farfán, Mauricio; Cano, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Podocin is a protein located in the glomerular slit diaphragm where it takes part in the regulation of glomerular filtration. Mutations of the NPHS2 gene that codes podocin are the main cause of autosomal recessive steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). To identify the NPHS2 mutations in Chilean children with SRNS, and to determine the prevalence of the most common variants in a group of healthy adults. Mutation analysis of NPHS2 in 34 Chilean children with SRNS. Once the two most common variants of NPHS2 were identified, screening for these mutations was performed on 233 healthy adults. The mutation analysis was performed by the direct sequencing of the eight coding exons by polymerase chain reaction amplification. The DNA sequencing was performed using a fluorometric method, and then evaluated with SeqPilot software. The relationship between the presence of NPHS2 variants and SRNS was calculated by comparing the allele frequency between patients with SRNS and those of the healthy volunteers using the exact Fisher test. A P<.05 was considered significant. Pathogenic NPHS2 mutations were detected in 7 (21%) of the 34 patients studied, of which 6 were heterozygotes for p.R229Q and p.A284V. The presence of p.R229Q was 2.46% in the healthy volunteers. This study shows that p.R229Q and p.A284V are the most frequent variants in Chilean children with SRNS. It is the first time that this relationship has been reported in Chilean children. Based on this, a screening strategy is proposed for the genetic study in patients with SRNS and their families. A parallel or sequential search strategy for p.R229Q and p.A284V in these patients is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. A BAFF receptor His159Tyr mutation in Sjögren's syndrome-related lymphoproliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Aristea; Mavragani, Clio P; Nezos, Andrianos; Zintzaras, Elias; Quartuccio, Luca; De Vita, Salvatore; Koutsilieris, Michael; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M; Voulgarelis, Michael

    2015-10-01

    To study the prevalence, clinical associations, and functional implications of the His159Tyr mutation of the BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) in patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS). The BAFF-R His159Tyr mutation was evaluated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays in 247 patients with SS (of whom 70 had SS complicated by lymphoma [SS-lymphoma]), 145 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and 101 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as well as 180 healthy controls. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed for the quantification of both NF-κB1 and NF-κB2 messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript and protein levels in isolated B cells from patients with SS-lymphoma carrying the mutation (SS-lymphoma-BAFF-RHis159Tyr -derived B cells) compared to B cells from patients with SS-lymphoma who were not carriers of the mutation and healthy controls. Both the SS-lymphoma and SS-nonlymphoma patient subgroups exhibited significantly higher frequencies of the His159Tyr BAFF-R mutation compared to healthy controls (8.6% of SS-lymphoma patients and 6.2% of SS-nonlymphoma patients versus 1.7% of healthy controls; P = 0.02 and P = 0.04, respectively). The corresponding frequencies of the His159Tyr BAFF-R mutation in SLE and RA patients were 3.5% and 3%, respectively. Of interest, 71.4% of the SS patients with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma who were between the ages of 31 and 40 years at disease onset were mutation carriers. The generalized odds ratio for the development of SS-related MALT lymphoma in the younger age at onset (age BAFF-R mutation was 6.1 (95% confidence interval 2.0-18.7) (P BAFF-RHis159Tyr -derived B cells. This study identifies an increased prevalence of the BAFF-R His159Tyr mutation in patients with SS, particularly in those with SS complicated by MALT lymphoma whose disease onset occurred at a younger age. BAFF-RHis159Tyr -mediated activation of the alternate NF-κB pathway might contribute to the pathogenesis of SS

  19. Atypical Alstrom syndrome with novel ALMS1 mutations precluded by current diagnostic criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Jillian

    2014-02-01

    We report on clinical and genetic studies in a non-consanguineous Irish sib-pair with infantile dilated cardiomyopathy and retinopathy. A diagnosis of Alström Syndrome (AS) was considered and diagnostic testing pursued. The Alströms gene (ALMS1) is very large (23 exons) and diagnostic testing of mutational hotspots (exon 6, 8 and 10) was negative. Furthermore the siblings were tall and did not have the typical phenotype of nystagmus, photophobia, obesity or hearing loss and so the AS diagnosis was removed. We then sought to identify the causative gene in this family using whole exome sequencing. Unexpectedly, the exome analysis identified novel compound heterozygous ALMS1 mutations in exon 5 (c.777delT:p.D260fs*26) and exon 20 (c.12145_12146insC:p.S4049fs*36) that segregated with the phenotype. Although the siblings show some clinical overlap with AS, their phenotype is not classical. It is plausible that their atypical presentation may be due to the location of the ALMS1 mutations outside the usual mutational hotspots. Our findings show how atypical cases of AS may be missed under the current diagnostic guidelines and support consideration of complete ALMS1 sequencing in children with two or more features, even if all of the core clinical features of AS are not present.

  20. Novel and recurrent MYO7A mutations in Usher syndrome type 1 and type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weining Rong

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is a group of disorders manifested as retinitis pigmentosa and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with or without vestibular dysfunction. Here, we recruited three Chinese families affected with autosomal recessive USH for detailed clinical evaluations and for mutation screening in the genes associated with inherited retinal diseases. Using targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS approach, three new alleles and one known mutation in MYO7A gene were identified in the three families. In two families with USH type 1, novel homozygous frameshift variant p.Pro194Hisfs*13 and recurrent missense variant p.Thr165Met were demonstrated as the causative mutations respectively. Crystal structural analysis denoted that p.Thr165Met would very likely change the tertiary structure of the protein encoded by MYO7A. In another family affected with USH type 2, novel biallelic mutations in MYO7A, c.[1343+1G>A];[2837T>G] or p.[?];[Met946Arg], were identified with clinical significance. Because MYO7A, to our knowledge, has rarely been correlated with USH type 2, our findings therefore reveal distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7A. We also conclude that targeted NGS is an effective approach for genetic diagnosis for USH, which can further provide better understanding of genotype-phenotype relationship of the disease.

  1. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: Mutation analysis of the receptor tyrosine kinase RET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolk, S.; Angrist, M.; Schwartz, S.; Chakravarti, A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[University Hospitals, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-28

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) usually occurs as an isolated phenotype. However, 16% of the index cases are also affected with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Complex segregation analysis suggests that CCHS is familial and has the same inheritance pattern with or without HSCR. We postulate that alteration of normal function of the receptor tyrosine kinase, RET, may contribute to CCHS based on RET`s expression pattern and the identification of RET mutations in HSCR patients. To further explore the nature of the inheritance of CCHS, we have undertaken two main routes of investigation: cytogenetic analysis and mutation detection. Cytogenetic analysis of metaphase chromosomes showed normal karyotypes in 13 of the 14 evaluated index cases; one index case carried a familial pericentric inversion on chromosome 2. Mutation analysis showed no sequence changes unique to index cases, as compared to control individuals, and as studied by single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding region of RET. We conclude that point mutations in the RET coding region cannot account for a substantial fraction of CCHS in this patient population, and that other candidate genes involved in neural crest cell differentiation and development must be considered. 54 refs.

  2. Mutations in a new gene in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrodental dysostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Perez, V L; Ide, S E; Strom, T M; Lorenz, B; Wilson, D; Woods, K; King, L; Francomano, C; Freisinger, P; Spranger, S; Marino, B; Dallapiccola, B; Wright, M; Meitinger, T; Polymeropoulos, M H; Goodship, J

    2000-03-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, MIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly and dysplastic nails and teeth. Congenital cardiac defects, most commonly a defect of primary atrial septation producing a common atrium, occur in 60% of affected individuals. The disease was mapped to chromosome 4p16 in nine Amish subpedigrees and single pedigrees from Mexico, Ecuador and Brazil. Weyers acrodental dysostosis (MIM 193530), an autosomal dominant disorder with a similar but milder phenotype, has been mapped in a single pedigree to an area including the EvC critical region. We have identified a new gene (EVC), encoding a 992-amino-acid protein, that is mutated in individuals with EvC. We identified a splice-donor change in an Amish pedigree and six truncating mutations and a single amino acid deletion in seven pedigrees. The heterozygous carriers of these mutations did not manifest features of EvC. We found two heterozygous missense mutations associated with a phenotype, one in a man with Weyers acrodental dysostosis and another in a father and his daughter, who both have the heart defect characteristic of EvC and polydactyly, but not short stature. We suggest that EvC and Weyers acrodental dysostosis are allelic conditions.

  3. Novel SCARB2 mutation in action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome and evaluation of SCARB2 mutations in isolated AMRF features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopfner Franziska

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome is a hereditary form of progressive myoclonus epilepsy associated with renal failure. It is considered to be an autosomal-recessive disease related to loss-of-function mutations in SCARB2. We studied a German AMRF family, additionally showing signs of demyelinating polyneuropathy and dilated cardiomyopathy. To test the hypothesis whether isolated appearance of individual AMRF syndrome features could be related to heterozygote SCARB2 mutations, we screened for SCARB2 mutations in unrelated patients showing isolated AMRF features. Methods In the AMRF family all exons of SCARB2 were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. The mutation screening of unrelated patients with isolated AMRF features affected by either epilepsy (n = 103, progressive myoclonus epilepsy or generalized epilepsy, demyelinating polyneuropathy (n = 103, renal failure (n = 192 or dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 85 was performed as high resolution melting curve analysis of the SCARB2 exons. Results A novel homozygous 1 bp deletion (c.111delC in SCARB2 was found by sequencing three affected homozygous siblings of the affected family. A heterozygous sister showed generalized seizures and reduction of nerve conduction velocity in her legs. No mutations were found in the epilepsy, renal failure or dilated cardiomyopathy samples. In the polyneuropathy sample two individuals with demyelinating disease were found to be carriers of a SCARB2 frameshift mutation (c.666delCCTTA. Conclusions Our findings indicate that demyelinating polyneuropathy and dilated cardiomyopathy are part of the action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome. Moreover, they raise the possibility that in rare cases heterozygous SCARB2 mutations may be associated with PNP features.

  4. Brittle Cornea Syndrome Associated with a Missense Mutation in the Zinc-Finger 469 Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Elisabeth; Knappskog, Per Morten; Midtbø, Marit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diverse clinical manifestations, identify the causative mutation and explain the association with red hair in a family with brittle cornea syndrome (BCS). Methods: Eight family members in three generations underwent ophthalmic, dental, and general medical examination...... mapping with SNP markers, DNA sequencing, and MC1R genotyping. Results: At 42 and 48 years of age, respectively, both affected individuals were blind due to retinal detachment and secondary glaucoma. They had extremely thin and bulging corneas, velvety skin, chestnut colored hair, scoliosis, reduced BMD......, dental anomalies, hearing loss and minor cardiac defects. The morphologies of the skin biopsies were normal except that in some areas slightly thinner collagen fibrils were seen in one of the affected individuals. Molecular genetic analysis revealed a novel missense mutation of ZNF469, c.10016G...

  5. Waardenburg syndrome: a rare cause of inherited neuropathy due to SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova-Mihaylova, Petya; Alexander, Michael D; Murphy, Raymond P J; Murphy, Sinéad M

    2017-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder comprising sensorineural deafness and pigmentation abnormalities. Four distinct subtypes are defined based on the presence or absence of additional symptoms. Mutations in six genes have been described in WS. SOX10 mutations are usually associated with a more severe phenotype of WS with peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, and Hirschsprung disease. Here we report a 32-year-old man with a novel heterozygous missense variant in SOX10 gene, who presented with congenital deafness, Hirschsprung disease, iris heterochromia, foot deformity, and intermediate conduction velocity length-dependent sensorimotor neuropathy. This case highlights that the presence of other non-neuropathic features in a patient with presumed hereditary neuropathy should alert the clinician to possible atypical rare causes. © 2017 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  6. Heterozygous germ line hCHK2 mutations in Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D W; Varley, J M; Szydlo, T E; Kang, D H; Wahrer, D C; Shannon, K E; Lubratovich, M; Verselis, S J; Isselbacher, K J; Fraumeni, J F; Birch, J M; Li, F P; Garber, J E; Haber, D A

    1999-12-24

    The hCHK2 gene encodes the human homolog of the yeast Cds1 and Rad53 G2 checkpoint kinases, whose activation in response to DNA damage prevents cellular entry into mitosis. Here, it is shown that heterozygous germ line mutations in hCHK2 occur in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a highly penetrant familial cancer phenotype usually associated with inherited mutations in the TP53 gene. These observations suggest that hCHK2 is a tumor suppressor gene conferring predisposition to sarcoma, breast cancer, and brain tumors, and they also provide a link between the central role of p53 inactivation in human cancer and the well-defined G2 checkpoint in yeast.

  7. Gain-of-function mutations in the calcium channel CACNA1C (Cav1.2) cause non-syndromic long-QT but not Timothy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Friedrich, Corinna; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Coffey, Alison J; Grace, Andrew; Zumhagen, Sven; Seebohm, Guiscard; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; Rinné, Susanne; Sachse, Frank B; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Decher, Niels

    2015-03-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in CACNA1C, encoding the L-type Ca(2+) channel Cav1.2, cause Timothy syndrome (TS), a multi-systemic disorder with dysmorphic features, long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and autism spectrum disorders. TS patients have heterozygous mutations (G402S and G406R) located in the alternatively spliced exon 8, causing a gain-of-function by reduced voltage-dependence of inactivation. Screening 540 unrelated patients with non-syndromic forms of LQTS, we identified six functional relevant CACNA1C mutations in different regions of the channel. All these mutations caused a gain-of-function combining different mechanisms, including changes in current amplitude, rate of inactivation and voltage-dependence of activation or inactivation, similar as in TS. Computer simulations support the theory that the novel CACNA1C mutations prolong action potential duration. We conclude that genotype-negative LQTS patients should be investigated for mutations in CACNA1C, as a gain-of-function in Cav1.2 is likely to cause LQTS and only specific and rare mutations, i.e. in exon 8, cause the multi-systemic TS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Loss-of-function mutations in SOX10 cause Kallmann syndrome with deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingault, Veronique; Bodereau, Virginie; Baral, Viviane; Marcos, Severine; Watanabe, Yuli; Chaoui, Asma; Fouveaut, Corinne; Leroy, Chrystel; Vérier-Mine, Odile; Francannet, Christine; Dupin-Deguine, Delphine; Archambeaud, Françoise; Kurtz, François-Joseph; Young, Jacques; Bertherat, Jérôme; Marlin, Sandrine; Goossens, Michel; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Dodé, Catherine; Bondurand, Nadege

    2013-05-02

    Transcription factor SOX10 plays a role in the maintenance of progenitor cell multipotency, lineage specification, and cell differentiation and is a major actor in the development of the neural crest. It has been implicated in Waardenburg syndrome (WS), a rare disorder characterized by the association between pigmentation abnormalities and deafness, but SOX10 mutations cause a variable phenotype that spreads over the initial limits of the syndrome definition. On the basis of recent findings of olfactory-bulb agenesis in WS individuals, we suspected SOX10 was also involved in Kallmann syndrome (KS). KS is defined by the association between anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to incomplete migration of neuroendocrine gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) cells along the olfactory, vomeronasal, and terminal nerves. Mutations in any of the nine genes identified to date account for only 30% of the KS cases. KS can be either isolated or associated with a variety of other symptoms, including deafness. This study reports SOX10 loss-of-function mutations in approximately one-third of KS individuals with deafness, indicating a substantial involvement in this clinical condition. Study of SOX10-null mutant mice revealed a developmental role of SOX10 in a subpopulation of glial cells called olfactory ensheathing cells. These mice indeed showed an almost complete absence of these cells along the olfactory nerve pathway, as well as defasciculation and misrouting of the nerve fibers, impaired migration of GnRH cells, and disorganization of the olfactory nerve layer of the olfactory bulbs. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutations in EXTL3 Cause Neuro-immuno-skeletal Dysplasia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Machteld M; Tuijnenburg, Paul; Hempel, Maja; van Vlies, Naomi; Ren, Zemin; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Jansen, Machiel H; Santer, René; Johannsen, Jessika; Bacchelli, Chiara; Alders, Marielle; Li, Rui; Davies, Rosalind; Dupuis, Lucie; Cale, Catherine M; Wanders, Ronald J A; Pals, Steven T; Ocaka, Louise; James, Chela; Müller, Ingo; Lehmberg, Kai; Strom, Tim; Engels, Hartmut; Williams, Hywel J; Beales, Phil; Roepman, Ronald; Dias, Patricia; Brunner, Han G; Cobben, Jan-Maarten; Hall, Christine; Hartley, Taila; Le Quesne Stabej, Polona; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Davies, E Graham; de Sousa, Sérgio B; Lessel, Davor; Arts, Heleen H; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2017-02-02

    EXTL3 regulates the biosynthesis of heparan sulfate (HS), important for both skeletal development and hematopoiesis, through the formation of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs). By whole-exome sequencing, we identified homozygous missense mutations c.1382C>T, c.1537C>T, c.1970A>G, and c.2008T>G in EXTL3 in nine affected individuals from five unrelated families. Notably, we found the identical homozygous missense mutation c.1382C>T (p.Pro461Leu) in four affected individuals from two unrelated families. Affected individuals presented with variable skeletal abnormalities and neurodevelopmental defects. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with a complete absence of T cells was observed in three families. EXTL3 was most abundant in hematopoietic stem cells and early progenitor T cells, which is in line with a SCID phenotype at the level of early T cell development in the thymus. To provide further support for the hypothesis that mutations in EXTL3 cause a neuro-immuno-skeletal dysplasia syndrome, and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of the disorder, we analyzed the localization of EXTL3 in fibroblasts derived from affected individuals and determined glycosaminoglycan concentrations in these cells as well as in urine and blood. We observed abnormal glycosaminoglycan concentrations and increased concentrations of the non-sulfated chondroitin disaccharide D0a0 and the disaccharide D0a4 in serum and urine of all analyzed affected individuals. In summary, we show that biallelic mutations in EXTL3 disturb glycosaminoglycan synthesis and thus lead to a recognizable syndrome characterized by variable expression of skeletal, neurological, and immunological abnormalities. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-07-25

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients.

  11. Identification of a novel WFS1 homozygous nonsense mutation in Jordanian children with Wolfram syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Khaldon Bodoor; Osama Batiha; Ayman Abu-Awad; Khaldon Al-Sarihin; Haya Ziad; Yousef Jarun; Aya Abu-sheikha; Sara Abu Jalboush; Khoulod S. Alibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presentation of early onset type I diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy with later onset diabetes insipidus and deafness. WFS1 gene was identified on chromosome 4p16.1 as the gene responsible for WS disease given that most of the WS patients were found to carry mutations in this gene. This study was carried out to investigate the molecular spectrum of WFS1 gene in Jordanian families. Molecular a...

  12. Urinary Tract Cancer in Lynch Syndrome; Increased Risk in Carriers of MSH2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Therkildsen, Christina; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of urothelial cancer in the upper urinary tract and the bladder, determine the contribution from the different mismatch-repair genes, and define clinical characteristics of urothelial cancer in Lynch syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The national hereditary...... nonpolyposis colorectal cancer registry was used to identify all 288 Lynch syndrome families in Denmark. Urothelial cancers that developed in mutation carriers and in their first-degree relatives were identified, mismatch-repair status was assessed, clinicopathologic variables were defined, and cumulative...... lifetime risks were determined. RESULTS: In total, 48 cancers of the ureter, 34 cancers of the renal pelvis, and 54 urinary bladder cancers developed at a mean age of 61 (24-89) years. The tumors were typically of high grade, showed loss of mismatch-repair protein expression in 90% of the tumors...

  13. A Turkish family with Nance-Horan Syndrome due to a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tug, Esra; Dilek, Nihal F; Javadiyan, Shahrbanou; Burdon, Kathryn P; Percin, Ferda E

    2013-08-01

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked syndrome characterized by congenital cataract which leads to profound vision loss, characteristic dysmorphic features and specific dental anomalies. Microcornea, microphthalmia and mild or moderate mental retardation may accompany these features. Heterozygous females often manifest similarly but with less severe features than affected males. We describe two brothers who have the NHS phenotype and their carrier mother who had microcornea but not cataract. We identified a previously unreported frameshift mutation (c.558insA) in exon 1 of the NHS gene in these patients and their mother which is predicted to result in the incorporation of 11 aberrant amino acids prior to a stop codon (p.E186Efs11X). We also discussed genotype-phenotype correlation according to relevant literature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mainzer-Saldino Syndrome Is a Ciliopathy Caused by IFT140 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Isabelle; Saunier, Sophie; Hanein, Sylvain; Filhol, Emilie; Bizet, Albane A.; Collins, Felicity; Salih, Mustafa A.M.; Gerber, Sylvie; Delphin, Nathalie; Bigot, Karine; Orssaud, Christophe; Silva, Eduardo; Baudouin, Véronique; Oud, Machteld M.; Shannon, Nora; Le Merrer, Martine; Roche, Olivier; Pietrement, Christine; Goumid, Jamal; Baumann, Clarisse; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Zahrate, Mohammed; Beales, Philip; Arts, Heleen H.; Munnich, Arnold; Kaplan, Josseline; Antignac, Corinne; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MSS) is a rare disorder characterized by phalangeal cone-shaped epiphyses, chronic renal failure, and early-onset, severe retinal dystrophy. Through a combination of ciliome resequencing and Sanger sequencing, we identified IFT140 mutations in six MSS families and in a family with the clinically overlapping Jeune syndrome. IFT140 is one of the six currently known components of the intraflagellar transport complex A (IFT-A) that regulates retrograde protein transport in ciliated cells. Ciliary abundance and localization of anterograde IFTs were altered in fibroblasts of affected individuals, a result that supports the pivotal role of IFT140 in proper development and function of ciliated cells. PMID:22503633

  15. Functional analysis of a SOX10 gene mutation associated with Waardenburg syndrome II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Ping; Hao, Zi-Qi; Liu, Ya-Lan; Mei, Ling-Yun; He, Chu-Feng; Niu, Zhi-Jie; Sun, Jie; Zhao, Yu-Lin; Feng, Yong

    2017-11-04

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant inherited non-syndromic type of hereditary hearing loss characterized by varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and inner ear. WS is classified into four subtypes (WS1-WS4) based on additional symptoms. WS2 is characterized by the absence of additional symptoms. Recently, we identified a SOX10 missense mutation c.422T > C (p.L141P) associated with WS2. We performed functional assays and found the mutant loses DNA-binding capacity, shows aberrant cytoplasmic and nuclear localization, and fails to interact with PAX3. Therefore, the mutant cannot transactivate the MITF promoter effectively, inhibiting melanin synthesis and leading to WS2. Our study confirmed haploinsufficiency as the underlying pathogenesis for WS2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar

    2016-01-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant...... in the majority of UHS case subjects. The two enzymes PADI3 and TGM3, responsible for posttranslational protein modifications, and their target structural protein TCHH are all involved in hair shaft formation. Elucidation of the molecular outcomes of the disease-causing mutations by cell culture experiments...... and tridimensional protein models demonstrated clear differences in the structural organization and activity of mutant and wild-type proteins. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed morphological alterations in hair coat of Padi3 knockout mice. All together, these findings elucidate the molecular genetic...

  17. Sequencing EVC and EVC2 identifies mutations in two-thirds of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompson, Stuart W J; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Blair, Helen J; Barton, Stephanie; Navarro, Victoria; Robson, Joanne L; Wright, Michael J; Goodship, Judith A

    2007-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is caused by mutations in EVC and EVC2, genes in a divergent orientation separated by only 2.6 kb. We systematically sought mutations in both genes in a panel of 65 affected individuals to assess the proportion of cases resulting from mutations in each gene. We PCR amplified and sequenced the coding exons of both genes. We investigated mutations that could affect splicing by in vitro splicing assays and cDNA analysis. We have identified EVC mutations in 20 cases (31%); in all of these we have detected the mutation on each allele. We have identified EVC2 mutations in 25 cases (38%); in 22 of these we have isolated a mutation on each allele. The majority of the mutations introduce a premature termination codon. We sequenced the region between the two genes in 10 of the 20 cases in which we had not identified a mutation in either gene, revealing only one SNP that was not a common polymorphism. As we have not identified mutations in either gene in 20 cases (31%) it is possible that there is further genetic heterogeneity.

  18. Identification of four new PITX2 gene mutations in patients with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Veronique; David, Gabriel; Roche, Olivier; de la Houssaye, Guillaume; Boutboul, Sandrine; Arbogast, Laurence; Kobetz, Alexandra; Orssaud, Christophe; Camand, Olivier; Schorderet, Daniel F; Munier, Francis; Rossi, Annick; Delezoide, Anne Lise; Marsac, Cecile; Ricquier, Daniel; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Menasche, Maurice; Abitbol, Marc

    2006-12-01

    Axenfeld Rieger syndrome (ARS) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder affecting development of the ocular anterior chamber, abdomen, teeth and facial structures. The PITX2 gene is a major gene encoding a major transcription factor associated with ARS. ARS patients were collected from six unrelated families. Patients and their families were ophthalmologically phenotyped and their blood was collected for DNA extraction. We screened the coding region of human PITX2 gene by direct sequencing. The consequences of the mutations described were investigated by generating crystallographic representations of the amino acid changes. In order to better understand the occurrence of glaucoma in ARS patients, we studied the PITX2 gene expression in human embryonic and fetal ocular tissue sections. We identified four novel PITX2 genetic alterations in four unrelated families with ARS. These mutations included two nonsense mutations (E55X and Y121X), an eight nucleotides insertion (1251 ins CGACTCCT) and a substitution (F58L), in familial and sporadic cases of ARS. We also showed for the first time that PITX2 is expressed at early stages of the human embryonic and fetal periocular mesenchyme, as well as at later stages of human development in the fetal ciliary body, ciliary processes, irido corneal angle and corneal endothelium. The human fetal eye PITX2 gene expression pattern reported here for the first time provides a strong basis for explaining the frequent occurrence of glaucoma in patients affected by PITX2 gene mutations. Two mutations identified affect the homeodomain (E55X and F58L). The E55X nonsense mutation is likely to alter dramatically the DNA-binding capabilities of the PITX2 homeodomain. Furthermore, there is a complete loss of the carboxy-terminal part of the PITX2 protein beyond the site of the mutation. The phenylalanine F58 is known to contribute to the hydrophobic network of the homeodomain. The crystallographic representations of the mutation F58L show

  19. Novel mutations in PRG4 gene in two Indian families with camptodactyly-arthropathy- coxa vara- pericarditis (CACP syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajashree S Nandagopalan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Camptodactyly - arthropathy- coxa vara- pericarditis (CACP syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the PRG4 (proteoglycan 4 gene. Hallmarks of the syndrome include congenital or early-onset camptodactyly and arthropathy with synovial hyperplasia, progressive coxa vara deformity and non-inflammatory pericardial effusions. Till date only around 25 pathogenic mutations have been reported in this gene and none have been reported from India. We report here the mutations in the PRG4 gene in three patients of CACP from two unrelated families from India. Methods: Molecular genetic studies were done for the three patients with the CACP syndrome, from two unrelated Indian families, through sequence analysis of all coding exons and the exon-intron boundaries of the PRG4 gene. Results: Two novel frame-shift deletion mutations leading to premature protein termination were found. One patient was identified to be homozygous for a 2 base pair deletion in exon 6 (c.2645_2646delGA and the two affected siblings from the other family were found to be homozygous for a 4 base pair deletion in exon 6 (c.2883_2886delAAGA. Conclusions: This is perhaps the first report of PRG4 mutations from India. Further mutation studies in Indian CACP cases will help to determine the mutation spectrum of the PRG4 gene in the Indian population and also help to further elucidate the molecular pathology and the genotype-phenotype correlation of this rare disease.

  20. SOS1 frameshift mutations cause pure mucosal neuroma syndrome, a clinical phenotype distinct from multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Martina; Kivuva, Emma; Quinn, Anthony; Brennan, Paul; Caswell, Richard; Lango Allen, Hana; Vaidya, Bijay; Ellard, Sian

    2016-05-01

    Mucosal neuromas, thickened corneal nerves and marfanoid body habitus are characteristic phenotypic features of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B) and often provide an early clue to the diagnosis of the syndrome. Rarely, patients present with typical physical features of MEN2B but without associated endocrinopathies (medullary thyroid carcinoma or pheochromocytoma) or a RET gene mutation; this clinical presentation is thought to represent a distinct condition termed 'pure mucosal neuroma syndrome'. Exome sequencing was performed in two unrelated probands with mucosal neuromas, thickened corneal nerves and marfanoid body habitus, but no MEN2B-associated endocrinopathy or RET gene mutation. Sanger sequencing was performed to confirm mutations detected by exome sequencing and to test in family members and 3 additional unrelated index patients with mucosal neuromas or thickened corneal nerves. A heterozygous SOS1 gene frameshift mutation (c.3266dup or c.3248dup) was identified in each proband. Sanger sequencing showed that proband 1 inherited the c.3266dup mutation from his affected mother, while the c.3248dup mutation had arisen de novo in proband 2. Sanger sequencing also identified one further novel SOS1 mutation (c.3254dup) in one of the 3 additional index patients. Our results demonstrate the existence of pure mucosal neuroma syndrome as a clinical entity distinct from MEN2B that can now be diagnosed by genetic testing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Novel mutation in forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) gene in an Indian patient with Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Jadhav, Vaishali; Ghattargi, Vikas C; Udani, Vrajesh

    2014-03-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by the progressive loss of intellectual functioning, fine and gross motor skills and communicative abilities, deceleration of head growth, and the development of stereotypic hand movements, occurring after a period of normal development. The classic form of RTT involves mutation in MECP2 while the involvement of CDKL5 and FOXG1 genes has been identified in atypical RTT phenotype. FOXG1 gene encodes for a fork-head box protein G1, a transcription factor acting primarily as transcriptional repressor through DNA binding in the embryonic telencephalon as well as a number of other neurodevelopmental processes. In this report we have described the molecular analysis of FOXG1 gene in Indian patients with Rett syndrome. FOXG1 gene mutation analysis was done in a cohort of 34 MECP2/CDKL5 mutation negative RTT patients. We have identified a novel mutation (p. D263VfsX190) in FOXG1 gene in a patient with congenital variant of Rett syndrome. This mutation resulted into a frameshift, thereby causing an alteration in the reading frames of the entire coding sequence downstream of the mutation. The start position of the frameshift (Asp263) and amino acid towards the carboxyl terminal end of the protein was found to be well conserved across species using multiple sequence alignment. Since the mutation is located at forkhead binding domain, the resultant mutation disrupts the secondary structure of the protein making it non-functional. This is the first report from India showing mutation in FOXG1 gene in Rett syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Recurrent Stroke in a Child with TRMA Syndrome and SLC19A2 Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Moosavian, Toktam; Moosavian, Hamidreza

    2018-01-01

    Here we report a 5-month-old boy with thiamine Responsive Megaloblastic Anemia syndrome (TRMA syndrome) with several attacks of stroke, admitted to Mofid Children's Hospital, Tehran, Iran, in 2016. In addition to the cardinal clinical manifestations of the syndrome, other manifestations comprise thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia, diabetes mellitus, and sensor neural hearing loss. The patient showed the ischemic attack of stroke. Megaloblastic anemia and diabetes were diagnosed at 8 months and was successfully treated with vitamin and insulin prescription. After treatment of thiamine, diabetes was controlled and insulin was discontinued. In spite of the thiamine administration, the second stroke as hemorrhagic stroke occurred in the patient after a few months. TRAMA is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. TRMA was confirmed by mutation in SLC19A2. A homozygous splice site variant was detected in SLC19A2 gene. Stroke was not reported in this syndrome (only in one report about one attack in an adult patient) but in this patient, several attacks of stroke were reported before and after thiamin administration.

  3. Individual Clinically Diagnosed with CHARGE Syndrome but with a Mutation in KMT2D, a Gene Associated with Kabuki Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonoko Sakata

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a Japanese female patient presenting with classic features of CHARGE syndrome, including choanal atresia, growth and development retardation, ear malformations, genital anomalies, multiple endocrine deficiency, and unilateral facial nerve palsy. She was clinically diagnosed with typical CHARGE syndrome, but genetic analysis using the TruSight One Sequence Panel revealed a germline heterozygous mutation in KMT2D with no pathogenic CHD7 alterations associated with CHARGE syndrome. Kabuki syndrome is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by five cardinal manifestations including typical facial features, skeletal anomalies, dermatoglyphic abnormalities, mild to moderate intellectual disability, and postnatal growth deficiency. Germline mutations in KMT2D underlie the molecular pathogenesis of 52–76% of patients with Kabuki syndrome. This is an instructive case that clearly represents a phenotypic overlap between Kabuki syndrome and CHARGE syndrome. It suggests the importance of considering the possibility of a diagnosis of Kabuki syndrome even if patients present with typical symptoms and meet diagnostic criteria of CHARGE syndrome. The case also emphasizes the impact of non-biased exhaustive genetic analysis by next-generation sequencing in the genetic diagnosis of rare congenital disorders with atypical manifestations.

  4. Factor V Leiden mutation is not a predisposing factor for acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himabindu, G; Rajasekhar, D; Latheef, K; Sarma, P V G K; Vanajakshamma, V; Chaudhury, Abhijit; Bitla, Aparna R

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of Coronary artery disease (CAD) in India has increased considerably over the past few years and could become the number one killer disease if interventions are not done. Factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation and FII G20210A polymorphism are two recently described genetic factors with a propensity towards venous thrombosis. This warrants the investigations for thrombophilia in myocardial infarction patients in India. The study cohort consisted of 51 patients aged below 50 years presenting with acute coronary syndromes. In both patient group and normal individuals the major risk factors Protein C deficiency, Protein S deficiency, anticardiolipin antibodies, Fibrinogen and Lipoprotein [a] were studied. Factor V Leiden (FVL) G1691A mutation in both control and patient group was looked by using Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by sequencing of the PCR products. Our results indicated significantly higher levels of anticardiolipin antibodies and fibrinogen in the patients and absence of FVL (G1691A) mutation in our study cohort. One of the patients (H5) showed insertion of an extra A nucleotide in exon 10 of the Factor V gene resulting in frame shift mutation in this patient. The results of present study showed absence of FVL mutation in our population. However, there is a need to confirm the above findings on patients from different populations from different parts of the country. The insertion of an extra A in exon 10 in the patient needs to be ascertained to confirm that it is one of its kinds or is prevalent in the population. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. A new germline TP53 gene mutation in a family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockhorn-Dworniczak, B; Wolff, J; Poremba, C; Schäfer, K L; Ritter, J; Gullotta, F; Jürgens, H; Böcker, W

    1996-07-01

    This report describes an unusual clinical presentation of Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Family history revealed a mild aggregation of adult cancers in one generation, and an unusual clustering of brain tumours of early childhood in the following generation. In order to evaluate the genetic basis for cancer predisposition in this family, molecular genetic analysis for the occurrence of germline TP53 tumour suppressor gene mutations was performed on 12 siblings of two generations. Indirect mutation analysis was performed by the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique. Alterations were characterised by automated direct fluorescence sequencing analysis. Tumour material was also examined for p53 protein accumulation by immunohistochemistry. Initially, a TP53 gene germline missense mutation was detected in an 11-year-old kindred with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) following intensive treatment of a brain tumour. In peripheral blood and bone marrow samples of this proband, a reduction to hemizygosity occurred. During AML treatment, detection of LOH of 17p was used as a marker for clonality and treatment control. The mutation was found to be inherited from the proband's mother, who was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 48 years. Further, three siblings were carriers, and two are apparently healthy at the age of 21 and 23 years. Knowledge of germline mutations may allow accurate DNA-based carrier diagnosis which is of important clinical significance for treatment strategy and control. Furthermore, the occurrence of unaffected carriers in this family raises questions about appropriate methods of cancer surveillance and counselling for these people.

  6. EstimatingTP53Mutation Carrier Probability in Families with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome Using LFSPRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Gang; Bojadzieva, Jasmina; Ballinger, Mandy L; Li, Jialu; Blackford, Amanda L; Mai, Phuong L; Savage, Sharon A; Thomas, David M; Strong, Louise C; Wang, Wenyi

    2017-06-01

    Background: Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is associated with germline TP53 mutations and a very high lifetime cancer risk. Algorithms that assess a patient's risk of inherited cancer predisposition are often used in clinical counseling. The existing LFS criteria have limitations, suggesting the need for an advanced prediction tool to support clinical decision making for TP53 mutation testing and LFS management. Methods: Based on a Mendelian model, LFSPRO estimates TP53 mutation probability through the Elston-Stewart algorithm and consequently estimates future risk of cancer. With independent datasets of 1,353 tested individuals from 867 families, we evaluated the prediction performance of LFSPRO. Results: LFSPRO accurately predicted TP53 mutation carriers in a pediatric sarcoma cohort from MD Anderson Cancer Center in the United States, the observed to expected ratio (OE) = 1.35 (95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.80); area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.85 (0.75-0.93); a population-based sarcoma cohort from the International Sarcoma Kindred Study in Australia, OE = 1.62 (1.03-2.55); AUC = 0.67 (0.54-0.79); and the NCI LFS study cohort, OE = 1.28 (1.17-1.39); AUC = 0.82 (0.78-0.86). LFSPRO also showed higher sensitivity and specificity than the classic LFS and Chompret criteria. LFSPRO is freely available through the R packages LFSPRO and BayesMendel. Conclusions: LFSPRO shows good performance in predicting TP53 mutations in individuals and families in varied situations. Impact: LFSPRO is more broadly applicable than the current clinical criteria and may improve clinical management for individuals and families with LFS. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 837-44. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Kallmann syndrome: 14 novel mutations in KAL1 and FGFR1 (KAL2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuisson, Juliette; Pêcheux, Chistophe; Carel, Jean-Claude; Lacombe, Didier; Leheup, Bruno; Lapuzina, Pablo; Bouchard, Philippe; Legius, Eric; Matthijs, Gert; Wasniewska, Malgorzata; Delpech, Marc; Young, Jacques; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Dodé, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KAL) combines hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. Hypogonadism is due to Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) deficiency and anosmia is related to hypoplasia of the olfactory bulbs. Occasional symptoms include renal agenesis, bimanual synkinesia, cleft lip palate, dental agenesis. KAL is genetically heterogeneous and two genes have so far been identified, namely KAL1 (Xp22.3) and FGFR1/KAL2 (8p12), which underlie the X chromosome-linked form and an autosomal dominant form of the disease, respectively. We studied a cohort of 98 unrelated Caucasian KAL patients. We identified KAL1 mutations in 14 patients, of which 7 (c.3G>A (p.M1?), g.IVS1+1G>T, c.570_571insA (p.R191fsX14), c.784G>C (p.R262P), c.958G>T (p.E320X), c.1651_1654delinsAGCT (p.P551_E552delinsSX), c.1711T>A (p.W571R)) have not been previously reported. In addition, we found FGFR1 mutations in 7 patients, namely c.303G>A (p.V102I), C.385A>C (p.D129A), c.810G>A (p.V273M), c.1093_1094delAG (p.R365fsX41), c.1561G>A (p.A520T), c.1836_1837insT (p.Y613fsX42), c.2190C>G (p.Y730X), all of which were novel mutations. In this study, unilateral renal agenesis and bimanual synkinesia were exclusively found associated with KAL1mutations, cleft palate and dental agenesia with FGFR1mutations. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Novel germline mutations in FLCN gene identified in two Chinese patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Teng; Ning, Xianghui; He, Qun; Gong, Kan

    2017-01-09

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a hereditary renal cancer syndrome caused by mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene, is characterized by the presence of fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Few BHD syndrome cases have been reported in Asian countries, and cutaneous presentations are relatively rare in Asian patients. Asian BHD patients may be misdiagnosed due to their atypical manifestations. Here, we report two Chinese BHD patients with novel FLCN mutations (c.946-947delAG in exon 9 and c.770-772delCCT in exon 7). Both of them had RCC and spontaneous pneumothorax without fibrofolliculomas. In patients with RCC and pulmonary cysts but without cutaneous lesions, screening for mutations in the FLCN gene should be performed, especially for those with a family history of RCC or pulmonary cysts (pneumothorax).

  9. A de novo deletion mutation in SOX10 in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong; Zhu, Yaowu; Shen, Na; Peng, Jing; Wang, Chunyu; Liu, Haiyi; Lu, Yanjun

    2017-01-27

    Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) or Waardenburg-Shah syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with a prevalence of <1/1,000,000 and characterized by the association of congenital sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary abnormalities, and intestinal aganglionosis. There are three types of WS4 (WS4A-C) caused by mutations in endothelin receptor type B, endothelin 3, and SRY-box 10 (SOX10), respectively. This study investigated a genetic mutation in a Chinese family with one WS4 patient in order to improve genetic counselling. Genomic DNA was extracted, and mutation analysis of the three WS4 related genes was performed using Sanger sequencing. We detected a de novo heterozygous deletion mutation [c.1333delT (p.Ser445Glnfs*57)] in SOX10 in the patient; however, this mutation was absent in the unaffected parents and 40 ethnicity matched healthy controls. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis and three-dimensional modelling of the SOX10 protein confirmed that the c.1333delT heterozygous mutation was pathogenic, indicating that this mutation might constitute a candidate disease-causing mutation.

  10. [Type 1 polyglandular autoimmune syndrome associated with C322fsx372 mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncalés-Samanes, P; de Arriba Muñoz, A; Lou Francés, G M; Ferrer Lozano, M; Justa Roldán, M L; Labarta Aizpun, J I

    2015-01-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes are rare diseases based on autoimmune mechanisms in which endocrine and non-endocrine disorders coexist. In type 1 the characteristic manifestations are chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency. A case is presented of a patient with typical clinical sequence, along with other changes, and in whom a mutation in homozygosis, C322fsX372, was detected after performing a molecular analysis of autoimmunity regulator gene (AIRE). Inheritance is autosomal recessive, associated with mutations in the AIRE gene, which encodes a protein involved in autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. For diagnosis, At least two of the three major clinical manifestations are required for a diagnosis. However, only one of them is necessary in the study of relatives of affected patients. These syndromes must be diagnosed early, given their high morbidity and mortality. Every manifestation needs to be treated, in order to maintain the quality of life. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting the age of the mutation for Usher syndrome type I in the Acadian population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouri, N.; Risch, N.J.; Pelias, M.Z. [Louisiana State Univ., NO (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The locus for Usher syndrome type I (USH1C) in the Acadian population is in the p15.1-p14 region of chromosome 11. This recessive disease is characterized by sensorineural hearing impairment, vestibular dysfunction, and pigmentary retinopathy. Three separate loci have been localized for Usher syndrome type I. All Acadian, but no non-Acadian, families show linkage to the 11p locus, suggesting a founder effect in the Acadian population. Linkage and haplotype analyses of eight markers spanning 10 centiMorgans demonstrate that USH1C lies between D11S1397 and D11S1310. Based on analyses of Usher and CEPH families the most likely linkage map for the eight markers is: D11S569-(.02)-D11S861-(.01)-D11S419-(.01)-D11S1397-(.004)-D11S921-(.007)-D11S1310-(.01)-D11S899-(.04)-D11S928. Evidence of linkage disequilibrium with USH1C was found for all markers, indicating a recent origin of a unique mutation. Parental haplotypes were separated into those with the disease allele and those with the normal allele at the USH1C locus. Of the 54 chromosomes with the disease allele, 17 had an identical haplotype for the eight markers. All but one of the haplotypes on the remaining 37 chromosomes could be explained by a few recombination events, suggesting that a single mutation is responsible for nearly all cases of Usher syndrome type I in the Acadian population. The same alleles were found at D11S921 and D11S1310 on 50 of the 54 chromosomes with the disease allele and on only 5 of the 50 chromosomes with the normal allele. Analysis of recombination and linkage disequilibrium between USH1C and each of the markers suggests that the age of the mutation is approximately 15 generations, which corresponds with the time that the Acadians arrived in the Canadian territory of Acadia. The analysis indicates that this mutation was already established in the Acadians who made their way to Louisiana after 1755.

  12. Novel association of neurofibromatosis type 1-causing mutations in families with neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekvall, Sara; Sjörs, Kerstin; Jonzon, Anders; Vihinen, Mauno; Annerén, Göran; Bondeson, Marie-Louise

    2014-03-01

    Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome (NFNS) is a rare condition with clinical features of both neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Noonan syndrome (NS). All three syndromes belong to the RASopathies, which are caused by dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK pathway. The major gene involved in NFNS is NF1, but co-occurring NF1 and PTPN11 mutations in NFNS have been reported. Knowledge about possible involvement of additional RASopathy-associated genes in NFNS is, however, very limited. We present a comprehensive clinical and molecular analysis of eight affected individuals from three unrelated families displaying features of NF1 and NFNS. The genetic etiology of the clinical phenotypes was investigated by mutation analysis, including NF1, PTPN11, SOS1, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, RAF1, SHOC2, SPRED1, MAP2K1, MAP2K2, and CBL. All three families harbored a heterozygous NF1 variant, where the first family had a missense variant, c.5425C>T;p.R1809C, the second family a recurrent 4bp-deletion, c.6789_6792delTTAC;p.Y2264Tfs*6, and the third family a splice-site variant, c.2991-1G>A, resulting in skipping of exon 18 and an in-frame deletion of 41 amino acids. These NF1 variants have all previously been reported in NF1 patients. Surprisingly, both c.6789_6792delTTAC and c.2991-1G>A are frequently associated with NF1, but association to NFNS has, to our knowledge, not previously been reported. Our results support the notion that NFNS represents a variant of NF1, genetically distinct from NS, and is caused by mutations in NF1, some of which also cause classical NF1. Due to phenotypic overlap between NFNS and NS, we propose screening for NF1 mutations in NS patients, preferentially when café-au-lait spots are present. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Treacher Collins syndrome with craniosynostosis, choanal atresia, and esophageal regurgitation caused by a novel nonsense mutation in TCOF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Katsumi; Ariga, Tadashi; Fujioka, Hirotaka; Kawashima, Kunihiro; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Igawa, Hiroharu; Sakiyama, Yukio; Sugihara, Tsuneki

    2004-07-15

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is caused by mutations in TCOF1 of the nonsense, small deletion, and small insertion types, which most likely result in haploinsufficiency. We report a novel de novo nonsense mutation 2731C --> T, resulting in Arg911Stop, which truncates the protein. Our patient had the classic findings of TCS, but with documented craniosynostosis, choanal atresia, and esophageal regurgitation. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome Manifesting as Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A Novel Mutation of the Folliculin Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Soo; Choi, Hang Jun; Jang, Woori; Chae, Hyojin; Kim, Myungshin; Moon, Seok Whan

    2017-10-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is a rare disease with autosomal dominant inheritance that manifests through skin tumors, pulmonary cystic lesions, and renal tumors. A mutation of FLCN located on chromosome 17p11.2, which encodes a tumor-suppressor protein (folliculin), is responsible for the development of BHDS. We report the case of a patient presenting with spontaneous pneumothorax, in whom a familial genetic study revealed a novel nonsense mutation: p.(Arg379*) in FLCN .

  15. Relative frequency of GJB2 gene mutations in autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL patients in Lorestan population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mitra Sapahvand

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: Unexpectedly, in this research just 17 percent of cases are covered. In this study 510 insCGAA mutation was seen. This is a new mutation which is not reported in other studied populations in the world. Hence, this research shows that – at least in our studied population- the effect of other genes that could cause non-syndromic hearing loss is possible and should be studied

  16. Huntington's disease-like and ataxia syndromes: identification of a family with a de novo SCA17/TBP mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Sara; Petersen, Thor; Nørremølle, Anne

    2010-01-01

    with a Huntington's disease-like phenotype without the HD-gene mutation and 178 patients with genetically unclassified cerebellar ataxia for the mutation in TBP. A 33-year old woman presenting with an HD like phenotype with a de novo 54 CAG/CAA repeat expansion was identified. Her normal allele included 38 repeats......-like phenotypes and ataxia syndromes, also in isolated cases....

  17. Expanding the SHOC2 Mutation Associated Phenotype of Noonan Syndrome with Loose Anagen Hair: Structural Brain Anomalies and Myelofibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gripp, Karen W.; Zand, Dina J.; Demmer, Laurie; Anderson, Carol E.; Dobyns, William B.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Denenberg, Elizabeth; Jenny, Kim; Stabley, Deborah L.; Sol-Church, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a heterogenous rasopathy typically presenting with short stature, characteristic facial features, cardiac abnormalities including pulmonic valve stenosis, ASD and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cryptorchidism, ectodermal abnormalities and learning differences. The phenotype is variable, and limited genotype phenotype correlation exists with SOS1 mutations often associated with normal cognition and stature, RAF1 mutations entailing a high HCM risk, and certain PTPN11 mut...

  18. Loss-of-activity-mutation in the cardiac chloride-bicarbonate exchanger AE3 causes short QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Kasper; Dam, Vibeke S.; Kjaer-Sorensen, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    Patients with short QT syndrome (SQTS) may present with syncope, ventricular fibrillation or sudden cardiac death. Six SQTS susceptibility genes, encoding cation channels, explain ... unrelated families with SQTS. The mutation causes reduced surface expression of AE3 and reduced membrane bicarbonate transport. Slc4a3 knockdown in zebrafish causes increased cardiac pHi, short QTc, and reduced systolic duration, which is rescued by wildtype but not mutated SLC4A3. Mechanistic analyses...

  19. Intracardiac and intracerebral thrombosis associated with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase A1298C homozygote mutation in paediatric steroidresistant nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahime Renda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Thromboembolic complications are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in cases of nephrotic syndrome. Hereditary thrombophilias are also known to increase vascular thrombosis. We present a case that has been followed up for steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (NS in which intracardiac and intracranial thrombosis subsequently developed. The patient was found to have a homozygote mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene as an additional risk factor for recurrent thrombosis. MTHFR mutation with NS was considered to have an important effect on the development of life-threatening thrombosis.

  20. Flecainide provocation reveals concealed brugada syndrome in a long QT syndrome family with a novel L1786Q mutation in SCN5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, Jørgen K.; Yuan, Lei; Hedley, Paula L

    2014-01-01

    precordial leads of the electrocardiogram. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a Danish family suffering from long QT syndrome, a novel missense mutation in SCN5A, changing a leucine residue into a glutamine residue at position 1786 (L1786Q), was found to be present in heterozygous form co-segregating with prolonged QT......: The L1786Q mutation is associated with a combined LQT3 and concealed BrS phenotype explained by gating characteristics of the mutated ion channel protein. Hence, sodium channel blockade should be considered in clinical evaluation of apparent LQT3 patients....

  1. Persistent Unresolved Inflammation in the Mecp2-308 Female Mutated Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Cortelazzo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder usually caused by mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2. Several Mecp2 mutant mouse lines have been developed recapitulating part of the clinical features. In particular, Mecp2-308 female heterozygous mice, bearing a truncating mutation, are a validated model of the disease. While recent data suggest a role for inflammation in RTT, little information on the inflammatory status in murine models of the disease is available. Here, we investigated the inflammatory status by proteomic 2-DE/MALDI-ToF/ToF analyses in symptomatic Mecp2-308 female mice. Ten differentially expressed proteins were evidenced in the Mecp2-308 mutated plasma proteome. In particular, 5 positive acute-phase response (APR proteins increased (i.e., kininogen-1, alpha-fetoprotein, mannose-binding protein C, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and alpha-2-macroglobulin, and 3 negative APR reactants were decreased (i.e., serotransferrin, albumin, and apolipoprotein A1. CD5 antigen-like and vitamin D-binding protein, two proteins strictly related to inflammation, were also changed. These results indicate for the first time a persistent unresolved inflammation of unknown origin in the Mecp2-308 mouse model.

  2. Dental and Craniofacial Anomalies Associated with Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome with PITX2 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Dressler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS (OMIM Nr.: 180500 is a rare autosomal dominant disorder (1  :  200000 with genetic and morphologic variability. Glaucoma is associated in 50% of the patients. Craniofacial and dental anomalies are frequently reported with ARS. The present study was designed as a multidisciplinary analysis of orthodontic, ophthalmologic, and genotypical features. A three-generation pedigree was ascertained through a family with ARS. Clinically, radiographic and genetic analyses were performed. Despite an identical genotype in all patients, the phenotype varies in expressivity of craniofacial and dental morphology. Screening for PITX2 and FOXC1 mutations by direct DNA-sequencing revealed a P64L missense mutation in PITX2 in all family members, supporting earlier reports that PITX2 is an essential factor in morphogenesis of teeth and craniofacial skeleton. Despite the fact that the family members had identical mutations, morphologic differences were evident. The concomitant occurrence of rare dental and craniofacial anomalies may be early diagnostic indications of ARS. Early detection of ARS and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP helps to prevent visual field loss.

  3. Identification of fibrillin 1 gene mutations in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) without Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital heart disease with frequent involvement in thoracic aortic dilatation, aneurysm and dissection. Although BAV and Marfan syndrome (MFS) share some clinical features, and some MFS patients with BAV display mutations in FBN1, the gene encoding fibrillin-1, the genetic background of isolated BAV is poorly defined. Methods Ten consecutive BAV patients [8 men, age range 24–42 years] without MFS were clinically characterized. BAV phenotype and function, together with evaluation of aortic morphology, were comprehensively assessed by Doppler echocardiography. Direct sequencing of each FBN1 exon with flanking intron sequences was performed on eight patients. Results We detected three FBN1 mutations in two patients (aged 24 and 25 years) displaying aortic root aneurysm ≥50 mm and moderate aortic regurgitation. In particular, one patient had two mutations (p.Arg2726Trp and p.Arg636Gly) one of which has been previously associated with variable Marfanoid phenotypes. The other patient showed a pArg529Gln substitution reported to be associated with an incomplete MFS phenotype. Conclusions The present findings enlarge the clinical spectrum of isolated BAV to include patients with BAV without MFS who have involvement of FBN1 gene. These results underscore the importance of accurate phenotyping of BAV aortopathy and of clinical characterization of BAV patients, including investigation of systemic connective tissue manifestations and genetic testing. PMID:24564502

  4. Identification of a novel NHS mutation in a Chinese family with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aijun; Li, Bingzhen; Wu, Lemeng; Yang, Liping; Chen, Ningning; Ma, Zhizhong

    2015-04-01

    To identiy the disease causing mutation in a Chinese family presenting with early-onset cataract and dental anomalies. A specific Hereditary Eye Disease Enrichment Panel (HEDEP) (personalized customization by MyGenostics, Baltimore, MD) based on targeted exome capture technology was used to collect the protein coding regions of 30 early-onset cataract associated genes, and high throughput sequencing was done with Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. The identified variant was confirmed with Sanger sequencing. A novel deletion in exon 4 (c.852delG) of NHS gene was identified; the identified 1 bp deletion altered the reading frame and was predicted to result in a premature stop codon after the addition of twelve novel amino acid (p.S285PfsX13). This mutation co-segregated in affected males and obligate female carriers, but was absent in 100 matched controls. Our findings broaden the spectrum of NHS mutations causing Nance-Horan syndrome and phenotypic spectrum of the disease in Chinese patients.

  5. Mutations in the Treacher Collins syndrome gene lead to mislocalization of the nucleolar protein treacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, K L; Dixon, J; Dixon, M J

    1998-10-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. The TCS gene ( TCOF1 ), which is localized to chromosome 5q32-q33.1, recently has been identified by positional cloning. Analysis of TCOF1 revealed that the majority of TCS mutations result in the creation of a premature termination codon. The function of the predicted protein, treacle, is unknown, although indirect evidence from database analyses suggests that it may function as a shuttling nucleolar phosphoprotein. In the current study, we provide the first direct evidence that treacle is a nucleolar protein. An antibody generated against treacle shows that it localizes to the nucleolus. Fusion proteins tagged to a green fluorescent protein reporter were shown to localize to different compartments of the cell when putative nuclear localization signals were deleted. Parallel experiments using conserved regions of the murine homologue of TCOF1 confirmed these results. Site-directed mutagenesis has been used to recreate mutations observed in individuals with TCS. The resulting truncated proteins are mislocalized within the cell, which further supports the hypothesis that an integral part of treacle's function involves shuttling between the nucleolus and the cytoplasm. TCS is, therefore, the first Mendelian disorder resulting from mutations which lead to aberrant expression of a nucleolar protein.

  6. Novel Heterogenous CHS1 Mutations Identified in Five Japanese Patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuminori Tanabe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, recurrent bacterial infections and progressive neurological dysfunction. We demonstrate novel heterogenous mutations of CHS1, the responsive gene of CHS, identified in five Japanese patients with CHS. Patients 1, 2, and 3 were siblings, and they had albinism of the skin and hair. They all had a heterogenous two-base deletion (c.5541-5542 del AA, p.Q1847fsX1850 in exon 18. Patient 4 had a heterogenous single-base insertion (c.3944-3945 ins C, p.T1315fsX1331 in exon 10. The patient exhibited severe early-onset phenotype and suffered from hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Patient 5 had two heterogenous nonsense mutations; c.7982C>G, p.S2661X in exon 30 and c.8281A>T, p.R2761X in exon 31. The patient suffered from infections in childhood and had visual disturbance and albinism of the skin and hair. The CHS1 mutations described here have not been reported previously.

  7. Novel Heterogenous CHS1 Mutations Identified in Five Japanese Patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Fuminori; Kasai, Hirotake; Morimoto, Michiko; Oh, Shigeharu; Takada, Hidetoshi; Hara, Toshiro; Ito, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, recurrent bacterial infections and progressive neurological dysfunction. We demonstrate novel heterogenous mutations of CHS1, the responsive gene of CHS, identified in five Japanese patients with CHS. Patients 1, 2, and 3 were siblings, and they had albinism of the skin and hair. They all had a heterogenous two-base deletion (c.5541-5542 del AA, p.Q1847fsX1850) in exon 18. Patient 4 had a heterogenous single-base insertion (c.3944-3945 ins C, p.T1315fsX1331) in exon 10. The patient exhibited severe early-onset phenotype and suffered from hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Patient 5 had two heterogenous nonsense mutations; c.7982C>G, p.S2661X in exon 30 and c.8281A>T, p.R2761X in exon 31. The patient suffered from infections in childhood and had visual disturbance and albinism of the skin and hair. The CHS1 mutations described here have not been reported previously. PMID:21209802

  8. Germline mutation in NLRP2 (NALP2 in a familial imprinting disorder (Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome.

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    Esther Meyer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS is a fetal overgrowth and human imprinting disorder resulting from the deregulation of a number of genes, including IGF2 and CDKN1C, in the imprinted gene cluster on chromosome 11p15.5. Most cases are sporadic and result from epimutations at either of the two 11p15.5 imprinting centres (IC1 and IC2. However, rare familial cases may be associated with germline 11p15.5 deletions causing abnormal imprinting in cis. We report a family with BWS and an IC2 epimutation in which affected siblings had inherited different parental 11p15.5 alleles excluding an in cis mechanism. Using a positional-candidate gene approach, we found that the mother was homozygous for a frameshift mutation in exon 6 of NLRP2. While germline mutations in NLRP7 have previously been associated with familial hydatidiform mole, this is the first description of NLRP2 mutation in human disease and the first report of a trans mechanism for disordered imprinting in BWS. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that NLRP2 has a previously unrecognised role in establishing or maintaining genomic imprinting in humans.

  9. Postoperative Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Associated with Complement C3 Mutation

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    Eiji Matsukuma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS can be distinguished from typical or Shiga-like toxin-induced HUS. The clinical outcome is unfavorable; up to 50% of affected patients progress to end-stage renal failure and 25% die during the acute phase. Multiple conditions have been associated with aHUS, including infections, drugs, autoimmune conditions, transplantation, pregnancy, and metabolic conditions. aHUS in the nontransplant postsurgical period, however, is rare. An 8-month-old boy underwent surgical repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Neurological disturbances, acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia developed 25 days later, and aHUS was diagnosed. Further evaluation revealed that his complement factor H (CFH level was normal and that anti-FH antibodies were not detected in his plasma. Sequencing of his CFH, complement factor I, membrane cofactor protein, complement factor B, and thrombomodulin genes was normal. His ADAMTS-13 (a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with thrombospondin-1 repeats 13 activity was also normal. However, he had a potentially causative mutation (R425C in complement component C3. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that his father and aunt also had this mutation; however, they had no symptoms of aHUS. We herein report a case of aHUS that developed after cardiovascular surgery and was caused by a complement C3 mutation.

  10. Clinical Characteristics of Wolfram Syndrome in Chinese Population and a Novel Frameshift Mutation in WFS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; Li, Qian; Tong, An-Li; Mao, Jiang-Feng; Yu, Miao; Yuan, Tao; Chai, Xiao-Feng; Gu, Feng

    2018-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare, degenerative, and hereditary disorder characterized by ear diabetes mellitus (DM) and optic atrophy (OA). We aim to characterize clinical features in Chinese patients who had been poorly studied until now. We performed a retrospective review of patients with WS seen in the Peking Union Medical College Hospital from 2002 to 2017. Data including demographic data, clinical presentations, examination results, family history, and genetic analysis were described. Six patients with WS were identified, meeting the diagnostic criteria of the coincidence of DM and OA before 15 years old or the existence of two WFS1 mutations. All were male, with the median age of 14.5 years (range 10-19 years). Blood glucose impairment, OA, and diabetes insipidus were present in all (100%), hearing impairment in four (66.7%), urological abnormalities in four (66.7%), neurological abnormalities in one (16.7%), and endocrine disorder in one (16.7%). Rare presentation includes cataract, glaucoma, and spina bifida occulta. Diabetes was insulin-dependent and not ketosis onset, with antibody to glutamic acid decarboxylase and islet cell negative. Genetic analysis revealed mutations in WFS1 in three patients. A novel frameshift mutation (p.Asp151Glufs*93) was identified in exon 4 of WFS1 . Our series of WS patients indicated that WS is a degenerative disease with a wide and variable spectrum, characterized by ear non-autoimmune DM and bilateral OA. Genetic analysis is recommended when suspected of WS.

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD mutations and haemoglobinuria syndrome in the Vietnamese population

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    Day Nick

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Vietnam the blackwater fever syndrome (BWF has been associated with malaria infection, quinine ingestion and G6PD deficiency. The G6PD variants within the Vietnamese Kinh contributing to the disease risk in this population, and more generally to haemoglobinuria, are currently unknown. Method Eighty-two haemoglobinuria patients and 524 healthy controls were screened for G6PD deficiency using either the methylene blue reduction test, the G-6-PDH kit or the micro-methaemoglobin reduction test. The G6PD gene variants were screened using SSCP combined with DNA sequencing in 82 patients with haemoglobinuria, and in 59 healthy controls found to be G6PD deficient. Results This study confirmed that G6PD deficiency is strongly associated with haemoglobinuria (OR = 15, 95% CI [7.7 to 28.9], P G6PD variants were identified in the Vietnamese population, of which two are novel (Vietnam1 [Glu3Lys] and Vietnam2 [Phe66Cys]. G6PD Viangchan [Val291Met], common throughout south-east Asia, accounted for 77% of the variants detected and was significantly associated with haemoglobinuria within G6PD-deficient ethnic Kinh Vietnamese (OR = 5.8 95% CI [114-55.4], P = 0.022. Conclusion The primary frequency of several G6PD mutations, including novel mutations, in the Vietnamese Kinh population are reported and the contribution of G6PD mutations to the development of haemoglobinuria are investigated.

  12. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome.

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    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Méchin, Marie-Claire; Wolf, Sabrina; Romano, Maria Teresa; Valentin, Frederic; Wiegmann, Henning; Huchenq, Anne; Kandil, Rima; Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Kilic, Arzu; George, Susannah; Ralser, Damian J; Bergner, Stefan; Ferguson, David J P; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Wehner, Maria; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Swan, Daniel; Houniet, Darren; Büchner, Aline; Weibel, Lisa; Wagner, Nicola; Grimalt, Ramon; Bygum, Anette; Serre, Guy; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Sprecher, Eli; Schoch, Susanne; Oji, Vinzenz; Hamm, Henning; Farrant, Paul; Simon, Michel; Betz, Regina C

    2016-12-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant to being combed flat. Until now, both simplex and familial UHS-affected case subjects with autosomal-dominant as well as -recessive inheritance have been reported. However, none of these case subjects were linked to a molecular genetic cause. Here, we report the identification of UHS-causative mutations located in the three genes PADI3 (peptidylarginine deiminase 3), TGM3 (transglutaminase 3), and TCHH (trichohyalin) in a total of 11 children. All of these individuals carry homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in one of these three genes, indicating an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern in the majority of UHS case subjects. The two enzymes PADI3 and TGM3, responsible for posttranslational protein modifications, and their target structural protein TCHH are all involved in hair shaft formation. Elucidation of the molecular outcomes of the disease-causing mutations by cell culture experiments and tridimensional protein models demonstrated clear differences in the structural organization and activity of mutant and wild-type proteins. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed morphological alterations in hair coat of Padi3 knockout mice. All together, these findings elucidate the molecular genetic causes of UHS and shed light on its pathophysiology and hair physiology in general. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. FAM20A mutations can cause enamel-renal syndrome (ERS.

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    Shih-Kai Wang

    Full Text Available Enamel-renal syndrome (ERS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe enamel hypoplasia, failed tooth eruption, intrapulpal calcifications, enlarged gingiva, and nephrocalcinosis. Recently, mutations in FAM20A were reported to cause amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival fibromatosis syndrome (AIGFS, which closely resembles ERS except for the renal calcifications. We characterized three families with AIGFS and identified, in each case, recessive FAM20A mutations: family 1 (c.992G>A; g.63853G>A; p.Gly331Asp, family 2 (c.720-2A>G; g.62232A>G; p.Gln241_Arg271del, and family 3 (c.406C>T; g.50213C>T; p.Arg136* and c.1432C>T; g.68284C>T; p.Arg478*. Significantly, a kidney ultrasound of the family 2 proband revealed nephrocalcinosis, revising the diagnosis from AIGFS to ERS. By characterizing teeth extracted from the family 3 proband, we demonstrated that FAM20A(-/- molars lacked true enamel, showed extensive crown and root resorption, hypercementosis, and partial replacement of resorbed mineral with bone or coalesced mineral spheres. Supported by the observation of severe ectopic calcifications in the kidneys of Fam20a null mice, we conclude that FAM20A, which has a kinase homology domain and localizes to the Golgi, is a putative Golgi kinase that plays a significant role in the regulation of biomineralization processes, and that mutations in FAM20A cause both AIGFS and ERS.

  14. FAM20A Mutations Can Cause Enamel-Renal Syndrome (ERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Aref, Parissa; Hu, Yuanyuan; Milkovich, Rachel N.; Simmer, James P.; El-Khateeb, Mohammad; Daggag, Hinda; Baqain, Zaid H.; Hu, Jan C-C.

    2013-01-01

    Enamel-renal syndrome (ERS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe enamel hypoplasia, failed tooth eruption, intrapulpal calcifications, enlarged gingiva, and nephrocalcinosis. Recently, mutations in FAM20A were reported to cause amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival fibromatosis syndrome (AIGFS), which closely resembles ERS except for the renal calcifications. We characterized three families with AIGFS and identified, in each case, recessive FAM20A mutations: family 1 (c.992G>A; g.63853G>A; p.Gly331Asp), family 2 (c.720-2A>G; g.62232A>G; p.Gln241_Arg271del), and family 3 (c.406C>T; g.50213C>T; p.Arg136* and c.1432C>T; g.68284C>T; p.Arg478*). Significantly, a kidney ultrasound of the family 2 proband revealed nephrocalcinosis, revising the diagnosis from AIGFS to ERS. By characterizing teeth extracted from the family 3 proband, we demonstrated that FAM20A −/− molars lacked true enamel, showed extensive crown and root resorption, hypercementosis, and partial replacement of resorbed mineral with bone or coalesced mineral spheres. Supported by the observation of severe ectopic calcifications in the kidneys of Fam20a null mice, we conclude that FAM20A, which has a kinase homology domain and localizes to the Golgi, is a putative Golgi kinase that plays a significant role in the regulation of biomineralization processes, and that mutations in FAM20A cause both AIGFS and ERS. PMID:23468644

  15. Chronic constipation recognized as a sign of a SOX10 mutation in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Yukiko; Namba, Kazunori; Nakano, Atsuko; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2014-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is characterized by hearing loss, pigmentation abnormalities, dysmorphologic features, and neurological phenotypes. Waardenburg syndrome consists of four distinct subtypes, and SOX10 mutations have been identified in type II and type IV. Type IV differs from type II owing to the presence of Hirschsprung disease. We identified a de novo nonsense mutation in SOX10 (p.G39X) in a female pediatric patient with Waardenburg syndrome with heterochromia iridis, profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, inner ear malformations, and overall hypopigmentation of the hair without dystopia canthorum. This patient has experienced chronic constipation since she was a neonate, but anorectal manometry showed a normal anorectal reflex. Chronic constipation in this patient was likely to be a consequence of a mild intestinal disorder owing to the SOX10 mutation, and this patient was considered to have a clinical phenotype intermediate between type II and type IV of the syndrome. Chronic constipation may be recognized as indicative of a SOX10 mutation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome and PCWH associated with SOX10 mutations: a case report and review of the literature.

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    Verheij, Johanna B G M; Sival, Deborah A; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Vos, Yvonne J; Meiners, Linda C; Brouwer, Oebele F; van Essen, Anthonie J

    2006-01-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome is a rare congenital disorder with variable clinical expression, characterised by aganglionosis of the rectosigmoïd (Hirschsprung disease), and abnormal melanocyte migration, resulting in pigmentary abnormalities and sensorineural deafness (Waardenburg syndrome). Mutations in the EDN, EDNRB and SOX10 genes can be found in patients with this syndrome. SOX10 mutations are specifically associated with a more severe phenotype called PCWH: peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease. Neuronal expression of SOX10 occurs in neural crest cells during early embryonic development and in glial cells of the peripheral and central nervous systems during late embryonic development and in adults. We present a 4-year-old girl with the PCWH phenotype associated with a de novo nonsense mutation (S384X) in SOX10. Main clinical features were mental retardation, peripheral neuropathy, deafness, Hirschsprung disease, distal arthrogryposis, white hairlock, and growth retardation. She presented with hypotonia, developmental delay, reduced peripheral nerve conduction velocities, and radiologically assessed central hypomyelination. Subsequently, the formation of abnormal myelin within the central and peripheral nervous system was functionally and radiologically assessed. Children presenting with features of Waardenburg syndrome and neurological dysfunction should be tested for mutations in the SOX10 gene to enable diagnosis and counselling.

  17. Tietz/Waardenburg type 2A syndrome associated with posterior microphthalmos in two unrelated patients with novel MITF gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-González, Vianney; Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Guzmán-Sánchez, Martín; Giordano-Herrera, Verónica; Guadarrama-Vallejo, Dalia; Ruíz-Quintero, Narlly; Villanueva-Mendoza, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    Tietz syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome type 2A are allelic conditions caused by MITF mutations. Tietz syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by congenital deafness and generalized skin, hair, and eye hypopigmentation, while Waardenburg syndrome type 2A typically includes variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss and patches of de-pigmented skin, hair, and irides. In this paper, we report two unrelated families with MITF mutations. The first family showed an autosomal dominant pattern and variable expressivity. The second patient was isolated. MITF gene analysis in the first family demonstrated a c.648A>C heterozygous mutation in exon 8 c.648A>C; p. (R216S), while in the isolated patient, an apparently de novo heterozygous c.1183_1184insG truncating mutation was demonstrated in exon 10. All patients except one had bilateral reduced ocular anteroposterior axial length and a high hyperopic refractive error corresponding to posterior microphthalmos, features that have not been described as part of the disease. Our results suggest that posterior microphthalmos might be part of the clinical characteristics of Tietz/Waardenburg syndrome type 2A and expand both the clinical and molecular spectrum of the disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Autosomal recessive POLR1D mutation with decrease of TCOF1 mRNA is responsible for Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Elise; Collet, Corinne; Genevieve, David; Vincent, Marie; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Sanchez, Elodie; Bolender, Chantal; Eliot, Marie-Madeleine; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Passos-Bueno, Maria-Rita; Wieczorek, Dagmar; van Maldergem, Lionel; Doray, Bérénice

    2014-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a mandibulofacial dysostosis caused by mutations in genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and synthesis. TCOF1 mutations are observed in ~80% of the patients and are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Recently, two other genes have been reported in TCOF1, POLR1C, and POLR1D in two unrelated consanguineous families. The four affected children shared the same homozygous mutation in POLR1D (c.163C>G, p.Leu55Val). This mutation is localized in a region encoding the dimerization domain of the RNA polymerase. It is supposed that this mutation impairs RNA polymerase, resulting in a lower amount of mature dimeric ribosomes. A functional analysis of the transcripts of TCOF1 by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed in the first family, demonstrating a 50% reduction in the index case, compatible with this hypothesis. This is the first report of POLR1D mutation being responsible for an autosomal recessive inherited Treacher Collins syndrome. These results reinforce the concept of genetic heterogeneity of Treacher Collins syndrome and underline the importance of combining clinical expertise and familial molecular analyses for appropriate genetic counseling.

  19. Screening for hotspot mutations in PI3K, JAK2, FLT3 and NPM1 in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

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    João Agostinho Machado-Neto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Myelodysplastic syndromes encompass a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, refractory cytopenia and a tendency to progress toward acute myeloid leukemia. The accumulation of genetic alterations is closely associated with the progression of myelodysplastic syndromes toward acute myeloid leukemia. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the presence of mutations in the points most frequent for mutations (hotspot mutations in phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2, FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3 and nucleophosmin (NPM1, which are involved in leukemia and other cancers, in a population of Brazilian MDS patients. METHODS: Fifty-one myelodysplastic syndromes patients were included in the study. According to French-American-British classification, the patients were distributed as follows: 31 with refractory anemia, 8 with refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, 7 with refractory anemia with excess blasts, 3 with refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation and 2 with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Bone marrow samples were obtained and screened for the presence of hotspot mutations using analysis based on amplification with the polymerase chain reaction, sequencing, fragment size polymorphisms or restriction enzyme digestion. All patients were screened for mutations at the time of diagnosis, and 5 patients were also screened at the time of disease progression. RESULTS: In the genes studied, no mutations were detected in the patients at the time of diagnosis. One patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia was heterozygous for a Janus kinase 2 mutation after disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that hotspot mutations in the PI3K, JAK2, FLT3 and NPM1 genes are not common in MDS patients; nevertheless, JAK2 mutations may be present in myelodysplasia during disease progression.

  20. Nonsense mutation in the glycoprotein Ibα coding sequence associated with Bernard-Soulier syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.; Russell, S.R.; Vicente, V.; Scharf, R.E.; Tomer, A.; McMillian, R.; Ruggeri, Z.M.

    1990-01-01

    Three distinct gene products, the α and β chains of glycoprotein (GP) Ib and GP IX, constitute the platelet membrane GP Ib-IX complex, a receptor for von Willebrand factor and thrombin involved in platelet adhesion and aggregation. Defective function of the GP Ib-IX complex is the hallmark of a rare congenital bleeding disorder of still undefined pathogenesis, the Bernard-Soulier syndrome. The authors have analyzed the molecular basis of the disease in one patient in whom immunoblotting of solubilized platelets demonstrated absence of normal GP Ibα but presence of a smaller immunoreactive species. The truncated polypeptide was also present, along with normal protein, in platelets from the patient's mother and two of his four children. Genetic characterization identified a nucleotide transition changing the Trp-343 codon (TGG) to a nonsense codon (TGA). Such a mutation explains the origin of the smaller GP Ibα, which by lacking half of the sequence on the carboxyl-terminal side, including the transmembrane domain, cannot be properly inserted in the platelet membrane. Both normal and mutant codons were found in the patient, suggesting that he is a compound heterozygote with a still unidentified defect in the other GP Ibα allele. Nonsense mutation and truncated GP Ibα polypeptide were found to cosegregate in four individuals through three generations and were associated with either Bernard-Soulier syndrome or carrier state phenotype. The molecular abnormality demonstrated in this family provides evidence that defective synthesis of GP Ibα alters the membrane expression of the GP Ib-IX complex and may be responsible for Bernard-Soulier syndrome

  1. Novel MBTPS2 missense mutation in the N-terminus transmembrane domain in a patient with ichthyosis follicularis, alopecia, and photophobia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kosuke; Wilkens, Alisha; Treat, James R; Pride, Howard B; Krantz, Ian D

    2013-01-01

    Ichthyosis follicularis, alopecia, and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome is an X-linked dominant condition characterized by the triad of ichthyosis follicularis, alopecia, and photophobia caused by mutations in the MBTPS2 gene. Herein we describe a proband with IFAP syndrome with mild cutaneous manifestations and a novel MBTPS2 mutation in the N-terminal transmembrane domain. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Molecular and clinical analyses of Greig cephalopolysyndactyly and Pallister-Hall syndromes: Robust phenotype prediction from the type and position of GLI3 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnston, Jennifer J.; Olivos-Glander, Isabelle; Killoran, Christina; Elson, Emma; Turner, Joyce T.; Peters, Kathryn F.; Abbott, Margaret H.; Aughton, David J.; Aylsworth, Arthur S.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Booth, Carol; Curry, Cynthia J.; David, Albert; Dinulos, Mary Beth; Flannery, David B.; Fox, Michelle A.; Graham, John M.; Grange, Dorothy K.; Guttmacher, Alan E.; Hannibal, Mark C.; Henn, Wolfram; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Holmes, Lewis B.; Hoyme, H. Eugene; Leppig, Kathleen A.; Lin, Angela E.; Macleod, Patrick; Manchester, David K.; Marcelis, Carlo; Mazzanti, Laura; McCann, Emma; McDonald, Marie T.; Mendelsohn, Nancy J.; Moeschler, John B.; Moghaddam, Billur; Neri, Giovanni; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Pagon, Roberta A.; Phillips, John A.; Sadler, Laurie S.; Stoler, Joan M.; Tilstra, David; Walsh Vockley, Catherine M.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Zadeh, Touran M.; Brueton, Louise; Black, Graeme Charles M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the GLI3 zinc-finger transcription factor gene cause Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) and Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS), which are variable but distinct clinical entities. We hypothesized that GLI3 mutations that predict a truncated functional repressor protein cause PHS and

  3. Genotype-Phenotype Correlation of Coffin-Siris Syndrome Caused by Mutations in SMARCB1, SMARCA4, SMARCE1, and ARID1A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosho, Tomoki; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Imai, Yoko; Ohashi, Hirofumi; van Eerde, Albertien M.; Chrzanowska, Krystyna; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kingston, Helen; Mari, Francesca; Aggarwal, Shagun; Mowat, David; Niikawa, Norio; Hiraki, Yoko; Matsumoto, Naoya; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Josifova, Dragana; Dean, John; Smigiel, Robert; Sakazume, Satoru; Silengo, Margherita; Tinschert, Sigrid; Kawame, Hiroshi; Yano, Shoji; Yamagata, Takanori; van Bon, Bregje W. M.; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Bigoni, Stefania; Alanay, Yasemin; Miyake, Noriko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Santen, Gijs W. E.; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wollnik, Bernd; Hennekam, Raul C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is a rare congenital malformation syndrome, recently found to be caused by mutations in several genes encoding components of the BAF complex. To date, 109 patients have been reported with their mutations: SMARCB1 (12%), SMARCA4 (11%), SMARCE1 (2%), ARID1A (7%), ARID1B

  4. Genotype-phenotype correlation of Coffin-Siris syndrome caused by mutations in SMARCB1, SMARCA4, SMARCE1, and ARID1A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosho, T.; Okamoto, N.; Bon, B.W. van; Vulto-van Silfhout, A.T.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is a rare congenital malformation syndrome, recently found to be caused by mutations in several genes encoding components of the BAF complex. To date, 109 patients have been reported with their mutations: SMARCB1 (12%), SMARCA4 (11%), SMARCE1 (2%), ARID1A (7%), ARID1B

  5. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor deficiency caused by mutations in PIGW is associated with West syndrome and hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiyonobu, Tomohiro; Inoue, Norimitsu; Morimoto, Masafumi; Kinoshita, Taroh; Murakami, Yoshiko

    2014-03-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) is a glycolipid that anchors 150 or more kinds of proteins to the human cell surface. There are at least 26 genes involved in the biosynthesis and remodelling of GPI anchored proteins (GPI-APs). Recently, inherited GPI deficiencies (IGDs) were reported which cause intellectual disability often accompanied by epilepsy, coarse facial features and multiple anomalies that vary in severity depending upon the degree of defect and/or step in the pathway of affected gene. A patient born to non-consanguineous parents developed intractable seizures with typical hypsarrhythmic pattern in electroencephalography, and was diagnosed as having West syndrome. Because the patient showed severe developmental delay with dysmorphic facial features and hyperphosphatasia, characteristics often seen in IGDs, the patient was tested for GPI deficiency. The patient had decreased surface expression of GPI-APs on blood granulocytes and was identified to be compound heterozygous for NM_178517:c.211A>C and c.499A>G mutations in PIGW by targeted sequencing. Here we describe the first patient with deficiency of PIGW, which is involved in the addition of the acyl-chain to inositol in an early step of GPI biosynthesis. Therefore, IGD should be considered in West syndrome and flow cytometric analysis of blood cells is effective in screening IGD.

  6. Long QT syndrome and left ventricular noncompaction in 4 family members across 2 generations with KCNQ1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbanda, Mira; Hunter, Amanda; Tennant, Stephen; Moore, David; Curtis, Stephanie; Hancox, Jules C; Murday, Victoria

    2017-05-01

    The association of long QT syndrome and left ventricular noncompaction is uncommon, with only a handful of previous reports, and only one reported case in association with a mutation in KCNQ1. Here we present genetic and phenotypic data for 4 family members across 2 generations who all have evidence of prolonged QT interval and left ventricular noncompaction in association with a pathogenic mutation in KCNQ1, and discuss the potential mechanisms of this association. In conclusion, we suggest that it may be helpful to consider looking for mutations in KCNQ1 in similar patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Audiometric characteristics of a dutch family with a new mutation in GATA3 causing HDR syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beelen, E; Leijendeckers, J M; Admiraal, R J C; Huygen, P L M; Hoefsloot, L H; Pennings, R J E; Snik, A F M; Kunst, H P M

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a Dutch family with a new mutation (c523_528dup) in GATA3 causing HDR syndrome. HDR syndrome is characterised by hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal defects. In this study, we describe the audiometric characteristics of 5 patients from this family. Their hearing impairment was congenital, bilateral and symmetric. Audiograms showed mild-to-moderate hearing impairment with a flat audiogram configuration. Higher frequencies tended to be affected more strongly. Cross-sectional analyses showed no progression, and a mean audiogram was established. Psychophysical measurements in 3 HDR patients - including speech reception in noise, loudness scaling, gap detection and difference limen for frequency - were obtained to assess hearing function in greater detail. Overall, the results of the psychophysical measurements indicated characteristics of outer hair cell loss. CT scanning showed no anomalies in 3 of the HDR patients. Although 2 patients displayed vestibular symptoms, no anomalies in the vestibular system were found by vestibulo-ocular examination. Our results are in agreement with the theory that outer hair cell malfunctioning can play a major role in HDR syndrome.

  8. Introducing Pitt-Hopkins syndrome-associated mutations of TCF4 to Drosophila daughterless

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Tamberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS is caused by haploinsufficiency of Transcription factor 4 (TCF4, one of the three human class I basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors called E-proteins. Drosophila has a single E-protein, Daughterless (Da, homologous to all three mammalian counterparts. Here we show that human TCF4 can rescue Da deficiency during fruit fly nervous system development. Overexpression of Da or TCF4 specifically in adult flies significantly decreases their survival rates, indicating that these factors are crucial even after development has been completed. We generated da transgenic fruit fly strains with corresponding missense mutations R578H, R580W, R582P and A614V found in TCF4 of PTHS patients and studied the impact of these mutations in vivo. Overexpression of wild type Da as well as human TCF4 in progenitor tissues induced ectopic sensory bristles and the rough eye phenotype. By contrast, overexpression of DaR580W and DaR582P that disrupt DNA binding reduced the number of bristles and induced the rough eye phenotype with partial lack of pigmentation, indicating that these act dominant negatively. Compared to the wild type, DaR578H and DaA614V were less potent in induction of ectopic bristles and the rough eye phenotype, respectively, suggesting that these are hypomorphic. All studied PTHS-associated mutations that we introduced into Da led to similar effects in vivo as the same mutations in TCF4 in vitro. Consequently, our Drosophila models of PTHS are applicable for further studies aiming to unravel the molecular mechanisms of this disorder.

  9. A Novel Homozygous Mutation in FOXC1 Causes Axenfeld Rieger Syndrome with Congenital Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Micheal

    Full Text Available Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD disorders are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous phenotypes in which frequently cornea, iris, and lens are affected. This study aimed to identify novel mutations in PAX6, PITX2 and FOXC1 in families with anterior segment dysgenesis disorders.We studied 14 Pakistani and one Mexican family with Axenfeld Rieger syndrome (ARS; n = 10 or aniridia (n = 5. All affected and unaffected family members underwent full ophthalmologic and general examinations. Total genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood. PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed for the exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FOXC1, PAX6, and PITX2 genes.Mutations were identified in five of the 15 probands; four variants were novel and one variant was described previously. A novel de novo variant (c.225C>A; p.Tyr75* was identified in the PAX6 gene in two unrelated probands with aniridia. In addition, a known variant (c.649C>T; p.Arg217* in PAX6 segregated in a family with aniridia. In the FOXC1 gene, a novel heterozygous variant (c.454T>C; p.Trp152Arg segregated with the disease in a Mexican family with ARS. A novel homozygous variant (c.92_100del; p.Ala31_Ala33del in the FOXC1 gene segregated in a Pakistani family with ARS and congenital glaucoma.Our study expands the mutation spectrum of the PAX6 and FOXC1 genes in individuals with anterior segment dysgenesis disorders. In addition, our study suggests that FOXC1 mutations, besides typical autosomal dominant ARS, can also cause ARS with congenital glaucoma through an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. Our results thus expand the disease spectrum of FOXC1, and may lead to a better understanding of the role of FOXC1 in development.

  10. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome in Mice with an Inherited Mutation in RyR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Nitin; Sood, Subeena; Wang, Sufen; van Oort, Ralph J.; Sarma, Satyam; Li, Na; Skapura, Darlene G.; Bayle, J. Henri; Valderrábano, Miguel; Wehrens, Xander H.T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor gene (RYR2) have been recently identified in victims of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The aim of this study was to determine whether a gain-of-function mutation in RYR2 increases the propensity to cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death in young mice. Methods and Results Incidence of sudden death was monitored prospectively in heterozygous knock-in mice with mutation R176Q in Ryr2 (R176Q/+). Young R176Q/+ mice exhibited a higher incidence of sudden death compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. Optical mapping of membrane potentials and calcium levels in 1-7 day-old R176Q/+ and WT mice revealed an increased incidence of ventricular ectopy and spontaneous calcium releases in neonatal R176Q/+ mice. Surface ECGs in 3-10 day-old mice showed that R176Q/+ mice developed more ventricular arrhythmias following provocation with epinephrine and caffeine. Intracardiac pacing studies in 12-18 day-old mice revealed the presence of an arrhythmogenic substrate in R176Q/+ compared with WT mice. RT-PCR and Western blotting showed that expression levels of other calcium handling proteins were unaltered suggesting that calcium leak through mutant RyR2 underlies arrhythmogenesis and sudden death in young R176Q/+ mice. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that a gain-of-function mutation in RyR2 confers an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death in young mice, and that young R176Q/+ mice may be used as a model for elucidating the complex interplay between genetic and environmental risk factors associated with SIDS. PMID:20009080

  11. Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome with homozygous missense mutation of the KCNQ1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Esra; Ertuğrul, İlker; Özer, Sema; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet; Aktaş, Dilek; Boduroğlu, Koray; Ütine, Gülen Eda

    2014-01-01

    Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) is an autosomal recessive cardioauditory ion channel disorder characterized by congenital bilateral sensorineural deafness and long QT interval. JLNS is a ventricular repolarization abnormality and is caused by mutations in the KCNQ1 or KCNE1 gene. It has a high mortality rate in childhood due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias, episodes of torsade de pointes which may cause syncope or sudden cardiac death. Here, we present a 4.5-year-old female patient who had a history of syncope and congenital sensorineural deafness. She had a cochlear implant operation at 15 months of age and received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) at 3 years of age because of recurrent syncope attacks. Five months after cochlear implant placement, she could say her first words and is now able to speak. With β-blocker therapy and ICD, she has remained syncope-free for a year. On the current admission, the family visited the genetics department to learn about the possibility of prenatal diagnosis of sensorineural deafness, as the mother was 9 weeks pregnant. A diagnosis of JLNS was established for the first time, and a homozygous missense mutation in the KCNQ1 gene (c.128 G>A, p.R243H) was detected. Heterozygous mutations of KCNQ1 were identified in both parents, thereby allowing future prenatal diagnoses. The family obtained prenatal diagnosis for the current pregnancy, and fetal KCNQ1 analysis revealed the same homozygous mutation. The pregnancy was terminated at the 12th week of gestation. The case presented here is the third molecularly confirmed Turkish JLNS case; it emphasizes the importance of timely genetic diagnosis, which allows appropriate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis, as well as proper management of the condition.

  12. Neurological findings and genetic alterations in patients with Kostmann syndrome and HAX1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, Gaëlle; Munzer, Martine; Barthez, Marie-Anne Carpentier; Beaufils, Sandrine; Beaupain, Blandine; Flood, Terry; Keren, Boris; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Donadieu, Jean

    2014-06-01

    To describe the clinical profile and the prevalence of severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) and HAX1 mutations, so-called Kostmann syndrome, in France. Two pedigrees were identified from the French registry. The study included five subjects (three males), which represent 0.7% of the 759 SCN cases registered in France. The age at diagnosis was 0.3 years (range: 0.1-1.2 years) and the median age at the last follow-up was 7.3 years (range: 1.2-17.8 years). A novel large homozygous deletion of the HAX1 gene (exons 2-5) was found in one pedigree; while, a homozygous frameshift mutation was identified in exon 3 (c.430dupG, p.Val144fs) in the second pedigree. Severe bacterial infections were observed in four patients, including two cases of sepsis, one case of pancolitis, a lung abscess, and recurrent cellulitis and stomatitis. During routine follow-up, the median neutrophil value was 0.16 × 10(9)/L, associated with monocytosis (2 × 10(9)/L). Bone marrow (BM) smears revealed a decrease of the granulocytic lineage with no mature myeloid cells above the myelocytes. One patient died at age 2 from neurological complications, while two other patients, including one who underwent a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at age 5, are living with very severe neurological retardation. SCN with HAX1 mutations, is a rare sub type of congenital neutropenia, mostly observed in population from Sweden and Asia minor, associating frequently neurological retardation, when the mutations involved the B isoform of the protein. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The SMAD-binding domain of SKI: a hotspot for de novo mutations causing Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Dorien; Doyle, Alexander J; Oswald, Gretchen; Sparks, Elizabeth; Myers, Loretha; Willems, Patrick J; Mansour, Sahar; Simpson, Michael A; Frysira, Helena; Maat-Kievit, Anneke; Van Minkelen, Rick; Hoogeboom, Jeanette M; Mortier, Geert R; Titheradge, Hannah; Brueton, Louise; Starr, Lois; Stark, Zornitza; Ockeloen, Charlotte; Lourenco, Charles Marques; Blair, Ed; Hobson, Emma; Hurst, Jane; Maystadt, Isabelle; Destrée, Anne; Girisha, Katta M; Miller, Michelle; Dietz, Harry C; Loeys, Bart; Van Laer, Lut

    2015-02-01

    Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS) is a rare, systemic connective tissue disorder characterized by craniofacial, skeletal, and cardiovascular manifestations that show a significant overlap with the features observed in the Marfan (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). A distinguishing observation in SGS patients is the presence of intellectual disability, although not all patients in this series present this finding. Recently, SGS was shown to be due to mutations in the SKI gene, encoding the oncoprotein SKI, a repressor of TGFβ activity. Here, we report eight recurrent and three novel SKI mutations in eleven SGS patients. All were heterozygous missense mutations located in the R-SMAD binding domain, except for one novel in-frame deletion affecting the DHD domain. Adding our new findings to the existing data clearly reveals a mutational hotspot, with 73% (24 out of 33) of the hitherto described unrelated patients having mutations in a stretch of five SKI residues (from p.(Ser31) to p.(Pro35)). This implicates that the initial molecular testing could be focused on mutation analysis of the first half of exon 1 of SKI. As the majority of the known mutations are located in the R-SMAD binding domain of SKI, our study further emphasizes the importance of TGFβ signaling in the pathogenesis of SGS.

  14. A case of Donohue syndrome “Leprechaunism” with a novel mutation in the insulin receptor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdağ, Özkan; Köşger, Pelin; Aydoğdu, Sultan Durmuş; Alıncak, Eylem; Tekin, Neslihan

    2017-01-01

    Donohue syndrome (Leprechaunism) is characterized by severe insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, postprandial hyperglycemia, preprandial hypoglycemia, intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, dysmorphic findings, and clinical and laboratory findings of hyperandrogenemia due to homozygous or compound heterozygous inactivating mutations in the insulin receptor gene. A female newborn presented with lack of subcutaneous fat tissue, bilateral simian creases, hypertrichosis, especially on her face, gingival hypertrophy, cliteromegaly, and prominent nipples. Her laboratory tests revealed hyperandrogenism, postprandial hyperglycemia and preprandial hypoglycemia, and very high concurrent insulin levels. She was diagnosed as having Donohue syndrome. Metformin and continuous nasogastric feeding were administrated. During follow-up, relatively good glycemic control was obtained. However, severe hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and severe malnutrition developed. She died aged 75 days of severe heart failure and pneumonia. Her insulin receptors gene analysis revealed a compound heterozygous mutation. One of these mutations was a p.R813 (c.2437C>T) mutation, which was defined previously and shown also in her father, the other mutation was a novel p.777-790delVAAFPNTSSTSVPT mutation, also shown in her mother. The parents were heterozygous for these mutations. PMID:29483803

  15. MECP2 mutations in Czech patients with Rett syndrome and Rett-like phenotypes: novel mutations, genotype-phenotype correlations and validation of high-resolution melting analysis for mutation scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahorakova, Daniela; Lelkova, Petra; Gregor, Vladimir; Magner, Martin; Zeman, Jiri; Martasek, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by developmental regression with loss of motor, communication and social skills, onset of stereotypic hand movements and often seizures. RTT is primarily caused by de novo mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2). We established a high-resolution melting (HRM) technique for mutation scanning of the MECP2 gene and performed analyses in Czech patients with RTT, autism spectrum conditions and intellectual disability with Rett-like features. In the cases with confirmed MECP2 mutations, we determined X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), examined the relationships between genotype and clinical severity and evaluated the modifying influence of XCI. Our results demonstrate that HRM analysis is a reliable method for the detection of point mutations, small deletions and duplications in the MECP2 gene. We identified 29 pathogenic mutations in 75 girls, including four novel mutations: c.155_1189del1035;909_932inv;insC, c.573delC, c.857_858dupAA and c.1163_1200del38. Skewed XCI (ratio >75%) was found in 19.3% of the girls, but no gross divergence in clinical severity was observed. Our findings confirm a high mutation frequency in classic RTT (92%) and a correlation between the MECP2 mutation type and clinical severity. We also demonstrate limitations of XCI in explaining all of the phenotypic differences in RTT.

  16. [Research progress of mutational spectrum and pathophysiology of WFS1 gene in Wolfram syndrome and nonsyndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, S M; Han, Y H; Wang, H B

    2016-09-07

    Compound homozygous or heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome (WS), and heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal dominant non-syndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL). In addition, mutations in the WFS region has relationship with diabetes and psychiatric diseases. In this paper, we provide an overview of genetic research with different phenotypes, including WS and LFSNHL.

  17. An inducible mouse model of podocin-mutation-related nephrotic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Tabatabaeifar

    Full Text Available Mutations in the NPHS2 gene, encoding podocin, cause hereditary nephrotic syndrome. The most common podocin mutation, R138Q, is associated with early disease onset and rapid progression to end-stage renal disease. Knock-in mice carrying a R140Q mutation, the mouse analogue of human R138Q, show developmental arrest of podocytes and lethal renal failure at neonatal age. Here we created a conditional podocin knock-in model named NPHS2 R140Q/-, using a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase, which permits to study the effects of the mutation in postnatal life. Within the first week of R140Q hemizygosity induction the animals developed proteinuria, which peaked after 4-5 weeks. Subsequently the animals developed progressive renal failure, with a median survival time of 12 (95% CI: 11-13 weeks. Foot process fusion was observed within one week, progressing to severe and global effacement in the course of the disease. The number of podocytes per glomerulus gradually diminished to 18% compared to healthy controls 12-16 weeks after induction. The fraction of segmentally sclerosed glomeruli was 25%, 85% and 97% at 2, 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. Severe tubulointerstitial fibrosis was present at later disease stage and was correlated quantitatively with the level of proteinuria at early disease stages. While R140Q podocin mRNA expression was elevated, protein abundance was reduced by more than 50% within one week following induction. Whereas miRNA21 expression persistently increased during the first 4 weeks, miRNA-193a expression peaked 2 weeks after induction. In conclusion, the inducible R140Q-podocin mouse model is an auspicious model of the most common genetic cause of human nephrotic syndrome, with a spontaneous disease course strongly reminiscent of the human disorder. This model constitutes a valuable tool to test the efficacy of novel pharmacological interventions aimed to improve podocyte function and viability and attenuate proteinuria

  18. Clinical variability in hereditary optic neuropathies: Two novel mutations in two patients with dominant optic atrophy and Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Dominant optic atrophy (DOA) and Wolfram syndrome share a great deal of clinical variability, including an association with hearing loss and the presence of optic atrophy at similar ages. The objective of this paper was to discuss the phenotypic variability of these syndromes with respect to the presentation of two clinical cases. We present two patients, each with either DOA or Wolfram syndrome, and contribute to the research literature through our findings of two novel mutations. The overlapping of several clinical characteristics in hereditary optic neuropathies can complicate the differential diagnosis. Future studies are needed to better determine the genotype-phenotype correlation for these diseases.

  19. Sjogren-Larsson syndrome: Novel mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene in a French cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarret, Catherine; Rigal, Mélanie; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Dorboz, Imen; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Combes, Patricia; Giraud, Geneviève; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Afenjar, Alexandra; Francannet, Christine; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Sjogren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ichthyosis, spastic di- or tetraplegia and mental retardation due a defect of the fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH), related to mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene. In this study, we screened a French cohort of

  20. De novo heterozygous mutations in SMC3 cause a range of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-overlapping phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Ansari, Morad; Tan, Christopher A.; Parenti, Ilaria; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Ousager, Lilian B.; Puisac, Beatriz; Hernández-Marcos, María; Teresa-Rodrigo, María Esperanza; Marcos-Alcalde, Iñigo; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Lusa-Bernal, Silvia; Bijlsma, Emilia K.; Braunholz, Diana; Bueno-Martinez, Inés; Clark, Dinah; Cooper, Nicola S.; Curry, Cynthia J.; Fisher, Richard; Fryer, Alan; Ganesh, Jaya; Gervasini, Cristina; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Guo, Yiran; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hopkin, Robert J.; Kaur, Maninder; Keating, Brendan J.; Kibaek, María; Kinning, Esther; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Kline, Antonie D.; Kuchinskaya, Ekaterina; Larizza, Lidia; Li, Yun R.; Liu, Xuanzhu; Mariani, Milena; Picker, Jonathan D.; Pié, Ángeles; Pozojevic, Jelena; Queralt, Ethel; Richer, Julie; Roeder, Elizabeth; Sinha, Anubha; Scott, Richard H.; So, Joyce; Wusik, Katherine A.; Wilson, Louise; Zhang, Jianguo; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Casale, César H.; Ström, Lena; Selicorni, Angelo; Ramos, Feliciano J.; Jackson, Laird G.; Krantz, Ian D.; Das, Soma; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Kaiser, Frank J.; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Pié, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by facial dysmorphism, growth failure, intellectual disability, limb malformations, and multiple organ involvement. Mutations in five genes, encoding subunits of the cohesin complex (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21) and its regulators (NIPBL, HDAC8), account for

  1. Identification of a novel EYA1 splice-site mutation in a Danish branchio-oto-renal syndrome family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann Marie; Tümer, Zeynep; Tommerup, Niels

    2004-01-01

    Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by variable clinical manifestations including branchial fistulae, preauricular pits, ear malformations, hearing impairment, and renal anomalies. BOR is caused by mutations in the genes EYA1 and SIX1. A Danish BOR fa...

  2. The phenotype of Floating-Harbor syndrome: Clinical characterization of 52 individuals with mutations in exon 34 of SRCAP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Nikkel (Sarah); A. Dauber (Andrew); S. de Munnik (Sonja); M. Connolly (Meghan); R.L. Hood (Rebecca L); O. Caluseriu (Oana); J.A. Hurst (Jane); U. Kini (Usha); M.J.M. Nowaczyk; A. Afenjar (Alexandra); B. Albrecht; J.E. Allanson (Judith); P. Balestri (Paolo); T. Ben-Omran (Tawfeg); F. Brancati (Fred); I. Cordeiro (Isabel); B.S. Da Cunha (Bruna Santos); P.F. Delaney (Peter); A. Destrée (Anne); D.R. Fitzpatrick (David); F. Forzano (Francesca); N. Ghali (Neeti); G. Gillies (Greta); J. Harwood; Y. Hendriks; D. Héron (Delphine); A. Hoischen (Alex); E.M. Honey (Engela Magdalena); E.H. Hoefsloot (Lies); J. Ibrahim (Jennifer); C. Jacob (Claire); S.G. Kant (Sarina); C.A. Kim (Chong); E.P. Kirk (Edwin P); N.V.A.M. Knoers (Nine); D. Lacombe (Denis); C. van der Lee (Christiaan); I.F.M. Lo (Ivan F M); L.S. Lucas (Luiza S); F. Mari (Francesca); V. Mericq (Veronica); J.S. Moilanen (Jukka S); S.T. Møller (Sanne Traasdahl); S. Moortgat (Stephanie); D.T. Pilz (Daniela); K. Pope (Kate); S. Price (Susan); A. Renieri (Alessandra); J. Sá (Joaquim); J. Schoots (Jeroen); E.L. Silveira (Elizabeth L); M.E.H. Simon (Marleen); A. Slavotinek (Anne); I.K. Temple; I. van der Burgt (Ineke); B.B.A. de Vries (Bert); J.D. Weisfeld-Adams (James D); M.L. Whiteford (Margo L); D. Wierczorek (Dagmar); J.M. Wit (Jan); C.F.O. Yee (Connie Fung On); P. Beaulieu (Patrick); S.M. White (Sue M); B. Bulman; E. Bongers (Ernie); H. Brunner (Han); M. Feingold (Murray); K.M. Boycott (Kym)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare condition characterized by short stature, delays in expressive language, and a distinctive facial appearance. Recently, heterozygous truncating mutations in SRCAP were determined to be disease-causing. With the availability of a DNA

  3. Metopic and sagittal synostosis in Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome: five cases with intragenic mutations or complete deletions of GLI3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurst, Jane A; Jenkins, Dagan; Vasudevan, Pradeep C

    2011-01-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) is a multiple congenital malformation characterised by limb and craniofacial anomalies, caused by heterozygous mutation or deletion of GLI3. We report four boys and a girl who were presented with trigonocephaly due to metopic synostosis, in association ...

  4. A case of Donohue syndrome “Leprechaunism” with a novel mutation in the insulin receptor gene

    OpenAIRE

    Kirel, Birgül; Bozdağ, Özkan; Köşger, Pelin; Aydoğdu, Sultan Durmuş; Alıncak, Eylem; Tekin, Neslihan

    2017-01-01

    Donohue syndrome (Leprechaunism) is characterized by severe insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, postprandial hyperglycemia, preprandial hypoglycemia, intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, dysmorphic findings, and clinical and laboratory findings of hyperandrogenemia due to homozygous or compound heterozygous inactivating mutations in the insulin receptor gene. A female newborn presented with lack of subcutaneous fat tissue, bilateral simian creases, hypertrichosis, especially on he...

  5. The long-term outcome of boys with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome and a mutation in the androgen receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas-Herald, A.; S. Bertelloni (Silvano); A. Juul (Anders); J. Bryce (Jillian); Jiang, J.; M. Rodie (Martina); R. Sinnott (Richard); Boroujerdi, M.; Lindhardt Johansen, M.; O. Hiort (Olaf); P-M. Holterhus (Paul-Martin); M.L. Cools (Martine); Guaragna-Filho, G.; Guerra-Junior, G.; N. Weintrob (Naomi); S.E. Hannema (Sabine); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); T. Guran (Tulay); F. Darendeliler (Feyza); A. Nordenström (Anna); I.A. Hughes (Ieuan A.); Acerini, C.; Tadokoro-Cuccaro, R.; S.F. Ahmed (Faisal)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In boys with suspected partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS), systematic evidence that supports the long-term prognostic value of identifying a mutation in the androgen receptor gene (AR) is lacking. Objective: To assess the clinical characteristics and long-term

  6. Detection of mutations in the COL4A5 gene by SSCP in X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Juncker, I; Persson, U

    2001-01-01

    of type IV-collagen. We performed mutation analysis of the COL4A5 gene by PCR-SSCP analysis of each of the 51 exons with flanking intronic sequences in 81 patients suspected of X-linked Alport syndrome including 29 clear X-linked cases, 37 cases from families with a pedigree compatible with X...

  7. Mutations in SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex gene ARID1B cause Coffin-Siris syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santen, G.W.; Aten, E.; Sun, Y; Almomani, R.; Gilissen, C.F.; Nielsen, M.; Kant, S.G.; Snoeck, I.N.; Peeters, E.A.; Hilhorst-Hofstee, Y.; Wessels, M.W.; Hollander, N.S. den; Ruivenkamp, C.A.; van Ommen, G.J.; Breuning, M.H.; den Dunnen, J.T.; van Haeringen, A.; Kriek, M.

    2012-01-01

    We identified de novo truncating mutations in ARID1B in three individuals with Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) by exome sequencing. Array-based copy-number variation (CNV) analysis in 2,000 individuals with intellectual disability revealed deletions encompassing ARID1B in 3 subjects with phenotypes

  8. Aarskog-Scott syndrome: clinical update and report of nine novel mutations of the FGD1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orrico, A; Galli, L; Faivre, L

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the FGD1 gene have been shown to cause Aarskog-Scott syndrome (AAS), or facio-digito-genital dysplasia (OMIM#305400), an X-linked disorder characterized by distinctive genital and skeletal developmental abnormalities with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. To date, 20 distinct ...

  9. A novel syndrome of autosomal-dominant hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia linked to a mutation in the human insulin receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Hansen, Torben; Lajer, Maria

    2004-01-01

    a missense mutation (Arg1174Gln) in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor gene that cosegregated with the disease phenotype (logarithm of odds [LOD] score 3.21). In conclusion, we report a novel syndrome of autosomal-dominant hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. The findings demonstrate...

  10. Mutational spectrum of the WFS1 gene in Wolfram syndrome, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, diabetes mellitus, and psychiatric disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cryns, K; Sivakumaran, TA; Van den Ouweland, JMW; Pennings, RJE; Cremers, CWRJ; Flothmann, K; Young, TL; Smith, RJH; Lesperance, MM; Van Camp, G

    2003-01-01

    WFS1 is a novel gene and encodes an 890 amino-acid glycoprotein (wolframin), predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutations in WFS1 underlie autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome and autosomal dominant low frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) DFNA6/14. In addition,

  11. Mutational spectrum of the WFS1 gene in Wolfram syndrome, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, diabetes mellitus, and psychiatric disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cryns, K.; Sivakumaran, T.A.; Ouweland, J.M.W. van den; Pennings, R.J.E.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Flothmann, K.; Young, T.L.; Smith, R.J.H.; Lesperance, M.M.; Camp, G. van

    2003-01-01

    WFS1 is a novel gene and encodes an 890 amino-acid glycoprotein (wolframin), predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutations in WFS1 underlie autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome and autosomal dominant low frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) DFNA6/14. In addition,

  12. Double heterozygous mutations of MITF and PAX3 result in Waardenburg syndrome with increased penetrance in pigmentary defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T; Li, X; Huang, Q; Li, L; Chai, Y; Sun, L; Wang, X; Zhu, Y; Wang, Z; Huang, Z; Li, Y; Wu, H

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary defects of the hair, skin, and iris. Heterozygous mutations of MITF and its transactivator gene PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) and type I (WS1), respectively. Most patients with MITF or PAX3 mutations, however, show variable penetrance of WS-associated phenotypes even within families segregating the same mutation, possibly mediated by genetic background or specific modifiers. In this study, we reported a rare Waardenburg syndrome simplex family in which a pair of WS parents gave birth to a child with double heterozygous mutations of MITF and PAX3. Compared to his parents who carried a single mutation in either MITF or PAX3, this child showed increased penetrance of pigmentary defects including white forelock, white eyebrows and eyelashes, and patchy facial depigmentation. This observation suggested that the expression level of MITF is closely correlated to the penetrance of WS, and variants in transcription regulator genes of MITF may modify the relevant clinical phenotypes. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Novel LRPPRC Mutation in a Boy With Mild Leigh Syndrome, French-Canadian Type Outside of Québec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Velda Xinying; Tan, Teresa S; Wang, Furene S; Tay, Stacey Kiat-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Leigh syndrome, French-Canadian type is unique to patients from a genetic isolate in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region of Québec. It has also been recently described in 10 patients with LRPPRC mutation outside of Québec. It is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder with fatal metabolic crisis and severe neurological morbidity in infancy caused by LRPPRC mutation. The authors report a boy with a novel LRPPRC compound heterozygous missense mutations c.3130C>T, c.3430C>T, and c.4078G>A found on whole-exome sequencing which correlated with isolated cytochrome c-oxidase deficiency found in skeletal muscle. LRPPRC mutation is a rare cause of cytochrome c-oxidase-deficient form of Leigh syndrome outside of Québec. Our patient broadens the spectrum of phenotypes of Leigh syndrome, French-Canadian type. LRPPRC mutation should be considered in children with early childhood neurodegenerative disorder, even in the absence of metabolic crisis. Early evaluation with whole-exome sequencing is useful for early diagnosis and for genetic counseling.

  14. The first two confirmed sub-Saharan African families with germline TP53 mutations causing Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaulay, Shelley; Goodyear, Quintin Clive; Kruger, Mia; Chen, Wenlong; Essop, Fahmida; Krause, Amanda

    2018-02-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome is a rare inherited cancer syndrome characterised by the early onset of specific cancers. Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is associated with germline mutations in the tumour suppressor gene, TP53. This study reports the first cases of molecularly confirmed LFS germline mutations in sub-Saharan Africa. Three black African patients, all with LFS-associated cancers, were seen through the Clinical and Counselling Section of the Division of Human Genetics at the National Health Laboratory Service and University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, during 2011-2012. All three patients (two were related) were recruited into this research study. Sequence analysis of the coding region of the TP53 gene identified a Class IV (likely pathogenic) variant, c.326T > C (p.Phe109Ser), in the two related patients, and a known pathogenic mutation, c.1010G > A (p.Arg337His), also referred to as the Brazilian founder mutation, in the other patient. A confirmed diagnosis in these patients will assist in tailored medical management (it is recommended that individuals carrying a germline TP53 mutation avoid radiotherapy as this might cause secondary radiotherapy-induced malignancies) and in addition, genetic testing of at-risk family members can be offered. Very little is known and documented on LFS in African individuals. Despite the small number of patients in this study, the results support the need for diagnostic genetic testing for LFS in South Africa.

  15. Mutation Spectrum of Common Deafness-Causing Genes in Patients with Non-Syndromic Deafness in the Xiamen Area, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Jiang

    Full Text Available In China, approximately 30,000 babies are born with hearing impairment each year. However, the molecular factors causing congenital hearing impairment in the Xiamen area of Fujian province have not been evaluated. To provide accurate genetic testing and counseling in the Xiamen area, we investigated the molecular etiology of non-syndromic deafness in a deaf population from Xiamen. Unrelated students with hearing impairment (n = 155 who attended Xiamen Special Education School in Fujian Province were recruited for this study. Three common deafness-related genes, GJB2, SLC26A4, and mtDNA12SrRNA, were analyzed using all-exon sequencing. GJB2 mutations were detected in 27.1% (42/155 of the entire cohort. The non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL hotspot mutations c.109G>A (p.V37I and c.235delC were found in this population, whereas the Caucasian hotspot mutation c.35delG was not. The allelic frequency of the c.109G>A mutation was 9.03% (28/310, slightly higher than that of c.235delC (8.39%, 26/310, which is the most common GJB2 mutation in most areas of China. The allelic frequency of the c.109G>A mutation was significantly higher in this Xiamen's deaf population than that in previously reported cohorts (P = 0.00. The SLC26A4 mutations were found in 16.77% (26/155 of this cohort. The most common pathogenic allele was c.IVS7-2A>G (6.13%, 19/310, and the second most common was the c.1079C>T (p.A360V mutation (1.94%, 6/310 which has rarely been reported as a hotspot mutation in other studies. The mutation rate of mtDNA12SrRNA in this group was 3.87% (6/155, all being the m.A1555G mutation. These findings show the specificity of the common deaf gene-mutation spectrum in this area. According to this study, there were specific hotspot mutations in Xiamen deaf patients. Comprehensive sequencing analysis of the three common deaf genes can help portray the mutation spectrum and develop optimal testing strategies for deaf patients in this area.

  16. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case Study in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G

    2011-01-01

    birth cohorts. Using historic cancer registry data, we borrow from relative survival analysis methods to adjust for changes in age-specific incidence across birth cohorts. Our motivating case study comes from a Danish cancer register of 124 families with mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes known....... In this article, we posit a Bayesian approach to infer genetic anticipation under flexible random effects models for censored data that capture the effect of successive generations on AOO. Primary interest lies in the random effects. Misspecifying the distribution of random effects may result in incorrect...... to cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, also called Lynch syndrome (LS). We find evidence for a decrease in AOO between generations in this article. Our model predicts family-level anticipation effects that are potentially useful in genetic counseling clinics for high-risk families....

  17. [Allgrove syndrome (triple A). Finding of a mutation not described in the AAAS gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capataz Ledesma, M; Méndez Pérez, P; Rodríguez López, R; Galán Gómez, E

    2013-02-01

    Allgrove syndrome (triple A) is a rare autosomal recessive disease. The classic triad includes, congenital adrenal insufficiency due to ACTH resistance, achalasia of the cardia and alacrimia. Neurological abnormalities are associated with autonomic neuropathy, sensory and motor defects, deafness, mental retardation, Parkinsonism and dementia. The gene responsible is the ADRACALIN or AAAS encoding a protein called ALADIN. We report a case of a 19 year-old male, assessed when he was 10 years old in our department due to suspected storage disease. Mild mental and language retardation, hypernasal voice, sensory-motor neuropathy with autonomic involvement and signs of spastic paraparesis, alacrimia. gastroesophageal reflux, and achalasia. Molecular studies showed to mutations, the undescribed p.Tyr 19 Cys, and IVS14 +1 G. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel mutation of WFS1 gene in a Chinese patient with Wolfram syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Liu, Jia; Yi, Huan; Xu, Li; Zhong, Xiufeng; Peng, Fuhua

    2018-03-17

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), caused by mutations of the Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene on chromosome 4p16.1, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes insipidus (DI), neuro-psychiatric disorders, hearing deficit, and urinary tract anomalies. Here we report a 11-year-old Chinese boy who presented with visual loss, was suspected with optic neuritis (ON) or neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and referred to our department for further diagnosis. Finally he was diagnosed with WS because of diabetes mellitus (DM) and optic atrophy (OA). Eight exons and flanking introns of WFS1 gene were analyzed by sequencing. A novel mutation c.1760G > A in WFS1 gene of exon 8 was identified. This report reviews a case of WS associated with a novel mutation, c.1760G > A in WFS1 gene of exon 8, and emphasizes that WS should be taken into account for juveniles with visual loss and diabetes mellitus.

  19. Exclusion of TCOF1 mutations in a case of bilateral Goldenhar syndrome and one familial case of microtia with meatal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Christian T; Rosanowski, Frank; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Reis, André; Rauch, Anita

    2005-04-01

    A number of different disorders involving first and second branchial arch anomalies have been described as distinct entities, including Treacher-Collins-Franceschetti syndrome, Goldenhar syndrome, Nager syndrome and Miller syndrome. The significant phenotypic overlap between these disorders raises the issue of a common developmental origin. After the identification of mutations in TCOF1 as a general cause of the Treacher-Collins-Franceschetti syndrome, TCOF1 mutations were excluded in patients with unilateral signs of the Goldenhar syndrome spectrum. We also present two rare cases of bilateral Goldenhar syndrome and familial microtia with meatal atresia, respectively, in whom we also excluded TCOF1 mutations. Thus, genetic heterogeneity in different disorders of the first and second branchial arch development is supported.

  20. Modeling tissue- and mutation- specific electrophysiological effects in the long QT syndrome: role of the Purkinje fiber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Iyer

    Full Text Available Congenital long QT syndrome is a heritable family of arrhythmias caused by mutations in 13 genes encoding ion channel complex proteins. Mounting evidence has implicated the Purkinje fiber network in the genesis of ventricular arrhythmias. In this study, we explore the hypothesis that long QT mutations can demonstrate different phenotypes depending on the tissue type of expression. Using computational models of the human ventricular myocyte and the Purkinje fiber cell, the biophysical alteration in channel function in LQT1, LQT2, LQT3, and LQT7 are modeled. We identified that the plateau potential was important in LQT1 and LQT2, in which mutation led to minimal action potential prolongation in Purkinje fiber cells. The phenotype of LQT3 mutation was dependent on the biophysical alteration induced as well as tissue type. The canonical ΔKPQ mutation causes severe action potential prolongation in both tissue types. For LQT3 mutation F1473C, characterized by shifted channel availability, a more severe phenotype was seen in Purkinje fiber cells with action potential prolongation and early afterdepolarizations. The LQT3 mutation S1904L demonstrated striking effects on action potential duration restitution and more severe action potential prolongation in Purkinje fiber cells at higher heart rates. Voltage clamp simulations highlight the mechanism of effect of these mutations in different tissue types, and impact of drug therapy is explored. We conclude that arrhythmia formation in long QT syndrome may depend not only on the basis of mutation and biophysical alteration, but also upon tissue of expression. The Purkinje fiber network may represent an important therapeutic target in the management of patients with heritable channelopathies.

  1. Myelination Delay and Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome Caused by a Novel Mutation in the SLC16A2 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Piana, Roberta; Vanasse, Michel; Brais, Bernard; Bernard, Genevieve

    2015-09-01

    Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome is an X-linked disease caused by mutations in the solute carrier family 16 member 2 (SLC16A2) gene. As SLC16A2 encodes the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a thyroid hormone transporter, patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome present a specific altered thyroid hormone profile. Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome has been associated with myelination delay on the brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of affected subjects. We report a patient with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome characterized by developmental delay, hypotonia, and delayed myelination caused by a novel SLC16A2 mutation (p.L291R). The thyroid hormones profile in our patient was atypical for Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. The follow-up examinations showed that the progression of the myelination was not accompanied by a clinical improvement. Our paper suggests that SLC16A2 mutations should be investigated in patients with myelination delay even when the thyroid function is not conclusively altered. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Aspects of speech-language abilities are influenced by MECP2 mutation type in girls with Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Downs, Jenny; Girdler, Sonya; Ciccone, Natalie; Leonard, Helen

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates relationships between methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) mutation type and speech-language abilities in girls with Rett syndrome. Cross-sectional data on 766 girls, aged 15 years and under, with genetically confirmed Rett syndrome was obtained from the Australian Rett Syndrome Database (ARSD) (n = 244) and the International Rett Syndrome Phenotype Database (InterRett) (n = 522). Relationships between MECP2 mutation type and age of regression in speech-language abilities, and the level of speech-language abilities before and after this regression were investigated. The females had a median age of 4.95 years in the ARSD and 5.25 years in InterRett. The majority (89%, 685/766) acquired speech-language abilities in the form of babble or words at some point in time. Of those who acquired babble or words, 85% (581/685) experienced a regression in these abilities. Those with a p.Arg133Cys mutation were the most likely to use one or more words, prior to (RRR = 3.45; 95% CI 1.15-10.41) and after (RRR = 5.99; 95% CI 2.00-17.92), speech-language regression. Girls with Rett syndrome vary in their use of speech and language, and in their experience of speech-language regression and these variations are partly explained by genotype. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. High mutation detection rate in TCOF1 among Treacher Collins syndrome patients reveals clustering of mutations and 16 novel pathogenic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splendore, A; Silva, E O; Alonso, L G; Richieri-Costa, A; Alonso, N; Rosa, A; Carakushanky, G; Cavalcanti, D P; Brunoni, D; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2000-10-01

    Twenty-eight families with a clinical diagnosis of Treacher Collins syndrome were screened for mutations in the 25 coding exons of TCOF1 and their adjacent splice junctions through SSCP and direct sequencing. Pathogenic mutations were detected in 26 patients, yielding the highest detection rate reported so far for this disease (93%) and bringing the number of known disease-causing mutations from 35 to 51. This is the first report to describe clustering of pathogenic mutations. Thirteen novel polymorphic alterations were characterized, confirming previous reports that TCOF1 has an unusually high rate of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within its coding region. We suggest a possible different mechanism leading to TCS or genetic heterogeneity for this condition, as we identified two families with no apparent pathogenic mutation in the gene. Furthermore, our data confirm the absence of genotype-phenotype correlation and reinforce that the apparent anticipation often observed in TCS families is due to ascertainment bias. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Usher's Syndrome Type II: A Comparative Study of Genetic Mutations and Vestibular System Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Gagliardi, Silvia; Iozzo, Nicola; Plateroti, Rocco; Mariottini, Alessandro; Torricelli, Francesca

    2017-11-01

    Objective Usher's syndrome type II (USH2) is characterized by moderate to profound congenital hearing loss, later onset of retinitis pigmentosa, and normal vestibular function. Recently, a study investigating the vestibular function of USH2 patients demonstrated a pathologic response to vestibular tests. In this cross-sectional study we performed vestibular tests of a group patients with genetic diagnosis of USH2 syndrome to demonstrate if vestibular damage is present in USH2 patients. Study Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Tertiary referral center. Subjects and Methods Mutated genes of 7 patients with a clinical diagnosis of USH2 were evaluated. Vestibular function was investigated by audiometry, Fitzgerald-Hallpike caloric vestibular testing, cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (C-VEMPs), ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (O-VEMPs), and video head impulse test (v-HIT). Results Genetic tests confirmed the USH2 diagnosis in 5 of 7 patients examined, with 1 patient reporting a unique mutation on genetic tests. Four (80%) of the 5 patients with a genetic diagnosis of USH2 showed pathological O-VEMPs. Two patients (40%) reported bilateral absent or abnormal values of C-VEMPs. The superior semicircular canal presented a significant deficit in 2 (40%) patients. The same 2 cases showed a pathologic response of the v-HIT of the horizontal semicircular canal. Finally, the posterior semicircular canal presented a significant deficit in 4 (40.0%) patients. Conclusion A vestibular evaluation with vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and v-HIT seems to identify latent damage to the vestibular receptors of USH2 patients.

  5. Missense mutations in the WD40 domain of AHI1 cause non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Minh T; Hull, Sarah; Roepman, Ronald; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Oud, Machteld M; de Vrieze, Erik; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Letteboer, Stef J F; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Blokland, Ellen A; Yntema, Helger G; Cremers, Frans P M; van der Zwaag, Paul A; Arno, Gavin; van Wijk, Erwin; Webster, Andrew R; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke

    2017-09-01

    Recent findings suggesting that Abelson helper integration site 1 ( AHI1 ) is involved in non-syndromic retinal disease have been debated, as the functional significance of identified missense variants was uncertain. We assessed whether AHI1 variants cause non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Exome sequencing was performed in three probands with RP. The effects of the identified missense variants in AHI1 were predicted by three-dimensional structure homology modelling. Ciliary parameters were evaluated in patient's fibroblasts, and recombinant mutant proteins were expressed in ciliated retinal pigmented epithelium cells. In the three patients with RP, three sets of compound heterozygous variants were detected in AHI1 (c.2174G>A; p.Trp725* and c.2258A>T; p.Asp753Val, c.660delC; p.Ser221Glnfs*10 and c.2090C>T; p.Pro697Leu, c.2087A>G; p.His696Arg and c.2429C>T; p.Pro810Leu). All four missense variants were present in the conserved WD40 domain of Jouberin, the ciliary protein encoded by AHI1 , with variable predicted implications for the domain structure. No significant changes in the percentage of ciliated cells, nor in cilium length or intraflagellar transport were detected. However, expression of mutant recombinant Jouberin in ciliated cells showed a significantly decreased enrichment at the ciliary base. This report confirms that mutations in AHI1 can underlie autosomal recessive RP. Moreover, it structurally and functionally validates the effect of the RP-associated AHI1 variants on protein function, thus proposing a new genotype-phenotype correlation for AHI1 mutation associated retinal ciliopathies. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Biallelic SUN5 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Recessive Acephalic Spermatozoa Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fuxi; Wang, Fengsong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jingjing; Wu, Huan; Zhang, Zhou; Zhang, Zhiguo; He, Xiaojin; Zhou, Ping; Wei, Zhaolian; Gecz, Jozef; Cao, Yunxia

    2016-10-06

    Acephalic spermatozoa syndrome is a rare and severe form of teratozoospermia characterized by a predominance of headless spermatozoa in the ejaculate. Family clustering and consanguinity suggest a genetic origin; however, causative mutations have yet to be identified. We performed whole-exome sequencing in two unrelated infertile men and subsequent variant filtering identified one homozygous (c.824C>T [p.Thr275Met]) and one compound heterozygous (c.1006C>T [p.Arg356Cys] and c.485T>A [p.Met162Lys]) SUN5 (also named TSARG4) variants. Sanger sequencing of SUN5 in 15 additional unrelated infertile men revealed four compound heterozygous (c.381delA [p.Val128Serfs ∗ 7] and c.824C>T [p.Thr275Met]; c.381delA [p.Val128Serfs ∗ 7] and c.781G>A [p.Val261Met]; c.216G>A [p.Trp72 ∗ ] and c.1043A>T [p.Asn348Ile]; c.425+1G>A/c.1043A>T [p.Asn348Ile]) and two homozygous (c.851C>G [p.Ser284 ∗ ]; c.350G>A [p.Gly114Arg]) variants in six individuals. These 10 SUN5 variants were found in 8 of 17 unrelated men, explaining the genetic defect in 47.06% of the affected individuals in our cohort. These variants were absent in 100 fertile population-matched control individuals. SUN5 variants lead to absent, significantly reduced, or truncated SUN5, and certain variants altered SUN5 distribution in the head-tail junction of the sperm. In summary, these results demonstrate that biallelic SUN5 mutations cause male infertility due to autosomal-recessive acephalic spermatozoa syndrome. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Frameshift mutational target gene analysis identifies similarities and differences in constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency and Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletzki, Claudia; Huehns, Maja; Bauer, Ingrid; Ripperger, Tim; Mork, Maureen M; Vilar, Eduardo; Klöcking, Sabine; Zettl, Heike; Prall, Friedrich; Linnebacher, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Mismatch-repair deficient (MMR-D) malignancies include Lynch Syndrome (LS), which is secondary to germline mutations in one of the MMR genes, and the rare childhood-form of constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency (CMMR-D); caused by bi-allelic MMR gene mutations. A hallmark of LS-associated cancers is microsatellite instability (MSI), characterized by coding frameshift mutations (cFSM) in target genes. By contrast, tumors arising in CMMR-D patients are thought to display a somatic mutation pattern differing from LS. This study has the main goal to identify cFSM in MSI target genes relevant in CMMR-D and to compare the spectrum of common somatic mutations, including alterations in DNA polymerases POLE and D1 between LS and CMMR-D. CMMR-D-associated tumors harbored more somatic mutations compared to LS cases, especially in the TP53 gene and in POLE and POLD1, where novel mutations were additionally identified. Strikingly, MSI in classical mononucleotide markers BAT40 and CAT25 was frequent in CMMR-D cases. MSI-target gene analysis revealed mutations in CMMR-D-associated tumors, some of them known to be frequently hit in LS, such as RNaseT2, HT001, and TGFβR2. Our results imply a general role for these cFSM as potential new drivers of MMR-D tumorigenesis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mutational analysis of the TCOF1 gene in 11 Japanese patients with Treacher Collins Syndrome and mechanism of mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Katsumi; Ariga, Tadashi; Fujioka, Hirotaka; Kawashima, Kunihiro; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Igawa, Hiroharu; Sugihara, Tsuneki; Sakiyama, Yukio

    2005-05-01

    Treacher Collins Syndrome (TCS) (OMIM 154500) is a congenital, craniofacial disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The responsible gene for TCS, TCOF1, was mapped to 5q32-33.1 and identified in 1996. Since then, TCOF1 mutations in patients with TCS have been reported from Europe, North and South America, however, no TCS cases from an Asian country have been molecularly characterized. Here we report mutational analysis for 11 Japanese patients with TCS for the first time, and have identified TCOF1 mutations in 9 of them. The mutations detected were various, but most likely all the mutations are predicted to result in a truncated gene product, known as treacle. One mutation frequently reported was included in our cases, but no missense mutations were detected. These findings are similar to those for the previous studies for TCS in other races. We have speculated about the molecular mechanisms of the mutations in most cases. Collectively, we have defined some of the characteristic molecular features commonly observed in TCS patients, irrespective of racial difference. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Heterozygous Germline Mutations in the CBL Tumor-Suppressor Gene Cause a Noonan Syndrome-like Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Simone; De Luca, Alessandro; Stellacci, Emilia; Rossi, Cesare; Checquolo, Saula; Lepri, Francesca; Caputo, Viviana; Silvano, Marianna; Buscherini, Francesco; Consoli, Federica; Ferrara, Grazia; Digilio, Maria C.; Cavaliere, Maria L.; van Hagen, Johanna M.; Zampino, Giuseppe; van der Burgt, Ineke; Ferrero, Giovanni B.; Mazzanti, Laura; Screpanti, Isabella; Yntema, Helger G.; Nillesen, Willy M.; Savarirayan, Ravi; Zenker, Martin; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2010-01-01

    RAS signaling plays a key role in controlling appropriate cell responses to extracellular stimuli and participates in early and late developmental processes. Although enhanced flow through this pathway has been established as a major contributor to oncogenesis, recent discoveries have revealed that aberrant RAS activation causes a group of clinically related developmental disorders characterized by facial dysmorphism, a wide spectrum of cardiac disease, reduced growth, variable cognitive deficits, ectodermal and musculoskeletal anomalies, and increased risk for certain malignancies. Here, we report that heterozygous germline mutations in CBL, a tumor-suppressor gene that is mutated in myeloid malignancies and encodes a multivalent adaptor protein with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, can underlie a phenotype with clinical features fitting or partially overlapping Noonan syndrome (NS), the most common condition of this disease family. Independent CBL mutations were identified in two sporadic cases and two families from among 365 unrelated subjects who had NS or suggestive features and were negative for mutations in previously identified disease genes. Phenotypic heterogeneity and variable expressivity were documented. Mutations were missense changes altering evolutionarily conserved residues located in the RING finger domain or the linker connecting this domain to the N-terminal tyrosine kinase binding domain, a known mutational hot spot in myeloid malignancies. Mutations were shown to affect CBL-mediated receptor ubiquitylation and dysregulate signal flow through RAS. These findings document that germline mutations in CBL alter development to cause a clinically variable condition that resembles NS and that possibly predisposes to malignancies. PMID:20619386

  10. A novel homozygous AP4B1 mutation in two brothers with AP-4 deficiency syndrome and ocular anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accogli, Andrea; Hamdan, Fadi F; Poulin, Chantal; Nassif, Christina; Rouleau, Guy A; Michaud, Jacques L; Srour, Myriam

    2018-04-01

    Adaptor protein complex-4 (AP-4) is a heterotetrameric protein complex which plays a key role in vesicle trafficking in neurons. Mutations in genes affecting different subunits of AP-4, including AP4B1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4M1, have been recently associated with an autosomal recessive phenotype, consisting of spastic tetraplegia, and intellectual disability (ID). The overlapping clinical picture among individuals carrying mutations in any of these genes has prompted the terms "AP-4 deficiency syndrome" for this clinically recognizable phenotype. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a novel homozygous mutation (c.991C>T, p.Q331*, NM_006594.4) in AP4B1 in two siblings from a consanguineous Pakistani couple, who presented with severe ID, progressive spastic tetraplegia, epilepsy, and microcephaly. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation was homozygous in the siblings and heterozygous in the parents. Similar to previously reported individuals with AP4B1 mutations, brain MRI revealed ventriculomegaly and white matter loss. Interestingly, in addition to the typical facial gestalt reported in other AP-4 deficiency cases, the older brother presented with congenital left Horner syndrome, bilateral optic nerve atrophy and cataract, which have not been previously reported in this condition. In summary, we report a novel AP4B1 homozygous mutation in two siblings and review the phenotype of AP-4 deficiency, speculating on a possible role of AP-4 complex in eye development. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese patient caused by a novel nonsense mutation in the SOX10 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Tie-Song; Lin, Ken; Sun, Hao; Jiang, Hong-Chao; Yang, Yan-Li; Low, Fan; Gao, Ying-Qin; Ruan, Biao

    2016-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a congenital genetic disorder. It is the most common type of syndromic hearing impairment with highly genetic heterogeneity and proved to be related by 6 genes as follows: PAX3, MITF, SNAI2, EDN3, EDNRB and SOX10. This article aims to identify the genetic causes of a Chinese WS child patient. A Chinese WS child was collected for clinical data collection by questionnaire survey. DNA samples of proband and his parents were extracted from peripheral blood samples. Six candidate genes were sequenced by the Trusight One sequencing panel on the illumina NextSeq 500 platform. A novel nonsense heterozygous mutation was found in the coding region of exon 2 in the SOX10 gene of proband. The novel nonsense heterozygous mutation could cause the replacement of the 55th lysine codon by stop codon (484T > C, C142R) and further more possibly cause terminating the protein translation in advance. However, both proband's parents had no mutation of genes above mentioned. The gene mutation of SOX10 [NM_006941.3 c.163A > T] is a novel nonsense mutation. No record of this mutation has been found in dbSNP, HGMD, 1000 Genomes Project, ClinVar and ESP6500 databases. It meets the condition of PS2 of strong evidence in 2015 ACMG Standards and Guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Spectrum of p63 mutations in a selected patient cohort affected with ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome (AEC).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinne, T.K.; Bolat, E.; Meijer, R.; Scheffer, H.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2009-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the p63 gene underlie a group of at least seven allelic syndromes, including ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome (AEC) and Rapp Hodgkin syndrome (RHS), which involves varying degrees of ectodermal dysplasia, orofacial clefting and limb

  13. An intronic mutation leading to incomplete skipping of exon-2 in KCNQ1 rescues hearing in Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Momenah, Tarek S.; Amin, Ahmad S.; Al-Khadra, Ayman S.; Alders, Marielle; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Romano-Ward syndrome (RWs) and Jervell and Lange-Nielsen Syndrome (JLNs) are two inherited arrhythmia disorders caused by monoallelic or bi-allelic mutations, respectively, in the KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes. Both disorders could cause Long QT syndrome either without deafness (RWs), or with deafness

  14. Mutations in RIT1 cause Noonan syndrome with possible juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia but are not involved in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavé, Hélène; Caye, Aurélie; Ghedira, Nehla; Capri, Yline; Pouvreau, Nathalie; Fillot, Natacha; Trimouille, Aurélien; Vignal, Cédric; Fenneteau, Odile; Alembik, Yves; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Blanchet, Patricia; Boute, Odile; Bouvagnet, Patrice; David, Albert; Dieux Coeslier, Anne; Doray, Bérénice; Dulac, Olivier; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Gérard, Marion; Héron, Delphine; Isidor, Bertrand; Lacombe, Didier; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Perrin, Laurence; Rio, Marlène; Roume, Joëlle; Sauvion, Sylvie; Toutain, Annick; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Willems, Marjorie; Baumann, Clarisse; Verloes, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Noonan syndrome is a heterogeneous autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in at least eight genes involved in the RAS/MAPK signaling pathway. Recently, RIT1 (Ras-like without CAAX 1) has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of some patients. We report a series of 44 patients from 30 pedigrees (including nine multiplex families) with mutations in RIT1. These patients display a typical Noonan gestalt and facial phenotype. Among the probands, 8.7% showed postnatal growth retardation, 90% had congenital heart defects, 36% had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (a lower incidence compared with previous report), 50% displayed speech delay and 52% had learning difficulties, but only 22% required special education. None had major skin anomalies. One child died perinatally of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. Compared with the canonical Noonan phenotype linked to PTPN11 mutations, patients with RIT1 mutations appear to be less severely growth retarded and more frequently affected by cardiomyopathy. Based on our experience, we estimate that RIT1 could be the cause of 5% of Noonan syndrome patients. Because mutations found constitutionally in Noonan syndrome are also found in several tumors in adulthood, we evaluated the potential contribution of RIT1 to leukemogenesis in Noonan syndrome. We screened 192 pediatric cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemias (96 B-ALL and 96 T-ALL) and 110 cases of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemias (JMML), but detected no variation in these tumoral samples, suggesting that Noonan patients with germline RIT1 mutations are not at high risk to developing JMML or ALL, and that RIT1 has at most a marginal role in these sporadic malignancies.

  15. Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by a hitherto unknown genetic mutation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashizaki Fumihiro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease that causes arterial spurting, intestinal perforation, uterine rupture and hemopneumothorax due to decreased production of type III collagen. The average age at death is 48 years old, and it is considered to be the most severe form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We report the case of a 64-year-old Japanese woman and her 38-year-old daughter who were diagnosed with this disease. Case presentation A 64-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital because of right anterior chest pain following cough and pharyngeal discomfort. Pleurisy was suspected due to the presence of right pleural effusion, so the next day she was referred to our department, where a detailed examination led to the diagnosis of hemothorax. The bleeding that caused the right hemothorax was difficult to control, so our patient was transferred to the Department of Thoracic Surgery for hemostasis control. Our patient’s personal history of uterine hemorrhage and skin ulcers, as well as the finding of skin fragility during surgery, were indicative of a weak connective tissue disease; therefore, after improvement of the hemothorax, a genetic analysis was performed. This revealed a heterozygous missense mutation in COL3A1, c.2411 G>T p.Gly804Val (exon 36. A detailed investigation conducted at a later date revealed that her daughter also had the same genetic mutation. This led to the diagnosis of vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome characterized by a new gene mutation. Conclusion We report a new genetic mutation associated with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We present the clinical and imaging findings, and the disease and treatment course in this patient. We believe this information will be important in treating future cases of vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in patients with this mutation.

  16. A novel de novo PSTPIP1 mutation in a boy with pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathalla, Basil M; Al-Wahadneh, Adel M; Al-Mutawa, Mariam; Kambouris, Marios; El-Shanti, Hatem

    2014-01-01

    Autoinflammatory disorders are a group of Mendelian disorders characterized by seemingly unprovoked inflammatory bouts without high-titer autoantibodies or antigen-specific T-cells and are probably due to defects in the innate immunity. We here report on a 4-year-old Arabic boy with the clinical presentation of an autoinflammatory disorder, namely Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma Gangrenosum and Acne (PAPA) syndrome. The presentation includes abscess formation after immunization and recurrent mono-articular acute arthritis in various joints that responded favourably to systemic glucocorticosteroids, albeit without acne or pyoderma gangrenosum. The mutation analysis of the boy identified a novel de novo mutation in PSTPIP1, the gene responsible for PAPA syndrome. We recommend that the diagnosis of PAPA syndrome should be entertained in the differential diagnosis of patients with recurrent sterile pyogenic arthritis prior to the development of pyoderma gangrenosum or acne in order to initiate a timely management of the disorder.

  17. Brittle Cornea Syndrome: Case Report with Novel Mutation in the PRDM5 Gene and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Avgitidou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old boy presented with acute corneal hydrops on the left eye and spontaneous corneal rupture on the right eye. A diagnosis of brittle cornea syndrome was confirmed by molecular analysis. A novel mutation, the homozygous variant c.17T>G, p.V6G, was found in the gene for PR-domain-containing protein 5 (PRDM5 in exon 1. Brittle cornea syndrome is a rare connective tissue disease with typical ocular, auditory, musculoskeletal, and cutaneous disorders. Almost all patients suffer from declined vision due to corneal scarring, thinning, and rupture. The most common ophthalmologic findings include keratoconus, progressive central corneal thinning, high myopia, irregular astigmatism, retinal detachment, and high risk for spontaneous corneal or scleral rupture. In addition to describing the case with a novel mutation here we review the current literature on brittle cornea syndrome pathogenesis, clinical findings, and therapy.

  18. Single-Nucleotide Mutations in Reveal Novel Functions and Regulatory Mechanisms of the Fragile X Syndrome Protein FMRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A. Suhl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is a monogenic disorder and a common cause of intellectual disability. Despite nearly 25 years of research on FMR1, the gene underlying the syndrome, very few pathological mutations other than the typical CGG-repeat expansion have been reported. This is in contrast to other X-linked, monogenic, intellectual disability disorders, such as Rett syndrome, where many point mutations have been validated as causative of the disorder. As technology has improved and significantly driven down the cost of sequencing, allowing for whole genes to be sequenced with relative ease, in-depth sequencing studies on FMR1 have recently been performed. These studies have led to the identification of novel variants in FMR1 , where some of which have been functionally evaluated and are likely pathogenic. In this review, we discuss recently identified FMR1 variants, the ways these novel variants cause dysfunction, and how they reveal new regulatory mechanisms and functionalities of the gene.

  19. Primary diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome in an adult patient--case report and description of a novel pathogenic mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waschbisch, Anne; Volbers, Bastian; Struffert, Tobias; Hoyer, Juliane; Schwab, Stefan; Bardutzky, Juergen

    2011-01-15

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative disorder presenting with the main clinical symptoms of childhood-onset diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus and deafness (DIDMOAD). Later stages of the disease are dominated by neurological complications and death occurs early in life with a median life expectancy of 30 years. Here we present a 44 year old patient who presented to our hospital with central respiratory failure, cognitive impairment, ataxia and parkinsonism and was first diagnosed with Wolfram syndrome. DNA sequence analysis revealed a novel pathogenic mutation within the WFS1 gene. Advanced clinical and imaging studies performed in this patient highlight the neurodegenerative process in Wolfram syndrome and expand our knowledge on the mutational spectrum of the disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Complete direct sequencing of the entire AR gene in 45 unrelated patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome: Mutations identified in 32 patients (18 novel mutations), no mutation detected in 13 other patients (29%)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mebarki, F.; Forest, M.G.; Josso, N. [Hospital Debrousse, Lyon (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The androgen insensivity syndrome (AIS) is a recessive X-linked disorder resulting from a deficient function of the androgen receptor (AR). The human AR gene has 3 functional domains: N-terminal encoded by exon 1, DNA-binding domain encoded by exons 2 and 3, and androgen-binding domain encoded by exons 4 to 8. In order to characterize the molecular defects of the AR gene in AIS, the entire coding regions and the intronic bording sequences of the AR gene were amplified by PCR before automatic direct sequencing in 45 patients. Twenty seven different point mutations were found in 32 unrelated AIS patients: 18 with a complete form (CAIS), 14 with a partial form (PAIS); 18 of these mutations are novel mutations, not published to date. Only 3 mutations were repeatedly found: R804H in 3 families; M780I in 3 families and R774C in 2 families. For 26 patients out of the 32 found to have a mutation, maternal DNA was collected and sequenced: 6 de novo mutations were detected (i.e. 23% of the cases). Finally, no mutation was detected in 13 patients (29%): 7 with CAIS and 6 familial severe PAIS. The latter all presented with perineal hypospadias, micropenis, 4 out of 6 being raised as girl. Diagnosis of AIS in these 13 families in whom no mutation was detected is supported by the following criteria: clinical data, familial history (2 or 3 index cases in the same family), familial segregation of the polymorphic CAG repeat of the AR gene. Mutations in intronic regions or the promoter of the AR gene could not explain all cases of AIS without mutations in the AR coding regions, because AR binding (performed in 9 out of 13) was normal in 6, suggesting the synthesis of an AR protein. This situation led us to speculate that another X-linked factor associated with the AR could be implicated in some cases of AIS.

  1. MASA syndrome is caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion gene, L1CAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, C.E.; Wang, Y.; Schroer, R.J.; Stevenson, R.E. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The MASA syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by Mental retardation, Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia. Recently we found that MASA in one family was likely caused by a point mutation in exon 6 of the L1CAM gene. This gene has also been shown to be involved in X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS). We have screened 60 patients with either sporadic HSAS or MASA as well as two additional families with MASA. For the screening, we initially utilized 3 cDNA probes for the L1CAM gene. In one of the MASA families, K8310, two affected males were found to have an altered BglII band. The band was present in their carrier mother but not in their normal brothers. This band was detected by the entire cDNA probe as well as the cDNA probe for 3{prime} end of the gene. Analysis of the L1CAM sequence indicated the altered BglII site is distal to the exon 28 but proximal to the punative poly A signal site. It is hypothesized that this point mutation alters the stability of the L1CAM mRNA. This is being tested using cell lines established from the two affected males.

  2. SPINK5 and Netherton syndrome: novel mutations, demonstration of missing LEKTI, and differential expression of transglutaminases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Michael; Tontsidou, Lambrini; Oji, Vinzenz; Aufenvenne, Karin; Schürmeyer-Horst, Funda; Jayakumar, Arumugam; Ständer, Hartmut; Smolle, Josef; Clayman, Gary L; Traupe, Heiko

    2004-09-01

    Netherton syndrome (NTS) is an autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis featuring chronic inflammation of the skin, hair anomalies, epidermal hyperplasia with an impaired epidermal barrier function, failure to thrive and atopic manifestations. The disease is caused by mutations in the SPINK5 gene encoding the serine proteinase inhibitor lympho-epithelial Kazal-type inhibitor (LEKTI). Sequence analyses of SPINK5 in seven NTS patients from five different families allowed us to identify two known and three novel mutations all creating premature termination codons. We developed a monoclonal antibody giving a strong signal for LEKTI in the stratum granulosum of normal skin and demonstrated absence of the protein in NTS epidermis. Immunoblot analysis revealed presence of full length LEKTI and of LEKTI cleavage fragments in normal hair roots, whereas in NTS hair roots LEKTI and its cleavage products were completely missing. Transglutaminase1 activity was present throughout almost the entire suprabasal epidermis in NTS, whereas in normal skin it is restricted to the stratum granulosum. In contrast, immunostaining for transglutaminase3 was absent or faint. Moreover, comparable with the altered pattern in psoriatic skin the epidermis in NTS strongly expressed the serine proteinase inhibitor SKALP/elafin and the anti-microbial protein human beta-defensin 2. These studies demonstrate LEKTI deficiency in the epidermis and in hair roots at the protein level and an aberrant expression of other proteins, especially transglutaminase1 and 3, which may account for the impaired epidermal barrier in NTS.

  3. FTL c.-168G>C Mutation in Hereditary Hyperferritinemia Cataract Syndrome: A New Italian Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Elisa; Capra, Anna Paola; Zirilli, Giuseppina; Meduri, Alessandro; Urso, Mario; Briuglia, Silvana; La Rosa, Maria Angela

    2018-01-01

    We describe a new Italian family with 7 members affected by hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (HHCS), an uncommon autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations of the iron-responsive element (IRE) of the ferritin light chain (FTL) gene determining its overexpression. The family diagnosis of HHCS took place after finding high ferritin levels in a 6-year-old girl. Seven members of the family had bilateral and symmetrical cataracts, normal iron, and hematological parameters except for high serum ferritin levels. About 160 families/unrelated cases with HHCS are known worldwide. This report documents a second Italian family, with a c.-168G>C mutation that is located in the highly conserved 3-nucleotide bulge structure of the FTL in the 5' untranslated region. This case shows how important the family history is in reaching a correct diagnosis and avoiding unnecessary and invasive analysis. HHCS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of childhood hyperferritinemia, especially in the presence of normal transferrin saturation.

  4. Mutations in the gene encoding epsilon-sarcoglycan cause myoclonus-dystonia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimprich, A; Grabowski, M; Asmus, F; Naumann, M; Berg, D; Bertram, M; Scheidtmann, K; Kern, P; Winkelmann, J; Müller-Myhsok, B; Riedel, L; Bauer, M; Müller, T; Castro, M; Meitinger, T; Strom, T M; Gasser, T

    2001-09-01

    The dystonias are a common clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of movement disorders. More than ten loci for inherited forms of dystonia have been mapped, but only three mutated genes have been identified so far. These are DYT1, encoding torsin A and mutant in the early-onset generalized form, GCH1 (formerly known as DYT5), encoding GTP-cyclohydrolase I and mutant in dominant dopa-responsive dystonia, and TH, encoding tyrosine hydroxylase and mutant in the recessive form of the disease. Myoclonus-dystonia syndrome (MDS; DYT11) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by bilateral, alcohol-sensitive myoclonic jerks involving mainly the arms and axial muscles. Dystonia, usually torticollis and/or writer's cramp, occurs in most but not all affected patients and may occasionally be the only symptom of the disease. In addition, patients often show prominent psychiatric abnormalities, including panic attacks and obsessive-compulsive behavior. In most MDS families, the disease is linked to a locus on chromosome 7q21 (refs. 11-13). Using a positional cloning approach, we have identified five different heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the gene for epsilon-sarcoglycan (SGCE), which we mapped to a refined critical region of about 3.2 Mb. SGCE is expressed in all brain regions examined. Pedigree analysis shows a marked difference in penetrance depending on the parental origin of the disease allele. This is indicative of a maternal imprinting mechanism, which has been demonstrated in the mouse epsilon-sarcoglycan gene.

  5. Expanding the clinical and mutational spectrum of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, dermatosparaxis type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Tim; Colige, Alain; Syx, Delfien; Giunta, Cecilia; Lindert, Uschi; Rohrbach, Marianne; Aryani, Omid; Alanay, Yasemin; Simsek-Kiper, Pelin Özlem; Kroes, Hester Y; Devriendt, Koen; Thiry, Marc; Symoens, Sofie; De Paepe, Anne; Malfait, Fransiska

    2016-09-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), dermatosparaxis type, is a recessively inherited connective tissue disorder caused by deficient activity of ADAMTS-2, an enzyme that cleaves the aminoterminal propeptide domain of types I, II, and III procollagen. Only 10 EDS dermatosparaxis patients have been reported, all presenting a recognizable phenotype with characteristic facial gestalt, extreme skin fragility and laxity, excessive bruising, and sometimes major complications due to visceral and vascular fragility. We report on five new EDS dermatosparaxis patients and provide a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of the natural history of this condition. We identified three novel homozygous loss-of-function mutations (c.2927_2928delCT, p.(Pro976Argfs*42); c.669_670dupG, p.(Pro224Argfs*24); and c.2751-2A>T) and one compound heterozygous mutation (c.2T>C, p.? and c.884_887delTGAA, p.(Met295Thrfs26*)) in ADAMTS2 in five patients from four unrelated families. Three of these displayed a phenotype that was strikingly milder than that of previously reported patients. This study expands the clinical and molecular spectrum of the dermatosparaxis type of EDS to include a milder phenotypic variant and stresses the importance of good clinical criteria. To address this, we propose an updated set of criteria that accurately captures the multisystemic nature of the dermatosparaxis type of EDS.Genet Med 18 9, 882-891.

  6. Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome due to complement factor I mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalki, Abdullah H; Sadagah, Laila F; Qureshi, Mohammed; Maghrabi, Hatim; Algain, Abdulrahman; Alsaeed, Ahmed

    2017-11-06

    Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease of complement dysregulation leading to thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Renal involvement and progression to end-stage renal disease are common in untreated patients. We report a 52-year-old female patient who presented with severe acute kidney injury, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. She was managed with steroid, plasma exchange, and dialysis. Kidney biopsy shows TMA and renal cortical necrosis. Genetic analysis reveals heterozygous complement factor I (CFI) mutation. Eculizumab was initiated after 3 mo of presentation, continued for 9 mo, and stopped because of sustained hematologic remission, steady renal function, and cost issues. Despite this, the patient continued to be in hematologic remission and showed signs of renal recovery, and peritoneal dialysis was stopped 32 mo after initiation. We report a case of aHUS due to CFI mutation, which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported before in Saudi Arabia. Our case illustrates the challenges related to the diagnosis and management of this condition, in which a high index of suspicion and prompt treatment are usually necessary.

  7. [Pseudo-Bartter syndrome as manifestation of cystic fibrosis with DF508 mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaviz-Ballesteros, María de Jesús; Acosta-Rodríguez-Bueno, Carlos Patricio; Consuelo-Sánchez, Alejandra; Franco-Álvarez, Isidro; Olalla-Mora, Odilo Iván; Vázquez-Frias, Rodrigo

    Pseudo Bartter syndrome (PBS) is defined as hypokalaemic hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis in the absence of renal tubular pathology. Children with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at risk of developing electrolyte abnormalities and even PBS may occur. 5 months old female infant with a history of two events of dehydration with vomit, refusal to eat, chronic cough, polyuria, malnutrition, metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, hyponatremia, hypochloremia and acute renal failure. Chronic cough study was performed, discarding pulmonary tuberculosis, gastroesophageal reflux disease and impaired swallowing. PBS was diagnosed due to hypokalaemic hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis in the absence of renal tubular pathology. CF was corroborated by electrolytes in sweat and through molecular analysis of the delta F508 mutation. This is one of the few reported cases linking PBS and this mutation. In patients with hyponatremic dehydration episodes with hypokalaemic hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis, PBS should be considered as differential diagnosis. CF could be presented as PBS, mainly in patients younger than 2 years. Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Distinct mutation profile and prognostic relevance in patients with hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndromes (h-MDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chi-Yuan; Hou, Hsin-An; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Lin, Chien-Chin; Chou, Wen-Chien; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Wu, Shang-Ju; Liao, Xiu-Wen; Lin, Chien-Ting; Ko, Bor-Shen; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Li, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shang-Yi; Yao, Ming; Tang, Jih-Luh; Tsay, Woei; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2016-09-27

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies. Although most MDS patients have normal or increased BM cellularity (NH-MDS), some have hypocellular BM (h-MDS). The reports concerning the differences in genetic alterations between h-MDS and NH-MDS patients are limited. In this study, 369 MDS patients diagnosed according to the WHO 2008 criteria were recruited. h-MDS patients had lower PB white blood cell and blast counts, and lower BM blast percentages, than those with NH-MDS. h-MDS was closely associated with lower-risk MDS, defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and revised IPSS (IPSS-R). IPSS-R could properly predict the prognosis in h-MDS (PMDS patients. The h-MDS patients had lower incidences of RUNX1, ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2 and TP53 mutations than NH-MDS patients. The cumulated incidence of acute leukemic transformation at 5 years was 19.3% for h-MDS and 40.4% for NH-MDS patients (P= 0.001). Further, the patients with h-MDS had longer overall survival (OS) than those with NH-MDS (P= 0.001), and BM hypocellularity remains an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS irrespective of age, IPSS-R, and gene mutations. Our findings provide evidence that h-MDS indeed represent a distinct clinico-biological subgroup of MDS and can predict better leukemia-free survival and OS.

  9. PAX7 mutation in a syndrome of failure to thrive, hypotonia, and global neurodevelopmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskorovski-Ohayon, Regina; Kadir, Rotem; Michalowski, Analia; Flusser, Hagit; Perez, Yonatan; Hershkovitz, Eli; Sivan, Sara; Birk, Ohad S

    2017-12-01

    PAX7 encodes a transcription factor essential in neural crest formation, myogenesis, and pituitary lineage specification. Pax7 null mice fail to thrive and exhibit muscle weakness, dying within 3 weeks. We describe a human autosomal-recessive syndrome, with failure to thrive, severe global developmental delay, microcephaly, axial hypotonia, pyramidal signs, dystonic postures, seizures, irritability, and self-mutilation. Aside from low blood carnitine levels, biochemical and metabolic screen was normal, with growth hormone deficiency in one patient. Electromyography was normal, with no specific findings in brain MRI/MRS yet nondemonstrable neuropituitary, a finding of unclear significance. Muscle biopsy showed unaffected overall organization of muscle fibers, yet positive fetal alpha myosin staining, suggesting regeneration. Homozygosity mapping with whole-exome sequencing identified a single disease-associated mutation in PAX7, segregating as expected in the kindred with no homozygosity in 200 ethnically matched controls. Transfection experiments showed that the PAX7 splice-site mutation putatively causes nonsense-mediated mRNA decay affecting onlyPAX7 isoform 3. This isoform, expressed specifically in brain, skeletal muscle and testes, is the sole Pax7 variant normally found in mice. The human muscle phenotype is in line with that in conditional Pax7 null mutant mice, where initial aberrant histological findings resolve postnatally through muscle regeneration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Mutations in SNRPB, encoding components of the core splicing machinery, cause cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacrot, Séverine; Doyard, Mathilde; Huber, Céline; Alibeu, Olivier; Feldhahn, Niklas; Lehalle, Daphné; Lacombe, Didier; Marlin, Sandrine; Nitschke, Patrick; Petit, Florence; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2015-02-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a developmental disorder characterized by the association of Pierre Robin sequence and posterior rib defects. Exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in five unrelated CCMS patients revealed five heterozygous variants in the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptides B and B1 (SNRPB) gene. This gene includes three transcripts, namely transcripts 1 and 2, encoding components of the core spliceosomal machinery (SmB' and SmB) and transcript 3 undergoing nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. All variants were located in the premature termination codon (PTC)-introducing alternative exon of transcript 3. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed a significant increase in transcript 3 levels in leukocytes of CCMS individuals compared to controls. We conclude that CCMS is due to heterozygous mutations in SNRPB, enhancing inclusion of a SNRPB PTC-introducing alternative exon, and show that this developmental disease is caused by defects in the splicing machinery. Our finding confirms the report of SNRPB mutations in CCMS patients by Lynch et al. (2014) and further extends the clinical and molecular observations. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  11. HDAC8 mutations in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome affect the cohesin acetylation cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deardorff, Matthew A.; Bando, Masashige; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Watrin, Erwan; Itoh, Takehiko; Minamino, Masashi; Saitoh, Katsuya; Komata, Makiko; Katou, Yuki; Clark, Dinah; Cole, Kathryn E.; Baere, Elfride De; Decroos, Christophe; Donato, Nataliya Di; Ernst, Sarah; Francey, Lauren J.; Gyftodimou, Yolanda; Hirashima, Kyotaro; Hullings, Melanie; Ishikawa, Yuuichi; Jaulin, Christian; Kaur, Maninder; Kiyono, Tohru; Lombardi, Patrick M.; Magnaghi-Jaulin, Laura; Mortier, Geert R.; Nozaki, Naohito; Petersen, Michael B.; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Siu, Victoria M.; Suzuki, Yutaka; Takagaki, Kentaro; Wilde, Jonathan J.; Willems, Patrick J.; Prigent, Claude; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Christianson, David W.; Kaiser, Frank J.; Jackson, Laird G.; Hirota, Toru; Krantz, Ian D.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominantly inherited congenital malformation disorder caused by mutations in the cohesin-loading protein NIPBL1,2 for nearly 60% of individuals with classical CdLS3-5 and in the core cohesin components SMC1A (~5%) and SMC3 (<1%) for a smaller fraction of probands6,7. In humans, the multi-subunit complex cohesin is comprised of SMC1, SMC3, RAD21 and a STAG protein to form a ring structure proposed to encircle sister chromatids to mediate sister chromatid cohesion (SCC)8 as well as play key roles in gene regulation9. SMC3 is acetylated during S-phase to establish cohesiveness of chromatin-loaded cohesin10-13 and in yeast, HOS1, a class I histone deacetylase, deacetylates SMC3 during anaphase14-16. Here we report the identification of HDAC8 as the vertebrate SMC3 deacetylase as well as loss-of-function HDAC8 mutations in six CdLS probands. Loss of HDAC8 activity results in increased SMC3 acetylation (SMC3-ac) and inefficient dissolution of the “used” cohesin complex released from chromatin in both prophase and anaphase. While SMC3 with retained acetylation is loaded onto chromatin, ChIP-Seq analysis demonstrates decreased occupancy of cohesin localization sites that results in a consistent pattern of altered transcription seen in CdLS cell lines with either NIPBL or HDAC8 mutations. PMID:22885700

  12. Brittle cornea syndrome associated with a missense mutation in the zinc-finger 469 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Anne E; Knappskog, Per M; Midtbø, Marit; Gjesdal, Clara G; Mengel-From, Jonas; Morling, Niels; Rødahl, Eyvind; Boman, Helge

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the diverse clinical manifestations, identify the causative mutation and explain the association with red hair in a family